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Sample records for cancer survival population

  1. Cancer survival in adult patients in Spain. Results from nine population-based cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Chirlaque, M D; Salmerón, D; Galceran, J; Ameijide, A; Mateos, A; Torrella, A; Jiménez, R; Larrañaga, N; Marcos-Gragera, R; Ardanaz, E; Sant, M; Minicozzi, P; Navarro, C; Sánchez, M J

    2017-07-17

    With the aim of providing cancer control indicators, this work presents cancer survival in adult (≥15 years) patients in Spain diagnosed during the period 2000-2007 from Spanish cancer registries participating in the EUROCARE project. Cancer cases from nine Spanish population-based cancer registries were included and analysed as a whole. All primary malignant neoplasms diagnosed in adult patients were eligible for the analysis. Cancer patients were followed until 31 December 2008. For each type of cancer, 1-, 3- and 5-year observed and relative survival were estimated by sex, age and years from diagnosis. Furthermore, age-standardized 5-year relative survival for the period 2000-2007 has been compared with that of the period 1995-1999. Skin melanoma (84.6 95% CI 83.0-86.2), prostate (84.6% 95% CI 83.6-85.6) and thyroid (84.2% CI 95% 82.0-86.6) cancers showed the highest 5-year relative survival, whereas the worst prognosis was observed in pancreatic (6% 95% CI 5.1-7.0) and oesophageal (9.4% 95% CI 7.9-11.1) cancers. Overall, survival is higher in women (58.0%) than in men (48.9%). The absolute difference in relative survival between 2000-2007 and 1995-1999 was positive for all cancers as a whole (+4.8% in men, +1.6% in women) and for most types of tumours. Survival increased significantly for chronic myeloid leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rectum cancer in both sexes, and for acute lymphoid leukaemia, prostate, liver and colon cancers in men and Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer in women. Survival patterns by age were similar in Europe and Spain. A decline in survival by age was observed in all tumours, being more pronounced for ovarian, corpus uteri, prostate and urinary bladder and less for head and neck and rectum cancers. High variability and differences have been observed in survival among adults in Spain according to the type of cancer diagnosed, from above 84% to below 10%, reflecting high heterogeneity. The differences in prognosis by age, sex

  2. Estimating the personal cure rate of cancer patients using population-based grouped cancer survival data.

    PubMed

    Binbing Yu; Tiwari, Ram C; Feuer, Eric J

    2011-06-01

    Cancer patients are subject to multiple competing risks of death and may die from causes other than the cancer diagnosed. The probability of not dying from the cancer diagnosed, which is one of the patients' main concerns, is sometimes called the 'personal cure' rate. Two approaches of modelling competing-risk survival data, namely the cause-specific hazards approach and the mixture model approach, have been used to model competing-risk survival data. In this article, we first show the connection and differences between crude cause-specific survival in the presence of other causes and net survival in the absence of other causes. The mixture survival model is extended to population-based grouped survival data to estimate the personal cure rate. Using the colorectal cancer survival data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Programme, we estimate the probabilities of dying from colorectal cancer, heart disease, and other causes by age at diagnosis, race and American Joint Committee on Cancer stage.

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Therapy-induced Cancer Drug Resistance: Connecting Cancer Mechanisms to Population Survival Rates

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Bao, Jiguang; Shao, Yongzhao

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance significantly limits the long-term effectiveness of targeted therapeutics for cancer patients. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that cancer cell heterogeneity and microenvironment adaptations to targeted therapy play important roles in promoting the rapid acquisition of drug resistance and in increasing cancer metastasis. The systematic development of effective therapeutics to overcome drug resistance mechanisms poses a major challenge. In this study, we used a modeling approach to connect cellular mechanisms underlying cancer drug resistance to population-level patient survival. To predict progression-free survival in cancer patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a set of stochastic differential equations to describe the dynamics of heterogeneous cell populations while taking into account micro-environment adaptations. Clinical data on survival and circulating tumor cell DNA (ctDNA) concentrations were used to confirm the effectiveness of our model. Moreover, our model predicted distinct patterns of dose-dependent synergy when evaluating a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors versus a combination of BRAF and PI3K inhibitors. These predictions were consistent with the findings in previously reported studies. The impact of the drug metabolism rate on patient survival was also discussed. The proposed model might facilitate the quantitative evaluation and optimization of combination therapeutics and cancer clinical trial design. PMID:26928089

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Therapy-induced Cancer Drug Resistance: Connecting Cancer Mechanisms to Population Survival Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Bao, Jiguang; Shao, Yongzhao

    2016-03-01

    Drug resistance significantly limits the long-term effectiveness of targeted therapeutics for cancer patients. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that cancer cell heterogeneity and microenvironment adaptations to targeted therapy play important roles in promoting the rapid acquisition of drug resistance and in increasing cancer metastasis. The systematic development of effective therapeutics to overcome drug resistance mechanisms poses a major challenge. In this study, we used a modeling approach to connect cellular mechanisms underlying cancer drug resistance to population-level patient survival. To predict progression-free survival in cancer patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a set of stochastic differential equations to describe the dynamics of heterogeneous cell populations while taking into account micro-environment adaptations. Clinical data on survival and circulating tumor cell DNA (ctDNA) concentrations were used to confirm the effectiveness of our model. Moreover, our model predicted distinct patterns of dose-dependent synergy when evaluating a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors versus a combination of BRAF and PI3K inhibitors. These predictions were consistent with the findings in previously reported studies. The impact of the drug metabolism rate on patient survival was also discussed. The proposed model might facilitate the quantitative evaluation and optimization of combination therapeutics and cancer clinical trial design.

  5. Mathematical Modeling of Therapy-induced Cancer Drug Resistance: Connecting Cancer Mechanisms to Population Survival Rates.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Bao, Jiguang; Shao, Yongzhao

    2016-03-01

    Drug resistance significantly limits the long-term effectiveness of targeted therapeutics for cancer patients. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that cancer cell heterogeneity and microenvironment adaptations to targeted therapy play important roles in promoting the rapid acquisition of drug resistance and in increasing cancer metastasis. The systematic development of effective therapeutics to overcome drug resistance mechanisms poses a major challenge. In this study, we used a modeling approach to connect cellular mechanisms underlying cancer drug resistance to population-level patient survival. To predict progression-free survival in cancer patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a set of stochastic differential equations to describe the dynamics of heterogeneous cell populations while taking into account micro-environment adaptations. Clinical data on survival and circulating tumor cell DNA (ctDNA) concentrations were used to confirm the effectiveness of our model. Moreover, our model predicted distinct patterns of dose-dependent synergy when evaluating a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors versus a combination of BRAF and PI3K inhibitors. These predictions were consistent with the findings in previously reported studies. The impact of the drug metabolism rate on patient survival was also discussed. The proposed model might facilitate the quantitative evaluation and optimization of combination therapeutics and cancer clinical trial design.

  6. Cancer survival in Africa, Asia, and Central America: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Brenner, Hermann; Chen, Kexin; Chia, Kee Seng; Chen, Jian Guo; Law, Stephen C K; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Xiang, Yong Bing; Yeole, Balakrishna B; Shin, Hai Rim; Shanta, Viswanathan; Woo, Ze Hong; Martin, Nimit; Sumitsawan, Yupa; Sriplung, Hutcha; Barboza, Adolfo Ortiz; Eser, Sultan; Nene, Bhagwan M; Suwanrungruang, Krittika; Jayalekshmi, Padmavathiamma; Dikshit, Rajesh; Wabinga, Henry; Esteban, Divina B; Laudico, Adriano; Bhurgri, Yasmin; Bah, Ebrima; Al-Hamdan, Nasser

    2010-02-01

    Population-based cancer survival data, a key indicator for monitoring progress against cancer, are not widely available from countries in Africa, Asia, and Central America. The aim of this study is to describe and discuss cancer survival in these regions. Survival analysis was done for 341 658 patients diagnosed with various cancers from 1990 to 2001 and followed up to 2003, from 25 population-based cancer registries in 12 countries in sub-Saharan Africa (The Gambia, Uganda), Central America (Costa Rica), and Asia (China, India, Pakistan, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Turkey). 5-year age-standardised relative survival (ASRS) and observed survival by clinical extent of disease were determined. For cancers in which prognosis depends on stage at diagnosis, survival was highest in China, South Korea, Singapore, and Turkey and lowest in Uganda and The Gambia. 5-year ASRS ranged from 76-82% for breast cancer, 63-79% for cervical cancer, 71-78% for bladder cancer, and 44-60% for large-bowel cancers in China, Singapore, South Korea, and Turkey. Survival did not exceed 22% for any cancer site in The Gambia; in Uganda, survival did not exceed 13% for any cancer site except breast (46%). Variations in survival correlated with early detection initiatives and level of development of health services. The wide variation in cancer survival between regions emphasises the need for urgent investments in improving awareness, population-based cancer registration, early detection programmes, health-services infrastructure, and human resources. Association for International Cancer Research (AICR; St Andrews, UK), Association pour la Recherche sur le Cancer (ARC, Villejuif, France), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (Seattle, USA). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cancer survival in Qidong between 1972 and 2011: A population-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Guo; Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Zhang, Yi-Xin; Yao, Deng-Fu; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Lu, Jian-Hua; Ding, Lu-Lu; Chen, Hai-Zhen; Zhu, Chao-Yong; Yang, Li-Ping; Zhu, Yuan-Rong; Qiang, Fu-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Population-based cancer survival is an improved index for evaluating the overall efficiency of cancer health services in a given region. The current study analysed the observed survival and relative survival of leading cancer sites from a population-based cancer registry between 1972 and 2011 in Qidong, China. A total of 92,780 incident cases with cancer were registered and followed-up for survival status. The main sites of the cancer types, based on the rank order of incidence, were the liver, stomach, lung, colon and rectum, oesophagus, breast, pancreas, leukaemia, brain and central nervous system (B and CNS), bladder, blood [non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL)] and cervix. For all malignancies combined, the 5-year observed survival was 13.18% and the relative survival was 15.80%. Females had higher observed survival and relative survival (19.32 and 22.71%, respectively) compared with males (9.63 and 11.68%, respectively). The cancer sites with the highest five-year relative survival rates were the female breast, bladder, cervix and colon and rectum; followed by NHL, stomach, B and CNS cancer and leukaemia. The poorest survival rates were cancers of oesophagus, lung, pancreas and liver. Higher survival rates were observed in younger patients compared with older patients. Cancers of the oesophagus, female breast and bladder were associated with higher survival in middle-aged groups. Improved survival rates in the most recent two 5-year calendar periods were identified for stomach, lung, colon and rectum, oesophagus, female breast and bladder cancer, as well as leukaemia and NHL. The observations of the current study provide the opportunity for evaluation of the survival outcomes of frequent cancer sites that reflects the changes and improvement in a rural area in China. PMID:28588795

  8. Population-based survival from cancers of breast, cervix and ovary in women in Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Yeole, Balkrishna Bhika; Kumar, A Venkata Ramana; Kurkure, Arun; Sunny, Lizzy

    2004-01-01

    Breast, cervix and ovarian cancers contribute more than 45% of the total in women in Mumbai and survival proportions for these neoplasms are very high in most developed populations in the World. The authors here report and discuss the population-based survival for these cancers in Mumbai, India. Follow-up information on 4865 cancers of breast, cervix and ovary, registered in the Mumbai Population Based Cancer Registry for the period 1992-1994 was obtained by a variety of methods, including matching with death certificates from the Mumbai vital statistics registration system, postal/telephone enquiries, home visits and scrutiny of medical records. The survival for each case was determined as the duration between the date of diagnosis and date of death, date of loss to follow-up or the closing date of the study (December 31(st), 1999). Cumulative observed and relative survival was calculated by the Hakulinen Method. For comparison of results with other populations, age-standardized relative survival (ASRS) was calculated by directly standardizing age specific relative survival to the specific age distributions of the estimated global incidence of major cancers in 1985. The log rank test was used in univariate analysis to identify the potentially important prognostic variables. The variables showing statistical significance in univariate analysis were introduced stepwise into a Cox Regression model to identify the independent predictors of survival. The 5-year relative survival rates were 46.2% for breast, 47.7% for the cervix and 25.4% for the ovary. Higher survival was observed for those younger than 35 years for all these three sites. For each, survival declined with advancing age. Single patients who remained unmarried had better survival. For all sites Muslims had a better and Christians a lower survival as compared to Hindus. Education did not appear to be of significance. Survival decreased rapidly with advancing clinical extent of disease for all sites. With

  9. Full dates (day, month, year) should be used in population-based cancer survival studies.

    PubMed

    Woods, Laura M; Rachet, Bernard; Ellis, Libby; Coleman, Michel P

    2012-10-01

    Accurate survival estimates are essential for monitoring cancer survival trends, for health care planning and for resource allocation. To obtain precise estimates of survival, full dates (day, month and year) rather than partial dates (month and year) are required. In some jurisdictions, however, cancer registries are constrained from providing full dates on the grounds of confidentiality. The bias resulting from the use of partial dates in the estimation and comparison of survival makes it impossible to determine precisely the differences in the risk of death from cancer between population groups or in successive calendar periods. Important operational arguments also exist against the use of incomplete dates for survival analysis, including increased workload for cancer registry staff and the introduction of avoidable complexity for quality control of survival data. Cancer survival is one of the most widely known outputs produced by population-based cancer registries, and it is a crucial metric for the comparative effectiveness of health services. The bodies that set data access guidelines must take a more balanced view of the risks and benefits of using full dates for the estimation of cancer survival.

  10. Partitioning of excess mortality in population-based cancer patient survival studies using flexible parametric survival models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Relative survival is commonly used for studying survival of cancer patients as it captures both the direct and indirect contribution of a cancer diagnosis on mortality by comparing the observed survival of the patients to the expected survival in a comparable cancer-free population. However, existing methods do not allow estimation of the impact of isolated conditions (e.g., excess cardiovascular mortality) on the total excess mortality. For this purpose we extend flexible parametric survival models for relative survival, which use restricted cubic splines for the baseline cumulative excess hazard and for any time-dependent effects. Methods In the extended model we partition the excess mortality associated with a diagnosis of cancer through estimating a separate baseline excess hazard function for the outcomes under investigation. This is done by incorporating mutually exclusive background mortality rates, stratified by the underlying causes of death reported in the Swedish population, and by introducing cause of death as a time-dependent effect in the extended model. This approach thereby enables modeling of temporal trends in e.g., excess cardiovascular mortality and remaining cancer excess mortality simultaneously. Furthermore, we illustrate how the results from the proposed model can be used to derive crude probabilities of death due to the component parts, i.e., probabilities estimated in the presence of competing causes of death. Results The method is illustrated with examples where the total excess mortality experienced by patients diagnosed with breast cancer is partitioned into excess cardiovascular mortality and remaining cancer excess mortality. Conclusions The proposed method can be used to simultaneously study disease patterns and temporal trends for various causes of cancer-consequent deaths. Such information should be of interest for patients and clinicians as one way of improving prognosis after cancer is through adapting treatment

  11. Conditional survival estimates for childhood cancer in Australia, 2002-2011: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Youlden, Danny R; Baade, Peter D; Hallahan, Andrew R; Valery, Patricia C; Green, Adèle C; Aitken, Joanne F

    2015-06-01

    Conditional survival estimates take into account the time that a patient has remained alive following diagnosis to provide a realistic perspective on the probability of longer term survival. Such estimates are scarce for childhood cancer, particularly by age at diagnosis or stage of cancer. De-identified population-based data were obtained from the Australian Paediatric Cancer Registry for children aged 0-14 years diagnosed with cancer between 1983 and 2010. Mortality status was followed up to the end of 2011. The hybrid period method was used to calculate relative survival estimates for those who were at risk during the period 2002-2011. Conditional survival stratified by diagnostic group or subgroup, age and stage at diagnosis was then obtained from the ratio of the relative survival estimates at different time points. A total of 13,537 children were eligible for inclusion. Five-year survival for all childhood cancers combined improved from 82% at diagnosis (95% confidence interval=81-83%) to 89% (88-90%) conditional on surviving one year, and 97% (97-98%) conditional on surviving five years after diagnosis. Conditional survival reached 95% within five years of diagnosis for nearly all types of cancer, regardless of a child's age or stage at diagnosis. Most children diagnosed with cancer who are alive five years after diagnosis can anticipate similar survival to children in the general population. This information may help alleviate some of the distress associated with childhood cancer, particularly for those with an initially poor prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Survival rate of breast cancer patients in Malaysia: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Nor Aini; Wan Mahiyuddin, Wan Rozita; Muhammad, Nor Asiah; Ali, Zainudin Mohamad; Ibrahim, Lailanor; Ibrahim Tamim, Nor Saleha; Mustafa, Amal Nasir; Kamaluddin, Muhammad Amir

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Malaysian women. Other than hospital-based results, there are no documented population-based survival rates of Malaysian women for breast cancers. This population- based retrospective cohort study was therefore conducted. Data were obtained from Health Informatics Centre, Ministry of Health Malaysia, National Cancer Registry and National Registration Department for the period from 1st Jan 2000 to 31st December 2005. Cases were captured by ICD-10 and linked to death certificates to identify the status. Only complete data were analysed. Survival time was calculated from the estimated date of diagnosis to the date of death or date of loss to follow-up. Observed survival rates were estimated by Kaplan- Meier method using SPSS Statistical Software version 17. A total of 10,230 complete data sets were analysed. The mean age at diagnosis was 50.6 years old. The overall 5-year survival rate was 49% with median survival time of 68.1 months. Indian women had a higher survival rate of 54% compared to Chinese women (49%) and Malays (45%). The overall 5-year survival rate of breast cancer patient among Malaysian women was still low for the cohort of 2000 to 2005 as compared to survival rates in developed nations. Therefore, it is necessary to enhance the strategies for early detection and intervention.

  13. Sex differences in lung cancer survival: long-term trends using population-based cancer registry data in Osaka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Fukuaki Lee; Ito, Yuri; Morishima, Toshitaka; Miyashiro, Isao; Nakayama, Tomio

    2017-09-01

    Several studies of sex differences in lung cancer survival have been reported. However, large-size population-based studies based on long-term observation are scarce. We investigated long-term trends in sex differences in lung cancer survival using population-based cancer registry data from Osaka, Japan. We analyzed 79 330 cases from the Osaka Cancer Registry (OCR) diagnosed between 1975 and 2007. We calculated 5-year relative survival in the six periods (1975-1980, 1981-1986, 1987-1992, 1993-1997, 1998-2002 and 2003-2007). To estimate the trends in sex differences in lung cancer survival throughout the study period, we applied a multivariate excess hazard model to control for confounders. The proportion of adenocarcinoma (ADC) and 5-year relative relative survival have increased for both sexes. Sex differences in lung cancer survival have widened over the period, especially in ADC and since the late 1990s. The excess hazard ratio of death within 5 years for males was 1.19 (95% CI: 1.16-1.21), adjusting for period at diagnosis, histologic type, stage, age group and treatment. We reported that females have better prognosis in lung cancer than males and the sex differences in lung cancer survival have become wider in Osaka, Japan. This can be partly explained by the sex differences in the proportions of histologic type and stage. Further studies considering other factors that influence sex differences in lung cancer survival are needed.

  14. Cancer survival in Cali, Colombia: A population-based study, 1995-2004

    PubMed Central

    García, Luz Stella; Collazos, Paola Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is limited information on population-based cancer survival data in Latin America. Objetive: To obtain estimates of survival for some cancers recognized as a public health priority in Colombia using data from the Cancer Registry of Cali for 1995-2004. Methods: All cancer cases for residents of Cali were included for the following sites: breast (3,984), cervix uteri (2,469), prostate (3,999), stomach (3,442) and lung (2,170). Five-year relative survival estimates were calculated using the approach described by Estève. Results: Five-year relative survival was 79% in patients with prostate cancer and 68% and 60% in women with breast or cervix uteri cancer, respectively. The cure fraction was close to zero in subjects with lung cancer and less than 10% in those with stomach cancer. The probability of dying from breast or prostate cancer in people in the lower socio-economic strata (SES) was 1.8 and 2.6 times, respectively, when compared to upper SES, p <0.001. Excess mortality associated with cancer was independent of age in prostate or breast cancer. After adjusting for age, sex and SES, the risk of dying from breast, cervix uteri, prostate and lung cancer during the 2000-2004 period decreased 19%, 13%, 48% and 16%, respectively, when compared with the period of 1995-1999. There was no change in the prognosis for patients with stomach cancer. Conclusions: Survival for some kinds of cancer improved through the 1995-2004 period, however health care programs for cancer patients in Cali are inequitable. People from lower SES are the most vulnerable and the least likely to survive. PMID:25386036

  15. Improved Estimates of Cancer-Specific Survival Rates From Population-Based Data

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Lynn A. G.; Mariotto, Angela B.; Reichman, Marsha E.; Ruhl, Jennifer; Cronin, Kathleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Accurate estimates of cancer survival are important for assessing optimal patient care and prognosis. Evaluation of these estimates via relative survival (a ratio of observed and expected survival rates) requires a population life table that is matched to the cancer population by age, sex, race and/or ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and ideally risk factors for the cancer under examination. Because life tables for all subgroups in a study may be unavailable, we investigated whether cause-specific survival could be used as an alternative for relative survival. Methods We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program for 2 330 905 cancer patients from January 1, 1992, through December 31, 2004. We defined cancer-specific deaths according to the following variables: cause of death, only one tumor or the first of multiple tumors, site of the original cancer diagnosis, and comorbidities. Estimates of relative survival and cause-specific survival that were derived by use of an actuarial method were compared. Results Among breast cancer patients who were white, black, or of Asian or Pacific Islander descent and who were older than 65 years, estimates of 5-year relative survival (107.5%, 106.6%, and 103.0%, respectively) were higher than estimates of 5-year cause-specific survival (98.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 98.4% to 98.8%; 97.4%, 95% CI = 96.2% to 98.2%; and 99.2%, 95% CI = 98.4%, 99.6%, respectively). Relative survival methods likely underestimated rates for cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx (eg, for white cancer patients aged ≥65 years, relative survival = 54.2%, 95% CI = 53.1% to 55.3%, and cause-specific survival = 60.1%, 95% CI = 59.1% to 60.9%) and the lung and bronchus (eg, for black cancer patients aged ≥65 years, relative survival = 10.5%, 95% CI = 9.9% to 11.2%, and cause-specific survival = 11.9%, 95% CI = 11.2 % to 12.6%), largely because of mismatches between the population with these diseases and

  16. Childhood cancer survival in Finland (1953-2010): a nation-wide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Madanat-Harjuoja, L M; Pokhrel, A; Kivivuori, S M; Saarinen-Pihkala, U M

    2014-11-01

    Population based survival studies are critical in monitoring changes in anticancer therapy, evaluating effectiveness of new treatments as well as identifying possibilities for further improvement. The previous report on cancer survival in Finland covered patients diagnosed in 1953-1995. Data on survival in the European and Nordic pediatric populations have been published with follow-up ending in 2002. We describe population-based survival of childhood cancer patients (n = 8270, age 0-14 years) in Finland overall and by disease category with follow-up extending from 1953 to 2010 and focusing on the modern treatment era. Data were collected from the Finnish Cancer Registry. Age-standardised observed survival proportions (rates) were calculated using the actuarial (or life-table) method. Trends in observed survival rates were studied over six diagnostic periods: 1953-1960, 1961-1970, 1971-1980, 1981-1990, 1991-2000 and 2001-2010. The overall 5-year survival reached 82.1% (95% CI 80.0-84.2) in the most recent period. In most diagnostic categories, the biggest leap in survival was seen between 1961-1970 and 1981-1990, after which slight improvements occurred between 1981-1990 and 1991-2000, with no significant increase thereafter. In analyses by diagnostic group, positive trends in survival over the last three decades were seen for leukemia (p = 0.000), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (p = 0.002) and CNS tumours (p = 0.02). Although survival of childhood cancer patients overall has significantly improved from 1953 to 2000, improvement thereafter has been marginal. Future treatment efforts should be directed at bone tumours, soft-tissue sarcoma, neuroblastoma and malignant brain tumours as well as high-risk leukemia.

  17. Survival of solid cancer patients in France, 1989-2013: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Cowppli-Bony, Anne; Uhry, Zoé; Remontet, Laurent; Voirin, Nicolas; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Trétarre, Brigitte; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Colonna, Marc; Bossard, Nadine; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Grosclaude, Pascale

    2017-11-01

    This study provides updates of net survival (NS) estimates at 5, 10, and 15 years as well as survival trends for 35 solid cancers in France using data from 19 population-based cancer registries. The study considered all cases of solid cancer diagnosed between 1989 and 2010 in patients older than 15 years of age who were actively followed up until 30 June 2013. NS was estimated using the Pohar-Perme method. The age-standardized NS used the international cancer survival standard weights. The 5-year age-standardized NSs ranged from 4% (pleural mesothelioma) to 93% (prostate) in men and from 10% (pancreas) to 97% (thyroid) in women. The 10-year age-standardized NSs ranged from 2% (pleural mesothelioma) in both sexes to 95% (testis) in men and 91% (thyroid) in women. The most frequent cancers (namely, breast and prostate cancers) had the highest NSs: 87 and 93% at 5 years and 78 and 84% at 10 years, respectively. Several cancers (especially lung, pancreas, and liver cancer) had very poor prognoses (5-year NSs under 20%). Fifteen-year NSs remained high for testis cancer. In most cancers, 5- and 10-year age-standardized NSs increased between 1989 and 2010. Advanced age was associated with a poor prognosis and little improvement in survival. The increases in cancer survival are probably related to earlier diagnosis and therapeutic advances over the last decade. However, poor prognoses are still found in some alcohol-related and tobacco-related cancers and in elderly patients, highlighting the need for more prevention, diagnosis, and treatment efforts.

  18. Predictors of Colorectal Cancer Survival in Golestan, Iran: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Aryaie, Mohammad; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Semnani, Shahryar; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Aarabi, Mohsen; Vakili, Mohammad Ali; Kazemnejhad, Vahideh; Sedaghat, Seyed Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We aimed to investigate factors associated with colorectal cancer survival in Golestan, Iran. METHODS We used a population based cancer registry to recruit study subjects. All patients registered since 2004 were contacted and data were collected using structured questionnaires and trained interviewers. All the existing evidences to determine the stage of the cancer were also collected. The time from first diagnosis to death was compared in patients according to their stage of cancer using the Kaplan-Meir method. A Cox proportional hazard model was built to examine their survival experience by taking into account other covariates. RESULTS Out of a total of 345 subjects, 227 were traced. Median age of the subjects was 54 and more than 42% were under 50 years old. We found 132 deaths among these patients, 5 of which were non-colorectal related deaths. The median survival time for the entire cohort was 3.56 years. A borderline significant difference in survival experience was detected for ethnicity (log rank test, p=0.053). Using Cox proportional hazard modeling, only cancer stage remained significantly associated with time of death in the final model. CONCLUSIONS Colorectal cancer occurs at a younger age among people living in Golestan province. A very young age at presentation and what appears to be a high proportion of patients presenting with late stage in this area suggest this population might benefit substantially from early diagnoses by introducing age adapted screening programs. PMID:23807907

  19. Medication use and survival in diabetic patients with kidney cancer: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nayan, Madhur; Macdonald, Erin M; Juurlink, David N; Austin, Peter C; Finelli, Antonio; Kulkarni, Girish S; Hamilton, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Survival rates in kidney cancer have improved little over time, and diabetes may be an independent risk factor for poor survival in kidney cancer. We sought to determine whether medications with putative anti-neoplastic properties (statins, metformin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)) are associated with survival in diabetics with kidney cancer. We conducted a population-based cohort study utilizing linked healthcare databases in Ontario, Canada. Patients were aged 66 or older with newly diagnosed diabetes and a subsequent diagnosis of incident kidney cancer. Receipt of metformin, statins or NSAIDs was defined using prescription claims. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality and the secondary outcome was cancer-specific mortality. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression, with medication use modeled with time-varying and cumulative exposure analyses to account for intermittent use. During the 14-year study period, we studied 613 patients. Current statin use was associated with a markedly reduced risk of death from any cause (adjusted hazard ratio 0.74; 95% CI 0.59-0.91) and death due to kidney cancer (adjusted hazard ratio 0.71; 95% CI 0.51-0.97). However, survival was not associated with current use of metformin or NSAIDs, or cumulative exposure to any of the medications studied. Among diabetic patients with kidney cancer, survival outcomes are associated with active statin use, rather than total cumulative use. These findings support the use of randomized trials to confirm whether diabetics with kidney cancer should be started on a statin at the time of cancer diagnosis to improve survival outcomes.

  20. Estimating and modeling the cure fraction in population-based cancer survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Paul C; Thompson, John R; Weston, Claire L; Dickman, Paul W

    2007-07-01

    In population-based cancer studies, cure is said to occur when the mortality (hazard) rate in the diseased group of individuals returns to the same level as that expected in the general population. The cure fraction (the proportion of patients cured of disease) is of interest to patients and is a useful measure to monitor trends in survival of curable disease. There are 2 main types of cure fraction model, the mixture cure fraction model and the non-mixture cure fraction model, with most previous work concentrating on the mixture cure fraction model. In this paper, we extend the parametric non-mixture cure fraction model to incorporate background mortality, thus providing estimates of the cure fraction in population-based cancer studies. We compare the estimates of relative survival and the cure fraction between the 2 types of model and also investigate the importance of modeling the ancillary parameters in the selected parametric distribution for both types of model.

  1. Epidemiology, Management, and Survival of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis from Colorectal Cancer: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Quere, P; Facy, O; Manfredi, S; Jooste, V; Faivre, J; Lepage, C; Bouvier, A-M

    2015-08-01

    Modern chemotherapy aims to improve long-term survival for selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Publications suggest promising results, but the spread of these new aggressive treatment strategies in the general population is not well known. The aim of this study was to draw a picture of epidemiology, management, and survival in synchronous and metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis from colorectal cancer. The cumulative risk of metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis was estimated in patients resected for cure. Net survival rates were calculated for synchronous and metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis. The study was conducted with the use of the Burgundy Digestive Cancer Registry. Overall, 9174 primary colorectal cancers registered between 1976 and 2011 by the population-based digestive cancer registry were considered. In total, 7% of patients were diagnosed with synchronous peritoneal carcinomatosis. The 5-year cumulative risk of metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis was 6%, and the stage of the colorectal cancer at diagnosis was the major risk factor. Other independent risk factors were mucinous adenocarcinoma, ulceroinfiltrating tumors, and diagnosis after obstruction or perforation. The proportion of patients resected for cure was 11% and 9% for synchronous and metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis, and 3-year overall net survival was 8% and 5%. The corresponding rates after resection for cure were 21% and 17%. There was a dramatic increase in the proportion of patients receiving systemic chemotherapy: from 11% before 1997 to 48% in 2011 for synchronous peritoneal carcinomatosis and from 3% to 38% for metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis. This is a retrospective observational population-based study. Peritoneal carcinomatosis complicating colorectal cancer is a major reason for treatment failure. This study identified patients at a high risk of developing peritoneal carcinomatosis who may benefit from specific surveillance. New therapeutic

  2. A MAP3k1 SNP Predicts Survival of Gastric Cancer in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Dongying; Shen, Lili; Wang, Meilin; Xu, Zhi; Gong, Weida; Tang, Cuiju; Gao, Jinglong; Chen, Jinfei; Zhang, Zhengdong

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have demonstrated that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) MAP3K1 rs889312 is a genetic susceptibility marker significantly associated with a risk of hormone-related tumors such as breast cancer. Considering steroid hormone-mediated signaling pathways have an important role in the progression of gastric cancer, we hypothesized that MAP3K1 rs889312 may be associated with survival outcomes in gastric cancer. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis. Methods We genotyped MAP3K1 rs889312 using TaqMan in 884 gastric cancer patients who received subtotal or total gastrectomy. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to analyze the association between MAP3K1 rs889312 genotypes and survival outcomes of gastric cancer. Results Our findings reveal that the rs889312 heterozygous AC genotype was significantly associated with an increased rate of mortality among patients with diffuse-type gastric cancer (log-rank P = 0.028 for AC versus AA/CC, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03–1.69), compared to those carrying the homozygous variant genotypes (AA/CC). Additionally, univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrate that rs889312 polymorphism was an independent risk factor for poor survival in these patients. Conclusions In conclusion, we demonstrate that MAP3K1 rs889312 is closely correlated with outcome among diffuse-type gastric cancer. This raises the possibility for rs889312 polymorphisms to be used as an independent indicator for predicting the prognosis of diffuse-type gastric cancer within the Chinese population. PMID:24759887

  3. Evidence of improving survival of patients with rectal cancer in France: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Finn-Faivre, C; Maurel, J; Benhamiche, A; Herbert, C; Mitry, E; Launoy, G; Faivre, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Over the past 20 years there have been many changes in the management of rectal cancer. Their impact on the overall population is not well known. 
AIMS—To determine trends in management and prognosis of rectal cancer in two French regions. 
SUBJECTS—1978 patients with a rectal carcinoma diagnosed between 1978 and 1993. 
METHODS—Time trends in treatment, stage at diagnosis, operative mortality, and survival were studied on a four year basis. A non-conditional logistic regression was performed to obtain an odds ratio for each period adjusted for the other variables. To estimate the independent effect of the period a multivariate relative survival analysis was performed. 
RESULTS—Over the 16 year period resection rates increased from 66.0% to 80.1%; the increase was particularly noticeable for sphincter saving procedures (+30.6% per four years, p=0.03). The percentage of patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy increased from 24.0% to 40.0% (p=0.02). The proportion of patients with Dukes' type A cancer increased from 17.7% to 30.6% with a corresponding decrease in those with more advanced disease. Operative mortality decreased by 31.1% per four years (p=0.03). All these improvements have resulted in a dramatic increase in relative survival (from 35.4% for the 1978-1981 period to 57.0% for the 1985-1989 period). 
CONCLUSIONS—Substantial advances in the management of rectal cancer have been achieved, but there is evidence that further improvements can be made in order to increase survival. 

 Keywords: rectal cancer; treatment; stage at diagnosis; survival; time trends; cancer registries PMID:10026324

  4. Incidence and survival of stomach cancer in a high-risk population of Chile

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Katy; Bertran, Enriqueta; Andia, Marcelo E; Ferreccio, Catterina

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the incidence and survival rate of stomach cancer (SC) and its associated factors in a high risk population in Chile. METHODS: The population-based cancer registry of Valdivia, included in the International Agency for Research on Cancer system, covers 356 396 residents of Valdivia Province, Southern Chile. We studied all SC cases entered in this Registry during 1998-2002 (529 cases). Population data came from the Chilean census (2002). Standardized incidence rates per 100 000 inhabitants (SIR) using the world population, cumulative risk of developing cancer before age 75, and rate ratios by sex, age, ethnicity and social factors were estimated. Relative survival (Ederer II method) and age-standardized estimates (Brenner method) were calculated. Specific survival rates (Kaplan-Meier) were measured at 3 and 5 years and survival curves were analyzed with the Logrank and Breslow tests. Survival was studied in relation to demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory results and medical management of the cases. Those variables significantly associated with survival were later included in a Cox multivariate model. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2002, 529 primary gastric cancers occurred in Valdivia (crude incidence rate 29.2 per 100 000 inhabitants). Most cases were male (69.0%), residents of urban areas (57.5%) and Hispanic (83.2%), with a low education level (84.5% < 8 school years). SC SIR was higher in men than women (40.8 and 14.8 respectively, P < 0.001), risk factors were low education RR 4.4 (95% CI: 2.9-6.8) and 1.6, (95% CI: 1.1-2.1) for women and men respectively and Mapuche ethnicity only significant for women (RR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.2-3.7). Of all cases, 76.4% were histologically confirmed, 11.5% had a death certificate only (DCO), 56.1% were TNM stage IV; 445 cases (84.1%) were eligible for survival analysis, all completed five years follow-up; 42 remained alive, 392 died of SC and 11 died from other causes. Specific 5-year survival, excluding cases

  5. Lung cancer survival in Germany: A population-based analysis of 132,612 lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Andrea; Jansen, Lina; Castro, Felipe; Krilaviciute, Agne; Luttmann, Sabine; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Nennecke, Alice; Katalinic, Alexander; Brenner, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer-related death worldwide. In Germany it accounts for 25% of cancer deaths in men, and 14% in women. The aim of this study is to provide an overview of 5-year relative survival by sex, age, histology, and tumour stage in Germany representing a population of 26.7 million people. The study is based on a pooled German dataset including data from 12 population-based cancer registries covering around one third of the German population. A total of 132,612 patients diagnosed with lung cancer from 2002 to 2010 were included in the analysis. Survival estimates for the time period 2007-2010 were calculated using period analysis. Differences in survival between sexes were tested for statistical significance by model-based period analysis (poisson regression model). The relative excess risk (RER) of death (women vs. men) was extracted from the model with the p value for the difference in RER. The overall age adjusted 5-year relative survival was 15.5% (standard error (SE) 0.2) for men and 20.3% (SE 0.3) in women. Survival differed markedly according to age (men: <60 years 18.5% vs. 80+ years 8.4% and women 23.7% vs. 10.6%, respectively), histology (largest difference between histological groups: men 25.7 and women 44.4% points) and stage (men: UICC Ia 62.9%, vs. UICC IV 4.6% and women 75.2% vs. 7.0%, respectively). Our study showed survival advantages for women compared to men, most notably in younger aged patients (RER 0.83, p<0.0001), patients with adenocarcinoma (RER 0.80, p<0.0001), and patients with lower stage cancer (RER 0.62, p<0.0001). This study presents up-to-date survival estimates for lung cancer in Germany. Compared to other European countries survival was relatively high. Women showed higher survival than men independent of age, histology and stage. The reasons for the survival differences require further clarification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Population-based Model of Local Control and Survival Benefit of Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, J; Hanna, T P; Vinod, S K; Delaney, G P; Barton, M B

    2016-10-01

    To estimate the population-based locoregional control and overall survival benefits of radiotherapy for lung cancer if the whole population were treated according to evidence-based guidelines. These estimates were based on a published radiotherapy utilisation (RTU) model that has been used to estimate the demand and planning of radiotherapy services nationally and internationally. The lung cancer RTU model was extended to incorporate an estimate of benefits of radiotherapy alone, and of radiotherapy in conjunction with concurrent chemotherapy (CRT). Benefits were defined as the proportional gains in locoregional control and overall survival from radiotherapy over no radiotherapy for radical indications, and from postoperative radiotherapy over surgery alone for adjuvant indications. A literature review (1990-2015) was conducted to identify benefit estimates of individual radiotherapy indications and summed to estimate the population-based gains for these outcomes. Model robustness was tested through univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses. If evidence-based radiotherapy recommendations are followed for the whole lung cancer population, the model estimated that radiotherapy alone would result in a gain of 8.3% (95% confidence interval 7.4-9.2%) in 5 year locoregional control, 11.4% (10.8-12.0%) in 2 year overall survival and 4.0% (3.6-4.4%) in 5 year overall survival. For the use of CRT over radiotherapy alone, estimated benefits would be: locoregional control 1.7% (0.8-2.4%), 2 year overall survival 1.7% (0.5-2.8%) and 5 year overall survival 1.2% (0.7-1.9%). The model provided estimates of radiotherapy benefit that could be achieved if treatment guidelines are followed for all cancer patients. These can be used as a benchmark so that the effects of a shortfall in the utilisation of radiotherapy can be better understood and addressed. The model can be adapted to other populations with known epidemiological parameters to ensure the planning of equitable

  7. Population-based survival-cure analysis of ER-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lan; Johnson, Karen A; Mariotto, Angela B; Dignam, James J; Feuer, Eric J

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated the trends over time in age and stage specific population-based survival of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) breast cancer patients by examining the fraction of cured patients and the median survival time for uncured patients. Cause-specific survival data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program for cases diagnosed during 1992-1998 were used in mixed survival cure models to evaluate the cure fraction and the extension in survival for uncured patients. Survival trends were compared with adjuvant chemotherapy data available from an overlapping patterns-of-care study. For stage II N+ disease, the largest increase in cure fraction was 44-60% (P = 0.0257) for women aged >or=70 in contrast to a 7-8% point increase for women aged <50 or 50-69 (P = 0.056 and 0.038, respectively). For women with stage III disease, the increases in the cure fraction were not statistically significant, although women aged 50-69 had a 10% point increase (P = 0.103). Increases in cure fraction correspond with increases in the use of adjuvant chemotherapy, particularly for the oldest age group. In this article, for the first time, we estimate the cure fraction for ER- patients. We notice that at age >o5r=70, the accelerated increase in cure fraction from 1992 to 1998 for women with stage II N+ compared with stage III suggests a selective benefit for chemotherapy in the lower stage group.

  8. OBESITY IN CANCER SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Niyati; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V.

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is a well known risk factor for several cancers, its role on cancer survival is poorly understood. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the current evidence evaluating the impact of body adiposity on the prognosis of the three most common obesity-related cancers: prostate, colorectal, and breast. We included 33 studies of breast cancer, six studies of prostate cancer, and eight studies of colorectal cancer. We note that the evidence over-represents breast cancer survivorship research and is sparse for prostate and colorectal cancers. Overall, most studies support a relationship between body adiposity and site-specific mortality or cancer progression. However, most of the research was not specifically designed to study these outcomes and, therefore, several methodological issues should be considered before integrating their results to draw conclusions. Further research is urgently warranted to assess the long-term impact of obesity among the growing population of cancer survivors. PMID:22540252

  9. Cancer incidence, trends, and survival among immigrants to Sweden: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Hemminki, Kari

    2015-03-01

    This review aimed at covering cancer risk trends by site and histology in first-generation and second-generation immigrants in Sweden compared with natives. In addition, we reviewed data on cancer survival in immigrants to explore factors explaining cancer survival in the entire population. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to calculate standardized incidence ratios and hazard ratios (HRs) of death from cancer in 77,360 and 993,824 cases among first-generation, and 4356 and 263,485 cases among second-generation immigrants and Swedes, respectively. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratio. To obtain the maximum number of cases, we classified the immigrants according to geographical setting, population, and/or cancer risk. Compared with native Swedes, the highest risk of cancer was observed for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Southeast Asian men (standardized incidence ratio=35.6) and women (24.6), for hypopharyngeal carcinoma in Indian men (5.4), for squamous-cell carcinoma of the esophagus in Iranian women (3.8), for cardia of the stomach in East Asian women (4.2), for signet-ring cell carcinoma of the stomach in Southeast Asian women (6.7), for the liver in East Asian men (6.8), for the gall bladder in Indian women (3.8), for the pancreas in North African men (2.2), for large cell carcinoma of the lung in former Yugoslavian men (4.2), for pleural mesothelioma in Turkish women (23.8), for the cervix in Danes (1.6), for seminoma in Chileans (2.1), for transitional-cell carcinoma of the bladder in Asian Arab men (2.3), for meningioma in former Yugoslavians (1.3), and for papillary carcinoma of the thyroid in East and Southeast Asian men (3.6). No immigrant groups had an increased risk of breast, uterus, ovary, and prostate cancers or nervous system tumors. The HRs for all breast cancers were between 1.0 in low-risk Europeans and 1.2 in lowest-risk non-Europeans. Low-risk non-Europeans had an HR of 2.9 for lobular carcinoma. Low

  10. Factors related to survival from oral cancer in an Andalusian population sample (Spain).

    PubMed

    Vallecillo Capilla, Manuel; Romero Olid, Maria Nuria; Olmedo Gaya, Maria Victoria; Reyes Botella, Candela; Bustos Ruiz, Vicente

    2007-11-01

    Approximately 3% of malignant tumors originate in the oral cavity. The majority are squamous cell carcinomas, and a small percentage, malignant tumors of the salivary glands, lymphoreticular diseases, bone tumors, melanomas, sarcomas, malignant odontogenic tumors and metastases of tumors from other locations. The prognosis of these pathologies depends on the size, infiltration, and site of the lesion, the presence or absence of metastatic spread, and to a certain degree the differentiation of the tumor. The prognosis of an oral cancer remains generally negative, with 5-year survival figures below 50%, producing high rates of mortality and morbidity. To evaluate the influence of different variables on survival in an oral cancer population. Two-hundred and sixteen patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma were studied over a period of five years, evaluating 42 variables grouped into five data sections: personal, lesion, site, stage, and risk factors. Average survival was 2088 days, with a standard deviation of 98 days. The factors most associated with mortality were: location in the gingiva (p=0.0590), in the trigone (p=0.0104), size (T3-T4) (p=0.0004) and lymph node involvement (N2a-N2b) (p=0.0035). Tobacco and alcohol, nowadays considered to be highly significant in carcinogenesis, had no considerable influence on survival.

  11. Radiotherapy and Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Esther H. Ellis, Rodney J.; Cherullo, Edward; Colussi, Valdir; Xu Fang; Chen Weidong; Gupta, Sanjay; Whalen, Christopher C.; Bodner, Donald; Resnick, Martin I.; Rimm, Alfred A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of overall and disease-specific survival with the five standard treatment modalities for prostate cancer (CaP): radical prostatectomy (RP), brachytherapy (BT), external beam radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and no treatment (NT) within 6 months after CaP diagnosis. Methods and Materials: The study population included 10,179 men aged 65 years and older with incident CaP diagnosed between 1999 and 2001. Using the linked Ohio Cancer Incidence Surveillance System, Medicare, and death certificate files, overall and disease-specific survival through 2005 among the five clinically accepted therapies were analyzed. Results: Disease-specific survival rates were 92.3% and 23.9% for patients with localized vs. distant disease at 7 years, respectively. Controlling for age, race, comorbidities, stage, and Gleason score, results from the Cox multiple regression models indicated that the risk of CaP-specific death was significantly reduced in patients receiving RP or BT, compared with NT. For localized disease, compared with NT, in the monotherapy cohort, RP and BT were associated with reduced hazard ratios (HR) of 0.25 and 0.45 (95% confidence intervals 0.13-0.48 and 0.23-0.87, respectively), whereas in the combination therapy cohort, HR were 0.40 (0.17-0.94) and 0.46 (0.27-0.80), respectively. Conclusions: The present population-based study indicates that RP and BT are associated with improved survival outcomes. Further studies are warranted to improve clinical determinates in the selection of appropriate management of CaP and to improve predictive modeling for which patient subsets may benefit most from definitive therapy vs. conservative management and/or observation.

  12. Long-term costs and survival of prostate cancer: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Brodszky, Valentin; Varga, Péter; Gimesi-Országh, Judit; Fadgyas-Freyler, Petra; Boncz, Imre; Nyirády, Péter; Riesz, Péter; Baji, Petra; Péntek, Márta; Rencz, Fanni; Gulácsi, László

    2017-07-31

    There is a rising interest in measuring the societal burden of malignancies including prostate cancer. However, population-based studies reporting incidence costs of prostate cancer in the long term are lacking in Europe. The objectives of the study are to analyse the long-term costs and survival of prostate cancer patients treated by radical prostatectomy (RP) or conservative management (nRP). A retrospective claims data analysis of the National Health Insurance Found Administration of Hungary between 01.01.2002 and 31.10.2013 was carried out. Annual incidence costs related to prostate cancer and overall survival were calculated for a cohort of patients diagnosed between 2002 and 2005. Altogether 17,642 patients were selected; 2185 (12%) of them have undergone RP. The annual incidence rate ranged between 4177 and 4736 cases. Mean age of RP and nRP patients was 59.4 (SD 5.9) and 71.0 (8.4) years, respectively. The mean survival time of the RP patients was significantly longer compared to nRP patients both in the total sample (11.2 vs. 7.4 years; p < 0.001) and in the subgroup <70 years (11.3 vs. 8.8 years; p < 0.001). At the end of the 12-year follow-up, RP patients had a higher (0.83 vs. 0.68), while nRP patients had a slightly lower (0.35 vs. 38) probability of being alive compared with the age-matched general male population. The long-term cumulative costs of the RP and nRP patients amounted to €4448 and €8616. The main driver of the cost difference was the high drug costs in the nRP group. To our knowledge, this study applied the longest time-window in reporting population-based incidence costs in Europe. We found that not only RP patients lived longer but they had significantly lower total long-term costs than nRP patients. Therefore, radical prostatectomy is a cost-effective strategy in prostate cancer.

  13. Alcohol consumption and survival of colorectal cancer patients: a population-based study from Germany.

    PubMed

    Walter, Viola; Jansen, Lina; Ulrich, Alexis; Roth, Wilfried; Bläker, Hendrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-06-01

    Studies on the association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis have yielded inconsistent results. The associations of lifetime and 1-y prediagnostic alcohol consumption with relevant prognostic outcomes were evaluated in a large population-based cohort of CRC patients. In 2003-2010, 3121 patients diagnosed with CRC were interviewed on sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, medication, and comorbidities. Cancer recurrence, vital status, and cause of death were documented for a median follow-up time of 4.8 y. With the use of Cox proportional hazard regression, associations between lifetime and recent alcohol consumption and overall, CRC-specific, recurrence-free, and disease-free survival were analyzed. In this patient cohort with a median age of 69 y at diagnosis, lifetime abstainers showed poorer overall [adjusted HR (aHR): 1.25; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.52] and CRC-specific (aHR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.70) survival than lifetime light drinkers (women: >0-12 g/d; men: >0-24 g/d). Lifetime heavy drinkers showed poorer overall (aHR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.78) and disease-free (aHR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.74) survival. Alcohol abstaining in the year before diagnosis was associated with poorer overall (aHR: 1.42; 95% CI: 1.20, 1.68), CRC-specific (aHR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.13, 1.68), and disease-free (aHR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.44) survival. Lifetime abstainers with nonmetastatic disease showed poorer CRC-specific (aHR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.10, 2.00) and recurrence-free (aHR: 1.32; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.70) survival. Wine abstaining but not beer or liquor abstaining was associated with poorer survival. Associations between alcohol consumption and prognosis varied according to presence of diabetes and age. Prediagnostic alcohol abstaining and heavy drinking were associated with poorer survival after a CRC diagnosis than light drinking. The protective effects of light consumption might be restricted to wine, and associations might differ according to age and presence

  14. Sex differences in colorectal cancer survival: population-based analysis of 164,996 colorectal cancer patients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Majek, Ondrej; Gondos, Adam; Jansen, Lina; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Nennecke, Alice; Eberle, Andrea; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) is considerably higher in men compared to women; however, there is inconclusive evidence of sex differences in CRC prognosis. We aimed to assess and explain sex differences in 5-year relative survival using standard and model-based period analysis among 164,996 patients diagnosed with CRC from 1997 to 2006 and reported to 11 German cancer registries covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Age-adjusted 5-year relative survival was higher in women (64.5% vs. 61.9%, P<0.0001). A substantial survival advantage of women was confirmed in multivariate analysis after adjusting for CRC stage and subsite in subjects under 65 years of age (relative excess risk, RER 0.86, 95% CI 0.82-0.90), but not in older subjects (RER 1.01, 95% CI 0.98-1.04); this pattern was similar in the 1st and in the 2nd to 5th year after diagnosis. The survival advantage of women varied by CRC stage and age and was most pronounced for localized disease (RERs 0.59-0.88 in various age subgroups) and in patients under 45 years of age (RERs 0.59, 0.72 and 0.76 in patients with localized, regional or advanced disease, respectively). On the contrary, sex differences in survival did not vary by location of CRC. In conclusion, our large population-based study confirmed a survival advantage of female compared to male CRC patients, most notably in young and middle aged patients and patients with localized disease. The effect of sex hormones, either endogenous or through hormonal replacement therapy, might be the most plausible explanation for the observed patterns.

  15. Cancer survival in Europe 1999-2007 by country and age: results of EUROCARE--5-a population-based study.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Roberta; Sant, Milena; Coleman, Michel P; Francisci, Silvia; Baili, Paolo; Pierannunzio, Daniela; Trama, Annalisa; Visser, Otto; Brenner, Hermann; Ardanaz, Eva; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Engholm, Gerda; Nennecke, Alice; Siesling, Sabine; Berrino, Franco; Capocaccia, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Cancer survival is a key measure of the effectiveness of health-care systems. EUROCARE-the largest cooperative study of population-based cancer survival in Europe-has shown persistent differences between countries for cancer survival, although in general, cancer survival is improving. Major changes in cancer diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation occurred in the early 2000s. EUROCARE-5 assesses their effect on cancer survival in 29 European countries. In this retrospective observational study, we analysed data from 107 cancer registries for more than 10 million patients with cancer diagnosed up to 2007 and followed up to 2008. Uniform quality control procedures were applied to all datasets. For patients diagnosed 2000-07, we calculated 5-year relative survival for 46 cancers weighted by age and country. We also calculated country-specific and age-specific survival for ten common cancers, together with survival differences between time periods (for 1999-2001, 2002-04, and 2005-07). 5-year relative survival generally increased steadily over time for all European regions. The largest increases from 1999-2001 to 2005-07 were for prostate cancer (73.4% [95% CI 72.9-73.9] vs 81.7% [81.3-82.1]), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (53.8% [53.3-54.4] vs 60.4% [60.0-60.9]), and rectal cancer (52.1% [51.6-52.6] vs 57.6% [57.1-58.1]). Survival in eastern Europe was generally low and below the European mean, particularly for cancers with good or intermediate prognosis. Survival was highest for northern, central, and southern Europe. Survival in the UK and Ireland was intermediate for rectal cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, skin melanoma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but low for kidney, stomach, ovarian, colon, and lung cancers. Survival for lung cancer in the UK and Ireland was much lower than for other regions for all periods, although results for lung cancer in some regions (central and eastern Europe) might be affected by overestimation. Survival usually decreased with age, although

  16. Regional differences in population-based cancer survival between six prefectures in Japan: application of relative survival models with funnel plots.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuri; Ioka, Akiko; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Ajiki, Wakiko; Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Rachet, Bernard; Coleman, Michel P

    2009-07-01

    We used new methods to examine differences in population-based cancer survival between six prefectures in Japan, after adjustment for age and stage at diagnosis. We applied regression models for relative survival to data from population-based cancer registries covering each prefecture for patients diagnosed with stomach, lung, or breast cancer during 1993-1996. Funnel plots were used to display the excess hazard ratio (EHR) for each prefecture, defined as the excess hazard of death from each cancer within 5 years of diagnosis relative to the mean excess hazard (in excess of national background mortality by age and sex) in all six prefectures combined. The contribution of age and stage to the EHR in each prefecture was assessed from differences in deviance-based R(2) between the various models. No significant differences were seen between prefectures in 5-year survival from breast cancer. For cancers of the stomach and lung, EHR in Osaka prefecture were above the upper 95% control limits. For stomach cancer, the age- and stage-adjusted EHR in Osaka were 1.29 for men and 1.43 for women, compared with Fukui and Yamagata. Differences in the stage at diagnosis of stomach cancer appeared to explain most of this excess hazard (61.3% for men, 56.8% for women), whereas differences in age at diagnosis explained very little (0.8%, 1.3%). This approach offers the potential to quantify the impact of differences in stage at diagnosis on time trends and regional differences in cancer survival. It underlines the utility of population-based cancer registries for improving cancer control.

  17. Cancer survival in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the UK, 1995–2007 (the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership): an analysis of population-based cancer registry data

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, MP; Forman, D; Bryant, H; Butler, J; Rachet, B; Maringe, C; Nur, U; Tracey, E; Coory, M; Hatcher, J; McGahan, CE; Turner, D; Marrett, L; Gjerstorff, ML; Johannesen, TB; Adolfsson, J; Lambe, M; Lawrence, G; Meechan, D; Morris, EJ; Middleton, R; Steward, J; Richards, MA

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Cancer survival is a key measure of the effectiveness of health-care systems. Persistent regional and international differences in survival represent many avoidable deaths. Differences in survival have prompted or guided cancer control strategies. This is the first study in a programme to investigate international survival disparities, with the aim of informing health policy to raise standards and reduce inequalities in survival. Methods Data from population-based cancer registries in 12 jurisdictions in six countries were provided for 2·4 million adults diagnosed with primary colorectal, lung, breast (women), or ovarian cancer during 1995–2007, with follow-up to Dec 31, 2007. Data quality control and analyses were done centrally with a common protocol, overseen by external experts. We estimated 1-year and 5-year relative survival, constructing 252 complete life tables to control for background mortality by age, sex, and calendar year. We report age-specific and age-standardised relative survival at 1 and 5 years, and 5-year survival conditional on survival to the first anniversary of diagnosis. We also examined incidence and mortality trends during 1985–2005. Findings Relative survival improved during 1995–2007 for all four cancers in all jurisdictions. Survival was persistently higher in Australia, Canada, and Sweden, intermediate in Norway, and lower in Denmark, England, Northern Ireland, and Wales, particularly in the first year after diagnosis and for patients aged 65 years and older. International differences narrowed at all ages for breast cancer, from about 9% to 5% at 1 year and from about 14% to 8% at 5 years, but less or not at all for the other cancers. For colorectal cancer, the international range narrowed only for patients aged 65 years and older, by 2–6% at 1 year and by 2–3% at 5 years. Interpretation Up-to-date survival trends show increases but persistent differences between countries. Trends in cancer incidence and

  18. Cancer survival in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the UK, 1995-2007 (the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership): an analysis of population-based cancer registry data.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M P; Forman, D; Bryant, H; Butler, J; Rachet, B; Maringe, C; Nur, U; Tracey, E; Coory, M; Hatcher, J; McGahan, C E; Turner, D; Marrett, L; Gjerstorff, M L; Johannesen, T B; Adolfsson, J; Lambe, M; Lawrence, G; Meechan, D; Morris, E J; Middleton, R; Steward, J; Richards, M A

    2011-01-08

    Cancer survival is a key measure of the effectiveness of health-care systems. Persistent regional and international differences in survival represent many avoidable deaths. Differences in survival have prompted or guided cancer control strategies. This is the first study in a programme to investigate international survival disparities, with the aim of informing health policy to raise standards and reduce inequalities in survival. Data from population-based cancer registries in 12 jurisdictions in six countries were provided for 2·4 million adults diagnosed with primary colorectal, lung, breast (women), or ovarian cancer during 1995-2007, with follow-up to Dec 31, 2007. Data quality control and analyses were done centrally with a common protocol, overseen by external experts. We estimated 1-year and 5-year relative survival, constructing 252 complete life tables to control for background mortality by age, sex, and calendar year. We report age-specific and age-standardised relative survival at 1 and 5 years, and 5-year survival conditional on survival to the first anniversary of diagnosis. We also examined incidence and mortality trends during 1985-2005. Relative survival improved during 1995-2007 for all four cancers in all jurisdictions. Survival was persistently higher in Australia, Canada, and Sweden, intermediate in Norway, and lower in Denmark, England, Northern Ireland, and Wales, particularly in the first year after diagnosis and for patients aged 65 years and older. International differences narrowed at all ages for breast cancer, from about 9% to 5% at 1 year and from about 14% to 8% at 5 years, but less or not at all for the other cancers. For colorectal cancer, the international range narrowed only for patients aged 65 years and older, by 2-6% at 1 year and by 2-3% at 5 years. Up-to-date survival trends show increases but persistent differences between countries. Trends in cancer incidence and mortality are broadly consistent with these trends in

  19. Influence of socioeconomic environment on survival in patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Launay, L; Dejardin, O; Pornet, C; Morlais, F; Guittet, L; Launoy, G; Bouvier, V

    2012-01-01

    The influence of social environment on survival in patients with cancer has been demonstrated in many studies, subjects living in the most deprived areas having a poorer prognosis. Geographic remoteness and limited access to specialized care centers are often associated with socioeconomic deprivation. The aim was to assess the influence of social environment and geographic remoteness on the relative survival of patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer between 1997 and 2004 in the department of Calvados in France. The study population, which was provided by the Calvados digestive cancer registry, included 629 patients. Relative survival was used to estimate the influence of social environment and geographic remoteness on patient survival. Five-year survival rates were 14.1%, 15.1%, 11.8%, 8.8%, and 11.4%, respectively, for patients living in the least to the most deprived areas (P= 0.39). The influence of social environment was significant after adjustment for clinical variables, patients living in the most deprived areas having the worst survival. These discrepancies cannot totally be explained by differences in access to care, cancer extension, or morphology at diagnosis. No association was observed between distance to the nearest cancer center and survival. Social environment appears to induce disparities among patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer, with a worse prognosis for patients living in the most deprived areas.

  20. Survival of women with inflammatory breast cancer: a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Dawood, S; Lei, X; Dent, R; Gupta, S; Sirohi, B; Cortes, J; Cristofanilli, M; Buchholz, T; Gonzalez-Angulo, A M

    2014-06-01

    Our group has previously reported that women with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) continue to have worse outcome compared with those with non-IBC. We undertook this population-based study to see if there have been improvements in survival among women with stage III IBC, over time. We searched the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Registry to identify female patients diagnosed with stage III IBC between 1990 and 2010. Patients were divided into four groups according to year of diagnosis: 1990-1995, 1996-2000, 2001-2005, and 2006-2010. Breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared across groups using the log-rank test. Cox models were then fit to determine the association of year of diagnosis and BCSS after adjusting for patient and tumor characteristics. A total of 7679 patients with IBC were identified of whom 1084 patients (14.1%) were diagnosed between 1990 and 1995, 1614 patients (21.0%) between 1996 and 2000, 2683 patients (34.9%) between 2001 and 2005, and 2298 patients (29.9%) between 2006 and 2010. The 2-year BCSS for the whole cohort was 71%. Two-year BCSS were 62%, 67%, 72%, and 76% for patients diagnosed between 1990-1995, 1996-2000, 2001-2005, and 2006-2010, respectively (P < 0.0001). In the multivariable analysis, increasing year of diagnosis (modeled as a continuous variable) was associated with decreasing risks of death from breast cancer (HR = 0.98, 95% confidence interval 0.97-0.99, P < 0.0001). There has been a significant improvement in survival of patients diagnosed with IBC over a two-decade time span in this large population-based study. This suggests that therapeutic strategies researched and evolved in the context of non-IBC have also had a positive impact in women with IBC. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Statin treatment is associated with survival in a nationally representative population of elderly women with epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Tilley Jenkins; Goodman, Marc T; Li, Andrew J; Jeon, Christie Y

    2017-08-01

    Observational studies suggest that statin therapy for cardio-protection is associated with improved survival in cancer patients. We sought to evaluate the impact of statin treatment on ovarian cancer survival in a nationally representative elderly population. The linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries and Medicare claims data on patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer in 2007-2009 were used to extract data on statin prescription fills, population characteristics, primary treatment, comorbidity and survival. Cox regression models were used to examine the association between statin treatment and overall survival. Among the 1431 ovarian cancer patients who underwent surgical resection, 609 (42.6%) filled prescriptions for statin. The majority of statin-users (89%) were prescribed a lipophilic formulation. Mean overall survival among statin-users was 32.3months compared to 28.8months for non-users (p<0.0001). A 34% reduction in death was associated with statin therapy, independent of age, race, neighborhood median household income, stage, platinum therapy and comorbid conditions (HR=0.66, 95% CI 0.55-0.81). Improved overall survival with statin use was observed for both serous (HR=0.69, 95% CI 0.54-0.87) and non-serous (HR=0.63, 95% CI 0.44-0.90) histologies. When statin treatment was categorized by lipophilicity and intensity, a significant survival benefit was limited to lipophilic statin users and those who took statins of moderate intensity. This SEER-Medicare analysis demonstrates improvement in overall survival with lipophilic statin use after surgery in elderly patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. A clinical trial to evaluate the impact of statin treatment in ovarian cancer survival is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Obesity and survival in population-based patients with pancreatic cancer in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhihong; Holly, Elizabeth A; Bracci, Paige M

    2012-12-01

    Obesity has been consistently associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality. However, studies of obesity and overall survival in patients with pancreatic cancer are notably lacking, especially in population-based studies. Active and passive follow-up were used to determine vital status and survival for 510 pancreatic cancer patients diagnosed from 1995 to 1999 in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area. Survival rates were computed using Kaplan-Meier methods. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were estimated in multivariable Cox proportional hazards models as measures of the association between pre-diagnostic obesity and pancreatic cancer survival. An elevated hazard ratio of 1.3 (95 % CI, 0.91-1.81) was observed for obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30] compared with normal range BMI (<25) patients. Associations between BMI and overall survival did not statistically significantly vary by known prognostic and risk factors (all p-interaction ≥0.18), yet elevated HRs consistently were observed for obese compared with normal BMI patients [localized disease at diagnosis (HR, 3.1), surgical resection (HR, 1.6), ever smokers (HR, 1.6), diabetics (HR, 3.3)]. Poor survival was observed among men, older patients, more recent and current smokers, whereas improved survival was observed for Asian/Pacific Islanders. Our results in general provide limited support for an association between pre-diagnostic obesity and decreased survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. Patterns of reduced survival associated with obesity in some patient subgroups could be due to chance and require assessment in larger pooled studies.

  3. Implications of incomplete registration of deaths on long-term survival estimates from population-based cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Hermann; Hakulinen, Timo

    2009-07-15

    International comparison of population-based cancer survival is a key component of monitoring progress against cancer. Its validity depends to an unknown degree on completeness of ascertainment of deaths in the cancer registries involved which may vary according to legal and administrative circumstances. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of incomplete registration of deaths through various mechanisms on the validity of long-term absolute and relative survival estimates. For that purpose, we simulated underascertainment of deaths through linkage failure of registry data with death certificates with probabilities between 0.1 and 5%, and underascertainment of deaths by unregistered annual emigration with probabilities between 0.05 and 2%, using data from the Finnish Cancer Registry. The expected impact on estimates of 5-, 10- and 15-year absolute and relative survival was assessed. We demonstrate that even modest levels of under-registration of deaths may lead to severe overestimation of long-term survival estimates, ranging from 0 to 31 percent units in the scenarios assessed. In general, relative survival is much more affected than absolute survival, and potential problems are much larger for relative survival estimates in older compared with younger patients. Potential overestimation strongly increases with length of follow-up, and this increase is particularly pronounced for under-registration of deaths because of unrecorded emigration. Every effort should be made in cancer registry based survival analyses to ascertain deaths with close to 100% completeness. When such completeness cannot be achieved, long-term relative survival estimates and their comparison across populations must be interpreted with much caution.

  4. Population-based study of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy and survival outcomes of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Isabelle; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Chang, George J

    2010-03-17

    Despite increased demand for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), the survival benefit of this procedure remains uncertain. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database to identify 107 106 women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy for treatment between 1998 and 2003 and a subset of 8902 women who also underwent CPM during the same period. Associations between predictor variables and the likelihood of undergoing CPM were evaluated by use of chi(2) analyses. Risk-stratified (estrogen receptor [ER] status, stage, and age) adjusted survival analyses were performed by using Cox regression. Statistical tests were two-sided. In a univariate analysis, CPM was associated with improved disease-specific survival (hazard ratio [HR] of death = 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.57 to 0.69; P < .001). Risk-stratified analysis showed that this association was because of a reduction in breast cancer-specific mortality in women aged 18-49 years with stages I-II ER-negative cancer (HR of death = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.88; P = .004). Five year-adjusted breast cancer survival for this group was improved with CPM vs without (88.5% vs 83.7%, difference = 4.8%). Although rates of contralateral breast cancer among young women with stages I-II disease undergoing CPM were independent of ER status, women with ER-positive tumors in the absence of prophylactic mastectomy also had a lower overall risk for contralateral breast cancer than women with ER-negative tumors (0.46% vs 0.90%, difference = 0.44%; P < .001). CPM is associated with a small improvement in 5-year breast cancer-specific survival mainly in young women with early-stage ER-negative breast cancer. This effect is related to a higher baseline risk of contralateral breast cancer.

  5. Death certificate only proportions should be age adjusted in studies comparing cancer survival across populations and over time.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Hermann; Castro, Felipe A; Eberle, Andrea; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Jansen, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The proportion of cases notified by death certificate only (DCO) is a commonly used data quality indicator in studies comparing cancer survival across regions and over time. We aimed to assess dependence of DCO proportions on the age structure of cancer patients. Using data from a national cancer survival study in Germany, we determined age specific and overall (crude) DCO proportions for 24 common forms of cancer. We then derived overall (crude) DCO proportions expected in case of shifts of the age distribution of the cancer populations by 5 and 10 years, respectively, assuming age specific DCO proportions to remain constant. Median DCO proportions across the 24 cancers were 2.4, 3.7, 5.5, 8.5 and 23.9% in age groups 15-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, and 75+, respectively. A decrease of ages by 5 and 10 years resulted in decreases of cancer specific crude DCO proportions ranging from 0.4 to 4.8 and from 0.7 to 8.6 percent units, respectively. Conversely, an increase of ages by 5 and 10 years led to increases of cancer specific crude DCO proportions ranging from 0.8 to 4.8 and from 1.8 to 9.6 percent units, respectively. These changes were of similar magnitude (but in opposite direction) as changes in crude 5-year relative survival resulting from the same shifts in age distribution. The age structure of cancer patient populations has a substantial impact on DCO proportions. DCO proportions should therefore be age adjusted in comparative studies on cancer survival across regions and over time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Urinary tract cancer survival in Europe 1999-2007: Results of the population-based study EUROCARE-5.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Mallone, Sandra; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Vilardell, Loreto; Malats, Núria; Allory, Yves; Sant, Milena

    2015-10-01

    This work presents relative survival estimates regarding urinary tract tumours among adult patients (age⩾15years) diagnosed in Europe. It reports on survival estimates of cases diagnosed in 2000-2007, and on survival time trends from 1999-2001 to 2005-2007. Data on 677,340 adult urinary tract tumour patients, (429,154 cases of invasive and non-invasive bladder and 248,186 cases of invasive kidney cancers) diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 were provided by 86 population-based cancer registries from 29 European countries. The complete approach was used to estimate survival in 2000-2007; the period approach was used to estimate survival over time. The age-standardised 5-year relative survival for patients with kidney tumours diagnosed in Europe during 2000-2007 was 60%. The best prognosis was observed in Southern and Central Europe and prognosis improved in all regions along the time period. For invasive and non-invasive patients with bladder tumours combined the age-standardised 5-year relative survival in Europe was 68%. The best prognosis was observed in Southern and Northern Europe. However, in Scotland and The Netherlands the relative survival was significantly lower, although the survival estimates for these two countries were based on invasive tumours only. Differences in registration practices affect comparisons of survival values between European countries, especially in patients with urinary bladder cancers. The between-country variation in survival is influenced by the varying use of diagnostic investigation in urinary tract tumours. Further data on stage at diagnosis can help to elucidate the influence of diagnostic intensity or early diagnosis on the survival patterns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimating Heritability of Prostate Cancer-Specific Survival Using Population-Based Registers.

    PubMed

    Szulkin, Robert; Clements, Mark S; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Wiklund, Fredrik E; Kuja-Halkola, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    There is a strong genetic component in prostate cancer development with an estimated heritability of 58%. In addition, recent epidemiological assessments show a familial component in prostate cancer-specific survival, which could be due to either common genetics or environment. In this study we sought to estimate the heritability of prostate cancer-specific survival by studying brothers and father-son pairs in Sweden. We used linkage records from three Swedish national registers: the Multi-Generation Register, the Cancer Register, and the Cause of Death Register. One thousand seven hundred twenty-eight brother pairs and 6,444 father-son pairs, where both family members were diagnosed with prostate cancer, were followed for prostate cancer mortality. By assuming that (i) brothers on average share 50% of their segregating alleles and 100% environment and (ii) fathers and sons share 50% of their segregating alleles and no environment, we implemented a model including influences of additive genetics (heritability), shared environment and non-shared environment for survival data. A conditional likelihood estimation procedure was developed to fit the model. Data simulation was applied to validate model assumptions. In a model that adjusted for age at diagnosis and calendar period, the estimated heritability of prostate cancer-specific survival was 0.10 (95% CI = 0.00-0.20) that was borderline significantly different from zero (P = 0.057). The shared environment component was not significantly different from zero with a point estimate of 0.00 (95% CI = 0.00-0.13). Simulation studies and sensitivity analysis revealed that the estimated heritability component was robust, whereas the shared environmental component may be underestimated. Heritability of prostate cancer-specific survival is considerably lower than for prostate cancer incidence. This supports a hypothesis that susceptibility of disease and progression of disease are separate mechanisms that involve

  8. Treatment and survival outcomes in young men diagnosed with prostate cancer: a population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Daniel W.; Porter, Michael; Montgomery, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Outcomes of treatment for young men compared with older men with prostate cancer are poorly defined outside of limited institutional series. This study examines the association between age at diagnosis and grade, stage, treatment, and survival outcomes in men diagnosed during the era of prostate-specific antigen testing. Patients and Methods The NCI SEER database was used to identify men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1988 and 2003. Men aged 35-74 were stratified by age at diagnosis to examine differences in tumor characteristics, treatment, and survival within each age group. Results We identified 318,774 men ages 35 to 74 diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate between 1988 and 2003. The proportion of men age 55 and younger at diagnosis increased over the study period, from 2.3% between the years 1988-1991 to 9.0% between the years 2000-2003, and median age at diagnosis decreased from 72 in 1988 to 68 in 2003. Younger men were less frequently diagnosed with organ confined tumors (p<0.001), but less likely to be diagnosed with high grade cancer (p<0.001). Older men were more likely to receive no local therapy or external beam radiation than young men (p< 0.001 for trends). Among men with Gleason 5-7 tumors, overall survival was worse with advancing age. However, among all age groups with high grade and stage, the youngest men (35-44) were at the highest risk of all cause and cancer specific death. Conclusions Age at diagnosis among men with prostate cancer continues to decline. Younger men are more likely to be treated with prostatectomy, have lower grade cancer, and as a group have better overall, and equivalent cancer specific survival at 10 years compared to older men. Among men with high grade and locally advanced prostate cancer, the youngest men have a particularly poor prognosis compared to older men. PMID:19466697

  9. Digoxin use after diagnosis of breast cancer and survival: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Karasneh, Reema A; Murray, Liam J; Mc Menamin, Úna C; Hughes, Carmel M; Cardwell, Chris R

    2015-06-01

    Digoxin has been shown to have an estrogenic effect and is associated with increased risk of gynecomastia and estrogen-sensitive cancers such as breast and uterus cancer. These findings, particularly recent observations of increased breast cancer risk, raise questions about the safety of digoxin use in breast cancer patients. Therefore, we investigated whether digoxin use after breast cancer diagnosis increased the risk of breast cancer-specific mortality in breast cancer patients. A cohort of 17,842 breast cancer patients newly diagnosed from 1998 to 2009 was identified from English cancer registries (from the National Cancer Data Repository). This cohort was linked to the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (to provide digoxin and other prescription records) and to the Office of National Statistics mortality data (to identify breast cancer-specific deaths). Using time-dependent Cox regression models, unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the association between post-diagnostic exposure to digoxin and breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. In 17,842 breast cancer patients, there were 2219 breast cancer-specific deaths. Digoxin users appeared to have increased breast cancer-specific mortality compared with non-users (HR 1.73; 95 % CI 1.39-2.15) but this association was entirely attenuated after adjustment for potential confounders (adjusted HR 0.91; 95 % CI 0.72-1.14). In this large population-based breast cancer cohort study, there was little evidence of an increase in breast cancer-specific mortality with digoxin use after diagnosis. These results provide some reassurance that digoxin use is safe in breast cancer patients.

  10. Effects of marital status and economic resources on survival after cancer: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Hurley, Susan; Canchola, Alison J; Keegan, Theresa H M; Cheng, Iona; Murphy, James D; Clarke, Christina A; Glaser, Sally L; Martínez, María Elena

    2016-05-15

    Although married cancer patients have more favorable survival than unmarried patients, reasons underlying this association are not fully understood. The authors evaluated the role of economic resources, including health insurance status and neighborhood socioeconomic status (nSES), in a large California cohort. From the California Cancer Registry, we identified 783,167 cancer patients (386,607 deaths) who were diagnosed during 2000 through 2009 with a first primary, invasive cancer of the 10 most common sites of cancer-related death for each sex and were followed through 2012. Age-stratified and stage-stratified Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for all-cause mortality associated with marital status, adjusted for cancer site, race/ethnicity, and treatment. Compared with married patients, unmarried patients had an elevated risk of mortality that was higher among males (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.26-1.29) than among females (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.18-1.20; Pinteraction < .001). Adjustment for insurance status and nSES reduced the marital status HRs to 1.22 for males and 1.15 for females. There was some evidence of synergistic effects of marital status, insurance, and nSES, with relatively higher risks observed for unmarried status among those who were under-insured and living in high nSES areas compared with those who were under-insured and living in low nSES areas (Pinteraction = 6.8 × 10(-9) among males and 8.2 × 10(-8) among females). The worse survival of unmarried than married cancer patients appears to be minimally explained by differences in economic resources. Cancer 2016;122:1618-25. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  11. Metformin use and survival from lung cancer: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Menamin, Úna C Mc; Cardwell, Chris R; Hughes, Carmel M; Murray, Liam M

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical evidence suggests that metformin, a widely prescribed anti-diabetic drug, may inhibit lung cancer progression. We investigated whether metformin use was associated with decreased risk of cancer-specific mortality in lung cancer patients. This study included newly diagnosed lung cancer patients (identified from English National Cancer Data Repository, 1998-2009) with type 2 diabetes (based on UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink prescriptions and diagnosis records). Lung cancer deaths occurring up to 2012 were identified using Office of National Statistics mortality data and the association between metformin use (before and after diagnosis) and risk of lung cancer-specific mortality was calculated using Cox regression models. In analysis of 533 patients, we found a weak non-significant reduction in lung cancer-specific mortality with metformin use after diagnosis (adjusted HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.68-1.09). No association was evident for metformin use before diagnosis and cancer-specific mortality in analysis of 1350 patients (adjusted HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.86, 1.11). Associations were similar by duration of use. In addition, after adjustment for potential confounders, there was little evidence of an association between the use of other anti-diabetic medications (either before or after diagnosis) and lung cancer-specific mortality; including sulfonylureas, insulin or other anti-diabetic medications (such as thiazolidinediones). Overall, the results from this population-based study provide little evidence of a protective association between metformin use and cancer mortality in lung cancer patients.

  12. Digoxin use after diagnosis of colorectal cancer and survival: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Karasneh, Reema A; Murray, Liam J; Hughes, Carmel M; Cardwell, Chris R

    2015-11-01

    Digoxin has been shown to affect a number of pathways that are of relevance to cancer, and its use has been associated with increased risks of breast and uterus cancer and, more recently, a 40% increase in colorectal cancer risk. These findings raise questions about the safety of digoxin use in colorectal cancer patients, and, therefore, we investigated whether digoxin use after colorectal cancer diagnosis increased the risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality. A cohort of 10,357 colorectal cancer patients newly diagnosed from 1998 to 2009 was identified from English cancer registries and linked to the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (to provide digoxin and other prescription records) and to the Office of National Statistics mortality data (to identify 2,724 colorectal cancer-specific deaths). Using time-dependent Cox regression models, unadjusted and adjusted HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for the association between postdiagnostic exposure to digoxin and colorectal cancer-specific mortality. Overall, 682 (6%) colorectal cancer patients used digoxin after diagnosis. Digoxin use was associated with a small increase in colorectal cancer-specific mortality before adjustment (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.07-1.46), but after adjustment for confounders, the association was attenuated (adjusted HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.91-1.34) and there was no evidence of a dose response. In this large population-based colorectal cancer cohort, there was little evidence of an increase in colorectal cancer-specific mortality with digoxin use after diagnosis. These results provide some reassurance that digoxin use is safe in colorectal cancer patients. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Childhood cancer survival in Europe 1999-2007: results of EUROCARE-5--a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Gemma; Botta, Laura; Rossi, Silvia; Aareleid, Tiiu; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Clavel, Jacqueline; Dimitrova, Nadya; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Kaatsch, Peter; Lacour, Brigitte; Mallone, Sandra; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Minicozzi, Pamela; Sánchez-Pérez, Maria-José; Sant, Milena; Santaquilani, Mariano; Stiller, Charles; Tavilla, Andrea; Trama, Annalisa; Visser, Otto; Peris-Bonet, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Survival and cure rates for childhood cancers in Europe have greatly improved over the past 40 years and are mostly good, although not in all European countries. The EUROCARE-5 survival study estimates survival of children diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2007, assesses whether survival differences among European countries have changed, and investigates changes from 1999 to 2007. We analysed survival data for 157,499 children (age 0-14 years) diagnosed between Jan 1, 1978 and Dec 31, 2007. They came from 74 population-based cancer registries in 29 countries. We calculated observed, country-weighted 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year survival for major cancers and all cancers combined. For comparison between countries, we used the corrected group prognosis method to provide survival probabilities adjusted for multiple confounders (sex, age, period of diagnosis, and, for all cancers combined without CNS cancers, casemix). Age-adjusted survival differences by area and calendar period were calculated with period analysis and were given for all cancers combined and the major cancers. We analysed 59,579 cases. For all cancers combined for children diagnosed in 2000-07, 1-year survival was 90.6% (95% CI 90.2-90.9), 3-year survival was 81.0 % (95% CI 80.5-81.4), and 5-year survival was 77.9% (95% CI 77.4-78.3). For all cancers combined, 5-year survival rose from 76.1% (74.4-77.7) for 1999-2001, to 79.1% (77.3-80.7) for 2005-07 (hazard ratio 0.973, 95% CI 0.965-0.982, p<0.0001). The greatest improvements were in eastern Europe, where 5-year survival rose from 65.2% (95% CI 63.1-67.3) in 1999-2001, to 70.2% (67.9-72.3) in 2005-07. Europe-wide average yearly change in mortality (hazard ratio) was 0.939 (95% CI 0.919-0.960) for acute lymphoid leukaemia, 0.959 (0.933-0.986) for acute myeloid leukaemia, and 0.940 (0.897-0.984) for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Mortality for all of Europe did not change significantly for Hodgkin's lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, CNS tumours, neuroblastoma

  14. Marital status and survival after oesophageal cancer surgery: a population-based nationwide cohort study in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Brusselaers, Nele; Mattsson, Fredrik; Johar, Asif; Wikman, Anna; Lagergren, Pernilla; Lagergren, Jesper; Ljung, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A beneficial effect of being married on survival has been shown for several cancer types, but is unclear for oesophageal cancer. The objective of this study was to clarify the potential influence of the marital status on the overall and disease-specific survival after curatively intended treatment of oesophageal cancer using a nationwide population-based design, taking into account the known major prognostic variables. Design Prospective, population-based cohort. Setting All Swedish hospitals performing surgery for oesophageal cancer during 2001–2005. Participants This study included 90% of all patients with oesophageal or junctional cancer who underwent surgical resection in Sweden in 2001–2005, with follow-up until death or the end of the study period (2012). Primary and secondary outcome measures Cox regression was used to estimate associations between the marital status and the 5-year overall and disease-specific mortality, expressed as HRs with 95% CIs, with adjustment for sex, age, tumour stage, histological type, complications, comorbidities and annual surgeon volume. Results Of all 606 included patients (80.4% men), 55.1% were married, 9.2% were remarried, 22.6% were previously married and 13% were never married. Compared with the married patients, the never married (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.35), previously married (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.15) and remarried patients (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.13) had no increased overall 5-year mortality. The corresponding HRs for disease-specific survival, and after excluding the initial 90 days of surgery, were similar to the HRs for the overall survival. Conclusions This study showed no evidence of a better 5-year survival in married patients compared with non-married patients undergoing surgery for oesophageal cancer. PMID:24907248

  15. Incidence, mortality, and survival trends of ovarian cancer in Hong Kong, 1997 to 2006: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Wong, K H; Mang, Oscar W K; Au, K H; Law, Stephen C K

    2012-12-01

    To assess the incidence and mortality of ovarian cancer, and the survival patterns of the invasive epithelial ovarian carcinoma in Hong Kong based on population-based cancer registry data. Historical cohort study. Hong Kong. All patients with ovarian cancer diagnosed between 1997 and 2006 were included. Patients eligible for survival analysis were followed up until 31 December 2007. Age-standardised incidence and mortality rates with their estimated annual percent changes were determined. Cumulative observed and relative survival rates were estimated using a period approach. During the study period, in Hong Kong there was a steadily increasing ovarian cancer incidence rate (1.4% annually) but a steadily decreasing mortality rate (1.9% annually). The improvement in mortality was mainly in the age-group of 50-69 years (4.7% annually). Invasive epithelial ovarian carcinoma accounted for 79.6% of the study cohort. The 2-year and 5-year relative survival rates were 75.8% and 63.1%, respectively. Those diagnosed in the period 2002 to 2006 had significantly better survival than those diagnosed in the period 1997 to 2001 (65.3% vs 60.7%; P=0.008); a significant improvement was evident for patients with stage II disease and in the age-group of 50-69 years. Multivariate analyses confirmed that age, histological subtype, FIGO stage, and the period of diagnosis were independent prognostic indicators of invasive epithelial ovarian carcinoma. In Hong Kong, invasive epithelial ovarian carcinoma showed an increasing incidence and an improving survival trend over the period 1997 to 2006. The survival data derived from this study provides a baseline from which to monitor the effectiveness of ovarian cancer treatment in Hong Kong.

  16. Breast cancer characteristics and survival in a Hispanic population of costa rica.

    PubMed

    Srur-Rivero, Nadia; Cartin-Brenes, Mayra

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer characteristics may vary according to the patient's ethnic group. The goal of this cohort study was to evaluate the characteristics of a group of Costa Rican breast cancer patients and their relationship with survival. Age, stage, tumor grade, immunohistochemistry, lymphovascular invasion, recurrence, and survival data on 199 Hispanic patients with breast cancer diagnosis, treated between January 2009 and May 2010, were collected from a single institution in San Jose, Costa Rica. The data were statistically analyzed for significance. Median age at diagnosis was 53 years. With a median follow-up of 46.5 months, there was an 88% overall survival rate. Thirty-seven percent of the patients (p < 0.001) were at stages III and IV during diagnosis. The hormone receptor human epidermal receptor negative phenotype (HR-HER2-) (p < 0.001) was present in 17% of the cases. In a multivariate analysis, local (risk ratio, RR: 7.2; confidence interval, CI 95%: 3.8-7.6; p = 0.06) and distant recurrence (RR: 14.9; CI 95%: 7.7-28.9; p = 0.01) showed the strongest association with the probability of death from the disease. Patients with HR-HER2- phenotype tumors reported more local recurrences (p = 0.04), a higher tumor grade (p < 0.01), and lower overall survival than patients with other breast cancer phenotypes (p = 0.01). Although this study analyzes a modest number of cases, it is an initial insight into factors that may contribute to differences in breast cancer outcomes among Hispanic women in Costa Rica. The higher proportion of triple negative tumors, advanced stage, and younger median age at diagnosis could contribute to the inferior prognostic described among Hispanic women. There may be a different distribution of tumor subtypes compared to non-Hispanic white women. Further studies are necessary to confirm such findings.

  17. Breast Cancer Characteristics and Survival in a Hispanic Population of Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Srur-Rivero, Nadia; Cartin-Brenes, Mayra

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Breast cancer characteristics may vary according to the patient’s ethnic group. The goal of this cohort study was to evaluate the characteristics of a group of Costa Rican breast cancer patients and their relationship with survival. METHODS Age, stage, tumor grade, immunohistochemistry, lymphovascular invasion, recurrence, and survival data on 199 Hispanic patients with breast cancer diagnosis, treated between January 2009 and May 2010, were collected from a single institution in San Jose, Costa Rica. The data were statistically analyzed for significance. RESULTS Median age at diagnosis was 53 years. With a median follow-up of 46.5 months, there was an 88% overall survival rate. Thirty-seven percent of the patients (p < 0.001) were at stages III and IV during diagnosis. The hormone receptor human epidermal receptor negative phenotype (HR−HER2−) (p < 0.001) was present in 17% of the cases. In a multivariate analysis, local (risk ratio, RR: 7.2; confidence interval, CI 95%: 3.8–7.6; p = 0.06) and distant recurrence (RR: 14.9; CI 95%: 7.7–28.9; p = 0.01) showed the strongest association with the probability of death from the disease. Patients with HR−HER2− phenotype tumors reported more local recurrences (p = 0.04), a higher tumor grade (p < 0.01), and lower overall survival than patients with other breast cancer phenotypes (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Although this study analyzes a modest number of cases, it is an initial insight into factors that may contribute to differences in breast cancer outcomes among Hispanic women in Costa Rica. The higher proportion of triple negative tumors, advanced stage, and younger median age at diagnosis could contribute to the inferior prognostic described among Hispanic women. There may be a different distribution of tumor subtypes compared to non-Hispanic white women. Further studies are necessary to confirm such findings. PMID:25125980

  18. Influence of Educational Level, Stage, and Histological Type on Survival of Oral Cancer in a Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Thinali Sousa; de Barros Silva, Paulo Goberlânio; Sousa, Eric Fernandes; da Cunha, Maria do PSS; de Aguiar, Andréa Silvia Walter; Costa, Fábio Wildson Gurgel; Mota, Mário Rogério Lima; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Sousa, Fabrício Bitu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mortality rate associated with oral cancer is estimated at approximately 12,300 deaths per year, and the survival rate is only 40% to 50% for diagnosed patients and is closely related to the duration of time between disease perception and its diagnosis and treatment. Socioeconomic risk factors are determinants of the incidence and mortality related to oral cancer. We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study of 573 records of patients with oral cancer at Haroldo Juaçaba Hospital – Cancer Institute of Ceará from 2000 to 2009 to evaluate the influence of socioeconomic factors on survival and epidemiological behavior of this neoplasia in a Brazilian population. In this study, patients with oral cancer were males greater than 60 years of age, presented squamous cell carcinoma in the floor of mouth and were characterized by low education levels. A total of 573 lesions were found in oral cavities. Cox proportional hazards regression model showed that the histological type, tumor stage, and low degree of education significantly influenced survival. A lower patient survival rate was correlated with a more advanced stage of disease and a worse prognosis. Squamous cell carcinoma is associated with a higher mortality when compared with other histological types of malign neoplasia. PMID:26817864

  19. Accuracy of cause of death data routinely recorded in a population-based cancer registry: impact on cause-specific survival and validation using the Geneva cancer registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Information on the underlying cause of death of cancer patients is of interest because it can be used to estimate net survival. The population-based Geneva Cancer Registry is unique because registrars are able to review the official cause of death. This study aims to describe the difference between the official and revised cause-of-death variables and the impact on cancer survival estimates. Methods The recording process for each cause of death variable is summarised. We describe the differences between the two cause-of-death variables for the 5,065 deceased patients out of the 10,534 women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1970 and 2009. The Kappa statistic and logistic regression are applied to evaluate the degree of concordance. The impact of discordance on cause-specific survival is examined using the Kaplan Meier method. Results The overall agreement between the two variables was high. However, several subgroups presented a lower concordance, suggesting differences in calendar time and less attention given to older patients and more advanced diseases. Similarly, the impact of discordance on cause-specific survival was small on overall survival but larger for several subgroups. Conclusion Estimation of cancer-specific survival could therefore be prone to bias when using the official cause of death. Breast cancer is not the more lethal cancer and our results can certainly not be generalised to more lethal tumours. PMID:24373194

  20. Increased incidence and improved survival in endometrioid endometrial cancer diagnosed since 1989 in The Netherlands: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Boll, D; Karim-Kos, H E; Verhoeven, R H A; Burger, C W; Coebergh, J W; van de Poll-Franse, L V; van Doorn, H C

    2013-02-01

    To measure progress against endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EEC) in the Netherlands by analyzing trends in incidence, survival and mortality simultaneously. Descriptive study of incidence, survival and mortality rates of women with EEC in the Netherlands. Rates were age-standardized to the European standard population. Population-based data were extracted from the nationwide Dutch Cancer Registry (NCR) between 1989 and 2009. Mortality data since 1989 came from Statistics Netherlands. European age standardized incidence rates were calculated according to age, histology and stage. Five year relative survival estimates were calculated in four periods. Optimal progress against cancer is defined as decreasing incidence and/or improving survival accompanied by declining mortality. 80% of the 32,332 patients newly diagnosed with a corpus uteri malignancy had an EEC. The incidence of EEC rose significantly from 11/100,000 to 15/100,000, being most pronounced in women with FIGO stage IB and in the group with grade 1&2 tumours (P<0.05). Coinciding with the increased incidence, 5-year relative survival increased, especially for patients aged 60-74 years, in women with FIGO stage I, and in histology group grade 1&2, being 87%, 94% and 93%, respectively, during 2005-2009. The incidence of EEC (being 80% of corpus uteri cancer) increased markedly between 1989 and 2009, especially in women of 60-74 years. Five-year survival for patients with EEC increased from 83 to 85%. Progress against EEC has been less than was assumed previously, because mortality proportionally decreased only slightly, and because of the increasing incidence although survival improved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Uncovering disparities in survival after non-small-cell lung cancer among Asian/Pacific Islander ethnic populations in California

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ellen T.; Shema, Sarah J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Clarke, Christina A.; Gomez, Scarlett Lin

    2009-01-01

    Asians may have better survival after non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) than non-Asians. However, it is unknown whether survival varies among the heterogeneous U.S. Asian/Pacific Islander (API) populations. Therefore, this study aimed to quantify survival differences among APIs with NSCLC. Differences in overall and disease-specific survival were analyzed in the California Cancer Registry among 16,577 API patients diagnosed with incident NSCLC between 1988 and 2007. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models with separate baseline hazards by disease stage. Despite better overall and disease-specific survival among APIs compared with non-Hispanic Whites, differences were evident across API populations. Among women, Japanese (overall survival HR=1.16, 95% CI=1.06–1.27) and APIs other than those in the six largest ethnic groups (“other APIs”; HR=1.19, 95% CI=1.07–1.33) had significantly poorer overall and disease-specific survival than Chinese. By contrast, South Asian women had significantly better survival than Chinese (HR=0.79, 95% CI=0.63–0.97). Among men, Japanese (HR=1.15, 95% CI=1.07–1.24), Vietnamese (HR=1.07, 95% CI=1.00–1.16), and other APIs (HR=1.18, 95% CI=1.08–1.28) had significantly poorer overall and disease-specific survival than Chinese. Other factors independently associated with poorer survival were lower neighborhood SES, involvement with a non-university-teaching hospital, unmarried status, older age, and earlier year of diagnosis. APIs have significant ethnic differences in NSCLC survival that may be related to disparate lifestyles, biology, and especially health care access or use. To reduce the nationwide burden of lung cancer mortality, it is critical to identify and ameliorate hidden survival disparities such as those among APIs. PMID:19622719

  2. Differences in colorectal cancer survival between European and US populations: the importance of sub-site and morphology.

    PubMed

    Gatta, G; Ciccolallo, L; Capocaccia, R; Coleman, M P; Hakulinen, T; Møller, H; Berrino, F

    2003-10-01

    A previous study has shown a lower survival for colorectal cancer in Europe than in the United States of America (USA). It is of interest to examine the extent to which anatomical location and morphological type influence this difference in colorectal cancer survival. We analysed survival for 151,244 European and 53,884 US patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer aged 15-99 years during the period of 1985-1989, obtained from 40 cancer registries that contribute to the EUROCARE study from 17 countries, and nine Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER) registries in the USA. Cases included in the analysis were first primary malignant tumours (ICD-O behaviour code 3 or higher). Relative survival was estimated to correct for competing causes of mortality. The Hakulinen-Tenkanen multiple regression approach was used to examine the prognostic impact of sub-site and ICD-O histology codes. Relative excess risks (RERs) derived from this approach estimate the extent to which the hazard of death differs from that in a reference region after adjustment for mortality in the general population. In order to explore geographical variation, we defined three groups of European registries within which survival rates were known to be broadly similar. The proportion of cases with unspecified sub-site was higher in Europe than the USA (10% versus 2%), but sub-site distributions were broadly similar in the two populations. With the exception of appendix, 5-year survival was 13-22% higher in the USA than in Europe for each anatomical sub-site. The proportion of non-microscopically-verified cases was higher in Europe than the USA (16 versus 3%). Adenocarcinomas arising in a polyp (ICD-O-2 8210, 8261, 8263) were more frequent in the USA than Europe (13 versus 2%). Five-year survival was higher in the USA than Europe for each morphological group, with the exception of non-microscopically-verified cases. When age, gender and sub-site were considered, RERs ranged from 1.52 to 2

  3. Adult children's socioeconomic resources and mothers' survival after a breast cancer diagnosis: a Swedish population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Hannah L; Ringbäck Weitoft, Gunilla; Talbäck, Mats; Feychting, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Socioeconomic inequalities in survival after breast cancer persist worldwide. We aim to determine whether adult offspring's socioeconomic resources contribute to inequalities in mothers' survival after breast cancer. Methods 14 231 women, aged 65–79 years, with a child aged ≥30 years and a first primary diagnosis of breast cancer in the National Cancer Register between 2001 and 2010 were followed until death, 10 years after diagnosis, or end of study (December 2015). Relative survival proportions and excess mortality within 10 years of diagnosis by strata of offspring's education level and disposable income were estimated using flexible parametric models accounting for measures of mothers' socioeconomic position and expected mortality in the general population. Results 4292 women died during 102 236 person-years of follow-up. Crude 10-year relative survival proportions for mothers of children with >14, 12–14 and <12 years of education were 0.89 (0.87 to 0.91), 0.87 (0.85 to 0.89) and 0.79 (0.76 to 0.81), respectively. Compared with mothers of children with >14 years of education, mothers of children with <12 or 12–14 years of education had substantially higher excess mortality (excess HR 1.69 (1.38 to 2.07) and 1.22 (1.00 to 1.48), respectively). Higher mortality did not differ between tertiles of offspring's disposable income. Conclusions Adult offspring's education level may contribute to inequalities in mothers' survival after breast cancer. Clinicians should be aware of the educational context beyond the individual and women with less educated offsprings may require extra support. This should be considered in future research, policy frameworks and interventions aimed at reducing survival inequalities. PMID:28363931

  4. High hospital research participation and improved colorectal cancer survival outcomes: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Neil; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Finan, Paul J; Thomas, James D; Chapman, Michael; Hamilton, Russell; Campbell, Helen; Cameron, David; Kaplan, Richard; Parmar, Mahesh; Stephens, Richard; Seymour, Matt; Gregory, Walter; Selby, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objective In 2001, the National Institute for Health Research Cancer Research Network (NCRN) was established, leading to a rapid increase in clinical research activity across the English NHS. Using colorectal cancer (CRC) as an example, we test the hypothesis that high, sustained hospital-level participation in interventional clinical trials improves outcomes for all patients with CRC managed in those research-intensive hospitals. Design Data for patients diagnosed with CRC in England in 2001–2008 (n=209 968) were linked with data on accrual to NCRN CRC studies (n=30 998). Hospital Trusts were categorised by the proportion of patients accrued to interventional studies annually. Multivariable models investigated the relationship between 30-day postoperative mortality and 5-year survival and the level and duration of study participation. Results Most of the Trusts achieving high participation were district general hospitals and the effects were not limited to cancer ‘centres of excellence’, although such centres do make substantial contributions. Patients treated in Trusts with high research participation (≥16%) in their year of diagnosis had lower postoperative mortality (p<0.001) and improved survival (p<0.001) after adjustment for casemix and hospital-level variables. The effects increased with sustained research participation, with a reduction in postoperative mortality of 1.5% (6.5%–5%, p<2.2×10−6) and an improvement in survival (p<10−19; 5-year difference: 3.8% (41.0%–44.8%)) comparing high participation for ≥4 years with 0 years. Conclusions There is a strong independent association between survival and participation in interventional clinical studies for all patients with CRC treated in the hospital study participants. Improvement precedes and increases with the level and years of sustained participation. PMID:27797935

  5. The Effect of Positive SWOG Treatment Trials on Survival of Patients With Cancer in the US Population.

    PubMed

    Unger, Joseph M; LeBlanc, Michael; Blanke, Charles D

    2017-06-05

    Recently, tremendous prominence has been given to the investigation of the effect of different research processes as part of the Cancer Moonshot. More than half a century ago, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) established a network of publicly funded cancer cooperative research groups to systematically evaluate new treatments for efficacy and safety. To examine the extent to which positive NCI-sponsored cancer treatment trials have benefited patients with cancer in the US population. This investigation used study data from SWOG, an NCI-sponsored network cooperative research group. All treatment trials during SWOG's 60-year history (1956-2016) were identified for which the new, experimental therapy provided a statistically significant improvement in overall survival. It was assumed that the new, proven treatments from these trials established new standards for cancer care in the treatment community. Twenty-three positive SWOG treatment trials were identified from a variety of different disease settings. This study estimated population life-years gained from the 23 treatment trials through 2015 by mapping the effect of the new treatments onto the US cancer population using an area under the Kaplan-Meier survival curve approach that combined trial-specific hazard function and hazard ratio results, along with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program and life table data. Calculations were age adjusted. The US dollar return on investment was estimated as the ratio of the total investment by the NCI in the treatment trial program divided by the estimate of life-years gained. In total, 12 361 patients were enrolled to the 23 positive trials from 1965 to 2012. The study estimated that 3.34 million (95% confidence limit, 2.39-4.15 million) life-years were gained from these 23 trials through 2015. Estimates were greater than 2 million life-years gained under most model simulations. The US dollar return on investment was $125 per life-year gained. SWOG treatment

  6. Centralized primary care of advanced ovarian cancer improves complete cytoreduction and survival - A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dahm-Kähler, Pernilla; Palmqvist, Charlotte; Staf, Christian; Holmberg, Erik; Johannesson, Liza

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate centralized primary care of advanced ovarian and fallopian tube cancers in a complete population cohort in relation to complete cytoreduction, time interval from surgery to chemotherapy and relative survival. A regional population-based cohort study of women diagnosed with primary ovarian and fallopian tube cancers and included in the Swedish Quality Registry (SQR) during 2008-2013 in a region where primary care of advanced stages was centralized in 2011. Surgical, oncological characteristics, outcomes, follow-ups and relative survivals were analyzed. There were 817 women diagnosed with ovarian and fallopian tube cancers during 2008-2013 and 523 were classified as FIGO stage III-IV and further analyzed. Primary debulking surgery (PDS) was performed in 81% and neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) followed by interval debulking surgery (IDS) in 11%. Complete cytoreduction at PDS was performed in 37% before compared to 49% after centralization (p<0.03). The chemotherapy protocols were identical in the cohorts and they received and completed the planned chemotherapy equally. The time interval between PDS and chemotherapy was 36days (median) before compared to 24days after centralization (p<0.01). The relative 3-year survival rate in women treated by PDS was 44% compared to 65% after centralization and the estimated excess mortality rate ratio (EMRR) was reduced (RR 0.58; 95% CI 0.42-0.79). Comparing the complete cohorts before and after centralization, regardless primary treatment, the relative 3-year survival rate increased from 40% to 61% with reduced EMRR (RR 0.59; 95% CI 0.45-0.76). Centralized primary care of advanced ovarian and fallopian tube cancers increases complete cytoreduction, decreases time interval from PDS to chemotherapy and improves relative survival significantly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimating and modelling cure in population-based cancer studies within the framework of flexible parametric survival models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background When the mortality among a cancer patient group returns to the same level as in the general population, that is, the patients no longer experience excess mortality, the patients still alive are considered "statistically cured". Cure models can be used to estimate the cure proportion as well as the survival function of the "uncured". One limitation of parametric cure models is that the functional form of the survival of the "uncured" has to be specified. It can sometimes be hard to find a survival function flexible enough to fit the observed data, for example, when there is high excess hazard within a few months from diagnosis, which is common among older age groups. This has led to the exclusion of older age groups in population-based cancer studies using cure models. Methods Here we have extended the flexible parametric survival model to incorporate cure as a special case to estimate the cure proportion and the survival of the "uncured". Flexible parametric survival models use splines to model the underlying hazard function, and therefore no parametric distribution has to be specified. Results We have compared the fit from standard cure models to our flexible cure model, using data on colon cancer patients in Finland. This new method gives similar results to a standard cure model, when it is reliable, and better fit when the standard cure model gives biased estimates. Conclusions Cure models within the framework of flexible parametric models enables cure modelling when standard models give biased estimates. These flexible cure models enable inclusion of older age groups and can give stage-specific estimates, which is not always possible from parametric cure models. PMID:21696598

  8. Worse survival in breast cancer among women with recent childbirth: results from a Swedish population-based register study.

    PubMed

    Bladström, Anna; Anderson, Harald; Olsson, Håkan

    2003-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate how time since childbirth affects breast cancer survival using unselected population-based data linking data from the Swedish Cancer Registry, fertility register, and population census registers. A total of 14,693 parous women < or =45 years of age with breast cancer were identified. Information on deaths was collected, and 5- and 10-year survival rates were calculated according to time since most recent childbirth. Mortality during the first 10 years of follow-up was further investigated in a Cox analysis, with adjustments for age at diagnosis, time period during which the diagnosis was made, number of children, and age at the time of the first child's birth. Women with diagnosis during pregnancy had a 5-year survival rate of 52.1% (95% CI, 41.2%-61.9%) and a 10-year survival rate of 43.9% (95% CI, 33.1%-54.2%), compared with survival rates of 80.0% (95% CI, 79.6%-81.4%) and 68.6% (95% CI, 67.5%-69.7%), respectively, in women diagnosed >10 years since childbirth. In the multivariate model, we found that time since childbirth was associated with inferior survival rates in cases of diagnosis <8 years after childbirth, in which the lowest survival rates were seen in women with diagnosis during pregnancy in the first 5 years of follow-up (adjusted relative risk compared with women with >10 years since last childbirth, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.8-3.4). The adjusted hazard ratios could be described by a decreasing function of a logarithmic transformation of years since childbirth. We found that the time of follow-up was of importance, in that women with a recent pregnancy had particularly lower survival rates during the first 5 years after diagnosis. The mechanisms behind the poor survival in breast cancer for women with recent childbirth are not known, but we suggest that one explanation might be a lower proportion of hormone receptor-positive tumors.

  9. Inter-country and ethnic variation in colorectal cancer survival: Comparisons between a Philippine population, Filipino-Americans and Caucasians

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous population-based studies showed differences in international and within country colorectal cancer survival estimates, but few investigated the role of prognostic factors. Using a "high resolution approach", we aimed to determine the effect of ethnicity and health care by comparing Filipino-Americans with Philippine residents, who have the same ethnicity, and with Caucasians living in the US, who have the same health care system. Methods Using databases from the Manila and Rizal Cancer Registries and the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, age-adjusted five-year absolute and relative survival estimates were computed and compared between Filipino-American colorectal cancer patients, cancer patients from the Philippines and Caucasian patients. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to determine factors affecting survival differences. Results Much lower 5-year relative survival estimates were obtained for Philippine residents (37%) as compared to those in Filipino-Americans (60.3%) and Caucasians (62.4%). Differences in age, stage and receipt of surgery explained a large proportion of the survival differences between Philippine residents and Filipino-Americans. However, strong excess risk of death for Philippine residents remained after controlling for these and other variables (relative risk, RR, 2.03, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 1.83-2.25). Conclusions Strong survival disadvantages of Philippine residents compared to Filipino-American patients were disclosed, which most likely reflect differences in access to and utilization of health care. Health education and advocacy, for both patients and health practitioners, should likewise be given priority. PMID:20233442

  10. Statin improves survival in patients with EGFR-TKI lung cancer: A nationwide population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Huang, Ru-Jiun; Chen, Pau-Chung; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Yang, Yao-Hsu

    2017-01-01

    Long-term use of statins has been reported to reduce the risk of death in patients with lung cancer. This study investigated the effect of statin use among patients with lung cancer receiving epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKIs) therapy. A nationwide, population-based case-control study was conducted using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. From January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2012, a total of 1,707 statin and 6,828 non-statin matched lung cancer cohorts with EGFR-TKIs treatment were studied. Statin use was associated with a reduced risk of death (HR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.54–0.62, p < 0.001). In addition, statin use was associated with a significantly longer median progression-free survival (8.3 months, 95% CI: 7.6–8.9 vs. 6.1 months, 95% CI: 6.0–6.4, p < 0.001) and median overall survival (35.5 months, 95% CI: 33.8–38.1 vs. 23.9 months, 95% CI: 23.4–24.7, p < 0.001). In conclusion, statins might potentially enhance the therapeutic effect and increase survival in patients with lung cancer receiving EGFR-TKI therapy. PMID:28158206

  11. Risk factors and survival analysis of the esophageal cancer in the population of Jammu, India.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, S; Kaul, S; Gupta, B B; Dhar, M K

    2012-01-01

    To identify the risk factors of esophageal cancer and study their effect on the survival rates patients of Jammu region, India. Detailed information was collected on socio-demographic, dietary and clinico-pathological parameters for 200 case control pairs. Discrete (categorical) data of 2 independent groups (control and cases) were summarized in frequency (%) and compared by using Chi-square (χ2 ) test. The mean age of two independent groups was compared by independent Student's t-test. To find out potential risk factor (s), the variable (s) found significant in univariate analysis were further subjected to multivariate logistic regression analysis. The association of potential risk factors with patients survival (3-year overall survival) was done by Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis using Log-rank test. A 2-tailed (a = 2) P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Out of the 63 response parameters, seven were found highly significant on multivariate analysis. The mean (± SD) age was 56.74 ± 10.76 years, the proportions of males were higher than females, mostly illiterate and lower income group. Among dietary characteristics, snuff was highest (OR = 3.86, 95% CI = 2.46-6.08) followed by salt tea (OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.49-4.29), smoking (OR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.18-3.30), sundried food (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.10-2.85) and red chilly (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.07-2.89). Probability of survival lowered significantly (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01 or P < 0.001) in those consuming tobacco in the form of snuff (Log-rank c 2 = 24.62, P = 0.000) and smoking (Log-rank c 2 = 5.20, P = 0.023) as compared to those who did not take these. The analysis finally established snuff (smokeless tobacco) as the most powerful risk factor of esophageal cancer in Jammu region, followed by the salt tea, smoking and the sundried food.

  12. Patterns of metastasis and survival in breast cancer patients: a preliminary study in an Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Ziaei, Jamal Eivazi; Pourzand, Ali; Bayat, Amrollah; Vaez, Jalil

    2012-01-01

    Due to lack of sufficient data on characteristics of breast cancer patients and risk factors for developing metastasis in Iran this study was designed to understand clinical aspects impacting on survival. A cross-sectional study on breast cancer patients was conducted in an oncology clinic of the university hospital between 1995 and 2010. Data were retrieved from medical records and included age, menopausal status, tumor diameter, number of involved nodes, histopathological type, estrogen and progesterone receptor expression, c-erbB-2, primary and secondary metastasis sites, overall survival, disease free interval and type of chemotherapy protocol. The results were analyzed with SPSS 13 software.The mean age of the patients was 49.2 (27-89) years. The primary tumors were mainly ER positive (48%) and PR negative (49.3%). The status of lymph nodes dissected and examined in these patients was unknown in 19 patients (25.3%) while 18 patients (24%) had positive lymph nodes with no report on the number of involved nodes. All of the patients had received antracyclin based chemotherapy in an adjuvant or metastatic setting. Adjuvant hormonal therapy was administered to receptor positive patients. In average, overall survival after recurrence was 30 months (95%CI 24.605-35.325) for non-skeletal versus 42 months (95%CI 31.211-52.789) for skeletal metastasis (P= 0.002). The median survival was also greater for receptor positive patients; 39 months (95%CI 33.716-44.284) for PR+ versus 26 months (95%CI 19.210-32.790) for PR- (P=0.047) and 38 months (95%CI 32.908-43.092) for ER+ versus 27 months (95%CI 18.780-35.220) for ER- patients (P=0.016). No relation was found between site of first metastasis and hormone receptor, age, tumor diameter, DFI and menopausal status. Sites of metastasis were independent of age, size of the tumor, menopausal and hormone receptor status in this study. Overall survival provided significant relations with respect to receptor status and bone

  13. Socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival: a population-based study of adult patients diagnosed in Osaka, Japan, during the period 1993-2004.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuri; Nakaya, Tomoki; Nakayama, Tomio; Miyashiro, Isao; Ioka, Akiko; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Rachet, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    Long-term recession of the Japanese economy during the 1990s led to growing social inequalities whilst health inequalities also appeared. The 2007 National Cancer Control Program of Japan targeted "equalisation of cancer medical services", but the system to monitor health inequalities was still inadequate. We aimed to measure socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival in Japan. We analysed 13 common invasive, primary, malignant tumours diagnosed from 1993 to 2004 and registered by the population-based Cancer Registry of Osaka Prefecture. An ecological socioeconomic deprivation index based on small area statistics, divided into quintile groups, was linked to patients according to their area of residence at the time of diagnosis. We estimated one-, five-year and conditional five-year net survival by sex, period of diagnosis (1993-1996/1997-2000/2001-2004) and deprivation group. Changes in survival over time, deprivation gap in survival, and change in deprivation gap were estimated at one and five years after diagnosis using variance-weighted least square regression. The deprivation gap in one-year net survival was narrower than in five-year net survival and conditional five-year survival. During the study period, there was no change in deprivation gap, except for reductions for pancreas (men) and stomach (women), and an increase for lung (men) in one-year survival. We observed a linear association between level of survival and deprivation gap at five years and conditional five years, but no association at one-year survival. A wide deprivation gap in survival was observed in most of the adult, solid, malignant tumours, within the universal healthcare system in Japan. Overall, cancer survival improved in Osaka without any widening of inequalities in cancer survival in 1993-2004, shortly after the long-term economic recession and deep modifications in the social and work environments in Japan. The longer term impact of the recession on inequalities in cancer survival

  14. Prognostic factors and survival of colorectal cancer in Kurdistan province, Iran: A population-based study (2009-2014).

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Mohammad Aziz; Moradi, Ghobad; Roshani, Daem; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Ghaytasi, Bahman

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) survival varies at individual and geographically level. This population-based study aimed to evaluating various factors affecting the survival rate of CRC patients in Kurdistan province.In a retrospective cohort study, patients diagnosed as CRC were collected through a population-based study from March 1, 2009 to 2014. The data were collected from Kurdistan's Cancer Registry database. Additional information and missing data were collected reference to patients' homes, medical records, and pathology reports. The CRC survival was calculated from the date of diagnosis to the date of cancer-specific death or the end of follow-up (cutoff date: October 2015). Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used for the univariate analysis of survival in various subgroups. The proportional-hazard model Cox was also used in order to consider the effects of different factors on survival including age at diagnosis, place of residence, marital status, occupation, level of education, smoking, economic status, comorbidity, tumor stage, and tumor grade.A total number of 335 patients affected by CRC were assessed and the results showed that 1- and 5-year survival rate were 87% and 33%, respectively. According to the results of Cox's multivariate analysis, the following factors were significantly related to CRC survival: age at diagnosis (≥65 years old) (HR 2.08, 95% CI: 1.17-3.71), single patients (HR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.10-2.40), job (worker) (HR 2.09, 95% CI: 1.22-3.58), educational level: diploma or below (HR 0.61, 95% CI: 0.39-0.92), wealthy economic status (HR 0.51, 95% CI: 0.31-0.82), tumor grade in poorly differentiated (HR 2.25, 95% CI: 1.37-3.69), and undifferentiated/anaplastic grade (HR 2.90, 95% CI: 1.67-4.98).We found that factors such as low education, inappropriate socioeconomic status, and high tumor grade at the time of disease diagnosis were effective in the poor survival of CRC patients in Kurdistan province; this, which need more attention.

  15. Association between the time to surgery and survival among patients with colon cancer: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Flemming, J A; Nanji, S; Wei, X; Webber, C; Groome, P; Booth, C M

    2017-08-01

    Factors associated with time-to-surgery (TTS) and survival in colon cancer has not been well studied. Cancer Care Ontario recommends surgery within 42 days of diagnosis and that 90% of patients meet this benchmark. We describe factors associated with TTS and survival in routine clinical practice. Retrospective population-based cohort study of patients receiving elective colonic resection after diagnosis of colon cancer in Ontario, Canada from 2002 to 2008 followed until 2012. Factors associated with TTS were identified using multivariate log-binomial and Quantile regression at 42 days and 90th percentiles. The association between TTS and cancer-specific (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were examined using multivariate Cox regression. 4326 patients; median age 71 years and 52% male. Median TTS was 24 days (IQR 14-37); at the 90th percentile 56 days. Factors associated with TTS ≥ 42 days and >90th percentile included older age, co-morbid illness, surgeon volume, and stage I disease (P < 0.05 for all). In patients whose TTS was either at 42 days or 90th percentile, those ≥80 years old waited two weeks longer than those <60 years, individuals with co-morbid illness waited 10 days longer than without co-morbidity, and patients with stage I disease waited 10 days longer than those with stage IV disease (P < 0.05 for all). Delay in TTS > 42 days or >90th percentile was not associated with OS or CSS. Age, co-morbidity, and stage of cancer are associated with TTS. There was no association between TTS and CSS or OS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  16. Breast cancer survival and stage at diagnosis in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and the UK, 2000-2007: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Walters, S; Maringe, C; Butler, J; Rachet, B; Barrett-Lee, P; Bergh, J; Boyages, J; Christiansen, P; Lee, M; Wärnberg, F; Allemani, C; Engholm, G; Fornander, T; Gjerstorff, M L; Johannesen, T B; Lawrence, G; McGahan, C E; Middleton, R; Steward, J; Tracey, E; Turner, D; Richards, M A; Coleman, M P

    2013-01-01

    Background: We investigate whether differences in breast cancer survival in six high-income countries can be explained by differences in stage at diagnosis using routine data from population-based cancer registries. Methods: We analysed the data on 257 362 women diagnosed with breast cancer during 2000–7 and registered in 13 population-based cancer registries in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and the UK. Flexible parametric hazard models were used to estimate net survival and the excess hazard of dying from breast cancer up to 3 years after diagnosis. Results: Age-standardised 3-year net survival was 87–89% in the UK and Denmark, and 91–94% in the other four countries. Stage at diagnosis was relatively advanced in Denmark: only 30% of women had Tumour, Nodes, Metastasis (TNM) stage I disease, compared with 42–45% elsewhere. Women in the UK had low survival for TNM stage III–IV disease compared with other countries. Conclusion: International differences in breast cancer survival are partly explained by differences in stage at diagnosis, and partly by differences in stage-specific survival. Low overall survival arises if the stage distribution is adverse (e.g. Denmark) but stage-specific survival is normal; or if the stage distribution is typical but stage-specific survival is low (e.g. UK). International differences in staging diagnostics and stage-specific cancer therapies should be investigated. PMID:23449362

  17. Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer Survival rates are often used by doctors ... Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  18. Survival of Sami cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Leena; Pokhrel, Arun; Dyba, Tadek; Pukkala, Eero; Hakulinen, Timo

    2012-07-02

    The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300-500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979-2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modelling. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85-1.30) and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86-1.20), indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  19. Survival of Sami cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Leena; Pokhrel, Arun; Dyba, Tadek; Pukkala, Eero; Hakulinen, Timo

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300-500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979-2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modelling. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85-1.30) and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86-1.20), indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  20. Incidence of, phenotypes of and survival from small bowel cancer in Denmark, 1994-2010: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bojesen, Rasmus Dahlin; Andersson, Mikael; Riis, Lene Buhl; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Jess, Tine

    2016-09-01

    Small bowel cancer (SBC) is a rare and highly heterogeneous disease in respect to both anatomical distribution and histological morphology. We aimed to conduct a Danish nationwide population-based cohort study of the incidence of, phenotypes of, stage of, synchronous/metachronous cancer occurrence of and survival from SBC during 1994-2010. The study population included all individuals aged 16 years or older living in Denmark during 1994-2010 (n = 7,070,142). Patients with SBC were identified through the Danish Cancer Registry. Incidence rates were calculated overall and according to the anatomical origin and morphological subtype. Patients were followed up from the date of cancer diagnosis to the date of emigration, death or the end of the study (31 December 2010). SBC was diagnosed in 1088 patients during 1994-2010. The total annual incidence of SBC was 1.10 per 100,000 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to 1.17 per 100,000], with an annual percentage change of 1.9 % (95 % CI 0.6-3.1 %, p = 0.003) during the observation period. This increase was mainly explained by an increase in the occurrence of duodenal adenocarcinomas, with an annual percentage change of 7.5 % (95 % CI 4.9-10.2 %, p < 0.001). Further, 29 % of all SBC patients had metastatic cancer at the time of diagnosis and 32 % had one or more synchronous/metachronous cancers. All morphological subtypes were associated with poor 5-year prognoses, in particular duodenal adenocarcinomas, with a 5-year survival rate of only 16 % (95 % CI 12-22 %). The incidence of SBC has increased in recent decades, mainly because of a large increase in the incidence of duodenal adenocarcinomas, which are also associated with the poorest prognosis.

  1. Potentially Curative Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Norway: A Population-Based Study of Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, Trond-Eirik; Brunsvig, Paal Fredrik; Johannessen, Dag Clement; Sundstrom, Stein; Wang, Mari; Hornslien, Kjersti; Bremnes, Roy Martin; Stensvold, Andreas; Garpestad, Oddveig; Norstein, Jarle

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: The efficacy of curative irradiation in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer patients is considered limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term survival in a population-based approach. Methods and Materials: Cases of non-small-cell lung cancer diagnosed from 1993 to 2001 were identified in the Cancer Registry of Norway. Electronic linkage with national data from the hospitals' radiotherapy verification systems identified those who received potentially curative doses ({>=}50 Gy). Hospital records were reviewed for all patients. Results: A total of 497 patients (336 men) were identified with a radiation dose of {>=}50 Gy delivered to the lung region. Of these, 41% received 60 Gy or more. The majority (70%) of patients included had advanced stage disease: 24% Stage IIIA and 46% Stage IIIB. The overall 1-, 3-, and 5-year observed survival rates were 53%, 16%, and 9%, respectively. Multivariable analyses identified stage and chemotherapy, but not radiation dose, as significant independent prognostic variables for survival. However, 68% of patients treated with chemotherapy participated in prospective studies with inclusion criteria that excluded patients with less favorable prognostic factors, leading to a selection bias. The number of fractions and the radiation doses varied widely among different hospitals. Conclusion: The long-term prognosis after radiation therapy is poor. More sophisticated, targeted, and uniform delivery of radiation therapy is needed. The apparent benefit of chemotherapy may in part be due to selection of patients with more favorable prognostic factors for this therapy.

  2. Long-term survival, prevalence, and cure of cancer: a population-based estimation for 818 902 Italian patients and 26 cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Dal Maso, L.; Guzzinati, S.; Buzzoni, C.; Capocaccia, R.; Serraino, D.; Caldarella, A.; Dei Tos, A. P.; Falcini, F.; Autelitano, M.; Masanotti, G.; Ferretti, S.; Tisano, F.; Tirelli, U.; Crocetti, E.; De Angelis, R.; Virdone, S.; Zucchetto, A.; Gigli, A.; Francisci, S.; Baili, P.; Gatta, G.; Castaing, M.; Zanetti, R.; Contiero, P.; Bidoli, E.; Vercelli, M.; Michiara, M.; Federico, M.; Senatore, G.; Pannozzo, F.; Vicentini, M.; Bulatko, A.; Pirino, D. R.; Gentilini, M.; Fusco, M.; Giacomin, A.; Fanetti, A. C.; Cusimano, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Persons living after a cancer diagnosis represent 4% of the whole population in high-income countries. The aim of the study was to provide estimates of indicators of long-term survival and cure for 26 cancer types, presently lacking. Patients and methods Data on 818 902 Italian cancer patients diagnosed at age 15–74 years in 1985–2005 were included. Proportions of patients with the same death rates of the general population (cure fractions) and those of prevalent patients who were not at risk of dying as a result of cancer (cure prevalence) were calculated, using validated mixture cure models, by cancer type, sex, and age group. We also estimated complete prevalence, conditional relative survival (CRS), time to reach 5- and 10-year CRS >95%, and proportion of patients living longer than those thresholds. Results The cure fractions ranged from >90% for patients aged <45 years with thyroid and testis cancers to <10% for liver and pancreatic cancers of all ages. Five- or 10-year CRS >95% were both reached in <10 years by patients with cancers of the stomach, colon–rectum, pancreas, corpus and cervix uteri, brain, and Hodgkin lymphoma. For breast cancer patients, 5- and 10-year CRSs reached >95% after 19 and 25 years, respectively, and in 15 and 18 years for prostate cancer patients. Five-year CRS remained <95% for >25 years after cancer diagnosis in patients with liver and larynx cancers, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, myeloma, and leukaemia. Overall, the cure prevalence was 67% for men and 77% for women. Therefore, 21% of male and 31% of female patients had already reached 5-year CRS >95%, whereas 18% and 25% had reached 10-year CRS >95%. Conclusions A quarter of Italian cancer patients can be considered cured. This observation has a high potential impact on health planning, clinical practice, and patients' perspective. PMID:25149707

  3. Favourable ten-year overall survival in a Caucasian population with high probability of hereditary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to compare differences in the prognosis of breast cancer (BC) patients at high (H) risk or intermediate slightly (IS) increased risk based on family history and those without a family history of BC, and to evaluate whether ten-year overall survival can be considered a good indicator of BRCA1 gene mutation. Methods We classified 5923 breast cancer patients registered between 1988 and 2006 at the Department of Oncology and Haematology in Modena, Italy, into one of three different risk categories according to Modena criteria. One thousand eleven patients at H and IS increased risk were tested for BRCA1/2 mutations. The overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) were the study end-points. Results Eighty BRCA1 carriers were identified. A statistically significantly better prognosis was observed for patients belonging to the H risk category with respect to women in the IS and sporadic groups (82% vs.75% vs.73%, respectively; p < 0.0001). Comparing only BRCA1 carriers with BRCA-negative and sporadic BC (77% vs.77% vs.73%, respectively; p < 0.001) an advantage in OS was seen. Conclusions Patients belonging to a population with a high probability of being BRCA1 carriers had a better prognosis than those with sporadic BC. Considering these results, women who previously had BC and had survived ten years could be selected for BRCA1 analysis among family members at high risk of hereditary BC during genetic counselling. Since only 30% of patients with a high probability of having hereditary BC have BRCA1 mutations, selecting women with a long term survival among this population could increase the rate of positive analyses, avoiding the use of expensive tests. PMID:20219108

  4. Childhood cancer survival in Europe.

    PubMed

    Gatta, G; Corazziari, I; Magnani, C; Peris-Bonet, R; Roazzi, P; Stiller, C

    2003-01-01

    EUROCARE-3 collected data from 45 population-based cancer registries in 20 countries on 24 620 European children aged from 0 to 14 years diagnosed with malignancy in the period 1990-1994. Five-year survival between countries was compared for all malignancies and for the major diagnostic categories, adjusting for age, and estimated average European survival weighting for differences in childhood populations. For all cancers combined, survival variation was large (45% in Estonia to 90% in Iceland), and was generally low (60-70%) in eastern Europe and high (> or =75%) in Switzerland, Germany and the Nordic countries (except Denmark). The Nordic countries had the highest survival for four of the seven major tumour types: nephroblastoma (92%), acute lymphoid leukaemia (85%), CNS tumours (73%) and acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia (62%). The eastern countries had lowest survival: 89% for Hodgkin's disease, 71% for nephroblastoma, 68% for acute lymphoid leukaemia, 61% for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 57% for central nervous system (CNS) tumours and 29% for acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia. The Nordic countries represent a survival gold standard to which other countries can aspire. Since most childhood cancers respond well to treatment, survival differences are attributable to differences in access (including referral and timely diagnosis) and use of modern treatments; however, the obstacles to access and application of standard treatments probably vary markedly with country.

  5. Do Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) processes influence survival in patients with colorectal cancer? A population-based experience.

    PubMed

    Munro, Alastair; Brown, Mhari; Niblock, Paddy; Steele, Robert; Carey, Frank

    2015-10-13

    MDT (multidisciplinary team) meetings are considered an essential component of care for patients with cancer. However there is remarkably little direct evidence that such meetings improve outcomes. We assessed whether or not MDT (multidisciplinary team) processes influenced survival in a cohort of patients with colorectal cancer. Observational study of a population-based cohort of 586 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer diagnosed in Tayside (Scotland) during 2006 and 2007. Recommendations from MDT meetings were implemented in 411/586 (70.1 %) of patients, the MDT+ group. The remaining175/586 (29.9 %) were either never discussed at an MDT, or recommendations were not implemented, MDT- group. The 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 63.1 % (MDT+) and 48.2 % (MDT-), p < 0.0001. In analysis confined to patients who survived >6 weeks after diagnosis, the rates were 63.2 % (MDT+) and 57.7 % (MDT-), p = 0.064. The adjusted hazard rate (HR) for death from colorectal cancer was 0.73 (0.53 to 1.00, p = 0.047) in the MDT+ group compared to the MDT- group, in patients surviving >6 weeks the adjusted HR was 1.00 (0.70 to 1.42, p = 0.987). Any benefit from the MDT process was largely confined to patients with advanced disease: adjusted HR (early) 1.32 (0.69 to 2.49, p = 0.401); adjusted HR(advanced) 0.65 (0.45 to 0.96, p = 0.031). Adequate MDT processes are associated with improved survival for patients with colorectal cancer. However, some of this effect may be more apparent than real - simply reflecting selection bias. The MDT process predominantly benefits the 40 % of patients who present with advanced disease and conveys little demonstrable advantage to patients with early tumours. These results call into question the current belief that all new patients with colorectal cancer should be discussed at an MDT meeting.

  6. Longitudinal trends in prostate cancer incidence, mortality, and survival of patients from two Shanghai city districts: a retrospective population-based cohort study, 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the fifth most common cancer affecting men of all ages in China, but robust surveillance data on its occurrence and outcome is lacking. The specific objective of this retrospective study was to analyze the longitudinal trends of prostate cancer incidence, mortality, and survival in Shanghai from 2000 to 2009. Methods A retrospective population-based cohort study was performed using data from a central district (Putuo) and a suburban district (Jiading) of Shanghai. Records of all prostate cancer cases reported to the Shanghai Cancer Registry from 2000 to 2009 for the two districts were reviewed. Prostate cancer outcomes were ascertained by matching cases with individual mortality data (up to 2010) from the National Death Register. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze factors associated with prostate cancer survival. Results A total of 1022 prostate cancer cases were diagnosed from 2000 to 2009. The average age of patients was 75 years. A rapid increase in incidence occurred during the study period. Compared with the year 2000, 2009 incidence was 3.28 times higher in Putuo and 5.33 times higher in Jiading. Prostate cancer mortality declined from 4.45 per 105 individuals per year in 2000 to 1.94 per 105 in 2009 in Putuo and from 5.45 per 105 to 3.5 per 105 in Jiading during the same period. One-year and 5-year prostate cancer survival rates were 95% and 56% in Putuo, and 88% and 51% in Jiading, respectively. Staging of disease, Karnofsky Performance Scale Index, and selection of chemotherapy were three independent factors influencing the survival of prostate cancer patients. Conclusions The prostate cancer incidence increased rapidly from 2000 to 2009, and prostate cancer survival rates decreased in urban and suburban Chinese populations. Early detection and prompt prostate cancer treatment is important for improving health and for increasing survival rates of the Shanghai male population. PMID:24731197

  7. Prostate cancer clinical presentation, incidence, mortality and survival in Guadeloupe over the period 2008-2013 from a population-based cancer registry.

    PubMed

    Deloumeaux, J; Bhakkan, B; Eyraud, R; Braud, F; Manip M'Ebobisse, N; Blanchet, P; Brureau, L

    2017-09-18

    The Caribbean population of Guadeloupe has one of the highest incidence rates of prostate cancer worldwide. In 2008, a population-based cancer registry was set up for the monitoring of cancer incidence in the aftermath of the environmental pollution with chlordecone, a persistent organochlorine insecticide formerly used in banana plantations. We describe the clinical presentation, incidence, mortality and survival of prostate cancer for the period 2008-2013. The Guadeloupe cancer registry has been routinely collecting all incident cases of cancer since 2008. We compared age-specific incidence rates between different populations, and calculated incidence and mortality rates standardized to the world population. Kaplan-Meier observed survival and estimated age-standardized net survival were calculated by category for age, PSA level, and Gleason score using the Pohar-Perme method. Overall, 3,295 cases of prostate cancer were recorded. World-standardized incidence and mortality were respectively 184.1 [177.8-190.4] and 23.9 [21.9-25.7] per 100,000 person-years. At diagnosis, the mean age of patients was 68 ± 9.6 years old and 22% were aged over 75. Median PSA level was 8.9 [IQR: 6.0-16.0] and 13.6% of the patients had a Gleason ≥ 8. Five-year observed and net survivals were, respectively, 79.6% [77.9-81.2] and 90.7% [88.6-92.8]. The incidence of prostate cancer in Guadeloupe is among the highest in the world, along with those of the neighboring Caribbean countries and US African-Americans. We observed no decrease in incidence rates, and a decreasing but non-significant trend in mortality rates, which nonetheless remain higher than in high-income countries. Many Genome-Wide Association Studies are conducted to identify genetic markers involved in prostate cancer risk. In the Caribbean, complementary studies on both lifestyle and behavioral factors should highlight potential common risks among populations who share both genetic and environmental

  8. Survival after colorectal cancer in patients with Crohn's disease: A nationwide population-based Danish follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Mette; Mose, Hanne; Gislum, Mette; Skriver, Mette V; Jepsen, Peter; Nørgård, Bente; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2007-01-01

    Patients with Crohn's disease (CD) are at increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but little is known about the impact of CD on CRC prognosis. Based on nationwide population-based registries, we compared survival among CRC patients with CD and CRC patients without CD. We used the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Hospital Discharge Registry to identify all patients diagnosed with CRC, with and without CD, in Denmark between 1977 and 1999. We ascertained the stage distribution at the time of CRC diagnosis and 1- and 5-yr survival both for patients with Crohn-associated CRC and patients with non-Crohn CRC. Cox regression was used to compute hazard ratios (HRs), adjusting for gender, age, calendar year, and stage. We identified 100 CRC patients with CD and 71,438 CRC patients without CD. At the time of diagnosis, patients with CD were younger, but stage distributions were similar in the two groups. The overall HR for CRC with CD compared to CRC without CD was 1.82 (95% CI 1.36-2.43) after 1 yr of follow-up, and 1.57 (95% CI 1.24-1.99) after 5 yr of follow-up. Subanalyses showed that the effect of CD on CRC survival was more pronounced in the youngest patients (0-59 yr), in men, and in patients whose tumors had regional spread. We found that CD worsens the prognosis of CRC, particularly CRC with regional spread.

  9. Social inequalities in non-small cell lung cancer management and survival: a population-based study in central Sweden.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Anders; Holmberg, Lars; Tishelman, Carol; Wagenius, Gunnar; Eaker, Sonja; Lambe, Mats

    2010-04-01

    To examine possible associations between socioeconomic status, management and survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a population-based cohort study, information was retrieved from the Regional Lung Cancer Register in central Sweden, the Cause of Death Register and a social database. ORs and HRs were compared to assess associations between educational level and management and survival. 3370 eligible patients with an NSCLC diagnosis between 1996 and 2004 were identified. There were no differences in stage at diagnosis between educational groups. A higher diagnostic intensity was observed in patients with high compared with low education. There were also social gradients in time between referral and diagnosis in early stage disease (median time: low, 32 days; high, 17 days). Social differences in treatment remained following adjustment for prognostic factors (surgery in early stage disease, high vs low OR 2.84; CI 1.40 to 5.79). Following adjustment for prognostic factors and treatment, the risk of death in early stage disease was lower in women with a high education (high vs low HR 0.33; CI 0.14 to 0.77). The results of this study indicate that socioeconomically disadvantaged groups with NSCLC receive less intensive care. Low education remained an independent predictor of poor survival only in women with early stage disease. The exact underlying mechanisms of these social inequalities are unknown, but differences in access to care, co-morbidity and lifestyle factors may all contribute.

  10. Global surveillance of cancer survival 1995–2009: analysis of individual data for 25 676 887 patients from 279 population-based registries in 67 countries (CONCORD-2)

    PubMed Central

    Allemani, Claudia; Weir, Hannah K; Carreira, Helena; Harewood, Rhea; Spika, Devon; Wang, Xiao-Si; Bannon, Finian; Ahn, Jane V; Johnson, Christopher J; Bonaventure, Audrey; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Stiller, Charles; Silva, Gulnar Azevedo e; Chen, Wan-Qing; Ogunbiyi, Olufemi J; Rachet, Bernard; Soeberg, Matthew J; You, Hui; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Storm, Hans; Tucker, Thomas C; Coleman, Michel P

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Worldwide data for cancer survival are scarce. We aimed to initiate worldwide surveillance of cancer survival by central analysis of population-based registry data, as a metric of the effectiveness of health systems, and to inform global policy on cancer control. Methods Individual tumour records were submitted by 279 population-based cancer registries in 67 countries for 25·7 million adults (age 15–99 years) and 75 000 children (age 0–14 years) diagnosed with cancer during 1995–2009 and followed up to Dec 31, 2009, or later. We looked at cancers of the stomach, colon, rectum, liver, lung, breast (women), cervix, ovary, and prostate in adults, and adult and childhood leukaemia. Standardised quality control procedures were applied; errors were corrected by the registry concerned. We estimated 5-year net survival, adjusted for background mortality in every country or region by age (single year), sex, and calendar year, and by race or ethnic origin in some countries. Estimates were age-standardised with the International Cancer Survival Standard weights. Findings 5-year survival from colon, rectal, and breast cancers has increased steadily in most developed countries. For patients diagnosed during 2005–09, survival for colon and rectal cancer reached 60% or more in 22 countries around the world; for breast cancer, 5-year survival rose to 85% or higher in 17 countries worldwide. Liver and lung cancer remain lethal in all nations: for both cancers, 5-year survival is below 20% everywhere in Europe, in the range 15–19% in North America, and as low as 7–9% in Mongolia and Thailand. Striking rises in 5-year survival from prostate cancer have occurred in many countries: survival rose by 10–20% between 1995–99 and 2005–09 in 22 countries in South America, Asia, and Europe, but survival still varies widely around the world, from less than 60% in Bulgaria and Thailand to 95% or more in Brazil, Puerto Rico, and the USA. For cervical cancer

  11. Correlation of IL-27 genetic polymorphisms with the risk and survival of cervical cancer in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian; Yuan, Meng; Liu, Shuang; Duan, Xiaoyang; Chen, Juan

    2016-05-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) has been recognized as a pleiotropic cytokine with both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. However, there are no data about the role of IL-27 polymorphism in the development of cervical cancer. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in 380 patients with cervical cancer and 380 healthy controls to investigate the possible associations of IL-27 gene polymorphisms (-964A/G, 2905T/G, and 4730T/C), with susceptibility to cervical cancer and clinical outcome. Our results suggested that the IL-27 2905T/G was significantly associated with a decreased risk of cervical cancer (TG vs. TT, odds ratio (OR) = 0.77; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.60-0.86; GG vs. TT, OR = 0.95; 95 % CI = 0.72-0.96; TG+GG vs. TT, OR = 0.87; 95 % CI = 0.65-0.94). However, the genotype and allele frequencies of IL-27 (-964A/G and 4730T/C) polymorphisms in cervical cancer patients were not significantly different from controls. Further analysis showed IL-27 2905T/G genotypes were associated with advanced tumor stages of cervical cancer patients. More interestingly, the IL-27 2905T/G genotypes were statistically significantly associated with the survival in cervical cancer patients. Our results showed that the IL-27 2905T/G genotypes were associated with decreased susceptibility and development of cervical cancer in Chinese Han population.

  12. Effects of Type of Health Insurance Coverage on Colorectal Cancer Survival in Puerto Rico: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Ortiz, Karen J.; Ramírez-García, Roberto; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Ríos-González, Moraima Y.; Ortiz, Ana Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer represents a major health problem and an important economic burden in Puerto Rico. In the 1990's, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico implemented a health care reform through the privatization of the public health system. The goal was to ensure access to health services, eliminate disparities for medically indigent citizens and provide special coverage for high-risk conditions such as cancer. This study estimates the 5-year relative survival rate of colorectal cancer and the relative excess risk of death in Puerto Rico for 2004–2005, by type of health insurance coverage; Government Health Plan vs. Non-Government Health Plan. Colorectal cancer in advanced stages was more common in Government Health Plan patients compared with Non-Government Health Plan patients (44.29% vs. 40.24 had regional extent and 13.58% versus 10.42% had distant involvement, respectively). Government Health Plan patients in the 50–64 (RR = 6.59; CI: 2.85–15.24) and ≥65 (RR = 2.4; CI: 1.72–4.04) age-groups had the greater excess risk of death compared with Non-Government Health Plan patients. Further studies evaluating the interplay of access to health services and the barriers affecting the Government Health Plan population are warranted. PMID:24796444

  13. Disparities in Adolescent and Young Adult Survival After Testicular Cancer Vary by Histologic Subtype: A Population-Based Study in California 1988–2010

    PubMed Central

    Mujahid, Mahasin; Srinivas, Sandy; Keegan, Theresa H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Testicular cancer is the most common cancer among adolescent and young adult (AYA) men 15–39 years of age. This study aims to determine whether race/ethnicity and/or neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) contribute independently to survival of AYAs with testicular cancer. Methods: Data on 14,249 eligible AYAs with testicular cancer diagnosed in California between 1988 and 2010 were obtained from the population-based California Cancer Registry. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine overall and testicular cancer-specific survival and survival for the seminoma and nonseminoma histologic subtypes according to race/ethnicity, census-tract level neighborhood SES, and other patient and clinical characteristics. Results: Compared with White AYAs, Hispanic AYAs had worse overall and testicular cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07–1.37) and Black AYAs had worse overall survival (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.01–1.97), independent of neighborhood SES and other demographic and clinical factors. Racial/ethnic disparities in survival were more pronounced for nonseminoma than for seminoma. AYAs residing in middle and low SES neighborhoods experienced worse survival across both histologic subtypes independent of race/ethnicity and other factors, while improvements in survival over time were more pronounced for seminoma. Longer time to treatment was also associated with worse survival, particularly for AYAs with nonseminoma. Conclusion: Among AYAs, race/ethnicity, and neighborhood SES are independently associated with survival after testicular cancer. Variation in disparities by histologic type according to demographic factors, year of diagnosis, and time to treatment may reflect differences in prognosis and extent of treatment for the two histologies. PMID:26812451

  14. Age-dependent improvement in median and long-term survival in unselected population-based Nordic registries of patients with synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sorbye, H; Cvancarova, M; Qvortrup, C; Pfeiffer, P; Glimelius, B

    2013-09-01

    In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) trials, median survival has increased from 6 months to above 20 months during the previous decades. Uncertainty exists in how this survival improvement has translated to the general mCRC population. Survival data from patients with synchronous mCRC were collected from the Norwegian (1980-2008), Swedish (1996-2008) and Danish (2001-09) cancer registries. A total of 29 628 patients were identified. From 1980-1985 to 2006-2008, median survival increased from 5 to 10 months for Norwegian patients. Three-year survival increased from 7% to 21% and 5-year survival from 4% to 9%. For patients <60 years, median survival was doubled to 16 months, 3-year survival increased fourfold up to 28% and 5-year survival threefold up to 14%. Similar improvements were seen in Sweden and Denmark. In all countries, the improved outcome was seen especially for younger patients and much less for patients >75 years of age. An increase in median and long-term survival over time was found in unselected population-based registries of patients with synchronous mCRC. The improved outcome in survival was especially seen in younger patients, raising concerns over our ability to adapt available treatment options for elderly patients.

  15. Age and case mix-standardised survival for all cancer patients in Europe 1999-2007: Results of EUROCARE-5, a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Baili, Paolo; Di Salvo, Francesca; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Siesling, Sabine; Mallone, Sandra; Santaquilani, Mariano; Micheli, Andrea; Lillini, Roberto; Francisci, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Overall survival after cancer is frequently used when assessing a health care service's performance as a whole. It is mainly used by the public, politicians and the media, and is often dismissed by clinicians because of the heterogeneous mix of different cancers, risk factors and treatment modalities. Here we give survival details for all cancers combined in Europe, correlating it with economic variables to suggest reasons for differences. We computed age and cancer site case-mix standardised relative survival for all cancers combined (ACRS) for 29 countries participating in the EUROCARE-5 project with data on more than 7.5million cancer cases from 87 population-based cancer registries, using complete and period approach. Denmark, United Kingdom (UK) and Eastern European countries had lower survival than neighbouring countries. Five-year ACRS has been increasing throughout Europe, and substantial increases, between 1999-2001 and 2005-2007, have been achieved in countries where survival was lower in the past. Five-year ACRS for men and women are positively correlated with macro-economic variables like the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and Total National Expenditure on Health (TNEH) (R(2) about 70%). Countries with recent larger increases in GDP and TNEH had greater increases in cancer survival. ACRS serves to compare all cancer survival in Europe taking account of the geographical variability in case-mixes. The EUROCARE-5 data on ACRS confirm previous EUROCARE findings. Survival appears to correlate with macro-economic determinants, particularly with investments in the health care system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cancer Survival in California Hispanic Farmworkers, 1988-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Jennifer L.; Mills, Paul K.; Riordan, Deborah G.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although epidemiologic studies have identified elevated cancer risk in farmworkers for some cancer types, little is known about cancer survival in this population. Purpose: To determine if cancer survival differs between a Hispanic farmworker population and the general Hispanic population in California. Methods: Hispanic United Farm…

  17. Cancer Survival in California Hispanic Farmworkers, 1988-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Jennifer L.; Mills, Paul K.; Riordan, Deborah G.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although epidemiologic studies have identified elevated cancer risk in farmworkers for some cancer types, little is known about cancer survival in this population. Purpose: To determine if cancer survival differs between a Hispanic farmworker population and the general Hispanic population in California. Methods: Hispanic United Farm…

  18. Angiogenic balance in pregnancy and subsequent breast cancer risk and survival: a population study.

    PubMed

    Vatten, Lars J; Romundstad, Pål R; Jenum, Pål A; Eskild, Anne

    2009-07-01

    Women with a history of preeclampsia have reduced breast cancer risk. Because preeclampsia is characterized by an imbalance in angiogenic factors, we assessed pregnancy levels of placental growth factor (PlGF), soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), and soluble endoglin (s-endoglin) and subsequent breast cancer risk. In a case-control study among 26,744 pregnant women, we compared angiogenic factors between 145 women who later developed invasive breast cancer and 400 controls. The angiogenic factors were determined with ELISA in blood samples collected in weeks (median) 10, 23, and 35 of the baseline pregnancy. Concentrations of PlGF, sFlt-1, and s-endoglin did not differ between women who later developed breast cancer and control women, and odds ratios across quartiles of each factor did not indicate any association in blood samples from gestational week 10, 23, or 35. During pregnancy, there was a general increase in each angiogenic factor, but degree of increase from one sampling period to the next was not associated with later breast cancer risk. Among cases, 22 of 145 died from breast cancer during 10 years of follow-up, but there was no consistent indication that angiogenic factors measured in pregnancy up to several years before diagnosis were associated with case fatality. The results of this nested case-control study, based on blood samples collected up to three time points during pregnancy, and subsequent cancer follow-up, do not provide any evidence that pregnancy levels of PlGF, sFlt-1, and s-endoglin are associated with breast cancer risk later in life.

  19. The application of cure models in the presence of competing risks: a tool for improved risk communication in population-based cancer patient survival.

    PubMed

    Eloranta, Sandra; Lambert, Paul C; Andersson, Therese M-L; Björkholm, Magnus; Dickman, Paul W

    2014-09-01

    Quantifying cancer patient survival from the perspective of cure is clinically relevant. However, most cure models estimate cure assuming no competing causes of death. We use a relative survival framework to demonstrate how flexible parametric cure models can be used in combination with competing-risks theory to incorporate noncancer deaths. Under a model that incorporates statistical cure, we present the probabilities that cancer patients (1) have died from their cancer, (2) have died from other causes, (3) will eventually die from their cancer, or (4) will eventually die from other causes, all as a function of time since diagnosis. We further demonstrate how conditional probabilities can be used to update the prognosis among survivors (eg, at 1 or 5 years after diagnosis) by summarizing the proportion of patients who will not die from their cancer. The proposed method is applied to Swedish population-based data for persons diagnosed with melanoma, colon cancer, or acute myeloid leukemia between 1973 and 2007.

  20. Five-Year Survival is Not a Useful Measure for Cancer Control in the Population: an Analysis Based on UK Data

    PubMed

    Li, Si Qi; Pan, Xiong Fei; Kashaf, Michael Saheb; Xue, Qing Ping; Luo, Hui Jing; Wang, Yan Yan; Wen, Ying; Yang, Chun Xia

    2017-02-01

    Background: Five-year survival is an important metric for progress in cancer control broadly used both in the cancer literature and by the public. In order to assess its validity and relation to other common metrics, we analyzed the relationship between 5-year survival, incidence and mortality using publicly available cancer registry data from England and Wales. Methods: Five-year survival, incidence and mortality data were obtained from the online database of a registered charity, Cancer Research UK. We extracted sex-specific age-standardized mortality, incidence, and 5-year survivalfor16 types of cancer over the period from 1976 to 1995. The relationships between 5-year survival, incidence and mortality were estimated using both Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients. Results: All 16cancer types showed an increase in 5-year survival for both genders from 1976 to 1995, ranging from 0.2% (pancreas and lung cancer) to 16.6% (prostate cancer) for males and 0.2% (pancreas cancer) to 16.6% (leukemia) for females. From 1976 to 1995, there was no significant correlation between changes in 5-year survival and cancer mortality for either sex (males, Pearson r=0.16, Spearman r=-0.06; females, Pearson r=-0.33, Spearman r=-0.43). A positive relationship between 5-year survival and incidence was noted among males, but not among females (males, Pearson r=0.61, Spearman r=0.53; females, Pearson r=0.03, Spearman r=0.11). However, after excluding breast and prostate cancer, the positive association became weaker and became statistically non-significant for males (Pearson r=0.47; Spearman r=0.41). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that there are no reliable relationships between changes in 5-year survival and cancer incidence or mortality. Increases in 5-year survival might therefore represent poor indicators of progress in cancer control at the population level. In the absence of over-diagnosis, 5-year survival might only indicate improved diagnosis and treatment in

  1. Five-Year Survival is Not a Useful Measure for Cancer Control in the Population: an Analysis Based on UK Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si Qi; Pan, Xiong Fei; Kashaf, Michael Saheb; Xue, Qing Ping; Luo, Hui Jing; Wang, Yan Yan; Wen, Ying; Yang, Chun Xia

    2017-01-01

    Background: Five-year survival is an important metric for progress in cancer control broadly used both in the cancer literature and by the public. In order to assess its validity and relation to other common metrics, we analyzed the relationship between 5-year survival, incidence and mortality using publicly available cancer registry data from England and Wales. Methods: Five-year survival, incidence and mortality data were obtained from the online database of a registered charity, Cancer Research UK. We extracted sex-specific age-standardized mortality, incidence, and 5-year survivalfor16 types of cancer over the period from 1976 to 1995. The relationships between 5-year survival, incidence and mortality were estimated using both Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients. Results: All 16cancer types showed an increase in 5-year survival for both genders from 1976 to 1995, ranging from 0.2% (pancreas and lung cancer) to 16.6% (prostate cancer) for males and 0.2% (pancreas cancer) to 16.6% (leukemia) for females. From 1976 to 1995, there was no significant correlation between changes in 5-year survival and cancer mortality for either sex (males, Pearson r=0.16, Spearman r=-0.06; females, Pearson r=-0.33, Spearman r=-0.43). A positive relationship between 5-year survival and incidence was noted among males, but not among females (males, Pearson r=0.61, Spearman r=0.53; females, Pearson r=0.03, Spearman r=0.11). However, after excluding breast and prostate cancer, the positive association became weaker and became statistically non-significant for males (Pearson r=0.47; Spearman r=0.41). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that there are no reliable relationships between changes in 5-year survival and cancer incidence or mortality. Increases in 5-year survival might therefore represent poor indicators of progress in cancer control at the population level. In the absence of over-diagnosis, 5-year survival might only indicate improved diagnosis and treatment in

  2. One-Carbon Metabolism and Breast Cancer Survival in a Population-Based Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    association of one-carbon metabolism polymorphisms and overall survival was different by ER/PR status for several polymorphisms, i.e. MTHFR C677T (p...survival ER/PR status Chemotheray + - yes no Gene Genotype HR HR HR HR MTHFR 0 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) (C677T) 1 1.47 0.61 1.13...0.86 P,int 0.05 0.55 MTHFR 0 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) (A1208C) 1 1.27 0.66 1.22 0.91 P,int 0.13 0.64 TSTR 0 1.00(ref

  3. Pathological factors associated with survival benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT): a population-based study of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Booth, Christopher M; Siemens, D Robert; Wei, Xuejiao; Peng, Yingwei; Berman, David M; Mackillop, William J

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate whether pathological factors are associated with differential effect of adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT). In this population-based retrospective cohort study, we linked electronic records of treatment and surgical pathology to the Ontario Cancer Registry. The study population included all patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer undergoing cystectomy in Ontario 1994-2008. Factors associated with overall (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards. We tested for interaction between the following variables and ACT effect-size: N-stage, margin status, T-stage, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI). The study population included 2802 patients; 19% were treated with ACT. Interaction terms with ACT for OS/CSS are: N-stage (both P < 0.001); margin status (P = 0.054/P = 0.048); T-stage (P = 0.509/P = 0.286); and LVI (P = 0.361/P = 0.405). Magnitude of effect for ACT was greater for patients with node-positive disease [OS: hazard ratio (HR) 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47-0.67; CSS: HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.49-0.72] than for patients with node-negative disease (OS: HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.61-1.03; CSS: HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.59-1.07). ACT was also associated with greater effect among patients with involved margins (OS: HR 0.45, 95% CI 0.33-0.62; CSS: HR 0.40, 95% CI 0.28-0.57) compared with patients with negative margins (OS: HR 0.75, 95% CI 0.65-0.87; CSS: HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.67-0.93). In this population-based cohort study we observe evidence of interaction between ACT effect and nodal stage and surgical margin status. Our results suggest that patients at highest risk of disease recurrence may derive greatest benefit from ACT. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Social inequality in incidence of and survival from cancer in a population-based study in Denmark, 1994-2003: Summary of findings.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Schüz, Joachim; Engholm, Gerda; Johansen, Christoffer; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Storm, Hans H; Olsen, Jørgen H

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this nationwide, population register-based study was to describe variations in cancer incidence and survival by social position in a social welfare state, Denmark, on the basis of a range of socioeconomic, demographic and health-related indicators. Our study population comprised all 3.22 million Danish residents born in 1925-1973 and aged >or=30 years, who were followed up for cancer incidence in 1994-2003 and for survival in 1994-2006, yielding 147,973 cancers. The incidence increased with lower education and income, especially for tobacco- and other lifestyle-related cancers, although for cancers of the breast and prostate and malignant melanoma the association was inverse. Conversely there was a general increase in incidence among early retirement pensioners, persons living in rented housing and those living in the smallest dwellings. Also incidence rates were generally higher in persons living alone compared to those living with a partner and in the capital area compared to the rural areas. Social inequality in the prognosis of most cancers was observed, despite the equal access to health care in Denmark, with poorer relative survival related to fewer advantages, regardless of how they were measured, often most pronounced in the first year after diagnosis. Also living alone and having somatic or psychiatric comorbidity negatively impacted the relative survival after most cancers. Our study shows that inequalities in cancer incidence and survival must be addressed in all aspects of public health, with interventions both to reduce incidence and to prolong survival.

  5. Socioeconomic disparities in breast cancer incidence and survival among parous women: findings from a population-based cohort, 1964-2008.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Mandy; Calderon-Margalit, Ronit; Paltiel, Ora; Abu Ahmad, Wiessam; Friedlander, Yechiel; Harlap, Susan; Manor, Orly

    2015-11-19

    Socioeconomic position (SEP) has been associated with breast cancer incidence and survival. We examined the associations between two socioeconomic indicators and long-term breast cancer incidence and survival in a population-based cohort of parous women. Residents of Jerusalem who gave birth between 1964-1976 (n = 40,586) were linked to the Israel Cancer Registry and Israel Population Registry to determine breast cancer incidence and vital status through mid-2008. SEP was assessed by husband's occupation and the woman's education. We used log ranks tests to compare incidence and survival curves by SEP, and Cox proportional hazard models to adjust for demographic, reproductive and diagnostic factors and assess effect modification by ethnic origin. In multivariable models, women of high SEP had a greater risk of breast cancer compared to women of low SEP (Occupation: HR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.03-1.35; Education: HR 1.39, 95 % CI 1.21-1.60) and women of low SEP had a greater risk of mortality after a breast cancer diagnosis (Occupation: HR 1.33, 95 % CI 1.04-1.70; Education: HR 1.37, 95 % CI 1.06-1.76). The association between education and survival was modified by ethnic origin, with a gradient effect observed only among women of European origin. Women of Asian, North African and Israeli origin showed no such trend. SEP was associated with long-term breast cancer incidence and survival among Israeli Jews. Education had a stronger effect on breast cancer outcomes than occupation, suggesting that a behavioral mechanism may underlie disparities. More research is needed to explain the difference in the effect of education on survival among European women compared to women of other ethnicities.

  6. One-Carbon Metabolism and Breast Cancer Survival in a Population-Based Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    1. All genotype distributions at these three loci were in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium. In addition, genotyping for the MTHFR 677C>T...95%CI 1.04-2.06). MTHFR 677 C-- > T GENOTYPF AND BC SURV’,[VAL HR: 1.46 (1.04 -- 2.06) MTHFR 677 C->T Genotype------ TT or CT CC Overall survival ofthe...BC cases in the LIBCSP affected by MTHFR 677 C-.T genotypes: CC versus TT or CT c. Study associations of one-carbon metabolism (diet and polymorphism

  7. Sodium channel-inhibiting drugs and survival of breast, colon and prostate cancer: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, Caroline; Watt, Ian; Martin, Fabiola; Bland, Martin; Brackenbury, William J

    2015-11-18

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) regulate invasion and metastasis. Several VGSC-inhibiting drugs reduce metastasis in murine cancer models. We aimed to test the hypothesis that patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs who developed cancer live longer than those not taking these drugs. A cohort study was performed on primary care data from the QResearch database, including patients with breast, bowel or prostate cancer. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare the survival from cancer diagnosis of patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs with those not exposed to these drugs. Median time to death was 9.7 years in the exposed group and 18.4 years in the unexposed group, and exposure to these medications significantly increased mortality. Thus, exposure to VGSC-inhibiting drugs associates with reduced survival in breast, bowel and prostate cancer patients. This finding is not consistent with the preclinical data. Despite the strengths of this study including the large sample size, the study is limited by missing information on potentially important confounders such as cancer stage, co-morbidities and cause of death. Further research, which is able to account for these confounding issues, is needed to investigate the relationship between VGSC-inhibiting drugs and cancer survival.

  8. Sodium channel-inhibiting drugs and survival of breast, colon and prostate cancer: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Fairhurst, Caroline; Watt, Ian; Martin, Fabiola; Bland, Martin; Brackenbury, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) regulate invasion and metastasis. Several VGSC-inhibiting drugs reduce metastasis in murine cancer models. We aimed to test the hypothesis that patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs who developed cancer live longer than those not taking these drugs. A cohort study was performed on primary care data from the QResearch database, including patients with breast, bowel or prostate cancer. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare the survival from cancer diagnosis of patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs with those not exposed to these drugs. Median time to death was 9.7 years in the exposed group and 18.4 years in the unexposed group, and exposure to these medications significantly increased mortality. Thus, exposure to VGSC-inhibiting drugs associates with reduced survival in breast, bowel and prostate cancer patients. This finding is not consistent with the preclinical data. Despite the strengths of this study including the large sample size, the study is limited by missing information on potentially important confounders such as cancer stage, co-morbidities and cause of death. Further research, which is able to account for these confounding issues, is needed to investigate the relationship between VGSC-inhibiting drugs and cancer survival. PMID:26577038

  9. Trend analysis and survival of primary gallbladder cancer in the United States: a 1973-2009 population-based study.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Rubayat; Simoes, Eduardo J; Schmaltz, Chester; Jackson, Christian S; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2017-04-01

    Primary gallbladder cancer is an aggressive and uncommon cancer with poor outcomes. Our study examines epidemiology, trend, and survival of gallbladder cancer in the United States from 1973 to 2009. We utilized the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database (SEER). Frequency and rate analyses on demographics, stage, and survival were compared among non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, African American, and Asian/Pacific Islanders. A total of 18,124 cases were reported in SEER from 1973 to 2009 comprising 1.4% of all reported gastrointestinal cancers. Gallbladder cancer was more common in females than males (71 vs. 29%, respectively). The age-adjusted incidence rate was 1.4 per 100,000, significantly higher in females than males (1.7 vs. 1.0). Trend analysis showed that the incidence rate has been decreasing over the last three decades for males. However, among females, the incidence rate had decreased from 1973 to mid-90s but has remained stable since then. Trend analysis for stage at diagnosis showed that the proportion of late-stage cases has been increasing significantly since 2001 after a decreasing pattern since 1973. Survival has improved considerably over time, and survival is better in females than males and in Asian/Pacific Islanders than other racial groups. The highest survival was in patients who received both surgery and radiation. Trend analysis revealed a recent increase of the incidence of late-stage gallbladder cancer. Highest survival was associated with receiving both surgery and radiation. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Variables affecting survival after second primary lung cancer: A population-based study of 187 Hodgkin's lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Milano, Michael T.; Li, Huilin; Constine, Louis S.; Travis, Lois B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients successfully treated for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) are at known risk for subsequent malignancies, the most common of which is lung cancer. To date, no population-based study has analyzed prognostic variables for overall survival (OS) among HL survivors who developed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods For 187 HL patients who developed NSCLC (among 22,648 HL survivors), we examined the impact of the following variables on OS after NSCLC diagnosis: gender, race, sociodemographic status (based upon county of residence), calendar year and age at NSCLC diagnosis, NSCLC histology and grade, HL stage and subtype, radiation for HL and latency between HL and NSCLC. Patients were grouped by NSCLC stage as follows: localized, regional or distant. All patients were reported to the population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. For those variables significant on univariate analyses, hazard ratios (HR) were derived from Cox proportional hazards model. Results Sociodemogaphic status, gender and latency between NSCLC and HL did not significantly affect OS of any NSCLC stage group. For patients with localized NSCLC, a history of mixed celluarlity HL was associated with a 3-fold improved OS (P=0.006). For patients with regional NSCLC, prior radiotherapy for HL was associated with a 2-fold worse OS (P=0.025). Conclusions A history of mixed cellularity HL subtype and a history of no radiotherapy for HL are favorable prognostic factors among patients who develop NSCLC. Further research into clinicopathologic and treatment-associated variables potentially affecting OS after second primary NSCLC among HL survivors is warranted. PMID:22295164

  11. Processes of care and the impact of surgical volumes on cancer-specific survival: a population-based study in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Siemens, D Robert; Mackillop, William J; Peng, Yingwei; Berman, David; Elharram, Ahmed; Rhee, Jonathan; Booth, Christopher M

    2014-11-01

    To describe the relationships between procedure volume and late survival after cystectomy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) and explore variables explaining any effect. Electronic records of treatment and surgical pathology reports were linked to a population-based registry to identify patients who underwent cystectomy during 1994-2008 in Ontario, Canada. Explanatory variables included adjuvant chemotherapy, lymph node dissection (LND), and margin status. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to explore associations between volume and cancer-specific survival (CSS) as well as overall survival. The cohort included 2802 MIBC patients treated with cystectomy. High-volume hospitals were more likely to have used adjuvant chemotherapy (25% vs 18%; P <.001), more likely to have performed an LND (83% vs 53%; P <.001), and associated with a lower 90-day mortality (6% vs 10%; P = .032). Low-volume hospitals had a lower 5-year CSS rate of 32% (28%-36%) compared with those of high-volume centers at 38% (33%-42%). Individual surgeon volume was similarly associated with both early- and long-term outcomes. In multivariate analysis, both surgeon and hospital volumes were associated with CSS and overall survival. The surgeon volume effect on long-term outcomes was modestly modified by indicators of the quality of the LND, with little effect of the other explanatory variables. Higher provider volume is associated with higher CSS in patients with MIBC in the general population. The volume effect was modestly mediated by the quality of LND. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Survival of European adolescents and young adults diagnosed with cancer in 2000-07: population-based data from EUROCARE-5.

    PubMed

    Trama, Annalisa; Botta, Laura; Foschi, Roberto; Ferrari, Andrea; Stiller, Charles; Desandes, Emmanuel; Maule, Milena Maria; Merletti, Franco; Gatta, Gemma

    2016-07-01

    Data from EUROCARE have consistently shown lower survival for adolescents and young adults (AYAs; aged 15-24 years) than for children (0-14 years) for most cancers that affect both groups, and modest survival improvements up to 2000-02. AYAs have longer survival than that of adults for most cancers. We used the latest definition of AYAs (aged 15-39 years) and provided estimates of 5-year relative survival for European AYAs with cancer diagnosed in 2000-07, compared with children and adults (40-69 years) with cancer, and assessed survival improvements over time. We analysed data from population-based cancer registries of 27 European countries participating in EUROCARE-5. We used the so-called complete method to estimate 5-year, population-weighted relative survival for 19 cancers affecting AYAs and children, and for 27 cancers affecting AYAs and adults. We assessed relative-survival differences between children versus AYAs, and between AYAs versus adults, using the Z test. We used the period approach to estimate 5-year relative survival over time for children and AYAs, and used a generalised linear model to model survival time trends (1999-2007) and to assess the significance of changes over time. We analysed 56 505 cancer diagnoses in children, 312 483 in AYAs, and 3 567 383 in adults. For all cancers combined, survival improved over time for AYAs (from 79% [95% CI 78·1-80·5] in 1999-2002 to 82% [81·1-83·3] in 2005-07; p<0·0001) and children (from 76% [74·7-77·1] to 79% [77·2-79·4]; p<0·0001). Survival improved significantly in children and AYAs for acute lymphoid leukaemia (p<0·0001) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (p<0·0001 in AYAs and p=0·023 in children). Survival improved significantly in AYAs only for CNS tumours (p=0·0046), astrocytomas (p=0·040), and malignant melanomas (p<0·0001). Survival remained significantly worse in AYAs than in children for eight important cancers: acute lymphoid leukaemias, acute myeloid leukaemias, Hodgkin

  13. One-Carbon Metabolism and Breast Cancer Survival in a Population-Based Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    overall survival was different by ER/PR status for several polymorphisms, i.e. MTHFR C677T (p,int = 0.05). ER/PR status significantly modified the effect...Genotype HR HR HR HR MTHFR 0 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) (C677T) 1 1.47 0.61 1.13 0.86 P,int 0.05 0.55 MTHFR 0 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref...1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) (A2756G) 1 0.66 0.84 0.83 1.33 P,int 0.64 0.5 MTRR 0 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) 1.00(ref) (A66G) 1 0.59 0.70

  14. Malignant ovarian germ cell tumors: presentation, survival and second cancer in a population based Norwegian cohort (1953-2009).

    PubMed

    Solheim, O; Kærn, J; Tropé, C G; Rokkones, E; Dahl, A A; Nesland, J M; Fosså, S D

    2013-11-01

    To quantify and compare survival in women with malignant ovarian germ cell tumors (MOGCTs) in Norway before and after the introduction of cisplatin-based chemotherapy (around 1980), and to explore the association between different types of treatment and the development of a second cancer. We identified 351 patients diagnosed with MOGCTs from 1953 to 2009 in the Cancer Registry of Norway. Ovarian cancer-specific survival was calculated separately for patients diagnosed before and after 1980. Patients were divided into subgroups by histological subtype (pure dysgerminoma, malignant teratoma, other MOGCTs) and extent of disease (localized and metastatic). We estimated the cumulative incidence of a second cancer in 10-year MOGCT survivors. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used, and p<0.05 was considered significant. 20-Year ovarian cancer-specific survival increased from 59% (95% CI 51% to 66%) before 1980 to 88% (95% CI 83%-93%) thereafter. Significant improvement was observed in all subgroups. No second cancer was diagnosed in any of 31 10-year MOGCT survivors treated with surgery only; second cancer was diagnosed in 23 of 139 patients who underwent cytotoxic treatment (98 radiotherapy ± chemotherapy, 41 chemotherapy only; p=0.08). Patients aged >50 years had a significantly poorer ovarian cancer-specific survival than younger patients (HR=5.98, 95% CI 3.39-10.57) after adjustment for histological subtype and stage at presentation. Our results favor the treatment of patients with metastatic MOGCTs at large cancer centers. Today women with MOGCTs have an excellent prognosis if treated according to modern therapeutic principles. © 2013.

  15. Trends in net survival from breast cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Roche, Laurent; Buzzoni, Carlotta; di Costanzo, Francesco; Molinié, Florence; Caldarella, Adele

    2017-01-01

    Survival from breast cancer (BC) is influenced by the timeliness of diagnosis and appropriateness of treatment, and may constitute a measure of the global effectiveness of a healthcare system. As the healthcare systems of several European Latin countries have some similarities, the search for differences in cancer survival may provide interesting information on the efficacy of these systems. The SUDCAN study is a collaboration between the Group for Epidemiology and Cancer Registration in Latin language countries (GRELL) and EUROCARE. BC data from six countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Switzerland) were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, we focus on 1- and 5-year age-standardized net survival (NS) from BC by country over the 2000-2004 period. Then, trends in NS over the 1989-2004 period and changes in the pattern of cancer excess mortality rate (EMR) up to 5 years after diagnosis were examined using a multivariate EMR model. There were little differences in age-standardized NS from BC. Over the 2000-2004 period, the 5-year survival ranged between 82 (Spain, Belgium, and Portugal) and 86% (France). There was an increase in age-standardized survival between 1989 and 2004 at 1 year as well as at 5 years. This increase was observed at all ages and in all countries. There was a decrease in the cancer EMR both immediately after diagnosis and by the second and third year of follow-up. There were only minor differences in survival from BC between European Latin countries. The general improvement in NS is presumably because of advances in early cancer diagnosis and improvements in treatment.

  16. Socio-economic factors and health care system characteristics related to cancer survival in the elderly. A population-based analysis in 16 European countries (ELDCARE project).

    PubMed

    Quaglia, Alberto; Vercelli, Marina; Lillini, Roberto; Mugno, Eugenio; Coebergh, Jan Willem; Quinn, Mike; Martinez-Garcia, Carmen; Capocaccia, Riccardo; Micheli, Andrea

    2005-05-01

    The ELDCARE study aims to investigate, at the ecological level, the relationships between socio-economic variables and cancer survival in patients aged 65 years and over. Survival data for patients diagnosed during the period 1985-1989 and followed up to 1994 were provided by 43 European Cancer Registries in 16 countries participating in the EUROCARE 2 project. Relative survival was computed by Hakulinen's methods. Data on socio-economic factors were collected by national statistics offices for the years around 1991. Pearson's correlation was used to study the relationships between cancer survival and socio-economic factors. We selected four groups of variables. The first group included macro-economic variables (such as Gross Domestic Product, GDP; Total Health Expenditure, THE); the second, the main characteristics of national health care systems; the third, demographic factors; and the fourth, variables on labour market organisation. The countries with the largest proportions of elderly populations, in Northern and Western Europe, spent more on health than the less affluent countries of Eastern Europe. GDP was strongly related to THE but a very high variability in Computed Tomography Scanners (CTS) among countries with similar THE was observed. Indeed, those countries with THE around US 1500 dollars per capita had survival rates for breast cancer ranging from 67 to 82%. Cancer survival in elderly patients in Europe was most strongly related to GDP and THE, especially for good prognosis cancers. Survival was strongly correlated with health care technologies, particularly CTS, but not with health employment. Survival was positively correlated with proportion of married elderly people (and negatively with widowed elderly), suggesting a role played by social support in influencing the prognosis of elderly patients. These results highlight how health outcomes in the elderly are a complex phenomenon, not determined only by GDP and THE, but affected by social

  17. Breast Cancer Stage, Surgery, and Survival Statistics for Idaho’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program Population, 2004–2012

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Robert; Moran, Patti; Cariou, Charlene; Bordeaux, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides access to breast and cervical cancer screening for low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women in all states and US territories. In Idaho, a rural state with very low breast and cervical cancer screening rates, this program is called Women’s Health Check (WHC). The program has been operating continuously since 1997 and served 4,719 enrollees in 2013. The objective of this study was to assess whether disparities existed in cause-specific survival (a net survival measure representing survival of a specified cause of death in the absence of other causes of death) between women screened by WHC and outside WHC and to determine how type of surgery or survival varies with stage at diagnosis. Methods WHC data were linked to Idaho’s central cancer registry to compare stage distribution, type of surgery, and cause-specific survival between women with WHC-linked breast cancer and a comparison group of women whose records did not link to the WHC database (nonlinked breast cancer). Results WHC-linked breast cancer was significantly more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage of disease than nonlinked breast cancer. Because of differences in stage distribution between WHC-linked and nonlinked breast cancers, overall age-standardized, cause-specific breast cancer survival proportions diverged over time, with a 5.1 percentage-point deficit in survival among WHC-linked cases at 5 years of follow-up (83.9% vs 89.0%). Differences in type of surgery and cause-specific survival were attenuated when controlling for stage. Conclusion This study suggests that disparities may exist for Idaho WHC enrollees in the timely diagnosis of breast cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first study to publish comparisons of cause-specific breast cancer survival between NBCCEDP-linked and nonlinked cases. PMID:25789497

  18. Survival of older patients with metastasised breast cancer lags behind despite evolving treatment strategies--a population-based study.

    PubMed

    de Glas, N A; Bastiaannet, E; de Craen, A J M; van de Velde, C J H; Siesling, S; Liefers, G J; Portielje, J E A

    2015-02-01

    Older women are more likely to be diagnosed with primary metastasised breast cancer than their younger counterparts. Evolving treatment strategies of metastasised breast cancer have resulted in improved survival in younger patients, but it remains unclear if this improvement has occurred in older patients as well. The aim of this study was to assess changes in treatment strategies over time in relation to overall and relative survival of older patients compared to younger patients with primary metastasised breast cancer. All patients with a breast cancer diagnosis and distant metastases at first presentation (stage IV), between 1990 and 2012, were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Changes in treatment over time per age-group (<65 years, 65-75 years and >75 years) were assessed using logistic regression. Overall survival over time was calculated using Cox Regression Models and relative survival was assessed using the Ederer II method. Overall, 14,310 patients were included. Treatment strategies have strongly changed in the past twenty years; especially the use of chemotherapy has increased (P<0.001 in all age-groups). Overall survival of patients <65 has significantly improved (Hazard Ratio (HR) per year 0.98, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.98-0.99, P<0.001), but the survival of older patients has not improved (HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.99-1.01, P=0.86 for patients aged 65-75 and HR 1.00, 95% CI 1.00-1.01, P=0.46 for patients aged >75). Similarly, relative survival has improved in patients <65 but not in women aged 65-75 and >75. Overall and relative survival of older patients with metastasised breast cancer at first presentation have not improved in recent years in contrast with the survival of younger patients, despite increased treatment with chemotherapy for women of all ages. Future studies should focus on stratification models that can be used to predict which patients may benefit from specific treatment options. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  19. Population estimates of survival in women with screen-detected and symptomatic breast cancer taking account of lead time and length bias.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gill; Wallis, Matthew; Allgood, Prue; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Warwick, Jane; Cafferty, Fay H; Houssami, Nehmat; Kearins, Olive; Tappenden, Nancy; O'Sullivan, Emma; Duffy, Stephen W

    2009-07-01

    Evidence of the impact of breast screening is limited by biases inherent in non-randomised studies and often by lack of complete population data. We address this by estimating the effect of screen detection on cause-specific fatality in breast cancer, corrected for all potential biases, using population cancer registry data. Subjects (N = 26,766) comprised all breast cancers notified to the West Midlands Cancer Intelligence Unit and diagnosed in women aged 50-74, from 1988 to 2004. These included 10,100 screen-detected and 15,862 symptomatic breast cancers (6,009 women with interval cancers and 9,853 who had not attended screening). Our endpoint was survival to death from breast cancer. We estimated the relative risk (RR) of 10-year cause-specific fatality (screen-detected compared to symptomatic cancers) correcting for lead time bias and performing sensitivity analyses for length bias. To exclude self-selection bias, survival analyses were also performed with interval cancers as the comparator symptomatic women. Uncorrected RR associated with screen-detection was 0.34 (95% CI 0.31-0.37). Correcting for lead time, RR was 0.49 (95% CI 0.45-0.53); length bias analyses gave a range of RR corrected for both phenomena of 0.49-0.59, with a median of 0.51. Self-selection bias-corrected estimates yielded a median RR of 0.68. After adjusting for various potential biases, women with screen-detected breast cancer have a substantial survival advantage over those with symptomatic breast cancer.

  20. Trends in the receipt of guideline care and survival for women with ovarian cancer: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Warren, Joan L; Harlan, Linda C; Trimble, Edward L; Stevens, Jennifer; Grimes, Melvin; Cronin, Kathleen A

    2017-06-01

    We assessed trends in the receipt of guideline care and 2-year cause-specific survival for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. This retrospective cohort analysis used National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies data for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2002 and 2011 (weighted n=6427). Data included patient characteristics, treatment type, and provider characteristics. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association of year of diagnosis with receipt of guideline surgery, multiagent chemotherapy, or both. Two-year cause-specific survival, 2002-2013, was assessed using SEER data. The adjusted rate of women who received stage-appropriate surgery, 48%, was unchanged from 2002 to 2011. Gynecologic oncologist (GO) consultations increased from 43% (2002) to 78% (2011). GO consultation was a significant predictor for receipt of guideline care, although only 40% of women who saw a GO received guideline surgery and chemotherapy. The percent of women who received guideline surgery and chemotherapy increased significantly from 32% in 2002 to 37% in 2011. From 2002 to 2011, 2-year cause-specific ovarian cancer survival was unchanged for Stages I-III cancers, with slight improvement for Stage IV cancers. Receipt of guideline care has improved modestly from 2002-2011 for women with ovarian cancer. Current treatment is far below clinical recommendations and may explain limited improvement in 2-year cause-specific survival. Most women consulted a GO in 2011 yet did not receive guideline care. There needs to be a better understanding of the decision-making process about treatment during the consultation with GOs and other factors precluding receipt of guideline care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Social inequality and incidence of and survival from cancer in a population-based study in Denmark, 1994-2003: Background, aims, material and methods.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Gislum, Mette; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Engholm, Gerda; Schüz, Joachim

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this register-based study was to identify variations in cancer incidence and survival after cancer in Denmark on the basis of a range of socioeconomic, demographic and health-related indicators. The indicators were level of education, disposable income, affiliation to the work market, social class, housing tenure, size of dwelling, cohabitation status, type of district, ethnicity, Charlson comorbidity index, depression and schizophrenia measured at the individual level on an annual basis. The study population comprised all Danish residents born between 1925 and 1973 and aged >or=30 years, who were followed up for cancer incidence in 1994-2003 and for survival in 1994-2006. The study was based on 3.22 million persons, yielding almost 26 million person-years and 147,973 cancers. In this paper, we provide a detailed description of the indicators and the statistical methods, and we discuss the strengths and limitations of our approach.

  2. Trends in net survival from kidney cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Mangone, Lucia; Bossard, Nadine; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Pezzarossi, Annamaria; Roncaglia, Francesca; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Kidney cancer is a frequent malignant disease. To date, there is no evidence on the effectiveness of early detection and, in most cases, surgery represents the only standard treatment. So far, there is no standardized therapy for localized and locally advanced renal tumors; however, the recent introduction of target therapy has significantly improved the prognosis of metastatic disease. Therefore, survival differences in Europe are deemed to involve differences in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the net survival from kidney cancer between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Switzerland) and provide trends in net survival and dynamics of excess mortality rates up to 5 years after diagnosis. The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, net survival was studied over the 2000-2004 period using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analysis, the study period was specific to each country. The results are reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland, and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. These analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modeling strategy. In 2000-2004, the 5-year net survival ranged between 59% (Spain) and 67% (France and Italy) in men and between 60% (Spain) and 73% (Portugal) in women. There was an increase in the age-standardized net survival between 1992 and 2004 at 1 year, as well as at 5 years, in all age groups and countries. Irrespective of the year of diagnosis, the excess mortality rate decreased with time elapsed since diagnosis. There are some differences in survival from kidney cancer between European Latin countries, but a considerable improvement was observed in most countries.

  3. Influence of Educational Level, Stage, and Histological Type on Survival of Oral Cancer in a Brazilian Population: A Retrospective Study of 10 Years Observation.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Thinali Sousa; de Barros Silva, Paulo Goberlânio; Sousa, Eric Fernandes; da Cunha, Maria do Pss; de Aguiar, Andréa Silvia Walter; Costa, Fábio Wildson Gurgel; Mota, Mário Rogério Lima; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Sousa, Fabrício Bitu

    2016-01-01

    The mortality rate associated with oral cancer is estimated at approximately 12,300 deaths per year, and the survival rate is only 40% to 50% for diagnosed patients and is closely related to the duration of time between disease perception and its diagnosis and treatment. Socioeconomic risk factors are determinants of the incidence and mortality related to oral cancer. We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study of 573 records of patients with oral cancer at Haroldo Juaçaba Hospital - Cancer Institute of Ceará from 2000 to 2009 to evaluate the influence of socioeconomic factors on survival and epidemiological behavior of this neoplasia in a Brazilian population. In this study, patients with oral cancer were males greater than 60 years of age, presented squamous cell carcinoma in the floor of mouth and were characterized by low education levels. A total of 573 lesions were found in oral cavities. Cox proportional hazards regression model showed that the histological type, tumor stage, and low degree of education significantly influenced survival. A lower patient survival rate was correlated with a more advanced stage of disease and a worse prognosis. Squamous cell carcinoma is associated with a higher mortality when compared with other histological types of malign neoplasia.

  4. Disparities in Breast Cancer Survival Among Asian Women by Ethnicity and Immigrant Status: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Christina A.; Shema, Sarah J.; Chang, Ellen T.; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Glaser, Sally L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated heterogeneity in ethnic composition and immigrant status among US Asians as an explanation for disparities in breast cancer survival. Methods. We enhanced data from the California Cancer Registry and the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program through linkage and imputation to examine the effect of immigrant status, neighborhood socioeconomic status, and ethnic enclave on mortality among Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, South Asian, and Vietnamese women diagnosed with breast cancer from 1988 to 2005 and followed through 2007. Results. US-born women had similar mortality rates in all Asian ethnic groups except the Vietnamese, who had lower mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.1, 0.9). Except for Japanese women, all foreign-born women had higher mortality than did US-born Japanese, the reference group. HRs ranged from 1.4 (95% CI = 1.2, 1.7) among Koreans to 1.8 (95% CI = 1.5, 2.2) among South Asians and Vietnamese. Little of this variation was explained by differences in disease characteristics. Conclusions. Survival after breast cancer is poorer among foreign- than US-born Asians. Research on underlying factors is needed, along with increased awareness and targeted cancer control. PMID:20299648

  5. Overall and cancer-specific survival of patients with breast, colon, kidney, and lung cancers with and without chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a SEER population-based study.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Benjamin M; Rabe, Kari G; Slager, Susan L; Brewer, Jerry D; Cerhan, James R; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2013-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is associated with an increased risk of developing second cancers. However, it is unknown whether CLL alters the disease course of these cancers once they occur. All patients with cancers of the breast (n = 579,164), colorectum (n = 412,366), prostate (n = 631,616), lung (n = 489,053), kidney (n = 95,795), pancreas (n = 82,116), and ovary (n = 61,937) reported to the SEER program from 1990 to 2007 were identified. Overall survival (OS; death resulting from any cause) and cancer-specific survival were examined, comparing patients with and without pre-existing CLL. Cancer-specific survival was evaluated for each tumor type in a site-specific manner (eg, death resulting from breast cancer in a patient with breast cancer). Patients with cancers of the breast (hazard ratio [HR], 1.70; P < .001), colorectum (HR, 1.65; P < .001), kidney (HR, 1.54; P < .001), prostate (HR, 1.92; P < .001), or lung (HR, 1.19; P < .001) had inferior OS if they had a pre-existing diagnosis of CLL after adjusting for age, sex, race, and disease stage. These results for OS remained significant for patients with cancers of the breast, colorectum, and prostate after excluding or censoring CLL-related deaths. Cancer-specific survival was also inferior for patients with cancers of the breast (HR, 1.41; P = .005) and colorectum (HR, 1.46; P < .001) who had pre-existing CLL after adjusting for age, sex, race, and disease stage. Inferior OS and cancer-specific survival was observed for several common cancers in patients with pre-existing CLL. Additional studies are needed to determine the optimal management of these malignancies in patients with CLL and whether more aggressive screening or alternative approaches to adjuvant therapy are needed.

  6. Endoscopic ultrasonography in esophageal cancer leads to improved survival rates: results from a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Wani, Sachin; Das, Ananya; Rastogi, Amit; Drahos, Jennifer; Ricker, Winifred; Parsons, Ruth; Bansal, Ajay; Yen, Roy; Hosford, Lindsay; Jankowski, Meghan; Sharma, Prateek; Cook, Michael B

    2015-01-15

    The advantages of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and computed tomography (CT)-positron emission tomography (PET) with respect to survival for esophageal cancer patients are unclear. This study aimed to assess the effects of EUS, CT-PET, and their combination on overall survival with respect to cases not receiving these procedures. Patients who were ≥66 years old when diagnosed with esophageal cancer were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database. Cases were split into 4 analytic groups: EUS only (n = 318), CT-PET only (n = 853), EUS+CT-PET (n = 189), and no EUS or CT-PET (n = 2439). Survival times were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared with the log-rank test for each group versus the no EUS or CT-PET group. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates. Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that EUS, CT-PET, and EUS+CT-PET patients had improved survival for all stages (with the exception of stage 0 disease) in comparison with patients undergoing no EUS or CT-PET. Receipt of EUS increased the likelihood of receiving endoscopic therapies, esophagectomy, and chemoradiation. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models showed that receipt of EUS was a significant predictor of improved 1- (hazard ratio [HR], 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-0.59; P < .0001), 3- (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.48-0.66; P < .0001), and 5-year survival (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.50-0.68). Similar results were noted when the results were stratified on the basis of histology and for the CT-PET and EUS+CT-PET groups. Receipt of either EUS or CT-PET alone in esophageal cancer patients was associated with improved 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival. Future studies should identify barriers to the dissemination of these staging modalities. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  7. The Impact of Socioeconomic Status, Surgical Resection and Type of Hospital on Survival in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer. A Population-Based Study in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van der Geest, Lydia G. M.; de Jong, Koert P.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of socioeconomic inequalities in pancreatic cancer patients and especially its effect in patients who had a resection is not known. Hospital type in which resection is performed might also influence outcome. Patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer from 1989 to 2011 (n = 34,757) were selected from the population-based Netherlands Cancer Registry. Postal code was used to determine SES. Multivariable survival analyses using Cox regression were conducted to discriminate independent risk factors for death. Patients living in a high SES neighborhood more often underwent resection and more often were operated in a university hospital. After adjustment for clinicopathological factors, risk of dying was increased independently for patients with intermediate and low SES compared to patients with high SES. After resection, no survival difference was found among patients in the three SES groups. However, survival was better for patients treated in university hospitals compared to patients treated in non-university hospitals. Low SES was an independent risk factor for poor survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. SES was not an adverse risk factor after resection. Resection in non-university hospitals was associated with a worse prognosis. PMID:27832174

  8. Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy Is Associated With Improved Survival in Node-Positive Male Breast Cancer: A Population Analysis.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Matthew J; Koffer, Paul P; Wazer, David E; Hepel, Jaroslaw T

    2017-06-01

    Because of its rarity, there are no randomized trials investigating postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in male breast cancer. This study retrospectively examines the impact of PMRT in male breast cancer patients in the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The SEER database 8.3.2 was queried for men ages 20+ with a diagnosis of localized or regional nonmetastatic invasive ductal/lobular carcinoma from 1998 to 2013. Included patients were treated by modified radical mastectomy (MRM), with or without adjuvant external beam radiation. Univariate and multivariate analyses evaluated predictors for PMRT use after MRM. Kaplan-Meier overall survival (OS) curves of the entire cohort and a case-matched cohort were calculated and compared by the log-rank test. Cox regression was used for multivariate survival analyses. A total of 1933 patients were included in the unmatched cohort. There was no difference in 5-year OS between those who received PMRT and those who did not (78% vs 77%, respectively, P=.371); however, in the case-matched analysis, PMRT was associated with improved OS at 5 years (83% vs 54%, P<.001). On subset analysis of the unmatched cohort, PMRT was associated with improved OS in men with 1 to 3 positive nodes (5-year OS 79% vs 72% P=.05) and those with 4+ positive nodes (5-year OS 73% vs 53% P<.001). On multivariate analysis of the unmatched cohort, independent predictors for improved OS were use of PMRT: HR=0.551 (0.412-0.737) and estrogen receptor-positive disease: HR=0.577 (0.339-0.983). Predictors for a survival detriment were higher grade 3/4: HR=1.825 (1.105-3.015), larger tumor T2: HR=1.783 (1.357-2.342), T3/T4: HR=2.683 (1.809-3.978), higher N-stage: N1 HR=1.574 (1.184-2.091), N2/N3: HR=2.328 (1.684-3.218), black race: HR=1.689 (1.222-2.336), and older age 81+: HR=4.164 (1.497-11.582). There may be a survival benefit with the addition of PMRT for male breast cancer with node-positive disease

  9. ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASONOGRAPHY IN ESOPHAGEAL CANCER LEADS TO IMPROVED SURVIVAL RATES: RESULTS FROM A POPULATION-BASED STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Sachin; Das, Ananya; Rastogi, Amit; Drahos, Jennifer; Ricker, Winifred; Parsons, Ruth; Bansal, Ajay; Yen, Roy; Hosford, Lindsay; Jankowski, Meghan; Sharma, Prateek; Cook, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The advantages of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and computed tomography-positron emission tomography (CT-PET) in relation to survival in esophageal cancer (EC) patients are unclear. This study aimed to assess the effect of EUS, CT-PET and its combination on overall survival relative to cases not receiving these procedures. Methods Patients aged ≥ 66 years diagnosed with EC were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database. Cases were split into four analytic groups: EUS only (n=318), CT-PET only (853), EUS+CT-PET (189) and “no EUS or CT-PET” (2,439). Survival times were estimated by Kaplan-Meier method and compared by using log-rank test for each group versus the “no EUS or CT-PET” group. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare 1, 3 and 5-year survival rates. Results Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that patients undergoing EUS, CT-PET and EUS+CT-PET had improved survival for all stages, all compared with “no EUS or CT-PET”, with the exception of stage 0 disease. Receipt of EUS increased the likelihood of receiving endoscopic therapies, esophagectomy and chemoradiation. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models showed that receipt of EUS was a significant predictor for improved 1-year (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.39–0.59, p<0.0001), 3-year (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.48–0.66, p<0.0001) and 5-year (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.50–0.68) survival. Similar results were noted when results were stratified based on histology, as well as for CT-PET and EUS+CT-PET groups. Conclusions Receipt of either EUS or CT-PET alone in EC patients is associated with improved 1, 3 and 5-year survival. Future studies should identify barriers to dissemination of these staging modalities. PMID:25236485

  10. Body Mass Index at Diagnosis and Breast Cancer Survival Prognosis in Clinical Trial Populations from NRG Oncology/NSABP B-30, B-31, B-34, and B-38.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Reena S; Swain, Sandra M; Costantino, Joseph P; Rastogi, Priya; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Anderson, Stewart J; Tang, Gong; Geyer, Charles E; Lembersky, Barry C; Romond, Edward H; Paterson, Alexander H G; Wolmark, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) has been associated with breast cancer outcomes. However, few studies used clinical trial settings where treatments and outcomes are consistently evaluated and documented. There are also limited data assessing how patient/disease characteristics and treatment may alter the BMI-breast cancer association. We evaluated 15,538 breast cancer participants from four NSABP protocols. B-34 studied early-stage breast cancer patients (N = 3,311); B-30 and B-38 included node-positive breast cancer patients (N = 5,265 and 4,860); and B-31 studied node-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer patients (N = 2,102). We used Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate adjusted hazards ratios (HR) for risk of death and recurrence, and conducted separate analyses by estrogen receptor (ER) status and treatment group. In B-30, increased BMI was significantly related to survival. Compared with BMI < 25, HRs were 1.04 for BMI 25 to 29.9 and 1.18 for BMI ≥ 30 (P = 0.02). Separate analyses indicated the significant relationship was only in ER-positive disease (P = 0.002) and the subgroup treated with doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (P = 0.005). There were no significant trends across BMI for the other three trials. Similar results were found for recurrence. Increased BMI was significantly related to recurrence in B-30 (P = 0.03); and the significant relationship was only in ER-positive breast cancers (P = 0.001). Recurrence was also significant among ER-positive disease in B-38 (P = 0.03). In our investigation, we did not find a consistent relationship between BMI at diagnosis and breast cancer recurrence or death. This work demonstrates that the heterogeneity of breast cancer between different breast cancer populations and the different therapies used to treat them may modify any association that exists between BMI and breast cancer outcome. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Invasion characteristics of oral tongue cancer: frequency of reporting and effect on survival in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Michael; Liu, Lihua; Ward, Kevin; Zhang, Juanjuan; Almon, Lyn; Su, Gan; Berglund, Lenard; Chen, Amy; Sinha, Uttam K; Young, John L

    2009-09-01

    The 2000 College of American Pathologists (CAP) guidelines recommend that a characterization of carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract, including tongue cancer, should include depth of invasion (DI) and the presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) or perineural invasion (PNI). This study included patients who were diagnosed with cancer of the oral tongue, who underwent tumor resection, and who were reported to either the Metropolitan Atlanta and Rural Georgia Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry or the Los Angeles SEER registry. The authors assessed the completeness of pathology reporting with respect to the documentation of PNI or LVI and DI. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine factors that influenced reporting while taking into consideration clustering of observations within the hospitals. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were conducted to examine the impact of tumor invasion characteristics on mortality while controlling for other prognostic factors. DI reporting increased from 13% between 1997 and 1999 to 23% between 2000 and 2004 after the CAP issued its recommendations; whereas mode of invasion (the presence of LVI and/or PNI) reporting for the same period increased from 13% to 38%. The observed increase in reporting was most pronounced in the first 2 years (2000 and 2001) and appeared to decline again afterward. Tumor invasion >3 mm in depth and the presence of PNI were among the strongest predictors of survival in multivariate analyses. The current results indicated the importance of reporting tumor invasion characteristics for patients diagnosed with cancer of the oral tongue. The findings also underscore the need for continuous monitoring of adherence to the CAP protocol.

  12. Obesity and gynecologic cancer etiology and survival.

    PubMed

    Webb, Penelope M

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States and elsewhere has increased dramatically in recent decades. It has long been known that obese women have an increased risk of developing endometrial cancer, but recent studies suggest this association is strongest for the most common low-grade endometrioid endometrial cancers and weaker for the other histologic subtypes. There are insufficient data to assess whether obesity affects endometrial cancer-specific survival or whether the relation with all-cause mortality is similar to that seen in the general population. Recent data suggest obesity also increases risk of ovarian cancer, although it may not influence risk of the high-grade serous cancers that account for the majority of ovarian cancer deaths, and that it is also associated with poorer outcomes. There is currently insufficient evidence to draw any clear conclusions regarding the relation between obesity and risk of/survival from other gynecologic cancers although there are suggestions that obesity may increase risk of cervical cancer, particularly adenocarcinoma, and perhaps vulvar cancer. Possible mechanisms whereby obesity might influence gynecologic cancer risk and survival include: its strong association with endogenous estrogen levels among postmenopausal women, its effects on glucose metabolism, its effects on the wide range of adipocytokines and inflammatory mediators that are produced by adipose tissue and altered in concentration among obese individuals, and its potential effects on patient management, particularly with regard to chemotherapy dosing.

  13. Increased incidence but improved median overall survival for biliary tract cancers diagnosed in Ontario from 1994 through 2012: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Flemming, Jennifer A; Zhang-Salomons, Jina; Nanji, Sulaiman; Booth, Christopher M

    2016-08-15

    To the authors' knowledge, the incidence of biliary tract cancer (BTC) in Canada is unknown. In the current study, the authors sought to describe the epidemiology of BTC using a large population-based cancer database from Ontario, Canada. The current study was a population-based cohort study using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC), extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHCC), and gallbladder cancer (GBC) diagnosed between 1994 and 2012 were included. Age-standardized incidence and mortality rates were compared using incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Overall survival from the time of diagnosis was calculated for 3 eras: 1994 through 1999, 2000 through 2005, and 2006 through 2012. The number of patients receiving chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery was determined using linked clinical data. A total of 9039 cases (1569 IHCC cases, 4337 EHCC cases, and 3133 GBC cases) were identified. The rate of BTC increased by 1.6% per year (IRR, 1.016; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.008-1.024 [P<.001]). The incidence increased by 7.0% per year among cases of IHCC (IRR, 1.070; 95% CI, 1.058-1.081 [P<.001]) and 1.8% per year in cases of EHCC (IRR, 1.018; 95% CI, 1.009-1.027 [P<.001]), whereas the incidence of GBC remained unchanged (IRR, 0.991; 95% CI, 0.982-1.001 [P = .086]). The median survival for the cohort was 8.3 months, with improvement noted over the study period (6.1 months for 1994-1999 vs 8.5 months for 2000-2005 vs 10.3 months for 2006-2012 [P<.001]). The median survival was the longest for EHCC (11.3 months), followed by GBC (6.4 months) and IHCC (6.2 months). The percentage of patients receiving chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy increased over the study (P<.001), whereas the percentage of patients receiving surgery decreased (P<.001). An increased incidence of BTC during 1994 through 2012 was observed. Explanations for the observed temporal improvement in median survival require further exploration. Cancer 2016

  14. Does KRAS Testing in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Impact Overall Survival? A Comparative Effectiveness Study in a Population-Based Sample

    PubMed Central

    Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Zeng, Chan; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Richards, C. Sue; Johnson, Monique A.; Kauffman, Tia L.; Webster, Jennifer; Nyirenda, Carsie; Alexander, Gwen L.; Hwang, Clara; Cross, Deanna; McCarty, Catherine A.; Davis, Robert L.; Schwarzkopf, Denise; Williams, Andrew E.; Honda, Stacey; Daida, Yihe; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Delate, Thomas; Goddard, Katrina A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors are approved for treating metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC); KRAS mutation testing is recommended prior to treatment. We conducted a non-inferiority analysis to examine whether KRAS testing has impacted survival in CRC patients. Patients and Methods We included 1186 metastatic CRC cases from seven health plans. A cutpoint of July, 2008, was used to define two KRAS testing time period groups: “pre-testing” (n = 760 cases) and “post-testing” (n = 426 cases). Overall survival (OS) was estimated, and the difference in median OS between the groups was calculated. The lower bound of the one-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) for the difference in survival was used to test the null hypothesis of post-testing inferiority. Multivariable Cox regression models were constructed to adjust for covariates. Results The median unadjusted OS was 15.4 months (95% CI: 14.0–17.5) and 12.8 months (95% CI: 10.0–15.2) in the pre- and post-testing groups, respectively. The OS difference was −2.6 months with one-sided 95% lower confidence bound of −5.13 months, which was less than the non-inferiority margin (−5.0 months, unadjusted p = 0.06), leading to a failure to reject inferiority of OS in the post-testing period. In contrast, in the adjusted analysis, OS non-inferiority was identified in the post-testing period (p = 0.001). Sensitivity analyses using cutpoints before and after July, 2008, also met the criteria for non-inferiority. Conclusion Implementation of KRAS testing did not influence CRC OS. Our data support the use of KRAS testing to guide administration of EGFR inhibitors for treatment of metastatic CRC without diminished OS. PMID:24788807

  15. Dietary intake of fish, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and survival after breast cancer: A population-based follow-up study on Long Island, New York.

    PubMed

    Khankari, Nikhil K; Bradshaw, Patrick T; Steck, Susan E; He, Ka; Olshan, Andrew F; Shen, Jing; Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Yu; Ahsan, Habibul; Terry, Mary Beth; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Neugut, Alfred I; Santella, Regina M; Gammon, Marilie D

    2015-07-01

    In laboratory experiments, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been found to reduce inflammatory eicosanoids resulting from ω-6 PUFA metabolism via competitive inhibition, and the ω-3-induced cytotoxic environment increases apoptosis and reduces cell growth in breast cancer cells. To the authors' knowledge, epidemiologic investigations regarding whether dietary ω-3 PUFA intake benefits survival after breast cancer are limited and inconsistent. The authors used resources from a population-based follow-up study conducted on Long Island, New York, among 1463 women newly diagnosed with first primary breast cancer who were interviewed an average of approximately 3 months after diagnosis to assess risk and prognostic factors, including dietary intake (using a food frequency questionnaire). Vital status was determined through 2011, yielding a median follow-up of 14.7 years and 485 deaths. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. All-cause mortality was reduced among women with breast cancer reporting the highest quartile of intake (compared with never) for tuna (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92), other baked/broiled fish (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97), and the dietary long-chain ω-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92) and eicosapentaenoic acid (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97). All-cause mortality was reduced by 16% to 34% among women with breast cancer who reported a high intake of fish and long-chain ω-3 PUFAs. Long-chain ω-3 PUFA intake from fish and other dietary sources may provide a potential strategy to improve survival after breast cancer. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  16. Drugs affecting the renin-angiotensin system and survival from cancer: a population based study of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer patient cohorts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are commonly prescribed to the growing number of cancer patients (more than two million in the UK alone) often to treat hypertension. However, increased fatal cancer in ARB users in a randomized trial and increased breast cancer recurrence rates in ACEI users in a recent observational study have raised concerns about their safety in cancer patients. We investigated whether ACEI or ARB use after breast, colorectal or prostate cancer diagnosis was associated with increased risk of cancer-specific mortality. Methods Population-based cohorts of 9,814 breast, 4,762 colorectal and 6,339 prostate cancer patients newly diagnosed from 1998 to 2006 were identified in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink and confirmed by cancer registry linkage. Cancer-specific and all-cause mortality were identified from Office of National Statistics mortality data in 2011 (allowing up to 13 years of follow-up). A nested case–control analysis was conducted to compare ACEI/ARB use (from general practitioner prescription records) in cancer patients dying from cancer with up to five controls (not dying from cancer). Conditional logistic regression estimated the risk of cancer-specific, and all-cause, death in ACEI/ARB users compared with non-users. Results The main analysis included 1,435 breast, 1,511 colorectal and 1,184 prostate cancer-specific deaths (and 7,106 breast, 7,291 colorectal and 5,849 prostate cancer controls). There was no increase in cancer-specific mortality in patients using ARBs after diagnosis of breast (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.06 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.84, 1.35), colorectal (adjusted OR = 0.82 95% CI 0.64, 1.07) or prostate cancer (adjusted OR = 0.79 95% CI 0.61, 1.03). There was also no evidence of increases in cancer-specific mortality with ACEI use for breast (adjusted OR = 1.06 95% CI 0.89, 1.27), colorectal (adjusted OR = 0

  17. Surviving childhood cancer: the impact on life.

    PubMed

    Goldsby, Robert E; Taggart, Denah R; Ablin, Arthur R

    2006-01-01

    With modern therapies, most children diagnosed with cancer are expected to reach adulthood. Therefore, there are large and ever-increasing numbers of children and young adults in our population who are survivors of childhood cancer. Many of the therapies responsible for improved cancer survival rates can also damage normal cells and tissues. As more children survive cancer, the physical and emotional costs of enduring cancer therapy become increasingly important. Although most childhood cancer survivors are now expected to survive, they remain at risk for relapse, second malignant neoplasms, organ dysfunction, and a negative psychologic impact. Individual risk is quite variable and is dependent on multiple factors including the type and site of cancer, the therapy utilized, and the individual's constitution. The risks are likely to change as we learn more about the specific long-term effects of cancer therapy, develop more refined and targeted therapies, and develop and apply more effective preventative strategies or therapeutic interventions. Guidelines for long-term follow-up have been established and are available to help facilitate appropriate monitoring of and care for potential late effects.

  18. Correlation between mutational status and survival and second cancer risk assessment in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Rubió-Casadevall, Jordi; Borràs, Joan Lluis; Carmona-García, Maria Carme; Ameijide, Alberto; Gonzalez-Vidal, Allan; Ortiz, Maria Rosa; Bosch, Ramon; Riu, Francesc; Parada, David; Martí, Esther; Miró, Josefina; Sirvent, Juan Jose; Galceran, Jaume; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael

    2015-02-13

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are sarcomas of the digestive tract characterized by mutations mainly located in the c-KIT or in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-alpha genes. Mutations in the BRAF gene have also been described. Our purpose is to define the distribution of c-KIT, PDGFR and BRAF mutations in a population-based cohort of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) patients and correlate them with anatomical site, risk classification and survival. In addition, as most of the GIST patients have a long survival, second cancers are frequently diagnosed in them. We performed a second primary cancer risk assessment. Our analysis was based on data from Tarragona and Girona Cancer Registries. We identified all GIST diagnosed from 1996 to 2006 and performed a mutational analysis of those in which paraffin-embedded tissue was obtained. Observed (OS) and relative survival (RS) were calculated according to risk classifications and mutational status. Multivariate analysis of variables for observed survival and was also done. A total of 132 GIST cases were found and we analyzed mutations in 108 cases. We obtained 53.7% of mutations in exon 11 and 7.4% in exon 9 of c-KIT gene; 12% in exon 18 and 1.9% in exon 12 of PDGFR gene and 25% of cases were wild type GIST. Patients with mutations in exon 11 of the c-KIT gene had a 5-year OS and RS of 59.6% and 66.3%, respectively. Patients with mutations in exon 18 of the PDGFR gene had a 5-year OS and RS of 84.6% and 89.7%. In multivariate analysis, only age and risk group achieved statistical significance for observed survival. GIST patients had an increased risk of second cancer with a hazard ratio of 2.47. This population-based study shows a spectrum of mutations in the c-KIT and PDGFR genes in GIST patients similar to that previously published. The OS and RS of GIST with the exon 18 PDGFR gene mutation could indicate that this subgroup of patients may be less aggressive and have a good prognosis, although

  19. Validation of nomogram for disease free survival for colon cancer in UK population: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kazem, M A; Khan, A U; Selvasekar, C R

    2016-03-01

    To externally validate the MSKCC nomogram in a UK population, and determine if it could be used in our practice here in the UK. The colon cancer database from a district general hospital in England was used to extract all patients who had a curative colon cancer resection. Inclusion criteria were all patients who had curative elective colon cancer resection between 01/01/1998 and 31/12/2003. Patients were followed up for up to ten years. Five and ten year predictions were calculated for each patient, and plotted against the actual recurrence using a ROC curve, and AUC was calculated for both the five and ten year nomogram. 138 patients were included in the study. Overall five year recurrence rate was 26.8% with a mean follow up of 60.24 months (SD = 38.6). 118 patients were included in the five year nomogram validation, and 102 patients were included in the ten year nomogram validation. A ROC curve was plotted for both the five and ten year nomogram and AUC was calculated. For the five year nomogram AUC was 0.673, and for the ten year nomogram AUC was 0.687. Two cut off points were identified for each nomogram and this divided the cohort into low, medium and high risk groups for recurrence. Cox regression showed there was significant difference between all groups for both nomograms. The MSKCC colon cancer nomogram was validated in our cohort, but it is recommended to be used in conjunction with AJCC TNM staging system. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Multifactorial analysis of survival and recurrences in differentiated thyroid cancer. Comparative evaluation of usefulness of AGES, MACIS, and risk group scores in Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cuevas, S; Labastida-Almendaro, S; Cortés-Arroyo, H; López-Garza, J; Barroso-Bravo, S

    2002-03-01

    Many risk factors have been identified in differentiated thyroid cancer, with them, some prognostic scores have been designed to asign the risk of recurrence and survival. In Mexican population, this type of study is scarce. This is a retrospective review of 180 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer completely treated at the Hospital de Oncologia, IMSS, in Mexico City from 1980 to 1990. All prognostic factors were analyzed and a score obtained either by the method of AGES, MACIS, or SKMH. Correlation of recurrences and survival was carried out according to score or risk assignment. There was a predominance of females (4.8:1), 48% had metastatic cervical nodes, median tumor size was 4 cm, 16% had multiple macroscopic thyroid tumors, in 12% resection was incomplete, 96% were papillary, and 4% follicular cancers. According to AGES, 46% were high risk patients, 49.4% with MACIS and 45.5% with SKMH, respectively. Median follow-up was 8.3 years. There were 67 (37%) recurrences. Ten-year overall survival was 89.4% and disease-free survival was 79.2%. There was no statistical significant difference of survival of AGES until the score reached 6 or more or the MACIS score reached 8 or more. Cox multivariate model showed that above the age of 45, tumor size of 5 cm or more, follicular histology, multiple macroscopic thyroid tumors, and extracapsular node invasion affected ten-year survival. In conclusions our patients are diagnosed at more advanced stages than patients in the U.S. or European countries. Nearly one half of our patients belonged to the high-risk group. This study confirms that patients over the age of 45, tumor size > 5 cm, and follicular histology are adverse prognostic factors and report that extracapsular node invasion and multiple macroscopic thyroid tumors are also adverse prognostic factors. In Mexican population, with 50% of high-risk patients, AGES and MACIS scores reached statistical differences with higher qualifications than observed in the U.S.

  1. Geographic disparities in colorectal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kevin A; Niu, Xiaoling; Boscoe, Francis P

    2009-01-01

    Background Examining geographic variation in cancer patient survival can help identify important prognostic factors that are linked by geography and generate hypotheses about the underlying causes of survival disparities. In this study, we apply a recently developed spatial scan statistic method, designed for time-to-event data, to determine whether colorectal cancer (CRC) patient survival varies by place of residence after adjusting survival times for several prognostic factors. Methods Using data from a population-based, statewide cancer registry, we examined a cohort of 25,040 men and women from New Jersey who were newly diagnosed with local or regional stage colorectal cancer from 1996 through 2003 and followed to the end of 2006. Survival times were adjusted for significant prognostic factors (sex, age, stage at diagnosis, race/ethnicity and census tract socioeconomic deprivation) and evaluated using a spatial scan statistic to identify places where CRC survival was significantly longer or shorter than the statewide experience. Results Age, sex and stage adjusted survival times revealed several areas in the northern part of the state where CRC survival was significantly different than expected. The shortest and longest survival areas had an adjusted 5-year survival rate of 73.1% (95% CI 71.5, 74.9) and 88.3% (95% CI 85.4, 91.3) respectively, compared with the state average of 80.0% (95% CI 79.4, 80.5). Analysis of survival times adjusted for age, sex and stage as well as race/ethnicity and area socioeconomic deprivation attenuated the risk of death from CRC in several areas, but survival disparities persisted. Conclusion The results suggest that in areas where additional adjustments for race/ethnicity and area socioeconomic deprivation changed the geographic survival patterns and reduced the risk of death from CRC, the adjustment factors may be contributing causes of the disparities. Further studies should focus on specific and modifiable individual and

  2. The Effect of the UK Coordinating Centre for Cancer Research Anal Cancer Trial (ACT1) on Population-based Treatment and Survival for Squamous Cell Cancer of the Anus.

    PubMed

    Downing, A; Morris, E J A; Aravani, A; Finan, P J; Lawton, S; Thomas, J D; Sebag-Montefiore, D

    2015-12-01

    Between 1987 and 1994, three randomised phase III trials showed that chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil was superior to radiotherapy alone (ACT1, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) or radiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 87-04, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 1289) for squamous cell carcinoma of the anus. We explored the population-based changes in England before, during and after the UK-based ACT1 trial. Information was extracted from the National Cancer Data Repository on patients diagnosed with squamous cell anal cancer in England between 1981 and 2010 (n = 11 743). Robust treatment information was available for the Yorkshire region (n = 1065). Changes in treatment patterns and 3 year survival were investigated in 7 year cohorts before, during and after the ACT1 trial. In Yorkshire, the proportion of patients receiving surgery alone fell from 61.6% before, 29.8% during and 12.5% after ACT1; the proportion of patients receiving primary chemoradiotherapy rose from 6.5% before, 17.7% during and 58.8% after ACT1 and continued to rise to 70.3% in the subsequent period. Three year survival improved during the study period from 59.5% (95% confidence interval 56.6-62.2) before ACT1 to 73.6% (95% confidence interval 71.9-75.2) after the trial. Survival in Yorkshire was comparable with that in England. The treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the anus changed dramatically during the study period. The predominant use of surgery before ACT1, a transition phase during the trial and a dramatic increase in the use of chemoradiotherapy after ACT1 provide strong evidence of the effect of the trial on population-based practice. Survival continued to increase during this period. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Global surveillance of cancer survival 1995-2009: analysis of individual data for 25,676,887 patients from 279 population-based registries in 67 countries (CONCORD-2).

    PubMed

    Allemani, Claudia; Weir, Hannah K; Carreira, Helena; Harewood, Rhea; Spika, Devon; Wang, Xiao-Si; Bannon, Finian; Ahn, Jane V; Johnson, Christopher J; Bonaventure, Audrey; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Stiller, Charles; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar; Chen, Wan-Qing; Ogunbiyi, Olufemi J; Rachet, Bernard; Soeberg, Matthew J; You, Hui; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Storm, Hans; Tucker, Thomas C; Coleman, Michel P

    2015-03-14

    Worldwide data for cancer survival are scarce. We aimed to initiate worldwide surveillance of cancer survival by central analysis of population-based registry data, as a metric of the effectiveness of health systems, and to inform global policy on cancer control. Individual tumour records were submitted by 279 population-based cancer registries in 67 countries for 25·7 million adults (age 15-99 years) and 75,000 children (age 0-14 years) diagnosed with cancer during 1995-2009 and followed up to Dec 31, 2009, or later. We looked at cancers of the stomach, colon, rectum, liver, lung, breast (women), cervix, ovary, and prostate in adults, and adult and childhood leukaemia. Standardised quality control procedures were applied; errors were corrected by the registry concerned. We estimated 5-year net survival, adjusted for background mortality in every country or region by age (single year), sex, and calendar year, and by race or ethnic origin in some countries. Estimates were age-standardised with the International Cancer Survival Standard weights. 5-year survival from colon, rectal, and breast cancers has increased steadily in most developed countries. For patients diagnosed during 2005-09, survival for colon and rectal cancer reached 60% or more in 22 countries around the world; for breast cancer, 5-year survival rose to 85% or higher in 17 countries worldwide. Liver and lung cancer remain lethal in all nations: for both cancers, 5-year survival is below 20% everywhere in Europe, in the range 15-19% in North America, and as low as 7-9% in Mongolia and Thailand. Striking rises in 5-year survival from prostate cancer have occurred in many countries: survival rose by 10-20% between 1995-99 and 2005-09 in 22 countries in South America, Asia, and Europe, but survival still varies widely around the world, from less than 60% in Bulgaria and Thailand to 95% or more in Brazil, Puerto Rico, and the USA. For cervical cancer, national estimates of 5-year survival range from less

  4. Association between race and survival of patients with non--small-cell lung cancer in the United States veterans affairs population.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Apar Kishor; Subbiah, Shanmuga P; Kessinger, Anne; Gonsalves, Wilson I; Silberstein, Peter T; Loberiza, Fausto R

    2014-03-01

    Racial disparities in outcomes of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in the United States are well documented. A retrospective analysis of patients in the Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry was conducted to determine whether similar disparities exist in a population with a single-payer, accessible health care system. Demographic data of patients diagnosed with NSCLC between January 1995 and February 2009 were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test or the χ(2) test. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to compare survival among races. Of the 82,414 patients, 98% were male, 82% had a smoking history, and 81% were Caucasian. Caucasian individuals had better prognostic features compared with African-American individuals (stage I/II [24% vs. 21%]; Grade I/II [21% vs. 17%]). A larger proportion of Caucasian compared with African-American individuals received stage-appropriate treatment (surgery for stage I [48% vs. 41%; P < .001]; chemotherapy for stage IV [18% vs. 16%; P = .003]). African-American individuals had a lower risk of mortality compared with Caucasian individuals (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.96). Although African-American patients had a higher stage and grade of NSCLC, they had a better overall survival than Caucasian patients. In a single-payer system with accessible health care, previously described racial differences in lung cancer outcomes were not observed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Quality analysis of population-based information on cancer stage at diagnosis across Europe, with presentation of stage-specific cancer survival estimates: A EUROCARE-5 study.

    PubMed

    Minicozzi, Pamela; Innos, Kaire; Sánchez, Maria-José; Trama, Annalisa; Walsh, Paul M; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Dimitrova, Nadya; Botta, Laura; Visser, Otto; Rossi, Silvia; Tavilla, Andrea; Sant, Milena

    2017-10-01

    Cancer registries (CRs) are fundamental for estimating cancer burden, evaluating screening and monitoring health service performance. Stage at diagnosis-an essential information item collected by CRs-has been made available, for the first time, by CRs participating in EUROCARE-5. We analysed the quality of this information and estimated stage-specific survival across Europe for CRs with good data quality. Sixty-two CRs sent stage (as TNM, condensed TNM or extent of disease) for 15 cancers diagnosed in 2000-2007. We assessed the quality, partly by comparing stage according to the three systems. We also developed procedures to reconstruct stage (categories: local, regional, metastatic and unknown) using information from all three systems, thus minimising the amount of missing information. Moderate-to-excellent stage concordance was found for practically all 24 CRs, for which it was possible to compare at least two staging systems. However, since stage was often incorrectly assigned, and information on the presence/absence of metastases was often lacking, data on only 7/15 cancers from 34/62 CRs (15 countries) were of sufficient quality for further analysis. Cases diagnosed ≥70 years had more advanced (or lacking) stage- and worse stage-specific survival than those <70 years. Many European CRs collect and record reasonably accurate stage information. Others have difficulties. Both the completeness of primary data and the accuracy of stage coding need to be improved in order for CRs to fulfil their expanding roles in cancer control. We propose our stage reconstruction/checking procedures as a means of fully exploiting the stage information provided by EUROCARE CRs. More advanced (or lacking) stage at diagnosis plus poorer stage-specific survival in the elderly are worrying. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does the Intent to Irradiate the Internal Mammary Nodes Impact Survival in Women With Breast Cancer? A Population-Based Analysis in British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Robert A.; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Lau, Jeffrey; Lo, Andrea; Truong, Pauline T.; Tyldesley, Scott; Olivotto, Ivo A.; Weir, Lorna

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of the intent to include internal mammary nodes (IMNs) in the radiation therapy (RT) volume for patients receiving adjuvant locoregional (breast or chest wall plus axillary and supraclavicular fossa) RT for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: 2413 women with node-positive or T3/4N0 invasive breast cancer, treated with locoregional RT from 2001 to 2006, were identified in a prospectively maintained, population-based database. Intent to include IMNs in RT volume was determined through review of patient charts and RT plans. Distant relapse free survival (D-RFS), breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS), and overall survival (OS) were compared between the two groups. Prespecified pN1 subgroup analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up time was 6.2 years. Forty-one percent of study participants received IMN RT. The 5-year D-RFS for IMN inclusion and exclusion groups were 82% vs. 82% (p = 0.82), BCSS was 87% vs. 87% (p = 0.81), and OS was 85% vs. 83% (p = 0.06). In the pN1 subgroup, D-RFS was 90% vs. 88% (p = 0.31), BCSS was 94% vs. 92% (p = 0.18), and OS was 91% vs. 88% (p = 0.01). After potential confounding variables were controlled for, women who received IMN RT did not have significantly different D-RFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.24; p = 0.85), BCSS (HR = 0.98 (95% CI, 0.79-1.22; p = 0.88), or OS (HR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.78-1.15; p = 0.57). In the pN1 subgroup, IMN RT was associated with trends for improved survival that were not statistically significant: D-RFS (HR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.63-1.22; p = 0.42), BCSS (HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.57-1.25; p = 0.39), and OS (HR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.56-1.09; p = 0.14). Conclusions: After a median follow-up time of 6.2 years, although intentional IMN RT was not associated with a significant improvement in survival, this population-based study suggests that IMN RT may contribute to improved outcomes in selected patients with N1 disease.

  7. Improving treatment and survival: a population-based study of current outcomes after a hepatic resection in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaydfudim, Victor M; McMurry, Timothy L; Harrigan, Amy M; Friel, Charles M; Stukenborg, George J; Bauer, Todd W; Adams, Reid B; Hedrick, Traci L

    2015-01-01

    Background Population-based studies historically report underutilization of a resection in patients with colorectal metastases to the liver. Recent data suggest limitations of the methods in the historical analysis. The present study examines trends in a hepatic resection and survival among Medicare recipients with hepatic metastases. Methods Medicare recipients with incident colorectal cancer diagnosed between 1991 and 2009 were identified in the SEER(Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results)-Medicare dataset. Patients were stratified into historical (1991–2001) and current (2002–2009) cohorts. Analyses compared treatment, peri-operative outcomes and survival. Results Of 31 574 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer to the liver, 14 859 were in the current cohort treated after 2002 and 16 715 comprised the historical control group. The overall proportion treated with a hepatic resection increased significantly during the study period (P < 0.001) with pre/post change from 6.5% pre-2002 to 7.5% currently (P < 0.001). Over time, haemorrhagic and infectious complications declined (both P ≤ 0.047), but 30-day mortality was similar (3.5% versus 3.9%, P = 0.660). After adjusting for predictors of survival, the use of a hepatic resection [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.40, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.38–0.42, P < 0.001] and treatment after 2002 (HR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.86–0.90, P < 0.001) were associated with a reduced risk of death. Conclusions Case identification using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) codes is imperfect; however, comparison of trends over time suggests an improvement in multimodality therapy and survival in patients with colorectal metastases to the liver. PMID:26353888

  8. Survival of 86,690 patients with thyroid cancer: A population-based study in 29 European countries from EUROCARE-5.

    PubMed

    Dal Maso, L; Tavilla, A; Pacini, F; Serraino, D; van Dijk, B A C; Chirlaque, M D; Capocaccia, R; Larrañaga, N; Colonna, M; Agius, D; Ardanaz, E; Rubió-Casadevall, J; Kowalska, A; Virdone, S; Mallone, S; Amash, H; De Angelis, R

    2017-05-01

    Incidence rates of thyroid cancer (TC) increased in several countries during the last 30 years, while mortality rates remained unchanged, raising important questions for treatment and follow-up of TC patients. This study updates population-based estimates of relative survival (RS) after TC diagnosis in Europe by sex, country, age, period and histology. Data from 87 cancer registries in 29 countries were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 dataset. One- and 5-year RS were estimated using the cohort approach for 86,690 adult TC patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed-up to 12/31/2008. RS trends in 1999-2007 and 10-year RS in 2005-2007 were estimated using the period approach. In Europe 2000-2007, 5-year RS after TC was 88% in women and 81% in men. Survival rates varied by country and were strongly correlated (Pearson ρ = 75%) with country-specific incidence rates. Five-year RS decreased with age (in women from >95% at age 15-54 to 57% at age 75+), from 98% in women and 94% in men with papillary TC to 14% in women and 12% in men with anaplastic TC. Proportion of papillary TC varied by country and increased over time, while survival rates were similar across areas and periods. In 1999-2007, 5-year RS increased by five percentage points for all TCs but only by two for papillary and by four for follicular TC. Ten-year RS in 2005-2007 was 89% in women and 79% in men. The reported increasing TC survival trend and differences by area are mainly explained by the varying histological case-mix of cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Is England closing the international gap in cancer survival?

    PubMed

    Walters, Sarah; Benitez-Majano, Sara; Muller, Patrick; Coleman, Michel P; Allemani, Claudia; Butler, John; Peake, Mick; Guren, Marianne Grønlie; Glimelius, Bengt; Bergström, Stefan; Påhlman, Lars; Rachet, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    We provide an up-to-date international comparison of cancer survival, assessing whether England is 'closing the gap' compared with other high-income countries. Net survival was estimated using national, population-based, cancer registrations for 1.9 million patients diagnosed with a cancer of the stomach, colon, rectum, lung, breast (women) or ovary in England during 1995-2012. Trends during 1995-2009 were compared with estimates for Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Clinicians were interviewed to help interpret trends. Survival from all cancers remained lower in England than in Australia, Canada, Norway and Sweden by 2005-2009. For some cancers, survival improved more in England than in other countries between 1995-1999 and 2005-2009; for example, 1-year survival from stomach, rectal, lung, breast and ovarian cancers improved more than in Australia and Canada. There has been acceleration in lung cancer survival improvement in England recently, with average annual improvement in 1-year survival rising to 2% during 2010-2012. Survival improved more in Denmark than in England for rectal and lung cancers between 1995-1999 and 2005-2009. Survival has increased in England since the mid-1990s in the context of strategic reform in cancer control, however, survival remains lower than in comparable developed countries and continued investment is needed to close the international survival gap.

  10. Is England closing the international gap in cancer survival?

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Sarah; Benitez-Majano, Sara; Muller, Patrick; Coleman, Michel P; Allemani, Claudia; Butler, John; Peake, Mick; Guren, Marianne Grønlie; Glimelius, Bengt; Bergström, Stefan; Påhlman, Lars; Rachet, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background: We provide an up-to-date international comparison of cancer survival, assessing whether England is ‘closing the gap' compared with other high-income countries. Methods: Net survival was estimated using national, population-based, cancer registrations for 1.9 million patients diagnosed with a cancer of the stomach, colon, rectum, lung, breast (women) or ovary in England during 1995–2012. Trends during 1995–2009 were compared with estimates for Australia, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Clinicians were interviewed to help interpret trends. Results: Survival from all cancers remained lower in England than in Australia, Canada, Norway and Sweden by 2005–2009. For some cancers, survival improved more in England than in other countries between 1995–1999 and 2005–2009; for example, 1-year survival from stomach, rectal, lung, breast and ovarian cancers improved more than in Australia and Canada. There has been acceleration in lung cancer survival improvement in England recently, with average annual improvement in 1-year survival rising to 2% during 2010–2012. Survival improved more in Denmark than in England for rectal and lung cancers between 1995–1999 and 2005–2009. Conclusions: Survival has increased in England since the mid-1990s in the context of strategic reform in cancer control, however, survival remains lower than in comparable developed countries and continued investment is needed to close the international survival gap. PMID:26241817

  11. Survival in patients with breast cancer with bone metastasis: a Danish population-based cohort study on the prognostic impact of initial stage of disease at breast cancer diagnosis and length of the bone metastasis-free interval

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Karynsa; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Sværke, Claus; Jacobsen, Jacob Bonde; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Since population-based data on prognostic factors affecting survival in patients with breast cancer with bone metastasis (BM) are currently limited, we conducted this nationwide retrospective cohort study to examine the prognostic role of disease stage at breast cancer diagnosis and length of BM-free interval (BMFI). Setting Denmark. Participants 2427 women with a breast cancer diagnosis between 1997 and 2011 in the Danish Cancer Registry and a concurrent or subsequent BM diagnosis in the Danish National Registry of Patients. Primary and secondary outcome measures Survival (crude) based on Kaplan-Meier method and mortality risk (crude and adjusted for age, year of diagnosis, estrogen receptor status and comorbidity) based on Cox proportional hazards regression analyses by stage of disease at breast cancer diagnosis and by length of BMFI (time from breast cancer to BM diagnosis), following patients from BM diagnosis until death, emigration or until 31 December 2012, whichever came first. Results Survival decreased with more advanced stage of disease at the time of breast cancer diagnosis; risk of mortality during the first year following a BM diagnosis was over two times higher for those presenting with metastatic versus localised disease (adjusted HR=2.12 (95% CI 1.71 to 2.62)). With respect to length of BMFI, survival was highest in women with a BMFI <1 year (ie, in those who presented with BM at the time of breast cancer diagnosis or were diagnosed within 1 year). However, among patients with a BMFI ≥1 year, survival increased with longer BMFI (1-year survival: 39.9% (95% CI 36.3% to 43.6%) for BMFI 1 to <3 years and 52.6% (95% CI 47.4% to 57.6%) for BMFI ≥5 years). This pattern was also observed in multivariate analyses. Conclusions Stage of disease at breast cancer diagnosis and length of BMFI appear to be important prognostic factors for survival following BM. PMID:25926150

  12. Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162498.html Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival: Study Weak social ties linked to higher ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Loneliness may impede long-term breast cancer survival, a new study suggests. In the years ...

  13. Modern Treatments in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Temporal Trends and Effect on Survival. A French Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Olivier; Selvaggi, Lucia; Jégu, Jérémie; Purohit, Ashok; Prim, Nathalie; Velten, Michel; Quoix, Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Extrapolation of clinical trials results to the general population is always challenging. We analysed 1047 patients diagnosed with an advanced stage disease between 1998 and 2005 in a french administrative department and found a good spread of modern chemotherapy since 1998 and targeted therapy since 2002. Moreover, the outcomes in patients treated according to guidelines are very proximal from those obtained in clinical trials. Management of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer has considerably evolved during the past 2 decades. In this study we aimed to assess how treatments have spread at a population-based level and their effect on survival. Medical records of patients diagnosed from 1998 to 2005 in the French department of Bas-Rhin were checked to collect data on patient characteristics and treatments received. Multivariate analysis of survival was performed using pretherapeutic and therapeutic factors including targeted therapies received as third-line treatment. We included 1047 patients with stage IIIB to IV non-small-cell lung cancer. The proportion of patients who underwent chemotherapy increased from 373/471 (79.2%) to 491/576 (85.2%) over the 1998 to 2001 and 2002 to 2005 periods, and there was an increased use of third-generation drugs associated with platin. Third-line treatment was gefitinib or erlotinib in 73/155 (47.1%) of the cases among patients diagnosed from 2002 to 2005. Compared with older agents, targeted therapy administered as third-line treatment was associated with a longer survival but there was no significant difference in survival with recent chemotherapy agents in multivariate analyses (hazard ratio, 0.773; 95% confidence interval, 0.445-1.343). Results of our study showed a good spread of modern chemotherapy and targeted therapy use at a population-based level. However, even if the general outcomes were improved along the years, the results observed in real clinical practice were slightly different from those reported in clinical

  14. Genetic variants in interleukin genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival in a genetically admixed population: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; John, Esther M.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Hines, Lisa M.; Stern, Mariana C.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Presson, Angela P.; Wolff, Roger K.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukins (ILs) are key regulators of immune response. Genetic variation in IL genes may influence breast cancer risk and mortality given their role in cell growth, angiogenesis and regulation of inflammatory process. We examined 16 IL genes with breast cancer risk and mortality in an admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases and 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases and 1585 controls) women. Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance and lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) was used to identify potential gene by gene and gene by lifestyle interactions. The pathway was statistically significant for breast cancer risk overall (P ARTP = 0.0006), for women with low NA ancestry (P ARTP = 0.01), for premenopausal women (P ARTP = 0.02), for estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ tumors (P ARTP = 0.03) and ER−/PR− tumors (P ARTP = 0.02). Eight of the 16 genes evaluated were associated with breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL2RA, IL4, IL6 and IL10); four genes were associated with breast cancer risk among women with low NA ancestry (IL1B, IL6, IL6R and IL10), two were associated with breast cancer risk among women with high NA ancestry (IL2 and IL2RA) and four genes were associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL2 and IL3). IL4, IL6R, IL8 and IL17A were associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. We confirmed associations with several functional polymorphisms previously associated with breast cancer risk and provide support that their combined effect influences the carcinogenic process. PMID:24670917

  15. Genetic variants in interleukin genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival in a genetically admixed population: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; John, Esther M; Giuliano, Anna R; Hines, Lisa M; Stern, Mariana C; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Presson, Angela P; Wolff, Roger K

    2014-08-01

    Interleukins (ILs) are key regulators of immune response. Genetic variation in IL genes may influence breast cancer risk and mortality given their role in cell growth, angiogenesis and regulation of inflammatory process. We examined 16 IL genes with breast cancer risk and mortality in an admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases and 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases and 1585 controls) women. Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance and lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) was used to identify potential gene by gene and gene by lifestyle interactions. The pathway was statistically significant for breast cancer risk overall (P ARTP = 0.0006), for women with low NA ancestry (P(ARTP) = 0.01), for premenopausal women (P(ARTP) = 0.02), for estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.03) and ER-/PR- tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.02). Eight of the 16 genes evaluated were associated with breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL2RA, IL4, IL6 and IL10); four genes were associated with breast cancer risk among women with low NA ancestry (IL1B, IL6, IL6R and IL10), two were associated with breast cancer risk among women with high NA ancestry (IL2 and IL2RA) and four genes were associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL2 and IL3). IL4, IL6R, IL8 and IL17A were associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. We confirmed associations with several functional polymorphisms previously associated with breast cancer risk and provide support that their combined effect influences the carcinogenic process.

  16. Surgery Combined with Radiotherapy Improved Survival in Metastatic Esophageal Cancer in a Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, San-Gang; Xie, Wei-Hao; Zhang, Zhao-Qiang; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Huan-Xin; Yong Bao; He, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study used a population-based national registry to determine the impact of local treatment modalities on survival in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer (EC). The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was used to identify patients with metastatic EC from 1988 to 2012. A total of 9,125 patients were identified. There were 426 patients underwent primary surgery, 4,786 patients were administered radiotherapy (RT) alone, 847 patients underwent surgery plus RT, and 3,066 patients without any local treatment. Multivariate analysis results indicated that year of diagnosis, age, race, histologic subtype, grade, and local treatment modalities were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). The 5-year OS were 8.4%, 4.5%, 17.5%, and 3.4% in primary surgery, RT only, surgery plus RT, and no local treatment, respectively (P < 0.001). Subgroup analyses showed that the impact of RT was mainly reflected by preoperative radiotherapy, as patients received preoperative radiotherapy had significantly better OS than patients who underwent primary surgery alone and postoperative RT, the 5-year OS rates were 24.7%, 6.5%, and 7.8%, respectively, respectively (P < 0.001). Surgery plus RT, especially preoperative RT, may improve long-term survival of patients with metastatic EC. PMID:27323696

  17. Impact of local surgical treatment on survival in young women with T1 breast cancer: long-term results of a population-based cohort.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ye Won; Choi, Jung Eun; Park, Heung Kyu; Kim, Ku Sang; Lee, Jee Yeon; Suh, Young Jin

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the type of local surgical treatment on survival in young women aged less than 40 years with T1 breast cancer. We analyzed data from 3,512 patients aged ≤40 years old who were diagnosed with T1 breast cancer from the Korean Breast Cancer Registry database between January 1988 and December 2006 and underwent either breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or mastectomy. The overall survival (OS) and breast-cancer-specific survival (BCSS) were compared between BCT and mastectomy. Of the 3,512 patients analyzed, 1,951 (55.6 %) underwent BCT, and 1,561 (44.4 %) underwent mastectomy. The median follow-up period was 111.0 (79.0-131.5) months. Overall, the 10-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 95 and 92.1 %, respectively (p = 00004), and the 10-year BCSS rates for BCT and mastectomy patients were 96.9 and 94.9 %, respectively (p = 0.12). In node-negative patients, no significant difference was observed in either the OS (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.072; 95 % CI, 0.750-1.5332, p = 0.704) or BCSS (adjusted HR 0.988; 95 % CI, 0.620-1.574, p = 0.960) rate between the BCT and mastectomy groups. In node-positive patients, no significant difference was observed in the OS (adjusted HR 1.634; 95 % CI, 0.982-2.272, p = 0.59) and BCSS (adjusted HR 1.410; 95 % CI, 0.755-2.633, p = 0.281) rates between the BCT and mastectomy groups. In this large, population-based analysis of young women with T1 breast cancer, the OS and BCSS were not different between BCT and mastectomy.

  18. Recent cancer survival in Germany: an analysis of common and less common cancers.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lina; Castro, Felipe A; Gondos, Adam; Krilaviciute, Agne; Barnes, Benjamin; Eberle, Andrea; Emrich, Katharina; Hentschel, Stefan; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Brenner, Hermann

    2015-06-01

    The monitoring of cancer survival by population-based cancer registries is a prerequisite to evaluate the current quality of cancer care. Our study provides 1-, 5- and 10-year relative survival as well as 5-year relative survival conditional on 1-year survival estimates and recent survival trends for Germany using data from 11 population-based cancer registries, covering around one-third of the German population. Period analysis was used to estimate relative survival for 24 common and 11 less common cancer sites for the period 2007-2010. The German and the United States survival estimates were compared using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results 13 database. Trends in cancer survival in Germany between 2002-2004 and 2008-2010 were described. Five-year relative survival increased in Germany from 2002-2004 to 2008-2010 for most cancer sites. Among the 24 most common cancers, largest improvements were seen for multiple myeloma (8.0% units), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (6.2% units), prostate cancer (5.2% units) and colorectal cancer (4.6% units). In 2007-2010, the survival disadvantage in Germany compared to the United States was largest for cancers of the mouth/pharynx (-11.0% units), thyroid (-6.8% units) and prostate (-7.5% units). Although survival estimates were much lower for elderly patients in both countries, differences in age patterns were observed for some cancer sites. The reported improvements in cancer survival might reflect advances in the quality of cancer care on the population level as well as increased use of screening in Germany. The survival differences across countries and the survival disadvantage in the elderly require further investigation.

  19. Does women's education affect breast cancer risk and survival? Evidence from a population based social experiment in education.

    PubMed

    Palme, Mårten; Simeonova, Emilia

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer is a notable exception to the well documented positive education gradient in health. A number of studies have found that highly educated women are more likely to be diagnosed with the disease. Breast cancer is therefore often labeled as a "welfare disease". However, it has not been established whether the strong positive correlation holds up when education is exogenously determined. We estimate the causal effect of education on the probability of being diagnosed with breast cancer by exploiting an education reform that extended compulsory schooling and was implemented as a social experiment. We find that the incidence of breast cancer increased for those exposed to the reform.

  20. Public Perception of Cancer Survival Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jakob D.; Scherr, Courtney L.; Brown, Natasha; Jones, Christina; Christy, Katheryn

    2013-01-01

    Past research has observed that certain subgroups (e.g., individuals who are overweight/obese) have inaccurate estimates of survival rates for particular cancers (e.g., colon cancer). However, no study has examined whether the lay public can accurately rank cancer survival rates in comparison with one another (i.e., rank cancers from most deadly…

  1. Public Perception of Cancer Survival Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jakob D.; Scherr, Courtney L.; Brown, Natasha; Jones, Christina; Christy, Katheryn

    2013-01-01

    Past research has observed that certain subgroups (e.g., individuals who are overweight/obese) have inaccurate estimates of survival rates for particular cancers (e.g., colon cancer). However, no study has examined whether the lay public can accurately rank cancer survival rates in comparison with one another (i.e., rank cancers from most deadly…

  2. Social inequality and incidence of and survival from cancers of the mouth, pharynx and larynx in a population-based study in Denmark, 1994-2003.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Lassen, Christina Funch; Clemmensen, Inge Haunstrup

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effects of socioeconomic, demographic and health-related indicators on the incidence of and survival from mouth, pharynx and larynx cancers diagnosed in 1994-2003 with follow-up through 2006 in Denmark using information from nationwide registers. The analyses were based on data on 3058 patients with mouth and pharynx cancer and 1799 with larynx cancer in a cohort of 3.22 million persons born between 1925 and 1973 and aged >or=30 years. The incidences of all the three cancers increased with decreasing socioeconomic position, measured as disposable income, work market affiliation, social class, housing tenure, cohabiting status and type of district. Similar differences in survival persisted for all 5 years observed. Immigrants had better survival from larynx cancer than native Danes. We could not determine the effects of differences in tobacco and alcohol consumption or their multiplicative interactions.

  3. Survival of Patients with Thyroid Cancer in Yazd, Iran

    PubMed

    Vahedian Ardakani, Hassan Ali; Moghimi, Mansour; Shayestehpour, Mohammad; Doosti, Masoud; Beigi Sharifabadi, Shamsi

    2017-08-27

    Background: Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine related malignancy in the world. This cancer has increased during recent years in Iran and is the11th most common malignancy in Iranian population. Survival of patients with thyroid carcinoma in the different geographic areas within Iran is not clear. The present study aimed to estimate survival of patients suffering from thyroid cancer in Yazd, Iran. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, data were collected from 80 patients with thyroid cancer registered in Shohadaye Kargar and Shahid Sadoughy hospitals in Yazd between March 2001 and March 2012. The Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for estimation of survival over time and Cox regression method was performed for calculating hazard ratios according to demographic and risk variables. Results: Survival rates at the end of 1, 3, and 5 years in thyroid cancer patients were 99%, 96%, and 91%, respectively. A statistically significant correlation was found between stage of disease, type of cancer and survival time of patients (p<0.05). The worst survival was in peoples with the anaplastic type and stage IV of thyroid carcinoma. Conclusion: The survival of patients with thyroid carcinoma was higher than some areas in Iran. Since type and stage of thyroid cancer were the important factors in survival time, screening of people for cancer diagnosis in early stages, it seems to improve survival of patients. Radioactive iodine therapy can increase the survival rate in patients suffering from thyroid malignancy. Creative Commons Attribution License

  4. Health-related quality of life is a prognostic factor for survival in older patients after colorectal cancer diagnosis: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Evelyne; Jooste, Valérie; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Quipourt, Valérie; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Mercier, Mariette

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out in the context of clinical trials have shown a relationship between survival and health-related quality of life in colorectal cancer patients. We assessed the prognostic value of health-related quality of life at diagnosis and of its longitudinal evolution on survival in older colorectal cancer patients. All patients aged ≥65 years, diagnosed with new colorectal cancer between 2003 and 2005 and registered in the Digestive Cancer Registry of Burgundy were eligible. Patients were asked to complete the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 at inclusion, three, six and twelve months after. Multivariate regression models were used to evaluate the prognostic value of health-related quality of life scores at diagnosis and their deterioration on relative survival. In multivariate analysis, a role functioning dimension lower than median was predictive of lower survival (hazard ratio=3.1, p=0.015). After three and six months of follow-up, patients with greater appetite loss were more likely to die, with hazard ratios of 4.7 (p=0.013) and 3.7 (p=0.002), respectively. Health-related quality of life assessments at diagnosis are independently associated with older colorectal cancer patients' survival. Its preservation should be a major management goal for older cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of age and comorbidity on survival in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Eeghen, Elmer E.; Bakker, Sandra D.; van Bochove, Aart

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer are often excluded from clinical trials based on age or a poor performance score. However, 70% of colorectal cancer is diagnosed in patients over 65. Evaluation on the influence of age and comorbidity on survival and cause of death in a non-selected population. Methods Included were 621 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer. An extensive chart review was performed for 392 patients with colon cancer and 143 patients with rectal cancer. Analyses were performed separately for both groups. Results Median survival of colon cancer patients was 5.13 years, 131 patients (34.3%) died from tumour progression. Age and comorbidity were significant predictors for overall survival (P<0.001). Age was also a significant predictor of cause of death (P=0.001). In rectal cancer patients median survival was 4.67 years, 51 (35.7%) of patients died from tumour progression. Neither age nor comorbidity was significant predictors of survival. Age was a significant predictor of cause of death (P<0.001). Conclusions In colon cancer patient age and comorbidity predict survival. This represents possible bias or a reduced survival benefit of treatment, and is an indication that colon cancer is not the prognosis defining illness in the majority of patients. In rectal cancer patients neither age or comorbidity significantly impacted survival. PMID:26697191

  6. Mind matters in cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, David

    2012-06-01

    The very name "psycho-oncology" implies interaction between brain and body. One of the most intriguing scientific questions for the field is whether or not living better may also mean living longer. Randomized intervention trials examining this question will be reviewed. The majority show a survival advantage for patients randomized to psychologically effective interventions for individuals with a variety of cancers, including breast, melanoma, gastrointestinal, lymphoma, and lung cancers. Importantly, for breast and other cancers, when aggressive anti-tumor treatments are less effective, supportive approaches appear to become more useful. This is highlighted by a recent randomized clinical trial of palliative care for non-small cell lung cancer patients.There is growing evidence that disruption of circadian rhythms, including rest-activity patterns and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, affects cancer risk and progression. Women with metastatic breast cancer have flatter diurnal cortisol patterns than normal, and the degree of loss of daily variation in cortisol predicts earlier mortality. Mechanisms by which abnormal cortisol patterns affect metabolism, gene expression, and immune function are reviewed. The HPA hyperactivity associated with depression can produce elevated levels of cytokines that affect the brain. Tumor cells can, in turn, co-opt certain mediators of inflammation such as NFkB, interleukin-6, and angiogenic factors to promote metastasis. Also, exposure to elevated levels of norepinephrine triggers release of vascular endothelial growth factor, which facilitates tumor growth. Therefore, the stress of advancing cancer and management of it is associated with endocrine, immune, and autonomic dysfunction that has consequences for host resistance to cancer progression. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Surviving cancer without compromising aspirations.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    This short paper is a reflection of how one person coped, survived and grew following numerous metastatic incidences over a 20 year period. Surviving cancer is a complex process but coping with the threat of regular recurrence has required a coping strategy that embraced the disease, set it aside and refused to compromise hopes, dreams and future life. Central to this personal journey has been the need to redefine normality, live with and set aside the fear of future metastases and death and find an answer and meaning in a changing biology, increased morbidity and possible mortality. This paper contends that not compromising the direction of travel and being able to focus on a career has ensured that survival was valuable and valued. A working environment in which students' problems have been immediate has produced different stressors. These have ultimately forced personal worries to be set aside, while living with cancer has become normal and accepted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Did the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to conventional radiotherapy improve survival for patients with HPV+ve and HPV-ve Oropharynx cancer? A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hall, Stephen F; Liu, Fei-Fei; O'Sullivan, Brian; Shi, Willa; Rohland, Susan; Griffiths, Rebecca; Groome, Patti

    2017-10-10

    In the absence of clear evidence on the efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) over conventional radiotherapy (RT) for HPV+ve and for HPV-ve oropharyngeal cancer (OPC), this study compares the treatments and outcomes from pre-CRT years to post-CRT years. A population-based retrospective treatment-effectiveness study based on all patients with OPC treated in Ontario Canada in 1998, 1999, 2003 and 2004. Charts were reviewed, tissue samples were requested and tissue was tested for p16 or in situ hybridisation. Overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were compared by treatment era and by treatment type for all 1028 patients, for 865 treated for cure and for 610 with HPV status. There was no improvement in OS comparing pre-CRT to post-CRT eras for the HPV+ve patients (P=0.147) or for the HPV-ve patients (P=0.362). There was no difference in OS comparing CRT to RT for the HPV+ve cohort (HR=0.948 (0.642-1.400)) or for the HPV-ve patients (HR=1.083 (0.68-1.727)). In these 'real-world' patients what appeared to be improvements in OS with CRT in clinical trials were confounded by HPV status in Ontario. CRT did not improve outcomes for HPV+ve or for HPV-ve patients.

  9. Resection for oesophageal cancer - complications and survival.

    PubMed

    Grøtting, Marie Sæthre; Løberg, Else Marit; Johannessen, Hans-Olaf; Johnson, Egil

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND Surgery is considered necessary to achieve a cure for oesophageal cancer. Minimally invasive oesophageal resection is increasingly performed with the aim of reducing the number of complications compared with open surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate postoperative complications, mortality and long-term survival following hybrid oesophageal resection by laparoscopy and thoracotomy.MATERIAL AND METHOD Patients with oesophageal cancer who underwent hybrid resection with curative intent at Oslo University Hospital Ullevål from 1 November 2007 to 1 June 2013 were included (n = 109). Complications were graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and survival figures were recorded.RESULTS Median age was 65 years, 79 % were men. Altogether 118 complications were recorded in 70 patients (64.2 %). Distribution of complications was 1.8 % for stage I, 29.4 % for stage II, 22.1 % for stage III and 11.0 % for stage IV. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 4.6 %. There was no postoperative mortality. The proportion of R0 resections with microscopic radicality was 91 % (n = 100). For the entire patient population, the estimated 5-year survival rate was 48 % (95 % CI 36 - 60 %), for R0 resection 51 % (38 - 63 %) and for R1-2 resection 0 %. Estimated median survival with R0-2, R0 and R1-2 resection was 55, 55 and 10 months (0 - 28 months), respectively. R status and stage had a significant bearing on survival.INTERPRETATION There was a low percentage of serious complications, no mortality and few anastomotic leakages after hybrid resection for oesophageal cancer. The 5-year survival rate was good.

  10. Social inequality and incidence of and survival from cancer of the female genital organs in a population-based study in Denmark, 1994-2003.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kirsten Egebjerg; Hannibal, Charlotte Gerd; Nielsen, Ann; Jensen, Allan; Nøhr, Bugge; Munk, Christian; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effects of socioeconomic, demographic and health-related indicators on the incidence of and survival from cancers of the cervix, endometrium and ovary diagnosed in 1994-2003 with follow-up through 2006 in Denmark using information from nationwide registers. The analyses were based on the data on 3007 patients with cervical cancer, 3826 with endometrial cancer and 3855 with ovarian cancer in a cohort of 3.22 million persons born between 1925 and 1973 and aged >or=30 years. The incidence of cervical cancer increased with decreasing socioeconomic position; the incidences of endometrial and ovarian cancer were mostly associated with higher disposable income. Relative survival from cervical cancer was the highest among women of high socioeconomic position; increased excess mortality rates from endometrial and ovarian cancer were associated with low educational level, mainly during the first year after diagnosis. Socioeconomic position seemed to affect both the incidence of and the survival from cancers of the female genital organs.

  11. Improved survival after an educational project on colon cancer management in the county of Stockholm--a population based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bernhoff, R; Martling, A; Sjövall, A; Granath, F; Hohenberger, W; Holm, T

    2015-11-01

    Outcomes in rectal cancer have improved dramatically after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Recently, the TME concept has been transformed into that of complete mesocolic excision (CME) in an attempt to improve prognosis for patients with colon cancer. Multidisciplinary team (MDT) workshops including the CME concept were held annually between 2004 and 2008 at the Karolinska University Hospital. The workshops focused on preoperative staging, surgery and histopathology and included lectures and live surgery sessions. To compare survival before and after the "Stockholm Colon Cancer Project" all patients diagnosed with a right sided colon cancer between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2003 (Group 1) and from January 1, 2006 until December 31, 2008 (Group 2) in Stockholm were identified from the Swedish ColoRectal Cancer Registry (SCRCR). The proportion of patients having a tumour resection and the proportion having emergency surgery was higher in Group 1. There were more early tumours and more R0 resections in Group 2. Overall survival in all diagnosed patients and disease free survival after tumour resection was improved in the second time period. Surgical teaching programmes may have an impact on the management and outcome in colon cancer. The exact impact from the "Stockholm Colon Cancer Project" cannot be established, however it is likely that it contributed to the improved survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of neighborhood socioeconomic status and race on survival from ovarian cancer: a population-based analysis of Cook County, Illinois.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Katherine C; Peterson, Caryn E; Davis, Faith G; Hoskins, Kent; Pauls, Heather; Joslin, Charlotte E

    2015-08-01

    Despite significant improvements in treatment for ovarian cancer, survival is poorer for non-Hispanic black (NHB) women compared to non-Hispanic white (NHW) women. Neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) has been implicated in racial disparities across a variety of health outcomes and may similarly contribute to racial disparities in ovarian cancer survival. The purpose of this analysis is to assess the influence of neighborhood SES on NHB-NHW survival differences after accounting for differences in tumor characteristics and in treatment. Data were obtained from 2432 women (443 NHB and 1989 NHW) diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer in Cook County, Illinois between 1998 and 2007. Neighborhood (i.e., census tract) SES at the time of diagnosis was calculated for each woman using two well-established composite measures of affluence and disadvantage. Cox proportional hazard models measured the association between NHB race and survival after adjusting for age, tumor characteristics, treatment, year of diagnosis, and neighborhood SES. There was a strong association between ovarian cancer survival and both measures of neighborhood SES (P < .0001 for both affluence and disadvantage). After adjusting for age, tumor characteristics, treatment, and year of diagnosis, NHB were more likely than NHW to die of ovarian cancer (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28-1.68). The inclusion of neighborhood affluence and disadvantage into models separately and together attenuated this risk (HRaffluence = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.18-1.58; HRdisadvantage = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.08-1.52; and HRaffluence + disadvantage = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.08-1.52. Neighborhood SES, as measured by composite measures of affluence and disadvantage, is a predictor of survival in women diagnosed with ovarian cancer in Cook County, Illinois and may contribute to the racial disparity in survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Improved survival of colon cancer due to improved treatment and detection: a nationwide population-based study in The Netherlands 1989-2006.

    PubMed

    van Steenbergen, L N; Elferink, M A G; Krijnen, P; Lemmens, V E P P; Siesling, S; Rutten, H J T; Richel, D J; Karim-Kos, H E; Coebergh, J W W

    2010-11-01

    We described changes in treatment of colon cancer over time and the impact on survival in The Netherlands in the period 1989-2006. All 103,744 patients with invasive colon cancer during 1989-2006 in The Netherlands were included. Data were extracted from The Netherlands Cancer Registry. Trends in treatment over time were analysed and multivariable relative survival analysis was carried out. The administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage III patients <75 years increased from 19% in 1989-1993 to 79% in 2004-2006 and from 1% to 19% in stage III patients ≥75 years. Among stage IV patients, resection rates of the primary tumour decreased from 72% to 63%, while chemotherapy administration increased from 23% to 64% in those <75 years. Survival increased from 52% to 58% in males and from 55% to 58% among females. Stage III patients with adjuvant chemotherapy exhibited a relative excess risk of 0.4 (95% confidence interval 0.4-0.4) compared with those without. Among stage IV patients, resection of primary tumour, palliative chemotherapy, and metastasectomy were important prognostic factors. There were substantial improvements in management and survival of colon cancer from 1989 to 2006. Stage III disease patients with colon cancer experienced the largest improvement in survival, most likely related to the increased administration of adjuvant chemotherapy.

  14. Fish populations surviving estrogen pollution.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Claus

    2014-02-10

    Among the most common pollutants that enter the environment after passing municipal wastewater treatment are estrogens, especially the synthetic 17α-ethinylestradiol that is used in oral contraceptives. Estrogens are potent endocrine disruptors at concentrations frequently observed in surface waters. However, new genetic analyses suggest that some fish populations can be self-sustaining even in heavily polluted waters. We now need to understand the basis of this tolerance.

  15. Survival Continues to Improve for Most Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... and breast cancers. However, death rates rose for cancers of the liver, pancreas and brain in men and for the liver ... myeloma and leukemia. The lowest survival rates for cancers diagnosed between 2006 and 2012 were: pancreas (8.5 percent survival five years after diagnosis); ...

  16. Medical Advances and Racial/ethnic Disparities in Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tehranifar, Parisa; Neugut, Alfred I.; Phelan, Jo C.; Link, Bruce G.; Liao, Yuyan; Desai, Manisha; Terry, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although advances in early detection and treatment of cancer improve overall population survival, these advances may not benefit all population groups equally, and may heighten racial/ethnic (R/E) differences in survival. METHODS We identified cancer cases in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, who were ≥ 20 years and diagnosed with one invasive cancer in 1995–1999 (n=580,225). We used 5-year relative survival rates (5Y-RSR) to measure the degree to which mortality from each cancer is amenable to medical interventions (amenability index). We used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate survival differences between each R/E minority group relative to whites, by the overall amenability index, and three levels of amenability (non-amenable, partly and mostly amenable cancers, corresponding to cancers with 5Y-RSR <40%, 40–69% and ≥ 70%, respectively), adjusting for gender, age, disease stage and county-level poverty concentration. RESULTS As amenability increased, R/E differences in cancer survival increased for African Americans, American Indians/Native Alaskans and Hispanics relative to whites. For example, the hazard rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) for African Americans vs. whites from non-amenable, partly amenable and mostly amenable cancers were 1.05 (1.03, 1.07), 1.38 (1.34,1.41), and 1.41 (1.37, 1.46), respectively. Asians/Pacific Islanders had similar or longer survival relative to whites across amenability levels; however, several subgroups experienced increasingly poorer survival with increasing amenability. CONCLUSIONS Cancer survival disparities for most R/E minority populations widen as cancers become more amenable to medical interventions. Efforts in developing cancer control measures must be coupled with specific strategies for reducing the expected disparities. PMID:19789367

  17. Fish populations surviving estrogen pollution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Among the most common pollutants that enter the environment after passing municipal wastewater treatment are estrogens, especially the synthetic 17α-ethinylestradiol that is used in oral contraceptives. Estrogens are potent endocrine disruptors at concentrations frequently observed in surface waters. However, new genetic analyses suggest that some fish populations can be self-sustaining even in heavily polluted waters. We now need to understand the basis of this tolerance. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/12/1 PMID:24512617

  18. Minding the body: psychotherapy and cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, David

    2014-09-01

    This article reviews evidence regarding effects of psychotherapy on overall cancer survival time. Special emphasis is given to research on adverse effects of depression on cancer survival, breast cancer, and mediating psychophysiological pathways linking psychosocial support to longer survival. It reviews all published clinical trials addressing effects of psychotherapy on cancer survival, emphasizing depression, breast cancer, and psychophysiological evidence linking stress, depression, and support to cancer survival. Systematic literature review and synthesis. Eight of 15 published trials indicate that psychotherapy enhances cancer survival time. No studies show an adverse effect of psychotherapy on cancer survival. Potential psychophysiological mechanisms linking stress to shorter survival include dysregulation of diurnal cortisol, increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, reduced natural killer cell activity, shorter telomeres and lower telomerase activity, glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of p53 and BrCA1 gene expression, and sympathetic nervous system activation of vascular endothelial growth factor. Stress and support affect the course of cancer progression. What is known? Stress and support have been thought to be related to cancer risk and progression, but evidence has been mixed. Depression is a natural co-morbid condition with cancer. It has not been clear how stress and support could physiologically affect the rate of cancer progression. Immune function was not thought to have much relevance to cancer progression. Few other physiological mechanisms linking stress to cancer progression were known. What does this paper add? There is evidence from 15 RCTs indicating that effective psychosocial support improves quantity as well as quality of life with cancer. There is evidence that chronic depression predicts poorer prognosis with cancer. Dysregulated circadian cortisol patterns predict more rapid cancer progression. Inflammatory processes affect cancer

  19. Dietary influences on survival after ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Christina M; Purdie, David M; Webb, Penelope M; Green, Adèle; Harvey, Philip W; Bain, Christopher J

    2003-08-20

    We evaluated the effects of various food groups and micronutrients in the diet on survival among women who originally participated in a population-based case-control study of ovarian cancer conducted across 3 Australian states between 1990 and 1993. This analysis included 609 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, primarily because there was negligible mortality in women with borderline tumors. The women's usual diet was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Deaths in the cohort were identified using state-based cancer registries and the Australian National Death Index (NDI). Crude 5-year survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier technique, and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained from Cox regression models. After adjusting for important confounding factors, a survival advantage was observed for those who reported higher intake of vegetables in general (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.57-0.99, p-value trend 0.01 for the highest third, compared to the lowest third), and cruciferous vegetables in particular (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.57-0.98, p-value trend 0.03), and among women in the upper third of intake of vitamin E (HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.58-1.01, p-value trend 0.04). Inverse associations were also seen with protein (p-value trend 0.09), red meat (p-value trend 0.06) and white meat (p-value trend 0.07), and modest positive trends (maximum 30% excess) with lactose (p-value trend 0.04), calcium and dairy products. Although much remains to be learned about the influence of nutritional factors after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer, our study suggests the possibility that a diet high in vegetable intake may help improve survival.

  20. Survival rates of cervical cancer patients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhamad, Nor Asiah; Kamaluddin, Muhammad Amir; Adon, Mohd Yusoff; Noh, Mohamed Asyraf; Bakhtiar, Mohammed Faizal; Ibrahim Tamim, Nor Saleha; Mahmud, Siti Haniza; Aris, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common malignant cancer of the female reproductive organs worldwide. Currently, cervical cancer can be prevented by vaccination and detected at an early stage via various screening methods. Malaysia, as a developing country faces a heavy disease burden of cervical cancer as it is the second most common cancer among Malaysian women. This population based study was carried out to fulfil the primary aim of determining the survival rates of Malaysian women with cervical cancer and associated factors. Data were obtained from two different sources namely, the Malaysian National Cancer Registry (MNCR) and National Health Informatics Centre (NHIC) from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2005. Kaplan Meier analyses were conducted to identify the overall survival rates and median survival time. Differences in survival among different ethnic and age group were compared using the log-rank test. A total of 5,859 patients were included. The median survival time for cervical cancer in this study was 65.8 months and the 5-year survival rate was 71.1%. The overall observed survival rates at 1, 3 and 5 years were 94.1%, 79.3% and 71.1% respectively. The log-rank test finding also showed that there were significant differences in the 5-year survival rate among different ethnic groups. Malays had the lowest survival rate of 59.2% followed by Indians (69.5%) and Chinese (73.8%). The overall 5-year survival rate among patients with cervical cancer in Malaysia is relatively good. Age and ethnic groups remain as significant determining factors for cervical cancer survival rate.

  1. Survival of Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Listl, Stefan; Jansen, Lina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Freier, Kolja; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Gondos, Adam; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the survival of patients diagnosed with oral cavity cancer in Germany. The analyses relied on data from eleven population-based cancer registries in Germany covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Patients with a diagnosis of oral cavity cancer (ICD-10: C00-06) between 1997 and 2006 are included. Period analysis for 2002–2006 was applied to estimate five-year age-standardized relative survival, taking into account patients' sex as well as grade and tumor stage. Overall five-year relative survival for oral cavity cancer patients was 54.6%. According to tumor localization, five-year survival was 86.5% for lip cancer, 48.1% for tongue cancer and 51.7% for other regions of the oral cavity. Differences in survival were identified with respect to age, sex, tumor grade and stage. The present study is the first to provide a comprehensive overview on survival of oral cavity cancer patients in Germany. PMID:23349710

  2. Survival of patients with oral cavity cancer in Germany.

    PubMed

    Listl, Stefan; Jansen, Lina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Freier, Kolja; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Gondos, Adam; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the survival of patients diagnosed with oral cavity cancer in Germany. The analyses relied on data from eleven population-based cancer registries in Germany covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Patients with a diagnosis of oral cavity cancer (ICD-10: C00-06) between 1997 and 2006 are included. Period analysis for 2002-2006 was applied to estimate five-year age-standardized relative survival, taking into account patients' sex as well as grade and tumor stage. Overall five-year relative survival for oral cavity cancer patients was 54.6%. According to tumor localization, five-year survival was 86.5% for lip cancer, 48.1% for tongue cancer and 51.7% for other regions of the oral cavity. Differences in survival were identified with respect to age, sex, tumor grade and stage. The present study is the first to provide a comprehensive overview on survival of oral cavity cancer patients in Germany.

  3. Mitochondrial and Postmitochondrial Survival Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Neelu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, however, the molecular mechanisms of resistance to therapy remain unclear. Cellular survival machinery protects mitochondrial integrity against endogenous or exogenous stresses. Prodeath molecules orchestrate around mitochondria to initiate and execute cell death in cancer, and also play an under appreciated role in survival of cancer cells. Prosurvival mechanisms can operate at mitochondrial and postmitochondrial levels to attenuate core apoptotic death program. It is intriguing to explore how prosurvival and prodeath molecules crosstalk to regulate mitochondrial functions leading to increased cancer cell survival. This review describes some putative survival mechanisms at mitochondria, which may play significant role in designing effective agents for cancer prevention and therapy. These survival pathways may also have significance in understanding other human pathophysiological conditions including diabetes, cardiovascular, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24333692

  4. Early Colonoscopy Confers Survival Benefits on Colon Cancer Patients with Pre-Existing Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chieh-Lin Jerry; Yu, Jui-Ting; Chen, Yi-Huei; Lin, Ching-Heng; Hwang, Wen-Li

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the prognostic significance of pre-existing iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and the benefits of early colonoscopy in patients with colon cancer, since these have not been clearly established to date. Using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, we retrieved and retrospectively reviewed the records of patients aged ≥55 years who were diagnosed with colon cancer between 2000 and 2005. The patient cohort was divided into two groups: patients with (n = 1,260) or without (n = 15,912) an IDA diagnosis during ≤18 months preceding the date of colon cancer diagnosis. We found that diabetes (27.9% vs. 20.3%, p<0.0001), cardiovascular disease (61.6% vs. 54.7%, p<0.001), and chronic kidney disease (4.6% vs. 2.2%, p<0.0001) were more common among patients with IDA than among those without IDA. The median overall survival times for patients with IDA and those without IDA were 4.6 and 5.7 years, respectively (p = 0.002). Patients who underwent colonoscopy ≤30 days, 31–90, and ≥91 days after IDA diagnosis showed median overall survival times of 5.79, 4.43, and 4.04 years, respectively (p = 0.003). Delayed colonoscopy was an independent factor associated with poor overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–1.53; p = 0.01). In conclusion, colon cancer patients with IDA were more likely to experience comorbidities than were those without IDA. Pre-existing IDA was a poor prognostic factor in adult men and postmenopausal women who had colon cancer. Early colonoscopy could improve overall survival possibly by facilitating early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24466209

  5. Early colonoscopy confers survival benefits on colon cancer patients with pre-existing iron deficiency anemia: a nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Chieh-Lin Jerry; Yu, Jui-Ting; Chen, Yi-Huei; Lin, Ching-Heng; Hwang, Wen-Li

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the prognostic significance of pre-existing iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and the benefits of early colonoscopy in patients with colon cancer, since these have not been clearly established to date. Using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, we retrieved and retrospectively reviewed the records of patients aged ≥ 55 years who were diagnosed with colon cancer between 2000 and 2005. The patient cohort was divided into two groups: patients with (n = 1,260) or without (n = 15,912) an IDA diagnosis during ≤ 18 months preceding the date of colon cancer diagnosis. We found that diabetes (27.9% vs. 20.3%, p<0.0001), cardiovascular disease (61.6% vs. 54.7%, p<0.001), and chronic kidney disease (4.6% vs. 2.2%, p<0.0001) were more common among patients with IDA than among those without IDA. The median overall survival times for patients with IDA and those without IDA were 4.6 and 5.7 years, respectively (p = 0.002). Patients who underwent colonoscopy ≤ 30 days, 31-90, and ≥ 91 days after IDA diagnosis showed median overall survival times of 5.79, 4.43, and 4.04 years, respectively (p = 0.003). Delayed colonoscopy was an independent factor associated with poor overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.53; p = 0.01). In conclusion, colon cancer patients with IDA were more likely to experience comorbidities than were those without IDA. Pre-existing IDA was a poor prognostic factor in adult men and postmenopausal women who had colon cancer. Early colonoscopy could improve overall survival possibly by facilitating early diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Effect of Psychosocial Factors on Cancer Risk and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial factors such as personality traits and depression may alter immune and endocrine function, with possible effects on cancer incidence and survival. Although these factors have been extensively studied as risk and prognostic factors for cancer, the associations remain unclear. The author used data from prospective cohort studies in population-based and clinical databases to investigate these relations. The findings do not support the hypotheses that personality traits and depression are direct risk factors for cancer and cancer survival. Some researchers have recently reported that cancer affects the psychological status of the partners and family members of cancer patients. The mechanisms underlying this hypothesis imply the existence of not only psychological distress from caregiving and grief but also a shared unhealthy lifestyle. Only a few studies have suggested that major psychosocial problems develop in partners of cancer patients. The present study used nationwide population-based data to investigate depression risk among male partners of women with breast cancer. The results support the hypothesis that such men are at increased risk of depression. In conclusion, the effects of personality traits and depression on cancer risk and survival appear to be extremely small. In addition, partners of cancer patients were at increased risk of depression. Screening partners and family members of cancer patients for depressive symptoms is therefore an important concern for research in psycho-oncology. PMID:24270060

  7. Trends in net survival from head and neck cancer in six European Latin countries: results from the SUDCAN population-based study.

    PubMed

    Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Uhry, Zoé; de Raucourt, Dominique; Mazzoleni, Guido; Sánchez, Maria-José; Ligier, Karine

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the SUDCAN collaborative study was to compare the trends in 1- and 5-year net survival and the trends in the dynamics of the excess mortality rates in head and neck cancers between six European Latin countries (Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland). The data were extracted from the EUROCARE-5 database. First, the net survival was studied over the 2000-2004 period using the Pohar-Perme estimator. For trend analyses, the study period was specific to each country. The results are reported from 1992 to 2004 in France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland and from 2000 to 2004 in Belgium and Portugal. The analyses were carried out using a flexible excess rate modelling. There were significant differences between countries in 5-year age-standardized net survivals over the 2000-2004 period, ranging from 33 to 34% in France and Portugal from 42 to 44% in Switzerland and Italy, respectively. The age-standardized net survival improved considerably from 1992 to 2004 in Italy, Spain and Switzerland, but not in France because of lack of improvement in the elderly. The increase in net survival was linked to a decrease in the excess mortality rate up to 3-4 years after diagnosis. The net survival from head and neck cancers improved over the study period, but significant differences were still observed in 2004. Differences in sex ratio and anatomical distribution contributed only partially towards these disparities. Differences in stage at diagnosis, time to treatment and/or proportion of human papillomavirus-related cases are also probably involved in the survival disparities observed. Overall, the prognosis of these tumours remains poor.

  8. Body mass index at diagnosis and breast cancer survival prognosis in clinical trial populations from NRG Oncology/NSABP B-30, B-31, B-34, and B-38

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Reena S.; Swain, Sandra M.; Costantino, Joseph P.; Rastogi, Priya; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Anderson, Stewart J.; Tang, Gong; Geyer, Charles E.; Lembersky, Barry C.; Romond, Edward H.; Paterson, Alexander H.G.; Wolmark, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Background Body mass index (BMI) has been associated with breast cancer (BC) outcomes. However, few studies used clinical trial settings where treatments and outcomes are consistently evaluated and documented. There are also limited data assessing how patient/disease characteristics and treatment may alter the BMI/BC association. Methods We evaluated 15,538 BC participants from four NSABP protocols. B-34 studied early-stage BC patients (N=3,311); B-30 and B-38 included node-positive BC patients (N=5,265 and 4,860); B-31 studied node-positive and HER2-positive BC patients (N=2,102). We used Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate adjusted hazards ratios (HRs) for risk of death and recurrence, and conducted separate analyses by ER-status and treatment group. Results In B-30, increased BMI was significantly related to survival. Compared with BMI<25, HRs were 1.04 for BMI 25–29.9 and 1.18 for BMI≥30 (p=0.02). Separate analyses indicated the significant relationship was only in ER-positive disease (p=0.002) and the sub-group treated with doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (p=0.005). There were no significant trends across BMI for the other three trials. Similar results were found for recurrence. Increased BMI was significantly related to recurrence in B-30 (p=0.03); and the significant relationship was only in ER-positive BCs (p=0.001). Recurrence was also significant among ER-positive disease in B-38 (p=0.03). Conclusions In our investigation, we did not find a consistent relationship between BMI at diagnosis and BC recurrence or death. Impact This work demonstrates that the heterogeneity of BC between different BC populations and the different therapies used to treat them may modify any association that exists between BMI and BC outcome. PMID:26545405

  9. The influence of marital status on the stage at diagnosis, treatment, and survival of adult patients with gastric cancer: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jieyun; Gan, Lu; Wu, Zhenhua; Yan, Shican; Liu, Xiyu; Guo, Weijian

    2017-04-04

    Marital status was reported as a prognostic factor in many cancers. However, its role in gastric cancer (GC) hasn't been thoroughly explored. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of marital status on survival, stage, treatment, and survival in subgroups. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database and identified 16910 GC patients. These patients were categorized into married (58.44%) and unmarred (41.56%) groups. Pearson chi-square, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney, Log-rank, multivariate Cox regression, univariate and multivariate binomial or multinomial logistic regression analysis were used in our analysis. Subgroup analyses of married versus unmarried patients were summarized in a forest plot. Married patients had better 5-year overall survival (OS) (32.09% VS 24.61%, P<0.001) and 5-year cancer-caused special survival (CSS) (37.74% VS 32.79%, P<0.001) than unmarried ones. Then we studied several underlying mechanisms. Firstly, married patients weren't in earlier stage at diagnosis (P=0.159). Secondly, married patients were more likely to receive surgery (P < 0.001) or radiotherapy (P < 0.001) compared with the unmarried. Thirdly, in subgroup analyses, married patients still had survival advantage in subgroups with stage II-IV and no radiotherapy. These results showed that marital status was an independently prognostic factor for both OS and CSS in GC patients. Undertreatment and lack of social support in unmarried patients were potential explanations. With the knowledge of heterogeneous effects of marriage in subgroups, we can target unmarried patients with better social support, especially who are diagnosed at late stage and undergo no treatment.

  10. Trends in incidence and survival analysis in non-melanoma skin cancer from 1994 to 2012 in Girona, Spain: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Rubió-Casadevall, J; Hernandez-Pujol, A M; Ferreira-Santos, M C; Morey-Esteve, G; Vilardell, L; Osca-Gelis, G; Vilar-Coromina, N; Marcos-Gragera, R

    2016-12-01

    We present an epidemiological study focused on Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC), including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFS) and adnexal and skin appendages neoplasm (ASAN), a neoplasm understudied in cancer registries. We analyze trends of incidence and survival of NMSC registered with the Cancer Registry of Girona, Spain. We found 14389 cases of NMSC, accounting 3,474 SCC, 10729 BCC, 33 MCC, 61 DFSP and 71 ASAN. Incidence increased significantly in SCC and BCC with annual percentage of change of 1.6 and 1.5, respectively, but not in MCC, DFS or ASAN. Five-year relative survival for both sexes was 90.1% in SCC, 99.8% in BCC, 44.2% in MCC, 93.7% in DFS and 84% in ASAN. Our study confirms the increasing incidence and good survival of SCC and BCC and enhances knowledge on the epidemiology of the less incidental NMSC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inbreeding and homozygosity in breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Hauke; Filho, Miguel Inacio da Silva; Woltmann, Andrea; Johansson, Robert; Eyfjörd, Jorunn E; Hamann, Ute; Manjer, Jonas; Enquist-Olsson, Kerstin; Henriksson, Roger; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Chen, Bowang; Huhn, Stefanie; Hemminki, Kari; Lenner, Per; Försti, Asta

    2015-11-12

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) help to understand the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on breast cancer (BC) progression and survival. We performed multiple analyses on data from a previously conducted GWAS for the influence of individual SNPs, runs of homozygosity (ROHs) and inbreeding on BC survival. (I.) The association of individual SNPs indicated no differences in the proportions of homozygous individuals among short-time survivors (STSs) and long-time survivors (LTSs). (II.) The analysis revealed differences among the populations for the number of ROHs per person and the total and average length of ROHs per person and among LTSs and STSs for the number of ROHs per person. (III.) Common ROHs at particular genomic positions were nominally more frequent among LTSs than in STSs. Common ROHs showed significant evidence for natural selection (iHS, Tajima's D, Fay-Wu's H). Most regions could be linked to genes related to BC progression or treatment. (IV.) Results were supported by a higher level of inbreeding among LTSs. Our results showed that an increased level of homozygosity may result in a preference of individuals during BC treatment. Although common ROHs were short, variants within ROHs might favor survival of BC and may function in a recessive manner.

  12. After accounting for competing causes of death and more advanced stage, do Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with cancer still have worse survival? A population-based cohort study in New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Tervonen, Hanna E; Walton, Richard; You, Hui; Baker, Deborah; Roder, David; Currow, David; Aranda, Sanchia

    2017-06-02

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia have been found to have poorer cancer survival than non-Aboriginal people. However, use of conventional relative survival analyses is limited due to a lack of life tables. This cohort study examined whether poorer survival persist after accounting for competing risks of death from other causes and disparities in cancer stage at diagnosis, for all cancers collectively and by cancer site. People diagnosed in 2000-2008 were extracted from the population-based New South Wales Cancer Registry. Aboriginal status was multiply imputed for people with missing information (12.9%). Logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 'advanced stage' at diagnosis (separately for distant and distant/regional stage). Survival was examined using competing risk regression to compute subhazard ratios (SHRs) with 95%CIs. Of the 301,356 cases, 2517 (0.84%) identified as Aboriginal (0.94% after imputation). After adjusting for age, sex, year of diagnosis, socio-economic status, remoteness, and cancer site Aboriginal peoples were more likely to be diagnosed with distant (OR 1.30, 95%CI 1.17-1.44) or distant/regional stage (OR 1.29, 95%CI 1.18-1.40) for all cancers collectively. This applied to cancers of the female breast, uterus, prostate, kidney, others (those not included in other categories) and cervix (when analyses were restricted to cases with known stages/known Aboriginal status). Aboriginal peoples had a higher hazard of death than non-Aboriginal people after accounting for competing risks from other causes of death, socio-demographic factors, stage and cancer site (SHR 1.40, 95%CI 1.31-1.50 for all cancers collectively). Consistent results applied to colorectal, lung, breast, prostate and other cancers. Aboriginal peoples with cancer have an elevated hazard of cancer death compared with non-Aboriginal people, after accounting for more advanced stage and competing

  13. Survival after Abdominoperineal and Sphincter-Preserving Resection in Nonmetastatic Rectal Cancer: A Population-Based Time-Trend and Propensity Score-Matched SEER Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Warschkow, Rene; Ebinger, Sabrina M.; Brunner, Walter; Schmied, Bruno M.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Abdominoperineal resection (APR) has been associated with impaired survival in nonmetastatic rectal cancer patients. It is unclear whether this adverse outcome is due to the surgical procedure itself or is a consequence of tumor-related characteristics. Study Design. Patients were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. The impact of APR compared to coloanal anastomosis (CAA) on survival was assessed by Cox regression and propensity-score matching. Results. In 36,488 patients with rectal cancer resection, the APR rate declined from 31.8% in 1998 to 19.2% in 2011, with a significant trend change in 2004 at 21.6% (P < 0.001). To minimize a potential time-trend bias, survival analysis was limited to patients diagnosed after 2004. APR was associated with an increased risk of cancer-specific mortality after unadjusted analysis (HR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.28–2.03, P < 0.01) and multivariable adjustment (HR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.10–1.76, P < 0.01). After optimal adjustment of highly biased patient characteristics by propensity-score matching, APR was not identified as a risk factor for cancer-specific mortality (HR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.56–1.29, P = 0.456). Conclusions. The current propensity score-adjusted analysis provides evidence that worse oncological outcomes in patients undergoing APR compared to CAA are caused by different patient characteristics and not by the surgical procedure itself. PMID:28197206

  14. Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Prostate Cancer Survival.

    PubMed

    Mondul, Alison M; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Moy, Kristin A; Männistö, Satu; Albanes, Demetrius

    2016-04-01

    Recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that higher circulating vitamin D does not protect against prostate cancer and, in fact, may increase the risk of developing this malignancy. However, few studies have examined the most clinically relevant outcome, prostate cancer mortality. We examined prediagnostic serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH)D) and prostate cancer survival in a cohort of 1,000 cases in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study. During 23 years of follow-up, 363 men died from their disease. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of death from prostate cancer by season-specific quintile of 25(OH)D. Multivariable models were adjusted for age, physical activity, cigarettes per day, and family history of prostate cancer. Men with higher serum 25(OH)D were less likely to die from their prostate cancer (Q5 vs. Q1 HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.52-0.99; Ptrend = 0.006). This finding was independent of stage or grade at diagnosis and appeared restricted to men who survived longer (survived <3.3 years: Q5 vs. Q1 HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.61-1.50; Ptrend, 0.53; survived ≥3.3 years: Q5 vs. Q1 HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.34-0.85; Ptrend, 0.0002). In this population of men diagnosed with prostate cancer, higher serum 25(OH)D years prior to diagnosis was associated with longer prostate cancer survival. In light of inconsistent evidence regarding the role of vitamin D in the development of prostate cancer, the present findings regarding the most clinically relevant prostate cancer outcome, disease-specific mortality, could have important public health implications. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 665-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Survival from salivary glands adenoid cystic carcinoma in European populations.

    PubMed

    Ciccolallo, Laura; Licitra, Lisa; Cantú, Giulio; Gatta, Gemma

    2009-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of salivary gland origin is rare. The EUROCARE data provide a good opportunity to study the survival of this uncommon cancer in a large population. A total of 2611 cases, aged 15 to 99 years, diagnosed between 1983 and 1994 with primary salivary gland ACC were analyzed. Thirty-two population based cancer registries from seventeen countries participating in EUROCARE contributed the data. Relative survival by sex, age, period of diagnosis, region, site and stage, and the adjusted relative excess risk (RER) of death were estimated. Survival since diagnosis was 94%, 78% and 65% at 1, 5 and ten years, respectively. Ten-year survival was best (69%) in patients of the youngest age group (15-54 years) and from Northern Europe (69%). In the UK was higher (65%) than in Western (62%) and Eastern (56%) Europe. ACCs in nasal cavity (RER 2.6), pharynx (RER 3.5) and larynx and bronchus (RER 3.9) had a worse prognosis compared to those of oral cavity. A strong effect of stage at diagnosis on RERs and some worsening of survival at five years over time (80% in 1983-1985, 76% in 1992-1994) were also evident. The findings of the present study, as those from clinical studies, confirm the important impact of primary site and stage at diagnosis on survival. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that survival for ACC did not improve over time and that cases from Eastern countries had a significant worse prognosis. Improvements in the disease detection in its early stage and international collaborative research should be encouraged.

  16. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  17. High BRAF Mutation Frequency and Marked Survival Differences in Subgroups According to KRAS/BRAF Mutation Status and Tumor Tissue Availability in a Prospective Population-Based Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Cohort.

    PubMed

    Sorbye, Halfdan; Dragomir, Anca; Sundström, Magnus; Pfeiffer, Per; Thunberg, Ulf; Bergfors, Monica; Aasebø, Kristine; Eide, Geir Egil; Ponten, Fredrik; Qvortrup, Camilla; Glimelius, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    RAS and BRAF mutations impact treatment and prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer patients (mCRC), but the knowledge is based on trial patients usually not representative for the general cancer population. Patient characteristics, treatment and efficacy according to KRAS, BRAF and MSI status were analyzed in a prospectively collected unselected population-based cohort of 798 non-resectable mCRC patients. The cohort contained many patients with poor performance status (39% PS 2-4) and elderly (37% age>75), groups usually not included in clinical trials. Patients without available tissue micro array (TMA) (42%) had worse prognostic factors and inferior survival (all patients; 7m vs 11m, chemotherapy-treated;12m vs 17m). The 92 patients (21%) with BRAF mutation had a poor prognosis regardless of microsatellite instability, but receipt of 1-2nd chemotherapy was similar to wildtype BRAF patients. Median survival in this cohort varied from 1 month in BRAF mutated patients not given chemotherapy to 26 months in wildtype KRAS/BRAF patients <75 years in good PS. TMA availability, BRAF mutation and KRAS mutation were all independent prognostic factors for survival. The observed 21% BRAF mutation incidence is higher than the previously and repeatedly reported incidence of 5-12% in mCRC. Screening for BRAF mutations before selection of treatment is relevant for many patients, especially outside clinical trials. A BRAF mutation only partly explained the very poor prognosis of many mCRC patients. Survival in unselected metastatic colorectal cancer patients is extremely variable and subgroups have an extremely short survival compared to trial patients. Patients without available TMA had worse prognostic factors and shorter survival, which questions the total generalizability of present TMA studies and implies that we lack information on the biologically worst mCRC cases. Lack of available tissue is an important underexposed issue which introduces sample bias, and this should

  18. Survival | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  19. Survival | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  20. Lung cancer: Incidence and survival in Rabat, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Lachgar, A; Tazi, M A; Afif, M; Er-Raki, A; Kebdani, T; Benjaafar, N

    2016-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, but epidemiologic data from developing countries are lacking. This article reports lung cancer incidence and survival in Rabat, the capital of Morocco. All lung cancer cases diagnosed between 2005 and 2008 were analyzed using data provided by the Rabat Cancer Registry. The standardized rate was reported using age adjustment with respect to the world standard population, and the observed survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Three hundred fifty-one cases were registered (314 males and 37 females), aged 27-90 years (median, 59 years). The most common pathological type was adenocarcinoma (40.2%) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (31.9%); the majority of cases were diagnosed at stage IV (52%). The age-standardized incidence rate was 25.1 and 2.7 per 100,000 for males and females, respectively, and the overall observed survival rates at 1 and 5 years were 31.7% and 3.4%, respectively. The clinical stage of disease was the only independent predictor of survival. The survival rate of lung cancer in Rabat is very poor. This finding explains the need for measures to reduce the prevalence of tobacco and to improve diagnostic and therapeutic facilities for lung cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Survival and cancer in laboratory mammals exposed to radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Elder, Joe A

    2003-01-01

    This article is a review of the effects of radiofrequency (RF) energy on (1). survival and (2). cancer in the same animal populations having survival data. The literature consisted of 18 studies with survival data, and 16 of these have information on cancer. In one study, a significant decrease in lifespan was observed at 6.8 W/kg but not at 2 W/kg. Thermal stress appears to be the causal factor for the effect on lifespan because the higher dose rate, unlike the lower dose rate, was estimated to increase body temperature significantly. The finding that the lower level was without effect is consistent with the results of a number of recent studies showing that long term, low level exposure to RF energy did not affect survival adversely. Many of these recent studies addressed the cancer issue by histopathological analysis of many organs and tissues following exposure up to 2 years, the average lifetime of rats and mice. Some investigations examined the effect of RF fields from mobile phones on brain cancer, including the progression of chemically induced brain cancer. The results demonstrate that RF exposure did not adversely affect cancer incidence at whole body specific absorption rates (SARs) survival and cancer in laboratory mammals.

  2. Survival rates and predictors of survival among colorectal cancer patients in a Malaysian tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Magaji, Bello Arkilla; Moy, Foong Ming; Roslani, April Camilla; Law, Chee Wei

    2017-05-18

    Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancy and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death globally. It is the second most common cancer among both males and females in Malaysia. The economic burden of colorectal cancer is likely to increase over time owing to its current trend and aging population. Cancer survival analysis is an essential indicator for early detection and improvement in cancer treatment. However, there was a scarcity of studies concerning survival of colorectal cancer patients as well as its predictors. Therefore, we aimed to determine the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates, compare survival rates among ethnic groups and determine the predictors of survival among colorectal cancer patients. This was an ambidirectional cohort study conducted at the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. All Malaysian citizens or permanent residents with histologically confirmed diagnosis of colorectal cancer seen at UMMC from 1 January 2001 to 31 December 2010 were included in the study. Demographic and clinical characteristics were extracted from the medical records. Patients were followed-up until death or censored at the end of the study (31st December 2010). Censored patients' vital status (whether alive or dead) were cross checked with the National Registration Department. Survival analyses at 1-, 3- and 5-year intervals were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Log-rank test was used to compare the survival rates, while Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was carried out to determine the predictors of 5-year colorectal cancer survival. Among 1212 patients, the median survival for colorectal, colon and rectal cancers were 42.0, 42.0 and 41.0 months respectively; while the 1-, 3-, and 5-year relative survival rates ranged from 73.8 to 76.0%, 52.1 to 53.7% and 40.4 to 45.4% respectively. The Chinese patients had the lowest 5-year survival compared to Malay and Indian patients. Based on the 814

  3. Survival outcome in endometrial cancer patients according to hereditary predisposition.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Heon Jong; Lim, Myong Cheol; Son, Yedong; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Sun Ho; Yoo, Chong Woo; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2015-02-01

    A familial history of ovarian cancer/breast cancer is considered a significant prognostic factor for ovarian cancer. We investigated hereditary factors by examining the incidence of synchronous malignancy in patients with endometrial cancer, and assessed the prognostic role of heredity in endometrial cancer. We retrospectively evaluated patients with endometrial cancer who underwent surgery from January 2001 to April 2011. A hereditary background in this study was defined as double primary cancer, that is, endometrial cancer accompanied by colon, ovarian, or breast cancer suggestive of Lynch syndrome, hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome, or Cowden syndrome, respectively. Among 282 patients with endometrial cancer in the study population, 20 patients (7.1%) had a hereditary predisposition: 10 patients (3.5%) had ovarian cancer, six patients (2.1%) had breast cancer, and four patients (1.4%) had colon cancer. Age and lower uterine segment involvement were not statistically different between the hereditary and nonhereditary groups. The majority of the women in the hereditary group presented with Stage I cancer; however, there were no significant differences in Stage I cancer between the hereditary group and the sporadic endometrial cancer group (85% and 77%, respectively, p = 0.561). The median follow-up period was 60 months. A 5-year overall survival rate was not different between the two groups (95% and 95%, respectively, p = 0.659). Among a subgroup of patients with Stage I endometrial cancer, the 5-year overall survival rate was lower in the endometrial cancer with a hereditary predisposition group compared with the sporadic endometrial cancer group (94% and 98%, respectively, p = 0.027). Seven percent of the women with endometrial cancer in our study had other malignancies such as ovarian, colon, or breast cancer synchronously. Among a subgroup of patients with Stage I cancer in the endometrial cancer with a hereditary predisposition group, the 5-year

  4. Incidence and survival of rare urogenital cancers in Europe.

    PubMed

    Visser, O; Adolfsson, J; Rossi, S; Verne, J; Gatta, G; Maffezzini, M; Franks, K N

    2012-03-01

    The RARECARE project aims at increasing knowledge of rare cancers in Europe. This manuscript describes the epidemiology (incidence, prevalence, survival) of rare urogenital cancers, taking into account the morphological characterisation of these tumours. We used data gathered by RARECARE on cancer patients diagnosed from 1995 to 2002 and archived in 64 European population-based cancer registries, followed up to December 31st, 2003 or later. The annual number of males that develop penile cancer in the EU is estimated at 3100, which is equivalent to an age standardised rate (ASR) of 12 per million males. The 5-year relative survival rate is 69%, while squamous cell carcinoma is the predominant morphological entity. Each year around 650 persons in the EU develop cancer of the urethra and 7200 develop cancer of the renal pelvis or ureter (RPU). The ASR for cancer of the urethra and RPU is 1.1 (males 1.6; females 0.6) and 12 (males 16; females 7) per million inhabitants, respectively. The 5-year relative survival rate for cancer of the urethra and RPU is 54% and 51%, respectively. Transitional cell carcinoma is the predominant morphological entity of cancer of the urethra and RPU. In view of the low number of cases and the fact that one third to one half of the patients die of their disease, centralisation of treatment of these rare tumours to a select number of specialist centres should be promoted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Polyphosphate Affects Breast Cancer Cell Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    W81XWH-04-1-0379 TITLE: Polyphosphate Affects Breast Cancer Cell Survival PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christine Haakenson CONTRACTING...From - To) 15 Mar 05 – 14 Mar 06 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Polyphosphate Affects Breast Cancer Cell Survival 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0379 5c...also affect Pol κ. Figure 13: Cellular survival after UV irradiation for Pol IV knockout in wild type and PPK- cells 0.01 0.10 1.00 0 30 60 90

  6. Copy-number variation of MCL1 predicts overall survival of non-small-cell lung cancer in a Southern Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jieyun; Li, Yangkai; Zhao, Hao; Qin, Qin; Li, Xiaorong; Huang, Jiao; Shi, Yun; Gong, Shufang; Liu, Li; Fu, Xiangning; Nie, Shaofa; Wei, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    BCL2L1 and MCL1 are key anti-apoptotic genes, and critical for cancer progression. The prognostic values of BCL2L1 and MCL1 copy-number variations (CNVs) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain largely unknown. Somatic CNVs in BCL2L1 and MCL1 genes were tested in tumor tissues from 516 NSCLC patients in southern China; afterward, survival analyses were conducted with overall survival (OS) as outcome. Additionally, the associations between CNVs and mRNA expression levels were explored using data from 986 NSCLC patients in the Cancer Genome Atlas project. It was found that amplifications of BCL2L1 and MCL1 were associated with unfavorable OS of NSCLC, with adjusted hazards ratio of 1.62 (95% confident interval [CI] = 1.10-2.40; P = 0.015) and 1.39 (95% CI = 1.05-1.84; P = 0.020), respectively. Amplifications of MCL1, but not BCL2L1, were related with higher mRNA expression levels of corresponding gene, compared with non-amplifications (P = 0.005). Interestingly, after incorporating with MCL1 CNV status, clinical variables (age, sex, TNM stage, and surgical approach) showed an improved discriminatory ability to classify OS (area under curve increased from 72.2% to 74.1%; P = 0.042, DeLong's test). Overall, MCL1 CNV might be a prognostic biomarker for NSCLC, and additional investigations are needed to validate our findings. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and prostate cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Mondul, Alison M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Moy, Kristin A.; Männistö, Satu; Albanes, Demetrius

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that higher circulating vitamin D does not protect against prostate cancer and, in fact, may increase the risk of developing this malignancy. However, few studies have examined the most clinically relevant outcome, prostate cancer mortality. Methods We examined pre-diagnostic serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH)D) and prostate cancer survival in a cohort of 1,000 cases in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study. During 23 years of follow-up, 363 men died from their disease. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% CI of death from prostate cancer by season-specific quintile of 25(OH)D. Multivariable models were adjusted for age, physical activity, cigarettes per day, and family history of prostate cancer. Results Men with higher serum 25(OH)D were less likely to die from their prostate cancer (Q5 vs. Q1 HR=0.72, 95% CI=0.52 – 0.99, p-trend=0.006). This finding was independent of stage or grade at diagnosis, and appeared restricted to men who survived longer (survived <3.3 years: Q5 vs. Q1 HR=0.95, 95% CI=0.61 – 1.50, p-trend=0.53; survived ≥3.3 years: Q5 vs. Q1 HR=0.53, 95% CI=0.34 – 0.85, p-trend=0.0002). Conclusions In this population of men diagnosed with prostate cancer, higher serum 25(OH)D years prior to diagnosis was associated with longer prostate cancer survival. Impact In light of inconsistent evidence regarding the role of vitamin D in the development of prostate cancer, the present findings regarding the most clinically relevant prostate cancer outcome, disease-specific mortality, could have important public health implications. PMID:26809275

  8. Cancer rehabilitation: a barometer for survival?

    PubMed

    Saotome, Takako; Klein, Linda; Faux, Steven

    2015-10-01

    This pilot study was conducted to describe the clinical features and functional outcomes of patients attending inpatient rehabilitation for cancer-related deconditioning and neurological deficits and to explore factors associated with improved survival. Using a retrospective audit, demographic characteristics, discharge outcomes, survival time, and functional status as measured by Functional Independence Measure (FIM) were recorded for 73 patients. Clinical status was estimated by Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (KPS). Cox regression was used to assess factors associated with improved survival following discharge from rehabilitation. Significant functional gains following rehabilitation were observed in total FIM (p = 0.02), motor FIM (p = 0.001), and KPS (p = 0.003). Length of survival ranged from 9.0 to 25.0 months, with 26 cases surviving to the end of study (censored). Patients scoring a total FIM of ≥80 survived significantly longer than patients scoring <80 (p = 0.002). At discharge, motor FIM scores (p = 0.004), FIM Efficiency (p = 0.001), KPS scores (p = 0.022), ambulation ability (p = 0.026), return to home (p = 0.009), and receipt of in-home services (p = 0.045) were significantly associated with improved survival. Functional improvement achieved through inpatient rehabilitation was associated with prolonged survival among cancer patients. Rehabilitation leading to improved independence among cancer patients may act as a marker of those with greater likelihood of better prognosis.

  9. Pre-diagnostic 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, VDR and CASR Polymorphisms, and Survival in Patients with Colorectal Cancer in Western European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Fedirko, Veronika; Riboli, Elio; Tjønneland, Anne; Ferrari, Pietro; Olsen, Anja; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J.B.; Norat, Teresa; Jansen, Eugène H.J.M.; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Racine, Antoine; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Teucher, Birgit; Boeing, Heiner; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Grioni, Sara; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Siersema, Peter D.; Peeters, Petra HM; Skeie, Guri; Brustad, Magritt; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte; Garcia, Jose Ramón Quirós; Pérez, Maria José Sánchez; Dorronsoro, Miren; Bonet, Catalina; Palmqvist, Richard; Hallmans, Göran; Key, Timothy J.; Crowe, Francesca; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Romieu, Isabelle; McKay, James; Wark, Petra A.; Romaguera, Dora; Jenab, Mazda

    2012-01-01

    Background Individuals with higher blood 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels have a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC), but the influence of 25(OH)D on mortality after CRC diagnosis is unknown. Methods The association between pre-diagnostic 25(OH)D levels and CRC-specific (N=444) and overall mortality (N=541) was prospectively examined among 1,202 participants diagnosed with CRC between 1992-2003 in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) according to 25(OH)D quintiles and genetic variation within the VDR and CASR genes. Potential dietary, lifestyle and metabolic effect modifiers were also investigated. Results There were 541 deaths, 444 (82%) due to CRC. Mean follow-up was 73 months. In multivariable analysis, higher 25(OH)D levels were associated with a statistically significant reduction in CRC-specific (Ptrend=0.04) and overall mortality (Ptrend=0.01). Participants with 25(OH)D levels in the highest quintile had an adjusted HR of 0.69 (95%CI: 0.50-0.93) for CRC-specific and 0.67 (95%CI: 0.50-0.88) for overall mortality, compared to the lowest quintile. Except for a possible interaction by pre-diagnostic dietary calcium intake (Pinteraction=0.01), no other potential modifying factors related to CRC survival were noted. The VDR (FokI and BsmI) and CASR (rs1801725) genotypes were not associated with survival. Conclusions High pre-diagnostic 25(OH)D levels are associated with improved survival of patients with CRC. Impact Our findings may stimulate further research directed at investigating the effects of blood vitamin D levels before, at, and after CRC diagnosis on outcomes in CRC patients. PMID:22278364

  10. Novel nomograms for survival and progression in HPV+ and HPV- oropharyngeal cancer: a population-based study of 1,542 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Christian Grønhøj; Jensen, David H.; Carlander, Amanda-Louise Fenger; Kiss, Katalin; Andersen, Luise; Olsen, Caroline Holkmann; Andersen, Elo; Garnæs, Emilie; Cilius, Finn; Specht, Lena; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background No study has combined tumour and clinical covariates for survival to construct an individual risk-profile for overall survival (OS), time to progression (TTP), and survival after progression (SAP) in patients with HPV+ and HPV– oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Based on the largest-to-date, unselected, population-based cohort of patients diagnosed with OPSCC, we performed a comprehensive analysis of long-term OS, TTP, and SAP and constructed novel nomograms to evaluate patients' prognoses. Results At a median follow-up of 4.0 years (range: 0.8–15.8 yrs.), 690 deaths were recorded. The 5-year OS, TTP, and SAP for the HPV+/p16+ subgroup were 77%, 82%, and 33, vs. 30%, 66%, and 6% for the HPV–/p16– group (P < 0.01). 376 patients failed to maintain disease control with a median TTP of 13 months in the HPV+/p16+ subgroup vs. 8.5 months in the HPV–/p16– subgroup (P < 0.05). HPV combined with p16 status remained one of the most informative covariates in the final Cox regression model for OS, TTP, and SAP. Methods We included all patients diagnosed with OPSCC (n = 1,542) between 2000–2014 in Eastern Denmark. Survival rates were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. A multivariate Cox regression model was used to construct predictive, internally validated nomograms. Conclusion The HPV+/p16+ subgroup had improved OS, TTP, and SAP compared with other combinations of HPV and p16 after adjusting for covariates. Nomograms were constructed for 1-, 5- and 10-year survival probability. Models may aid patients and clinicians in their clinical decision making as well as in counselling, research, and trial design. PMID:27708214

  11. The impact of risk-reducing hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy on survival in patients with a history of breast cancer--a population-based data linkage study.

    PubMed

    Obermair, Andreas; Youlden, Danny R; Baade, Peter D; Janda, Monika

    2014-05-01

    Prophylactic surgery including hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) is recommended in breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA)-positive women, whereas in women from the general population, hysterectomy plus BSO may increase the risk of overall mortality. The effect of hysterectomy plus BSO on women previously diagnosed with breast cancer is unknown. We used data from a population-base data linkage study of all women diagnosed with primary breast cancer in Queensland, Australia between 1997 and 2008 (n = 21,067). We fitted flexible parametric breast cancer-specific and overall survival models with 95% confidence intervals (also known as Royston-Parmar models) to assess the impact of risk-reducing surgery (removal of uterus, one or both ovaries). We also stratified analyses by age 20-49 and 50-79 years, respectively. Overall, 1,426 women (7%) underwent risk-reducing surgery (13% of premenopausal women and 3% of postmenopausal women). No women who had risk-reducing surgery compared to 171 who did not have risk-reducing surgery developed a gynaecological cancer. Overall, 3,165 (15%) women died, including 2,195 (10%) from breast cancer. Hysterectomy plus BSO was associated with significantly reduced risk of death overall [adjusted hazard ration (HR), 0.69; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.53-0.89; p = 0.005]. Risk reduction was greater among premenopausal women, whose risk of death halved (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.25-0.79; p < 0.006). This was largely driven by reduction in breast cancer-specific mortality (HR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.24-0.79; p < 0.006). This population-based study found that risk-reducing surgery halved the mortality risk for premenopausal breast cancer patients. Replication of our results in independent cohorts and subsequently randomised trials are needed to confirm these findings. © 2013 UICC.

  12. Survival impact of integrative cancer care in advanced metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Block, Keith I; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte; Tripathy, Debu; Freels, Sally; Mead, Mark N; Block, Penny B; Steinmann, William C; Newman, Robert A; Shoham, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Integrative cancer treatment is of substantial interest to many cancer patients. Research is needed to evaluate the effects of integrative treatment on patient outcomes. We report survival data for a consecutive case series of advanced metastatic breast cancer patients who received a comprehensive clinical program combining conventional treatments with nutrition and supplementation, fitness and mind-spirit instruction at the Block Center for Integrative Cancer Treatment. Treatment outcomes using integrative care for this disease have not previously been documented; survival data will thus contribute to decisions concerning future research directions and design. Ninety consecutive patients with metastatic breast cancer diagnosed during 1984-1997 who received chemotherapy at the integrative cancer center were included. Prognostic factors, treatments and survival from onset of metastases were determined from analysis of scans, labs, pathology and medical records. The log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards analyses were used, and a Kaplan-Meier curve was calculated. All patients had metastatic disease at baseline, 96% were relapsed and 52% had received prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease. Median age at onset of metastasis was 46 years. Median survival was 38 months (95% CI 27,48). Published literature on populations with somewhat more favorable prognostic factors treated in conventional clinics showed median survivals of 20 to 23 months. Through the 1990s, median survival reported in metastatic breast cancer trials or observations generally ranged from 12 to 24 months. Five-year survival was 27% for Center versus 17% for comparison patients. Despite a higher proportion of younger and relapsed patients, survival of metastatic breast cancer patients at the Center was approximately double that of comparison populations and possibly even higher compared to trials published during this period. Explanations for the advantage relative to conventional treatment alone

  13. Lung Cancer Survival Among Chinese Americans, 2000 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Yang, Juan; Lin, Shih-Wen; McCusker, Margaret; Sandler, Alan; Patel, Manali; Cheng, Iona; Wakelee, Heather A; Clarke, Christina A

    2016-02-01

    Despite being the leading cause of cancer death, no prior studies have characterized survival patterns among Chinese Americans diagnosed with lung cancer. This study was conducted to identify factors associated with survival after lung cancer in a contemporary cohort of Chinese patients with lung cancer. The study design is a prospective descriptive analysis of population-based California Cancer Registry data. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for overall mortality. Participants were Chinese American residents diagnosed with first primary invasive lung cancer from 2000 to 2010 (2,216 men and 1,616 women). Among Chinese men, decreased mortality was associated with care at a National Cancer Institute cancer center (HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73 to 0.99) and adenocarcinoma versus small-cell carcinoma (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.92). Women had better survival compared with men (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.89), with mortality associated with never married versus currently married status (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.66), lower versus higher neighborhood socioeconomic status (HR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.72 comparing lowest to highest quintile), care at a cancer center (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.96), and squamous cell relative to small-cell carcinoma (HR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.48). Focusing on factors associated with marital status, community socioeconomic status, and characteristics unique to National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers may help to identify potential strategies for improving the length of survival for Chinese Americans.

  14. Locoregional treatment and overall survival of men with T1a,b,cN0M0 breast cancer: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Leone, José Pablo; Leone, Julieta; Zwenger, Ariel Osvaldo; Iturbe, Julián; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Vallejo, Carlos Teodoro

    2017-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MaBC) is an understudied disease; information about locoregional treatment and outcomes in patients with early stage is unknown. We aimed to analyse patient characteristics, locoregional treatment and overall survival (OS) of T1a,b,cN0M0 male breast cancer. We evaluated men with T1a,b,cN0M0 breast cancer reported to Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program from 1988 to 2012. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the effect of each variable on OS. We included 1263 patients. Median age was 66 years (range 27-103). Median follow-up was 62 months (range 1-294). OS at 5 and 10 years were 85.1% and 66.5%, respectively. Distribution according to tumour sub-stage was: T1a 6.5%, T1b 20.7% and T1c 72.8%. Mastectomy was performed in >74% of patients of each tumour size group and overall 44.1% had >5 lymph nodes examined (LNE). Univariate analysis showed that patients with T1c, no surgery and 0 LNE had worse prognosis. In multivariate analysis, older age (hazard ratio [HR] 11.09), grade 3/4 tumours (HR 1.7), no surgery (HR 3.3), 0 LNE (HR 5.1) and unmarried patients (HR 1.7) had significantly shorter OS. There were no differences in OS between breast conservation versus mastectomy and 1-5 LNE versus > 5 LNE. Men with early breast cancer have a favourable OS. However, older age, higher grade, no breast surgery, no LNE and unmarried status emerged as poor prognostic characteristics. Efforts to decrease the high rates of mastectomy and extensive LNE should be taken given similar OS observed with breast conservation and 1-5 LNE, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Colon and Rectal Cancer Survival by Tumor Location and Microsatellite Instability: The Colon Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Amanda I.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Baron, John A.; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. Objective We assessed differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. Design This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. Settings This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Patients Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997–2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18–74. Main Outcome Measures Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Results Distal colon (hazard ratio=0.59, 95% confidence interval: 0.49–0.71) and rectal cancers (hazard ratio=0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.57–0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically to cases with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, cases with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; cases with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Limitations Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause of death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some case groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Conclusion Proximal colon cancer survival

  16. Colon and rectal cancer survival by tumor location and microsatellite instability: the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Amanda I; Lindor, Noralane M; Jenkins, Mark A; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A

    2013-08-01

    Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. We assessed the differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997 and 2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18 to 74. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Distal colon (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71) and rectal cancers (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically with patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, patients with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause-of-death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some patient groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Proximal colon cancer survival differs from survival for distal colon and rectal cancer in a manner apparently dependent on microsatellite instability status. These

  17. Construction of a North American Cancer Survival Index to Measure Progress of Cancer Control Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Hannah K; Mariotto, Angela; Wilson, Reda; Nishri, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Population-based cancer survival data provide insight into the effectiveness of health care delivery. Comparing survival for all cancer sites combined is challenging, because the primary cancer site and age distribution of patients may differ among areas or change over time. Cancer survival indices (CSIs) are summary measures of survival for cancers of all sites combined and are used in England and Europe to monitor temporal trends and examine geographic differences in survival. We describe the construction of the North American Cancer Survival Index and demonstrate how it can be used to compare survival by geographic area and by race. Methods We used data from 36 US cancer registries to estimate relative survival ratios for people diagnosed with cancer from 2006 through 2012 to create the CSI: the weighted sum of age-standardized, site-specific, relative survival ratios, with weights derived from the distribution of incident cases by sex and primary site from 2006 through 2008. The CSI was calculated for 32 registries for all races, 31 registries for whites, and 12 registries for blacks. Results The survival estimates standardized by age only versus age-, sex-, and site-standardized (CSI) were 64.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 64.1%–64.2%) and 63.9% (95% CI, 63.8%–63.9%), respectively, for the United States for all races combined. The inter-registry ranges in unstandardized and CSI estimates decreased from 12.3% to 5.0% for whites, and from 5.4% to 3.9% for blacks. We found less inter-registry variation in CSI estimates than in unstandardized all-sites survival estimates, but disparities by race persisted. Conclusions CSIs calculated for different jurisdictions or periods are directly comparable, because they are standardized by age, sex, and primary site. A national CSI could be used to measure temporal progress in meeting public health objectives, such as Healthy People 2030. PMID:28910593

  18. Impact of abiraterone acetate with and without prior docetaxel chemotherapy on the survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Joice; Aprikian, Armen G.; Vanhuyse, Marie; Cury, Fabio L.; Hu, Jason; Prévost, Noémie; Dragomir, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Background: Abiraterone acetate was introduced in Quebec in 2012 for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in patients who had received chemotherapy with docetaxel. This study describes abiraterone use in the early postapproval period and its clinical effectiveness in Quebec, for both patients who had received docetaxel chemotherapy and those who could not receive docetaxel therapy owing to medical reasons. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Quebec public health care administrative databases. Our cohort consisted of patients with mCRPC who received abiraterone between January 2012 and June 2013. Treatment groups were defined as patients who received abiraterone following docetaxel chemotherapy and those who received abiraterone without having had chemotherapy, under the "exception patient" measure. Study outcomes included overall survival, duration of abiraterone therapy and number of hospital days. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate the effectiveness of abiraterone adjusted for several covariates. Results: Our cohort consisted of 303 patients with mCRPC treated with abiraterone (99 after chemotherapy and 204 as exception patients). The median age at initiation of abiraterone therapy was 75.0 for the postchemotherapy group and 80.0 for the exception patient group. The corresponding median survival values were 12 and 14 months (log-rank test p = 0.8). Risk of death was similar in the 2 groups (adjusted hazard ratio 0.89 [95% confidence interval 0.57-1.38]). Interpretation: The effectiveness of abiraterone in older patients who were ineligible for chemotherapy was similar to that of patients with prior docetaxel exposure. Overall, the real-world survival benefits of abiraterone were similar to those in the COU-AA-301 trial. PMID:28401143

  19. Education, survival and avoidable deaths in cancer patients in Finland.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, A; Martikainen, P; Pukkala, E; Rautalahti, M; Seppä, K; Hakulinen, T

    2010-09-28

    Relative survival after cancer in Finland is at the highest level observed in Europe and has, in general, been on a steady increase. The aim of this study is to assess whether the high survival is equally shared by different population subgroups and to estimate the possible gains that might be achieved if equity prevailed. The educational level and occupation before the cancer diagnosis of patients diagnosed in Finland in 1971-2005 was derived from an antecedent population census. The cancers were divided into 27 site categories. Cancer (cause)-specific 5-year survival proportions were calculated for three patient categories based on the educational level and for an occupational group of potentially health-conscious patients (physicians, nurses, teachers etc.). Proportions of avoidable deaths were derived by assuming that the patients from the two lower education categories would have the same mortality owing to cancer, as those from the highest educational category. Estimates were also made by additionally assuming that even the mortalities owing to other causes of death were all equal to those in the highest category. For almost all the sites considered, survival was consistently highest for patients with the highest education and lowest for those with only basic education. The potentially health-conscious patients had an even higher survival. The differences were, in part, attributable to less favourable distributions of tumour stages in the lower education categories. In 1996-2005, 4-7% of the deaths in Finnish cancer patients could have potentially been avoided during the first 5-year period after diagnosis, if all the patients had the same cancer mortality as the patients with the highest educational background. The proportion would have also been much higher, 8-11%, if, in addition, the mortality from other causes had been the same as that in the highest educational category. Even in a potentially equitable society with high health care standards, marked

  20. Education, survival and avoidable deaths in cancer patients in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, A; Martikainen, P; Pukkala, E; Rautalahti, M; Seppä, K; Hakulinen, T

    2010-01-01

    Background: Relative survival after cancer in Finland is at the highest level observed in Europe and has, in general, been on a steady increase. The aim of this study is to assess whether the high survival is equally shared by different population subgroups and to estimate the possible gains that might be achieved if equity prevailed. Materials and method: The educational level and occupation before the cancer diagnosis of patients diagnosed in Finland in 1971–2005 was derived from an antecedent population census. The cancers were divided into 27 site categories. Cancer (cause)-specific 5-year survival proportions were calculated for three patient categories based on the educational level and for an occupational group of potentially health-conscious patients (physicians, nurses, teachers etc.). Proportions of avoidable deaths were derived by assuming that the patients from the two lower education categories would have the same mortality owing to cancer, as those from the highest educational category. Estimates were also made by additionally assuming that even the mortalities owing to other causes of death were all equal to those in the highest category. Results: For almost all the sites considered, survival was consistently highest for patients with the highest education and lowest for those with only basic education. The potentially health-conscious patients had an even higher survival. The differences were, in part, attributable to less favourable distributions of tumour stages in the lower education categories. In 1996–2005, 4–7% of the deaths in Finnish cancer patients could have potentially been avoided during the first 5-year period after diagnosis, if all the patients had the same cancer mortality as the patients with the highest educational background. The proportion would have also been much higher, 8–11%, if, in addition, the mortality from other causes had been the same as that in the highest educational category. Interpretation: Even in a

  1. Impact of National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Centers on Ovarian Cancer Treatment and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Robert E; Chang, Jenny; Ziogas, Argyrios; Campos, Belinda; Chavez, Leo R; Anton-Culver, Hoda

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The regional impact of care at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center (NCI-CCC) on adherence to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) ovarian cancer treatment guidelines and survival is unclear. STUDY DESIGN We performed a retrospective population-based study of consecutive patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2006 in southern California. Patients were stratified according to care at an NCI-CCC (n = 5), non-NCI high-volume hospital (≥10 cases/year, HVH, n = 29), or low-volume hospital (<10 cases/year, LVH, n = 158). Multivariable logistic regression and Cox-proportional hazards models were used to examine the effect of NCI-CCC status on treatment guideline adherence and ovarian cancer-specific survival. RESULTS A total of 9,933 patients were identified (stage I, 22.8%; stage II, 7.9%; stage III, 45.1%; stage IV, 24.2%), and 8.1% of patients were treated at NCI-CCCs. Overall, 35.7% of patients received NCCN guideline adherent care, and NCI-CCC status (odds ratio [OR] 1.00) was an independent predictor of adherence to treatment guidelines compared with HVHs (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.70 to 0.99) and LVHs (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.67). The median ovarian cancer-specific survivals according to hospital type were: NCI-CCC 77.9 (95% CI 61.4 to 92.9) months, HVH 51.9 (95% CI 49.2 to 55.7) months, and LVH 43.4 (95% CI 39.9 to 47.2) months (p < 0.0001). National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center status (hazard ratio [HR] 1.00) was a statistically significant and independent predictor of improved survival compared with HVH (HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.33) and LVH (HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.47). CONCLUSIONS National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center status is an independent predictor of adherence to ovarian cancer treatment guidelines and improved ovarian cancer-specific survival. These data validate NCI-CCC status as a structural health care characteristic correlated with

  2. Impact of National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Centers on ovarian cancer treatment and survival.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Robert E; Chang, Jenny; Ziogas, Argyrios; Campos, Belinda; Chavez, Leo R; Anton-Culver, Hoda

    2015-05-01

    The regional impact of care at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center (NCI-CCC) on adherence to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) ovarian cancer treatment guidelines and survival is unclear. We performed a retrospective population-based study of consecutive patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2006 in southern California. Patients were stratified according to care at an NCI-CCC (n = 5), non-NCI high-volume hospital (≥ 10 cases/year, HVH, n = 29), or low-volume hospital (<10 cases/year, LVH, n = 158). Multivariable logistic regression and Cox-proportional hazards models were used to examine the effect of NCI-CCC status on treatment guideline adherence and ovarian cancer-specific survival. A total of 9,933 patients were identified (stage I, 22.8%; stage II, 7.9%; stage III, 45.1%; stage IV, 24.2%), and 8.1% of patients were treated at NCI-CCCs. Overall, 35.7% of patients received NCCN guideline adherent care, and NCI-CCC status (odds ratio [OR] 1.00) was an independent predictor of adherence to treatment guidelines compared with HVHs (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.70 to 0.99) and LVHs (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.67). The median ovarian cancer-specific survivals according to hospital type were: NCI-CCC 77.9 (95% CI 61.4 to 92.9) months, HVH 51.9 (95% CI 49.2 to 55.7) months, and LVH 43.4 (95% CI 39.9 to 47.2) months (p < 0.0001). National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center status (hazard ratio [HR] 1.00) was a statistically significant and independent predictor of improved survival compared with HVH (HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.33) and LVH (HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.47). National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center status is an independent predictor of adherence to ovarian cancer treatment guidelines and improved ovarian cancer-specific survival. These data validate NCI-CCC status as a structural health care characteristic correlated with superior ovarian cancer quality measure

  3. A minimum version of log-rank test for testing the existence of cancer cure using relative survival data.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binbing

    2012-01-01

    Cancer survival is one of the most important measures to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment and early diagnosis. The ultimate goal of cancer research and patient care is the cure of cancer. As cancer treatments progress, cure becomes a reality for many cancers if patients are diagnosed early and get effective treatment. If a cure does exist for a certain type of cancer, it is useful to estimate the time of cure. For cancers that impose excess risk of mortality, it is informative to understand the difference in survival between cancer patients and the general cancer-free population. In population-based cancer survival studies, relative survival is the standard measure of excess mortality due to cancer. Cure is achieved when the survival of cancer patients is equivalent to that of the general population. This definition of cure is usually called the statistical cure, which is an important measure of burden due to cancer. In this paper, a minimum version of the log-rank test is proposed to test the equivalence of cancer patients' survival using the relative survival data. Performance of the proposed test is evaluated by simulation. Relative survival data from population-based cancer registries in SEER Program are used to examine patients' survival after diagnosis for various major cancer sites.

  4. High BRAF Mutation Frequency and Marked Survival Differences in Subgroups According to KRAS/BRAF Mutation Status and Tumor Tissue Availability in a Prospective Population-Based Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sorbye, Halfdan; Dragomir, Anca; Sundström, Magnus; Pfeiffer, Per; Thunberg, Ulf; Bergfors, Monica; Aasebø, Kristine; Eide, Geir Egil; Ponten, Fredrik; Qvortrup, Camilla; Glimelius, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    RAS and BRAF mutations impact treatment and prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer patients (mCRC), but the knowledge is based on trial patients usually not representative for the general cancer population. Patient characteristics, treatment and efficacy according to KRAS, BRAF and MSI status were analyzed in a prospectively collected unselected population-based cohort of 798 non-resectable mCRC patients. The cohort contained many patients with poor performance status (39% PS 2-4) and elderly (37% age>75), groups usually not included in clinical trials. Patients without available tissue micro array (TMA) (42%) had worse prognostic factors and inferior survival (all patients; 7m vs 11m, chemotherapy-treated;12m vs 17m). The 92 patients (21%) with BRAF mutation had a poor prognosis regardless of microsatellite instability, but receipt of 1-2nd chemotherapy was similar to wildtype BRAF patients. Median survival in this cohort varied from 1 month in BRAF mutated patients not given chemotherapy to 26 months in wildtype KRAS/BRAF patients <75 years in good PS. TMA availability, BRAF mutation and KRAS mutation were all independent prognostic factors for survival. The observed 21% BRAF mutation incidence is higher than the previously and repeatedly reported incidence of 5-12% in mCRC. Screening for BRAF mutations before selection of treatment is relevant for many patients, especially outside clinical trials. A BRAF mutation only partly explained the very poor prognosis of many mCRC patients. Survival in unselected metastatic colorectal cancer patients is extremely variable and subgroups have an extremely short survival compared to trial patients. Patients without available TMA had worse prognostic factors and shorter survival, which questions the total generalizability of present TMA studies and implies that we lack information on the biologically worst mCRC cases. Lack of available tissue is an important underexposed issue which introduces sample bias, and this should

  5. Cervical cancer: incidence and survival in migrants within Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Borràs, J M; Sánchez, V; Moreno, V; Izquierdo, A; Viladiu, P

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--This study examined the incidence of cervical cancer and survival rates according to migrant experience of women from different regions of Spain to Girona, Catalonia (Spain). DESIGN--Using data from the population based cancer registry of Girona for the period 1980-89, crude and age adjusted incidence rates were calculated for local-born and first generation migrants from other Spanish regions. The age standardised rate ratio (SRR) was calculated and Cox's regression model was used to adjust survival according to migrant status for age and stage at diagnosis. MAIN RESULTS--The incidence of cervical cancer was significantly higher in first generation Spanish migrants compared with locally born women (SRR: 2.02; 95% CI 1.40:2.92). The stage at diagnosis was more advanced among migrants. Survival probability was significantly associated with stage at diagnosis, but age and region of birth were not. CONCLUSIONS--Migrants from the southern Spanish regions show a twofold excess in the incidence of cervical cancer compared with the Girona-born female population. Cases of cervical cancer in migrants are diagnosed at a more advanced stage and as a consequence have a poorer prognosis. PMID:7798043

  6. Use of Aspirin postdiagnosis improves survival for colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaannet, E; Sampieri, K; Dekkers, O M; de Craen, A J M; van Herk-Sukel, M P P; Lemmens, V; van den Broek, C B M; Coebergh, J W; Herings, R M C; van de Velde, C J H; Fodde, R; Liefers, G J

    2012-01-01

    Background: The preventive role of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin, in particular, on colorectal cancer is well established. More recently, it has been suggested that aspirin may also have a therapeutic role. Aim of the present observational population-based study was to assess the therapeutic effect on overall survival of aspirin/NSAIDs as adjuvant treatment used after the diagnosis of colorectal cancer patients. Methods: Data concerning prescriptions were obtained from PHARMO record linkage systems and all patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (1998–2007) were selected from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry (population-based cancer registry). Aspirin/NSAID use was classified as none, prediagnosis and postdiagnosis and only postdiagnosis. Patients were defined as non-user of aspirin/NSAIDs from the date of diagnosis of the colorectal cancer to the date of first use of aspirin or NSAIDs and user from first use to the end of follow-up. Poisson regression was performed with user status as time-varying exposure. Results: In total, 1176 (26%) patients were non-users, 2086 (47%) were prediagnosis and postdiagnosis users and 1219 (27%) were only postdiagnosis users (total n=4481). Compared with non-users, a survival gain was observed for aspirin users; the adjusted rate ratio (RR) was 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63–0.95; P=0.015). Stratified for colon and rectal, the survival gain was only present in colon cancer (adjusted RR 0.65 (95%CI 0.50–0.84; P=0.001)). For frequent users survival gain was larger (adjusted RR 0.61 (95%CI 0.46–0.81; P=0.001). In rectal cancer, aspirin use was not associated with survival (adjusted RR 1.10 (95%CI 0.79–1.54; P=0.6). The NSAIDs use was associated with decreased survival (adjusted RR 1.93 (95%CI 1.70–2.20; P<0.001). Conclusion: Aspirin use initiated or continued after diagnosis of colon cancer is associated with a lower risk of overall mortality. These findings strongly support initiation of

  7. Palliative resection of the primary tumor is associated with improved overall survival in incurable stage IV colorectal cancer: A nationwide population-based propensity-score adjusted study in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    't Lam-Boer, Jorine; Van der Geest, Lydia G; Verhoef, Cees; Elferink, Marloes E; Koopman, Miriam; de Wilt, Johannes H

    2016-11-01

    As the value of palliative primary tumor resection in stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) is still under debate, the purpose of this population-based study was to investigate if palliative primary tumor resection as the initial treatment after diagnosis was associated with improved overall survival. All patients with stage IV colorectal adenocarcinoma (2008-2011) were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry, and patients undergoing treatment with curative intent (i.e., metastasectomy, radiofrequency ablation and/or hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy), or best supportive care were excluded. After propensity score matching, a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model was performed to determine the association between treatment strategy and mortality. From a total group of 10,371 patients with stage IV CRC, 2,746 patients (26%) underwent an elective palliative resection of the primary tumor, whether or not followed by systemic therapy, and 3,345 patients (32%) were initially treated with palliative systemic therapy. After propensity score matching, median overall survival in these groups was 17.2 months (95% CI 16.3-18.1) and 11.5 months (95% CI 11.0-12.0), respectively. In Cox regression analysis, primary tumor resection was significantly associated with improved overall survival (hazard ratio of death = 0.44 [95% CI 0.35-0.55], p < 0.001). This large population-based study shows an overall survival benefit for patients with incurable stage IV CRC who underwent primary tumor resection as the initial treatment after diagnosis, compared to patients who started systemic therapy with the primary tumor in situ. This result is an argument in favor of resection of the primary tumor, even when patients have little to no symptoms.

  8. Statin use and survival in elderly patients with endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Lara S; Goodman, Marc T; Rimel, B J; Jeon, Christie Y

    2015-05-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic cancer in the United States. Statins have demonstrated anti-cancer effects in other tumor types, such as the breast and lung cancers. The objective of our study was to determine the association between statin use and endometrial cancer survival in a nationally-representative elderly population with endometrial cancer in the U.S. We employed the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results registries and Medicare claims files to collect data from 2987 patients who were diagnosed with endometrial cancer between 2007 and 2009 and who received a hysterectomy. The association between statin use and overall survival was examined using Cox regression models adjusting for follow-up time, age, race, neighborhood income, cancer stage, tumor grade, hysterectomy type, chemotherapy, radiation, impaired glucose tolerance, obesity, dyslipidemia and diabetes. The mortality rate was lower in statin users compared to non-users for both type I (4.6 vs. 5.7 deaths/100 person-years, p=0.08) and type II (11.2 vs. 16.5 deaths/100 person-years, p=0.01) cancer types. However, after adjustment for the time from surgery to statin use and confounding, statin use after a hysterectomy was not significantly associated with a reduction in hazard of death for both type I (hazard ratio [HR] 0.92, 95%CI 0.70,1.2) and type II (HR=0.92, 95%CI 0.65, 1.29, p=0.62) endometrial cancer patients. Accounting for all confounders and biases considered, statin use on or after a hysterectomy was not associated with survival in those with type I or type II disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Childhood cancer in Argentina: Survival 2000-2007.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Florencia; Florencia, Moreno; Dussel, Veronica; Veronica, Dussel; Orellana, Liliana; Liliana, Orellana

    2015-08-01

    Information on the epidemiology of childhood cancer in Latin America is limited. The Argentinean Oncopaediatric Registry (ROHA) is a population-based registry active since 2000. This paper describes the 3-year survival experience of children diagnosed with cancer in Argentina during 2000-2007 by major morphological subgroup, age, sex, and geographical region of residence. Newly diagnosed paediatric cancer cases are registered in ROHA (estimated coverage is 93% of the country's cases). Three-year overall survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Univariate Cox models were used to compare subgroup survival. Between 2000 and 2007, a total of 10,181 new cancer diagnoses in children aged 0-14 years were reported to the registry. Three-year overall survival (95%CI) for all cancers was 61.7% (60.7; 62.7). Specific survival for the most frequent morphological types was: leukaemias 63.3% (61.6; 64.9), lymphomas and related neoplasms 75.3% (72.7; 77.7), brain neoplasms 46.3% (43.9; 48.7), soft-tissue sarcomas 52.3% (48.0; 56.5), neuroblastomas 49.6% (44.6; 54.3), renal tumours 76.7% (72.2; 80.6), and malignant bone tumours 47.2% (42.3; 51.9). Overall survival was associated with age but not sex and varied by geographical region. Compared to other regions, patients who resided in the capital city had a significantly higher survival: 69.6% (65.8; 73.0) versus 63.5% (59.4; 67.4) in Patagonia, 63.2% (61.9; 64.5) in the central region, 58.0% (54.2; 61.7) in Cuyo, 55.6% (52.5; 58.6) in the north-east, and 55.4% (52.4; 58.2) in the north-west (all P values <0.005). Of children diagnosed with cancer in Argentina, 62% survived at least 3 years after diagnosis. Even though this figure is lower than that reported for more developed countries, survival patterns by diagnosis, age and sex were quite similar. Survival was lower in the two northern regions, which are areas with higher poverty levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Breast cancer patients survival and associated factors: reported outcomes from the Southern Cancer Registry in Portugal.

    PubMed

    André, Maria Rosario; Amaral, Sandra; Mayer, Alexandra; Miranda, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Although the breast cancer incidence in Portugal is lower than the European average, it is the most frequent cancer in women. Overall, mortality rates are heterogeneous throughout Portugal. Implicated factors may include demographic and socioeconomic aspects, tumor biological characteristics, and access to medical care. The aim of this study is to detect survival differences in female breast cancer and identify the main associated factors. We have conducted a population-based, retrospective cohort study with follow-up. Incident breast cancer cases diagnosed in 2005 of residents in the southern region of Portugal were included. Data was collected from the Southern Portugal Cancer Registry (ROR-Sul) database and completed with clinical chart information. A total of 1 354 patients were included in this study. Observed geographical variations were as follows: for age distribution, with an aging population in Alentejo; for tumor sub-types, there was a higher incidence of HER2-positive tumors in the Algarve and a higher incidence of HER2-negative tumors in Região Autónoma da Madeira. Reported estimated 5-year overall survival was 80%, with significant association with tumor stage, hormone receptor and HER2 status. No survival differences were identified among women from distinct geographical regions. Although we found differences in age and tumor sub-type distribution between geographical regions, our study does not support the existence of discrepancies in breast cancer survival between these regions. Tumor biological characteristics seem to be the main associated factor with breast cancer survival in our population. Our study confirms the association between patient survival and tumor stage, hormone receptor and HER2 status. However, no differences in patient survival were observed among different regions of residence.

  11. Cigarette Smoking and Pancreatic Cancer Survival.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chen; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Babic, Ana; Clish, Clary B; Kraft, Peter; Bao, Ying; Qian, Zhi Rong; Rubinson, Douglas A; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward L; Ogino, Shuji; Stampfer, Meir J; Gaziano, John Michael; Sesso, Howard D; Cochrane, Barbara B; Manson, JoAnn E; Fuchs, Charles S; Wolpin, Brian M

    2017-03-30

    Purpose Cigarette smoking is associated with increased incidence of pancreatic cancer. However, few studies have prospectively evaluated the association of smoking with patient survival. Patients and Methods We analyzed survival by smoking status among 1,037 patients from two large US prospective cohort studies diagnosed from 1986 to 2013. Among 485 patients from four prospective US cohorts, we also evaluated survival by prediagnostic circulating levels of cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine that is proportional to tobacco smoke exposure. On the basis of prediagnosis cotinine levels, we classified patients as nonsmokers (< 3.1 ng/mL), light smokers (3.1-20.9 ng/mL), or heavy smokers (≥ 21.0 ng/mL). We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for death by using Cox proportional hazards models, with adjustment for age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, diabetes status, diagnosis year, and cancer stage. Results The multivariable-adjusted HR for death was 1.37 (95% CI, 1.11 to 1.69) comparing current smokers with never smokers ( P = .003). A statistically significant negative trend in survival was observed for increasing pack-years of smoking ( Ptrend = .008), with HR for death of 1.49 (95% CI, 1.05 to 2.10) for > 60 pack-years of smoking versus never smoking. Survival among former smokers was similar to that for never smokers, regardless of time since quitting. Heavy smokers defined by prediagnostic circulating cotinine levels had a multivariable-adjusted HR for death of 1.76 (95% CI, 1.23 to 2.51) compared with nonsmokers. Among patients with circulating cotinine levels measured within 5 years before diagnosis, heavy smokers had a multivariable-adjusted HR for death of 2.47 (95% CI, 1.24 to 4.92) compared with nonsmokers. Conclusion Cigarette smoking was associated with a reduction in survival among patients with pancreatic cancer.

  12. Smoking and survival in male breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Padron-Monedero, Alicia; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Tannenbaum, Stacey L; Miao, Feng; Hansra, Damien; Lee, David J; Byrne, Margaret M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the article was to assess whether smoking affects survival in male breast cancer patients for the overall population and when stratified by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Data were obtained by linking the 1996-2007 Florida Cancer Data System, the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, and the US Census. Inclusion criteria were males ≥18 years, diagnosed with breast cancer and residing in Florida (n = 1573). To analyze the association between smoking and survival, we performed sequential multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models with progressive adjustment for main confounders. Compared to never smokers, worse survival was found in current (hazard ratio = 1.63; 95 % CI = 1.23-2.16) but not in former smokers (1.26; 0.99-1.59). Those who smoked ≥1 packs/day had worse survival (2.48; 1.59-3.87) than never smokers with a significant dose-response (P for linear trend <0.001). Race-ethnic stratified models comparing current and former smokers with never smokers found significant differences among Whites [(1.88; 1.44-2.44) and (1.31; 1.04-1.65, respectively)] and non-Hispanics, [(1.73; 1.31-2.28) and (1.31; 1.04-1.66, respectively)]. Overall, current smokers were found to have significantly reduced survival, which was worse by intensity of smoking. Also, any smoking history is associated with worse survival in White and non-Hispanic male breast cancer patients compared to never smokers. Thus, male breast cancer patients should be advised to quit smoking.

  13. Human papillomavirus-related esophageal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lanwei; Liu, Shuzheng; Zhang, Shaokai; Chen, Qiong; Zhang, Meng; Quan, Peiliang; Sun, Xi-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified to be related to progression of esophageal cancer. However, the results remain controversial. A meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was therefore conducted to address this issue. Methods: The electronic databases of MEDLINE and Excerpta Medica database were searched till April 30, 2016. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using a random-effects model. Results: Ten studies involving a total of 1184 esophageal cancer cases were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled hazard ratio comparing HPV-positive to HPV-negative esophageal cancers was 1.03 (95% confidence interval 0.78–1.37), which was not significantly correlated with improved survival. However, HPV-16-positive patients might have a significantly favorable survival (hazard ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.44–1.21). Conclusion: The meta-analysis indicated that HPV infection may not be of prognostic utility in the evaluation of factors contributing to esophageal cancer. Further large prospective studies are encouraged to stratify survival analysis by HPV type. PMID:27861358

  14. [The parameter "relative survival": Analysis of regional cancer registry data for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Leuchter, M; Kalata, P; Hildebrandt, G; Zettl, H; Hakenberg, O W

    2016-02-01

    There is a lack of comparability of relative survival rates due to differences in regional mortality. How should relative survival be calculated to be able to compare regional cancer mortality? Calculation of relative survival rates of prostate cancer patients from a regional cancer registry using diagnosis year and stage, based on differential mortality tables. Calculation of relative survival for all prostate cancer patients shows a very slight excess mortality after 5 years compared to a matched general population. Introduction of new imaging techniques and PSA screening led to a change in the distribution of diagnosed stages. Differentiation by stage is therefore essential. Thus, patients with UICC stage I, II, and III have a very low excess mortality, while patients with a UICC stage IV have a significantly higher excess mortality; however, it is very surprising that the excess mortality of patients without specification of the UICC stage is similarly unfavorable as in the case of patients with UICC stage IV. If data from a regional cancer registry are used, adequate mortality tables from the catchment area of the registry should be used as a reference due to regional mortality differences. Thus, progress in patient survival can be more precisely mapped. With respect to prostate cancer patients, differential consideration by stage is also necessary because improved early detection methods has led to a change in the stage distribution and, thus, survival.

  15. Is cancer survival associated with cancer symptom awareness and barriers to seeking medical help in England? An ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Niksic, Maja; Rachet, Bernard; Duffy, Stephen W; Quaresma, Manuela; Møller, Henrik; Forbes, Lindsay JL

    2016-01-01

    Background: Campaigns aimed at raising cancer awareness and encouraging early presentation have been implemented in England. However, little is known about whether people with low cancer awareness and increased barriers to seeking medical help have worse cancer survival, and whether there is a geographical variation in cancer awareness and barriers in England. Methods: From population-based surveys (n=35 308), using the Cancer Research UK Cancer Awareness Measure, we calculated the age- and sex-standardised symptom awareness and barriers scores for 52 primary care trusts (PCTs). These measures were evaluated in relation to the sex-, age-, and type of cancer-standardised cancer survival index of the corresponding PCT, from the National Cancer Registry, using linear regression. Breast, lung, and bowel cancer survival were analysed separately. Results: Cancer symptom awareness and barriers scores varied greatly between geographical regions in England, with the worst scores observed in socioeconomically deprived parts of East London. Low cancer awareness score was associated with poor cancer survival at PCT level (estimated slope=1.56, 95% CI: 0.56; 2.57). The barriers score was not associated with overall cancer survival, but it was associated with breast cancer survival (estimated slope=−0.66, 95% CI: −1.20; −0.11). Specific barriers, such as embarrassment and difficulties in arranging transport to the doctor's surgery, were associated with worse breast cancer survival. Conclusions: Cancer symptom awareness and cancer survival are associated. Campaigns should focus on improving awareness about cancer symptoms, especially in socioeconomically deprived areas. Efforts should be made to alleviate barriers to seeking medical help in women with symptoms of breast cancer. PMID:27537388

  16. Is cancer survival associated with cancer symptom awareness and barriers to seeking medical help in England? An ecological study.

    PubMed

    Niksic, Maja; Rachet, Bernard; Duffy, Stephen W; Quaresma, Manuela; Møller, Henrik; Forbes, Lindsay Jl

    2016-09-27

    Campaigns aimed at raising cancer awareness and encouraging early presentation have been implemented in England. However, little is known about whether people with low cancer awareness and increased barriers to seeking medical help have worse cancer survival, and whether there is a geographical variation in cancer awareness and barriers in England. From population-based surveys (n=35 308), using the Cancer Research UK Cancer Awareness Measure, we calculated the age- and sex-standardised symptom awareness and barriers scores for 52 primary care trusts (PCTs). These measures were evaluated in relation to the sex-, age-, and type of cancer-standardised cancer survival index of the corresponding PCT, from the National Cancer Registry, using linear regression. Breast, lung, and bowel cancer survival were analysed separately. Cancer symptom awareness and barriers scores varied greatly between geographical regions in England, with the worst scores observed in socioeconomically deprived parts of East London. Low cancer awareness score was associated with poor cancer survival at PCT level (estimated slope=1.56, 95% CI: 0.56; 2.57). The barriers score was not associated with overall cancer survival, but it was associated with breast cancer survival (estimated slope=-0.66, 95% CI: -1.20; -0.11). Specific barriers, such as embarrassment and difficulties in arranging transport to the doctor's surgery, were associated with worse breast cancer survival. Cancer symptom awareness and cancer survival are associated. Campaigns should focus on improving awareness about cancer symptoms, especially in socioeconomically deprived areas. Efforts should be made to alleviate barriers to seeking medical help in women with symptoms of breast cancer.

  17. Air pollution affects lung cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Eckel, Sandrah P; Cockburn, Myles; Shu, Yu-Hsiang; Deng, Huiyu; Lurmann, Frederick W; Liu, Lihua; Gilliland, Frank D

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollutants has been associated with increased lung cancer incidence and mortality, but due to the high case fatality rate, little is known about the impacts of air pollution exposures on survival after diagnosis. This study aimed to determine whether ambient air pollutant exposures are associated with the survival of patients with lung cancer. Participants were 352 053 patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer during 1988-2009 in California, ascertained by the California Cancer Registry. Average residential ambient air pollutant concentrations were estimated for each participant's follow-up period. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate HRs relating air pollutant exposures to all-cause mortality overall and stratified by stage (localised only, regional and distant site) and histology (squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, small cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma and others) at diagnosis, adjusting for potential individual and area-level confounders. Adjusting for histology and other potential confounders, the HRs associated with 1 SD increases in NO2, O3, PM10, PM2.5 for patients with localised stage at diagnosis were 1.30 (95% CI 1.28 to 1.32), 1.04 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.05), 1.26 (95% CI 1.25 to 1.28) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.35 to 1.41), respectively. Adjusted HRs were smaller in later stages and varied by histological type within stage (p<0.01, except O3). The largest associations were for patients with early-stage non-small cell cancers, particularly adenocarcinomas. These epidemiological findings support the hypothesis that air pollution exposures after lung cancer diagnosis shorten survival. Future studies should evaluate the impacts of exposure reduction. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. SURVIVAL DISPARITIES BY MEDICAID STATUS: AN ANALYSIS OF EIGHT CANCERS

    PubMed Central

    Koroukian, Siran M.; Bakaki, Paul M.; Raghavan, Derek

    2011-01-01

    Study Objective To compare survival and 5-year mortality, by Medicaid status, in adults diagnosed with 8 select cancers. Methods Linking records from the Ohio Cancer Incidence Surveillance System (OCISS) with Ohio Medicaid enrollment data, we identified Medicaid and non-Medicaid patients aged 15–54 years and diagnosed with the following incident cancers in the years 1996–2002: cancer of the testis; Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma; early-stage melanoma, colon, lung, and bladder cancer; or pediatric malignancies (n=12,703). Medicaid beneficiaries were identified in the pre-diagnosis group if they were enrolled in Medicaid at least 3 months before cancer diagnosis, and in the peri/post-diagnosis group if they enrolled in Medicaid upon or after being diagnosed with cancer. We also linked the OCISS with death certificates and data from the U.S. Census. Using Cox and logistic regression analysis, we examined the association between Medicaid status and each of survival and 5-year mortality, respectively, after adjusting for patient covariates. Results Nearly 11% of the study population were Medicaid beneficiaries. Of those, 45% were identified in the peri/post-diagnosis group. Consistent with higher mortality, findings from the Cox regression model indicated that compared to non-Medicaid, patients in the Medicaid pre-diagnosis and peri/post-diagnosis groups experienced unfavorable survival outcomes (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR): 1.52, 95% confidence interval (1.27, 1.82), and 2.01 (1.70, 2.38), respectively). Conclusions Medicaid status was associated with unfavorable survival, even after adjusting for confounders. Impact The findings reflect the vulnerability of Medicaid beneficiaries and possible inadequacies in the process of care. PMID:22213271

  19. Survival After Surgical Treatment of Lung Cancer Arising in the Population Exposed to Illegal Dumping of Toxic Waste in the Land of Fires ('Terra dei Fuochi') of Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Petitti, Tommasangelo; Martucci, Nicola; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; LA Rocca, Antonello; LA Manna, Carmine; DE Luca, Giuseppe; Morabito, Alessandro; Chirico, Andrea; Franco, Renato; Accardo, Rosanna; Normanno, Nicola; Botti, Gerardo; Lodato, Sergio; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Pedicini, Tonino; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Terra dei Fuochi (TdF), the so-called 'Land of Fires' in Southern Italy, is an agricultural territory characterized by illegal dumping of toxic waste known to occur since the 1980s. It is unknown whether prognosis of patients developing cancer and living in that area may differ compared to those living in areas not exposed to this specific type of pollution. We retrospectively analyzed the 5-year survival rates of patients originating from the TdF diagnosed with lung cancer compared to patients from other areas. Patients consecutively operated on for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) between November 2004 and April 2013 at the Division of Thoracic Surgery of the National Cancer Institute of Naples were eligible. The study outcome was overall survival (OS). In addition, the TdF and non-TdF groups were compared through propensity score matching (PSM). Overall, 439 patients with resectable NSCLC were operated on, 123 (28%) from the TdF and 316 (72%) from other referral centers of our catchment area. There were 301 males and 138 females; the median age of the entire surgical population was 65 years (range=25-83) years. Apart from a different prevalence of hypertension and underweight patients, preoperative factors were evenly distributed between the two groups. At univariate analysis, OS was not different between the TdF and non TdF group (median 72 and 68 months, respectively; p=0.75 log-rank test). Multivariable analysis confirmed that living in the TdF area had no prognostic impact (hazard ratio=1.05; 95% confidence interval=0.70-1.57; p=0.78) on OS. PSM confirmed no statistically significant difference of OS (hazard ratio=1.01, 95% confidence interval=0.67-1.52; p=0.93). Following surgery for lung cancer, TdF and non-TdF surgical candidates had similar long-term survival. Originating from the TdF does not seem to be associated with worse outcomes after surgical treatment of patients with lung cancer. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research

  20. Do the British public recognise differences in survival between three common cancers?

    PubMed

    Whitaker, K L; Simon, A E; Beeken, R J; Wardle, J

    2012-06-05

    The recognition that cancer is not a single entity, rather that different cancers have different causes and trajectories, has been a key development in the scientific understanding of cancer. However, little is known about the British public's awareness of differences between cancers. This study examined differences in perceived survivability for three common cancers with widely disparate survival rates (breast, colorectal and lung). In a population-based survey, using home interviews (N=2018), respondents answered a quantitative (numeric) question on 5-year survival and a qualitative (non-numeric) question on curability, for each of the three cancers. British adults correctly recognised that 5-year survival for breast cancer was higher than for colorectal cancer (CRC), which in turn was recognised to be higher than for lung cancer. Similarly, curability was perceived to be higher for breast than CRC, and both were perceived to be more curable than lung cancer. Awareness of survival differences did not vary by sex, age or socioeconomic status. In terms of absolute values, there was a tendency to underestimate breast cancer survival and overestimate lung cancer survival. The British public appear to be aware that not all cancers are equally fatal.

  1. Effect of obesity on disease-free and overall survival in node-positive breast cancer patients in a large French population: a pooled analysis of two randomised trials.

    PubMed

    Ladoire, Sylvain; Dalban, Cecile; Roché, Henri; Spielmann, Marc; Fumoleau, Pierre; Levy, Christelle; Martin, Anne Laure; Ecarnot, Fiona; Bonnetain, Frank; Ghiringhelli, François

    2014-02-01

    To examine the association between baseline body mass index (BMI), and disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in a large French early-stage breast cancer population included in the UNICANCER Programme d'Action Concerté Sein-01 (PACS01) and PACS04 phase III randomised trials. After a median follow-up of 5.9years, this report analyses 4996 patients with node-positive breast cancer, and randomly assigned to adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy combined or not with taxanes. Univariate analyses were used to study the effects of well known prognostic factors and BMI on DFS and OS. BMI was obtained at baseline, before chemotherapy initiation, and obesity was defined as a BMI⩾30kg/m(2). Cox proportional hazards regression models were secondly used to assess the influence of BMI after adjusting for other factors. Exhaustive analysis of the dose intensity delivered was also studied for comparison between obese and non-obese patients. Obese patients initially present with more advanced disease at diagnosis compared to non-obese patients. By univariate analysis, obesity was moderately associated with poorer DFS (hazard ratio (HR)=1.18 [1.01-1.39] P=0.04), but mostly with poorer OS (HR=1.38 [1.13-1.69] P=0.002). Delivered dose intensity of anthracyclines and taxanes was not significantly different between obese and non-obese patients. After adjustment for disease characteristics, BMI had no influence either on DFS or OS. This report suggests that in a French population, obesity has no impact on breast cancer prognosis when modern adjuvant chemotherapy, at the appropriate dose intensity, is delivered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Polyphosphate Affects on Breast Cancer Cell Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0379 TITLE: Polyphosphate Affects on Breast Cancer Cell Survival PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christine L. Haakenson... cells , specifically with regard to how polyphosphates may affect the cell cycle and gene expression. page 6 Annual Summary (2004-2005) W81XWH-04-1-0379...AND DATES COVERED (Leave blank) April 2005 Annual Summary (15 Mar 2004 - 14 Mar 2005) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Polyphosphate Affects on

  3. Metformin Use and Endometrial Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Nevadunsky, Nicole S.; Van Arsdale, Anne; Strickler, Howard D.; Moadel, Alyson; Kaur, Gurpreet; Frimer, Marina; Conroy, Erin; Goldberg, Gary L.; Einstein, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes are risk factors for the development of uterine cancer. Although greater progression free survival among diabetic patients with ovarian and breast cancer using metformin have been reported, no studies have assessed the association of metformin use with survival in women with endometrial cancer (EC). Methods We conducted a single-institution retrospective cohort study of all patients treated for uterine cancer from January 1999 through December 2009. Demographic, medical, social, and survival data were abstracted from medical records and the national death registry. Overall survival (OS) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox models were utilized for multivariate analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Of 985 patients, 114 (12%) had diabetes and were treated with metformin, 136 (14%) were diabetic but did not use metformin, and 735 (74%) had not been diagnosed with diabetes. Greater OS was observed in diabetics with non-endometrioid EC who used metformin than in diabetic cases not using metformin and non-endometrioid EC cases without diabetes (log rank test (p=0.02)). This association remained significant (hazard ratio = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.30–0.97, p<0.04) after adjusting for age, clinical stage, grade, chemotherapy treatment, radiation treatment and presence of hyperlipidemia in multivariate analysis. No association between metformin use and OS in diabetics with endometrioid histology was observed. Conclusion Diabetic EC patients with non-endometrioid tumors who used metformin had lower risk of death than women with EC who did not use metformin. These data suggest that metformin might be useful as adjuvant therapy for non-endometrioid EC. PMID:24189334

  4. Metformin use and endometrial cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Nevadunsky, Nicole S; Van Arsdale, Anne; Strickler, Howard D; Moadel, Alyson; Kaur, Gurpreet; Frimer, Marina; Conroy, Erin; Goldberg, Gary L; Einstein, Mark H

    2014-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes are risk factors for the development of uterine cancer. Although greater progression free survival among diabetic patients with ovarian and breast cancers using metformin has been reported, no studies have assessed the association of metformin use with survival in women with endometrial cancer (EC). We conducted a single-institution retrospective cohort study of all patients treated for uterine cancer from January 1999 through December 2009. Demographic, medical, social, and survival data were abstracted from medical records and the national death registry. Overall survival (OS) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox models were utilized for multivariate analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Of 985 patients, 114 (12%) had diabetes and were treated with metformin, 136 (14%) were diabetic but did not use metformin, and 735 (74%) had not been diagnosed with diabetes. Greater OS was observed in diabetics with non-endometrioid EC who used metformin than in diabetic cases not using metformin and non-endometrioid EC cases without diabetes (log rank test (p=0.02)). This association remained significant (hazard ratio=0.54, 95% CI: 0.30-0.97, p<0.04) after adjusting for age, clinical stage, grade, chemotherapy treatment, radiation treatment and the presence of hyperlipidemia in multivariate analysis. No association between metformin use and OS in diabetics with endometrioid histology was observed. Diabetic EC patients with non-endometrioid tumors who used metformin had lower risk of death than women with EC who did not use metformin. These data suggest that metformin might be useful as adjuvant therapy for non-endometrioid EC. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The cancer survival gap between elderly and middle-aged patients in Europe is widening.

    PubMed

    Quaglia, Alberto; Tavilla, Andrea; Shack, Lorraine; Brenner, Hermann; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska; Allemani, Claudia; Colonna, Marc; Grande, Enrico; Grosclaude, Pascale; Vercelli, Marina

    2009-04-01

    The present study is aimed to compare survival and prognostic changes over time between elderly (70-84 years) and middle-aged cancer patients (55-69 years). We considered seven cancer sites (stomach, colon, breast, cervix and corpus uteri, ovary and prostate) and all cancers combined (but excluding prostate and non-melanoma skin cancers). Five-year relative survival was estimated for cohorts of patients diagnosed in 1988-1999 in a pool of 51 European populations covered by cancer registries. Furthermore, we applied the period-analysis method to more recent incidence data from 32 cancer registries to provide 1- and 5-year relative survival estimates for the period of follow-up 2000-2002. A significant survival improvement was observed from 1988 to 1999 for all cancers combined and for every cancer site, except cervical cancer. However, survival increased at a slower rate in the elderly, so that the gap between younger and older patients widened, particularly for prostate cancer in men and for all considered cancers except cervical cancer in women. For breast and prostate cancers, the increasing gap was likely attributable to a larger use of, respectively, mammographic screening and PSA test in middle-aged with respect to the elderly. In the period analysis of the most recent data, relative survival was much higher in middle-aged patients than in the elderly. The differences were higher for breast and gynaecological cancers, and for prostate cancer. Most of this age gap was due to a very large difference in survival after the 1st year following the diagnosis. Differences were much smaller for conditional 5-year relative survival among patients who had already survived the first year. The increase of survival in elderly men is encouraging but the lesser improvement in women and, in particular, the widening gap for breast cancer suggest that many barriers still delay access to care and that enhanced prevention and clinical management remain major issues.

  6. Survival of stomach and esophagus cancer patients in Germany in the early 21st century.

    PubMed

    Hiripi, Eva; Jansen, Lina; Gondos, Adam; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Luttmann, Sabine; Nennecke, Alice; Brenner, Hermann

    2012-09-01

    Esophagus and stomach cancers are associated with poor prognosis. But most published population-based cancer survival estimates for stomach and esophagus cancer refer to survival experience of patients diagnosed in the 1990s or earlier years. The aim of this study was to provide up-to-date survival estimates and trends for patients with stomach and esophagus cancer in Germany. Our analysis is based on data from 11 population-based cancer registries, covering 33 million inhabitants. Patients diagnosed with stomach and esophagus cancer in 1997-2006 were included. Period analysis was used to derive five-year relative survival estimates and trends by age, sex, cancer subsite, and stage for the time period of 2002-2006. German and US survival estimates were compared utilizing the SEER 13 database. Overall age-standardized five-year relative survival was 31.8% and 18.3% for stomach and esophagus cancer, respectively, compared to 27.2% and 17.4% in the US. Survival was somewhat higher among female than among male patients for both cancer sites (33.6% vs. 30.6% and 21.5% vs. 17.5%, respectively) and much higher for non-cardia stomach cancer (40.4%) than for cardia cancer (23.4%). From 2002 to 2006, a moderate increase in five-year relative survival by 2.7 percent units was observed for non-cardia stomach cancer patients in Germany (p < 0.001). Five-year relative cancer survival has reached levels around 40% for patients with non-cardia stomach cancer in Germany in the early 21st century, whereas it remained at lower levels around 20% for patients with esophagus and cardia cancer.

  7. Digoxin and prostate cancer survival in the Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaapu, Kalle J; Murtola, Teemu J; Talala, Kirsi; Taari, Kimmo; Tammela, Teuvo Lj; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-11-22

    Protective effects have been suggested for digoxin against prostate cancer risk. However, few studies have evaluated the possible effects on prostate cancer-specific survival. We studied the association between use of digoxin or beta-blocker sotalol and prostate cancer-specific survival as compared with users of other antiarrhythmic drugs in a retrospective cohort study. Our study population consisted of 6537 prostate cancer cases from the Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer diagnosed during 1996-2009 (485 digoxin users). The median exposure for digoxin was 480 DDDs (interquartile range 100-1400 DDDs). During a median follow-up of 7.5 years after diagnosis, 617 men (48 digoxin users) died of prostate cancer. We collected information on antiarrhythmic drug purchases from the national prescription database. Both prediagnostic and postdiagnostic drug usages were analysed using the Cox regression method. No association was found for prostate cancer death with digoxin usage before (HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.56-1.80) or after (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.43-1.51) prostate cancer diagnosis. The results were also comparable for sotalol and antiarrhythmic drugs in general. Among men not receiving hormonal therapy, prediagnostic digoxin usage was associated with prolonged prostate cancer survival (HR 0.20, 95% CI 0.05-0.86). No general protective effects against prostate cancer were observed for digoxin or sotalol usage.

  8. Gender and ethnic differences in incidence and survival of lymphoid neoplasm subtypes in an Asian population: Secular trends of a population-based cancer registry from 1998 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Lim, Raymond Boon Tar; Loy, En Yun; Lim, Gek Hsiang; Zheng, Huili; Chow, Khuan Yew; Lim, Soon Thye

    2015-12-01

    Descriptive epidemiology on incidence and survival by lymphoid neoplasm (LN) subtypes using the 2008 World Health Organisation (WHO) classification remained limited in Asia. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether gender and ethnic differences in incidence and survival of LN subtypes existed using the Singapore Cancer Registry (SCR) from 1998 to 2012. We derived age standardised incidence rates (ASIRs) by the direct standardisation method and 5-year relative survival (RSR) by the Ederer II method and period approach. Five-year observed survival (OS) was obtained for each ethnicity. Malays had the highest ASIR of total LNs among the three ethnicities for each time period. The largest increase in 5-year RSR subtypes was follicular lymphoma from 43.8% in 1998-2002 to 82.3% in 2008-2012; followed by chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL)/small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) from 48.1% in 1998-2002 to 77.9% in 2008-2012. Although males had higher incidence than females in each time period, females had greater 5-year RSR for follicular lymphoma (89.8% in 2008-2012 for females vs. 76.6% in 2008-2012 for males) and CLL/SLL (78.7% in 2008-2012 for females vs. 76.7% in 2008-2012 for males). All three ethnicities experienced an overall increase in 5-year OS for mature B-cell lymphoma, with Indians experiencing the greatest increase (37.1% in 1998-2002 to 61.1% in 2008-2012), followed by Malays (30.8% in 1998-2002 to 48.7% in 2008-2012) and then Chinese (36.4% in 1998-2002 to 51.3% in 2008-2012). Our study demonstrated that improved mature B-cell lymphoma survival was not only observed in the West, but also in Singapore.

  9. Inherited Determinants of Ovarian Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Ellen L.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Armasu, Sebastian M.; White, Kristin L.; Keeney, Gary L.; Cliby, William A.; Rider, David N.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Jones, Monica B.; Peethambaram, Prema P.; Lancaster, Johnathan M.; Olson, Janet E.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Hartmann, Lynn C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Due to variation of outcome among cases, we sought to examine whether overall survival in ovarian cancer was associated with common inherited variants in 227 candidate genes from ovarian cancer-related pathways including angiogenesis, inflammation, detoxification, glycosylation, one-carbon transfer, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, and cellular senescence. Experimental Design Blood samples were obtained from 325 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic from 1999 to 2006. During a median follow-up of 3.8 years (range, 0.1 – 8.6 years), 157 deaths were observed. Germline DNA was analyzed at 1,416 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). For all patients, and for 203 with serous subtype, we assessed the overall significance of each gene and pathway, and estimated risk of death via hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results Variation within angiogenesis was most strongly associated with survival time overall (p=0.03) and among patients with serous cancer (p=0.05), particularly for EIF2B5 rs4912474 (all patients HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.54-0.89, p=0.004), VEGFC rs17697305 (serous subtype HR 2.29, 95% CI 1.34-3.92, p=0.003), and four SNPs in VHL. Variation within the inflammation pathway was borderline significant (all patients, p=0.09), and SNPs in CCR3, IL1B, IL18, CCL2, and ALOX5 which correlated with survival time are worthy of follow-up. Conclusion An extensive multiple-pathway assessment found evidence that inherited differences may play a role in outcome of ovarian cancer patients, particularly in genes within the angiogenesis and inflammation pathways. Our work supports efforts to target such mediators for therapeutic gain. PMID:20103664

  10. [Mortality and survival analysis of esophageal cancer in China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, S W; Zheng, R S; Zuo, T T; Zeng, H M; Chen, W Q; He, J

    2016-09-23

    To estimate the nationwide mortality of esophageal cancer in China in 2012, to investigate the trends of the disease, and to provide support data for esophageal cancer prevention and control in China. Data of population-based cancer registry of China were extracted by sex and geographical area. Joinpoint software was used to analyze the trends of esophageal cancer from 2000 to 2011 using the continuous data of 22 cancer registries. Average annual percentage change rates (AAPC) were calculated, and 17 cancer registries data during 2003-2005 were analyzed. In 2012, there were estimated 210.9 thousand new cases of esophageal cancer death in China, with 149 thousand in males and 61.9 thousand in females, accounting for 9.65% of overall cancer death. The crude mortality rate of esophageal cancer in 2012 was 15.58 per 100 000, accounting for the fourth-leading cause of overall cancer deaths. The age-standardized mortality rates by world population and China population were 10.67 per 100 000 and 10.62 per 100 000, respectively. The cumulative mortality rate for age 0-74 was 1.28%. The age-specific mortality rates were increasing with age, and there was a sharp increase after 50 years of age. From 2000 to 2011, there was a slight decreasing trend for crude mortality rate, with the AAPC of -1.1% (95% CI: -1.8% to -0.5%). However, the age standardized mortality rates were decreasing significantly with the AAPC of -4.6% (95% CI: -5.7% to -3.6%). The AAPCs for age-standardized esophageal cancer mortality were -3.8% in urban areas and -2.4% in rural areas. For combined 5-year age standardized relative survival was 20.9% (95%CI: 20.2% to 21.7%) and the 1-, 3- and 5-year observed survival rates were 54.0%, 25.5%, 18.4%, respectively. There is still a heavy burden of esophageal cancer in China. Prevention and early diagnosis of the disease in esophageal cancer high-risk areas is very essential.

  11. Widening educational differences in cancer survival in Norway.

    PubMed

    Kravdal, Håkon

    2014-04-01

    All-cause and cause-specific mortality have long been known to be associated with various indicators of socio-economic status, and social gradients have been shown also for cancer survival. In recent decades, several studies have reported increasing social differentials in mortality rates. This study aims to investigate the development with respect to cancer survival, which has not been done before. Discrete-time hazard regression models for cancer deaths among women and men diagnosed with cancer 1970-2007 at age 30-89 were estimated, using register data encompassing the entire Norwegian population. The analysis was based on >200,000 cancer deaths during over 2 million person-years of exposure among >440,000 individuals diagnosed with cancer. There has been an increasing advantage for women of all educational categories when compared with those with only compulsory schooling. No such widening of the educational gap has appeared with respect to cancer survival among men. Increasing educational differentials in health at the time of diagnosis, health behaviour and cancer treatment seem plausible, and would to some extent accord with the increasing social gaps in all-cause or cause-specific mortality rates that have been reported in other studies. Also, it is not impossible that such trends in the educational gradients in health and treatment are stronger for women than for men, though such sex differences have not been indicated in mortality studies. There is no obvious explanation for the complete absence of change in the education effects among men.

  12. Practices That Reduce the Latina Survival Disparity After Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, J. Emilio; Ang, Alfonzo; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Latina breast cancer patients are 20 percent more likely to die within 5 years after diagnosis compared with white women, even though they have a lower incidence of breast cancer, lower general mortality rates, and some better health behaviors. Existing data only examine disparities in the utilization of breast cancer care; this research expands the study question to which utilization factors drive the shorter survival in Latina women compared with white women. Methods This longitudinal linked Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort study examined early stage breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1992 and 2000 and followed for 5–11 years after diagnosis (N=44,999). Modifiable utilization factors included consistent visits to primary care providers and to specialists after diagnosis, consistent post-diagnosis mammograms, and receipt of initial care consistent with current standards of care. Results Of the four utilization factors potentially driving this disparity, a lack of consistent post-diagnosis mammograms was the strongest driver of the Latina breast cancer survival disparity. Consistent mammograms attenuated the hazard of death from 23% [hazard ratio, HR, (95% confidence interval, 95%CI)=1.23 (1.1,1.4)] to a nonsignificant 12% [HR (95%CI)=1.12 (0.7,1.3)] and reduced the excess hazard of death in Latina women by 55%. Effect modification identified that visits to primary care providers have a greater protective impact on the survival of Latina compared to white women [HR (95%CI)=0.9 (0.9,0.9)]. Conclusions We provide evidence that undetected new or recurrent breast cancers due to less consistent post-diagnosis mammograms contribute substantially to the long-observed Latina survival disadvantage. Interventions involving primary care providers may be especially beneficial to this population. PMID:24106867

  13. Whole grain intake and survival among Scandinavian colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Skeie, Guri; Braaten, Tonje; Olsen, Anja; Kyrø, Cecilie; Tjønneland, Anne; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Landberg, Rikard; Lund, Eiliv

    2014-01-01

    To our knowledge, no studies of associations between intake of whole grain (WHG) and survival of colorectal cancer have been published, despite evidence that dietary fiber, and to some extent WHG, are associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer. Scandinavia is an area where the WHG consumption traditionally is high. We performed a case-only (N = 1119) study in the Scandinavian HELGA cohort of pre-diagnosis WHG intake (total WHG, WHG wheat, WHG rye, and WHG oats) and survival of colorectal cancer. Cox regression analyses were used to study the associations, both in categorical and continuous models, stratified by location (proximal, distal, rectum) and country. No evidence of an association was found, neither for total WHG intake (hazard ratio = 1.32, 95% confidence interval: 0.88-1.97 lowest vs. highest tertile, adjusted for age at diagnosis, metastasis status, smoking, folate, margarine, and energy), nor for specific grains. Prediagnosis consumption of WHG does not seem to improve survival of colorectal cancer in subjects diagnosed within this prospective population-based Scandinavian cohort.

  14. Age-specific survival and annual variation in survival of female chamois differ between populations.

    PubMed

    Bleu, Josefa; Herfindal, Ivar; Loison, Anne; Kwak, Anne M G; Garel, Mathieu; Toïgo, Carole; Rempfler, Thomas; Filli, Flurin; Sæther, Bernt-Erik

    2015-12-01

    In many species, population dynamics are shaped by age-structured demographic parameters, such as survival, which can cause age-specific sensitivity to environmental conditions. Accordingly, we can expect populations with different age-specific survival to be differently affected by environmental variation. However, this hypothesis is rarely tested at the intra-specific level. Using capture-mark-recapture models, we quantified age-specific survival and the extent of annual variations in survival of females of alpine chamois in two sites. In one population, survival was very high (>0.94; Bauges, France) until the onset of senescence at approximately 7 years old, whereas the two other populations (Swiss National Park, SNP) had a later onset (12 years old) and a lower rate of senescence. Senescence patterns are therefore not fixed within species. Annual variation in survival was higher in the Bauges (SD = 0.26) compared to the SNP populations (SD = 0.20). Also, in each population, the age classes with the lowest survival also experienced the largest temporal variation, in accordance with inter-specific comparisons showing a greater impact of environmental variation on these age classes. The large difference between the populations in age-specific survival and variation suggests that environmental variation and climate change will affect these populations differently.

  15. Does colour polymorphism enhance survival of prey populations?

    PubMed

    Wennersten, Lena; Forsman, Anders

    2009-06-22

    That colour polymorphism may protect prey populations from predation is an old but rarely tested hypothesis. We examine whether colour polymorphic populations of prey exposed to avian predators in an ecologically valid visual context were exposed to increased extinction risk compared with monomorphic populations. We made 2976 artificial pastry prey, resembling Lepidoptera larvae, in four different colours and presented them in 124 monomorphic and 124 tetramorphic populations on tree trunks and branches such that they would be exposed to predation by free-living birds, and monitored their 'survival'. Among monomorphic populations, there was a significant effect of prey coloration on survival, confirming that coloration influenced susceptibility to visually oriented predators. Survival of polymorphic populations was inferior to that of monomorphic green populations, but did not differ significantly from monomorphic brown, yellow or red populations. Differences in survival within polymorphic populations paralleled those seen among monomorphic populations; the red morph most frequently went extinct first and the green morph most frequently survived the longest. Our findings do not support the traditional protective polymorphism hypothesis and are in conflict with those of earlier studies. As a possible explanation to our findings, we offer a competing 'giveaway cue' hypothesis: that polymorphic populations may include one morph that attracts the attention of predators and that polymorphic populations therefore may suffer increased predation compared with some monomorphic populations.

  16. Cancer survival in Eastern and Western Germany after the fall of the iron curtain.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lina; Gondos, Adam; Eberle, Andrea; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Brenner, Hermann

    2012-09-01

    Prior to the German reunification, cancer survival was much lower in East than in West Germany. We compare cancer survival between Eastern and Western Germany in the early twenty-first century, i.e. the second decade after the German reunification. Using data from 11 population-based cancer registries covering a population of 33 million people, 5-year age-standardized relative survival for the time period 2002-2006 was estimated for the 25 most common cancers using model-based period analysis. In 2002-2006, 5-year relative survival was very similar for most cancers, with differences below 3% units for 20 of 25 cancer sites. Larger, statistically significant survival advantages were seen for oral cavity, oesophagus, and gallbladder cancer and skin melanoma in the West and for leukemia in the East. Our study shows that within two decades after the assimilation of political and health care systems, the former major survival gap of cancer patients in Eastern Germany has been essentially overcome. This result is encouraging as it suggests that, even though economic conditions have remained difficult in Eastern Germany, comparable health care provision may nevertheless enable comparable levels of cancer survival within a relatively short period of time.

  17. The role of Hispanic race/ethnicity and poverty in breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Delgado, D J; Lin, W Y; Coffey, M

    1995-06-01

    diagnosed in the early 1980's (vs. the late 1970's) was associated with reduced breast cancer survival time--vs. Whites, who experienced no significant change in breast cancer survival time in the same time period. Poverty was not a predictor for Hispanic survival time in any of the models; however, it was a predictor for younger Whites for breast cancer survival time. These results fueled discussion in three areas targeting breast cancer in underserved women: the development of racial/ethnic-specific cancer control guidelines, the development of a breast cancer integrated delivery system, and population management.

  18. Does colour polymorphism enhance survival of prey populations?

    PubMed Central

    Wennersten, Lena; Forsman, Anders

    2009-01-01

    That colour polymorphism may protect prey populations from predation is an old but rarely tested hypothesis. We examine whether colour polymorphic populations of prey exposed to avian predators in an ecologically valid visual context were exposed to increased extinction risk compared with monomorphic populations. We made 2976 artificial pastry prey, resembling Lepidoptera larvae, in four different colours and presented them in 124 monomorphic and 124 tetramorphic populations on tree trunks and branches such that they would be exposed to predation by free-living birds, and monitored their ‘survival’. Among monomorphic populations, there was a significant effect of prey coloration on survival, confirming that coloration influenced susceptibility to visually oriented predators. Survival of polymorphic populations was inferior to that of monomorphic green populations, but did not differ significantly from monomorphic brown, yellow or red populations. Differences in survival within polymorphic populations paralleled those seen among monomorphic populations; the red morph most frequently went extinct first and the green morph most frequently survived the longest. Our findings do not support the traditional protective polymorphism hypothesis and are in conflict with those of earlier studies. As a possible explanation to our findings, we offer a competing ‘giveaway cue’ hypothesis: that polymorphic populations may include one morph that attracts the attention of predators and that polymorphic populations therefore may suffer increased predation compared with some monomorphic populations. PMID:19324729

  19. Treatment with finasteride and prostate cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Kjellman, Anders; Friis, Søren; Granath, Fredrik; Gustafsson, Ove; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Akre, Olof

    2013-08-01

    This study compared survival after diagnosis of prostate cancer (PC) in men previously treated with finasteride, in men previously treated with α-adrenoceptor antagonists, in men treated with both, and in men who had received neither type of medication. In total, 3791 men diagnosed with PC in northern Denmark were identified. The region's prescription database was used to identify all men prescribed finasteride and α-adrenoceptor antagonists and those who had received neither medication during the period 1989-2001. Among men with a diagnosis of PC, overall survival and disease-specific survival were assessed after diagnosis using Cox proportional hazards regression. The risk of being diagnosed with non-localized PC was estimated using conditional logistic regression. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for PC death and overall death after treatment with finasteride was 0.93 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.76-1.14] and 0.92 (95% CI 0.77-1.10), respectively. Treatment with α-adrenoceptor antagonists was associated with a reduced risk of PC death and overall death (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.67-0.90, and 0.82, 95% CI 0.73-0.93, respectively. The risk of being diagnosed with non-localized PC was increased for men taking finasteride (odds ratio 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.29) per 100 defined daily doses. Treatment with finasteride prior to a diagnosis of PC did not affect PC-specific survival, but increased the risk of being diagnosed with non-localized disease. Treatment with α-adrenoceptor antagonists was associated with better cause-specific survival and lower risk of non-localized disease.

  20. Worldwide comparison of ovarian cancer survival: Histological group and stage at diagnosis (CONCORD-2).

    PubMed

    Matz, Melissa; Coleman, Michel P; Carreira, Helena; Salmerón, Diego; Chirlaque, Maria Dolores; Allemani, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    Ovarian cancer comprises several histological groups with widely differing levels of survival. We aimed to explore international variation in survival for each group to help interpret international differences in survival from all ovarian cancers combined. We also examined differences in stage-specific survival. The CONCORD programme is the largest population-based study of global trends in cancer survival, including data from 60 countries for 695,932 women (aged 15-99years) diagnosed with ovarian cancer during 1995-2009. We defined six histological groups: type I epithelial, type II epithelial, germ cell, sex cord-stromal, other specific non-epithelial and non-specific morphology, and estimated age-standardised 5-year net survival for each country by histological group. We also analysed data from 67 cancer registries for 233,659 women diagnosed from 2001 to 2009, for whom information on stage at diagnosis was available. We estimated age-standardised 5-year net survival by stage at diagnosis (localised or advanced). Survival from type I epithelial ovarian tumours for women diagnosed during 2005-09 ranged from 40 to 70%. Survival from type II epithelial tumours was much lower (20-45%). Survival from germ cell tumours was higher than that of type II epithelial tumours, but also varied widely between countries. Survival for sex-cord stromal tumours was higher than for the five other groups. Survival from localised tumours was much higher than for advanced disease (80% vs. 30%). There is wide variation in survival between histological groups, and stage at diagnosis remains an important factor in ovarian cancer survival. International comparisons of ovarian cancer survival should incorporate histology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Five-Year Cancer Survival Rates in Oklahoma from 1997 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Janis; Gandhi, Krupa; Pate, Anne; Janitz, Amanda; Anderson, Amber; Kinnard, Robin; Ding, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study evaluated the five-year observed survival rates of American Indians/Alaskan Native, African American, and white cancer patients among various demographic characteristics in Oklahoma focusing on lung and bronchus, colon and rectum, female breast, and prostate for the cancer patients diagnosed between 1997 and 2008. Methods The five-year observed survival rates were calculated for overall cancer and specific cancer sites, using Kaplan-Meier method with data from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry. Results Overall, 51.5% patients diagnosed with cancer survived for five years. For specific sites we found: 79.2% for female breast cancer survived; 77.5% for prostate cancer; 12.9% for lung and bronchus cancer; and 49.9% for colorectal cancer. Conclusions The five-year observed survival rates in Oklahoma were consistent with national trends. Overall, cancer survival seems to be improving over time, but there remains disparity with the AA and AI/AN populations in contrast to whites in Oklahoma. PMID:27890941

  2. Five-Year Cancer Survival Rates in Oklahoma from 1997 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Janis; Gandhi, Krupa; Pate, Anne; Janitz, Amanda; Anderson, Amber; Kinnard, Robin; Ding, Kai

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the five-year observed survival rates of American Indians/Alaskan Native, African American, and white cancer patients among various demographic characteristics in Oklahoma focusing on lung and bronchus, colon and rectum, female breast, and prostate for the cancer patients diagnosed between 1997 and 2008. The five-year observed survival rates were calculated for overall cancer and specific cancer sites, using Kaplan-Meier method with data from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry. Overall, 51.5% patients diagnosed with cancer survived for five years. For specific sites we found: 79.2% for female breast cancer survived; 77.5% for prostate cancer; 12.9% for lung and bronchus cancer; and 49.9% for colorectal cancer. The five-year observed survival rates in Oklahoma were consistent with national trends. Overall, cancer survival seems to be improving over time, but there remains disparity with the AA and AI/AN populations in contrast to whites in Oklahoma.

  3. Prostate cancer specific survival in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Paul F.; Black, Amanda; Parnes, Howard L.; Grubb, Robert; Crawford, E. David; Miller, Anthony; Reding, Douglas; Andriole, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Background The prostate component of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) randomized screening trial demonstrated no mortality effect of screening. Here we analyze prostate cancer specific survival in PLCO and its relation to screening. Methods 76,693 men aged 55–74 were randomized to usual care (n = 38,350) or intervention (n = 38,343). Intervention arm men received annual prostate-specific antigen (6 years) and digital rectal exam (4 years). Men were followed for cancer diagnosis and mortality through 13 years. Medical record abstractors confirmed prostate cancer diagnoses, stage and grade. Prostate-specific survival in PLCO cases was analyzed using Kaplan–Meier analysis and proportional hazards modeling. We utilized data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program to compute expected survival in PLCO and compared this to observed. Results There was no significant difference in prostate-specific survival rates between arms; 10 year survival rates were 94.7% (intervention, n = 4250 cases) versus 93.5% (usual care, n = 3815 cases). Within the intervention arm, cases never screened in PLCO had lower 10 year survival rates (82%) than screen detected or interval (following a negative screen) cases, both around 95.5%. The ratio of observed to expected 10 year prostate-specific death (1-survival) rates was 0.59 (95% CI: 0.51–0.68) for all PLCO cases, 0.66 (95% CI: 0.51–0.81) for Gleason 5–7 cases and 1.07 (95% CI: 0.87–1.3) for Gleason 8–10 cases. Conclusion Prostate cancer specific survival in PLCO was comparable across arms and significantly better than expected based on nationwide population data. How much of the better survival is due to a healthy volunteer effect and to lead-time and overdiagnosis biases is not readily determinable. PMID:23000116

  4. Doubly robust estimator for net survival rate in analyses of cancer registry data.

    PubMed

    Komukai, Sho; Hattori, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    Cancer population studies based on cancer registry databases are widely conducted to address various research questions. In general, cancer registry databases do not collect information on cause of death. The net survival rate is defined as the survival rate if a subject would not die for any causes other than cancer. This counterfactual concept is widely used for the analyses of cancer registry data. Perme, Stare, and Estève (2012) proposed a nonparametric estimator of the net survival rate under the assumption that the censoring time is independent of the survival time and covariates. Kodre and Perme (2013) proposed an inverse weighting estimator for the net survival rate under the covariate-dependent censoring. An alternative approach to estimating the net survival rate under covariate-dependent censoring is to apply a regression model for the conditional net survival rate given covariates. In this article, we propose a new estimator for the net survival rate. The proposed estimator is shown to be doubly robust in the sense that it is consistent at least one of the regression models for survival time and for censoring time. We examine the theoretical and empirical properties of our proposed estimator by asymptotic theory and simulation studies. We also apply the proposed method to cancer registry data for gastric cancer patients in Osaka, Japan.

  5. Association of Breast Cancer Risk loci with Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Giles, Graham G.; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E.; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J.; Joshi, Amit D.; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele=0.70; 95% CI: 0.58–0.85; Ptrend=2.84×10−4; HRheterozygotes=0.71; 95% CI: 0.55–0.92; HRhomozygotes=0.48; 95% CI: 0.31–0.76; P2DF=1.45×10−3). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04–1.15; Ptrend=6.6×10−4; HRheterozygotes=0.96 95% CI: 0.90–1.03; HRhomozygotes= 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09–1.35; P2DF=1.25×10−4). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. PMID:25611573

  6. Identification of Novel Genetic Markers of Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Kraft, Peter; Canisius, Sander; Chen, Constance; Khan, Sofia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lush, Michael; Kar, Siddhartha; Beesley, Jonathan; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Leunen, Karin; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A.; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Humphreys, Keith; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hamann, Ute; Kabisch, Maria; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Margolin, Sara; Kristensen, Vessela; Nord, Silje; Evans, D. Gareth; Abraham, Jean E.; Earl, Helena M.; Hiller, Louise; Dunn, Janet A.; Bowden, Sarah; Berg, Christine; Campa, Daniele; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Willett, Walter; Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer–specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large meta-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference panel from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also carried out subtype-specific analyses based on 6881 estrogen receptor (ER)–negative patients (920 events) and 23059 ER-positive patients (1333 events). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We identified one new locus (rs2059614 at 11q24.2) associated with survival in ER-negative breast cancer cases (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 2.47, P = 1.91 x 10–8). Genotyping a subset of 2113 case patients, of which 300 were ER negative, provided supporting evidence for the quality of the imputation. The association in this set of case patients was stronger for the observed genotypes than for the imputed genotypes. A second locus (rs148760487 at 2q24.2) was associated at genome-wide statistical significance in initial analyses; the association was similar in ER-positive and ER-negative case patients. Here the results of genotyping suggested that the finding was less robust. Conclusions: This is currently the largest study investigating genetic variation associated with breast cancer survival. Our results have potential clinical implications, as they confirm that germline genotype can provide prognostic information in addition to standard tumor prognostic factors. PMID:25890600

  7. Intrinsic time scaling in survival analysis: application to biological populations.

    PubMed

    Eakin, T

    1994-11-01

    A method of dimensionless time-scaling based on extrinsic expectation of life at birth but intrinsic to a system generating a survival distribution is introduced. Such scaling allows the survival fraction function and its associated mortality function to serve as Green's functions for their generalized equivalents, i.e., a "population" function and a "death" function. The analytical mechanics of utilizing these concepts are formulated, applied to the classical Gompertz and Weibull survival models, and discussed with respect to biological relevance.

  8. Predictors of survival of natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, in a non-Asian population: a single cancer centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Jule; Serrano, Mariana; Lopez, Lourdes; Pacheco, Cristian; Quintana, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Background Natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL), part of T-cell and NK-cell neoplasms in the World Health Organisation (WHO) classification, is an aggressive lymphoma with poor prognosis more predominantly seen in Asian and South American countries. This study evaluates the factors associated with survival among patients with newly diagnosed NKTCL in Peru. Methods Information was abstracted from medical records (MR) for all NKTCL patients >13 years of age at the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas (INEN) between 2002 and 2011. The estimate of the survival curves was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the difference was computed by the log-rank test. Results Around 226 MR were reviewed, 153 met the selection criteria, the median age was 40 years (14–84). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 20 months, five year PFS was 42.6%, univariable analysis (UA) showed statistical significance (p < 0.05) for male sex, non-nasal primary site, advanced clinical stages, B symptoms, poor performance status, regional nodal involvement (RNI). In the multivariate analysis the only poor prognostic factors was primary non-nasal (Hazard ratio (HR) = 2.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.43– 4.02, P = 0.01). The median overall survival (OS) was 49 months, five year OS was 48.9%, UA showed statistical significance for non-nasal primary site, advanced clinical stages, B symptoms, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) > normal, RNI and local tumour invasion. In the multivariate analysis, primary non-nasal was the only poor prognostic factor with HR = 2.57, 95% CI = 1.37–4.83, P = 0.03. Conclusions In Peru, OS of NKTCL is similar to other countries. This result suggests that non-nasal NKTCL is the only poor prognostic factor of OS and PFS. PMID:27994644

  9. Ethnic Disparities in Cervical Cancer Survival Among Texas Women

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, Christopher P.; Eggleston, Katherine S.; White, Arica L.; Williams, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this work was to determine whether minority women are more likely to die of cervical cancer. A population-based cohort study was performed using Texas Cancer Registry (TCR) data from 1998 to 2002. Methods A total of 5,166 women with cervical cancer were identified during 1998–2002 through the TCR. Measures of socioeconomic status (SES) and urbanization were created using census block group-level data. Multilevel logistic regression was used to calculate the odds of dying from cervical cancer by race, and Cox proportional hazards modeling was used for cervical cancer-specific survival analysis. Results After adjusting for age, SES, urbanization, stage, cell type, and treatment, Hispanic women were significantly less likely than non-Hispanic White women to die from cervical cancer (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 0.69; 95% CI [confidence interval] = 0.59–0.80), whereas Black women were more likely to die (aHR = 1.26; 95% CI = 1.06–1.50). Black and Hispanic women were more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage than White women. Black women were significantly less likely to receive surgery among those diagnosed with localized disease (p = 0.001) relative to both White and Hispanic women. Conclusions Relative to non-Hispanic White women, Black women were more likely to die of cervical cancer while Hispanic women were less likely to die; these survival differences were not explained by SES, urbanization, age, cell type, stage at diagnosis, or treatment. PMID:19788363

  10. History of Recreational Physical Activity and Survival After Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yani; John, Esther M.; Sullivan-Halley, Jane; Vigen, Cheryl; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Caan, Bette J.; Lee, Valerie S.; Roh, Janise M.; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Kurian, Allison W.; Monroe, Kristine R.; Cheng, Iona; Sposto, Richard; Wu, Anna H.; Bernstein, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that prediagnosis physical activity is associated with survival in women diagnosed with breast cancer. However, few data exist for racial/ethnic groups other than non-Latina whites. To examine the association between prediagnosis recreational physical activity and mortality by race/ethnicity, we pooled data from the California Breast Cancer Survivorship Consortium for 3 population-based case-control studies of breast cancer patients (n = 4,608) diagnosed from 1994 to 2002 and followed up through 2010. Cox proportional hazards models provided estimates of the relative hazard ratio for mortality from all causes, breast cancer, and causes other than breast cancer associated with recent recreational physical activity (i.e., in the 10 years before diagnosis). Among 1,347 ascertained deaths, 826 (61%) were from breast cancer. Compared with women with the lowest level of recent recreational physical activity, those with the highest level had a marginally decreased risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 0.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.76, 1.01) and a statistically significant decreased risk of mortality from causes other than breast cancer (hazard ratio = 0.63, 95% confidence interval: 0.49, 0.80), and particularly from cardiovascular disease. No association was observed for breast cancer–specific mortality. These risk patterns did not differ by race/ethnicity (non-Latina white, African American, Latina, and Asian American). Our findings suggest that physical activity is beneficial for overall survival regardless of race/ethnicity. PMID:25925388

  11. Poor oral health affects survival in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Douglas R; Divaris, Kimon; Mazul, Angela L; Weissler, Mark C; Zevallos, Jose P; Olshan, Andrew F

    2017-10-01

    Poor oral health has emerged as a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) but its impact on survival has not been examined. We sought to estimate the impact of oral health indicators on survival in a population-based HNSCC cohort. Cases (n=1381) and age-, sex- and race-matched controls (n=1396) were participants in the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiologic Study (CHANCE). Vital status was determined via linkage with the National Death Index. Survival was considered at 5years post-diagnosis or study-enrollment for controls. Oral health was assessed using self-reported indicators including frequency of routine dental exams and tooth brushing. We used Kaplan-Meyer analyses and Cox regression to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Routine dental visits during the preceding 10years were associated with decreased mortality risk (>10 visits: HR=0.6, 95% CI=0.4-0.8) after adjusting for confounders. This effect was most pronounced for oral cavity cancer-(e.g., >10 visits: HR=0.4, 95% CI=0.2-0.9). Dental visits were also positively associated with survival among controls. No other routine health screening (e.g., eye exams) was associated with survival. We found significant associations between markers of oral health and survival among both HNSCC cases and controls. This association was most pronounced for sites closer to the dentition. Oral health may have a direct effect on tumor biology due to the associated immune or inflammatory response. It may also represent a proxy for wellness or unmeasured social determinants of health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Landmark Risk Prediction of Residual Life for Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Parast, Layla; Cai, Tianxi

    2013-01-01

    The importance of developing personalized risk prediction estimates has become increasingly evident in recent years. In general, patient populations may be heterogenous and represent a mixture of different unknown subtypes of disease. When the source of this heterogeneity and resulting subtypes of disease are unknown, accurate prediction of survival may be difficult. However, in certain disease settings the onset time of an observable short term event may be highly associated with these unknown subtypes of disease and thus may be useful in predicting long term survival. One approach to incorporate short term event information along with baseline markers for the prediction of long term survival is through a landmark Cox model, which assumes a proportional hazards model for the residual life at a given landmark point. In this paper, we use this modeling framework to develop procedures to assess how a patient’s long term survival trajectory may change over time given good short term outcome indications along with prognosis based on baseline markers. We first propose time-varying accuracy measures to quantify the predictive performance of landmark prediction rules for residual life and provide resampling-based procedures to make inference about such accuracy measures. Simulation studies show that the proposed procedures perform well in finite samples. Throughout, we illustrate our proposed procedures using a breast cancer dataset with information on time to metastasis and time to death. In addition to baseline clinical markers available for each patient, a chromosome instability genetic score, denoted by CIN25, is also available for each patient and has been shown to be predictive of survival for various types of cancer. We provide procedures to evaluate the incremental value of CIN25 for the prediction of residual life and examine how the residual life profile changes over time. This allows us to identify an informative landmark point, t0, such that accurate risk

  13. Survival of European children and young adults with cancer diagnosed 1995-2002.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Gemma; Zigon, Giulia; Capocaccia, Riccardo; Coebergh, Jan Willem; Desandes, Emmanuel; Kaatsch, Peter; Pastore, Guido; Peris-Bonet, Rafael; Stiller, Charles A

    2009-04-01

    This study analyses survival in 40,392 children (age 0-14 years) and 30,187 adolescents/young adults (age 15-24 years) diagnosed with cancer between 1995 and 2002. The cases were from 83 European population-based cancer registries in 23 countries participating in EUROCARE-4. Five-year survival in countries and in regional groupings of countries was compared for all cancers combined and for major cancers. Survival for 15 rare cancers in children was also analysed. Five-year survival for all cancers combined was 81% in children and 87% in adolescents/young adults. Between-country survival differences narrowed for both children and adolescents/young adults. Relative risk of death reduced significantly, by 8% in children and by 13% in adolescents/young adults, from 1995-1999 to 2000-2002. Survival improved significantly over time for acute lymphoid leukaemia and primitive neuroectodermal tumours in children and for non-Hodgkin lymphoma in adolescents/young adults. Cancer survival in patients <25 years is poorly documented in Eastern European countries. Complete cancer registration should be a priority for these countries as an essential part of a policy for effective cancer control in Europe.

  14. Increasing Disadvantages in Cancer Survival in New Zealand Compared to Australia, between 2000-05 and 2006-10.

    PubMed

    Elwood, J Mark; Aye, Phyu Sin; Tin Tin, Sandar

    2016-01-01

    New Zealand has lower cancer survival compared to its neighbour Australia. If this were due to long established differences between the two patient populations, it might be expected to be either constant in time, or decreasing, as improving health services deals with inequities. In this study we compared trends in relative cancer survival ratios in New Zealand and Australia between 2000-05 and 2006-10, using data from the New Zealand Cancer Registry and the Australian Institute for Health and Welfare. Over this period, Australia showed significant improvements (6.0% in men, 3.0% in women) in overall 5-year cancer survival, with substantial increases in survival from major cancer sites such as lung, bowel, prostate, and breast cancers. New Zealand had only a 1.8% increase in cancer survival in men and 1.3% in women, with non-significant changes in survival from lung and bowel cancers, although there were increases in survival from prostate and breast cancers. For all cancers combined, and for lung and bowel cancer, the improvements in survival and the greater improvements in Australia were mainly in 1-year survival, suggesting factors related to diagnosis and presentation. For breast cancer, the improvements were similar in each country and seen in survival after the first year. The findings underscore the need to accelerate the efforts to improve early diagnosis and optimum treatment for New Zealand cancer patients to catch up with the progress in Australia.

  15. Survival from anal cancer among Hispanics-Puerto Rico, 2000-2007.

    PubMed

    Colon-Lopez, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana P; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Torres-Cintrón, Mariela; Perez, Naydi; Mercado-Acosta, Juan José; Guiot, Humberto M; Suarez, Erick

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing, particularly among HIV and men who have sex with men (MSM) groups. The vast majority of cases are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection. Epidemiological studies have also documented low survival, which might be linked to lack of appropriate screening, access, and utilization of pertinent health care services. Our objective was to assess the relative survival (1 and 3 years) of anal cancer in Puerto Rico for men and women during the period from 2000-2007. All histological types of cancer of anus, anal canal, and anorectum (ICD-O-3 codes C210-C218), except for sarcomas, were included. Relative survival was estimated with the use of life tables from the population of Puerto Rico. In addition, the excess survival was compared by age at diagnosis, histology, and stage (defined as local, regional, or distant), using the Poisson regression model. The overall 3-year relative survival in Puerto Rico was the same (53 %) for men and women. Our findings establish baseline survival data for anal cancer in Hispanics from Puerto Rico. Since now, the national guidelines for anal cancer screening and treatment are on their way to be determined; baseline information about survival will allow monitoring the efficacy that standardized screening programs may eventually have in increasing anal cancer survival in this population.

  16. EUROCARE-3: survival of cancer patients diagnosed 1990-94--results and commentary.

    PubMed

    Sant, M; Aareleid, T; Berrino, F; Bielska Lasota, M; Carli, P M; Faivre, J; Grosclaude, P; Hédelin, G; Matsuda, T; Møller, H; Möller, T; Verdecchia, A; Capocaccia, R; Gatta, G; Micheli, A; Santaquilani, M; Roazzi, P; Lisi, D

    2003-01-01

    EUROCARE-3 analysed the survival of 1815584 adult cancer patients diagnosed from 1990 to 1994 in 22 European countries. The results are reported in tables, one per cancer site, coded according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 classification. The main findings of the tables are summarised and commented on in this article. For most solid cancers, wide differences in survival between different European populations were found, as also reported by EUROCARE-1 and EUROCARE-2, despite a remarkable (10%) overall increase in cancer survival from 1985 to 1994. Survival was highest in northern Europe (Sweden, Norway, Finland and Iceland), and fairly good in central-southern Europe (France, Switzerland, Austria and Spain). Survival was particularly low in eastern Europe, low in Denmark and the UK, and fairly low in Portugal and Malta. The mix of tumour stage at diagnosis explains much of the survival differences for cancers of the digestive tract, female reproductive system, breast, thyroid, and also skin melanoma. For tumours of the urinary tract and prostate, the differences were explained mainly by differences in diagnostic criteria and procedures. The case mix by anatomic subsite largely explains differences in survival for head and neck cancers. For oesophagus, pancreas, liver and brain cancer, with poor prognoses, survival differences were limited. Tumours, for which highly effective treatments are available, such as testicular cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma and some haematological malignancies, had fairly uniform survival across Europe. Survival for all tumours combined (an indicator of the overall cancer care performance of a nation's health system) was better in young than old patients, and better in women than men. The affluence of countries influenced overall cancer survival through the availability of adequate diagnostic and treatment procedures, and screening programmes.

  17. Cancer survival discrepancies in developed and developing countries: comparisons between the Philippines and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Redaniel, M T; Laudico, A; Mirasol-Lumague, M R; Gondos, A; Pulte, D; Mapua, C; Brenner, H

    2009-01-01

    Despite the availability of population-based cancer survival data from the developed and developing countries, comparisons remain very few. Such comparisons are important to assess the magnitude of survival discrepancies and to disentangle the impact of ethnic background and health care access on cancer survival. Using the SEER 13 database and databases from the Manila and Rizal Cancer Registries in the Philippines, a 5-year relative survival for 9 common cancers in 1998–2002 of Filipino-American cancer patients were compared with both cancer patients from the Philippines, having the same ethnicity, and Caucasians in the United States, being exposed to a similar societal environment and the same health care system. Survival estimates were much higher for the Filipino-Americans than the Philippine resident population, with particularly large differences (more than 20–30% units) for cancers with good prognosis if diagnosed and treated early (colorectal, breast and cervix), or those with expensive treatment regimens (leukaemias). Filipino-Americans and Caucasians showed very similar survival for all cancer sites except stomach cancer (30.7 vs 23.2%) and leukaemias (37.8 vs 48.4%). The very large differences in the survival estimates of Filipino-Americans and the Philippine resident population highlight the importance of the access to and utilisation of diagnostic and therapeutic facilities in developing countries. Survival differences in stomach cancer and leukaemia between Filipino-Americans and Caucasians in the United States most likely reflect biological factors rather than the differences in access to health care. PMID:19240723

  18. Decreased Cancer Survival in Individuals Separated at Time of Diagnosis: Critical Period for Cancer Pathophysiology?

    PubMed Central

    Sprehn, Gwen C.; Chambers, Joanna E.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Konski, Andre; Johnstone, Peter A. S.

    2009-01-01

    Background It long has been recognized that married patients have improved cancer survival when compared to unmarried patients. This has been postulated as being due to increased support, potentially leading to better compliance with therapy. Conversely, some data exist pointing to a relationship between marital discord and decreased immunity. We examined whether unmarried patients have a different prognosis by whether they are (a) never married; (b) divorced; (c) widowed; or (d) separated at time of diagnosis. Methods The public access data of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry were queried for cancer survival across all 17 registries between 1973 and 2004. Data were last updated by SEER in April, 2007. Records of 3.79 million patients were included in the analysis. We specifically analyzed 5- and 10-year relative survival (5yRS, 10yRS), defined as observed survival divided by observed survival of an age-, race- and gender-matched population without disease, for all cancer patients by marital status, with specific subset analyses as indicated. Results Among unmarried patients, those separated at time of diagnosis had the lowest survival, followed by widowed, divorced, and never married patients. 5- and 10-year relative survival of separated patients was 72% and 64% that of married patients, respectively. This relationship persists when data are analyzed by gender. Conclusions Separated marital status is associated with a significant decrement in cancer survival, even in comparison with other unmarried groups. While other socioeconomic variables could contribute to this phenomenon, further research into the immunologic correlates of the acutely stressful condition of marital separation should be conducted. PMID:19705348

  19. Could Grilled, Smoked Meats Lower Survival After Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Could Grilled, Smoked Meats Lower Survival After Breast Cancer? Study can't prove cause and effect, but ... and smoked meats could increase the risk of breast cancer. Now, a new study finds these cooking methods ...

  20. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  1. Drug Xeloda Prolongs Survival for Some Breast Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 166103.html Drug Xeloda Prolongs Survival for Some Breast Cancer Patients It cut risk of relapse, death by ... can extend the lives of some women whose breast cancer is not wiped out by standard treatment, a ...

  2. Oesophageal cancer survival in Europe: a EUROCARE-4 study.

    PubMed

    Gavin, A T; Francisci, S; Foschi, R; Donnelly, D W; Lemmens, V; Brenner, H; Anderson, L A

    2012-12-01

    Oesophageal cancer survival is poor with variation across Europe. No pan-European studies of survival differences by oesophageal cancer subtype exist. This study investigates rates and trends in oesophageal cancer survival across Europe. Data for primary malignant oesophageal cancer diagnosed in 1995-1999 and followed up to the end of 2003 was obtained from 66 cancer registries in 24 European countries. Relative survival was calculated using the Hakulinen approach. Staging data were available from 19 registries. Survival by region, gender, age, morphology and stage was investigated. Cohort analysis and the period approach were applied to investigate survival trends from 1988 to 2002 for 31 registries in 17 countries. In total 51,499 cases of oesophageal cancer diagnosed 1995-1999 were analysed. Overall, European 1- and 5-year survival rates were 33.4% (95% CI 32.9-33.9%) and 9.8% (95% CI 9.4-10.1%), respectively. Males, older patients and patients with late stage disease had poorer 1- and 5-year relative survival. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma had poorer 1-year relative survival. Regional variation in survival was observed with Central Europe above and Eastern Europe below the European pool. Survival for distant stage disease was similar across Europe while survival rates for localised disease were below the European pool in Eastern and Southern Europe. Improvement in European 1-year relative survival was reported (p=0.016). Oesophageal cancer survival was poor across Europe. Persistent regional variations in 1-year survival point to a need for a high resolution study of diagnostic and treatment practices of oesophageal cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-Term Survival and Risk of Second Cancers After Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Tatsuya; Kato, Shingo; Sato, Shinichiro; Fukuhisa, Kenjiro; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Arai, Tatsuo

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of second cancers after cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy for Asian populations. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 2,167 patients with cervical cancer undergoing radiotherapy between 1961 and 1986. Intracavitary brachytherapy was performed with high-dose rate source (82%) or low-dose rate source (12%). Relative risk (RR), absolute excess risk (AR), and cumulative risk of second cancer were calculated using the Japanese disease expectancy table. For 1,031 patients, the impact of smoking habit on the increasing risk of second cancer was also evaluated. Results: The total number of person-years of follow-up was 25,771, with 60 patients being lost to follow-up. Among the 2,167 patients, 1,063 (49%) survived more than 10 years. Second cancers were observed in 210 patients, representing a significant 1.2-fold risk (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.4) of developing second cancer compared with the general population, 1.6% excess risk per person per decade of follow-up, and elevating cumulative risk up to 23.8% (95% CI, 20.3-27.3) at 30 years after radiotherapy. The RR of second cancer was 1.6-fold for patients with the smoking habit and 1.4-fold for those without. Conclusions: Small but significant increased risk of second cancer was observed among Japanese women with cervical cancer mainly treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy. Considering the fact that about half of the patients survived more than 10 years, the benefit of radiotherapy outweighs the risk of developing second cancer.

  4. Survival of Stomach Cancer Cases in Khon Kaen, Thailand 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    Nanthanangkul, Sirinya; Suwanrungruang, Krittika; Wiangnon, Surapon; Promthet, Supannee

    2016-01-01

    Stomach cancer is an aggressive malignancy that is difficult to detect at an early stage and therefore is characterized by poor survival rates. Over the last two decades, there has been no report of gastric cancer survival in Khon Kaen province, Thailand. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to provide up-to-date information about the survival of gastric cancer patients in this province. Data from Khon Kaen population-based cancer registry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University were newly obtained on 650 patients who were diagnosed with stomach cancer during the period 1 January, 2000 to 31 December, 2012. These were then followed up until death or the end of the study (31 December 2014). We calculated the observed survival with the actuarial life table method, and relative survival, defined as the ratio of observed survival in the group of the stomach cancer patients to the expected survival in the entire Thai population from the estimated generation life tables for Thailand of five-year birth cohorts from 1900 - 2000. The 5 year observed and 5 year relative survival rates were 17.2 % (95% CI: 13.54-21.14) and 18.2 % (95% CI: 14.3-22.4), respectively. The highest 5 year relative survival rates were demonstrated among patients aged 45-65, with stage I or II lesions, with adenocarcinomas, with a body of stomach location, well differentiated and receiving surgery and/or chemotherapy. The observed and relative survival rates were close to each other. Our findings provide basic information beneficial to development of an effective treatment system and appropriately improved population-based cancer registration.

  5. Survival of mountain quail translocated from two distinct source populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troy, Ronald J.; Coates, Peter S.; Connelly, John W.; Gillette, Gifford; Delehanty, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Translocation of mountain quail (Oreortyx pictus) to restore viable populations to their former range has become a common practice. Because differences in post-release vital rates between animals from multiple source populations has not been well studied, wildlife and land managers may arbitrarily choose the source population or base the source population on immediate availability when planning translocation projects. Similarly, an understanding of the optimal proportion of individuals from different age and sex classes for translocation would benefit translocation planning. During 2006 and 2007, we captured and translocated 125 mountain quail from 2 ecologically distinct areas: 38 from southern California and 87 from southwestern Oregon. We released mountain quail in the Bennett Hills of south-central Idaho. We radio-marked and monitored a subsample of 58 quail and used them for a 2-part survival analysis. Cumulative survival probability was 0.23 ± 0.05 (SE) at 150 days post-release. We first examined an a priori hypothesis (model) that survival varied between the 2 distinct source populations. We found that source population did not explain variation in survival. This result suggests that wildlife managers have flexibility in selecting source populations for mountain quail translocation efforts. In a post hoc examination, we pooled the quail across source populations and evaluated differences in survival probabilities between sex and age classes. The most parsimonious model indicated that adult male survival was substantially less than survival rates of other mountain quail age and sex classes (i.e., interaction between sex and age). This result suggests that translocation success could benefit by translocating yearling males rather than adult males, perhaps because adult male breeding behavior results in vulnerability to predators

  6. Men and women show similar survival rates after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bender, Paulo Franscisco Mascarenhas; de Oliveira, Letícia Lima; Costa, Célia Regina; de Aguiar, Suzana Sales; Bergmann, Anke; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos

    2017-04-01

    To compare the disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates of men and women undergoing treatment for breast cancer. A retrospective cohort study of patients with breast cancer diagnosed and treated at the Cancer Hospital III of the National Cancer Institute of Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 1999 and 2013. Male breast cancer cases were matched for age, year of diagnosis, and clinical staging to three female cases (1:3). Patient characteristics were abstracted from hospital records and medical charts. Cases were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and comparisons between the genders were performed using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression analysis with 95% confidence intervals. The study population comprised 98 men and 294 women. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) between the genders for marital status, alcohol consumption, smoking, presence of hypertension and other comorbidities, histological type of tumor, expression of estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor-type 2, type of breast surgery, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, adjuvant radiotherapy, and use of palliative bisphosphonate therapy. Five- and 10-year DFS rates were, respectively, 80.0 and 51.4% for men and 71.4 and 63.5% for women (p = 0.245), and 5- and 10-year OS rates were, respectively, 65.0 and 47.5% for men and 56.5 and 41.4% for women (p = 0.221). There was no significant difference in prognosis (DFS and OS rates) between the genders, but significant differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were detected between male and female breast cancer cases.

  7. Cancer Survival: An Overview of Measures, Uses, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Noone, Anne-Michelle; Howlader, Nadia; Cho, Hyunsoon; Keel, Gretchen E.; Garshell, Jessica; Woloshin, Steven; Schwartz, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Survival statistics are of great interest to patients, clinicians, researchers, and policy makers. Although seemingly simple, survival can be confusing: there are many different survival measures with a plethora of names and statistical methods developed to answer different questions. This paper aims to describe and disseminate different survival measures and their interpretation in less technical language. In addition, we introduce templates to summarize cancer survival statistic organized by their specific purpose: research and policy versus prognosis and clinical decision making. PMID:25417231

  8. Childhood cancer survival in Switzerland (1976-2013): Time-trends and predictors.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Matthias; Belle, Fabiën N; Grotzer, Michael A; von der Weid, Nicolas X; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2017-01-01

    Population-based studies on childhood cancer survival are key to monitor progress against cancer and to detect potential differences between regions and other subgroups in the population. We investigated time trends and factors associated with childhood cancer survival on a national level in Switzerland, from 1976 to 2013. We extracted data from the population-based Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry of 5,776 children (age 0-14 years) diagnosed with cancer from 1985 to 2014 in Switzerland. We calculated age-adjusted 5-year survival, defined the annual reduction in risk of death (ARR), and explored associations of survival with clinical and demographic factors. Overall, 5-year survival improved significantly, from 64% in 1976-1983 to 88% in 2004-2013. ARR over the whole period was 4% for all diagnostic groups, greatest for Hodgkin lymphomas (8%), ependymomas (6%), Burkitt's lymphomas (6%) and germ cell tumours (6%). Children treated in hospitals without specialised paediatric cancer centre for leukaemia (HR 12.9), lymphoma (HR 5.0) and neuroblastoma (HR 3.7) were at higher risk of death. In French-speaking Switzerland, risk of death was lower for lymphoma (HR 0.6), CNS tumours (HR 0.7) and neuroblastoma (HR 0.5). Children with migration background had a higher risk of death from all tumours except bone tumours. Childhood cancer survival significantly improved from 1976 to 2013, but there is room for further improvement. Survival rates varied by type of clinical treatment, language region and nationality. All paediatric cancer patients should be referred to a specialised paediatric cancer centre. Further research is needed to intervene and completely eliminate inequalities in survival. © 2016 UICC.

  9. Improving Oral Cancer Survival: The Role of Dental Providers

    PubMed Central

    MESSADI, DIANA V.; WILDER-SMITH, PETRA; WOLINSKY, LAWRENCE

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer accounts for 2 percent to 4 percent of all cancers diagnosed each year in the United States. In contrast to other cancers, the overall U.S. survival rate from oral cancer has not improved during the past 50 years, mostly due to late-stage diagnosis. Several noninvasive oral cancer detection techniques that emerged in the past decade will be discussed, with a brief overview of most common oral cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:19998655

  10. Comparing multilevel and Bayesian spatial random effects survival models to assess geographical inequalities in colorectal cancer survival: a case study.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Paramita; Cramb, Susanna M; Aitken, Joanne F; Turrell, Gavin; Baade, Peter D

    2014-10-04

    Multilevel and spatial models are being increasingly used to obtain substantive information on area-level inequalities in cancer survival. Multilevel models assume independent geographical areas, whereas spatial models explicitly incorporate geographical correlation, often via a conditional autoregressive prior. However the relative merits of these methods for large population-based studies have not been explored. Using a case-study approach, we report on the implications of using multilevel and spatial survival models to study geographical inequalities in all-cause survival. Multilevel discrete-time and Bayesian spatial survival models were used to study geographical inequalities in all-cause survival for a population-based colorectal cancer cohort of 22,727 cases aged 20-84 years diagnosed during 1997-2007 from Queensland, Australia. Both approaches were viable on this large dataset, and produced similar estimates of the fixed effects. After adding area-level covariates, the between-area variability in survival using multilevel discrete-time models was no longer significant. Spatial inequalities in survival were also markedly reduced after adjusting for aggregated area-level covariates. Only the multilevel approach however, provided an estimation of the contribution of geographical variation to the total variation in survival between individual patients. With little difference observed between the two approaches in the estimation of fixed effects, multilevel models should be favored if there is a clear hierarchical data structure and measuring the independent impact of individual- and area-level effects on survival differences is of primary interest. Bayesian spatial analyses may be preferred if spatial correlation between areas is important and if the priority is to assess small-area variations in survival and map spatial patterns. Both approaches can be readily fitted to geographically enabled survival data from international settings.

  11. Impact of nutrition and exercise on cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Melinda L; Mayne, Susan T

    2008-01-01

    An increasing number of men and women are being diagnosed with cancer and many cancer survivors are seeking lifestyle-based approaches to improve survival. The American Cancer Society issued nutrition and physical activity recommendations for cancer survivors in 2006. This article discusses these guidelines, including more recent publications regarding obesity, exercise, diet, and nutrient supplement use in relation to cancer outcomes including survival. Observational data strongly indicate that obesity, weight gain, and physical inactivity are adverse prognostic factors, although data on diet or supplement use in relation to cancer survival are more limited and inconsistent. Randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in survivors are also very limited at present. Although there are major research gaps in the literature on nutrition and physical activity for cancer survivors, the available evidence to date suggests that physicians should be familiar with current guidelines and discuss them with their patients as an important strategy to improve long-term survival.

  12. Impaired Gastric Cancer Survival in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Loes H C; Assendorp, Eemke L; van der Post, Rachel S; Derikx, Lauranne A A P; de Jong, Dirk J; Kievit, Wietske; Pierik, Marieke; van den Heuvel, Tim; Verhoeven, Rob; Overbeek, Lucy I H; Hoentjen, Frank; Nagtegaal, Iris D

    2016-12-01

    Both chronic inflammation and reduced immunosurveillance contribute to malignancy development in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Previous literature suggests that especially Crohn's disease patients are at an increased risk for developing gastric cancer (GC). This study aimed to identify risk factors for GC development in IBD and to compare the clinical characteristics of GC in IBD to those in the general population. We retrospectively searched the Dutch Pathology Database to identify all Dutch IBD patients with GC between January 2004 and December 2008. Two case-control studies were performed. I: to identify risk factors for GC in IBD, with controls from the IBD South Limburg (IBDSL) population-based cohort; and II: to compare GC disease course in IBD patients with the general population. General population data were obtained from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry (ECR). We included 59 patients with IBD and GC (cases). Cases were significantly older at IBD diagnosis than IBDSL controls (median age 61 years versus 40; p<0.01), and ulcerative colitis (UC) was more frequent in the case group (69.5% versus 51.4%; p<0.01). We found no difference in age at diagnosis, gender, tumor location and tumor differentiation between IBD GC patients and ECR controls. When corrected for confounders and TNM-stage, IBD patients showed impaired survival (p=0.035; HR 1.385). Survival is significantly reduced in IBD patients compared to the general population in the multivariate analysis of our study, but age at GC diagnosis and TNM-stage were comparable between IBD cases and controls. Elderly onset IBD emerged as a risk factor for GC development in IBD patients, particularly in UC.

  13. Estimating the loss in expectation of life due to cancer using flexible parametric survival models.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Therese M-L; Dickman, Paul W; Eloranta, Sandra; Lambe, Mats; Lambert, Paul C

    2013-12-30

    A useful summary measure for survival data is the expectation of life, which is calculated by obtaining the area under a survival curve. The loss in expectation of life due to a certain type of cancer is the difference between the expectation of life in the general population and the expectation of life among the cancer patients. This measure is used little in practice as its estimation generally requires extrapolation of both the expected and observed survival. A parametric distribution can be used for extrapolation of the observed survival, but it is difficult to find a distribution that captures the underlying shape of the survival function after the end of follow-up. In this paper, we base our extrapolation on relative survival, because it is more stable and reliable. Relative survival is defined as the observed survival divided by the expected survival, and the mortality analogue is excess mortality. Approaches have been suggested for extrapolation of relative survival within life-table data, by assuming that the excess mortality has reached zero (statistical cure) or has stabilized to a constant. We propose the use of flexible parametric survival models for relative survival, which enables estimating the loss in expectation of life on individual level data by making these assumptions or by extrapolating the estimated linear trend at the end of follow-up. We have evaluated the extrapolation from this model using data on four types of cancer, and the results agree well with observed data.

  14. When do I know I am cured? Using conditional estimates to provide better information about cancer survival prospects.

    PubMed

    Baade, Peter D; Youlden, Danny R; Chambers, Suzanne K

    2011-01-17

    To report the latest conditional survival estimates for patients with cancer in Queensland, Australia. Descriptive study of state-wide population-based data from the Queensland Cancer Registry on patients aged 15-89 years who were diagnosed with invasive cancer between 1982 and 2007. Conditional 5-year relative survival for the 13 most common types of invasive cancer, and all cancers combined. The prognosis for patients with cancer generally improves with each additional year that they survive. A significant excess in mortality compared with the general population ceases to occur within 10 years after diagnosis for survivors of stomach, colorectal, cervical and thyroid cancer and melanoma, with these groups having a conditional 5-year relative survival of at least 95% after 10 years. For the remaining cancers we studied (pancreatic, lung, breast, prostate, kidney, and bladder cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and leukaemia), conditional 5-year relative survival estimates (at 10 years after diagnosis) ranged from 82% to 94%, suggesting that patients in these cohorts continue to have poorer survival compared with the age-matched general population. Estimates of conditional survival have the potential to provide useful information for cancer clinicians, patients and their carers as they are confronted by personal and surveillance-related decisions. This knowledge may be effective in building realistic hope and helping people manage uncertainty about the future. We suggest that measures of conditional survival be incorporated into routine statistical reporting in Australia.

  15. Prediagnostic alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer survival: The Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Amanda I; Robinson, Jamaica R; Campbell, Peter T; Win, Aung Ko; Figueiredo, Jane C; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A

    2017-05-15

    Although previous studies have noted an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) among moderate to heavy alcohol consumers in comparison with nondrinkers, the relation between alcohol consumption and CRC survival remains unclear. Cases of incident invasive CRC diagnosed between 1997 and 2007 were identified via population-based cancer registries at 4 study sites in the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Study participants completed a risk-factor questionnaire on prediagnostic behaviors, including wine, beer, and liquor consumption, at the baseline. Prospective follow-up for survival was conducted for 4966 CRC cases. Cox regression was used to compare nondrinkers with individuals who consumed, on average, 1 or more servings of alcohol per day in the years preceding their CRC diagnosis with respect to overall and disease-specific survival. Separate analyses by beverage type, stratified by patient and tumor attributes, were also performed. All models were adjusted for the age at diagnosis, sex, study site, year of diagnosis, smoking history, body mass index, and education. Prediagnostic beer and liquor consumption was not associated with CRC survival; however, higher levels of wine consumption were modestly associated with a better prognosis overall (CRC-specific hazard ratio [HR], 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-1.03; overall HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94). Similar patterns were noted in stratified analyses. These findings suggest that prediagnostic wine consumption is modestly associated with more favorable survival after CRC. Cancer 2017;123:1035-43. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  16. Association of sugary beverages with survival among patients with cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Miles, Fayth L; Chang, Shen-Chih; Morgenstern, Hal; Tashkin, Donald; Rao, Jian-Yu; Cozen, Wendy; Mack, Thomas; Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2016-11-01

    The role of consumption of added sugars in cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) is unclear. We examined associations between sugary beverages and susceptibility to UADT cancer as well as overall survival among UADT cancer patients. The association between dietary added sugar and susceptibility to UADT cancers or overall survival among 601 UADT cancer cases was evaluated using data from a population-based case-control study conducted in Los Angeles County. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for cancer susceptibility, and Cox regression was used to estimate hazards ratios (HRs) with 95 % CIs for survival, adjusting for relevant confounders. A total of 248 deaths were observed during follow-up (median 12.1 years). A positive association was observed with consumption of grams of sugar from beverages, including soft drinks and fruit juices, and poorer survival among UADT cancer cases (aHR, Q4 vs. Q1:1.88; 95 % CI 1.29, 2.72; p for trend = 0.002), as well as servings of sugary beverages (aHR, Q4 vs. Q1: 95 % CI 1.97, 95 % CI 1.32-2.93). This was due largely to consumption of sugars from soft drinks. Particularly, high consumption of sugary beverages was associated with poorer survival among esophageal cancer cases, driven by squamous cancers. No association was observed between sugary beverages and cancer susceptibility. These findings suggest that consumption of sugary beverages may decrease survival associated with UADT cancers. Additional studies should be conducted to examine survival among cancer patients consuming high amounts of added or refined sugars. Such studies may highlight prognostic factors for UADT cancers.

  17. Lung cancer survival in Norway, 1997-2011: from nihilism to optimism.

    PubMed

    Nilssen, Yngvar; Strand, Trond Eirik; Fjellbirkeland, Lars; Bartnes, Kristian; Møller, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    We examine changes in survival and patient-, tumour- and treatment-related factors among resected and nonresected lung cancer patients, and identify subgroups with the largest and smallest survival improvements.National population-based data from the Cancer Registry of Norway, Statistics Norway and the Norwegian Patient Register were linked for lung cancer patients diagnosed during 1997-2011. The 1- and 5-year relative survival were estimated, and Cox proportional hazard regression, adjusted for selected patient characteristics, was used to assess prognostic factors for survival in lung cancer patients overall and stratified by resection status.We identified 34 157 patients with lung cancer. The proportion of histological diagnoses accompanied by molecular genetics testing increased from 0% to 26%, while those accompanied by immunohistochemistry increased from 8% to 26%. The 1-year relative survival among nonresected and resected patients increased from 21.7% to 34.2% and 75.4% to 91.5%, respectively. The improved survival remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, stage and histology. The largest improvements in survival occurred among resected and adenocarcinoma patients, while patients ≥80 years experienced the smallest increase.Lung cancer survival has increased considerably in Norway. The explanation is probably multifactorial, including improved attitude towards diagnostic work-up and treatment, and more accurate diagnostic testing that allows for improved selection for resection and improved treatment options.

  18. Life tables for world-wide comparison of relative survival for cancer (CONCORD study).

    PubMed

    Baili, Paolo; Micheli, Andrea; De Angelis, Roberta; Weir, Hannah K; Francisci, Silvia; Santaquilani, Mariano; Hakulinen, Timo; Quaresmas, Manuela; Coleman, Michel P

    2008-01-01

    The CONCORD study compares population-based relative survival from cancer using data from cancer registries in five continents. To estimate relative survival, general mortality life tables are required. Available statistics are incomplete, so various approaches are used to construct complete life tables. This article outlines how the life tables were constructed for CONCORD; it compares life expectancy at birth between 101 populations covered by cancer registries in 31 countries and compares the impact of two approaches to the deployment of life tables in relative survival analysis. The CONCORD approach, using specific mathematical methods, produced complete (single-year-of-age) life tables by sex, cancer registry area, calendar year (1990-1999) and race (only in the USA). In order to study the impact of different approaches, we compared relative survival in the USA using the US national life table, centered on the relevant census years, and the CONCORD approach. We estimated relative survival in each American participating cancer registry for patients diagnosed with breast (women), colorectal or prostate cancer during 1990-1994 and followed up to 1999. Average life expectancy at birth during 1990-1999 varied in CONCORD cancer registry areas from 64 to 78 years in males and from 71 to 84 years in females. It increased during the 1990s more in men than in women. In the USA, it was lower in blacks than in whites. Relative survival in American populations was lower with the CONCORD approach, which incorporates trends and geographic variation in background mortality, than with the USA census life tables. International variation in background mortality by geographic area, calendar time, race, age and sex is wide. We suggest that in international comparisons of cancer relative survival, complete life tables that are specific for cancer registry area, calendar year and race should be used.

  19. FACTORS AFFECTING SURVIVAL OF WOMEN DIAGNOSED WITH BREAST CANCER IN GEORGIA.

    PubMed

    Vashakidze, N; Mebonia, N; Kereselidze, M; Zhizhilashvili, S

    2017-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women worldwide with nearly 2.4 million new cases diagnosed in 2015, In Georgia survival from breast cancer is lower than in many developing countries. The goal of the study was to identify predictors for low survival of disease in the country. Data from population-based cancer registry was used in order to estimate 1-year and 5-years relative survival rates for breast cancer. To identify predictors for low survival time, was performed bivariate analysis. Statistical analyses looked at correlations between possible predictors and survival period. From the cancer registry database 190 breast cancer cases, whose diagnosis were conformed histologically and died in 2015 were included in a statistical analysis. All analyses were performed using Epi Info version 7. According to population-based cancer registry, breast cancer is the most common form of  cancer among women in Georgia. In 2015 1838 breast cancer new cases were detected in the country, incidence rate composed 94.7 per 100000 population. Based on 190 breast cancer patients' data, that died during 2015, one-year and 5-year survival rate composed 69% and 26% in accordance. The results of bivariate analysis, show that late stage at diagnosis (OR=1.89, 95%CI=0.74-4.68), a young age of patients at diagnosis (OR=1.89, 95%CI=0.50-7.17), highly differentiated histological grade (OR=1.21, 95%CI= 0.44 - 3.54), is positively correlated with low survival period (less than 5 years), while having mastectomy (OR=0.52, 95%CI=0.27-0.89), adjuvant chemotherapy (OR=0.38, 95%CI=0.20-0.74), and a radiotherapy (OR=0.62, 95%CI=0.31-1.25), have statistically significant positive association with high (more than 5 years), survival period. A young age of patients at diagnosis, highly differentiated histological grade and late stage at diagnosis were possible predictors for low survival time (less than 5 years) in Georgia. Breast cancer survival can be extended by using

  20. Site-specific associations between miRNA expression and survival in colorectal cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Pellatt, Daniel F.; Mullany, Lila E.; Stevens, John R.; Wolff, Erica; Hoffman, Michael D.; Wolff, Roger K.; Samowitz, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small non-coding RNA involved in cellular processes, including cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Thus, miRNA expression may alter survival after diagnosis with colorectal cancer (CRC). Results Individuals diagnosed with stage 1 or stage 2 rectal cancer had worse survival than colon cancer cases diagnosed at stage 1 or stage 2. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, no miRNAs were significantly associated with disease stage. Two miRNAs infrequently expressed in the population and not previously reported were associated with survival after diagnosis with colon cancer (miR-1 HR 2.17 95% CI 1.41, 3.36; and miR-101-3p HR 3.51 95% CI 1.72, 7.15). Among those diagnosed with rectal cancer, 201 miRNAs were associated with survival when the FDR q value was < 0.05. Assessment of 105 previously reported miRNAs associated with prognosis showed that four miRNAs influenced colon cancer survival and 17 influenced survival after a diagnosis with rectal cancer when raw p values were considered. Patients and Methods This study includes data from population-based studies of CRC conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. A total of 1893 carcinoma and normal paired colorectal mucosa tissue samples were run using the Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V19.0. We assessed miRNA differential expression between paired carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa tissue with CRC- specific survival evaluating stage and site-specific associations after adjusting for age, sex, microsatellite instability tumor status, and AJCC stage. Conclusions MiRNAs dysregulated for both colon and rectal cancer had a greater impact on survival after a diagnosis with rectal cancer. PMID:27517623

  1. Recurrence season impacts the survival of epithelial ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Hui; Man, Ya-Nan; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Several studies indicated that the diagnosis season affects the prognosis of some cancers, such as examples in the prostate, colon and breast This retrospective study aimed to investigate whether the diagnosis and recurrent season impacts the prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer patients. From January 2005 to August 2010, 161 epithelial ovarian cancer patients were analyzed and followed up until August 2013. Kaplan- Meier survival curves and the log-rank test were used to make the survival analysis. Multivariate analysis was conducted to identify independent prognostic factors. The prognostic factors of overall survival in epithelial ovarian cancer patients included age, clinical stage, pathological type, histological grade, residual disease after primary surgery, recurrent season and adjuvant chemotherapy cycles. Moreover, clinical stage, histological grade, residual disease after primary surgery, recurrent season and adjuvant chemotherapy cycles also impacted the progression-free survival of epithelial ovarian cancer patients. The diagnosis season did not have a significantly relationship with the survival of operable epithelial ovarian cancer patients. Median overall survival of patients with recurrent month from April to November was 47 months, which was longer (P < 0.001) than that of patients with recurrence month from December to March (19 months). Median progression-free survival of patients with recurrence month from April to November and December to March was 20 and 8 months, respectively (P < 0.001). The recurrence season impacts the survival of epithelial ovarian cancer patients. However, the diagnosed season does not appear to exert a significant influence.

  2. Pathobiology of breast cancer: hypothesis of biological predetermination and long-term survival.

    PubMed

    Vorherr, H

    1981-08-03

    Th pathobiology of breast cancer is complex: clinically "early" breast cancer may be tumor biologically "late" progressing rapidly toward death. Accordingly, it has been suggested that two different breast cancer populations (slow tumor growth and long survival-fast tumor growth and short survival) exist, which cannot be identified by pathohistological criteria. However, these "populations" are most likely either patients with localized disease and occult metastases (long survival) or with diagnosable regional and occult or overt systemic spread (short survival). Since even small tumors (0.1 to 0.3 cm in diameter) can spread systemically, in most patients breast cancer upon clinical diagnosis may be considered an inevitably lethal disease. Present treatment modalities can only improve the quality of life and delay death, even though the overall long-term survival rates of breast cancer are better or at least equal to those of other cancers. However, with other cancers (Table 2) it is decided within the first 5 years which patients are cured because the survival rates for 5, 10, 15, and 20 years are similar. In contrast, survival rates of patients with breast cancer steadily decline and there is no point in time when patients can feel really safe; this is indicative of a peculiar tumor pathobiology of this disease, the nature of which remains to be investigated. Progress in the fight against breast cancer is only possible by application of sensitive physical, reliable immunological, and specific biochemical methods for early diagnosis and development of efficient therapeutic modalities for inhibition of growth or complete eradication of metastasized cancer cells.

  3. Incidence and survival of childhood cancer cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2000 in Hiroshima City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Hiromi; Nishi, Nobuo; Kuwabara, Masao; Ninomiya, Motoki; Arita, Ken-ichi; Yasui, Wataru; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Kodama, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    There have been few studies on cancer incidence and survival among children in Japan. Childhood cancer cases in Hiroshima City can be ascertained almost perfectly in terms of completeness and validity as both a population-based cancer registry and a tissue registry cover the whole area. We report here recent incidence and survival of childhood cancer in Hiroshima City. Subjects were cancer patients less than 15 years of age in Hiroshima City registered in the Hiroshima City Cancer Registry and/or the Hiroshima Prefecture Tumor Registry (tissue registry) between 1998 and 2000. Cancer incidence in Hiroshima City was calculated for 12 diagnostic groups according to the International Classification of Childhood Cancer, and compared with general incidence in Japan. Five-year survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. There were 63 children who had a cancer newly diagnosed during 1998-2000, with only one death-certificate-only case (1.6%). Age-standardized incidence rates (per million) were 144.3 for boys and 93.9 for girls. Leukemia was the most frequent (29%) among the 12 diagnostic groups. There were 13 cancer deaths during this period and five-year survival was 79% (95% Confidence Interval: 67%-87%). Childhood cancer incidence was slightly higher than that for all of Japan, but the relative distribution of patients by diagnostic group was compatible with the general pattern. Both of these observations might be due to the high quality of the tumor and tissue registries.

  4. Personality and cancer survival: the Miyagi cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, N; Tsubono, Y; Nishino, Y; Hosokawa, T; Fukudo, S; Shibuya, D; Akizuki, N; Yoshikawa, E; Kobayakawa, M; Fujimori, M; Saito-Nakaya, K; Uchitomi, Y; Tsuji, I

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that personality plays a role in cancer outcome in a population-based prospective cohort study in Japan. In July 1990, 41 442 residents of Japan completed a short form of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised and a questionnaire on various health habits, and between January 1993 and December 1997, 890 incident cases of cancer were identified among them. These 890 cases were followed up until March 2001, and a total of 356 deaths from all causes was identified among them. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of death according to four score levels on each of four personality subscales (extraversion, neuroticism, psychoticism, and lie), with adjustment for potential confounding factors. Multivariable HRs of deaths from all causes for individuals in the highest score level on each personality subscale compared with those at the lowest level were 1.0 for extraversion (95% CI=0.8–1.4; Trend P=0.73), 1.1 for neuroticism (0.8–1.6; Trend P=0.24), 1.2 for psychoticism (0.9–1.6; Trend P=0.29), and 1.0 for lie (0.7–1.5; Trend P=0.90). The data obtained in this population-based prospective cohort study in Japan do not support the hypothesis that personality is associated with cancer survival. PMID:15900301

  5. Cancer survival in New Zealand: ethnic, social and geographical inequalities.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Robin; Pearce, Jamie; Barnett, Ross

    2008-09-01

    This study investigated the combined effects of ethnicity, deprivation and geographical access to health services on the likelihood of survival from a range of common cancers in New Zealand. Individual cancer registry records of 99,062 cases of melanoma, colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancers diagnosed in the period 1994-2004 were supplemented with small area information on social deprivation and estimates of travel time to the nearest primary care and cancer centre. Logistic regression was used to identify the variables associated with advanced extent of the disease at diagnosis. Adverse influences on survival were investigated using Cox proportional hazards models. Controlling for age and gender, Māori and Pacific peoples' ethnicity was strongly associated with poorer survival, partly because ethnicity was also linked to the likelihood of advanced disease at diagnosis. Living in a deprived area was related to later stage presentation and poorer survival of people with melanoma, but there was no other evidence that living in a deprived area or in a remote location were associated with later stage presentation. Some disease-specific trends in survival were observed. Colorectal and lung cancers were more likely to be fatal for people living in deprived areas, survival from prostate cancer was poor for men living remote from primary care, and people with colorectal, breast and prostate cancers had adverse survival chances if they lived distant from a cancer centre.

  6. Trends in 5-year survival rates among breast cancer patients by hormone receptor status and stage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Linden, Hannah M.; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Li, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Improvement in breast cancer survival has been observed in recent decades in the U.S., but it is unclear if similar survival gains are consistent across breast cancer subtypes, especially with regards to more advanced stages of the disease. Methods Data were from 13 population-based cancer registries participating in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program, consisting of women between 20–79 years of age diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 1992 and 2008. 2-year (1992–2008) and 5-year (1992–2006) breast cancer cause-specific survival rates were calculated and stratified by estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) status, stage and race. Annual percent changes in survival rates were assessed. Results From 1992 through 1998–1999, 5-year and 2-year cause specific survival rates significantly improved across ER+/PR+, ER−/PR− and ER+/PR− subtypes, with an annual increase ranging from 0.5%–1.0%. From 1998–1999 to 2006, different patterns were observed by ER/PR subtypes with survival rates slightly improving for ER+/PR+, continuing to improve at a rate of 0.5% per year for ER−/PR−, and dropping 0.3% annually for ER+/PR− No significant survival gains were experienced by patients with ER−/PR+ cancer during the study period. In terms of advanced diseases, greatest annual increases in survival rates were seen for patients with stage III–IV ER+/PR+ and ER−/PR− tumors but less progress was observed for advanced ER+/PR− breast cancers. Conclusion Steady improvements in survival rates for breast cancer have been achieved over the past several decades. However, 5-year survival rates for stage IV disease remained dismally below 20% for most ER/PR subtypes. PMID:25164974

  7. Socioeconomic deprivation and cancer survival in Germany: an ecological analysis in 200 districts in Germany.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lina; Eberle, Andrea; Emrich, Katharina; Gondos, Adam; Holleczek, Bernd; Kajüter, Hiltraud; Maier, Werner; Nennecke, Alice; Pritzkuleit, Ron; Brenner, Hermann

    2014-06-15

    Although socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival have been demonstrated both within and between countries, evidence on the variation of the inequalities over time past diagnosis is sparse. Furthermore, no comprehensive analysis of socioeconomic differences in cancer survival in Germany has been conducted. Therefore, we analyzed variations in cancer survival for patients diagnosed with one of the 25 most common cancer sites in 1997-2006 in ten population-based cancer registries in Germany (covering 32 million inhabitants). Patients were assigned a socioeconomic status according to the district of residence at diagnosis. Period analysis was used to derive 3-month, 5-year and conditional 1-year and 5-year age-standardized relative survival for 2002-2006 for each deprivation quintile in Germany. Relative survival of patients living in the most deprived district was compared to survival of patients living in all other districts by model-based period analysis. For 21 of 25 cancer sites, 5-year relative survival was lower in the most deprived districts than in all other districts combined. The median relative excess risk of death over the 25 cancer sites decreased from 1.24 in the first 3 months to 1.16 in the following 9 months to 1.08 in the following 4 years. Inequalities persisted after adjustment for stage. These major regional socioeconomic inequalities indicate a potential for improving cancer care and survival in Germany. Studies on individual-level patient data with access to treatment information should be conducted to examine the reasons for these socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival in more detail. © 2013 UICC.

  8. Multimorbidity and survival in older persons with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gross, Cary P; Guo, Zhenchao; McAvay, Gail J; Allore, Heather G; Young, Mary; Tinetti, Mary E

    2006-12-01

    To ascertain the effect of common chronic conditions on mortality in older persons with colorectal cancer. Retrospective cohort study. Population-based cancer registry. Patients in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare linked database who were aged 67 and older and had a primary diagnosis of Stage 1 to 3 colorectal cancer during 1993 through 1999. Chronic conditions were identified using claims data, and vital status was determined from the Medicare enrollment files. After estimating the adjusted hazard ratios for mortality associated with each condition using a Cox model, the population attributable risk (PAR) was calculated for the full sample and by age subgroup. The study sample consisted of 29,733 patients, 88% of whom were white and 55% were female. Approximately 9% of deaths were attributable to congestive heart failure (CHF; PAR = 9.4%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 8.4-10.5%), more than 5% were attributable to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; PAR = 5.3%, 95% CI = 4.7-6.6%), and nearly 4% were attributable to diabetes mellitus (PAR = 3.9%, 95% CI = 3.1-4.8%). The PAR associated with CHF increased with age, from 6.3% (95% CI = 4.4-8.8%) in patients aged 67 to 70 to 14.5% (95% CI = 12.0-17.5%) in patients aged 81 to 85. Multiple conditions were common. More than half of the patients who had CHF also had diabetes mellitus or COPD. The PAR associated with CHF alone (4.29%, 95% CI = 3.68-4.94%) was similar to the PAR for CHF in combination with diabetes mellitus (3.08, 95% CI = 2.60-3.61%) or COPD (3.93, 95% CI = 3.41-4.54%). A substantial proportion of deaths in older persons with colorectal cancer can be attributed to CHF, diabetes mellitus, and COPD. Multimorbidity is common and exerts a substantial effect on colorectal cancer survival.

  9. Improving survival after endometrial cancer: the big picture.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Janice S

    2015-07-01

    To improve survival in women with endometrial cancer, we need to look at the "big picture" beyond initial treatment. Although the majority of women will be diagnosed with early stage disease and are cured with surgery alone, there is a subgroup of women with advanced and high-risk early stage disease whose life expectancy may be prolonged with the addition of chemotherapy. Immunohistochemistry will help to identify those women with Lynch syndrome who will benefit from more frequent colorectal cancer surveillance and genetic counseling. If they happen to be diagnosed with colorectal cancer, this information has an important therapeutic implication. And finally, because the majority of women will survive their diagnosis of endometrial cancer, they remain at risk for breast and colorectal cancer, so these women should be counselled about screening for these cancers. These three interventions will contribute to improving the overall survival of women with endometrial cancer.

  10. Population demographics, survival, and reporduction: Alaska sea otter research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monson, D.H.; Bodkin, James L.; Doak, D.F.; Estes, J.A.; Tinker, M.T.; Siniff, D.B.; Maldini, Daniela; Calkins, Donald; Atkinson, Shannon; Meehan, Rosa

    2004-01-01

    The fundamental force behind population change is the balance between age-specific survival and reproductive rates. Thus, understanding population demographics is crucial when trying to interpret trends in population change over time. For many species, demographic rates change as the population’s status (i.e., relative to prey resources) varies. Indices of body condition indicative of individual energy reserves can be a useful gauge of population status. Integrated studies designed to measure (1) population trends; (2) current population status; and (3) demographic rates will provide the most complete picture of the factors driving observed population changes. In particular, estimates of age specific survival and reproduction in conjunction with measures of population change can be integrated into population matrix models useful in explaining observed trends. We focus here on the methods used to measure demographic rates in sea otters, and note the importance of comparable methods between studies. Next, we review the current knowledge of the influence of population status on demographic parameters. We end with examples of the power of matrix modeling as a tool to integrate various types of demographic information for detecting otherwise hard to detect changes in demographic parameters.

  11. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  12. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  13. Association between overall environmental quality and lung cancer survival

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung cancer remains one of the most prevalent and lethal cancers in the United States. Individual environmental exposures have been associated with lung cancer incidence. However, the impact of cumulative environmental exposures on survival is not well understood. To address this...

  14. Survival rate after emergency diagnosis of cancer is 'shocking'.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    ONE QUARTER of patients diagnosed with cancer after attending a London emergency department will die within two months, latest research suggests. Study author Kathy Pritchard-Jones, chief medical officer for London Cancer, said the 'shocking figures' confirm that early diagnosis makes a huge difference to the chances of surviving cancer.

  15. Colorectal Cancer in Jordan: Survival Rate and Its Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    Arqoub, Kamal H.; Tarawneh, Mohammad R.; Al-zaghal, Marwan J.; Subih, Hadil S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the survival rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) and determine its predictors among Jordanian patients who were diagnosed in the period of 2005–2010. Methods. This study was based on Jordan cancer registry. All CRC cases that were registered in cancer registry during 2005–2010 were analyzed using the survival analysis. The last date for follow-up was 1st Oct 2016. Results. A total of 3005 patients with CRC were registered during 2005–2010. The overall 5-year and 10-year survival rates for patients with CRC were 58.2% and 51.8%, respectively. The 5-year survival rate decreased significantly from 60.4% for the age <50 years to 49.3% for the age ≥70 years (p < 0.005). The 5-year survival rate was 72.1% for the localized stage, 53.8% for the regional stage, and 22.6% for the distant metastasis. In the multivariate analysis, the only factors that were significantly associated with survival were age, grade, stage, and location of tumor. Conclusions. The overall 5-year and ten-year survival rates for CRC were 58.2% and 51.8%, respectively. Increased age, poor differentiation, advanced cancer stage, and right-sided cancers were associated with lower survival rates. Screening strategies are needed for early detection of colon adenomas and colorectal cancer in Jordan. PMID:28458690

  16. Cancer survival in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, R

    2011-01-01

    The dearth of reliable survival statistics from developing countries was very evident until the mid-1990s. This prompted the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) to undertake a project that facilitated hands-on-training and thereby transfer of knowledge and technology on cancer survival analysis to a majority of researchers from the participating population-based cancer registries, which culminated in the publication of the first volume of the IARC scientific publication on Cancer Survival in Developing Countries in 1998. The present study is the second in the series with wider geographical coverage and is based on data from 27 registries in 14 countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America. The calendar period of registration of incident cases for the present study ranges between 1990 and 2001. Data on 564 606 cases of 1-56 cancer sites from different registries are reported. Data from eleven registries were utilized for eliciting survival trend and seventeen registries for reporting survival by clinical extent of disease. Besides chapters on every registry and general chapters on methodology, database and overview, the availability of online comparative statistics on cancer survival data by participating registries or cancer site in the form of tables or graphs is an added feature (available online at http://survcan.iarc.fr).

  17. Indirect economic effects of long-term breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Chirikos, Thomas N; Russell-Jacobs, Anita; Cantor, Alan B

    2002-01-01

    The indirect morbidity/disability costs of breast cancer may be rising as a consequence of the growth in the population of long-term survivors. This study was conducted to test whether women who have survived breast cancer for at least 5 years experience long-lasting or continuing economic consequences that are attributable to their disease. A group of 105 women who initially had been treated for breast cancer approximately 5 years before were interviewed to obtain data on economic, demographic, and health changes in the period since diagnosis. An age-matched and work-matched group of 105 women without cancer also was interviewed to obtain the same data for the same time period. Key changes in the economic position of subjects and their families were measured, including changes in work effort, pay rates, and annual earnings of working women and changes in household earnings, income, and assets of all women. These preliminary empirical findings suggest that breast cancer exacts an economic toll from long-term survivors. In particular, survivors who were working at the time of their diagnosis experienced significantly larger reductions in annual market earnings over the 5-year study period than did working control subjects. These losses appear to arise mostly from reduced work effort, not changes in pay rates. Also, changes in total household earnings were lower for survivors, suggesting the presence of family adjustments to the disease. However, no significant differences were detected between the groups in changes in total income or assets over the study period. Clinicians and policy makers must seek ways to minimize the indirect economic losses that are attributable to breast cancer.

  18. Clinical features and overall survival among elderly cancer patients in a tertiary cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Bugano, Diogo Diniz Gomes; del Giglio, Auro; Kaliks, Rafael Aliosha; Karnakis, Theodora; Pontes, Lucíola de Barros

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the epidemiological profile and overall survival of a large population of elderly individuals diagnosed with solid tumors in a tertiary hospital. Methods This retrospective study included patients aged >65 years, diagnosed with solid tumors between January 2007 and December 2011, at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil. The medical records were reviewed to obtain information about clinical variables and overall survival. Results A total of 806 patients were identified, and 58.4% were male. Mean age was 74 years (65 to 99 years). The most common types were prostate (22%), colorectal (21%), breast (19%), and lung cancer (13%), followed by bladder (8%), pancreas (6%), and other types (11%). The majority of patients were diagnosed at early stage disease. After a median follow-up of 27 months (15 to 45 months), 29% of the patients (234/806) died, predominantly in the group older than 70 years. For the entire cohort, the median 2-year survival rate was 71%. Median overall survival was not reached within the study period. In a multivariate analysis, age (HR: 1.35; 95%CI: 1.25-1.45; p<0.001) and disease stage (HR: 1.93; 95%CI: 1.75-2.14; p<0.001) were independent negative predictors of poor survival. Conclusion The most prevalent tumors were prostate, colorectal, breast, and lung cancer, with the larger proportion diagnosed at initial stages, reflecting the great number of patients alive at last follow-up. PMID:26676269

  19. Landmark risk prediction of residual life for breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Parast, Layla; Cai, Tianxi

    2013-09-10

    The importance of developing personalized risk prediction estimates has become increasingly evident in recent years. In general, patient populations may be heterogenous and represent a mixture of different unknown subtypes of disease. When the source of this heterogeneity and resulting subtypes of disease are unknown, accurate prediction of survival may be difficult. However, in certain disease settings, the onset time of an observable short-term event may be highly associated with these unknown subtypes of disease and thus may be useful in predicting long-term survival. One approach to incorporate short-term event information along with baseline markers for the prediction of long-term survival is through a landmark Cox model, which assumes a proportional hazards model for the residual life at a given landmark point. In this paper, we use this modeling framework to develop procedures to assess how a patient's long-term survival trajectory may change over time given good short-term outcome indications along with prognosis on the basis of baseline markers. We first propose time-varying accuracy measures to quantify the predictive performance of landmark prediction rules for residual life and provide resampling-based procedures to make inference about such accuracy measures. Simulation studies show that the proposed procedures perform well in finite samples. Throughout, we illustrate our proposed procedures by using a breast cancer dataset with information on time to metastasis and time to death. In addition to baseline clinical markers available for each patient, a chromosome instability genetic score, denoted by CIN25, is also available for each patient and has been shown to be predictive of survival for various types of cancer. We provide procedures to evaluate the incremental value of CIN25 for the prediction of residual life and examine how the residual life profile changes over time. This allows us to identify an informative landmark point, t(0) , such that

  20. Health effects of air pollution on length of respiratory cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Air pollution has been extensively and consistently linked with mortality. However, no study has investigated the health effects of air pollution on length of survival among diagnosed respiratory cancer patients. Methods In this study, we conducted a population-based study to investigate if air pollution exposure has adverse effects on survival time of respiratory cancer cases in Los Angeles (LA), CA and Honolulu, HI. We selected all White respiratory cancer patients in the two study areas from the 1992–2008 Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results cancer data. Death from respiratory cancer and length of survival were the main outcomes. Results Kaplan-Meier survival analysis shows that all respiratory cancer cases exposed to high air pollution referring to the individuals from LA had a significantly shorter survival time than the low pollution exposure group referring to those from Honolulu without adjusting for other covariates (p <0.0001). Moreover, the results from the Cox Proportional-Hazards models suggest that exposure to particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter (PM10) was associated with an increased risk of cancer death (HR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.44-1.52 per 10 μg/m3 increase in PM10) after adjusting for demographic factors and cancer characteristics. Similar results were observed for particles less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter and ozone. Conclusion Our study indicates that air pollution may have deleterious effects on the length of survival among White respiratory cancer patients. This study calls for attention to preventive effort from air pollution for this susceptible population in standard cancer patient care. The findings from this study warrant further investigation. PMID:24004483

  1. Health effects of air pollution on length of respiratory cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohui; Ha, Sandie; Kan, Haidong; Hu, Hui; Curbow, Barbara A; Lissaker, Claudia T K

    2013-09-03

    Air pollution has been extensively and consistently linked with mortality. However, no study has investigated the health effects of air pollution on length of survival among diagnosed respiratory cancer patients. In this study, we conducted a population-based study to investigate if air pollution exposure has adverse effects on survival time of respiratory cancer cases in Los Angeles (LA), CA and Honolulu, HI. We selected all White respiratory cancer patients in the two study areas from the 1992-2008 Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results cancer data. Death from respiratory cancer and length of survival were the main outcomes. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis shows that all respiratory cancer cases exposed to high air pollution referring to the individuals from LA had a significantly shorter survival time than the low pollution exposure group referring to those from Honolulu without adjusting for other covariates (p <0.0001). Moreover, the results from the Cox Proportional-Hazards models suggest that exposure to particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter (PM10) was associated with an increased risk of cancer death (HR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.44-1.52 per 10 μg/m3 increase in PM10) after adjusting for demographic factors and cancer characteristics. Similar results were observed for particles less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter and ozone. Our study indicates that air pollution may have deleterious effects on the length of survival among White respiratory cancer patients. This study calls for attention to preventive effort from air pollution for this susceptible population in standard cancer patient care. The findings from this study warrant further investigation.

  2. A cohort study on mental disorders, stage of cancer at diagnosis and subsequent survival

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin-Kuo; Hayes, Richard D; Broadbent, Matthew T M; Hotopf, Matthew; Davies, Elizabeth; Møller, Henrik; Stewart, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the stage at cancer diagnosis and survival after cancer diagnosis among people served by secondary mental health services, compared with other local people. Setting Using the anonymised linkage between a regional monopoly secondary mental health service provider in southeast London of four London boroughs, Croydon, Lambeth, Lewisham and Southwark, and a population-based cancer register, a historical cohort study was constructed. Participants A total of 28 477 cancer cases aged 15+ years with stage of cancer recorded at diagnosis were identified. Among these, 2206 participants had been previously assessed or treated in secondary mental healthcare before their cancer diagnosis and 125 for severe mental illness (schizophrenia, schizoaffective or bipolar disorders). Primary and secondary outcome measures Stage when cancer was diagnosed and all-cause mortality after cancer diagnosis among cancer cases registered in the geographical area of southeast London. Results Comparisons between people with and without specific psychiatric diagnosis in the same residence area for risks of advanced stage of cancer at diagnosis and general survival after cancer diagnosed were analysed using logistic and Cox models. No associations were found between specific mental disorder diagnoses and beyond local spread of cancer at presentation. However, people with severe mental disorders, depression, dementia and substance use disorders had significantly worse survival after cancer diagnosis, independent of cancer stage at diagnosis and other potential confounders. Conclusions Previous findings of associations between mental disorders and cancer mortality are more likely to be accounted for by differences in survival after cancer diagnosis rather than by delayed diagnosis. PMID:24477317

  3. Targeting Cell Survival Proteins for Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj K.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Deb, Lokesh; Huang, Jiamin; Karelia, Deepkamal N.; Amin, Shantu G.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Escaping from cell death is one of the adaptations that enable cancer cells to stave off anticancer therapies. The key players in avoiding apoptosis are collectively known as survival proteins. Survival proteins comprise the Bcl-2, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP), and heat shock protein (HSP) families. The aberrant expression of these proteins is associated with a range of biological activities that promote cancer cell survival, proliferation, and resistance to therapy. Several therapeutic strategies that target survival proteins are based on mimicking BH3 domains or the IAP-binding motif or competing with ATP for the Hsp90 ATP-binding pocket. Alternative strategies, including use of nutraceuticals, transcriptional repression, and antisense oligonucleotides, provide options to target survival proteins. This review focuses on the role of survival proteins in chemoresistance and current therapeutic strategies in preclinical or clinical trials that target survival protein signaling pathways. Recent approaches to target survival proteins-including nutraceuticals, small-molecule inhibitors, peptides, and Bcl-2-specific mimetic are explored. Therapeutic inventions targeting survival proteins are promising strategies to inhibit cancer cell survival and chemoresistance. However, complete eradication of resistance is a distant dream. For a successful clinical outcome, pretreatment with novel survival protein inhibitors alone or in combination with conventional therapies holds great promise. PMID:26927133

  4. Incidence, mortality and survival of female breast cancer during 2003-2011 in Jiangsu province, China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinran; Han, Renqiang; Zhou, Jinyi; Yu, Hao; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the incidence, mortality and survival status of female breast cancer in Jiangsu province of China. Methods Population-based cancer registry data in Jiangsu province were collected during 2003-2011. Crude rates, age-specific rates, age-standardized rates and annual percent changes of incidence and mortality were calculated to describe the epidemiologic characteristics and time trends. Patients diagnosed from 2003 to 2005 were chosen for analyzing the survival status of breast cancer. Results From 2003 to 2011, 17,605 females were diagnosed with breast cancer and 4,883 died in selected registry areas in Jiangsu province. The crude incidence rate was 25.18/100,000, and the age-standardized rates by Chinese population (ASRC) and by world population (ASRW) were 19.03/100,000 and 17.92/100,000, respectively. During the same period, the crude mortality rate was 6.98/100,000 and the ASRC and ASRW were 4.93/100,000 and 4.80/100,000, respectively. From 2003 to 2011, the incidence and mortality increased with annual percent change of 11.37% and 5.78%, respectively. For survival analysis, 1,392 patients in 7 areas were identified in 2003-2005 and finished 5 years of follow-up. Survival rates were found to decrease with survival years, the 5-year observed survival rate was 45.9% and the relative survival rate was 52.0%. We also found that the survival rate varied across the province, which was lower in the north and higher in the south of Jiangsu province. Conclusions Breast cancer has become a significant public health problem in Jiangsu province and China. More resources should be invested in primary prevention, earlier diagnosis and better health services in order to increase survival rates among Chinese females. PMID:27478317

  5. Microchimerism and survival after breast and colon cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we reported microchimerism to be oppositely associated with maternal breast and colon cancer. In women with a blood test positive for male microchimerism the risk of breast cancer development was reduced to one third, whereas the risk of colon cancer was elevated 4-fold. In this article addendum, I report the survival of cases in the original study after being diagnosed with cancer. Despite small numbers, the analysis suggests that microchimerism may be positively associated with survival after breast and maybe colon cancer diagnosis. Despite the findings on colon cancer in our original report, I speculate whether microchimerism could have a general beneficial role in cancer, which in some sites may not be evident because an allogeneic maternal immune reaction hastens cancer development.

  6. Trends in relative survival for ovarian cancer from 1975 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jason D; Chen, Ling; Tergas, Ana I; Patankar, Sonali; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Neugut, Alfred I; Ananth, Cande V; Hershman, Dawn L

    2015-06-01

    To examine relative survival (a metric that incorporates changes in survival within a population) in women with ovarian cancer from 1975 to 2011. Women diagnosed with ovarian cancer from 1975 to 2011 and recorded in the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database were examined. Relative survival, estimated as the ratio of the observed survival of cancer patients (all-cause mortality) to the expected survival of a comparable group from the general population, was matched to the patients with the main factors that are considered to affect patient survival such as age, calendar time, and race. Hazard ratios were adjusted for age, race, year of diagnosis, time since diagnosis, and the interaction of age and years since diagnosis (except for stage II). A total of 49,932 women were identified. For stage I ovarian cancer, the adjusted excess hazard ratio for death in 2006 was 0.51 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.41-0.63) compared with those diagnosed in 1975. The reduction in excess mortality remained significant when compared with 1980 and 1985. For women with stage III-IV tumors, the excess hazard of mortality was lower in 2006 compared with all other years of study ranging from 0.49 (95% CI 0.44-0.55) compared with 1975 to 0.93 (95% CI 0.87-0.99) relative to 2000. For women aged 50-59 years, 10-year relative survival was 0.85 (99% CI 0.61-0.95) for stage I disease and 0.18 (99% CI 0.10-0.27) for stage III-IV tumors. For women aged 60-69 years, the corresponding 10-year relative survival estimates were 0.89 (99% CI 0.58-0.98) and 0.15 (99% CI 0.09-0.21). Relative survival has improved for all stages of ovarian cancer from 1975 to 2011. II.

  7. Prostate cancer: net survival and cause-specific survival rates after multiple imputation.

    PubMed

    Morisot, Adeline; Bessaoud, Faïza; Landais, Paul; Rébillard, Xavier; Trétarre, Brigitte; Daurès, Jean-Pierre

    2015-07-28

    Estimations of survival rates are diverse and the choice of the appropriate method depends on the context. Given the increasing interest in multiple imputation methods, we explored the interest of a multiple imputation approach in the estimation of cause-specific survival, when a subset of causes of death was observed. By using European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC), 20 multiply imputed datasets were created and analyzed with a Multivariate Imputation by Chained Equation (MICE) algorithm. Then, cause-specific survival was estimated on each dataset with two methods: Kaplan-Meier and competing risks. The two pooled cause-specific survival and confidence intervals were obtained using Rubin's rules after complementary log-log transformation. Net survival was estimated using Pohar-Perme's estimator and was compared to pooled cause-specific survival. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was performed to test the robustness of our constructed multiple imputation model. Cause-specific survival performed better than net survival, since this latter exceeded 100 % for almost the first 2 years of follow-up and after 9 years whereas the cause-specific survival decreased slowly and than stabilized at around 94 % at 9 years. Sensibility study results were satisfactory. On our basis of prostate cancer data, the results obtained by cause-specific survival after multiple imputation appeared to be better and more realistic than those obtained using net survival.

  8. Metastatic lung cancer in the age of targeted therapy: improving long-term survival

    PubMed Central

    Del Rivero, Jaydira; Thomas, Anish

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are the most frequent targetable genetic abnormality observed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). More than a decade after EGFR mutations were shown to predict sensitivity to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKI), retrospective cohort studies are now identifying and characterizing 5-year survivors. While these studies indicate subsets of patients achieving long-term survival, there is paucity of data pertaining to the long-term survival benefits of these targeted therapies at a population level. Improving access to molecular testing and treatment are key to maximizing the survival benefits at a population level. PMID:28149768

  9. Private Payer's Status Improves Male Breast Cancer Survival.

    PubMed

    Shi, Runhua; Taylor, Hannah; Liu, Lihong; Mills, Glenn; Burton, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Survival from male breast cancer is influenced by many factors. This study assessed payer's status effect on survival of male breast cancer patients. This study included 8,828 male breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1998-2006 and followed to 2011 in the National Cancer Data Base. Cox regression was used to investigate the effect of payer's status and other factors on overall survival. Patients had 36.2%, 42.7%, 14.7%, and 6.5% of stage I to IV cancer, respectively. Payer status was private 47.7%, Medicare 42.6%, Medicaid 3.24%, unknown 3.59%, and uninsured 2.95%. Median overall survival (MOS) for all patients was 10.6 years. In multivariate analysis, Direct adjusted MOS was 12.46, 11.89, 9.99, 9.02, and 8.29 years for private, "unknown," Medicare, uninsured, and Medicaid payer's status, respectively. Patients with private and "unknown" payer's status showed a significant difference in survival compared to uninsured patients, while Medicaid and Medicare patients did not. Age, race, stage, grade, income, comorbidity, distance travelled, and diagnosing/treating facility were also significant predictors of survival. Treatment delay and cancer program did not have a significant influence on survival. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Survival models for harvest management of mourning dove populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otis, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative models of the relationship between annual survival and harvest rate of migratory game-bird populations are essential to science-based harvest management strategies. I used the best available band-recovery and harvest data for mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) to build a set of models based on different assumptions about compensatory harvest mortality. Although these models suffer from lack of contemporary data, they can be used in development of an initial set of population models that synthesize existing demographic data on a management-unit scale, and serve as a tool for prioritization of population demographic information needs. Credible harvest management plans for mourning dove populations will require a long-term commitment to population monitoring and iterative population analysis.

  11. Prediction of Breast Cancer Survival Through Knowledge Discovery in Databases

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hadi Lotfnezhad; Ahmadi, Maryam; Roudbari, Masoud; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    The collection of large volumes of medical data has offered an opportunity to develop prediction models for survival by the medical research community. Medical researchers who seek to discover and extract hidden patterns and relationships among large number of variables use knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) to predict the outcome of a disease. The study was conducted to develop predictive models and discover relationships between certain predictor variables and survival in the context of breast cancer. This study is Cross sectional. After data preparation, data of 22,763 female patients, mean age 59.4 years, stored in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) breast cancer dataset were analyzed anonymously. IBM SPSS Statistics 16, Access 2003 and Excel 2003 were used in the data preparation and IBM SPSS Modeler 14.2 was used in the model design. Support Vector Machine (SVM) model outperformed other models in the prediction of breast cancer survival. Analysis showed SVM model detected ten important predictor variables contributing mostly to prediction of breast cancer survival. Among important variables, behavior of tumor as the most important variable and stage of malignancy as the least important variable were identified. In current study, applying of the knowledge discovery method in the breast cancer dataset predicted the survival condition of breast cancer patients with high confidence and identified the most important variables participating in breast cancer survival. PMID:25946945

  12. Data-Driven Metabolic Pathway Compositions Enhance Cancer Survival Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Auslander, Noam; Wagner, Allon; Oberhardt, Matthew; Ruppin, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is an important characteristic and driver of cancer. Surprisingly, however, we find here that aggregating individual gene expression using canonical metabolic pathways fails to enhance the classification of noncancerous vs. cancerous tissues and the prediction of cancer patient survival. This supports the notion that metabolic alterations in cancer rewire cellular metabolism through unconventional pathways. Here we present MCF (Metabolic classifier and feature generator), which incorporates gene expression measurements into a human metabolic network to infer new cancer-mediated pathway compositions that enhance cancer vs. adjacent noncancerous tissue classification across five different cancer types. MCF outperforms standard classifiers based on individual gene expression and on canonical human curated metabolic pathways. It successfully builds robust classifiers integrating different datasets of the same cancer type. Reassuringly, the MCF pathways identified lead to metabolites known to be associated with the pertaining specific cancer types. Aggregating gene expression through MCF pathways leads to markedly better predictions of breast cancer patients’ survival in an independent cohort than using the canonical human metabolic pathways (C-index = 0.69 vs. 0.52, respectively). Notably, the survival predictive power of individual MCF pathways strongly correlates with their power in predicting cancer vs. noncancerous samples. The more predictive composite pathways identified via MCF are hence more likely to capture key metabolic alterations occurring in cancer than the canonical pathways characterizing healthy human metabolism. PMID:27673682

  13. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their association with survival following breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Humberto; Wolff, Mary S.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Eng, Sybil M.; Khankari, Nikhil K.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are hypothesized to influence breast carcinogenesis due to their persistence and potential to induce estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects. Whether PCBs influence survival following breast cancer is unknown. Methods A population-based cohort of women diagnosed with first primary invasive or in situ breast cancer in 1996–1997 and with blood-measured PCBs (n=627) collected shortly after diagnosis was followed for vital status through 2011. After 5 and 15 years we identified 54 and 187 deaths, respectively, of which 36 and 74 were breast cancer-related. Using Cox regression, we estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for mortality for baseline PCB concentrations, individually and as estrogenic (ΣGroup 1B: PCB101, PCB174, PCB177, PCB187, PCB199), anti-estrogenic (ΣGroup 2A: PCB66, PCB74, PCB105, PCB118; Σ2B: PCB138, PCB170), and cytochrome P450 enzyme-inducing (ΣGroup 3: PCB99, PCB153, PCB180, PCB183, PCB203) groups. Results The highest PCB174 tertile was associated with an increase in all-cause (HR=2.22, 95%CI: 1.14–4.30) and breast cancer-specific (HR=3.15, 95%CI: 1.23–8.09) mortality within 5 years of diagnosis and remained associated with breast cancer-specific mortality (HR=1.88, 95%CI: 1.05–3.36) at 15 years. At 5 years, the highest tertile of PCB177 was positively associated with all-cause mortality (HR=2.12, 95%CI: 1.05–4.30). At 15 years, the highest tertiles of ΣGroup 2A congeners and PCB118 were inversely associated with all-cause mortality (HR=0.60, 95%CI: 0.39–0.83; HR=0.63, 95%CI: 0.43–0.92, respectively). Conclusions In this first US study of PCBs and breast cancer survival, PCBs were associated with mortality in biologically plausible directions. The investigation of other, structurally similar, chemicals may be warranted. PMID:26798968

  14. Commercial insurance triples chances of breast cancer survival in a public hospital.

    PubMed

    Shi, Runhua; Mills, Glenn; McLarty, Jerry; Burton, Gary; Shi, Zhenzhen; Glass, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer survival is affected both by endogenous factors and exogenous factors such as socioeconomic status. This study explored the relationship between insurance status and overall survival of 987 female breast cancer patients in a population served by a public hospital. All patients were offered the same level of care regardless of ability to pay. Of the 987 breast cancer patients investigated, 54.6% were African-American. 54.1% of patients were insured (commercial insurance or Medicare), 27.1% with Medicaid, and 18.8% who were uninsured. Overall median survival was 15.5 years and was not statistically significant between Caucasian and African-American women. Median survival times were 15.8, 11.3, and 8.2 years for insured, Medicaid, and uninsured groups, respectively. Uninsured patients had worse overall survival rates compared with insured patients (p < 0.05). Adjusting for other factors (e.g., stage, age, race, body mass index, and income), insurance was a significant factor affecting survival with hazard ratios of 2.24 and 3.22 for Medicaid and uninsured patients, respectively, compared with insured patients. Even in a public hospital, after adjusting for potential risk factors, insurance status still proved to be an important factor in the survival of breast cancer patients. Further research is necessary to identify causal factors related to the survival disparities associated with insurance status. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Stratification of ALS patients' survival: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Marin, Benoît; Couratier, Philippe; Arcuti, Simona; Copetti, Massimiliano; Fontana, Andrea; Nicol, Marie; Raymondeau, Marie; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Preux, Pierre Marie

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and patient risk stratification are areas of considerable research interest. We aimed (1) to describe the survival of a representative cohort of French ALS patients, and (2) to identify covariates associated with various patterns of survival using a risk classification analysis. ALS patients recruited in the FRALim register (2000-2013) were included. Time-to-death analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox model. A recursive partitioning and amalgamation (RECPAM) algorithm analysis identified subgroups of patients with different patterns of survival. Among 322 patients, median survival times were 26.2 and 15.6 months from time of onset and of diagnosis, respectively. Four groups of patients were identified, depending on their baseline characteristics and survival (1) ALSFRS-R slope >0.46/month and definite or probable ALS (median survival time (MST) 10.6 months); (2) ALSFRS-R slope >0.46/month and possible or probable laboratory-supported ALS (MST: 18.1 months); (3) ALSFRS-R slope ≤0.46/month and definite or probable ALS (MST: 22.5 months), and (4) ALSFRS-R slope ≤0.46/month and possible or probable laboratory-supported ALS (MST: 37.6 months). Median survival time is among the shortest ever reported by a worldwide population-based study. This is probably related to the age structure of the patients (the oldest identified to date), driven by the underlying population (30 % of subjects older than 60 years). Further research in the field of risk stratification could help physicians better anticipate prognosis of ALS patients, and help improve the design of randomized controlled trials.

  16. Arrested recovery of Diadema antillarum population: Survival or recruitment limitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Barreras, Ruber; Pérez, María E.; Mercado-Molina, Alex E.; Sabat, Alberto M.

    2015-09-01

    Densities of the long-spined sea urchin Diadema antillarum remain significantly below pre mass-mortality levels at most Caribbean localities. The arrested recovery of this formerly abundant herbivore has been attributed to low supply of recruits and high post settlement mortality. There is, however, some debate as to which of these factors is determinant of the local dynamics of this echinoid. In this study, we use demographic modeling to analyze the contribution of recruitment and post settlement survival on the dynamics of D. antillarum in four localities of Puerto Rico Archipelago. Our results indicate relatively high adult survival, and low stasis but high growth transition in the small individuals. Recruitment rates were low and exhibited high spatial and temporal variability. The four populations exhibited asymptotic growth rates (λ) below 1.0, with λ varying from 0.918 to 0.964. The elasticity analysis showed that the survival of large-sized Diadema can potentially contribute most to the changes in λ for all sites. Numerical projections of the populations indicate that no site would exhibit an increase in density under current recruitment rates, but doubling recruitment would produce an increase in sea urchin density in three of the four sites. Recovery of D. antillarum populations would require the spatial and temporal co-occurrence of high recruitment and survival rates.

  17. Eribulin Improves Survival of Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment with eribulin (Halaven™) improved overall survival in women with metastatic breast cancer whose disease progressed despite multiple rounds of prior chemotherapy, according to the results of a phase III clinical trial called EMBRACE.

  18. Preoperative Chemotherapy, Radiation Improve Survival in Esophageal Cancer (Updated)

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with esophageal cancer who received chemotherapy and radiation before surgery survived, on average, nearly twice as long as patients treated with surgery alone, according to results of a randomized clinical trial published May 31, 2012, in NEJM.

  19. Survival in familial colorectal cancer: a Danish cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lautrup, Charlotte Kvist; Mikkelsen, Ellen M; Lash, Timothy L; Katballe, Niels; Sunde, Lone

    2015-12-01

    The monogenic Lynch syndrome (LS) is associated with better survival in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Whether family history of CRC affects CRC prognosis in general remains unclear. We evaluated overall mortality in a Danish cohort of CRC patients comparing patients with a family history (FHpos) to those without (FHneg) with focus on patients from non-syndromic families, thus FHpos patients were further divided into a non-syndromic group (FHNS) and a HNPCC/LS group (FHHNPCC). We included CRC patients diagnosed 1995-1998. First degree relatives were identified using Danish population registries and family history was obtained by linkage to Danish medical registries. 1- and 5-year mortality were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression, with adjustment for age, sex, cancer site, cancer stage, and comorbidity. 1196 CRC patients were included in the study, 219 FHpos patients of whom 197 were FHNS patients. 1- and 5-year adjusted Mortality Rate Ratios comparing FHpos patients to FHneg patients were 0.99 (95% CI 0.69, 1.42) and 1.07 (95% CI 0.87, 1.32), respectively. For FHNS patients, the corresponding MRRs were 1.01 (95% CI 0.69, 1.47) and 1.15 (95% CI 0.93, 1.43). For the FHHNPCC patients MRRs were 0.84 (95% CI 0.29, 2.44) and 0.66 (95% CI 0.33, 1.31), respectively. In contrast to the lower mortality in LS patients, other types of familial CRC do not seem to affect the survival after CRC diagnosis.

  20. An international comparison of cancer survival: Toronto, Ontario, and Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan areas.

    PubMed Central

    Gorey, K. M.; Holowaty, E. J.; Fehringer, G.; Laukkanen, E.; Moskowitz, A.; Webster, D. J.; Richter, N. L.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether socioeconomic status has a differential effect on the survival of adults diagnosed with cancer in Canada and the United States. METHODS: The Ontario Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program provided a total of 58,202 and 76,055 population-based primary malignant cancer cases for Toronto, Ontario, and Detroit, Mich, respectively. Socioeconomic data for each person's residence at time of diagnosis were taken from population censuses. RESULTS: In the US cohort, there was a significant association between socioeconomic status and survival for 12 of the 15 most common cancer sites; in the Canadian cohort, there was no such association for 12 of the 15 sites. Among residents of low-income areas, persons in Toronto experienced a survival advantage for 13 of 15 cancer sites at 1- and 5-year follow-up. No such between-country differentials were observed in the middle- or high-income groups. CONCLUSIONS: The consistent pattern of a survival advantage in Canada observed across various cancer sites and follow-up periods suggests that Canada's more equitable access to preventive and therapeutic health care services is responsible for the difference. PMID:9240106

  1. History of tuberculosis as an independent prognostic factor for lung cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Heuvers, Marlies E; Aerts, Joachim G J V; Hegmans, Joost P; Veltman, Joris D; Uitterlinden, André G; Ruiter, Rikje; Rodenburg, Eline M; Hofman, Albert; Bakker, Marleen; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Stricker, Bruno H; van Klaveren, Rob J

    2012-06-01

    It is well known that pulmonary tuberculosis is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. We investigated whether a history of pulmonary tuberculosis is an independent risk factor for lung cancer survival in Caucasian patients. The data of the prospective population-based cohort of The Rotterdam Study were used. During a mean follow-up time of 18 years, there were 214 incident cases of pathology-proven lung cancer in a source population of 7983 study participants. History of tuberculosis was assessed at baseline by interviewers using standardized questionnaires. Associations of lung cancer survival with the occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis were assessed using Cox's proportional hazard regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, pack-years, educational level and tumor stage. A history of tuberculosis was reported in 13 of the 214 subjects with lung cancer. The survival of patients with lung cancer was significantly shorter in subjects with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis (HR=2.36, CI95%: 1.1-4.9), than in subjects without a history of pulmonary tuberculosis with a mean difference of 311 days. The presence of a history of pulmonary tuberculosis may be an important prognostic factor in the survival of lung cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Midlife Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Incident Cancer, and Survival After Cancer in Men: The Cooper Center Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Lakoski, Susan G; Willis, Benjamin L; Barlow, Carolyn E; Leonard, David; Gao, Ang; Radford, Nina B; Farrell, Stephen W; Douglas, Pamela S; Berry, Jarett D; DeFina, Laura F; Jones, Lee W

    2015-05-01

    Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) as assessed by formalized incremental exercise testing is an independent predictor of numerous chronic diseases, but its association with incident cancer or survival following a diagnosis of cancer has received little attention. To assess the association between midlife CRF and incident cancer and survival following a cancer diagnosis. This was a prospective, observational cohort study conducted at a preventive medicine clinic. The study included 13 949 community-dwelling men who had a baseline fitness examination. All men completed a comprehensive medical examination, a cardiovascular risk factor assessment, and incremental treadmill exercise test to evaluate CRF. We used age- and sex-specific distribution of treadmill duration from the overall Cooper Center Longitudinal Study population to define fitness groups as those with low (lowest 20%), moderate (middle 40%), and high (upper 40%) CRF groups. The adjusted multivariable model included age, examination year, body mass index, smoking, total cholesterol level, systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and fasting glucose level. Cardiorespiratory fitness levels were assessed between 1971 and 2009, and incident lung, prostate, and colorectal cancer using Medicare Parts A and B claims data from 1999 to 2009; the analysis was conducted in 2014. The main outcomes were (1) incident prostate, lung, and colorectal cancer and (2) all-cause mortality and cause-specific mortality among men who developed cancer at Medicare age (≥65 years). Compared with men with low CRF, the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for incident lung, colorectal, and prostate cancers among men with high CRF were 0.45 (95% CI, 0.29-0.68), 0.56 (95% CI, 0.36-0.87), and 1.22 (95% CI, 1.02-1.46), respectively. Among those diagnosed as having cancer at Medicare age, high CRF in midlife was associated with an adjusted 32% (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.47-0.98) risk reduction in all cancer-related deaths and a 68% reduction in

  3. Survival of women with breast cancer in Kaunas Region, Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Ivanauskienė, Rugilė; Gedminaitė, Jurgita; Juozaitytė, Elona; Vanagas, Giedrius; Simoliūnienė, Renata; Padaiga, Zilvinas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The assessment of breast cancer survival rates and comparison with those of other countries may help to deepen knowledge among decision makers in the health care system and to improve the inequalities in accessibility to early detection and effective treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate breast cancer survival rates in Kaunas region, Lithuania, and to compare them with those in the selected European countries. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A retrospective study was carried out using medical records and data gathered from the Lithuanian Cancer Registry. A group of 240 patients with primary breast cancer diagnosed in 2008 in Kaunas region was analyzed. All causes of death were included in the analysis. The closing date of follow-up was September 30, 2010. Survival was determined using the life-table method and the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the effects of prognostic risk factors on survival. RESULTS. The median age of the patients was 63 years (range, 28-95). The 1-year and 2-year cumulative survival for breast cancer patients in Kaunas region, Lithuania, was 94.2% and 90.1%, respectively. As expected, the survival of patients with diagnosed advanced disease (stage III and IV) was significantly worse than that of patients with stage I (P<0.001) and II (P=0.003) disease. The screening group (aged 50-69 years) showed better survival in comparison with the group older than 69 years. Age, T4 tumor, and distant metastasis were the prognostic factors significantly associated with an increased relative mortality risk of breast cancer. CONCLUSIONS. Compared to the European survival rates, the 1-year and 2-year survival of patients with breast cancer in Lithuania was found to be similar to most European countries.

  4. History of Recreational Physical Activity and Survival After Breast Cancer: The California Breast Cancer Survivorship Consortium.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yani; John, Esther M; Sullivan-Halley, Jane; Vigen, Cheryl; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Kwan, Marilyn L; Caan, Bette J; Lee, Valerie S; Roh, Janise M; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Keegan, Theresa H M; Kurian, Allison W; Monroe, Kristine R; Cheng, Iona; Sposto, Richard; Wu, Anna H; Bernstein, Leslie

    2015-06-15

    Recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that prediagnosis physical activity is associated with survival in women diagnosed with breast cancer. However, few data exist for racial/ethnic groups other than non-Latina whites. To examine the association between prediagnosis recreational physical activity and mortality by race/ethnicity, we pooled data from the California Breast Cancer Survivorship Consortium for 3 population-based case-control studies of breast cancer patients (n=4,608) diagnosed from 1994 to 2002 and followed up through 2010. Cox proportional hazards models provided estimates of the relative hazard ratio for mortality from all causes, breast cancer, and causes other than breast cancer associated with recent recreational physical activity (i.e., in the 10 years before diagnosis). Among 1,347 ascertained deaths, 826 (61%) were from breast cancer. Compared with women with the lowest level of recent recreational physical activity, those with the highest level had a marginally decreased risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio=0.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.76, 1.01) and a statistically significant decreased risk of mortality from causes other than breast cancer (hazard ratio=0.63, 95% confidence interval: 0.49, 0.80), and particularly from cardiovascular disease. No association was observed for breast cancer-specific mortality. These risk patterns did not differ by race/ethnicity (non-Latina white, African American, Latina, and Asian American). Our findings suggest that physical activity is beneficial for overall survival regardless of race/ethnicity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Survival of patients with cancer starting chronic dialysis: data from kidney and cancer registries in Lower Normandy.

    PubMed

    Béchade, Clémence; Dejardin, Olivier; Bara, Simona; Bouvier, Véronique; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; De Mil, Rémy; Troussard, Xavier; Launoy, Guy; Lobbedez, Thierry

    2017-06-20

    Cancer and chronic kidney disease are known to be associated. The way in which a history of cancer can influence outcome in dialysis is not well described. This work aimed to evaluate survival of cancer patients starting chronic dialysis after their diagnosis of cancer. We merged data from cancer registries and a dialysis registry, and explored patients' charts. Between January 2001 and December 2008, 74 patients with incident cancer in the two-counties-study-area (Calvados and Manche) started chronic dialysis after their diagnosis of cancer. Survival of these incident dialysis patients with a previous diagnosis of cancer was respectively 80.9% (confidence interval 69.9; 88.2) and 68.3% (confidence interval 56.3%; 77.7%) at one and two years. Only 29 of the 74 patients (39.2%) were still alive at the end of the observation period; median participation time was 2.8 years (1(st) and 3(rd) quartiles: 1.3-4.4). Survival of patients with cancer was not different to that of non-cancer dialysis patients matched for age and sex, except in patients with haematological malignancies who had a poorer outcome. In a multivariate stratified Cox model, the history of cancer before dialysis start was not associated with death, after adjustment on diabetes. In our study, survival in dialysis was not different among patients with a history of cancer compared to matched patients without malignancy. We can hypothesize that only some selected patients with cancer have access to dialysis. Studies in ESRD patients with cancer should be performed to evaluate access to dialysis in that population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. LONG TERM SURVIVAL FOLLOWING TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: A POPULATION BASED PARAMETRIC SURVIVAL ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Gordon Ward; Ransom, Jeanine; Mandrekar, Jay; Brown, Allen W

    2017-01-01

    Background Long term mortality may be increased following traumatic brain injury (TBI); however the degree to which survival could be reduced is unknown. We aimed to model life expectancy following post-acute TBI to provide predictions of longevity and quantify differences in survivorship with the general population. Methods A population based retrospective cohort study using data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) was performed. A random sample of patients from Olmsted County, Minnesota with a confirmed TBI between 1987 and 2000 was identified and vital status determined in 2013. Parametric survival modelling was then used to develop a model to predict life expectancy following TBI conditional on age at injury. Survivorship following TBI was also compared with the general population and age and gender matched non-head injured REP controls. Results 769 patients were included in complete case analyses. Median follow up time was 16.1 years (IQR 9.0–20.4) with 120 deaths occurring in the cohort during the study period. Survival after acute TBI was well represented by a Gompertz distribution. Victims of TBI surviving for at least 6 months post-injury demonstrated a much higher ongoing mortality rate compared to the US general population and non-TBI controls (hazard ratio 1·47, 95% CI 1·15–1·87). US general population cohort life table data was used to update the Gompertz model’s shape and scale parameters to account for cohort effects and allow prediction of life expectancy in contemporary TBI. Conclusions Survivors of TBI have decreased life expectancy compared to the general population. This may be secondary to the head injury itself or result from patient characteristics associated with both the propensity for TBI and increased early mortality. Post-TBI life expectancy estimates may be useful to guide prognosis, in public health planning, for actuarial applications and in the extrapolation of outcomes for TBI economic models. PMID:27165161

  7. Childhood cancer survival in France, 2000-2008.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Brigitte; Goujon, Stéphanie; Guissou, Sandra; Guyot-Goubin, Aurélie; Desmée, Solène; Désandes, Emmanuel; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports the latest survival data for French childhood cancer patients at the national level. Data from the two French National Registries of Childhood Cancer (Haematopoietic Malignancies and Solid Tumours) were used to describe survival outcomes for 15,479 children diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2008 in mainland France. The overall survival was 91.7% at 1 year, 86.9% at 2 years and 81.6% at 5 years. Relative survival did not differ from overall survival even for infants. Survival was lower among infants for lymphoblastic leukaemia and astrocytoma, but higher for neuroblastoma. For all cancers considered together, 5-year survival increased from 79.5% in the first (2000-2002) diagnostic period to 83.2% in the last (2006-2008) period. The improvement was significant for leukaemia, both myeloid and lymphoid, central nervous system tumours (ependymoma) and neuroblastoma. The results remained valid in the multivariate analysis, and, for all cancers combined, the risk of death decreased by 20% between 2000-2002 and 2006-2008. The figures are consistent with various international estimates and are the result of progress in treatment regimens and collaborative clinical trials. The challenge for the French registries is now to study the long-term follow-up of survivors to estimate the incidence of long-term morbidities and adverse effects of treatments.

  8. Breast self examination and survival from breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Le Geyte, M.; Mant, D.; Vessey, M. P.; Jones, L.; Yudkin, P.

    1992-01-01

    The survival of 616 women aged 15-59 with breast cancer, 226 of whom had been taught and practised breast self examination (BSE) prior to diagnosis and 390 of whom had not, is reported. Six year survival rates were 73.1% in the BSE taught group and 66.1% in other women (P = 0.07). PMID:1419636

  9. Ovarian and tubal cancer in Denmark: an update on incidence and survival.

    PubMed

    Gottschau, Mathilde; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Hannibal, Charlotte G; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2016-10-01

    The Nordic countries are areas with a high-incidence of ovarian cancer; however, differences between the countries exist. We used the Danish Cancer Registry to identify 11 264 cases of ovarian cancer and 363 cases of tubal cancer during 1993-2013. We calculated age-standardized (world standard population) incidence rates for overall and subtype-specific ovarian cancer, and for tubal cancer. We compared age-standardized incidence rates, and 1- and 5-year age-standardized relative survival rates, respectively, for ovarian and tubal cancer combined in four Nordic countries using the NORDCAN database. The incidence rate of ovarian cancer overall in Denmark decreased statistically significantly by approximately 2.3% per year among women aged <70 years, whereas no change was seen among women aged 70+ years. In the <70-year age-group, the incidence of serous tumors was fairly steady, whereas that of other and unspecified epithelial tumors decreased significantly by 6.4% per year. The incidence of tubal cancer was quite stable. In Norway and Finland, the incidence rates of ovarian and tubal cancer combined decreased from 1993 to 2013 in women aged <70 years, whereas in Sweden the incidence rates decreased independently of age. The 1- and 5-year relative survival rates of ovarian and tubal cancer combined increased during the study period in all the Nordic countries. Denmark had the lowest survival; however, the survival rates approached those of the other countries in recent years. In Denmark, the positive development in ovarian cancer has continued during recent years with a lower incidence and an increased survival. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  10. An overview of cancer survival in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America: the case for investment in cancer health services.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, R; Swaminathan, R; Jayant, K; Brenner, H

    2011-01-01

    Population-based cancer survival data, a key indicator for monitoring progress against cancer, are reported from 27 population-based cancer registries in 14 countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America. In China, Singapore, the Republic of Korea, and Turkey, the 5-year age-standardized relative survival ranged from 76-82% for breast, 63-79% for cervical, 71-78% for bladder, and 44-60% for large-bowel cancer. Survival did not exceed 22% for any cancer site in The Gambia, or 13% for any cancer site except breast (46%) in Uganda. For localized cancers of the breast, large bowel, larynx, ovary, urinary bladder and for regional diseases at all sites, higher survival rates were observed in countries with more rather than less developed health services. Inter- and intra-country variations in survival imply that the levels of development of health services and their efficiency to provide early diagnosis, treatment and clinical follow-up care have a profound impact on survival from cancer. These are reliable baseline summary estimates to evaluate improvements in cancer control and emphasise the need for urgent investment to improve awareness, population-based cancer registration, early detection programmes, health-services infrastructure, and human resources in these countries in the future.

  11. Cancer incidence and survival among children and adolescents in Israel during the years 1998 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Rabinowicz, Ron; Barchana, Micha; Liphshiz, Irena; Futerman, Boris; Linn, Shai; Weyl-Ben-Arush, Myriam

    2012-08-01

    Our goal was to describe childhood cancer incidence and survival in Israel and to identify demographic and epidemiologic variations among children and adolescents with cancer. We used data from the Israel National Cancer Registry to examine the incidence and survival of pediatric cancer in Israeli children aged 0 to 19 years, diagnosed during the years 1998 to 2007. Cases were analyzed according to sex, age, ethnicity, and geographic region. Among the 4255 cases of childhood cancer, there was a total age-adjusted incidence rate of 172.4 per million for children aged 0 to 19 years and 153.4 per million for children aged 0 to 14 years. The incidence rate for boys was higher than for girls (192.5 and 153.3, respectively) and higher for Jewish children than for Arab children (177.6 and 156.8, respectively). The largest groups were leukemias (22%), lymphomas (20.2%), and central nervous system tumors (17.4%). The number of new cases increased each year, but the incidence rate remained steady. The survival probability updated to December 2008 was estimated and the 5-year survival was calculated for the new cases until the end of 2003. The overall survival at 5 years was 80.8%, with 72.8% for the Arabic population and 83.2% for the Jewish population, and depended on the diagnosis. Incidence and survival in childhood cancer in Israel is at the same medium level compared with other parts of the world. This study may set the basis for investigating the genetic and environmental factors that cause pediatric cancer in Israel, delineating the genetic basis for ethnic origin disparities in survival.

  12. Demography of population recovery: survival and fidelity of peregrine falcons at various stages of population recovery.

    PubMed

    Smith, George D; Murillo-García, Oscar E; Hostetler, Jeffrey A; Mearns, Richard; Rollie, Chris; Newton, Ian; McGrady, Michael J; Oli, Madan K

    2015-06-01

    Factors influencing vital demographic rates and population dynamics can vary across phases of population growth. We studied factors influencing survival and fidelity of peregrine falcons in south Scotland-north England at two stages of population growth: when the population was recovering from pesticide-related declines and density was low, and when it had largely recovered from pesticide effects and density was high. Fidelity was higher for: adults and subadults than for juveniles, females than for males, and juveniles and adults during the low-density than during the high-density study period. Survival was age specific, with lower survival for juveniles than for older birds (juveniles, 0.600 ± SE 0.063; subadults, 0.811 ± 0.058; adults, 0.810 ± 0.034). Furthermore, there was some evidence that survival was generally lower for all age classes during the low-density period than during the high-density period, possibly due to a chronic, persistent effect of organochlorine pesticides as the population recovered. Evidence for a density-dependent effect on survival was weak, but a negative effect of density on fidelity of juveniles (dispersing age class) during the recovery phase suggests density-dependent dispersal when the population was increasing. Our results show how population density can influence demographic parameters differently and how such influences can vary across phases of population growth.

  13. Survival analysis of cervical cancer using stratified Cox regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnami, S. W.; Inayati, K. D.; Sari, N. W. Wulan; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the mostly widely cancer cause of the women death in the world including Indonesia. Most cervical cancer patients come to the hospital already in an advanced stadium. As a result, the treatment of cervical cancer becomes more difficult and even can increase the death's risk. One of parameter that can be used to assess successfully of treatment is the probability of survival. This study raises the issue of cervical cancer survival patients at Dr. Soetomo Hospital using stratified Cox regression based on six factors such as age, stadium, treatment initiation, companion disease, complication, and anemia. Stratified Cox model is used because there is one independent variable that does not satisfy the proportional hazards assumption that is stadium. The results of the stratified Cox model show that the complication variable is significant factor which influent survival probability of cervical cancer patient. The obtained hazard ratio is 7.35. It means that cervical cancer patient who has complication is at risk of dying 7.35 times greater than patient who did not has complication. While the adjusted survival curves showed that stadium IV had the lowest probability of survival.

  14. DO CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL POPULATIONS TRULY REPRESENT CANCER PATIENTS? A COMPARISON OF OPEN CLINICAL TRIALS TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS.

    PubMed

    Geifman, Nophar; Butte, Atul J

    2016-01-01

    Open clinical trial data offer many opportunities for the scientific community to independently verify published results, evaluate new hypotheses and conduct meta-analyses. These data provide a springboard for scientific advances in precision medicine but the question arises as to how representative clinical trials data are of cancer patients overall. Here we present the integrative analysis of data from several cancer clinical trials and compare these to patient-level data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Comparison of cancer type-specific survival rates reveals that these are overall lower in trial subjects. This effect, at least to some extent, can be explained by the more advanced stages of cancer of trial subjects. This analysis also reveals that for stage IV cancer, colorectal cancer patients have a better chance of survival than breast cancer patients. On the other hand, for all other stages, breast cancer patients have better survival than colorectal cancer patients. Comparison of survival in different stages of disease between the two datasets reveals that subjects with stage IV cancer from the trials dataset have a lower chance of survival than matching stage IV subjects from TCGA. One likely explanation for this observation is that stage IV trial subjects have lower survival rates since their cancer is less likely to respond to treatment. To conclude, we present here a newly available clinical trials dataset which allowed for the integration of patient-level data from many cancer clinical trials. Our comprehensive analysis reveals that cancer-related clinical trials are not representative of general cancer patient populations, mostly due to their focus on the more advanced stages of the disease. These and other limitations of clinical trials data should, perhaps, be taken into consideration in medical research and in the field of precision medicine.

  15. Short-term and long-term survival of interval breast cancers taking into account prognostic features.

    PubMed

    Delacour-Billon, Solenne; Mathieu-Wacquant, Anne Laure; Campone, Mario; Auffret, Nathalie; Amossé, Sophie; Allioux, Corinne; Cowppli-Bony, Anne; Molinié, Florence

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this population-based study was to estimate short-term and long-term survival of interval breast cancers and to compare them to clinically detected cancers, taking into account prognostic features. This study included all interval cancers and clinically detected cancers diagnosed in the Loire-Atlantique population-based cancer registry from 2000 to 2010 in women aged 50-76 years. We used the Pohar-Perme method to estimate 5- and 10 year net survival rates and a flexible parametric model to compare interval cancer and clinically detected cancer prognosis with and without adjustment for the main prognostic factors (age, stage, histological grade, and phenotype). This study included 813 interval cancers and 1,354 clinically detected cancers. Interval cancers were diagnosed at a significantly less advanced stage than clinically detected cancers, but more often with a triple-negative phenotype. Interval cancer age-standardised net survival was 88.0% at 5 years (95% CI 84.9-91.2) and 81.7% at 10 years (95% CI 76.9-86.9), whereas clinically detected cancer age-standardised net survival was 77.8% (95% CI 75.1-80.6) and 64.6% (95% CI 60.7-68.7), respectively. After adjustment for covariates, survival no longer differed between interval cancers and clinically detected cancers at 5 and 10 years. Although the interval cancer net survival rate was higher, interval cancers had a similar short-term and long-term prognosis than clinically detected cancers after taking into account the main prognostic factors.

  16. Breast cancer survival of Hispanic women in the USA is influenced by country of origin

    PubMed Central

    CHAKRABORTY, Subhankar; SMITH, Lynette; GANTI, Apar Kishor; BONTHU, Neelima; SHIMIZHU, Tomohiro; BATRA, Surinder K

    2014-01-01

    Aim People of Hispanic origin comprise nearly 16 percent of the (US) population. With the growing population of Hispanics in the USA, an important epidemiological question is whether their country of origin affects survival in Hispanic women living in the USA at the time of diagnosis of breast cancer. Methods We searched the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database for Hispanic women with a single primary breast cancer with known country of origin diagnosed between 1973 and 2008. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate whether the country of origin was an independent predictor of survival. Results In total, 48 849 female breast cancer patients of Hispanic origin were included in the SEER database. Nearly 23 percent of them had an origin in Mexico, 9 percent in South or Central America 3 percent in Puerto Rico, 2 percent in Cuba, 0.3 percent in the Dominical Republic and 3 percent in other countries, including Europe. About 60 percent of patients were identified as Hispanic by their surname or classified as Spanish/Hispanic not otherwise specified. Median survival of patients in these groups was 204, 240, 142, 169, 82.4, 115.5 and 210 months, respectively (P < 0.0001 by log–rank test). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that the country of origin was an independent predictor of survival in Hispanic women with breast cancer. Conclusion The country of origin is an independent predictor of overall survival among Hispanic women diagnosed with breast cancer. PMID:23551959

  17. Metformin use improves survival of diabetic liver cancer patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shu-Juan; Zheng, Yi-Xiang; Zhou, Peng-Cheng; Xiao, Yan-Ni; Tan, Hong-Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Metformin has garnered considerable interest as a chemo-preventive and chemo-therapeutic agent given the increased risk of liver cancer among diabetic patients. This work was performed to illustrate the association between metformin use and survival of diabetic liver cancer patients. We conducted a comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, BIOSIS Previews, Cochrane Library from inception to 12 May 2016. Meta-analyses were performed using Stata (version 12.0), with hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) as effect measures. Eleven cohort studies involving 3452 liver cancer patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses showed that metformin use was associated with better survival (HR = 0.59; 95% CI, 0.42-0.83; p = 0.002) of liver cancer patients, and the beneficial effect persisted (HR = 0.64; 95% CI, 0.42-0.97; p = 0.035) when the population was restricted to diabetic liver cancer patients. After adjusting for age, etiology, index of tumor severity and treatment of liver cancer, the association between metformin use and better survival of liver cancer patients was stable, pooled HR ranged from 0.47 to 0.57. The results indicated that metformin use improved survival of diabetic liver cancer patients. However, the results should be interpreted with caution given the possibility of residual confounding. Further prospective studies are still needed to confirm the prognostic benefit of metformin use. PMID:27494848

  18. Use of opioid analgesics or sleeping medication and survival of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Pei; Lin, Chia-Chin

    2015-06-01

    Pain and sleep disturbance have been shown to have a profound influence on the outcomes of cancer treatment. This study sought to determine whether administering opioid analgesics or sleeping medication to cancer patients during their first admission to a hospital is associated with poor prognoses. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study by analyzing data obtained from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. The study population comprised cancer patients whose first admission to a hospital for initial cancer treatment was in 2004. We collected data on 2302 cancer patients. To analyze the effect of opioid analgesic and sleeping medication usage on cancer patient survival, we compared the 3-year survival rates among 4 groups of patients (no use, sleeping medications-only, opioid analgesics-only, both used). The 3-year Kaplan-Meier plots for these 4 groups show that the difference was statistically significant (log rank 48.244, p < 0.001). The longevity of cancer patients was the greatest among the no-use group, followed by the sleeping medications-only group, then the opioid analgesics-only group, and finally, the group in which both sleeping medications and opioid analgesics were used. The use of opioid analgesics or sleeping medication was shown to be negatively correlated with the survival rate of cancer patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A let-7 microRNA binding site polymorphism in the KRAS 3'UTR is associated with increased risk and reduced survival for gallbladder cancer in North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Kazmi, Hasan Raza; Chandra, Abhijit; Kumar, Saket; Satyam, Leena Khare; Gupta, Annapurna; Nigam, Jaya; Srivastava, Meenu; Mittal, Balraj

    2016-12-01

    Gallbladder cancer is a lethal malignancy of hepato-biliary system with high incidence in North India, especially along gangetic plain. The let-7 microRNAs play a key role in regulating KRAS expression and a polymorphism in 3' untranslated region (rs61764370, T/G) of KRAS leads to its higher expression. This polymorphism is known to be associated with increased risk and prognosis of various cancers but its association with gallbladder cancer has not been evaluated. To address this research question, we evaluated whether rs61764370 variant is associated with gallbladder cancer susceptibility and clinical outcomes. In present case-control study, we enrolled 541 patients with gallbladder malignancy and 307 controls. Genomic DNA was obtained from peripheral blood and genotyping was performed using Taqman allelic discrimination assay. Heterozygous (TG) individuals are at a significant higher risk for GBC as compared with wild genotype (TT) (p = 0.007, odds ratio = 2.56, 95 % CI 1.27-5.18). At allelic level, allele G has significant higher risk for GBC as compared with T allele (p = 0.008, odds ratio = 2.5, 95 % CI 1.25-5.01). Survival analysis reveals decrease in overall survival for heterozygous genotype (p < 0.0001, hazard ratio = 3.42, 95 % CI 1.21-4.20). Also, significant decrease in overall survival was observed for patient carrying allele G (p < 0.0001, HR = 2.89, 95 % CI 1.21-4.20) as compared with allele C. We conclude that KRAS rs61764370 polymorphism is significantly associated with risk and prognosis of gallbladder malignancy in this endemic belt.

  20. Changing roles of population-based cancer registries in Australia.

    PubMed

    Roder, David; Creighton, Nicola; Baker, Deborah; Walton, Richard; Aranda, Sanchia; Currow, David

    2015-09-01

    Registries have key roles in cancer incidence, mortality and survival monitoring and in showing disparities across the population. Incidence monitoring began in New South Wales in 1972 and other jurisdictions soon followed. Registry data are used to evaluate outcomes of preventive, screening, treatment and support services. They have shown decreases in cancer incidence following interventions and have been used for workforce and other infrastructure planning. Crude markers of optimal radiotherapy and chemotherapy exist and registry data are used to show shortfalls against these markers. The data are also used to investigate cancer clusters and environmental concerns. Survival data are used to assess service performance and interval cancer data are used in screening accreditation. Registries enable determination of risk of multiple primary cancers. Clinical quality registries are used for clinical quality improvement. Population-based cancer registries and linked administrative data complement clinical registries by providing high-level system-wide data. The USA Commission on Cancer has long used registries for quality assurance and service accreditation. Increasingly population-based registry data in Australia are linked with administrative data on service delivery to assess system performance. Addition oftumour stage and otherprognostic indicators is important forthese analyses and is facilitated by the roll-out of structured pathology reporting. Data linkage with administrative data, following checks on the quality of these data, enables assessment of patterns of care and other performance indicators for health-system monitoring. Australian cancer registries have evolved and increasingly are contributing to broader information networks for health system management.

  1. Propranolol and survival from breast cancer: a pooled analysis of European breast cancer cohorts.

    PubMed

    Cardwell, Chris R; Pottegård, Anton; Vaes, Evelien; Garmo, Hans; Murray, Liam J; Brown, Chris; Vissers, Pauline A J; O'Rorke, Michael; Visvanathan, Kala; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; De Schutter, Harlinde; Lambe, Mats; Powe, Des G; van Herk-Sukel, Myrthe P P; Gavin, Anna; Friis, Søren; Sharp, Linda; Bennett, Kathleen

    2016-12-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that propranolol inhibits several pathways involved in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We investigated whether breast cancer patients who used propranolol, or other non-selective beta-blockers, had reduced breast cancer-specific or all-cause mortality in eight European cohorts. Incident breast cancer patients were identified from eight cancer registries and compiled through the European Cancer Pharmacoepidemiology Network. Propranolol and non-selective beta-blocker use was ascertained for each patient. Breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality were available for five and eight cohorts, respectively. Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for cancer-specific and all-cause mortality by propranolol and non-selective beta-blocker use. HRs were pooled across cohorts using meta-analysis techniques. Dose-response analyses by number of prescriptions were also performed. Analyses were repeated investigating propranolol use before cancer diagnosis. The combined study population included 55,252 and 133,251 breast cancer patients in the analysis of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality respectively. Overall, there was no association between propranolol use after diagnosis of breast cancer and breast cancer-specific or all-cause mortality (fully adjusted HR = 0.94, 95% CI, 0.77, 1.16 and HR = 1.09, 95% CI, 0.93, 1.28, respectively). There was little evidence of a dose-response relationship. There was also no association between propranolol use before breast cancer diagnosis and breast cancer-specific or all-cause mortality (fully adjusted HR = 1.03, 95% CI, 0.86, 1.22 and HR = 1.02, 95% CI, 0.94, 1.10, respectively). Similar null associations were observed for non-selective beta-blockers. In this large pooled analysis of breast cancer patients, use of propranolol or non-selective beta-blockers was not associated with improved survival.

  2. Physical Activity and Survival among Long-term Cancer Survivor and Non-Cancer Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Gunnell, Anthony S.; Joyce, Sarah; Tomlin, Stephania; Taaffe, Dennis R.; Cormie, Prue; Newton, Robert U.; Joseph, David; Spry, Nigel; Einarsdóttir, Kristjana; Galvão, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests physical activity improves prognosis following cancer diagnosis; however, evidence regarding prognosis in long-term survivors of cancer is scarce. We assessed physical activity in 1,589 cancer survivors at an average 8.8 years following their initial diagnosis and calculated their future mortality risk following physical activity assessment. We also selected a cancer-free cohort of 3,145 age, sex, and survey year group-matched cancer-free individuals from the same source population for comparison purposes. Risks for cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality in relation to physical activity levels were estimated using Cox regression proportional hazard regression analyses within the cancer and non-cancer cohorts. Physical activity levels of 360+ min per week were inversely associated with cancer-specific mortality in long-term cancer survivors [hazard ratios (HR) = 0.30 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.13–0.70)] and participants without prior cancer [HR = 0.16 (95% CI 0.05–0.56)] compared with no reported physical activity. Physical activity levels of 150–359 and 360+ min were inversely associated with all-cause mortality in long-term cancer survivors [150–359 min; HR = 0.55 (95% CI 0.31–0.97), 360+ min; HR = 0.41 (95% CI 0.21–0.79)] and those without prior cancer [150–359 min; HR = 0.52 (95% CI 0.32–0.86), 360+ min; HR = 0.50 (95% CI 0.29–0.88)]. These results suggest that meeting exercise guidelines of 150 min of physical activity per week were associated with reduced all-cause mortality in both long-term cancer surviving and cancer-free cohorts. Exceeding exercise oncology guidelines (360+ min per week) may provide additional protection in terms of cancer-specific death. PMID:28261579

  3. Population size, survival, growth, and movements of Rana sierrae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fellers, Gary M.; Kleeman, Patrick M.; Miller, David A. W.; Halstead, Brian J.; Link, William

    2013-01-01

    Based on 2431 captures of 757 individual frogs over a 9-yr period, we found that the population of R. sierrae in one meadow–stream complex in Yosemite National Park ranged from an estimated 45 to 115 adult frogs. Rana sierrae at our relatively low elevation site (2200 m) grew at a fast rate (K = 0.73–0.78), had high overwintering survival rates (44.6–95%), lived a long time (up to 16 yr), and tended to be fairly sedentary during the summer (100% minimum convex polygon annual home ranges of 139 m2) but had low year-to-year site fidelity. Even though the amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) has been present in the population for at least 13 yr, there was no clear downward trend as might be expected from reports of R. sierrae population declines associated with Bd or from reports of widespread population decline of R. sierrae throughout its range.

  4. Gender differences in colorectal cancer survival: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yafan; Wang, Guiying; He, Jingli; Ren, Shuguang; Wu, Fengpeng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Wang, Feifei

    2017-06-09

    A meta-analysis was conducted to determine the influence of gender on overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) in colorectal cancer patients. Major databases were searched for clinical trials, which compare survival differences between male and female for colorectal cancer patients. A list of these studies and references, published in English and Chinese from 1960 to 2017, was obtained independently by two reviewers from databases such as PubMed, Medline, ScienceDirect, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Web of Science. Overall survival and cancer-specific survival were compared using Review Manager 5.3. Females had significantly better OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85-0.89) and CSS (HR = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.89-0.95) than males after meta-analysis. These results suggest that gender seems to be a significant factor influencing survival results among colorectal cancer patients. © 2017 UICC.

  5. XRCC1 Gene Polymorphism, Clinicopathological Characteristics and Stomach Cancer Survival in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Putthanachote, Nuntiput; Promthet, Supannee; Suwanrungruan, Krittika; Chopjitt, Peechanika; Wiangnon, Surapon; Chen, Li-Sheng; Yen, Ming-Fang; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    Stomach cancer is one of leading causes of death worldwide. In Thailand, the incidence and mortality of stomach cancer are in the top ten for cancers. Effects of DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementary protein 1 (XRCC1) polymorphisms and clinicopathological characteristics on survival of stomach cancer in Thailand have not been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of XRCC1 gene and clinicopathological characteristics on survival of stomach cancer patients in Thailand. Data and blood samples were collected from 101 newly diagnosed stomach cancer cases pathologically confirmed and recruited during 2002 to 2006 and followed-up for vital status until 31 October 2012. Genotype analysis was performed using real-time PCR-HRM. The data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method to yield cumulative survival curve, log-rank test to assess statistical difference of survival and Cox proportional hazard models to estimate adjusted hazard ratio. The total followed-up times were 2,070 person-months, and the mortality rate was 4.3 per 100 person-months. The median survival time after diagnosis was 8.07 months. The cumulative 1-, 3-, 5-years survival rates were 40.4%, 15.2 % and 10.1 % respectively. After adjustment, tumour stage were associated with an increased risk of death (p= 0.036). The XRCC1 Gln339Arg, Arg/Arg homozygote was also associated with increased risk but statistically this was non-significant. In addition to tumour stage, which is an important prognostic factor affecting to the survival of stomach cancer patients, the genetic variant Gln339Arg in XRCC1 may non-significantly contribute to risk of stomach cancer death among Thai people. Larger studies with different populations are need to verify ours findings.

  6. Prostate cancer incidence, mortality, and survival trends in the United States: 1981-2001.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Aruna V; Schottenfeld, David

    2002-02-01

    The increased use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in screening for preclinical disease after 1985 is thought to be a major determinant of the changing patterns in prostate cancer incidence; however, the long-term effect of screening on future trends in mortality and survival is uncertain. This article reviews the temporal trends (1981-1998) for prostate cancer incidence, mortality, and survival, and projects prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates for 1999 to 2001. Autoregressive, quadratic, time-series models were used to describe prostate cancer mortality rates in the US population and prostate cancer incidence rates derived from the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program. These models were based on data collected from 1979 through 1998, with forecasts produced for 1999 to 2001. Prostate cancer incidence increased steadily from 1981 to 1989, with a steep increase in the early 1990s, followed by a decline. Incidence rates were forecasted to remain stable through the year 2001. Mortality rates decreased steadily and were forecasted to continue to decrease concurrently with increasing 5- and 10-year relative survival rates. The incidence, mortality, and survival trends were comparable in US blacks, who exhibited on average 2-fold higher mortality and 50% higher incidence than whites. Decreasing prostate cancer mortality and increasing relative survival trends in the United States were described after the introduction of PSA screening. However, the exaggerated rate of increase in the early 1990s in prostate cancer incidence was transient and likely a result of increased detection of preclinical disease that was prevalent in the general population. Copyright 2002 by W.B. Saunders Company

  7. Socioeconomic disparities in childhood cancer survival in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Adam, Martin; Rueegg, Corina S; Schmidlin, Kurt; Spoerri, Adrian; Niggli, Felix; Grotzer, Michael; von der Weid, Nicolas X; Egger, Matthias; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Zwahlen, Marcel; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we investigated whether childhood cancer survival in Switzerland is influenced by socioeconomic status (SES), and if disparities vary by type of cancer and definition of SES (parental education, living condition, area-based SES). Using Cox proportional hazards models, we analyzed 5-year cumulative mortality in all patients registered in the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry diagnosed 1991-2006 below 16 years. Information on SES was extracted from the Swiss census by probabilistic record linkage. The study included 1602 children (33% with leukemia, 20% with lymphoma, 22% with central nervous system (CNS) tumors); with an overall 5-year survival of 77% (95%CI 75-79%). Higher SES, particularly parents' education, was associated with a lower 5-year cumulative mortality. Results varied by type of cancer with no association for leukemia and particularly strong effects for CNS tumor patients, where mortality hazard ratios for the different SES indicators, comparing the highest with the lowest group, ranged from 0.48 (95%CI: 0.28-0.81) to 0.71 (95%CI: 0.44-1.15). We conclude that even in Switzerland with a high quality health care system and mandatory health insurance, socioeconomic differences in childhood cancer survival persist. Factors causing these survival differences have to be further explored, to facilitate universal access to optimal treatment and finally eliminate social inequalities in childhood cancer survival. © 2016 UICC.

  8. Predicting survival in potentially curable lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Win, Thida; Sharples, Linda; Groves, Ashley M; Ritchie, Andrew J; Wells, Francis C; Laroche, Clare M

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death with unchanged mortality for 50 years. Only localized nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is curable. In these patients it is essential to accurately predict survival to help identify those that will benefit from treatment and those at risk of relapse. Despite needing this clinical information, prospective data are lacking. We therefore prospectively identified prognostic factors in patients with potentially curable lung cancer. Over 2 years, 110 consecutive patients with confirmed localized NSCLC (stages 1-3A) were recruited from a single tertiary center. Prognostic factors investigated included age, gender, body mass index (BMI), performance status, comorbidity, disease stage, quality of life, and respiratory physiology. Patients were followed up for 3-5 years and mortality recorded. The data were analyzed using survival analysis methods. Twenty-eight patients died within 1 year, 15 patients died within 2 years, and 11 patients died within 3 years postsurgery. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates show a survival rate of 51% at 3 years. Factors significantly (p < 0.05) associated with poor overall survival were age at assessment, diabetes, serum albumin, peak VO(2) max, shuttle walk distance, and predicted postoperative transfer factor. In multiple-variable survival models, the strongest predictors of survival overall were diabetes and shuttle walk distance. The results show that potentially curable lung cancer patients should not be discriminated against with respect to weight and smoking history. Careful attention is required when managing patients with diabetes. Respiratory physiologic measurements were of limited value in predicting long-term survival after lung cancer surgery.

  9. Public perceptions of cancer prevention, screening, and survival: comparison with state-of-science evidence for colon, skin, and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Lila Finney; Hesse, Bradford W; Moser, Richard P; McCaul, Kevin D; Rothman, Alexander J

    2009-01-01

    Lay understanding of cancer prevention, screening, and survival may influence health behavior and health outcomes. Data were from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). In our analyses, we describe population (N = 5586) beliefs about cancer prevention, detection, and survival for colon, lung, and skin cancer and compare beliefs with state-of-science evidence. We examined differences by sociodemographic subgroups. A majority of respondents responded consistently with state-of-science evidence in prevention for colon (78.2%), lung (81.2%), and skin cancer (83.5%). Respondents' perceptions of screening for colon cancer were generally consistent with state-of-science evidence (89.9%); however, fewer respondents' responded consistently with state-of-science in screening for lung (12.6%) and skin cancer (11.9%). Finally, respondents' estimates of survival/cure of colon (66.2%) and skin cancer (63.6%) were consistent with state-of-the-science evidence in survival; however, a minority of respondents' estimates of lung cancer survival (17.3%) were consistent with state-of-science. Sociodemographic associates of state-of-science consistent responses included younger age, greater education, and White race. Public knowledge of cancer prevention, screening, and survival varies by type of cancer, levels of evidence, and sociodemographic factors. These findings provide an evidence base for improving public awareness and understanding of cancer prevention, screening, and survival.

  10. A Pessimistic Explanatory Style is Prognostic for Poor Lung Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Paul; Colligan, Robert C.; Szydlo, Daniel W.; Clark, Matthew M.; Rausch, Sarah; Wampfler, Jason; Sloan, Jeff A.; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated the importance of personality constructs on health behaviors and health status. Having a pessimistic outlook has been related to negative health behaviors and higher mortality. However, the construct has not been well explored in cancer populations. Methods Survival time of 534 adults, who were diagnosed with lung cancer and had a pessimistic explanatory style, was examined. The patients had completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) approximately 18.2 years prior to receiving their lung cancer diagnosis. MMPI Optimism-Pessimism (PSM) scores were divided into high (60 or more) and low scores (less than 60), and log-rank tests and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to determine survival differences. Multivariate Cox models were used for assessing prognostic values of pessimism along with other known predictors for lung cancer survival outcome. Booting strapping of the survival models was used as a sensitivity analysis. Results At the time of lung cancer diagnosis, patients were on average 67 years old; 48% were female; 85% had non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); 15% had small cell lung cancer (SCLC); 30% were stage I; 4% were stage II; 31% were stage III/limited; and 35% were stage IV/extensive. Patients who exhibited a non-pessimistic explanatory style survived approximately six months longer than patients classified as having a pessimistic explanatory style. Conclusion Among lung cancer patients, those having a pessimistic explanatory style experienced less favorable survival outcome, which may be related to cancer treatment decisions. Further research in this area is warranted. PMID:20139778

  11. Association of the Timing of Pregnancy With Survival in Women With Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Javaid; Amir, Eitan; Rochon, Paula A; Giannakeas, Vasily; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2017-05-01

    Increasing numbers of women experience pregnancy around the time of, or after, a diagnosis of breast cancer. Understanding the effect of pregnancy on survival in women with breast cancer will help in the counseling and treatment of these women. To compare the overall survival of women diagnosed with breast cancer during pregnancy or in the postpartum period with that of women who had breast cancer but did not become pregnant. This population-based, retrospective cohort study linked health administrative databases in Ontario, Canada, comprising 7553 women aged 20 to 45 years at the time of diagnosis with invasive breast cancer, from January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2014. Any pregnancy in the period from 5 years before, until 5 years after, the index date of the diagnosis of breast cancer. Women were classified into the following 4 exposure groups: no pregnancy (the referent), pregnancy before breast cancer, pregnancy-associated breast cancer, and pregnancy following breast cancer. Five-year actuarial survival rates for all exposure groups, age-adjusted and multivariable hazard ratios [HRs] of pregnancy for overall survival for all exposure groups, and time-dependent hazard ratios for women with pregnancy following breast cancer. Among the 7553 women in the study (mean age at diagnosis, 39.1 years; median, 40 years; range, 20-44 years) the 5-year actuarial survival rate was 87.5% (95% CI, 86.5%-88.4%) for women with no pregnancy, 85.3% (95% CI, 82.8%-87.8%) for women with pregnancy before breast cancer (age-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.85-1.27; P = .73), and 82.1% (95% CI, 78.3%-85.9%) for women with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (age-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.91-1.53; P = .20). The 5-year actuarial survival rate was 96.7% (95% CI, 94.1%-99.3%) for women who had pregnancy 6 months or more after diagnosis of breast cancer, vs 87.5% (95% CI, 86.5%-88.4%) for women with no pregnancy) (age-adjusted HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.10-0.49; P

  12. Incidence and survival rates of ovarian cancer in low-income women in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Abuidris, Dafalla O.; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Elhaj, Ahmed M.; Eltayeb, Elgaylani Abdallah; Elsanousi, Mohamed; Ibnoof, Rehab S.; Mohammed, Sulma I.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the second most common gynecological cancer worldwide. Little is known about the disease in Sudan. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the incidence rate, age and stage at diagnosis, and median survival time of patients presenting at the National Cancer Institute-University of Gezira (NCI-UG), Sudan. Data were collected in a prospective study of women with ovarian cancer over a period of eleven years of follow-up (between 2000 and 2011). Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the distribution of the demographics of the sample. The direct method was used to compute the age-standardized rate (ASR) using data from the 1966 and 2000 World Standard Populations (WSPs). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival functions and the median survival time. Log-rank tests were used to statistically compare between the survival functions. There were steady increases in ovarian cancer incidence rates between 2000 and 2009, with a slight decline noted in 2010 and 2011. The patients' age range was 9–90. The age-specific incidence rate increased greatly in women aged 55 years or older. The majority of the patients had stage III or IV disease. The annual ASR using WSPs 1966 and 2000 as standard populations were 3.3 and 3.7 per 100,000 women, respectively. The median survival time was 31 months (95% confidence interval, 19–43). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 38%. In Sudan, ovarian cancer affects postmenopausal women, akin to what is reported in the developed world with high incidence rates. Presenting with advanced stage disease is the predominant factor that results in a short survival time for women. PMID:28105363

  13. Germ Cell Cancer and Multiple Relapses: Toxicity and Survival.

    PubMed

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria G G; Mortensen, Mette S; Bandak, Mikkel; Gupta, Ramneek; Holm, Niels V; Agerbaek, Mads; Daugaard, Gedske

    2015-10-01

    A small number of patients with germ cell cancer (GCC) receive more than one line of treatment for disseminated disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate late toxicity and survival in an unselected cohort of patients who experienced relapse after receiving first-line treatment for disseminated disease. From the Danish Testicular Cancer database, we identified all patients who received more than one line of treatment for disseminated disease. Information about late toxicity and mortality was obtained by means of linkage to national registers. Prognostic factors for relapse and death were identified and compared with the International Prognostic Factors Study Group (IPFSG) classification. In total, 268 patients received more than one line of treatment for disseminated GCC. Approximately half of patients (n=136) died as a result of GCC. The 132 remaining patients, compared with patients treated with only orchiectomy, had an increased risk for a second cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 3.2; 95% CI, 1.9 to 5.5), major cardiovascular disease (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.3), pulmonary disease (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.8), GI disease (HR, 7.3; 95% CI, 3.6 to 14.8), renal impairment (HR, 8.3; 95% CI, 3.0 to 23.2), neurologic disorders (HR, 6.3; 95% CI, 3.1 to 12.6), and death as a result of other causes (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.6 to 4.2). In large part, the IPFSG classification was confirmed in our population; however, we could not confirm the primary site and the level of human chorionic gonadotropin as independent factors. We identified increasing age as a possible new prognostic factor for treatment failure after second-line treatment (HR, 1.2 per 10 years; 95% CI, 1.2 to 15). Patients with GCC who survive after more than one line of treatment for disseminated disease have a highly increased risk of late toxicity and death as a result of causes other than GCC. Therefore, they should be candidates for life-long follow-up. The IPFSG classification was confirmed in this

  14. Invasive Cancer Incidence and Survival - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Henley, S Jane; Singh, Simple D; King, Jessica; Wilson, Reda J; O'Neil, Mary Elizabeth; Ryerson, A Blythe

    2017-01-27

    Although cancer represents many heterogeneous diseases, some cancer types share common risk factors. For example, conclusive evidence links cancer at multiple sites with tobacco use, alcohol use, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, excess body weight, and physical inactivity (1,2). To monitor changes in cancer incidence and assess progress toward achieving Healthy People 2020 objectives,* CDC analyzed data from the U.S. Cancer Statistics (USCS) data set for 2013, the most recent year for which incidence and survival data are available. In 2013, a total of 1,559,130 invasive cancers were reported to cancer registries in the United States (excluding Nevada), for an annual age-adjusted incidence rate of 439 cases per 100,000 persons. Cancer incidence rates were higher among males (479) than females (413), highest among blacks (444), and ranged by state from 364 (New Mexico) to 512 (Kentucky) per 100,000 persons (359 in Puerto Rico). The proportion of persons with cancer who survived ≥5 years after diagnosis was 67%. This proportion was the same for males and females (67%), but lower among blacks (62%) than among whites (67%). Cancer surveillance data are key to cancer epidemiologic and clinical outcomes research, program planning and monitoring, resource allocation, and state and federal appropriations accountability.

  15. Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and survival in patients with cutaneous melanoma: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Orlow, Irene; Reiner, Anne S.; Thomas, Nancy E.; Roy, Pampa; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Luo, Li; Paine, Susan; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Kricker, Anne; Marrett, Loraine D.; Rosso, Stefano; Zanetti, Roberto; Gruber, Stephen B.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gallagher, Richard P.; Dwyer, Terence; Busam, Klaus; Begg, Colin B.; Berwick, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Factors known to affect melanoma survival include age at presentation, sex and tumor characteristics. Polymorphisms also appear to modulate survival following diagnosis. Result from other studies suggest that vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms (SNPs) impact survival in patients with glioma, renal cell carcinoma, lung, breast, prostate and other cancers; however, a comprehensive study of VDR polymorphisms and melanoma-specific survival is lacking. We aimed to investigate whether VDR genetic variation influences survival in patients with cutaneous melanoma. The analysis involved 3566 incident single and multiple primary melanoma cases enrolled in the international population-based Genes, Environment, and Melanoma Study. Melanoma-specific survival outcomes were calculated for each of 38 VDR SNPs using a competing risk analysis after adjustment for covariates. There were 254 (7.1%) deaths due to melanoma during the median 7.6 years follow-up period. VDR SNPs rs7299460, rs3782905, rs2239182, rs12370156, rs2238140, rs7305032, rs1544410 (BsmI) and rs731236 (TaqI) each had a statistically significant (trend P values < 0.05) association with melanoma-specific survival in multivariate analysis. One functional SNP (rs2239182) remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing using the Monte Carlo method. None of the SNPs associated with survival were significantly associated with Breslow thickness, ulceration or mitosis. These results suggest that the VDR gene may influence survival from melanoma, although the mechanism by which VDR exerts its effect does not seem driven by tumor aggressiveness. Further investigations are needed to confirm our results and to understand the relationship between VDR and survival in the combined context of tumor and host characteristics. PMID:26521212

  16. Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and survival in patients with cutaneous melanoma: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Orlow, Irene; Reiner, Anne S; Thomas, Nancy E; Roy, Pampa; Kanetsky, Peter A; Luo, Li; Paine, Susan; Armstrong, Bruce K; Kricker, Anne; Marrett, Loraine D; Rosso, Stefano; Zanetti, Roberto; Gruber, Stephen B; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gallagher, Richard P; Dwyer, Terence; Busam, Klaus; Begg, Colin B; Berwick, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Factors known to affect melanoma survival include age at presentation, sex and tumor characteristics. Polymorphisms also appear to modulate survival following diagnosis. Result from other studies suggest that vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms (SNPs) impact survival in patients with glioma, renal cell carcinoma, lung, breast, prostate and other cancers; however, a comprehensive study of VDR polymorphisms and melanoma-specific survival is lacking. We aimed to investigate whether VDR genetic variation influences survival in patients with cutaneous melanoma. The analysis involved 3566 incident single and multiple primary melanoma cases enrolled in the international population-based Genes, Environment, and Melanoma Study. Melanoma-specific survival outcomes were calculated for each of 38 VDR SNPs using a competing risk analysis after adjustment for covariates. There were 254 (7.1%) deaths due to melanoma during the median 7.6 years follow-up period. VDR SNPs rs7299460, rs3782905, rs2239182, rs12370156, rs2238140, rs7305032, rs1544410 (BsmI) and rs731236 (TaqI) each had a statistically significant (trend P values < 0.05) association with melanoma-specific survival in multivariate analysis. One functional SNP (rs2239182) remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing using the Monte Carlo method. None of the SNPs associated with survival were significantly associated with Breslow thickness, ulceration or mitosis. These results suggest that the VDR gene may influence survival from melanoma, although the mechanism by which VDR exerts its effect does not seem driven by tumor aggressiveness. Further investigations are needed to confirm our results and to understand the relationship between VDR and survival in the combined context of tumor and host characteristics.

  17. Estimation of temporal variability of survival in animal populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, W.R.; Nichols, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    Temporal variation of demographic characteristics for animal populations is of interest to both ecologists and biological modelers. The standard deviation of a series of estimated parameter values (e.g., estimated population size) or some function thereof (e.g, log of the estimated parameters) is commonly used as a measure of temporal variability. These measures of temporal variation overestimate the true temporal variation by not accounting for sampling variability inherent to the estimation of unknown population parameters. Using a variance-components approach to partitioning the total variability of an estimated parameter, we demonstrate the ease with which sampling variation can be removed from the observed total variation of parameter estimates. Estimates of temporal variability of survival are given after removal of sampling variation for three bird species: the federally listed Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii), Black-capped Chickadees (Parus atricapillus), and Mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). Sampling variation accounted for the majority of the total variation in the survival estimates for nearly all of the populations studied. Substantial differences in observed significance levels were observed when testing for demographic differences in temporal variation using temporal variance estimates adjusted and unadjusted for sampling variance.

  18. The Nottingham Prognostic Index: five- and ten-year data for all-ca