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Sample records for cancer survival population

  1. Estimating the personal cure rate of cancer patients using population-based grouped cancer survival data.

    PubMed

    Binbing Yu; Tiwari, Ram C; Feuer, Eric J

    2011-06-01

    Cancer patients are subject to multiple competing risks of death and may die from causes other than the cancer diagnosed. The probability of not dying from the cancer diagnosed, which is one of the patients' main concerns, is sometimes called the 'personal cure' rate. Two approaches of modelling competing-risk survival data, namely the cause-specific hazards approach and the mixture model approach, have been used to model competing-risk survival data. In this article, we first show the connection and differences between crude cause-specific survival in the presence of other causes and net survival in the absence of other causes. The mixture survival model is extended to population-based grouped survival data to estimate the personal cure rate. Using the colorectal cancer survival data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Programme, we estimate the probabilities of dying from colorectal cancer, heart disease, and other causes by age at diagnosis, race and American Joint Committee on Cancer stage.

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Therapy-induced Cancer Drug Resistance: Connecting Cancer Mechanisms to Population Survival Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Bao, Jiguang; Shao, Yongzhao

    2016-03-01

    Drug resistance significantly limits the long-term effectiveness of targeted therapeutics for cancer patients. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that cancer cell heterogeneity and microenvironment adaptations to targeted therapy play important roles in promoting the rapid acquisition of drug resistance and in increasing cancer metastasis. The systematic development of effective therapeutics to overcome drug resistance mechanisms poses a major challenge. In this study, we used a modeling approach to connect cellular mechanisms underlying cancer drug resistance to population-level patient survival. To predict progression-free survival in cancer patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a set of stochastic differential equations to describe the dynamics of heterogeneous cell populations while taking into account micro-environment adaptations. Clinical data on survival and circulating tumor cell DNA (ctDNA) concentrations were used to confirm the effectiveness of our model. Moreover, our model predicted distinct patterns of dose-dependent synergy when evaluating a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors versus a combination of BRAF and PI3K inhibitors. These predictions were consistent with the findings in previously reported studies. The impact of the drug metabolism rate on patient survival was also discussed. The proposed model might facilitate the quantitative evaluation and optimization of combination therapeutics and cancer clinical trial design.

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Therapy-induced Cancer Drug Resistance: Connecting Cancer Mechanisms to Population Survival Rates.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Bao, Jiguang; Shao, Yongzhao

    2016-03-01

    Drug resistance significantly limits the long-term effectiveness of targeted therapeutics for cancer patients. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that cancer cell heterogeneity and microenvironment adaptations to targeted therapy play important roles in promoting the rapid acquisition of drug resistance and in increasing cancer metastasis. The systematic development of effective therapeutics to overcome drug resistance mechanisms poses a major challenge. In this study, we used a modeling approach to connect cellular mechanisms underlying cancer drug resistance to population-level patient survival. To predict progression-free survival in cancer patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a set of stochastic differential equations to describe the dynamics of heterogeneous cell populations while taking into account micro-environment adaptations. Clinical data on survival and circulating tumor cell DNA (ctDNA) concentrations were used to confirm the effectiveness of our model. Moreover, our model predicted distinct patterns of dose-dependent synergy when evaluating a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors versus a combination of BRAF and PI3K inhibitors. These predictions were consistent with the findings in previously reported studies. The impact of the drug metabolism rate on patient survival was also discussed. The proposed model might facilitate the quantitative evaluation and optimization of combination therapeutics and cancer clinical trial design.

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Therapy-induced Cancer Drug Resistance: Connecting Cancer Mechanisms to Population Survival Rates

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Bao, Jiguang; Shao, Yongzhao

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance significantly limits the long-term effectiveness of targeted therapeutics for cancer patients. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that cancer cell heterogeneity and microenvironment adaptations to targeted therapy play important roles in promoting the rapid acquisition of drug resistance and in increasing cancer metastasis. The systematic development of effective therapeutics to overcome drug resistance mechanisms poses a major challenge. In this study, we used a modeling approach to connect cellular mechanisms underlying cancer drug resistance to population-level patient survival. To predict progression-free survival in cancer patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a set of stochastic differential equations to describe the dynamics of heterogeneous cell populations while taking into account micro-environment adaptations. Clinical data on survival and circulating tumor cell DNA (ctDNA) concentrations were used to confirm the effectiveness of our model. Moreover, our model predicted distinct patterns of dose-dependent synergy when evaluating a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors versus a combination of BRAF and PI3K inhibitors. These predictions were consistent with the findings in previously reported studies. The impact of the drug metabolism rate on patient survival was also discussed. The proposed model might facilitate the quantitative evaluation and optimization of combination therapeutics and cancer clinical trial design. PMID:26928089

  5. Full dates (day, month, year) should be used in population-based cancer survival studies.

    PubMed

    Woods, Laura M; Rachet, Bernard; Ellis, Libby; Coleman, Michel P

    2012-10-01

    Accurate survival estimates are essential for monitoring cancer survival trends, for health care planning and for resource allocation. To obtain precise estimates of survival, full dates (day, month and year) rather than partial dates (month and year) are required. In some jurisdictions, however, cancer registries are constrained from providing full dates on the grounds of confidentiality. The bias resulting from the use of partial dates in the estimation and comparison of survival makes it impossible to determine precisely the differences in the risk of death from cancer between population groups or in successive calendar periods. Important operational arguments also exist against the use of incomplete dates for survival analysis, including increased workload for cancer registry staff and the introduction of avoidable complexity for quality control of survival data. Cancer survival is one of the most widely known outputs produced by population-based cancer registries, and it is a crucial metric for the comparative effectiveness of health services. The bodies that set data access guidelines must take a more balanced view of the risks and benefits of using full dates for the estimation of cancer survival.

  6. Survival rate of breast cancer patients in Malaysia: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Nor Aini; Wan Mahiyuddin, Wan Rozita; Muhammad, Nor Asiah; Ali, Zainudin Mohamad; Ibrahim, Lailanor; Ibrahim Tamim, Nor Saleha; Mustafa, Amal Nasir; Kamaluddin, Muhammad Amir

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Malaysian women. Other than hospital-based results, there are no documented population-based survival rates of Malaysian women for breast cancers. This population- based retrospective cohort study was therefore conducted. Data were obtained from Health Informatics Centre, Ministry of Health Malaysia, National Cancer Registry and National Registration Department for the period from 1st Jan 2000 to 31st December 2005. Cases were captured by ICD-10 and linked to death certificates to identify the status. Only complete data were analysed. Survival time was calculated from the estimated date of diagnosis to the date of death or date of loss to follow-up. Observed survival rates were estimated by Kaplan- Meier method using SPSS Statistical Software version 17. A total of 10,230 complete data sets were analysed. The mean age at diagnosis was 50.6 years old. The overall 5-year survival rate was 49% with median survival time of 68.1 months. Indian women had a higher survival rate of 54% compared to Chinese women (49%) and Malays (45%). The overall 5-year survival rate of breast cancer patient among Malaysian women was still low for the cohort of 2000 to 2005 as compared to survival rates in developed nations. Therefore, it is necessary to enhance the strategies for early detection and intervention.

  7. Cancer survival in Cali, Colombia: A population-based study, 1995-2004

    PubMed Central

    García, Luz Stella; Collazos, Paola Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is limited information on population-based cancer survival data in Latin America. Objetive: To obtain estimates of survival for some cancers recognized as a public health priority in Colombia using data from the Cancer Registry of Cali for 1995-2004. Methods: All cancer cases for residents of Cali were included for the following sites: breast (3,984), cervix uteri (2,469), prostate (3,999), stomach (3,442) and lung (2,170). Five-year relative survival estimates were calculated using the approach described by Estève. Results: Five-year relative survival was 79% in patients with prostate cancer and 68% and 60% in women with breast or cervix uteri cancer, respectively. The cure fraction was close to zero in subjects with lung cancer and less than 10% in those with stomach cancer. The probability of dying from breast or prostate cancer in people in the lower socio-economic strata (SES) was 1.8 and 2.6 times, respectively, when compared to upper SES, p <0.001. Excess mortality associated with cancer was independent of age in prostate or breast cancer. After adjusting for age, sex and SES, the risk of dying from breast, cervix uteri, prostate and lung cancer during the 2000-2004 period decreased 19%, 13%, 48% and 16%, respectively, when compared with the period of 1995-1999. There was no change in the prognosis for patients with stomach cancer. Conclusions: Survival for some kinds of cancer improved through the 1995-2004 period, however health care programs for cancer patients in Cali are inequitable. People from lower SES are the most vulnerable and the least likely to survive. PMID:25386036

  8. Improved Estimates of Cancer-Specific Survival Rates From Population-Based Data

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Lynn A. G.; Mariotto, Angela B.; Reichman, Marsha E.; Ruhl, Jennifer; Cronin, Kathleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Accurate estimates of cancer survival are important for assessing optimal patient care and prognosis. Evaluation of these estimates via relative survival (a ratio of observed and expected survival rates) requires a population life table that is matched to the cancer population by age, sex, race and/or ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and ideally risk factors for the cancer under examination. Because life tables for all subgroups in a study may be unavailable, we investigated whether cause-specific survival could be used as an alternative for relative survival. Methods We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program for 2 330 905 cancer patients from January 1, 1992, through December 31, 2004. We defined cancer-specific deaths according to the following variables: cause of death, only one tumor or the first of multiple tumors, site of the original cancer diagnosis, and comorbidities. Estimates of relative survival and cause-specific survival that were derived by use of an actuarial method were compared. Results Among breast cancer patients who were white, black, or of Asian or Pacific Islander descent and who were older than 65 years, estimates of 5-year relative survival (107.5%, 106.6%, and 103.0%, respectively) were higher than estimates of 5-year cause-specific survival (98.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 98.4% to 98.8%; 97.4%, 95% CI = 96.2% to 98.2%; and 99.2%, 95% CI = 98.4%, 99.6%, respectively). Relative survival methods likely underestimated rates for cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx (eg, for white cancer patients aged ≥65 years, relative survival = 54.2%, 95% CI = 53.1% to 55.3%, and cause-specific survival = 60.1%, 95% CI = 59.1% to 60.9%) and the lung and bronchus (eg, for black cancer patients aged ≥65 years, relative survival = 10.5%, 95% CI = 9.9% to 11.2%, and cause-specific survival = 11.9%, 95% CI = 11.2 % to 12.6%), largely because of mismatches between the population with these diseases and

  9. Childhood cancer survival in Finland (1953-2010): a nation-wide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Madanat-Harjuoja, L M; Pokhrel, A; Kivivuori, S M; Saarinen-Pihkala, U M

    2014-11-01

    Population based survival studies are critical in monitoring changes in anticancer therapy, evaluating effectiveness of new treatments as well as identifying possibilities for further improvement. The previous report on cancer survival in Finland covered patients diagnosed in 1953-1995. Data on survival in the European and Nordic pediatric populations have been published with follow-up ending in 2002. We describe population-based survival of childhood cancer patients (n = 8270, age 0-14 years) in Finland overall and by disease category with follow-up extending from 1953 to 2010 and focusing on the modern treatment era. Data were collected from the Finnish Cancer Registry. Age-standardised observed survival proportions (rates) were calculated using the actuarial (or life-table) method. Trends in observed survival rates were studied over six diagnostic periods: 1953-1960, 1961-1970, 1971-1980, 1981-1990, 1991-2000 and 2001-2010. The overall 5-year survival reached 82.1% (95% CI 80.0-84.2) in the most recent period. In most diagnostic categories, the biggest leap in survival was seen between 1961-1970 and 1981-1990, after which slight improvements occurred between 1981-1990 and 1991-2000, with no significant increase thereafter. In analyses by diagnostic group, positive trends in survival over the last three decades were seen for leukemia (p = 0.000), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (p = 0.002) and CNS tumours (p = 0.02). Although survival of childhood cancer patients overall has significantly improved from 1953 to 2000, improvement thereafter has been marginal. Future treatment efforts should be directed at bone tumours, soft-tissue sarcoma, neuroblastoma and malignant brain tumours as well as high-risk leukemia.

  10. Predictors of Colorectal Cancer Survival in Golestan, Iran: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Aryaie, Mohammad; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Semnani, Shahryar; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Aarabi, Mohsen; Vakili, Mohammad Ali; Kazemnejhad, Vahideh; Sedaghat, Seyed Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We aimed to investigate factors associated with colorectal cancer survival in Golestan, Iran. METHODS We used a population based cancer registry to recruit study subjects. All patients registered since 2004 were contacted and data were collected using structured questionnaires and trained interviewers. All the existing evidences to determine the stage of the cancer were also collected. The time from first diagnosis to death was compared in patients according to their stage of cancer using the Kaplan-Meir method. A Cox proportional hazard model was built to examine their survival experience by taking into account other covariates. RESULTS Out of a total of 345 subjects, 227 were traced. Median age of the subjects was 54 and more than 42% were under 50 years old. We found 132 deaths among these patients, 5 of which were non-colorectal related deaths. The median survival time for the entire cohort was 3.56 years. A borderline significant difference in survival experience was detected for ethnicity (log rank test, p=0.053). Using Cox proportional hazard modeling, only cancer stage remained significantly associated with time of death in the final model. CONCLUSIONS Colorectal cancer occurs at a younger age among people living in Golestan province. A very young age at presentation and what appears to be a high proportion of patients presenting with late stage in this area suggest this population might benefit substantially from early diagnoses by introducing age adapted screening programs. PMID:23807907

  11. Medication use and survival in diabetic patients with kidney cancer: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nayan, Madhur; Macdonald, Erin M; Juurlink, David N; Austin, Peter C; Finelli, Antonio; Kulkarni, Girish S; Hamilton, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Survival rates in kidney cancer have improved little over time, and diabetes may be an independent risk factor for poor survival in kidney cancer. We sought to determine whether medications with putative anti-neoplastic properties (statins, metformin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)) are associated with survival in diabetics with kidney cancer. We conducted a population-based cohort study utilizing linked healthcare databases in Ontario, Canada. Patients were aged 66 or older with newly diagnosed diabetes and a subsequent diagnosis of incident kidney cancer. Receipt of metformin, statins or NSAIDs was defined using prescription claims. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality and the secondary outcome was cancer-specific mortality. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression, with medication use modeled with time-varying and cumulative exposure analyses to account for intermittent use. During the 14-year study period, we studied 613 patients. Current statin use was associated with a markedly reduced risk of death from any cause (adjusted hazard ratio 0.74; 95% CI 0.59-0.91) and death due to kidney cancer (adjusted hazard ratio 0.71; 95% CI 0.51-0.97). However, survival was not associated with current use of metformin or NSAIDs, or cumulative exposure to any of the medications studied. Among diabetic patients with kidney cancer, survival outcomes are associated with active statin use, rather than total cumulative use. These findings support the use of randomized trials to confirm whether diabetics with kidney cancer should be started on a statin at the time of cancer diagnosis to improve survival outcomes.

  12. Estimating and modeling the cure fraction in population-based cancer survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Paul C; Thompson, John R; Weston, Claire L; Dickman, Paul W

    2007-07-01

    In population-based cancer studies, cure is said to occur when the mortality (hazard) rate in the diseased group of individuals returns to the same level as that expected in the general population. The cure fraction (the proportion of patients cured of disease) is of interest to patients and is a useful measure to monitor trends in survival of curable disease. There are 2 main types of cure fraction model, the mixture cure fraction model and the non-mixture cure fraction model, with most previous work concentrating on the mixture cure fraction model. In this paper, we extend the parametric non-mixture cure fraction model to incorporate background mortality, thus providing estimates of the cure fraction in population-based cancer studies. We compare the estimates of relative survival and the cure fraction between the 2 types of model and also investigate the importance of modeling the ancillary parameters in the selected parametric distribution for both types of model.

  13. Evidence of improving survival of patients with rectal cancer in France: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Finn-Faivre, C; Maurel, J; Benhamiche, A; Herbert, C; Mitry, E; Launoy, G; Faivre, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Over the past 20 years there have been many changes in the management of rectal cancer. Their impact on the overall population is not well known. 
AIMS—To determine trends in management and prognosis of rectal cancer in two French regions. 
SUBJECTS—1978 patients with a rectal carcinoma diagnosed between 1978 and 1993. 
METHODS—Time trends in treatment, stage at diagnosis, operative mortality, and survival were studied on a four year basis. A non-conditional logistic regression was performed to obtain an odds ratio for each period adjusted for the other variables. To estimate the independent effect of the period a multivariate relative survival analysis was performed. 
RESULTS—Over the 16 year period resection rates increased from 66.0% to 80.1%; the increase was particularly noticeable for sphincter saving procedures (+30.6% per four years, p=0.03). The percentage of patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy increased from 24.0% to 40.0% (p=0.02). The proportion of patients with Dukes' type A cancer increased from 17.7% to 30.6% with a corresponding decrease in those with more advanced disease. Operative mortality decreased by 31.1% per four years (p=0.03). All these improvements have resulted in a dramatic increase in relative survival (from 35.4% for the 1978-1981 period to 57.0% for the 1985-1989 period). 
CONCLUSIONS—Substantial advances in the management of rectal cancer have been achieved, but there is evidence that further improvements can be made in order to increase survival. 

 Keywords: rectal cancer; treatment; stage at diagnosis; survival; time trends; cancer registries PMID:10026324

  14. Incidence and survival of stomach cancer in a high-risk population of Chile

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Katy; Bertran, Enriqueta; Andia, Marcelo E; Ferreccio, Catterina

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the incidence and survival rate of stomach cancer (SC) and its associated factors in a high risk population in Chile. METHODS: The population-based cancer registry of Valdivia, included in the International Agency for Research on Cancer system, covers 356 396 residents of Valdivia Province, Southern Chile. We studied all SC cases entered in this Registry during 1998-2002 (529 cases). Population data came from the Chilean census (2002). Standardized incidence rates per 100 000 inhabitants (SIR) using the world population, cumulative risk of developing cancer before age 75, and rate ratios by sex, age, ethnicity and social factors were estimated. Relative survival (Ederer II method) and age-standardized estimates (Brenner method) were calculated. Specific survival rates (Kaplan-Meier) were measured at 3 and 5 years and survival curves were analyzed with the Logrank and Breslow tests. Survival was studied in relation to demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory results and medical management of the cases. Those variables significantly associated with survival were later included in a Cox multivariate model. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2002, 529 primary gastric cancers occurred in Valdivia (crude incidence rate 29.2 per 100 000 inhabitants). Most cases were male (69.0%), residents of urban areas (57.5%) and Hispanic (83.2%), with a low education level (84.5% < 8 school years). SC SIR was higher in men than women (40.8 and 14.8 respectively, P < 0.001), risk factors were low education RR 4.4 (95% CI: 2.9-6.8) and 1.6, (95% CI: 1.1-2.1) for women and men respectively and Mapuche ethnicity only significant for women (RR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.2-3.7). Of all cases, 76.4% were histologically confirmed, 11.5% had a death certificate only (DCO), 56.1% were TNM stage IV; 445 cases (84.1%) were eligible for survival analysis, all completed five years follow-up; 42 remained alive, 392 died of SC and 11 died from other causes. Specific 5-year survival, excluding cases

  15. Population-based survival-cure analysis of ER-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lan; Johnson, Karen A; Mariotto, Angela B; Dignam, James J; Feuer, Eric J

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated the trends over time in age and stage specific population-based survival of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) breast cancer patients by examining the fraction of cured patients and the median survival time for uncured patients. Cause-specific survival data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program for cases diagnosed during 1992-1998 were used in mixed survival cure models to evaluate the cure fraction and the extension in survival for uncured patients. Survival trends were compared with adjuvant chemotherapy data available from an overlapping patterns-of-care study. For stage II N+ disease, the largest increase in cure fraction was 44-60% (P = 0.0257) for women aged >or=70 in contrast to a 7-8% point increase for women aged <50 or 50-69 (P = 0.056 and 0.038, respectively). For women with stage III disease, the increases in the cure fraction were not statistically significant, although women aged 50-69 had a 10% point increase (P = 0.103). Increases in cure fraction correspond with increases in the use of adjuvant chemotherapy, particularly for the oldest age group. In this article, for the first time, we estimate the cure fraction for ER- patients. We notice that at age >o5r=70, the accelerated increase in cure fraction from 1992 to 1998 for women with stage II N+ compared with stage III suggests a selective benefit for chemotherapy in the lower stage group.

  16. Cancer incidence, trends, and survival among immigrants to Sweden: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Hemminki, Kari

    2015-03-01

    This review aimed at covering cancer risk trends by site and histology in first-generation and second-generation immigrants in Sweden compared with natives. In addition, we reviewed data on cancer survival in immigrants to explore factors explaining cancer survival in the entire population. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to calculate standardized incidence ratios and hazard ratios (HRs) of death from cancer in 77,360 and 993,824 cases among first-generation, and 4356 and 263,485 cases among second-generation immigrants and Swedes, respectively. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratio. To obtain the maximum number of cases, we classified the immigrants according to geographical setting, population, and/or cancer risk. Compared with native Swedes, the highest risk of cancer was observed for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Southeast Asian men (standardized incidence ratio=35.6) and women (24.6), for hypopharyngeal carcinoma in Indian men (5.4), for squamous-cell carcinoma of the esophagus in Iranian women (3.8), for cardia of the stomach in East Asian women (4.2), for signet-ring cell carcinoma of the stomach in Southeast Asian women (6.7), for the liver in East Asian men (6.8), for the gall bladder in Indian women (3.8), for the pancreas in North African men (2.2), for large cell carcinoma of the lung in former Yugoslavian men (4.2), for pleural mesothelioma in Turkish women (23.8), for the cervix in Danes (1.6), for seminoma in Chileans (2.1), for transitional-cell carcinoma of the bladder in Asian Arab men (2.3), for meningioma in former Yugoslavians (1.3), and for papillary carcinoma of the thyroid in East and Southeast Asian men (3.6). No immigrant groups had an increased risk of breast, uterus, ovary, and prostate cancers or nervous system tumors. The HRs for all breast cancers were between 1.0 in low-risk Europeans and 1.2 in lowest-risk non-Europeans. Low-risk non-Europeans had an HR of 2.9 for lobular carcinoma. Low

  17. Smoking and survival of colorectal cancer patients: population-based study from Germany.

    PubMed

    Walter, Viola; Jansen, Lina; Hoffmeister, Michael; Ulrich, Alexis; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann

    2015-09-15

    Current evidence on the association between smoking and colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis after diagnosis is heterogeneous and few have investigated dose-response effects or outcomes other than overall survival. Therefore, the association of smoking status and intensity with several prognostic outcomes was evaluated in a large population-based cohort of CRC patients; 3,130 patients with incident CRC, diagnosed between 2003 and 2010, were interviewed on sociodemographic factors, smoking behavior, medication and comorbidities. Tumor characteristics were collected from medical records. Vital status, recurrence and cause of death were documented for a median follow-up time of 4.9 years. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, associations between smoking characteristics and overall, CRC-specific, non-CRC related, recurrence-free and disease-free survival were evaluated. Among stage I-III patients, being a smoker at diagnosis and smoking ≥15 cigarettes/day were associated with lower recurrence-free (adjusted hazard ratios (aHR): 1.29; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93-1.79 and aHR: 1.31; 95%-CI: 0.92-1.87) and disease-free survival (aHR: 1.26; 95%-CI: 0.95-1.67 and aHR: 1.29; 95%-CI: 0.94-1.77). Smoking was associated with decreased survival in stage I-III smokers with pack years ≥20 (Overall survival: aHR: 1.40; 95%-CI: 1.01-1.95), in colon cancer cases (Overall survival: aHR: 1.51; 95%-CI: 1.05-2.17) and men (Recurrence-free survival: aHR: 1.51; 95%-CI: 1.09-2.10; disease-free survival: aHR: 1.49; 95%-CI: 1.12-1.97), whereas no associations were seen among women, stage IV or rectal cancer patients. The observed patterns support the existence of adverse effects of smoking on CRC prognosis among nonmetastatic CRC patients. The potential to enhance prognosis of CRC patients by promotion of smoking cessation, embedded in tertiary prevention programs warrants careful evaluation in future investigations.

  18. Radiotherapy and Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Esther H. Ellis, Rodney J.; Cherullo, Edward; Colussi, Valdir; Xu Fang; Chen Weidong; Gupta, Sanjay; Whalen, Christopher C.; Bodner, Donald; Resnick, Martin I.; Rimm, Alfred A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of overall and disease-specific survival with the five standard treatment modalities for prostate cancer (CaP): radical prostatectomy (RP), brachytherapy (BT), external beam radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and no treatment (NT) within 6 months after CaP diagnosis. Methods and Materials: The study population included 10,179 men aged 65 years and older with incident CaP diagnosed between 1999 and 2001. Using the linked Ohio Cancer Incidence Surveillance System, Medicare, and death certificate files, overall and disease-specific survival through 2005 among the five clinically accepted therapies were analyzed. Results: Disease-specific survival rates were 92.3% and 23.9% for patients with localized vs. distant disease at 7 years, respectively. Controlling for age, race, comorbidities, stage, and Gleason score, results from the Cox multiple regression models indicated that the risk of CaP-specific death was significantly reduced in patients receiving RP or BT, compared with NT. For localized disease, compared with NT, in the monotherapy cohort, RP and BT were associated with reduced hazard ratios (HR) of 0.25 and 0.45 (95% confidence intervals 0.13-0.48 and 0.23-0.87, respectively), whereas in the combination therapy cohort, HR were 0.40 (0.17-0.94) and 0.46 (0.27-0.80), respectively. Conclusions: The present population-based study indicates that RP and BT are associated with improved survival outcomes. Further studies are warranted to improve clinical determinates in the selection of appropriate management of CaP and to improve predictive modeling for which patient subsets may benefit most from definitive therapy vs. conservative management and/or observation.

  19. Regional differences in population-based cancer survival between six prefectures in Japan: application of relative survival models with funnel plots.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuri; Ioka, Akiko; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Ajiki, Wakiko; Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Rachet, Bernard; Coleman, Michel P

    2009-07-01

    We used new methods to examine differences in population-based cancer survival between six prefectures in Japan, after adjustment for age and stage at diagnosis. We applied regression models for relative survival to data from population-based cancer registries covering each prefecture for patients diagnosed with stomach, lung, or breast cancer during 1993-1996. Funnel plots were used to display the excess hazard ratio (EHR) for each prefecture, defined as the excess hazard of death from each cancer within 5 years of diagnosis relative to the mean excess hazard (in excess of national background mortality by age and sex) in all six prefectures combined. The contribution of age and stage to the EHR in each prefecture was assessed from differences in deviance-based R(2) between the various models. No significant differences were seen between prefectures in 5-year survival from breast cancer. For cancers of the stomach and lung, EHR in Osaka prefecture were above the upper 95% control limits. For stomach cancer, the age- and stage-adjusted EHR in Osaka were 1.29 for men and 1.43 for women, compared with Fukui and Yamagata. Differences in the stage at diagnosis of stomach cancer appeared to explain most of this excess hazard (61.3% for men, 56.8% for women), whereas differences in age at diagnosis explained very little (0.8%, 1.3%). This approach offers the potential to quantify the impact of differences in stage at diagnosis on time trends and regional differences in cancer survival. It underlines the utility of population-based cancer registries for improving cancer control.

  20. Cancer survival in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the UK, 1995–2007 (the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership): an analysis of population-based cancer registry data

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, MP; Forman, D; Bryant, H; Butler, J; Rachet, B; Maringe, C; Nur, U; Tracey, E; Coory, M; Hatcher, J; McGahan, CE; Turner, D; Marrett, L; Gjerstorff, ML; Johannesen, TB; Adolfsson, J; Lambe, M; Lawrence, G; Meechan, D; Morris, EJ; Middleton, R; Steward, J; Richards, MA

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Cancer survival is a key measure of the effectiveness of health-care systems. Persistent regional and international differences in survival represent many avoidable deaths. Differences in survival have prompted or guided cancer control strategies. This is the first study in a programme to investigate international survival disparities, with the aim of informing health policy to raise standards and reduce inequalities in survival. Methods Data from population-based cancer registries in 12 jurisdictions in six countries were provided for 2·4 million adults diagnosed with primary colorectal, lung, breast (women), or ovarian cancer during 1995–2007, with follow-up to Dec 31, 2007. Data quality control and analyses were done centrally with a common protocol, overseen by external experts. We estimated 1-year and 5-year relative survival, constructing 252 complete life tables to control for background mortality by age, sex, and calendar year. We report age-specific and age-standardised relative survival at 1 and 5 years, and 5-year survival conditional on survival to the first anniversary of diagnosis. We also examined incidence and mortality trends during 1985–2005. Findings Relative survival improved during 1995–2007 for all four cancers in all jurisdictions. Survival was persistently higher in Australia, Canada, and Sweden, intermediate in Norway, and lower in Denmark, England, Northern Ireland, and Wales, particularly in the first year after diagnosis and for patients aged 65 years and older. International differences narrowed at all ages for breast cancer, from about 9% to 5% at 1 year and from about 14% to 8% at 5 years, but less or not at all for the other cancers. For colorectal cancer, the international range narrowed only for patients aged 65 years and older, by 2–6% at 1 year and by 2–3% at 5 years. Interpretation Up-to-date survival trends show increases but persistent differences between countries. Trends in cancer incidence and

  1. Influence of socioeconomic environment on survival in patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Launay, L; Dejardin, O; Pornet, C; Morlais, F; Guittet, L; Launoy, G; Bouvier, V

    2012-01-01

    The influence of social environment on survival in patients with cancer has been demonstrated in many studies, subjects living in the most deprived areas having a poorer prognosis. Geographic remoteness and limited access to specialized care centers are often associated with socioeconomic deprivation. The aim was to assess the influence of social environment and geographic remoteness on the relative survival of patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer between 1997 and 2004 in the department of Calvados in France. The study population, which was provided by the Calvados digestive cancer registry, included 629 patients. Relative survival was used to estimate the influence of social environment and geographic remoteness on patient survival. Five-year survival rates were 14.1%, 15.1%, 11.8%, 8.8%, and 11.4%, respectively, for patients living in the least to the most deprived areas (P= 0.39). The influence of social environment was significant after adjustment for clinical variables, patients living in the most deprived areas having the worst survival. These discrepancies cannot totally be explained by differences in access to care, cancer extension, or morphology at diagnosis. No association was observed between distance to the nearest cancer center and survival. Social environment appears to induce disparities among patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer, with a worse prognosis for patients living in the most deprived areas.

  2. Implications of incomplete registration of deaths on long-term survival estimates from population-based cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Hermann; Hakulinen, Timo

    2009-07-15

    International comparison of population-based cancer survival is a key component of monitoring progress against cancer. Its validity depends to an unknown degree on completeness of ascertainment of deaths in the cancer registries involved which may vary according to legal and administrative circumstances. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of incomplete registration of deaths through various mechanisms on the validity of long-term absolute and relative survival estimates. For that purpose, we simulated underascertainment of deaths through linkage failure of registry data with death certificates with probabilities between 0.1 and 5%, and underascertainment of deaths by unregistered annual emigration with probabilities between 0.05 and 2%, using data from the Finnish Cancer Registry. The expected impact on estimates of 5-, 10- and 15-year absolute and relative survival was assessed. We demonstrate that even modest levels of under-registration of deaths may lead to severe overestimation of long-term survival estimates, ranging from 0 to 31 percent units in the scenarios assessed. In general, relative survival is much more affected than absolute survival, and potential problems are much larger for relative survival estimates in older compared with younger patients. Potential overestimation strongly increases with length of follow-up, and this increase is particularly pronounced for under-registration of deaths because of unrecorded emigration. Every effort should be made in cancer registry based survival analyses to ascertain deaths with close to 100% completeness. When such completeness cannot be achieved, long-term relative survival estimates and their comparison across populations must be interpreted with much caution.

  3. Digoxin use after diagnosis of breast cancer and survival: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Karasneh, Reema A; Murray, Liam J; Mc Menamin, Úna C; Hughes, Carmel M; Cardwell, Chris R

    2015-06-01

    Digoxin has been shown to have an estrogenic effect and is associated with increased risk of gynecomastia and estrogen-sensitive cancers such as breast and uterus cancer. These findings, particularly recent observations of increased breast cancer risk, raise questions about the safety of digoxin use in breast cancer patients. Therefore, we investigated whether digoxin use after breast cancer diagnosis increased the risk of breast cancer-specific mortality in breast cancer patients. A cohort of 17,842 breast cancer patients newly diagnosed from 1998 to 2009 was identified from English cancer registries (from the National Cancer Data Repository). This cohort was linked to the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (to provide digoxin and other prescription records) and to the Office of National Statistics mortality data (to identify breast cancer-specific deaths). Using time-dependent Cox regression models, unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the association between post-diagnostic exposure to digoxin and breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. In 17,842 breast cancer patients, there were 2219 breast cancer-specific deaths. Digoxin users appeared to have increased breast cancer-specific mortality compared with non-users (HR 1.73; 95 % CI 1.39-2.15) but this association was entirely attenuated after adjustment for potential confounders (adjusted HR 0.91; 95 % CI 0.72-1.14). In this large population-based breast cancer cohort study, there was little evidence of an increase in breast cancer-specific mortality with digoxin use after diagnosis. These results provide some reassurance that digoxin use is safe in breast cancer patients.

  4. Metformin use and survival from lung cancer: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Menamin, Úna C Mc; Cardwell, Chris R; Hughes, Carmel M; Murray, Liam M

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical evidence suggests that metformin, a widely prescribed anti-diabetic drug, may inhibit lung cancer progression. We investigated whether metformin use was associated with decreased risk of cancer-specific mortality in lung cancer patients. This study included newly diagnosed lung cancer patients (identified from English National Cancer Data Repository, 1998-2009) with type 2 diabetes (based on UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink prescriptions and diagnosis records). Lung cancer deaths occurring up to 2012 were identified using Office of National Statistics mortality data and the association between metformin use (before and after diagnosis) and risk of lung cancer-specific mortality was calculated using Cox regression models. In analysis of 533 patients, we found a weak non-significant reduction in lung cancer-specific mortality with metformin use after diagnosis (adjusted HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.68-1.09). No association was evident for metformin use before diagnosis and cancer-specific mortality in analysis of 1350 patients (adjusted HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.86, 1.11). Associations were similar by duration of use. In addition, after adjustment for potential confounders, there was little evidence of an association between the use of other anti-diabetic medications (either before or after diagnosis) and lung cancer-specific mortality; including sulfonylureas, insulin or other anti-diabetic medications (such as thiazolidinediones). Overall, the results from this population-based study provide little evidence of a protective association between metformin use and cancer mortality in lung cancer patients.

  5. Influence of Educational Level, Stage, and Histological Type on Survival of Oral Cancer in a Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Thinali Sousa; de Barros Silva, Paulo Goberlânio; Sousa, Eric Fernandes; da Cunha, Maria do PSS; de Aguiar, Andréa Silvia Walter; Costa, Fábio Wildson Gurgel; Mota, Mário Rogério Lima; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Sousa, Fabrício Bitu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mortality rate associated with oral cancer is estimated at approximately 12,300 deaths per year, and the survival rate is only 40% to 50% for diagnosed patients and is closely related to the duration of time between disease perception and its diagnosis and treatment. Socioeconomic risk factors are determinants of the incidence and mortality related to oral cancer. We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study of 573 records of patients with oral cancer at Haroldo Juaçaba Hospital – Cancer Institute of Ceará from 2000 to 2009 to evaluate the influence of socioeconomic factors on survival and epidemiological behavior of this neoplasia in a Brazilian population. In this study, patients with oral cancer were males greater than 60 years of age, presented squamous cell carcinoma in the floor of mouth and were characterized by low education levels. A total of 573 lesions were found in oral cavities. Cox proportional hazards regression model showed that the histological type, tumor stage, and low degree of education significantly influenced survival. A lower patient survival rate was correlated with a more advanced stage of disease and a worse prognosis. Squamous cell carcinoma is associated with a higher mortality when compared with other histological types of malign neoplasia. PMID:26817864

  6. Breast Cancer Characteristics and Survival in a Hispanic Population of Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Srur-Rivero, Nadia; Cartin-Brenes, Mayra

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Breast cancer characteristics may vary according to the patient’s ethnic group. The goal of this cohort study was to evaluate the characteristics of a group of Costa Rican breast cancer patients and their relationship with survival. METHODS Age, stage, tumor grade, immunohistochemistry, lymphovascular invasion, recurrence, and survival data on 199 Hispanic patients with breast cancer diagnosis, treated between January 2009 and May 2010, were collected from a single institution in San Jose, Costa Rica. The data were statistically analyzed for significance. RESULTS Median age at diagnosis was 53 years. With a median follow-up of 46.5 months, there was an 88% overall survival rate. Thirty-seven percent of the patients (p < 0.001) were at stages III and IV during diagnosis. The hormone receptor human epidermal receptor negative phenotype (HR−HER2−) (p < 0.001) was present in 17% of the cases. In a multivariate analysis, local (risk ratio, RR: 7.2; confidence interval, CI 95%: 3.8–7.6; p = 0.06) and distant recurrence (RR: 14.9; CI 95%: 7.7–28.9; p = 0.01) showed the strongest association with the probability of death from the disease. Patients with HR−HER2− phenotype tumors reported more local recurrences (p = 0.04), a higher tumor grade (p < 0.01), and lower overall survival than patients with other breast cancer phenotypes (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Although this study analyzes a modest number of cases, it is an initial insight into factors that may contribute to differences in breast cancer outcomes among Hispanic women in Costa Rica. The higher proportion of triple negative tumors, advanced stage, and younger median age at diagnosis could contribute to the inferior prognostic described among Hispanic women. There may be a different distribution of tumor subtypes compared to non-Hispanic white women. Further studies are necessary to confirm such findings. PMID:25125980

  7. Accuracy of cause of death data routinely recorded in a population-based cancer registry: impact on cause-specific survival and validation using the Geneva cancer registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Information on the underlying cause of death of cancer patients is of interest because it can be used to estimate net survival. The population-based Geneva Cancer Registry is unique because registrars are able to review the official cause of death. This study aims to describe the difference between the official and revised cause-of-death variables and the impact on cancer survival estimates. Methods The recording process for each cause of death variable is summarised. We describe the differences between the two cause-of-death variables for the 5,065 deceased patients out of the 10,534 women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1970 and 2009. The Kappa statistic and logistic regression are applied to evaluate the degree of concordance. The impact of discordance on cause-specific survival is examined using the Kaplan Meier method. Results The overall agreement between the two variables was high. However, several subgroups presented a lower concordance, suggesting differences in calendar time and less attention given to older patients and more advanced diseases. Similarly, the impact of discordance on cause-specific survival was small on overall survival but larger for several subgroups. Conclusion Estimation of cancer-specific survival could therefore be prone to bias when using the official cause of death. Breast cancer is not the more lethal cancer and our results can certainly not be generalised to more lethal tumours. PMID:24373194

  8. Uncovering disparities in survival after non-small-cell lung cancer among Asian/Pacific Islander ethnic populations in California

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ellen T.; Shema, Sarah J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Clarke, Christina A.; Gomez, Scarlett Lin

    2009-01-01

    Asians may have better survival after non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) than non-Asians. However, it is unknown whether survival varies among the heterogeneous U.S. Asian/Pacific Islander (API) populations. Therefore, this study aimed to quantify survival differences among APIs with NSCLC. Differences in overall and disease-specific survival were analyzed in the California Cancer Registry among 16,577 API patients diagnosed with incident NSCLC between 1988 and 2007. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models with separate baseline hazards by disease stage. Despite better overall and disease-specific survival among APIs compared with non-Hispanic Whites, differences were evident across API populations. Among women, Japanese (overall survival HR=1.16, 95% CI=1.06–1.27) and APIs other than those in the six largest ethnic groups (“other APIs”; HR=1.19, 95% CI=1.07–1.33) had significantly poorer overall and disease-specific survival than Chinese. By contrast, South Asian women had significantly better survival than Chinese (HR=0.79, 95% CI=0.63–0.97). Among men, Japanese (HR=1.15, 95% CI=1.07–1.24), Vietnamese (HR=1.07, 95% CI=1.00–1.16), and other APIs (HR=1.18, 95% CI=1.08–1.28) had significantly poorer overall and disease-specific survival than Chinese. Other factors independently associated with poorer survival were lower neighborhood SES, involvement with a non-university-teaching hospital, unmarried status, older age, and earlier year of diagnosis. APIs have significant ethnic differences in NSCLC survival that may be related to disparate lifestyles, biology, and especially health care access or use. To reduce the nationwide burden of lung cancer mortality, it is critical to identify and ameliorate hidden survival disparities such as those among APIs. PMID:19622719

  9. High hospital research participation and improved colorectal cancer survival outcomes: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Neil; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Finan, Paul J; Thomas, James D; Chapman, Michael; Hamilton, Russell; Campbell, Helen; Cameron, David; Kaplan, Richard; Parmar, Mahesh; Stephens, Richard; Seymour, Matt; Gregory, Walter; Selby, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objective In 2001, the National Institute for Health Research Cancer Research Network (NCRN) was established, leading to a rapid increase in clinical research activity across the English NHS. Using colorectal cancer (CRC) as an example, we test the hypothesis that high, sustained hospital-level participation in interventional clinical trials improves outcomes for all patients with CRC managed in those research-intensive hospitals. Design Data for patients diagnosed with CRC in England in 2001–2008 (n=209 968) were linked with data on accrual to NCRN CRC studies (n=30 998). Hospital Trusts were categorised by the proportion of patients accrued to interventional studies annually. Multivariable models investigated the relationship between 30-day postoperative mortality and 5-year survival and the level and duration of study participation. Results Most of the Trusts achieving high participation were district general hospitals and the effects were not limited to cancer ‘centres of excellence’, although such centres do make substantial contributions. Patients treated in Trusts with high research participation (≥16%) in their year of diagnosis had lower postoperative mortality (p<0.001) and improved survival (p<0.001) after adjustment for casemix and hospital-level variables. The effects increased with sustained research participation, with a reduction in postoperative mortality of 1.5% (6.5%–5%, p<2.2×10−6) and an improvement in survival (p<10−19; 5-year difference: 3.8% (41.0%–44.8%)) comparing high participation for ≥4 years with 0 years. Conclusions There is a strong independent association between survival and participation in interventional clinical studies for all patients with CRC treated in the hospital study participants. Improvement precedes and increases with the level and years of sustained participation. PMID:27797935

  10. Worse survival in breast cancer among women with recent childbirth: results from a Swedish population-based register study.

    PubMed

    Bladström, Anna; Anderson, Harald; Olsson, Håkan

    2003-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate how time since childbirth affects breast cancer survival using unselected population-based data linking data from the Swedish Cancer Registry, fertility register, and population census registers. A total of 14,693 parous women < or =45 years of age with breast cancer were identified. Information on deaths was collected, and 5- and 10-year survival rates were calculated according to time since most recent childbirth. Mortality during the first 10 years of follow-up was further investigated in a Cox analysis, with adjustments for age at diagnosis, time period during which the diagnosis was made, number of children, and age at the time of the first child's birth. Women with diagnosis during pregnancy had a 5-year survival rate of 52.1% (95% CI, 41.2%-61.9%) and a 10-year survival rate of 43.9% (95% CI, 33.1%-54.2%), compared with survival rates of 80.0% (95% CI, 79.6%-81.4%) and 68.6% (95% CI, 67.5%-69.7%), respectively, in women diagnosed >10 years since childbirth. In the multivariate model, we found that time since childbirth was associated with inferior survival rates in cases of diagnosis <8 years after childbirth, in which the lowest survival rates were seen in women with diagnosis during pregnancy in the first 5 years of follow-up (adjusted relative risk compared with women with >10 years since last childbirth, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.8-3.4). The adjusted hazard ratios could be described by a decreasing function of a logarithmic transformation of years since childbirth. We found that the time of follow-up was of importance, in that women with a recent pregnancy had particularly lower survival rates during the first 5 years after diagnosis. The mechanisms behind the poor survival in breast cancer for women with recent childbirth are not known, but we suggest that one explanation might be a lower proportion of hormone receptor-positive tumors.

  11. Statin improves survival in patients with EGFR-TKI lung cancer: A nationwide population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Huang, Ru-Jiun; Chen, Pau-Chung; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Yang, Yao-Hsu

    2017-01-01

    Long-term use of statins has been reported to reduce the risk of death in patients with lung cancer. This study investigated the effect of statin use among patients with lung cancer receiving epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKIs) therapy. A nationwide, population-based case-control study was conducted using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. From January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2012, a total of 1,707 statin and 6,828 non-statin matched lung cancer cohorts with EGFR-TKIs treatment were studied. Statin use was associated with a reduced risk of death (HR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.54–0.62, p < 0.001). In addition, statin use was associated with a significantly longer median progression-free survival (8.3 months, 95% CI: 7.6–8.9 vs. 6.1 months, 95% CI: 6.0–6.4, p < 0.001) and median overall survival (35.5 months, 95% CI: 33.8–38.1 vs. 23.9 months, 95% CI: 23.4–24.7, p < 0.001). In conclusion, statins might potentially enhance the therapeutic effect and increase survival in patients with lung cancer receiving EGFR-TKI therapy. PMID:28158206

  12. Patterns of metastasis and survival in breast cancer patients: a preliminary study in an Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Ziaei, Jamal Eivazi; Pourzand, Ali; Bayat, Amrollah; Vaez, Jalil

    2012-01-01

    Due to lack of sufficient data on characteristics of breast cancer patients and risk factors for developing metastasis in Iran this study was designed to understand clinical aspects impacting on survival. A cross-sectional study on breast cancer patients was conducted in an oncology clinic of the university hospital between 1995 and 2010. Data were retrieved from medical records and included age, menopausal status, tumor diameter, number of involved nodes, histopathological type, estrogen and progesterone receptor expression, c-erbB-2, primary and secondary metastasis sites, overall survival, disease free interval and type of chemotherapy protocol. The results were analyzed with SPSS 13 software.The mean age of the patients was 49.2 (27-89) years. The primary tumors were mainly ER positive (48%) and PR negative (49.3%). The status of lymph nodes dissected and examined in these patients was unknown in 19 patients (25.3%) while 18 patients (24%) had positive lymph nodes with no report on the number of involved nodes. All of the patients had received antracyclin based chemotherapy in an adjuvant or metastatic setting. Adjuvant hormonal therapy was administered to receptor positive patients. In average, overall survival after recurrence was 30 months (95%CI 24.605-35.325) for non-skeletal versus 42 months (95%CI 31.211-52.789) for skeletal metastasis (P= 0.002). The median survival was also greater for receptor positive patients; 39 months (95%CI 33.716-44.284) for PR+ versus 26 months (95%CI 19.210-32.790) for PR- (P=0.047) and 38 months (95%CI 32.908-43.092) for ER+ versus 27 months (95%CI 18.780-35.220) for ER- patients (P=0.016). No relation was found between site of first metastasis and hormone receptor, age, tumor diameter, DFI and menopausal status. Sites of metastasis were independent of age, size of the tumor, menopausal and hormone receptor status in this study. Overall survival provided significant relations with respect to receptor status and bone

  13. Prognostic factors and survival of colorectal cancer in Kurdistan province, Iran: A population-based study (2009-2014).

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Mohammad Aziz; Moradi, Ghobad; Roshani, Daem; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Ghaytasi, Bahman

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) survival varies at individual and geographically level. This population-based study aimed to evaluating various factors affecting the survival rate of CRC patients in Kurdistan province.In a retrospective cohort study, patients diagnosed as CRC were collected through a population-based study from March 1, 2009 to 2014. The data were collected from Kurdistan's Cancer Registry database. Additional information and missing data were collected reference to patients' homes, medical records, and pathology reports. The CRC survival was calculated from the date of diagnosis to the date of cancer-specific death or the end of follow-up (cutoff date: October 2015). Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used for the univariate analysis of survival in various subgroups. The proportional-hazard model Cox was also used in order to consider the effects of different factors on survival including age at diagnosis, place of residence, marital status, occupation, level of education, smoking, economic status, comorbidity, tumor stage, and tumor grade.A total number of 335 patients affected by CRC were assessed and the results showed that 1- and 5-year survival rate were 87% and 33%, respectively. According to the results of Cox's multivariate analysis, the following factors were significantly related to CRC survival: age at diagnosis (≥65 years old) (HR 2.08, 95% CI: 1.17-3.71), single patients (HR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.10-2.40), job (worker) (HR 2.09, 95% CI: 1.22-3.58), educational level: diploma or below (HR 0.61, 95% CI: 0.39-0.92), wealthy economic status (HR 0.51, 95% CI: 0.31-0.82), tumor grade in poorly differentiated (HR 2.25, 95% CI: 1.37-3.69), and undifferentiated/anaplastic grade (HR 2.90, 95% CI: 1.67-4.98).We found that factors such as low education, inappropriate socioeconomic status, and high tumor grade at the time of disease diagnosis were effective in the poor survival of CRC patients in Kurdistan province; this, which need more attention.

  14. Potentially Curative Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Norway: A Population-Based Study of Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, Trond-Eirik; Brunsvig, Paal Fredrik; Johannessen, Dag Clement; Sundstrom, Stein; Wang, Mari; Hornslien, Kjersti; Bremnes, Roy Martin; Stensvold, Andreas; Garpestad, Oddveig; Norstein, Jarle

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: The efficacy of curative irradiation in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer patients is considered limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term survival in a population-based approach. Methods and Materials: Cases of non-small-cell lung cancer diagnosed from 1993 to 2001 were identified in the Cancer Registry of Norway. Electronic linkage with national data from the hospitals' radiotherapy verification systems identified those who received potentially curative doses ({>=}50 Gy). Hospital records were reviewed for all patients. Results: A total of 497 patients (336 men) were identified with a radiation dose of {>=}50 Gy delivered to the lung region. Of these, 41% received 60 Gy or more. The majority (70%) of patients included had advanced stage disease: 24% Stage IIIA and 46% Stage IIIB. The overall 1-, 3-, and 5-year observed survival rates were 53%, 16%, and 9%, respectively. Multivariable analyses identified stage and chemotherapy, but not radiation dose, as significant independent prognostic variables for survival. However, 68% of patients treated with chemotherapy participated in prospective studies with inclusion criteria that excluded patients with less favorable prognostic factors, leading to a selection bias. The number of fractions and the radiation doses varied widely among different hospitals. Conclusion: The long-term prognosis after radiation therapy is poor. More sophisticated, targeted, and uniform delivery of radiation therapy is needed. The apparent benefit of chemotherapy may in part be due to selection of patients with more favorable prognostic factors for this therapy.

  15. Long-term survival, prevalence, and cure of cancer: a population-based estimation for 818 902 Italian patients and 26 cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Dal Maso, L.; Guzzinati, S.; Buzzoni, C.; Capocaccia, R.; Serraino, D.; Caldarella, A.; Dei Tos, A. P.; Falcini, F.; Autelitano, M.; Masanotti, G.; Ferretti, S.; Tisano, F.; Tirelli, U.; Crocetti, E.; De Angelis, R.; Virdone, S.; Zucchetto, A.; Gigli, A.; Francisci, S.; Baili, P.; Gatta, G.; Castaing, M.; Zanetti, R.; Contiero, P.; Bidoli, E.; Vercelli, M.; Michiara, M.; Federico, M.; Senatore, G.; Pannozzo, F.; Vicentini, M.; Bulatko, A.; Pirino, D. R.; Gentilini, M.; Fusco, M.; Giacomin, A.; Fanetti, A. C.; Cusimano, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Persons living after a cancer diagnosis represent 4% of the whole population in high-income countries. The aim of the study was to provide estimates of indicators of long-term survival and cure for 26 cancer types, presently lacking. Patients and methods Data on 818 902 Italian cancer patients diagnosed at age 15–74 years in 1985–2005 were included. Proportions of patients with the same death rates of the general population (cure fractions) and those of prevalent patients who were not at risk of dying as a result of cancer (cure prevalence) were calculated, using validated mixture cure models, by cancer type, sex, and age group. We also estimated complete prevalence, conditional relative survival (CRS), time to reach 5- and 10-year CRS >95%, and proportion of patients living longer than those thresholds. Results The cure fractions ranged from >90% for patients aged <45 years with thyroid and testis cancers to <10% for liver and pancreatic cancers of all ages. Five- or 10-year CRS >95% were both reached in <10 years by patients with cancers of the stomach, colon–rectum, pancreas, corpus and cervix uteri, brain, and Hodgkin lymphoma. For breast cancer patients, 5- and 10-year CRSs reached >95% after 19 and 25 years, respectively, and in 15 and 18 years for prostate cancer patients. Five-year CRS remained <95% for >25 years after cancer diagnosis in patients with liver and larynx cancers, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, myeloma, and leukaemia. Overall, the cure prevalence was 67% for men and 77% for women. Therefore, 21% of male and 31% of female patients had already reached 5-year CRS >95%, whereas 18% and 25% had reached 10-year CRS >95%. Conclusions A quarter of Italian cancer patients can be considered cured. This observation has a high potential impact on health planning, clinical practice, and patients' perspective. PMID:25149707

  16. Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer Survival rates are often used by doctors ... Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  17. Favourable ten-year overall survival in a Caucasian population with high probability of hereditary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to compare differences in the prognosis of breast cancer (BC) patients at high (H) risk or intermediate slightly (IS) increased risk based on family history and those without a family history of BC, and to evaluate whether ten-year overall survival can be considered a good indicator of BRCA1 gene mutation. Methods We classified 5923 breast cancer patients registered between 1988 and 2006 at the Department of Oncology and Haematology in Modena, Italy, into one of three different risk categories according to Modena criteria. One thousand eleven patients at H and IS increased risk were tested for BRCA1/2 mutations. The overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) were the study end-points. Results Eighty BRCA1 carriers were identified. A statistically significantly better prognosis was observed for patients belonging to the H risk category with respect to women in the IS and sporadic groups (82% vs.75% vs.73%, respectively; p < 0.0001). Comparing only BRCA1 carriers with BRCA-negative and sporadic BC (77% vs.77% vs.73%, respectively; p < 0.001) an advantage in OS was seen. Conclusions Patients belonging to a population with a high probability of being BRCA1 carriers had a better prognosis than those with sporadic BC. Considering these results, women who previously had BC and had survived ten years could be selected for BRCA1 analysis among family members at high risk of hereditary BC during genetic counselling. Since only 30% of patients with a high probability of having hereditary BC have BRCA1 mutations, selecting women with a long term survival among this population could increase the rate of positive analyses, avoiding the use of expensive tests. PMID:20219108

  18. Global surveillance of cancer survival 1995–2009: analysis of individual data for 25 676 887 patients from 279 population-based registries in 67 countries (CONCORD-2)

    PubMed Central

    Allemani, Claudia; Weir, Hannah K; Carreira, Helena; Harewood, Rhea; Spika, Devon; Wang, Xiao-Si; Bannon, Finian; Ahn, Jane V; Johnson, Christopher J; Bonaventure, Audrey; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Stiller, Charles; Silva, Gulnar Azevedo e; Chen, Wan-Qing; Ogunbiyi, Olufemi J; Rachet, Bernard; Soeberg, Matthew J; You, Hui; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Storm, Hans; Tucker, Thomas C; Coleman, Michel P

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Worldwide data for cancer survival are scarce. We aimed to initiate worldwide surveillance of cancer survival by central analysis of population-based registry data, as a metric of the effectiveness of health systems, and to inform global policy on cancer control. Methods Individual tumour records were submitted by 279 population-based cancer registries in 67 countries for 25·7 million adults (age 15–99 years) and 75 000 children (age 0–14 years) diagnosed with cancer during 1995–2009 and followed up to Dec 31, 2009, or later. We looked at cancers of the stomach, colon, rectum, liver, lung, breast (women), cervix, ovary, and prostate in adults, and adult and childhood leukaemia. Standardised quality control procedures were applied; errors were corrected by the registry concerned. We estimated 5-year net survival, adjusted for background mortality in every country or region by age (single year), sex, and calendar year, and by race or ethnic origin in some countries. Estimates were age-standardised with the International Cancer Survival Standard weights. Findings 5-year survival from colon, rectal, and breast cancers has increased steadily in most developed countries. For patients diagnosed during 2005–09, survival for colon and rectal cancer reached 60% or more in 22 countries around the world; for breast cancer, 5-year survival rose to 85% or higher in 17 countries worldwide. Liver and lung cancer remain lethal in all nations: for both cancers, 5-year survival is below 20% everywhere in Europe, in the range 15–19% in North America, and as low as 7–9% in Mongolia and Thailand. Striking rises in 5-year survival from prostate cancer have occurred in many countries: survival rose by 10–20% between 1995–99 and 2005–09 in 22 countries in South America, Asia, and Europe, but survival still varies widely around the world, from less than 60% in Bulgaria and Thailand to 95% or more in Brazil, Puerto Rico, and the USA. For cervical cancer

  19. Correlation of IL-27 genetic polymorphisms with the risk and survival of cervical cancer in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian; Yuan, Meng; Liu, Shuang; Duan, Xiaoyang; Chen, Juan

    2016-05-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) has been recognized as a pleiotropic cytokine with both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. However, there are no data about the role of IL-27 polymorphism in the development of cervical cancer. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in 380 patients with cervical cancer and 380 healthy controls to investigate the possible associations of IL-27 gene polymorphisms (-964A/G, 2905T/G, and 4730T/C), with susceptibility to cervical cancer and clinical outcome. Our results suggested that the IL-27 2905T/G was significantly associated with a decreased risk of cervical cancer (TG vs. TT, odds ratio (OR) = 0.77; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.60-0.86; GG vs. TT, OR = 0.95; 95 % CI = 0.72-0.96; TG+GG vs. TT, OR = 0.87; 95 % CI = 0.65-0.94). However, the genotype and allele frequencies of IL-27 (-964A/G and 4730T/C) polymorphisms in cervical cancer patients were not significantly different from controls. Further analysis showed IL-27 2905T/G genotypes were associated with advanced tumor stages of cervical cancer patients. More interestingly, the IL-27 2905T/G genotypes were statistically significantly associated with the survival in cervical cancer patients. Our results showed that the IL-27 2905T/G genotypes were associated with decreased susceptibility and development of cervical cancer in Chinese Han population.

  20. Effects of Type of Health Insurance Coverage on Colorectal Cancer Survival in Puerto Rico: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Ortiz, Karen J.; Ramírez-García, Roberto; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Ríos-González, Moraima Y.; Ortiz, Ana Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer represents a major health problem and an important economic burden in Puerto Rico. In the 1990's, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico implemented a health care reform through the privatization of the public health system. The goal was to ensure access to health services, eliminate disparities for medically indigent citizens and provide special coverage for high-risk conditions such as cancer. This study estimates the 5-year relative survival rate of colorectal cancer and the relative excess risk of death in Puerto Rico for 2004–2005, by type of health insurance coverage; Government Health Plan vs. Non-Government Health Plan. Colorectal cancer in advanced stages was more common in Government Health Plan patients compared with Non-Government Health Plan patients (44.29% vs. 40.24 had regional extent and 13.58% versus 10.42% had distant involvement, respectively). Government Health Plan patients in the 50–64 (RR = 6.59; CI: 2.85–15.24) and ≥65 (RR = 2.4; CI: 1.72–4.04) age-groups had the greater excess risk of death compared with Non-Government Health Plan patients. Further studies evaluating the interplay of access to health services and the barriers affecting the Government Health Plan population are warranted. PMID:24796444

  1. Disparities in Adolescent and Young Adult Survival After Testicular Cancer Vary by Histologic Subtype: A Population-Based Study in California 1988–2010

    PubMed Central

    Mujahid, Mahasin; Srinivas, Sandy; Keegan, Theresa H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Testicular cancer is the most common cancer among adolescent and young adult (AYA) men 15–39 years of age. This study aims to determine whether race/ethnicity and/or neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) contribute independently to survival of AYAs with testicular cancer. Methods: Data on 14,249 eligible AYAs with testicular cancer diagnosed in California between 1988 and 2010 were obtained from the population-based California Cancer Registry. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine overall and testicular cancer-specific survival and survival for the seminoma and nonseminoma histologic subtypes according to race/ethnicity, census-tract level neighborhood SES, and other patient and clinical characteristics. Results: Compared with White AYAs, Hispanic AYAs had worse overall and testicular cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07–1.37) and Black AYAs had worse overall survival (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.01–1.97), independent of neighborhood SES and other demographic and clinical factors. Racial/ethnic disparities in survival were more pronounced for nonseminoma than for seminoma. AYAs residing in middle and low SES neighborhoods experienced worse survival across both histologic subtypes independent of race/ethnicity and other factors, while improvements in survival over time were more pronounced for seminoma. Longer time to treatment was also associated with worse survival, particularly for AYAs with nonseminoma. Conclusion: Among AYAs, race/ethnicity, and neighborhood SES are independently associated with survival after testicular cancer. Variation in disparities by histologic type according to demographic factors, year of diagnosis, and time to treatment may reflect differences in prognosis and extent of treatment for the two histologies. PMID:26812451

  2. Trend analysis and survival of primary gallbladder cancer in the United States: a 1973-2009 population-based study.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Rubayat; Simoes, Eduardo J; Schmaltz, Chester; Jackson, Christian S; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2017-03-20

    Primary gallbladder cancer is an aggressive and uncommon cancer with poor outcomes. Our study examines epidemiology, trend, and survival of gallbladder cancer in the United States from 1973 to 2009. We utilized the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database (SEER). Frequency and rate analyses on demographics, stage, and survival were compared among non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, African American, and Asian/Pacific Islanders. A total of 18,124 cases were reported in SEER from 1973 to 2009 comprising 1.4% of all reported gastrointestinal cancers. Gallbladder cancer was more common in females than males (71 vs. 29%, respectively). The age-adjusted incidence rate was 1.4 per 100,000, significantly higher in females than males (1.7 vs. 1.0). Trend analysis showed that the incidence rate has been decreasing over the last three decades for males. However, among females, the incidence rate had decreased from 1973 to mid-90s but has remained stable since then. Trend analysis for stage at diagnosis showed that the proportion of late-stage cases has been increasing significantly since 2001 after a decreasing pattern since 1973. Survival has improved considerably over time, and survival is better in females than males and in Asian/Pacific Islanders than other racial groups. The highest survival was in patients who received both surgery and radiation. Trend analysis revealed a recent increase of the incidence of late-stage gallbladder cancer. Highest survival was associated with receiving both surgery and radiation.

  3. Cancer Survival in California Hispanic Farmworkers, 1988-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Jennifer L.; Mills, Paul K.; Riordan, Deborah G.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although epidemiologic studies have identified elevated cancer risk in farmworkers for some cancer types, little is known about cancer survival in this population. Purpose: To determine if cancer survival differs between a Hispanic farmworker population and the general Hispanic population in California. Methods: Hispanic United Farm…

  4. Trends in net survival from ovarian cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Uhry, Zoé; Salmerón, Diego; Sánchez-Zapata, María-Isabel; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Navarro, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    European Latin countries have some similarities in their health systems. It is thus interesting to look at their differences in cancer survival (here, ovarian cancer) through monitoring of specific indicators of quality care. The aim of this SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the trends in 1 and 5-year net survival from ovarian cancer and the trends in the excess mortality rates between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland). The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, the net survival was studied over the 2000-2004 period using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. The results are reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland, and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. The analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modelling. Over the period 2000-2004, there were slight differences in the 5-year age-standardized net survivals from ovarian cancer; they ranged from 36% in Spain to 42% in Belgium. Net survival was much higher in young than in old age groups, but this difference was more marked in Spain and less marked in France. Between 1992 and 2004, the net survival increased in all countries, mainly in young and middle-aged women. However, the differences in 5-year net survival between these countries were larger in 2004 than in 1992. Slight differences were observed in survival from ovarian cancer between the six European Latin countries. A considerable improvement in survival was observed in all countries, especially in young and middle-aged women. This study highlights the need for further monitoring of ovarian cancer outcomes.

  5. The application of cure models in the presence of competing risks: a tool for improved risk communication in population-based cancer patient survival.

    PubMed

    Eloranta, Sandra; Lambert, Paul C; Andersson, Therese M-L; Björkholm, Magnus; Dickman, Paul W

    2014-09-01

    Quantifying cancer patient survival from the perspective of cure is clinically relevant. However, most cure models estimate cure assuming no competing causes of death. We use a relative survival framework to demonstrate how flexible parametric cure models can be used in combination with competing-risks theory to incorporate noncancer deaths. Under a model that incorporates statistical cure, we present the probabilities that cancer patients (1) have died from their cancer, (2) have died from other causes, (3) will eventually die from their cancer, or (4) will eventually die from other causes, all as a function of time since diagnosis. We further demonstrate how conditional probabilities can be used to update the prognosis among survivors (eg, at 1 or 5 years after diagnosis) by summarizing the proportion of patients who will not die from their cancer. The proposed method is applied to Swedish population-based data for persons diagnosed with melanoma, colon cancer, or acute myeloid leukemia between 1973 and 2007.

  6. Trends in net survival from pancreatic cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Bossard, Nadine; Colonna, Marc; Garcia-Velasco, Adelaida; Carulla, Maria; Manfredi, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer represents a real clinical challenge. The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the net survival from pancreatic cancer between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland) and provide trends in net survival and dynamics of excess mortality rates up to 5 years after diagnosis. The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, net survival was studied over the period 2000-2004 using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. Results were reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. These analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modelling strategy. There were little differences between countries in age-standardized net survivals (2000-2004). The 5-year net survival was poor (range: 6-10%). The changes in net survival from 1992 to 2004 were mostly related to early survival and patients aged 60 years. A slight decrease in the excess mortality rate between 1992 and 2004 was observed, limited to the 18 months after diagnosis. This study confirmed that, despite some improvement, survival from pancreatic cancer is still poor throughout European Latin countries. The major improvements in clinical imaging did not result in improvements in prognosis. Development of truly innovative treatments is highly needed to improve prognosis.

  7. One-Carbon Metabolism and Breast Cancer Survival in a Population-Based Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    association of one-carbon metabolism polymorphisms and overall survival was different by ER/PR status for several polymorphisms, i.e. MTHFR C677T (p...survival ER/PR status Chemotheray + - yes no Gene Genotype HR HR HR HR MTHFR 0 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) (C677T) 1 1.47 0.61 1.13...0.86 P,int 0.05 0.55 MTHFR 0 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) (A1208C) 1 1.27 0.66 1.22 0.91 P,int 0.13 0.64 TSTR 0 1.00(ref

  8. Social inequality in incidence of and survival from cancer in a population-based study in Denmark, 1994-2003: Summary of findings.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Schüz, Joachim; Engholm, Gerda; Johansen, Christoffer; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Storm, Hans H; Olsen, Jørgen H

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this nationwide, population register-based study was to describe variations in cancer incidence and survival by social position in a social welfare state, Denmark, on the basis of a range of socioeconomic, demographic and health-related indicators. Our study population comprised all 3.22 million Danish residents born in 1925-1973 and aged >or=30 years, who were followed up for cancer incidence in 1994-2003 and for survival in 1994-2006, yielding 147,973 cancers. The incidence increased with lower education and income, especially for tobacco- and other lifestyle-related cancers, although for cancers of the breast and prostate and malignant melanoma the association was inverse. Conversely there was a general increase in incidence among early retirement pensioners, persons living in rented housing and those living in the smallest dwellings. Also incidence rates were generally higher in persons living alone compared to those living with a partner and in the capital area compared to the rural areas. Social inequality in the prognosis of most cancers was observed, despite the equal access to health care in Denmark, with poorer relative survival related to fewer advantages, regardless of how they were measured, often most pronounced in the first year after diagnosis. Also living alone and having somatic or psychiatric comorbidity negatively impacted the relative survival after most cancers. Our study shows that inequalities in cancer incidence and survival must be addressed in all aspects of public health, with interventions both to reduce incidence and to prolong survival.

  9. One-Carbon Metabolism and Breast Cancer Survival in a Population-Based Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    1. All genotype distributions at these three loci were in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium. In addition, genotyping for the MTHFR 677C>T...95%CI 1.04-2.06). MTHFR 677 C-- > T GENOTYPF AND BC SURV’,[VAL HR: 1.46 (1.04 -- 2.06) MTHFR 677 C->T Genotype------ TT or CT CC Overall survival ofthe...BC cases in the LIBCSP affected by MTHFR 677 C-.T genotypes: CC versus TT or CT c. Study associations of one-carbon metabolism (diet and polymorphism

  10. Sodium channel-inhibiting drugs and survival of breast, colon and prostate cancer: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Fairhurst, Caroline; Watt, Ian; Martin, Fabiola; Bland, Martin; Brackenbury, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) regulate invasion and metastasis. Several VGSC-inhibiting drugs reduce metastasis in murine cancer models. We aimed to test the hypothesis that patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs who developed cancer live longer than those not taking these drugs. A cohort study was performed on primary care data from the QResearch database, including patients with breast, bowel or prostate cancer. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare the survival from cancer diagnosis of patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs with those not exposed to these drugs. Median time to death was 9.7 years in the exposed group and 18.4 years in the unexposed group, and exposure to these medications significantly increased mortality. Thus, exposure to VGSC-inhibiting drugs associates with reduced survival in breast, bowel and prostate cancer patients. This finding is not consistent with the preclinical data. Despite the strengths of this study including the large sample size, the study is limited by missing information on potentially important confounders such as cancer stage, co-morbidities and cause of death. Further research, which is able to account for these confounding issues, is needed to investigate the relationship between VGSC-inhibiting drugs and cancer survival. PMID:26577038

  11. Sodium channel-inhibiting drugs and survival of breast, colon and prostate cancer: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, Caroline; Watt, Ian; Martin, Fabiola; Bland, Martin; Brackenbury, William J

    2015-11-18

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) regulate invasion and metastasis. Several VGSC-inhibiting drugs reduce metastasis in murine cancer models. We aimed to test the hypothesis that patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs who developed cancer live longer than those not taking these drugs. A cohort study was performed on primary care data from the QResearch database, including patients with breast, bowel or prostate cancer. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare the survival from cancer diagnosis of patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs with those not exposed to these drugs. Median time to death was 9.7 years in the exposed group and 18.4 years in the unexposed group, and exposure to these medications significantly increased mortality. Thus, exposure to VGSC-inhibiting drugs associates with reduced survival in breast, bowel and prostate cancer patients. This finding is not consistent with the preclinical data. Despite the strengths of this study including the large sample size, the study is limited by missing information on potentially important confounders such as cancer stage, co-morbidities and cause of death. Further research, which is able to account for these confounding issues, is needed to investigate the relationship between VGSC-inhibiting drugs and cancer survival.

  12. Trends in net survival from stomach cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Glória, Luísa; Bossard, Nadine; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Mayer-da-Silva, Alexandra; Faivre, Jean; Miranda, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancers are a clinical challenge. The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the net survival from gastric cancer between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland) and explore the trends in net survival and in the dynamics of the excess mortality rates (EMRs) up to 5 years after diagnosis. The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, net survival was studied over the period 2000-2004 using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. The results are reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. These trend analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modelling strategy. There were little differences between countries in age-standardized net survival for stomach cancer (2000-2004). The 5-year net survival ranged between 26 (Spain) and 32% (Italy). There was a small increase in the age-standardized net survival at 1 year between 1992 and 2004. The increase was also observed in the 5-year net survival, except in France, where the increase was less marked. A slight decrease in the EMR between 1992 and 2004 was limited to the 24 months after diagnosis. In addition, the decrease in the EMR was the same whatever the year of diagnosis. There were minor differences in survival from stomach cancer between European Latin countries. A slight improvement in the 5-year net survival was observed in all countries and the major gain was observed during the 24 months after diagnosis. Development of innovative treatments is needed to improve the prognosis.

  13. Variables affecting survival after second primary lung cancer: A population-based study of 187 Hodgkin's lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Milano, Michael T.; Li, Huilin; Constine, Louis S.; Travis, Lois B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients successfully treated for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) are at known risk for subsequent malignancies, the most common of which is lung cancer. To date, no population-based study has analyzed prognostic variables for overall survival (OS) among HL survivors who developed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods For 187 HL patients who developed NSCLC (among 22,648 HL survivors), we examined the impact of the following variables on OS after NSCLC diagnosis: gender, race, sociodemographic status (based upon county of residence), calendar year and age at NSCLC diagnosis, NSCLC histology and grade, HL stage and subtype, radiation for HL and latency between HL and NSCLC. Patients were grouped by NSCLC stage as follows: localized, regional or distant. All patients were reported to the population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. For those variables significant on univariate analyses, hazard ratios (HR) were derived from Cox proportional hazards model. Results Sociodemogaphic status, gender and latency between NSCLC and HL did not significantly affect OS of any NSCLC stage group. For patients with localized NSCLC, a history of mixed celluarlity HL was associated with a 3-fold improved OS (P=0.006). For patients with regional NSCLC, prior radiotherapy for HL was associated with a 2-fold worse OS (P=0.025). Conclusions A history of mixed cellularity HL subtype and a history of no radiotherapy for HL are favorable prognostic factors among patients who develop NSCLC. Further research into clinicopathologic and treatment-associated variables potentially affecting OS after second primary NSCLC among HL survivors is warranted. PMID:22295164

  14. Trends in net survival from breast cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Roche, Laurent; Buzzoni, Carlotta; di Costanzo, Francesco; Molinié, Florence; Caldarella, Adele

    2017-01-01

    Survival from breast cancer (BC) is influenced by the timeliness of diagnosis and appropriateness of treatment, and may constitute a measure of the global effectiveness of a healthcare system. As the healthcare systems of several European Latin countries have some similarities, the search for differences in cancer survival may provide interesting information on the efficacy of these systems. The SUDCAN study is a collaboration between the Group for Epidemiology and Cancer Registration in Latin language countries (GRELL) and EUROCARE. BC data from six countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Switzerland) were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, we focus on 1- and 5-year age-standardized net survival (NS) from BC by country over the 2000-2004 period. Then, trends in NS over the 1989-2004 period and changes in the pattern of cancer excess mortality rate (EMR) up to 5 years after diagnosis were examined using a multivariate EMR model. There were little differences in age-standardized NS from BC. Over the 2000-2004 period, the 5-year survival ranged between 82 (Spain, Belgium, and Portugal) and 86% (France). There was an increase in age-standardized survival between 1989 and 2004 at 1 year as well as at 5 years. This increase was observed at all ages and in all countries. There was a decrease in the cancer EMR both immediately after diagnosis and by the second and third year of follow-up. There were only minor differences in survival from BC between European Latin countries. The general improvement in NS is presumably because of advances in early cancer diagnosis and improvements in treatment.

  15. Trends in net survival from colon cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Faivre, Jean; Bossard, Nadine; Jooste, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer represents a major public health issue. The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the net survival from colon cancer between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Switzerland) and provide trends in net survival and dynamics of the excess mortality rates up to 5 years after diagnosis. The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, net survival was studied over the 2000-2004 period using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. Results were reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. These analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modeling strategy. There were few differences between countries in age-standardized net survivals (2000-2004). During the 2000-2004 period, the 5-year net survival ranged between 57 (Spain and Portugal) and 61% (Belgium and Switzerland). The age-standardized survival at 1 and 5 years after diagnosis increased between 1992 and 2004. This increase was observed at ages 60 and 70, but was less marked at 80. This increase was linked to a marked decrease in the excess mortality rate between 1992 and 2004 until 18 months after diagnosis. Beyond this period, the decrease in the excess mortality rates among countries was modest and nearly the same whatever the year of diagnosis. There were minor differences in survival after colon cancer between European Latin countries. A considerable improvement in the 5-year net survival was observed in all countries, but the gain was mainly limited to the first 18 months after diagnosis. Further improvements are expected through the implementation of mass screening programs.

  16. Trends in net survival from kidney cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Mangone, Lucia; Bossard, Nadine; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Pezzarossi, Annamaria; Roncaglia, Francesca; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Kidney cancer is a frequent malignant disease. To date, there is no evidence on the effectiveness of early detection and, in most cases, surgery represents the only standard treatment. So far, there is no standardized therapy for localized and locally advanced renal tumors; however, the recent introduction of target therapy has significantly improved the prognosis of metastatic disease. Therefore, survival differences in Europe are deemed to involve differences in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the net survival from kidney cancer between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Switzerland) and provide trends in net survival and dynamics of excess mortality rates up to 5 years after diagnosis. The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, net survival was studied over the 2000-2004 period using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analysis, the study period was specific to each country. The results are reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland, and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. These analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modeling strategy. In 2000-2004, the 5-year net survival ranged between 59% (Spain) and 67% (France and Italy) in men and between 60% (Spain) and 73% (Portugal) in women. There was an increase in the age-standardized net survival between 1992 and 2004 at 1 year, as well as at 5 years, in all age groups and countries. Irrespective of the year of diagnosis, the excess mortality rate decreased with time elapsed since diagnosis. There are some differences in survival from kidney cancer between European Latin countries, but a considerable improvement was observed in most countries.

  17. Trends in net survival from esophageal cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Launoy, Guy; Bossard, Nadine; Castro, Clara; Manfredi, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal cancer represents a major clinical challenge because of its poor prognosis. The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the net survival from esophageal cancer between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Switzerland) and report the trends in net survival and the dynamics of excess mortality rates (EMRs) up to 5 years after diagnosis. The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, net survival was studied over the period 2000-2004 using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. The results were reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. These trend analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modeling strategy. There were some differences between countries in age-standardized net survival (2000-2004). The 5-year net survival ranged between 9 (Spain) and 21% (Belgium). The small increase in net survival from 1992 and 2004 was mostly observed at ages 55 and 65, but was less marked at age 75. There was a slight decrease in EMR between 1992 and 2004 until ∼24 months after diagnosis. Beyond this period, the decrease in the EMR was moderate and the same in all countries irrespective of the year of diagnosis. Some improvement in the 5-year net survival was observed in all countries limited to the 24 months after diagnosis. However, survival differences between countries persisted. Further improvement is expected from innovative treatments.

  18. The Impact of Socioeconomic Status, Surgical Resection and Type of Hospital on Survival in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer. A Population-Based Study in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van der Geest, Lydia G. M.; de Jong, Koert P.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of socioeconomic inequalities in pancreatic cancer patients and especially its effect in patients who had a resection is not known. Hospital type in which resection is performed might also influence outcome. Patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer from 1989 to 2011 (n = 34,757) were selected from the population-based Netherlands Cancer Registry. Postal code was used to determine SES. Multivariable survival analyses using Cox regression were conducted to discriminate independent risk factors for death. Patients living in a high SES neighborhood more often underwent resection and more often were operated in a university hospital. After adjustment for clinicopathological factors, risk of dying was increased independently for patients with intermediate and low SES compared to patients with high SES. After resection, no survival difference was found among patients in the three SES groups. However, survival was better for patients treated in university hospitals compared to patients treated in non-university hospitals. Low SES was an independent risk factor for poor survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. SES was not an adverse risk factor after resection. Resection in non-university hospitals was associated with a worse prognosis. PMID:27832174

  19. ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASONOGRAPHY IN ESOPHAGEAL CANCER LEADS TO IMPROVED SURVIVAL RATES: RESULTS FROM A POPULATION-BASED STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Sachin; Das, Ananya; Rastogi, Amit; Drahos, Jennifer; Ricker, Winifred; Parsons, Ruth; Bansal, Ajay; Yen, Roy; Hosford, Lindsay; Jankowski, Meghan; Sharma, Prateek; Cook, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The advantages of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and computed tomography-positron emission tomography (CT-PET) in relation to survival in esophageal cancer (EC) patients are unclear. This study aimed to assess the effect of EUS, CT-PET and its combination on overall survival relative to cases not receiving these procedures. Methods Patients aged ≥ 66 years diagnosed with EC were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database. Cases were split into four analytic groups: EUS only (n=318), CT-PET only (853), EUS+CT-PET (189) and “no EUS or CT-PET” (2,439). Survival times were estimated by Kaplan-Meier method and compared by using log-rank test for each group versus the “no EUS or CT-PET” group. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare 1, 3 and 5-year survival rates. Results Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that patients undergoing EUS, CT-PET and EUS+CT-PET had improved survival for all stages, all compared with “no EUS or CT-PET”, with the exception of stage 0 disease. Receipt of EUS increased the likelihood of receiving endoscopic therapies, esophagectomy and chemoradiation. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models showed that receipt of EUS was a significant predictor for improved 1-year (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.39–0.59, p<0.0001), 3-year (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.48–0.66, p<0.0001) and 5-year (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.50–0.68) survival. Similar results were noted when results were stratified based on histology, as well as for CT-PET and EUS+CT-PET groups. Conclusions Receipt of either EUS or CT-PET alone in EC patients is associated with improved 1, 3 and 5-year survival. Future studies should identify barriers to dissemination of these staging modalities. PMID:25236485

  20. Does the Intent to Irradiate the Internal Mammary Nodes Impact Survival in Women With Breast Cancer? A Population-Based Analysis in British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Robert A.; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Lau, Jeffrey; Lo, Andrea; Truong, Pauline T.; Tyldesley, Scott; Olivotto, Ivo A.; Weir, Lorna

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of the intent to include internal mammary nodes (IMNs) in the radiation therapy (RT) volume for patients receiving adjuvant locoregional (breast or chest wall plus axillary and supraclavicular fossa) RT for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: 2413 women with node-positive or T3/4N0 invasive breast cancer, treated with locoregional RT from 2001 to 2006, were identified in a prospectively maintained, population-based database. Intent to include IMNs in RT volume was determined through review of patient charts and RT plans. Distant relapse free survival (D-RFS), breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS), and overall survival (OS) were compared between the two groups. Prespecified pN1 subgroup analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up time was 6.2 years. Forty-one percent of study participants received IMN RT. The 5-year D-RFS for IMN inclusion and exclusion groups were 82% vs. 82% (p = 0.82), BCSS was 87% vs. 87% (p = 0.81), and OS was 85% vs. 83% (p = 0.06). In the pN1 subgroup, D-RFS was 90% vs. 88% (p = 0.31), BCSS was 94% vs. 92% (p = 0.18), and OS was 91% vs. 88% (p = 0.01). After potential confounding variables were controlled for, women who received IMN RT did not have significantly different D-RFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.24; p = 0.85), BCSS (HR = 0.98 (95% CI, 0.79-1.22; p = 0.88), or OS (HR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.78-1.15; p = 0.57). In the pN1 subgroup, IMN RT was associated with trends for improved survival that were not statistically significant: D-RFS (HR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.63-1.22; p = 0.42), BCSS (HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.57-1.25; p = 0.39), and OS (HR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.56-1.09; p = 0.14). Conclusions: After a median follow-up time of 6.2 years, although intentional IMN RT was not associated with a significant improvement in survival, this population-based study suggests that IMN RT may contribute to improved outcomes in selected patients with N1 disease.

  1. Improving treatment and survival: a population-based study of current outcomes after a hepatic resection in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaydfudim, Victor M; McMurry, Timothy L; Harrigan, Amy M; Friel, Charles M; Stukenborg, George J; Bauer, Todd W; Adams, Reid B; Hedrick, Traci L

    2015-01-01

    Background Population-based studies historically report underutilization of a resection in patients with colorectal metastases to the liver. Recent data suggest limitations of the methods in the historical analysis. The present study examines trends in a hepatic resection and survival among Medicare recipients with hepatic metastases. Methods Medicare recipients with incident colorectal cancer diagnosed between 1991 and 2009 were identified in the SEER(Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results)-Medicare dataset. Patients were stratified into historical (1991–2001) and current (2002–2009) cohorts. Analyses compared treatment, peri-operative outcomes and survival. Results Of 31 574 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer to the liver, 14 859 were in the current cohort treated after 2002 and 16 715 comprised the historical control group. The overall proportion treated with a hepatic resection increased significantly during the study period (P < 0.001) with pre/post change from 6.5% pre-2002 to 7.5% currently (P < 0.001). Over time, haemorrhagic and infectious complications declined (both P ≤ 0.047), but 30-day mortality was similar (3.5% versus 3.9%, P = 0.660). After adjusting for predictors of survival, the use of a hepatic resection [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.40, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.38–0.42, P < 0.001] and treatment after 2002 (HR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.86–0.90, P < 0.001) were associated with a reduced risk of death. Conclusions Case identification using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) codes is imperfect; however, comparison of trends over time suggests an improvement in multimodality therapy and survival in patients with colorectal metastases to the liver. PMID:26353888

  2. Is England closing the international gap in cancer survival?

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Sarah; Benitez-Majano, Sara; Muller, Patrick; Coleman, Michel P; Allemani, Claudia; Butler, John; Peake, Mick; Guren, Marianne Grønlie; Glimelius, Bengt; Bergström, Stefan; Påhlman, Lars; Rachet, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background: We provide an up-to-date international comparison of cancer survival, assessing whether England is ‘closing the gap' compared with other high-income countries. Methods: Net survival was estimated using national, population-based, cancer registrations for 1.9 million patients diagnosed with a cancer of the stomach, colon, rectum, lung, breast (women) or ovary in England during 1995–2012. Trends during 1995–2009 were compared with estimates for Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Clinicians were interviewed to help interpret trends. Results: Survival from all cancers remained lower in England than in Australia, Canada, Norway and Sweden by 2005–2009. For some cancers, survival improved more in England than in other countries between 1995–1999 and 2005–2009; for example, 1-year survival from stomach, rectal, lung, breast and ovarian cancers improved more than in Australia and Canada. There has been acceleration in lung cancer survival improvement in England recently, with average annual improvement in 1-year survival rising to 2% during 2010–2012. Survival improved more in Denmark than in England for rectal and lung cancers between 1995–1999 and 2005–2009. Conclusions: Survival has increased in England since the mid-1990s in the context of strategic reform in cancer control, however, survival remains lower than in comparable developed countries and continued investment is needed to close the international survival gap. PMID:26241817

  3. Genetic variants in interleukin genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival in a genetically admixed population: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; John, Esther M.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Hines, Lisa M.; Stern, Mariana C.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Presson, Angela P.; Wolff, Roger K.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukins (ILs) are key regulators of immune response. Genetic variation in IL genes may influence breast cancer risk and mortality given their role in cell growth, angiogenesis and regulation of inflammatory process. We examined 16 IL genes with breast cancer risk and mortality in an admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases and 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases and 1585 controls) women. Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance and lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) was used to identify potential gene by gene and gene by lifestyle interactions. The pathway was statistically significant for breast cancer risk overall (P ARTP = 0.0006), for women with low NA ancestry (P ARTP = 0.01), for premenopausal women (P ARTP = 0.02), for estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ tumors (P ARTP = 0.03) and ER−/PR− tumors (P ARTP = 0.02). Eight of the 16 genes evaluated were associated with breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL2RA, IL4, IL6 and IL10); four genes were associated with breast cancer risk among women with low NA ancestry (IL1B, IL6, IL6R and IL10), two were associated with breast cancer risk among women with high NA ancestry (IL2 and IL2RA) and four genes were associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL2 and IL3). IL4, IL6R, IL8 and IL17A were associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. We confirmed associations with several functional polymorphisms previously associated with breast cancer risk and provide support that their combined effect influences the carcinogenic process. PMID:24670917

  4. Genetic variants in interleukin genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival in a genetically admixed population: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; John, Esther M; Giuliano, Anna R; Hines, Lisa M; Stern, Mariana C; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Presson, Angela P; Wolff, Roger K

    2014-08-01

    Interleukins (ILs) are key regulators of immune response. Genetic variation in IL genes may influence breast cancer risk and mortality given their role in cell growth, angiogenesis and regulation of inflammatory process. We examined 16 IL genes with breast cancer risk and mortality in an admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases and 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases and 1585 controls) women. Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance and lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) was used to identify potential gene by gene and gene by lifestyle interactions. The pathway was statistically significant for breast cancer risk overall (P ARTP = 0.0006), for women with low NA ancestry (P(ARTP) = 0.01), for premenopausal women (P(ARTP) = 0.02), for estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.03) and ER-/PR- tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.02). Eight of the 16 genes evaluated were associated with breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL2RA, IL4, IL6 and IL10); four genes were associated with breast cancer risk among women with low NA ancestry (IL1B, IL6, IL6R and IL10), two were associated with breast cancer risk among women with high NA ancestry (IL2 and IL2RA) and four genes were associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL2 and IL3). IL4, IL6R, IL8 and IL17A were associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. We confirmed associations with several functional polymorphisms previously associated with breast cancer risk and provide support that their combined effect influences the carcinogenic process.

  5. Surgery Combined with Radiotherapy Improved Survival in Metastatic Esophageal Cancer in a Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, San-Gang; Xie, Wei-Hao; Zhang, Zhao-Qiang; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Huan-Xin; Yong Bao; He, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study used a population-based national registry to determine the impact of local treatment modalities on survival in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer (EC). The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was used to identify patients with metastatic EC from 1988 to 2012. A total of 9,125 patients were identified. There were 426 patients underwent primary surgery, 4,786 patients were administered radiotherapy (RT) alone, 847 patients underwent surgery plus RT, and 3,066 patients without any local treatment. Multivariate analysis results indicated that year of diagnosis, age, race, histologic subtype, grade, and local treatment modalities were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). The 5-year OS were 8.4%, 4.5%, 17.5%, and 3.4% in primary surgery, RT only, surgery plus RT, and no local treatment, respectively (P < 0.001). Subgroup analyses showed that the impact of RT was mainly reflected by preoperative radiotherapy, as patients received preoperative radiotherapy had significantly better OS than patients who underwent primary surgery alone and postoperative RT, the 5-year OS rates were 24.7%, 6.5%, and 7.8%, respectively, respectively (P < 0.001). Surgery plus RT, especially preoperative RT, may improve long-term survival of patients with metastatic EC. PMID:27323696

  6. Impact of local surgical treatment on survival in young women with T1 breast cancer: long-term results of a population-based cohort.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ye Won; Choi, Jung Eun; Park, Heung Kyu; Kim, Ku Sang; Lee, Jee Yeon; Suh, Young Jin

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the type of local surgical treatment on survival in young women aged less than 40 years with T1 breast cancer. We analyzed data from 3,512 patients aged ≤40 years old who were diagnosed with T1 breast cancer from the Korean Breast Cancer Registry database between January 1988 and December 2006 and underwent either breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or mastectomy. The overall survival (OS) and breast-cancer-specific survival (BCSS) were compared between BCT and mastectomy. Of the 3,512 patients analyzed, 1,951 (55.6 %) underwent BCT, and 1,561 (44.4 %) underwent mastectomy. The median follow-up period was 111.0 (79.0-131.5) months. Overall, the 10-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 95 and 92.1 %, respectively (p = 00004), and the 10-year BCSS rates for BCT and mastectomy patients were 96.9 and 94.9 %, respectively (p = 0.12). In node-negative patients, no significant difference was observed in either the OS (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.072; 95 % CI, 0.750-1.5332, p = 0.704) or BCSS (adjusted HR 0.988; 95 % CI, 0.620-1.574, p = 0.960) rate between the BCT and mastectomy groups. In node-positive patients, no significant difference was observed in the OS (adjusted HR 1.634; 95 % CI, 0.982-2.272, p = 0.59) and BCSS (adjusted HR 1.410; 95 % CI, 0.755-2.633, p = 0.281) rates between the BCT and mastectomy groups. In this large, population-based analysis of young women with T1 breast cancer, the OS and BCSS were not different between BCT and mastectomy.

  7. Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162498.html Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival: Study Weak social ties linked to higher ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Loneliness may impede long-term breast cancer survival, a new study suggests. In the years ...

  8. Recent cancer survival in Germany: an analysis of common and less common cancers.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lina; Castro, Felipe A; Gondos, Adam; Krilaviciute, Agne; Barnes, Benjamin; Eberle, Andrea; Emrich, Katharina; Hentschel, Stefan; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Brenner, Hermann

    2015-06-01

    The monitoring of cancer survival by population-based cancer registries is a prerequisite to evaluate the current quality of cancer care. Our study provides 1-, 5- and 10-year relative survival as well as 5-year relative survival conditional on 1-year survival estimates and recent survival trends for Germany using data from 11 population-based cancer registries, covering around one-third of the German population. Period analysis was used to estimate relative survival for 24 common and 11 less common cancer sites for the period 2007-2010. The German and the United States survival estimates were compared using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results 13 database. Trends in cancer survival in Germany between 2002-2004 and 2008-2010 were described. Five-year relative survival increased in Germany from 2002-2004 to 2008-2010 for most cancer sites. Among the 24 most common cancers, largest improvements were seen for multiple myeloma (8.0% units), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (6.2% units), prostate cancer (5.2% units) and colorectal cancer (4.6% units). In 2007-2010, the survival disadvantage in Germany compared to the United States was largest for cancers of the mouth/pharynx (-11.0% units), thyroid (-6.8% units) and prostate (-7.5% units). Although survival estimates were much lower for elderly patients in both countries, differences in age patterns were observed for some cancer sites. The reported improvements in cancer survival might reflect advances in the quality of cancer care on the population level as well as increased use of screening in Germany. The survival differences across countries and the survival disadvantage in the elderly require further investigation.

  9. Does women's education affect breast cancer risk and survival? Evidence from a population based social experiment in education.

    PubMed

    Palme, Mårten; Simeonova, Emilia

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer is a notable exception to the well documented positive education gradient in health. A number of studies have found that highly educated women are more likely to be diagnosed with the disease. Breast cancer is therefore often labeled as a "welfare disease". However, it has not been established whether the strong positive correlation holds up when education is exogenously determined. We estimate the causal effect of education on the probability of being diagnosed with breast cancer by exploiting an education reform that extended compulsory schooling and was implemented as a social experiment. We find that the incidence of breast cancer increased for those exposed to the reform.

  10. Public Perception of Cancer Survival Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jakob D.; Scherr, Courtney L.; Brown, Natasha; Jones, Christina; Christy, Katheryn

    2013-01-01

    Past research has observed that certain subgroups (e.g., individuals who are overweight/obese) have inaccurate estimates of survival rates for particular cancers (e.g., colon cancer). However, no study has examined whether the lay public can accurately rank cancer survival rates in comparison with one another (i.e., rank cancers from most deadly…

  11. Impact of age and comorbidity on survival in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Eeghen, Elmer E.; Bakker, Sandra D.; van Bochove, Aart

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer are often excluded from clinical trials based on age or a poor performance score. However, 70% of colorectal cancer is diagnosed in patients over 65. Evaluation on the influence of age and comorbidity on survival and cause of death in a non-selected population. Methods Included were 621 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer. An extensive chart review was performed for 392 patients with colon cancer and 143 patients with rectal cancer. Analyses were performed separately for both groups. Results Median survival of colon cancer patients was 5.13 years, 131 patients (34.3%) died from tumour progression. Age and comorbidity were significant predictors for overall survival (P<0.001). Age was also a significant predictor of cause of death (P=0.001). In rectal cancer patients median survival was 4.67 years, 51 (35.7%) of patients died from tumour progression. Neither age nor comorbidity was significant predictors of survival. Age was a significant predictor of cause of death (P<0.001). Conclusions In colon cancer patient age and comorbidity predict survival. This represents possible bias or a reduced survival benefit of treatment, and is an indication that colon cancer is not the prognosis defining illness in the majority of patients. In rectal cancer patients neither age or comorbidity significantly impacted survival. PMID:26697191

  12. Social inequality and incidence of and survival from cancer of the female genital organs in a population-based study in Denmark, 1994-2003.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kirsten Egebjerg; Hannibal, Charlotte Gerd; Nielsen, Ann; Jensen, Allan; Nøhr, Bugge; Munk, Christian; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effects of socioeconomic, demographic and health-related indicators on the incidence of and survival from cancers of the cervix, endometrium and ovary diagnosed in 1994-2003 with follow-up through 2006 in Denmark using information from nationwide registers. The analyses were based on the data on 3007 patients with cervical cancer, 3826 with endometrial cancer and 3855 with ovarian cancer in a cohort of 3.22 million persons born between 1925 and 1973 and aged >or=30 years. The incidence of cervical cancer increased with decreasing socioeconomic position; the incidences of endometrial and ovarian cancer were mostly associated with higher disposable income. Relative survival from cervical cancer was the highest among women of high socioeconomic position; increased excess mortality rates from endometrial and ovarian cancer were associated with low educational level, mainly during the first year after diagnosis. Socioeconomic position seemed to affect both the incidence of and the survival from cancers of the female genital organs.

  13. Resection for oesophageal cancer - complications and survival.

    PubMed

    Grøtting, Marie Sæthre; Løberg, Else Marit; Johannessen, Hans-Olaf; Johnson, Egil

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND Surgery is considered necessary to achieve a cure for oesophageal cancer. Minimally invasive oesophageal resection is increasingly performed with the aim of reducing the number of complications compared with open surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate postoperative complications, mortality and long-term survival following hybrid oesophageal resection by laparoscopy and thoracotomy.MATERIAL AND METHOD Patients with oesophageal cancer who underwent hybrid resection with curative intent at Oslo University Hospital Ullevål from 1 November 2007 to 1 June 2013 were included (n = 109). Complications were graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and survival figures were recorded.RESULTS Median age was 65 years, 79 % were men. Altogether 118 complications were recorded in 70 patients (64.2 %). Distribution of complications was 1.8 % for stage I, 29.4 % for stage II, 22.1 % for stage III and 11.0 % for stage IV. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 4.6 %. There was no postoperative mortality. The proportion of R0 resections with microscopic radicality was 91 % (n = 100). For the entire patient population, the estimated 5-year survival rate was 48 % (95 % CI 36 - 60 %), for R0 resection 51 % (38 - 63 %) and for R1-2 resection 0 %. Estimated median survival with R0-2, R0 and R1-2 resection was 55, 55 and 10 months (0 - 28 months), respectively. R status and stage had a significant bearing on survival.INTERPRETATION There was a low percentage of serious complications, no mortality and few anastomotic leakages after hybrid resection for oesophageal cancer. The 5-year survival rate was good.

  14. Fish populations surviving estrogen pollution.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Claus

    2014-02-10

    Among the most common pollutants that enter the environment after passing municipal wastewater treatment are estrogens, especially the synthetic 17α-ethinylestradiol that is used in oral contraceptives. Estrogens are potent endocrine disruptors at concentrations frequently observed in surface waters. However, new genetic analyses suggest that some fish populations can be self-sustaining even in heavily polluted waters. We now need to understand the basis of this tolerance.

  15. Medical Advances and Racial/ethnic Disparities in Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tehranifar, Parisa; Neugut, Alfred I.; Phelan, Jo C.; Link, Bruce G.; Liao, Yuyan; Desai, Manisha; Terry, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although advances in early detection and treatment of cancer improve overall population survival, these advances may not benefit all population groups equally, and may heighten racial/ethnic (R/E) differences in survival. METHODS We identified cancer cases in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, who were ≥ 20 years and diagnosed with one invasive cancer in 1995–1999 (n=580,225). We used 5-year relative survival rates (5Y-RSR) to measure the degree to which mortality from each cancer is amenable to medical interventions (amenability index). We used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate survival differences between each R/E minority group relative to whites, by the overall amenability index, and three levels of amenability (non-amenable, partly and mostly amenable cancers, corresponding to cancers with 5Y-RSR <40%, 40–69% and ≥ 70%, respectively), adjusting for gender, age, disease stage and county-level poverty concentration. RESULTS As amenability increased, R/E differences in cancer survival increased for African Americans, American Indians/Native Alaskans and Hispanics relative to whites. For example, the hazard rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) for African Americans vs. whites from non-amenable, partly amenable and mostly amenable cancers were 1.05 (1.03, 1.07), 1.38 (1.34,1.41), and 1.41 (1.37, 1.46), respectively. Asians/Pacific Islanders had similar or longer survival relative to whites across amenability levels; however, several subgroups experienced increasingly poorer survival with increasing amenability. CONCLUSIONS Cancer survival disparities for most R/E minority populations widen as cancers become more amenable to medical interventions. Efforts in developing cancer control measures must be coupled with specific strategies for reducing the expected disparities. PMID:19789367

  16. Survival Continues to Improve for Most Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... and breast cancers. However, death rates rose for cancers of the liver, pancreas and brain in men and for the liver ... myeloma and leukemia. The lowest survival rates for cancers diagnosed between 2006 and 2012 were: pancreas (8.5 percent survival five years after diagnosis); ...

  17. Fish populations surviving estrogen pollution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Among the most common pollutants that enter the environment after passing municipal wastewater treatment are estrogens, especially the synthetic 17α-ethinylestradiol that is used in oral contraceptives. Estrogens are potent endocrine disruptors at concentrations frequently observed in surface waters. However, new genetic analyses suggest that some fish populations can be self-sustaining even in heavily polluted waters. We now need to understand the basis of this tolerance. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/12/1 PMID:24512617

  18. Dietary influences on survival after ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Christina M; Purdie, David M; Webb, Penelope M; Green, Adèle; Harvey, Philip W; Bain, Christopher J

    2003-08-20

    We evaluated the effects of various food groups and micronutrients in the diet on survival among women who originally participated in a population-based case-control study of ovarian cancer conducted across 3 Australian states between 1990 and 1993. This analysis included 609 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, primarily because there was negligible mortality in women with borderline tumors. The women's usual diet was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Deaths in the cohort were identified using state-based cancer registries and the Australian National Death Index (NDI). Crude 5-year survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier technique, and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained from Cox regression models. After adjusting for important confounding factors, a survival advantage was observed for those who reported higher intake of vegetables in general (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.57-0.99, p-value trend 0.01 for the highest third, compared to the lowest third), and cruciferous vegetables in particular (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.57-0.98, p-value trend 0.03), and among women in the upper third of intake of vitamin E (HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.58-1.01, p-value trend 0.04). Inverse associations were also seen with protein (p-value trend 0.09), red meat (p-value trend 0.06) and white meat (p-value trend 0.07), and modest positive trends (maximum 30% excess) with lactose (p-value trend 0.04), calcium and dairy products. Although much remains to be learned about the influence of nutritional factors after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer, our study suggests the possibility that a diet high in vegetable intake may help improve survival.

  19. Mitochondrial and Postmitochondrial Survival Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Neelu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, however, the molecular mechanisms of resistance to therapy remain unclear. Cellular survival machinery protects mitochondrial integrity against endogenous or exogenous stresses. Prodeath molecules orchestrate around mitochondria to initiate and execute cell death in cancer, and also play an under appreciated role in survival of cancer cells. Prosurvival mechanisms can operate at mitochondrial and postmitochondrial levels to attenuate core apoptotic death program. It is intriguing to explore how prosurvival and prodeath molecules crosstalk to regulate mitochondrial functions leading to increased cancer cell survival. This review describes some putative survival mechanisms at mitochondria, which may play significant role in designing effective agents for cancer prevention and therapy. These survival pathways may also have significance in understanding other human pathophysiological conditions including diabetes, cardiovascular, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24333692

  20. Early Colonoscopy Confers Survival Benefits on Colon Cancer Patients with Pre-Existing Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chieh-Lin Jerry; Yu, Jui-Ting; Chen, Yi-Huei; Lin, Ching-Heng; Hwang, Wen-Li

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the prognostic significance of pre-existing iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and the benefits of early colonoscopy in patients with colon cancer, since these have not been clearly established to date. Using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, we retrieved and retrospectively reviewed the records of patients aged ≥55 years who were diagnosed with colon cancer between 2000 and 2005. The patient cohort was divided into two groups: patients with (n = 1,260) or without (n = 15,912) an IDA diagnosis during ≤18 months preceding the date of colon cancer diagnosis. We found that diabetes (27.9% vs. 20.3%, p<0.0001), cardiovascular disease (61.6% vs. 54.7%, p<0.001), and chronic kidney disease (4.6% vs. 2.2%, p<0.0001) were more common among patients with IDA than among those without IDA. The median overall survival times for patients with IDA and those without IDA were 4.6 and 5.7 years, respectively (p = 0.002). Patients who underwent colonoscopy ≤30 days, 31–90, and ≥91 days after IDA diagnosis showed median overall survival times of 5.79, 4.43, and 4.04 years, respectively (p = 0.003). Delayed colonoscopy was an independent factor associated with poor overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–1.53; p = 0.01). In conclusion, colon cancer patients with IDA were more likely to experience comorbidities than were those without IDA. Pre-existing IDA was a poor prognostic factor in adult men and postmenopausal women who had colon cancer. Early colonoscopy could improve overall survival possibly by facilitating early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24466209

  1. Early colonoscopy confers survival benefits on colon cancer patients with pre-existing iron deficiency anemia: a nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Chieh-Lin Jerry; Yu, Jui-Ting; Chen, Yi-Huei; Lin, Ching-Heng; Hwang, Wen-Li

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the prognostic significance of pre-existing iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and the benefits of early colonoscopy in patients with colon cancer, since these have not been clearly established to date. Using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, we retrieved and retrospectively reviewed the records of patients aged ≥ 55 years who were diagnosed with colon cancer between 2000 and 2005. The patient cohort was divided into two groups: patients with (n = 1,260) or without (n = 15,912) an IDA diagnosis during ≤ 18 months preceding the date of colon cancer diagnosis. We found that diabetes (27.9% vs. 20.3%, p<0.0001), cardiovascular disease (61.6% vs. 54.7%, p<0.001), and chronic kidney disease (4.6% vs. 2.2%, p<0.0001) were more common among patients with IDA than among those without IDA. The median overall survival times for patients with IDA and those without IDA were 4.6 and 5.7 years, respectively (p = 0.002). Patients who underwent colonoscopy ≤ 30 days, 31-90, and ≥ 91 days after IDA diagnosis showed median overall survival times of 5.79, 4.43, and 4.04 years, respectively (p = 0.003). Delayed colonoscopy was an independent factor associated with poor overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.53; p = 0.01). In conclusion, colon cancer patients with IDA were more likely to experience comorbidities than were those without IDA. Pre-existing IDA was a poor prognostic factor in adult men and postmenopausal women who had colon cancer. Early colonoscopy could improve overall survival possibly by facilitating early diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Effect of Psychosocial Factors on Cancer Risk and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial factors such as personality traits and depression may alter immune and endocrine function, with possible effects on cancer incidence and survival. Although these factors have been extensively studied as risk and prognostic factors for cancer, the associations remain unclear. The author used data from prospective cohort studies in population-based and clinical databases to investigate these relations. The findings do not support the hypotheses that personality traits and depression are direct risk factors for cancer and cancer survival. Some researchers have recently reported that cancer affects the psychological status of the partners and family members of cancer patients. The mechanisms underlying this hypothesis imply the existence of not only psychological distress from caregiving and grief but also a shared unhealthy lifestyle. Only a few studies have suggested that major psychosocial problems develop in partners of cancer patients. The present study used nationwide population-based data to investigate depression risk among male partners of women with breast cancer. The results support the hypothesis that such men are at increased risk of depression. In conclusion, the effects of personality traits and depression on cancer risk and survival appear to be extremely small. In addition, partners of cancer patients were at increased risk of depression. Screening partners and family members of cancer patients for depressive symptoms is therefore an important concern for research in psycho-oncology. PMID:24270060

  3. Trends in net survival from head and neck cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Uhry, Zoé; de Raucourt, Dominique; Mazzoleni, Guido; Sánchez, Maria-José; Ligier, Karine

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the trends in 1- and 5-year net survival and the trends in the dynamics of the excess mortality rates in head and neck cancers between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland). The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, the net survival was studied over the 2000-2004 period using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. The results are reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. The analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modelling. There were significant differences between countries in 5-year age-standardized net survivals over the 2000-2004 period, ranging from 33 to 34% in France and Portugal from 42 to 44% in Switzerland and Italy, respectively. The age-standardized net survival improved considerably from 1992 to 2004 in Italy, Spain and Switzerland, but not in France because of lack of improvement in the elderly. The increase in net survival was linked to a decrease in the excess mortality rate up to 3-4 years after diagnosis. The net survival from head and neck cancers improved over the study period, but significant differences were still observed in 2004. Differences in sex ratio and anatomical distribution contributed only partially towards these disparities. Differences in stage at diagnosis, time to treatment and/or proportion of human papillomavirus-related cases are also probably involved in the survival disparities observed. Overall, the prognosis of these tumours remains poor.

  4. Body mass index at diagnosis and breast cancer survival prognosis in clinical trial populations from NRG Oncology/NSABP B-30, B-31, B-34, and B-38

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Reena S.; Swain, Sandra M.; Costantino, Joseph P.; Rastogi, Priya; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Anderson, Stewart J.; Tang, Gong; Geyer, Charles E.; Lembersky, Barry C.; Romond, Edward H.; Paterson, Alexander H.G.; Wolmark, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Background Body mass index (BMI) has been associated with breast cancer (BC) outcomes. However, few studies used clinical trial settings where treatments and outcomes are consistently evaluated and documented. There are also limited data assessing how patient/disease characteristics and treatment may alter the BMI/BC association. Methods We evaluated 15,538 BC participants from four NSABP protocols. B-34 studied early-stage BC patients (N=3,311); B-30 and B-38 included node-positive BC patients (N=5,265 and 4,860); B-31 studied node-positive and HER2-positive BC patients (N=2,102). We used Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate adjusted hazards ratios (HRs) for risk of death and recurrence, and conducted separate analyses by ER-status and treatment group. Results In B-30, increased BMI was significantly related to survival. Compared with BMI<25, HRs were 1.04 for BMI 25–29.9 and 1.18 for BMI≥30 (p=0.02). Separate analyses indicated the significant relationship was only in ER-positive disease (p=0.002) and the sub-group treated with doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (p=0.005). There were no significant trends across BMI for the other three trials. Similar results were found for recurrence. Increased BMI was significantly related to recurrence in B-30 (p=0.03); and the significant relationship was only in ER-positive BCs (p=0.001). Recurrence was also significant among ER-positive disease in B-38 (p=0.03). Conclusions In our investigation, we did not find a consistent relationship between BMI at diagnosis and BC recurrence or death. Impact This work demonstrates that the heterogeneity of BC between different BC populations and the different therapies used to treat them may modify any association that exists between BMI and BC outcome. PMID:26545405

  5. Inbreeding and homozygosity in breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Hauke; Filho, Miguel Inacio da Silva; Woltmann, Andrea; Johansson, Robert; Eyfjörd, Jorunn E; Hamann, Ute; Manjer, Jonas; Enquist-Olsson, Kerstin; Henriksson, Roger; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Chen, Bowang; Huhn, Stefanie; Hemminki, Kari; Lenner, Per; Försti, Asta

    2015-11-12

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) help to understand the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on breast cancer (BC) progression and survival. We performed multiple analyses on data from a previously conducted GWAS for the influence of individual SNPs, runs of homozygosity (ROHs) and inbreeding on BC survival. (I.) The association of individual SNPs indicated no differences in the proportions of homozygous individuals among short-time survivors (STSs) and long-time survivors (LTSs). (II.) The analysis revealed differences among the populations for the number of ROHs per person and the total and average length of ROHs per person and among LTSs and STSs for the number of ROHs per person. (III.) Common ROHs at particular genomic positions were nominally more frequent among LTSs than in STSs. Common ROHs showed significant evidence for natural selection (iHS, Tajima's D, Fay-Wu's H). Most regions could be linked to genes related to BC progression or treatment. (IV.) Results were supported by a higher level of inbreeding among LTSs. Our results showed that an increased level of homozygosity may result in a preference of individuals during BC treatment. Although common ROHs were short, variants within ROHs might favor survival of BC and may function in a recessive manner.

  6. Survival after Abdominoperineal and Sphincter-Preserving Resection in Nonmetastatic Rectal Cancer: A Population-Based Time-Trend and Propensity Score-Matched SEER Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Warschkow, Rene; Ebinger, Sabrina M.; Brunner, Walter; Schmied, Bruno M.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Abdominoperineal resection (APR) has been associated with impaired survival in nonmetastatic rectal cancer patients. It is unclear whether this adverse outcome is due to the surgical procedure itself or is a consequence of tumor-related characteristics. Study Design. Patients were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. The impact of APR compared to coloanal anastomosis (CAA) on survival was assessed by Cox regression and propensity-score matching. Results. In 36,488 patients with rectal cancer resection, the APR rate declined from 31.8% in 1998 to 19.2% in 2011, with a significant trend change in 2004 at 21.6% (P < 0.001). To minimize a potential time-trend bias, survival analysis was limited to patients diagnosed after 2004. APR was associated with an increased risk of cancer-specific mortality after unadjusted analysis (HR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.28–2.03, P < 0.01) and multivariable adjustment (HR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.10–1.76, P < 0.01). After optimal adjustment of highly biased patient characteristics by propensity-score matching, APR was not identified as a risk factor for cancer-specific mortality (HR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.56–1.29, P = 0.456). Conclusions. The current propensity score-adjusted analysis provides evidence that worse oncological outcomes in patients undergoing APR compared to CAA are caused by different patient characteristics and not by the surgical procedure itself. PMID:28197206

  7. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  8. Survival | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  9. Survival and cancer in laboratory mammals exposed to radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Elder, Joe A

    2003-01-01

    This article is a review of the effects of radiofrequency (RF) energy on (1). survival and (2). cancer in the same animal populations having survival data. The literature consisted of 18 studies with survival data, and 16 of these have information on cancer. In one study, a significant decrease in lifespan was observed at 6.8 W/kg but not at 2 W/kg. Thermal stress appears to be the causal factor for the effect on lifespan because the higher dose rate, unlike the lower dose rate, was estimated to increase body temperature significantly. The finding that the lower level was without effect is consistent with the results of a number of recent studies showing that long term, low level exposure to RF energy did not affect survival adversely. Many of these recent studies addressed the cancer issue by histopathological analysis of many organs and tissues following exposure up to 2 years, the average lifetime of rats and mice. Some investigations examined the effect of RF fields from mobile phones on brain cancer, including the progression of chemically induced brain cancer. The results demonstrate that RF exposure did not adversely affect cancer incidence at whole body specific absorption rates (SARs) survival and cancer in laboratory mammals.

  10. Pre-diagnostic 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, VDR and CASR Polymorphisms, and Survival in Patients with Colorectal Cancer in Western European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Fedirko, Veronika; Riboli, Elio; Tjønneland, Anne; Ferrari, Pietro; Olsen, Anja; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J.B.; Norat, Teresa; Jansen, Eugène H.J.M.; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Racine, Antoine; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Teucher, Birgit; Boeing, Heiner; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Grioni, Sara; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Siersema, Peter D.; Peeters, Petra HM; Skeie, Guri; Brustad, Magritt; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte; Garcia, Jose Ramón Quirós; Pérez, Maria José Sánchez; Dorronsoro, Miren; Bonet, Catalina; Palmqvist, Richard; Hallmans, Göran; Key, Timothy J.; Crowe, Francesca; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Romieu, Isabelle; McKay, James; Wark, Petra A.; Romaguera, Dora; Jenab, Mazda

    2012-01-01

    Background Individuals with higher blood 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels have a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC), but the influence of 25(OH)D on mortality after CRC diagnosis is unknown. Methods The association between pre-diagnostic 25(OH)D levels and CRC-specific (N=444) and overall mortality (N=541) was prospectively examined among 1,202 participants diagnosed with CRC between 1992-2003 in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) according to 25(OH)D quintiles and genetic variation within the VDR and CASR genes. Potential dietary, lifestyle and metabolic effect modifiers were also investigated. Results There were 541 deaths, 444 (82%) due to CRC. Mean follow-up was 73 months. In multivariable analysis, higher 25(OH)D levels were associated with a statistically significant reduction in CRC-specific (Ptrend=0.04) and overall mortality (Ptrend=0.01). Participants with 25(OH)D levels in the highest quintile had an adjusted HR of 0.69 (95%CI: 0.50-0.93) for CRC-specific and 0.67 (95%CI: 0.50-0.88) for overall mortality, compared to the lowest quintile. Except for a possible interaction by pre-diagnostic dietary calcium intake (Pinteraction=0.01), no other potential modifying factors related to CRC survival were noted. The VDR (FokI and BsmI) and CASR (rs1801725) genotypes were not associated with survival. Conclusions High pre-diagnostic 25(OH)D levels are associated with improved survival of patients with CRC. Impact Our findings may stimulate further research directed at investigating the effects of blood vitamin D levels before, at, and after CRC diagnosis on outcomes in CRC patients. PMID:22278364

  11. Impact of abiraterone acetate with and without prior docetaxel chemotherapy on the survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Joice; Aprikian, Armen G.; Vanhuyse, Marie; Cury, Fabio L.; Hu, Jason; Prévost, Noémie; Dragomir, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Background: Abiraterone acetate was introduced in Quebec in 2012 for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in patients who had received chemotherapy with docetaxel. This study describes abiraterone use in the early postapproval period and its clinical effectiveness in Quebec, for both patients who had received docetaxel chemotherapy and those who could not receive docetaxel therapy owing to medical reasons. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Quebec public health care administrative databases. Our cohort consisted of patients with mCRPC who received abiraterone between January 2012 and June 2013. Treatment groups were defined as patients who received abiraterone following docetaxel chemotherapy and those who received abiraterone without having had chemotherapy, under the "exception patient" measure. Study outcomes included overall survival, duration of abiraterone therapy and number of hospital days. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate the effectiveness of abiraterone adjusted for several covariates. Results: Our cohort consisted of 303 patients with mCRPC treated with abiraterone (99 after chemotherapy and 204 as exception patients). The median age at initiation of abiraterone therapy was 75.0 for the postchemotherapy group and 80.0 for the exception patient group. The corresponding median survival values were 12 and 14 months (log-rank test p = 0.8). Risk of death was similar in the 2 groups (adjusted hazard ratio 0.89 [95% confidence interval 0.57-1.38]). Interpretation: The effectiveness of abiraterone in older patients who were ineligible for chemotherapy was similar to that of patients with prior docetaxel exposure. Overall, the real-world survival benefits of abiraterone were similar to those in the COU-AA-301 trial.

  12. A minimum version of log-rank test for testing the existence of cancer cure using relative survival data.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binbing

    2012-01-01

    Cancer survival is one of the most important measures to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment and early diagnosis. The ultimate goal of cancer research and patient care is the cure of cancer. As cancer treatments progress, cure becomes a reality for many cancers if patients are diagnosed early and get effective treatment. If a cure does exist for a certain type of cancer, it is useful to estimate the time of cure. For cancers that impose excess risk of mortality, it is informative to understand the difference in survival between cancer patients and the general cancer-free population. In population-based cancer survival studies, relative survival is the standard measure of excess mortality due to cancer. Cure is achieved when the survival of cancer patients is equivalent to that of the general population. This definition of cure is usually called the statistical cure, which is an important measure of burden due to cancer. In this paper, a minimum version of the log-rank test is proposed to test the equivalence of cancer patients' survival using the relative survival data. Performance of the proposed test is evaluated by simulation. Relative survival data from population-based cancer registries in SEER Program are used to examine patients' survival after diagnosis for various major cancer sites.

  13. Palliative resection of the primary tumor is associated with improved overall survival in incurable stage IV colorectal cancer: A nationwide population-based propensity-score adjusted study in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    't Lam-Boer, Jorine; Van der Geest, Lydia G; Verhoef, Cees; Elferink, Marloes E; Koopman, Miriam; de Wilt, Johannes H

    2016-11-01

    As the value of palliative primary tumor resection in stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) is still under debate, the purpose of this population-based study was to investigate if palliative primary tumor resection as the initial treatment after diagnosis was associated with improved overall survival. All patients with stage IV colorectal adenocarcinoma (2008-2011) were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry, and patients undergoing treatment with curative intent (i.e., metastasectomy, radiofrequency ablation and/or hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy), or best supportive care were excluded. After propensity score matching, a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model was performed to determine the association between treatment strategy and mortality. From a total group of 10,371 patients with stage IV CRC, 2,746 patients (26%) underwent an elective palliative resection of the primary tumor, whether or not followed by systemic therapy, and 3,345 patients (32%) were initially treated with palliative systemic therapy. After propensity score matching, median overall survival in these groups was 17.2 months (95% CI 16.3-18.1) and 11.5 months (95% CI 11.0-12.0), respectively. In Cox regression analysis, primary tumor resection was significantly associated with improved overall survival (hazard ratio of death = 0.44 [95% CI 0.35-0.55], p < 0.001). This large population-based study shows an overall survival benefit for patients with incurable stage IV CRC who underwent primary tumor resection as the initial treatment after diagnosis, compared to patients who started systemic therapy with the primary tumor in situ. This result is an argument in favor of resection of the primary tumor, even when patients have little to no symptoms.

  14. Cervical cancer: incidence and survival in migrants within Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Borràs, J M; Sánchez, V; Moreno, V; Izquierdo, A; Viladiu, P

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--This study examined the incidence of cervical cancer and survival rates according to migrant experience of women from different regions of Spain to Girona, Catalonia (Spain). DESIGN--Using data from the population based cancer registry of Girona for the period 1980-89, crude and age adjusted incidence rates were calculated for local-born and first generation migrants from other Spanish regions. The age standardised rate ratio (SRR) was calculated and Cox's regression model was used to adjust survival according to migrant status for age and stage at diagnosis. MAIN RESULTS--The incidence of cervical cancer was significantly higher in first generation Spanish migrants compared with locally born women (SRR: 2.02; 95% CI 1.40:2.92). The stage at diagnosis was more advanced among migrants. Survival probability was significantly associated with stage at diagnosis, but age and region of birth were not. CONCLUSIONS--Migrants from the southern Spanish regions show a twofold excess in the incidence of cervical cancer compared with the Girona-born female population. Cases of cervical cancer in migrants are diagnosed at a more advanced stage and as a consequence have a poorer prognosis. PMID:7798043

  15. Use of Aspirin postdiagnosis improves survival for colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaannet, E; Sampieri, K; Dekkers, O M; de Craen, A J M; van Herk-Sukel, M P P; Lemmens, V; van den Broek, C B M; Coebergh, J W; Herings, R M C; van de Velde, C J H; Fodde, R; Liefers, G J

    2012-01-01

    Background: The preventive role of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin, in particular, on colorectal cancer is well established. More recently, it has been suggested that aspirin may also have a therapeutic role. Aim of the present observational population-based study was to assess the therapeutic effect on overall survival of aspirin/NSAIDs as adjuvant treatment used after the diagnosis of colorectal cancer patients. Methods: Data concerning prescriptions were obtained from PHARMO record linkage systems and all patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (1998–2007) were selected from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry (population-based cancer registry). Aspirin/NSAID use was classified as none, prediagnosis and postdiagnosis and only postdiagnosis. Patients were defined as non-user of aspirin/NSAIDs from the date of diagnosis of the colorectal cancer to the date of first use of aspirin or NSAIDs and user from first use to the end of follow-up. Poisson regression was performed with user status as time-varying exposure. Results: In total, 1176 (26%) patients were non-users, 2086 (47%) were prediagnosis and postdiagnosis users and 1219 (27%) were only postdiagnosis users (total n=4481). Compared with non-users, a survival gain was observed for aspirin users; the adjusted rate ratio (RR) was 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63–0.95; P=0.015). Stratified for colon and rectal, the survival gain was only present in colon cancer (adjusted RR 0.65 (95%CI 0.50–0.84; P=0.001)). For frequent users survival gain was larger (adjusted RR 0.61 (95%CI 0.46–0.81; P=0.001). In rectal cancer, aspirin use was not associated with survival (adjusted RR 1.10 (95%CI 0.79–1.54; P=0.6). The NSAIDs use was associated with decreased survival (adjusted RR 1.93 (95%CI 1.70–2.20; P<0.001). Conclusion: Aspirin use initiated or continued after diagnosis of colon cancer is associated with a lower risk of overall mortality. These findings strongly support initiation of

  16. Human papillomavirus-related esophageal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lanwei; Liu, Shuzheng; Zhang, Shaokai; Chen, Qiong; Zhang, Meng; Quan, Peiliang; Sun, Xi-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified to be related to progression of esophageal cancer. However, the results remain controversial. A meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was therefore conducted to address this issue. Methods: The electronic databases of MEDLINE and Excerpta Medica database were searched till April 30, 2016. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using a random-effects model. Results: Ten studies involving a total of 1184 esophageal cancer cases were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled hazard ratio comparing HPV-positive to HPV-negative esophageal cancers was 1.03 (95% confidence interval 0.78–1.37), which was not significantly correlated with improved survival. However, HPV-16-positive patients might have a significantly favorable survival (hazard ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.44–1.21). Conclusion: The meta-analysis indicated that HPV infection may not be of prognostic utility in the evaluation of factors contributing to esophageal cancer. Further large prospective studies are encouraged to stratify survival analysis by HPV type. PMID:27861358

  17. Cigarette Smoking and Pancreatic Cancer Survival.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chen; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Babic, Ana; Clish, Clary B; Kraft, Peter; Bao, Ying; Qian, Zhi Rong; Rubinson, Douglas A; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward L; Ogino, Shuji; Stampfer, Meir J; Gaziano, John Michael; Sesso, Howard D; Cochrane, Barbara B; Manson, JoAnn E; Fuchs, Charles S; Wolpin, Brian M

    2017-03-30

    Purpose Cigarette smoking is associated with increased incidence of pancreatic cancer. However, few studies have prospectively evaluated the association of smoking with patient survival. Patients and Methods We analyzed survival by smoking status among 1,037 patients from two large US prospective cohort studies diagnosed from 1986 to 2013. Among 485 patients from four prospective US cohorts, we also evaluated survival by prediagnostic circulating levels of cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine that is proportional to tobacco smoke exposure. On the basis of prediagnosis cotinine levels, we classified patients as nonsmokers (< 3.1 ng/mL), light smokers (3.1-20.9 ng/mL), or heavy smokers (≥ 21.0 ng/mL). We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for death by using Cox proportional hazards models, with adjustment for age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, diabetes status, diagnosis year, and cancer stage. Results The multivariable-adjusted HR for death was 1.37 (95% CI, 1.11 to 1.69) comparing current smokers with never smokers ( P = .003). A statistically significant negative trend in survival was observed for increasing pack-years of smoking ( Ptrend = .008), with HR for death of 1.49 (95% CI, 1.05 to 2.10) for > 60 pack-years of smoking versus never smoking. Survival among former smokers was similar to that for never smokers, regardless of time since quitting. Heavy smokers defined by prediagnostic circulating cotinine levels had a multivariable-adjusted HR for death of 1.76 (95% CI, 1.23 to 2.51) compared with nonsmokers. Among patients with circulating cotinine levels measured within 5 years before diagnosis, heavy smokers had a multivariable-adjusted HR for death of 2.47 (95% CI, 1.24 to 4.92) compared with nonsmokers. Conclusion Cigarette smoking was associated with a reduction in survival among patients with pancreatic cancer.

  18. Is cancer survival associated with cancer symptom awareness and barriers to seeking medical help in England? An ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Niksic, Maja; Rachet, Bernard; Duffy, Stephen W; Quaresma, Manuela; Møller, Henrik; Forbes, Lindsay JL

    2016-01-01

    Background: Campaigns aimed at raising cancer awareness and encouraging early presentation have been implemented in England. However, little is known about whether people with low cancer awareness and increased barriers to seeking medical help have worse cancer survival, and whether there is a geographical variation in cancer awareness and barriers in England. Methods: From population-based surveys (n=35 308), using the Cancer Research UK Cancer Awareness Measure, we calculated the age- and sex-standardised symptom awareness and barriers scores for 52 primary care trusts (PCTs). These measures were evaluated in relation to the sex-, age-, and type of cancer-standardised cancer survival index of the corresponding PCT, from the National Cancer Registry, using linear regression. Breast, lung, and bowel cancer survival were analysed separately. Results: Cancer symptom awareness and barriers scores varied greatly between geographical regions in England, with the worst scores observed in socioeconomically deprived parts of East London. Low cancer awareness score was associated with poor cancer survival at PCT level (estimated slope=1.56, 95% CI: 0.56; 2.57). The barriers score was not associated with overall cancer survival, but it was associated with breast cancer survival (estimated slope=−0.66, 95% CI: −1.20; −0.11). Specific barriers, such as embarrassment and difficulties in arranging transport to the doctor's surgery, were associated with worse breast cancer survival. Conclusions: Cancer symptom awareness and cancer survival are associated. Campaigns should focus on improving awareness about cancer symptoms, especially in socioeconomically deprived areas. Efforts should be made to alleviate barriers to seeking medical help in women with symptoms of breast cancer. PMID:27537388

  19. Gender and ethnic differences in incidence and survival of lymphoid neoplasm subtypes in an Asian population: Secular trends of a population-based cancer registry from 1998 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Lim, Raymond Boon Tar; Loy, En Yun; Lim, Gek Hsiang; Zheng, Huili; Chow, Khuan Yew; Lim, Soon Thye

    2015-12-01

    Descriptive epidemiology on incidence and survival by lymphoid neoplasm (LN) subtypes using the 2008 World Health Organisation (WHO) classification remained limited in Asia. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether gender and ethnic differences in incidence and survival of LN subtypes existed using the Singapore Cancer Registry (SCR) from 1998 to 2012. We derived age standardised incidence rates (ASIRs) by the direct standardisation method and 5-year relative survival (RSR) by the Ederer II method and period approach. Five-year observed survival (OS) was obtained for each ethnicity. Malays had the highest ASIR of total LNs among the three ethnicities for each time period. The largest increase in 5-year RSR subtypes was follicular lymphoma from 43.8% in 1998-2002 to 82.3% in 2008-2012; followed by chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL)/small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) from 48.1% in 1998-2002 to 77.9% in 2008-2012. Although males had higher incidence than females in each time period, females had greater 5-year RSR for follicular lymphoma (89.8% in 2008-2012 for females vs. 76.6% in 2008-2012 for males) and CLL/SLL (78.7% in 2008-2012 for females vs. 76.7% in 2008-2012 for males). All three ethnicities experienced an overall increase in 5-year OS for mature B-cell lymphoma, with Indians experiencing the greatest increase (37.1% in 1998-2002 to 61.1% in 2008-2012), followed by Malays (30.8% in 1998-2002 to 48.7% in 2008-2012) and then Chinese (36.4% in 1998-2002 to 51.3% in 2008-2012). Our study demonstrated that improved mature B-cell lymphoma survival was not only observed in the West, but also in Singapore.

  20. Inherited Determinants of Ovarian Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Ellen L.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Armasu, Sebastian M.; White, Kristin L.; Keeney, Gary L.; Cliby, William A.; Rider, David N.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Jones, Monica B.; Peethambaram, Prema P.; Lancaster, Johnathan M.; Olson, Janet E.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Hartmann, Lynn C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Due to variation of outcome among cases, we sought to examine whether overall survival in ovarian cancer was associated with common inherited variants in 227 candidate genes from ovarian cancer-related pathways including angiogenesis, inflammation, detoxification, glycosylation, one-carbon transfer, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, and cellular senescence. Experimental Design Blood samples were obtained from 325 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic from 1999 to 2006. During a median follow-up of 3.8 years (range, 0.1 – 8.6 years), 157 deaths were observed. Germline DNA was analyzed at 1,416 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). For all patients, and for 203 with serous subtype, we assessed the overall significance of each gene and pathway, and estimated risk of death via hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results Variation within angiogenesis was most strongly associated with survival time overall (p=0.03) and among patients with serous cancer (p=0.05), particularly for EIF2B5 rs4912474 (all patients HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.54-0.89, p=0.004), VEGFC rs17697305 (serous subtype HR 2.29, 95% CI 1.34-3.92, p=0.003), and four SNPs in VHL. Variation within the inflammation pathway was borderline significant (all patients, p=0.09), and SNPs in CCR3, IL1B, IL18, CCL2, and ALOX5 which correlated with survival time are worthy of follow-up. Conclusion An extensive multiple-pathway assessment found evidence that inherited differences may play a role in outcome of ovarian cancer patients, particularly in genes within the angiogenesis and inflammation pathways. Our work supports efforts to target such mediators for therapeutic gain. PMID:20103664

  1. Practices That Reduce the Latina Survival Disparity After Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, J. Emilio; Ang, Alfonzo; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Latina breast cancer patients are 20 percent more likely to die within 5 years after diagnosis compared with white women, even though they have a lower incidence of breast cancer, lower general mortality rates, and some better health behaviors. Existing data only examine disparities in the utilization of breast cancer care; this research expands the study question to which utilization factors drive the shorter survival in Latina women compared with white women. Methods This longitudinal linked Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort study examined early stage breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1992 and 2000 and followed for 5–11 years after diagnosis (N=44,999). Modifiable utilization factors included consistent visits to primary care providers and to specialists after diagnosis, consistent post-diagnosis mammograms, and receipt of initial care consistent with current standards of care. Results Of the four utilization factors potentially driving this disparity, a lack of consistent post-diagnosis mammograms was the strongest driver of the Latina breast cancer survival disparity. Consistent mammograms attenuated the hazard of death from 23% [hazard ratio, HR, (95% confidence interval, 95%CI)=1.23 (1.1,1.4)] to a nonsignificant 12% [HR (95%CI)=1.12 (0.7,1.3)] and reduced the excess hazard of death in Latina women by 55%. Effect modification identified that visits to primary care providers have a greater protective impact on the survival of Latina compared to white women [HR (95%CI)=0.9 (0.9,0.9)]. Conclusions We provide evidence that undetected new or recurrent breast cancers due to less consistent post-diagnosis mammograms contribute substantially to the long-observed Latina survival disadvantage. Interventions involving primary care providers may be especially beneficial to this population. PMID:24106867

  2. Five-Year Cancer Survival Rates in Oklahoma from 1997 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Janis; Gandhi, Krupa; Pate, Anne; Janitz, Amanda; Anderson, Amber; Kinnard, Robin; Ding, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study evaluated the five-year observed survival rates of American Indians/Alaskan Native, African American, and white cancer patients among various demographic characteristics in Oklahoma focusing on lung and bronchus, colon and rectum, female breast, and prostate for the cancer patients diagnosed between 1997 and 2008. Methods The five-year observed survival rates were calculated for overall cancer and specific cancer sites, using Kaplan-Meier method with data from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry. Results Overall, 51.5% patients diagnosed with cancer survived for five years. For specific sites we found: 79.2% for female breast cancer survived; 77.5% for prostate cancer; 12.9% for lung and bronchus cancer; and 49.9% for colorectal cancer. Conclusions The five-year observed survival rates in Oklahoma were consistent with national trends. Overall, cancer survival seems to be improving over time, but there remains disparity with the AA and AI/AN populations in contrast to whites in Oklahoma. PMID:27890941

  3. Doubly robust estimator for net survival rate in analyses of cancer registry data.

    PubMed

    Komukai, Sho; Hattori, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    Cancer population studies based on cancer registry databases are widely conducted to address various research questions. In general, cancer registry databases do not collect information on cause of death. The net survival rate is defined as the survival rate if a subject would not die for any causes other than cancer. This counterfactual concept is widely used for the analyses of cancer registry data. Perme, Stare, and Estève (2012) proposed a nonparametric estimator of the net survival rate under the assumption that the censoring time is independent of the survival time and covariates. Kodre and Perme (2013) proposed an inverse weighting estimator for the net survival rate under the covariate-dependent censoring. An alternative approach to estimating the net survival rate under covariate-dependent censoring is to apply a regression model for the conditional net survival rate given covariates. In this article, we propose a new estimator for the net survival rate. The proposed estimator is shown to be doubly robust in the sense that it is consistent at least one of the regression models for survival time and for censoring time. We examine the theoretical and empirical properties of our proposed estimator by asymptotic theory and simulation studies. We also apply the proposed method to cancer registry data for gastric cancer patients in Osaka, Japan.

  4. Association of Breast Cancer Risk loci with Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Giles, Graham G.; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E.; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J.; Joshi, Amit D.; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele=0.70; 95% CI: 0.58–0.85; Ptrend=2.84×10−4; HRheterozygotes=0.71; 95% CI: 0.55–0.92; HRhomozygotes=0.48; 95% CI: 0.31–0.76; P2DF=1.45×10−3). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04–1.15; Ptrend=6.6×10−4; HRheterozygotes=0.96 95% CI: 0.90–1.03; HRhomozygotes= 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09–1.35; P2DF=1.25×10−4). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. PMID:25611573

  5. Predictors of survival of natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, in a non-Asian population: a single cancer centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Jule; Serrano, Mariana; Lopez, Lourdes; Pacheco, Cristian; Quintana, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Background Natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL), part of T-cell and NK-cell neoplasms in the World Health Organisation (WHO) classification, is an aggressive lymphoma with poor prognosis more predominantly seen in Asian and South American countries. This study evaluates the factors associated with survival among patients with newly diagnosed NKTCL in Peru. Methods Information was abstracted from medical records (MR) for all NKTCL patients >13 years of age at the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas (INEN) between 2002 and 2011. The estimate of the survival curves was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the difference was computed by the log-rank test. Results Around 226 MR were reviewed, 153 met the selection criteria, the median age was 40 years (14–84). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 20 months, five year PFS was 42.6%, univariable analysis (UA) showed statistical significance (p < 0.05) for male sex, non-nasal primary site, advanced clinical stages, B symptoms, poor performance status, regional nodal involvement (RNI). In the multivariate analysis the only poor prognostic factors was primary non-nasal (Hazard ratio (HR) = 2.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.43– 4.02, P = 0.01). The median overall survival (OS) was 49 months, five year OS was 48.9%, UA showed statistical significance for non-nasal primary site, advanced clinical stages, B symptoms, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) > normal, RNI and local tumour invasion. In the multivariate analysis, primary non-nasal was the only poor prognostic factor with HR = 2.57, 95% CI = 1.37–4.83, P = 0.03. Conclusions In Peru, OS of NKTCL is similar to other countries. This result suggests that non-nasal NKTCL is the only poor prognostic factor of OS and PFS. PMID:27994644

  6. Identification of Novel Genetic Markers of Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Kraft, Peter; Canisius, Sander; Chen, Constance; Khan, Sofia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lush, Michael; Kar, Siddhartha; Beesley, Jonathan; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Leunen, Karin; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A.; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Humphreys, Keith; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hamann, Ute; Kabisch, Maria; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Margolin, Sara; Kristensen, Vessela; Nord, Silje; Evans, D. Gareth; Abraham, Jean E.; Earl, Helena M.; Hiller, Louise; Dunn, Janet A.; Bowden, Sarah; Berg, Christine; Campa, Daniele; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Willett, Walter; Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer–specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large meta-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference panel from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also carried out subtype-specific analyses based on 6881 estrogen receptor (ER)–negative patients (920 events) and 23059 ER-positive patients (1333 events). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We identified one new locus (rs2059614 at 11q24.2) associated with survival in ER-negative breast cancer cases (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 2.47, P = 1.91 x 10–8). Genotyping a subset of 2113 case patients, of which 300 were ER negative, provided supporting evidence for the quality of the imputation. The association in this set of case patients was stronger for the observed genotypes than for the imputed genotypes. A second locus (rs148760487 at 2q24.2) was associated at genome-wide statistical significance in initial analyses; the association was similar in ER-positive and ER-negative case patients. Here the results of genotyping suggested that the finding was less robust. Conclusions: This is currently the largest study investigating genetic variation associated with breast cancer survival. Our results have potential clinical implications, as they confirm that germline genotype can provide prognostic information in addition to standard tumor prognostic factors. PMID:25890600

  7. Increasing Disadvantages in Cancer Survival in New Zealand Compared to Australia, between 2000-05 and 2006-10.

    PubMed

    Elwood, J Mark; Aye, Phyu Sin; Tin Tin, Sandar

    2016-01-01

    New Zealand has lower cancer survival compared to its neighbour Australia. If this were due to long established differences between the two patient populations, it might be expected to be either constant in time, or decreasing, as improving health services deals with inequities. In this study we compared trends in relative cancer survival ratios in New Zealand and Australia between 2000-05 and 2006-10, using data from the New Zealand Cancer Registry and the Australian Institute for Health and Welfare. Over this period, Australia showed significant improvements (6.0% in men, 3.0% in women) in overall 5-year cancer survival, with substantial increases in survival from major cancer sites such as lung, bowel, prostate, and breast cancers. New Zealand had only a 1.8% increase in cancer survival in men and 1.3% in women, with non-significant changes in survival from lung and bowel cancers, although there were increases in survival from prostate and breast cancers. For all cancers combined, and for lung and bowel cancer, the improvements in survival and the greater improvements in Australia were mainly in 1-year survival, suggesting factors related to diagnosis and presentation. For breast cancer, the improvements were similar in each country and seen in survival after the first year. The findings underscore the need to accelerate the efforts to improve early diagnosis and optimum treatment for New Zealand cancer patients to catch up with the progress in Australia.

  8. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  9. Could Grilled, Smoked Meats Lower Survival After Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Could Grilled, Smoked Meats Lower Survival After Breast Cancer? Study can't prove cause and effect, but ... and smoked meats could increase the risk of breast cancer. Now, a new study finds these cooking methods ...

  10. Long-Term Survival and Risk of Second Cancers After Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Tatsuya; Kato, Shingo; Sato, Shinichiro; Fukuhisa, Kenjiro; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Arai, Tatsuo

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of second cancers after cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy for Asian populations. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 2,167 patients with cervical cancer undergoing radiotherapy between 1961 and 1986. Intracavitary brachytherapy was performed with high-dose rate source (82%) or low-dose rate source (12%). Relative risk (RR), absolute excess risk (AR), and cumulative risk of second cancer were calculated using the Japanese disease expectancy table. For 1,031 patients, the impact of smoking habit on the increasing risk of second cancer was also evaluated. Results: The total number of person-years of follow-up was 25,771, with 60 patients being lost to follow-up. Among the 2,167 patients, 1,063 (49%) survived more than 10 years. Second cancers were observed in 210 patients, representing a significant 1.2-fold risk (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.4) of developing second cancer compared with the general population, 1.6% excess risk per person per decade of follow-up, and elevating cumulative risk up to 23.8% (95% CI, 20.3-27.3) at 30 years after radiotherapy. The RR of second cancer was 1.6-fold for patients with the smoking habit and 1.4-fold for those without. Conclusions: Small but significant increased risk of second cancer was observed among Japanese women with cervical cancer mainly treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy. Considering the fact that about half of the patients survived more than 10 years, the benefit of radiotherapy outweighs the risk of developing second cancer.

  11. Survival of mountain quail translocated from two distinct source populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troy, Ronald J.; Coates, Peter S.; Connelly, John W.; Gillette, Gifford; Delehanty, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Translocation of mountain quail (Oreortyx pictus) to restore viable populations to their former range has become a common practice. Because differences in post-release vital rates between animals from multiple source populations has not been well studied, wildlife and land managers may arbitrarily choose the source population or base the source population on immediate availability when planning translocation projects. Similarly, an understanding of the optimal proportion of individuals from different age and sex classes for translocation would benefit translocation planning. During 2006 and 2007, we captured and translocated 125 mountain quail from 2 ecologically distinct areas: 38 from southern California and 87 from southwestern Oregon. We released mountain quail in the Bennett Hills of south-central Idaho. We radio-marked and monitored a subsample of 58 quail and used them for a 2-part survival analysis. Cumulative survival probability was 0.23 ± 0.05 (SE) at 150 days post-release. We first examined an a priori hypothesis (model) that survival varied between the 2 distinct source populations. We found that source population did not explain variation in survival. This result suggests that wildlife managers have flexibility in selecting source populations for mountain quail translocation efforts. In a post hoc examination, we pooled the quail across source populations and evaluated differences in survival probabilities between sex and age classes. The most parsimonious model indicated that adult male survival was substantially less than survival rates of other mountain quail age and sex classes (i.e., interaction between sex and age). This result suggests that translocation success could benefit by translocating yearling males rather than adult males, perhaps because adult male breeding behavior results in vulnerability to predators

  12. Cancer Survival: An Overview of Measures, Uses, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Noone, Anne-Michelle; Howlader, Nadia; Cho, Hyunsoon; Keel, Gretchen E.; Garshell, Jessica; Woloshin, Steven; Schwartz, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Survival statistics are of great interest to patients, clinicians, researchers, and policy makers. Although seemingly simple, survival can be confusing: there are many different survival measures with a plethora of names and statistical methods developed to answer different questions. This paper aims to describe and disseminate different survival measures and their interpretation in less technical language. In addition, we introduce templates to summarize cancer survival statistic organized by their specific purpose: research and policy versus prognosis and clinical decision making. PMID:25417231

  13. Improving Oral Cancer Survival: The Role of Dental Providers

    PubMed Central

    MESSADI, DIANA V.; WILDER-SMITH, PETRA; WOLINSKY, LAWRENCE

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer accounts for 2 percent to 4 percent of all cancers diagnosed each year in the United States. In contrast to other cancers, the overall U.S. survival rate from oral cancer has not improved during the past 50 years, mostly due to late-stage diagnosis. Several noninvasive oral cancer detection techniques that emerged in the past decade will be discussed, with a brief overview of most common oral cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:19998655

  14. Estimating the loss in expectation of life due to cancer using flexible parametric survival models.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Therese M-L; Dickman, Paul W; Eloranta, Sandra; Lambe, Mats; Lambert, Paul C

    2013-12-30

    A useful summary measure for survival data is the expectation of life, which is calculated by obtaining the area under a survival curve. The loss in expectation of life due to a certain type of cancer is the difference between the expectation of life in the general population and the expectation of life among the cancer patients. This measure is used little in practice as its estimation generally requires extrapolation of both the expected and observed survival. A parametric distribution can be used for extrapolation of the observed survival, but it is difficult to find a distribution that captures the underlying shape of the survival function after the end of follow-up. In this paper, we base our extrapolation on relative survival, because it is more stable and reliable. Relative survival is defined as the observed survival divided by the expected survival, and the mortality analogue is excess mortality. Approaches have been suggested for extrapolation of relative survival within life-table data, by assuming that the excess mortality has reached zero (statistical cure) or has stabilized to a constant. We propose the use of flexible parametric survival models for relative survival, which enables estimating the loss in expectation of life on individual level data by making these assumptions or by extrapolating the estimated linear trend at the end of follow-up. We have evaluated the extrapolation from this model using data on four types of cancer, and the results agree well with observed data.

  15. Lung cancer survival in Norway, 1997-2011: from nihilism to optimism.

    PubMed

    Nilssen, Yngvar; Strand, Trond Eirik; Fjellbirkeland, Lars; Bartnes, Kristian; Møller, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    We examine changes in survival and patient-, tumour- and treatment-related factors among resected and nonresected lung cancer patients, and identify subgroups with the largest and smallest survival improvements.National population-based data from the Cancer Registry of Norway, Statistics Norway and the Norwegian Patient Register were linked for lung cancer patients diagnosed during 1997-2011. The 1- and 5-year relative survival were estimated, and Cox proportional hazard regression, adjusted for selected patient characteristics, was used to assess prognostic factors for survival in lung cancer patients overall and stratified by resection status.We identified 34 157 patients with lung cancer. The proportion of histological diagnoses accompanied by molecular genetics testing increased from 0% to 26%, while those accompanied by immunohistochemistry increased from 8% to 26%. The 1-year relative survival among nonresected and resected patients increased from 21.7% to 34.2% and 75.4% to 91.5%, respectively. The improved survival remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, stage and histology. The largest improvements in survival occurred among resected and adenocarcinoma patients, while patients ≥80 years experienced the smallest increase.Lung cancer survival has increased considerably in Norway. The explanation is probably multifactorial, including improved attitude towards diagnostic work-up and treatment, and more accurate diagnostic testing that allows for improved selection for resection and improved treatment options.

  16. Site-specific associations between miRNA expression and survival in colorectal cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Pellatt, Daniel F.; Mullany, Lila E.; Stevens, John R.; Wolff, Erica; Hoffman, Michael D.; Wolff, Roger K.; Samowitz, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small non-coding RNA involved in cellular processes, including cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Thus, miRNA expression may alter survival after diagnosis with colorectal cancer (CRC). Results Individuals diagnosed with stage 1 or stage 2 rectal cancer had worse survival than colon cancer cases diagnosed at stage 1 or stage 2. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, no miRNAs were significantly associated with disease stage. Two miRNAs infrequently expressed in the population and not previously reported were associated with survival after diagnosis with colon cancer (miR-1 HR 2.17 95% CI 1.41, 3.36; and miR-101-3p HR 3.51 95% CI 1.72, 7.15). Among those diagnosed with rectal cancer, 201 miRNAs were associated with survival when the FDR q value was < 0.05. Assessment of 105 previously reported miRNAs associated with prognosis showed that four miRNAs influenced colon cancer survival and 17 influenced survival after a diagnosis with rectal cancer when raw p values were considered. Patients and Methods This study includes data from population-based studies of CRC conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. A total of 1893 carcinoma and normal paired colorectal mucosa tissue samples were run using the Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V19.0. We assessed miRNA differential expression between paired carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa tissue with CRC- specific survival evaluating stage and site-specific associations after adjusting for age, sex, microsatellite instability tumor status, and AJCC stage. Conclusions MiRNAs dysregulated for both colon and rectal cancer had a greater impact on survival after a diagnosis with rectal cancer. PMID:27517623

  17. Pathobiology of breast cancer: hypothesis of biological predetermination and long-term survival.

    PubMed

    Vorherr, H

    1981-08-03

    Th pathobiology of breast cancer is complex: clinically "early" breast cancer may be tumor biologically "late" progressing rapidly toward death. Accordingly, it has been suggested that two different breast cancer populations (slow tumor growth and long survival-fast tumor growth and short survival) exist, which cannot be identified by pathohistological criteria. However, these "populations" are most likely either patients with localized disease and occult metastases (long survival) or with diagnosable regional and occult or overt systemic spread (short survival). Since even small tumors (0.1 to 0.3 cm in diameter) can spread systemically, in most patients breast cancer upon clinical diagnosis may be considered an inevitably lethal disease. Present treatment modalities can only improve the quality of life and delay death, even though the overall long-term survival rates of breast cancer are better or at least equal to those of other cancers. However, with other cancers (Table 2) it is decided within the first 5 years which patients are cured because the survival rates for 5, 10, 15, and 20 years are similar. In contrast, survival rates of patients with breast cancer steadily decline and there is no point in time when patients can feel really safe; this is indicative of a peculiar tumor pathobiology of this disease, the nature of which remains to be investigated. Progress in the fight against breast cancer is only possible by application of sensitive physical, reliable immunological, and specific biochemical methods for early diagnosis and development of efficient therapeutic modalities for inhibition of growth or complete eradication of metastasized cancer cells.

  18. Incidence and survival of childhood cancer cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2000 in Hiroshima City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Hiromi; Nishi, Nobuo; Kuwabara, Masao; Ninomiya, Motoki; Arita, Ken-ichi; Yasui, Wataru; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Kodama, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    There have been few studies on cancer incidence and survival among children in Japan. Childhood cancer cases in Hiroshima City can be ascertained almost perfectly in terms of completeness and validity as both a population-based cancer registry and a tissue registry cover the whole area. We report here recent incidence and survival of childhood cancer in Hiroshima City. Subjects were cancer patients less than 15 years of age in Hiroshima City registered in the Hiroshima City Cancer Registry and/or the Hiroshima Prefecture Tumor Registry (tissue registry) between 1998 and 2000. Cancer incidence in Hiroshima City was calculated for 12 diagnostic groups according to the International Classification of Childhood Cancer, and compared with general incidence in Japan. Five-year survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. There were 63 children who had a cancer newly diagnosed during 1998-2000, with only one death-certificate-only case (1.6%). Age-standardized incidence rates (per million) were 144.3 for boys and 93.9 for girls. Leukemia was the most frequent (29%) among the 12 diagnostic groups. There were 13 cancer deaths during this period and five-year survival was 79% (95% Confidence Interval: 67%-87%). Childhood cancer incidence was slightly higher than that for all of Japan, but the relative distribution of patients by diagnostic group was compatible with the general pattern. Both of these observations might be due to the high quality of the tumor and tissue registries.

  19. Personality and cancer survival: the Miyagi cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, N; Tsubono, Y; Nishino, Y; Hosokawa, T; Fukudo, S; Shibuya, D; Akizuki, N; Yoshikawa, E; Kobayakawa, M; Fujimori, M; Saito-Nakaya, K; Uchitomi, Y; Tsuji, I

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that personality plays a role in cancer outcome in a population-based prospective cohort study in Japan. In July 1990, 41 442 residents of Japan completed a short form of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised and a questionnaire on various health habits, and between January 1993 and December 1997, 890 incident cases of cancer were identified among them. These 890 cases were followed up until March 2001, and a total of 356 deaths from all causes was identified among them. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of death according to four score levels on each of four personality subscales (extraversion, neuroticism, psychoticism, and lie), with adjustment for potential confounding factors. Multivariable HRs of deaths from all causes for individuals in the highest score level on each personality subscale compared with those at the lowest level were 1.0 for extraversion (95% CI=0.8–1.4; Trend P=0.73), 1.1 for neuroticism (0.8–1.6; Trend P=0.24), 1.2 for psychoticism (0.9–1.6; Trend P=0.29), and 1.0 for lie (0.7–1.5; Trend P=0.90). The data obtained in this population-based prospective cohort study in Japan do not support the hypothesis that personality is associated with cancer survival. PMID:15900301

  20. Trends in 5-year survival rates among breast cancer patients by hormone receptor status and stage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Linden, Hannah M.; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Li, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Improvement in breast cancer survival has been observed in recent decades in the U.S., but it is unclear if similar survival gains are consistent across breast cancer subtypes, especially with regards to more advanced stages of the disease. Methods Data were from 13 population-based cancer registries participating in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program, consisting of women between 20–79 years of age diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 1992 and 2008. 2-year (1992–2008) and 5-year (1992–2006) breast cancer cause-specific survival rates were calculated and stratified by estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) status, stage and race. Annual percent changes in survival rates were assessed. Results From 1992 through 1998–1999, 5-year and 2-year cause specific survival rates significantly improved across ER+/PR+, ER−/PR− and ER+/PR− subtypes, with an annual increase ranging from 0.5%–1.0%. From 1998–1999 to 2006, different patterns were observed by ER/PR subtypes with survival rates slightly improving for ER+/PR+, continuing to improve at a rate of 0.5% per year for ER−/PR−, and dropping 0.3% annually for ER+/PR− No significant survival gains were experienced by patients with ER−/PR+ cancer during the study period. In terms of advanced diseases, greatest annual increases in survival rates were seen for patients with stage III–IV ER+/PR+ and ER−/PR− tumors but less progress was observed for advanced ER+/PR− breast cancers. Conclusion Steady improvements in survival rates for breast cancer have been achieved over the past several decades. However, 5-year survival rates for stage IV disease remained dismally below 20% for most ER/PR subtypes. PMID:25164974

  1. Socioeconomic deprivation and cancer survival in Germany: an ecological analysis in 200 districts in Germany.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lina; Eberle, Andrea; Emrich, Katharina; Gondos, Adam; Holleczek, Bernd; Kajüter, Hiltraud; Maier, Werner; Nennecke, Alice; Pritzkuleit, Ron; Brenner, Hermann

    2014-06-15

    Although socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival have been demonstrated both within and between countries, evidence on the variation of the inequalities over time past diagnosis is sparse. Furthermore, no comprehensive analysis of socioeconomic differences in cancer survival in Germany has been conducted. Therefore, we analyzed variations in cancer survival for patients diagnosed with one of the 25 most common cancer sites in 1997-2006 in ten population-based cancer registries in Germany (covering 32 million inhabitants). Patients were assigned a socioeconomic status according to the district of residence at diagnosis. Period analysis was used to derive 3-month, 5-year and conditional 1-year and 5-year age-standardized relative survival for 2002-2006 for each deprivation quintile in Germany. Relative survival of patients living in the most deprived district was compared to survival of patients living in all other districts by model-based period analysis. For 21 of 25 cancer sites, 5-year relative survival was lower in the most deprived districts than in all other districts combined. The median relative excess risk of death over the 25 cancer sites decreased from 1.24 in the first 3 months to 1.16 in the following 9 months to 1.08 in the following 4 years. Inequalities persisted after adjustment for stage. These major regional socioeconomic inequalities indicate a potential for improving cancer care and survival in Germany. Studies on individual-level patient data with access to treatment information should be conducted to examine the reasons for these socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival in more detail.

  2. Population demographics, survival, and reporduction: Alaska sea otter research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monson, D.H.; Bodkin, James L.; Doak, D.F.; Estes, J.A.; Tinker, M.T.; Siniff, D.B.; Maldini, Daniela; Calkins, Donald; Atkinson, Shannon; Meehan, Rosa

    2004-01-01

    The fundamental force behind population change is the balance between age-specific survival and reproductive rates. Thus, understanding population demographics is crucial when trying to interpret trends in population change over time. For many species, demographic rates change as the population’s status (i.e., relative to prey resources) varies. Indices of body condition indicative of individual energy reserves can be a useful gauge of population status. Integrated studies designed to measure (1) population trends; (2) current population status; and (3) demographic rates will provide the most complete picture of the factors driving observed population changes. In particular, estimates of age specific survival and reproduction in conjunction with measures of population change can be integrated into population matrix models useful in explaining observed trends. We focus here on the methods used to measure demographic rates in sea otters, and note the importance of comparable methods between studies. Next, we review the current knowledge of the influence of population status on demographic parameters. We end with examples of the power of matrix modeling as a tool to integrate various types of demographic information for detecting otherwise hard to detect changes in demographic parameters.

  3. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  4. Survival rate after emergency diagnosis of cancer is 'shocking'.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    ONE QUARTER of patients diagnosed with cancer after attending a London emergency department will die within two months, latest research suggests. Study author Kathy Pritchard-Jones, chief medical officer for London Cancer, said the 'shocking figures' confirm that early diagnosis makes a huge difference to the chances of surviving cancer.

  5. Cancer survival in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, R

    2011-01-01

    The dearth of reliable survival statistics from developing countries was very evident until the mid-1990s. This prompted the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) to undertake a project that facilitated hands-on-training and thereby transfer of knowledge and technology on cancer survival analysis to a majority of researchers from the participating population-based cancer registries, which culminated in the publication of the first volume of the IARC scientific publication on Cancer Survival in Developing Countries in 1998. The present study is the second in the series with wider geographical coverage and is based on data from 27 registries in 14 countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America. The calendar period of registration of incident cases for the present study ranges between 1990 and 2001. Data on 564 606 cases of 1-56 cancer sites from different registries are reported. Data from eleven registries were utilized for eliciting survival trend and seventeen registries for reporting survival by clinical extent of disease. Besides chapters on every registry and general chapters on methodology, database and overview, the availability of online comparative statistics on cancer survival data by participating registries or cancer site in the form of tables or graphs is an added feature (available online at http://survcan.iarc.fr).

  6. Clinical features and overall survival among elderly cancer patients in a tertiary cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Bugano, Diogo Diniz Gomes; del Giglio, Auro; Kaliks, Rafael Aliosha; Karnakis, Theodora; Pontes, Lucíola de Barros

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the epidemiological profile and overall survival of a large population of elderly individuals diagnosed with solid tumors in a tertiary hospital. Methods This retrospective study included patients aged >65 years, diagnosed with solid tumors between January 2007 and December 2011, at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil. The medical records were reviewed to obtain information about clinical variables and overall survival. Results A total of 806 patients were identified, and 58.4% were male. Mean age was 74 years (65 to 99 years). The most common types were prostate (22%), colorectal (21%), breast (19%), and lung cancer (13%), followed by bladder (8%), pancreas (6%), and other types (11%). The majority of patients were diagnosed at early stage disease. After a median follow-up of 27 months (15 to 45 months), 29% of the patients (234/806) died, predominantly in the group older than 70 years. For the entire cohort, the median 2-year survival rate was 71%. Median overall survival was not reached within the study period. In a multivariate analysis, age (HR: 1.35; 95%CI: 1.25-1.45; p<0.001) and disease stage (HR: 1.93; 95%CI: 1.75-2.14; p<0.001) were independent negative predictors of poor survival. Conclusion The most prevalent tumors were prostate, colorectal, breast, and lung cancer, with the larger proportion diagnosed at initial stages, reflecting the great number of patients alive at last follow-up. PMID:26676269

  7. Landmark risk prediction of residual life for breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Parast, Layla; Cai, Tianxi

    2013-09-10

    The importance of developing personalized risk prediction estimates has become increasingly evident in recent years. In general, patient populations may be heterogenous and represent a mixture of different unknown subtypes of disease. When the source of this heterogeneity and resulting subtypes of disease are unknown, accurate prediction of survival may be difficult. However, in certain disease settings, the onset time of an observable short-term event may be highly associated with these unknown subtypes of disease and thus may be useful in predicting long-term survival. One approach to incorporate short-term event information along with baseline markers for the prediction of long-term survival is through a landmark Cox model, which assumes a proportional hazards model for the residual life at a given landmark point. In this paper, we use this modeling framework to develop procedures to assess how a patient's long-term survival trajectory may change over time given good short-term outcome indications along with prognosis on the basis of baseline markers. We first propose time-varying accuracy measures to quantify the predictive performance of landmark prediction rules for residual life and provide resampling-based procedures to make inference about such accuracy measures. Simulation studies show that the proposed procedures perform well in finite samples. Throughout, we illustrate our proposed procedures by using a breast cancer dataset with information on time to metastasis and time to death. In addition to baseline clinical markers available for each patient, a chromosome instability genetic score, denoted by CIN25, is also available for each patient and has been shown to be predictive of survival for various types of cancer. We provide procedures to evaluate the incremental value of CIN25 for the prediction of residual life and examine how the residual life profile changes over time. This allows us to identify an informative landmark point, t(0) , such that

  8. A cohort study on mental disorders, stage of cancer at diagnosis and subsequent survival

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin-Kuo; Hayes, Richard D; Broadbent, Matthew T M; Hotopf, Matthew; Davies, Elizabeth; Møller, Henrik; Stewart, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the stage at cancer diagnosis and survival after cancer diagnosis among people served by secondary mental health services, compared with other local people. Setting Using the anonymised linkage between a regional monopoly secondary mental health service provider in southeast London of four London boroughs, Croydon, Lambeth, Lewisham and Southwark, and a population-based cancer register, a historical cohort study was constructed. Participants A total of 28 477 cancer cases aged 15+ years with stage of cancer recorded at diagnosis were identified. Among these, 2206 participants had been previously assessed or treated in secondary mental healthcare before their cancer diagnosis and 125 for severe mental illness (schizophrenia, schizoaffective or bipolar disorders). Primary and secondary outcome measures Stage when cancer was diagnosed and all-cause mortality after cancer diagnosis among cancer cases registered in the geographical area of southeast London. Results Comparisons between people with and without specific psychiatric diagnosis in the same residence area for risks of advanced stage of cancer at diagnosis and general survival after cancer diagnosed were analysed using logistic and Cox models. No associations were found between specific mental disorder diagnoses and beyond local spread of cancer at presentation. However, people with severe mental disorders, depression, dementia and substance use disorders had significantly worse survival after cancer diagnosis, independent of cancer stage at diagnosis and other potential confounders. Conclusions Previous findings of associations between mental disorders and cancer mortality are more likely to be accounted for by differences in survival after cancer diagnosis rather than by delayed diagnosis. PMID:24477317

  9. Incidence, mortality and survival of female breast cancer during 2003-2011 in Jiangsu province, China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinran; Han, Renqiang; Zhou, Jinyi; Yu, Hao; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the incidence, mortality and survival status of female breast cancer in Jiangsu province of China. Methods Population-based cancer registry data in Jiangsu province were collected during 2003-2011. Crude rates, age-specific rates, age-standardized rates and annual percent changes of incidence and mortality were calculated to describe the epidemiologic characteristics and time trends. Patients diagnosed from 2003 to 2005 were chosen for analyzing the survival status of breast cancer. Results From 2003 to 2011, 17,605 females were diagnosed with breast cancer and 4,883 died in selected registry areas in Jiangsu province. The crude incidence rate was 25.18/100,000, and the age-standardized rates by Chinese population (ASRC) and by world population (ASRW) were 19.03/100,000 and 17.92/100,000, respectively. During the same period, the crude mortality rate was 6.98/100,000 and the ASRC and ASRW were 4.93/100,000 and 4.80/100,000, respectively. From 2003 to 2011, the incidence and mortality increased with annual percent change of 11.37% and 5.78%, respectively. For survival analysis, 1,392 patients in 7 areas were identified in 2003-2005 and finished 5 years of follow-up. Survival rates were found to decrease with survival years, the 5-year observed survival rate was 45.9% and the relative survival rate was 52.0%. We also found that the survival rate varied across the province, which was lower in the north and higher in the south of Jiangsu province. Conclusions Breast cancer has become a significant public health problem in Jiangsu province and China. More resources should be invested in primary prevention, earlier diagnosis and better health services in order to increase survival rates among Chinese females. PMID:27478317

  10. Targeting Cell Survival Proteins for Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj K.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Deb, Lokesh; Huang, Jiamin; Karelia, Deepkamal N.; Amin, Shantu G.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Escaping from cell death is one of the adaptations that enable cancer cells to stave off anticancer therapies. The key players in avoiding apoptosis are collectively known as survival proteins. Survival proteins comprise the Bcl-2, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP), and heat shock protein (HSP) families. The aberrant expression of these proteins is associated with a range of biological activities that promote cancer cell survival, proliferation, and resistance to therapy. Several therapeutic strategies that target survival proteins are based on mimicking BH3 domains or the IAP-binding motif or competing with ATP for the Hsp90 ATP-binding pocket. Alternative strategies, including use of nutraceuticals, transcriptional repression, and antisense oligonucleotides, provide options to target survival proteins. This review focuses on the role of survival proteins in chemoresistance and current therapeutic strategies in preclinical or clinical trials that target survival protein signaling pathways. Recent approaches to target survival proteins-including nutraceuticals, small-molecule inhibitors, peptides, and Bcl-2-specific mimetic are explored. Therapeutic inventions targeting survival proteins are promising strategies to inhibit cancer cell survival and chemoresistance. However, complete eradication of resistance is a distant dream. For a successful clinical outcome, pretreatment with novel survival protein inhibitors alone or in combination with conventional therapies holds great promise. PMID:26927133

  11. Survival models for harvest management of mourning dove populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otis, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative models of the relationship between annual survival and harvest rate of migratory game-bird populations are essential to science-based harvest management strategies. I used the best available band-recovery and harvest data for mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) to build a set of models based on different assumptions about compensatory harvest mortality. Although these models suffer from lack of contemporary data, they can be used in development of an initial set of population models that synthesize existing demographic data on a management-unit scale, and serve as a tool for prioritization of population demographic information needs. Credible harvest management plans for mourning dove populations will require a long-term commitment to population monitoring and iterative population analysis.

  12. Metastatic lung cancer in the age of targeted therapy: improving long-term survival

    PubMed Central

    Del Rivero, Jaydira; Thomas, Anish

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are the most frequent targetable genetic abnormality observed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). More than a decade after EGFR mutations were shown to predict sensitivity to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKI), retrospective cohort studies are now identifying and characterizing 5-year survivors. While these studies indicate subsets of patients achieving long-term survival, there is paucity of data pertaining to the long-term survival benefits of these targeted therapies at a population level. Improving access to molecular testing and treatment are key to maximizing the survival benefits at a population level. PMID:28149768

  13. Microchimerism and survival after breast and colon cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we reported microchimerism to be oppositely associated with maternal breast and colon cancer. In women with a blood test positive for male microchimerism the risk of breast cancer development was reduced to one third, whereas the risk of colon cancer was elevated 4-fold. In this article addendum, I report the survival of cases in the original study after being diagnosed with cancer. Despite small numbers, the analysis suggests that microchimerism may be positively associated with survival after breast and maybe colon cancer diagnosis. Despite the findings on colon cancer in our original report, I speculate whether microchimerism could have a general beneficial role in cancer, which in some sites may not be evident because an allogeneic maternal immune reaction hastens cancer development.

  14. Prediction of Breast Cancer Survival Through Knowledge Discovery in Databases

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hadi Lotfnezhad; Ahmadi, Maryam; Roudbari, Masoud; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    The collection of large volumes of medical data has offered an opportunity to develop prediction models for survival by the medical research community. Medical researchers who seek to discover and extract hidden patterns and relationships among large number of variables use knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) to predict the outcome of a disease. The study was conducted to develop predictive models and discover relationships between certain predictor variables and survival in the context of breast cancer. This study is Cross sectional. After data preparation, data of 22,763 female patients, mean age 59.4 years, stored in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) breast cancer dataset were analyzed anonymously. IBM SPSS Statistics 16, Access 2003 and Excel 2003 were used in the data preparation and IBM SPSS Modeler 14.2 was used in the model design. Support Vector Machine (SVM) model outperformed other models in the prediction of breast cancer survival. Analysis showed SVM model detected ten important predictor variables contributing mostly to prediction of breast cancer survival. Among important variables, behavior of tumor as the most important variable and stage of malignancy as the least important variable were identified. In current study, applying of the knowledge discovery method in the breast cancer dataset predicted the survival condition of breast cancer patients with high confidence and identified the most important variables participating in breast cancer survival. PMID:25946945

  15. Arrested recovery of Diadema antillarum population: Survival or recruitment limitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Barreras, Ruber; Pérez, María E.; Mercado-Molina, Alex E.; Sabat, Alberto M.

    2015-09-01

    Densities of the long-spined sea urchin Diadema antillarum remain significantly below pre mass-mortality levels at most Caribbean localities. The arrested recovery of this formerly abundant herbivore has been attributed to low supply of recruits and high post settlement mortality. There is, however, some debate as to which of these factors is determinant of the local dynamics of this echinoid. In this study, we use demographic modeling to analyze the contribution of recruitment and post settlement survival on the dynamics of D. antillarum in four localities of Puerto Rico Archipelago. Our results indicate relatively high adult survival, and low stasis but high growth transition in the small individuals. Recruitment rates were low and exhibited high spatial and temporal variability. The four populations exhibited asymptotic growth rates (λ) below 1.0, with λ varying from 0.918 to 0.964. The elasticity analysis showed that the survival of large-sized Diadema can potentially contribute most to the changes in λ for all sites. Numerical projections of the populations indicate that no site would exhibit an increase in density under current recruitment rates, but doubling recruitment would produce an increase in sea urchin density in three of the four sites. Recovery of D. antillarum populations would require the spatial and temporal co-occurrence of high recruitment and survival rates.

  16. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their association with survival following breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Humberto; Wolff, Mary S.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Eng, Sybil M.; Khankari, Nikhil K.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are hypothesized to influence breast carcinogenesis due to their persistence and potential to induce estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects. Whether PCBs influence survival following breast cancer is unknown. Methods A population-based cohort of women diagnosed with first primary invasive or in situ breast cancer in 1996–1997 and with blood-measured PCBs (n=627) collected shortly after diagnosis was followed for vital status through 2011. After 5 and 15 years we identified 54 and 187 deaths, respectively, of which 36 and 74 were breast cancer-related. Using Cox regression, we estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for mortality for baseline PCB concentrations, individually and as estrogenic (ΣGroup 1B: PCB101, PCB174, PCB177, PCB187, PCB199), anti-estrogenic (ΣGroup 2A: PCB66, PCB74, PCB105, PCB118; Σ2B: PCB138, PCB170), and cytochrome P450 enzyme-inducing (ΣGroup 3: PCB99, PCB153, PCB180, PCB183, PCB203) groups. Results The highest PCB174 tertile was associated with an increase in all-cause (HR=2.22, 95%CI: 1.14–4.30) and breast cancer-specific (HR=3.15, 95%CI: 1.23–8.09) mortality within 5 years of diagnosis and remained associated with breast cancer-specific mortality (HR=1.88, 95%CI: 1.05–3.36) at 15 years. At 5 years, the highest tertile of PCB177 was positively associated with all-cause mortality (HR=2.12, 95%CI: 1.05–4.30). At 15 years, the highest tertiles of ΣGroup 2A congeners and PCB118 were inversely associated with all-cause mortality (HR=0.60, 95%CI: 0.39–0.83; HR=0.63, 95%CI: 0.43–0.92, respectively). Conclusions In this first US study of PCBs and breast cancer survival, PCBs were associated with mortality in biologically plausible directions. The investigation of other, structurally similar, chemicals may be warranted. PMID:26798968

  17. Stratification of ALS patients' survival: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Marin, Benoît; Couratier, Philippe; Arcuti, Simona; Copetti, Massimiliano; Fontana, Andrea; Nicol, Marie; Raymondeau, Marie; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Preux, Pierre Marie

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and patient risk stratification are areas of considerable research interest. We aimed (1) to describe the survival of a representative cohort of French ALS patients, and (2) to identify covariates associated with various patterns of survival using a risk classification analysis. ALS patients recruited in the FRALim register (2000-2013) were included. Time-to-death analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox model. A recursive partitioning and amalgamation (RECPAM) algorithm analysis identified subgroups of patients with different patterns of survival. Among 322 patients, median survival times were 26.2 and 15.6 months from time of onset and of diagnosis, respectively. Four groups of patients were identified, depending on their baseline characteristics and survival (1) ALSFRS-R slope >0.46/month and definite or probable ALS (median survival time (MST) 10.6 months); (2) ALSFRS-R slope >0.46/month and possible or probable laboratory-supported ALS (MST: 18.1 months); (3) ALSFRS-R slope ≤0.46/month and definite or probable ALS (MST: 22.5 months), and (4) ALSFRS-R slope ≤0.46/month and possible or probable laboratory-supported ALS (MST: 37.6 months). Median survival time is among the shortest ever reported by a worldwide population-based study. This is probably related to the age structure of the patients (the oldest identified to date), driven by the underlying population (30 % of subjects older than 60 years). Further research in the field of risk stratification could help physicians better anticipate prognosis of ALS patients, and help improve the design of randomized controlled trials.

  18. Assessing survival in a multi-population system: a case study on bat populations.

    PubMed

    Papadatou, Eleni; Ibáñez, Carlos; Pradel, Roger; Juste, Javier; Gimenez, Olivier

    2011-04-01

    In long-lived animals, adult survival is among the most important determinants of population dynamics. Although it may show considerable variation both in time and among populations and sites, a single survival estimate per species is often used in comparative evolutionary studies or in conservation management to identify threatened populations. We estimated adult survival of the isabelline serotine bat Eptesicus isabellinus using capture-recapture data collected on six maternity colonies scattered over a large area (distance 8-103 km) during periods varying from 8 to 26 years. We modelled temporal and inter-colony variations as random effects in a Bayesian framework and estimated mean annual adult survival of females on two scales and a single survival value across all colonies. On a coarse scale, we grouped colonies according to two different habitat types and investigated the effect on survival. A difference in adult survival was detected between the two habitat types [posterior mean of annual survival probability 0.71; 95% credible interval (CI) 0.51-0.86 vs. 0.60; 0.28-0.89], but it was not statistically supported. On a fine scale, survival of the six colonies ranged between 0.58 (95% CI 0.23-0.92) and 0.81 (0.73-0.88), with variation between only two colonies being statistically supported. Overall survival was 0.72 (95% CI 0.57-0.93) with important inter-colony variability (on a logit scale 0.98; 95% CI 0.00-8.16). Survival varied temporally in a random fashion across colonies. Our results show that inference based solely on single colonies should be treated with caution and that a representative unbiased estimate of survival for any species should ideally be based on multiple populations.

  19. An international comparison of cancer survival: Toronto, Ontario, and Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan areas.

    PubMed Central

    Gorey, K. M.; Holowaty, E. J.; Fehringer, G.; Laukkanen, E.; Moskowitz, A.; Webster, D. J.; Richter, N. L.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether socioeconomic status has a differential effect on the survival of adults diagnosed with cancer in Canada and the United States. METHODS: The Ontario Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program provided a total of 58,202 and 76,055 population-based primary malignant cancer cases for Toronto, Ontario, and Detroit, Mich, respectively. Socioeconomic data for each person's residence at time of diagnosis were taken from population censuses. RESULTS: In the US cohort, there was a significant association between socioeconomic status and survival for 12 of the 15 most common cancer sites; in the Canadian cohort, there was no such association for 12 of the 15 sites. Among residents of low-income areas, persons in Toronto experienced a survival advantage for 13 of 15 cancer sites at 1- and 5-year follow-up. No such between-country differentials were observed in the middle- or high-income groups. CONCLUSIONS: The consistent pattern of a survival advantage in Canada observed across various cancer sites and follow-up periods suggests that Canada's more equitable access to preventive and therapeutic health care services is responsible for the difference. PMID:9240106

  20. Preoperative Chemotherapy, Radiation Improve Survival in Esophageal Cancer (Updated)

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with esophageal cancer who received chemotherapy and radiation before surgery survived, on average, nearly twice as long as patients treated with surgery alone, according to results of a randomized clinical trial published May 31, 2012, in NEJM.

  1. Eribulin Improves Survival of Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment with eribulin (Halaven™) improved overall survival in women with metastatic breast cancer whose disease progressed despite multiple rounds of prior chemotherapy, according to the results of a phase III clinical trial called EMBRACE.

  2. Survival of women with breast cancer in Kaunas Region, Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Ivanauskienė, Rugilė; Gedminaitė, Jurgita; Juozaitytė, Elona; Vanagas, Giedrius; Simoliūnienė, Renata; Padaiga, Zilvinas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The assessment of breast cancer survival rates and comparison with those of other countries may help to deepen knowledge among decision makers in the health care system and to improve the inequalities in accessibility to early detection and effective treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate breast cancer survival rates in Kaunas region, Lithuania, and to compare them with those in the selected European countries. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A retrospective study was carried out using medical records and data gathered from the Lithuanian Cancer Registry. A group of 240 patients with primary breast cancer diagnosed in 2008 in Kaunas region was analyzed. All causes of death were included in the analysis. The closing date of follow-up was September 30, 2010. Survival was determined using the life-table method and the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the effects of prognostic risk factors on survival. RESULTS. The median age of the patients was 63 years (range, 28-95). The 1-year and 2-year cumulative survival for breast cancer patients in Kaunas region, Lithuania, was 94.2% and 90.1%, respectively. As expected, the survival of patients with diagnosed advanced disease (stage III and IV) was significantly worse than that of patients with stage I (P<0.001) and II (P=0.003) disease. The screening group (aged 50-69 years) showed better survival in comparison with the group older than 69 years. Age, T4 tumor, and distant metastasis were the prognostic factors significantly associated with an increased relative mortality risk of breast cancer. CONCLUSIONS. Compared to the European survival rates, the 1-year and 2-year survival of patients with breast cancer in Lithuania was found to be similar to most European countries.

  3. DO CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL POPULATIONS TRULY REPRESENT CANCER PATIENTS? A COMPARISON OF OPEN CLINICAL TRIALS TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS.

    PubMed

    Geifman, Nophar; Butte, Atul J

    2016-01-01

    Open clinical trial data offer many opportunities for the scientific community to independently verify published results, evaluate new hypotheses and conduct meta-analyses. These data provide a springboard for scientific advances in precision medicine but the question arises as to how representative clinical trials data are of cancer patients overall. Here we present the integrative analysis of data from several cancer clinical trials and compare these to patient-level data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Comparison of cancer type-specific survival rates reveals that these are overall lower in trial subjects. This effect, at least to some extent, can be explained by the more advanced stages of cancer of trial subjects. This analysis also reveals that for stage IV cancer, colorectal cancer patients have a better chance of survival than breast cancer patients. On the other hand, for all other stages, breast cancer patients have better survival than colorectal cancer patients. Comparison of survival in different stages of disease between the two datasets reveals that subjects with stage IV cancer from the trials dataset have a lower chance of survival than matching stage IV subjects from TCGA. One likely explanation for this observation is that stage IV trial subjects have lower survival rates since their cancer is less likely to respond to treatment. To conclude, we present here a newly available clinical trials dataset which allowed for the integration of patient-level data from many cancer clinical trials. Our comprehensive analysis reveals that cancer-related clinical trials are not representative of general cancer patient populations, mostly due to their focus on the more advanced stages of the disease. These and other limitations of clinical trials data should, perhaps, be taken into consideration in medical research and in the field of precision medicine.

  4. An overview of cancer survival in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America: the case for investment in cancer health services.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, R; Swaminathan, R; Jayant, K; Brenner, H

    2011-01-01

    Population-based cancer survival data, a key indicator for monitoring progress against cancer, are reported from 27 population-based cancer registries in 14 countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America. In China, Singapore, the Republic of Korea, and Turkey, the 5-year age-standardized relative survival ranged from 76-82% for breast, 63-79% for cervical, 71-78% for bladder, and 44-60% for large-bowel cancer. Survival did not exceed 22% for any cancer site in The Gambia, or 13% for any cancer site except breast (46%) in Uganda. For localized cancers of the breast, large bowel, larynx, ovary, urinary bladder and for regional diseases at all sites, higher survival rates were observed in countries with more rather than less developed health services. Inter- and intra-country variations in survival imply that the levels of development of health services and their efficiency to provide early diagnosis, treatment and clinical follow-up care have a profound impact on survival from cancer. These are reliable baseline summary estimates to evaluate improvements in cancer control and emphasise the need for urgent investment to improve awareness, population-based cancer registration, early detection programmes, health-services infrastructure, and human resources in these countries in the future.

  5. Changing roles of population-based cancer registries in Australia.

    PubMed

    Roder, David; Creighton, Nicola; Baker, Deborah; Walton, Richard; Aranda, Sanchia; Currow, David

    2015-09-01

    Registries have key roles in cancer incidence, mortality and survival monitoring and in showing disparities across the population. Incidence monitoring began in New South Wales in 1972 and other jurisdictions soon followed. Registry data are used to evaluate outcomes of preventive, screening, treatment and support services. They have shown decreases in cancer incidence following interventions and have been used for workforce and other infrastructure planning. Crude markers of optimal radiotherapy and chemotherapy exist and registry data are used to show shortfalls against these markers. The data are also used to investigate cancer clusters and environmental concerns. Survival data are used to assess service performance and interval cancer data are used in screening accreditation. Registries enable determination of risk of multiple primary cancers. Clinical quality registries are used for clinical quality improvement. Population-based cancer registries and linked administrative data complement clinical registries by providing high-level system-wide data. The USA Commission on Cancer has long used registries for quality assurance and service accreditation. Increasingly population-based registry data in Australia are linked with administrative data on service delivery to assess system performance. Addition oftumour stage and otherprognostic indicators is important forthese analyses and is facilitated by the roll-out of structured pathology reporting. Data linkage with administrative data, following checks on the quality of these data, enables assessment of patterns of care and other performance indicators for health-system monitoring. Australian cancer registries have evolved and increasingly are contributing to broader information networks for health system management.

  6. Childhood cancer survival in France, 2000-2008.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Brigitte; Goujon, Stéphanie; Guissou, Sandra; Guyot-Goubin, Aurélie; Desmée, Solène; Désandes, Emmanuel; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports the latest survival data for French childhood cancer patients at the national level. Data from the two French National Registries of Childhood Cancer (Haematopoietic Malignancies and Solid Tumours) were used to describe survival outcomes for 15,479 children diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2008 in mainland France. The overall survival was 91.7% at 1 year, 86.9% at 2 years and 81.6% at 5 years. Relative survival did not differ from overall survival even for infants. Survival was lower among infants for lymphoblastic leukaemia and astrocytoma, but higher for neuroblastoma. For all cancers considered together, 5-year survival increased from 79.5% in the first (2000-2002) diagnostic period to 83.2% in the last (2006-2008) period. The improvement was significant for leukaemia, both myeloid and lymphoid, central nervous system tumours (ependymoma) and neuroblastoma. The results remained valid in the multivariate analysis, and, for all cancers combined, the risk of death decreased by 20% between 2000-2002 and 2006-2008. The figures are consistent with various international estimates and are the result of progress in treatment regimens and collaborative clinical trials. The challenge for the French registries is now to study the long-term follow-up of survivors to estimate the incidence of long-term morbidities and adverse effects of treatments.

  7. Breast self examination and survival from breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Le Geyte, M.; Mant, D.; Vessey, M. P.; Jones, L.; Yudkin, P.

    1992-01-01

    The survival of 616 women aged 15-59 with breast cancer, 226 of whom had been taught and practised breast self examination (BSE) prior to diagnosis and 390 of whom had not, is reported. Six year survival rates were 73.1% in the BSE taught group and 66.1% in other women (P = 0.07). PMID:1419636

  8. Cancer incidence and survival among children and adolescents in Israel during the years 1998 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Rabinowicz, Ron; Barchana, Micha; Liphshiz, Irena; Futerman, Boris; Linn, Shai; Weyl-Ben-Arush, Myriam

    2012-08-01

    Our goal was to describe childhood cancer incidence and survival in Israel and to identify demographic and epidemiologic variations among children and adolescents with cancer. We used data from the Israel National Cancer Registry to examine the incidence and survival of pediatric cancer in Israeli children aged 0 to 19 years, diagnosed during the years 1998 to 2007. Cases were analyzed according to sex, age, ethnicity, and geographic region. Among the 4255 cases of childhood cancer, there was a total age-adjusted incidence rate of 172.4 per million for children aged 0 to 19 years and 153.4 per million for children aged 0 to 14 years. The incidence rate for boys was higher than for girls (192.5 and 153.3, respectively) and higher for Jewish children than for Arab children (177.6 and 156.8, respectively). The largest groups were leukemias (22%), lymphomas (20.2%), and central nervous system tumors (17.4%). The number of new cases increased each year, but the incidence rate remained steady. The survival probability updated to December 2008 was estimated and the 5-year survival was calculated for the new cases until the end of 2003. The overall survival at 5 years was 80.8%, with 72.8% for the Arabic population and 83.2% for the Jewish population, and depended on the diagnosis. Incidence and survival in childhood cancer in Israel is at the same medium level compared with other parts of the world. This study may set the basis for investigating the genetic and environmental factors that cause pediatric cancer in Israel, delineating the genetic basis for ethnic origin disparities in survival.

  9. Survival analysis of cervical cancer using stratified Cox regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnami, S. W.; Inayati, K. D.; Sari, N. W. Wulan; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the mostly widely cancer cause of the women death in the world including Indonesia. Most cervical cancer patients come to the hospital already in an advanced stadium. As a result, the treatment of cervical cancer becomes more difficult and even can increase the death's risk. One of parameter that can be used to assess successfully of treatment is the probability of survival. This study raises the issue of cervical cancer survival patients at Dr. Soetomo Hospital using stratified Cox regression based on six factors such as age, stadium, treatment initiation, companion disease, complication, and anemia. Stratified Cox model is used because there is one independent variable that does not satisfy the proportional hazards assumption that is stadium. The results of the stratified Cox model show that the complication variable is significant factor which influent survival probability of cervical cancer patient. The obtained hazard ratio is 7.35. It means that cervical cancer patient who has complication is at risk of dying 7.35 times greater than patient who did not has complication. While the adjusted survival curves showed that stadium IV had the lowest probability of survival.

  10. Metformin use improves survival of diabetic liver cancer patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shu-Juan; Zheng, Yi-Xiang; Zhou, Peng-Cheng; Xiao, Yan-Ni; Tan, Hong-Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Metformin has garnered considerable interest as a chemo-preventive and chemo-therapeutic agent given the increased risk of liver cancer among diabetic patients. This work was performed to illustrate the association between metformin use and survival of diabetic liver cancer patients. We conducted a comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, BIOSIS Previews, Cochrane Library from inception to 12 May 2016. Meta-analyses were performed using Stata (version 12.0), with hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) as effect measures. Eleven cohort studies involving 3452 liver cancer patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses showed that metformin use was associated with better survival (HR = 0.59; 95% CI, 0.42-0.83; p = 0.002) of liver cancer patients, and the beneficial effect persisted (HR = 0.64; 95% CI, 0.42-0.97; p = 0.035) when the population was restricted to diabetic liver cancer patients. After adjusting for age, etiology, index of tumor severity and treatment of liver cancer, the association between metformin use and better survival of liver cancer patients was stable, pooled HR ranged from 0.47 to 0.57. The results indicated that metformin use improved survival of diabetic liver cancer patients. However, the results should be interpreted with caution given the possibility of residual confounding. Further prospective studies are still needed to confirm the prognostic benefit of metformin use. PMID:27494848

  11. Population size, survival, growth, and movements of Rana sierrae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fellers, Gary M.; Kleeman, Patrick M.; Miller, David A. W.; Halstead, Brian J.; Link, William

    2013-01-01

    Based on 2431 captures of 757 individual frogs over a 9-yr period, we found that the population of R. sierrae in one meadow–stream complex in Yosemite National Park ranged from an estimated 45 to 115 adult frogs. Rana sierrae at our relatively low elevation site (2200 m) grew at a fast rate (K = 0.73–0.78), had high overwintering survival rates (44.6–95%), lived a long time (up to 16 yr), and tended to be fairly sedentary during the summer (100% minimum convex polygon annual home ranges of 139 m2) but had low year-to-year site fidelity. Even though the amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) has been present in the population for at least 13 yr, there was no clear downward trend as might be expected from reports of R. sierrae population declines associated with Bd or from reports of widespread population decline of R. sierrae throughout its range.

  12. Physical Activity and Survival among Long-term Cancer Survivor and Non-Cancer Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Gunnell, Anthony S.; Joyce, Sarah; Tomlin, Stephania; Taaffe, Dennis R.; Cormie, Prue; Newton, Robert U.; Joseph, David; Spry, Nigel; Einarsdóttir, Kristjana; Galvão, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests physical activity improves prognosis following cancer diagnosis; however, evidence regarding prognosis in long-term survivors of cancer is scarce. We assessed physical activity in 1,589 cancer survivors at an average 8.8 years following their initial diagnosis and calculated their future mortality risk following physical activity assessment. We also selected a cancer-free cohort of 3,145 age, sex, and survey year group-matched cancer-free individuals from the same source population for comparison purposes. Risks for cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality in relation to physical activity levels were estimated using Cox regression proportional hazard regression analyses within the cancer and non-cancer cohorts. Physical activity levels of 360+ min per week were inversely associated with cancer-specific mortality in long-term cancer survivors [hazard ratios (HR) = 0.30 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.13–0.70)] and participants without prior cancer [HR = 0.16 (95% CI 0.05–0.56)] compared with no reported physical activity. Physical activity levels of 150–359 and 360+ min were inversely associated with all-cause mortality in long-term cancer survivors [150–359 min; HR = 0.55 (95% CI 0.31–0.97), 360+ min; HR = 0.41 (95% CI 0.21–0.79)] and those without prior cancer [150–359 min; HR = 0.52 (95% CI 0.32–0.86), 360+ min; HR = 0.50 (95% CI 0.29–0.88)]. These results suggest that meeting exercise guidelines of 150 min of physical activity per week were associated with reduced all-cause mortality in both long-term cancer surviving and cancer-free cohorts. Exceeding exercise oncology guidelines (360+ min per week) may provide additional protection in terms of cancer-specific death. PMID:28261579

  13. Socioeconomic disparities in childhood cancer survival in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Adam, Martin; Rueegg, Corina S; Schmidlin, Kurt; Spoerri, Adrian; Niggli, Felix; Grotzer, Michael; von der Weid, Nicolas X; Egger, Matthias; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Zwahlen, Marcel; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we investigated whether childhood cancer survival in Switzerland is influenced by socioeconomic status (SES), and if disparities vary by type of cancer and definition of SES (parental education, living condition, area-based SES). Using Cox proportional hazards models, we analyzed 5-year cumulative mortality in all patients registered in the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry diagnosed 1991-2006 below 16 years. Information on SES was extracted from the Swiss census by probabilistic record linkage. The study included 1602 children (33% with leukemia, 20% with lymphoma, 22% with central nervous system (CNS) tumors); with an overall 5-year survival of 77% (95%CI 75-79%). Higher SES, particularly parents' education, was associated with a lower 5-year cumulative mortality. Results varied by type of cancer with no association for leukemia and particularly strong effects for CNS tumor patients, where mortality hazard ratios for the different SES indicators, comparing the highest with the lowest group, ranged from 0.48 (95%CI: 0.28-0.81) to 0.71 (95%CI: 0.44-1.15). We conclude that even in Switzerland with a high quality health care system and mandatory health insurance, socioeconomic differences in childhood cancer survival persist. Factors causing these survival differences have to be further explored, to facilitate universal access to optimal treatment and finally eliminate social inequalities in childhood cancer survival.

  14. Paediatric cancer stage in population-based cancer registries: the Toronto consensus principles and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumit; Aitken, Joanne F; Bartels, Ute; Brierley, James; Dolendo, Mae; Friedrich, Paola; Fuentes-Alabi, Soad; Garrido, Claudia P; Gatta, Gemma; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Gross, Thomas; Howard, Scott C; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Moreno, Florencia; Pole, Jason D; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Ramirez, Oscar; Ries, Lynn A G; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Shin, Hee Young; Steliarova-Foucher, Eva; Sung, Lillian; Supriyadi, Eddy; Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Torode, Julie; Vora, Tushar; Kutluk, Tezer; Frazier, A Lindsay

    2016-04-01

    Population-based cancer registries generate estimates of incidence and survival that are essential for cancer surveillance, research, and control strategies. Although data on cancer stage allow meaningful assessments of changes in cancer incidence and outcomes, stage is not recorded by most population-based cancer registries. The main method of staging adult cancers is the TNM classification. The criteria for staging paediatric cancers, however, vary by diagnosis, have evolved over time, and sometimes vary by cooperative trial group. Consistency in the collection of staging data has therefore been challenging for population-based cancer registries. We assembled key experts and stakeholders (oncologists, cancer registrars, epidemiologists) and used a modified Delphi approach to establish principles for paediatric cancer stage collection. In this Review, we make recommendations on which staging systems should be adopted by population-based cancer registries for the major childhood cancers, including adaptations for low-income countries. Wide adoption of these guidelines in registries will ease international comparative incidence and outcome studies.

  15. Incidence and survival rates of ovarian cancer in low-income women in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Abuidris, Dafalla O.; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Elhaj, Ahmed M.; Eltayeb, Elgaylani Abdallah; Elsanousi, Mohamed; Ibnoof, Rehab S.; Mohammed, Sulma I.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the second most common gynecological cancer worldwide. Little is known about the disease in Sudan. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the incidence rate, age and stage at diagnosis, and median survival time of patients presenting at the National Cancer Institute-University of Gezira (NCI-UG), Sudan. Data were collected in a prospective study of women with ovarian cancer over a period of eleven years of follow-up (between 2000 and 2011). Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the distribution of the demographics of the sample. The direct method was used to compute the age-standardized rate (ASR) using data from the 1966 and 2000 World Standard Populations (WSPs). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival functions and the median survival time. Log-rank tests were used to statistically compare between the survival functions. There were steady increases in ovarian cancer incidence rates between 2000 and 2009, with a slight decline noted in 2010 and 2011. The patients' age range was 9–90. The age-specific incidence rate increased greatly in women aged 55 years or older. The majority of the patients had stage III or IV disease. The annual ASR using WSPs 1966 and 2000 as standard populations were 3.3 and 3.7 per 100,000 women, respectively. The median survival time was 31 months (95% confidence interval, 19–43). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 38%. In Sudan, ovarian cancer affects postmenopausal women, akin to what is reported in the developed world with high incidence rates. Presenting with advanced stage disease is the predominant factor that results in a short survival time for women. PMID:28105363

  16. Predicting survival in potentially curable lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Win, Thida; Sharples, Linda; Groves, Ashley M; Ritchie, Andrew J; Wells, Francis C; Laroche, Clare M

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death with unchanged mortality for 50 years. Only localized nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is curable. In these patients it is essential to accurately predict survival to help identify those that will benefit from treatment and those at risk of relapse. Despite needing this clinical information, prospective data are lacking. We therefore prospectively identified prognostic factors in patients with potentially curable lung cancer. Over 2 years, 110 consecutive patients with confirmed localized NSCLC (stages 1-3A) were recruited from a single tertiary center. Prognostic factors investigated included age, gender, body mass index (BMI), performance status, comorbidity, disease stage, quality of life, and respiratory physiology. Patients were followed up for 3-5 years and mortality recorded. The data were analyzed using survival analysis methods. Twenty-eight patients died within 1 year, 15 patients died within 2 years, and 11 patients died within 3 years postsurgery. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates show a survival rate of 51% at 3 years. Factors significantly (p < 0.05) associated with poor overall survival were age at assessment, diabetes, serum albumin, peak VO(2) max, shuttle walk distance, and predicted postoperative transfer factor. In multiple-variable survival models, the strongest predictors of survival overall were diabetes and shuttle walk distance. The results show that potentially curable lung cancer patients should not be discriminated against with respect to weight and smoking history. Careful attention is required when managing patients with diabetes. Respiratory physiologic measurements were of limited value in predicting long-term survival after lung cancer surgery.

  17. The Nottingham Prognostic Index: five- and ten-year data for all-cause Survival within a Screened Population

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J; Brook, D; Kenkre, J; Jarvis, P; Gower-Thomas, K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) is an established prognostication tool in the management of breast cancers (BCs). Latest ten-year survival data have demonstrated an improved outlook for each NPI category and the latest UK five- and ten-year survival from BC has been reported to be 85% and 77%, respectively. We compared survival of each NPI category for BCs diagnosed within the national breast screening service in Wales (Breast Test Wales (BTW)) to the latest data, and reviewed its validity in unselected cases within a screened population. Methods All women screened between 1998 and 2001 within BTW were included. The NPI score for each cancer was calculated using the size, nodal status, and grade of the primary tumour. Survival data (all-cause) were calculated after ten years of follow-up. Results In the three-year screening period, 199,082 women were screened. A total of 1,712 cancers were diagnosed, and 1,546 had data available for calculating the NPI. Overall five-year and ten-year survival was 94% and 82%, respectively. Conclusions Overall five-year and ten-year survival (all-cause) has improved even when compared with UK data for BC-specific survival. We found that the NPI remains valid for BC treatment, and that our data provide a reference for updating the all-cause survival of women diagnosed with BCs within a screened population. PMID:25723691

  18. Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and survival in patients with cutaneous melanoma: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Orlow, Irene; Reiner, Anne S.; Thomas, Nancy E.; Roy, Pampa; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Luo, Li; Paine, Susan; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Kricker, Anne; Marrett, Loraine D.; Rosso, Stefano; Zanetti, Roberto; Gruber, Stephen B.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gallagher, Richard P.; Dwyer, Terence; Busam, Klaus; Begg, Colin B.; Berwick, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Factors known to affect melanoma survival include age at presentation, sex and tumor characteristics. Polymorphisms also appear to modulate survival following diagnosis. Result from other studies suggest that vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms (SNPs) impact survival in patients with glioma, renal cell carcinoma, lung, breast, prostate and other cancers; however, a comprehensive study of VDR polymorphisms and melanoma-specific survival is lacking. We aimed to investigate whether VDR genetic variation influences survival in patients with cutaneous melanoma. The analysis involved 3566 incident single and multiple primary melanoma cases enrolled in the international population-based Genes, Environment, and Melanoma Study. Melanoma-specific survival outcomes were calculated for each of 38 VDR SNPs using a competing risk analysis after adjustment for covariates. There were 254 (7.1%) deaths due to melanoma during the median 7.6 years follow-up period. VDR SNPs rs7299460, rs3782905, rs2239182, rs12370156, rs2238140, rs7305032, rs1544410 (BsmI) and rs731236 (TaqI) each had a statistically significant (trend P values < 0.05) association with melanoma-specific survival in multivariate analysis. One functional SNP (rs2239182) remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing using the Monte Carlo method. None of the SNPs associated with survival were significantly associated with Breslow thickness, ulceration or mitosis. These results suggest that the VDR gene may influence survival from melanoma, although the mechanism by which VDR exerts its effect does not seem driven by tumor aggressiveness. Further investigations are needed to confirm our results and to understand the relationship between VDR and survival in the combined context of tumor and host characteristics. PMID:26521212

  19. Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and survival in patients with cutaneous melanoma: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Orlow, Irene; Reiner, Anne S; Thomas, Nancy E; Roy, Pampa; Kanetsky, Peter A; Luo, Li; Paine, Susan; Armstrong, Bruce K; Kricker, Anne; Marrett, Loraine D; Rosso, Stefano; Zanetti, Roberto; Gruber, Stephen B; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gallagher, Richard P; Dwyer, Terence; Busam, Klaus; Begg, Colin B; Berwick, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Factors known to affect melanoma survival include age at presentation, sex and tumor characteristics. Polymorphisms also appear to modulate survival following diagnosis. Result from other studies suggest that vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms (SNPs) impact survival in patients with glioma, renal cell carcinoma, lung, breast, prostate and other cancers; however, a comprehensive study of VDR polymorphisms and melanoma-specific survival is lacking. We aimed to investigate whether VDR genetic variation influences survival in patients with cutaneous melanoma. The analysis involved 3566 incident single and multiple primary melanoma cases enrolled in the international population-based Genes, Environment, and Melanoma Study. Melanoma-specific survival outcomes were calculated for each of 38 VDR SNPs using a competing risk analysis after adjustment for covariates. There were 254 (7.1%) deaths due to melanoma during the median 7.6 years follow-up period. VDR SNPs rs7299460, rs3782905, rs2239182, rs12370156, rs2238140, rs7305032, rs1544410 (BsmI) and rs731236 (TaqI) each had a statistically significant (trend P values < 0.05) association with melanoma-specific survival in multivariate analysis. One functional SNP (rs2239182) remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing using the Monte Carlo method. None of the SNPs associated with survival were significantly associated with Breslow thickness, ulceration or mitosis. These results suggest that the VDR gene may influence survival from melanoma, although the mechanism by which VDR exerts its effect does not seem driven by tumor aggressiveness. Further investigations are needed to confirm our results and to understand the relationship between VDR and survival in the combined context of tumor and host characteristics.

  20. Cure fraction model with random effects for regional variation in cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Seppä, Karri; Hakulinen, Timo; Kim, Hyon-Jung; Läärä, Esa

    2010-11-30

    Assessing regional differences in the survival of cancer patients is important but difficult when separate regions are small or sparsely populated. In this paper, we apply a mixture cure fraction model with random effects to cause-specific survival data of female breast cancer patients collected by the population-based Finnish Cancer Registry. Two sets of random effects were used to capture the regional variation in the cure fraction and in the survival of the non-cured patients, respectively. This hierarchical model was implemented in a Bayesian framework using a Metropolis-within-Gibbs algorithm. To avoid poor mixing of the Markov chain, when the variance of either set of random effects was close to zero, posterior simulations were based on a parameter-expanded model with tailor-made proposal distributions in Metropolis steps. The random effects allowed the fitting of the cure fraction model to the sparse regional data and the estimation of the regional variation in 10-year cause-specific breast cancer survival with a parsimonious number of parameters. Before 1986, the capital of Finland clearly stood out from the rest, but since then all the 21 hospital districts have achieved approximately the same level of survival.

  1. Survival in Norwegian BRCA1 mutation carriers with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Anne Irene; Tretli, Steinar; Maehle, Lovise; Apold, Jaran; Vedå, Nina; Møller, Pål

    2009-04-14

    Several studies of survival in women with BRCA1 mutations have shown either reduced survival or no difference compared to controls. Programmes for early detection and treatment of inherited breast cancer, have failed to demonstrate a significant improvement in survival in BRCA1 mutation carriers.One hundred and sixty-seven women with disease-associated germline BRCA1 mutations and breast cancer from 1980 to 2001 were identified. Tumour characteristics, treatment given and survival were recorded. A control group comprising three hundred and four women matched for age, time of diagnosis and stage were used to compare survival.BRCA1 mutation carriers were found to have a poorer prognosis, which could be explained by neither the mode of surgical treatment nor the use of adjuvant chemotherapy. BRCA1 mutation carriers with node negative breast cancer had worse overall survival than controls.Our findings confirm the serious prognosis of BRCA1-associated breast cancer even when diagnosed at an early stage, and that type of treatment does not influence prognosis.

  2. A Survival Association Study of 102 Polymorphisms Previously Associated with Survival Outcomes in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingxiong; Werdyani, Salem; Shestopaloff, Konstantin; Dicks, Elizabeth; Green, Jane; Parfrey, Patrick; Green, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Several published studies identified associations of a number of polymorphisms with a variety of survival outcomes in colorectal cancer. In this study, we aimed to explore 102 previously reported common genetic polymorphisms and their associations with overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in a colorectal cancer patient cohort from Newfoundland (n = 505). Genotypes were obtained using a genomewide SNP genotyping platform. For each polymorphism, the best possible genetic model was estimated for both overall survival and disease-free survival using a previously published approach. These SNPs were then analyzed under their genetic models by Cox regression method. Correction for multiple comparisons was performed by the False Discovery Rate (FDR) method. Univariate analysis results showed that RRM1-rs12806698, IFNGR1-rs1327474, DDX20-rs197412, and PTGS2-rs5275 polymorphisms were nominally associated with OS or DFS (p < 0.01). In stage-adjusted analysis, the nominal associations of DDX20-rs197412, PTGS2-rs5275, and HSPA5-rs391957 with DFS were detected. However, after FDR correction none of these polymorphisms remained significantly associated with the survival outcomes. We conclude that polymorphisms investigated in this study are not associated with OS or DFS in our colorectal cancer patient cohort. PMID:26064972

  3. The optimal number of lymph nodes removed in maximizing the survival of breast cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lim Fong; Taib, Nur Aishah; Mohamed, Ibrahim; Daud, Noorizam

    2014-07-01

    The number of lymph nodes removed is one of the important predictors for survival in breast cancer study. Our aim is to determine the optimal number of lymph nodes to be removed for maximizing the survival of breast cancer patients. The study population consists of 873 patients with at least one of axillary nodes involved among 1890 patients from the University of Malaya Medical Center (UMMC) breast cancer registry. For this study, the Chi-square test of independence is performed to determine the significant association between prognostic factors and survival status, while Wilcoxon test is used to compare the estimates of the hazard functions of the two or more groups at each observed event time. Logistic regression analysis is then conducted to identify important predictors of survival. In particular, Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) are calculated from the logistic regression model for all thresholds of node involved, as an alternative measure for the Wald statistic (χ2), in order to determine the optimal number of nodes that need to be removed to obtain the maximum differential in survival. The results from both measurements are compared. It is recommended that, for this particular group, the minimum of 10 nodes should be removed to maximize survival of breast cancer patients.

  4. Survival Signaling in Prostate Cancer: Role of Androgen Receptor and Integrins in Regulating Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    to avoid selection against growth suppression, a problematic side - effect of AR expression in PC3 cells (1). AR expression was constantly monitored...targeting AR directly or its downstream effectors that regulate survival would be a more effective therapeutic approach for targeting and killing prostate...cancer cells. Development of new strategies for more effective treatment of prostate cancer is limited by an incomplete understanding of the

  5. Biobehavioral Approaches to Cancer Progression and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, there have been groundbreaking strides in our understanding of the multiple biological pathways by which psychosocial and behavioral factors can affect cancer progression. It is now clear that biobehavioral factors not only affect cellular immunity but both directly and indirectly modulate fundamental processes in cancer growth, including inflammation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. There is also an emerging understanding of how psychological and behavioral factors used in interventions can impact these physiological processes. This review outlines our current understanding of the physiological mechanisms by which psychological, social, and behavioral processes can affect cancer progression. The intervention literature is discussed, along with recommendations for future research to move the field of biobehavioral oncology forward. PMID:25730724

  6. Stochastic modeling and experimental analysis of phenotypic switching and survival of cancer cells under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani Dahaj, Seyed Alireza; Kumar, Niraj; Sundaram, Bala; Celli, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Rahul

    The phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells is critical to their survival under stress. A significant contribution to heterogeneity of cancer calls derives from the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a conserved cellular program that is crucial for embryonic development. Several studies have investigated the role of EMT in growth of early stage tumors into invasive malignancies. Also, EMT has been closely associated with the acquisition of chemoresistance properties in cancer cells. Motivated by these studies, we analyze multi-phenotype stochastic models of the evolution of cancers cell populations under stress. We derive analytical results for time-dependent probability distributions that provide insights into the competing rates underlying phenotypic switching (e.g. during EMT) and the corresponding survival of cancer cells. Experimentally, we evaluate these model-based predictions by imaging human pancreatic cancer cell lines grown with and without cytotoxic agents and measure growth kinetics, survival, morphological changes and (terminal evaluation of) biomarkers with associated epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes. The results derived suggest approaches for distinguishing between adaptation and selection scenarios for survival in the presence of external stresses.

  7. Polyphosphate Affects on Breast Cancer Cell Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    vortexing), heating , and pellet resuspensions. Figure 12 depicts the steps of the procedure. E . coli cultures were pelleted in a 1.5-mL tube and...biosynthetic enzyme, polyphosphate kinase (PPK) has been purified from Escherichia coli ( E . coli ) (Akiyama et al., 1992), as have an exopolyphosphatase (PPX...respond to and survive environmental challenges, such as nutrient deprivation, heat shock , phosphate deficiency, oxidative stress, and osmotic

  8. Cancer in socioeconomically disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Pamies, R J; Woodard, L J

    1992-09-01

    This article presents a summary of the health status of the disadvantaged populations in the United States, with specific regard to the incidence, treatment, and mortality of cancer. It begins with an historical overview of health care for the poor in this country, and continues with an explanation of the risk factors prevalent, if not inherent, in the life-style associated with low socioeconomic status, such as poor diet, cigarette smoking, and ignorance of preventive health measures and screening techniques. It includes a discussion of the different types that are overrepresented in this population and of the barriers to preventive care and treatment that still exist. The most important of these is decreased access to continuous medical care because of a lack of health insurance and an overdependence on emergency room treatment for all health care. The final section reviews solutions that have been preferred by physicians, nurses, lawmakers, public health workers, and community advocates for the poor. The most important parts of the solution are patient education for preventive health care, disease warning signs, and screening techniques and an overhaul of the present system of providing health care to ensure equal access and treatment for all members of the society.

  9. Psychiatric Sequelae of Surviving Childhood Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, John E.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Among the conclusions drawn from the findings were that the period when the child first learns of the cancer diagnosis is critical to long-term adjustment, and that the effective use of denial facilitates long-term adjustment. (Author/DLS)

  10. Experimental Designs for Testing Differences in Survival Among Salmonid Populations.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Annette; Busack, Craig; Knudsen, Craig

    1994-11-01

    The Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) is a supplementation plan for enhancing salmon runs in the Yakima River basin. It is presumed that inadequate spawning and rearing habitat are limiting factors to population abundance of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyacha). Therefore, the supplementation effort for spring chinook salmon is focused on introducing hatchery-raised smolts into the basin to compensate for the lack of spawning habitat. However, based on empirical evidence in the Yakima basin, hatchery-reared salmon have survived poorly compared to wild salmon. Therefore, the YFP has proposed to alter the optimal conventional treatment (OCT), which is the state-of-the-art hatchery rearing method, to a new innovative treatment (NIT). The NIT is intended to produce hatchery fish that mimic wild fish and thereby to enhance their survival over that of OCT fish. A limited application of the NIT (LNIT) has also been proposed to reduce the cost of applying the new treatment, yet retain the benefits of increased survival. This research was conducted to test whether the uncertainty using the experimental design was within the limits specified by the Planning Status Report (PSR).

  11. Neighborhood influences on recreational physical activity and survival after breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shariff-Marco, Salma; Sangaramoorthy, Meera; Koo, Jocelyn; Hertz, Andrew; Schupp, Clayton W.; Yang, Juan; John, Esther M.; Gomez, Scarlett L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Higher levels of physical activity have been associated with improved survival after breast cancer diagnosis. However, no previous studies have considered the influence of the social and built environment on physical activity and survival among breast cancer patients. Methods Our study included 4,345 women diagnosed with breast cancer (1995–2008) from two population-based studies conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area. We examined questionnaire-based moderate/strenuous recreational physical activity during the 3 years before diagnosis. Neighborhood characteristics were based on data from the 2000 US Census, business listings, parks, farmers’ markets, and Department of Transportation. Survival was evaluated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, with follow-up through 2009. Results Women residing in neighborhoods with no fast-food restaurants (vs. fewer fast-food restaurants) to other restaurants, high traffic density, and a high percentage of foreign-born residents were less likely to meet physical activity recommendations set by the American Cancer Society. Women who were not recreationally physically active had a 22 % higher risk of death from any cause than women that were the most active. Poorer overall survival was associated with lower neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) (p trend = 0.02), whereas better breast cancer-specific survival was associated with a lack of parks, especially among women in high-SES neighborhoods. Conclusion Certain aspects of the neighborhood have independent associations with recreational physical activity among breast cancer patients and their survival. Considering neighborhood factors may aide in the design of more effective, tailored physical activity programs for breast cancer survivors. PMID:25088804

  12. Bayesian analysis of a disability model for lung cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Armero, C; Cabras, S; Castellanos, M E; Perra, S; Quirós, A; Oruezábal, M J; Sánchez-Rubio, J

    2016-02-01

    Bayesian reasoning, survival analysis and multi-state models are used to assess survival times for Stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the evolution of the disease over time. Bayesian estimation is done using minimum informative priors for the Weibull regression survival model, leading to an automatic inferential procedure. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods have been used for approximating posterior distributions and the Bayesian information criterion has been considered for covariate selection. In particular, the posterior distribution of the transition probabilities, resulting from the multi-state model, constitutes a very interesting tool which could be useful to help oncologists and patients make efficient and effective decisions.

  13. Stress-induced cleavage of Myc promotes cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice; Ngouenet, Celine; Anderson, Sarah; Brabletz, Thomas; Eisenman, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of apoptosis is critical in Myc-induced tumor progression. Here we report that cancer cells evade death under stress by activating calpain-mediated proteolysis of Myc. This generates Myc-nick, a cytoplasmic, transcriptionally inactive cleavage product of Myc. We found conversion of Myc into Myc-nick in cell lines and tissues derived from multiple cancers. In colon cancer, the production of Myc-nick is enhanced under stress conditions such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Under these conditions, ectopic expression of Myc-nick promotes anchorage-independent growth and cell survival at least in part by promoting autophagy. Myc-nick also delays colon cancer cell death after treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs such as etoposide, cisplatin, and imatinib. Furthermore, colon cancer cells expressing a cleavage-resistant form of Myc undergo extensive apoptosis but are rescued by overexpression of Myc-nick. We also found that ectopic expression of Myc-nick results in the induction of the actin-bundling protein fascin, formation of filopodia, and increased cell motility—all mediators of tumor metastasis. Myc-nick-induced survival, autophagy, and motility require Myc box II (MBII), a region of Myc-nick that recruits acetyltransferases that in turn modify cytoplasmic proteins, including α-tubulin and ATG3. Our results suggest that Myc-nick-induced survival and motility contribute to colon cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:24696454

  14. The Survival Impact of the Intergroup 0116 Trial on Patients With Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Moody, John S.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: The Intergroup 0116 (INT 0116) trial demonstrated a survival benefit for a broad group of fully resected gastric cancer patients. This study examined the impact on survival of the release of this landmark trial. Methods and Materials: Patients with gastric carcinoma diagnosed between 1995 and 2004 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Patients from the overall population as well as those potentially eligible for the INT 0116 trial were classified as having been diagnosed either before (1995-1999) or after (2000-2004) this trial. Both Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox models were used to examine survival trends within these cohorts. Results: For the overall population of 22,982 patients, the use of radiotherapy (RT) significantly changed after the INT 0116 trial (p < 0.0001), with postoperative RT increasing from 6.5% to 13.3%. For the two periods of interest, overall survival significantly improved in recent years (p = 0.00008). A similar improvement was also seen for patients who were potentially eligible for the INT 0116 trial (p = 0.004), with 3-year survival rates improving from 32.2% to 34.5%. On both univariate and multivariate analysis, use of RT was associated with a significant survival improvement (HR, 0.65 [0.48-0.88]; p = 0.005). Conclusion: Use of postoperative RT for gastric cancer has significantly increased after the release of the INT 0116 trial, likely reflecting increased use of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. This change has been associated with improved survival in gastric cancer patients, suggesting that the improved outcome seen in this trial has been successfully translated to the community.

  15. The association of adjuvant therapy with survival at the population level following pancreatic adenocarcinoma resection

    PubMed Central

    Kagedan, Daniel J.; Raju, Ravish S.; Dixon, Matthew E.; Shin, Elizabeth; Li, Qing; Liu, Ning; Elmi, Maryam; El-Sedfy, Abraham; Paszat, Lawrence; Kiss, Alexander; Earle, Craig C.; Mittmann, Nicole; Coburn, Natalie G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Using a retrospective observational cohort approach, the overall survival (OS) following curative-intent resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) was defined at the population level according to adjuvant treatment, and predictors of OS were identified. Methods Patients undergoing resection of PC in the province of Ontario between 2005 and 2010 were identified using the provincial cancer registry, and linked to databases that include all treatments received and outcomes experienced in the province. Pathology reports were abstracted for staging and margin status. Patients were identified as having received chemotherapy (CT), chemoradiation therapy (CRT), or no adjuvant treatment (NAT). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis of patients surviving ≥6 months was performed, and predictors of OS identified by log-rank test. Cox multivariable analysis was used to define independent predictors of OS. Results Among the 473 patients undergoing PC resection, the median survival was 17.8 months; for the 397 who survived ≥6 months following surgery, the 5-year OS for the CT, CRT, and NAT groups was 21%, 16%, and 17%, respectively (p = 0.584). Lymph node-negative patients demonstrated improved OS associated with chemotherapy on multivariable analysis (HR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.25–3.83 for NAT vs. CT). Conclusions Following PC resection, only patients with negative lymph nodes demonstrated improved OS associated with adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27037203

  16. Organochlorine insecticides DDT and chlordane in relation to survival following breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Humberto; Wolff, Mary S.; Engel, Lawrence S.; White, Alexandra J.; Eng, Sybil M.; Cleveland, Rebecca J.; Khankari, Nikhil K.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2015-01-01

    Organochlorine insecticides have been studied extensively in relation to breast cancer incidence and results from two meta-analyses have been null for late-life residues, possibly due to measurement error. Whether these compounds influence survival remains to be fully explored. We examined associations between organochlorine insecticides (p,p’-DDT, its primary metabolite, p,p’-DDE, and chlordane) assessed shortly after diagnosis and survival among women with breast cancer. A population-based sample of women diagnosed with a first primary invasive or in situ breast cancer in 1996–1997 and with available organochlorine blood measures (n=633) were followed for vital status through 2011. After follow-up of 5 and 15 years, we identified 55 and 189 deaths, of which 36 and 74, respectively, were breast cancer-related. Using Cox regression models, we estimated the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for lipid-adjusted organochlorine concentrations with all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality. At 5 years after diagnosis, the highest tertile of DDT concentration was associated with all-cause (HR=2.19; 95%CI: 1.02, 4.67) and breast cancer-specific (HR=2.72; 95%CI: 1.04, 7.13) mortality. At 15 years, middle tertile concentrations of DDT (HR=1.42; CI 0.99, 2.06) and chlordane (HR=1.42; 95%CI: 0.94, 2.12) were modestly associated with all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality. Third tertile DDE concentrations were inversely associated with 15-year all-cause mortality (HR=0.66; 95%CI: 0.44, 0.99). This is the first population-based study in the United States to show that DDT may adversely impact survival following breast cancer diagnosis. Further studies are warranted given the high breast cancer burden and the ubiquity of these chemicals. PMID:26285160

  17. Organochlorine insecticides DDT and chlordane in relation to survival following breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Parada, Humberto; Wolff, Mary S; Engel, Lawrence S; White, Alexandra J; Eng, Sybil M; Cleveland, Rebecca J; Khankari, Nikhil K; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Neugut, Alfred I; Gammon, Marilie D

    2016-02-01

    Organochlorine insecticides have been studied extensively in relation to breast cancer incidence, and results from two meta-analyses have been null for late-life residues, possibly due to measurement error. Whether these compounds influence survival remains to be fully explored. We examined associations between organochlorine insecticides [p,p'-DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), its primary metabolite, p,p'-DDE, and chlordane] assessed shortly after diagnosis and survival among women with breast cancer. A population-based sample of women diagnosed with a first primary invasive or in situ breast cancer in 1996-1997 and with available organochlorine blood measures (n = 633) were followed for vital status through 2011. After follow-up of 5 and 15 years, we identified 55 and 189 deaths, of which 36 and 74, respectively, were breast cancer-related. Using Cox regression models, we estimated the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for lipid-adjusted organochlorine concentrations with all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality. At 5 years after diagnosis, the highest tertile of DDT concentration was associated with all-cause (HR = 2.19; 95% CI: 1.02, 4.67) and breast cancer-specific (HR = 2.72; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.13) mortality. At 15 years, middle tertile concentrations of DDT (HR = 1.42; 95% CI 0.99, 2.06) and chlordane (HR = 1.42; 95% CI: 0.94, 2.12) were modestly associated with all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality. Third tertile DDE concentrations were inversely associated with 15-year all-cause mortality (HR = 0.66; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.99). This is the first population-based study in the United States to show that DDT may adversely impact survival following breast cancer diagnosis. Further studies are warranted given the high breast cancer burden and the ubiquity of these chemicals.

  18. Person centered prediction of survival in population based screening program by an intelligent clinical decision support system

    PubMed Central

    Safdari, Reza; Maserat, Elham; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Javan Amoli, Amir hossein; Mohaghegh Shalmani, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To survey person centered survival rate in population based screening program by an intelligent clinical decision support system. Background: Colorectal cancer is the most common malignancy and major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Colorectal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death in Iran. In this survey, we used cosine similarity as data mining technique and intelligent system for estimating survival of at risk groups in the screening plan. Methods: In the first step, we determined minimum data set (MDS). MDS was approved by experts and reviewing literatures. In the second step, MDS were coded by python language and matched with cosine similarity formula. Finally, survival rate by percent was illustrated in the user interface of national intelligent system. The national intelligent system was designed in PyCharm environment. Results: Main data elements of intelligent system consist demographic information, age, referral type, risk group, recommendation and survival rate. Minimum data set related to survival comprise of clinical status, past medical history and socio-demographic information. Information of the covered population as a comprehensive database was connected to intelligent system and survival rate estimated for each patient. Mean range of survival of HNPCC patients and FAP patients were respectively 77.7% and 75.1%. Also, the mean range of the survival rate and other calculations have changed with the entry of new patients in the CRC registry by real-time. Conclusion: National intelligent system monitors the entire of risk group and reports survival rates by electronic guidelines and data mining technique and also operates according to the clinical process. This web base software has a critical role in the estimation survival rate in order to health care planning. PMID:28331566

  19. Treatment Extends Survival for Women with Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who received gemcitabine (Gemzar®) both as part of initial treatment and as part of therapy following primary treatment had improved survival compared with patients whose treatment did not include gemcitabine, according to findings presented at the 2009 ASCO meeting in Orlando.

  20. Exemestane Following Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences and Prolongs Survival

    Cancer.gov

    Postmenopausal women with early-stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer had delayed disease recurrence and longer survival after taking 2-3 years of tamoxifen followed by exemestane for a total of 5 years compared to taking tamoxifen for 5 years.

  1. Effect of adenosine 5'-triphosphate infusions on the nutritional status and survival of preterminal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Beijer, Sandra; Hupperets, Pierre S; van den Borne, Ben E; Eussen, Simone R; van Henten, Arjen M; van den Beuken-van Everdingen, Marieke; de Graeff, Alexander; Ambergen, Ton A; van den Brandt, Piet A; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of intravenous infusions of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) on nutritional status and survival in preterminal cancer patients. Ninety-nine preterminal cancer patients (estimated life expectancy 1-6 months) with mixed tumor types were randomly allocated to receive either intravenous ATP weekly (8-10 h/week, maximum 50 microg/kg/min) for 8 weeks, or no ATP (control group). Nutritional status parameters were assessed until 8 weeks, and analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of covariance. Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to assess the effect of ATP on short-term (0-8 weeks) and long-term (0-6 months) survival. Fifty-one patients were randomized to ATP and 48 to the control group. Results showed a significant favorable effect of ATP on triceps skin fold thickness [between-group difference per 8 weeks 1.76 mm, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.48-3.12 mm; P = 0.009] and on short-term survival [0-8 weeks hazard ratio (HR): 0.40, 95% CI: 0.17-0.95; P = 0.037]. In weight-stable patients and in lung cancer patients, long-term survival (0-6 months) was also significantly better in ATP-treated patients (weight-stable patients HR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.19-0.83; P = 0.014; patients with lung cancer: HR: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.14-0.88; P = 0.025). In conclusion, in this population of preterminal cancer patients, ATP infusions, at the dose and schedule studied, had a favorable effect on triceps skin fold thickness and survival, especially in weight-stable patients and patients with lung cancer. Larger studies are warranted to confirm these findings and to further define the effect of ATP on tumor growth and survival.

  2. Prediagnostic Plasma Adiponectin and Survival among Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chong, Dawn Q; Mehta, Raaj S; Song, Mingyang; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Ng, Kimmie; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward L; Ogino, Shuji; Chan, Andrew T

    2015-12-01

    Circulating adiponectin is inversely related to the risk of colorectal cancer. However, its influence on colorectal cancer survival is unclear. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the association between prediagnostic plasma levels of adiponectin and mortality in patients with colorectal cancer. We identified 621 incident colorectal cancer cases who provided blood specimens prior to diagnosis within the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI). After a median follow-up of 9 years, there were 269 (43%) total deaths, of which 181 (67%) were due to colorectal cancer. Compared with participants in the lowest quartile of adiponectin, those in the highest quartile had multivariate HRs of 1.89 (95% CI, 1.21-2.97; P(trend) = 0.01) for colorectal cancer-specific mortality and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.15-2.39; P(trend) = 0.009) for overall mortality. The apparent increased risk in colorectal cancer-specific mortality was more pronounced in patients with metastatic disease (HR, 3.02: 95% CI, 1.50-6.08). Among patients with colorectal cancer, prediagnostic plasma adiponectin is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer-specific and overall mortality and is more apparent in patients with metastatic disease. Adiponectin may be a marker for cancers which develop through specific pathways that may be associated with worsened prognosis. Further studies are needed to validate these findings.

  3. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Improves Survival in Patients With Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Paximadis, Peter; Yoo, George; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Jacobs, John; Sukari, Ammar; Dyson, Greg; Christensen, Michael; Kim, Harold

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review our institutional experience with hypopharyngeal carcinoma with respect to treatment modality. Methods and Materials: A total of 70 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer treated between 1999 and 2009 were analyzed for functional and survival outcomes. The treatments included surgery alone (n = 5), surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) (n = 3), surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy (CRT) (n = 13), RT alone (n = 2), CRT alone (n = 22), induction chemotherapy followed by RT (n = 3), and induction chemotherapy followed by CRT (n = 22). Results: The median follow-up was 18 months. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients was 28.3 and 17.6 months, respectively. The 1- and 2-year local control rate for all patients was 87.1% and 80%. CRT, given either as primary therapy or in the adjuvant setting, improved overall survival and disease-free survival compared with patients not receiving CRT. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for patients treated with CRT was 36.7 and 17.6 months vs. 14.0 and 8.0 months, respectively (p < .01). Of the patients initially treated with an organ-preserving approach, 4 (8.2%) required salvage laryngectomy for local recurrence or persistent disease; 8 (16.3%) and 12 (24.5%) patients were dependent on a percutaneous gastrostomy and tracheostomy tube, respectively. The 2-year laryngoesophageal dysfunction-free survival rate for patients treated with an organ-preserving approach was estimated at 31.7%. Conclusions: Concurrent CRT improves survival in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer. CRT given with conventional radiation techniques yields poor functional outcomes, and future efforts should be directed at determining the feasibility of pharyngeal-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with hypopharyngeal tumors.

  4. Breast Cancer in Developing Countries: Opportunities for Improved Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Lawrence N.; Willett, Walter; Sievers, Amy; Knaul, Felicia M.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer survival in the USA has continually improved over the last six decades and has largely been accredited to the use of mammography, advanced surgical procedures, and adjuvant therapies. Data indicate, however, that there were substantial improvements in survival in the USA even prior to these technological and diagnostic advances, suggesting important opportunities for early detection and treatment in low- and middle-income countries where these options are often unavailable and/or unaffordable. Thus, while continuing to strive for increased access to more advanced technology, improving survival in these settings should be more immediately achievable through increased awareness of breast cancer and of the potential for successful treatment, a high-quality primary care system without economic or cultural barriers to access, and a well-functioning referral system for basic surgical and hormonal treatment. PMID:21253541

  5. Optimum survival strategies against zombie infestations - a population dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    We model a zombie infestation by three coupled ODEs that jointly describe the time evolution of three populations: regular humans, zombies, and survivors (humans that have survived at least one zombie encounter). This can be generalized to take into account more levels of expertise and/or skill degradation. We compute the fixed points, and stability thereof, that correspond to one of three possible outcomes: human extinction, zombie extermination or, if one allows for a human non-zero birth-rate, co-habitation. We obtain analytically the optimum strategy for humans in terms of the model's parameters (essentially, whether to flee and hide, or fight). Zombies notwithstanding, this can also be seen as a toy model for infections of immune system cells, such as CD4+ T cells in AIDS, and macrophages in tuberculosis, whereby cells are both the target of infection, and mediate the acquired immunity response against the same infection. I thank FAPERJ for financial support.

  6. Soyfood intake and breast cancer survival: a followup of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Boyapati, Sonia M; Shu, Xiao-ou; Ruan, Zhi Xian; Dai, Qi; Cai, Qiuyin; Gao, Yu-tang; Zheng, Wei

    2005-07-01

    Soy and its constituents have been shown in many in vivo and in vitro studies and in some epidemiological studies to have anti-cancer effects. Some soy constituents, however, also stimulate cell proliferation, which has raised concerns in promoting soy intake among breast cancer survivors. To investigate whether soy intake may be associated with breast cancer survival, we evaluated data from a cohort of 1459 breast cancer patients who participated in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study between 1996 and 1998. Usual soy food intake was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline. The median follow-up time for this cohort of women was 5.2 years. We found that soy intake prior to cancer diagnosis was unrelated to disease-free breast cancer survival (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=0.99, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-1.33 for the highest tertile compared to the lowest tertile). The association between soy protein intake and breast cancer survival did not differ according to ER/PR status, tumor stage, age at diagnosis, body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio (WHR), or menopausal status. Additionally, the soy-survival association did not appear to vary according to XbaI or PvuII polymorphisms in ER-alpha, or C(14206)T, G(25652)A, or A(50766)G polymorphisms in ER-beta. These data suggest that soyfoods do not have an adverse effect on breast cancer survival.

  7. Childhood Cancer Survivorship Research in Minority Populations: A Position Paper from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Smita; Gibson, Todd M; Ness, Kirsten K; Liu, Qi; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Krull, Kevin R; Nathan, Paul C; Neglia, Joseph P; Leisenring, Wendy; Yasui, Yutaka; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    By the middle of this century, racial/ethnic minority populations will collectively constitute 50% of the US population. This temporal shift in the racial/ethnic make-up of the US population demands a close look at the race/ethnicity-specific burden of morbidity and premature mortality among childhood cancer survivors. To optimize targeted long-term follow-up care, it is essential to understand whether the burden of morbidity borne by survivors of childhood cancer differs by race/ethnicity. This is challenging because the number of minority participants is often limited in current childhood cancer survivorship research, resulting in a paucity of race/ethnicity-specific recommendations and/or interventions. We show that while the overall childhood cancer incidence increased between 1973 and 2003, the mortality rate declined; however these changes did not differ appreciably by race/ethnicity. We speculate that any racial/ethnic differences in outcome are likely to be multifactorial, and draw upon data from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study to illustrate the various contributors (socioeconomic characteristics, health behaviors and comorbidities) that could explain any observed differences in key treatment-related complications. Finally, we outline challenges in conducting race/ethnicity-specific childhood cancer survivorship research, showing that there are limited absolute numbers of children who are diagnosed and survive cancer in any one racial/ethnic minority population, precluding a rigorous evaluation of adverse events among specific primary cancer diagnoses and treatment exposure groups. PMID:27253866

  8. Cancer incidence and survival in adolescents and young adults in France, 2000-2008.

    PubMed

    Desandes, Emmanuel; Lacour, Brigitte; Belot, Aurélien; Molinie, Florence; Delafosse, Patricia; Tretarre, Brigitte; Velten, Michel; Sauleau, Erik-André; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Ganry, Olivier; Bara, Simona; Grosclaude, Pascale; Troussard, Xavier; Bouvier, Véronique; Brugieres, Laurence; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to describe cancer incidence (2000-2008) and survival (2000-2004) in France in adolescents and young adults (AYA). All cases of cancer diagnosed in 15-24 years, recorded by all French population-based registries (14% of the French population), over the 2000-2008 period, were included. Incidence change over time was described with the conventional annual percentage change (cAPC). The survival of cases diagnosed (2000-2004) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 1022 in adolescents and 1396 in young adults were diagnosed. Overall incidence rates were 219.4/10(6) in 15-19 year olds and 293.1/10(6) in 20-24 year olds. The most frequently diagnosed cancers in male AYA were malignant gonadal germ-cell tumors and Hodgkin's disease, and were melanoma, thyroid carcinoma, and Hodgkin's disease in females. The age-standardized rates appeared stable over time in AYA, with a cAPC of +2.0% (P = 0.68). The 5-year overall survival for all cancers was different between genders and age groups, with 78.8% (95%CI: 75.6-82.0) for males and 85.2% (95%CI: 82.2-88.1) for females (P = 0.01), and 78.5% (95%CI: 75.0-82.1) in 15-19 year olds and 84.3% (95% CI: 81.6-87.0) in 20-24 year olds (P = 0.02). Noteworthy, the frequency and the distribution of tumor types in AYA are unique and different from the observed at any other age group. Survival in French AYA has improved over time. Epidemiological data might reflect major trends in the risk factors and preventive interventions. Thus, further research into etiology of cancers affecting AYA should become key priorities for cancer control among AYA.

  9. Genetic polymorphisms in MMP 2, 9 and 3 genes modify lung cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes that contribute to all stages of tumour progression, including the later stages of invasion and metastasis. Genetic variants in the MMP genes may influence the biological function of these enzymes and change their role in carcinogenesis and progression. We have investigated the association between the -735 C/T, the -1171 5A/6A, and the -1562 C/T polymorphisms in the MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 genes, respectively, and the risk and survival of lung cancer. Methods The case-control study includes 879 lung cancer patients and 803 controls from a Caucasian population in Spain (CAPUA study). Genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. The Kaplan-Meier method, long-rank test and Cox's were used for the survival analysis. Results The MMP9 -1562 T/T genotype was associated with a statistically significant decreased risk of developing lung cancer (OR = 0.23; 95% CI: 0.06-0.85), whereas no association was found for the MMP2 -735 C/T and MMP3 -1171 5A/6A polymorphisms. The MMP2 -735 T/T genotype was statistically significantly associated with a decreased survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, identified as an independent prognosis factor of survival (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.00-3.20). In contrast, no association was found between the MMP3 -1171 5A/6A and the MMP9 -1562 C/T polymorphisms and survival. Conclusions These findings support the hypothesis that the MMP9 -1562 C/T polymorphism is associated with a protective effect against the development of lung cancer and suggest that the MMP2 -735 C/T polymorphism modify the length of survival in NSCLC patients. PMID:22455335

  10. Breast cancer survival in the US and Europe: a CONCORD high-resolution study.

    PubMed

    Allemani, Claudia; Sant, Milena; Weir, Hannah K; Richardson, Lisa C; Baili, Paolo; Storm, Hans; Siesling, Sabine; Torrella-Ramos, Ana; Voogd, Adri C; Aareleid, Tiiu; Ardanaz, Eva; Berrino, Franco; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Bolick, Susan; Cirilli, Claudia; Colonna, Marc; Contiero, Paolo; Cress, Rosemary; Crocetti, Emanuele; Fulton, John P; Grosclaude, Pascale; Hakulinen, Timo; Izarzugaza, M Isabel; Malmström, Per; Peignaux, Karin; Primic-Žakelj, Maja; Rachtan, Jadwiga; Safaei Diba, Chakameh; Sánchez, Maria-José; Schymura, Maria J; Shen, Tiefu; Traina, Adele; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tumino, Rosario; Velten, Michel; Vercelli, Marina; Wolf, Holly J; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Wu, Xiaocheng; Coleman, Michel P

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer survival is reportedly higher in the US than in Europe. The first worldwide study (CONCORD) found wide international differences in age-standardized survival. The aim of this study is to explain these survival differences. Population-based data on stage at diagnosis, diagnostic procedures, treatment and follow-up were collected for about 20,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer aged 15-99 years during 1996-98 in 7 US states and 12 European countries. Age-standardized net survival and the excess hazard of death up to 5 years after diagnosis were estimated by jurisdiction (registry, country, European region), age and stage with flexible parametric models. Breast cancers were generally less advanced in the US than in Europe. Stage also varied less between US states than between European jurisdictions. Early, node-negative tumors were more frequent in the US (39%) than in Europe (32%), while locally advanced tumors were twice as frequent in Europe (8%), and metastatic tumors of similar frequency (5-6%). Net survival in Northern, Western and Southern Europe (81-84%) was similar to that in the US (84%), but lower in Eastern Europe (69%). For the first 3 years after diagnosis the mean excess hazard was higher in Eastern Europe than elsewhere: the difference was most marked for women aged 70-99 years, and mainly confined to women with locally advanced or metastatic tumors. Differences in breast cancer survival between Europe and the US in the late 1990s were mainly explained by lower survival in Eastern Europe, where low healthcare expenditure may have constrained the quality of treatment.

  11. Prognostic factors and survival in patients with gastric stump cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hua; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Jin, Jie-Jie; Long, Zi-Wen; Cai, Hong; Liu, Xiao-Wen; Zhou, Ye; Wang, Ya-Nong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the clinicopathological characteristics and prognostic factors of gastric stump cancer (GSC). METHODS: The clinical data for 92 patients with GSC were collected at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. The prognostic factors were analyzed with Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: GSC tended to occur within 25 years following the primary surgery, when the initial disease is benign, whereas it primarily occurred within the first 15 years post-operation for gastric cancer. Patients with regular follow-up after primary surgery had a better survival rate. The multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that Borrmann type I/II (HR = 3.165, 95%CI: 1.055-9.500, P = 0.040) and radical resection (HR = 1.780, 95%CI: 1.061-2.987, P = 0.029) were independent prognostic factors for GSC. The overall 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates of the 92 patients were 78.3%, 45.6% and 27.6%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates of those undergoing radical resection were 79.3%, 52.2%, and 37.8%, respectively. The 5-year survival rates for stages I, II, III, and IV were 85.7%, 47.4%, 16.0%, and 13.3%, respectively (P = 0.005). CONCLUSION: The appearance of GSC occurs sooner in patients with primary malignant cancer than in patients with a primary benign disease. Therefore, close follow-up is necessary. The overall survival of patients with GSC is poor, and curative resection can improve their prognosis. PMID:25684953

  12. Modelling Circulating Tumour Cells for Personalised Survival Prediction in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics. PMID:25978366

  13. Factors associated with disease-specific survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Mirian Carvalho; Cruz, Oswaldo Gonçalves; Vasconcelos, Ana Glória Godoi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Lung cancer is a global public health problem and is associated with high mortality. Lung cancer could be largely avoided by reducing the prevalence of smoking. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of social, behavioral, and clinical factors on the survival time of patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated at Cancer Hospital I of the José Alencar Gomes da Silva National Cancer Institute, located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 2000 and 2003. Methods: This was a retrospective hospital cohort study involving 1,194 patients. The 60-month disease-specific survival probabilities were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method for three stage groups. The importance of the studied factors was assessed with a hierarchical theoretical model after adjustment by Cox multiple regression. Results: The estimated 60-month specific-disease lethality rate was 86.0%. The 60-month disease-specific survival probability ranged from 25.0% (stages I/II) to 2.5% (stage IV). The performance status, the intention to treat, and the initial treatment modality were the major prognostic factors identified in the study population. Conclusions: In this cohort of patients, the disease-specific survival probabilities were extremely low. We identified no factors that could be modified after the diagnosis in order to improve survival. Primary prevention, such as reducing the prevalence of smoking, is still the best method to reduce the number of people who will suffer the consequences of lung cancer. PMID:27812630

  14. Survival of the fittest: cancer stem cells in therapeutic resistance and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eyler, Christine E; Rich, Jeremy N

    2008-06-10

    In an increasing number of cancers, tumor populations called cancer stem cells (CSCs), or tumor-initiating cells, have been defined in functional assays of self-renewal and tumor initiation. Moreover, recent work in several different cancers has suggested the CSC population as a source of chemotherapy and radiation-therapy resistance within tumors. Work in glioblastoma and breast cancers supports the idea that CSCs may possess innate resistance mechanisms against radiation- and chemotherapy-induced cancer cell death, allowing them to survive and initiate tumor recurrence. Several resistance mechanisms have been proposed, including amplified checkpoint activation and DNA damage repair as well as increased Wnt/beta-catenin and Notch signaling. Novel targeted therapies against the DNA damage checkpoint or stem-cell maintenance pathways may sensitize CSCs to radiation or other therapies. Another important category of cancer therapies are antiangiogenic and vascular targeting agents, which are also becoming integrated in the treatment paradigm of an increasing number of cancers. Recent results from our laboratory and others support a role for CSCs in the angiogenic drive as well as the mechanism of antiangiogenic agents. Identifying and targeting the molecular mechanisms responsible for CSC therapeutic resistance may improve the efficacy of current cancer therapies.

  15. Checkpoint immunotherapy for cancer: superior survival, unaccustomed toxicities.

    PubMed

    Gedye, C; van der Westhuizen, A; John, T

    2015-07-01

    Novel cancer immunotherapy antibodies are moving from clinical trials into routine practice, delivering sustained benefits and prolonged survival to patients with melanoma, lung, kidney and other cancers. These immunostimulatory antibodies non-specifically activate the patient's own immune system by inhibiting immune system checkpoint proteins. This mechanism of action is entirely different to traditional cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy. While there are virtually no immediate toxicities, serious life-threatening autoimmune side-effects such as colitis, dermatitis, hypophysitis, pneumonitis and hepatitis can occur, sometimes starting long after the treatment has been given. Recognition, referral and prompt treatment with immunosuppressive drugs like corticosteroids can control these immune-related side-effects without compromising efficacy. This exciting new class of drugs is defining a new paradigm in cancer therapy.

  16. Allergies, obesity, other risk factors and survival from pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Olson, Sara H; Chou, Joanne F; Ludwig, Emmy; O'Reilly, Eileen; Allen, Peter J; Jarnagin, William R; Bayuga, Sharon; Simon, Jennifer; Gonen, Mithat; Reisacher, William R; Kurtz, Robert C

    2010-11-15

    Survival from pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains extremely poor, approximately 5% at 5 years. Risk factors include smoking, high body mass index (BMI), family history of pancreatic cancer, and long-standing diabetes; in contrast, allergies are associated with reduced risk. Little is known about associations between these factors and survival. We analyzed overall survival in relation to risk factors for 475 incident cases who took part in a hospital based case-control study. Analyses were conducted separately for those who did (160) and did not (315) undergo tumor resection. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to describe survival according to smoking, BMI, family history, diabetes, and presence of allergies. Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust for covariates. There was no association with survival based on smoking, family history, or history of diabetes in either group. Among patients with resection, those with allergies showed nonstatistically significant longer survival, a median of 33.1 months (95% CI: 19.0-52.5) vs. 21.8 months (95% CI: 18.0-33.1), p = 0.25. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.43-1.23), p = 0.23. Among patients without resection, those with self-reported allergies survived significantly longer than those without allergies: 13.3 months (95% CI: 10.6-16.9) compared to 10.4 months (95% CI: 8.8-11.0), p = 0.04, with an adjusted HR of 0.68 (95% CI: 0.49-0.95), p = 0.02. Obesity was nonsignificantly associated with poorer survival, particularly in the resected group (HR = 1.62, 95% CI: 0.76-3.44). The mechanisms underlying the association between history of allergies and improved survival are unknown. These novel results need to be confirmed in other studies.

  17. Aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen and ovarian cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Christina M; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; DeFazio, Anna; Protani, Melinda M; Webb, Penelope M

    2015-04-01

    Aspirin and nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to decrease tumor progression in pre-clinical models of ovarian cancer, however the influence of these drugs on survival in women following a diagnosis of ovarian cancer is unknown. We included 1305 Australian women diagnosed with incident invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, recruited into a population-based case-control study. Use of aspirin, nonaspirin NSAIDs and acetaminophen in the 5 years preceding ovarian cancer diagnosis was assessed from self-reports. Deaths were ascertained up to October 2011 via linkage with the Australian National Death Index. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). During a mean follow-up time of 4.9 years (SD 2.8 years), there were 834 deaths, of which 779 (93% of deaths) were from ovarian cancer. We found uniformly inverse, but non-significant, HRs for ever use in the last five years of aspirin, nonaspirin NSAIDs and acetaminophen compared with no use (adjusted HRs 0.92 [95% CI 0.81-1.06], 0.91 [95% CI 0.80-1.05] and 0.91 [95% CI 0.69-1.20], respectively). There was no evidence of any dose response trends. The results remained unchanged when we limited the outcome to ovarian cancer mortality. Associations did not differ by histologic subtype, age at diagnosis or stage. Given current interest in the role of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs in cancer survival these results are noteworthy given they are the first to investigate these associations in women with ovarian cancer. Our results provide no strong evidence that pre-diagnostic use of aspirin or nonaspirin NSAIDs are associated with improved survival in women with ovarian cancer.

  18. Snus use, smoking and survival among prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kathryn M; Markt, Sarah C; Fang, Fang; Nordenvall, Caroline; Rider, Jennifer R; Ye, Weimin; Adami, Hans-Olov; Stattin, Pär; Nyrén, Olof; Mucci, Lorelei A

    2016-12-15

    Smoking is associated with prostate cancer mortality. The Scandinavian smokeless tobacco product snus is a source of nicotine but not the combustion products of smoke and has not been studied with respect to prostate cancer survival. The study is nested among 9,582 men with incident prostate cancer within a prospective cohort of 336,381 Swedish construction workers. Information on tobacco use was collected at study entry between 1971 and 1992, and categorized into (i) never users of any tobacco, (ii) exclusive snus: ever users of snus only, (iii) exclusive smokers: ever smokers (cigarette, cigar and/or pipe) only and (iv) ever users of both snus and smoking. Hazard ratios for prostate cancer-specific and total mortality for smoking and snus use based on Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, calendar period at diagnosis and body mass index at baseline. During 36 years of follow-up, 4,758 patients died-2,489 due to prostate cancer. Compared to never users of tobacco, exclusive smokers were at increased risk of prostate cancer mortality (HR 1.15, 95% CI: 1.05-1.27) and total mortality (HR 1.17, 95% CI: 1.09-1.26). Exclusive snus users also had increased risks for prostate cancer mortality (HR 1.24, 95% CI: 1.03-1.49) and total mortality (HR 1.19, 95% CI: 1.04-1.37). Among men diagnosed with nonmetastatic disease, the HR for prostate cancer death among exclusive snus users was 3.17 (95% CI: 1.66-6.06). The study is limited by a single assessment of tobacco use prior to diagnosis. Snus use was associated with increased risks of prostate cancer and total mortality among prostate cancer patients. This suggests that tobacco-related components such as nicotine or tobacco-specific carcinogens may promote cancer progression independent of tobacco's combustion products.

  19. Hormone receptor status and survival of medullary breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Asude; Odabas, Hatice; Kaya, Serap; Bozkurt, Oktay; Degirmenci, Mustafa; Topcu, Turkan O.; Aytekin, Aydın; Arpaci, Erkan; Avci, Nilufer; Pilanci, Kezban N.; Cinkir, Havva Y.; Bozkaya, Yakup; Cirak, Yalcin; Gumus, Mahmut

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the relationship between clinical features, hormonal receptor status, and survival in patients who were diagnosed with medullary breast cancer (MBC). Methods: Demographic characteristics, histopathological features, and survival statuses of 201 patients diagnosed with MBC between 1995 and 2015 were retrospectively recorded. Survival analyses were conducted with uni- and multivariate cox regression analysis. Results: Median follow-up time was 54 (4-272) months. Median patient age at the time of diagnosis was 47 years old (26-90). Of the patients, 91.5% were triple negative. Five-year recurrence free survival time (RFS) rate was 87.4% and overalll survival (OS) rate 95.7%. For RFS, progesterone receptor (PR) negativity, atypical histopathological evaluation, absence of lymphovascular invasion, smaller tumor, lower nodal involvement were found to be favourable prognostic factors by univariate analysis (p<0.05). The PR negativity and smaller tumor were found to be favourable factors by univariate analysis (p<0.05). However, none of these factors were determined as significant independent prognostic factors for OS (p>0.05). Conclusion: Turkish MBC patients exhibited good prognosis, which was comparable with survival outcomes achieved in the literature. The PR negativity was related to a better RFS and OS rates. PMID:28133688

  20. Survival in gastric cancer in relation to postoperative adjuvant therapy and determinants

    PubMed Central

    Ozden, Sevgi; Ozgen, Zerrin; Ozyurt, Hazan; Gemici, Cengiz; Yaprak, Gokhan; Tepetam, Huseyin; Mayadagli, Alpaslan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate survival data in patients with gastric cancer in relation to postoperative adjuvant therapy and survival determinants METHODS: A total of 201 patients (mean ± SD age: 56.0 ± 11.9 years, 69.7% were males) with gastric carcinoma who were operated and followed up at Lutfi Kirdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital between 1998 and 2010 were included in this retrospective study. Follow up was evaluated divided into two consecutive periods (before 2008 and 2008-2010, respectively) based on introduction of 3-D conformal technique in radiotherapy at our clinic in 2008. Data on patient demographics, clinical and histopathological characteristics of gastric carcinoma and the type of treatment applied after surgery [postoperative adjuvant treatment protocols including chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and chemotherapy (CT), supportive therapy or follow up without any treatment] were recorded. The median duration and determinants of local recurrence free (LRF) survival, distant metastasis free (DMF) survival and overall survival were evaluated in the overall population as well as with respect to follow up years [1998-2008 (n = 127) vs 2008-2010 (n = 74)]. RESULTS: Median duration for LRF survival, DMF survival and overall survival were 31.9, 24.1 and 31.9 mo, respectively in patients with postoperative adjuvant CRT. No significant difference was noted in median duration for LRF survival, DMF survival and overall survival with respect to treatment protocols in the overall population and also with respect to followed up periods. In the overall population, CT protocols FUFA [5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m2) and leucovorin-folinic acid (FA, 20 mg/m2)] (29.9 mo) and UFT® + Antrex® [a fixed combination of the oral FU prodrug tegafur (flouroprymidine, FT, 300 mg/m2 per day) with FA (Antrex®), 15 mg tablet, two times a day] (42.5 mo) was significantly associated with longer LRF survival times than other CT protocols (P = 0.036), while no difference was noted between CT

  1. Survival analysis of children with primary malignant brain tumors in England and Wales: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Jen-Ho; Tseng, Ming-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    Primary malignant brain tumor is the second most common cancer in children. To investigate factors affecting children's survival at a population level, data of 3,169 patients (age<15 years) from the Cancer Registry in England and Wales were used. They were diagnosed during 1971-1990 and followed up until 1995. Variables including age, gender, morphology, WHO grade, tumor site, socioeconomic status, geographical region, and period of diagnosis were available for analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox hazards ratio (HR) regression. Results showed that the median survival and the 1-, 5-, and 10-year crude survival rate for this population were 8.7 years, 72.4, 54.0, and 49.2% respectively. Survival was influenced by age (HR 0.88/5 years), morphology (ependymoma HR 2.43), WHO grades (HR 1.42/grade), tumor sites (brain stem HR 2.11), and periods of diagnosis (HR 0.88/5 years). Gender, socioeconomic status, and geographical region did not affect their survival. Results from this population-based data are very helpful for comparison with other hospital-based studies and for public health purposes.

  2. Targeting Metabolic Survival Pathways in Lung Cancer via Combination Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    critical metabolic pathways necessary for survival of liver kinase B1 (LKB1)- deficient non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. We have conducted...13C metabolic flux analysis studies in LKB1 proficient or deficient NSCLC cells under nutrient complete or metabolic stress conditions (e.g. hypoxia...derived pyruvate in mitochondria. LKB1- deficient cells also exhibit increased reliance on glutamine metabolism. Treatment with biguanides such as

  3. Metabolic pathways promoting cancer cell survival and growth.

    PubMed

    Boroughs, Lindsey K; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2015-04-01

    Activation of oncogenes and loss of tumour suppressors promote metabolic reprogramming in cancer, resulting in enhanced nutrient uptake to supply energetic and biosynthetic pathways. However, nutrient limitations within solid tumours may require that malignant cells exhibit metabolic flexibility to sustain growth and survival. Here, we highlight these adaptive mechanisms and also discuss emerging approaches to probe tumour metabolism in vivo and their potential to expand the metabolic repertoire of malignant cells even further.

  4. Illicit survival of cancer cells during polyploidization and depolyploidization

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, I; Galluzzi, L; Senovilla, L; Criollo, A; Jemaà, M; Castedo, M; Kroemer, G

    2011-01-01

    Tetraploidy and the depolyploidization of tetraploid cells may contribute to oncogenesis. Several mechanisms have evolved to avoid the generation, survival, proliferation and depolyploidization of tetraploids. Cells that illicitly survive these checkpoints are prone to chromosomal instability and aneuploidization. Along with their replication, tetraploids constantly undergo chromosomal rearrangements that eventually lead to pseudodiploidy by two non-exclusive mechanisms: (i) multipolar divisions and (ii) illicit bipolar divisions in the presence of improper microtubule-kinetochore attachments. Here, we describe the regulation and the molecular mechanisms that underlie such a ‘polyploidization–depolyploidization' cascade, while focusing on the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in tetraploidy-driven tumorigenesis. We speculate that the identification of signaling/metabolic cascades that are required for the survival of tetraploid or aneuploid (but not diploid) cancer cells may pave the way for the development of novel broad-spectrum anticancer agents. PMID:21072053

  5. Illicit survival of cancer cells during polyploidization and depolyploidization.

    PubMed

    Vitale, I; Galluzzi, L; Senovilla, L; Criollo, A; Jemaà, M; Castedo, M; Kroemer, G

    2011-09-01

    Tetraploidy and the depolyploidization of tetraploid cells may contribute to oncogenesis. Several mechanisms have evolved to avoid the generation, survival, proliferation and depolyploidization of tetraploids. Cells that illicitly survive these checkpoints are prone to chromosomal instability and aneuploidization. Along with their replication, tetraploids constantly undergo chromosomal rearrangements that eventually lead to pseudodiploidy by two non-exclusive mechanisms: (i) multipolar divisions and (ii) illicit bipolar divisions in the presence of improper microtubule-kinetochore attachments. Here, we describe the regulation and the molecular mechanisms that underlie such a 'polyploidization-depolyploidization' cascade, while focusing on the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in tetraploidy-driven tumorigenesis. We speculate that the identification of signaling/metabolic cascades that are required for the survival of tetraploid or aneuploid (but not diploid) cancer cells may pave the way for the development of novel broad-spectrum anticancer agents.

  6. PERK Integrates Oncogenic Signaling and Cell Survival During Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    Bu, Yiwen; Diehl, J Alan

    2016-10-01

    Unfolded protein responses (UPR), consisting of three major transducers PERK, IRE1, and ATF6, occur in the midst of a variety of intracellular and extracellular challenges that perturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER stress occurs and is thought to be a contributing factor to a number of human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and various metabolic syndromes. In the context of neoplastic growth, oncogenic stress resulting from dysregulation of oncogenes such as c-Myc, Braf(V600E) , and HRAS(G12V) trigger the UPR as an adaptive strategy for cancer cell survival. PERK is an ER resident type I protein kinase harboring both pro-apoptotic and pro-survival capabilities. PERK, as a coordinator through its downstream substrates, reprograms cancer gene expression to facilitate survival in response to oncogenes and microenvironmental challenges, such as hypoxia, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Herein, we discuss how PERK kinase engages in tumor initiation, transformation, adaption microenvironmental stress, chemoresistance and potential opportunities, and potential opportunities for PERK targeted therapy. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2088-2096, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The influence of geographical access to health care and material deprivation on colorectal cancer survival: evidence from France and England.

    PubMed

    Dejardin, O; Jones, A P; Rachet, B; Morris, E; Bouvier, V; Jooste, V; Coombes, E; Forman, D; Bouvier, A M; Launoy, G

    2014-11-01

    This article investigates the influence of distance to health care and material deprivation on cancer survival for patients diagnosed with a colorectal cancer between 1997 and 2004 in France and England. This population-based study included all cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed between 1997 and 2004 in 3 cancer registries in France and 1 cancer registry in England (N=40,613). After adjustment for material deprivation, travel times in England were no longer significantly associated with survival. In France patients living between 20 and 90min from the nearest cancer unit tended to have a poorer survival, although this was not statistically significant. In England, the better prognosis observed for remote patients can be explained by associations with material deprivation; distance to health services alone did not affect survival whilst material deprivation level had a major influence, with lower survival for patients living in deprived areas. Increases in travel times to health services in France were associated with poorer survival rates. The pattern of this influence seems to follow an inverse U distribution, i.e. maximal for average travel times.

  8. Targeting proapoptotic protein BAD inhibits survival and self-renewal of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sastry, K S R; Al-Muftah, M A; Li, Pu; Al-Kowari, M K; Wang, E; Ismail Chouchane, A; Kizhakayil, D; Kulik, G; Marincola, F M; Haoudi, A; Chouchane, L

    2014-12-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the resistance of cancer stem cells (CSC) to many conventional therapies is one of the major limiting factors of cancer therapy efficacy. Identification of mechanisms responsible for survival and self-renewal of CSC will help design new therapeutic strategies that target and eliminate both differentiated cancer cells and CSC. Here we demonstrated the potential role of proapoptotic protein BAD in the biology of CSC in melanoma, prostate and breast cancers. We enriched CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells (CSC) by tumorosphere formation and purified this population by FACS. Both spheres and CSC exhibited increased potential for proliferation, migration, invasion, sphere formation, anchorage-independent growth, as well as upregulation of several stem cell-associated markers. We showed that the phosphorylation of BAD is essential for the survival of CSC. Conversely, ectopic expression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant BAD induced apoptosis in CSC. This effect was enhanced by treatment with a BH3-mimetic, ABT-737. Both pharmacological agents that inhibit survival kinases and growth factors that are involved in drug resistance delivered their respective cytotoxic and protective effects by modulating the BAD phosphorylation in CSC. Furthermore, the frequency and self-renewal capacity of CSC was significantly reduced by knocking down the BAD expression. Consistent with our in vitro results, significant phosphorylation of BAD was found in CD44(+) CSC of 83% breast tumor specimens. In addition, we also identified a positive correlation between BAD expression and disease stage in prostate cancer, suggesting a role of BAD in tumor advancement. Our studies unveil the role of BAD in the survival and self-renewal of CSC and propose BAD not only as an attractive target for cancer therapy but also as a marker of tumor progression.

  9. Targeting proapoptotic protein BAD inhibits survival and self-renewal of cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, K S R; Al-Muftah, M A; Li, Pu; Al-Kowari, M K; Wang, E; Ismail Chouchane, A; Kizhakayil, D; Kulik, G; Marincola, F M; Haoudi, A; Chouchane, L

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the resistance of cancer stem cells (CSC) to many conventional therapies is one of the major limiting factors of cancer therapy efficacy. Identification of mechanisms responsible for survival and self-renewal of CSC will help design new therapeutic strategies that target and eliminate both differentiated cancer cells and CSC. Here we demonstrated the potential role of proapoptotic protein BAD in the biology of CSC in melanoma, prostate and breast cancers. We enriched CD44+/CD24− cells (CSC) by tumorosphere formation and purified this population by FACS. Both spheres and CSC exhibited increased potential for proliferation, migration, invasion, sphere formation, anchorage-independent growth, as well as upregulation of several stem cell-associated markers. We showed that the phosphorylation of BAD is essential for the survival of CSC. Conversely, ectopic expression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant BAD induced apoptosis in CSC. This effect was enhanced by treatment with a BH3-mimetic, ABT-737. Both pharmacological agents that inhibit survival kinases and growth factors that are involved in drug resistance delivered their respective cytotoxic and protective effects by modulating the BAD phosphorylation in CSC. Furthermore, the frequency and self-renewal capacity of CSC was significantly reduced by knocking down the BAD expression. Consistent with our in vitro results, significant phosphorylation of BAD was found in CD44+ CSC of 83% breast tumor specimens. In addition, we also identified a positive correlation between BAD expression and disease stage in prostate cancer, suggesting a role of BAD in tumor advancement. Our studies unveil the role of BAD in the survival and self-renewal of CSC and propose BAD not only as an attractive target for cancer therapy but also as a marker of tumor progression. PMID:25215949

  10. Metformin Improves Overall Survival of Colorectal Cancer Patients with Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanqiang

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetic population has a higher risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality than nondiabetics. The role of metformin in CRC prognosis is still controversial. The meta-analysis aims to investigate whether metformin improves the survival of diabetic CRC patients. Methods. PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library were searched till July 1, 2016. Cohort studies were included. All articles were evaluated by Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Hazard Ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each study were calculated and pooled HRs with corresponding 95% CIs were generated using the random-effects model. Heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. Results. We included seven cohort studies with a medium heterogeneity (I2 = 56.1% and p = 0.033) in our meta-analysis. An improved overall survival (OS) for metformin users over nonusers among colorectal cancers with diabetes was noted (HR 0.75; 95% CI 0.65 to 0.87). However, metformin reveals no benefits for cancer-specific survival (HR 0.79, 95%, CI 0.58 to 1.08). Conclusions. Metformin prolongs the OS of diabetic CRC patients, but it does not affect the CRC-specific survival. Metformin may be a good choice in treating CRC patients with diabetes mellitus in clinical settings.

  11. Association of educational levels with survival in Indian patients with cancer of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Krishnatreya, Manigreeva; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Nandy, Pintu; Gogoi, Gayatri

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this paper was to assess the influence of educational level on the survival of uterine cervix cancer patients in our population. A total of 224 patients were registered in our registry, of which 178 had information on stage and different educational levels. The overall median survival (MS) was 23 months, with values of 18.5, 20.7 and 41.3 months for the illiterate, literate and qualified groups, respectively. In the illiterate patients, stage I was seen in 2.6% and stage IV in 11.8%, while in other 2 groups stage I was seen in 10% to 17% of patients at the time of diagnosis. The survival probability at around 50 months was around 42%, 30% and 26% (approximately) for qualified, literates and illiterates respectively [Log Rank (Mantel-Cox) showed p=0.023]. Emphasis on imparting education to females can be a part of comprehensive cancer control programme for improving the overall survival in patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix in our population.

  12. Population based study of social and productive activities as predictors of survival among elderly Americans

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Thomas A; de Leon, Carlos Mendes; Marottoli, Richard A; Berkman, Lisa F

    1999-01-01

    Objectives To examine any association between social, productive, and physical activity and 13 year survival in older people. Design Prospective cohort study with annual mortality follow up. Activity and other measures were assessed by structured interviews at baseline in the participants’ homes. Proportional hazards models were used to model survival from time of initial interview. Setting City of New Haven, Connecticut, United States. Participants 2761 men and women from a random population sample of 2812 people aged 65 and older. Main outcome measure Mortality from all causes during 13 years of follow up. Results All three types of activity were independently associated with survival after age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, income, body mass index, smoking, functional disability, and history of cancer, diabetes, stroke, and myocardial infarction were controlled for. Conclusions Social and productive activities that involve little or no enhancement of fitness lower the risk of all cause mortality as much as fitness activities do. This suggests that in addition to increased cardiopulmonary fitness, activity may confer survival benefits through psychosocial pathways. Social and productive activities that require less physical exertion may complement exercise programmes and may constitute alternative interventions for frail elderly people. Key messagesLittle is known about predictors of survival among elderly peoplePhysical activity is clearly good for health, but the potential benefits of social activities have not been studiedSocial and productive activities are as effective as fitness activities in lowering the risk of deathEnhanced social activities may help to increase the quality and length of life PMID:10454399

  13. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  14. Comparison of Survival Outcomes Among Cancer Patients Treated In and Out of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical trials test the efficacy of a treatment in a select patient population. We examined whether cancer clinical trial patients were similar to nontrial, “real-world” patients with respect to presenting characteristics and survival. Methods We reviewed the SWOG national clinical trials consortium database to identify candidate trials. Demographic factors, stage, and overall survival for patients in the standard arms were compared with nontrial control subjects selected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. Multivariable survival analyses using Cox regression were conducted. The survival functions from aggregate data across all studies were compared separately by prognosis (≥50% vs <50% average 2-year survival). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results We analyzed 21 SWOG studies (11 good prognosis and 10 poor prognosis) comprising 5190 patients enrolled from 1987 to 2007. Trial patients were younger than nontrial patients (P < .001). In multivariable analysis, trial participation was not associated with improved overall survival for all 11 good-prognosis studies but was associated with better survival for nine of 10 poor-prognosis studies (P < .001). The impact of trial participation on overall survival endured for only 1 year. Conclusions Trial participation was associated with better survival in the first year after diagnosis, likely because of eligibility criteria that excluded higher comorbidity patients from trials. Similar survival patterns between trial and nontrial patients after the first year suggest that trial standard arm outcomes are generalizable over the long term and may improve confidence that trial treatment effects will translate to the real-world setting. Reducing eligibility criteria would improve access to clinical trials. PMID:24627276

  15. Excess Body Weight and Colorectal Cancer Survival: The Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Harmon, Brook E.; Little, Melissa A.; Ollberding, Nicholas J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Wilkens, Lynne R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Excess body weight is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and may also adversely affect survival in CRC patients. Methods This study examined the relation of body mass index (BMI), which was self-reported at cohort entry and after 5.7±0.8 years, with CRC-specific and all-cause survival among 4,204 incident cases of invasive CRC in the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC). Cox regression analysis with age as time metric and BMI as time-varying exposure was applied to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) while adjusting for relevant covariates. Results Over 6.0±4.7 years of follow-up, 1,976 all-cause and 1,095 CRC-specific deaths were recorded. The mean time interval between cohort entry and diagnosis was 7.6±4.7 years. No association with CRC-specific survival was detected in men (HR5units=0.94; 95%CI 0.84–1.04) or women (HR5units=0.98; 95%CI 0.89–1.08). In men, all-cause survival also showed no relation with BMI (HR5unit=0.97; 95%CI 0.90–1.06), whereas it was reduced in women (HR5units=1.10; 95%CI 1.03–1.18). Interactions of BMI with ethnicity were only significant for obesity. Obese Latino and overweight Native Hawaiian men as well as overweight African American women, experienced significantly better CRC-specific survival than whites. Overweight Japanese men and African American women had better all-cause survival and obese Latino women had the lowest all-cause survival (HRobese=1.74; 95%CI 1.08–2.80). Conclusions This analysis detected little evidence for an adverse effect of excess body weight on CRC-specific survival, but all-cause survival was reduced in women. These findings suggest that adiposity may be less important for CRC survival than as an etiologic factor. PMID:26358830

  16. Childhood cancer survivorship research in minority populations: A position paper from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Smita; Gibson, Todd M; Ness, Kirsten K; Liu, Qi; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Krull, Kevin R; Nathan, Paul C; Neglia, Joseph P; Leisenring, Wendy; Yasui, Yutaka; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T

    2016-08-01

    By the middle of this century, racial/ethnic minority populations will collectively constitute 50% of the US population. This temporal shift in the racial/ethnic composition of the US population demands a close look at the race/ethnicity-specific burden of morbidity and premature mortality among survivors of childhood cancer. To optimize targeted long-term follow-up care, it is essential to understand whether the burden of morbidity borne by survivors of childhood cancer differs by race/ethnicity. This is challenging because the number of minority participants is often limited in current childhood cancer survivorship research, resulting in a paucity of race/ethnicity-specific recommendations and/or interventions. Although the overall childhood cancer incidence increased between 1973 and 2003, the mortality rate declined; however, these changes did not differ appreciably by race/ethnicity. The authors speculated that any racial/ethnic differences in outcome are likely to be multifactorial, and drew on data from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study to illustrate the various contributors (socioeconomic characteristics, health behaviors, and comorbidities) that could explain any observed differences in key treatment-related complications. Finally, the authors outlined challenges in conducting race/ethnicity-specific childhood cancer survivorship research, demonstrating that there are limited absolute numbers of children who are diagnosed and survive cancer in any one racial/ethnic minority population, thereby precluding a rigorous evaluation of adverse events among specific primary cancer diagnoses and treatment exposure groups. Cancer 2016;122:2426-2439. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  17. The relationships among individual and regional smoking, socioeconomic status, and oral and pharyngeal cancer survival: a mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Logan, Henrietta L; Marks, John G; Shenkman, Elizabeth A

    2015-10-01

    Poorer survival from oral and pharyngeal cancer (OPC) has been reported for populations of lower socioeconomic status (SES), adjusting for risk factors such as patient and clinical characteristics. Beyond these risk factors, higher rates of tobacco use may be a mediator for the observed poorer OPC survival for low SES populations. In this study, we aimed to examine the impact of the relationships among SES, individual smoking status, and living in a region with a higher smoking rate on OPC survival. We obtained Florida Cancer Data System data from 1996 to 2010 and merged the data with US Census data and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from 1996 to 2010. We built multivariable survival models to quantify the mediational effect of individual smoking on overall and OPC-specific survival, adjusting for regional smoking, demographics, and clinical characteristics. We found that lower SES, individual smoking, and living in a region with a higher smoking rate were all strongly associated with poorer survival. We estimated that the indirect effect of individual smoking accounted for a large part (ranged from 13.3% to 30.2%) of the total effect of SES on overall and OPC-specific survival. In conclusion, individual and regional smoking are both significant and independent predictors of poor cancer survival. Higher rate of individual smoking is partially responsible for poorer cancer survival in low SES populations. Results of this study provide rationale for considering a multi-level approach that simultaneously targets both individual and contextual factors for future smoking cessation interventions.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts and survival among women with breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sagiv, Sharon K. Gaudet, Mia M.; Eng, Sybil M.; Abrahamson, Page E.; Shantakumar, Sumitra; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Bell, Paula; Thomas, Joyce A.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Santella, Regina M.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2009-04-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are mammary carcinogens in animal studies, and a few epidemiologic studies have suggested a link between elevated levels of PAH-DNA adducts and breast cancer incidence. An association between PAH-DNA adducts and survival among breast cancer cases has not been previously reported. We conducted a survival analysis among women with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer between 1996 and 1997, enrolled in the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. DNA was isolated from blood samples that were obtained from cases shortly after diagnosis and assayed for PAH-DNA adducts using ELISA. Among the 722 cases with PAH-DNA adduct measurements, 97 deaths (13.4%) from all causes and 54 deaths (7.5%) due to breast cancer were reported to National Death Index (NDI) by December 31, 2002. Using Cox proportional hazards models and controlling for age at diagnosis, we did not find evidence that all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR)=0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57-1.37), or breast cancer mortality (HR=1.20; 95% CI: 0.63-2.28) was strongly associated with detectable PAH-DNA adduct levels compared with non-detectable adducts; additionally, no dose-response association was observed. Among a subgroup with treatment data (n=520), adducts were associated with over a two-fold higher mortality among those receiving radiation, but mortality for adducts was reduced among hormone therapy users. Results from this large population-based study do not provide strong support for an association between detectable PAH-DNA adducts and survival among women with breast cancer, except perhaps among those receiving radiation treatment.

  19. Early-Stage Young Breast Cancer Patients: Impact of Local Treatment on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Bantema-Joppe, Enja J.; Munck, Linda de; Willemse, Pax H.B.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Siesling, Sabine; Maduro, John H.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In young women, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), i.e., lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy, has been associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. Still, there is insufficient evidence that BCT impairs survival. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of BCT with mastectomy on overall survival (OS) in young women with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: From two Dutch regional population-based cancer registries (covering 6.2 million inhabitants) 1,453 women <40 years with pathologically T1N0-1M0 breast cancer were selected. Cox regression survival analysis was used to study the effect of local treatment (BCT vs. mastectomy) stratified for nodal stage on survival and corrected for tumor size, age, period of diagnosis, and use of adjuvant systemic therapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 9.6 years, 10-year OS was 83% after BCT and 78% after mastectomy, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.72). In N0-patients, 10-year OS was 84% after BCT and 81% after mastectomy and local treatment was not associated with differences in OS (HR 1.19; 95% CI, 0.89-1.58; p = 0.25). Within the N1-patient group, OS was better after BCT compared with mastectomy, 79% vs. 71% at 10 years (HR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.28-2.84; p = 0.001) and in patients treated with adjuvant hormonal therapy (HR 0.34; 95% CI, 0.18-0.66; p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this large population-based cohort of early-stage young breast cancer patients, 10-year OS was not impaired after BCT compared with mastectomy. Patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes had better prognosis after BCT than after mastectomy.

  20. Human mitochondrial pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 promotes invasiveness and impacts survival in breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jiefeng; Kuo, Mei-Ling; Su, Leila; Xue, Lijun; Luh, Frank; Zhang, Hang; Wang, Jianghai; Lin, Tiffany G; Zhang, Keqiang; Chu, Peiguo; Zheng, Shu; Liu, Xiyong; Yen, Yun

    2017-04-03

    Human mitochondrial pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (PYCR) is a house-keeping enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate to proline. This enzymatic cycle plays pivotal roles in amino acid metabolism, intracellular redox potential and mitochondrial integrity. Here, we hypothesize that PYCR1 might be a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for breast cancer. In this study, breast cancer tissue samples were obtained from Zhejiang University (ZJU set). Immunohistochemistry analysis was performed to detect the protein level of PYCR1, and Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional analyses were employed in this outcome study. The prognostic significance and performance of PYCR1 mRNA were validated on 13 worldwide independent microarray data sets, composed of 2500 assessable breast cancer cases. Our findings revealed that both PYCR1 mRNA and protein expression were significantly associated with tumor size, grade and invasive molecular subtypes of breast cancers. Independent and pooled analyses verified that higher PYCR1 mRNA levels were significantly associated with poor survival of breast cancer patients, regardless of estrogen receptor (ER) status. For in vitro studies, inhibition of PYCR1 by small-hairpin RNA significantly reduced the growth and invasion capabilities of the cells, while enhancing the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 (ER positive) and MDA-MB-231 (ER negative). Further population study also validated that chemotherapy significantly improved survival in early-stage breast cancer patients with low PYCR1 expression levels. Therefore, PYCR1 might serve as a prognostic biomaker for either ER-positive or ER-negative breast cancer subtypes and can also be a potential target for breast cancer therapy.

  1. Inferential statistics from Black Hispanic breast cancer survival data.

    PubMed

    Khan, Hafiz M R; Saxena, Anshul; Ross, Elizabeth; Ramamoorthy, Venkataraghavan; Sheehan, Diana

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we test the statistical probability models for breast cancer survival data for race and ethnicity. Data was collected from breast cancer patients diagnosed in United States during the years 1973-2009. We selected a stratified random sample of Black Hispanic female patients from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database to derive the statistical probability models. We used three common model building criteria which include Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC), and Deviance Information Criteria (DIC) to measure the goodness of fit tests and it was found that Black Hispanic female patients survival data better fit the exponentiated exponential probability model. A novel Bayesian method was used to derive the posterior density function for the model parameters as well as to derive the predictive inference for future response. We specifically focused on Black Hispanic race. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method was used for obtaining the summary results of posterior parameters. Additionally, we reported predictive intervals for future survival times. These findings would be of great significance in treatment planning and healthcare resource allocation.

  2. Is Human Papillomavirus Associated with Prostate Cancer Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Barbazza, Renzo; Marongiu, Barbara; Bonin, Serena; Stanta, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in prostate carcinogenesis is highly controversial: some studies suggest a positive association between HPV infection and an increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa), whereas others do not reveal any correlation. In this study, we investigated the prognostic impact of HPV infection on survival in 150 primary PCa patients. One hundred twelve (74.67%) patients had positive expression of HPV E7 protein, which was evaluated in tumour tissue by immunohistochemistry. DNA analysis on a subset of cases confirmed HPV infection and revealed the presence of genotype 16. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, HPV-positive cancer patients showed worse overall survival (OS) (median 4.59 years) compared to HPV-negative (median 8.24 years, P = 0.0381). In multivariate analysis age (P < 0.001), Gleason score (P < 0.001), nuclear grading (P = 0.002), and HPV status (P = 0.034) were independent prognostic factors for OS. In our cohort, we observed high prevalence of HPV nuclear E7 oncoprotein and an association between HPV infection and PCa survival. In the debate about the oncogenic activity of HPV in PCa, our results further confirm the need for additional studies to clarify the possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:24288430

  3. Chromothripsis and progression-free survival in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skuja, Elina; Kalniete, Dagnija; Nakazawa-Miklasevica, Miki; Daneberga, Zanda; Abolins, Arnis; Purkalne, Gunta; Miklasevics, Edvins

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination of the primary tumor is the major cause of death in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Multiple chromosomal breaks and chromothripsis, a phenomenon involving multiple chromosomal fragmentations occurring in a single catastrophic event, are associated with cancer genesis, progression and developing of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chromothripsis and total breakpoint count (breakpoint instability index) on progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 19 patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) receiving FOLFOX first-line palliative chemotherapy between August, 2011 and October, 2012 were selected for this study. The results indicated that the highest breakpoint count was observed in chromosomes 1, 2 and 6. Chromothripsis was detected in 52.6% of the study patients. Furthermore, chromothripsis was associated with an increased median PFS (mPFS; 14 vs. 8 months, respectively; P=0.03), but an association with overall survival was not identified. The present study demonstrated that chromothripsis affected CRC patient survival, suggesting a role for this event as a prognostic and predictive marker in mCRC treatment. PMID:28357089

  4. Four microRNAs Signature for Survival Prognosis in Colon Cancer using TCGA Data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop microRNA expression signature for colon cancer survival prognosis based on the Cancer Genomic Common database. miRNAs levels between colon cancer and non-cancer tissues were screened by t-test (p < 0.05). Kaplan-Meier survival method was used to discriminate survival significant miRNAs, followed by miRNAs index accumulation to power the miRNAs-survival reliability. In the end, we test the selected miRNAs in HT126 colon cancer cells to validate its anti-cancer effect. The study identified a 84-miRNAs signature. Of the above 84 miRNAs, we got four miRNAs which were survival associated by using ROC curve method and Kaplan-Meier survival method (p < 0.001). The result showed that low risk group had quite a low death rate, the survival rate was over 80%. The high risk group had survival rate lower than 20%, which was also extremely lower than the overall survival rate. In the HT126 cells study, cell growth assay showed miR-130a sponge inhibited colon cancer cells growth and sensitized the anti-cancer drug effect of 5-FU to blocked cancer cell growth. We developed a prognostic 4-microRNA expression signature for colon cancer patient survival, and validated miR-130a sponge could sensitized 5-FU anti-cancer effect. PMID:27974852

  5. Cancer Prevention in HIV-Infected Populations

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Priscila H.; Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo M.; Yarchoan, Robert; Uldrick, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer since the advent of effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). While cART substantially decreases the risk of developing some cancers, HIV-infected individuals remain at high risk for Kaposi sarcoma, lymphoma and several solid tumors. Currently HIV-infected patients represent an aging group, and malignancies have become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Tailored cancer-prevention strategies are needed for this population. In this review we describe the etiologic agents and pathogenesis of common malignancies in the setting of HIV, as well as current evidence for cancer prevention strategies and screening programs. PMID:26970136

  6. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  7. Differences in survival between Māori and New Zealand Europeans with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lao, C; Obertová, Z; Brown, C; Scott, N; Edlin, R; Gilling, P; Holmes, M; Tyrie, L; Lawrenson, R

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to examine the survival disparity between Māori men and New Zealand (NZ) Europeans diagnosed with prostate cancer. We identified men aged 40+ years in the Midland Cancer Network region registered with prostate cancer in 2007-2010 in the Cancer Registry. Data were extracted from patient notes of all Māori men and a sample of NZ Europeans. The survival disparity between Māori men and Europeans was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional-hazards regression models after adjusting for other factors. This study included 535 men with prostate cancer (135 Māori men and 400 Europeans). The 5-year cancer-specific survival was 98.6% for men diagnosed with localised cancer, 88.8% for locally advanced disease and 19.1% for metastatic cancer. The all-cause survival and the cancer-specific survival were both significantly poorer for Māori men than for NZ Europeans (log rank test: P = 0.004, 0.006 respectively). The hazard ratio of cancer-specific survival for Māori men was 2.01 (95% CI: 1.21-3.36) compared with NZ Europeans. Māori men with prostate cancer had poorer all-cause survival and cancer-specific survival than NZ Europeans. Māori men were at risk of having more advanced disease at diagnosis, which explains most of the survival inequity between Māori men and NZ Europeans.

  8. Second Cancers After Fractionated Radiotherapy: Stochastic Population Dynamics Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachs, Rainer K.; Shuryak, Igor; Brenner, David; Fakir, Hatim; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2007-01-01

    When ionizing radiation is used in cancer therapy it can induce second cancers in nearby organs. Mainly due to longer patient survival times, these second cancers have become of increasing concern. Estimating the risk of solid second cancers involves modeling: because of long latency times, available data is usually for older, obsolescent treatment regimens. Moreover, modeling second cancers gives unique insights into human carcinogenesis, since the therapy involves administering well characterized doses of a well studied carcinogen, followed by long-term monitoring. In addition to putative radiation initiation that produces pre-malignant cells, inactivation (i.e. cell killing), and subsequent cell repopulation by proliferation can be important at the doses relevant to second cancer situations. A recent initiation/inactivation/proliferation (IIP) model characterized quantitatively the observed occurrence of second breast and lung cancers, using a deterministic cell population dynamics approach. To analyze ifradiation-initiated pre-malignant clones become extinct before full repopulation can occur, we here give a stochastic version of this I I model. Combining Monte Carlo simulations with standard solutions for time-inhomogeneous birth-death equations, we show that repeated cycles of inactivation and repopulation, as occur during fractionated radiation therapy, can lead to distributions of pre-malignant cells per patient with variance >> mean, even when pre-malignant clones are Poisson-distributed. Thus fewer patients would be affected, but with a higher probability, than a deterministic model, tracking average pre-malignant cell numbers, would predict. Our results are applied to data on breast cancers after radiotherapy for Hodgkin disease. The stochastic IIP analysis, unlike the deterministic one, indicates: a) initiated, pre-malignant cells can have a growth advantage during repopulation, not just during the longer tumor latency period that follows; b) weekend

  9. Conditional disease-free survival among patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Paik, Hyun-June; Lee, Se Kyung; Ryu, Jai Min; Park, Sungmin; Kim, Isaac; Bae, Soo Youn; Yu, Jonghan; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kim, Seok Won; Nam, Seok Jin

    2017-01-01

    Conditional disease-free survival (CDFS) reflects changes over time. Because traditional disease-free survival (DFS) is estimated from the date of diagnosis, it is limited in the ability to predict risk of recurrence in patients who have been disease free. In this study, we determined CDFS of breast cancer patients and estimated the prognostic factors for DFS.We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of 7587 consecutive patients who underwent curative surgery for breast cancer between January 2004 and December 2013 at Samsung Medical Center. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify risk factors for DFS, which was computed using the Kaplan-Meier method. CDFS rates were based on cumulative DFS estimates.Median follow-up duration was 20.59 months. Three-year DFS was 93.46% at baseline. Three-year CDFS survival estimates for patients who had been disease free for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years after treatment were calculated as 92.84%, 92.37%, 93.03%, 89.41%, and 79.64%, respectively. Three-year CDFS increased continuously each year after 1 year of DFS in hormone receptor (HR)-negative patients but decreased each year in HR-positive patients.In HR-positive patients who are disease free after 3 years, continuous care including surveillance and metastases workup should be considered, although this is not recommended in the current guidelines. On the other hand, the social costs may be reduced in HR-negative patients by extending the surveillance interval. Further studies are needed to identify indicators of DFS prognosis in breast cancer patients.

  10. Adult survival and population growth rate in Colorado big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, T.J.; Ellison, L.E.; Stanley, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    We studied adult survival and population growth at multiple maternity colonies of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) in Fort Collins, Colorado. We investigated hypotheses about survival using information-theoretic methods and mark-recapture analyses based on passive detection of adult females tagged with passive integrated transponders. We constructed a 3-stage life-history matrix model to estimate population growth rate (??) and assessed the relative importance of adult survival and other life-history parameters to population growth through elasticity and sensitivity analysis. Annual adult survival at 5 maternity colonies monitored from 2001 to 2005 was estimated at 0.79 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.77-0.82). Adult survival varied by year and roost, with low survival during an extreme drought year, a finding with negative implications for bat populations because of the likelihood of increasing drought in western North America due to global climate change. Adult survival during winter was higher than in summer, and mean life expectancies calculated from survival estimates were lower than maximum longevity records. We modeled adult survival with recruitment parameter estimates from the same population. The study population was growing (?? = 1.096; 95% CI = 1.057-1.135). Adult survival was the most important demographic parameter for population growth. Growth clearly had the highest elasticity to adult survival, followed by juvenile survival and adult fecundity (approximately equivalent in rank). Elasticity was lowest for fecundity of yearlings. The relative importances of the various life-history parameters for population growth rate are similar to those of large mammals. ?? 2011 American Society of Mammalogists.

  11. Prognostic factors and survival of colorectal cancer in Kurdistan province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rasouli, Mohammad Aziz; Moradi, Ghobad; Roshani, Daem; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Ghaytasi, Bahman

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer (CRC) survival varies at individual and geographically level. This population-based study aimed to evaluating various factors affecting the survival rate of CRC patients in Kurdistan province. In a retrospective cohort study, patients diagnosed as CRC were collected through a population-based study from March 1, 2009 to 2014. The data were collected from Kurdistan's Cancer Registry database. Additional information and missing data were collected reference to patients’ homes, medical records, and pathology reports. The CRC survival was calculated from the date of diagnosis to the date of cancer-specific death or the end of follow-up (cutoff date: October 2015). Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test were used for the univariate analysis of survival in various subgroups. The proportional-hazard model Cox was also used in order to consider the effects of different factors on survival including age at diagnosis, place of residence, marital status, occupation, level of education, smoking, economic status, comorbidity, tumor stage, and tumor grade. A total number of 335 patients affected by CRC were assessed and the results showed that 1- and 5-year survival rate were 87% and 33%, respectively. According to the results of Cox's multivariate analysis, the following factors were significantly related to CRC survival: age at diagnosis (≥65 years old) (HR 2.08, 95% CI: 1.17–3.71), single patients (HR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.10–2.40), job (worker) (HR 2.09, 95% CI: 1.22–3.58), educational level: diploma or below (HR 0.61, 95% CI: 0.39–0.92), wealthy economic status (HR 0.51, 95% CI: 0.31–0.82), tumor grade in poorly differentiated (HR 2.25, 95% CI: 1.37–3.69), and undifferentiated/anaplastic grade (HR 2.90, 95% CI: 1.67–4.98). We found that factors such as low education, inappropriate socioeconomic status, and high tumor grade at the time of disease diagnosis were effective in the poor survival of CRC patients in Kurdistan province; this

  12. Cancer Mortality in People Treated with Antidepressants before Cancer Diagnosis: A Population Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuelian; Vedsted, Peter; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Wu, Chun Sen; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Olsen, Jørn; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is common after a cancer diagnosis and is associated with an increased mortality, but it is unclear whether depression occurring before the cancer diagnosis affects cancer mortality. We aimed to study cancer mortality of people treated with antidepressants before cancer diagnosis. Methods and Findings We conducted a population based cohort study of all adults diagnosed with cancer between January 2003 and December 2010 in Denmark (N = 201,662). We obtained information on cancer from the Danish Cancer Registry, on the day of death from the Danish Civil Registry, and on redeemed antidepressants from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Current users of antidepressants were defined as those who redeemed the latest prescription of antidepressant 0–4 months before cancer diagnosis (irrespective of earlier prescriptions), and former users as those who redeemed the latest prescription five or more months before cancer diagnosis. We estimated an all-cause one-year mortality rate ratio (MRR) and a conditional five-year MRR for patients who survived the first year after cancer diagnosis and confidence interval (CI) using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Overall, 33,111 (16.4%) patients redeemed at least one antidepressant prescription in the three years before cancer diagnosis of whom 21,851 (10.8%) were current users at the time of cancer diagnosis. Current antidepressant users had a 32% higher one-year mortality (MRR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.29–1.35) and a 22% higher conditional five-year mortality (MRR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.17–1.26) if patients survived the first year after the cancer diagnosis than patients not redeeming antidepressants. The one-year mortality was particularly high for patients who initiated antidepressant treatment within four months before cancer diagnosis (MRR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.47–1.61). Former users had no increased cancer mortality. Conclusions Initiation of antidepressive treatment prior to cancer diagnosis is

  13. Obesity and survival among women with ovarian cancer: results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, C M; Dixon, S C; Jensen, A; Kjaer, S K; Modugno, F; deFazio, A; Fereday, S; Hung, J; Johnatty, S E; Fasching, P A; Beckmann, M W; Lambrechts, D; Vergote, I; Van Nieuwenhuysen, E; Lambrechts, S; Risch, H A; Rossing, M A; Doherty, J A; Wicklund, K G; Chang-Claude, J; Goodman, M T; Ness, R B; Moysich, K; Heitz, F; du Bois, A; Harter, P; Schwaab, I; Matsuo, K; Hosono, S; Goode, E L; Vierkant, R A; Larson, M C; Fridley, B L; Høgdall, C; Schildkraut, J M; Weber, R P; Cramer, D W; Terry, K L; Bandera, E V; Paddock, L; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, L; Wentzensen, N; Yang, H P; Brinton, L A; Lissowska, J; Høgdall, E; Lundvall, L; Whittemore, A; McGuire, V; Sieh, W; Rothstein, J; Sutphen, R; Anton-Culver, H; Ziogas, A; Pearce, C L; Wu, A H; Webb, P M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Observational studies have reported a modest association between obesity and risk of ovarian cancer; however, whether it is also associated with survival and whether this association varies for the different histologic subtypes are not clear. We undertook an international collaborative analysis to assess the association between body mass index (BMI), assessed shortly before diagnosis, progression-free survival (PFS), ovarian cancer-specific survival and overall survival (OS) among women with invasive ovarian cancer. Methods: We used original data from 21 studies, which included 12 390 women with ovarian carcinoma. We combined study-specific adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) using random-effects models to estimate pooled HRs (pHR). We further explored associations by histologic subtype. Results: Overall, 6715 (54%) deaths occurred during follow-up. A significant OS disadvantage was observed for women who were obese (BMI: 30–34.9, pHR: 1.10 (95% confidence intervals (CIs): 0.99–1.23); BMI: ⩾35, pHR: 1.12 (95% CI: 1.01–1.25)). Results were similar for PFS and ovarian cancer-specific survival. In analyses stratified by histologic subtype, associations were strongest for women with low-grade serous (pHR: 1.12 per 5 kg m−2) and endometrioid subtypes (pHR: 1.08 per 5 kg m−2), and more modest for the high-grade serous (pHR: 1.04 per 5 kg m−2) subtype, but only the association with high-grade serous cancers was significant. Conclusions: Higher BMI is associated with adverse survival among the majority of women with ovarian cancer. PMID:26151456

  14. Canine parvovirus effect on wolf population change and pup survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Goyal, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Canine parvovirus infected wild canids more than a decade ago, but no population effect has been documented. In wild Minnesota wolves (Canis lupus) over a 12-yr period, the annual percent population increase and proportion of pups each were inversely related to the percentage of wolves serologically positive to the disease. Although these effects did not seem to retard this large extant population, similar relationships in more isolated wolf populations might hinder recovery of this endangered and threatened species.

  15. Autophagy in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes tumor cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Trimmer, Casey; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Chiavarina, Barbara; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Chengwang; Pavlides, Stephanos; Martinez-Cantarin, Maria P; Capozza, Franco; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Flomenberg, Neal; Howell, Anthony; Pestell, Richard G; Caro, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    Recently, using a co-culture system, we demonstrated that MCF7 epithelial cancer cells induce oxidative stress in adjacent cancer-associated fibroblasts, resulting in the autophagic/lysosomal degradation of stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1). However, the detailed signaling mechanism(s) underlying this process remain largely unknown. Here, we show that hypoxia is sufficient to induce the autophagic degradation of Cav-1 in stromal fibroblasts, which is blocked by the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine. Concomitant with the hypoxia-induced degradation of Cav-1, we see the upregulation of a number of well-established autophagy/mitophagy markers, namely LC3, ATG16L, BNIP3, BNIP3L, HIF-1α and NFκB. In addition, pharmacological activation of HIF-1α drives Cav-1 degradation, while pharmacological inactivation of HIF-1 prevents the downregulation of Cav-1. Similarly, pharmacological inactivation of NFκB—another inducer of autophagy—prevents Cav-1 degradation. Moreover, treatment with an inhibitor of glutathione synthase, namely BSO, which induces oxidative stress via depletion of the reduced glutathione pool, is sufficient to induce the autophagic degradation of Cav-1. Thus, it appears that oxidative stress mediated induction of HIF1- and NFκB-activation in fibroblasts drives the autophagic degradation of Cav-1. In direct support of this hypothesis, we show that MCF7 cancer cells activate HIF-1α- and NFκB-driven luciferase reporters in adjacent cancer-associated fibroblasts, via a paracrine mechanism. Consistent with these findings, acute knockdown of Cav-1 in stromal fibroblasts, using an siRNA approach, is indeed sufficient to induce autophagy, with the upregulation of both lysosomal and mitophagy markers. How does the loss of stromal Cav-1 and the induction of stromal autophagy affect cancer cell survival? Interestingly, we show that a loss of Cav-1 in stromal fibroblasts protects adjacent cancer cells against apoptotic cell death. Thus, autophagic cancer

  16. Bioelectrical impedance phase angle as a prognostic indicator of survival in head-and-neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Władysiuk, M.S.; Mlak, R.; Morshed, K.; Surtel, W.; Brzozowska, A.; Małecka-Massalska, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Phase angle could be an alternative to subjective global assessment for the assessment of nutrition status in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods We prospectively evaluated a cohort of 75 stage iiib and iv head-and-neck patients treated at the Otolaryngology Department, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of Lublin, Poland. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was performed in all patients using an analyzer that operated at 50 kHz. The phase angle was calculated as reactance divided by resistance (Xc/R) and expressed in degrees. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate survival. Results Median overall survival in the cohort was 32.0 months. At the time of analysis, 47 deaths had been recorded in the cohort (62.7%). The risk of shortened overall survival was significantly higher in patients whose phase angle was less than 4.733 degrees than in the remaining patients (19.6 months vs. 45 months, p = 0.0489; chi-square: 3.88; hazard ratio: 1.8856; 95% confidence interval: 1.0031 to 3.5446). Conclusions Phase angle might be prognostic of survival in patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer. Further investigation in a larger population is required to confirm our results. PMID:27803609

  17. Impact of Metformin on Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Survival: Too Little, Too Late?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Xiao; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Metformin offers no survival advantage in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Despite promising experimental evidence suggesting an anti-tumor effect of metformin, its impact on the survival of advanced pancreatic cancer is likely very limited. Future studies may need to consider its role in early-stage pancreatic cancer. PMID:26637275

  18. Methodology to predict long-term cancer survival from short-term data using Tobacco Cancer Risk and Absolute Cancer Cure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, R. F.; Lederman, M.; Tai, P.; Wong, J. K. M.

    2002-11-01

    incorporate a parameter for a statistically cured fraction of patients CSLN, CTCR and CACC, but because of the long follow-up range of 20-44 years, also by complete life analysis. The survival experience of those who did not die of their original cancer of the larynx was compared to the expected survival experience of a population with the same age, birth cohort and sex structure. To date it has been generally assumed for early stage disease that although for some 5-10 years after treatment the survival experience of this patient subgroup might be no different from that expected in the matched group, thereafter the death rate of this subgroup becomes lower than that of the matched group. This implies that surviving cancer patients cured of their disease tend to die of other conditions at a higher than normal rate as they become older, and therefore cancer is never totally cured. Our conclusion is that at least for cancer of the glottic larynx, the answer to the question: 'Can cancer totally be cured?' is 'Yes to at least 15-years post-treatment and also probably to 25 years.'

  19. Colon cancer: association of histopathological parameters and patients' survival with clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Alexiusdottir, Kristin K; Snaebjornsson, Petur; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Jonasson, Larus; Olafsdottir, Elinborg J; Björnsson, Einar Stefan; Möller, Pall Helgi; Jonasson, Jon G

    2013-10-01

    Available data correlating symptoms of colon cancer patients with the severity of the disease are very limited. In a population-based setting, we correlated information on symptoms of colon cancer patients with several pathological tumor parameters and survival. Information on all patients diagnosed with colon cancer in Iceland in 1995-2004 for this retrospective, population-based study was obtained from the Icelandic Cancer Registry. Information on symptoms of patients and blood hemoglobin was collected from patients' files. Pathological parameters were obtained from a previously performed standardized tumor review. A total of 768 patients entered this study; the median age was 73 years. Tumors in patients presenting at diagnosis with visible blood in stools were significantly more likely to be of lower grade, having pushing border, conspicuous peritumoral lymphocytic infiltration, and lower frequency of vessel invasion. Patients with abdominal pain and anemia were significantly more likely to have vessel invasion. Logistic regression showed that visible blood in stools was significantly associated with protecting pathological factors (OR range 0.38-0.83, p < 0.05). Tumors in patients presenting with abdominal pain were strongly associated with infiltrative margin and scarce peritumoral lymphocytic infiltration (OR = 1.95; 2.18 respectively, p < 0.05). Changes in bowel habits were strongly associated with vessel invasion (OR = 2.03, p < 0.05). Cox regression showed that blood in stools predicted survival (HR = 0.54). In conclusion, visible blood in stools correlates significantly with all the beneficial pathological parameters analyzed and with better survival of patients. Anemia, general symptoms, changes in bowel habits, acute symptoms, and abdominal pain correlate with more aggressive tumor characteristics and adverse outcome for patients.

  20. Cowpox virus infection in natural field vole Microtus agrestis populations: significant negative impacts on survival

    PubMed Central

    Burthe, Sarah; Telfer, Sandra; Begon, Michael; Bennett, Malcolm; Smith, Andrew; Lambin, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cowpox virus is an endemic virus circulating in populations of wild rodents. It has been implicated as a potential cause of population cycles in field voles Microtus agrestis L., in Britain, owing to a delayed density-dependent pattern in prevalence, but its impact on field vole demographic parameters is unknown. This study tests the hypothesis that wild field voles infected with cowpox virus have a lower probability of survival than uninfected individuals. The effect of cowpox virus infection on the probability of an individual surviving to the next month was investigated using longitudinal data collected over 2 years from four grassland sites in Kielder Forest, UK. This effect was also investigated at the population level, by examining whether infection prevalence explained temporal variation in survival rates, once other factors influencing survival had been controlled for. Individuals with a probability of infection, P(I), of 1 at a time when base survival rate was at median levels had a 22·4% lower estimated probability of survival than uninfected individuals, whereas those with a P(I) of 0·5 had a 10·4% lower survival. At the population level, survival rates also decreased with increasing cowpox prevalence, with lower survival rates in months of higher cowpox prevalence. Simple matrix projection models with 28 day time steps and two stages, with 71% of voles experiencing cowpox infection in their second month of life (the average observed seroprevalence at the end of the breeding season) predict a reduction in 28-day population growth rate during the breeding season from λ = 1·62 to 1·53 for populations with no cowpox infection compared with infected populations. This negative correlation between cowpox virus infection and field vole survival, with its potentially significant effect on population growth rate, is the first for an endemic pathogen in a cyclic population of wild rodents. PMID:18177331

  1. Oral contraceptives and survival in breast cancer patients aged 20 to 54 years.

    PubMed

    Trivers, Katrina F; Gammon, Marilie D; Abrahamson, Page E; Lund, Mary Jo; Flagg, Elaine W; Moorman, Patricia G; Kaufman, Jay S; Cai, Jianwen; Porter, Peggy L; Brinton, Louise A; Eley, J William; Coates, Ralph J

    2007-09-01

    Recent oral contraceptive (OC) use is associated with modestly higher breast cancer incidence among younger women, but its impact on survival is unclear. This study examined the relationship between OC use before breast cancer diagnosis and survival. A population-based sample of 1,264 women aged 20 to 54 years with a first primary invasive breast cancer during 1990 to 1992 were followed up for 8 to 10 years. OC and covariate data were obtained by interviews conducted shortly after diagnosis and from medial records. All-cause mortality was ascertained through the National Death Index (n = 292 deaths). Age- and income-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by Cox regression methods. All-cause mortality was not associated with ever use of OCs or duration of use. Compared with nonusers, mortality estimates were elevated among women who were using OCs at diagnosis or stopped use in the previous year (HR, 1.57; 95% CI, 0.95-2.61). The HR for use of high-dose estrogen pills within 5 years before diagnosis was double that of nonusers (HR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.29-4.41) or, if the most recent pill included the progestin levonorgestrel, compared with nonusers (HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.03-3.91). Because subgroup estimates were based on small numbers of OC users, these results should be cautiously interpreted. Overall, most aspects of OC use did not seem to influence survival, although there is limited evidence that OC use just before diagnosis, particularly use of some pill types, may negatively impact survival in breast cancer patients aged 20 to 54 years.

  2. Cure frailty models for survival data: application to recurrences for breast cancer and to hospital readmissions for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, Virginie; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Corbière, Fabien; Gonzalez, Juan R; Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone

    2013-06-01

    Owing to the natural evolution of a disease, several events often arise after a first treatment for the same subject. For example, patients with a primary invasive breast cancer and treated with breast conserving surgery may experience breast cancer recurrences, metastases or death. A certain proportion of subjects in the population who are not expected to experience the events of interest are considered to be 'cured' or non-susceptible. To model correlated failure time data incorporating a surviving fraction, we compare several forms of cure rate frailty models. In the first model already proposed non-susceptible patients are those who are not expected to experience the event of interest over a sufficiently long period of time. The other proposed models account for the possibility of cure after each event. We illustrate the cure frailty models with two data sets. First to analyse time-dependent prognostic factors associated with breast cancer recurrences, metastases, new primary malignancy and death. Second to analyse successive rehospitalizations of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Estimates were obtained by maximization of likelihood using SAS proc NLMIXED for a piecewise constant hazards model. As opposed to the simple frailty model, the proposed methods demonstrate great potential in modelling multivariate survival data with long-term survivors ('cured' individuals).

  3. Comparison of social support content within online communities for high- and low-survival-rate cancers.

    PubMed

    Buis, Lorraine R; Whitten, Pamela

    2011-08-01

    People experiencing cancer use the Internet for many reasons, particularly for social support. This study sought to determine how social support content within online support communities for different cancers varied according to cancer survival rate. A quantitative content analysis was conducted on 3717 posts from eight online communities focused on cancers with high and low 5-year relative survival rates. Using Optimal Matching Theory, we predicted that low-survival-rate communities would have more emotional support content than high-survival-rate communities, and high-survival-rate communities would have more informational support content than low-survival-rate communities. Emotional support content was consistently more common than informational support. Overall, high-survival-rate communities had a greater proportion of posts containing emotional support content (75%) than low-survival-rate communities (66%) (χ1 = 20.89 [n = 2235], P < .001). Furthermore, low-survival-rate communities had a greater proportion of posts containing informational support content (46%) than high-survival-rate communities (36%) (χ1 = 21.13 [n = 2235], P< .001). Although the relationships between survival rate and support types were significant, they were not as hypothesized. Deviations from theoretically predicted results suggest that individuals experiencing low-survival-rate cancers may have a greater desire for informational support online than individuals experiencing high-survival-rate cancers.

  4. The effect of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status on esophageal cancer survival in working-age patients in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin-Chia; Chang, Chun-Ming; Hsu, Ta-Wen; Lee, Cheng-Hung; Chen, Jian-Han; Huang, Chih-Yuan; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer mortality. More than 90% of patients with esophageal cancer in Taiwan have squamous cell carcinoma. Survival of such patients is related to socioeconomic status (SES). We studied the association between SES (individual and neighborhood) and the survival of working-age patients with esophageal cancer in Taiwan. A population-based study was conducted of 4097 patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer between 2002 and 2006. Each was traced for 5 years or until death. Individual SES was defined by enrollee job category. Neighborhood SES was based on household income and dichotomized into advantaged or disadvantaged. Multilevel logistic regression was used to compare the survival rates by SES group after adjustment for possible confounding and risk factors. Hospital and neighborhood SES were used as random effects in multilevel logistic regression. In patients younger than 65 years, 5-year overall survival rates were worst for those with low individual SES living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. After adjustment for patient characteristics, esophageal cancer patients with high individual SES had a 39% lower risk of mortality than those with low individual SES (odds ratio 0.61, 95% confidence interval 0.48–0.77). Patients living in disadvantaged areas with high individual SES were more likely to receive surgery than those with low SES (odds ratio 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.11–1.89). Esophageal cancer patients with low individual SES have the worst 5-year survival, even with a universal healthcare system. Public health, education, and social welfare programs should address the inequality of esophageal cancer survival. PMID:27399129

  5. The effect of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status on esophageal cancer survival in working-age patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin-Chia; Chang, Chun-Ming; Hsu, Ta-Wen; Lee, Cheng-Hung; Chen, Jian-Han; Huang, Chih-Yuan; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer mortality. More than 90% of patients with esophageal cancer in Taiwan have squamous cell carcinoma. Survival of such patients is related to socioeconomic status (SES). We studied the association between SES (individual and neighborhood) and the survival of working-age patients with esophageal cancer in Taiwan. A population-based study was conducted of 4097 patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer between 2002 and 2006. Each was traced for 5 years or until death. Individual SES was defined by enrollee job category. Neighborhood SES was based on household income and dichotomized into advantaged or disadvantaged. Multilevel logistic regression was used to compare the survival rates by SES group after adjustment for possible confounding and risk factors. Hospital and neighborhood SES were used as random effects in multilevel logistic regression. In patients younger than 65 years, 5-year overall survival rates were worst for those with low individual SES living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. After adjustment for patient characteristics, esophageal cancer patients with high individual SES had a 39% lower risk of mortality than those with low individual SES (odds ratio 0.61, 95% confidence interval 0.48-0.77). Patients living in disadvantaged areas with high individual SES were more likely to receive surgery than those with low SES (odds ratio 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.11-1.89). Esophageal cancer patients with low individual SES have the worst 5-year survival, even with a universal healthcare system. Public health, education, and social welfare programs should address the inequality of esophageal cancer survival.

  6. Differences in Breast Cancer Survival between Public and Private Care in New Zealand: Which Factors Contribute?

    PubMed Central

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Elwood, J. Mark; Lawrenson, Ross; Campbell, Ian; Harvey, Vernon; Seneviratne, Sanjeewa

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients who received private health care appear to have better survival from breast cancer compared to those who received public care. This study investigated if this applied to New Zealand women and identified factors that could explain such disparities. Methods This study involved all women who were diagnosed with primary breast cancer in two health regions in New Zealand, covering about 40% of the national population, between June 2000 and May 2013. Patients who received public care for primary treatment, mostly surgical treatment, were compared with those who received private care in terms of demographics, mode of presentation, disease factors, comorbidity index and treatment factors. Cox regression modelling was performed with stepwise adjustments, and hazards of breast cancer specific mortality associated with the type of health care received was assessed. Results Of the 14,468 patients, 8,916 (61.6%) received public care. Compared to patients treated in private care facilities, they were older, more likely to be Māori, Pacifika or Asian and to reside in deprived neighbourhoods and rural areas, and less likely to be diagnosed with early staged cancer and to receive timely cancer treatments. They had a higher risk of mortality from breast cancer (hazard ratio: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.75, 2.17), of which 80% (95% CI: 63%, 100%) was explained by baseline differences, particularly related to ethnicity, stage at diagnosis and type of loco-regional therapy. After controlling for these demographic, disease and treatment factors, the risk of mortality was still 14% higher in the public sector patients. Conclusions Ethnicity, stage at diagnosis and type of loco-regional therapy were the three key contributors to survival disparities between patients treated in public and private health care facilities in New Zealand. The findings underscore the need for more efforts to improve the quality, timeliness and equitability of public cancer care services. PMID:27054698

  7. FANCM c.5101C>T mutation associates with breast cancer survival and treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kiiski, Johanna I.; Fagerholm, Rainer; Tervasmäki, Anna; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Jamshidi, Maral; Mantere, Tuomo; Pylkäs, Katri; Bartek, Jiri; Bartkova, Jirina; Mannermaa, Arto; Tengström, Maria; Kosma, Veli‐Matti; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is a heterogeneous disease, and different tumor characteristics and genetic variation may affect the clinical outcome. The FANCM c.5101C > T nonsense mutation in the Finnish population associates with increased risk of breast cancer, especially for triple‐negative breast cancer patients. To investigate the association of the mutation with disease prognosis, we studied tumor phenotype, treatment outcome, and patient survival in 3,933 invasive breast cancer patients, including 101 FANCM c.5101C > T mutation carriers and 3,832 non‐carriers. We also examined association of the mutation with nuclear immunohistochemical staining of DNA repair markers in 1,240 breast tumors. The FANCM c.5101C > T mutation associated with poor 10‐year breast cancer‐specific survival (hazard ratio (HR)=1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09–2.52, p = 0.018), with a more pronounced survival effect among familial cases (HR = 2.93, 95% CI 1.5–5.76, p = 1.80 × 10−3). Poor disease outcome of the carriers was also found among the estrogen receptor (ER) positive subgroup of patients (HR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.09–2.98, p = 0.021). Reduced survival was seen especially among patients who had not received radiotherapy (HR = 3.43, 95% CI 1.6–7.34, p = 1.50 × 10−3) but not among radiotherapy treated patients (HR = 1.35, 95% CI 0.82–2.23, p = 0.237). Significant interaction was found between the mutation and radiotherapy (p = 0.040). Immunohistochemical analyses show that c.5101C > T carriers have reduced PAR‐activity. Our results suggest that FANCM c.5101C > T nonsense mutation carriers have a reduced breast cancer survival but postoperative radiotherapy may diminish this survival disadvantage. PMID:27542569

  8. Use of Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil and Radiation Therapy After Gastric Cancer Resection Among the Elderly and Impact on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Joshua; Hershman, Dawn L.; Buono, Donna; McBride, Russell; Clark-Garvey, Sean; Woodhouse, Shermian A.; Abrams, Julian A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: In randomized trials patients with resected nonmetastatic gastric cancer who received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (chemoRT) had better survival than those who did not. We investigated the effectiveness of adjuvant chemoRT after gastric cancer resection in an elderly general population and its effects by stage. Methods and Materials: We identified individuals in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database aged 65 years or older with Stage IB through Stage IV (M0) gastric cancer, from 1991 to 2002, who underwent gastric resection, using multivariate modeling to analyze predictors of chemoRT use and survival. Results: Among 1,993 patients who received combined chemoRT or no adjuvant therapy after resection, having a later year of diagnosis, having a more advanced stage, being younger, being white, being married, and having fewer comorbidities were associated with combined treatment. Among 1,476 patients aged less than 85 years who survived more than 4 months, the 313 who received combined treatment had a lower mortality rate (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.98) than the 1,163 who received surgery alone. Adjuvant therapy significantly reduced the mortality rate for Stages III and IV (M0), trended toward improved survival for Stage II, and showed no benefit for Stage IB. We observed trends toward improved survival in all age categories except 80 to 85 years. Conclusions: The association of combined adjuvant chemoRT with improved survival in an overall analysis of Stage IB through Stage IV (M0) resected gastric cancer is consistent with clinical trial results and suggests that, in an elderly population, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is effective. However, our observational data suggest that adjuvant treatment may not be effective for Stage IB cancer, is possibly appropriate for Stage II, and shows significant survival benefits for Stages III and IV (M0) for those aged less than 80 years.

  9. Growth and Survival Mechanisms Associated with Perineural Invasion in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    CANCER RESEARCH 64, 6082–6090, September 1, 2004] Growth and Survival Mechanisms Associated with Perineural Invasion in Prostate Cancer Gustavo E...Departments of 1Pathology, 2Urology, and 3Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas ABSTRACT Perineural invasion (PNI) is...PNI. Cancer cells in a perineural location acquire a survival and growth advantage using a NFB survival pathway. Targeting PNI might help detain local

  10. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts at diagnosis are associated with overall survival of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yuanyuan; Xie, Zhihui; Shao, Zhenyi; Chen, Wen; Xie, Hua; Qin, Guoyou; Zhao, Naiqing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been found to be significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (PC) survival. However, no existing studies discussed the association between neutrophil count, lymphocyte count, and PC survival jointly. In this study, we aimed to analyze the influence of neutrophil and lymphocyte counts measured at disease diagnosis on the overall survival (OS) of PC. A total of 288 PC patients diagnosed between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2013, were retrospectively selected from a population-based electronic inpatients database. Multivariate Cox model and restricted cubic spline (RCS) were used to estimate the associations between neutrophil count, lymphocyte count, and OS of PC. We found that a decreased lymphocyte count at diagnosis was significantly associated with OS of PC: for PC patients whose lymphocyte counts were less than 1.5 × 109/L, the hazard ratio (HR) was 1.82 (95% confidence interval: 1.37–2.40). Although abnormally increased baseline neutrophil count in general was not associated with OS of PC, RCS found a prominently deteriorated survival for PC patients whose baseline neutrophil counts were close to the cutoff point (7.0 × 109/L). Our study results indicate that neutrophil and lymphocyte counts at diagnosis may have prognostic relevance in PC survival, especially lymphocyte count. The clinical significance of neutrophil inhibition and lymphocyte promotion treatments in PC patients should be further discussed. PMID:27749562

  11. Effect of misclassified underlying cause of death on survival estimates of colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Daixin; Morris, Cyllene R; Bates, Janet H; German, Robert R

    2011-07-20

    Inaccurate coding of patients' Underlying Cause of Death (UCOD) has constrained cause-specific survival estimates for colon and rectal cancers. Using California data from the Accuracy of Cancer Mortality study, we compared the cancer site data from the California Cancer Registry (CCR) with UCODs reported on death certificates and reclassified the UCODs based on cancer registry data when they disagreed. We then calculated 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year cause-specific survival for colon and rectal cancers separately, before and after the reclassification. Records from 26 312 colon and 10 687 rectal cancer patients were examined. UCOD records disagreed with CCR records for 700 (6%) of 11 404 colon cancer deaths and with 1958 (39%) of 5011 rectal cancer deaths, and 82% of the misclassified rectal cancer deaths were coded as colon cancer deaths in the UCOD. Reclassification decreased cause-specific survival for both colon and rectal cancers, but the impact was more pronounced for rectal cancer (eg, 5-year cause-specific survival of colon cancer decreased by 2.8% and of rectal cancer decreased by 20.0% relative to previous estimates; absolute rates changed from 65.4% to 63.6%, and 81.2% to 64.9%, respectively, after reclassification). Interchangeable use of the terms colon cancer and colorectal cancer is likely to be one of the reasons for UCOD misclassification. Educational measures could improve the accuracy of UCOD for colon and rectal cancer deaths.

  12. Maryland's Special Populations Cancer Network: cancer health disparities reduction model.

    PubMed

    Baquet, Claudia R; Mack, Kelly M; Bramble, Joy; DeShields, Mary; Datcher, Delores; Savoy, Mervin; Hummel, Kery; Mishra, Shiraz I; Brooks, Sandra E; Boykin-Brown, Stephanie

    2005-05-01

    Cancer in Maryland is a serious health concern for minority and underserved populations in rural and urban areas. This report describes the National Cancer Institute (NCI) supported Maryland Special Populations Cancer Network (MSPN), a community-academic partnership. The MSPN's priority populations include African Americans, Native Americans, and other medically underserved residents of rural and urban areas. The MSPN has established a community infrastructure through formal collaborations with several community partners located in Baltimore City, the rural Eastern Shore, and Southern and Western Maryland, and among the Piscataway Conoy Tribe and the other 27 Native American Tribes in Maryland. Key partners also include the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and the University of Maryland Statewide Health Network. The MSPN has implemented innovative and successful programs in cancer health disparities research, outreach, and training; clinical trials education, health disparities policy, and resource leveraging. The MSPN addresses the goal of the NCI and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to reduce and eventually eliminate cancer health disparities. Community-academic partnerships are the foundation of this successful network.

  13. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of cancer stem-like side population cells in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Long; Wu, Jian-Bing; Yi, Feng-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies in cancer biology suggest that chemotherapeutic drug resistance and tumor relapse are driven by cells within a tumor termed 'cancer stem cells'. In the present study, a Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion technique was used to identify cancer stem‑like side population (SP) cells in colon carcinoma, which accounted for 3.4% of the total cell population. Following treatment with verapamil, the population of SP cells was reduced to 0.6%. In addition, the sorted SP cells exhibited marked multidrug resistance and enhanced cell survival rates compared with non‑SP cells. The SP cells were able to generate more tumor spheres and were CD133 positive. Subsequent biochemical analysis revealed that the levels of the adenosine triphosphate‑binding cassette sub‑family G member 2 transporter protein, B‑cell lymphoma anti‑apoptotic factor and autocrine production of interleukin‑4 were significantly enhanced in the colon cancer SP cells, which contributed to drug resistance, protection of the cells from apoptosis and tumor recurrence. Therefore, the findings suggested that treatment failure and colon tumorigenesis is dictated by a small population of SP cells, which indicate a potential target in future therapies.

  14. Phase transitions in unstable cancer cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé, R. V.

    2003-09-01

    The dynamics of cancer evolution is studied by means of a simple quasispecies model involving cells displaying high levels of genetic instability. Both continuous, mean-field and discrete, bit-string models are analysed. The string model is simulated on a single-peak landscape. It is shown that a phase transition exists at high levels of genetic instability, thus separating two phases of slow and rapid growth. The results suggest that, under a conserved level of genetic instability the cancer cell population will be close to the threshold level. Implications for therapy are outlined.

  15. Compensatory effects of recruitment and survival when amphibian populations are perturbed by disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Scherer, R. D.; Pilliod, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    The need to increase our understanding of factors that regulate animal population dynamics has been catalysed by recent, observed declines in wildlife populations worldwide. Reliable estimates of demographic parameters are critical for addressing basic and applied ecological questions and understanding the response of parameters to perturbations (e.g. disease, habitat loss, climate change). However, to fully assess the impact of perturbation on population dynamics, all parameters contributing to the response of the target population must be estimated. We applied the reverse-time model of Pradel in Program mark to 6years of capture-recapture data from two populations of Anaxyrus boreas (boreal toad) populations, one with disease and one without. We then assessed a priori hypotheses about differences in survival and recruitment relative to local environmental conditions and the presence of disease. We further explored the relative contribution of survival probability and recruitment rate to population growth and investigated how shifts in these parameters can alter population dynamics when a population is perturbed. High recruitment rates (0??41) are probably compensating for low survival probability (range 0??51-0??54) in the population challenged by an emerging pathogen, resulting in a relatively slow rate of decline. In contrast, the population with no evidence of disease had high survival probability (range 0??75-0??78) but lower recruitment rates (0??25). Synthesis and applications.We suggest that the relationship between survival and recruitment may be compensatory, providing evidence that populations challenged with disease are not necessarily doomed to extinction. A better understanding of these interactions may help to explain, and be used to predict, population regulation and persistence for wildlife threatened with disease. Further, reliable estimates of population parameters such as recruitment and survival can guide the formulation and implementation of

  16. Pretreatment serum xanthophyll concentrations as predictors of head and neck cancer recurrence and survival

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Anna E.; Bellile, Emily L.; Rozek, Laura S.; Peterson, Karen E.; Ren, Jianwei; Harris, Ethan; Mueller, Christie; Jolly, Shruti; Peterson, Lisa A.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Djuric, Zora

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine associations of pretreatment serum carotenoids, tocopherols, and quercetin with prognosis in 154 newly diagnosed head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods Pretreatment blood and health surveys were collected. Serum micronutrients were measured by HPLC. Data on recurrence and death were collected annually. Cox proportional hazards models measured associations of serum nutrient concentrations with recurrence and overall survival. Results During a median follow-up time of 37 months, there were 32 recurrences and 27 deaths. After controlling for covariates, subjects with high versus low serum xanthophyll and total carotenoid concentrations had significantly longer recurrence-free time (P = 0.002 and P = 0.02, respectively). Overall survival time was significantly longer in subjects with high versus low serum xanthophyll concentrations (P = 0.02). Conclusions Future research should evaluate the possible benefits of interventions to increase intakes of rich food sources of xanthophylls in this patient population. PMID:26614223

  17. Better survival in PMRT of female breast cancer patients with >5 negative lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyong; Zhang, Chenyue; Kong, Li; Zhu, Hui; Yu, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Many studies have confirmed the role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) for breast cancer patients with at least 4 lymph nodes invasion in the postoperative therapy. Recently, the number of negative lymph nodes (NLNs) has been increasingly paid attention to and recognized as a prognostic indicator in different kinds of caners. Therefore, it is very necessary to study the association between the number of NLNs and the prognosis of PMRT in breast cancer patients. In our study, we used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based data and identified 16,686 breast cancer patients to explore their correlation. The ROC curve and the log-rank χ2 test were applied to determine the appropriate cutoff point of the number of NLNs and 5 was selected as the cutoff point. Furthermore, the cutoff point 5 was validated as an independent prognostic factor affecting cancer-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients, as confirmed by both univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.001). In addition, subgroup analysis showed that the number of NLNs >5 can be a prognostic indicator in patients with PMRT according to different clinical variables (all, P < 0.001). Importantly, our results showed that PMRT obviously improved CSS and OS in patients regardless of the number of NLNs (P < 0.001). In conclusion, our study showed the number of NLNs is an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer patients with PMRT, and those who have higher number of NLNs have an increased CSS and OS. PMID:28121956

  18. Polymorphisms in microRNAs are associated with survival in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Wei, Qingyi; Hu, Lingming; Chen, Feng; Hu, Zhibin; Heist, Rebecca S.; Su, Li; Amos, Christopher I.; Shen, Hongbing; Christiani, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression and are involved in human carcinogenesis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA sequence may alter miRNA functions in gene regulation, which, in turn, may affect cancer risk and disease progression. Methods We conducted an analysis of associations of 142 miRNA SNPs with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) survival using data from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in a Caucasian population from the Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA, US) including 452 early-stage and 526 late-stage NSCLC cases. Replication analyses were further performed in two external populations, one Caucasian cohort from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX, US) and one Han Chinese cohort from Nanjing, China. Results We identified 7 significant SNPs in the discovery set. Results from the independent Caucasian cohort demonstrated that the C allele of rs2042253 (has-miRNA-5197) was significantly associated with decreased risk for death among the late-stage NSCLC patients (discovery set: HR=0.80, P=0.007; validation set: HR=0.86, P=0.035; combined analysis: HR=0.84, P=0.001). Conclusions These findings provide evidence that some miRNA SNPs are associated with NSCLC survival and can be used as predictive biomarkers. Impact This study provided an estimate of outcome probability for survival experience of NSCLC patients, which demonstrates that genetic factors, as well as classical non-genetic factors, may be used to predict individual outcome. PMID:25103824

  19. Human Papillomavirus Genotype and Oropharynx Cancer Survival in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Marc T.; Saraiya, Mona; Thompson, Trevor D.; Steinau, Martin; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Lynch, Charles F.; Lyu, Christopher W.; Wilkinson, Edward J.; Tucker, Thomas; Copeland, Glenn; Peters, Edward S.; Altekruse, Sean; Unger, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (OPSCC) tissue appears to be a strong predictor of improved prognosis, but this observation has not been explored in a population-based sample with generalizable findings. Methods Follow-up data from a large sample of OPSCC patients identified through six population-based cancer registries in the US was used to characterize the association of tumor HPV status with survival. Results HPV DNA was detected in tumor tissue from 71% (378/529) of the OPSCC patients. A total of 65% of patients with HPV16-associated tumors survived 5-years compared to 46% of patients with other HPV-types and 28% of patients with HPV-negative tumors (p log-rank test <0.0001). The OPSCC patients with detectable HPV16 DNA had a 62% reduced hazard of death at 5-years, and patients with other HPV types had a 42% reduced hazard of death at 5-years compared to HPV-negative patients. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, Blacks with OPSCC had a 2.5-fold greater risk of death at 5-years after adjustment for HPV-status and other prognostic variables. Both surgery and radiation therapy were associated with a reduced 5-year risk of death, but no evidence was found for an interaction between HPV-status and radiotherapy or surgery on survival time. Conclusions Data from this US study suggest that HPV16-positive OPSCC patients survive longer than HPV-negative patients regardless of treatment, highlighting the prognostic importance of HPV-status for this malignancy. Optimal treatment regimens for OPSCC could be tailored to each patient’s HPV-status and prognostic profile.malignancy. PMID:26602016

  20. Prediagnostic Plasma Adiponectin and Survival among Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Dawn Q.; Mehta, Raaj S.; Song, Mingyang; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Ng, Kimmie; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Ogino, Shuji; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating adiponectin is inversely related to the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, its influence on CRC survival is unclear. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the association between prediagnostic plasma levels of adiponectin and mortality in patients with CRC. We identified 621 incident CRC cases who provided blood specimens prior to diagnosis within the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). After a median follow-up of 9 years, there were 269 (43%) total deaths, of which 181 (67%) were due to CRC. Compared with participants in the lowest quartile of adiponectin, those in the highest quartile had multivariate HRs of 1.89 (95% CI, 1.21–2.97; Ptrend = 0.01) for CRC-specific mortality and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.15–2.39; Ptrend = 0.009) for overall mortality. The apparent increased risk in CRC-specific mortality was more pronounced in patients with metastatic disease (HR 3.02, 95% CI, 1.50–6.08). Among patients with CRC, prediagnostic plasma adiponectin is associated with an increased risk of CRC-specific and overall mortality, and is more apparent in patients with metastatic disease. Adiponectin may be a marker for cancers which develop through specific pathways that may be associated with worsened prognosis. Further studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:26382604

  1. Prevalent cases in observational studies of cancer survival: do they bias hazard ratio estimates?

    PubMed Central

    Azzato, E M; Greenberg, D; Shah, M; Blows, F; Driver, K E; Caporaso, N E; Pharoah, P D P

    2009-01-01

    Observational epidemiological studies often include prevalent cases recruited at various times past diagnosis. This left truncation can be dealt with in non-parametric (Kaplan–Meier) and semi-parametric (Cox) time-to-event analyses, theoretically generating an unbiased hazard ratio (HR) when the proportional hazards (PH) assumption holds. However, concern remains that inclusion of prevalent cases in survival analysis results inevitably in HR bias. We used data on three well-established breast cancer prognosticators – clinical stage, histopathological grade and oestrogen receptor (ER) status – from the SEARCH study, a population-based study including 4470 invasive breast cancer cases (incident and prevalent), to evaluate empirically the effectiveness of allowing for left truncation in limiting HR bias. We found that HRs of prognostic factors changed over time and used extended Cox models incorporating time-dependent covariates. When comparing Cox models restricted to subjects ascertained within six months of diagnosis (incident cases) to models based on the full data set allowing for left truncation, we found no difference in parameter estimates (P=0.90, 0.32 and 0.95, for stage, grade and ER status respectively). Our results show that use of prevalent cases in an observational epidemiological study of breast cancer does not bias the HR in a left truncation Cox survival analysis, provided the PH assumption holds true. PMID:19401693

  2. Estimating Survival and Recruitment in a Freshwater Mussel Population Using Mark-recapture Techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villella, R.F.; Smith, D.R.; Lemarie, D.P.

    2004-01-01

    We used a mark-recapture method and model averaging to estimate apparent survival, recruitment and rate of population growth in a native freshwater mussel population at a site on the Cacapon River, which is a tributary to the Potomac River. Over 2200 Elliptio complanata, E. fisheriana and Lampsilis cariosa were uniquely tagged over a period of 4 y. Recapture probabilities were higher in spring and summer than in winter except for L. cariosa which had a low probability of recapture regardless of time of year. All three species had high annual adult survival rates (>90%) with lower estimated survival of small (???55 mm) mussels (43%-69%). The variation in apparent survival over time was similar for all three species. This suggests that whatever environmental variables affect survival of mussels in this site affected all three species the same. Recruitment rates were low (1-4%) for both E. complanata and L. cariosa, with E. fisheriana having several periods of high (15-23%) recruitment. Distribution within the site was affected by both downstream and upstream movement, though movement rates were generally <1%. Average population growth rates for E. complanata (?? = 0.996, SE = 0.053), L. cariosa (?? = 0.993, SE = 0.076) and E. fisheriana (?? = 1.084, SE = 0.276) indicated static populations. Population growth rate approximating 1.0 suggests this site supports a stable freshwater mussel population through a life history strategy of low but constant recruitment and high annual adult survival.

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair genes, cancer treatment, and head and neck cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Annah B.; Weissler, Mark C.; Avery, Christy L.; Herring, Amy H.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Funkhouser, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Head and neck cancers (HNC) are commonly treated with radiation and platinum-based chemotherapy, which produce bulky DNA adducts to eradicate cancerous cells. Because nucleotide excision repair (NER) enzymes remove adducts, variants in NER genes may be associated with survival among HNC cases both independently and jointly with treatment. Methods Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate race-stratified (White, African American) hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals for overall (OS) and disease-specific (DS) survival based on treatment (combinations of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy) and 84 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 15 NER genes among 1,227 HNC cases from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Study. Results None of the NER variants evaluated were associated with survival at a Bonferroni-corrected alpha of 0.0006. However, rs3136038 [OS HR = 0.79 (0.65, 0.97), DS HR = 0.69 (0.51, 0.93)] and rs3136130 [OS HR = 0.78 (0.64, 0.96), DS HR = 0.68 (0.50, 0.92)] of ERCC4 and rs50871 [OS HR = 0.80 (0.64, 1.00), DS HR = 0.67 (0.48, 0.92)] of ERCC2 among Whites, and rs2607755 [OS HR = 0.62 (0.45, 0.86), DS HR = 0.51 (0.30, 0.86)] of XPC among African Americans were suggestively associated with survival at an uncorrected alpha of 0.05. Three SNP-treatment joint effects showed possible departures from additivity among Whites. Conclusions Our study, a large and extensive evaluation of SNPs in NER genes and HNC survival, identified mostly null associations, though a few variants were suggestively associated with survival and potentially interacted additively with treatment. PMID:24487794

  4. Comparison of clinicopathologic features and survival of histopathologically amelanotic and pigmented melanomas: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nancy E; Kricker, Anne; Waxweiler, Weston T; Dillon, Patrick M; Busman, Klaus J; From, Lynn; Groben, Pamela A; Armstrong, Bruce K; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gruber, Stephen B; Marrett, Loraine D; Gallagher, Richard P; Zanetti, Roberto; Rosso, Stefano; Dwyer, Terence; Venn, Alison; Kanetsky, Peter A; Orlow, Irene; Paine, Susan; Ollila, David W; Reiner, Anne S; Luo, Li; Hao, Honglin; Frank, Jill S; Begg, Colin B; Berwick, Marianne

    2014-12-01

    IMPORTANCE Previous studies have reported that histopathologically amelanotic melanoma is associated with poorer survival than pigmented melanoma; however, small numbers of amelanotic melanomas, selected populations, lack of centralized pathologic review, or no adjustment for stage limit the interpretation or generalization of results from prior studies.OBJECTIVE To compare melanoma-specific survival between patients with histopathologically amelanotic and those with pigmented melanoma in a large international population-based study.DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Survival analysis with a median follow-up of 7.6 years.The study population comprised 2995 patients with 3486 invasive primary melanomas centrally scored for histologic pigmentation from the Genes, Environment, and Melanoma(GEM) Study, which enrolled incident cases of melanoma diagnosed in 1998 through 2003 from international population-based cancer registries.MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Clinicopathologic predictors and melanoma-specific survival of histologically amelanotic and pigmented melanoma were compared using generalized estimating equations and Cox regression models, respectively.RESULTS Of 3467 melanomas, 275 (8%) were histopathologically amelanotic. Female sex,nodular and unclassified or other histologic subtypes, increased Breslow thickness, presence of mitoses, severe solar elastosis, and lack of a coexisting nevus were independently associated with amelanotic melanoma (each P < .05). Amelanotic melanoma was generally ofa higher American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) tumor stage at diagnosis (odds ratios[ORs] [95%CIs] between 2.9 [1.8-4.6] and 11.1 [5.8-21.2] for tumor stages between T1b and T3b and ORs [95%CIs] of 24.6 [13.6-44.4] for T4a and 29.1 [15.5-54.9] for T4b relative to T1a;P value for trend, <.001) than pigmented melanoma. Hazard of death from melanoma was higher for amelanotic than for pigmented melanoma (hazard ratio [HR], 2.0; 95%CI, 1.4-3.0)(P < .001), adjusted for age, sex

  5. Survival Outcomes and Predictive Factors for Female Urethral Cancer: Long-term Experience with Korean Patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minyong; Jeong, Chang Wook; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Ku, Ja Hyeon

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate female urethral cancer (UCa) patients treated and followed-up during a time period spanning more than 20 yr at single institution in Korea. We reviewed medical records of 21 consecutive patients diagnosed with female UCa at our institution between 1991 and 2012. After exclusion of two patients due to undefined histology, we examined clinicopathological variables, as well as survival outcomes of 19 patients with female UCa. A Cox proportional hazards ratio model was used to identify significant predictors of prognosis according to variables. The median age at diagnosis was 59 yr, and the median follow-up duration was 87.0 months. The most common initial symptoms were voiding symptoms and blood spotting. The median tumor size was 3.4 cm, and 55% of patients had lesions involving the entire urethra. The most common histologic type was adenocarcinoma, and the second most common type was urothelial carcinoma. Fourteen patients underwent surgery, and 7 of these patients received adjuvant radiation or systemic chemotherapy. Eleven patients experienced tumor recurrence after primary therapy. Patients with high stage disease, advanced T stage (≥T3), and positive lymph nodes had worse survival outcomes compared to their counterparts. Particularly, lymph node positivity and advanced T stage were significant predictive factors for all survival outcomes. Tumor location was the only significant predictor for recurrence-free survival. Although our study included a small number of patients, it conveys valuable information about this rare female urologic malignancy in a Korean population.

  6. Association of the ABCG2 C421A polymorphism with prostate cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Erin R.; Ahlers, Christoph M.; Shukla, Suneet; Sissung, Tristan M.; Ockers, Sandra B.; Price, Douglas K.; Hamada, Akinobu; Robey, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Dahut, William L.; Figg, William D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine if the C421A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 increases prostate cancer risk or affects survival. Patients, subjects and methods Numerous studies have suggested that dietary, hormonal and environmental factors all play a role in the initiation in prostate cancer; among these, the carcinogenic heterocyclic amine 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), a known substrate of the ABCG2. A SNP of ABCG2, C421A, resulting in a glutamine to lysine change at amino acid 141, has been shown to result in decreased function of the protein. Due to the expression of ABCG2 in the prostate, together with the purported role of dietary carcinogens and steroids in the development and progression of prostate cancer, 311 individuals were genotyped for the ABCG2 C421A SNP, 170 patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC) and 141 ‘healthy’ controls. We also evaluated the effect of this SNP on the intracellular accumulation of PhIP and testosterone in vitro. Results There were no significant differences in the prevalence of prostate cancer based on ABCG2 genetic variation in this population. However, survival was significantly longer for individuals with wild-type ABCG2, as compared with those hetero- or homozygous for the C421A SNP (7.4 years vs 5.3 years, P = 0.044). Conclusion Intracellular accumulation of PhIP was 80% higher in HEK293 cells transfected with Q141K ABCG2 than in wild-type cells, confirming that this SNP decreases transport of PhIP. In contrast, testosterone was not transported by either wild-type or variant transfected cells, nor did it act as in inhibitor of ABCG2 in subsequent transport assays. PMID:18710444

  7. The influence of nativity and neighborhoods on breast cancer stage at diagnosis and survival among California Hispanic women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the US, foreign-born Hispanics tend to live in socioeconomic conditions typically associated with later stage of breast cancer diagnosis, yet they have lower breast cancer mortality rates than their US-born counterparts. We evaluated the impact of nativity (US- versus foreign-born), neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and Hispanic enclave (neighborhoods with high proportions of Hispanics or Hispanic immigrants) on breast cancer stage at diagnosis and survival among Hispanics. Methods We studied 37,695 Hispanic women diagnosed from 1988 to 2005 with invasive breast cancer from the California Cancer Registry. Nativity was based on registry data or, if missing, imputed from case Social Security number. Neighborhood variables were developed from Census data. Stage at diagnosis was analyzed with logistic regression, and survival, based on vital status determined through 2007, was analyzed with Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Compared to US-born Hispanics, foreign-born Hispanics were more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage of breast cancer (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09-1.20), but they had a somewhat lower risk of breast cancer specific death (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.90-0.99). Living in low SES and high enclave neighborhoods was associated with advanced stage of diagnosis, while living in a lower SES neighborhood, but not Hispanic enclave, was associated with worse survival. Conclusion Identifying the modifiable factors that facilitate this survival advantage in Hispanic immigrants could help to inform specific interventions to improve survival in this growing population. PMID:21050464

  8. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  9. Comparison of Clinicopathologic Features and Survival of Histopathologically Amelanotic and Pigmented Melanomas: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Nancy E.; Kricker, Anne; Waxweiler, Weston T.; Dillon, Patrick M.; Busam, Klaus J.; From, Lynn; Groben, Pamela A.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gruber, Stephen B.; Marrett, Loraine D.; Gallagher, Richard P.; Zanetti, Roberto; Rosso, Stefano; Dwyer, Terence; Venn, Alison; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Orlow, Drs. Irene; Paine, Susan; Ollila, David W.; Reiner, Anne S.; Luo, Li; Hao, Honglin; Frank, Jill S.; Begg, Colin B.; Berwick, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Importance Previous studies have reported that histopathologically amelanotic melanoma is associated with poorer survival than pigmented melanoma; however, small numbers of amelanotic melanomas, selected populations, lack of centralized pathology review, or no adjustment for stage limit interpretation or generalization of results from prior studies. Objective To compare melanoma-specific survival between patients with histopathologically amelanotic and those with pigmented melanoma in a large international population-based study. Design Survival analysis with median follow-up of 7.6 years. Setting The Genes, Environment, and Melanoma study enrolled incident cases of melanoma diagnosed in 1998-2003 from international population-based cancer registries. Participants A total of 2,995 patients with 3,486 invasive primary melanomas centrally scored for histologic pigmentation. Main Outcomes and Measurements Clinicopathologic predictors and melanoma-specific survival of histologically amelanotic and pigmented melanoma were compared using generalized estimating equations and Cox regression models, respectively. Results Eight percent of melanomas (275 of 3,467) were histopathologically amelanotic. Female sex, nodular and unclassified or other histologic subtypes, increased Breslow thickness, presence of mitoses, severe solar elastosis, and lack of a co-existing nevus were independently associated with amelanotic melanoma (each P < .05). Amelanotic melanoma was generally of a higher American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) tumor stage at diagnosis (P for trend <.001) than pigmented melanoma. Hazard of death from melanoma was higher for amelanotic than pigmented melanoma [hazard ratio (HR), 2.0; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4-3.0; P< .001], adjusted for age, sex anatomic site, and study design variables; but survival did not differ once AJCC tumor stage was also taken into account, (HR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.5-1.2; P = .36). Conclusions and Relevance At the population level

  10. Tumor RNA disruption predicts survival benefit from breast cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Parissenti, Amadeo M; Guo, Baoqing; Pritzker, Laura B; Pritzker, Kenneth P H; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhu, Mu; Shepherd, Lois E; Trudeau, Maureen E

    2015-08-01

    In a prior substudy of the CAN-NCIC-MA.22 clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00066443), we observed that neoadjuvant chemotherapy reduced tumor RNA integrity in breast cancer patients, a phenomenon we term "RNA disruption." The purpose of the current study was to assess in the full patient cohort the relationship between mid-treatment tumor RNA disruption and both pCR post-treatment and, subsequently, disease-free survival (DFS) up to 108 months post-treatment. To meet these objectives, we developed the RNA disruption assay (RDA) to quantify RNA disruption and stratify it into 3 response zones of clinical importance. Zone 1 is a level of RNA disruption inadequate for pathologic complete response (pCR); Zone 2 is an intermediate level, while Zone 3 has high RNA disruption. The same RNA disruption cut points developed for pCR response were then utilized for DFS. Tumor RDA identified >fourfold more chemotherapy non-responders than did clinical response by calipers. pCR responders were clustered in RDA Zone 3, irrespective of tumor subtype. DFS was about 2-fold greater for patients with tumors in Zone 3 compared to Zone 1 patients. Kaplan-Meier survival curves corroborated these findings that high tumor RNA disruption was associated with increased DFS. DFS values for patients in zone 3 that did not achieve a pCR were similar to that of pCR recipients across tumor subtypes, including patients with hormone receptor positive tumors that seldom achieve a pCR. RDA appears superior to pCR as a chemotherapy response biomarker, supporting the prospect of its use in response-guided chemotherapy.

  11. Palliative Care Improves Survival, Quality of Life in Advanced Lung Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Results from the first randomized clinical trial of its kind have revealed a surprising and welcome benefit of early palliative care for patients with advanced lung cancer—longer median survival. Although several researchers said that the finding needs to be confirmed in other trials of patients with other cancer types, they were cautiously optimistic that the trial results could influence oncologists’ perceptions and use of palliative care. |

  12. Do Breast Cancer Risk Factors Affect the Survival of Breast Cancer Patients in Southern Sri Lanka?

    PubMed

    Peiris, H H; Mudduwa, L K B; Thalagala, N I; Jayatilaka, K A P W

    2017-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer continues to be a major cause of morbidity among women in Sri Lanka. Possible effects of etiological risk factors on breast cancer specific survival (BCSS) of the disease is not clear.This study was designed to explore the impact of breast cancer risk factors on the BCSS of patients in Southern Sri Lanka. Method: This retro-prospective study included all breast cancer patients who had sought immunohistochemistry services at our unit from May 2006 to December 2012. A pre-tested, interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to gather information on risk factors. BCSS was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier model. Univariate Cox-regression analysis was performed with 95% confidence intervals using the SPSS statistical package. Results: A total of 944 breast cancer patients were included. Five year BCSS was 78.8%. There was a statistically significant difference between the patients who had a family history of breast cancer and no family history of any cancer in terms of the presence/absence of lymph node metastasis (p=0.011) and pathological stage (p=0.042). The majority of the premenopausal patients had associated DCIS (p<0.001) and large tumours (p=0.015) with positive lymph nodes (p=0.016). There was no statistically significant association between hormone receptor subtypes and hormone related risk factors. Univariate analysis revealed that breast cancer risk factors had no significant effect on the BCSS. Conclusion: Even though family history of breast cancer and premenopausal status are associated with poor prognostic features, they, in line with the other breast cancer risk factors, appear to have no significant effect on the BCSS of patients in Southern Sri Lanka.

  13. Post Diagnosis Diet Quality and Colorectal Cancer Survival in Women

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Teresa T.; Kashambwa, Rutendo; Sato, Kaori; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward; Ogino, Shuji; Hu, Frank B.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dietary factors are known to influence colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, however, their association with CRC survival is unclear. Therefore, we prospectively examined the association between diet quality scores, dietary patterns and colorectal cancer (CRC) survival. Methods 1201 women diagnosed with stage I–III CRC between 1986 and 2008, were followed through 2010. Diet was assessed via a food frequency questionnaire administered at least 6 months after diagnosis. We computed the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010), alternate Mediterranean Diet score (aMED) and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension score (DASH) and derived two dietary patterns, Western (unhealthy) and prudent (healthy), by principal component analysis for each woman. Results During follow-up, we documented 435 deaths, including 162 from CRC. After adjusting for potential confounders, only a higher AHEI-2010 score was significantly associated with lower overall mortality (HR comparing extreme quintiles = 0.71, 95% CI 0.52–0.98, p trend = 0.01) as well as borderline significantly with lower risk of CRC mortality by the trend test (HR Q5 vs Q1 = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.43–1.21, p trend = 0.07). When AHEI-2010 components were examined separately, inverse associations for overall mortality were primarily accounted for by moderate alcohol intake (HR comparing abstainers vs 5–15 g/d = 1.30, 95%CI = 1.05–1.61) and lower intake of sugar sweetened beverages and fruit juices combined (HR for each additional serving = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01–1.23). No other diet quality score or dietary pattern was associated with overall or CRC-specific mortality. Conclusion Higher AHEI-2010 score may be associated with lower overall mortality, moderate alcohol consumption and lower consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and juices combined appeared to account for most of the observed associations. PMID:25506700

  14. A retrospective analysis of the role of proton pump inhibitors in colorectal cancer disease survival

    PubMed Central

    Graham, C.; Orr, C.; Bricks, C.S.; Hopman, W.M.; Hammad, N.; Ramjeesingh, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitors (ppis) are a commonly used medication. A limited number of studies have identified a weak-to-moderate association between ppi use and colorectal cancer (crc) risk, but none to date have identified an effect of ppi use on crc survival. We therefore postulated that an association between ppi use and crc survival might potentially exist. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 1304 crc patients diagnosed from January 2005 to December 2011 and treated at the Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate overall survival (os). Results We identified 117 patients (9.0%) who were taking ppis at the time of oncology consult. Those taking a ppi were also more often taking asa or statins (or both) and had a statistically significantly increased rate of cardiac disease. No identifiable difference in tumour characteristics was evident in the two groups, including tumour location, differentiation, lymph node status, and stage. Univariate analysis identified a statistically nonsignificant difference in survival, with those taking a ppi experiencing lesser 1-year (82.1% vs. 86.7%, p = 0.161), 2-year (70.1% vs. 76.8%, p = 0.111), and 5-year os (55.2% vs. 62.9%, p = 0.165). When controlling for patient demographics and tumour characteristics, multivariate Cox regression analysis identified a statistically significant effect of ppi in our patient population (hazard ratio: 1.343; 95% confidence interval: 1.011 to 1.785; p = 0.042). Conclusions Our results suggest a potential adverse effect of ppi use on os in crc patients. These results need further evaluation in prospective analyses. PMID:28050148

  15. Population aging through survival of the fit and stable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotto, Tommaso; Bunin, Guy; Kurchan, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the wide range of known self-replicating systems, some far from genetics, we study a system composed by individuals having an internal dynamics with many possible states that are partially stable, with varying mutation rates. Individuals reproduce and die with a rate that is a property of each state, not necessarily related to its stability, and the offspring is born on the parent’s state. The total population is limited by resources or space, as for example in a chemostat or a Petri dish. Our aim is to show that mutation rate and fitness become more correlated, even if they are completely uncorrelated for an isolated individual, underlining the fact that the interaction induced by limitation of resources is by itself efficient for generating collective effects.

  16. Soy Food Intake, Tamoxifen Use, Estrogen Receptor Polymorphism, and Breast Cancer Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Results from the soy food intake and breast cancer survival manuscript indicate that there is no association between soy protein intake and breast cancer...tertile). The association between soy protein intake and breast cancer survival did not differ according to ER/PR status, tumor stage, age at diagnosis...reported a decrease. standard protocol. Soy protein content of each food item was estimated Patients were followed up through January 2003 with based on the

  17. Cancer among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A population-based cohort study in northeastern Italy.

    PubMed

    Gini, Andrea; Bidoli, Ettore; Zanier, Loris; Clagnan, Elena; Zanette, Giorgio; Gobbato, Michele; De Paoli, Paolo; Serraino, Diego

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with an elevated risk of cancer. The aim of this study was to assess cancer risk and survival in individuals with type 2 DM (T2DM) in Friuli Venezia Giulia, Italy. A retrospective population-based cohort study of 32,247 T2DM patients aged 40-84 years was conducted through a record linkage of local healthcare databases and cancer registry for the period 2002-2009. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) and 5-year survival probabilities after T2DM and cancer diagnosis were computed. The SIRs for all cancers (n=2069) was 1.28 (95%CI: 1.23-1.34). The highest SIRs were observed for cancers of the liver, female genital organs, small intestine, and pancreas. After 3 years from T2DM diagnosis, a reduced risk of prostate cancer (SIR=0.73, 95%CI: 0.54-0.96) was found in men aged 65-74 years, and a higher risk for breast cancer (SIR=1.24, 95%CI: 1.00-1.52) was found among T2DM female patients. The overall 5-year survival after T2DM was 88.7%. Furthermore, T2DM appeared to have a negative effect on survival of women with breast cancer. This population-based study confirmed that T2DM patients are at increased risk of several cancers, and of premature death in women with breast cancer.

  18. Influence of socioeconomic factors on survival after breast cancer--a nationwide cohort study of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 1983-1999.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Ross, Lone; Düring, Maria; Carlsen, Kathrine; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Lynch, John; Johansen, Christoffer

    2007-12-01

    The reasons for social inequality in breast cancer survival are far from established. Our study aims to study the importance of a range of socioeconomic factors and comorbid disorders on survival after breast cancer surgery in Denmark where the health care system is tax-funded and uniform. All 25,897 Danish women who underwent protocol-based treatment for breast cancer in 1983-1999 were identified in a clinical database and information on socioeconomic variables and both somatic and psychiatric comorbid disorders was obtained from population-based registries. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the association between socioeconomic position and overall survival and further to analyse breast cancer specific deaths in a competing risk set-up regarding all other causes of death as competing risks. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for death was reduced in women with higher education (HR, 0.91; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.85-0.98), with higher income (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.87-0.98) and with larger dwellings (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.85-0.96 for women living in houses larger than 150 m(2)). Presence of comorbid disorders increased the HR. An interaction between income and comorbid disorders resulting in a 15% lower survival 10 year after primary surgery in poor women with low-risk breast cancer having comorbid conditions ( approximately 65%) compared to rich women with similar breast cancer prognosis and comorbid conditions ( approximately 80%) suggests that part of the explanation for the social inequality in survival after breast cancer surgery in Denmark lies in the access to and/or compliance with management of comorbid conditions in poorer women.

  19. Transglutaminase Is a Tumor Cell and Cancer Stem Cell Survival Factor

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Richard L.; Fisher, Matthew L.; Grun, Dan; Adhikary, Gautam; Xu, Wen; Kerr, Candace

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that cancer cells express elevated levels of type II transglutaminase (TG2), and that expression is further highly enriched in cancer stem cells derived from these cancers. Moreover, elevated TG2 expression is associated with enhanced cancer stem cell marker expression, survival signaling, proliferation, migration, invasion, integrin-mediated adhesion, epithelial–mesenchymal transition, and drug resistance. TG2 expression is also associated with formation of aggressive and metastatic tumors that are resistant to conventional therapeutic intervention. This review summarizes the role of TG2 as a cancer cell survival factor in a range of tumor types, and as a target for preventive and therapeutic intervention. The literature supports the idea that TG2, in the closed/GTP-binding/signaling conformation, drives cancer cell and cancer stem cell survival, and that TG2, in the open/crosslinking conformation, is associated with cell death. PMID:26258961

  20. Esophageal cancer epidemiology in blacks and whites: racial and gender disparities in incidence, mortality, survival rates and histology.

    PubMed Central

    Baquet, Claudia R.; Commiskey, Patricia; Mack, Kelly; Meltzer, Stephen; Mishra, Shiraz I.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Esophageal cancer rate disparities are pronounced for blacks and whites. This study presents black-white esophageal cancer incidence, mortality, relative survival rates, histology and trends for two five-year time periods--1991-1995 and 1996-2000--and for the time period 1991-2000. METHODS: The study used data from the National Cancer Institute's population-based Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER) program with submission dates 1991-2000. Age-adjusted incidence, mortality, relative survival rates and histology for esophageal carcinoma were calculated for nine SEER cancer registries for 1991-2000. Rates were analyzed by race and gender for changes over specified time periods. RESULTS: Esophageal cancer age-adjusted incidence of blacks was about twice that of whites (8.63 vs. 4.39/100,000, p < 0.05). Age-adjusted mortality for blacks, although showing a declining trend, was nearly twice that of whites (7.79 vs. 3.96, p < 0.05). Although survival was poor for all groups, it was significantly poorer in blacks than in whites. Squamous cell carcinoma was more commonly diagnosed in blacks and white females, whereas adenocarcinoma was more common among white males (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Racial disparities in esophageal cancer incidence, mortality, survival and histology exist. Survival rates from this disease have not significantly improved over the decade. These data support the need for advances in prevention, early detection biomarker research and research on new, more effective treatment modalities for this disease. Images Figure 1 PMID:16334494

  1. Hidden survival heterogeneity of three Common eider populations in response to climate fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Guéry, Loreleï; Descamps, Sébastien; Pradel, Roger; Hanssen, Sveinn Are; Erikstad, Kjell Einar; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Gilchrist, H Grant; Bêty, Joël

    2017-01-26

    Understanding how individuals and populations respond to fluctuations in climatic conditions is critical to explain and anticipate changes in ecological systems. Most such studies focus on climate impacts on single populations without considering inter- and intra-population heterogeneity. However, comparing geographically dispersed populations limits the risk of faulty generalizations and helps to improve ecological and demographic models. We aimed to determine whether differences in migration tactics among and within populations would induce inter- or intra-population heterogeneity in survival in relation to winter climate fluctuations. Our study species was the Common eider (Somateria mollissima), a marine duck with a circumpolar distribution, which is strongly affected by climatic conditions during several phases of its annual cycle. Capture-mark-recapture data were collected in two arctic (northern Canada and Svalbard) and one subarctic (northern Norway) population over a period of 18, 15, and 29 years respectively. These three populations have different migration tactics and experience different winter climatic conditions. Using multi-event and mixture modelling, we assessed the association between adult female eider survival and winter conditions as measured by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index. We found that winter weather conditions affected the survival of female eiders from each of these three populations. However, different mechanisms seemed to be involved. Survival of the two migrating arctic populations was impacted directly by changes in the NAO, whereas the subarctic resident population was affected by the NAO with time lags of 2-3 years. Moreover, we found evidence for intra-population heterogeneity in the survival response to the winter NAO in the Canadian eider population, where individuals migrate to distinct wintering areas. Our results illustrate how individuals and populations of the same species can vary in their responses to

  2. LHRH and LHR genotypes and prostate cancer incidence and survival.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Sue Ann; Liu, Stephen V; Pinski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Despite their crucial role in initiating steroid-hormone synthesis, the hypothalamic and pituitary hormones (LH, LHRH) and their receptors have received scant attention in genetic studies of hormone-related diseases. This study included 1,170 men diagnosed with prostate cancer (PC) in Los Angeles County between 1999 and 2003. LHRH and LH receptor genotypes were examined for association with PC survival. Additionally, associations with PC incidence were examined by comparing PC cases to control men of similar age and race/ethnicity. The LHR 312 G allele was found to be associated with increased PC mortality (p=0.01). Ten years after diagnosis, 16% of men carrying two copies of the G allele (genotype GG) had died of PC, compared to 11% of those with genotype AG and 9% of those with AA. In a case-control comparison, this same allele was significantly associated with decreased PC risk: OR=0.68 (95% CI: 0.49, 0.93) for genotype GG vs. AA. These results suggest that androgens may play opposing roles in PC initiation and progression, and highlight the need to include these important but overlooked genes in future studies of PC etiology, prognosis, and treatment.

  3. CANCER-ASSOCIATED FIBROBLAST EXOSOMES REGULATE SURVIVAL AND PROLIFERATION OF PANCREATIC CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Katherine E.; Zeleniak, Ann E.; Fishel, Melissa L.; Wu, Junmin; Littlepage, Laurie E.; Hill, Reginald

    2016-01-01

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) comprise the majority of the tumor bulk of pancreatic adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Current efforts to eradicate these tumors focus predominantly on targeting the proliferation of rapidly growing cancer epithelial cells. We know that this is largely ineffective with resistance arising in most tumors following exposure to chemotherapy. Despite the long-standing recognition of the prominence of CAFs in PDAC, the effect of chemotherapy on CAFs and how they may contribute to drug resistance in neighboring cancer cells is not well characterized. Here we show that CAFs exposed to chemotherapy play an active role in regulating the survival and proliferation of cancer cells. We found that CAFs are intrinsically resistant to gemcitabine, the chemotherapeutic standard of care for PDAC. Further, CAFs exposed to gemcitabine significantly increase the release of extracellular vesicles called exosomes. These exosomes increased chemoresistance-inducing factor, Snail, in recipient epithelial cells and promote proliferation and drug resistance. Finally, treatment of gemcitabine-exposed CAFs with an inhibitor of exosome release, GW4869, significantly reduces survival in co-cultured epithelial cells, signifying an important role of CAF exosomes in chemotherapeutic drug resistance. Collectively, these findings show the potential for exosome inhibitors as treatment options alongside chemotherapy for overcoming PDAC chemoresistance. PMID:27669441

  4. Intentional genetic introgression influences survival of adults and subadults in a small, inbred felid population.

    PubMed

    Benson, John F; Hostetler, Jeffrey A; Onorato, David P; Johnson, Warren E; Roelke, Melody E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Jansen, Deborah; Oli, Madan K

    2011-09-01

    1. Inbreeding and low genetic diversity can cause reductions in individual fitness and increase extinction risk in animal populations. Intentional introgression, achieved by releasing genetically diverse individuals into inbred populations, has been used as a conservation tool to improve demographic performance in endangered populations. 2. By the 1980s, Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi) had been reduced to a small, inbred population that appeared to be on the brink of extinction. In 1995, female pumas from Texas (P. c. stanleyana) were released in occupied panther range as part of an intentional introgression programme to restore genetic variability and improve demographic performance of panthers. 3. We used 25 years (1981-2006) of continuous radiotelemetry and genetic data to estimate and model subadult and adult panther survival and cause-specific mortality to provide rigorous sex and age class-specific survival estimates and evaluate the effect of the introgression programme on these parameters. 4. Genetic ancestry influenced annual survival of subadults and adults after introgression, as F(1) generation admixed panthers ( = 0·98) survived better than pre-introgression type panthers ( = 0·77) and other admixed individuals ( = 0·82). Furthermore, heterozygosity was higher for admixed panthers relative to pre-introgression type panthers and positively influenced survival. 5. Our results are consistent with hybrid vigour; however, extrinsic factors such as low density of males in some areas of panther range may also have contributed to higher survival of F(1) panthers. Regardless, improved survival of F(1) subadults and adults likely contributed to the numerical increase in panthers following introgression, and our results indicate that intentional admixture, achieved here by releasing individuals from another population, appears to have been successful in improving demographic performance in this highly endangered population.

  5. Childhood cancer camps: their role in adults surviving childhood cancers lives.

    PubMed

    Beckwitt, Asher E

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the role that childhood cancer camps continue to play in the lives of adults surviving childhood cancers (ASCCs). Specifically, the purpose of this study is to understand the roles these camps play in enhancing ASCCs' psychosocial and emotional well-being and access to information. Twenty-three ASCCs participated in this study. Illness narratives were used to understand ASCCs' camp experiences. Three themes emerged from the data analysis to reflect ASCCs' experiences: (1) normalcy, (2) meaningful camp experiences, and (3) access to information. Results show that in the years following camp participation, childhood cancer camps continue to play an important role in ASCCs' lives, providing them with ongoing social and emotional support and access to resources.

  6. The Inverse Relationship between 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Cancer Survival: Discussion of Causation

    PubMed Central

    Robsahm, Trude E.; Schwartz, Gary G.; Tretli, Steinar

    2013-01-01

    Cancer mortality rates vary inversely with geographic latitude and solar ultraviolet-B doses. This relationship may be due to an inhibitory role of vitamin D on cancer development. The relationship between vitamin D and cancer appears to be stronger for studies of cancer mortality than incidence. Because cancer mortality reflects both cancer incidence and survival, the difference may be due to effects of vitamin D on cancer survival. Here we review analytic epidemiologic studies investigating the relation between vitamin D, measured by circulating levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), and cancer survival. A relationship between low 25-OHD levels and poor survival is shown by most of the reviewed studies. This relationship is likely to be causal when viewed in light of most criteria for assessing causality (temporality, strength, exposure-response, biological plausibility and consistency). A serum level of 25-OHD around 50 nmol/L appears to be a threshold level. Conversely, there are several mechanisms whereby cancer could lower serum levels of 25-OHD. The severity of disease at the time of diagnosis and time of serum sampling are key factors to clarify the temporal aspect of these relationships. Evidence that vitamin D supplementation could retard the disease process or prolong survival time would be key evidence, but is difficult to generate. However, recent clinical trial results in prostate cancer support a role for vitamin D in this regard. PMID:24202453

  7. Survival, recruitment, and population growth rate of an important mesopredator: the northern raccoon.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Elizabeth M; Cameron Devitt, Susan E; Sunquist, Melvin E; Goswami, Varun R; Oli, Madan K

    2014-01-01

    Populations of mesopredators (mid-sized mammalian carnivores) are expanding in size and range amid declining apex predator populations and ever-growing human presence, leading to significant ecological impacts. Despite their obvious importance, population dynamics have scarcely been studied for most mesopredator species. Information on basic population parameters and processes under a range of conditions is necessary for managing these species. Here we investigate survival, recruitment, and population growth rate of a widely distributed and abundant mesopredator, the northern raccoon (Procyon lotor), using Pradel's temporal symmetry models and >6 years of monthly capture-mark-recapture data collected in a protected area. Monthly apparent survival probability was higher for females (0.949, 95% CI = 0.936-0.960) than for males (0.908, 95% CI = 0.893-0.920), while monthly recruitment rate was higher for males (0.091, 95% CI = 0.078-0.106) than for females (0.054, 95% CI = 0.042-0.067). Finally, monthly realized population growth rate was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.996-1.004), indicating that our study population has reached a stable equilibrium in this relatively undisturbed habitat. There was little evidence for substantial temporal variation in population growth rate or its components. Our study is one of the first to quantify survival, recruitment, and realized population growth rate of raccoons using long-term data and rigorous statistical models.

  8. Cancer survival in England and Wales at the end of the 20th century

    PubMed Central

    Rachet, B; Woods, L M; Mitry, E; Riga, M; Cooper, N; Quinn, M J; Steward, J; Brenner, H; Estève, J; Sullivan, R; Coleman, M P

    2008-01-01

    Survival has risen steadily since the 1970s for most cancers in adults in England and Wales, but persistent inequalities exist between those living in affluent and deprived areas. These differences are not seen for children. For many of the common adult cancers, these inequalities in survival (the ‘deprivation gap') became more marked in the 1990s. This volume presents extended analyses of survival for adults diagnosed during the 14 years 1986–1999 and followed up to 2001, including trends in overall survival in England and Wales and trends in the deprivation gap in survival. The analyses include individual tumour data for 2.2 million cancer patients. This article outlines the structure of the supplement – an article for each of the 20 most common cancers in adults, followed by an expert commentary from one of the leading UK clinicians specialising in malignancies of that organ or system. The available data, quality control and methods of analysis are described here, rather than repeated in each of the 20 articles. We open the discussion between clinicians and epidemiologists on how to interpret the observed trends and inequalities in cancer survival, and we highlight some of the most important contrasts in these very different points of view. Survival improved substantially for adult cancer patients in England and Wales up to the end of the 20th century. Although socioeconomic inequalities in survival are remarkably persistent, the overall patterns suggest that these inequalities are largely avoidable. PMID:18813248

  9. Nationwide trends in incidence, treatment and survival of colorectal cancer patients with synchronous metastases.

    PubMed

    van der Geest, Lydia G M; Lam-Boer, Jorine't; Koopman, Miriam; Verhoef, Cees; Elferink, Marloes A G; de Wilt, Johannes H W

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine trends in incidence, treatment and survival of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with synchronous metastases (Stage IV) in the Netherlands. This nationwide population-based study included 160,278 patients diagnosed with CRC between 1996 and 2011. We evaluated changes in stage distribution, location of synchronous metastases and treatment in four consecutive periods, using Chi square tests for trend. Median survival in months was determined, using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The proportion of Stage IV CRC patients (n = 33,421) increased from 19 % (1996-1999) to 23 % (2008-2011, p < 0.001). This was predominantly due to a major increase in the incidence of lung metastases (1.7-5.0 % of all CRC patients). During the study period, the primary tumor was resected less often in Stage IV patients (65-46 %) and the use of systemic treatment has increased (29-60 %). Also an increase in metastasectomy was found in patients with one metastatic site, especially in patients with liver-only disease (5-18 %, p < 0.001). Median survival of all Stage IV CRC patients increased from 7 to 12 months. Especially in patients with metastases confined to the liver or lungs this improvement in survival was apparent (9-16 and 12-24 months respectively, both p < 0.001). In the last two decades, more lung metastases were detected and an increasing proportion of Stage IV CRC patients was treated with systemic therapy and/or metastasectomy. Survival of patients has significantly improved. However, the prognosis of Stage IV patients becomes increasingly diverse.

  10. Impact of Neoadjuvant Radiation on Survival in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Matthew; Goloubeva, Olga; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The role of surgery in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial. This study was undertaken to assess the impact of neoadjuvant radiation therapy for Stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database that included patients who were 18 years and older with NSCLC classified as Stage III and who underwent definitive therapy from 1988 to 2004. Patients were characterized by type of treatment received. Survival functions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression model was used to analyze trends in overall (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 48,131 patients were selected, with a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 0-203 months). By type of treatment, the 3-year OS was 10% with radiation therapy (RT), 37% with surgery (S), 34% with surgery and postoperative radiation (S-RT), and 45% with neoadjuvant radiation followed by surgery (Neo-RT) (p = 0.0001). Multivariable Cox model identified sex, race, laterality, T stage, N stage, and type of treatment as factors affecting survival. Estimated hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for other variables in regression model showed the types of treatment: S (HR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.4), S-RT (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3), and RT (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 2.15-2.53) were associated with significantly worse overall survival when compared with Neo-RT (p = 0.0001). Conclusion: This population based study demonstrates that patients with Stage III NSCLC receiving Neo-RT had significantly improved overall survival when compared with other treatment groups.

  11. Gastric cancer survival in Sweden. Lack of improvement in 19 years.

    PubMed Central

    Lundegårdh, G; Adami, H O; Malker, B

    1986-01-01

    A total of 34,549 patients constituting 87.0% of all patients with gastric cancer diagnosed in Sweden in 1960-1978 and reported to the National Cancer Registry were included in a complete follow-up over a period of 1-20 years. The poor outcome in this disease was again established in this unselected material. Thus, the 5-year relative survival rate (with 95% confidence limits) was 12.7% (12.1-13.2%) among the men and 14.1% (13.4-14.9%) among the women, without any long-term difference between the sexes. The annual hazard rates in male and female patients were still 11.0% (8.3-13.7%) and 9.0% (7.1-10.9%), respectively, after 5 years and did not approach zero until 10 years after the diagnosis. Men older than 75 showed a slightly higher mortality during the first year, but there were seemingly no relationships of tumor-biological or clinical significance between age at diagnosis and long-term relative survival. The overall prognosis remained unchanged during the 19 years of the study, whereas the incidence was reduced by about 40% in the whole Swedish population. PMID:3767487

  12. Polymorphisms of key chemokine genes and survival of non-small cell lung cancer in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongxia; Shu, Yongqian; Pan, Shiyang; Chen, Jiaping; Dai, Juncheng; Jin, Guangfu; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing

    2011-11-01

    Chemokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although the deregulations of chemokines have been reported to be associated with the development and progression of many human cancers including lung cancer, polymorphisms of chemokine genes have not been examined with the survival of NSCLC. We systematically investigated associations of 23 common potentially functional SNPs in the key chemokine genes (CCL2, CCL5, CCL8, CCL20, CCL22, CXCL1, CXCL6, CXCL9 and CXCL12) with the survival of NSCLC in a case cohort of 568 NSCLC patients in a Chinese population. The results showed that variant genotypes of CCL2 rs3760396 and CCL8 rs3138035 were associated with a significantly decreased risk of death for NSCLC (dominant model: adjusted HR=0.65, 95% CI=0.48-0.89 for rs3760396; dominant model: adjusted HR=0.65, 95% CI=0.49-0.86 for rs3138035), while CXCL12 rs1804429 was associated with an increased risk of death for NSCLC (CC vs AA: adjusted HR=6.03, 95% CI=1.44-25.24). Further stepwise regression analysis suggested that only rs3138035, a SNP located at 5'-flanking region of CCL8, was an independently favorable factor for the prognosis of NSCLC and the protective effect was more evident in smokers (adjusted HR=0.61, 95% CI=0.42-0.87), patients with squamous cell cancer (adjusted HR=0.58, 95% CI=0.35-0.96), patients with early stage (adjusted HR=0.32, 95% CI=0.15-0.67) and patients treated with surgical operation (adjusted HR=0.47, 95% CI=0.31-0.71). In addition, the interaction analysis demonstrated that stage and surgical operation interacted with the genetic effect of rs3138035 in relation to NSCLC survival (adjusted P(interaction)=0.02 and 0.01, respectively). These findings suggest that CCL8 rs3138035 may be one of the candidate biomarkers for NSCLC survival and may modify death risk associated with stage and surgical operation. Larger studies incorporating functional evaluations are warranted to validate our findings.

  13. Cancer incidence and survival (1997-2006) among adolescents and young adults in the north of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Helena; Antunes, Luís; Castro, Clara; Lunet, Nuno; Bento, Maria José

    2012-10-01

    Cancer is the first cause of natural death among young subjects. Population-based statistics are important to evaluate the burden of disease and the effectiveness of healthcare provision. We aimed to describe cancer incidence and survival among adolescents (15-19 years) and young adults (20-24 years) in the north of Portugal. Data on the cancers diagnosed between 1997 and 2006 were obtained from the Portuguese North Region Cancer Registry, and incidence rates were computed. Vital status was determined until December 2010. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier survival function. Trends on cancer incidence were assessed using the Joinpoint regression analysis. A total of 1223 cases were diagnosed: 441 among adolescents and 782 among young adults. Overall incidence rate was 198.3 per million adolescents [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 135.7-260.9] and 306.2 per million young adults (95% CI: 262.3-350.0). The most frequent tumors were Hodgkin lymphoma (adolescents: 21.0%; young adults: 14.8%), thyroid carcinoma (adolescents: 11.5%; young adults: 16.2%), and germ cell tumors (adolescents: 11.1%; young adults: 16.3%). Cancer incidence significantly increased among young adults [annual average percent change: 3.6%, (95% CI: 1.7-5.4)], while appears to vary randomly among adolescents. Overall five-year observed survival was 77.2% (95% CI: 72.9%-80.8%) among adolescents and 81.3% (95% CI: 78.4%-83.9%) among young adults, lower in males. In conclusion, cancer incidence among adolescents and young adults is higher in the north of Portugal than in other European countries, especially of thyroid tumors. Between 1997 and 2006, the incidence increased significantly in young adults.

  14. Pre-diagnostic Sleep Duration and Sleep Quality in Relation to Subsequent Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Amanda I.; Bhatti, Parveen; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Chen, Chu; Crane, Tracy E.; Kroenke, Candyce H.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather; Rissling, Michelle; Snively, Beverly M.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Treggiari, Miriam M.; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Poor sleep quality and short sleep duration have been associated with elevated risk for several cancer types; however, the relationship between sleep and cancer outcomes has not been well characterized. We assessed the association between pre-diagnostic sleep attributes and subsequent cancer survival within the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). Methods: We identified WHI participants in whom a first primary invasive cancer had been diagnosed during follow-up (n = 21,230). Participants provided information on sleep characteristics at enrollment. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between these pre-diagnostic sleep characteristics and cancer-specific survival for all cancers combined and separately for common cancers. Analyses were adjusted for age, study arm, cancer site, marital status, income, smoking, physical activity, and time to diagnosis. Results: No individual pre-diagnostic sleep characteristics were found to be significantly associated with cancer survival in analyses of all cancer sites combined; however, women who reported short sleep duration (≤ 6 h sleep/night) combined with frequent snoring (≥ 5 nights/w experienced significantly poorer cancer-specific survival than those who reported 7–8 h of sleep/night and no snoring (HR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.14–1.54). Short sleep duration (HR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.07–1.99) and frequent snoring (HR = 1.34, 95% CI: 0.98–1.85) were each associated with poorer breast cancer survival; those reporting short sleep combined with frequent snoring combined had substantially poorer breast cancer survival than those reporting neither (HR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.47–3.13). Conclusions: Short sleep duration combined with frequent snoring reported prior to cancer diagnosis may influence subsequent cancer survival, particularly breast cancer survival. Citation: Phipps AI, Bhatti P, Neuhouser ML, Chen C, Crane TE, Kroenke CH, Ochs-Balcom H

  15. Winter fidelity and apparent survival of lesser snow goose populations in the Pacific flyway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, C.K.; Samuel, M.D.; Baranyuk, Vasily V.; Cooch, E.G.; Kraege, Donald K.

    2008-01-01

    The Beringia region of the Arctic contains 2 colonies of lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) breeding on Wrangel Island, Russia, and Banks Island, Canada, and wintering in North America. The Wrangel Island population is composed of 2 subpopulations from a sympatric breeding colony but separate wintering areas, whereas the Banks Island population shares a sympatric wintering area in California, USA, with one of the Wrangel Island subpopulations. The Wrangel Island colony represents the last major snow goose population in Russia and has fluctuated considerably since 1970, whereas the Banks Island population has more than doubled. The reasons for these changes are unclear, but hypotheses include independent population demographics (survival and recruitment) and immigration and emigration among breeding or wintering populations. These demographic and movement patterns have important ecological and management implications for understanding goose population structure, harvest of admixed populations, and gene flow among populations with separate breeding or wintering areas. From 1993 to 1996, we neckbanded molting birds at their breeding colonies and resighted birds on the wintering grounds. We used multistate mark-recapture models to evaluate apparent survival rates, resighting rates, winter fidelity, and potential exchange among these populations. We also compared the utility of face stain in Wrangel Island breeding geese as a predictor of their wintering area. Our results showed similar apparent survival rates between subpopulations of Wrangel Island snow geese and lower apparent survival, but higher emigration, for the Banks Island birds. Males had lower apparent survival than females, most likely due to differences in neckband loss. Transition between wintering areas was low (<3%), with equal movement between northern and southern wintering areas for Wrangel Island birds and little evidence of exchange between the Banks and northern Wrangel Island

  16. The accuracy of clinicians' predictions of survival in advanced cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Stephanie; Agarwal, Arnav; Popovic, Marko; Milakovic, Milica; Lam, Michael; Fu, Wayne; DiGiovanni, Julia; Lam, Henry; Lechner, Breanne; Pulenzas, Natalie; Chow, Ronald; Chow, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The process of formulating an accurate survival prediction is often difficult but important, as it influences the decisions of clinicians, patients, and their families. The current article aims to review the accuracy of clinicians' predictions of survival (CPS) in advanced cancer patients. A literature search of Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, and MEDLINE was conducted to identify studies that reported clinicians' prediction of survival in advanced cancer patients. Studies were included if the subjects consisted of advanced cancer patients and the data reported on the ability of clinicians to predict survival, with both estimated and observed survival data present. Studies reporting on the ability of biological and molecular markers to predict survival were excluded. Fifteen studies that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were identified. Clinicians in five studies underestimated patients' survival (estimated to observed survival ratio between 0.5 and 0.92). In contrast, 12 studies reported clinicians' overestimation of survival (ratio between 1.06 and 6). CPS in advanced cancer patients is often inaccurate and overestimated. Given these findings, clinicians should be aware of their tendency to be overoptimistic. Further investigation of predictive patient and clinician characteristics is warranted to improve clinicians' ability to predict survival.

  17. Integrated population modeling reveals the impact of climate on the survival of juvenile emperor penguins.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Fitsum; Barbraud, Christophe; Gimenez, Olivier

    2017-03-01

    Early-life demographic traits are poorly known, impeding our understanding of population processes and sensitivity to climate change. Survival of immature individuals is a critical component of population dynamics and recruitment in particular. However, obtaining reliable estimates of juvenile survival (i.e., from independence to first year) remains challenging, as immatures are often difficult to observe and to monitor individually in the field. This is particularly acute for seabirds, in which juveniles stay at sea and remain undetectable for several years. In this work, we developed a Bayesian integrated population model to estimate the juvenile survival of emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri), and other demographic parameters including adult survival and fecundity of the species. Using this statistical method, we simultaneously analyzed capture-recapture data of adults, the annual number of breeding females, and the number of fledglings of emperor penguins collected at Dumont d'Urville, Antarctica, for the period 1971-1998. We also assessed how climate covariates known to affect the species foraging habitats and prey [southern annular mode (SAM), sea ice concentration (SIC)] affect juvenile survival. Our analyses revealed that there was a strong evidence for the positive effect of SAM during the rearing period (SAMR) on juvenile survival. Our findings suggest that this large-scale climate index affects juvenile emperor penguins body condition and survival through its influence on wind patterns, fast ice extent, and distance to open water. Estimating the influence of environmental covariates on juvenile survival is of major importance to understand the impacts of climate variability and change on the population dynamics of emperor penguins and seabirds in general and to make robust predictions on the impact of climate change on marine predators.

  18. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems. PMID:27226981

  19. Methodological issues in estimating survival in patients with multiple primary cancers: an application to women with breast cancer as a first tumour

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Stefano; Ricceri, Fulvio; Terracini, Lea; Zanetti, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Background Comparing survival of patients with a single tumour and patients with multiple primaries poses different methodological problems. In population based studies, where we cannot rely on detailed clinical information, the issue is disentangling the share of survival probability from the first and second cancer, and their compounded effect. We examined three hypotheses: A) the survival probability since the first tumour does not change with the occurrence of a second tumour; B) the probability of surviving a tumour does not change with the presence of a previous primary; C) the probabilities of surviving two subsequent primary tumours are independent (additivity hypothesis on mortality rates). Methods We studied the survival probabilities modelling mortality rates according to hypotheses A), B) and C). Mortality rates were calculated using Aalen-Johansen estimators which allowed to discount for the lag-time survival before developing a second tumour. We applied this approach to a cohort of 436 women with breast cancer (BC) and a subsequent tumour in the resident population of Turin, Italy, between 1985 and 2002. Results We presented our results in term of a Standardised Mortality Ratio calculated (SMRAJ) after 10 years of follow-up. For hypothesis A we observed a significant excess mortality of 2.21 (95% C.I. 1.94 – 2.45). Concerning hypothesis B we found a not significant SMRAJ of 0.98 (95% C.I. 0.87 – 1.10). The additivity hypothesis (C) was not confirmed as it overestimated the risk of death, in fact SMRsAJ were all below 1: 0.75 (95% C.I. 0.66 – 0.84) for BC and all subsequent cancers, 0.72 (95% C.I. 0.55 – 0.94) for BC and colon-rectum cancer, 0.76 (95% C.I. 0.48 – 1.14) for BC and corpus uteri cancer (not significant). Conclusion This method proved to be useful in disentangling the effect of different subsequent cancers on mortality. In our application it shows a worse long-term mortality for women with two cancers than that with BC only

  20. Population size, survival, and movements of white-cheeked pintails in Eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collazo, J.A.; Bonilla-Martinez, G.

    2001-01-01

    We estimated numbers and survival of White-cheeked Pintails (Anas bahamensis) in eastern Puerto Rico during 1996-1999. We also quantified their movements between Culebra Island and the Humacao Wildlife Refuge, Puerto Rico. Mark-resight population size estimates averaged 1020 pintails during nine, 3-month sampling periods from January 1997 to June 1999. On average, minimum regional counts were 38 % lower than mark-resight estimates (mean = 631). Adult survival was 0.51 ?? 0.09 (SE). This estimate is similar for other anatids of similar size but broader geographic distribution. The probability of pintails surviving and staying in Humacao was hiher (67 %) than for counterparts on Culebra (31 %). The probability of surviving and moving from Culebra to Humacao (41 %) was higher than from Humacao to Culebra (20 %). These findings, and available information on reproduction, indicate that the Humacao Wildlife Refuge refuge has an important role in the regional demography of pintails. Our findings on population numbers and regional survival are encouraging, given concerns about the species' status due to habitat loss and hunting. However, our outlook for the species is tempered by the remaining gaps in the population dynamics of pintails; for examples, survival estimates of broods and fledglings (age 0-1) are needed for a comprehensive status assessment. Until additional data are obtianed, White-cheeked Pintails should continue to be protectd from hunting in Puerto Rico.

  1. The impact of disease on the survival and population growth rate of the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Lachish, Shelly; Jones, Menna; McCallum, Hamish

    2007-09-01

    1. We investigated the impact of a recently emerged disease, Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD), on the survival and population growth rate of a population of Tasmanian devils, Sarcophilus harrisii, on the Freycinet Peninsula in eastern Tasmania. 2. Cormack-Jolly-Seber and multistate mark-recapture models were employed to investigate the impact of DFTD on age- and sex-specific apparent survival and transition rates. Disease impact on population growth rate was investigated using reverse-time mark-recapture models. 3. The arrival of DFTD triggered an immediate and steady decline in apparent survival rates of adults and subadults, the rate of which was predicted well by the increase in disease prevalence in the population over time. 4. Transitions from healthy to diseased state increased with disease prevalence suggesting that the force of infection in the population is increasing and that the epidemic is not subsiding. 5. The arrival of DFTD coincided with a marked, ongoing decline in the population growth rate of the previously stable population, which to date has not been offset by population compensatory responses.

  2. Cancer cell survival during detachment from the ECM: multiple barriers to tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Cassandra L; Weigel, Kelsey J; Schafer, Zachary T

    2014-09-01

    Epithelial cells require attachment to the extracellular matrix (ECM) for survival. However, during tumour progression and metastasis, cancerous epithelial cells must adapt to and survive in the absence of ECM. During the past 20 years, several cellular changes, including anoikis, have been shown to regulate cell viability when cells become detached from the ECM. In this Opinion article, we review in detail how cancer cells can overcome or take advantage of these specific processes. Gaining a better understanding of how cancer cells survive during detachment from the ECM will be instrumental in designing chemotherapeutic strategies that aim to eliminate ECM-detached metastatic cells.

  3. Population trends and survival of nesting green sea turtles Chelonia mydas on Aves Island, Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia-Cruz, Marco A.; Lampo, Margarita; Peñaloza, Claudia L.; Kendall, William; Solé, Genaro; Rodriguez-Clark, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term demographic data are valuable for assessing the effect of anthropogenic impacts on endangered species and evaluating recovery programs. Using a 2-state open robust design model, we analyzed mark-recapture data from green turtles Chelonia mydas sighted between 1979 and 2009 on Aves Island, Venezuela, a rookery heavily impacted by human activities before it was declared a wildlife refuge in 1972. Based on the encounter histories of 7689 nesting females, we estimated the abundance, annual survival, and remigration intervals for this population. Female survival varied from 0.14-0.91, with a mean of 0.79, which is low compared to survival of other populations from the Caribbean (mean = 0.84) and Australia (mean = 0.95), even though we partially corrected for tag loss, which is known to negatively bias survival estimates. This supports prior suggestions that Caribbean populations in general, and the Aves Island population in particular, may be more strongly impacted than populations elsewhere. It is likely that nesters from this rookery are extracted while foraging in remote feeding grounds where hunting still occurs. Despite its relatively low survival, the nesting population at Aves Island increased during the past 30 years from approx. 500 to >1000 nesting females in 2009. Thus, this population, like others in the Caribbean and the Atlantic, seems to be slowly recovering following protective management. Although these findings support the importance of long-term conservation programs aimed at protecting nesting grounds, they also highlight the need to extend management actions to foraging grounds where human activities may still impact green turtle populations.

  4. Investigating Rates of Hunting and Survival in Declining European Lapwing Populations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding effects of harvest on population dynamics is of major interest, especially for declining species. European lapwing Vanellus vanellus populations increased from the 1960s until the 1980s and declined strongly thereafter. About 400,000 lapwings are harvested annually and it is thus of high conservation relevance to assess whether hunting was a main cause for the observed changes in lapwing population trends. We developed a multi-event cause-specific mortality model which we applied to a long-term ring-recovery data set (1960–2010) of > 360,000 records to estimate survival and cause-specific mortalities. We found no temporal change in survival over the last 50 years for first-year (FY) and older birds (after first-year; AFY) originating from different ringing areas. Mean survival was high, around 0.60 and 0.80 for FY and AFY individuals, respectively. The proportion of total mortality due to hunting was <0.10 over the study period and the estimated proportion of harvested individuals (kill rate) was <0.05 in each year. Our result of constant survival indicates that demographic processes other than survival were responsible for the pronounced change in lapwing population trends in the 1980s. Our findings lend support to the hypothesis that hunting was not a significant contributor to the large-scale decline of lapwing populations. To halt the ongoing decline of European lapwing populations management should focus on life history stages other than survival (e.g. productivity). Further analyses are required to investigate the contribution of other demographic rates to the decline of lapwings and to identify the most efficient conservation actions. PMID:27685660

  5. Effects of weather on survival in populations of boreal toads in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scherer, R. D.; Muths, E.; Lambert, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the relationships between animal population demography and the abiotic and biotic elements of the environments in which they live is a central objective in population ecology. For example, correlations between weather variables and the probability of survival in populations of temperate zone amphibians may be broadly applicable to several species if such correlations can be validated for multiple situations. This study focuses on the probability of survival and evaluates hypotheses based on six weather variables in three populations of Boreal Toads (Bufo boreas) from central Colorado over eight years. In addition to suggesting a relationship between some weather variables and survival probability in Boreal Toad populations, this study uses robust methods and highlights the need for demographic estimates that are precise and have minimal bias. Capture-recapture methods were used to collect the data, and the Cormack-Jolly-Seber model in program MARK was used for analysis. The top models included minimum daily winter air temperature, and the sum of the model weights for these models was 0.956. Weaker support was found for the importance of snow depth and the amount of environmental moisture in winter in modeling survival probability. Minimum daily winter air temperature was positively correlated with the probability of survival in Boreal Toads at other sites in Colorado and has been identified as an important covariate in studies in other parts of the world. If air temperatures are an important component of survival for Boreal Toads or other amphibians, changes in climate may have profound impacts on populations. Copyright 2008 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  6. Survival estimates for reintroduced populations of the Chiricahua Leopard Frog (Lithobates chiricahuensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, Paige E; Hossack, Blake R.; Muths, Erin L.; Sigafus, Brent H.; Chandler, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Global amphibian declines have been attributed to a number of factors including disease, invasive species, habitat degradation, and climate change. Reintroduction is one management action that is commonly used with the goal of recovering imperiled species. The success of reintroductions varies widely, and evaluating their efficacy requires estimates of population viability metrics, such as underlying vital rates and trends in abundance. Although rarely quantified, assessing vital rates for recovering populations provides a more mechanistic understanding of population growth than numerical trends in population occupancy or abundance. We used three years of capture-mark-recapture data from three breeding ponds and a Cormack-Jolly-Seber model to estimate annual apparent survival for reintroduced populations of the federally threatened Chiricahua Leopard Frog (Lithobates chiricahuensis) at the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge (BANWR), in the Altar Valley, Arizona, USA. To place our results in context, we also compiled published survival estimates for other ranids. Average apparent survival of Chiricahua Leopard Frogs at BANWR was 0.27 (95% CI [0.07, 0.74]) and average individual capture probability was 0.02 (95% CI [0, 0.05]). Our apparent survival estimate for Chiricahua Leopard Frogs is lower than for most other ranids and is not consistent with recent research that showed metapopulation viability in the Altar Valley is high. We suggest that low apparent survival may be indicative of high emigration rates. We recommend that future research should estimate emigration rates so that actual, rather than apparent, survival can be quantified to improve population viability assessments of threatened species following reintroduction efforts.

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2: A Role in Cancer Stem Cell Survival and Repopulation of Cancer Cells during Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Emma A.; Argyle, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible form of the enzyme that catalyses the synthesis of prostanoids, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major mediator of inflammation and angiogenesis. COX-2 is overexpressed in cancer cells and is associated with progressive tumour growth, as well as resistance of cancer cells to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These therapies are often delivered in multiple doses, which are spaced out to allow the recovery of normal tissues between treatments. However, surviving cancer cells also proliferate during treatment intervals, leading to repopulation of the tumour and limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. Tumour cell repopulation is a major cause of treatment failure. The central dogma is that conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy selects resistant cancer cells that are able to reinitiate tumour growth. However, there is compelling evidence of an active proliferative response, driven by increased COX-2 expression and downstream PGE2 release, which contribute to the repopulation of tumours and poor patient outcome. In this review, we will examine the evidence for a role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell biology and as a mediator of tumour repopulation that can be molecularly targeted to overcome resistance to therapy. PMID:27882058

  8. Up-to-date and precise estimates of cancer patient survival: model-based period analysis.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Hermann; Hakulinen, Timo

    2006-10-01

    Monitoring of progress in cancer patient survival by cancer registries should be as up-to-date as possible. Period analysis has been shown to provide more up-to-date survival estimates than do traditional methods of survival analysis. However, there is a trade-off between up-to-dateness and the precision of period estimates, in that increasing the up-to-dateness of survival estimates by restricting the analysis to a relatively short, recent time period, such as the most recent calendar year for which cancer registry data are available, goes along with a loss of precision. The authors propose a model-based approach to maximize the up-to-dateness of period estimates at minimal loss of precision. The approach is illustrated for monitoring of 5-year relative survival of patients diagnosed with one of 20 common forms of cancer in Finland between 1953 and 2002 by use of data from the nationwide Finnish Cancer Registry. It is shown that the model-based approach provides survival estimates that are as up-to-date as the most up-to-date conventional period estimates and at the same time much more precise than the latter. The modeling approach may further enhance the use of period analysis for deriving up-to-date cancer survival rates.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; John, Esther; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Stern, Mariana; Lundgreen, Abbie; Hines, Lisa; Giuliano, Anna; Baumgartner, Kathy; Herrick, Jennifer; Wolff, Roger K

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to cancer through their involvement in cancer invasion and metastasis. We evaluated genetic variation in MMP1 (9 SNPs), MMP2 (8 SNPs), MMP3 (4 SNPs), and MMP9 (3 SNPs) and breast cancer risk among Hispanic (2111 cases, 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases, 1586 controls) women in the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study. Ancestral informative markers (n = 104) were assessed to determine Native American (NA) ancestry. MMP1 [4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)] and MMP2 (2 SNPs) were associated with breast cancer overall. MMP1 rs996999 had strongest associations among women with the most NA ancestry (OR 1.61,95% CI 1.09,2.40) as did MMP3 rs650108 (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.05,1.75) and MMP9 rs3787268 (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.09,2.13). The adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) showed a significant pathway p(artp)  value of 0.04, with a stronger association among women with the most NA ancestry (p(artp) = 0.02). Significant pathway genes using the ARTP were MMP1 for all women (p(artp) = 0.02) and MMP9 for women with the most NA ancestry (p(artp) = 0.024); MMP2 was borderline significant overall (p(artp) =0.06) and MMP1 and MMP3 were borderline significant for women with the most NA ancestry (p(artp) = 0.07 and 0.06 respectively). MMP1 and MMP2 were associated with ER+/PR+ and ER+/PR-tumors; MMP3 and MMP9 were associated with ER-/PR- tumors. The pathway was highly significant with survival (p(artp) = 0.0041) with MMP2 having the strongest gene association (p(artp) = 0.0007). Our findings suggest that genetic variation in MMP genes influence breast cancer development and survival in this genetically admixed population.

  10. Differences in esophageal cancer characteristics and survival between Chinese and Caucasian patients in the SEER database

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Min-Qiang; Li, Yue-Ping; Wu, San-Gang; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Lin, Huan-Xin; Zhang, Shi-Yang; He, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare the clinicopathologic characteristics and survival of Chinese and Caucasian esophageal cancer (EC) patients residing in the US, using a population-based national registry (Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results [SEER]) database. Methods Patients with EC were identified from the SEER program from 1988 to 2012. Kaplan–Meier survival methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed. Results A total of 479 Chinese and 35,748 Caucasian EC patients were identified. Compared with Caucasian patients, the Chinese patients had a later year of diagnosis, remained married after EC was diagnosed, had esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) more frequently, had tumors located in the upper-third and middle-third of the esophagus more frequently, and fewer patients presented with poorly/undifferentiated EC and underwent cancer-directed surgery. In Chinese patients, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs) increased from 1988 to 2012 (P=0.054), and the majority of EAC patients had tumors located in the lower thoracic esophagus. The overall survival (OS) was not significantly different between Chinese and Caucasian patients (P=0.767). However, Chinese patients with ESCC had a significantly better OS when compared to their Caucasian counterparts, whereas there was no significant difference in the OS between Chinese and Caucasian patients with EAC. Conclusion The presenting demographic features, tumor characteristics, and outcomes of EC patients differed between Chinese and Caucasian patients residing in the US. Chinese patients diagnosed with EAC tended to share similar clinical features with their Caucasian counterparts, and the Chinese patients with ESCC had better OS than their Caucasian counterparts. PMID:27799791

  11. Median Survival Time of Endometrial Cancer Patients with Lymphovascular Invasion at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Asyikeen, Wan Adnan Wan Nor; Siti-Azrin, Ab Hamid; Jalil, Nur Asyilla Che; Zin, Anani Aila Mat; Othman, Nor Hayati

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecologic malignancy among females worldwide. The purpose of this study was to determine the median survival time of endometrial cancer patients at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). Methods A list of 121 endometrial cancer cases registered at Hospital USM between 2000 until 2011 was retrospectively reviewed. The survival time of the endometrial cancer patients was estimated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Log-rank tests were performed to compare the survival of the patients based on socio-demographics and clinical presentation. Results Only 108 patients, 87.0%, were included who were of Malay ethnicity. Previous history included menopause in 67.6% of patients and diabetes mellitus in 39.8% of patients; additionally, 63.4% of patients were nulliparous. Tumour staging was as follows: 24.5% stage I, 10.8% stage II, 26.5% stage III and 38.2% stage IV. The overall median survival time of the endometrial cancer patients was 70.20 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 51.79, 88.61). The significant factors were age, the presence of lymphovascular invasion and treatment received. Conclusion The overall survival of endometrial cancer was low. A prospective study needs to be carried out to discover more effective and accurate tests for the early detection of endometrial cancer. PMID:28090178

  12. Heterogeneity in phage induction enables the survival of the lysogenic population.

    PubMed

    Imamovic, Lejla; Ballesté, Elisenda; Martínez-Castillo, Alexandre; García-Aljaro, Cristina; Muniesa, Maite

    2016-03-01

    Lysogeny by temperate phages provides novel functions for bacteria and shelter for phages. However, under conditions that activate the phage lytic cycle, the benefit of lysogeny becomes a paradox that poses a threat for bacterial population survival. Using Escherichia coli lysogens for Shiga toxin (Stx) phages as model, we demonstrate how lysogenic bacterial populations circumvent extinction after phage induction. A fraction of cells maintains lysogeny, allowing population survival, whereas the other fraction of cells lyse, increasing Stx production and spreading Stx phages. The uninduced cells were still lysogenic for the Stx phage and equally able to induce phages as the original cells, suggesting heterogeneity of the E. coli lysogenic population. The bacterial population can modulate phage induction under stress conditions by the stress regulator RpoS. Cells overexpressing RpoS reduce Stx phage induction and compete with and survive better than cells with baseline RpoS levels. Our observations suggest that population heterogeneity in phage induction could be widespread among other bacterial genera and we propose this is a mechanism positively selected to prevent the extinction of the lysogenic population that can be modulated by environmental conditions.

  13. EUROCOURSE recipe for cancer surveillance by visible population-based cancer RegisTrees in Europe: From roots to fruits.

    PubMed

    Coebergh, Jan Willem; van den Hurk, Corina; Louwman, Marieke; Comber, Harry; Rosso, Stefano; Zanetti, Roberto; Sacchetto, Lidia; Storm, Hans; van Veen, Evert-Ben; Siesling, Sabine; van den Eijnden-van Raaij, Janny

    2015-06-01

    Currently about 160 population-based cancer registries (CRs) in Europe have extensive experience in generating valid information on variation in cancer risk and survival with time and place. Most CRs cover all cancers, but some are confined to specific cancers or to children. They cover 15-55% of the populations in all of the larger member states of the European Union (EU), except the United Kingdom (UK), and 100% coverage in 80% of those with populations below 20 million. The EU FP 7 EUROCOURSE project, which operated in 2009-2013, explored the essential role of CRs in cancer research and public health, and also focused attention on their programme owners (POs) and stakeholders (e.g. cancer societies, oncological professionals, cancer patient groups, and planners, providers and evaluators of cancer care and mass screening). Generally, all CRs depended on their regional and/or national oncological context and were increasingly involved in population-based studies of quality of cancer care, long-term prognosis and quality of life, one third being very active. Within the public health domain, CRs, in addition to describing the variety of environmental and lifestyle-related cancer epidemics, have also contributed actively to aetiologic research by a European databases that showed wide discrepancies in cancer risk and survival across the EU, and in more depth by follow-up of cohorts and recruitment for case-control studies. CRs were also actively contributing to independent evaluation of mass screening as an intervention which affects quality of care and cancer mortality. The potential of CRs for clinical evaluation has grown substantially through interaction with clinical stakeholders and more incidentally biobanks, also with greater involvement of patient groups - with a special focus on elderly patients who generally do not take part in clinical trials. Whereas 25-35% of CRs are active in a range of cancer research areas, the rest have a low profile and usually

  14. Effects of multidisciplinary team working on breast cancer survival: retrospective, comparative, interventional cohort study of 13 722 women

    PubMed Central

    Allardice, Gwen M; George, W David; Burns, Harry J G; Morrison, David S

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the effect of multidisciplinary care on survival in women treated for breast cancer. Design Retrospective, comparative, non-randomised, interventional cohort study. Setting NHS hospitals, health boards in the west of Scotland, UK. Participants 14 358 patients diagnosed with symptomatic invasive breast cancer between 1990 and 2000, residing in health board areas in the west of Scotland. 13 722 (95.6%) patients were eligible (excluding 16 diagnoses of inflammatory cancers and 620 diagnoses of breast cancer at death). Intervention In 1995, multidisciplinary team working was introduced in hospitals throughout one health board area (Greater Glasgow; intervention area), but not in other health board areas in the west of Scotland (non-intervention area). Main outcome measures Breast cancer specific mortality and all cause mortality. Results Before the introduction of multidisciplinary care (analysed time period January 1990 to September 1995), breast cancer mortality was 11% higher in the intervention area than in the non-intervention area (hazard ratio adjusted for year of incidence, age at diagnosis, and deprivation, 1.11; 95% confidence interval 1.00 to 1.20). After multidisciplinary care was introduced (time period October 1995 to December 2000), breast cancer mortality was 18% lower in the intervention area than in the non-intervention area (0.82, 0.74 to 0.91). All cause mortality did not differ significantly between populations in the earlier period, but was 11% lower in the intervention area than in the non-interventional area in the later period (0.89, 0.82 to 0.97). Interrupted time series analyses showed a significant improvement in breast cancer survival in the intervention area in 1996, compared with the expected survival in the same year had the pre-intervention trend continued (P=0.004). This improvement was maintained after the intervention was introduced. Conclusion Introduction of multidisciplinary care was associated with

  15. Participation in cancer trials: recruitment of underserved populations.

    PubMed

    Paskett, Electra D; Katz, Mira L; DeGraffinreid, Cecilia R; Tatum, Cathy M

    2003-10-01

    One approach to address cancer health disparities is to focus on the under-representation by minority populations in cancer trials. Recruitment strategies include: 1) characterizing the target populations, 2) involve members of the population in planning, 3) take the message to the population, 4) give something back to the community, 5) enhance credibility with a community spokesperson, 6) identify and remove barriers, 7) improve staff sensitivity, and 8) educate the population about the trial. To recruit minorities to clinical trials, we have developed the Accrual to Clinical Trials (ACT) framework for understanding and enhancing the recruitment of participants to cancer trials.

  16. Sentinel Lymph Node Occult Metastases Have Minimal Survival Effect in Some Breast Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Detailed examination of sentinel lymph node tissue from breast cancer patients revealed previously unidentified metastases in about 16% of the samples, but the difference in 5-year survival between patients with and without these metastases was very small

  17. Quantifying the changes in survival inequality for Indigenous people diagnosed with cancer in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Baade, Peter D; Dasgupta, Paramita; Dickman, Paul W; Cramb, Susanna; Williamson, John D; Condon, John R; Garvey, Gail

    2016-08-01

    The survival inequality faced by Indigenous Australians after a cancer diagnosis is well documented; what is less understood is whether this inequality has changed over time and what this means in terms of the impact a cancer diagnosis has on Indigenous people. Survival information for all patients identified as either Indigenous (n=3168) or non-Indigenous (n=211,615) and diagnosed in Queensland between 1997 and 2012 were obtained from the Queensland Cancer Registry, with mortality followed up to 31st December, 2013. Flexible parametric survival models were used to quantify changes in the cause-specific survival inequalities and the number of lives that might be saved if these inequalities were removed. Among Indigenous cancer patients, the 5-year cause-specific survival (adjusted by age, sex and broad cancer type) increased from 52.9% in 1997-2006 to 58.6% in 2007-2012, while it improved from 61.0% to 64.9% among non-Indigenous patients. This meant that the adjusted 5-year comparative survival ratio (Indigenous: non-Indigenous) increased from 0.87 [0.83-0.88] to 0.89 [0.87-0.93], with similar improvements in the 1-year comparative survival. Using a simulated cohort corresponding to the number and age-distribution of Indigenous people diagnosed with cancer in Queensland each year (n=300), based on the 1997-2006 cohort mortality rates, 35 of the 170 deaths due to cancer (21%) expected within five years of diagnosis were due to the Indigenous: non-Indigenous survival inequality. This percentage was similar when applying 2007-2012 cohort mortality rates (19%; 27 out of 140 deaths). Indigenous people diagnosed with cancer still face a poorer survival outlook than their non-Indigenous counterparts, particularly in the first year after diagnosis. The improving survival outcomes among both Indigenous and non-Indigenous cancer patients, and the decreasing absolute impact of the Indigenous survival disadvantage, should provide increased motivation to continue and enhance

  18. Hormonal Drug Boosts Survival After Prostate Cancer's Return

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kutikov, an associate professor of urologic oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. For one, Kutikov ... Alexander Kutikov, M.D., associate professor, urologic oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia; Ashutosh Tewari, M.D., ...

  19. Survival Signaling in Prostate Cancer: Role of Androgen Receptor and Integrins in Regulating Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    of PI-3K. AR expression leads to increased expression of α6β1integrin and subsequent increased expression of the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL...viability was assessed 72h after inhibitor addition by trypan blue staining. Error bars on all graphs represent standard deviations; n=3-4 (n=2 for...levels in AR expressing PC3 cells to determine the effects on survival. However, I found that the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL is up-regulated in AR

  20. Mutations in POLE and survival of colorectal cancer patients – link to disease stage and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stenzinger, Albrecht; Pfarr, Nicole; Endris, Volker; Penzel, Roland; Jansen, Lina; Wolf, Thomas; Herpel, Esther; Warth, Arne; Klauschen, Frederick; Kloor, Matthias; Roth, Wilfried; Bläker, Hendrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Weichert, Wilko

    2014-01-01

    Recent molecular profiling studies reported a new class of ultramutated colorectal cancers (CRCs), which are caused by exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in DNA polymerase ε (POLE). Data on the clinical implications of these findings as to whether these mutations define a unique CRC entity with distinct clinical outcome are lacking. We performed Sanger sequencing of the POLE exonuclease domain in 431 well-characterized patients with microsatellite stable (MSS) CRCs of a population-based patient cohort. Mutation data were analyzed for associations with major epidemiological, clinical, genetic, and pathological parameters including overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). In 373 of 431 MSS CRC, all exons of the exonuclease domain were analyzable. Fifty-four mutations were identified in 46 of these samples (12.3%). Besides already reported EDMs, we detected many new mutations in exons 13 and 14 (corresponding to amino acids 410–491) as well as in exon 9 and exon 11 (corresponding to aa 268–303 and aa 341–369). However, we did not see any significant associations of EDMs with clinicopathological parameters, including sex, age, tumor location and tumor stage, CIMP, KRAS, and BRAF mutations. While with a median follow-up time of 5.0 years, survival analysis of the whole cohort revealed nonsignificantly different adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of 1.35 (95% CI: 0.82–2.25) and 1.44 (0.81–2.58) for OS and DSS indicating slightly impaired survival of patients with EDMs, subgroup analysis for patients with stage III/IV disease receiving chemotherapy revealed a statistically significantly increased adjusted HR (1.87; 95%CI: 1.02–3.44). In conclusion, POLE EDMs do not appear to define an entirely new clinically distinct disease entity in CRC but may have prognostic or predictive implications in CRC subgroups, whose significance remains to be investigated in future studies. PMID:25124163

  1. G protein-coupled receptors provide survival signals in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yowell, Charles W; Daaka, Yehia

    2002-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading cause for noncutaneous cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. The disease is biologically characterized as being either androgen dependent or androgen independent. Whereas androgen-dependent prostate cancer can be successfully treated with androgen ablative therapy, to date no cure exists for androgen-independent disease. Mechanisms involved in the progression of prostate cancer to androgen independence are not known. Here we present evidence that in addition to growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, G protein- coupled receptors can mediate survival signals in prostate cancer cells. The G protein- coupled receptors exert their effects by activating multiple intracellular signal transduction networks that promote prostate cancer cell survival, including the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, protein kinase B (Akt) and nuclear factor-kB. Prostate-expressed G protein- coupled receptors and their downstream effectors may prove to be effective targets in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  2. Survival of primary lung cancer patients in Brunei Darussalam, 1987–2012

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Amalina; Abdullah, Syafiq; Kifli, Nurolaini

    2017-01-01

    Background In 2009 to 2011, the commonest cause of death was by cancer in Brunei Darussalam, and 16.5% and 19.5% of cancer deaths were due to lung cancer in 2004 and 2011 respectively. This study was to investigate the survival of lung cancer patients in Brunei Darussalam. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted in 2013 & 2014 for those who were diagnosed as primary lung cancer in the period of 1987 to 2012. Data were retrieved from patients’ medical records and death certificates using pretested data collection form. Survival analyses namely Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank test to compare survival between groups. Results We retrieved 630 primary lung cancer records. Majority was diagnosed at the late stages, 42.5% at Stage IV & 33.4% at Stage III. The overall median survival time was 6.1 months whereas 2.6 and 79.1 months for Stage IV and Stage I respectively. The overall 6-month, 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 50.2%, 32.1%, 14.5% and 8.8% respectively. Survival duration had significantly improved from 1987–1999 to 2000–2012 (P=0.001) although significant higher proportion of Stage IV was diagnosed in the second period (P=0.008). Conclusions Overall survival rates and duration of primary lung cancer in Brunei Darussalam were comparable with some developed countries. However, through effective public intervention such as increase awareness, early case detection, and effective anti-smoking strategies, survival of lung cancer patients can certainly be improved and the burden of disease can be reduced. PMID:28361063

  3. Deriving stage at diagnosis from multiple population-based sources: colorectal and lung cancer in England

    PubMed Central

    Benitez-Majano, S; Fowler, H; Maringe, C; Di Girolamo, C; Rachet, B

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stage at diagnosis is a strong predictor of cancer survival. Differences in stage distributions and stage-specific management help explain geographic differences in cancer outcomes. Stage information is thus essential to improve policies for cancer control. Despite recent progress, stage information is often incomplete. Data collection methods and definition of stage categories are rarely reported. These inconsistencies may result in assigning conflicting stage for single tumours and confound the interpretation of international comparisons and temporal trends of stage-specific cancer outcomes. We propose an algorithm that uses multiple routine, population-based data sources to obtain the most complete and reliable stage information possible. Methods: Our hierarchical approach derives a single stage category per tumour prioritising information deemed of best quality from multiple data sets and various individual components of tumour stage. It incorporates rules from the Union for International Cancer Control TNM classification of malignant tumours. The algorithm is illustrated for colorectal and lung cancer in England. We linked the cancer-specific Clinical Audit data (collected from clinical multi-disciplinary teams) to national cancer registry data. We prioritise stage variables from the Clinical Audit and added information from the registry when needed. We compared stage distribution and stage-specific net survival using two sets of definitions of summary stage with contrasting levels of assumptions for dealing with missing individual TNM components. This exercise extends a previous algorithm we developed for international comparisons of stage-specific survival. Results: Between 2008 and 2012, 163 915 primary colorectal cancer cases and 168 158 primary lung cancer cases were diagnosed in adults in England. Using the most restrictive definition of summary stage (valid information on all individual TNM components), colorectal cancer stage

  4. Cognition and Survival in a Biracial Urban Population of Old People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robert S.; Barnes, Lisa L.; de Leon, Carlos F. Mendes; Evans, Denis A.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the relation of level of cognition to survival in a biracial community population of more than 10,000 older persons. At baseline, participants completed 4 cognitive tests from which a composite global cognitive measure was derived. During up to 14 years of follow-up (mean = 6.9 years), 4201 people died (41.6%). Higher level of…

  5. Risk factors for cancer in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Castles, Simon; Wainer, Zoe; Jayasekara, Harindra

    2016-01-01

    Cancer incidence in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is higher and survival lower compared with non-Indigenous Australians. A proportion of these cancers are potentially preventable if factors associated with carcinogenesis are known and successfully avoided. We conducted a systematic review of the published literature to examine risk factors for cancer in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. Electronic databases Medline, Web of Science and the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Bibliographic Index were searched through August 2014 using broad search terms. Studies reporting a measure of association between a risk factor and any cancer site in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population were eligible for inclusion. Ten studies (1991-2014) were identified, mostly with small sample sizes, showing marked heterogeneity in terms of methods used to assess exposure and capture outcomes, and often using descriptive comparative analyses. Relatively young (as opposed to elderly) and geographically remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders were found to be at increased risk for selected cancers while most modifiable lifestyle and behavioural risk factors were rarely assessed. Further studies examining associations between potential risk factors and cancer will help define public health policy for cancer prevention in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Clinicopathologic Features of, Treatment in, and Survival of Americans with Lung or Bronchial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Du, Xianglin L.; Ren, Yinghong; Liu, Peijun; Li, Shuting; Yang, Jiao; Lv, Meng; Chen, Ling; Wang, Xin; Li, Enxiao; Yang, Jin; Yi, Min

    2016-01-01

    Ethnic disparities in lung and bronchial cancer diagnoses and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates in the United States are well known. However, few studies have specifically assessed these differences in Asian subgroups. The primary objectives of the retrospective analysis described herein were to identify any significant differences in clinicopathologic features, treatment, and survival rate between Asian lung cancer patients and lung cancer patients in other broad ethnic groups in the United States and to determine the reasons for these differences among subgroups of Asian patients with lung or bronchial cancer. We searched the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program database to identify patients diagnosed with lung or bronchial cancer from 1990 to 2012. Differences in clinicopathologic features, treatment, and DSS rate in four broad ethnic groups and eight Asian subgroups were compared. The study population consisted of 849,088 patients, 5.2% of whom were of Asian descent. Female Asian patients had the lowest lung and bronchial cancer incidence rates, whereas male black patients had the highest rates. Asian patients had the best 5-year DSS rate. In our Asian subgroup analysis, Indian/Pakistani patients had the best 5-year DSS rate, whereas Hawaiian/Pacific Islander patients had the worst 5-year DSS rates. We found the differences in DSS rate among the four broad ethnic groups and eight Asian subgroups when we grouped patients by age and disease stage, as well. Asian patients had better DSS rates than those in the other three broad ethnic groups in almost every age and disease-stage group, especially in older patients and those with advanced-stage disease. In conclusion, we found that clinicopathologic features and treatment of lung and bronchial cancer differ by ethnicity in the United States, and the differences impact survival in each ethnic group. PMID:27244238

  7. Bladder Preservation for Localized Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: The Survival Impact of Local Utilization Rates of Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Hamidi, Maryam; Manning, Matthew; Moody, John S.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: This study examines the management and outcomes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the United States. Methods and Materials: Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer diagnosed between 1988 and 2006 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Patients were classified according to three mutually exclusive treatment categories based on the primary initial treatment: no local management, radiotherapy, or surgery. Overall survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox models based on multiple factors including treatment utilization patterns. Results: The study population consisted of 26,851 patients. Age, sex, race, tumor grade, histology, and geographic location were associated with differences in treatment (all p < 0.01). Patients receiving definitive radiotherapy tended to be older and have less differentiated tumors than patients undergoing surgery (RT, median age 78 years old and 90.6% grade 3/4 tumors; surgery, median age 71 years old and 77.1% grade 3/4 tumors). No large shifts in treatment were seen over time, with most patients managed with surgical resection (86.3% for overall study population). Significant survival differences were observed according to initial treatment: median survival, 14 months with no definitive local treatment; 17 months with radiotherapy; and 43 months for surgery. On multivariate analysis, differences in local utilization rates of definitive radiotherapy did not demonstrate a significant effect on overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.002; 95% confidence interval, 0.999-1.005). Conclusions: Multiple factors influence the initial treatment strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, but definitive radiotherapy continues to be used infrequently. Although patients who undergo surgery fare better, a multivariable model that accounted for patient and tumor characteristics found no survival detriment to the utilization of definitive radiotherapy. These results support continued

  8. Loco-regional treatment in metastatic breast cancer patients: is there a survival benefit?

    PubMed

    Ly, Bevan H; Nguyen, Nam P; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Rapiti, Elisabetta; Vlastos, Georges

    2010-02-01

    A number of studies have recently demonstrated a survival benefit in stage IV breast cancer patients following surgical resection of the primary tumor. Here, we investigate the relationship between loco-regional treatment and survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer and evaluate the impact of different loco-regional treatments. We conducted a systematic review of the literature using PubMed to analyze studies with the following criteria: Type of loco-regional treatment (surgery alone or combined with radiation, radiotherapy), overall survival, progression-free survival, selection factors for local treatment, and complication rates. Thirteen studies evaluated the effect of loco-regional treatment on overall survival with overall median survival increasing from a range of 12.6-28.3 months among patients without surgery to a range of 25-42 months among patients with surgery. In addition, six studies reported a 3-year survival benefit of 28-95% and 17-79% in women with and without locoregional therapy respectively. Two studies did not find any improvement in overall survival. One study found an improvement in 5-year breast cancer-specific survival of 27% with negative surgical margins versus 12% with no surgery. Three studies reported an advantage in progression-free survival in the treatment group compared with the non-treatment group. Loco-regional treatment for breast cancer patients with distant metastases at diagnosis is an important issue because of possible improvement of survival or disease-free survival. The possibility of surgery and/or radiotherapy following induction chemotherapy should be weighed and left to individual practice. Participation in randomized controlled trials should be encouraged.

  9. Effects of forest management on density, survival, and population growth of wood thrushes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, L.A.; Lang, J.D.; Conroy, M.J.; Krementz, D.G.

    2000-01-01

    Loss and alteration of breeding habitat have been proposed as causes of declines in several Neotropical migrant bird populations. We conducted a 4-year study to determine the effects of winter prescribed burning and forest thinning on breeding wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) populations at the Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge (PNWR) in Georgia. We estimated density, adult and juvenile survival rates, and apparent annual survival using transect surveys, radiotelemetry, and mist netting. Burning and thinning did not cause lower densities (P = 0.25); wood thrush density ranged from 0.15 to 1.30 pairs/10 ha. No radiomarked male wood thrushes (n = 68) died during the 4 years, but female (n = 63) weekly survival was 0.981 ? 0.014 (SE) for females (n = 63) and 0.976 ? 0.010 for juveniles (n = 38). Apparent annual adult survival was 0.579 (SE = 0.173). Thinning and prescribed burning did not reduce adult or juvenile survival during the breeding season or apparent annual adult survival. Annual population growth (lambda) at PNWR was 1.00 (95% confidence interval = 0.32--1.63), and the considerable uncertainty in this prediction underscores the need for long term monitoring to effectively manage Neotropical migrants. Population growth increased on experimental compartments after the burn and thin (95% CI before = 0.91--0.97, after = 0.98--1.05), while control compartment declined (before = 0.98--1.05, after = 0.87--0.92). We found no evidence that the current management regime at PNWR, designed to improve red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) habitat, negatively affected wood thrushes.

  10. Survival, Recruitment, and Population Growth Rate of an Important Mesopredator: The Northern Raccoon

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Elizabeth M.; Cameron Devitt, Susan E.; Sunquist, Melvin E.; Goswami, Varun R.; Oli, Madan K.

    2014-01-01

    Populations of mesopredators (mid-sized mammalian carnivores) are expanding in size and range amid declining apex predator populations and ever-growing human presence, leading to significant ecological impacts. Despite their obvious importance, population dynamics have scarcely been studied for most mesopredator species. Information on basic population parameters and processes under a range of conditions is necessary for managing these species. Here we investigate survival, recruitment, and population growth rate of a widely distributed and abundant mesopredator, the northern raccoon (Procyon lotor), using Pradel’s temporal symmetry models and >6 years of monthly capture-mark-recapture data collected in a protected area. Monthly apparent survival probability was higher for females (0.949, 95% CI = 0.936–0.960) than for males (0.908, 95% CI = 0.893–0.920), while monthly recruitment rate was higher for males (0.091, 95% CI = 0.078–0.106) than for females (0.054, 95% CI = 0.042–0.067). Finally, monthly realized population growth rate was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.996–1.004), indicating that our study population has reached a stable equilibrium in this relatively undisturbed habitat. There was little evidence for substantial temporal variation in population growth rate or its components. Our study is one of the first to quantify survival, recruitment, and realized population growth rate of raccoons using long-term data and rigorous statistical models. PMID:24901349

  11. Poorer breast cancer survival outcomes in males than females might be attributable to tumor subtype

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shan; Wu, Juan; Li, Xiang; Liu, Qian; Wei, Wen; Sun, Shengrong

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Substantial controversy exists regarding the differences in tumor subtypes between male breast cancer (MBC) and female breast cancer (FBC). This is the largest population-based study to compare MBC and FBC patients. Methods Using data obtained by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program from 2010-2012, a retrospective, population-based cohort study was conducted to investigate tumor subtype-specific differences in various characteristics, overall survival (OS) and breast cancer-specific mortality (BCSM) between males and females. Results In all, 181,814 BC patients (1,516 male and 180,298 female) were eligible for this study. The male patients were more likely to be black, older, and have lower histological grades, more advanced stages, larger tumors, more lymph node and distant metastases and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors (each p<0.05). A matched analysis showed that the 2-year OS was 91.2% and 93.7% and that the BCSM was 2.2% and 2.5% for male and female patients, respectively. The univariate analysis showed that male triple-negative (TN), hormone receptor (HoR)-positive/HER2-positive and HoR-positive/HER2-negative patients had poorer OS (p <0.01). Meanwhile, the HoR-positive/HER2-positive and TN subtypes were associated with a higher BCSM in MBC patients (p<0.01). The multivariate analysis revealed that TN MBC patients had poorer OS and BCSM (p<0.05). Simultaneously, the results showed that male patients in the HoR-positive/HER2-negative subgroup were less likely to die of BC when adjusting for other factors (p<0.05). Conclusions The analysis of 2-year OS and BCSM among the BC subtypes showed clear differences between MBC and FBC patients with the TN subtype; these differences warrant further investigation PMID:27655704

  12. Population density, call-response interval, and survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of geographic variation on outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The present study investigated the relationship between population density, time between emergency call and ambulance arrival, and survival of OHCA, using the All-Japan Utstein-style registry database, coupled with geographic information system (GIS) data. Methods We examined data from 101,287 bystander-witnessed OHCA patients who received emergency medical services (EMS) through 4,729 ambulatory centers in Japan between 2005 and 2007. Latitudes and longitudes of each center were determined with address-match geocoding, and linked with the Population Census data using GIS. The endpoints were 1-month survival and neurologically favorable 1-month survival defined as Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance categories 1 or 2. Results Overall 1-month survival was 7.8%. Neurologically favorable 1-month survival was 3.6%. In very low-density (<250/km2) and very high-density (≥10,000/km2) areas, the mean call-response intervals were 9.3 and 6.2 minutes, 1-month survival rates were 5.4% and 9.1%, and neurologically favorable 1-month survival rates were 2.7% and 4.3%, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, cause of arrest, first aid by bystander and the proportion of neighborhood elderly people ≥65 yrs, patients in very high-density areas had a significantly higher survival rate (odds ratio (OR), 1.64; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.44 - 1.87; p < 0.001) and neurologically favorable 1-month survival rate (OR, 1.47; 95%CI, 1.22 - 1.77; p < 0.001) compared with those in very low-density areas. Conclusion Living in a low-density area was associated with an independent risk of delay in ambulance response, and a low survival rate in cases of OHCA. Distribution of EMS centers according to population size may lead to inequality in health outcomes between urban and rural areas. PMID:21489299

  13. Effects of polymorphisms in alcohol metabolism and oxidative stress genes on survival from head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hakenewerth, Anne M.; Millikan, Robert C.; Rusyn, Ivan; Herring, Amy H.; Weissler, Mark C.; Funkhouser, William K.; North, Kari E.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Olshan, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heavy alcohol consumption increases risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Alcohol metabolism to cytotoxic and mutagenic intermediates acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species is critical for alcohol-drinking-associated carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in alcohol metabolism-related and antioxidant genes influence SCCHN survival. Methods Interview and genotyping data (64 polymorphisms in 12 genes) were obtained from 1227 white and African-American cases from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology study, a population-based case–control study of SCCHN conducted in North Carolina from 2002 to 2006. Vital status, date and cause of death through 2009 were obtained from the National Death Index. Kaplan–Meier log-rank tests and adjusted hazard ratios were calculated to identify alleles associated with survival. Results Most tested SNPs were not associated with survival, with the exception of the minor alleles of rs3813865 and rs8192772 in CYP2E1. These were associated with poorer cancer-specific survival (HRrs3813865, 95%CI = 2.00, 1.33–3.01; HRrs8192772, 95%CI = 1.62, 1.17–2.23). Hazard ratios for 8 additional SNPs in CYP2E1, GPx2, SOD1, and SOD2, though not statistically significant, were suggestive of differences in allele hazards for all-cause and/or cancer death. No consistent associations with survival were found for SNPs in ADH1B, ADH1C, ADH4, ADH7, ALDH2, GPx2, GPx4, and CAT. Conclusions We identified some polymorphisms in alcohol and oxidative stress metabolism genes that influence survival in subjects with SCCHN. Previously unreported associations of SNPs in CYP2E1 warrant further investigation. PMID:23632049

  14. Inferring population trends for the world's largest fish from mark-recapture estimates of survival.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Corey J A; Mollet, Henry F; Meekan, Mark G

    2007-05-01

    1. Precise estimates of demographic rates are key components of population models used to predict the effects of stochastic environmental processes, harvest scenarios and extinction probability. 2. We used a 12-year photographic identification library of whale sharks from Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia to construct Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) model estimates of survival within a capture-mark-recapture (CMR) framework. Estimated survival rates, population structure and assumptions regarding age at maturity, longevity and reproduction frequency were combined in a series of age-classified Leslie matrices to infer the potential trajectory of the population. 3. Using data from 111 individuals, there was evidence for time variation in apparent survival (phi) and recapture probability (p). The null model gave a phi of 0.825 (95% CI: 0.727-0.893) and p = 0.184 (95% CI: 0.121-0.271). The model-averaged annual phi ranged from 0.737 to 0.890. There was little evidence for a sex effect on survival. 4. Using standardized total length as a covariate in the CMR models indicated a size bias in phi. Ignoring the effects of time, a 5-m shark has a phi = 0.59 and a 9 m shark has phi = 0.81. 5. Of the 16 model combinations considered, 10 (63%) indicated a decreasing population (lambda < 1). For models based on age at first reproduction (alpha) of 13 years, the mean age of reproducing females at the stable age distribution (A) ranged from 15 to 23 years, which increased to 29-37 years when alpha was assumed to be 25. 6. All model scenarios had higher total elasticities for non-reproductive female survival [E(s(nr))] compared to those for reproductive female survival [E(s(r))]. 7. Assuming relatively slow, but biologically realistic, vital rates (alpha = 25 and biennial reproduction) and size-biased survival probabilities, our results suggest that the Ningaloo Reef population of whale sharks is declining, although more reproductive data are clearly needed to confirm this conclusion

  15. The changing face of thyroid cancer in a population-based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Alok Pathak, K; Leslie, William D; Klonisch, Thomas C; Nason, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In North America, the incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing by over 6% per year. We studied the trends and factors influencing thyroid cancer incidence, its clinical presentation, and treatment outcome during 1970–2010 in a population-based cohort of 2306 consecutive thyroid cancers in Canada, that was followed up for a median period of 10.5 years. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and disease-free survival were estimated by the Kaplan–Meier method and the independent influence of various prognostic factors was evaluated by Cox proportional hazard models. Cumulative incidence of deaths resulting from thyroid cancer was calculated by competing risk analysis. A P-value <0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. The age standardized incidence of thyroid cancer by direct method increased from 2.52/100,000 (1970) to 9.37/100,000 (2010). Age at diagnosis, gender distribution, tumor size, and initial tumor stage did not change significantly during this period. The proportion of papillary thyroid cancers increased significantly (P < 0.001) from 58% (1970–1980) to 85.9% (2000–2010) while that of anaplastic cancer fell from 5.7% to 2.1% (P < 0.001). Ten-year DSS improved from 85.4% to 95.6%, and was adversely influenced by anaplastic histology (hazard ratio [HR] = 8.7; P < 0.001), male gender (HR = 1.8; P = 0.001), TNM stage IV (HR = 8.4; P = 0.001), incomplete surgical resection (HR = 2.4; P = 0.002), and age at diagnosis (HR = 1.05 per year; P < 0.001). There was a 373% increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer in Manitoba with a marked improvement in the thyroid cancer-specific survival that was independent of changes in patient demographics, tumor stage, or treatment practices, and is largely attributed to the declining proportion of anaplastic thyroid cancers. This article shows there is an increase in the incidence of thyroid cancers of all sizes in a population cohort in Canada. The improvement in thyroid

  16. Inhibition of human lung cancer cell proliferation and survival by wine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Compounds of plant origin and food components have attracted scientific attention for use as agents for cancer prevention and treatment. Wine contains polyphenols that were shown to have anti-cancer and other health benefits. The survival pathways of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), and the tumor suppressor p53 are key modulators of cancer cell growth and survival. In this study, we examined the effects of wine on proliferation and survival of human Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and its effects on signaling events. Methods Human NSCLC adenocarcinoma A549 and H1299 cells were used. Cell proliferation was assessed by thymidine incorporation. Clonogenic assays were used to assess cell survival. Immunoblotting was used to examine total and phosphorylated levels of Akt, Erk and p53. Results In A549 cells red wine inhibited cell proliferation and reduced clonogenic survival at doses as low as 0.02%. Red wine significantly reduced basal and EGF-stimulated Akt and Erk phosphorylation while it increased the levels of total and phosphorylated p53 (Ser15). Control experiments indicated that the anti-proliferative effects of wine were not mediated by the associated contents of ethanol or the polyphenol resveratrol and were independent of glucose transport into cancer cells. White wine also inhibited clonogenic survival, albeit at a higher doses (0.5-2%), and reduced Akt phosphorylation. The effects of both red and white wine on Akt phosphorylation were also verified in H1299 cells. Conclusions Red wine inhibits proliferation of lung cancer cells and blocks clonogenic survival at low concentrations. This is associated with inhibition of basal and EGF-stimulated Akt and Erk signals and enhancement of total and phosphorylated levels of p53. White wine mediates similar effects albeit at higher concentrations. Our data suggest that wine may have considerable anti-tumour and chemoprevention properties in lung cancer and deserves further

  17. Juvenile survival in a tropical population of roseate terns: Interannual variation and effect of tick parasitism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monticelli, David; Ramos, Jaime A.; Hines, James E.; Nichols, James D.; Spendelow, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Many demographic studies on long-lived seabirds have focused on the estimation of adult survival, but much less is known about survival during the early years of life, especially in tropical species. We report analyses of a capture–recapture dataset of 685 roseate terns ringed as fledglings and adults between 1998 and 2005 on Aride Island, Seychelles, and recaptured/resighted at the same colony site over a 5 yr (2002 to 2006) period. A multistate model was used to estimate survival for different age classes, including juvenile (first-year) birds returning as non-breeding prospectors. The effect of infestation by parasites (ticks) on survival was also examined. Overall, the estimated return of first-year individuals to the natal colony was very variable, ranging from 2 to 22%. Conditioned on survival, the probability of returning from Age 2 yr onwards increased to 70%. Survival rates were best modeled as time-specific, with estimates varying from 0.02 to 1.00 (mean 0.69) in first-year birds with a marked negative effect of tick infestation. In older birds (minimum age of 2 yr), the annual estimates fell between 0.69 and 0.86 (mean 0.77). Using a components of variance approach for estimation of year-to-year variation, we found high temporal variability for first-year individuals (coefficient of variation [CV] = 65%) compared to much less variation in the survival rate of older birds (CV = 9%). These findings agree with the life-history prediction that demographic rates of juveniles are usually lower and more variable than those of older individuals. Our results are also consistent with the predicted negative effect of tick parasitism on juvenile survival. Compared with data from other roseate tern populations, survival over the first 2 yr (Age 0 to 2 yr) was 18 to 40% higher in this study, suggesting that a high ‘young’ survival rate may be an important demographic trait in this tropical population to compensate for the low annual reproductive success. Our

  18. Prediagnostic plasma vitamin B6 (pyridoxal 50-phosphate) and survival in patients with colorectal cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Higher plasma pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) levels are associated with a decreased incidence of colorectal cancer, but the influence of plasma PLP on survival of patients with colorectal cancer is unknown. We prospectively examined whether prediagnostic plasma PLP levels are associated with mortality...

  19. Effect of autoimmune diseases on risk and survival in histology-specific lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2012-12-01

    Patients with autoimmune diseases are at an increased risk of cancer due to underlying dysregulation of the immune system or treatment. Data on cancer incidence, mortality and survival after autoimmune diseases would provide further information on the clinical implications. We systematically analysed data on lung cancer in patients diagnosed with 33 different autoimmune diseases. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for subsequent incident lung cancers or lung cancer deaths up to 2008 in patients hospitalised for autoimmune disease after 1964. Increased risks of lung cancer were recorded for SIRs after 12 autoimmune diseases, SMRs after 11 autoimmune diseases and HRs after two autoimmune diseases. The highest SIRs and SMRs, respectively, were seen after discoid lupus erythematosus (4.71 and 4.80), polymyosistis/dermatomyositis (4.20 and 4.17), systemic lupus erythematosus (2.47 and 2.69), rheumatic fever (2.07 and 2.07) and systemic sclerosis (2.19 and 1.98). Autoimmune disease did not influence survival overall but some autoimmune diseases appeared to impair survival in small cell carcinoma. All autoimmune diseases that had an SIR >2.0 are known to present with lung manifestations, suggesting that the autoimmune process contributes to lung cancer susceptibility. The data on survival are reassuring that autoimmune diseases do not influence prognosis in lung cancer.

  20. Cancer Incidence, Survival, and Mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horm, John W.; Burhansstipanov, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Overall cancer incidence among southwestern American Indians is less than half that of U.S. whites; Alaska Native and white rates are similar. However, both native groups have elevated rates for specific cancers (stomach, liver, and gallbladder), and Indians have low five-year survival rates. Data tables outline incidence, mortality, and survival…

  1. Bald eagle survival and population dynamics in Alaska after the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, T.D.; Bernatowicz, J.A.; Schempf, P.F.

    1995-04-01

    We investigated age-specific annual survival rates for 159 bald eagles (Haliaeetus Leucocephalus) radiotagged from 1989 to 1992 in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska. We monitored radio-tagged eagles for {le}3 years beginning 4 months after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. There was no difference (P > 0.10) in survival rates between eagles radiotagged in oiled areas and eagles radiotagged in unoiled areas of PWS. Pooled annual survival rates were 71% for first-year eagles, 95% for subadults, and 88% for adult bald eagles. Most deaths occurred from March to May. We found no indication that survival of bald eagles radiotagged >4 months after the oil spill in PWS was directly influenced by the spill and concluded that any effect of the spill on survival occurred before eagles were radiotagged. A deterministic life table model suggests that the PWS bald eagle population has an annual finite growth rate of 2%. Given the cumulative effects of direct mortality and reduced productivity caused by the oil spill, we predicted that the bald eagle population would return to its pre-spill size by 1992. 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Patient And Physician Views On Providing Cancer Patient-Specific Survival Information

    PubMed Central

    Solowski, Nancy L.; Okuyemi, Oluwafunmilola T.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Nicklaus, Joyce; Piccirillo, Jay F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To gather input regarding the presentation, content, and understanding of survival and support information for Prognostigram, a computer-based program that uses standard cancer registry data elements to present individualized survival estimates. Study Design Cross-sectional survey research Methods Two groups of patients (total n=40) and one group of physicians (n=5) were interviewed. The patient groups were interviewed to assess baseline patient numeracy and health literacy and patient desire for prognostic information. The first group (n=20) was introduced to generalized survival curves in a paper booklet. The second group (n=20) was introduced to individualized survival curves from Prognostigram on the computer. Both patient groups were queried about the survival curves. The physicians were asked their opinions on sharing prognostic information with patients. Results Numeracy assessments indicated that the patients are able to understand concepts and statistics presented by Prognostigram. According to the patient interviews, the Internet is the most frequent source for survival statistics. Of the 40 patient participants, 39 reported survival statistics as being “Somewhat” or “Very” useful to cancer patients. All five physicians believed survival statistics were useful to patients and physicians and noted accurate and understandable survival statistics are fundamental to facilitate discussions with patients regarding prognosis and expectations. Conclusion Formative research indicates that cancer patients and their families actively seek survival statistics on their own. All patients indicated strong interest in Prognostigram, which is a software tool designed to produce individualized survival statistics to oncologists and cancer patients in a user-friendly manner. PMID:24338452

  3. Leukoplakia, Oral Cavity Cancer Risk, and Cancer Survival in the U.S. Elderly.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Katki, Hormuzd A; Silverberg, Michael J; Manos, M Michele; Engels, Eric A; Chaturvedi, Anil K

    2015-09-01

    Screening for oral leukoplakia, an oral cavity cancer (OCC) precursor, could lead to earlier detection of OCC. However, the progression rate from leukoplakia to OCC and the benefits of leukoplakia screening for improving OCC outcomes are currently unclear. We conducted a case-cohort study of U.S. adults ages ≥65 years in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linkage. We identified leukoplakia diagnoses through Medicare claims, and OCC diagnoses through SEER cancer registries. Weighted Cox regression was used to estimate leukoplakia associations with OCC incidence, and the absolute OCC risk following leukoplakia diagnosis was calculated. Among OCC cases, we compared OCC stage and OCC survival between cases with a prior leukoplakia diagnosis versus those without prior leukoplakia. Among 470,266 individuals in the SEER-Medicare subcohort, 1,526 (0.3%) had a leukoplakia diagnosis. Among people with leukoplakia, the cumulative OCC incidence was 0.7% at 3 months and 2.5% at 5 years. OCC risk was most increased <3 months after leukoplakia diagnosis (HR, 115), likely representing the diagnosis of prevalent cancers. Nonetheless, risk remained substantially increased in subsequent follow-up [HR ≥ 3 months, 24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 22-27; HR ≥ 12 months, 22, 95% CI, 20-25]. Among OCC cases (N = 8,927), those with prior leukoplakia were less likely to be diagnosed at regional/distant stage (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.30-0.43), and had lower mortality (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.65-0.84) when compared with OCC cases without a prior leukoplakia. Individuals with leukoplakia have substantially elevated risk of OCC. Lower stage and better survival after OCC diagnosis suggest that leukoplakia identification can lead to earlier OCC detection and reduced mortality.

  4. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Survival Outcomes of Invasive Cribriform Carcinoma of Breast: A SEER Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Yu; Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Liu, Yi-Rong; Zuo, Wen-Jia; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Invasive cribriform carcinoma (ICC) is a rare histologic subtype of breast cancer. We aimed to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of ICC.Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 233,337 female patients diagnosed with ICC (n = 618) or infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) (n = 232,719). Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were utilized to calculate and compare disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS). A 1:1 paired match was carried out on age, tumor stage, tumor grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, and progesterone receptor (PR) status. Baseline characteristics and survival outcomes were also analyzed in ER-positive tumors. Subgroup analyses summarized the hazard ratio (HR) of IDC versus ICC using a forest plot.ICCs presented smaller size, lower grade, higher ER and PR positive rate, less nodal metastasis, and were less likely to be treated with mastectomy compared to IDCs. Five-year DSS rates were significantly better for patients with ICC than for patients with IDC (98.8% vs. 93%, P < 0.001). Five-year OS rates were 95.3% versus 90.1% (P < 0.001). After adjustment for common clinicopathological factors in the multivariate analysis, patients with ICC showed limited DSS advantage over the IDC group (HR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.38-1.51, P = 0.421). No significant difference in DSS nor OS was observed in matched groups between ICC and IDC. Analysis among ER-positive patients revealed similar prognostic factors as among all patients. Survival analysis in different tumor grade subgroups showed no significant difference between ICC and IDC.ICCs have unique clinicopathological characteristics, higher rates of breast-conserving surgery, and more favorable prognosis compared to the overall IDC population. Difference in tumor grade between the 2 groups may partially explain the different outcome. Improved clinical and biological understanding of ICC

  5. The changing face of thyroid cancer in a population-based cohort.

    PubMed

    Pathak, K Alok; Leslie, William D; Klonisch, Thomas C; Nason, Richard W

    2013-08-01

    In North America, the incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing by over 6% per year. We studied the trends and factors influencing thyroid cancer incidence, its clinical presentation, and treatment outcome during 1970-2010 in a population-based cohort of 2306 consecutive thyroid cancers in Canada, that was followed up for a median period of 10.5 years. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and disease-free survival were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the independent influence of various prognostic factors was evaluated by Cox proportional hazard models. Cumulative incidence of deaths resulting from thyroid cancer was calculated by competing risk analysis. A P-value <0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. The age standardized incidence of thyroid cancer by direct method increased from 2.52/100,000 (1970) to 9.37/100,000 (2010). Age at diagnosis, gender distribution, tumor size, and initial tumor stage did not change significantly during this period. The proportion of papillary thyroid cancers increased significantly (P < 0.001) from 58% (1970-1980) to 85.9% (2000-2010) while that of anaplastic cancer fell from 5.7% to 2.1% (P < 0.001). Ten-year DSS improved from 85.4% to 95.6%, and was adversely influenced by anaplastic histology (hazard ratio [HR] = 8.7; P < 0.001), male gender (HR = 1.8; P = 0.001), TNM stage IV (HR = 8.4; P = 0.001), incomplete surgical resection (HR = 2.4; P = 0.002), and age at diagnosis (HR = 1.05 per year; P < 0.001). There was a 373% increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer in Manitoba with a marked improvement in the thyroid cancer-specific survival that was independent of changes in patient demographics, tumor stage, or treatment practices, and is largely attributed to the declining proportion of anaplastic thyroid cancers.

  6. PPAR-delta promotes survival of breast cancer cells in harsh metabolic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Wang, G; Shi, Y; Sun, L; Gorczynski, R; Li, Y-J; Xu, Z; Spaner, D E

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPARδ) in breast cancer cells is negatively associated with patient survival, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. High PPARδ protein levels in rat breast adenocarcinomas were found to be associated with increased growth in soft agar and mice. Transgenic expression of PPARδ increased the ability of human breast cancer cell lines to migrate in vitro and form lung metastases in mice. PPARδ also conferred the ability to grow in exhausted tissue culture media and survive in low-glucose and other endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions such as hypoxia. Upregulation of PPARδ by glucocorticoids or synthetic agonists also protected human breast cancer cells from low glucose. Survival in low glucose was related to increased antioxidant defenses mediated in part by catalase and also to late AKT phosphorylation, which is associated with the prolonged glucose-deprivation response. Synthetic antagonists reversed the survival benefits conferred by PPARδ in vitro. These findings suggest that PPARδ conditions breast cancer cells to survive in harsh microenvironmental conditions by reducing oxidative stress and enhancing survival signaling responses. Drugs that target PPARδ may have a role in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:27270614

  7. Several microRNAs could predict survival in patients with hepatitis B-related liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Ye; Xinghui, Zhao; Chao, Wu; Yi, Zhao; Jinwen, Chen; Ruifang, Gao; Chao, Zhang; Min, Zhao; Chunlei, Guo; Yan, Fang; Lingfang, Du; Long, Shen; Wenzhi, Shen; Xiaohe, Luo; Rong, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs as biomarkers play an important role in the tumorigenesis process, including hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). In this paper, we used The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database to mine hepatitis B-related liver cancer microRNAs that could predict survival in patients with hepatitis B-related liver cancer. There were 93 cases of HBV-HCC and 49 cases of adjacent normal controls included in the study. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis of a liver cancer group versus a normal control group of differentially expressed genes identified eight genes with statistical significance. Compared with the normal liver cell line, hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines had high expression of 8 microRNAs, albeit at different levels. A Cox proportional hazards regression model for multivariate analysis showed that four genes had a significant difference. We established classification models to distinguish short survival time and long survival time of liver cancers. Eight genes (mir9-3, mir10b, mir31, mir519c, mir522, mir3660, mir4784, and mir6883) were identified could predict survival in patients with HBV-HCC. There was a significant correlation between mir10b and mir31 and clinical stages (p < 0.05). A random forests model effectively estimated patient survival times. PMID:28322348

  8. Polymorphisms in MicroRNA Binding Sites Predict Colorectal Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Pi; Ting, Wen-Chien; Chen, Lu-Min; Lu, Te-Ling; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) mediate negative regulation of target genes through base pairing, and aberrant miRNA expression has been described in cancers. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within miRNA target sites might influence clinical outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods: Sixteen common SNPs within miRNA target sites were identified, and the association between these SNPs and overall survival was assessed in colorectal cancer patients using Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox regression model, and survival tree analysis. Results: Survival tree analysis identified a higher-order genetic interaction profile consisting of the RPS6KB1 rs1051424 and ZNF839 rs11704 that was significantly associated with overall survival. The 5-year survival rates were 74.6%, 62.7%, and 57.1% for the low-, medium-, and high-risk genetic profiles, respectively (P = 0.006). The genetic interaction profile remained significant even after adjusting for potential risk factors. Additional in silico analysis provided evidence that rs1051424 and rs11704 affect RPS6KB1 and ZNF839 expressions, which in turn is significantly correlated with prognosis in colorectal cancer. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the genetic interaction profiles among SNPs within miRNA target sites might be prognostic markers for colorectal cancer survival. PMID:28138309

  9. Application of Artificial Neural Network in Predicting the Survival Rate of Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Biglarian, A; Hajizadeh, E; Kazemnejad, A; Zali, MR

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to predict the survival rate of Iranian gastric cancer patients using the Cox proportional hazard and artificial neural network models as well as comparing the ability of these approaches in predicting the survival of these patients. Methods: In this historical cohort study, the data gathered from 436 registered gastric cancer patients who have had surgery between 2002 and 2007 at the Taleghani Hospital (a referral center for gastrointestinal cancers), Tehran, Iran, to predict the survival time using Cox proportional hazard and artificial neural network techniques. Results: The estimated one-year, two-year, three-year, four-year and five-year survival rates of the patients were 77.9%, 53.1%, 40.8%, 32.0%, and 17.4%, respectively. The Cox regression analysis revealed that the age at diagnosis, high-risk behaviors, extent of wall penetration, distant metastasis and tumor stage were significantly associated with the survival rate of the patients. The true prediction of neural network was 83.1%, and for Cox regression model, 75.0%. Conclusion: The present study shows that neural network model is a more powerful statistical tool in predicting the survival rate of the gastric cancer patients compared to Cox proportional hazard regression model. Therefore, this model recommended for the predicting the survival rate of these patients. PMID:23113076

  10. Accumulation of cytoplasmic Cdk1 is associated with cancer growth and survival rate in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ha-Yeon; Chung, Joon-Yong; Kang, Eun Suk; Lee, Eun-ju; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) have previously reported correlation with cancer growth and a key regulator for cell cycle. Mostly, Cdk1′s function of nucleus for cell cycle is well known to be associated with cancer, but cytoplasmic Cdk1′s traits are not clearly identified, yet. We revealed that tissue microarray blocks of epithelial ovarian cancer (n = 249) showed increased level of cytoplasmic Cdk1 (p < 0.001), but not in nucleus (p = 0.192) of histologic cell type independently. On survival analysis, Cdk1 overexpression conferred a significantly worse prognosis in 5-year overall survival (Log-rank p = 0.028, Hazard ratio = 2.016, 95% CI = 1.097 to 4.635). Also, the expression of Cdk1 was increased in ovarian cancer cell lines and Gene Expression Omnibus datasets. When the expression and activity of Cdk1 were inhibited by si-Cdk1 or RO-3306 which is a potent Cdk1 inhibitor, the growth of ovarian cancer was diminished. Moreover, combined treatment with RO-3306 and cisplatin in ovarian cancer significantly elevated anti-cancer effects than single-agent treatment. In conclusion, cytoplasmic Cdk1 expression which was elevated in ovarian cancer predicts a poor overall survival. The inhibition of Cdk1 expression and activity reduced ovarian cancer growth. PMID:27385216

  11. Delay in Breast Cancer: Implications for Stage at Diagnosis and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be a disease with tremendous public health significance. Primary prevention of breast cancer is still not available, so efforts to promote early detection continue to be the major focus in fighting breast cancer. Since early detection is associated with decreased mortality, one would think that it is important to minimize delays in detection and diagnosis. There are two major types of delay. Patient delay is delay in seeking medical attention after self-discovering a potential breast cancer symptom. System delay is delay within the health care system in getting appointments, scheduling diagnostic tests, receiving a definitive diagnosis, and initiating therapy. Earlier studies of the consequences of delay on prognosis tended to show that increased delay is associated with more advanced stage cancers at diagnosis, thus resulting in poorer chances for survival. More recent studies have had mixed results, with some studies showing increased survival with longer delays. One hypothesis is that diagnostic difficulties could perhaps account for this survival paradox. A rapidly growing lump may suggest cancer to both doctors and patients, while a slow growing lump or other symptoms could be less obvious to them. If this is the case, then the shorter delays would be seen with the more aggressive tumors for which the prognosis is worse leading to reduced survival. It seems logical that a tumor that is more advanced at diagnosis would lead to shorter survival but the several counter-intuitive studies in this review show that it is dangerous to make assumptions. PMID:25121080

  12. Survivorship: How to Survive Cancer and Still Lose Your Life
.

    PubMed

    Colón, Yvette

    2017-04-01

    Cancer survivorship implies that the cancer has been treated and the survivor can return to his or her precancer life. The term fails to acknowledge the radical change to the person's mind, body, and spirit, nor does it address the diminished quality of life that can occur secondary to treatment. The survivorship struggle is often overlooked as public interests lies only in "success stories."

  13. Modeling Intercellular Communication as a Survival Strategy of Cancer Cells: An In Silico Approach on a Flexible Bioinformatics Framework

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-García, Maura; González-Pérez, Pedro P.; Montagna, Sara; Cortés, Oscar Sánchez; Caballero, Elena Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communication is very important for cell development and allows a group of cells to survive as a population. Cancer cells have a similar behavior, presenting the same mechanisms and characteristics of tissue formation. In this article, we model and simulate the formation of different communication channels that allow an interaction between two cells. This is a first step in order to simulate in the future processes that occur in healthy tissue when normal cells surround a cancer cell and to interrupt the communication, thus preventing the spread of malignancy into these cells. The purpose of this study is to propose key molecules, which can be targeted to allow us to break the communication between cancer cells and surrounding normal cells. The simulation is carried out using a flexible bioinformatics platform that we developed, which is itself based on the metaphor chemistry-based model. PMID:26997867

  14. Modeling Intercellular Communication as a Survival Strategy of Cancer Cells: An In Silico Approach on a Flexible Bioinformatics Framework.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-García, Maura; González-Pérez, Pedro P; Montagna, Sara; Cortés, Oscar Sánchez; Caballero, Elena Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communication is very important for cell development and allows a group of cells to survive as a population. Cancer cells have a similar behavior, presenting the same mechanisms and characteristics of tissue formation. In this article, we model and simulate the formation of different communication channels that allow an interaction between two cells. This is a first step in order to simulate in the future processes that occur in healthy tissue when normal cells surround a cancer cell and to interrupt the communication, thus preventing the spread of malignancy into these cells. The purpose of this study is to propose key molecules, which can be targeted to allow us to break the communication between cancer cells and surrounding normal cells. The simulation is carried out using a flexible bioinformatics platform that we developed, which is itself based on the metaphor chemistry-based model.

  15. Predicting survival time for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer: An iterative imputation approach

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Detian; Du, Yu; Ji, Zhicheng; Rao, Karthik; Wu, Zhenke; Zhu, Yuxin; Coley, R. Yates

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present our winning method for survival time prediction in the 2015 Prostate Cancer DREAM Challenge, a recent crowdsourced competition focused on risk and survival time predictions for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We are interested in using a patient's covariates to predict his or her time until death after initiating standard therapy. We propose an iterative algorithm to multiply impute right-censored survival times and use ensemble learning methods to characterize the dependence of these imputed survival times on possibly many covariates. We show that by iterating over imputation and ensemble learning steps, we guide imputation with patient covariates and, subsequently, optimize the accuracy of survival time prediction. This method is generally applicable to time-to-event prediction problems in the presence of right-censoring. We demonstrate the proposed method's performance with training and validation results from the DREAM Challenge and compare its accuracy with existing methods. PMID:28299176

  16. Snail reprograms glucose metabolism by repressing phosphofructokinase PFKP allowing cancer cell survival under metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Hee; Cha, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jueun; Lee, Seon-Hyeong; Yang, Ji Hye; Yun, Jun Seop; Cho, Eunae Sandra; Zhang, Xianglan; Nam, Miso; Kim, Nami; Yuk, Young-Su; Cha, So Young; Lee, Yoonmi; Ryu, Joo Kyung; Park, Sunghyouk; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kang, Sang Won; Kim, Soo-Youl; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Yook, Jong In; Kim, Hyun Sil

    2017-02-08

    Dynamic regulation of glucose flux between aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is not well-understood. Here we show that Snail (SNAI1), a key transcriptional repressor of EMT, regulates glucose flux toward PPP, allowing cancer cell survival under metabolic stress. Mechanistically, Snail regulates glycolytic activity via repression of phosphofructokinase, platelet (PFKP), a major isoform of cancer-specific phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1), an enzyme involving the first rate-limiting step of glycolysis. The suppression of PFKP switches the glucose flux towards PPP, generating NADPH with increased metabolites of oxidative PPP. Functionally, dynamic regulation of PFKP significantly potentiates cancer cell survival under metabolic stress and increases metastatic capacities in vivo. Further, knockdown of PFKP rescues metabolic reprogramming and cell death induced by loss of Snail. Thus, the Snail-PFKP axis plays an important role in cancer cell survival via regulation of glucose flux between glycolysis and PPP.

  17. [Childhood cancer: a comparative analysis of incidence, mortality, and survival in Goiania (Brazil) and other countries].

    PubMed

    Braga, Patrícia Emília; Latorre Md, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira; Curado, Maria Paula

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of cancer incidence, mortality, and survival rates can yield geographic and temporal trends that are useful for planning and evaluating health interventions. This article reviews cancer incidence and mortality rates and respective trends around the world in children under 15 years old, as well as their 5-year survival rates in developed and developing countries. We conclude that even though increasing or stable childhood cancer incidence rates and decreasing mortality rates have been observed in developed countries, the trends remain unknown in developing countries. Data from the city of Goiania, Brazil, show stable childhood cancer incidence and mortality rates. Five-year survival rates (48%) in Goiania are similar to those seen in underdeveloped regions and lower than those reported in developed countries (64-70%).

  18. Improvement of survival and prospect of cure in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yee Chung; Ueno, Naoto T

    2012-07-01

    Patients with metastatic breast cancer have traditionally been considered incurable with conventional treatment. However, 5-10% of those patients survive more than 5 years, and 2-5% survive more than 10 years. Recent studies suggest that the survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer has been slowly improving. In this review, we examine the possible curative approach for a certain group of patients with metastatic breast cancer. We identify that patients most likely to benefit from such an aggressive approach are young and have good performance status, adequate body functional reserve, long disease-free interval before recurrence, oligometastatic disease, and low systemic tumor load. An aggressive multidisciplinary approach including both local treatment of macroscopic disease and systemic treatment of microscopic disease can result in prolonged disease control in certain patients with metastatic breast cancer. Whether patients with prolonged disease control are "cured" remains controversial.

  19. Snail reprograms glucose metabolism by repressing phosphofructokinase PFKP allowing cancer cell survival under metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Hee; Cha, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jueun; Lee, Seon-Hyeong; Yang, Ji Hye; Yun, Jun Seop; Cho, Eunae Sandra; Zhang, Xianglan; Nam, Miso; Kim, Nami; Yuk, Young-Su; Cha, So Young; Lee, Yoonmi; Ryu, Joo Kyung; Park, Sunghyouk; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kang, Sang Won; Kim, Soo-Youl; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Yook, Jong In; Kim, Hyun Sil

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of glucose flux between aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) during epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is not well-understood. Here we show that Snail (SNAI1), a key transcriptional repressor of EMT, regulates glucose flux toward PPP, allowing cancer cell survival under metabolic stress. Mechanistically, Snail regulates glycolytic activity via repression of phosphofructokinase, platelet (PFKP), a major isoform of cancer-specific phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1), an enzyme involving the first rate-limiting step of glycolysis. The suppression of PFKP switches the glucose flux towards PPP, generating NADPH with increased metabolites of oxidative PPP. Functionally, dynamic regulation of PFKP significantly potentiates cancer cell survival under metabolic stress and increases metastatic capacities in vivo. Further, knockdown of PFKP rescues metabolic reprogramming and cell death induced by loss of Snail. Thus, the Snail-PFKP axis plays an important role in cancer cell survival via regulation of glucose flux between glycolysis and PPP. PMID:28176759

  20. Higher overall survival in metastatic pancreatic cancer: the impact of where and how treatment is delivered

    PubMed Central

    Usón, Pedro Luiz Serrano; França, Monique Sedlmaier; Rodrigues, Heloisa Veasey; Macedo, Antônio Luiz de Vasconcellos; Goldenberg, Alberto; Smaletz, Oren; Armentano, Daniela Pezzutti Domingues; Simon, Sergio Daniel; Gansl, Rene Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the overall survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and evaluate factors that impact prognosis in a private cancer center. Methods Data from the Hospital Cancer Registry at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein were retrospectively collected. The patients enrolled had metastatic cancer at diagnosis or earlier staging and subsequent recurrence. Cases of neuroendocrine tumors were excluded. Results A total of 65 patients were evaluated, including 63 with adenocarcinoma. The median overall survival for patients in all stages was 20.7 months (95%CI: 15.6-25.7), while the overall survival of metastatic disease was 13.3 months. Among the 33 cases with stage IV cancer, there was no evidence of a statistically significant association between median survival and CA19-9 dosage (p=0.212), tumor location (p=0.482), first treatment performed (p=0.337), lymphovascular invasion (p=0.286), and age (p=0.152). However, the number of lines of chemotherapy was significantly associated with survival (log-rank p=0.013), with an estimated median survival of 10.2 months for patients who received up to two lines of treatment and 23.5 months for those receiving more than two lines of chemotherapy. Conclusion The survival of patients treated was longer than that reported in the literature. The only statistically significant factor related to increased survival was higher number of lines of chemotherapy received. We believe that the higher socioeconomic status of patients surveyed in this study, as well as their greater access to treatment options, may have influenced their overall survival. PMID:26313433

  1. Bot fly parasitism of the red-backed vole: host survival, infection risk, and population growth.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Jérôme; Fortin, Daniel; Montiglio, Pierre-Olivier; Darveau, Marcel

    2009-03-01

    Parasites can play an important role in the dynamics of host populations, but empirical evidence remains sparse. We investigated the role of bot fly (Cuterebra spp.) parasitism in red-backed voles (Myodes gapperi) by first assessing the impacts of the parasite on the probability of vole survival under stressful conditions as well as on the reproductive activity of females. We then identified the main factors driving both the individual risk of infection and the abundance of bot flies inside red-backed voles. Finally, we evaluated the impacts of bot fly prevalence on the growth rate of vole populations between mid-July and mid-August. Thirty-six populations of red-backed voles were sampled in the boreal forest of Québec, Canada. The presence and the abundance of parasites in voles, two host life history traits (sex and body condition), three indices of habitat complexity (tree basal area, sapling basal area, coarse woody debris volume), and vole abundance were considered in models evaluating the effects of bot flies on host populations. We found that the probability of survival of red-backed voles in live traps decreased with bot fly infection. Both the individual risk of infection and the abundance of bot flies in red-backed voles were driven mainly by vole abundance rather than by the two host life history traits or the three variables of habitat complexity. Parasitism had population consequences: bot fly prevalence was linked to a decrease in short-term growth rate of vole populations over the summer. We found that bot flies have the potential to reduce survival of red-backed voles, an effect that may apply to large portions of populations.

  2. Treatment of upper aerodigestive tract cancers in England and its effect on survival

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Dympna M; Johnson, N W

    1999-01-01

    The evidence base for head and neck cancers is low with relatively few randomized controlled trials of the two main treatments, surgery and radiotherapy. The aim of the study was to investigate the patterns of surgery and radiotherapy treatment for head and neck cancers in three large areas of England and to investigate their effects on survival. This was a retrospective study of 13 510 cases of head and neck cancers (ICD10: C00–C14, C30–C32) diagnosed and treated from 1984 to 1992 in England. We undertook multivariate analyses of survival using a step-wise Cox proportional hazard model and Kaplan–Meier analysis. There were regional variations in the treatments given to patients. Four in ten patients did not receive currently recommended treatments. In multivariate analyses treatment content and timing had an independent effect on survival. Better survival was associated with surgery for mouth cancers, radiotherapy for laryngeal cancers and combined treatment for pharyngeal cancers independent of tumour and demographic factors. Further research is needed to investigate the findings of this study through large randomized controlled trials and multi-centre audits. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10496360

  3. Can lifestyle modification increase survival in women diagnosed with breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Rock, Cheryl L; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2002-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked diets high in vegetables and fruit with an increased likelihood of survival after the diagnosis of breast cancer, and clinical and epidemiologic studies have identified obesity as an important negative prognostic factor. Of the 26 studies published since 1990 that examined the relationship with obesity and survival, 17 reported a significant inverse relationship. Five of the eight cohort studies of breast cancer survivors that examined intakes of vegetables, fruit and related micronutrients published since 1985 reported a positive relationship between these factors and survival. The hypothesis that lifestyle factors such as diet and physical activity may improve the prognosis in women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer is currently under study. The Women's Healthy Eating and Living Study is a randomized controlled study that tests the effects of a diet high in vegetables, fruit and fiber and low in fat on disease-free survival after treatment for early stage breast cancer (n = 3109). In the Healthy Weight Management for Breast Cancer Survivors Study, a multifaceted approach to promoting weight loss and long-term weight maintenance is being tested in 85 women at risk for breast cancer recurrence. The intervention emphasizes increased physical activity, strategies to improve body image and self-acceptance, and cognitive-behavioral therapy to promote healthy eating attitudes and behaviors. The results of these studies will contribute to understanding the roles of diet and physical activity in the progression of breast cancer.

  4. Serum vitamin D, vitamin D binding protein, and lung cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Anic, Gabriella M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Mondul, Alison M.; Männistö, Satu; Albanes, Demetrius

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Vitamin D may prolong cancer survival by inhibiting tumor progression and metastasis, however, there are limited epidemiologic studies regarding the association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and lung cancer survival. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between serum 25(OH)D and lung cancer specific survival and to evaluate whether vitamin D binding protein (DBP) concentration modified this association. Materials and Methods 25(OH)D and DBP were measured in fasting serum samples from 500 male lung cancer cases in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer related death according to quartiles of season-specific 25(OH)D, DBP, and the molar ratio of 25(OH)D:DBP, a proxy for free circulating 25(OH)D. Results Comparing highest to lowest quartiles, serum 25(OH)D (HR=1.18; 95% CI: 0.89–1.56) and DBP (HR=0.95; 95% CI: 0.71–1.26) were not associated with lung cancer survival and DBP concentration did not modify the association with 25(OH)D (p for interaction=0.56). There was suggestion of an association between higher serum 25(OH)D and better survival from adenocarcinoma (HR=0.64; 95% CI: 0.17–2.45) and small cell carcinoma (HR=0.55; 95% CI: 0.21–1.45), but these estimates were based on a relatively small number of cases. Conclusion Serum 25(OH)D was not associated with overall lung cancer survival regardless of DBP concentration, however, these findings should be examined in other studies that include women and subjects with higher 25(OH)D levels. PMID:25456734

  5. Novel estimates of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) population size and adult survival based on Wolbachia releases.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Scott A; Montgomery, Brian L; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2013-05-01

    The size of Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquito populations and adult survival rates have proven difficult to estimate because of a lack of consistent quantitative measures to equate sampling methods, such as adult trapping, to actual population size. However, such estimates are critical for devising control methods and for modeling the transmission of dengue and other infectious agents carried by this species. Here we take advantage of recent releases of Wolbachia-infected Ae. aegypti coupled with the results of ongoing monitoring to estimate the size of adult Ae. aegypti populations around Cairns in far north Queensland, Australia. Based on the association between released adults infected with Wolbachia and data from Biogents Sentinel traps, we show that data from two locations are consistent with population estimates of approximately 5-10 females per house and daily survival rates of 0.7-0.9 for the released Wolbachia-infected females. Moreover, we estimate that networks of Biogents Sentinel traps at a density of one per 15 houses capture around 5-10% of the adult population per week, and provide a rapid estimate of the absolute population size of Ae. aegypti. These data are discussed with respect to release rates and monitoring in future Wolbachia releases and also the levels of suppression required to reduce dengue transmission.

  6. Varying postresection lactate dehydrogenase with overall survival of early stage pancreatic cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yuanyuan; Xie, Zhihui; Shao, Zhenyi; Chen, Wen; Xie, Hua; Qin, Guoyou; Zhao, Naiqing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Several previously published studies revealed a hazardous role of pretreatment lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in survival of advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer (PC) patients. Nevertheless, in early stage PC patients who are eligible for curative resection, the prognostic role of postresection LDH has never been discussed. In this study, we aimed to explore the prognostic significance of varying postresection LDH among early stage PC patients. In total, 80 PC patients who received curative resection were retrospectively selected from a population-based electronic inpatients database which originated from Shanghai, China. A dynamic survival analysis method, counting process approach in combination with the multiple failure-time Cox model, was applied to evaluate the association between postresection LDH and OS. The multiple failure-time Cox model found that age, resection modality, and postresection LDH were significantly associated with OS: an elevated LDH (defined as > 250 U/L) was related to 2.93 (95% CI: 1.26–6.79) folds of death hazard. Further analysis disclosed an identifiable dose–response association between LDH and OS: compared with LDH≤155 U/L, the HRs for 155 U/L < LDH < 196 U/L, and LDH≥196 U/L were 2.07 (95% CI: 0.88–4.88) and 3.15 (95% CI: 1.30–7.59), respectively. Our study results suggest that postresection LDH is a prominent prognostic factor in this group of early stage PC patients. Maintaining normally ranged LDH after resection might bring about survival benefit in early stage PC patients. PMID:28328834

  7. Varying postresection lactate dehydrogenase with overall survival of early stage pancreatic cancer patients: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuanyuan; Xie, Zhihui; Shao, Zhenyi; Chen, Wen; Xie, Hua; Qin, Guoyou; Zhao, Naiqing

    2017-03-01

    Several previously published studies revealed a hazardous role of pretreatment lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in survival of advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer (PC) patients. Nevertheless, in early stage PC patients who are eligible for curative resection, the prognostic role of postresection LDH has never been discussed. In this study, we aimed to explore the prognostic significance of varying postresection LDH among early stage PC patients. In total, 80 PC patients who received curative resection were retrospectively selected from a population-based electronic inpatients database which originated from Shanghai, China. A dynamic survival analysis method, counting process approach in combination with the multiple failure-time Cox model, was applied to evaluate the association between postresection LDH and OS. The multiple failure-time Cox model found that age, resection modality, and postresection LDH were significantly associated with OS: an elevated LDH (defined as > 250 U/L) was related to 2.93 (95% CI: 1.26-6.79) folds of death hazard. Further analysis disclosed an identifiable dose-response association between LDH and OS: compared with LDH≤155 U/L, the HRs for 155 U/L < LDH < 196 U/L, and LDH≥196 U/L were 2.07 (95% CI: 0.88-4.88) and 3.15 (95% CI: 1.30-7.59), respectively. Our study results suggest that postresection LDH is a prominent prognostic factor in this group of early stage PC patients. Maintaining normally ranged LDH after resection might bring about survival benefit in early stage PC patients.

  8. Effect of Radiotherapy Interruptions on Survival in Medicare Enrollees With Local and Regional Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fesinmeyer, Megan Dann; Mehta, Vivek; Blough, David; Tock, Lauri; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether interruptions in radiotherapy are associated with decreased survival in a population-based sample of head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database we identified Medicare beneficiaries aged 66 years and older diagnosed with local-regional head-and-neck cancer during the period 1997-2003. We examined claims records of 3864 patients completing radiotherapy for the presence of one or more 5-30-day interruption(s) in therapy. We then performed Cox regression analyses to estimate the association between therapy interruptions and survival. Results: Patients with laryngeal tumors who experienced an interruption in radiotherapy had a 68% (95% confidence interval, 41-200%) increased risk of death, compared with patients with no interruptions. Patients with nasal cavity, nasopharynx, oral, salivary gland, and sinus tumors had similar associations between interruptions and increased risk of death, but these did not reach statistical significance because of small sample sizes. Conclusions: Treatment interruptions seem to influence survival time among patients with laryngeal tumors completing a full course of radiotherapy. At all head-and-neck sites, the association between interruptions and survival is sensitive to confounding by stage and other treatments. Further research is needed to develop methods to identify patients most susceptible to interruption-induced mortality.

  9. Hyaluronan Tumor Cell Interactions in Prostate Cancer Growth and Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Comparison of the prognostic potential of hyaluronic acid , hyaluronidase (HYAL-1), CD44v6 and microvessel density for prostate cancer. Int J Cancer, 2004...112(1): p. 121-9. 22. Posey, J.T., et al., Evaluation of the prognostic potential of hyaluronic acid and hyaluronidase (HYAL1) for prostate... hyaluronic acid and CD44. Mol Cell Biol, 2000. 20(10): p. 3482-96. 29. Gao, A.C., et al., CD44 is a metastasis suppressor gene for prostatic cancer

  10. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Catalase Is Strongly Associated with Ovarian Cancer Survival.

    PubMed

    Belotte, Jimmy; Fletcher, Nicole M; Saed, Mohammed G; Abusamaan, Mohammed S; Dyson, Gregory; Diamond, Michael P; Saed, Ghassan M

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecologic cancers. Recent evidence demonstrates an association between enzymatic activity altering single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with human cancer susceptibility. We sought to evaluate the association of SNPs in key oxidant and antioxidant enzymes with increased risk and survival in epithelial ovarian cancer. Individuals (n = 143) recruited were divided into controls, (n = 94): healthy volunteers, (n = 18), high-risk BRCA1/2 negative (n = 53), high-risk BRCA1/2 positive (n = 23) and ovarian cancer cases (n = 49). DNA was subjected to TaqMan SNP genotype analysis for selected oxidant and antioxidant enzymes. Of the seven selected SNP studied, no association with ovarian cancer risk (Pearson Chi-square) was found. However, a catalase SNP was identified as a predictor of ovarian cancer survival by the Cox regression model. The presence of this SNP was associated with a higher likelihood of death (hazard ratio (HR) of 3.68 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.149-11.836)) for ovarian cancer patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated a significant median overall survival difference (108 versus 60 months, p<0.05) for those without the catalase SNP as compared to those with the SNP. Additionally, age at diagnosis greater than the median was found to be a significant predictor of death (HR of 2.78 (95% CI: 1.022-7.578)). This study indicates a strong association with the catalase SNP and survival of ovarian cancer patients, and thus may serve as a prognosticator.

  11. Expression profiles of loneliness-associated genes for survival prediction in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    You, Liang-Fu; Yeh, Jia-Rong; Su, Mu-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Influence of loneliness on human survival has been established epidemiologically, but genomic research remains undeveloped. We identified 34 loneliness-associated genes which were statistically significant for high- lonely and low-lonely individuals. With the univariate Cox proportional hazards regression model, we obtained corresponding regression coefficients for loneliness-associated genes fo individual cancer patients. Furthermore, risk scores could be generated with the combination of gene expression level multiplied by corresponding regression coefficients of loneliness-associated genes. We verified that high-risk score cancer patients had shorter mean survival time than their low-risk score counterparts. Then we validated the loneliness-associated gene signature in three independent brain cancer cohorts with Kaplan-Meier survival curves (n=77, 85 and 191), significantly separable by log-rank test with hazard ratios (HR) >1 and p-values <0.0001 (HR=2.94, 3.82, and 1.78). Moreover, we validated the loneliness-associated gene signature in bone cancer (HR=5.10, p-value=4.69e-3), lung cancer (HR=2.86, p-value=4.71e-5), ovarian cancer (HR=1.97, p-value=3.11e-5), and leukemia (HR=2.06, p-value=1.79e-4) cohorts. The last lymphoma cohort proved to have an HR=3.50, p-value=1.15e-7. Loneliness- associated genes had good survival prediction for cancer patients, especially bone cancer patients. Our study provided the first indication that expression of loneliness-associated genes are related to survival time of cancer patients.

  12. PDCD6 is an independent predictor of progression free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Programmed cell death 6 (PDCD6) beside its known proapoptotic functions may be a player in survival pathways in cancer. The purpose of this study is to further explore the roles of PDCD6 in epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Lentiviral vector with shRNA for PDCD6 was used to investigate the effects of PDCD6 knockdown on cell growth, cell cycle, apoptosis and motility in ovarian cancer cells. Two hundred twelve epithelial ovarian cancer tissues were analyzed for mRNA expression of PDCD6 using RT-PCR. Associations of its expression with clinical pathological factors, progression free and overall survival were evaluated. Results PDCD6 is highly expressed in metastatic ovarian cancer cells and positively regulates cell migration and invasion. Significantly, the level of PDCD6 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer correlates with clinical progression. Patients with medium or high levels of PDCD6 mRNA were at higher risk for disease progression, compared to those with low levels (HR, 1.29; P = 0.024 for medium levels; and HR, 1.57; P = 0.045 for high levels) after adjusting for age, disease stage, tumor grade, histologic type and residual tumor size. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated similar results. However, no association was found between PDCD6 expression and overall survival. Conclusions PDCD6 seems to play an important role in ovarian cancer progression and it may be an independent predictor of progression free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer. Further studies are needed to more completely elucidate the molecular mechanisms of PDCD6 involve in ovarian cancer progression. PMID:22369209

  13. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    Cancer.gov

    Taking adjuvant tamoxifen for 10 years after primary treatment leads to a greater reduction in breast cancer recurrences and deaths than taking the drug for only 5 years, according to the results of a large international clinical trial.

  14. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  15. Enzalutamide Improves Survival in Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared enzalutamide (Xtandi®) and placebo for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer that had progressed during treatment with androgen deprivation therapy.

  16. Hyaluronan Tumor Cell Interactions in Prostate Cancer Growth and Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Score (Figure 2B). Elevated levels of both HA (Figure 3A) and Hyal- 1(Figure 3B) were also observed in both BPH and prostate cancer, with a...elevated in BPH , and most strongly elevated in prostate carcinomas (Figure 2B). The intensity of RHAMM staining increased as a function of Gleason...by co-precipitation. Studies are currently underway to test this model in the prostate cancer model. 2. RHAMM expression should enhance the level of

  17. Bone Matrix Osteonectin Limits Prostate Cancer Cell Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kapinas, Kristina; Lowther, Katie M.; Kessler, Catherine B.; Tilbury, Karissa; Lieberman, Jay R.; Tirnauer, Jennifer S.; Campagnola, Paul; Delany, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding prostate cancer metastasis to bone and the interaction of these cells with the bone microenvironment. Osteonectin/SPARC/BM-40 is a collagen binding matricellular protein that is enriched in bone. Its expression is increased in prostate cancer metastases, and it stimulates the migration of prostate carcinoma cells. However, the presence of osteonectin in cancer cells and the stroma may limit prostate tumor development and progression. To determine how bone matrix osteonectin affects the behavior of prostate cancer cells, we modeled prostate cancer cell-bone interactions using the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3, and mineralized matrices synthesized by wild type and osteonectin-null osteoblasts in vitro. We developed this in vitro system because the structural complexity of collagen matrices in vivo is not mimicked by reconstituted collagen scaffolds or by more complex substrates, like basement membrane extracts. Second harmonic generation imaging demonstrated that the wild type matrices had thick collagen fibers organized into longitudinal bundles, whereas osteonectin-null matrices had thinner fibers in random networks. Importantly, a mouse model of prostate cancer metastases to bone showed a collagen fiber phenotype similar to the wild type matrix synthesized in vitro. When PC-3 cells were grown on the wild type matrices, they displayed decreased cell proliferation, increased cell spreading, and decreased resistance to radiation-induced cell death, compared to cells grown on osteonectin-null matrix. Our data support the idea that osteonectin can suppress prostate cancer pathogenesis, expanding this concept to the microenvironment of skeletal metastases. PMID:22525512

  18. Effect of p53 codon 72 polymorphism on the survival outcome in advanced stage cervical cancer patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Akanksha; Das, Poulami; Kannan, Sadhana; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Mulherkar, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The Arg>Pro polymorphism in codon 72 of p53 gene is known to affect the susceptibility of cervical cancer differently in different population worldwide although information regarding its role in determining survival status and disease outcome in patients is lacking. The present study was conducted to determine the genotype frequency and prognostic role of p53 codon 72 Arg>Pro polymorphism in patients with advanced stage cervical cancer in India. Methods: The p53 codon 72 polymorphism was determined in tumour biopsies (n = 107) and matched blood samples (n = 19) in cervical cancer patients using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP). Effect of p53 genotype on the overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) was analyzed. Individual Arg or Pro alleles were studied for their significance on survival as Pro carriers (Pro/Pro + Arg/Pro) versus Arg/Arg individuals or Arg carriers (Arg/Arg + Arg/Pro) versus Pro/Pro individuals. Results: The frequencies for Arg/Arg, Arg/Pro and Pro/Pro genotypes were 27.2, 49.5 and 23.3 per cent, respectively. There was no significant difference in the genotypes with respect to patients’ OS or RFS. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of our study indicated that p53 codon 72 polymorphism might not be an independent marker in predicting clinical outcome in advanced stage cervical cancer patients. Further studies need to be done in larger samples to confirm these findings. PMID:28139534

  19. Survival and functional capacity: three year follow up of an elderly population in hospitals and homes.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, L J; Jagger, C

    1983-01-01

    A three year mortality study was undertaken of a population of 4490 people aged 65 and over in all types of hospitals and homes provided within a defined geographical area. The rate of survival consistently fell with increasing incapacity in mobility, incontinence, washing/dressing, and feeding. The effect was independent of differences in age, sex, and duration of stay. Differences in survival between patients and residents of National Health Service hospitals (geriatric, psychiatric, acute) and homes for the elderly did not persist after adjustment for variations between populations in level of incapacity, age, and sex. An assessment based on ability to perform basic items of self care is easily undertaken and understood by staff in different settings. It allows homogeneous groups of elderly people to be identified despite a diverse range of underlying diseases and could provide the basis for planning and evaluating services and rehabilitation regimens. PMID:6619715

  20. Survival of patients with colorectal cancer in Austria by sex, age, and stage.

    PubMed

    Haidinger, Gerald; Waldhoer, Thomas; Hackl, Monika; Vutuc, Christian

    2006-10-01

    This paper for the first time presents Austrian data on survival of patients, diagnosed from 1998 through 2002, with colon cancer and with rectal cancer. Cumulative relative survival rates were calculated by age, standardized for all ages and stages combined, and by age groups (< 50 years, 50-64 years, and =65 years) according to stages (localized, regional metastases and distant metastases). In carcinoma of the colon 5-year relative survival was 66 % in males and 64 % in females. In carcinoma of the rectum 5-year relative survival was 64 % in males and 67 % in females. Compared to the earlier results from the Tyrol (based on patients diagnosed from 1990 through 1994) the 5-year survival of patients with colon cancer increased from 55 % to 66 % in males and from 58 % to 64 % in females. In patients with rectal cancer 5-year survival increased from 44 % to 64 % in males and from 46 % to 67 % in females. This increase in part can be explained by a positive effect of early detection and of better treatment.

  1. Impact of anaesthetic technique on survival in colon cancer: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, F Jeroen; Lips, Daan J; van Dorsten, Frank R C; Lemmens, Valery E; Bosscha, Koop

    2016-02-01

    An oncological surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for potentially curable colon cancer. At the time of surgery, a large fraction of patients do harbour-although not visibly-minimal residual disease at the time of surgery. The immunosuppression that accompanies surgery may have an effect on disease recurrence and survival. Regional or neuraxial anaesthetic techniques like epidural anaesthesia may suppress immune function less than opioid analgesia, by reducing stress response and significantly reducing exposure to opioids. Consistent with this hypothesis, regional anaesthetic techniques have been associated with lower recurrence rates in breast cancer and prostate cancer. Results for colon cancer, however, are contradictory. In this review of the literature we describe all studies addressing the association of the use of epidural anaesthesia and survival in colon cancer surgery.

  2. HER2 somatic mutations are associated with poor survival in HER2-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tonghui; Xu, Ye; Sheng, Shuyan; Yuan, Hua; Ouyang, Tao; Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Tianfeng; Fan, Zhaoqing; Fan, Tie; Lin, Benyao; Xie, Yuntao

    2017-02-06

    It is well documented that HER2 overexpression/amplification is associated with the poor survival in breast cancer patients. However, it is largely unknown whether HER2 somatic mutations are associated with the survival in HER2-negative breast cancer patients. Here, we identified HER2 somatic mutations in tumors from 1,348 unselected breast cancer patients by sequencing the entire HER2 coding region. All these mutations were tested for in corresponding blood samples to determine whether they were somatic or germline mutations. We further investigated the associations between the HER2 somatic mutations and recurrence-free survival (RFS) and distant recurrence-free survival (DRFS) in this cohort of patients. We found that 27 of 1,348 (2.0%) of these patients carried a HER2 somatic mutation. In vitro experiments demonstrated that some of novel mutations and those with unknown functions increased HER2 activity. HER2 status was available for 1,306 patients, and the HER2 somatic mutation rates in HER2-positive (n=353) and HER2-negative breast cancers (n=953) were 1.4% and 2.3%, respectively. Among the HER2-negative patients, those with a HER2 somatic mutation had a significantly worse recurrence-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] =2.67; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-5.72, P=0.002) and distant recurrence-free survival (unadjusted HR=2.50; 95% CI: 1.10-5.68, P=0.004) than those with wild-type HER2. Taken together, our findings suggested that HER2 somatic mutations occur at a higher frequency in HER2-negative breast cancer, and HER2-negative breast cancer patients with these mutations have poor survival. Therefore, HER2-negative patients with a HER2 somatic mutation are potentially good candidates for HER2-targeted therapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Do renin–angiotensin system inhibitors influence the recurrence, metastasis, and survival in cancer patients?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Li, Tao; Zhuang, Rongyuan; Cai, Weimin; Zheng, Yuanting

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Renin–angiotensin system inhibitors (RAS inhibitors) are antihypertensive agents with potential antitumor effects. However, various studies have yielded conflicting results on the influence of RAS inhibitors on survival of cancer patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of RAS inhibitors on recurrence, metastasis, and survival in cancer patients through a meta-analysis. Methods: PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library were systematically searched from inception to December 2016. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) with its 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was calculated to evaluate the association between RAS inhibitors and recurrence, metastasis, and survival in cancer patients. Results: Fifty-five eligible studies were included in the present meta-analysis. Results showed that there were significant improvements in overall survival (OS) (HR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.77–0.88; P < 0.001), progression-free survival (HR = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.66–0.84; P < 0.001), and disease-free survival (HR = 0.80; 95% CI: 0.67–0.95; P = 0.01) in RAS inhibitor users compared with nonusers. Subgroup analyses revealed that the effect of RAS inhibitors on OS depended on the cancer type or different RAS inhibitors. Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that RAS inhibitors could improve the survival of cancer patients and depend on cancer type and types of RAS inhibitors. PMID:28353566

  4. Time trends in breast cancer survival: experience in a single centre, 1975-89.

    PubMed Central

    Bradburn, M. J.; Altman, D. G.; Smith, P.; Fentiman, I. S.; Rubens, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to investigate whether survival of patients with breast cancer has changed over the period 1975-89. A total of 2604 women diagnosed as having invasive breast cancer at a clinical oncology unit in London were followed up for between 5 and 20 years. Patients were divided into four groups according to menstrual status (pre or post) and the staging of cancer (operable or inoperable). For each group, survival from diagnosis was compared between three consecutive 5-year cohorts, both with and without adjustments made for relevant prognostic factors. No temporal patterns were found in patients with inoperable cancer, in whom the survival rate was consistently low. Of women with operable cancers, differences were seen only among post-menopausal women, for whom the best survival patterns were seen in patients diagnosed between 1985-89. This is probably due to tamoxifen being commonly prescribed as adjuvant treatment for this cohort of patients. We cannot explain an apparently worse survival in the group of patients presenting in the early 1980s compared with that observed in the late 1970s. PMID:9667672

  5. Topoisomerase II{alpha} expression correlates with diminished disease-free survival in invasive breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, John K. . E-mail: joconno@yahoo.com; Hazard, Lisa J.; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Fischbach, Jennifer; Gaffney, David K.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Topoisomerase II{alpha} (Topo II{alpha}) plays a role in DNA replication and is the molecular target for anthracyline-based chemotherapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between Topo II{alpha} expression and survival in patients with invasive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from 24 women with invasive breast cancer were stained for Topo II{alpha} expression. All women underwent mastectomy. Radiotherapy was given at University of Utah Department of Radiation Oncology. Of the patients, 23 (96%) received chemotherapy. The level of Topo II{alpha} expression within tumor cells was compared with clinical factors and overall survival. Results: The median percentage of tumor cells expressing Topo II{alpha} was 70%. Increased Topo II{alpha} tumor expression significantly correlated with diminished disease-free survival. Five-year disease-free survival was 100% for patients with <70% of breast cancer cells expressing Topo II{alpha} compared with 42% for patients with {>=}70% Topo II{alpha} expression (p 0.008). The level of Topo II{alpha} expression within tumor cells correlated with T stage (p = 0.008) but not with other pathologic factors. Conclusions: Increased Topo II{alpha} expression significantly correlated with diminished disease-free survival in patients with invasive breast cancer. These findings may indicate a role for Topo II{alpha} expression as a prognostic factor in breast cancer.

  6. Disease Management Project Breast Cancer in Hesse – 5-Year Survival Data

    PubMed Central

    Jackisch, C.; Funk, A.; König, K.; Lubbe, D.; Misselwitz, B.; Wagner, U.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Disease Management Project Breast Cancer (DMP Breast Cancer) was first launched in Hesse in 2004. The project is supported by the health insurance companies in Hesse and the Professional Association of Gynaecologists in Hesse. The aim is to offer structured treatment programmes to all women diagnosed with breast cancer in Hesse by creating intersectoral cooperations between coordinating clinics, associated hospitals and gynaecologists in private practice who registered in the DMP programme. Method: Between 1 January 2005 and 30 June 2011, 13 973 women were enrolled in the DMP programme. Results: After data cleansing, survival rates were calculated for a total of 11 214 women. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 86.3 %; survival rates according to tumour stage on presentation were 92.2 % (pT1) and 82.3 % (pT2), respectively. The impact of steroid hormone receptor status on survival (87.8 % for receptor-positive cancers vs. 78.9 % for receptor-negative cancers) and of age at first diagnosis on survival (≤ 35 years = 91 %) were calculated. Conclusion: The project showed that intersectoral cooperation led to significant improvements in the quality of treatment over time, as measured by quality indicators and outcomes after treatment. PMID:24882878

  7. Socioeconomic inequalities in prostate cancer survival: A review of the evidence and explanatory factors.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jens; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf

    2015-10-01

    Although survival rates after prostate cancer diagnosis have improved in the past two decades, survival analyses regarding the socioeconomic status (SES) suggest inequalities indicating worse prognosis for lower SES groups. An overview of the current literature is lacking and moreover, there is an ongoing discussion about the underlying causes but evidence is comparatively sparse. Several patient, disease and health care related factors are discussed to have an important impact on disparities in survival. Therefore, a systematic review was conducted to sum up the current evidence of survival inequalities and the contribution of different potential explanatory factors among prostate cancer patients. The PubMed database was screened for relevant articles published between January 2005 and September 2014 revealing 330 potentially eligible publications. After systematic review process, 46 papers met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. About 75% of the studies indicate a significant association between low SES and worse survival among prostate cancer patients in the fully adjusted model. Overall, hazard ratios (low versus high SES) range from 1.02 to 3.57. A decrease of inequalities over the years was not identified. 8 studies examined the impact of explanatory factors on the association between SES and survival by progressive adjustment indicating mediating effects of comorbidity, stage at diagnosis and treatment modalities. Eventually, an apparent majority of the obtained studies indicates lower survival among patients with lower SES. The few studies that intend to explain inequalities found out instructive results regarding different contributing factors but evidence is still insufficient.

  8. Bowel Obstruction in Elderly Ovarian Cancer Patients: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Stephen J.; Winner, Megan; Hershman, Dawn L.; Wright, Jason D.; Feingold, Daniel L.; Allendorf, John D.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Bowel obstruction is a common pre-terminal event in abdominal/pelvic cancer that has mainly been described in small single-institution studies. We used a large, population-based database to investigate the incidence, management, and outcomes of obstruction in ovarian cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS We identified patients with stages IC-IV ovarian cancer, aged 65 years or older, in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database diagnosed between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 2005. We modeled predictors of inpatient hospitalization for bowel obstruction after cancer diagnosis, categorized management of obstruction, and analyzed the associations between treatment for obstruction and outcomes. RESULTS Of 8607 women with ovarian cancer, 1518 (17.6%) were hospitalized for obstruction subsequent to cancer diagnosis. Obstruction at cancer diagnosis (HR=2.17, 95% CI: 1.86–2.52) and mucinous tumor histology (HR=1.45, 95% CI: 1.15–1.83) were associated with increased risk of subsequent obstruction. Surgical management of obstruction was associated with lower 30-day mortality (13.4% in women managed surgically vs. 20.2% in women managed non-surgically), but equivalent survival after 30 days and equivalent rates of post-obstruction chemotherapy. Median post-obstruction survival was 382 days in women with obstructions of adhesive origin and 93 days in others. CONCLUSION In this large-scale, population-based assessment of patients with advanced ovarian cancer, nearly 20% of women developed bowel obstruction after cancer diagnosis. While obstruction due to adhesions did not signal the end of life, all other obstructions were pre-terminal events for the majority of patients regardless of treatment. PMID:23274561

  9. Survival-extinction phase transition in a bit-string population with mutation.

    PubMed

    Fehsenfeld, Kathia M; Dickman, Ronald; Bernardes, Américo T

    2003-03-01

    A bit-string model for the evolution of a population of haploid organisms, subject to competition, reproduction with mutation, and selection, is studied, using mean-field theory and Monte Carlo simulations. We show that, depending on environmental flexibility and genetic variability, the model exhibits a phase transition between extinction due to random drift and survival. For weak selection the population attains a neutral regime. The mean-field theory describes the infinite-size limit, while simulations are used to study quasistationary properties.

  10. Survival-extinction phase transition in a bit-string population with mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehsenfeld, Kathia M.; Dickman, Ronald; Bernardes, Américo T.

    2003-03-01

    A bit-string model for the evolution of a population of haploid organisms, subject to competition, reproduction with mutation, and selection, is studied, using mean-field theory and Monte Carlo simulations. We show that, depending on environmental flexibility and genetic variability, the model exhibits a phase transition between extinction due to random drift and survival. For weak selection the population attains a neutral regime. The mean-field theory describes the infinite-size limit, while simulations are used to study quasistationary properties.

  11. A Multiresolution Hazard Model for Multicenter Survival Studies: Application to Tamoxifen Treatment in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    BOUMAN, Peter; MENG, Xiao-Li; DIGNAM, James; DUKIĆ, Vanja

    2014-01-01

    In multicenter studies, one often needs to make inference about a population survival curve based on multiple, possibly heterogeneous survival data from individual centers. We investigate a flexible Bayesian method for estimating a population survival curve based on a semiparametric multiresolution hazard model that can incorporate covariates and account for center heterogeneity. The method yields a smooth estimate of the survival curve for “multiple resolutions” or time scales of interest. The Bayesian model used has the capability to accommodate general forms of censoring and a priori smoothness assumptions. We develop a model checking and diagnostic technique based on the posterior predictive distribution and use it to identify departures from the model assumptions. The hazard estimator is used to analyze data from 110 centers that participated in a multicenter randomized clinical trial to evaluate tamoxifen in the treatment of early stage breast cancer. Of particular interest are the estimates of center heterogeneity in the baseline hazard curves and in the treatment effects, after adjustment for a few key clinical covariates. Our analysis suggests that the treatment effect estimates are rather robust, even for a collection of small trial centers, despite variations in center characteristics. PMID:25620824

  12. The Ketogenic Diet and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Prolong Survival in Mice with Systemic Metastatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poff, Angela M.; Ari, Csilla; Seyfried, Thomas N.; D’Agostino, Dominic P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Abnormal cancer metabolism creates a glycolytic-dependency which can be exploited by lowering glucose availability to the tumor. The ketogenic diet (KD) is a low carbohydrate, high fat diet which decreases blood glucose and elevates blood ketones and has been shown to slow cancer progression in animals and humans. Abnormal tumor vasculature creates hypoxic pockets which promote cancer progression and further increase the glycolytic-dependency of cancers. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO2T) saturates tumors with oxygen, reversing the cancer promoting effects of tumor hypoxia. Since these non-toxic therapies exploit overlapping metabolic deficiencies of cancer, we tested their combined effects on cancer progression in a natural model of metastatic disease. Methods We used the firefly luciferase-tagged VM-M3 mouse model of metastatic cancer to compare tumor progression and survival in mice fed standard or KD ad libitum with or without HBO2T (2.5 ATM absolute, 90 min, 3x/week). Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Results KD alone significantly decreased blood glucose, slowed tumor growth, and increased mean survival time by 56.7% in mice with systemic metastatic cancer. While HBO2T alone did not influence cancer progression, combining the KD with HBO2T elicited a significant decrease in blood glucose, tumor growth rate, and 77.9% increase in mean survival time compared to controls. Conclusions KD and HBO2T produce significant anti-cancer effects when combined in a natural model of systemic metastatic cancer. Our evidence suggests that these therapies should be further investigated as potential non-toxic treatments or adjuvant therapies to standard care for patients with systemic metastatic disease. PMID:23755243

  13. Population genetics of the westernmost distribution of the glaciations-surviving black truffle Tuber melanosporum.

    PubMed

    García-Cunchillos, Iván; Sánchez, Sergio; Barriuso, Juan José; Pérez-Collazos, Ernesto

    2014-04-01

    The black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) is an important natural resource due to its relevance as a delicacy in gastronomy. Different aspects of this hypogeous fungus species have been studied, including population genetics of French and Italian distribution ranges. Although those studies include some Spanish populations, this is the first time that the genetic diversity and genetic structure of the wide geographical range of the natural Spanish populations have been analysed. To achieve this goal, 23 natural populations were sampled across the Spanish geographical distribution. ISSR technique demonstrated its reliability and capability to detect high levels of polymorphism in the species. Studied populations showed high levels of genetic diversity (h N  = 0.393, h S  = 0.678, Hs = 0.418), indicating a non threatened genetic conservation status. These high levels may be a consequence of the wide distribution range of the species, of its spore dispersion by animals, and by its evolutionary history. AMOVA analysis showed a high degree of genetic structure among populations (47.89%) and other partitions as geographical ranges. Bayesian genetic structure analyses differentiated two main Spanish groups separated by the Iberian Mountain System, and showed the genetic uniqueness of some populations. Our results suggest the survival of some of these populations during the last glaciation, the Spanish southern distribution range perhaps surviving as had occurred in France and Italy, but it is also likely that specific northern areas may have acted as a refugia for the later dispersion to other calcareous areas in the Iberian Peninsula and probably France.

  14. Incidence and survival trends for childhood cancer in Osaka, Japan, 1973-2001.

    PubMed

    Baba, Sachiko; Ioka, Akiko; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Noda, Hiroyuki; Ajiki, Wakiko; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2010-03-01

    Mortality for childhood cancer has declined in Osaka, as well as all over Japan, since the 1970s, but whether this decline can be explained by trends of incidence or survival of childhood cancer has not been examined. A total of 5960 malignant tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2001 in children <15 years of age were registered at the Osaka Cancer Registry in Japan. The time trends for childhood cancer were analyzed over 29 years for incidence and 20 years for survival. Leukemia was the most common among childhood cancer for both sexes and accounted for one-third of all cases. The age-standardized annual incidence rate of all tumors was highest in 1988-1992: 155.1 per million for males and 135.9 for females. Five-year survival for all tumors improved from 50.1% in 1978-1982 to 73.0% in 1993-1997 for males and from 52.3% to 76.3% for females. Thus, the constant decline in mortality in childhood cancer was primarily due to improved survival between the 1970s and 1980s and reduced incidence after the 1990s.

  15. Inequalities in survival from colorectal cancer: a comparison of the impact of deprivation, treatment, and host factors on observed and cause specific survival

    PubMed Central

    Wrigley, H; Roderick, P; George, S; Smith, J; Mullee, M; Goddard, J

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether socioeconomic deprivation is associated with cause specific and all cause survival for colorectal cancer and to what extent this is independent of significant prognostic factors. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: The former Wessex Health Region, South West England. Participants: All patients resident in Wessex registered with a diagnosis of colorectal cancer over three years (n=5176). Survival analysis was carried out on those patients with compete data for all factors and a positive survival time (n=4419). Outcomes: Death from colorectal cancer and all cause over five year follow up from initial diagnosis. Main results: Deprivation was significantly associated with survival for both outcomes in univariate analysis; the unadjusted hazard ratio for dying from colorectal cancer (most deprived compared with most affluent) was 1.12 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.25) and for all cause was 1.18 (1.07 to 1.30). Significant prognostic factors for both outcomes were age, specialisation of surgeon, Dukes's stage, and emergency compared with elective surgery. Comorbidity and gender were only associated with all cause survival. After adjustment for prognostic factors, the effect of deprivation on both cause specific and all cause mortality was reduced, and it was non-significant for colorectal cancer. However, the most deprived group had consistently worse survival than the most affluent. Conclusions: Factors associated with survival with colorectal cancer depend on the outcome measure. Socioeconomic deprivation is adversely associated with survival in patients with colorectal cancer. This is strongest for non-colorectal cancer death, partly reflecting higher comorbidity, but it is there for colorectal cancer though not statistically significant. Conclusive evidence of the inequalities by socioeconomic status and underlying reasons needs to come from studies using individual based measures of socioeconomic status and more detail on treatment and host

  16. Disease-Free Survival as a Surrogate for Overall Survival in Adjuvant Trials of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Xavier; Alberts, Steven; Bang, Yung-Jue; Benedetti, Jacqueline; Bleiberg, Harry; Catalano, Paul; Lordick, Florian; Michiels, Stefan; Morita, Satoshi; Ohashi, Yasuo; Pignon, Jean-pierre; Rougier, Philippe; Sasako, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Junichi; Sargent, Daniel; Shitara, Kohei; Cutsem, Eric Van; Buyse, Marc; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Background In investigations of the effectiveness of surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancers, overall survival (OS) is considered the gold standard endpoint. However, the disadvantage of using OS as the endpoint is that it requires an extended follow-up period. We sought to investigate whether disease-free survival (DFS) is a valid surrogate for OS in trials of adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer. Methods The GASTRIC group initiated a meta-analysis of individual patient data collected in randomized clinical trials comparing adjuvant chemotherapy vs surgery alone for patients with curatively resected gastric cancer. Surrogacy of DFS was assessed through the correlation between the endpoints as well as through the correlation between the treatment effects on the endpoints. External validation of the prediction based on DFS was also evaluated. Results Individual patient data from 14 randomized clinical trials that included a total of 3288 patients were analyzed. The rank correlation coefficient between DFS and OS was 0.974 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.971 to 0.976). The coefficient of determination between the treatment effects on DFS and on OS was as high as 0.964 (95% CI = 0.926 to 1.000), and the surrogate threshold effect based on adjusted regression analysis was 0.92. In external validation, the six hazard ratios for OS predicted according to DFS were in very good agreement with those actually observed for OS. Conclusions DFS is an acceptable surrogate for OS in trials of cytotoxic agents for gastric cancer in the adjuvant setting. PMID:24108812

  17. Survival from digestive cancer in emerging countries in Asia and Africa.

    PubMed

    Lambert, René; Saito, Hiroshi; Lucas, Eric; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2012-06-01

    The incidence of digestive cancer, including cancer of the esophagus, stomach, colon, and liver, is analyzed in developing and less developed countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America. The analysis is based on cancer registries for observed values, on a recent monograph published at International Agency for Research on Cancer and on the GLOBOCAN 2008 database for estimations. For all tumor sites analyzed, the incidence is lower in these countries than in developed countries of Europe, North America, and Japan. The 5-year relative survival from digestive cancer is also lower. In developing countries, there is room for prevention of cancer burden through lifestyle interventions and through improved early detection of cancer.

  18. Overall Survival Benefit From Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Organ-Confined, Margin-Positive Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, Robert O.; Hafer, Russell; Cox, Craig; McClure, Stephanie E.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Radical prostatectomy for invasive prostate cancer is associated with positive margin rates in 10% to 50% of resected specimens. Postoperative radiation therapy may benefit patients who have organ-confined prostate cancer with positive margins. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis to examine whether adjunctive radiation therapy enhanced long-term survival for prostate cancer patients who underwent prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer but with positive margins. We used the Hoag Cancer Center database to identify patients diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer. Relative and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Among 1,474 patients diagnosed with localized invasive prostate cancer during the years 1990 to 2006 and undergoing prostatectomy, 113 (7.7%) were identified who had positive margins and did not have local extension of disease, positive lymph nodes, or distant metastases. A total of 17 patients received adjunctive radiation therapy (Group A), whereas 96 did not (Group B; 3 received hormonal therapy). Both groups had a median age of 64 years and median follow-up of 7.5 years. In Group A, no patients have died as of last follow-up, but in Group B, 18 have died. Estimated 10-year and 15-year overall survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 85% and 57% respectively for Group B (p{sub 2} = 0.050, log rank). Relative 10- and 15 year survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 100% and 79% respectively for Group B. Conclusions: This retrospective analysis suggests that prostate cancer patients with localized disease but positive margins do derive a survival benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy.

  19. Protein kinase C beta II suppresses colorectal cancer by regulating IGF-1 mediated cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Catríona M.; Phelan, James; Callender, Julia A.; Cathcart, Mary Clare; Mehigan, Brian; McCormick, Paul; Dalton, Tara; Coffey, John C.; Newton, Alexandra C.; O'sullivan, Jacintha; Kiely, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive efforts, cancer therapies directed at the Protein Kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases have failed in clinical trials. These therapies have been directed at inhibiting PKC and have, in some cases, worsened disease outcome. Here we examine colon cancer patients and show not only that PKC Beta II is a tumour suppressor, but patients with low levels of this isozyme have significantly decreased disease free survival. Specifically, analysis of gene expression levels of all PKC genes in matched normal and cancer tissue samples from colon cancer patients revealed a striking down-regulation of the gene coding PKC Beta in the cancer tissue (n = 21). Tissue microarray analysis revealed a dramatic down-regulation of PKC Beta II protein levels in both the epithelial and stromal diseased tissue (n = 166). Of clinical significance, low levels of the protein in the normal tissue of patients is associated with a low (10%) 10 year survival compared with a much higher (60%) survival in patients with relatively high levels of the protein. Consistent with PKC Beta II levels protecting against colon cancer, overexpression of PKC Beta II in colon cancer cell lines reveals that PKC Beta II reverses transformation in cell based assays. Further to this, activation of PKC Beta II results in a dramatic downregulation of IGF-I-induced AKT, indicating a role for PKCs in regulating IGF-1 mediated cell survival. Thus, PKC Beta II is a tumour suppressor in colon cancer and low levels serve as a predictor for poor survival outcome. PMID:26989024

  20. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts at diagnosis are associated with overall survival of pancreatic cancer: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuanyuan; Xie, Zhihui; Shao, Zhenyi; Chen, Wen; Xie, Hua; Qin, Guoyou; Zhao, Naiqing

    2016-10-01

    Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been found to be significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (PC) survival. However, no existing studies discussed the association between neutrophil count, lymphocyte count, and PC survival jointly. In this study, we aimed to analyze the influence of neutrophil and lymphocyte counts measured at disease diagnosis on the overall survival (OS) of PC. A total of 288 PC patients diagnosed between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2013, were retrospectively selected from a population-based electronic inpatients database. Multivariate Cox model and restricted cubic spline (RCS) were used to estimate the associations between neutrophil count, lymphocyte count, and OS of PC. We found that a decreased lymphocyte count at diagnosis was significantly associated with OS of PC: for PC patients whose lymphocyte counts were less than 1.5 × 10/L, the hazard ratio (HR) was 1.82 (95% confidence interval: 1.37-2.40). Although abnormally increased baseline neutrophil count in general was not associated with OS of PC, RCS found a prominently deteriorated survival for PC patients whose baseline neutrophil counts were close to the cutoff point (7.0 × 10/L). Our study results indicate that neutrophil and lymphocyte counts at diagnosis may have prognostic relevance in PC survival, especially lymphocyte count. The clinical significance of neutrophil inhibition and lymphocyte promotion treatments in PC patients should be further discussed.

  1. Assessing the impact of climate variation on survival in vertebrate populations.

    PubMed

    Grosbois, V; Gimenez, O; Gaillard, J M; Pradel, R; Barbraud, C; Clobert, J; Møller, A P; Weimerskirch, H

    2008-08-01

    The impact of the ongoing rapid climate change on natural systems is a major issue for human societies. An important challenge for ecologists is to identify the climatic factors that drive temporal variation in demographic parameters, and, ultimately, the dynamics of natural populations. The analysis of long-term monitoring data at the individual scale is often the only available approach to estimate reliably demographic parameters of vertebrate populations. We review statistical procedures used in these analyses to study links between climatic factors and survival variation in vertebrate populations. We evaluated the efficiency of various statistical procedures from an analysis of survival in a population of white stork, Ciconia ciconia, a simulation study and a critical review of 78 papers published in the ecological literature. We identified six potential methodological problems: (i) the use of statistical models that are not well-suited to the analysis of long-term monitoring data collected at the individual scale; (ii) low ratios of number of statistical units to number of candidate climatic covariates; (iii) collinearity among candidate climatic covariates; (iv) the use of statistics, to assess statistical support for climatic covariates effects, that deal poorly with unexplained variation in survival; (v) spurious detection of effects due to the co-occurrence of trends in survival and the climatic covariate time series; and (vi) assessment of the magnitude of climatic effects on survival using measures that cannot be compared across case studies. The critical review of the ecological literature revealed that five of these six methodological problems were often poorly tackled. As a consequence we concluded that many of these studies generated hypotheses but only few provided solid evidence for impacts of climatic factors on survival or reliable measures of the magnitude of such impacts. We provide practical advice to solve efficiently most of the

  2. Winter fawn survival in black-tailed deer populations affected by hair loss syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bender, Louis C; Hall, P Briggs

    2004-07-01

    Overwinter fawn mortality associated with hair loss syndrome (HLS) is anecdotally thought to be important in declines of Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) populations in Washington and Oregon (USA). We determined prevalence of HLS in black-tailed deer, September and April fawn:doe ratios, and minimum overwinter survival rates of fawns for selected game management units (GMUs) in western Washington from 1999 to 2001. Prevalence of HLS ranged from 6% to 74% in fawns and 4% to 33% in does. Minimum fawn survival ranged from 0.56 to 0.83 and was unrelated to prevalence of HLS in either does (r=0.005, P=0.991) or fawns (r=-0.215, P=0.608). The prevalence of HLS in either does or fawns was also unrelated to either fall fawn:doe ratios (HLS does: r=-0.132, P=0.779; HLS fawns: r=0.130, P=0.760) or spring fawn:doe ratios (HLS does: r=-0.173, P=0.711; HLS fawns: r=-0.020, P=0.963). However, the prevalence of HLS in does and fawns was strongly related (r=0.942, P=0.002), and GMUs with high prevalence of HLS had lower deer population densities (fawns: r=-0.752, P=0.031; does: r=-0.813, P=0.026). Increased overwinter mortality of fawns because of HLS was not supported by our data. Decreased production of fawns, increased summer mortality of fawns, or both were seen in six of eight study GMU-year combinations. Observed rates of productivity and minimum fawn survival were inadequate to maintain population size in five of eight study GMU-year combinations, assuming an annual doe survival rate of 0.75. The influence of deer condition and population health on adult survival, fawn production, preweaning fawn survival, parasitism, and prevalence of HLS in both fawns and adults need to be clarified to identify what factors are limiting black-tailed deer productivity.

  3. Prostate cancer treatment and ten-year survival among group/staff HMO and fee-for-service Medicare patients.

    PubMed Central

    Potosky, A L; Merrill, R M; Riley, G F; Taplin, S H; Barlow, W; Fireman, B H; Lubitz, J D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare treatment patterns and the ten-year survival of prostate cancer patients in two large, nonprofit, group/staff HMOs to those of patients receiving care in the fee-for-service health setting. DATA SOURCES/STUDY DESIGN: A cohort of men age 65 and over diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1985 and the end of 1992 and followed through 1994. Subjects (n = 21,741) were ascertained by two population-based tumor registries covering the greater San Francisco-Oakland and Seattle-Puget Sound areas. Linkage of registry data with Medicare claims data and with HMO inpatient utilization data allowed the determination of health plan enrollment and the measurement of comorbid conditions. Multivariate regression models were used to examine HMO versus FFS treatment and survival differences adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Among cases with non-metastatic prostate cancer, HMO patients were more likely than FFS patients to receive aggressive therapy (either prostatectomy or radiation) in San Francisco-Oakland (odds ratio [OR] = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.46-1.96) but not in Seattle (OR = 1.15, 0.93-1.43). Among men receiving aggressive therapy, HMO cases were three to five times more likely to receive radiation therapy than prostatectomy. Overall mortality was equivalent over ten years (HMO versus FFS mortality risk ratio [RR] = 1.01, 0.94-1.08), but prostate cancer mortality was higher for HMO cases than for FFS cases (RR = 1.25, 1.13-1.39). CONCLUSION: Despite marked treatment differences for clinically localized prostate cancer, overall ten-year survival for patients enrolled in two nonprofit group/staff HMOs was equivalent to survival among patients receiving care in the FFS setting, even after adjustment for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Similar overall but better prostate cancer-specific survival among FFS patients is most plausibly explained by differences between the HMO and FFS patients in both tumor

  4. TRIM28 multi-domain protein regulates cancer stem cell population in breast tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Czerwińska, Patrycja; Shah, Parantu K.; Tomczak, Katarzyna; Klimczak, Marta; Mazurek, Sylwia; Sozańska, Barbara; Biecek, Przemysław; Korski, Konstanty; Filas, Violetta; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Andersen, Jannik N.; Wiznerowicz, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    The expression of Tripartite motif-containing protein 28 (TRIM28)/Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-associated protein 1 (KAP1), is elevated in at least 14 tumor types, including solid and hematopoietic tumors. High level of TRIM28 is associated with triple-negative subtype of breast cancer (TNBC), which shows higher aggressiveness and lower survival rates. Interestingly, TRIM28 is essential for maintaining the pluripotent phenotype in embryonic stem cells. Following on that finding, we evaluated the role of TRIM28 protein in the regulation of breast cancer stem cells (CSC) populations and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of TRIM28 expression in xenografts led to deceased expression of pluripotency and mesenchymal markers, as well as inhibition of signaling pathways involved in the complex mechanism of CSC maintenance. Moreover, TRIM28 depletion reduced the ability of cancer cells to induce tumor growth when subcutaneously injected in limiting dilutions. Our data demonstrate that the downregulation of TRIM28 gene expression reduced the ability of CSCs to self-renew that resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth. Loss of function of TRIM28 leads to dysregulation of cell cycle, cellular response to stress, cancer cell metabolism, and inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. All these mechanisms directly regulate maintenance of CSC population. Our original results revealed the role of the TRIM28 in regulating the CSC population in breast cancer. These findings may pave the way to novel and more effective therapies targeting cancer stem cells in breast tumors. PMID:27845900

  5. Gene signatures of drug resistance predict patient survival in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y; Zhou, J; Tong, Y

    2015-01-01

    Different combinations of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin, irinotecan and other newly developed agents have been used to treat colorectal cancer. Despite the advent of new treatment regimens, the 5-year survival rate for metastatic colorectal cancer remains low (~10%). Knowing the drug sensitivity of a given tumor for a particular agent could significantly impact decision making and treatment planning. Biomarkers are proven to be successful in characterizing patients into different response groups. Using survival prediction analysis, we have identified three independent gene signatures, which are associated with sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to 5-FU, oxaliplatin or irinotecan. On the basis of the three gene signatures, three score systems were developed to stratify patients from sensitive to resistance. These score systems exhibited robustness in stratify patients in two independent clinical studies. Patients with high scores in all three drugs exhibited the lowest survival. PMID:25179828

  6. Recruitment of a Population-Based Sample of Young Black Women with Breast Cancer through a State Cancer Registry.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Devon; Cragun, Deborah; Reynolds, Monique; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Pal, Tuya

    2016-01-01

    Given that Black women remain underrepresented in clinical research studies, we sought to recruit a population-based sample of young Black women with breast cancer through a state cancer registry. Demographic and clinical information on all Black women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer at or below age 50 between 2009 and 2012 in Florida was obtained through the state cancer registry. Survivors were invited to participate in the study through state-mandated recruitment methods. Participant demographic and clinical characteristics were compared using Chi-squared tests for categorical variables and the two sample t-test for continuous variables to identify differences between: (i) consented participants versus all other eligible; and (ii) living versus deceased. Of the 1,647 young Black women with breast cancer, mean age at diagnosis was 42.5, with the majority having localized or regional disease, unmarried, privately insured, and employed. There were no significant differences in demographic and clinical variables between the 456 consented study participants versus the remaining 1,191 presumed eligible individuals. Compared to potential participants, women determined to be deceased prior to recruitment (n = 182) were significantly more likely to have distant disease and a triple-negative phenotype. They were also significantly more likely to be unemployed, and uninsured or have public insurance (i.e., Medicaid or Medicare). Our results demonstrate that recruitment of a population-based sample of breast cancer survivors through a state cancer registry is a feasible strategy in this underserved and underrepresented population. However, survival bias, which was observed due to the lag time between diagnosis and recruitment, is important to adjust for when generalizing findings to all young Black breast cancer patients.

  7. Survival and population size of a resident bird species are declining as temperature increases.

    PubMed

    Santisteban, Leonard; Benkman, Craig W; Fetz, Trevor; Smith, Julie W

    2012-03-01

    1. A large number of migratory bird species appear to be declining as the result of climate change, but whether resident bird species have or will be adversely affected by climate change is less clear. We focus on the South Hills crossbill (Loxia curvirostra complex), which is endemic to about 70 km(2) of Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta latifolia) forest in southern Idaho, USA. 2. Our results indicate that the South Hills crossbill has declined by over 60% between 2003 and 2008, and that decreasing adult survival drives this population decline. 3. We evaluated the relative support for multiple hypotheses linking crossbill survival to climate, an ectoparasitic mite (scaly-leg mites Knemidokoptes jamaicensis), and the recent emergence of West Nile virus. Changes in adult apparent survival rate were closely associated with average spring and annual temperatures, and with high temperatures (≥32 °C) during summer, which have increased during the last decade. In contrast, there was little evidence that scaly-leg mites or West Nile virus contributed to recent declines in adult survival. 4. The most probable mechanism causing the decline in adult survival and population size is a decrease in the availability of their primary food resource, seeds in serotinous pine cones. Cone production has declined with increasing annual temperatures, and these cones appear to be prematurely opening owing to increasingly hot summer conditions releasing their seeds and reducing the carrying capacity for crossbills later in the year. 5. In light of regional climate change forecasts, which include an increase in both annual temperature and hot days (>32 °C), and the likely disappearance of lodgepole pine from southern Idaho by the end of this century, additional research is needed to determine how to maintain lodgepole pine forests and their supply of seeds to conserve one of the few bird species endemic to the continental United States.

  8. Addressing Cancer Disparities Among American Indian and Alaska Native Populations

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer disparities and health equity research is a critical part of NCI’s research portfolio. The three researchers featured in this video receive funding from NCI to conduct research among American Indian and Alaska Native populations.