Science.gov

Sample records for cancer treatments show

  1. Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164200.html Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows Even ' ... News) -- The long-term side effects of different prostate cancer treatments vary -- and knowing that may help men ...

  2. [Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Patients Showing Thyroglobulin Elevative and Iodine Scintigraphy Negative].

    PubMed

    Ma, Ningshuai; Li, Suping

    2015-06-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) and radioiodine whole body scan (WBS) have been commonly used in follow-up of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Tg is associated with radioiodine uptake in local or distant metastases. In minority of patients, the follow-up scan shows no functioning thyroid tissue, but the serum thyroglobulin is still elevated. Therefore, we review recent developments of diagnosis and treatment of those patients with differentiated thyroid cancer and with thyroglobulin elevation but negative iodine scintigraphy.

  3. Trials show delayed recurrence in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bender, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Phase I trials of 2 treatments for recurrent ovarian cancer-a 2-step immunotherapy treatment and an antibody-drug conjugate-demonstrated promising early results in delaying recurrence, in work presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2013.

  4. New cell culture model for aromatase inhibitor-resistant breast cancer shows sensitivity to fulvestrant treatment and cross-resistance between letrozole and exemestane.

    PubMed

    Hole, Stine; Pedersen, Astrid M; Hansen, Susanne K; Lundqvist, Johan; Yde, Christina W; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2015-04-01

    Aromatase inhibitor (AI) treatment is first-line systemic treatment for the majority of postmenopausal breast cancer patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive primary tumor. Although many patients benefit from treatment, some will develop resistance, and models mimicking acquired resistance will be valuable tools to unravel the resistance mechanisms and to find new treatments and biomarkers. Cell culture models for acquired resistance to the three clinically relevant AIs letrozole, anastrozole and exemestane were developed by selection and expansion of colonies of MCF-7 breast cancer cells surviving long-term AI treatment under conditions where endogenous aromatase-mediated conversion of androgen to estrogen was required for growth. Four cell lines resistant to each of the AIs were established and characterized. Maintenance of ER expression and function was a general finding, but ER loss was seen in one of twelve cell lines. HER receptor expression was increased, in particular EGFR expression in letrozole-resistant cell lines. The AI-resistant cell lines had acquired ability to grow without aromatase-mediated conversion of testosterone to estradiol, but upon withdrawal of AI treatment, testosterone induced minor growth stimulation. Letrozole, exemestane and tamoxifen were able to abrogate the testosterone stimulation but could not reduce growth to below the level in standard growth medium with AI, demonstrating cross-resistance between letrozole, exemestane and tamoxifen. In contrast, fulvestrant totally blocked growth of the AI resistant cell lines both after withdrawal of AI and with AI treatment. These data show that ER is the main driver of growth of the AI-resistant cell lines and indicate ligand-independent activation of ER. Fulvestrant is an efficient treatment option for these AI-resistant breast cancer cells, and the cell lines will be useful tools to disclose the underlying molecular mechanism for resistance to the different AIs.

  5. Post-cancer Treatment with Condurango 30C Shows Amelioration of Benzo[a]pyrene-induced Lung Cancer in Rats Through the Molecular Pathway of Caspa- se-3-mediated Apoptosis Induction

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Sourav; Mukherjee, Avinaba; Bishayee, Kausik; Paul, Avijit; Saha, Santu Kumar; Ghosh, Samrat; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The present investigation aimed at examining if post-cancer treatment with a potentized homeopathic drug, Condurango 30C, which is generally used to treat oesophageal cancer, could also show an ameliorating effect through apoptosis induction on lung cancer induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in white rats (Rattus norvegicus). Methods: Lung cancer was induced after four months by chronic feeding of BaP to rats through gavage at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight for one month. After four months, the lung-cancer-bearing rats were treated with Condurango 30C for the next one (5th), two (5th-6th) and three (5th-7th) months, respectively, and were sacrificed at the corresponding time- points. The ameliorating effect, if any, after Condurango 30C treatment for the various periods was evaluated by using protocols such as histology, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), annexinV-FITC/PI assay, flow cytometry of the apoptosis marker, DNA fragmentation, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, and western blot analyses of lung tissue samples. Results: Striking recovery of lung tissue to a near normal status was noticed after post-cancerous drug treatment, as evidenced by SEM and histology, especially after one and two months of drug treatment. Data from the annexinV-FITC/PI and DNA fragmentation assays revealed that Condurango 30C could induce apoptosis in cancer cells after post-cancer treatment. A critical analysis of signalling cascade, evidenced through a RT-PCR study, demonstrated up-regulation and down-regulation of different pro- and anti-apoptotic genes, respectively, related to a caspase-3-mediated apoptotic pathway, which was especially discernible after one-month and two- month drug treatments. Correspondingly, Western blot and immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the ameliorative potential of Condurango 30C by its ability to down-regulate the elevated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, a hallmark of lung

  6. A CD44high/EGFRlow subpopulation within head and neck cancer cell lines shows an epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype and resistance to treatment.

    PubMed

    La Fleur, Linnea; Johansson, Ann-Charlotte; Roberg, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Mortality in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is high due to emergence of therapy resistance which results in local and regional recurrences that may have their origin in resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) or cells with an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of using the cell surface expression of CD44 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), both of which have been used as stem cell markers, to identify subpopulations within HNSCC cell lines that differ with respect to phenotype and treatment sensitivity. Three subpopulations, consisting of CD44(high)/EGFR(low), CD44(high)/EGFR(high) and CD44(low) cells, respectively, were collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The CD44(high)/EGFR(low) population showed a spindle-shaped EMT-like morphology, while the CD44(low) population was dominated by cobblestone-shaped cells. The CD44(high)/EGFR(low) population was enriched with cells in G0/G1 and showed a relatively low proliferation rate and a high plating efficiency. Using a real time PCR array, 27 genes, of which 14 were related to an EMT phenotype and two with stemness, were found to be differentially expressed in CD44(high)/EGFR(low) cells in comparison to CD44(low) cells. Moreover, CD44(high)/EGFR(low) cells showed a low sensitivity to radiation, cisplatin, cetuximab and gefitinib, and a high sensitivity to dasatinib relative to its CD44(high)/EGFR(high) and CD44(low) counterparts. In conclusion, our results show that the combination of CD44 (high) and EGFR (low) cell surface expression can be used to identify a treatment resistant subpopulation with an EMT phenotype in HNSCC cell lines.

  7. Cancer treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer. This helps your body get rid of cancer cells. Immunotherapy works by: Stopping or slowing the growth of ... to seek and attack certain parts of a cancer cell. Some have toxins or radioactive substances attached to them. Immunotherapy is given by a shot or IV. Hormonal ...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Parathyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ...

  9. Worldwide trends show oropharyngeal cancer rates increasing

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer significantly increased during the period 1983-2002 among people in countries that are economically developed. Oropharyngeal cancer occurs primarily in the middle part of the throat behind t

  10. Nasal Swab Shows Promise in Confirming Lung Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163805.html Nasal Swab Shows Promise in Confirming Lung Cancers Simple technique is based on cancer DNA ... 27, 2017 MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer remains by far the leading cancer killer ...

  11. Coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tas, Faruk; Kilic, Leyla; Duranyildiz, Derya

    2014-06-01

    Activated coagulation and fibrinolytic system in cancer patients is associated with tumor stroma formation and metastasis in different cancer types. The aim of this study is to explore the correlation of blood coagulation assays for various clinicopathologic factors in breast cancer patients. A total of 123 female breast cancer patients were enrolled into the study. All the patients were treatment naïve. Pretreatment blood coagulation tests including PT, APTT, PTA, INR, D-dimer, fibrinogen levels, and platelet counts were evaluated. Median age of diagnosis was 51 years old (range 26-82). Twenty-two percent of the group consisted of metastatic breast cancer patients. The plasma level of all coagulation tests revealed statistically significant difference between patient and control group except for PT (p<0.001 for all variables except for PT; p=0.08). Elderly age (>50 years) was associated with higher D-dimer levels (p=0.003). Metastatic patients exhibited significantly higher D-dimer values when compared with early breast cancer patients (p=0.049). Advanced tumor stage (T3 and T4) was associated with higher INR (p=0.05) and lower PTA (p=0.025). In conclusion, coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

  12. Nanotechnology in cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironidou-Tzouveleki, Maria; Imprialos, Konstantinos; Kintsakis, Athanasios

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current evolutions on nanotechnology and its applications on cancer theragnostics.Rapid advances and emerging technologies in nanotechnology are having a profound impact on cancer treatment. Applications of nanotechnology, which include liposomes, nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, nanocantilever, carbon nanotubes and quantum dots have significantly revolutionized cancer theragnostics. From a pharmaceutical viewpoint, it is critical that the biodistribution of active agents has to be controlled as much as possible. This aspect is vital in order to assure the proper efficiency and safety of the anticancer agents. These biocompatible nanocomposites provide specific biochemical interactions with receptors expressed on the surface of cancer cells. With passive or active targeting strategies, an increased intracellular concentration of drugs can be achieved in cancer cells , while normal cells are being protected from the drug simultaneously. Thus, nanotechnology restricts the extent of the adverse effects of the anticancer therapy. Treatment for metastatic breast cancer, sarcoma in AIDS patients, ovarian and lung cancer is already on market or under final phases of many clinical trials, showing remarkable results. As nanotechnology is perfected, side effects due to normal cell damage will decrease, leading to better results and lengthening patient's survival.

  13. Targeted Therapy Shows Benefit in Rare Type of Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment with the multitargeted agent vandetanib (Caprelsa) improved progression-free survival in patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), according to findings from a randomized clinical trial.

  14. Anal Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer that remains after treatment with external-beam radiation therapy. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ... cancer remains or comes back after treatment with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. ... options. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ...

  15. [Second cancer after starting treatment for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Mikata, Noriharu; Imao, Sadao; Fukasawa, Ritu

    2002-08-01

    The subjects for the present study were 270 patients with prostate cancer who underwent initial treatment at our hospital over the 14 years from 1986 to 1999. They were investigated to assess the relationship between their treatment and metachronous tumors. Sixteen patients (5.9%) developed cancer of other organs after starting treatment for prostate cancer. These metachronous tumors included gastric cancer in six patients as well as lung cancer, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, renal cancer, bladder cancer, skin cancer, leukemia, and mediastinal adenocarcinoma. Treatment for prostate cancer other than surgery included radiotherapy in eight patients, administration of estramustine phosphate sodium in nine patients, and LH-RH analogues in six patients. The chi-square test showed no significant difference in the incidence of metachronous cancer in relation to the presence/absence of these three therapies. The present study therefore ruled out the possible induction of other tumors by treatment for prostate cancer.

  16. After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... they stop taking the drugs. Some men experience impotence after surgery for prostate cancer. Your doctor can ... changes, emotional concerns, follow-up appointments, hormone therapy, impotence, radiotherapy, sex and cancer, sexual treatment, side effects, ...

  17. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back After Treatment Prostate Cancer Treating Prostate Cancer Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  18. Report to the Nation shows cancer death rates dropping

    Cancer.gov

    The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975–2009, shows that overall cancer death rates continued to decline in the United States among both men and women, among all major racial and ethnic groups, and for all of the most common cancer s

  19. Nonthermal Plasma-Mediated Cancer Cell Death; Targeted Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byul-Bora; Choi, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Hae-Jun; Lee, Jae-Koo; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    Non-thermal air plasma can kill cancer cells. However, there is no selectivity between normal and cancer cells. Therefore, cancer specific antibody conjugated gold nanoparticle (GNP) was pretreated before plasma irradiation. Stimulation of antibody conjugated GNP by plasma treatment resulted in a significant decrease in viability of cancer cells. This technology shows the feasibility of using plasma therapy for killing cancer cells selectively.

  20. Cardiotoxicity Following Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, AR; Harbinson, MT; Hanna, GG

    2017-01-01

    More than half of those born after 1960 will develop cancer during their lifetime. Fortunately, owing to improved diagnosis and treatment, cure rates have risen steadily over the last three decades. With an increased survivorship, more will experience adverse effects of cancer therapeutics on the heart. As the oncologist’s focus begins to encompass the issues of cancer survivorship, awareness of the management of cardiac toxicity would be prudent for all physicians looking after patients with cancer. PMID:28298705

  1. Treatment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Mabilia, Andrea; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically resected gastric cancer patients relapse locally or with distant metastases, or receive the diagnosis of gastric cancer when tumor is disseminated; therefore, median survival rarely exceeds 12 mo, and 5-years survival is less than 10%. Cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, with addition of trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients, is the widely used treatment in stage IV patients fit for chemotherapy. Recent evidence supports the use of second-line chemotherapy after progression in patients with good performance status PMID:24587643

  2. Working during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... working through cancer easier on you and your co-workers. Schedule treatments late in the day so ... Consider letting your co-workers know you have cancer. It might be easier to work if you do not have to make excuses ...

  3. Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not go away. Tests that examine the head, neck, and the inside of the mouth are used ... team of doctors who are experts in treating head and neck cancer. Your treatment will be overseen by a ...

  4. What Happens After Treatment for Bone Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Bone Cancer? For some people with bone cancer, treatment ... Treatment for Bone Cancer Stops Working More In Bone Cancer About Bone Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  5. What Happens After Treatment for Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Stomach Cancer? For some people with stomach cancer, treatment ... Treatment for Stomach Cancer Stops Working More In Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  6. What Happens After Treatment for Testicular Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Testicular Cancer? For most people with testicular cancer, treatment removes ... Treatment for Testicular Cancer Stops Working More In Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. What Happens After Treatment for Kidney Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Kidney Cancer? For some people with kidney cancer, treatment can ... Treatment for Kidney Cancer Stops Working More In Kidney Cancer About Kidney Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  8. Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity includes efforts to identify individual toxicity risks and prevention strategies support the National Cancer Insitute's goal of reducing the burden of cancer diagnoses and treatment outcomes.

  9. Cancer-related fatigue shows a stable association with diurnal cortisol dysregulation in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martina E; Semik, Johanna; Habermann, Nina; Wiskemann, Joachim; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Steindorf, Karen

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue is a major burden for breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy. Yet, its pathophysiology is still not well understood. Hypothesized mechanisms include dysregulations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which may be reflected in alterations in the diurnal cortisol patterns. However, studies on the association between cortisol and fatigue during adjuvant cancer therapy are rare. We therefore assessed salivary cortisol at awakening, 0.5h post-awakening, noon, 5 pm and 10 pm/bedtime in 265 breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy at three timepoints. Cancer-related fatigue was assessed with the Fatigue Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ) covering the physical, affective, and cognitive fatigue dimensions. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed cross-sectionally at the three timepoints as well as longitudinally considering changes in cortisol and fatigue over time. The results showed that the physical dimension of cancer-related fatigue was significantly associated with increased evening cortisol levels and higher overall cortisol secretion. These associations were independent of depressive symptoms. Morning cortisol levels, the cortisol awakening response and the diurnal slope were not consistently associated with physical fatigue. Affective and cognitive fatigue showed no clear association with any of the cortisol parameters. In conclusion, the physical but not the affective or cognitive dimension of fatigue seems associated with cortisol dysregulations in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy, characterized by an unaffected cortisol level in the morning but blunted decline to the evening level. Research focusing on disturbances of the cortisol rhythm and HPA dysregulations during and after cancer treatment may open new strategies to reduce cancer-related fatigue.

  10. Experimental Lung Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A first-of-its-kind drug is showing early promise in attacking certain lung cancers that are hard to treat because they build up resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The drug, CO-1686, performed well in a preclinical study involving xenograft and transgenic mice, as reported in the journal Cancer Discovery. It is now being evaluated for safety and efficacy in Phase I and II clinical trials.

  11. Tackling ageism in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Duffin, Christian

    2013-02-01

    Evidence shows that older patients are discriminated against when it comes to cancer treatment. A pilot project was commissioned by the Department of Health in partnership with Macmillan Cancer Support and Age UK. The project involved staff, including nurses, from five cancer networks in England examining ways to improve care for this patient group. Drawing on approaches used in geriatric medicine, patients' needs in accessing treatment were explored by conducting assessments and, for example, providing taxis for hospital appointments and practical support from voluntary organisations. Challenges for nurses included lack of training in patient screening and the extra workload caused by the assessments. The report on the pilot project concluded that involving elderly care specialists and using comprehensive geriatric assessments were useful approaches in the care of older cancer patients.

  12. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management.

  13. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular head and ...

  14. Bleeding during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... throwing up blood or your vomit looks like coffee grounds Long or heavy periods (women) Headaches that do not go away or are very bad Blurry or double vision Abdominal pains Alternative Names Cancer treatment - bleeding; Chemotherapy - bleeding; Radiation - bleeding; Bone marrow ...

  15. Precision Medicine in Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Precision medicine helps doctors select cancer treatments that are most likely to help patients based on a genetic understanding of their disease. Learn about the promise of precision medicine and the role it plays in cancer treatment.

  16. A cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus shows enhanced suppression of stem-cell like colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, So Young; Bang, Seo Young; Jeong, Su-Nam; Kang, Dae Hwan; Heo, Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-like colon cancer cells (SCCs) pose a major challenge in colon cancer treatment because of their resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oncolytic virus-based therapy has shown promising results in uncured cancer patients; however, its effects on SCCs are not well studied yet. Here, we engineered a cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus (CVV) as a potent biotherapeutic and investigated its therapeutic efficacy in terms of killing SCCs. CVV is an evolved Wyeth strain vaccinia virus (EVV) lacking the viral thymidine kinase. SCC models were established using human or mouse colon cancer spheres, which continuously expressed stemness markers. The cancer-favoring characteristics and different cytotoxic pathways for killing cancer cells successfully overrode general drug resistance, thereby killing colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of SCCs. Subcutaneously injected HT29 spheres showed lower growth in CVV-treated models than in 5-Fu-treated models. Intraperitoneally injected CT26 spheres induced tumor masses in the abdominal region. CVV-treated groups showed higher survival rates and smaller tumor mass formation, compared to 5-Fu-treated groups. Interestingly, the combined treatment of CVV with 5-Fu showed improved survival rates and complete suppression of tumor mass. The CVV developed in this study, thus, effectively suppresses SCCs, which can be synergistically enhanced by simultaneous treatment with the anticancer drug 5-Fu. Our novel CVV is highly advantageous as a next-generation therapeutic for treating colon cancer. PMID:26918725

  17. Ayahuasca and cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Comprehensively review the evidence regarding the use of ayahuasca, an Amerindian medicine traditionally used to treat many different illnesses and diseases, to treat some types of cancer. Methods: An in-depth review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, books, institutional magazines, conferences and online texts in nonprofessional sources regarding the biomedical knowledge about ayahuasca in general with a specific focus in its possible relations to the treatment of cancer. Results: At least nine case reports regarding the use of ayahuasca in the treatment of prostate, brain, ovarian, uterine, stomach, breast, and colon cancers were found. Several of these were considered improvements, one case was considered worse, and one case was rated as difficult to evaluate. A theoretical model is presented which explains these effects at the cellular, molecular, and psychosocial levels. Particular attention is given to ayahuasca’s pharmacological effects through the activity of N,N-dimethyltryptamine at intracellular sigma-1 receptors. The effects of other components of ayahuasca, such as harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline, are also considered. Conclusion: The proposed model, based on the molecular and cellular biology of ayahuasca’s known active components and the available clinical reports, suggests that these accounts may have consistent biological underpinnings. Further study of ayahuasca’s possible antitumor effects is important because cancer patients continue to seek out this traditional medicine. Consequently, based on the social and anthropological observations of the use of this brew, suggestions are provided for further research into the safety and efficacy of ayahuasca as a possible medicinal aid in the treatment of cancer. PMID:26770688

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Anal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer that remains after treatment with external-beam radiation therapy. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ... cancer remains or comes back after treatment with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. ... options. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ...

  19. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ...

  20. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Doğer, Emek; Calışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and radiotherapy after delivery. Even though early stage breast cancers have similar prognosis, advanced stage breast cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation have poorer prognosis than similar stage breast cancers diagnosed in non-pregnant women. Women who desire to become pregnant after treatment of breast cancer will have many conflicts. Although the most common concern is recurrence of breast cancer due to pregnancy, the studies conducted showed that pregnancy has no negative effect on breast cancer prognosis. In this review we search for the frequency of breast cancer during pregnancy, the histopathological findings, risk factor, diagnostic and treatment modalities. We reviewed the literature for evidence based findings to help consult the patients on the outcome of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation, and also inform the patients who desire to become pregnant after breast cancer according to current evidences.

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... given chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given ... of a special probe with tiny electrodes that kill cancer cells . Sometimes the probe is inserted directly ...

  2. Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Symptoms Check with your healthcare provider if you have ...

  3. Intensive Treatment Shows Potential Against Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 164100.html Intensive Treatment Shows Potential Against Type 2 Diabetes Up to 40 percent experienced temporary remission, ... 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Instead of managing type 2 diabetes as a chronic condition, what if people ...

  4. 18. PLAIN OFFICE; SHOWS WOODWORK AND WALL TREATMENT. ROOM 2662, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. PLAIN OFFICE; SHOWS WOODWORK AND WALL TREATMENT. ROOM 2662, SECOND FLOOR, SOUTH SIDE. - Hughes Aircraft Company, Processing & Electronics Building, 6775 Centinela Avenue, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Treatment of Breast Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... During Pregnancy Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Treatment Treating Breast Cancer During Pregnancy If you are diagnosed with breast ... treatment more complicated. Is it safe to treat breast cancer during pregnancy? Pregnant women can get treatment for ...

  6. [Infertility, fertility treatment and breast cancer risk].

    PubMed

    Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Israel and throughout the world. It is the leading cause of death from cancer in women. The cause of breast cancer is unknown; however gynecological history and hormonal factors have a major impact on the risk to develop breast cancer. Infertility affects 15-20% of couples in developed countries and most of them will need fertility treatment. The variety of fertility treatments and their use has been widespread during the last 50 years and especially since the introduction of in vitro fertilization. During fertility treatment, and depending on the type of treatment, there is ovarian hyperstimulation with maturation of several follicles and higher than normal estradiol levels. This article reviews the leading studies that evaluated the possible link between fertility treatment and the development of breast cancer. Most studies showed no association between fertility drugs and breast cancer. Whereas other researchers demonstrated a possible link between some fertility drugs and increased risk for breast cancer in certain subgroups. Therefore, larger studies with longer follow-up periods and better control for all possible confounding factors are needed in order to confirm the safety of fertility treatments in the long run. The combination of infertility and fertility treatment might cause harm, such as an increased risk for breast cancer Therefore, one has to consider carefully, together with the woman, the need for fertility treatment and give the lowest possible dosage for the shortest duration in order to minimize the risk.

  7. What Happens After Treatment for Eye Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Eye Cancer? For many people with eye cancer, treatment ... manage them. Follow-up after treatment of uveal (eye) melanoma Your doctor will most likely want to ...

  8. Natural Product Shows Effectiveness in Combating Colorectal Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    An herbal extract used for centuries to prevent heart disease has now been shown to be effective against colorectal cancer when tested in laboratory cell cultures. Scientists from NCI at Frederick found that the natural extract cryptotanshinone (CPT) stops the uncontrolled cell growth characteristic of cancer by interfering with a protein that has been implicated in several cancers, including those of the colon and rectum. The results appear in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry.

  9. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  10. Immune-Focused Drug Shows Promise Against Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... phase 3 trial of a PD-L1-directed immunotherapy in lung cancer," Gandara said in a journal news release. "The ... and adds to the already known benefits of immunotherapy in lung cancer," he added. Dr. Kevin Sullivan is an oncologist ...

  11. Skin Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  12. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels ...

  13. Parathyroid Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish . ... the PDQ cancer information summaries and keep them up to date. These Boards are made up of experts in ...

  14. Combination Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Adding the drug everolimus (Afinitor®) to exemestane helped postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer had stopped responding to hormonal therapy live about 4 months longer without the disease progressing than women who received exemestane alone.

  15. Plasma for cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that grew from research in application of low-temperature (or cold) atmospheric plasmas in bioengineering. One of the most promising applications of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is cancer therapy. Convincing evidence of CAP selectivity towards the cancer cells has been accumulated. This review summarizes the state of the art of this emerging field, presenting various aspects of CAP application in cancer such as the role of reactive species (reactive oxygen and nitrogen), cell cycle modification, in vivo application, CAP interaction with cancer cells in conjunction with nanoparticles, and computational oncology applied to CAP.

  16. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-01-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment. PMID:26165830

  17. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  18. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  20. Treatment Options for Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Primary Liver Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  2. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... when lymph nodes are not involved, called node-negative breast cancer. These shorter schedules are becoming more ... patients with a smaller, less-aggressive, and node-negative tumor. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Intensity-modulated radiation ...

  3. Prostate cancer - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... well. Proton therapy is another kind of radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer. Proton beams target the tumor precisely, so there is less damage to the surrounding tissue. This therapy is not widely accepted or used. Prostate Brachytherapy ...

  4. Cancer treatment: preventing infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... before they spread. How Having Cancer Increases Infection Risk As part of your immune system, your white ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  5. Lasers in Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat cancer: carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) lasers, argon lasers, and neodymium: yttrium -aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) ... can be used with endoscopes. CO 2 and argon lasers can cut the skin’s surface without going ...

  6. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Véronique; Chantôme, Aurélie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10 μM and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl− and the decreased HCO3− concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na–K–2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl−/HCO3− anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  7. [Treatment of testicular cancer].

    PubMed

    Droz, Jean-Pierre; Boyle, Helen; Culine, Stéphane; Fizazi, Karim; Fléchon, Aude; Massard, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    Germ-cell tumours (GCTs) are the most common type of cancer in young men. Since the late 1970s, disseminated GCT have been a paradigm for curable metastatic cancer and metastatic GCTs are highly curable with cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by surgical resection of residual masses. Patients' prognosis is currently assessed using the International Germ-Cell Consensus Classification (IGCCC) and used to adapt the burden of chemotherapy. Approximately 20% of patients still do not achieve cure after first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and need salvage chemotherapy (high dose or standard dose chemotherapy). Clinical stage I testicular cancer is the most common presentation and different strategies are proposed: adjuvant therapies, surgery or surveillance. During the last three decades, clinical trials and strong international collaborations lead to the development of a consensus in the management of GCTs.

  8. Molecular imaging in cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    The success of cancer therapy can be difficult to predict, as its efficacy is often predicated upon characteristics of the cancer, treatment, and individual that are not fully understood or are difficult to ascertain. Monitoring the response of disease to treatment is therefore essential and has traditionally been characterized by changes in tumor volume. However, in many instances, this singular measure is insufficient for predicting treatment effects on patient survival. Molecular imaging allows repeated in vivo measurement of many critical molecular features of neoplasm, such as metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, hypoxia, and apoptosis, which can be employed for monitoring therapeutic response. In this review, we examine the current methods for evaluating response to treatment and provide an overview of emerging PET molecular imaging methods that will help guide future cancer therapies. PMID:20661557

  9. Testicular Cancer Treatments: Surveillance

    MedlinePlus

    ... are TC clean, and your first line of defense are these testing regimens. If you do all the tests, this is not a risky choice. Click on this to go back to the TCRC main page: This page was last updated on Dec 05, 2012 Copyright © 1997 - 2012 The Testicular Cancer Resource Center , All Rights Reserved

  10. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may be given radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that ... palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and improve the patient's quality of ... therapy with radiosensitizers , with or without chemotherapy . A clinical ...

  11. Preventing Infections During Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Angela; Tai, Eric; Nielsen, Danielle Beauchesne; Shropshire, Sonya; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in oncology care, infections from both community and healthcare settings remain a major cause of hospitalization and death among patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Neutropenia (low white blood cell count) is a common and potentially dangerous side effect in patients receiving chemotherapy treatments and may lead to higher risk of infection. Preventing infection during treatment can result in significant decreases in morbidity and mortality for patients with cancer. As part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients public health campaign, a public-private partnership was formed between the CDC Foundation and Amgen, Inc. The CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control developed and launched an interactive website, www.PreventCancerInfections.org, designed for patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The site encourages patients to complete a risk assessment for developing neutropenia during their treatment. After completing the assessment, patients receive information about how to lower the risk for infection and keep themselves healthy while receiving chemotherapy. PMID:25095295

  12. Salvianolic acid A shows selective cytotoxicity against multidrug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Chunyan; Zhang, Longjiang; Li, Yanjun; Wang, Shouju; Wang, Jiandong; Yuan, Caiyun; Niu, Jia; Wang, Chengsheng; Lu, Guangming

    2015-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause for incurable breast cancer. Salvianolic acid A (SAA), the hydrophilic polyphenolic derivative of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen/Red Sage), was examined for cytotoxicities to MDR MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and their parental counterparts. We have shown that SAA inhibited proliferation, caused cell cycle arrest at the S phase, and induced apoptosis dose dependently to the two kinds of cancer cells. However, the resistant cells were significantly susceptible to the inhibition of SAA compared with the parental cells. SAA increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by 6.2-fold in the resistant cells, whereas the level of SAA-induced ROS changed only by 1.6-fold in their parental counterparts. Thus, the data showed that the selective cytotoxicity resulted from the hypersensitivity of the resistant cells to the strongly elevated ROS by SAA. In addition, SAA-triggered apoptosis was associated with increased caspase-3 activity, disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, downregulated Bcl-2 expression, and upregulated Bax expression in the resistant cells. Moreover, SAA downregulated the level of P-glycoprotein, which was overexpressed in the resistant cells. This indicated that SAA modulated MDR. Furthermore, SAA showed higher antitumor activity than did doxorubicin in xenografts established from the resistant cells. The present work raised a possibility that SAA might be considered a potential choice to overcome MDR for the selective susceptibility of the resistant breast cancer cells to SAA treatment.

  13. Treatment of bladder cancer. Oncology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Surgical treatment of common bladder cancers; Radiation therapy of common bladder cancers; Chemotherapy of common bladder cancers; Immunotherapy of common bladder cancers; Multimodal treatment of common bladder cancers; Other treatment modalities of common bladder cancers; Treatment of less common bladder cancers; Reviews of treatment of bladder cancers.

  14. What Will Happen After Treatment for Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Treatment What Will Happen After Treatment for Ovarian Cancer? For some people with ovarian cancer, treatment may ... If Ovarian Cancer Treatment Stops Working More In Ovarian Cancer About Ovarian Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  15. Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... New types of treatment are being tested in clinical trials. Information about clinical trials is available from ... want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. For some patients, taking part in a ...

  16. [Medical treatment of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Lobel, B; Cipolla, B; Labrador, J

    1994-03-01

    Hormone dependence of prostate cancer is well known. In 80% of cases with metastases, hormone suppression leads to the reduction of tumour volume and related disorders. However the treatment is generally palliative because malignant process recurs after about around 16 months. Mean survival is less than 3 years in these forms. Lack of response come always together with a poor prognosis, and there is 90% mortality at 2 years. Advanced prostatic cancer should not be treated with hormones if the patient has few symptoms and his quality of life is satisfactory. Symptomatic forms require hormone manipulation. Orchidectomy or LH-RH are recommended. Total androgen ablation (combined treatment) leads rapidly to more relief of symptoms, but its drawbacks and especially high cost indicate that its use should be weighed individually. Estramustine is not a first-lune treatment. Presently, there is no criteria to predict response to treatment.

  17. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    ScienceCinema

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  18. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2012-04-11

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  19. Discovery – Methotrexate: Chemotherapy Treatment for Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Prior to the 1950s, treatment for the majority of cancers was limited to either surgery or the use of radiation. The discovery of the use of methotrexate in curing a rare cancer marked the first time a cancer had been cured. This led to the development of many of today’s common cancer treatments.

  20. Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Immunotherapy Treatment Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World Jun 16, 2014 This story is part of ... Research We Conduct Back To Top Imagine a world free from cancer. Help make it a reality. ...

  1. What Happens After Treatment for Liver Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Liver Cancer After Treatment Living as a Liver Cancer Survivor Completing treatment can be both stressful ... back, this could happen. Follow-up after a liver transplant A liver transplant can be very effective ...

  2. Breast cancer: Diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ariel, I.M.; Clearly, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    This is a publication about the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer with an appeal for unified reporting of end results. Nine chapters cover historical reviews, risk factors, pathology-receptors-immunology, detection and diagnosis, treatment of the potentially curable patient, and treatment of the patient with advanced disease. The three concluding chapters discuss reconstruction, special clinical situations, and support for the patient. The role of radiation therapy is presented well. The current status of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and combined therapies is also addressed by authoritative authors.

  3. Lipoplatin Treatment in Lung and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, Manuela; Gianni, Lorenzo; Santelmo, Carlotta; Drudi, Fabrizio; Castellani, Cinzia; Affatato, Alessandra; Nicolini, Mario; Ravaioli, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of cisplatin in cancer treatment represents an important achievement in the oncologic field. Many types of cancers are now treated with this drug, and in testicular cancer patients major results are reached. Since 1965, other compounds were disovered and among them carboplatin and oxaliplatin are the main Cisplatin analogues showing similar clinical efficacy with a safer toxicity profile. Lipoplatin is a new liposomal cisplatin formulation which seems to have these characteristics. Lipoplatin was shown to be effective in NSCLC both in phase 2 and phase 3 trials, with the same response rate of Cisplatin, a comparable overall survival but less toxicity. A new protocol aiming to elucidate the double capacity of Lipoplatin to act as a chemotherapeutic and angiogenetic agent in triple-negative breast cancer patients is upcoming. PMID:22295201

  4. Lipoplatin treatment in lung and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Manuela; Gianni, Lorenzo; Santelmo, Carlotta; Drudi, Fabrizio; Castellani, Cinzia; Affatato, Alessandra; Nicolini, Mario; Ravaioli, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of cisplatin in cancer treatment represents an important achievement in the oncologic field. Many types of cancers are now treated with this drug, and in testicular cancer patients major results are reached. Since 1965, other compounds were disovered and among them carboplatin and oxaliplatin are the main Cisplatin analogues showing similar clinical efficacy with a safer toxicity profile. Lipoplatin is a new liposomal cisplatin formulation which seems to have these characteristics. Lipoplatin was shown to be effective in NSCLC both in phase 2 and phase 3 trials, with the same response rate of Cisplatin, a comparable overall survival but less toxicity. A new protocol aiming to elucidate the double capacity of Lipoplatin to act as a chemotherapeutic and angiogenetic agent in triple-negative breast cancer patients is upcoming.

  5. Treatment options for small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Todd; Gillenwater, Heidi H

    2004-07-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises 15% to 25% of all lung cancers. The leading cause of lung cancer remains smoking, and rates of smoking continue to rise in women, whereas rates in other subgroups have slowed. In this article we review recent advances in the treatment of limited-stage as well as extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. In limited-stage disease, the best survival results are observed when patients are treated with twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy given concurrently with chemotherapy. Patients who have been successful in smoking cessation during therapy for limited-stage disease may have a survival benefit over those who are unable to quit smoking during treatment. In extensive-stage disease, the most significant trial is one comparing irinotecan plus cisplatin and etoposide plus cisplatin, showing a survival advantage for the irinotecan arm. This trial may change the standard of care for patients with extensive-stage disease. A similar ongoing trial in the United States is attempting to confirm these results.

  6. NIH-funded study shows increased prostate cancer risk from vitamin E supplements | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Men who took 400 international units (I.U.) of vitamin E daily had more prostate cancers compared to men who took a placebo, according to an updated review of data from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT). The findings showed that, per 1,000 men, there were 76 prostate cancers in men who took only vitamin E supplements, vs. |

  7. Expanding the Playing Field: Immune-Based Therapy Shows Potential for Lung, Other Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Results from two early-phase clinical trials presented at the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting provide further evidence that priming the immune system to attack tumors has potential as a treatment for certain cancers.

  8. Advances in paediatric cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Saletta, Federica; Seng, Michaela S; Lau, Loretta M S

    2014-04-01

    Four out of five children diagnosed with cancer can be cured with contemporary cancer therapy. This represents a dramatic improvement since 50 years ago when the cure rate of childhood cancer was <25% in the pre-chemotherapy era. Over the past ten years, while improvement in overall survival (OS) has been marginal, progress in pediatric oncology lies with adopting risk-adapted therapeutic approach. This has been made possible through identifying clinical and biologic prognostic factors with rigorous research and stratifying patients using these risk factors, and subsequently modifying therapy according to risk group assignment. This review provides a perspective for eight distinct pediatric malignancies, in which significant advances in treatment were made in the last decade and are leading to changes in standard of care. This includes four hematologic malignancies [acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL)] and four solid tumors [medulloblastoma (MB), low grade glioma (LGG), neuroblastoma (NB) and Ewing sarcoma (ES)]. Together, they comprise 60% of childhood cancer. Improved patient outcome is not limited to better survival, but encompasses reducing both short and long-term treatment-related complications which is as important as cure, given the majority of childhood cancer patients will become long-term survivors. Risk-adapted approach allows treatment intensification in the high-risk cohort while therapy can be de-escalated in the low-risk to minimize toxicity and late sequelae without compromising survival. Advances in medical research technology have also led to a rapid increase in the understanding of the genetics of childhood cancer in the last decade, facilitating identification of molecular targets that can potentially be exploited for therapeutic benefits. As we move into the era of targeted therapeutics, searching for novel agents that target specific genetic lesions becomes a

  9. Latest Surveillance Data Show Cancer Cases and Deaths Continue to Decline | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The overall rate of both new cancer diagnoses (incidence) and cancer deaths continued to decrease between 2003 and 2007, according to the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, published online March 31 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The decrease in cancer death rates of 1.6 percent per year continues a trend that began in the early 1990s. Overall, the decrease in incidence rates for men and women combined was 1 percent per year. |

  10. Estradiol shows anti-skin cancer activities through decreasing MDM2 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Feng, Jianguo; Chen, Ying; Li, Shun; Ou, Mengting; Sun, Weichao; Tang, Liling

    2017-01-31

    Estradiol plays important roles in many biological responses inducing tumor genesis and cancer treatment. However, the effects of estradiol on tumors were inconsistent among a lot of researches and the mechanism is not fully understood. Our previous study indicated that splicing factor hnRNPA1 could bind to the human homologue of mouse double minute (MDM2), an oncogene which has been observed to be over-expressed in numerous types of cancers. In this research, we investigated whether and how estradiol correlate to cancer cell behaviors through heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNPA1) and MDM2. Results showed that 10×10-13Mestradiol elevated the expression of hnRNPA1 regardless ER expression in cells, and then down-regulated the expression of MDM2. At the same time, estradiol inhibited cell proliferation, migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition progression of A375 and GLL19 cells. While, knocking down hnRNPA1 through the transfection of hnRNPA1 siRNA led to the increase of MDM2 at both protein level and gene level In vivo experiment, subcutaneous injection with estradiol every two days near the tumor at doses of 2.5mg/kg/d suppressed tumor growth and reduced MDM2 expression. In a word, via increasing hnRNPA1 level and then reducing the expression of MDM2, estradiol prevented carcinogenesis in melanomas. We confirmed therapeutic effect of estradiol, as well as a new way for estradiol to resist skin cancer.

  11. Multifunctional carbon nanohorn complexes for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Chechetka, Svetlana A; Pichon, Benoit; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Bianco, Alberto; Miyako, Eijiro

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional carbon nanohorn (CNH) complexes were synthesized using oxidized CNH, magnetite (MAG) nanoparticles, and polyethyleneimine (PEI). The ferromagnetic MAG nanoparticles were loaded onto CNH (MAG-CNH) using iron(II) acetate and subsequent heat treatment. Chemical functionalization of the MAG-CNH complexes with PEI improved their water-dispersibility and allowed further conjugation with a fluorophore. The application of an external magnetic field significantly intensified the targeted vectorization of CNH complexes into human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells. Following cell uptake, laser irradiation of the cells showed a significant enhancement in the photothermal effects of CNHs leading to cell death. We have confirmed that the photothermal properties and ferromagnetic characteristics of CNH complexes show efficient cell elimination. The present study is an essential step toward the development of an innovative cancer therapy and a highly sensitive detection of cancer cells at the single-cell level.

  12. Understanding Cancer Prevention, Detection, Treatment, Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH/NCI NCI: 70 Years of Excellence in Cancer Research Welcome to this special section on cancer research and treatment. August 5 of this year marks ... creation of what has become the world's preeminent cancer research organization, the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Our nation ...

  13. Gynaecological cancer pathway for faster cancer treatment: a clinical audit.

    PubMed

    Askew, Catherine; Gangji, Anand

    2016-10-28

    Gynaecological cancers make up 10% of cancer cases and 10% of female cancer deaths in New Zealand. The services for investigation and treatment of these women are regionally specific rather than centrally organised; hence we need appropriate standards of service and clear pathways for communication and management of these patients to ensure consistent care that is in line with the Ministry of Health goals for faster cancer treatment.

  14. What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Men? For many men with breast cancer, ... Breast Cancer in Men Stops Working More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  15. What Happens After Treatment for Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Bile Duct Cancer? For some people with bile duct cancer, ... Bile Duct Cancer Stops Working More In Bile Duct Cancer About Bile Duct Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  16. Controlling plasma stimulated media in cancer treatment application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dayun; Sherman, Jonathan H.; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Ratovitski, Edward; Canady, Jerome; Keidar, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) constitutes a "cocktail" of various reactive species. Accumulating evidence shows the effectiveness of CAP in killing cancer cells and decreasing the tumor size, which provides a solid basis for its potential use in cancer treatment. Currently, CAP is mainly used to directly treat cancer cells and trigger the death of cancer cells via apoptosis or necrosis. By altering the concentration of fetal bovine serum in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and the temperature to store CAP stimulated media, we demonstrated controllable strategies to harness the stimulated media to kill glioblastoma cells in vitro. This study demonstrated the significant role of media in killing cancer cells via the CAP treatment.

  17. NIH-supported trial drug shows benefit in children with previously treated cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Young patients with some types of advanced cancer, for whom standard treatment had failed, had their tumors disappear during treatment with a drug that both targets and blocks a protein associated with their disease. These findings are from a Phase I, mul

  18. Surgical treatments for esophageal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allum, William H.; Bonavina, Luigi; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Felix, Valter Nilton; Figueredo, Edgar; Gatenby, Piers A.C.; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ibraev, Maksat A.; Krasna, Mark J.; Lambert, René; Langer, Rupert; Lewis, Michael P.N.; Nason, Katie S.; Parry, Kevin; Preston, Shaun R.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Schaheen, Lara W.; Tatum, Roger P.; Turkin, Igor N.; van der Horst, Sylvia; van der Peet, Donald L.; van der Sluis, Peter C.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Wormald, Justin C.R.; Wu, Peter C.; Zonderhuis, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on the role of the nurse in preparation of esophageal resection (ER); the management of patients who develop high-grade dysplasia after having undergone Nissen fundoplication; the trajectory of care for the patient with esophageal cancer; the influence of the site of tumor in the choice of treatment; the best location for esophagogastrostomy; management of chylous leak after esophagectomy; the optimal approach to manage thoracic esophageal leak after esophagectomy; the choice for operational approach in surgery of cardioesophageal crossing; the advantages of robot esophagectomy; the place of open esophagectomy; the advantages of esophagectomy compared to definitive chemoradiotherapy; the pathologist report in the resected specimen; the best way to manage patients with unsuspected positive microscopic margin after ER; enhanced recovery after surgery for ER: expedited care protocols; and long-term quality of life in patients following esophagectomy. PMID:25266029

  19. [New frontiers in cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Tortora, Giampaolo; Daniele, Gennaro

    2006-12-01

    The knowledge acquired in the past few years on the regulatory mechanisms of cancer growth and spreading have started to be translated in the development of a new therapeutic modality directed against previously defined molecular targets, now defined as "target therapy", thus introducing a truly revolutionary concept in the anticancer therapeutic strategies. The novel molecular targeted drugs are usually integrated in therapeutic regimens that combine such novel agents with the conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and several studies have now demonstrated their efficacy in the clinical practice. The future goal of cancer therapy will be the tailoring of treatments based on the specific molecular features of the tumor of each patient, with the aim to obtain the maximum therapeutic efficacy with the lowest toxicity.

  20. Prostate Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  1. Kidney Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  2. Lung Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Ovarian Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  4. Colorectal Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  5. Bladder Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  6. Breast Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  7. Screening for Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  8. What's New in Nasopharyngeal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Nasopharyngeal Cancer About Nasopharyngeal Cancer What's New in Nasopharyngeal Cancer Research and Treatment? Research into ... the world where this cancer is common. Treatment New surgical techniques Advances in the field of skull ...

  9. What's New In Eye Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Eye Cancer About Eye Cancer What’s New in Eye Cancer Research and Treatment? Many medical ... high risk group. Using genes to help find new treatments Identifying gene changes in eye cancer cells ...

  10. What's New in Testicular Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer What’s New in Testicular Cancer Research and Treatment? Important research ... findings may help individualize treatment and help find new drugs to treat testicular cancer that can target ...

  11. [Radiolabeled antibodies for cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-François; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise

    2009-12-01

    The first treatment ever by radio-immunotherapy (RIT) was performed by William H. Beierwaltes in 1951 and was a success. Fifty years later, the main question is to find ways of extending the success of radiolabelled anti-CD20 antibodies in indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma to other forms of cancer. Solid tumours are much more radioresistant than lymphomas, but they respond to RIT if the lesions are small. Clinical situations of residual or minimal disease are thus the most likely to benefit from RIT in the adjuvant or consolidation settings. For disseminated disease, like leukemias or myelomas, the problem is different: beta- particles emitted by the radioactive atoms classically used for cancer treatment (iodine-131 or yttrium-90) disperse their energy in large volumes (ranges 1 mm to 1 cm) and are not very effective against isolated cells. Advances in RIT progress in two directions. One is the development of pretargeting strategies in which the antibody is not labelled but used to provide binding sites to small molecular weight radioactivity vectors (biotin, haptens). These techniques have been shown to increase tumour to non-target uptake ratios and anti-tumour efficacy has been demonstrated in the clinic. The other approach is the use of radionuclides adapted to the various clinical situations. Lutetium-177 or copper-67, because of the lower energy of their emission, their relatively long half-life and good gamma emission, may significantly improve RIT efficacy and acceptability. Beyond that, radionuclides emitting particles such as alpha particles or Auger electrons, much more efficient to kill isolated tumour cells, are being tested for RIT in the clinic. Finally, RIT should be integrated with other cancer treatment approaches in multimodality protocols. Thus RIT, now a mature technology, should enter a phase of well designed and focused clinical developments that may be expected to afford significant therapeutic advances.

  12. [New antibodies in cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C; Knuth, A

    2004-09-22

    Since the development of hybridoma technology in 1975 monoclonal antibodies with pre-defined specificity can be produced. Only twenty years later did it become possible to make therapeutic use of monoclonal antibodies in oncology. To this end it was necessary to attach the antigen-binding site of a mouse antibody onto the scaffold of a human antibody molecule. Such chimeric or "humanized" antibodies may be used in passive immunotherapy without eliciting an immune response. Rituximab and trastuzumab are such humanized antibodies. They are used today routinely in the treatment of malignant lymphoma and breast cancer, respectively. These antibodies are usually used in combination with conventional cytostatic anticancer drugs.

  13. Cancer cachexia, mechanism and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that half of all patients with cancer eventually develop a syndrome of cachexia, with anorexia and a progressive loss of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle mass. Cancer cachexia is characterized by systemic inflammation, negative protein and energy balance, and an involuntary loss of lean body mass. It is an insidious syndrome that not only has a dramatic impact on patient quality of life, but also is associated with poor responses to chemotherapy and decreased survival. Cachexia is still largely an underestimated and untreated condition, despite the fact that multiple mechanisms are reported to be involved in its development, with a number of cytokines postulated to play a role in the etiology of the persistent catabolic state. Existing therapies for cachexia, including orexigenic appetite stimulants, focus on palliation of symptoms and reduction of the distress of patients and families rather than prolongation of life. Recent therapies for the cachectic syndrome involve a multidisciplinary approach. Combination therapy with diet modification and/or exercise has been added to novel pharmaceutical agents, such as Megestrol acetate, medroxyprogesterone, ghrelin, omega-3-fatty acid among others. These agents are reported to have improved survival rates as well as quality of life. In this review, we will discuss the emerging understanding of the mechanisms of cancer cachexia, the current treatment options including multidisciplinary combination therapies, as well an update on new and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:25897346

  14. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    PubMed Central

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  15. [Surgical treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, O; Salinas-Aragón, L E; Camacho-Mauries, D; Medina-Franco, H

    2010-01-01

    Rectal affection accounts for 30% of colorectal cancer. The standard of treatment is surgical resection, which often is curative. For superior and middle-rectal involvement, low anterior resection (LAR) is the preferred procedure. For tumors involving the lower portion of the rectum, abdominoperineal resection (APR) or LAR are the options of treatment, depending on sphincter involvement. The main surgical objective is to achieve a R0 resection with an appropriated total mesorrectal excision, greater number of lymph nodes and negative distal and radial margins. These surgical parameters have been used as quality indicators and have prognostic implications in terms of overall and disease-free survival. Total mesorectal excision with preservation of hypogastric nerves has shown a reduction in rates of sexual and bladder dysfunction as well as lower local recurrence. At specialized centers such procedures are performed by minimal invasive surgery; however the number of meta-analysis is scarce.

  16. Long-Term Trial Results Show No Mortality Benefit from Annual Prostate Cancer Screening

    Cancer.gov

    Thirteen year follow-up data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial show higher incidence but similar mortality among men screened annually with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and digital rectal examination

  17. Cancer treatment: dealing with pain

    MedlinePlus

    Palliative - cancer pain ... The pain from cancer can have a few different causes: The cancer. When a tumor grows it can press ... nerves, bones, organs, or the spinal cord, causing pain. Medical tests. Some medical tests, such as a ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Endometrial Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage II endometrial cancer. Cancer has spread into connective tissue of the cervix, but has not spread outside ... uterus. In stage II , cancer has spread into connective tissue of the cervix , but has not spread outside ...

  19. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Chemotherapy - dry mouth; Radiation therapy - dry mouth; Transplant - dry mouth; Transplantation - dry mouth ... National Cancer Institute. Chemotherapy and you: support for people with cancer. Updated May 2007. ... ...

  20. What's New in Kidney Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Kidney Cancer About Kidney Cancer What’s New in Kidney Cancer Research and Treatment? Research on ... can also be used to develop new treatments. New approaches to local treatment High-intensity focused ultrasound ( ...

  1. Exercise training as treatment in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Lira, Fábio Santos; Neto, José Cesar Rosa; Seelaender, Marília

    2014-06-01

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome that may accompany a plethora of diseases, including cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, aids, and rheumatoid arthritis. It is associated with central and systemic increases of pro-inflammatory factors, and with decreased quality of life, response to pharmacological treatment, and survival. At the moment, there is no single therapy able to reverse cachexia many symptoms, which include disruption of intermediary metabolism, endocrine dysfunction, compromised hypothalamic appetite control, and impaired immune function, among other. Growing evidence, nevertheless, shows that chronic exercise, employed as a tool to counteract systemic inflammation, may represent a low-cost, safe alternative for the prevention/attenuation of cancer cachexia. Despite the well-documented capacity of chronic exercise to counteract sustained disease-related inflammation, few studies address the effect of exercise training in cancer cachexia. The aim of the present review was hence to discuss the results of cachexia treatment with endurance training. As opposed to resistance exercise, endurance exercise may be performed devoid of equipment, is well tolerated by patients, and an anti-inflammatory effect may be observed even at low-intensity. The decrease in inflammatory status induced by endurance protocols is paralleled by recovery of various metabolic pathways. The mechanisms underlying the response to the treatment are considered.

  2. Cancer Treatment 1975-85: The Use of Breakthrough Treatments for Seven Types of Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    O-RIOS 636 CANCER TREATMENT 1975-65: THE USE OF BREAKCTHROUGH / I TREATMENTS FOR SEVEN TYPES OF CANCER(U) GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE WASHINGTON DC...all breakthrouqhs in cancer treatment that met the followinq criteria: 1I B-226468 -they occurred by 1982 (so as to allow us to determine patterns of

  3. TAILORx Trial Shows Some Women with Breast Cancer May Forgo Chemotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from the Trial Assigning Individualized Options for Treatment, or TAILORx, finds that women with early-stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer have a low risk of recurrence based on a test for the expression of 21 genes.

  4. Toremifene in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mustonen, Mika VJ; Pyrhönen, Seppo; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2014-01-01

    Although more widespread screening and routine adjuvant therapy has improved the outcome for breast cancer patients in recent years, there remains considerable scope for improving the efficacy, safety and tolerability of adjuvant therapy in the early stage disease and the treatment of advanced disease. Toremifene is a selective estrogen receptor modifier (SERM) that has been widely used for decades in hormone receptor positive breast cancer both in early and late stage disease. Its efficacy has been well established in nine prospective randomized phase III trials compared to tamoxifen involving more than 5500 patients, as well as in several large uncontrolled and non-randomized studies. Although most studies show therapeutic equivalence between the two SERMs, some show an advantage for toremifene. Several meta-analyses have also confirmed that the efficacy of toremifene is at least as good as that of tamoxifen. In terms of safety and tolerability toremifene is broadly similar to tamoxifen although there is some evidence that toremifene is less likely to cause uterine neoplasms, serious vascular events and it has a more positive effect on serum lipids than does tamoxifen. Toremifene is therefore effective and safe in the treatment of breast cancer. It provides not only a useful therapeutic alternative to tamoxifen, but may bring specific benefits. PMID:25114854

  5. What's New in Anal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Anal Cancer About Anal Cancer What’s New in Anal Cancer Research and Treatment? Important research ... cancer cells is expected to help scientists develop new drugs to fight this disease. Early detection Ongoing ...

  6. What's New in Research and Treatment for Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thymus Cancer? Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer What’s New in Research and Treatment for Thymus Cancer? There ... treating thymomas is still being explored. In addition, new treatments are being developed and tested. Researchers are ...

  7. What's New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What’s New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment? Important research ... RAI) therapy. Doctors and researchers are looking for new ways to treat thyroid cancer that are more ...

  8. Dihydrochalcone Compounds Isolated from Crabapple Leaves Showed Anticancer Effects on Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoxiao; Xing, Yun Feng; Zhou, Zhiqin; Yao, Yuncong

    2015-11-27

    Seven dihydrochalcone compounds were isolated from the leaves of Malus crabapples, cv. "Radiant", and their chemical structures were elucidated by UV, IR, ESI-MS, ¹H-NMR and (13)C-NMR analyses. These compounds, which include trilobatin (A1), phloretin (A2), 3-hydroxyphloretin (A3), phloretin rutinoside (A4), phlorizin (A5), 6''-O-coumaroyl-4'-O-glucopyranosylphloretin (A6), and 3'''-methoxy-6''-O-feruloy-4'-O-glucopyranosyl-phloretin (A7), all belong to the phloretin class and its derivatives. Compounds A6 and A7 are two new rare dihydrochalcone compounds. The results of a MTT cancer cell growth inhibition assay demonstrated that phloretin and these derivatives showed significant positive anticancer activities against several human cancer cell lines, including the A549 human lung cancer cell line, Bel 7402 liver cancer cell line, HepG2 human ileocecal cancer cell line, and HT-29 human colon cancer cell line. A7 had significant effects on all cancer cell lines, suggesting potential applications for phloretin and its derivatives. Adding a methoxyl group to phloretin dramatically increases phloretin's anticancer activity.

  9. Long Term Toxicity of Cancer Treatment in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokni, Armin; Wu, Abraham; Carter, Jeanne; Lichtman, Stuart M.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis With earlier cancer diagnosis among older cancer patients, the possibility of curing cancer increases. However, cancer treatment may have long lasting impact on older cancer survivors. It is vital to screen, diagnose and properly manage the long term toxicities of cancer treatment, in order to maintain quality of life of older cancer survivors PMID:26614861

  10. Long-term Toxicity of Cancer Treatment in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Shahrokni, Armin; Wu, Abraham J; Carter, Jeanne; Lichtman, Stuart M

    2016-02-01

    With earlier cancer diagnosis among older patients with cancer, the possibility of curing cancer increases. However, cancer treatment may have a long-lasting impact on older cancer survivors. It is vital to screen, diagnose, and properly manage the long-term toxicities of cancer treatment in order to maintain the quality of life of older cancer survivors.

  11. Curcumin-treated cancer cells show mitotic disturbances leading to growth arrest and induction of senescence phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mosieniak, Grażyna; Sliwinska, Małgorzata A; Przybylska, Dorota; Grabowska, Wioleta; Sunderland, Piotr; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Sikora, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Cellular senescence is recognized as a potent anticancer mechanism that inhibits carcinogenesis. Cancer cells can also undergo senescence upon chemo- or radiotherapy. Curcumin, a natural polyphenol derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, shows anticancer properties both in vitro and in vivo. Previously, we have shown that treatment with curcumin leads to senescence of human cancer cells. Now we identified the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon. We observed a time-dependent accumulation of mitotic cells upon curcumin treatment. The time-lapse analysis proved that those cells progressed through mitosis for a significantly longer period of time. A fraction of cells managed to divide or undergo mitotic slippage and then enter the next phase of the cell cycle. Cells arrested in mitosis had an improperly formed mitotic spindle and were positive for γH2AX, which shows that they acquired DNA damage during prolonged mitosis. Moreover, the DNA damage response pathway was activated upon curcumin treatment and the components of this pathway remained upregulated while cells were undergoing senescence. Inhibition of the DNA damage response decreased the number of senescent cells. Thus, our studies revealed that the induction of cell senescence upon curcumin treatment resulted from aberrant progression through the cell cycle. Moreover, the DNA damage acquired by cancer cells, due to mitotic disturbances, activates an important molecular mechanism that determines the potential anticancer activity of curcumin.

  12. Endoglin for targeted cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Lee S; Gordon, Michael S; Robert, Francisco; Matei, Daniela E

    2014-02-01

    Endoglin is a homodimeric cell membrane glycoprotein receptor for transforming growth factor β and bone morphogenetic proteins. Endoglin is essential for angiogenesis, being densely expressed on proliferating endothelial cells and upregulated during hypoxia. Its expression is implicated in development of resistance to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition. TRC105 is an antibody that binds endoglin and prevents endothelial cell activation. Targeting endoglin and the VEGF pathway concurrently improves treatment in vitro and appears to reverse resistance to bevacizumab in some refractory cancer patients. Randomized trials are under way to assess the clinical benefit of adding TRC105 therapy to bevacizumab therapy. Further trials are under way to assess the activity of TRC105 with small-molecule inhibitors of the VEGF pathway in renal cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and soft tissue sarcoma. Stratification of soft tissue sarcomas based on endoglin expression levels is proposed to identify patients most likely to benefit from TRC105 treatment. The development of a TRC105 antibody-drug conjugate is also described.

  13. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Fazlul H. Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Esophageal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... layers of tissue , including mucous membrane , muscle, and connective tissue . Esophageal cancer starts on the inside lining of ... and spread into the muscle layer or the connective tissue layer of the esophagus wall. The cancer cells ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels ...

  17. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  18. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cancer and the stage (extent) of the disease. In general, patients with early-stage head and neck cancers (particularly those limited to the site of origin) are treated with one modality—either radiation therapy ...

  19. Review of hormonal treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdulkareem, I H; Zurmi, I B

    2012-01-01

    This critical review focuses on the role of steroid hormones and their receptors in the development and treatment of breast cancer, with special reference to estrogen receptors, as well as mechanisms of receptor-ligand interactions, response or resistance to hormonal therapy against breast cancer, in conjunction with other modalities like surgery and chemotherapy. Tamoxifen is used in hormonal treatment of breast cancer for up to five years, depending on the presentation. However, there have been recent developments in hormonal therapy of breast cancer in the last ten years, with the introduction of many different alternative therapies for this condition. A critical review of published articles in Pubmed/Medline, Athens, AJOL, NHS Evidence, Science Direct and Google, relating to hormonal treatment of breast cancer, was undertaken, in order to evaluate the mechanisms of estrogen receptor-ligand interactions, their involvement in the etio-pathogenesis of breast cancer, resistance of breast cancer cells to anti-hormonal agents, as well as ways of treating breast cancer using anti-hormone drugs like tamoxifen. Although tamoxifen is the established drug for hormonal treatment of breast cancer, cases of hormone resistance breast cancer have been described recently in the literature. This can happen from the beginning, or during treatment. Therefore, we aim to examine the causes of resistance to hormonal treatment with a view to understand the options of tackling this problem, and suggest other novel alternative hormonal therapies that can be tried, which may overtake tamoxifen in the future. We also seek to emphasize that hormonal therapy has a definite place in the treatment of breast cancer along with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, as the disease is often considered to be multi-systemic even from the beginning.

  20. Fertility preservation during cancer treatment: clinical guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny A; Oktay, Kutluk

    2014-01-01

    The majority of children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with cancer today will become long-term survivors. The threat to fertility that cancer treatments pose to young patients cannot be prevented in many cases, and thus research into methods for fertility preservation is developing, aiming at offering cancer patients the ability to have biologically related children in the future. This paper discusses the current status of fertility preservation methods when infertility risks are related to surgical oncologic treatments, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. Several scientific groups and societies have developed consensus documents and guidelines for fertility preservation. Decisions about fertility and imminent potentially gonadotoxic therapies must be made rapidly. Timely and complete information on the impact of cancer treatment on fertility and fertility preservation options should be presented to all patients when a cancer treatment is planned. PMID:24623991

  1. Treatment modalities for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Jesús; Pinedo, Eugenia; Ojeda, Vanesa; del Rio, Maria Guerra

    2015-01-01

    Different treatment modalities have been proposed in the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC). Endoscopic resection (ER) is an established treatment that allows curative treatment, in selected cases. In addition, ER allows for an accurate histological staging, which is crucial when deciding on the best treatment option for EGC. Recently, endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) have become alternatives to surgery in early gastric cancer, mainly in Asian countries. Patients with “standard” criteria can be successfully treated by EMR techniques. Those who meet “expanded” criteria may benefit from treatment by ESD, reducing the need for surgery. Standardized ESD training system is imperative to promulgate effective and safe ESD technique to practices with limited expertise. Although endoscopic resection is an option in patients with EGC, surgical treatment continues to be a widespread therapeutic option worldwide. In this review we tried to point out the treatment modalities for early gastric cancer. PMID:26380052

  2. Cripto: A Target for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-01-1-0165 TITLE: Cripto: A, Target for Breast Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Eileen D. Adamson, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...CONTRACT NUMBER Cripto: A Target for Breast Cancer Treatment 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-01-1-0165 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...Target for Breast Cancer Treatment " As reported fully in June 2004, the IDEA grant was not successful in the original mission of finding a peptide that

  3. An actuarial analysis shows that offering lung cancer screening as an insurance benefit would save lives at relatively low cost.

    PubMed

    Pyenson, Bruce S; Sander, Marcia S; Jiang, Yiding; Kahn, Howard; Mulshine, James L

    2012-04-01

    Lung cancer screening is not established as a public health practice, yet the results of a recent large randomized controlled trial showed that screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography reduces lung cancer mortality. Using actuarial models, this study estimated the costs and benefits of annual lung cancer screening offered as a commercial insurance benefit in the high-risk US population ages 50-64. Assuming current commercial reimbursement rates for treatment, we found that screening would cost about $1 per insured member per month in 2012 dollars. The cost per life-year saved would be below $19,000, an amount that compares favorably with screening for cervical, breast, and colorectal cancers. Our results suggest that commercial insurers should consider lung cancer screening of high-risk individuals to be high-value coverage and provide it as a benefit to people who are at least fifty years old and have a smoking history of thirty pack-years or more. We also believe that payers and patients should demand screening from high-quality, low-cost providers, thus helping set an example of efficient system innovation.

  4. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    ScienceCinema

    Gray, Joe

    2016-07-12

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  5. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-07

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  6. Cancer treatment and survivorship statistics, 2016.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kimberly D; Siegel, Rebecca L; Lin, Chun Chieh; Mariotto, Angela B; Kramer, Joan L; Rowland, Julia H; Stein, Kevin D; Alteri, Rick; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2016-07-01

    The number of cancer survivors continues to increase because of both advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the population. For the public health community to better serve these survivors, the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute collaborate to estimate the number of current and future cancer survivors using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registries. In addition, current treatment patterns for the most prevalent cancer types are presented based on information in the National Cancer Data Base and treatment-related side effects are briefly described. More than 15.5 million Americans with a history of cancer were alive on January 1, 2016, and this number is projected to reach more than 20 million by January 1, 2026. The 3 most prevalent cancers are prostate (3,306,760), colon and rectum (724,690), and melanoma (614,460) among males and breast (3,560,570), uterine corpus (757,190), and colon and rectum (727,350) among females. More than one-half (56%) of survivors were diagnosed within the past 10 years, and almost one-half (47%) are aged 70 years or older. People with a history of cancer have unique medical and psychosocial needs that require proactive assessment and management by primary care providers. Although there are a growing number of tools that can assist patients, caregivers, and clinicians in navigating the various phases of cancer survivorship, further evidence-based resources are needed to optimize care. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:271-289. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  7. [Selenium and cancer: from prevention to treatment].

    PubMed

    Brozmanová, J

    2011-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential dietary component for all animals, including human beings, that is regarded as a protective agent against cancer. Although the mode of its anticancer action is not yet fully understood, several mechanisms, such as antioxidant protection through selenoenzymes, stimulation of DNA repair, and apoptosis in tumor prestages have all been proposed. Despite the unsupported results of the last "SELECT" trial, the cancer-preventing activity of Se has been demonstrated in a majority of epidemiological studies. Moreover, recent studies suggest that Se has a potential to be used not only in cancer prevention but also in cancer treatment, where in combination with other anticancer drugs or radiation it may increase the efficacy of cancer therapy. In combating cancer cells, Se acts as a prooxidant rather than an antioxidant, inducing apoptosis through the generation of oxidative stress. Thus, inorganic Se compounds, having high redox potency, represent a promising option in cancer therapy.

  8. Capecitabine and docetaxel combination for the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Mariko; Leonard, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    The management of breast cancer depends on the tumor and patient's characteristics. Anthracycline-based regimens have been proven to decrease the risk of relapse and prolong survival time in breast cancer. Taxanes have been incorporated not only into metastatic breast cancer but also into adjuvant regimens. Capecitabine, an oral fluoropyrimidine carbamate, has good single-agent activity and, together with docetaxel, demonstrated preclinical synergy and a survival benefit in metastatic breast cancer. Recent analyses show that capecitabine/docetaxel dosing flexibility for managing side effects does not compromise efficacy, and define this combination regimen as an important treatment option for its efficacy, tolerability and cost-effectiveness.

  9. ISO-66, a novel inhibitor of macrophage migration, shows efficacy in melanoma and colon cancer models.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Kyriaki; Cheng, Kai Fan; Crichlow, Gregg V; Birmpilis, Anastasios I; Lolis, Elias J; Tsitsilonis, Ourania E; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2014-10-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine, which possesses a contributing role in cancer progression and metastasis and, thus, is now considered a promising anticancer drug target. Many MIF-inactivating strategies have proven successful in delaying cancer growth. Here, we report on the synthesis of ISO-66, a novel, highly stable, small-molecule MIF inhibitor, an analog of ISO-1 with improved characteristics. The MIF:ISO-66 co-crystal structure demonstrated that ISO-66 ligates the tautomerase active site of MIF, which has previously been shown to play an important role in its biological functions. In vitro, ISO-66 enhanced specific and non-specific anticancer immune responses, whereas prolonged administration of ISO-66 in mice with established syngeneic melanoma or colon cancer was non-toxic and resulted in a significant decrease in tumor burden. Subsequent ex vivo analysis of mouse splenocytes revealed that the observed decrease in tumor growth rates was likely mediated by the selective in vivo expansion of antitumor-reactive effector cells induced by ISO-66. Compared to other MIF-inactivating strategies employed in vivo, the anticancer activity of ISO-66 is demonstrated to be of equal or better efficacy. Our findings suggest that targeting MIF, via highly specific and stable compounds, such as ISO-66, may be effective for cancer treatment and stimulation of anticancer immune responses.

  10. A history of prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Denmeade, Samuel R.; Isaacs, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The increased incidence of prostate cancer has led to remarkable changes in diagnosis and treatment over the past century. What were the first ways in which prostate cancer was treated, and how did these evolve into the variety of therapeutic strategies from which patients have to choose today? PMID:12044015

  11. Lung cancer: Biology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Lemjabbar-Alaoui, Hassan; Hassan, Omer Ui; Yang, Yi-Wei; Buchanan, Petra

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women in the U.S. and worldwide. About 90% of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking and the use of tobacco products. However, other factors such as radon gas, asbestos, air pollution exposures, and chronic infections can contribute to lung carcinogenesis. In addition, multiple inherited and acquired mechanisms of susceptibility to lung cancer have been proposed. Lung cancer is divided into two broad histologic classes, which grow and spread differently: small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) and non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). Treatment options for lung cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Therapeutic-modalities recommendations depend on several factors, including the type and stage of cancer. Despite the improvements in diagnosis and therapy made during the past 25 years, the prognosis for patients with lung cancer is still unsatisfactory. The responses to current standard therapies are poor except for the most localized cancers. However, a better understanding of the biology pertinent to these challenging malignancies, might lead to the development of more efficacious and perhaps more specific drugs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent developments in lung cancer biology and its therapeutic strategies, and discuss the latest treatment advances including therapies currently under clinical investigation.

  12. Adapting conventional cancer treatment for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jian; Liu, Zhida; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-05-01

    The efficacy of directly killing tumors by conventional cancer therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, has been for several decades well established. But, a suppressed immune response might become a lethal side effect after repeated cycles of intensive treatment. Recently, achievements in immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive T cell-mediated immunotherapies have resulted in changes in frontline management of advanced cancer diseases. However, accumulated evidence indicates that immunotherapeutic and conventional strategies alone are often ineffective to eradicate big tumors or metastasis. To improve the outcomes of treatment for advanced cancer diseases, the combination of conventional cancer treatment with various immunotherapeutic approaches has been attempted and has shown potential synergistic effects. Recent studies have unexpectedly demonstrated that some strategies of conventional cancer treatment can regulate the immune response positively, thus the understanding of how to adapt conventional treatment for immunotherapy is crucial to the design of effective combination therapy of conventional treatment with immunotherapy. Here, we review both experimental and clinical studies on the therapeutic effect and its mechanisms of combining conventional therapy with immunotherapy in treatment of cancer.

  13. Clinical utility of exemestane in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Geuna, Elena; Milani, Andrea; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women, causing a significant mortality worldwide. Different endocrine strategies are available for the treatment of hormone-sensitive breast cancer, including antiestrogen tamoxifen and fulvestrant, as well as third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs), such as letrozole, anastrozole, and exemestane. In this review, we will focus on exemestane, its clinical use, and its side effects. Exemestane is a steroidal third-generation AI now used in all treatment settings for breast cancer. In the metastatic disease, it has been extensively investigated as the first-, second-, and further-line treatment and it is now registered for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer whose disease has progressed following antiestrogen therapy. A potential lack of cross-resistance with nonsteroidal AIs has been described, giving additional therapeutic opportunities in sequences of endocrine agents. Exemestane is also approved for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal early breast cancer, either as upfront monotherapy for 5 years, as a switch following 2–3 years of tamoxifen, or as extended therapy beyond 5 years of adjuvant treatment. New promising data also showed a beneficial effect in young premenopausal early breast cancer patients, when administered together with ovarian suppression. Interesting results have also emerged when exemestane has been investigated as neodjuvant treatment as well as preventive agent in healthy women at high risk for breast cancer. Exemestane is generally well tolerated, with a side effect profile similar to that of other AIs, including menopausal symptoms, arthralgia, and bone loss. In conclusion, exemestane can be considered an effective and well-tolerated endocrine treatment option for all stages of breast cancer. PMID:26064072

  14. Clinical utility of exemestane in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Geuna, Elena; Milani, Andrea; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women, causing a significant mortality worldwide. Different endocrine strategies are available for the treatment of hormone-sensitive breast cancer, including antiestrogen tamoxifen and fulvestrant, as well as third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs), such as letrozole, anastrozole, and exemestane. In this review, we will focus on exemestane, its clinical use, and its side effects. Exemestane is a steroidal third-generation AI now used in all treatment settings for breast cancer. In the metastatic disease, it has been extensively investigated as the first-, second-, and further-line treatment and it is now registered for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer whose disease has progressed following antiestrogen therapy. A potential lack of cross-resistance with nonsteroidal AIs has been described, giving additional therapeutic opportunities in sequences of endocrine agents. Exemestane is also approved for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal early breast cancer, either as upfront monotherapy for 5 years, as a switch following 2-3 years of tamoxifen, or as extended therapy beyond 5 years of adjuvant treatment. New promising data also showed a beneficial effect in young premenopausal early breast cancer patients, when administered together with ovarian suppression. Interesting results have also emerged when exemestane has been investigated as neodjuvant treatment as well as preventive agent in healthy women at high risk for breast cancer. Exemestane is generally well tolerated, with a side effect profile similar to that of other AIs, including menopausal symptoms, arthralgia, and bone loss. In conclusion, exemestane can be considered an effective and well-tolerated endocrine treatment option for all stages of breast cancer.

  15. Prostate cancer: 9. Treatment of advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleave, M E; Bruchovsky, N; Moore, M J; Venner, P

    1999-01-01

    A 70-year-old man is referred to a urologist for recommendations on the management of metastatic prostate cancer. His cancer was diagnosed 5 years ago, and he underwent radical prostatectomy at that time. The tumour was confined to the prostate gland (Gleason score 7), and during surgery the lymph nodes were assessed as being clear of cancer. Before the surgery, the patient's prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level had been 8 ng/mL. After the prostatectomy, PSA was at first undetectable, but recently the PSA level rose to 2 ng/mL and then, at the most recent test, to 16 ng/mL. A bone scan was ordered to investigate back discomfort, which has been persistent but easily controlled with acetaminophen. Unfortunately, the bone scan shows several sites of metastatic disease. The man's medical history includes type 2 diabetes, which has developed during the past 3 years and which is controlled by diet, as well as asymptomatic hypertension, which is managed by means of a thiazide diuretic. The patient asks what treatments are available, what impact they are likely to have on his disease and what risks are associated with the therapies. PMID:9951446

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Salivary Gland Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not go away. Tests that examine the head, neck, and the inside of the mouth are used ... team of doctors who are experts in treating head and neck cancer. Your treatment will be overseen by a ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Salivary Gland Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not go away. Tests that examine the head, neck, and the inside of the mouth are used ... team of doctors who are experts in treating head and neck cancer. Your treatment will be overseen by a ...

  18. Hedgehog Signal Transduction Inhibitors in Breast Cancer Treatment and Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    cancer treatment . We find 1) that constitutive activation of hedgehog signaling by overexpression of the Smoothened effector protein in transgenic mice leads to increased proliferation and cancer-like developmental defects. 2) hedgehog signaling inhibitors such as cyclopamine slow or prevent breast cancer cell growth (MCF7 and MDA231) but do not alter "normal" cell (MCF10A). In addition, inhibitors show no measurable effect on normal mammary gland development. 3) Unexpectedly, Ptcl-induced defects are not inhibited or reverted by treatment with specific inhibitors of

  19. Metallated DNA Aptamers For Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    including a polydA tail in one aptamer complex and a polydT tail in a second aptamer complex, with dimerization occurring by Watson - Crick base pair...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 W81XWH-10-1-0132 Metallated DNA Aptamers for Prostate Cancer Treatment Dr. William Gmeiner Wake Forest University Winston...efficacious for prostate cancer treatment. Significant progress has been made on refining novel Zn2+-binding DNA motifs that utilize FdU

  20. Cancer in pregnancy: disentangling treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Zagouri, Flora; Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Marinopoulos, Spyridon; Tsigginou, Alexandra; Dimopoulos, Meletios-Athanassios

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated cancer constitutes an uncommon and difficult to manage clinical situation. It is defined as the cancer diagnosed from the first day of childbearing to 1 year post partum. Coexistence of cancer with pregnancy adds complexity to treatment recommendations, as both the mother and the fetus may be affected. The optimal therapeutic management of pregnant women with cancer diagnosis should take into account, apart from medical factors, a host of other parameters (ethical, psychological, religious, legal, etc). Unfortunately, this situation becomes more complex as more women delay childbearing, and consequently the incidence of cancer during pregnancy is constantly increasing. This manuscript summarises the general principles in managing pregnant patients with cancer and gives detailed instructions in the management of pregnant patients with breast cancer, ovarian cancer, melanoma, lymphoma, lung cancer, soft-tissue sarcoma and cervical cancer. Of note, management of pregnant women with cancer diagnosis should be performed in specialised centres with experience and all cases should be discussed in multidisciplinary meetings composed of multiple specialists (medical oncologists, obstetricians, surgeons, radiologists and paediatricians). PMID:27843602

  1. What's New in Esophageal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Esophagus Cancer About Esophagus Cancer What’s New in Cancer of the Esophagus Research and Treatment? ... people with Barrett’s esophagus. This may lead to new tests for finding the people who are likely ...

  2. What's New in Gallbladder Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Gallbladder Cancer About Gallbladder Cancer What’s New in Gallbladder Cancer Research and Treatment? Research into ... Chemotherapy and radiation therapy Researchers are looking at new ways of increasing the effectiveness of radiation therapy . ...

  3. What's New in Bone Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Bone Cancer About Bone Cancer What’s New in Bone Cancer Research and Treatment? Research on ... from growing for a time. Some are testing new chemo drugs. Targeted therapy Targeted therapy drugs work ...

  4. What's New in Salivary Gland Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Salivary Gland Cancer About Salivary Gland Cancer What’s New in Salivary Gland Cancer Research and Treatment? Medical ... they hope to use this information to develop new treatments that work better and cause fewer side ...

  5. What's New in Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypopharyngeal Cancer About Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer What’s New in Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers Research and Treatment? ... to better tests for early detection and to new targeted treatments. Chemoprevention Chemoprevention is the use of ...

  6. What's New in Stomach Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer What’s New in Stomach Cancer Research and Treatment? Research is ... Chemotherapy drugs and combinations Some studies are testing new ways to combine drugs already known to be ...

  7. Cancer Stem Cells: A Novel Paradigm for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, D.; Ramalingam, S.; Houchen, C.W.; Anant, S.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause for mortality in US only after heart disease and lacks a good or effective therapeutic paradigm. Despite the emergence of new, targeted agents and the use of various therapeutic combinations, none of the treatment options available is curative in patients with advanced cancer. A growing body of evidence is supporting the idea that human cancers can be considered as a stem cell disease. Malignancies are believed to originate from a fraction of cancer cells that show self renewal and pluripotency and are capable of initiating and sustaining tumor growth. The cancer-initiating cells or cancer stem cells were originally identified in hematological malignancies but is now being recognized in several solid tumors. The hypothesis of stem cell-driven tumorigenesis raises questions as to whether the current treatments, most of which require rapidly dividing cells are able to efficiently target these slow cycling tumorigenic cells. Recent characterization of cancer stem cells should lead to the identification of key signaling pathways that may make cancer stem cells vulnerable to therapeutic interventions that target drug-effluxing capabilities, anti-apoptotic mechanisms, and induction of differentiation. Dietary phytochemicals possess anti-cancer properties and represent a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of many cancers. PMID:20370703

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer) cells form in the tissues of the pancreas. The pancreas is a gland about 6 inches ... spleen , and bile ducts . Tests that examine the pancreas are used to detect (find), diagnose, and stage ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy ( metabolism ). Control the amount of calcium ... test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Nasopharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol . Signs of nasopharyngeal cancer include trouble breathing, speaking, or hearing. These and other signs and symptoms ... or neck. A sore throat. Trouble breathing or speaking. Nosebleeds. Trouble hearing. Pain or ringing in the ...

  11. Treatment Options for Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Serosal (outer) layer. Between these layers is supporting connective tissue . Primary gallbladder cancer starts in the inner layer ... has spread beyond the muscle layer to the connective tissue around the muscle. Stage IIIA In stage IIIA , ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Gallbladder Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Serosal (outer) layer. Between these layers is supporting connective tissue . Primary gallbladder cancer starts in the inner layer ... has spread beyond the muscle layer to the connective tissue around the muscle. Stage IIIA In stage IIIA , ...

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells show little tropism for the resting and differentiated cancer stem cell-like glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenlin; Jiang, Zhongmin; Huang, Jianyong; Huang, Shuqiang; Li, Yanxia; Sheng, Feng; Yu, Simiao; Yu, Shizhu; Liu, Xiaozhi

    2014-04-01

    Intrinsic resistance of glioma cells to radiation and chemotherapy is currently hypothesized to be partially attributed to the existence of cancer stem cells. Emerging studies suggest that mesenchymal stem cells may serve as a potential carrier for delivery of therapeutic genes to disseminated glioma cells. However, the tropism character of mesenchymal stem cells for cancer stem cell-like glioma cells has rarely been described. In this study, we obtained homologous bone marrow-derived (BM-) and adipose tissue-derived (AT-) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), fibroblast, and cancer stem cell-like glioma cells (CSGCs) from tumor-bearing mice, and compared the tropism character of BM- and AT-MSCs for CSGCs with various form of existence. To characterize the cell proliferation and differentiation, the spheroids of CSGCs were cultured on the surface of the substrate with different stiffness, combined with or withdrew basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in medium. Our results showed that the CSGCs during the process of cell proliferation, but not in resting and differentiated status, display strong tropism characteristics on both BM- and AT-MSCs, as well as the expression of their cell chemokine factors which mediate cell migration. If the conclusion is further confirmed, it may expose a fatal flaw of MSCs as tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents in the treatment of the CSGCs, even other cancer stem cells, because there always exist a part of cancer stem cells that are in resting status. Overall, our findings provide novel insight into the complex issue of the MSCs as drug delivery in the treatment of brain tumors, especially in tumor stem cells.

  14. Breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers: medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Milani, Andrea; Geuna, Elena; Zucchini, Giorgia; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    About 10% of breast cancers are associated with the inheritance of autosomal dominant breast cancer susceptibility alleles BRCA1 and BRCA2. Until recently, the medical management of BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer has not differed from that of the sporadic breast cancer counterpart. However, there is mounting evidence that this molecular alteration confers sensitivity or resistance to systemic therapies that can be exploited in terms of medical management. For example, studies support the use of platinum salts chemotherapy in BRCA mutated cancers. Moreover, a number of targeted therapies are showing activity in BRCA mutation carriers. Above all, BRCA defective tumor cells are particularly sensitive to Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. This review will summarize the state of the art of the medical treatment of breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers, with a particular focus on chemotherapies and targeted therapies.

  15. Translating genomic profiling to gastrointestinal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuto; Mizrak Kaya, Dilsa; Shimodaira, Yusuke; Song, Shumei; Baba, Hideo; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2017-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing enables faster, cheaper and more accurate whole-genome sequencing, allowing genome profiling and discovery of molecular features. As molecular targeted drugs are developed, treatment can be tailored according to molecular subtype. Gastric and colorectal cancers have each been divided into four subtypes according to molecular features. Profiling of the esophageal cancer genome is underway and its classification is anticipated. To date, identification of HER2 expression in gastric adenocarcinoma and KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutations in colon cancer have proved essential for treatment decisions. However, to overcome therapy resistance and improve prognosis, further individualized therapy is required. Here, we summarize the treatment options for gastrointestinal cancer according to genomic profiling and discuss future directions.

  16. Spices for Prevention and Treatment of Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Spices have been widely used as food flavorings and folk medicines for thousands of years. Numerous studies have documented the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of spices, which might be related to prevention and treatment of several cancers, including lung, liver, breast, stomach, colorectum, cervix, and prostate cancers. Several spices are potential sources for prevention and treatment of cancers, such as Curcuma longa (tumeric), Nigella sativa (black cumin), Zingiber officinale (ginger), Allium sativum (garlic), Crocus sativus (saffron), Piper nigrum (black pepper) and Capsicum annum (chili pepper), which contained several important bioactive compounds, such as curcumin, thymoquinone, piperine and capsaicin. The main mechanisms of action include inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, migration and invasion of tumors, and sensitizing tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This review summarized recent studies on some spices for prevention and treatment of cancers, and special attention was paid to bioactive components and mechanisms of action. PMID:27529277

  17. How useful are unconventional cancer treatments?

    PubMed

    Ernst, E; Cassileth, B R

    1999-10-01

    Unconventional cancer treatments are used frequently. Therefore, oncologists need to know about them. This article gives an overview of current knowledge on the most prevalent complementary or alternative cancer therapies. A distinction is made between alleged cures, preventive and adjunctive measures. Shark cartilage, mistletoe, thymus therapy, essiac, hydrazine sulphate, 714-X, dietary regimens, green tea and Panax ginseng are all covered specifically. None of these treatments offer reasonable hope for a cure. Some strategies are promising in terms of cancer prevention. The true potential of unconventional therapies might lie in adjunctive and palliative care. It is concluded that good evidence in this area is scarce. Vis-à-vis the high prevalence of unconventional cancer treatments, rigorous investigations are mandatory, not least for increasing the safety of future patients.

  18. Treatment of Breast Cancer in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Rachel A

    2015-11-01

    Despite the fact that the US population is aging and the numbers of older patients with breast cancer are increasing, many questions remain on how to optimally treat this patient population. Accrual of older cancer patients to clinical trials has been stagnant, and consequently, evidence-based recommendations are often limited by a lack of prospective data to inform decisions. Increasingly, one's functional status has been recognized as a critical factor in predicting for treatment toxicity, and tools such as the geriatric assessment will likely become a routine part of clinical practice over time. Here, adjuvant treatment considerations for older patients will be reviewed, including what is known about treatment efficacy, utilization patterns, and toxicity for older breast cancer patients. Improving enrollment of older patients onto clinical trials should be a national priority; it is only through prospective assessment that we can improve our approaches to treating our older patients with cancer.

  19. EGFR inhibitors and autophagy in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Hu, Yun-Feng; Feng, Xie-Min; Tian, Tao; Guo, Ya-Huan; Ma, Jun-Wei; Nan, Ke-Jun; Zhang, Hong-Yi

    2014-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor treatment is a strategy for cancer therapy. However, innate and acquired resistance is a major obstacle of the efficacy. Autophagy is a self-digesting process in cells, which is considered to be associated with anti-cancer drug resistance. The activation of EGFR can regulate autophagy through multiple signal pathways. EGFR inhibitors can induce autophagy, but the specific function of the induction of autophagy by EGFR inhibitors remains biphasic. On the one hand, autophagy induced by EGFR inhibitors acts as a cytoprotective response in cancer cells, and autophagy inhibitors can enhance the cytotoxic effects of EGFR inhibitors. On the other hand, a high level of autophagy after treatment of EGFR inhibitors can also result in autophagic cell death lacking features of apoptosis, and the combination of EGFR inhibitors with an autophagy inducer might be beneficial. Thus, autophagy regulation represents a promising approach for improving the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in the treatment of cancer patients.

  20. Spices for Prevention and Treatment of Cancers.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-08-12

    Spices have been widely used as food flavorings and folk medicines for thousands of years. Numerous studies have documented the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of spices, which might be related to prevention and treatment of several cancers, including lung, liver, breast, stomach, colorectum, cervix, and prostate cancers. Several spices are potential sources for prevention and treatment of cancers, such as Curcuma longa (tumeric), Nigella sativa (black cumin), Zingiber officinale (ginger), Allium sativum (garlic), Crocus sativus (saffron), Piper nigrum (black pepper) and Capsicum annum (chili pepper), which contained several important bioactive compounds, such as curcumin, thymoquinone, piperine and capsaicin. The main mechanisms of action include inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, migration and invasion of tumors, and sensitizing tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This review summarized recent studies on some spices for prevention and treatment of cancers, and special attention was paid to bioactive components and mechanisms of action.

  1. Hepatic colorectal cancer metastases showing a distinctive pattern of pathological response after metronomic capecitabine and bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Pietrantonio, Filippo; Biondani, Pamela; Pellegrinelli, Alessandro; Marchianò, Alfonso; Dotti, Katia Fiorella; Buzzoni, Roberto; Di Bartolomeo, Maria

    2012-12-01

    A 48-year-old man was referred to our hospital with the diagnosis of colon cancer with multiple hepatic metastases. After right hemicolectomy, the rapid progression of liver disease was treated with metronomic capecitabine and bevacizumab according to a study protocol. A gradual regression of metastatic lesions was observed during a 9-month treatment period. After conversion of liver disease to resectability, the histological examination disclosed the complete necrosis of all lesions, with the exception of small neoplastic foci inside a single nodule. The comparison of this type of histological findings with the classic sclero-hyaline pathological response, as well as its importance as indicator of response to antiangiogenic treatment, is discussed.

  2. Management of Complications of Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, M. Dror; Cotter, Shane E.; Gargollo, Patricio C.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Dahl, Douglas M.; Smith, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in the United States. Treatment of men with prostate cancer commonly involves surgical, radiation, or hormone therapy. Most men with prostate cancer live for many years after diagnosis and may never suffer morbidity or mortality attributable to prostate cancer. The short-term and long-term adverse consequences of therapy are, therefore, of great importance. Adverse effects of radical prostatectomy include immediate postoperative complications and long-term urinary and sexual complications. External beam or interstitial radiation therapy in men with localized prostate cancer may lead to urinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual complications. Improvements in surgical and radiation techniques have reduced the incidence of many of these complications. Hormone treatment typically consists of androgen deprivation therapy, and consequences of such therapy may include vasomotor flushing, anemia, and bone density loss. Numerous clinical trials have studied the role of bone antiresorptive therapy for prevention of bone density loss and fractures. Other long-term consequences of androgen deprivation therapy may include adverse body composition changes and increased risk of insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Ongoing and planned clinical trials will continue to address strategies to prevent treatment-related side effects and improve quality of life for men with prostate cancer. PMID:18502900

  3. Nanomedicine for Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common cancer and the primary cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States and rest of the world. Due to diagnosis at an advanced stage, it is associated with a high mortality in a majority of patients. In recent years, enormous advances have occurred in the development and application of nanotechnology in the detection, diagnosis, and therapy of cancer. This progress has led to the development of the emerging field of "cancer nanomedicine." Nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems have gained immense popularity due to their bioavailability, in vivo stability, intestinal absorption, solubility, sustained and targeted delivery, and therapeutic effectiveness of several anticancer agents. Currently, a plethora of nanocarrier formulations are utilized including lipid-based, polymeric and branched polymeric, metal-based, magnetic, and mesoporous silica. In lung cancer, nanoparticle-based therapeutics is paving the way in the diagnosis, imaging, screening, and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors. The application and expansion of novel nanocarriers for drug delivery is an exciting and challenging research filed, in particular for the delivery of emerging cancer therapies. Some of the current progress and challenges in nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems for lung cancer treatment are discussed.

  4. Targeting Signaling Pathways in Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Li

    2017-01-01

    The Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch pathways are inherent signaling pathways in normal embryogenesis, development, and hemostasis. However, dysfunctions of these pathways are evident in multiple tumor types and malignancies. Specifically, aberrant activation of these pathways is implicated in modulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small subset of cancer cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation into heterogeneous tumor cells. The CSCs are accountable for tumor initiation, growth, and recurrence. In this review, we focus on roles of Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch pathways in CSCs' stemness and functions and summarize therapeutic studies targeting these pathways to eliminate CSCs and improve overall cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:28356914

  5. New Treatment in Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Dario; Prestifilippo, Angela; Scarfia, Alessia; Martino, Daniela; Marchisotta, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor. Thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine, and TSH suppression represent the standard treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer. Since chemotherapy has been shown to be unsuccessful in case of advanced thyroid carcinomas, the research for new therapies is fundamental. In this paper, we reviewed the recent literature reports (pubmed, medline, EMBASE database, and abstracts published in meeting proceedings) on new treatments in advanced nonmedullary and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Studies of many tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as antiangiogenic inhibitors suggest that patients with thyroid cancer could have an advantage with new target therapy. We summarized both the results obtained and the toxic effects associated with these treatments reported in clinical trials. Reported data in this paper are encouraging, but further trials are necessary to obtain a more effective result in thyroid carcinoma treatment. PMID:23133451

  6. Marine compound rhizochalinin shows high in vitro and in vivo efficacy in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alsdorf, Winfried H.; Hauschild, Jessica; Lange, Tobias; Venz, Simone; Bauer, Christiane K.; Bähring, Robert; Amann, Kerstin; Mandanchi, Ramin; Schumacher, Udo; Schröder-Schwarz, Jennifer; Makarieva, Tatyana N.; Guzii, Alla G.; Tabakmakher, Kseniya M.; Fedorov, Sergey N.; Shubina, Larisa K.; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Ehmke, Heimo; Steuber, Thomas; Stonik, Valentin A.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Honecker, Friedemann; von Amsberg, Gunhild

    2016-01-01

    Development of drug resistance is an inevitable phenomenon in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells requiring novel therapeutic approaches. In this study, efficacy and toxicity of Rhizochalinin (Rhiz) – a novel sphingolipid-like marine compound – was evaluated in prostate cancer models, resistant to currently approved standard therapies. In vitro activity and mechanism of action of Rhiz were examined in the human prostate cancer cell lines PC-3, DU145, LNCaP, 22Rv1, and VCaP. Rhiz significantly reduced cell viability at low micromolar concentrations showing most pronounced effects in enzalutamide and abiraterone resistant AR-V7 positive cells. Caspase-dependent apoptosis, inhibition of pro-survival autophagy, downregulation of AR-V7, PSA and IGF-1 expression as well as inhibition of voltage-gated potassium channels were identified as mechanisms of action. Remarkably, Rhiz re-sensitized AR-V7 positive cells to enzalutamide and increased efficacy of taxanes. In vivo activity and toxicity were evaluated in PC-3 and 22Rv1 NOD SCID mouse xenograft models using i.p. administration. Rhiz significantly reduced growth of PC-3 and 22Rv1 tumor xenografts by 27.0% (p = 0.0156) and 46.8% (p = 0.047) compared with controls with an increased fraction of tumor cells showing apoptosis secondary to Rhiz exposure. In line with the in vitro data, Rhiz was most active in AR-V7 positive xenografts in vivo. In animals, no severe side effects were observed. In conclusion, Rhiz is a promising novel marine-derived compound characterized by a unique combination of anticancer properties. Its further clinical development is of high impact for patients suffering from drug resistant prostate cancer especially those harboring AR-V7 mediated resistance to enzalutamide and abiraterone. PMID:27626485

  7. Exercise training manages cardiopulmonary function and fatigue during and following cancer treatment in male cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Carole M; Hsieh, City C; Sprod, Lisa K; Carter, Susan D; Hayward, Reid

    2007-09-01

    This investigation determined the cardiopulmonary function and fatigue alterations in male cancer survivors during treatment as well as following treatment utilizing similar exercise assessment protocols and individualized, prescriptive exercise interventions. The study included 45 male cancer survivors that were referred by local oncologists. Following a comprehensive screening and physical examination, cardiovascular endurance, pulmonary function, and fatigue were assessed leading to the development of 12-week individualized exercise prescriptions and exercise interventions. The cancer survivors were divided into during treatment (DTm) and following treatment (FTm) groups. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and analyses of covariance were used to compare pre- versus postintervention and between groups. Cardiopulmonary function was maintained in the DTm, whereas the FTm showed significant reductions in resting heart rate (P < .05) with concurrent increases in predicted VO2max and time on treadmill ( P < .05) postexercise intervention. Fatigue levels did not increase in the DTm group, whereas the FTm group showed significant reductions in behavioral fatigue, affective fatigue, sensory fatigue, cognitive/mood fatigue, and total fatigue (P < .05) after the exercise intervention. The results of the current study suggest that moderate intensity, individualized, prescriptive exercise intervention maintains or improves cardiovascular and pulmonary function with concomitant reductions in fatigue in cancer survivors during and following cancer treatment. Exercise appears to be a safe, efficacious strategy for improving physical fitness in cancer survivors during and following treatment.

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Laryngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... New types of treatment are being tested in clinical trials. This summary section describes treatments that are ... want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. For some patients, taking part in a ...

  9. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Vulvar Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may have chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that ... lymph node , nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Radiation therapy for patients who cannot have surgery . Check the list of ...

  11. Testicular Cancer Treatments: Inguinal Orchiectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... They need to check your blood for the presence of certain tumor markers and their levels while the tumor is still in your body. These tumor markers can later be used to determine if the cancer has spread outside of the ...

  12. Nanotechnologies in cancer treatment and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Morris, Stephanie A; Farrell, Dorothy; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Despite significant efforts toward research and treatment development, cancer continues to be a major health problem in the United States that is only further enhanced by the heterogeneous nature of the disease. Nanotechnology has evolved as a technology with applications to medicine and the potential to improve clinical outcomes, with its application to cancer garnering much attention recently. In particular, through the generation of novel nanoscale devices and therapeutic platforms, nanotechnologies have emerged as innovative approaches that enable the detection and diagnosis of cancer at its earliest stages, and the delivery of anticancer drugs directly to tumors. This article highlights recent advances in the development of nanotechnologies for cancer therapeutics and diagnostics, and focuses on the potential future of cancer nanotechnology and the challenges this young field faces as it continues to move toward clinical translation.

  13. Biomimetic Peptides for the Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mine, Yuichi; Munir, Hafsa; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2016-07-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide, indicating that current cancer therapies are ineffective. Therefore, new treatments with high specificity and low toxicity are needed. Cancerous cells can be distinguished from normal cells based on expression of key proteins, namely surface proteins, scaffold proteins and signaling molecules. Moreover, cancer cells communicate with the tumor microenvironment consisting of a heterogenous population of cells, extracellular matrix components and soluble factors such as cytokines/chemokines and growth factors. Most therapeutic interventions have been designed to specifically target these proteins of interest. Biomimetic peptides (BPs) are artificially designed peptides that imitate the action of parent proteins or peptides. BPs can be classified into at least three types based on their target molecule: BPs that target (i) cell-surface molecules, (ii) intracellular molecules, and (iii) cancer cell-tumor microenvironment interactions. In this review, we analyze/discuss the current strategies for targeting tumors using BPs.

  14. Cancer Immunotherapy: A Treatment for the Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattman, Joseph N.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2004-07-01

    Cancer immunotherapy attempts to harness the exquisite power and specificity of the immune system for the treatment of malignancy. Although cancer cells are less immunogenic than pathogens, the immune system is clearly capable of recognizing and eliminating tumor cells. However, tumors frequently interfere with the development and function of immune responses. Thus, the challenge for immunotherapy is to use advances in cellular and molecular immunology to develop strategies that effectively and safely augment antitumor responses.

  15. Curcumin Nanoformulation for Cervical Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mohd S.; Chauhan, Neeraj; Yallapu, Murali M.; Gara, Rishi K.; Maher, Diane M.; Kumari, Sonam; Sikander, Mohammed; Khan, Sheema; Zafar, Nadeem; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide. Current standards of care for cervical cancer includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Conventional chemotherapy fails to elicit therapeutic responses and causes severe systemic toxicity. Thus, developing a natural product based, safe treatment modality would be a highly viable option. Curcumin (CUR) is a well-known natural compound, which exhibits excellent anti-cancer potential by regulating many proliferative, oncogenic, and chemo-resistance associated genes/proteins. However, due to rapid degradation and poor bioavailability, its translational and clinical use has been limited. To improve these clinically relevant parameters, we report a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) based curcumin nanoparticle formulation (Nano-CUR). This study demonstrates that in comparison to free CUR, Nano-CUR effectively inhibits cell growth, induces apoptosis, and arrests the cell cycle in cervical cancer cell lines. Nano-CUR treatment modulated entities such as miRNAs, transcription factors, and proteins associated with carcinogenesis. Moreover, Nano-CUR effectively reduced the tumor burden in a pre-clinical orthotopic mouse model of cervical cancer by decreasing oncogenic miRNA-21, suppressing nuclear β-catenin, and abrogating expression of E6/E7 HPV oncoproteins including smoking compound benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced E6/E7 and IL-6 expression. These superior pre-clinical data suggest that Nano-CUR may be an effective therapeutic modality for cervical cancer. PMID:26837852

  16. What does cancer treatment look like in consumer cancer magazines? An exploratory analysis of photographic content in consumer cancer magazines.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Selene G; Della, Lindsay J; Sohn, Steve H

    2011-04-01

    In an exploratory analysis of several highly circulated consumer cancer magazines, the authors evaluated congruency between visual images of cancer patients and target audience risk profile. The authors assessed 413 images of cancer patients/potential patients for demographic variables such as age, gender, and ethnicity/race. They compared this profile with actual risk statistics. The images in the magazines are considerably younger, more female, and more White than what is indicated by U.S. cancer risk statistics. The authors also assessed images for visual signs of cancer testing/diagnosis and treatment. Few individuals show obvious signs of cancer treatment (e.g., head scarves, skin/nail abnormalities, thin body types). Most images feature healthier looking people, some actively engaged in construction work, bicycling, and yoga. In contrast, a scan of the editorial content showed that nearly two thirds of the articles focus on treatment issues. To explicate the implications of this imagery-text discontinuity on readers' attention and cognitive processing, the authors used constructs from information processing and social identity theories. On the basis of these models/theories, the authors provide recommendations for consumer cancer magazines, suggesting that the imagery be adjusted to reflect cancer diagnosis realities for enhanced message attention and comprehension.

  17. Cardiac and skeletal muscles show molecularly distinct responses to cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Shum, Angie M Y; Fung, David C Y; Corley, Susan M; McGill, Max C; Bentley, Nicholas L; Tan, Timothy C; Wilkins, Marc R; Polly, Patsie

    2015-12-01

    Cancer cachexia is a systemic, paraneoplastic syndrome seen in patients with advanced cancer. There is growing interest in the altered muscle pathophysiology experienced by cachectic patients. This study reports the microarray analysis of gene expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle in the colon 26 (C26) carcinoma mouse model of cancer cachexia. A total of 268 genes were found to be differentially expressed in cardiac muscle tissue, compared with nontumor-bearing controls. This was fewer than the 1,533 genes that changed in cachectic skeletal muscle. In addition to different numbers of genes changing, different cellular functions were seen to change in each tissue. The cachectic heart showed signs of inflammation, similar to cachectic skeletal muscle, but did not show the upregulation of ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic processes or downregulation of genes involved in cellular energetics and muscle regeneration that characterizes skeletal muscle cachexia. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate a subset of inflammatory genes in the cardiac and skeletal muscle of independent cachectic samples; this revealed that B4galt1, C1s, Serpina3n, and Vsig4 were significantly upregulated in cardiac tissue, whereas C1s and Serpina3n were significantly upregulated in skeletal tissue. Our skeletal muscle microarray results were also compared with those from three published microarray studies and found to be consistent in terms of the genes differentially expressed and the functional processes affected. Our study highlights that skeletal and cardiac muscles are affected differently in the C26 mouse model of cachexia and that therapeutic strategies cannot assume that both muscle types will show a similar response.

  18. Hadron Therapy for Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, Arlene

    2003-09-10

    The biological and physical rationale for hadron therapy is well understood by the research community, but hadron therapy is not well established in mainstream medicine. This talk will describe the biological advantage of neutron therapy and the dose distribution advantage of proton therapy, followed by a discussion of the challenges to be met before hadron therapy can play a significant role in treating cancer. A proposal for a new research-oriented hadron clinic will be presented.

  19. Targeting folate receptor alpha for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, Debra H.; Ilieva, Kristina M.; Pellizzari, Giulia; Opzoomer, James; Bloomfield, Jacinta; Fittall, Matthew; Grigoriadis, Anita; Figini, Mariangela; Canevari, Silvana; Spicer, James F.; Tutt, Andrew N.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2016-01-01

    Promising targeted treatments and immunotherapy strategies in oncology and advancements in our understanding of molecular pathways that underpin cancer development have reignited interest in the tumor-associated antigen Folate Receptor alpha (FRα). FRα is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane protein. Its overexpression in tumors such as ovarian, breast and lung cancers, low and restricted distribution in normal tissues, alongside emerging insights into tumor-promoting functions and association of expression with patient prognosis, together render FRα an attractive therapeutic target. In this review, we summarize the role of FRα in cancer development, we consider FRα as a potential diagnostic and prognostic tool, and we discuss different targeted treatment approaches with a specific focus on monoclonal antibodies. Renewed attention to FRα may point to novel individualized treatment approaches to improve the clinical management of patient groups that do not adequately benefit from current conventional therapies. PMID:27248175

  20. New advances in targeted gastric cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lazăr, Daniela Cornelia; Tăban, Sorina; Cornianu, Marioara; Faur, Alexandra; Goldiş, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Despite a decrease in incidence over past decades, gastric cancer remains a major global health problem. In the more recent period, survival has shown only minor improvement, despite significant advances in diagnostic techniques, surgical and chemotherapeutic approaches, the development of novel therapeutic agents and treatment by multidisciplinary teams. Because multiple genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and aberrant molecular signalling pathways are involved in the development of gastric cancers, recent research has attempted to determine the molecular heterogeneity responsible for the processes of carcinogenesis, spread and metastasis. Currently, some novel agents targeting a part of these dysfunctional molecular signalling pathways have already been integrated into the standard treatment of gastric cancer, whereas others remain in phases of investigation within clinical trials. It is essential to identify the unique molecular patterns of tumours and specific biomarkers to develop treatments targeted to the individual tumour behaviour. This review analyses the global impact of gastric cancer, as well as the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and the efficacy of bacterial eradication in preventing gastric cancer development. Furthermore, the paper discusses the currently available targeted treatments and future directions of research using promising novel classes of molecular agents for advanced tumours. PMID:27570417

  1. Cancer Treatment-Induced Neurotoxicity: A Focus on Newer Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jacqueline B.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity from traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy is widely recognized. The adverse effects of newer therapeutics such as biological and immunotherapeutic agents are less familiar and they are also associated with significant neurotoxicity in the central and peripheral nervous systems. This review addresses the main toxicities of cancer treatment by symptom with a focus on the newer therapeutics. Recognition of these patterns of toxicity is important as drug discontinuation or dose adjustment may prevent further neurologic injury. Also, knowledge of these toxicities helps to differentiate treatment-related symptoms from progression of cancer or its involvement of the nervous system. PMID:26391778

  2. Probiotic: effectiveness nutrition in cancer treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Kich, Débora Mara; Vincenzi, Angélica; Majolo, Fernanda; Volken de Souza, Claucia Fernanda; Goettert, Márcia Inês

    2016-11-29

    Among the neoplasias, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in men and women. The increasing incidence of this type of cancer is due to the increase in the population's life expectancy, by the increase in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, primarily ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, and the change in eating habits. The American Cancer Society (2011) shows that diet might be responsible for approximately 30% of cancer cases in developed countries, moreover when considering only colorectal cancer, the number can reach 30% to 50%. Probiotics are effective in the prevention and treatment of many bowel diseases as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, gluten intolerance, gastroenteritis, Helicobacter pyloriinfection, and colon cancer. Classical examples are strains from the Lactobacillus, and Bifidobacteriumgenus that have probiotic proprieties with a potential use in the prophylaxis, as well as in the treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal tract disorders. Researchers are focusing on extremely important studies regarding the possibility of using probiotics to promote a balanced microbiota composition, and a sufficient immunological surveillance system as a way to prevent cancer. Considering the fact that the human intestines host 100 trillion bacteria, including more than 1,000 species, there is still need to perform more in depth investigations in order to find probiotics with potential to prevent, and treat cancerous diseases, adding a very promising effect to this already successful panorama. This revision aims to conduct a review of the most recent studies correlating probiotics and its cancer preventing and treatment potential.

  3. Ions and ion accelerators for cancer treatment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelec, Krsto

    Energetic ions in the mass range up to neon may have important advantages in cancer treatment when compared to other, conventional types of radiation. This review will first consider radiobiological properties of several types of radiation (photons, electrons, protons and ions), pointing out to the relevant characteristics of ions compared to other types. Parameters of ion beams as required for cancer treatment will then be defined, followed by the review of the status of proton and ion therapy and clinical trials, and a description of operating and planned facilities. Finally, on the basis of existing experience and desired future performance, a possible design of such a facility will be suggested.

  4. Immunoexpression of cleaved caspase-3 shows lower apoptotic area indices in lip carcinomas than in intraoral cancer

    PubMed Central

    LEITE, Ana Flávia Schueler de Assumpção; BERNARDO, Vagner Gonçalves; BUEXM, Luisa Aguirre; da FONSECA, Eliene Carvalho; da SILVA, Licínio Esmeraldo; BARROSO, Danielle Resende Camisasca; LOURENÇO, Simone de Queiroz Chaves

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This study aimed to evaluate apoptosis by assessing cleaved caspase-3 immunoexpression in hyperplastic, potentially malignant disorder (PMD), and malignant tumors in intraoral and lower lip sites. Material and Methods A retrospective study using paraffin blocks with tissues from patients with inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia (IFH), actinic cheilitis, oral leukoplakia, lower lip and intraoral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was performed. The tissues were evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis with anti-cleaved caspase-3 antibody. Apoptotic area index was then correlated with lesion type. Results From 120 lesions assessed, 55 (46%) were cleaved caspase-3-positive. The SCC samples (n=40) had the highest apoptotic area indices (n=35; 87.5%). Significant differences were detected between SCCs and PMDs (p=0.0003), as well as SCCs and IFHs (p=0.001), regarding caspase-3 immunopositivity. Carcinomas of the lower lip had lower apoptotic area indices than intraoral cancer (p=0.0015). Conclusions Cleaved caspase-3 immunoexpression showed differences in oral SCCs and PMDs and demonstrated a distinct role of apoptosis in carcinogenesis of intraoral and lower lip cancer. In future, the expression of cleaved caspase-3 with other target molecules in oral cancer may be helpful in delineating the prognosis and treatment of these tumors. PMID:27556207

  5. [The treatment options for localized prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Livne, Pinhas M

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a very common tumor in men. Today the disease is very often diagnosed early because of an elevated PSA without symptoms and the disease is localized to the prostate. Patients with prostate cancer can be divided into 3 subgroups for the carcinoma: favorable, moderate, and poorly. The grouping depends mainly on the Gleason score of the prostate biopsy. According to the Gleason score, favorable cancer is up to score 6 (3 + 3), moderate score 7, and poor--Gleason score 8-10. The other favorable clinical factors are PSA < 10 ng/ml, and clinical stage by DRE of T1C or T2 (no nodule or palpable nodule not extending beyond the prostatic capsule). The treatment options for cure when the prostate cancer is localized are either radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy (external or brachytherapy or combination). Each of these therapies has side effects and each has advantages and disadvantages. Sometimes the treatment choice is not for cure and the options are hormonal treatment or watchful waiting. Twenty to 30% of the patients treated for cure may fail the treatment and have elevation of PSA without any clinical symptoms, or signs of local recurrence or distant spread. Some of these patients with biochemical failure may be cured by salvage treatment: radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy and salvage radical prostatectomy or cryotherapy following failure of radiotherapy.

  6. Treatment of colorectal cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Millan, Monica; Merino, Sandra; Caro, Aleidis; Feliu, Francesc; Escuder, Jordi; Francesch, Tani

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has a high incidence, and approximately 60% of colorectal cancer patients are older than 70, with this incidence likely increasing in the near future. Elderly patients (> 70-75 years of age) are a very heterogeneous group, ranging from the very fit to the very frail. Traditionally, these patients have often been under-treated and recruited less frequently to clinical trials than younger patients, and thus are under-represented in publications about cancer treatment. Recent studies suggest that fit elderly patients can be treated in the same way as their younger counterparts, but the treatment of frail patients with comorbidities is still a matter of controversy. Many factors should be taken into account, including fitness for treatment, the wishes of the patient and family, and quality of life. This review will focus on the existing evidence for surgical, oncologic, and palliative treatment in patients over 70 years old with colorectal cancer. Careful patient assessment is necessary in order to individualize treatment approach, and this should rely on a multidisciplinary process. More well-designed controlled trials are needed in this patient population. PMID:26483875

  7. Reducing Cancer Patients' Painful Treatment

    NASA Video Gallery

    A NASA light technology originally developed to aid plant growth experiments in space has proved to reduce the painful side effects resulting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment in bone marro...

  8. Targeting AMPK for cancer prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Young, Matthew R.; Chen, Guohong; Hua, Baojin

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important mediator in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. AMPK is activated in response to a shortage of energy. Once activated, AMPK can promote ATP production and regulate metabolic energy. AMPK is a known target for treating metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes; however, recently AMPK is emerging as a possible metabolic tumor suppressor and target for cancer prevention and treatment. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that treatment with metformin, an AMPK activator reduces the incidence of cancer. In this article we review the role of AMPK in regulating inflammation, metabolism, and other regulatory processes with an emphasis on cancer, as well as, discuss the potential for targeting AMPK to treat various types of cancer. Activation of AMPK has been found to oppose tumor progression in several cancer types and offers a promising cancer therapy. This review evaluates the evidence linking AMPK with tumor suppressor function and analyzes the molecular mechanisms involved. AMPK activity opposes tumor development and progression in part by regulating inflammation and metabolism. PMID:25812084

  9. Over-treatment in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Senkus, Elżbieta; Łacko, Aleksandra

    2017-02-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is an incurable disease and the main goals of treatment are prolongation of survival and preservation/improvement of quality of life. Thus the main philosophy of treatment should be to use the least toxic methods, as long as they provide sufficient disease control. In ER-positive tumours this can be in many cases achieved by endocrine therapy; in HER2-positive cancers efficacy of backbone therapy can be enhanced by an anti-HER2 agent. In patients requiring chemotherapy, consecutive single agent regimen provide disease control of a duration at least comparable to multidrug regimen, at a cost of significantly lower toxicity and are a preferred strategy in the majority of cases. Available data demonstrate, however, that aggressive chemotherapy is still overused in many metastatic breast cancer patients. The objective of this manuscript is to critically review available data on treatment choices and sequence in metastatic breast cancer across all breast cancer subtypes in relation to possible overtreatment, including therapies which are not recommended by current guidelines or not even approved. Our aim is to provide guidance on applying these data to clinical practice, but also to describe various, often non-scientific factors influencing therapeutic decisions in an aim to identify areas requiring educational and possibly political actions.

  10. What's New in Bile Duct Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bile Duct Cancer About Bile Duct Cancer What’s New in Bile Duct Cancer Research and Treatment? Bile ... is tumor blood vessels. Bile duct tumors need new blood vessels to grow beyond a certain size. ...

  11. Treatment Options by Stage (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  13. Treatment Options for Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  14. Nursing care and treatment of patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, B

    Bladder cancer is the second most common urological cancer after prostate cancer in the UK. This article aims to update nurses knowledge about the disease, focusing on diagnosis, treatment and nursing care.

  15. What's New in Liver Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Cancer About Liver Cancer What's New in Liver Cancer Research and Treatment? Because there are only ... other larger studies before it is widely used. Liver transplant Only a small portion of patients with ...

  16. Neurocognitive Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Robert W.; Haser, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    We review research on the neuropsychological effects that central nervous system (CNS) cancer treatments have on the cognitive abilities of children and adolescents. The authors focus on the two most common malignancies of childhood: leukemias and brain tumors. The literature review is structured so as to separate out earlier studies, generally…

  17. Phytochemicals from Kigelia pinnata leaves show antioxidant and anticancer potential on human cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Atolani, Olubunmi; Olatunji, Gabriel A; Fabiyi, Oluwatoyin Adenike; Adeniji, Adekunle J; Ogbole, Omonike O

    2013-10-01

    Studies suggest that the traditional applications of Kigelia pinnata leaves have beneficial effects against oxidative stress-mediated diseases and cancers. The pulverized dried leaves of K. pinnata were extracted with hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol sequentially, and the crude extracts were fractionated by silica gel column chromatography with solvent gradient of increasing polarity. 3-hydro-4,8-phytene, trans-phytol, (9Z,12Z)-methyl octadeca-9,12-dienoate, and two oil fractions were obtained. The chemical compositions of chromatographic fractions were determined using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The structure elucidations of the isolated compounds were based on FTIR, MS, and NMR spectral data analyses. These along with the crude extracts were examined for their antioxidant activities using ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, and 2,2-azinobis(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assays. Total phenolic contents were also determined. The crude extracts and purified compounds were evaluated on the rhabdomyosarcoma human cancer cell for their cytotoxicity using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability assays. The methanol extract was richer in phenolics and was most potent as antioxidant and cytotoxic agent among all the substances tested. Among the fractions and pure compounds, the two oil fractions showed more cytotoxicity potency, with IC50s of 143.4±0.5 and 147.9±1.3 ng/mL, which is more significant than the reference standard, cyclophosphamide (165.6±1.0 ng/mL). 3-hydro-4,8-phytene showed lower antioxidant and cytotoxicity potential (IC50=1818±5.2 μg/mL and 171.7±0.8 ng/mL, respectively). Trans-phytol did not show a high cytotoxic power (IC50=769.8±4.3 ng/mL). The comparatively high cytotoxicity index of (9Z, 12Z)-methyl octadeca-9,12-dienoate (IC50=153.3±0.1 ng/mL) indicated that it may be one of the principal cytotoxic agent in

  18. Chemotherapy Agents Alter Plasma Lipids in Breast Cancer Patients and Show Differential Effects on Lipid Metabolism Genes in Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Tuaine, Jo; McLaren, Blair; Waters, Debra L; Black, Katherine; Jones, Lynnette M; McCormick, Sally P A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications have emerged as a major concern for cancer patients. Many chemotherapy agents are cardiotoxic and some appear to also alter lipid profiles, although the mechanism for this is unknown. We studied plasma lipid levels in 12 breast cancer patients throughout their chemotherapy. Patients received either four cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by weekly paclitaxel or three cycles of epirubicin, cyclophosphamide and 5'-fluorouracil followed by three cycles of docetaxel. Patients demonstrated a significant reduction (0.32 mmol/L) in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) levels (0.18 g/L) and an elevation in apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels (0.15 g/L) after treatment. Investigation of the individual chemotherapy agents for their effect on genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism in liver cells showed that doxorubicin decreased ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) via a downregulation of the peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and liver X receptor α (LXRα) transcription factors. In contrast, ABCA1 levels were not affected by cyclophosphamide or paclitaxel. Likewise, apoA1 levels were reduced by doxorubicin and remained unaffected by cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel. Doxorubicin and paclitaxel both increased apoB protein levels and paclitaxel also decreased low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein levels. These findings correlate with the observed reduction in HDL-C and apoA1 and increase in apoB levels seen in these patients. The unfavourable lipid profiles produced by some chemotherapy agents may be detrimental in the longer term to cancer patients, especially those already at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This knowledge may be useful in tailoring effective follow-up care plans for cancer survivors.

  19. Numerical design of RF ablation applicator for hepatic cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmadi, Aditya; Basari

    2017-02-01

    Currently, cancer has become one of health problems that is difficult to be overcomed. This disease is not only difficult to be cured, but also to be detected and may cause death. For this reason, RF ablation treatment method is proposed to cure cancer. RF ablation therapy is a method in which an applicator is inserted into the body to kill cancer cells by heating the cells. The cancer cells are exposed to the temperature more than 60°C in short duration (few second to few minutes) so thus cell destruction occurs locally. For the sake of the successful treatment, a minimally invasive method is selected in order for perfect local temperature distribution in cancer cells can be achieved. In this paper, a coax-fed dipole-type applicator with interstitial irradiation technique is proposed aimed at RF ablation into hepatic cells. Numerical simulation is performed to obtain a suitable geometric dimension at operating frequency around 2.45 GHz, in order to localize the ablation area. The proposed applicator is inserted into a simple phantom representing an adult human body model in which normal and cancerous liver cells. The simulated results show that the proposed applicator is able to operate at center frequency of 2.355 GHz with blood droplet-type ablation zone and the temperature around the cancer cell by 60°C can be achieved.

  20. Use of Noninsulin Anti Diabetics for Prevention and Treatment of Cancer- Narrative Review Article

    PubMed Central

    RAANA, Sadaf; JAVEED, Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological evidence shows that cancer and diabetes are major causes of death in the world. Type2 diabetes increases the risk of cancer-specific mortality. This review relates diabetic therapies, diabetes and cancer. Method: All published papers in this field were searched, looking into such databases as Science Direct, ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed and Scopus. Results: In cancer patients, metformin improves patient outcome and reduces cancer risk. Sulfonylureas may increase risk of cancer, but decreased risk of cancer is associated with thiazolidinediones in type 2 diabetic subjects. Metformin lowers circulating insulin and it may be important for treatment of hyperinsulinemia-associated cancers, such as colon and breast cancer. Conclusion: However, laboratory investigations and large-scale population based studies are required for further investigation of association of cancer-preventive, anti-cancer and cancer-mortality of noninsulin antidiabetics. PMID:25905051

  1. Facing Forward Series: Life After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  2. [Treatment of Cancer Pain and Medical Narcotics].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization has reported that when morphine is used to control pain in cancer patients, psychological dependence is not a major concern. Our studies were undertaken to ascertain the modulation of psychological dependence on morphine under a chronic pain-like state in rats. Morphine induced a dose-dependent place preference. We found that inflammatory and neuropathic pain-like states significantly suppressed the morphine-induced rewarding effect. In an inflammatory pain-like state, the suppressive effect was significantly recovered by treatment with a κ-opioid receptor antagonist. In addition, in vivo microdialysis studies clearly showed that the morphine-induced increase in the extracellular levels of dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (N.Acc.) was significantly decreased in rats pretreated with formalin. This effect was in turn reversed by the microinjection of a specific dynorphin A antibody into the N.Acc. These findings suggest that the inflammatory pain-like state may have caused the sustained activation of the κ-opioidergic system within the N.Acc., resulting in suppression of the morphine-induced rewarding effect in rats. On the other hand, we found that attenuation of the morphine-induced place preference under neuropathic pain may result from a decrease in the morphine-induced DA release in the N.Acc with a reduction in the μ-opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activation in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Moreover, nerve injury results in the continuous release of endogenous β-endorphin to cause the dysfunction of μ-opioid receptors in the VTA. This paper also provides a review to clarify misunderstandings of opioid analgesic use to control pain in cancer patients.

  3. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2012-04-14

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, ranking 4th among causes for cancer-related death in the Western world including the United States. Surgical resection offers the only chance of cure, but only 15 to 20 percent of cases are potentially resectable at presentation. Different studies demonstrate and confirm that advanced pancreatic cancer is among the most complex cancers to treat and that these tumors are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently there is no consensus around the world on what constitutes "standard" adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer. This controversy derives from several studies, each fraught with its own limitations. Standards of care also vary somewhat with regard to geography and economy, for instance chemo-radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or vice versa is considered the optimal therapy in North America while chemotherapy alone is the current standard in Europe. Regardless of the efforts in adjuvant and neoadjuvant improved therapy, the major goal to combat pancreatic cancer is to find diagnostic markers, identifying the disease in a pre-metastatic stage and making a curative treatment accessible to more patients. In this review, authors examined the different therapy options for advanced pancreatic patients in recent years and the future directions in adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments for these patients.

  4. Pancreatic cancer, treatment options, and GI-4000

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion L; Bade, Najeebah A; Prins, Petra A; Ampie, Leonel; Marshall, John L

    2015-01-01

    Although pancreatic cancer is but the eleventh most prevalent cancer in the US, it is predicted that of all the patients newly diagnosed with this disease in 2014, only 27% will still be alive at the end of the first year, which is reduced to 6% after 5 years. The choice of chemotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is dependent on disease stage and patient performance status but, in general, the most widely used approved regimens include 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combinations and gemcitabine combinations. Recent therapeutic strategies have resulted in an improvement in survival of patients with pancreatic cancer but the magnitude of change is disappointing and vast improvements are still needed. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance and guide the body's immune system to recognize tumor-specific antigens and mount an attack against the disease. Among newer immune therapies, GI-4000 consists of 4 different targeted molecular immunogens, each containing a different Ras protein (antigen) encoded by the most commonly found mutant RAS genes in solid tumors—RAS mutations exist in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. We will review pancreatic cancer epidemiology and its current treatment options, and consider the prospects of immunotherapy, focusing on GI-4000. We discuss the potential mechanism of action of GI-4000, and the performance of this vaccination series thus far in early phase clinical trials. PMID:25933185

  5. Pancreatic cancer, treatment options, and GI-4000

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion L; Bade, Najeebah A; Prins, Petra A; Ampie, Leonel; Marshall, John L

    2015-01-01

    Although pancreatic cancer is but the eleventh most prevalent cancer in the US, it is predicted that of all the patients newly diagnosed with this disease in 2014, only 27% will still be alive at the end of the first year and only 6% will make it past 5 years. The choice of chemotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is dependent on disease stage and patient performance status but, in general, the most widely used approved regimens include 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combinations and gemcitabine combinations. Recent therapeutic strategies have resulted in an improvement in survival of patients with pancreatic cancer but the magnitude of change is disappointing and vast improvements are still needed. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance and guide the body's immune system to recognize tumor-specific antigens and mount an attack against the disease. Among newer immune therapies, GI-4000 consists of 4 different targeted molecular immunogens, each containing a different Ras protein (antigen) encoded by the most commonly found mutant RAS genes in solid tumors—RAS mutations exist in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. We will review pancreatic cancer epidemiology and its current treatment options, and consider the prospects of immunotherapy, focusing on GI-4000. We discuss the potential mechanism of action of GI-4000, and the performance of this vaccination series thus far in early phase clinical trials. PMID:25585100

  6. Retinoids in lung cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Toma, S; Raffo, P; Isnardi, L; Palumbo, R

    1999-01-01

    In this review, we aim to synthesize the emerging picture of retinoids in lung cancer through a summary of ongoing investigations in biology, chemoprevention and therapy settings, in an attempt to clarify the possible role of these agents in such a disease. Early work in head and neck cancer has evidenced the capability of retinoids to interrupt field carcinogenesis by reversing premalignant lesions and decreasing the incidence of second primary tumors (SPTs). At this time, the completed randomized trials in lung cancer have failed to demonstrate an evident chemopreventive effect of the tested agents on different study end points, although both a marginally significant benefit of retinol palmitate in time-to-development rates for smoke-related SPTs and a potential preventive effect of retinol supplementation against mesothelioma in selected populations of asbestos-exposed workers have been recently reported. Concerning the role of retinoids in lung cancer treatment, a moderate activity of 13-cis-retinoic acid (13cRA) or all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) as single agents has been reported in small series of advanced, mostly pretreated lung cancer patients. More encouraging findings derive from combination studies, in which retinoids, especially ATRA, are added to either alpha-interferon or chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Major recent advances have been made towards the understanding of retinoids mechanisms of action; at this regard, the role of RAR-beta basal or treatment-induced levels seems to be of particular interest as intermediate end point and/or independent prognostic factor, besides their known importance in lung carcinogenesis. Future research for chemopreventive and therapeutic programs with retinoids in lung cancer should be focused on the investigation of new generation compounds with a specificity for individual retinoid nuclear receptors. Such selective molecules may have a greater activity against lung cancer, with a more favourable toxicity profile, as

  7. Cancer treatment: fertility and sexual side effects in women

    MedlinePlus

    Radiotherapy - fertility; Radiation - fertility; Chemotherapy - fertility; Sexual dysfunction - cancer treatment ... Many cancer treatments can cause sexual side effects. But you are more likely to have these side effects if ...

  8. Anxiety May Lead to Unneeded Prostate Cancer Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163295.html Anxiety May Lead to Unneeded Prostate Cancer Treatments Researchers suggest that dealing with a patient's ... Jan. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Anxiety may prompt prostate cancer patients to opt for potentially unnecessary treatments, a ...

  9. Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000826.htm Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats To use the sharing ... JavaScript. Certain types of cancer treatments can cause hot flashes and night sweats. Hot flashes are when ...

  10. Nanoparticle therapeutics for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Vanna; Sechi, Mario

    2012-09-01

    The application of nanotechnology in medicine is offering many exciting possibilities in healthcare. Engineered nanoparticles have the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and the therapy of several diseases, particularly by targeted delivery of anticancer drugs and imaging contrast agents. Prostate cancer, the second most common cancer in men, represents one of the major epidemiological problems, especially for patients in the advanced age. There is a substantial interest in developing therapeutic options for treatment of prostate cancer based on use of nanodevices, to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents as well as for the early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. Herein, we highlight on the recent development of nanotechnology strategies adopted for the management of prostate cancer. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has recently resulted in the clinical development of BIND-014, a promising targeted Docetaxel-loaded nanoprototype, which can be validated for use in the prostate cancer therapy. However, several limitations facing nanoparticle delivery to solid tumours, such as heterogeneity of intratumoural barriers and vasculature, cytotoxicity and/or hypersensitivity reactions to currently available cancer nanomedicines, and the difficult in developing targeted nanoparticles with optimal biophysicochemical properties, should be still addressed for a successful tumour eradication.

  11. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and chemoprevention

  12. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression. (JMT)

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that connect the kidneys to the bladder). The drawing shows the ureter on the right blocked by ... that uses electrical current passed through a thin wire loop as a knife to remove abnormal tissue ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  15. Exploiting the Immunological Effects of Standard Treatments in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Exploiting the Immunological Effects of Standard Treatments in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Brad H. Nelson, Ph.D...From - To) 1 MAR 2008 - 28 FEB 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Exploiting the immunological effects of standard treatments in 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...treatment of prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Tumor immunology , immunotherapy, prostate cancer, antibody, T cell, tumor antigen, hormone therapy

  16. Nano-Engineered Drug Combinations for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Breast Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Joerg Lahann, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...CONTRACT NUMBER Nano-Engineered Drug Combinations for Breast Cancer Treatment 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0111 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...10 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) 2 Nano-engineered Drug Combinations for Breast Cancer Treatment Progress Report

  17. Autophagy regulation in the development and treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuting; Rucker, Edmund B.; Zhou, Binhua P.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a major catabolic process in which intracellular membrane structures, protein complexes, and lysosomes are formed as lysoautophagosome to degrade and renew cytoplasmic components. Autophagy is physiologically a strategy and mechanism for cellular homeostasis as well as adaptation to stress, and thus alterations in the autophagy machinery may lead to diverse pathological conditions. The role of autophagy in cancer is complex, and the current literature reflects this as a ‘double-edged sword’. Autophagy shows promise as a novel therapeutic target in various types of breast cancer, inhibiting or increasing treatment efficacy in a context- and cell-type-dependent manner. This review aims to summarize the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms by which key modulators of autophagy participate in cancer metastasis, highlight different autophagy-deficient murine models for breast cancer study, and provide further impetus for the modulation of autophagy in anticancer therapy. PMID:26637829

  18. Luminal breast cancer: from biology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, Michail; Sotiriou, Christos

    2013-09-01

    Oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive--or luminal--tumours represent around two-thirds of all breast cancers. Luminal breast cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease comprising different histologies, gene-expression profiles and mutational patterns, with very varied clinical courses and responses to systemic treatment. Despite adjuvant endocrine therapy and chemotherapy treatment for patients at high risk of relapse, both early and late relapses still occur, a fact that highlights the unmet medical needs of these patients. Ongoing research aims to identify those patients who can be spared adjuvant chemotherapy and who will benefit from extended adjuvant hormone therapy. This research also aims to explore the role of adjuvant bisphosphonates, to interrogate new agents for targeting minimal residual disease, and to address endocrine resistance. Data from next-generation sequencing studies have given us new insight into the biology of luminal breast cancer and, together with advances in preclinical models and the availability of newer targeted agents, have led to the testing of rationally chosen combination treatments in clinical trials. However, a major challenge will be to make sense of the large amount of patient genomic data that is becoming increasingly available. This analysis will be critical to our understanding how intertumour and intratumour heterogeneity can influence treatment response and resistance.

  19. Primary penile cancer organ sparing treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kuligowski, Marcin; Kuczkiewicz, Olga; Moskal, Katarzyna; Wolski, Jan Karol; Bjurlin, Marc A.; Wysock, James S.; Pęczkowski, Piotr; Protzel, Chris; Demkow, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical treatment of penile cancer is usually associated with mutilation; alterations in self-esteem and body image; affecting sexual and urinary functions; and declined health-related quality of life. Recently, organ sparing treatment has appeared and led to limiting these complications. Material and methods An extensive review of the literature concerning penile-preserving strategies was conducted. The focus was put on indications, general principles of management, surgical options and reconstructive techniques, the most common complications, as well as functional and oncological outcomes. Results Analyzed methods, e.g.: topical chemotherapy, laser ablation therapy, radiotherapy, Moh’s microscopic surgery, circumcision, wide local excision, glans resurfacing and glansectomy are indicated in low-stage tumors (Tis, Ta-T2). After glansectomy, reconstruction is also possible. Conclusions Organ sparing techniques may achieve good anatomical, functional, and psychological outcomes without compromising local cancer control, which depends on early diagnosis and treatment. Penile sparing strategies are acceptable treatment approaches in selected patients with low-stage penile cancer after establishing disease-risk and should be considered in this population. PMID:28127454

  20. Maintaining professional activity during breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ganem, G; Antoine, E-C; Touboul, C; Naman, H; Dohollou, N; Facchini, T; Coscas, Y; Lortholary, A; Catala, S; Jacquot, S; Lhomel, C; Eisinger, F

    2016-05-01

    The question of returning to work and pursuing professional activity during cancer treatment is an increasingly important consideration. The present work focuses on factors affecting the feasibility of maintaining professional activity during treatment for breast cancer, for women who wished to do so. Written questionnaires were collected from 216 patients between March and November 2012. Since the onset of their treatment, 31.4% of the women (68/216) had not been on sick-leave. The main factors associated with the pursuit of professional activity were: considering the availability of their physician to answer questions as unimportant [OR = 18.83 (3.60-98.53); P ≤ 0.05]; considering the diagnosis of cancer as likely to have a weak impact on career perspectives [OR = 4.07 (2.49-6.64); P ≤ 0.05]; not having any children in the household [OR = 3.87 (2.38-6.28); P ≤ 0.05]; being in a managerial position [OR = 3.13 (1.88-5.21); P ≤ 0.05]. Negative predictive factors were: physician mentioning adverse effects of the treatment [OR = 0.31 (0.16-0.58); P ≤ 0.05], and patient rating workload as high [OR = 0.26 (0.15-0.46); P ≤ 0.05]. As a result of advances in therapeutic strategies, more patients will expect healthcare professionals, as well as employers and occupational health societies, to prioritise issues pertaining to the maintenance of professional activities during cancer treatment.

  1. Mouse models for xeroderma pigmentosum group A and group C show divergent cancer phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Melis, Joost P M; Wijnhoven, Susan W P; Beems, Rudolf B; Roodbergen, Marianne; van den Berg, Jolanda; Moon, Hojin; Friedberg, Errol; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Vijg, Jan; van Steeg, Harry

    2008-03-01

    The accumulation of DNA damage is a slow but hazardous phenomenon that may lead to cell death, accelerated aging, and cancer. One of the most versatile defense mechanisms against the accumulation of DNA damage is nucleotide excision repair, in which, among others, the Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) and group A (XPA) proteins are involved. To elucidate differences in the functions of these two proteins, comprehensive survival studies with Xpa(-/-), Xpc(-/-) and wild-type control female mice in a pure C57BL/6J background were done. The median survival of Xpc(-/-) mice showed a significant decrease, whereas the median survival of Xpa(-/-) mice did not. Strikingly, Xpa(-/-) and Xpc(-/-) mice also showed a phenotypical difference in terms of tumor spectrum. Xpc(-/-) mice displayed a significant increase in lung tumors and a trend toward increased liver tumors compared with Xpa-deficient or wild-type mice. Xpa(-/-) mice showed a significant elevation in liver tumors. Additionally, Xpc-deficient mice exhibited a strong increase in mutant frequency in lung compared with Xpa(-/-) mice, whereas in both models mutant frequency is increased in liver. Our in vitro data displayed an elevated sensitivity to oxygen in Xpc(-/-) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) when compared with Xpa(-/-) and wild-type fibroblasts. We believe that XPC plays a role in the removal of oxidative DNA damage and that, therefore, Xpc(-/-) mice display a significant increase in lung tumors and a significant elevation in mutant frequency in lung, and Xpc-deficient MEFs show greater sensitivity to oxygen when compared with Xpa(-/-) and wild-type mice.

  2. Enhancing Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment Efficiency for Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaoqian

    To improve efficiency and safety of anti-cancer therapies the researchers and clinicians alike are prompted to develop targeted combined therapies that especially minimize damage to healthy tissues while eradicating the body of cancerous tissues. Previous research in cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) and cancer cell interaction has repeatedly proven that cold plasma induced cell death. In this study, we seek to integrate the medical application of CAP. We proposed and implemented 3 novel ideas to enhance efficacy and selectivity of cancer therapy. It is postulated that the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) play a major role in the CAP cancer therapy. We determined a mechanism of CAP therapy on glioblastoma cells (U87) through an understanding of the composition of CAP, including output voltage, treatment time, and gas flow-rate. We varied the characteristics of the cold plasma in order to obtain different major species (such as O, OH, N2+, and N2 lines). "plasma dosage" D ~ Q * V * t. is defined, where D is the entire "plasma dosage"; Q is the flow rate of feeding gas; V is output voltage; t is treatment time. The proper CAP dosage caused 3-fold cell death in the U87 cells compared to the normal human astrocytes E6/E7 cells. We demonstrated there is a synergy between AuNPS and CAP in cancer therapy. Specifically, the concentration of AuNPs plays an important role on plasma therapy. At an optimal concentration, gold nanoparticles can significantly induce U87 cell death up to a 30% overall increase compared to the control group with the same plasma dosage but no AuNPs applied. The ROS intensity of the corresponding conditions has a reversed trend compared to cell viability. This matches with the theory that intracellular ROS accumulation results in oxidative stress, which further changes the intracellular pathways, causing damage to the proteins, lipids and DNA. Our results show that this synergy has great potential in improving the

  3. Study shows colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The pattern of genomic alterations in colon and rectal tissues is the same regardless of anatomic location or origin within the colon or the rectum, leading researchers to conclude that these two cancer types can be grouped as one, according to The Cancer

  4. Selectively targeting estrogen receptors for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens regulate growth and development through the action of two distinct estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα and ERβ, which mediate proliferation and differentiation of cells. For decades, ERα mediated estrogen signaling has been therapeutically targeted to treat breast cancer, most notably with the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) tamoxifen. Selectively targeting ERs occurs at two levels: tissue selectivity and receptor subtype selectivity. SERMs have been developed with emphasis on tissue selectivity to target ER signaling for breast cancer treatment. Additionally, new approaches to selectively target the action of ERα going beyond ligand-dependent activity are under current investigation. As evidence of the anti-proliferative role of ERβ accumulates, selectively targeting ERβ is an attractive approach for designing new cancer therapies with the emphasis shifted to designing ligands with subtype selectivity. This review will present the mechanistic and structural features of ERs that determine tissue and subtype selectivity with an emphasis on current approaches to selectively target ERα and ERβ for cancer treatment. PMID:20708050

  5. Oncolytic Immunotherapy for Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsun, A; Miao, X N; Wang, C M; Yu, D C

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy entails the treatment of disease by modulation of the immune system. As detailed in the previous chapters, the different modes of achieving immune modulation are many, including the use of small/large molecules, cellular therapy, and radiation. Oncolytic viruses that can specifically attack, replicate within, and destroy tumors represent one of the most promising classes of agents for cancer immunotherapy (recently termed as oncolytic immunotherapy). The notion of oncolytic immunotherapy is considered as the way in which virus-induced tumor cell death (known as immunogenic cancer cell death (ICD)) allows the immune system to recognize tumor cells and provide long-lasting antitumor immunity. Both immune responses toward the virus and ICD together contribute toward successful antitumor efficacy. What is now becoming increasingly clear is that monotherapies, through any of the modalities detailed in this book, are neither sufficient in eradicating tumors nor in providing long-lasting antitumor immune responses and that combination therapies may deliver enhanced efficacy. After the rise of the genetic engineering era, it has been possible to engineer viruses to harbor combination-like characteristics to enhance their potency in cancer immunotherapy. This chapter provides a historical background on oncolytic virotherapy and its future application in cancer immunotherapy, especially as a combination therapy with other treatment modalities.

  6. Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer with Pharmacological Ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, John A; Cullen, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains dismal, with less than 3% survival at 5 years. Recent studies have demonstrated that high-dose, intravenous pharmacological ascorbate (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) induces cytotoxicity and oxidative stress selectively in pancreatic cancer cells vs. normal cells, suggesting a promising new role of ascorbate as a therapeutic agent. At physiologic concentrations, ascorbate functions as a reducing agent and antioxidant. However, when pharmacological ascorbate is given intravenously, it is possible to achieve millimolar plasma concentration. At these pharmacological levels, and in the presence of catalytic metal ions, ascorbate can induce oxidative stress through the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated ascorbate oxidation occurs extracellularly, generating H2O2 flux into cells resulting in oxidative stress. Pharmacologic ascorbate also inhibits the growth of pancreatic tumor xenografts and displays synergistic cytotoxic effects when combined with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. Phase I trials of pharmacological ascorbate in pancreatic cancer patients have demonstrated safety and potential efficacy. In this chapter, we will review the mechanism of ascorbate-induced cytotoxicity, examine the use of pharmacological ascorbate in treatment and assess the current data supporting its potential as an adjuvant in pancreatic cancer.

  7. Combinations in multimodality treatments and clinical outcomes during cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Combination approach could be easily considered as the future of therapeutics in all pathological states including cancer. Scientists are trying different combinations in order to determine synergism among different therapeutics which ultimately helps in the improved and more efficient management of the affected patients. Combination of multi-chemotherapeutic agents, or multi-drug therapy, may be the most commonly used strategy for cancer treatment. Monotherapy causes drug resistance and loses its response in patients after several cycles of treatment. While combining different anticancer drugs together for cancer treatment, as in the case of the cocktail therapy for HIV, not only overcomes the drug resistance but also leads to a synergistic effect, therefore showing prolonged survival for patients. The present review article is focused on different combinations in use for better efficiency of therapeutics against cancer. We searched the electronic database PubMed for pre-clinical as well as clinical controlled trials reporting diagnostic as well as therapeutic advances of various combinations in cancer. It was observed clearly that combination approach is better in various aspects including increase in efficacy, specificity and decline in the unwanted side effects. PMID:28101195

  8. Molecular Targeted Approaches for Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z.Q.; Saluja, A.K.; Dudeja, V.; Vickers, S.M.; Buchsbaum, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Human pancreatic cancer remains a highly malignant disease with almost similar incidence and mortality despite extensive research. Many targeted therapies are under development. However, clinical investigation showed that single targeted therapies and most combined therapies were not able to improve the prognosis of this disease, even though some of these therapies had excellent anti-tumor effects in pre-clinical models. Cross-talk between cell proliferation signaling pathways may be an important phenomenon in pancreatic cancer, which may result in cancer cell survival even though some pathways are blocked by targeted therapy. Pancreatic cancer may possess different characteristics and targets in different stages of pathogenesis, maintenance and metastasis. Sensitivity to therapy may also vary for cancer cells at different stages. The unique pancreatic cancer structure with abundant stroma creates a tumor microenvironment with hypoxia and low blood perfusion rate, which prevents drug delivery to cancer cells. In this review, the most commonly investigated targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer treatment are discussed. However, how to combine these targeted therapies and/or combine them with chemotherapy to improve the survival rate of pancreatic cancer is still a challenge. Genomic and proteomic studies using pancreatic cancer samples obtained from either biopsy or surgery are recommended to individualize tumor characters and to perform drug sensitivity study in order to design a tailored therapy with minimal side effects. These studies may help to further investigate tumor pathogenesis, maintenance and metastasis to create cellular expression profiles at different stages. Integration of the information obtained needs to be performed from multiple levels and dimensions in order to develop a successful targeted therapy. PMID:21777178

  9. Building a Personalized Cancer Treatment System.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Alexandra; López, Gustavo; Bola Nos, Constantino; Alvarado, Daniel; Solano, Andrés; López, Mariana; Báez, Andrés; Quirós, Steve; Mora, Rodrigo

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the process by which a personalized cancer treatment system was built, following a user-centered approach. We give some background on personalized cancer treatment, the particular tumor chemosensitivity assay supported by the system, as well as some quality and legal issues related to such health systems. We describe how Contextual Design was applied when building the system. Contextual design is a user-centered design technique involving seven steps. We also provide some details about the system implementation. Finally, we explain how the Think-Aloud protocol and Heuristic Evaluation methods were used to evaluate the system and report its results. A qualitative assessment from the users perspective is also provided. Results from the heuristic evaluation indicate that only one of ten heuristics was missing from the system, while five were partially covered and four were fully covered.

  10. Multifunctional materials for bone cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Catarina; Ferreira, José MF; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Ficai, Denisa; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Anton

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the most recent findings in bone tissue engineering. Special attention is given to multifunctional materials based on collagen and collagen–hydroxyapatite composites used for skin and bone cancer treatments. The multi-functionality of these materials was obtained by adding to the base regenerative grafts proper components, such as ferrites (magnetite being the most important representative), cytostatics (cisplatin, carboplatin, vincristine, methotrexate, paclitaxel, doxorubicin), silver nanoparticles, antibiotics (anthracyclines, geldanamycin), and/or analgesics (ibuprofen, fentanyl). The suitability of complex systems for the intended applications was systematically analyzed. The developmental possibilities of multifunctional materials with regenerative and curative roles (antitumoral as well as pain management) in the field of skin and bone cancer treatment are discussed. It is worth mentioning that better materials are likely to be developed by combining conventional and unconventional experimental strategies. PMID:24920907

  11. Treatment of stomach cancer, a national experience.

    PubMed

    Valen, B; Viste, A; Haugstvedt, T; Eide, G E; Søreide, O

    1988-07-01

    A total of 1165 patients with stomach cancer were entered into a prospective, observational national study. They represented 54 per cent of all stomach cancer patients reported to the Cancer Registry in Norway during the study period, and data are analysed for three hospital levels (local, county and university hospitals). The median age was 71 years (range 18-96 years). The median pretreatment delay was 113 days, and 46 per cent of patients had a performance status (Karnofsky index) of less than or equal to 80. The diagnosis was confirmed by pre-operative histology in 88 per cent of cases. In all, 88 per cent of patients underwent surgery, the resectability rate was 67 per cent and 50 per cent had a potential curative operation. Total gastrectomy was most commonly performed. Lymph node dissection was performed in 14 per cent of those undergoing a curative resection. The postoperative complication rate was 27 per cent but varied with the type of operation, being highest in proximal resection (55 per cent) and lowest after distal resection (19 per cent). A total of 7 per cent of the patients died postoperatively. Most patients had advanced disease at the time of treatment and only 6 per cent had stage I tumours. There were significant differences in patient and treatment characteristics between the three hospital levels. In conclusion, patient selection bias which will influence results does occur. A fairly aggressive attitude towards local disease was found, but the low proportion of patients undergoing lymph node dissection not only leads to questions regarding the efficacy of this treatment policy, but also casts doubt on the validity of staging of stomach cancer. Morbidity and mortality rates are still high. The consequences of the differences revealed between hospital groups are difficult to interpret. Proponents of both regionalization of treatment and small hospital care may find arguments for their case in the data.

  12. Stem cells show promising results for lymphoedema treatment--a literature review.

    PubMed

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Christensen, Marlene Louise; Sheikh, Søren Paludan; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2015-04-01

    Lymphoedema is a debilitating condition, manifesting in excess lymphatic fluid and swelling of subcutaneous tissues. Lymphoedema is as of yet still an incurable condition and current treatment modalities are not satisfactory. The capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to promote angiogenesis, secrete growth factors, regulate the inflammatory process, and differentiate into multiple cell types make them a potential ideal therapy for lymphoedema. Adipose tissue is the richest and most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells and they can be harvested, isolated, and used for therapy in a single stage procedure as an autologous treatment. The aim of this paper was to review all studies using mesenchymal stem cells for lymphoedema treatment with a special focus on the potential use of adipose-derived stem cells. A systematic search was performed and five preclinical and two clinical studies were found. Different stem cell sources and lymphoedema models were used in the described studies. Most studies showed a decrease in lymphoedema and an increased lymphangiogenesis when treated with stem cells and this treatment modality has so far shown great potential. The present studies are, however, subject to bias and more preclinical studies and large-scale high quality clinical trials are needed to show if this emerging therapy can satisfy expectations.

  13. Chronic methadone treatment shows a better cost/benefit ratio than chronic morphine in mice.

    PubMed

    Enquist, Johan; Ferwerda, Madeline; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2012-02-01

    Chronic treatment of pain with opiate drugs can lead to analgesic tolerance and drug dependence. Although all opiate drugs can promote tolerance and dependence in practice, the severity of those unwanted side effects differs depending on the drug used. Although each opiate drug has its own unique set of pharmacological profiles, methadone is the only clinically used opioid drug that produces substantial receptor endocytosis at analgesic doses. Here, we examined whether moderate doses of methadone carry any benefits over chronic use of equianalgesic morphine, the prototypical opioid. Our data show that chronic administration of methadone produces significantly less analgesic tolerance than morphine. Furthermore, we found significantly reduced precipitated withdrawal symptoms after chronic methadone treatment than after chronic morphine treatment. Finally, using a novel animal model with a degrading μ-opioid receptor we showed that, although endocytosis seems to protect against tolerance development, endocytosis followed by receptor degradation produces a rapid onset of analgesic tolerance to methadone. Together, these data indicated that opioid drugs that promote receptor endocytosis and recycling, such as methadone, may be a better choice for chronic pain treatment than morphine and its derivatives that do not.

  14. Apoptosis in cancer: from pathogenesis to treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is an ordered and orchestrated cellular process that occurs in physiological and pathological conditions. It is also one of the most studied topics among cell biologists. An understanding of the underlying mechanism of apoptosis is important as it plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In some, the problem is due to too much apoptosis, such as in the case of degenerative diseases while in others, too little apoptosis is the culprit. Cancer is one of the scenarios where too little apoptosis occurs, resulting in malignant cells that will not die. The mechanism of apoptosis is complex and involves many pathways. Defects can occur at any point along these pathways, leading to malignant transformation of the affected cells, tumour metastasis and resistance to anticancer drugs. Despite being the cause of problem, apoptosis plays an important role in the treatment of cancer as it is a popular target of many treatment strategies. The abundance of literature suggests that targeting apoptosis in cancer is feasible. However, many troubling questions arise with the use of new drugs or treatment strategies that are designed to enhance apoptosis and critical tests must be passed before they can be used safely in human subjects. PMID:21943236

  15. [Thyroid cancer. In search of individualized treatment].

    PubMed

    Pitoia, Fabián; Cavallo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has increased exponentially around the world (mostly papillary thyroid carcinoma). This growth may reflect the combined effects of increased screening practices, together with changes in risk factors for thyroid cancer. In spite of this, disease specific mortality remained stable in the last three decades. Due to the fact that patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma often have a very good prognosis, with high survival in the long term follow-up compared with other types of carcinomas, there has been no need to change the standard treatment. The mainstays of thyroid cancer treatment are surgery (total or near-total thyroidectomy) with or without the additional administration of radioiodine (131I). These approaches are now in the center of discussion in all global forums. The current trend is to ensure the most effective and less harmful treatment and the most important issue at this point is to individualize patients according to tumor stage and risk of recurrence, to define which patients will benefit of more aggressive therapy and who could be handled with a more conservative approach.

  16. Metronomic chemotherapy and immunotherapy in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Li; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2017-02-09

    Systemic chemotherapy given at maximum tolerated doses (MTD) has been the mainstay of cancer treatment for more than half a century. In some chemosensitive diseases such as hematologic malignancies and solid tumors, MTD has led to complete remission and even cure. The combination of maintenance therapy and standard MTD also can generate good disease control; however, resistance to chemotherapy and disease metastasis still remain major obstacles to successful cancer treatment in the majority of advanced tumors. Metronomic chemotherapy, defined as frequent administration of chemotherapeutic agents at a non-toxic dose without extended rest periods, was originally designed to overcome drug resistance by shifting the therapeutic target from tumor cells to tumor endothelial cells. Metronomic chemotherapy also exerts anti-tumor effects on the immune system (immunomodulation) and tumor cells. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance host anti-tumor immunities. Adding immunomodulators such as metronomic chemotherapy to immunotherapy can improve the clinical outcomes in a synergistic manner. Here, we review the anti-tumor mechanisms of metronomic chemotherapy and the preliminary research addressing the combination of immunotherapy and metronomic chemotherapy for cancer treatment in animal models and in clinical setting.

  17. Brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cesaretti, Jamie A; Stone, Nelson N; Skouteris, Vassilios M; Park, Janelle L; Stock, Richard G

    2007-01-01

    Low-dose rate brachytherapy has become a mainstream treatment option for men diagnosed with prostate cancer because of excellent long-term treatment outcomes in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. Largely due to patient lead advocacy for minimally invasive treatment options, high-quality prostate implants have become widely available in the US, Europe, and Japan. The reason that brachytherapy results are reproducible in several different practice settings is because numerous implant quality factors have been defined over the last 20 years, which can be applied objectively to judge the success of the intervention both during and after the procedure. In addition, recent long-term follow-up studies have clarified that the secondary cancer incidence of brachytherapy is not clinically meaningful. In terms of future directions, the study of radiation repair genetics may allow for the counseling physician to better estimate any given patients risk for side effects, thereby substantially reducing the therapeutic uncertainties faced by patients choosing a prostate cancer intervention.

  18. An Oncotropic Adenovirus Vector System for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0629 TITLE: An Oncotropic Adenovirus Vector System for Breast Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Igor P. Dmitriev...Aug 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER An Oncotropic Adenovirus Vector System for Breast Cancer Treatment 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1...epithelial cells, the origin of most human cancers. However, realization of the full potential of Ad vectors for targeted cancer treatment is currently

  19. Risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of hot flashes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fisher, William I; Johnson, Aimee K; Elkins, Gary R; Otte, Julie L; Burns, Debra S; Yu, Menggang; Carpenter, Janet S

    2013-05-01

    Hot flashes are prevalent and severe symptoms that can interfere with mood, sleep, and quality of life for women and men with cancer. The purpose of this article is to review existing literature on the risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of hot flashes in individuals with cancer. Electronic searches were conducted to identify relevant English-language literature published through June 15, 2012. Results indicated that risk factors for hot flashes in cancer include patient-related factors (eg, age, race/ethnicity, educational level, smoking history, cardiovascular risk including body mass index, and genetics) and disease-related factors (eg, cancer diagnosis and dose/type of treatment). In addition, although the pathophysiology of hot flashes has remained elusive, these symptoms are likely attributable to disruptions in thermoregulation and neurochemicals. Therapies that have been offered or tested fall into 4 broad categories: pharmacological, nutraceutical, surgical, and complementary/behavioral strategies. The evidence base for this broad range of therapies varies, with some treatments not yet having been fully tested or showing equivocal results. The evidence base surrounding all therapies is evaluated to enhance hot flash treatment decision-making by clinicians and patients.

  20. Risk Factors, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Hot Flashes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, William I.; Johnson, Aimee K.; Elkins, Gary R.; Otte, Julie L.; Burns, Debra S.; Yu, Menggang; Carpenter, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    Hot flashes are prevalent and severe symptoms that can interfere with mood, sleep, and quality of life for women and men with cancer. The purpose of this article is to review existing literature on the risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of hot flashes in persons with cancer. Electronic searches were conducted to identify relevant, English-language literature published through June 15, 2012. Results indicated that risk factors for hot flashes in cancer include patient-related factors (eg, age, race/ethnicity, educational level, smoking history, cardiovascular risk including BMI, and genetics) and disease-related factors (eg, cancer diagnosis, and dose/type of treatment). In addition, although the pathophysiology of hot flashes has remained elusive, these symptoms are likely attributable to disruptions in thermoregulation and neurochemicals. Therapies that have been offered or tested fall into 4 broad categories: pharmacological, nutraceutical, surgical, and complementary/behavioral strategies. The evidence base for this broad range of therapies varies, with some treatments not yet having been fully tested or showing equivocal results. The evidence base surrounding all therapies is evaluated to enhance hot flash treatment decision making by clinicians and patients. PMID:23355109

  1. Study Shows Aspirin Reduces Colorectal Cancer in Those at High Risk

    Cancer.gov

    Findings from the first large clinical trial of its kind indicate that taking high doses of aspirin daily for at least 2 years substantially reduces the risk of colorectal cancer among people at increased risk of the disease.

  2. Adjuvant treatment strategies for early colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Waterston, Ashita M; Cassidy, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Colon cancer remains a major cause of death; however, in the last 3 years a number of trials have been published that have led to changes in the treatment of patients with this disease. Initially, the adjuvant treatment of patients following curative resection was based on their Dukes staging; this is now being refined by consideration of other pathological factors, as well as the investigation of newer prognostic markers such as p53, Ki67 and a number of genes on chromosome 18. Tumours generally develop from the progressive accumulation of genetic events, although some develop through mutation or inactivation of DNA mismatch repair proteins leading to microsatellite instability; this is particularly important in Lynch's syndrome. The loss of gene expression can occur by deletion or mutation of genes or by aberrant methylation of CpG islands. In patients with Dukes C colon cancer the standard of care for adjuvant chemotherapy was previously based on bolus fluorouracil (5-fluorouracil) and folinic acid (leucovorin) administered 5 days per month or weekly for 6 months. Recent studies with a combination of infusional fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin have been found to be superior. A further study replacing fluorouracil with oral capecitabine has also demonstrated equivalent disease-free survival. Although some debate remains regarding the benefit of adjuvant treatment for patients with Dukes B colon cancer, the emerging consensus is that, for those patients who are younger and have high-risk features, chemotherapy should be discussed. A number of large vaccine trials have also been conducted in the adjuvant setting and, overall, these have been disappointing. This is a rapidly advancing area of therapy and the results of new trials are awaited to determine whether additional benefits can be achieved with biological therapies such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and anti-epithelial growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies, which have already

  3. Cholelithiasis after treatment for childhood cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, H.; Schell, M.; Pui, C.H. )

    1991-03-01

    The authors evaluated the risk of development of cholelithiasis in 6050 patients treated at a single hospital for various childhood cancers with different therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy, and bone marrow transplantation, from 1963 to 1989. Patients with underlying chronic hemolytic anemia or preexisting gallstones were excluded. Nine female and seven male patients with a median age of 12.4 years (range, 1.2 to 22.8 years) at diagnosis of primary cancer had gallstones develop 3 months to 17.3 years (median, 3.1 years) after therapy was initiated. Cumulative risks of 0.42% at 10 years and 1.03% at 18 years after diagnosis substantially exceed those reported for the general population of this age group. Treatment-related factors significantly associated with an increased risk of cholelithiasis were ileal conduit, parenteral nutrition, abdominal surgery, and abdominal radiation therapy (relative risks and 95% confidence intervals = 61.6 (27.9-135.9), 23.0 (9.8-54.1), 15.1 (7.1-32.2), and 7.4 (3.2-17.0), respectively). There was no correlation with the type of cancer, nor was the frequency of conventional predisposing features (e.g., family history, obesity, use of oral contraceptives, and pregnancy) any higher among the affected patients in this study than in the general population. Patients with cancer who have risk factors identified here should be monitored for the development of gallstones.

  4. Medical treatment of renal cancer: new horizons

    PubMed Central

    Greef, Basma; Eisen, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) makes up 2–3% of adult cancers. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in the mid-2000s radically changed the management of RCC. These targeted treatments superseded immunotherapy with interleukin-2 and interferon. The pendulum now appears to be shifting back towards immunotherapy, with the evidence of prolonged overall survival of patients with metastatic RCC on treatment with the anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand monoclonal antibody, nivolumab. Clinical prognostic criteria aid prediction of relapse risk for resected localised disease. Unfortunately, for patients at high risk of relapse, no adjuvant treatment has yet shown benefit, although further trials are yet to report. Clinical prognostic models also have a role in the management of advanced disease; now there is a pressing need for predictive biomarkers to direct therapy. Treatment selection for metastatic disease is currently based on histology, prognostic group and patient preference based on side effect profile. In this article, we review the current medical and surgical management of localised, oligometastatic and advanced RCC, including side effect management and the evidence base for management of poor-risk and non-clear cell disease. We discuss recent results from clinical trials and how these are likely to shape future practice and a renaissance of immunotherapy for renal cell cancer. PMID:27490806

  5. Drugs developed for treatment of diabetes show protective effects in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Christian

    2014-10-25

    Type 2 diabetes has been identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). In the brains of patients with AD and PD, insulin signaling is impaired. This finding has motivated new research that showed good effects using drugs that initially had been developed to treat diabetes. Preclinical studies showed good neuroprotective effects applying insulin or long lasting analogues of incretin peptides. In transgenic animal models of AD or PD, analogues of the incretin GLP-1 prevented neurodegenerative processes and improved neuronal and synaptic functionality and reduced the symptoms of the diseases. Amyloid plaque load and synaptic loss as well as cognitive impairment had been prevented in transgenic AD mouse models, and dopaminergic loss of transmission and motor function has been reversed in animal models of PD. On the basis of these promising findings, several clinical trials are being conducted with the first encouraging clinical results already published. In several pilot studies in AD patients, the nasal application of insulin showed encouraging effects on cognition and biomarkers. A pilot study in PD patients testing a GLP-1 receptor agonist that is currently on the market as a treatment for type 2 diabetes (exendin-4, Byetta) also showed encouraging effects. Several other clinical trials are currently ongoing in AD patients, testing another GLP-1 analogue that is on the market (liraglutide, Victoza). Recently, a third GLP-1 receptor agonist has been brought to the market in Europe (Lixisenatide, Lyxumia), which also shows very promising neuroprotective effects. This review will summarise the range of these protective effects that those drugs have demonstrated. GLP-1 analogues show promise in providing novel treatments that may be protective or even regenerative in AD and PD, something that no current drug does.

  6. Saraca indica Bark Extract Shows In Vitro Antioxidant, Antibreast Cancer Activity and Does Not Exhibit Toxicological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Navneet Kumar; Saini, Karan Singh; Hossain, Zakir; Omer, Ankur; Sharma, Chetan; Gayen, Jiaur R.; Singh, Poonam; Arya, K. R.; Singh, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are used as a complementary and alternative medicine in treatment of various diseases including cancer worldwide, because of their ease of accessibility and cost effectiveness. Multicomposed mixture of compounds present in a plant extract has synergistic activity, increases the therapeutic potential many folds, compensates toxicity, and increases bioavailability. Saraca indica (family Caesalpiniaceae) is one of the most ancient sacred plants with medicinal properties, exhibiting a number of pharmacological effects. Antioxidant, antibreast cancer activity and toxicological evaluation of Saraca indica bark extract (SIE) were carried out in the present study. The results of the study indicated that this herbal preparation has antioxidant and antibreast cancer activity. Toxicological studies suggest that SIE is safer to use and may have a potential to be used as complementary and alternative medicine for breast cancer therapy. PMID:25861411

  7. Hyoid Displacement in Post-Treatment Cancer Patients: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zu, Yihe; Yang, Zhenyu; Perlman, Adrienne L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia after head and neck cancer treatment is a health care issue; in some cases, the cause of death is not cancer but, rather, the passage of food or liquid into the lungs. Hyoid displacement is known to be important to safe swallowing function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate hyoid displacement after cancer treatment.…

  8. Treatment of brain metastasis from lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takuya; Phi, Ji Hoon; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Kim, Dong Gyu; Barfod, Bierta E; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Brain metastasis from lung cancer occupies a significant portion of all brain metastases. About 15-20% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) develop brain metastasis during the course of the disease. The prognosis of brain metastasis is poor with median survival of less than 1 year. Whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is widely used for the treatment of brain metastasis. WBRT can also be used as adjuvant treatment along with surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).Surgery provides a rapid relief of mass effects and may be the best choice for a large single metastasis. SRS confers local control rates comparable to those for surgery with minimal toxicities and versatility that makes it applicable to multiple lesions, deep-seated lesions, and to patients with poor medical conditions. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classes are widely used for prognostic stratification. However, the validity of RPA classes, especially for NSCLC, has been questioned and other scoring systems are being developed. Synchronous presentation of primary NSCLC and brain metastases is a special situation in which surgery for the lung lesion and surgery or SRS for brain lesions are recommended if the thoracic disease is in early stages. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a higher likelihood for brain metastasis than NSCLC and prophylactic cranial irradiation and subsequent WBRT are usually recommended. Recently, SRS for brain metastasis from SCLC has been tried, but requires further verification.

  9. [Integration of nutritional care into cancer treatment: need for improvement].

    PubMed

    Joly, Caroline; Jacqueline-Ravel, Nathalie; Pugliesi-Rinaldi, Angela; Bigler-Perrotin, Lucienne; Chikhi, Marinette; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Dulguerov, Pavel; Miralbell, Raymond; Picard-Kossovsky, Michel; Seium, Yodit; Thériault, Michel; Pichard, Claude

    2011-11-16

    Progresses in cancer treatment transformed cancer into a chronic disease associated with growing nutritional problems. Poor nutritional status of cancer patients worsens morbidity, mortality, overall cost of care and decreases patients' quality of life, oncologic treatments tolerance and efficacy. These adverse effects lead to treatment modifications or interruptions, reducing the chances to control or cure cancer. Implementation of an interdisciplinary and longitudinal integration of nutritional care and nutritional information into cancer treatment (The OncoNut Program) could prevent or treat poor nutritional status and its adversely side effects.

  10. Changing the Paradigm of Cancer Screening, Prevention, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The war on cancer has been fought during the past several decades primarily based on the somatic mutation model of cancer. This has resulted in the emphasis on cancer screening and elimination of any detected cancerous/precancerous cells as the primary method of cancer prevention. This approach has reduced mortality from some cancers, but age-adjusted cancer mortality rates continue to be high. The lack of significant progress in reducing cancer mortality rates may be indicative of a fundamental flaw in the cancer model used. An alternative model of cancer is the immune suppression model of cancer based on the tremendous increase in cancers when the immune system is suppressed. According to this model, the key carcinogenic event is the suppression of the immune system which enables the already existing covert cancers to grow uncontrollably, causing cancer. Hence, cancer screening would consist of identifying those with weak immune system response. The primary mode of cancer prevention and treatment would be boosting of the immune system, for example, through exercise, infection, and low-dose radiation, as they are all known to enhance immune system response and reduce cancers. There is sufficient evidence to justify clinical trials of this approach for cancer screening, prevention, and treatment. PMID:27928220

  11. Quality of Life and Cost Effectiveness of Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0257 TITLE: Quality of Life and Cost Effectiveness of Prostate Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ravishankar...patients across two ethnic groups, (2) analyze and compare short and long term cost-effectiveness of prostate cancer treatment across ethnic groups; and...cost-effectiveness of prostate cancer treatment across ethnic groups; and (3) analyze and compare resource utilization patterns, treatment modalities

  12. Lymphedema as a Cancer Treatment Side Effect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ...

  13. Treatment of breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Silvia; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C

    2013-10-05

    Breast cancer represents the second most frequent cause of brain metastases. Treatment planning should consider several tumor and patient factors to estimate prognosis based on the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), age, extent of extra-cerebral disease as well as genetic subtype. When systemic disease is under control patients with up to three metastases qualify for local therapy, such as surgical excision or stereotactic radiotherapy. After the local treatment the addition of whole brain radiation therapy may be postponed until disease progression in the brain is observed and overall survival will not be compromised. Asymptomatic brain metastases may be first approached with a systemic treatment to which the primary tumor is considered to be sensitive.

  14. New drug treatments show neuroprotective effects in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Insulin signaling in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease is impaired. Preclinical studies of growth factors showed impressive neuroprotective effects. In animal models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, insulin, glia-derived neurotrophic factor, or analogues of the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 prevented neurodegenerative processes and improved neuronal and synaptic functionality in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. On the basis of these promising findings, several clinical trials are ongoing with the first encouraging clinical results published. This gives hope for developing effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease that are currently unavailable.

  15. Polymer nanoassemblies for cancer treatment and imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jin; Ponta, Andrei; Bae, Younsoo

    2010-12-01

    Amphiphilic polymers represented by block copolymers self-assemble into well-defined nanostructures capable of incorporating therapeutics. Polymer nanoassemblies currently developed for cancer treatment and imaging are reviewed in this article. Particular attention is paid to three representative polymer nanoassemblies: polymer micelles, polymer micellar aggregates and polymer vesicles. Rationales, design and performance of these polymer nanoassemblies are addressed, focusing on increasing the solubility and chemical stability of drugs. Also discussed are polymer nanoassembly formation, the distribution of polymer materials in the human body and applications of polymer nanoassemblies for combined therapy and imaging of cancer. Updates on tumor-targeting approaches, based on preclinical and clinical results are provided, as well as solutions for current issues that drug-delivery systems have, such as in vivo stability, tissue penetration and therapeutic efficacy. These are discussed to provide insights on the future development of more effective polymer nanoassemblies for the delivery of therapeutics in the body.

  16. [Evolution of monoclonal antibodies in cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Kubczak, Małgorzata; Rogalińska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Since late 90s of last century the new age of directed therapy began using mainly biological constructs produced in rodents called monoclonal antibodies. The side effects of monoclonal antibodies were a challenge for pharmaceutical companies to improve the biological properties of these biological drugs. The humanization of monoclonal constructs was an idea to improve monoclonal antibodies next generation activity cancer cell reduction in humans. Moreover for some other patients sensitive for monoclonal antibodies therapy could also potentially induce immunological differences that might imply on human health. The new idea related to monoclonal antibodies was to design a small molecule constructs of nanoantibodies with ability to enter into cells. Such small molecules could find their targets inside human cells, even in nuclei leading to differences in cancer cells expression. The existing knowledge on monoclonal antibodies as well as directed activity of nanoantibodies could improve anticancer treatment efficancy of diseases.

  17. Immune checkpoint inhibitors for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Park, Junsik; Kwon, Minsuk; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2016-11-01

    During immune responses antigen-specific T cells are regulated by several mechanisms, including through inhibitory receptors and regulatory T cells, to avoid excessive or persistent immune responses. These regulatory mechanisms, which are called 'immune checkpoints', suppress T cell responses, particularly in patients with chronic viral infections and cancer where viral antigens or tumor antigens persist for a long time and contribute to T cell exhaustion. Among these regulatory mechanisms, cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated protein-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) are the most well-known receptors and both have been targeted for drug development. As a result, anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 (or anti-PD-L1) antibodies were recently developed as immune checkpoint inhibitors for use in cancer treatments. In this review we describe several receptors that function as immunological checkpoints as well as the pharmaceuticals that target them.

  18. Sexual dysfunction and infertility as late effects of cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Schover, Leslie R; van der Kaaij, Marleen; van Dorst, Eleonora; Creutzberg, Carien; Huyghe, Eric; Kiserud, Cecilie E

    2014-06-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common consequence of cancer treatment, affecting at least half of men and women treated for pelvic malignancies and over a quarter of people with other types of cancer. Problems are usually linked to damage to nerves, blood vessels, and hormones that underlie normal sexual function. Sexual dysfunction also may be associated with depression, anxiety, relationship conflict, and loss of self-esteem. Innovations in cancer treatment such as robotic surgery or more targeted radiation therapy have not had the anticipated result of reducing sexual dysfunction. Some new and effective cancer treatments, including aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer or chemoradiation for anal cancer also have very severe sexual morbidity. Cancer-related infertility is an issue for younger patients, who comprise a much smaller percentage of total cancer survivors. However, the long-term emotional impact of being unable to have a child after cancer can be extremely distressing. Advances in knowledge about how cancer treatments may damage fertility, as well as newer techniques to preserve fertility, offer hope to patients who have not completed their childbearing at cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately, surveys in industrialised nations confirm that many cancer patients are still not informed about potential changes to their sexual function or fertility, and all modalities of fertility preservation remain underutilised. After cancer treatment, many patients continue to have unmet needs for information about restoring sexual function or becoming a parent. Although more research is needed on optimal clinical practice, current studies suggest a multidisciplinary approach, including both medical and psychosocial treatment options.

  19. NVP-BKM120, a novel PI3K inhibitor, shows synergism with a STAT3 inhibitor in human gastric cancer cells harboring KRAS mutations

    PubMed Central

    PARK, EUNJU; PARK, JINAH; HAN, SAE-WON; IM, SEOCK-AH; KIM, TAE-YOU; OH, DO-YOUN; BANG, YUNG-JUE

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations of Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling are frequently observed in many types of cancer, promoting its emergence as a promising target for cancer treatment. PI3K can become activated by various pathways, one of which includes RAS. RAS can not only directly activate the PI3K/AKT pathway via binding to p110 of PI3K, but also regulates mTOR via ERK or RSK independently of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Thus, actively mutated RAS can constitutively activate PI3K signaling. Additionally, in RAS tumorigenic transformation, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been known also to be required. In this study, we examined the efficacy of NVP-BKM120, a pan-class I PI3K inhibitor in human gastric cancer cells and hypothesized that the combined inhibition of PI3K and STAT3 would be synergistic in KRAS mutant gastric cancer cells. NVP-BKM120 demonstrated anti-proliferative activity in 11 human gastric cancer cell lines by decreasing mTOR downstream signaling. But NVP-BKM120 treatment increased p-AKT by subsequent abrogation of feedback inhibition by stabilizing insulin receptor substrate-1. In KRAS mutant gastric cancer cells, either p-ERK or p-STAT3 was also increased upon treatment of NVP-BKM120. The synergistic efficacy study demonstrated that dual PI3K and STAT3 blockade showed a synergism in cells harboring mutated KRAS by inducing apoptosis. The synergistic effect was not seen in KRAS wild-type cells. Together, these findings suggest for the first time that the dual inhibition of PI3K and STAT3 signaling may be an effective therapeutic strategy for KRAS mutant gastric cancer patients. PMID:22159814

  20. Phytomedicine in the Treatment of Cancer: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Tanushree; Chahar, Akriti; Sharma, Jitendar Kumar; Kaur, Kirandeep

    2015-01-01

    phytomedicine is INR 49,237/death averted (US$ 779/death averted). Conclusion When taken with conventional cancer treatment, phytomedicine shows clinical and cost effectiveness. Domestic manufacturing and practice of phytomedicine should be encouraged. PMID:26816981

  1. Treatment helps young women preserve fertility during breast cancer chemo

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have found that young women with breast cancer were able to better preserve their fertility during cancer treatments by using hormone-blocking drug injections that put them into temporary menopause. The results announced today at the annual me

  2. What`s New in Cervical Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... trials are underway to find out more. See Cancer Immunotherapy for more information on this type of treatment. HPV vaccines Vaccines have been developed to prevent infection with some of ... cancer. Currently available vaccines are intended to produce immunity ...

  3. Seniors with Brain Cancer May Have Better Treatment Option

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164102.html Seniors With Brain Cancer May Have Better Treatment Option ... More Health News on: Brain Tumors Cancer Chemotherapy Seniors' Health Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics ...

  4. Mouth Sores Caused by Cancer Treatment: How to Cope

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the seventh day after chemotherapy treatment ends. Head or neck radiation therapy Only radiation aimed at your head ... May 19, 2014. Oral complications of chemotherapy and head/neck radiation (PDQ). National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer. ...

  5. Paclitaxel targets VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bin; Bie, Zhixin; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Ailing

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the gynecologic cancers with the highest mortality, wherein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in regulating tumor vascularization, growth, migration, and invasion. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in tumors has been targeted in various cancer treatments, and anti-VEGF therapy has been used clinically for treatment of several types of cancer. Paclitaxel is a natural antitumor agent in the standard front-line treatment that has significant efficiency to treat advanced cancers, including ovarian cancer. Although platinum/paclitaxel-based chemotherapy has good response rates, most patients eventually relapse because the disease develops drug resistance. We aim to review the recent advances in paclitaxel treatment of ovarian cancer via antiangiogenesis. Single-agent therapy may be used in selected cases of ovarian cancer. However, to prevent drug resistance, drug combinations should be identified for optimal effectiveness and existing therapies should be improved. PMID:27648354

  6. Osteopathic manipulative treatment showed reduction of length of stay and costs in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Lanaro, Diego; Ruffini, Nuria; Manzotti, Andrea; Lista, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Osteopathic medicine is an emerging and complementary method used in neonatology. Methods: Outcomes were the mean difference in length of stay (LOS) and costs between osteopathy and alternative treatment group. A comprehensive literature search of (quasi)- randomized controlled trials (RCTs), was conducted from journal inception to May, 2015. Eligible studies must have treated preterm infants directly in the crib or bed and Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) must have been performed by osteopaths. A rigorous Cochrane-like method was used for study screening and selection, risk of bias assessment and data reporting. Fixed effect meta-analysis was performed to synthesize data. Results: 5 trials enrolling 1306 infants met our inclusion criteria. Although the heterogeneity was moderate (I2 = 61%, P = 0.03), meta-analysis of all five studies showed that preterm infants treated with OMT had a significant reduction of LOS by 2.71 days (95% CI −3.99, −1.43; P < 0.001). Considering costs, meta-analysis showed reduction in the OMT group (−1,545.66€, −1,888.03€, −1,203.29€, P < 0.0001). All studies reported no adverse events associated to OMT. Subgroup analysis showed that the benefit of OMT is inversely associated to gestational age. Conclusions: The present systematic review showed the clinical effectiveness of OMT on the reduction of LOS and costs in a large population of preterm infants. PMID:28328840

  7. BnNHL18A shows a localization change by stress-inducing chemical treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Suk-Bae; Ham, Byung-Kook; Park, Jeong Mee; Kim, Young Jin; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-01-06

    The two genes, named BnNHL18A and BnNHL18B, showing sequence homology with Arabidopsis NDR1/HIN1-like (NHL) genes, were isolated from cDNA library prepared with oilseed rape (Brassica napus) seedlings treated with NaCl. The transcript level of BnNHL18A was increased by sodium chloride, ethephon, hydrogen peroxide, methyl jasmonate, or salicylic acid treatment. The coding regions of BnNHL18A and BnNHL18B contain a sarcolipin (SLN)-like sequence. Analysis of the localization of smGFP fusion proteins showed that BnNHL18A is mainly localized to endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This result suggests that the SLN-like sequence plays a role in retaining proteins in ER membrane in plants. In response to NaCl, hydrogen peroxide, ethephon, and salicylic acid treatments, the protein localization of BnNHL18A was changed. Our findings suggest a common function of BnNHL18A in biotic and abiotic stresses, and demonstrate the presence of the shared mechanism of protein translocalization between the responses to plant pathogen and to osmotic stress.

  8. Radiotherapy combined with surgery as treatment for advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Perches, R D; Lobaton, A T; Garcia, M C

    1983-12-01

    Experience obtained in a group of 44 patients with advanced cervical cancer is reported here. In this study, patients with residual cancer underwent laparotomy eight weeks after one or two different radiotherapy protocols. Sixty-eight percent of patients underwent radical surgery, 85% of patients pelvic exenterations, and 15% radical hysterectomies. In 27% of patients, no evidence of residual cancer was found in surgical specimens. Radical surgery was well tolerated, and one-third of patients were free of disease for one year or more. Control of disease was obtained in 50% of pelvic exenterations and in 60% of radical hysterectomies, regardless of prognosis, clinical stage or radiotherapy scheme. Although results show an improvement of up to 22% when comparing this to other more conventional treatments, we have concluded that we must obtain a wider experience in order to support our findings.

  9. [Locally advanced prostate cancer: definition, prognosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Plantade, Anne; Massard, Christophe; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Fizazi, Karim

    2007-07-01

    According to d'Amico's criteria, high-risk localized prostate cancer are defined either by an extracapsular extension (T3 or T4), either by a high Gleason score (> 7) or a PSA rate higher than 20 ng/ml. Pelvic lymph node involvement also corresponds to locally advanced prostate cancer. Statistical models called nomograms have been developed to predict the probability of prostate cancer recurrence and are also used to define locally advanced patients. Prostate MRI may help to detect an extracapsular extension or a seminal vesicles involvement but remains still discussed. A bone scan, an abdominal and pelvic CT scan have to be performed in order to detect metastases. A pelvic lymph node dissection is recommended in order to adapt the treatment of these patients. Standard treatment for high-risk localized prostate cancer without lymph node involvement is now well defined. The association of both local radiation and a long androgen deprivation (GnHR agonist) showed an overall survival benefit (more than 10%). The radiation dose of 74 Gy is recommended. Other questions are still debating : the optimal duration of the hormonotherapy , the use of the bicalutamide 150 mg instead of GnRH agonists, the optimal radiation dose. Radical prostatectomy is no more considered as a standard treatment for these patients. Since the use of chemotherapy for metastatic patients showed a benefit in overall survival, the place of chemotherapy as adjuvant or neo-adjuvant treatment is questionned in several randomized phase III studies. Sometimes high-risk disease is diagnosed after performance of a radical prostatectomy. A postoperative radiation may be performed in order to decrease clinical and biochemical progression. The use of bicalutamide 150 mg in this situation may have a positive impact too on progression free survival. In case of lymph node involvement, androgen deprivation is the standard treatment with an overall survival benefit. The place of local radiation therapy is still

  10. Overcoming treatment resistance in cancer: Current understanding and tactics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guang; Wilson, George; George, Jacob; Liddle, Christopher; Hebbard, Lionel; Qiao, Liang

    2017-02-28

    Chemotherapy is the standard treatment for many, if not all, metastatic cancers. While chemotherapy is often capable of inducing cell death in tumors leading to shrinkage of the tumor bulk, many patients suffer from recurrence and ultimately death due to resistance. During the last decade, treatment resistance has attracted great attention followed by some seminal discoveries, including sequential mutations, cancer stem cells, and bidirectional inter-conversion of stem and non-stem cancer cell populations. Nevertheless, the successful treatment of cancer will require a considerable refinement of our knowledge concerning treatment resistance. In doing so, we expect that a more informed and refined approach to treat cancer will be developed and this may improve prognosis of cancer patients. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge concerning the failure of cancer treatments and the potential approaches to overcome therapeutic resistance.

  11. The evolving biology and treatment of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, Russel S.; Loberg, Robert D.; Mehra, Rohit; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2007-01-01

    Since the effectiveness of androgen deprivation for treatment of advanced prostate cancer was first demonstrated, prevention strategies and medical therapies for prostate cancer have been based on understanding the biologic underpinnings of the disease. Prostate cancer treatment is one of the best examples of a systematic therapeutic approach to target not only the cancer cells themselves, but the microenvironment in which they are proliferating. As the population ages and prostate cancer prevalence increases, challenges remain in the diagnosis of clinically relevant prostate cancer as well as the management of the metastatic and androgen-independent metastatic disease states. PMID:17786228

  12. New drug treatments show neuroprotective effects in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hölscher, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Insulin signaling in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease is impaired. Preclinical studies of growth factors showed impressive neuroprotective effects. In animal models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, insulin, glia-derived neurotrophic factor, or analogues of the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 prevented neurodegenerative processes and improved neuronal and synaptic functionality in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. On the basis of these promising findings, several clinical trials are ongoing with the first encouraging clinical results published. This gives hope for developing effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease that are currently unavailable. PMID:25558231

  13. Diabetic pdx1-mutant zebrafish show conserved responses to nutrient overload and anti-glycemic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Robin A.; Dobler, Stefan; Schmitner, Nicole; Walsen, Tanja; Freudenblum, Julia; Meyer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by disrupted glucose homeostasis due to loss or dysfunction of insulin-producing beta cells. In this work, we characterize pancreatic islet development and function in zebrafish mutant for pdx1, a gene which in humans is linked to genetic forms of diabetes and is associated with increased susceptibility to Type 2 diabetes. Pdx1 mutant zebrafish have the key diabetic features of reduced beta cells, decreased insulin and elevated glucose. The hyperglycemia responds to pharmacologic anti-diabetic treatment and, as often seen in mammalian diabetes models, beta cells of pdx1 mutants show sensitivity to nutrient overload. This unique genetic model of diabetes provides a new tool for elucidating the mechanisms behind hyperglycemic pathologies and will allow the testing of novel therapeutic interventions in a model organism that is amenable to high-throughput approaches. PMID:26384018

  14. Breast cancer. Part 2: present and future treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    This is the second article in a series of three on breast cancer. Part 1 discussed breast anatomy, the principles behind breast awareness and breast health, detailing common benign breast diseases, types of breast cancer and staging. In this article, treatment for breast cancer is discussed. The article will follow the usual order of modalities in the trajectory, starting with surgery, then chemotherapy, radiotherapy and endocrine treatment, finishing with a discussion of future and biological treatments.

  15. Angiostatic Therapy: A New Treatment Modality for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    21702-5012. AUTHORITY USAMRMC ltr, 26 Nov 2002 THIS PAGE IS UNCLASSIFIED AD Award Number: DAMD17-99-1-9010 TITLE: Angiostatic Therapy : A New Treatment ...FUNDING NUMBERS Angiostatic Therapy : A New Treatment Modality for Prostate DAMD17-99-1-9010 Cancer 6. AUTHORIS) Per Borgstrom, Ph.D.* 7. PERFORMING...Cancer of the prostate is a major malignancy in men therapy , and hormonal treatment derives largely from in the Western world. After lung cancer, it is

  16. Exploration of Prostate Cancer Treatment Induced Neurotoxicity with Neuroimaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0033 TITLE: Exploration of Prostate Cancer Treatment Induced...Prostate Cancer Treatment Induced Neurotoxicity with Neuroimaging 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0033 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jeri...consequences on brain health of prostate cancer treatments in men despite data suggesting that ADT may cause memory or other cognitive impairments. Our study

  17. A Comparison of Breast Cancer Treatment Regimens by Demographic Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    Cancer Treatment Regimens by Demographic Characteristics PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Marianne E. Ulcickas Yood, M.P.H. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Henry...NUMBERS A Comparison of Breast Cancer Treatment Regimens by Demographic Characteristics DAMD17-97-1-7302 6. AUTHOR(S) Marianne E. Ulcickas Yood, M.P.H. 7... Cancer Treatment Regimens by Demographic Characteristics (DAMD17-97-1-7302), Annual Report October, 1998 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction

  18. [Peri-operative treatments for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Doyen, Jerome; Bénézery, Karen; Borens, Bruno; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; François, Éric

    2015-06-01

    Depending on its location or stage, rectal cancer may differ significantly. Before any treatment decision a careful work up is mandatory relying mainly on endoscopy and imaging (MRI). Surgery according to the TME principle is the cornerstone of treatment. Most of the time surgery is associated with external beam radiotherapy often combined with concurrent chemotherapy (capecitabine) according to the neoadjuvant regimen CAP 50 (5 weeks long). It is sometimes possible to escalate safely the dose of irradiation using contact X-ray brachytherapy 50 Kv or Iridium 192 interstitial brachytherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be given in case of pejorative pathological findings but its benefit is not yet proven in contrast with colon cancer. Local recurrences are becoming unusual as is permanent APE surgery with permanent stoma. To reduce the risk of distant metastasis clinical trials are testing first line chemotherapy in T3-4 lesions. For early stage (T2-"small" T3) clinical trials try to achieve organ preservation. Intensification of CAP 50 either with more chemotherapy or radiation dose escalation using contact X-ray aim at achieving a clinical complete response followed by local excision or close surveillance.

  19. Intravesical Treatments of Bladder Cancer: Review

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zancong; Shen, Tong; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; O’Donnell, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    For bladder cancer, intravesical chemo/immunotherapy is widely used as adjuvant therapies after surgical transurethal resection, while systemic therapy is typically reserved for higher stage, muscle-invading, or metastatic diseases. The goal of intravesical therapy is to eradicate existing or residual tumors through direct cytoablation or immunostimulation. The unique properties of the urinary bladder render it a fertile ground for evaluating additional novel experimental approaches to regional therapy, including iontophoresis/electrophoresis, local hyperthermia, co-administration of permeation enhancers, bioadhesive carriers, magnetic-targeted particles and gene therapy. Furthermore, due to its unique anatomical properties, the drug concentration-time profiles in various layers of bladder tissues during and after intravesical therapy can be described by mathematical models comprised of drug disposition and transport kinetic parameters. The drug delivery data, in turn, can be combined with the effective drug exposure to infer treatment efficacy and thereby assists the selection of optimal regimens. To our knowledge, intravesical therapy of bladder cancer represents the first example where computational pharmacological approach was used to design, and successfully predicted the outcome of, a randomized phase III trial (using mitomycin C). This review summarizes the pharmacological principles and the current status of intravesical therapy, and the application of computation to optimize the drug delivery to target sites and the treatment efficacy. PMID:18369709

  20. Oral complications of cancer and cancer therapy: from cancer treatment to survivorship.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Joel B; Thariat, Juliette; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Barasch, Andrei; Murphy, Barbara A; Kolnick, Leanne; Popplewell, Leslie; Maghami, Ellie

    2012-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Oral complications resulting from cancer and cancer therapies cause acute and late toxicities that may be underreported, underrecognized, and undertreated. Recent advances in cancer treatment have led to changes in the incidence, nature, and severity of oral complications. As the number of survivors increases, it is becoming increasingly recognized that the aggressive management of oral toxicities is needed to ensure optimal long-term oral health and general well-being. Advances in care have had an impact on previously recognized oral complications and are leading to newly recognized adverse effects. Here, the authors briefly review advances in cancer therapy, including recent advances in surgery, oral care, radiation therapy, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and medical oncology; describe how these advances affect oral health; and discuss the frequent and/or severe oral health complications associated with cancer and cancer treatment and their effect upon long-term health. Although some of the acute oral toxicities of cancer therapies may be reduced, they remain essentially unavoidable. The significant impact of long-term complications requires increased awareness and recognition to promote prevention and appropriate intervention. It is therefore important for the primary oncologist to be aware of these complications so that appropriate measures can be implemented in a timely manner. Prevention and management is best provided via multidisciplinary health care teams, which must be integrated and communicate effectively in order to provide the best patient care in a coordinated manner at the appropriate time.

  1. Targeted treatment of liver metastasis from gastric cancer using specific binding peptide

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianfeng; Tan, Gewen; Sheng, Nengquan; You, Weiqiang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks the first in China among all gastrointestinal cancers in terms of incidence, and liver metastasis is the leading cause of death for patients with advanced gastric cancer. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a cytokine commonly chosen as the target for gene therapy against cancers. The specific binding peptide pd20 of gastric cancer cells with a high potential for liver metastasis was fused with human TNF to obtain the pd20-TNF gene using DNA recombinant technique. The expression of the fusion protein was induced and the protein was purified. In vitro activity test showed that the fusion protein greatly improved the membrane permeability of liver cells in nude mice with liver metastasis from gastric cancer. The tumor implantation experiment in nude mice showed that the fusion protein effectively mitigated the cancer lesions. The results provide important clues for developing the drugs for targeted treatment of liver metastasis from gastric cancer. PMID:27347305

  2. Kinetic assay shows that increasing red cell volume could be a treatment for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Henry, Eric R; Hofrichter, James; Smith, Jeffrey F; Cellmer, Troy; Dunkelberger, Emily B; Metaferia, Belhu B; Jones-Straehle, Stacy; Boutom, Sarah; Christoph, Garrott W; Wakefield, Terri H; Link, Mary E; Staton, Dwayne; Vass, Erica R; Miller, Jeffery L; Hsieh, Matthew M; Tisdale, John F; Eaton, William A

    2017-01-31

    Although it has been known for more than 60 years that the cause of sickle cell disease is polymerization of a hemoglobin mutant, hydroxyurea is the only drug approved for treatment by the US Food and Drug Administration. This drug, however, is only partially successful, and the discovery of additional drugs that inhibit fiber formation has been hampered by the lack of a sensitive and quantitative cellular assay. Here, we describe such a method in a 96-well plate format that is based on laser-induced polymerization in sickle trait cells and robust, automated image analysis to detect the precise time at which fibers distort ("sickle") the cells. With this kinetic method, we show that small increases in cell volume to reduce the hemoglobin concentration can result in therapeutic increases in the delay time prior to fiber formation. We also show that, of the two drugs (AES103 and GBT440) in clinical trials that inhibit polymerization by increasing oxygen affinity, one of them (GBT440) also inhibits sickling in the absence of oxygen by two additional mechanisms.

  3. Kinetic assay shows that increasing red cell volume could be a treatment for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Henry, Eric R.; Hofrichter, James; Smith, Jeffrey F.; Cellmer, Troy; Dunkelberger, Emily B.; Metaferia, Belhu B.; Jones-Straehle, Stacy; Boutom, Sarah; Christoph, Garrott W.; Wakefield, Terri H.; Link, Mary E.; Staton, Dwayne; Vass, Erica R.; Miller, Jeffery L.; Hsieh, Matthew M.; Tisdale, John F.; Eaton, William A.

    2017-01-01

    Although it has been known for more than 60 years that the cause of sickle cell disease is polymerization of a hemoglobin mutant, hydroxyurea is the only drug approved for treatment by the US Food and Drug Administration. This drug, however, is only partially successful, and the discovery of additional drugs that inhibit fiber formation has been hampered by the lack of a sensitive and quantitative cellular assay. Here, we describe such a method in a 96-well plate format that is based on laser-induced polymerization in sickle trait cells and robust, automated image analysis to detect the precise time at which fibers distort (“sickle”) the cells. With this kinetic method, we show that small increases in cell volume to reduce the hemoglobin concentration can result in therapeutic increases in the delay time prior to fiber formation. We also show that, of the two drugs (AES103 and GBT440) in clinical trials that inhibit polymerization by increasing oxygen affinity, one of them (GBT440) also inhibits sickling in the absence of oxygen by two additional mechanisms. PMID:28096387

  4. Exercise in the prevention and treatment of cancer. An update.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    1993-04-01

    Physical activity potentially encourages a healthy lifestyle and it could have a more direct preventive effect on certain forms of carcinogenesis (for instance, by speeding gastrointestinal transit, or by moderating sex hormone levels). However, there are also potential negative effects, particularly an excessive exposure to ultraviolet light in certain water sports. The many types of neoplasm and the equally varied sources of physical activity militate against finding any simple relationship between the risk of malignancy and the individual's physical activity history. Nevertheless, evidence that physical activity protects against certain forms of cancer can be deduced from studies of experimental animals, former athletes, people employed in active occupations, and those with an active recreational lifestyle. Many occupational surveys and a number of studies of recreational activity show an association between sedentary living and a risk of colon cancer, both in men and in women. Moreover, an application of Bradford Hill's criteria gives some support to the causal nature of the association. More limited data suggest that a history of active leisure is associated with a reduced risk of all-cause cancer and in women of breast and reproductive system cancers. The last observation must still be reconciled with an apparent increase in the risk of prostatic cancer in active men. Since moderate exercise elevates mood and helps to conserve lean tissue, it may finally be a helpful component of treatment after a neoplasm has been diagnosed.

  5. Treatment Options by Stage (Endometrial Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage II endometrial cancer. Cancer has spread into connective tissue of the cervix, but has not spread outside ... uterus. In stage II , cancer has spread into connective tissue of the cervix , but has not spread outside ...

  6. Drug treatment of cancer cell lines: a way to select for cancer stem cells?

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A Ivana; Mondello, Chiara

    2011-03-04

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  7. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Mondello, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs. PMID:24212655

  8. Genetic variations associated with gemcitabine treatment outcome in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Wei; Jenkins, Gregory; Xie, Fang; Carlson, Erin E.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Bamlet, William R.; Petersen, Gloria M.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Wang, Liewei

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a rapidly fatal disease with gemcitabine remaining the first-line therapy. We performed a genotype–phenotype association study to identify biomarkers for predicting gemcitabine treatment outcome. Materials and methods We selected the top 200 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from our previous genome-wide association study to associate with overall survival using 400 patients treated with/or without gemcitabine, followed by imputation analysis for regions around the identified SNPs and a replication study using an additional 537 patients by the TaqMan genotyping assay. Functional validation was performed using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR for gemcitabine-induced expression in genotyped lymphoblastoid cell lines and siRNA knockdown for candidate genes in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Results Four SNPs in chromosome 1, 3, 9, and 20 showed an interaction with gemcitabine from the discovery cohort of 400 patients (P<0.01). Subsequently, we selected those four genotyped plus four imputed SNPs for SNP×gemcitabine interaction analysis using the secondary validation cohort. Two imputed SNPs in CDH4 and KRT8P35 showed a trend in interaction with gemcitabine treatment. The lymphoblastoid cell lines with the variant sequences showed increased CDH4 expression compared with the wild-type cells after gemcitabine exposure. Knockdown of CDH4 significantly desensitized pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine cytotoxicity. The CDH4 SNPs that interacted with treatment are more predictive than prognostic. Conclusion We identified SNPs with gemcitabine-dependent effects on overall survival. CDH4 might contribute to variations in gemcitabine response. These results might help us to better predict gemcitabine response in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27749787

  9. Polyphenols bearing cinnamaldehyde scaffold showing cell growth inhibitory effects on the cisplatin-resistant A2780/Cis ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soon Young; Jung, Hyeryoung; Ahn, Seunghyun; Hwang, Doseok; Yoon, Hyuk; Hyun, Jiye; Yong, Yeonjoong; Cho, Hi Jae; Koh, Dongsoo; Lee, Young Han; Lim, Yoongho

    2014-03-15

    Ovarian carcinoma remains the most lethal among gynecological cancers. Chemoresistance is a clinical problem that severely limits treatment success. To identify potent anticancer agents against the cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cell line A2780/Cis, 26 polyphenols bearing a cinnamaldehyde scaffold were synthesized. Structural differences in their inhibitory effect on clonogenicity of A2780/Cis cells were elucidated using comparative molecular field analysis and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis. Structural conditions required for increased inhibitory activity can be derived based on the analysis of their contour maps. The two most active compounds (16 and 19) were selected and further characterized their biological activities. We found that compounds 16 and 19 trigger cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and apoptotic cell death in cisplatin-resistant A2780/Cis human ovarian cancer cells. The molecular mechanism of compound 16 was elucidated using in vitro aurora A kinase assay, and the binding mode between the compound 16 and aurora A kinase was interpreted using in silico docking experiments. The findings obtained here may help us develop novel plant-derived polyphenols used for potent chemotherapeutic agents. In conclusion, compounds 16 and 19 could be used as promising lead compounds for the development of novel anticancer therapies in the treatment of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancers.

  10. Development of new immunotherapy treatments in different cancer types.

    PubMed

    Stanculeanu, D L; Daniela, Zob; Lazescu, A; Bunghez, R; Anghel, R

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy involves the use of therapeutic modalities that determine a manipulation of the immune system by using immune agents such as cytokines, vaccines, cell therapies and humoral, transfection agents. Immunotherapy of cancer has to stimulate the host's anti-tumor response by increasing the effector cell number and the production of soluble mediators and decrease the host's suppressor mechanisms by inducing tumor killing environment and by modulating immune checkpoints. Immunotherapy seems to work better in more immunogenic tumors. Making a review of literature, the article presents the new immunologic treatments in cancers less presented in the latest conferences, cancers in which, immunotherapy is still under investigation. Bladder cancer was the first indication for which immunotherapy was used in 1970. A promising clinical research in bladder cancer is the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors. Although breast cancer is considered immunologically silent, several preclinical and clinical studies suggested that immunotherapy has the potential to improve the clinical outcomes for patients with breast cancer. Cervical cancer, brain cancer, head and neck cancer and colorectal and esophageal cancers are cancer types for which new immune-based cancer treatments are currently under development. Recent agents used in clinical trials will be described in before mentioned cancers.

  11. Development of new immunotherapy treatments in different cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Stanculeanu, DL; Daniela, Zob; Lazescu, A; Bunghez, R; Anghel, R

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy involves the use of therapeutic modalities that determine a manipulation of the immune system by using immune agents such as cytokines, vaccines, cell therapies and humoral, transfection agents. Immunotherapy of cancer has to stimulate the host’s anti-tumor response by increasing the effector cell number and the production of soluble mediators and decrease the host’s suppressor mechanisms by inducing tumor killing environment and by modulating immune checkpoints. Immunotherapy seems to work better in more immunogenic tumors. Making a review of literature, the article presents the new immunologic treatments in cancers less presented in the latest conferences, cancers in which, immunotherapy is still under investigation. Bladder cancer was the first indication for which immunotherapy was used in 1970. A promising clinical research in bladder cancer is the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors. Although breast cancer is considered immunologically silent, several preclinical and clinical studies suggested that immunotherapy has the potential to improve the clinical outcomes for patients with breast cancer. Cervical cancer, brain cancer, head and neck cancer and colorectal and esophageal cancers are cancer types for which new immune-based cancer treatments are currently under development. Recent agents used in clinical trials will be described in before mentioned cancers. PMID:27974927

  12. Nanotextured polymer substrates show enhanced cancer cell isolation and cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Muhymin; Sajid, Adeel; Arif Iftakher Mahmood, M.; Motasim Bellah, Mohammad; Allen, Peter B.; Kim, Young-Tae; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2015-06-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the early stages of cancer is a great challenge because of their exceedingly small concentration. There are only a few approaches sensitive enough to differentiate tumor cells from the plethora of other cells in a sample like blood. In order to detect CTCs, several antibodies and aptamers have already shown high affinity. Nanotexture can be used to mimic basement membrane to further enhance this affinity. This article reports an approach to fabricate nanotextured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates using micro reactive ion etching (micro-RIE). Three recipes were used to prepare nanotextured PDMS using oxygen and carbon tetrafluoride. Micro-RIE provided better control on surface properties. Nanotexturing improved the affinity of PDMS surfaces to capture cancer cells using surface immobilized aptamers against cell membrane overexpressed with epidermal growth factor receptors. In all cases, nanotexture of PDMS increased the effective surface area by creating nanoscale roughness on the surface. Nanotexture also enhanced the growth rate of cultured cells compared to plain surfaces. A comparison among the three nanotextured surfaces demonstrated an almost linear relationship between the surface roughness and density of captured tumor cells. The nanotextured PDMS mimicked biophysical environments for cells to grow faster. This can have many implications in microfluidic platforms used for cell handling.

  13. What does the evidence show? Efficacy of behavioural treatments for recurrent headaches in adults.

    PubMed

    Andrasik, F

    2007-05-01

    Behavioural treatments (predominantly biofeedback, relaxation and cognitive-behavioural) have been utilised in headache management for nearly 4 decades. This paper examines their clinical efficacy, drawing upon 2 primary sources of evidence: meta-analytic and evidenced-based reviews. Behavioural treatments have demonstrated efficacy and have been endorsed by various reviewing groups, such as the US Headache Consortium. Outcomes from behavioural treatments appear to endure over longer-term follow-up intervals as well. Meta-analyses comparing behavioural and pharmacological treatments have revealed similar levels of outcome. The article closes with a brief discussion of methods investigators are exploring to make behavioural treatments more available and affordable to headache patients.

  14. The Role of Cancer Boards in the Treatment Decisions Regarding Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Sho; Fukui, Tadahisa; (Ito) Sasahara, Yuriko; Suzuki, Shuhei; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Misako; Ichikawa, Mayumi; Nemoto, Kenji; Yamakawa, Mayumi; Yoshioka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The influence of cancer boards with respect to the treatment decisions regarding chemotherapy remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the cases that presented at our institutional cancer boards, to assess the effect of cancer boards on the treatment decisions regarding chemotherapy. Methods Data from the cancer boards at Yamagata University Hospital, Yamagata, Japan, were collected. Along with data from the clinical records, the details of the discussions and the chosen plan of treatment of the cancer boards were analyzed. Results From February 2010 to February 2014, 1,541 cases were discussed at our cancer boards. Of these, 811 cases (52.6%) involved discussions about chemotherapy. Of those 811 cases, recommendations were made to alter the treatment plans for 189 cases (23.3%). The reasons for discouraging chemotherapy varied; however, 29/45 (64.4%) cases involved discouragement for the following reasons: old age, a comorbid condition, the physical (performance) status, or insufficient evidence to administer chemotherapy. Eighty-six patients were referred to the medical oncology department through the cancer boards. Conclusion Our results showed that cancer boards have a great influence on the treatment decisions regarding chemotherapy and the prompt referral of cases to medical oncologists as necessary. In terms of future research, we will evaluate the effect of cancer boards on the prognosis and outcomes of cases using the institutional cancer registry. PMID:27803404

  15. Targeted Approach to Overcoming Treatment Resistance in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    therapy -­‐resistant   prostate   cancer  cells  and  in  combination   therapy  (SOW...treatment resistance in advanced prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Karin Scarpinato CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgia Southern...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to determine if rescinnamine is effective against prostate cancer and

  16. Disparities in Prostate Cancer Treatment Modality and Quality of Life

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    producing hormones) 1 0 10 11 B8f. Watchful waiting (no treatment, wait and see if your prostate cancer grows) 1 0 10 11 B8g. Cryotherapy (process...your prostate cancer grows) 7 Cryotherapy (process to freeze and destroy prostate tissue) 8 Chemotherapy (use of anti-cancer drugs) 9 Any other

  17. Oncolytic virotherapy for treatment of breast cancer, including triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Simona; Koski, Anniina; Liikanen, Ilkka; Vassilev, Lotta; Oksanen, Minna; Siurala, Mikko; Heiskanen, Raita; Hakonen, Tiina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by several distinct biological subtypes, among which triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one associated with a poor prognosis. Oncolytic virus replication is an immunogenic phenomenon, and viruses can be armed with immunostimulatory molecules to boost virus triggered antitumoral immune responses. Cyclophosphamide (CP) is a chemotherapy drug that is associated with cytotoxicity and immunosuppression at higher doses, whereas immunostimulatory and anti-angiogenic properties are observed at low continuous dosage. Therefore, the combination of oncolytic immuno-virotherapy with low-dose CP is an appealing approach. We investigated the potency of oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF on a TNBC cell line and in vivo in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model, in combination with low-dose CP or its main active metabolite 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HP-CP). Furthermore, we summarized the breast cancer-specific human data on this virus from the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP). Low-dose CP increased the efficacy of Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF in vitro and in a TNBC mouse model. In ATAP, treatments appeared safe and well-tolerated. Thirteen out of 16 breast cancer patients treated were evaluable for possible benefits with modified RECIST 1.1 criteria: 1 patient had a minor response, 2 had stable disease (SD), and 10 had progressive disease (PD). One patient is alive at 1,771 d after treatment. Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF in combination with low-dose CP showed promising efficacy in preclinical studies and possible antitumor activity in breast cancer patients refractory to other forms of therapy. This preliminary data supports continuing the clinical development of oncolytic adenoviruses for treatment of breast cancer, including TNBC.

  18. Showe 29-gene signature for lung cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    A 29-gene peripheral blood gene expression signature that separates patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors and patient controls with 86% accuracy (91% sensitivity, 80% specificity). Subjects were primarily smokers and former smokers. The 29 genes, minus one that did not match a gene symbol in the naming database: RSF1, DYRK2, YY1, C19orf12, THEM2, TRIO, MYADM, BAIAP2, ROGDI, DNAJB14, BRE, TMEM41A, C9orf64, FAM110A, PCNXL2, REST, C19orf62, C13orf27, ASCC3, SLC1A5, PTPLAD1, MRE11A, GTPBP10, SERPINI2, CREB1, CCDC53, USP48, ZSCAN2

  19. Muscle strength in breast cancer patients receiving different treatment regimes

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Oliver; Schmidt, Martina E.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Potthoff, Karin; Steindorf, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Muscle dysfunction and sarcopenia have been associated with poor performance status, an increased mortality risk, and greater side effects in oncologic patients. However, little is known about how performance is affected by cancer therapy. We investigated muscle strength in breast cancer patients in different adjuvant treatment settings and also compared it with data from healthy individuals. Methods Breast cancer patients (N = 255) from two randomized controlled exercise trials, staged 0–III and aged 54.4 ± 9.4 years, were categorized into four groups according to their treatment status. In a cross‐sectional design, muscle function was assessed bilaterally by isokinetic dynamometry (0°, 60°, 180°/s) as maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and maximal isokinetic peak torque (MIPT) in shoulder rotators and knee flexors and extensors. Additionally, muscular fatigue index (FI%) and shoulder flexibility were evaluated. Healthy women (N = 26), aged 53.3 ± 9.8 years, were tested using the same method. Analysis of covariance was used to estimate the impact of different cancer treatments on skeletal muscle function with adjustment for various clinical and socio‐demographic factors. Results Consistently, lower muscle strength was measured in shoulder and knee strength in patients after chemotherapy. On average, patients had up to 25% lower strength in lower extremities and 12–16% in upper extremities in MVIC and MIPT during cancer treatment compared with healthy women. No substantial difference between patient groups in shoulder strength, but significantly lower shoulder flexibility in patients with radical mastectomy was measured. Chemotherapy‐treated patients had consistently higher FI%. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusions Breast cancer patients showed markedly impaired muscle strength and joint dysfunctions before and after anticancer treatment. The significant differences between patients

  20. Towards personalized perioperative treatment for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ru-Lin; Wu, Ai-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide. Although the rate of gastric cancer has declined dramatically over the past decades in most developed Western countries, it has not declined in East Asia. Currently, a radical gastrectomy is still the only curative treatment for gastric cancer. Over the last twenty years, however, surgery alone has been replaced by a multimodal perioperative approach. To achieve the maximum benefit from the perioperative treatment, a thorough evaluation of the tumor must first be performed. A complete assessment of gastric cancer is divided into two parts: staging and histology. According to the stage and histology of the cancer, perioperative chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy can be implemented, and perioperative targeted therapies such as trastuzumab may also play a role in this field. However, perioperative treatment approaches have not been widely accepted until a series of clinical trials were performed to evaluate the value of perioperative treatment. Although multimodal perioperative treatment has been widely applied in clinical practice, personalization of perioperative treatment represents the next stage in the treatment of gastric cancer. Genomic-guided treatment and efficacy prediction using molecular biomarkers in perioperative treatment are of great importance in the evolution of treatment and may become an ideal treatment method. PMID:25206266

  1. Hepatic toxicity resulting from cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, T.S.; Robertson, J.M.; Anscher, M.S.

    1995-03-30

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), often called radiation hepatitis, is a syndrome characterized by the development of anicteric ascites approximately 2 weeks to 4 months after hepatic irradiation. There has been a renewed interest in hepatic irradiation because of two significant advances in cancer treatment; three dimensional radiation therapy treatment planning and bone marrow transplantation using total body irradiation. RILD resulting from liver radiation can usually be distinguished clinically from the resulting from the preparative regime associated with bone marrow transplantation. However, both syndromes demonstrate the same pathological lesion; veno-occlusive disease. Recent evidence suggests that elevated transforming growth factor {beta} levels may play a role in the development of veno-occlusive disease. Three dimensional treatment planning offers the potential to determine the radiation dose and volume dependence of RILD, permitting the safe delivery of high doses of radiation to parts of the liver. The chief therapy for RILD is diuretics, although some advocate steroids of severe cases. The characteristics of RILD permit the development of a grading system modeled after the NCI Acute Common Toxicity Criteria, which incorporates standard criteria of hepatic dysfunction. 64 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Transcription factor profiling shows new ways towards new treatment options of cutaneous T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Döbbeling, Udo

    2007-06-01

    Most oncogenes encode activators of transcription factors or transcription factors themselves. Transcription factors that are induced by growth stimuli are, in contrast to transcription factors that regulate house keeping genes, tightly regulated and only active, when a stimulus (e.g. cytokines or other growth factors) is given. Examples of such transcription factors are members of the jun, fos, myc, NFkB and STAT gene families. In cancer cells this regulation is interrupted, resulting in constitutive activities of transcription factors that are normally silent. This in turn results in the increased expression of target genes that are necessary for growth and protection from apoptosis. Since inducible transcription factors are activated by specific pathways, the identification of unusual constitutively active transcription factors also identifies the involved signal transduction pathway. Inhibitors of the components of these pathways may be effective anti-cancer agents, as they interrupt the abnormal signalling and in cancer cells. We applied this strategy for two forms of cutaneous T cell lymphomas and identified several groups of agents that may be the prototypes of new drugs to fight these diseases.

  3. Radionuclide imaging and treatment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu Juan; Li, XianFeng; Ren, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, the diagnostic methods and therapeutic tools for thyroid cancer (TC) have been greatly improved. In addition to the classical method of ingestion of radioactive iodine-131 (I131) and subsequent I123 and I124 positron emission tomography (PET) in therapy and examination, I124 PET-based 3-dimensional imaging, Ga68-labeled [1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI(3)-octreotide (DOTANOC) PET/computed tomography (CT), Tc99m tetrofosmin, pre-targeted radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy have all been used clinically. These novel methods are useful in diagnosis and therapy of TC, but also have unavoidable adverse effects. In this review, we will discuss the development of nuclear medicine in TC examination and treatment.

  4. [Treatment of breakthrough pain in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Magdelijns, Fabienne J H; van den Beuken-van Everdingen, Marieke H J; Courtens, Annemie M; Janssen, Daisy J A

    2015-01-01

    Pain is common in patients with cancer (33-64%) and can be divided into background and breakthrough pain (BTP). BTP is a passing, acute pain that occurs despite the use of analgesia to control background pain. BTP may arise spontaneously or be provoked by certain movements or activities. It lasts 30-60 minutes and is generally self-limiting and is often undertreated. We describe 2 patients aged 68 and 57 years with metastatic disease who were admitted for pain management. BTP was inadequately managed during their hospital stay. Both patients had to wait too long before they received their BTP medication, causing the BTP to have passed its peak. After consultation with their nurses, both patients were allowed to have one dose of breakthrough medication in advance, which resulted in better treatment of their BTP. Every hospitalized patient with BTP should have one dose of breakthrough medication ready for taking in advance.

  5. The treatment of cancer in Greek antiquity.

    PubMed

    Karpozilos, A; Pavlidis, N

    2004-09-01

    Literary sources provide considerable information on the existence of various malignant tumours in the classical period. Based on a close reading of the ancient Greek medical treatises, this paper traces the history of the treatment of cancer by examining the theories of tumour formation, as they were codified by leading physicians of antiquity, together with the therapeutic methods they proposed in their writings. The discussion focuses on a series of medical texts beginning with the Hippocratic corpus (ca. 460-370 B.C.) and the voluminous works of Galen (129-199 A.D.) and extends to medical handbooks (Oreibasios, Aetios of Amida, Paul of Aegina) composed in subsequent centuries up to the end of the ancient world (VII c. A.D.).

  6. Changes in brain activation in breast cancer patients depend on cognitive domain and treatment type

    PubMed Central

    Menning, Sanne; de Ruiter, Michiel B.; Veltman, Dick J.; Boogerd, Willem; Oldenburg, Hester S. A.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Cognitive problems in breast cancer patients are common after systemic treatment, particularly chemotherapy. An increasing number of fMRI studies show altered brain activation in breast cancer patients after treatment, suggestive of neurotoxicity. Previous prospective fMRI studies administered a single cognitive task. The current study employed two task paradigms to evaluate whether treatment-induced changes depend on the probed cognitive domain. Methods Participants were breast cancer patients scheduled to receive systemic treatment (anthracycline-based chemotherapy +/- endocrine treatment, n = 28), or no systemic treatment (n = 24) and no-cancer controls (n = 31). Assessment took place before adjuvant treatment and six months after chemotherapy, or at similar intervals. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation and performance were measured during an executive functioning task and an episodic memory task. Group-by-time interactions were analyzed using a flexible factorial design. Results Task performance did not differ between patient groups and did not change over time. Breast cancer patients who received systemic treatment, however, showed increased parietal activation compared to baseline with increasing executive functioning task load compared to breast cancer patients who did not receive systemic treatment. This hyperactivation was accompanied by worse physical functioning, higher levels of fatigue and more cognitive complaints. In contrast, in breast cancer patients who did not receive systemic treatment, parietal activation normalized over time compared to the other two groups. Conclusions Parietal hyperactivation after systemic treatment in the context of stable levels of executive task performance is compatible with a compensatory processing account of hyperactivation or maintain adequate performance levels. This over-recruitment of brain regions depends on the probed cognitive domain and may represent a response to decreased neural

  7. Current state of prostate cancer treatment in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Belinda F; Aiken, William D; Mayhew, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer in Jamaica as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. One report suggested that Jamaica has the highest incidence rate of prostate cancer in the world, with an age-standardised rate of 304/100,000 per year. The Caribbean region is reported to have the highest mortality rate of prostate cancer worldwide. Prostate cancer accounts for a large portion of the clinical practice for health-care practitioners in Jamaica. The Jamaica Urological Society is a professional body comprising 19 urologists in Jamaica who provide most of the care for men with prostate cancer in collaboration with medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and a palliative care physician. The health-care system is structured in two tiers in Jamaica: public and private. The urologist-to-patient ratio is high, and this limits adequate urological care. Screening for prostate cancer is not a national policy in Jamaica. However, the Jamaica Urological Society and the Jamaica Cancer Society work synergistically to promote screening as well as to provide patient education for prostate cancer. Adequate treatment for localised prostate cancer is available in Jamaica in the forms of active surveillance, nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy, external beam radiation, and brachytherapy. However, there is a geographic maldistribution of centres that provide prostate cancer treatment, which leads to treatment delays. Also, there is difficulty in affording some treatment options in the private health-care sectors. Androgen deprivation therapy is available for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer and is subsidised through a programme called the National Health Fund. Second-line hormonal agents and chemotherapeutic agents are available but are costly to most of the population. The infrastructure for treatment of prostate cancer in Jamaica is good, but it requires additional technological advances as well as additional specialist

  8. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF THYROID CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David F.; Chen, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer exists in several forms. Differentiated thyroid cancers include papillary and follicular histologies. These tumors exist along a spectrum of differentiation, and their incidence continues to climb. A number of advances in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancers now exist. These include molecular diagnostics and more advanced strategies for risk stratification. Medullary cancer arises from the parafollicular cells and not the follicular cells. Therefore, diagnosis and treatment differs from differentiated thyroid tumors. Genetic testing and newer adjuvant therapies has changed the diagnosis and treatment of medullary thyroid cancer. This review will focus on the epidemiology, diagnosis, work-up, and treatment of both differentiated and medullary thyroid cancers, focusing specifically on newer developments in the field. PMID:23797834

  9. Living Alone During Cancer Treatment: An Exploration of Patients' Experiences.

    PubMed

    Benoot, Charlotte; Bilsen, Johan; Grypdonck, Maria; Deschepper, Reginald

    2014-08-01

    The social environment is an important determinant in the overall experience of having cancer. The purpose of this article is to identify how patients experience living alone during their cancer treatment. Using qualitative methods based on grounded theory techniques, we interviewed a sample of 32 cancer patients. Living alone was an ambiguous experience during cancer treatment: patients experienced both a lack of support as well a gain in privacy, freedom, and know-how. Living alone was also seen as a constitutive element of the patients' identity. Consequently, patients saw living alone as either a threat or as a resource for their adjustment to cancer treatment. These divergent meanings of living alone did share one common attribute, which was that staying independent was their key goal during cancer treatment. Health care providers should be attentive to the heterogeneous aspects of the experience of living alone when critically appraising the independence of patients.

  10. Aquaporin 5 expression is frequent in prostate cancer and shows a dichotomous correlation with tumor phenotype and PSA recurrence.

    PubMed

    Pust, Alexandra; Kylies, Dominik; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Kluth, Martina; Minner, Sarah; Koop, Christina; Grob, Tobias; Graefen, Markus; Salomon, Georg; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Izbicki, Jakob; Wittmer, Corinna; Huland, Hartwig; Simon, Ronald; Wilczak, Waldemar; Sauter, Guido; Steurer, Stefan; Krech, Till; Schlomm, Thorsten; Melling, Nathaniel

    2016-02-01

    Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) is an androgen-regulated member of a family of small hydrophobic integral transmembrane water channel proteins regulating cellular water homeostasis and growth signaling. To evaluate its clinical impact and relationship with key genomic alterations in prostate cancer, AQP5 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing 12427 prostate cancers. The analysis revealed weak to moderate immunostaining in normal prostate epithelium. In prostate cancers AQP5 staining levels were more variable and also included completely negative and highly overexpressing cases. Negative, weak, moderate, and strong AQP5 staining was found in 25.0%, 32.5%, 32.5%, and 10.0% of 10239 interpretable tumors. Comparison of AQP5 expression levels with tumor characteristics showed a dichotomous pattern with both high and low staining levels being linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype. AQP5 was negative in 28%, 23%, 24%, and 35% of tumors with Gleason score ≤3 + 3, 3 + 4, 4 + 3 and ≥4 + 4, while the rate of strongly positive cases continuously increased from 7.0% over 10.0% and 12.0% to 13.0% in cancers with Gleason score ≤3 + 3, 3 + 4, 4 + 3 and ≥4 + 4. AQP5 expression was also related to ERG positivity and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deletion (P < .0001 each). Strong AQP5 positivity was seen in 15.5% of ERG-positive and 5.8% of ERG-negative cancers (P < .0001) as well as in 14.7% of cancers with PTEN deletion and 9.4% of cancers without PTEN deletion. Remarkably, both negativity and strong positivity of AQP5 were linked to unfavorable disease outcome. This was however only seen in subgroups defined by TMPRSS2-ERG fusion and/or PTEN deletion. In summary, AQP5 can be both overexpressed and lost in subgroups of prostate cancers. Both alterations are linked to unfavorable outcome in molecularly defined cancer subgroups. It is hypothesized that this dichotomous role of AQP5 is due to two highly different mechanisms as to how the

  11. On-line Adaptive Radiation Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Angels, CA, 2007 5. D. Schulze, T. Zhang, et al, “ Dosimetric Comparison of Various Online Adaptive Prostate Cancer Treatment Techniques ”, Los...is to develop an online adaptive treatment technique for prostate cancer treatments . During the first year, we have developed parallel deformable...1 The new system design for online imaging: Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT): (a) mounted on radiotherapy treatment machine, (b) diagram

  12. Natural anti-cancer agents: Implications in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Marasini, Bishal; Sahu, Ravi P

    2017-03-15

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancy accounting for the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Among several explored anti-cancer agents, Gemcitabine, a nucleoside analogue remained a front line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, gemcitabine exerts a low response rate with limited progression free survival in cancer patients due to cellular resistance of pancreatic tumors to this therapy. Several chemotherapeutic agents have been explored in combination with gemcitabine against pancreatic cancer with overall mixed responses and survival rates. Naturally occurring dietary agents possess promising anti-cancer properties and have been shown to target various oncogenic signaling pathways in in-vitro and in-vivo pancreatic cancer models. Multiple studies using natural compounds have shown increased therapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer models. This review is focused on recent updates on preclinical and clinical studies utilizing natural anti-cancer agents with gemcitabine against pancreatic cancer.

  13. Lectin staining and Western blot data showing differential sialylation of nutrient-deprived cancer cells to sialic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Badr, Haitham A; AlSadek, Dina M M; Mathew, Mohit P; Li, Chen-Zhong; Djansugurova, Leyla B; Yarema, Kevin J; Ahmed, Hafiz

    2015-12-01

    This report provides data that are specifically related to the differential sialylation of nutrient deprived breast cancer cells to sialic acid supplementation in support of the research article entitled, "Nutrient-deprived cancer cells preferentially use sialic acid to maintain cell surface glycosylation" [1]. Particularly, breast cancer cells, when supplemented with sialic acid under nutrient deprivation, display sialylated glycans at the cell surface, but non-malignant mammary cells show sialylated glycans intracellularly. The impact of sialic acid supplementation under nutrient deprivation was demonstrated by measuring levels of expression and sialylation of two markers, EGFR1 and MUC1. This Data in Brief article complements the main manuscript by providing detailed instructions and representative results for cell-level imaging and Western blot analyses of changes in sialylation during nutrient deprivation and sialic acid supplementation. These methods can be readily generalized for the study of many types of glycosylation and various glycoprotein markers through the appropriate selection of fluorescently-labeled lectins.

  14. Pazopanib, a novel multi-kinase inhibitor, shows potent antitumor activity in colon cancer through PUMA-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Huanan; Li, Wei; Zhong, Juchang; Yu, Rongcheng; Huang, Xinfeng; Wang, Honghui; Tan, Zhikai; Wang, Jiangang; Zhang, Yingjie

    2017-01-10

    Colon cancer is still the third most common cancer which has a high mortality but low five-year survival rate. Novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as pazopanib become effective antineoplastic agents that show promising clinical activity in a variety of carcinoma, including colon cancer. However, the precise underlying mechanism against tumor is unclear. Here, we demonstrated that pazopanib promoted colon cancer cell apoptosis through inducing PUMA expression. Pazopanib induced p53-independent PUMA activation by inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, thereby activating Foxo3a, which subsequently bound to the promoter of PUMA to activate its transcription. After induction, PUMA activated Bax and triggered the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, administration of pazopanib highly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft model. PUMA deletion in cells and tumors led to resistance of pazopanib, indicating PUMA-mediated pro-apoptotic and anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo. Combing pazopanib with some conventional or novel drugs, produced heightened and synergistic antitumor effects that were associated with potentiated PUMA induction via different pathways. Taken together, these results establish a critical role of PUMA in mediating the anticancer effects of pazopanib in colon cancer cells and provide the rationale for clinical evaluation.

  15. School Behavior and Attendance during the First Year of Treatment for Childhood Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stehbens, James A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated school behavior and attendance of children with cancer (N=36) and hemophilia (N=26). Teacher ratings of students' behavior showed no differences before and after treatment. Children with cancer were absent four times more than healthy children; absenteeism of hemophiliacs was twice the normal rate. Academic performance was negatively…

  16. A matched couple: Combining kinase inhibitors with immunotherapy for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qun; Weiss, Jonathan M; Wiltrout, Robert H

    2012-01-01

    Small-molecule kinase inhibitors targeting oncogenic signaling pathways have been explored as cancer therapeutic agents due to their strong anti-tumor activity and manageable toxicity. Accumulating evidence shows that many kinase inhibitors also profoundly modulate immune cell functions, suggesting they may be promising candidates for combination with immunotherapeutic agents for the improved treatment of cancer.

  17. Nanoparticle Based Combination Treatments for Targeting Multiple Hallmarks of Cancer.

    PubMed

    VanDyke, D; Kyriacopulos, P; Yassini, B; Wright, A; Burkhart, E; Jacek, S; Pratt, M; Peterson, C R; Rai, P

    Treatment of cancer remains one of the most challenging tasks facing the healthcare system. Cancer affects the lives of millions of people and is often fatal. Current treatment methods include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapies or some combinations of these. However, recurrence is a major problem. These treatments can be invasive with severe side effects. Inefficacies in treatments are a result of the complex and variable biology of cancerous cells. Malignant tumor cells and normal functioning cells share many of the same biological characteristics but the main difference is that in cancer cells there is in an overuse and over expression of these biological characteristics. These pertinent characteristics can be grouped into eight hallmarks, as illustrated by Hanahan and Weinberg. These characteristics include sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, activating invasion and metastasis, reprogramming energy metabolism, and evading immune destruction. In order to provide a noninvasive, effective treatment, delivery methods must be explored in order to transport cytotoxic agents used for targeting the hallmarks of cancer in a safer and more effective fashion. The use of nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers provides an effective method in which multiple cytotoxic agents can be safely delivered to cancer tissue to simultaneously target multiple hallmarks. By targeting multiple hallmarks of cancer at once, the efficacy of cancer treatments could be improved drastically. This review explores the uses and efficacy of combination therapies using nanoparticles that can simultaneously target multiple hallmarks of cancer.

  18. Nanoparticle Based Combination Treatments for Targeting Multiple Hallmarks of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    VanDyke, D; Kyriacopulos, P; Yassini, B; Wright, A; Burkhart, E; Jacek, S; Pratt, M; Peterson, CR; Rai, P

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of cancer remains one of the most challenging tasks facing the healthcare system. Cancer affects the lives of millions of people and is often fatal. Current treatment methods include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapies or some combinations of these. However, recurrence is a major problem. These treatments can be invasive with severe side effects. Inefficacies in treatments are a result of the complex and variable biology of cancerous cells. Malignant tumor cells and normal functioning cells share many of the same biological characteristics but the main difference is that in cancer cells there is in an overuse and over expression of these biological characteristics. These pertinent characteristics can be grouped into eight hallmarks, as illustrated by Hanahan and Weinberg. These characteristics include sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, activating invasion and metastasis, reprogramming energy metabolism, and evading immune destruction. In order to provide a noninvasive, effective treatment, delivery methods must be explored in order to transport cytotoxic agents used for targeting the hallmarks of cancer in a safer and more effective fashion. The use of nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers provides an effective method in which multiple cytotoxic agents can be safely delivered to cancer tissue to simultaneously target multiple hallmarks. By targeting multiple hallmarks of cancer at once, the efficacy of cancer treatments could be improved drastically. This review explores the uses and efficacy of combination therapies using nanoparticles that can simultaneously target multiple hallmarks of cancer. PMID:27547592

  19. Expression of CRM1 and CDK5 shows high prognostic accuracy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu-Qin; Xie, Jian-Wei; Xie, Hong-Teng; Chen, Peng-Chen; Zhang, Xiu-Li; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Li, Ping; Wang, Jia-Bin; Lin, Jian-Xian; Cao, Long-Long; Huang, Chang-Ming; Lin, Yao

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the predictive value of the expression of chromosomal maintenance (CRM)1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)5 in gastric cancer (GC) patients after gastrectomy. METHODS A total of 240 GC patients who received standard gastrectomy were enrolled in the study. The expression level of CRM1 and CDK5 was detected by immunohistochemistry. The correlations between CRM1 and CDK5 expression and clinicopathological factors were explored. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were used to identify prognostic factors for GC. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to compare the accuracy of the prediction of clinical outcome by the parameters. RESULTS The expression of CRM1 was significantly related to size of primary tumor (P = 0.005), Borrmann type (P = 0.006), degree of differentiation (P = 0.004), depth of invasion (P = 0.008), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.013), TNM stage (P = 0.002) and distant metastasis (P = 0.015). The expression of CDK5 was significantly related to sex (P = 0.048) and Lauren’s classification (P = 0.011). Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified that CRM1 and CDK5 co-expression status was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) of patients with GC. Integration of CRM1 and CDK5 expression could provide additional prognostic value for OS compared with CRM1 or CDK5 expression alone (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION CRM1 and CDK5 co-expression was an independent prognostic factors for GC. Combined CRM1 and CDK5 expression could provide a prognostic model for OS of GC. PMID:28373767

  20. Downstream carcinogenesis signaling pathways by green tea polyphenols: a translational perspective of chemoprevention and treatment for cancers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guohua; Zhang, Lei; Rong, Yefei; Ni, Xiaoling; Sun, Yihong

    2014-01-01

    Green tea is one of the most popular beverages around the world. For several decades, numerous epidemiological, preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that green tea polyphenols (GTPs), especially epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) have cancer-preventing effects on various cancers. In this review, we present inhibition of carcinogenesis in different animal models by GTPs or EGCG, including prostate cancer, bladder cancer, breast cancer, intestinal cancer, colon cancer, gastric cancer, lung cancer, oral cancer and skin cancer. In vitro studies showed that GTPs/EGCG potently induces apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and suppresses metastasis in tumor cells but not in their normal cell counterparts. The molecular mechanisms of these activities are discussed in detail to elucidate GTPs/EGCG downstream carcinogenesis signaling pathways and their values of perspective of chemoprevention and treatment for cancers.

  1. New Drug Combo Shows Promise Curbing Tough-to-Treat Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162445.html New Drug Combo Shows Promise Curbing Tough-to-Treat Breast ... were more common in the group taking the new drug combo, however. Those women reported more fatigue, high ...

  2. Relapsed neuroblastomas show frequent RAS-MAPK pathway mutations | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The majority of patients with neuroblastoma have tumors that initially respond to chemotherapy, but a large proportion will experience therapy-resistant relapses. The molecular basis of this aggressive phenotype is unknown. Whole-genome sequencing of 23 paired diagnostic and relapse neuroblastomas showed clonal evolution from the diagnostic tumor, with a median of 29 somatic mutations unique to the relapse sample. Eighteen of the 23 relapse tumors (78%) showed mutations predicted to activate the RAS-MAPK pathway.

  3. Nonsurgical Innovations in the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Sadegh; Viera, Martha H.; Valins, Whitney

    2010-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most frequent types of cancer in the United States and represent 75 percent and 20 percent, respectively, of all nonmelanoma skin cancers. Since ultraviolet radiation is implicated in their development, photoprotection is fundamental in their prevention. Additional preventive measures include identifying high-risk individuals for early detection along with using agents, such as retinoids, that are effective in decreasing the risk of premalignant cells further developing into carcinomas. Newer agents achieving this goal include perillyl alcohol, T4 endonuclease 5, DL-α-tocopherol, and α-difluoromethylornithine. Procedural modalities are currently the standard of treatment, but recent evidence has consistently shown that newer (nonsurgical) therapies, such as interferon, imiquimod, retinoids, and 5-fluorouracil, can be used effectively either as monotherapies or as adjuvants to those surgical modalities for the treatment of superficial nonmelanoma skin cancers and premalignant lesions. These newer therapies have achieved significant reductions in morbidity and mortality. Procedural modalities that have been evolving into important tools for the treatment of actinic keratosis and nonmelanoma skin cancers include photodynamic therapy and lasers. Nonsurgical therapies currently proving to be effective in clinical trials include ingenol mebutate and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. Agents that are showing promising results in early phases of clinical trials include betulinic acid; hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitors, such as cyclopamine and GDC-0449; α-melanocyte–stimulating hormone analogs, such as afamelanotide; epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, such as gefitinib and erlotinib; anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab and panitumumab; and the 5-fluorouracil prodrug capecitabine. PMID:20725548

  4. Pretubulysin: a new option for the treatment of metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Braig, S; Wiedmann, R M; Liebl, J; Singer, M; Kubisch, R; Schreiner, L; Abhari, B A; Wagner, E; Kazmaier, U; Fulda, S; Vollmar, A M

    2014-01-01

    Tubulin-binding agents such as taxol, vincristine or vinblastine are well-established drugs in clinical treatment of metastatic cancer. However, because of their highly complex chemical structures, the synthesis and hence the supply issues are still quite challenging. Here we set on stage pretubulysin, a chemically accessible precursor of tubulysin that was identified as a potent microtubule-binding agent produced by myxobacteria. Although much simpler in chemical structure, pretubulysin abrogates proliferation and long-term survival as well as anchorage-independent growth, and also induces anoikis and apoptosis in invasive tumor cells equally potent to tubulysin. Moreover, pretubulysin posseses in vivo efficacy shown in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model with T24 bladder tumor cells, in a mouse xenograft model using MDA-MB-231 mammary cancer cells and finally in a model of lung metastasis induced by 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells. Pretubulysin induces cell death via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by abrogating the expression of pivotal antiapoptotic proteins, namely Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL, and shows distinct chemosensitizing properties in combination with TRAIL in two- and three-dimensional cell culture models. Unraveling the underlying signaling pathways provides novel information: pretubulysin induces proteasomal degradation of Mcl-1 by activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (especially JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase)) and phosphorylation of Mcl-1, which is then targeted by the SCFFbw7 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for ubiquitination and degradation. In sum, we designate the microtubule-destabilizing compound pretubulysin as a highly promising novel agent for mono treatment and combinatory treatment of invasive cancer. PMID:24434509

  5. Quality assurance in the treatment of colorectal cancer: the EURECCA initiative.

    PubMed

    Breugom, A J; Boelens, P G; van den Broek, C B M; Cervantes, A; Van Cutsem, E; Schmoll, H J; Valentini, V; van de Velde, C J H

    2014-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in Europe. Over the past few decades, important advances have been made in screening, staging and treatment of colorectal cancer. However, considerable variation between and within European countries remains, which implies that further improvements are possible. The most important remaining question now is: when are we, health care professionals, delivering the best available care to patients with colon or rectal cancer? Currently, quality assurance is a major issue in colorectal cancer care and quality assurance awareness is developing in almost all disciplines involved in the treatment of colorectal cancer patients. Quality assurance has shown to be effective in clinical trials. For example, standardisation and quality control were introduced in the Dutch TME trial and led to marked improvements of local control and survival in rectal cancer patients. Besides, audit structures can also be very effective in monitoring cancer management and national audits showed to further improve outcome in colorectal cancer patients. To reduce the differences between European countries, an international, multidisciplinary, outcome-based quality improvement programme, European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA), has been initiated. In the near future, the EURECCA dataset will perform research on subgroups as elderly patients or patients with comorbidities, which are often excluded from trials. For optimal colorectal cancer care, quality assurance in guideline formation and in multidisciplinary team management is also of great importance. The aim of this review was to create greater awareness and to give an overview of quality assurance in the management of colorectal cancer.

  6. Women's poorer satisfaction with their sex lives following gynecologic cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lara, Lucia Alves Silva; de Andrade, Jurandyr Moreira; Consolo, Flavio Donaire; Romão, Adriana Peterson Mariano Salata

    2012-06-01

    Gynecologic cancer treatment can lead to anatomical changes in the genitalia that may impair sexual response. As a result, the authors aimed to assess women's self-perceptions of their sex lives following gynecologic cancer treatment and the impact of such treatment on sexual function. Thirty sexually active women were examined. At the first meeting with a physician sex therapist, women were asked about their satisfaction with their sexual activities prior to and after gynecologic cancer treatment, either with a partner or alone, and how many times per month they had sexual intercourse prior to the cancer diagnosis and after treatment. Women reported significantly worse sex lives and a significantly lower frequency of sexual relations following cancer treatment. All participants reported pain on vaginal penetration and feeling uncomfortable in discussing their sexual difficulties with the oncologist. The findings show that women experienced impaired sexual function, as well as poorer quality of sexual function, following gynecologic cancer treatment. Nurses should provide basic guidelines about sexual function to all patients who undergo treatment for gynecologic cancer.

  7. [Intestinal obstruction in cancer patients. Palliative treatment].

    PubMed

    Costa, I; Conçalves, F

    1997-05-01

    The treatment of intestinal obstruction (IO) in patients with advanced or terminal cancer represents an open and widely discussed topic in clinical oncology practice. As surgical palliation is a complex issue, the decision to advance with surgery should be made in consultation with the patients and family members. The prognostic factors, mainly the survival time and the surgical risks can be considered guideline indicators. If there is any possibility that surgery will be of benefit, the patient should be treated with intravenous fluids and nasogastric suction while appropriate radiological investigations are performed. When surgical intervention is contraindicated, symptomatic medical treatment should be started through continuous subcutaneous administration of analgesic and antiemetic drugs. Minor episodes of vomiting may occur, which do not trouble patients since the most distressing symptom, nausea, can be controlled. Dehydration may be avoided with a liquid diet in small quantities. In this way, it is possible to manage patients with IO for several weeks without the need of nasogastric suction or intravenous fluids. Percutaneous gastrostomy, nasogastric tube, or hypodermoclysis may be necessary for a small number of patients, principally with high obstruction, who have refractory symptoms.

  8. Treatment of cancer with heavy charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.; Saunders, W.M.; Tobias, C.A.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Curtis, S.; Lyman, J.T.; Collier, J.M.; Pitluck, S.; Woodruff, K.A.; Blakely, E.A.

    1982-12-01

    A clinical radiotherapeutic trial using heavy charged particles in the treatment of human cancers has accrued over 400 patients since 1975, 378 of whom were treated with particles and 28 with low LET photons as control patients. Heavy charged particle radiotherapy offers the potential advantages of improved dose localization and/or enhanced biologic effect, depending on particle selected for treatment. Target sites have included selected head and neck tumors, ocular melanomata, malignant gliomata of the brain, carcinoma of the esophagus, carcinoma of the stomach, carcinoma of the pancreas, selected juxtaspinal tumors and other locally advanced, unresectable tumors. A Phase III prospective clinical trial has been started in carcinoma of the pancreas using helium ions. Phase I-II studies are underway with heavier particles such as carbon, neon and argon ions in order to prepare for prospective Phase III trials. Silicon ions are also under consideration for clinical trial. These studies are supported by the United States Department of Energy and National Institutes of Health.

  9. [Use of herbal medicine for cancer treatment-related toxicities].

    PubMed

    Samuels, Noah; Morag, Ofir; Maimon, Yair

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatment-related toxicities often require dose reductions and delays. Herbal medicine use is prevalent among cancer patients. Though evidence is lacking regarding benefits in treatment outcomes and immunity, a large body of evidence supports the use of herbals for reducing treatment-induced toxicities. We present three cases where herbal medicine provided relief from side effects of anti-cancer treatment, enabling the completion of treatment protocols. In the first case, a 79 year-old female patient with metastatic breast cancer developed flushing and excessive sweating from Tamoxifen treatment. Herbal medicine reduced symptoms significantly, enabling the continuation of treatment with partial disease resolution. In the second case, a 69 year-old male with esophageal cancer terminated treatment on the adjuvant treatment protocol because of severe nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, peripheral neuropathy and fatigue. Herbal medicine reduced symptom severity and chemotherapy was reinstituted. In the third case, a 58 year-old female patient with advanced metastatic colon cancer was referred by her oncologist for treatment with herbal medicine for alleviation of fatigue and weakness, flushing and palpitations, mouth ulcers and dyspnea. Despite significant symptom reduction, with completion of treatment regimens, her disease progressed and she subsequently succumbed to the disease. In summary, the above cases illustrate potential benefits of herbal medicine in the reduction of cancer treatment-related symptoms, enabling patients to complete their anti-cancer treatment regimen. Further research examining the efficacy and safety of herbal compounds is needed, in light of potential toxicity and negative interactions with conventional treatment.

  10. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  11. Penile Cancer: What Happens After Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... many cancer survivors have learned to accept this uncertainty and are living full lives. For more information, ... very stressful. It has its own type of uncertainty. Read Managing Cancer as a Chronic Condition for ...

  12. Anal Cancer: What Happens After Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer survivors have learned to live with this uncertainty and are leading full lives. For other people, ... very stressful. It has its own type of uncertainty. Managing Cancer as a Chronic Illness covers more ...

  13. What Happens After Treatment for Adrenal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer survivors have learned to live with this uncertainty and are leading full lives. The Understanding Recurrence , ... very stressful. It has its own type of uncertainty. See Managing Cancer As a Chronic Illness for ...

  14. Treatment Summary Tables | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile ducts or has spread to the liver, lymph nodes , or other places in the body). Whether ... the body. Cancer can spread through tissue , the lymph system , and the blood : Tissue. The cancer spreads ...

  16. Treatment Options for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile ducts or has spread to the liver, lymph nodes , or other places in the body). Whether ... the body. Cancer can spread through tissue , the lymph system , and the blood : Tissue. The cancer spreads ...

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Esophageal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... layers of tissue , including mucous membrane , muscle, and connective tissue . Esophageal cancer starts on the inside lining of ... and spread into the muscle layer or the connective tissue layer of the esophagus wall. The cancer cells ...

  18. Human sperm chromosomes. Long-term effect of cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Genesca, A.; Caballin, M.R.; Miro, R.; Benet, J.; Bonfill, X.; Egozcue, J. )

    1990-06-01

    The long-term cytogenetic effect of radio- or chemotherapy or both on male germ cells was evaluated by study of the chromosomal abnormalities in spermatozoa of four men treated for cancer 5-18 years earlier. The cytogenetic analysis of 422 sperm metaphases showed no differences in the aneuploidy rate. The incidence of structural chromosome aberrations was 14.0%, however, which is much higher than in controls. Thus, the high incidence of structurally aberrant spermatozoa observed in our long-term study indicates that antitumoral treatments affect stem-cell spermatogonia and that aberrant cells can survive germinal selection and produce abnormal spermatozoa.

  19. Novel Lignan and Stilbenoid Mixture Shows Anticarcinogenic Efficacy in Preclinical PC-3M-luc2 Prostate Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Laajala, Teemu D.; Smeds, Annika; Eckerman, Christer; Holmbom, Bjarne; Saarinen, Niina M.; Aittokallio, Tero; Mäkelä, Sari I.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer of men in the Western world, and novel approaches for prostate cancer risk reduction are needed. Plant-derived phenolic compounds attenuate prostate cancer growth in preclinical models by several mechanisms, which is in line with epidemiological findings suggesting that consumption of plant-based diets is associated with low risk of prostate cancer. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of a novel lignan-stilbenoid mixture in PC-3M-luc2 human prostate cancer cells in vitro and in orthotopic xenografts. Lignan and stilbenoid –rich extract was obtained from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) knots. Pine knot extract as well as stilbenoids (methyl pinosylvin and pinosylvin), and lignans (matairesinol and nortrachelogenin) present in pine knot extract showed antiproliferative and proapoptotic efficacy at ≥40 μM concentration in vitro. Furthermore, pine knot extract derived stilbenoids enhanced tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induced apoptosis already at ≥10 μM concentrations. In orthotopic PC-3M-luc2 xenograft bearing immunocompromized mice, three-week peroral exposure to pine knot extract (52 mg of lignans and stilbenoids per kg of body weight) was well tolerated and showed anti-tumorigenic efficacy, demonstrated by multivariate analysis combining essential markers of tumor growth (i.e. tumor volume, vascularization, and cell proliferation). Methyl pinosylvin, pinosylvin, matairesinol, nortrachelogenin, as well as resveratrol, a metabolite of pinosylvin, were detected in serum at total concentration of 7−73 μM, confirming the bioavailability of pine knot extract derived lignans and stilbenoids. In summary, our data indicates that pine knot extract is a novel and cost-effective source of resveratrol, methyl pinosylvin and other bioactive lignans and stilbenoids. Pine knot extract shows anticarcinogenic efficacy in preclinical prostate cancer model, and our in vitro data

  20. Role of lapatinib alone or in combination in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hurvitz, Sara A; Kakkar, Reva

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This review aims to present the preclinical and clinical data regarding efficacy and safety of lapatinib alone and in combination with other agents in the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer. Background HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer remains a treatment challenge. It is more aggressive than other breast cancers and it is associated with a poor outcome. Targeted therapy for HER2+ breast cancer has significantly changed the clinical course of the disease. Despite advances in therapy, there remains an unmet need in the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer. Lapatinib is a novel, orally bioavailable epidermal growth factor receptor/HER2+ targeted agent. Many trials have investigated the efficacy and safety of lapatinib alone and in conjunction with other agents in the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer. Methods and results Preclinical and clinical trials of lapatinib have shown that it is effective in the treatment on HER2+ breast cancer. More important, studies show that it is effective in the setting of trastuzumab resistance and in the treatment of central nervous system metastases, both of which are current treatment challenges. Furthermore, lapatinib is effective in conjunction with trastuzumab in the treatment of early breast cancer. Data regarding the safety of lapatinib show that it is generally well tolerated; however, multiple studies have shown significant (grade 3 and 4) diarrhea and rash associated with lapatinib, thereby limiting its use. Carditoxicity has not been a significant adverse event associated with the use of lapatinib. Conclusion Lapatinib is effective alone and in conjunction with other agents in the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer. However, its use is limited by significant diarrhea and rash. PMID:24367193

  1. Cancer Prehabilitation for Patients Starting from Active Treatment to Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Shun, Shiow-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this brief summary is to introduce the concept of cancer prehabilitation and the role of oncology nurses in prehabilitation care. Cancer prehabilitation has been defined by Sliver and Baima (2013) as “a process on the cancer continuum of care that occurs between the time of cancer diagnosis and the beginning of acute treatment.” The evidence supports the notion that prehabilitation programs can improve physical and psychological health outcomes and decrease overall health care costs. The care model for cancer prehabilitation should include timely and efficient assessment throughout the care continuum with a focus on improving outcomes in cancer at every stage. During the cancer journey, three types of assessment with different aims are included: (1) prehabilitation assessment pretreatment, (2) rehabilitation assessment at early post treatment, and (3) health promotion assessment at the end of treatment. Specific prehabilitation assessment and interventions for treatment-related complications or major side-effects should be considered. Teaching, counseling, discharge planning, and coordination should also be part of an oncology nurse's role in cancer prehabilitation. It is suggested that cancer care managers or navigators be trained in the assessment of their patients’ physical and psychological status once the cancer diagnosis has been identified and the patient has decided to receive active treatment, especially for those waiting for surgery at home. Oncology nurses could increase their competence with prehabilitation care by gaining knowledge about cancer-related treatments and their outcomes for specific cancers and by strengthening the ability to assess the functional status and psychological distress of their patients. PMID:27981135

  2. Repurposing metformin for cancer treatment: current clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Young Kwang; Arya, Ayush; Malecek, Mary-Kate; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Carneiro, Benedito; Chandra, Sunandana; Kaplan, Jason; Kalyan, Aparna; Altman, Jessica K.; Platanias, Leonidas; Giles, Francis

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have presented evidence suggesting a potential role for metformin in anti-cancer therapy. Preclinical studies have demonstrated several anticancer molecular mechanisms of metformin including mTOR inhibition, cytotoxic effects, and immunomodulation. Epidemiologic data have demonstrated decreased cancer incidence and mortality in patients taking metformin. Several clinical trials, focused on evaluation of metformin as an anti-cancer agent are presently underway. Data published from a small number of completed trials has put forth intriguing results. Clinical trials in pre-surgical endometrial cancer patients exhibited a significant decrease in Ki67 with metformin monotherapy. Another interesting observation was made in patients with breast cancer, wherein a trend towards improvement in cancer proliferation markers was noted in patients without insulin resistance. Data on survival outcomes with the use of metformin as an anti-cancer agent is awaited. This manuscript will critically review the role of metformin as a potential cancer treatment. PMID:27004404

  3. Enhancing cold atmospheric plasma treatment of cancer cells by static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoqian; Rajjoub, Kenan; Shashurin, Alexey; Yan, Dayun; Sherman, Jonathan H; Bian, Ka; Murad, Ferid; Keidar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported since late 1970 that magnetic field interacts strongly with biological systems. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has also been widely studied over the past few decades in physics, biology, and medicine. In this study, we propose a novel idea to combine static magnetic field (SMF) with CAP as a tool for cancer therapy. Breast cancer cells and wild type fibroblasts were cultured in 96-well plates and treated by CAP with or without SMF. Breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 showed a significant decrease in viability after direct plasma treatment with SMF (compared to only plasma treatment). In addition, cancer cells treated by the CAP-SMF-activated medium (indirect treatment) also showed viability decrease but was slightly weaker than the direct plasma-SMF treatment. By integrating the use of SMF and CAP, we were able to discover their advantages that have yet to be utilized. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:53-62, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Polymeric composite devices for localized treatment of early-stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Soboyejo, Wole

    2017-01-01

    For early-stage breast cancers mastectomy is an aggressive form of treatment. Therefore, there is a need for new treatment strategies that can enhance the use of lumpectomy by eliminating residual cancer cells with limited side effects to reduce local recurrence. Although, various radiotherapy-based methods have been developed, residual cells are found in 20–55% of the time at the first operation. Furthermore, some current treatment methods result in poor cosmesis. For the last decade, the authors have been exploring the use of polymeric composite materials in single and multi-modal implantable biomedical devices for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. In this paper, the concept and working principles of the devices, as well as selected results from experimental and numerical investigations, are presented. The results show the potential of the biomedical implants for cancer treatment. PMID:28245288

  5. A method to determine the mammographic regions that show early changes due to the development of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karemore, Gopal; Nielsen, Mads; Karssemeijer, Nico; Brandt, Sami S.

    2014-11-01

    It is well understood nowadays that changes in the mammographic parenchymal pattern are an indicator of a risk of breast cancer and we have developed a statistical method that estimates the mammogram regions where the parenchymal changes, due to breast cancer, occur. This region of interest is computed from a score map by utilising the anatomical breast coordinate system developed in our previous work. The method also makes an automatic scale selection to avoid overfitting while the region estimates are computed by a nested cross-validation scheme. In this way, it is possible to recover those mammogram regions that show a significant difference in classification scores between the cancer and the control group. Our experiments suggested that the most significant mammogram region is the region behind the nipple and that can be justified by previous findings from other research groups. This result was conducted on the basis of the cross-validation experiments on independent training, validation and testing sets from the case-control study of 490 women, of which 245 women were diagnosed with breast cancer within a period of 2-4 years after the baseline mammograms. We additionally generalised the estimated region to another, mini-MIAS study and showed that the transferred region estimate gives at least a similar classification result when compared to the case where the whole breast region is used. In all, by following our method, one most likely improves both preclinical and follow-up breast cancer screening, but a larger study population will be required to test this hypothesis.

  6. Randomized, blinded, controlled clinical trial shows no benefit of homeopathic mastitis treatment in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Fanny; Staufenbiel, Rudolf; Simons, Julia; Pieper, Laura

    2017-03-22

    Mastitis is one of the most common diseases in dairy production, and homeopathic remedies have been used increasingly in recent years to treat it. Clinical trials evaluating homeopathy have often been criticized for their inadequate scientific approach. The objective of this triple-blind, randomized controlled trial was to assess the efficacy of homeopathic treatment in bovine clinical mastitis. The study was conducted on a conventionally managed dairy farm between June 2013 and May 2014. Dairy cows with acute mastitis were randomly allocated to homeopathy (n = 70) or placebo (n = 92), for a total of 162 animals. The homeopathic treatment was selected based on clinical symptoms but most commonly consisted of a combination of nosodes with Streptococcinum, Staphylococcinum, Pyrogenium, and Escherichia coli at a potency of 200c. Treatment was administered to cows in the homeopathy group at least once per day for an average of 5 d. The cows in the placebo group were treated similarly, using a placebo preparation instead (lactose globules without active ingredients). If necessary, we also used allopathic drugs (e.g., antibiotics, udder creams, and anti-inflammatory drugs) in both groups. We recorded data relating to the clinical signs of mastitis, treatment, time to recovery, milk yield, somatic cell count at first milk recording after mastitis, and culling. We observed cows for up to 200 d after clinical recovery. Base-level data did not differ between the homeopathy and placebo groups. Mastitis lasted for an average of 6 d in both groups. We observed no significant differences in time to recovery, somatic cell count, risk of clinical cure within 14 d after disease occurrence, mastitis recurrence risk, or culling risk. The results indicated no additional effect of homeopathic treatment compared with placebo. The advantages or disadvantages of homeopathy should be carefully assessed for individual farms.

  7. Treatment-Resistant Depressed Youth Show a Higher Response Rate If Treatment Ends during Summer School Break

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamseddeen, Wael; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Emslie, Graham; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Porta, Giovanna; Mayes, Taryn; Keller, Martin B.; Brent, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is little work on the effect of school on response to treatment of depression, with available research suggesting that children and adolescents with school difficulties are less likely to respond to fluoxetine compared with those with no school difficulties. Method: Depressed adolescents in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in…

  8. Nephrotoxicity of epigenetic inhibitors used for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Scholpa, N E; Kolli, R T; Moore, M; Arnold, R D; Glenn, T C; Cummings, B S

    2016-10-25

    This study determined the anti-neoplastic activity and nephrotoxicity of epigenetic inhibitors in vitro. The therapeutic efficacy of epigenetic inhibitors was determined in human prostate cancer cells (PC-3 and LNCaP) using the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). Cells were also treated with carbamazepine (CBZ), an anti-convulsant with histone deacetylase inhibitor-like properties. 5-Aza, TSA or CBZ alone did not decrease MTT staining in PC-3 or LNCaP cells after 48 h. In contrast, docetaxel, a frontline chemotherapeutic induced concentration-dependent decreases in MTT staining. Pretreatment with 5-Aza or TSA increased docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity in LNCaP cells, but not PC-3 cells. TSA pretreatment also increased cisplatin-induced toxicity in LNCaP cells. Carfilzomib (CFZ), a protease inhibitor approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma had minimal effect on LNCaP cell viability, but reduced MTT staining 50% in PC-3 cells compared to control, and pretreatment with 5-Aza further enhanced toxicity. Treatment of normal rat kidney (NRK) and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells with the same concentrations of epigenetic inhibitors used in prostate cancer cells significantly decreased MTT staining in all cell lines after 48 h. Interestingly, we found that the toxicity of epigenetic inhibitors to kidney cells was dependent on both the compound and the stage of cell growth. The effect of 5-Aza and TSA on DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase activity, respectively, was confirmed by assessing the methylation and acetylation of the CDK inhibitor p21. Collectively, these data show that combinatorial treatment with epigenetic inhibitors alters the efficacy of chemotherapeutics in cancer cells in a compound- and cell-specific manner; however, this treatment also has the potential to induce nephrotoxic cell injury.

  9. Recent advances in the medical treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vorobiof, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the systemic therapy of breast cancer (early and advanced) has changed considerably. For the past 40-50 years, and since the discovery and further therapeutic use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, breast cancer treatment has become the model for the development and success of tailored medical treatment. Much still needs to be done in improving outcomes for all patients with breast cancer, and especially for those who have advanced breast cancer, a challenging area for medical oncologists. Ongoing international clinical trials are currently evaluating new therapeutic approaches and identifying specific biological subsets that could determine a patient's ability to respond to particular chemotherapeutic drugs.

  10. Long-term Morbidity of Testicular Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fung, Chunkit; Fossa, Sophie D; Williams, Annalynn; Travis, Lois B

    2015-08-01

    Second malignant neoplasms, cardiovascular disease, neurotoxicity and ototoxicity, pulmonary complications, hypogonadism, and nephrotoxicity are potentially life-threatening long-term complications of testicular cancer and its therapy. This article describes the pathogenesis, risks, and management of these late effects experienced by long-term testicular cancer survivors, who are defined as individuals who are disease free 5 years or more after primary treatment. Testicular cancer survivors should follow applicable national guidelines for cancer screening and management of cardiovascular disease risk factors. In addition, health care providers should capitalize on the time of cancer diagnosis as a teachable moment to introduce and promote lifestyle changes.

  11. Models for prevention and treatment of cancer: problems vs promises.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Danda, Divya; Gupta, Shan; Gehlot, Prashasnika

    2009-11-01

    Current estimates from the American Cancer Society and from the International Union Against Cancer indicate that 12 million cases of cancer were diagnosed last year, with 7 million deaths worldwide; these numbers are expected to double by 2030 (27 million cases with 17 million deaths). Despite tremendous technological developments in all areas, and President Richard Nixon's initiative in the 1974 "War against Cancer", the US cancer incidence is the highest in the world and the cancer death rate has not significantly changed in the last 50 years (193.9 per 100,000 in 1950 vs 193.4 per 100,000 in 2002). Extensive research during the same time, however, has revealed that cancer is a preventable disease that requires major changes in life style; with one third of all cancers assigned to Tobacco, one third to diet, and remaining one third to the environment. Approximately 20 billion dollars are spent annually to find a cure for cancer. We propose that our inability to find a cure to cancer lies in the models used. Whether cell culture or animal studies, no model has yet been found that can reproduce the pathogenesis of the disease in the laboratory. Mono-targeted therapies, till know in most cases, have done a little to make a difference in cancer treatment. Similarly, molecular signatures/predictors of the diagnosis of the disease and response are also lacking. This review discusses the pros and cons of current cancer models based on cancer genetics, cell culture, animal models, cancer biomarkers/signature, cancer stem cells, cancer cell signaling, targeted therapies, therapeutic targets, clinical trials, cancer prevention, personalized medicine, and off-label uses to find a cure for cancer and demonstrates an urgent need for "out of the box" approaches.

  12. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Lohmueller, Jason J.; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M.; Tucker, Meghan A.; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M.; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D.; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Finn, Olivera J.

    2016-01-01

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1+ target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27545199

  13. Biodegradable Porous Silicon Nanomaterials for Imaging and Treatment of Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Luo

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death, claiming ˜0.56 million lives in the U.S. every year following heart diseases (˜0.62 million). From 1991 to 2007, mortality associated with heart diseases decreased 39%; by contrast, the death rate of cancer only decreased by 17% in spite of intensive research and improved therapeutics. The stagnation of conventional medicine and the complexity of cancer demand new therapeutic strategies. As an emerging approach, the use of nanomaterials as cancer diagnostic and therapeutic agents has shown promising results due to their unique physical and chemical properties. To date, more than two dozen nanoparticle-based products have been approved for clinical use and they show advantages over conventional therapeutics. However, translation of many other nanomaterials has been impeded due to concerns over toxicity and biodegradability. This dissertation presents the development of biodegradable luminescent porous silicon nanomaterials and their potential applications for imaging and treatment of cancer. After a brief introduction to nanomedicine and the biomedical applications of porous silicon, Chapter 2 presents a method of making silicon nanoparticles with porous structure and intrinsic luminescence (LPSiNPs). The low toxicity and biodegradability of LPSiNPs are demonstrated in vitro with human cancer cells and in vivo with mouse model. The in vivo clearance of intravenously injected LPSiNPs is studied by tracking the emission of the nanoparticles with fluorescence imaging. Chapter 3 presents a diagnostic application of LPSiNPs. Time-gated fluorescence imaging of tumors using LPSiNPs with long emission lifetime is developed. This technique can effectively eliminate interference from short-lived tissue autofluorescence and improve the detection sensitivity. Chapter 4--6 demonstrate the therapeutic applications of porous silicon nanomaterials. In Chapter 4, magnetically-guided delivery of anticancer drug to cancer cells in vitro

  14. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-12-06

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas.

  15. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    PubMed Central

    Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Investigators, kConFab/AOCS; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas. PMID:27792995

  16. Neratinib shows efficacy in the treatment of HER2 amplified carcinosarcoma in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Carlton L.; English, Diana P.; Black, Jonathan; Bellone, Stefania; Lopez, Salvatore; Cocco, Emiliano; Bonazzoli, Elena; Bussi, Beatrice; Predolini, Federica; Ferrari, Francesca; Ratner, Elena; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Rutherford, Thomas; Schwartz, Peter E.; Santin, Alessandro D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Carcinosarcoma is a deadly gynecologic malignancy with few effective treatment options. The study of new therapies is difficult because of its rarity. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of neratinib in the treatment of HER2 amplified carcinosarcoma. Methods The efficacy of neratinib in the treatment of HER2 amplified carcinosarcoma was determined in vitro using seven primary carcinosarcoma cell lines with differential expression of HER2/neu. Data regarding IC50, cell cycle distribution, and cell signaling changes were assessed by flow cytometry. The efficacy of neratinib was determined in treating mice harboring HER2 amplified carcinosarcoma xenografts. Results Two of seven (28.5%) carcinosarcoma cell lines were HER2/neu amplified. HER2/neu amplified cell lines SARARK6 and SARARK9 were significantly more sensitive to neratinib than the five non-HER2/neu amplified carcinosarcoma cell lines (mean±SEM IC50: 0.014μM±0.004 vs. 0.164μM±0.019 p=0.0003). Neratinib treatment caused a significant build up in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, arrest auto phosphorylation of HER2/neu and activation of S6. Neratinib inhibited tumor growth (p=0.012) and prolonged survival in mice harboring HER2 amplified carcinosarcoma xenografts (p=0.0039). Conclusions Neratinib inhibits HER2 amplified carcinosarcoma proliferation, signaling, cell cycle progression and tumor growth in vitro. Neratinib inhibits HER2/neu amplified xenograft growth and improves overall survival. Clinical trials are warranted. PMID:26260909

  17. Statutory requirements for disclosure of breast cancer treatment alternatives.

    PubMed

    Nayfield, S G; Bongiovanni, G C; Alciati, M H; Fischer, R A; Bergner, L

    1994-08-17

    Therapeutic options for breast cancer, particularly for early-stage disease, and increased patient participation in medical decision-making have oriented state legislatures toward ensuring that women with breast cancer have adequate information about treatment alternatives. Currently, 18 states have enacted statutes regarding physician disclosure of treatment alternatives to breast cancer patients. This paper reviews these statutes in the context of the requirements imposed on the physician as health care provider and the content of medical information presented to the patient as a consequence of the laws. State statutes were identified through the National Cancer Institute's State Cancer Legislative Database, and the statutory requirements were analyzed. For statutes requiring development of a written summary of treatment alternatives, the most recent summary was obtained through the responsible state agency, and informational content was analyzed for relevance to treatment decisions in early-stage disease. As a group, these laws address informed consent for treatment, physician behavior within the patient-physician relationship, and the medical information upon which treatment decisions are based. Individual statutes vary in the scope of the issues addressed, particularly in the responsibility placed on physicians, and treatment option summaries developed in response to this legislation vary widely in content and scope. Despite broad implications of these statutes in oncology practice, little is known about their effects on breast cancer care. Additional research is needed to define the impact of these statutes on breast cancer care, as such legislation is considered by other states for this and other diseases.

  18. The Right Treatment for the Right Patient - Personalised Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Scharl, A; Kühn, T; Papathemelis, T; Salterberg, A

    2015-07-01

    The probability of healing breast cancer has been greatly improved in recent decades through the introduction and optimisation of multi-modal therapies and interdisciplinary treatments. Today, in addition to surgery or radiation, most patients receive a systemic treatment. To prevent excessive treatment, patients whose prognosis is so good that certain adjuvant therapies can be foregone or reduced must be identified. A lack of compliance with therapy, especially in the endocrine therapies stretching over years, is a further problem. As only treatments that are also carried out can improve chances of survival, efforts to improve compliance must be intensified. Studies show that lifestyle changes influence the efficiency of medication on the one hand, and on the other hand can also by themselves achieve a relevant improvement of the prognosis. Therefore, it is time not only to treat the tumour, but to also focus on the patient as a whole in therapeutic interventions.

  19. The Right Treatment for the Right Patient – Personalised Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scharl, A.; Kühn, T.; Papathemelis, T.; Salterberg, A.

    2015-01-01

    The probability of healing breast cancer has been greatly improved in recent decades through the introduction and optimisation of multi-modal therapies and interdisciplinary treatments. Today, in addition to surgery or radiation, most patients receive a systemic treatment. To prevent excessive treatment, patients whose prognosis is so good that certain adjuvant therapies can be foregone or reduced must be identified. A lack of compliance with therapy, especially in the endocrine therapies stretching over years, is a further problem. As only treatments that are also carried out can improve chances of survival, efforts to improve compliance must be intensified. Studies show that lifestyle changes influence the efficiency of medication on the one hand, and on the other hand can also by themselves achieve a relevant improvement of the prognosis. Therefore, it is time not only to treat the tumour, but to also focus on the patient as a whole in therapeutic interventions. PMID:26257405

  20. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  1. [Touching cancer: shiatsu as complementary treatment to support cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Argash, Oz; Caspi, Opher

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the interest of cancer patients in receiving complementary medicine therapies as supportive measures to cure the disease. In response, medical units that combine conventional and complementary medicine (integrative medicine) have been established in leading cancer centers worldwide. In Israel, a special integrative medicine unit that combines mind-body, Chinese medicine, nutrition, herbs, supplements, and manual therapies (such as shiatsu) before, during and after conventional anti-cancer therapies has been established as an integral part of the Davidoff Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2006. Shiatsu represents a group of manual therapeutic techniques, including acupressure. Shiatsu offers cancer patients a non-pharmacologic method to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life throughout the course of illness. Research indicates that acupressure is relatively effective and safe for common cancer-related symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and insomnia. In our experience, shiatsu is also relatively effective and safe for other common symptoms such as fatigue, muscular pain and body image dissatisfaction. Yet, insufficient evidence exists to delineate the best means by which shiatsu and other manual therapies could or should be integrated into routine cancer care. The purpose of the present paper is to describe what is currently known about this topic in order to support decision-making that is based on facts, rather than on myths and misconceptions. We call for more research that examines the effectiveness and safety of shiatsu and other manual therapies in the care of cancer patients.

  2. Cold atmospheric plasma, a novel promising anti-cancer treatment modality.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dayun; Sherman, Jonathan H; Keidar, Michael

    2016-11-11

    Over the past decade, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), a near room temperature ionized gas has shown its promising application in cancer therapy. Two CAP devices, namely dielectric barrier discharge and plasma jet, show significantly anti-cancer capacity over dozens of cancer cell lines in vitro and several subcutaneous xenograft tumors in vivo. In contrast to conventional anti-cancer approaches and drugs, CAP is a selective anti-cancer treatment modality. Thus far establishing the chemical and molecular mechanism of the anti-cancer capacity of CAP is far from complete. In this review, we provide a comprehensive introduction of the basics of CAP, state of the art research in this field, the primary challenges, and future directions to cancer biologists.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Potential uses of monoclonal antibodies in anti-cancer treatment include passive serotherapy, radioisotope conjugates, toxin-linked conjugates, and chemotherapy-monoclonal antibody conjugates. The bases for these applications have been founded in research with heterologous antisera, and in some cases with monoclonal antibodies in animal tumor models. Human trials with passive serotherapy have already begun in both hematopoietic and solid tumor malignancies. Promising results have been reported in cutaneous T cell lymphoma with anti-T cell monoclonal antibody, and in nodular lymphoma with anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody. Radioisotope conjugate work appears promising for imaging in both animals and humans, and this work will lay the foundation for possible therapeutic application of radio-immunotherapy. Toxin-linked conjugates are promising in vitro and may have application in autologous bone marrow transplantation. Research with chemotherapy conjugates is also underway. Preliminary results suggest that murine monoclonal antibodies will be well tolerated clinically except in the setting of circulating cells which bear the target antigen, where rapid infusions may be associated with intolerable side effects. In certain diseases, production of endogenous anti-mouse antibodies may also limit application. Advances in the technology for human-human hybridoma production may help solve some of these problems. 132 references.

  4. Parental involvement in paediatric cancer treatment decisions.

    PubMed

    McKenna, K; Collier, J; Hewitt, M; Blake, H

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated parents' information needs and involvement in decision-making processes affecting the care of children diagnosed with cancer. Interviews and questionnaires were used to assess parental satisfaction in 50 mothers and 16 fathers responsible for 58 children in an English Paediatric Oncology Unit. Parents reported that doctors contributed almost twice as much to the decision-making process as they did, but parental satisfaction was positively correlated with the amount of information provided when giving informed consent. Satisfaction about their involvement in this process relied heavily upon the level of support received from others. Parents consenting to their child's involvement in non-randomised trials perceived themselves to be under greater pressure from others during the decision-making process while those whose children were further along the treatment trajectory were more uncertain about decisions previously made. Findings indicate that the accessibility, support, information and degree of control afforded to parents by healthcare professionals impacts upon their satisfaction with both the decision-making process and their confidence in the decisions thus made. Information and support tailored to parents' specific needs may therefore enhance satisfaction with clinical decision making and reassure parents about decisions made in the long-term interest of their child's health.

  5. Cancer treatment with nano-diamonds.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan; Gupta, Sneh

    2017-01-01

    Diamond nano-particles find new and far-reaching applications in modern biomedical science and biotechnologies. Due to its excellent biocompatibility, nano-diamonds serve as versatile platforms that can be embedded within polymer-based microfilm devices. Nano-diamonds are complexed with a chemotherapeutic that enables sustained/slow release of the drug for a minimum of one month, with a significant amount of drug in reserve. This opens up the potential for highly localized drug release as a complementary and potent form of treatment with systemic injection towards the reduction of continuous dosing, and as such, attenuation of the often powerful side effects of chemotherapy. Nano-diamonds are quite economical, enabling the broad impact of these devices towards a spectrum of physiological disorders e.g. serving as a local chemotherapeutic patch, or as a pericardial device to suppress inflammation after open heart surgery. Nano-diamond patch could be used to treat a localized region where residual cancer cells might remain after a tumor is removed. Nano-diamonds can be used to explore a broad range of therapeutic classes, including additional small molecules, proteins, therapeutic antibodies, RNAi.

  6. Neutrons applications in cancer treatment and in specific diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Shahri, Keyhandokht Karimi; Motavalli, Laleh Rafat; Hakimabad, Hashem Miri

    2011-01-01

    The major effect of ionizing radiation in cells is to destroy the ability of cells to divide by damaging their DNA strands. Extensive researches are leading to an understanding that the characteristics of high LET radiations such as fast neutrons and low LET radiations like protons, photons and electrons are different; because of different types of their interactions with tissue. Low LET radiations mostly damage tissue by producing free radicals. Oxygen has an effect of enhancing free radical formation in cells. Indeed hypoxic cells, which exist in malignant tumors, are radio resistant under irradiation with low LET radiations. In contrast, neutron interacts with tissue primarily via nuclear interactions, so its biological effectiveness is not affected on the presence of oxygen. The required dose to kill the same number of cancerous cells by neutrons is about one third in comparison with photons. Clinical reports show that a full course of treatment with neutrons consists of 12 treatment sessions, compared to 30-40 treatments with photons or electrons. In conclusion, in this review we describe which cancers or tumors could be better treated with neutrons. We also refer to whether neutrons could be used for diagnosis.

  7. Cancer-related fatigue: Mechanisms, risk factors, and treatments

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Julienne E.

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment, and may persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Cancer-related fatigue causes disruption in all aspects of quality of life and may be a risk factor for reduced survival. The prevalence and course of fatigue in cancer patients has been well characterized, and there is growing understanding of underlying biological mechanisms. Inflammation has emerged as a key biological pathway for cancer-related fatigue, with studies documenting links between markers of inflammation and fatigue before, during, and particularly after treatment. There is considerable variability in the experience of cancer-related fatigue that is not explained by disease- or treatment-related characteristics, suggesting that host factors may play an important role in the development and persistence of this symptom. Indeed, longitudinal studies have begun to identify genetic, biological, psychosocial, and behavioral risk factors for cancer-related fatigue. Given the multi-factorial nature of cancer-related fatigue, a variety of intervention approaches have been examined in randomized controlled trials, including physical activity, psychosocial, mind-body, and pharmacological treatments. Although there is currently no gold standard for treating fatigue, several of these approaches have shown beneficial effects and can be recommended to patients. This report provides a state of the science review of mechanisms, risk factors, and interventions for cancer-related fatigue, with a focus on recent longitudinal studies and randomized trials that have targeted fatigued patients. PMID:25113839

  8. Head and Neck Cancer: An Evolving Treatment Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Cognetti, David M.; Weber, Randal S.; Lai, Stephen Y.

    2009-01-01

    Since the inception of this journal in 1948, the understanding of etiologic factors that contribute to and the treatment of head and neck cancer has evolved dramatically. Advances in surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have improved locoregional control, survival, and quality of life. The outcomes of these treatment modalities have shifted the focus of curative efforts from radical ablation to preservation and restoration of function. This evolution has been documented in the pages of Cancer for the past 6 decades. This review focuses on the evolution of treatment approaches for head and neck cancer and future directions while recognizing the historic contributions recorded within this journal. PMID:18798532

  9. Mixed poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-based drug-loaded nanomicelles shows enhanced efficacy against pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Veeren, Anisha; Bhaw-Luximon, Archana; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Jhurry, Dhanjay

    2017-03-18

    We report in this paper on the enhanced efficacy of a physical mixture of two single anti-cancer loaded nanomicelles against PANC-1 and BxPC-3. Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone-b-polycaprolactone) (PVP-b-PCL) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone-b-poly(dioxanone-co-methyl dioxanone)) (PVP-b-P(DX-co-MeDX)) were synthesized and successfully loaded with various anti-cancer drugs - gemcitabine (GEM), doxorubicin.HCl (DOX.HCl), doxorubicin.NH2 (DOX), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and paclitaxel (PTX). Spherical micelles of size 160-477 nm were obtained as characterized by DLS while sizes determined by TEM were in the range 140-250 nm. The hydrophobic drugs had a higher loading percentage efficiency compared to hydrophilic drugs in the trend PTX>DOX>5-FU>GEM>DOX.HCl whereas the drug release pattern followed the reverse trend in accordance with decreased polymer-drug interaction as quantified by the binding constant and micellar drug location. Cellular uptake studies showed that nanomicelles are taken up by pancreatic cancer cells into the cytoplasm and nucleus. The free nanomicelles were confirmed to be non-cytotoxic. A physical mixture of GEM loaded micelles and DOX.HCl loaded micelles of comparable size showed significantly higher cytotoxicity than either the free drug mixture or the individual single drug loaded micelles as confirmed by their IC50 values.

  10. Polyphenol-rich strawberry extract (PRSE) shows in vitro and in vivo biological activity against invasive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Amatori, Stefano; Mazzoni, Luca; Alvarez-Suarez, Josè Miguel; Giampieri, Francesca; Gasparrini, Massimiliano; Forbes-Hernandez, Tamara Yuliett; Afrin, Sadia; Errico Provenzano, Alfredo; Persico, Giuseppe; Mezzetti, Bruno; Amici, Augusto; Fanelli, Mirco; Battino, Maurizio

    2016-08-08

    We describe the biological effects of a polyphenol-rich strawberry extract (PRSE), obtained from the "Alba" variety, on the highly aggressive and invasive basal-like breast cancer cell line A17. Dose-response and time-course experiments showed that PRSE is able to decrease the cellular viability of A17 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. PRSE effect on cell survival was investigated in other tumor and normal cell lines of both mouse and human origin, demonstrating that PRSE is more active against breast cancer cells. Cytofluorimetric analysis of A17 cells demonstrated that sub-lethal doses of PRSE reduce the number of cells in S phase, inducing the accumulation of cells in G1 phase of cell cycle. In addition, the migration of A17 cells was studied monitoring the ability of PRSE to inhibit cellular mobility. Gene expression analysis revealed the modulation of 12 genes playing different roles in the cellular migration, adhesion and invasion processes. Finally, in vivo experiments showed the growth inhibition of A17 cells orthotopically transplanted into FVB syngeneic mice fed with PRSE. Overall, we demonstrated that PRSE exerts important biological activities against a highly invasive breast cancer cell line both in vitro and in vivo suggesting the strawberry extracts as preventive/curative food strategy.

  11. Polyphenol-rich strawberry extract (PRSE) shows in vitro and in vivo biological activity against invasive breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Amatori, Stefano; Mazzoni, Luca; Alvarez-Suarez, Josè Miguel; Giampieri, Francesca; Gasparrini, Massimiliano; Forbes-Hernandez, Tamara Yuliett; Afrin, Sadia; Errico Provenzano, Alfredo; Persico, Giuseppe; Mezzetti, Bruno; Amici, Augusto; Fanelli, Mirco; Battino, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    We describe the biological effects of a polyphenol-rich strawberry extract (PRSE), obtained from the “Alba” variety, on the highly aggressive and invasive basal-like breast cancer cell line A17. Dose-response and time-course experiments showed that PRSE is able to decrease the cellular viability of A17 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. PRSE effect on cell survival was investigated in other tumor and normal cell lines of both mouse and human origin, demonstrating that PRSE is more active against breast cancer cells. Cytofluorimetric analysis of A17 cells demonstrated that sub-lethal doses of PRSE reduce the number of cells in S phase, inducing the accumulation of cells in G1 phase of cell cycle. In addition, the migration of A17 cells was studied monitoring the ability of PRSE to inhibit cellular mobility. Gene expression analysis revealed the modulation of 12 genes playing different roles in the cellular migration, adhesion and invasion processes. Finally, in vivo experiments showed the growth inhibition of A17 cells orthotopically transplanted into FVB syngeneic mice fed with PRSE. Overall, we demonstrated that PRSE exerts important biological activities against a highly invasive breast cancer cell line both in vitro and in vivo suggesting the strawberry extracts as preventive/curative food strategy. PMID:27498973

  12. Oncology Nursing and Shared Decision Making for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tariman, Joseph D; Mehmeti, Enisa; Spawn, Nadia; McCarter, Sarah P; Bishop-Royse, Jessica; Garcia, Ima; Hartle, Lisa; Szubski, Katharine

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to describe the contemporary role of the oncology nurse throughout the entire cancer shared decision-making (SDM) process. Study participants consisted of 30 nurses and nurse practitioners who are actively involved in direct care of patients with cancer in the inpatient or outpatient setting. The major themes that emerged from the content analysis are: oncology nurses have various roles at different time points and settings of cancer SDM processes; patient education, advocacy, and treatment side effects management are among the top nursing roles; oncology nurses value their participation in the cancer SDM process; oncology nurses believe they have a voice, but with various degrees of influence in actual treatment decisions; nurses' level of disease knowledge influences the degree of participation in cancer SDM; and the nursing role during cancer SDM can be complicated and requires flexibility.
.

  13. Estimating Preferences for Treatments in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ávila, Mónica; Becerra, Virginia; Guedea, Ferran; Suárez, José Francisco; Fernandez, Pablo; Macías, Víctor; Mariño, Alfonso; and others

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Studies of patients' preferences for localized prostate cancer treatments have assessed radical prostatectomy and external radiation therapy, but none of them has evaluated brachytherapy. The aim of our study was to assess the preferences and willingness to pay of patients with localized prostate cancer who had been treated with radical prostatectomy, external radiation therapy, or brachytherapy, and their related urinary, sexual, and bowel side effects. Methods and Materials: This was an observational, prospective cohort study with follow-up until 5 years after treatment. A total of 704 patients with low or intermediate risk localized prostate cancer were consecutively recruited from 2003 to 2005. The estimation of preferences was conducted using time trade-off, standard gamble, and willingness-to-pay methods. Side effects were measured with the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC), a prostate cancer-specific questionnaire. Tobit models were constructed to assess the impact of treatment and side effects on patients' preferences. Propensity score was applied to adjust for treatment selection bias. Results: Of the 580 patients reporting preferences, 165 were treated with radical prostatectomy, 152 with external radiation therapy, and 263 with brachytherapy. Both time trade-off and standard gamble results indicated that the preferences of patients treated with brachytherapy were 0.06 utilities higher than those treated with radical prostatectomy (P=.01). Similarly, willingness-to-pay responses showed a difference of €57/month (P=.004) between these 2 treatments. Severe urinary incontinence presented an independent impact on the preferences elicited (P<.05), whereas no significant differences were found by bowel and sexual side effects. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that urinary incontinence is the side effect with the highest impact on preferences and that brachytherapy and external radiation therapy are more valued than radical prostatectomy

  14. Evaluation of semen quality in patients with malignancies referred for sperm banking before cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Amirjannati, N; Sadeghi, M; Hosseini Jadda, S H; Ranjbar, F; Kamali, K; Akhondi, M A

    2011-10-01

    Different cancer treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy can lead to azoospermia and even sterility for an unknown period. Whether the type of cancer could affect semen quality or not is under debate. In this study, we have reviewed semen parameters of men with cancer who deposited their sperm samples at the Avicenna Research Institute tissue bank before undergoing cytotoxic treatment. This descriptive retrospective study examined 73 cases referred to sperm bank, because of malignancy, prior to initiation of cancer treatments including chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The data recorded were age, marital status, reproductive history, semen analysis reports and cancer history of the patients. Semen samples were analysed according to recommendations of the World Health Organization (1999) before freezing. Results of the analysis showed that 71.2% (52) of patients had oligozoospermia, 93.2% (68) teratozoospermia and 86.3% (63) asthenozoospermia. Different groups of cancer patients did not show any differences in oligozoospermia, teratozoospermia and asthenozoospermia. Impaired spermatogenesis even prior to cancer treatment indicates the importance of fertility preservation. As the majority of patients had suitable specimens for freezing and assisted reproduction, sperm banking is recommended to be performed promptly and before any treatment, especially surgery.

  15. Surgical treatment of double primary liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aijun; Ma, Senlin; Pawlik, Timothy; Wu, Bin; Yang, Xiaoyu; Cui, Longjiu; Wu, Mengchao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Double primary liver cancer (DPLC) is a special type of clinical situation. As such, a detailed analysis of the surgical management and prognosis of patients with DPLC is lacking. The objective of the current study was to define the management and outcome of patients undergoing surgery for DPLC at a major hepatobiliary center. A total of 87 patients treated by surgical resection at the Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital from January 1st, 2007 to October 31st, 2013 who had DPLC demonstrated by final pathological diagnosis were identified. Among these, 50 patients had complete clinical and prognostic data. Demographic and tumor characteristics as well as the prognosis were analyzed. The proportion of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) (+) and hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) (+), HBsAg (+), and HBeAg (−) hepatocirrhosis in all patients was 21.84%, 67.82%, and 63.22%, respectively. Incidental findings accounted for 58.62% of patients; among those who had symptoms, the main symptom was abdominal pain (31.03%). Nonanatomic wedge resection was the main operative approach (62.07%). Postoperatively, the main complications included seroperitoneum (11.49%), hypoproteinemia (10.34%), and pleural effusion (8.05%). Factors associated with disease-free survival (DFS) included intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) tumor size (P = 0.002) and use of postoperative prophylactic transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) treatment (P = 0.015). Meanwhile, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) size (P = 0.045), ICC size (P < 0.001), and liver function (including aspartate aminotransferase [P = 0.001] and r-glutamyl transferase [P < 0.001]) were associated with overall survival (OS). Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatitis or cirrhosis is also an important factor in the pathogenesis of DPLC and surgical treatment is safe for it with low complication rates. In addition, it is effective to prolong DFS that DPLC patients undergo postoperative

  16. Late effects of treatment of cancer in infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Pastore, G.; Antonelli, R.; Fine, W.; Li, F.P.; Sallan, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Eighty-six children were diagnosed with cancer in infancy, followed for at lest 5 years, and assessed for late effects of disease and therapy. One child subsequently died from respiratory failure and 3 died from second primary cancers. Another patient survived second primary cancers of the skin. The high frequency of new cancers (4 observed, 0.09 expected) was attributable to host susceptibility factors and treatment effects. Kyphoscoliosis was diagnosed in 44 patients, 40 of whom had received radiotherapy to the spine. Other patients had neurologic deficits, pulmonary fibrosis, hypoplastic breasts, bowel adhesions, thyroid nodules, musculoskeletal defects, and liver fibrosis associated with tumor therapy. Sequelae of cancer were more common after treatment in infancy than in later childhood. Improved treatments and knowledge of natural history can reduce adverse effects of therapy.

  17. Proton beam therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Thomas J; Lee, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    Through unique physical dose deposition properties, proton beam therapy (PBT) potentiates radiation dose escalation to target tissue while minimizing radiation exposure to nontarget organs. Proton beam therapy has been used to treat prostate cancer for several decades; however, access to proton centers has been restricted to the limited number of proton centers. Because of recent enhancements in availability and treatment delivery systems, interest in PBT has been burgeoning among oncologists, industry experts, and prostate cancer patients. As a result, the importance of understanding the collective experience to date and technical aspects of PBT delivery has become increasingly important in cancer medicine. This review article is intended to discuss the fundamentals of PBT treatment, critically review the literature on PBT for localized prostate cancer, and describe the continued development of proton beam technology for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  18. Genetic factors affecting patient responses to pancreatic cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fotopoulos, George; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the exocrine pancreas is a malignancy with a high lethal rate. Surgical resection is the only possible curative mode of treatment. Metastatic pancreatic cancer is incurable with modest results from the current treatment options. New genomic information could prove treatment efficacy. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect databases was performed up to March 2016, using combinations of terms such pancreatic exocrine cancer, chemotherapy, genomic profile, pancreatic cancer pharmacogenomics, genomics, molecular pancreatic pathogenesis, and targeted therapy. Recent genetic studies have identified new markers and therapeutic targets. Our current knowledge of pancreatic cancer genetics must be further advanced to elucidate the molecular basis and pathogenesis of the disease, improve the accuracy of diagnosis, and guide tailor-made therapies. PMID:27708512

  19. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  20. Sipuleucel-T for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, Mark W

    2012-06-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response to prostate cancer that prolongs the overall survival of men with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The clinical development program and key efficacy, safety, and immune response findings from the phase III studies are presented. The integration of sipuleucel-T into the treatment paradigm of advanced prostate cancer and future directions for research are discussed.

  1. The Future of Prostate Cancer Research and Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    On January 12, 2017 prostate cancer experts William Dahut, M.D. of the National Cancer Institute and Dr. Heather Cheng, M.D. of the University of Washington had a vibrant discussion about current and future research areas and treatment options for prostate cancer. The panel was moderated by Ana Fadich, MPH, CHES Vice President at Men’s Health of the Men's Health Network.

  2. Cervical cancer prevention and treatment in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Melissa S; Baker, Ellen S; Maza, Mauricio; Fontes-Cintra, Georgia; Lopez, Aldo; Carvajal, Juan M; Nozar, Fernanda; Fiol, Veronica; Schmeler, Kathleen M

    2017-02-07

    Cervical cancer is a preventable disease with a known etiology (human papillomavirus), effective preventive vaccines, excellent screening methods, and a treatable pre-invasive phase. Surgery is the primary treatment for pre-invasive and early-stage disease and can safely be performed in many low-resource settings. However, cervical cancer rates remain high in many areas of Latin America. This article presents a number of evidence-based strategies being implemented to improve cervical cancer outcomes in Latin America.

  3. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Gray, Joe

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  4. The Changing Landscape of Lung Cancer Research and Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Along with the Lung Cancer Social Media (#LCSM) community, the National Cancer Institute will be co-hosting a lively and interactive Google Hangout on Air about the changing landscape of lung cancer research and treatment. During the chat, viewers will have the opportunity to pose questions to a panel of lung cancer experts including NCI's Dr. Shakun Malik, the head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD, Chief of Medical Oncology, Yale Cancer Center and Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven and David Tom Cooke MD FACS, Head, Section of General Thoracic Surgery University of California, Davis. You can also learn more and follow along on the #LCSM Chat page. The chat will be moderated by lung cancer advocate and #LCSM co-founder, Janet Freeman-Daily. To ask questions of our experts, simply use the #LCSM hashtag during the chat.

  5. Analysis of Maryland Cancer Patient Participation in NCI Supported Cancer Treatment Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Baquet, Claudia R.; Ellison, Gary L.; Mishra, Shiraz I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We examined the relationship of sociodemographic factors, urban/rural residence, and countylevel socioeconomic factors on accrual of Maryland patients with cancer to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer treatment clinical trials. Patients and Methods Data were analyzed for the period 1999 to 2002 for 2,240 Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials. The extent to which Maryland patients with cancer and patients residing in lower socioeconomic and/or rural areas were accrued to cancer trials and were representative of all patients with cancer in Maryland was determined. Data were obtained from several sources, including NCI’s Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program for Maryland patients with cancer in Cooperative Group therapeutic trials, Maryland Cancer Registry data on cancer incidence, and United States Census and the Department of Agriculture. Results For Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials between 1999 and 2002, subgroups accrued at a higher rate included pediatric and adolescent age groups, white patients, female patients (for sex-specific tumors), patients with private health insurance, and patients residing in the Maryland National Capitol region. Moreover, between 1999 and 2002, there was an estimated annual decline (8.9% per year; P < .05) in the percentage of black patients accrued onto cancer treatment trials. Logistic regression models uncovered different patterns of accrual for female patients and male patients on county-level socioeconomic factors. Conclusion Results highlight disparities in the accrual of Maryland patients with cancer onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials based on patient age, race/ethnicity, geography of residence, and county-level socioeconomic factors. Findings provide the basis for development of innovative tailored and targeted educational efforts to improve trial accrual, particularly for the underserved. PMID:18612153

  6. Analysis of Maryland Cancer Patient Participation in NCI Supported Cancer Treatment Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Baquet, Claudia R.; Ellison, Gary L.; Mishra, Shiraz I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We examined the relationship of sociodemographic factors, urban/rural residence, and countylevel socioeconomic factors on accrual of Maryland patients with cancer to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer treatment clinical trials. Patients and Methods Data were analyzed for the period 1999 to 2002 for 2,240 Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials. The extent to which Maryland patients with cancer and patients residing in lower socioeconomic and/or rural areas were accrued to cancer trials and were representative of all patients with cancer in Maryland was determined. Data were obtained from several sources, including NCI’s Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program for Maryland patients with cancer in Cooperative Group therapeutic trials, Maryland Cancer Registry data on cancer incidence, and United States Census and the Department of Agriculture. Results For Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials between 1999 and 2002, subgroups accrued at a higher rate included pediatric and adolescent age groups, white patients, female patients (for sex-specific tumors), patients with private health insurance, and patients residing in the Maryland National Capitol region. Moreover, between 1999 and 2002, there was an estimated annual decline (8.9% per year; P < .05) in the percentage of black patients accrued onto cancer treatment trials. Logistic regression models uncovered different patterns of accrual for female patients and male patients on county-level socioeconomic factors. Conclusion Results highlight disparities in the accrual of Maryland patients with cancer onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials based on patient age, race/ethnicity, geography of residence, and county-level socioeconomic factors. Findings provide the basis for development of innovative tailored and targeted educational efforts to improve trial accrual, particularly for the underserved. PMID:19711497

  7. Quality of Life in Cancer Patients with Disfigurement due to Cancer and its Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Duraipandi; Thirumoorthy, Ammapattian; Devi, Saraswathi; Thennarasu

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of disfigurement due to cancer and its treatments on quality of life. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 patients from the inpatient/outpatient department of oncology who had undergone various forms of treatment for cancer were included in this study. The WHOQuality of Life BREF (WHOQL-BREF) version was administered to the patients to assess their quality of life. Results: Patients’ overall quality of life score ranged from 34 to 79 with an average of 53.18 (SD 11.94) and a large number of patients had scored from 40 to 54 on the WHOQOL-BREF.The study showed a significant difference between gender groups (t = 3.899, P < 0.05), with a significant difference in the mean quality of life between different categories of the prominent stigma (f = 4.018, P < 0.05) and the nature of stigma. Disfigurement clearly was a stressful experience for both sexes, but substantially more distressing for women. Majority of the patients experienced poor quality of life in all dimensions, namely, physical health, psychological health, social relationships, environmental health, and other sociodemographic variables. Conclusion: Living with a disfiguring body which is visibly different is not always easy. A sudden change either due to cancer or its treatment or due to side effects leads to significant social maladjustment, elevated anxiety, depression, and poor quality of life among the cancer survivors with body disfigurement which calls for multiprofessional involvement in addressing various psychosocial issues. PMID:22346042

  8. Treatment Extends Survival for Women with Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who received gemcitabine (Gemzar®) both as part of initial treatment and as part of therapy following primary treatment had improved survival compared with patients whose treatment did not include gemcitabine, according to findings presented at the 2009 ASCO meeting in Orlando.

  9. Pancreatic cancer: New hopes after first line treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aroldi, Francesca; Bertocchi, Paola; Savelli, Giordano; Rosso, Edoardo; Zaniboni, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Extensive research has yielded advances in first-line treatment strategies, but there is no standardized second-line therapy. In this review, we examine the literature trying to establish a possible therapeutic algorithm. PMID:27672426

  10. Angiostatic Therapy: A New Treatment Modality for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    could be a new innovative treatment regimen for hormone-refractory prostate cancer. This was to be achieved with human prostate cancer tissue and...indices, low cell death and a highly invasive phenotype. Using this model we identified surgical castration, COX-2 inhibition and dendritic cell based immunotherapy as effective mono and combined therapies for prostate carcinoma.

  11. Experiences of cancer patients in Poland throughout diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, D; Adamczak, M; Wojtyś, P

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have failed to explain why the mortality rate of cancer patients is higher in Poland than other countries in the European Union. We aimed to evaluate the health care system in Poland during the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In this multicentre study, 125 cancer patients treated at 15 centres across Poland participated in focus group interviews in 2014. We identified and assessed crucial elements that affect a patients' experience from the early onset of symptoms, through to diagnosis and treatment. We found that the majority of patients were dissatisfied with the length of time taken to diagnose cancer. Throughout diagnosis, treatment and follow-up, patients reported a lack of communication from health care professionals. While dealings with oncologists and medical staff were viewed favourably, patients felt the cancer centres were not well organised. Patients recommended that having one doctor in charge of an individual's treatment and follow-up would improve patient care and well-being. A late cancer diagnosis may be contributing to the high mortality rate observed in Poland. In the future, new policies should be developed to reduce the time to cancer diagnosis, increase communication with health care professionals and improve the organisation of cancer care for patients.

  12. Nanotechnology and Pediatric Cancer: Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zare-Zardini, H; Amiri, A; Shanbedi, M; Taheri-Kafrani, A; Sadri, Z; Ghanizadeh, F; Neamatzadeh, H; Sheikhpour, R; Keyvani Boroujeni, F; Masoumi Dehshiri, R; Hashemi, A; Aminorroaya, MM; Dehgahnzadeh, MR; Shahriari, Sh

    2015-01-01

    Despite development of new approaches for the treatment of cancer disease, it is the second cause of mortality in world. Annually, 30000 persons die in Iran due to cancer diseases. Eighty percent of cancer patients are children which about 50% children lead to death. Given the high rate of cancer-related death, the new approaches for prevention, control, early diagnosis, and treatment of this disease seem necessary. Investigation of new strategies is the major challenge for scientists at recent century. Nanotechnology as a new scientific field with novel and small compounds utilized different fields over the past ten years especially in medicine. This science has come to the forefront in the areas of medical diagnostics, imaging, and therapeutic scheduls. Therefore, it has the potential applications for cancer detection and therapy. This review will discuss the therapeutic applications of different nano-materials in diagnosis, imaging, and delivery of therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer with a major focus on their applications for the treatment of cancer and cancer- related diseases in children. The advancements in established nanoparticle technologies such as liposomes, polymer micelles, and functionalization regarding tumor targeting and controlled release strategies as well as drug delivery were discussed. It will also review the blood toxicity of used nanostructures. PMID:26985357

  13. Selective use of sorafenib in the treatment of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pitoia, Fabián; Jerkovich, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multiple kinase inhibitor (MKI) approved for the treatment of primary advanced renal cell carcinoma and advanced primary liver cancer. It was recently approved by several health agencies around the world as the first available MKI treatment for radioactive iodine-refractory advanced and progressive differentiated thyroid cancer. Sorafenib targets C-RAF, B-RAF, VEGF receptor-1, -2, -3, PDGF receptor-β, RET, c-kit, and Flt-3. As a multifunctional inhibitor, sorafenib has the potential of inhibiting tumor growth, progression, metastasis, and angiogenesis and downregulating mechanisms that protect tumors from apoptosis and has shown to increase the progression-free survival in several Phase II trials. This led to the Phase III trial (DECISION) which showed that there was an improvement in progression-free survival of 5 months for patients on sorafenib when compared to those on placebo. Adverse events with this drug are common but usually manageable. The development of resistance after 1 or 2 years is almost a rule in most patients who showed partial response or stabilization of the disease while on sorafenib, which makes it necessary to think of a plan for subsequent therapies. These may include the use of another MKI, such as lenvatinib, the second approved MKI for advanced differentiated thyroid cancer, or include patients in clinical trials or the off-label use of other MKIs. Given sorafenib’s earlier approval, most centers now have access to its prescription. The goal of this review was to improve the care of these patients by describing key aspects that all prescribers will need to master in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:27042004

  14. Bisphosphonate-functionalized hyaluronic acid showing selective affinity for osteoclasts as a potential treatment for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kootala, Sujit; Ossipov, Dmitri; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander; Hilborn, Jöns

    2015-08-01

    Current treatments for osteoporosis involve the administration of high doses of bisphosphonates (BPs) over a number of years. However, the efficiency of the absorption of these drugs and specificity towards targeted osteoclastic cells is still suboptimal. In this study, we have exploited the natural affinity of high (H) and low (L) molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (HA) towards a cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) receptors on osteoclasts to use it as a biodegradable targeting vehicle. We covalently bonded BP to functionalised HA (HA-BP) and found that HA-BP conjugates were highly specific to osteoclastic cells and reduced mature osteoclast numbers significantly more than free BP. To study the uptake of HA-BP, we fluorescently derivatised the polymer-drug with fluorescein B isothiocyanate (FITC) and found that L-HA-BP could seamlessly enter osteoclastic cells. Alternatively, we tested polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a synthetic polymer delivery vehicle using similar chemistry to link BP and found that osteoclast numbers did not reduce in the same way. These findings could pave the way for biodegradable polymers to be used as vehicles for targeted delivery of anti-osteoporotic drugs.

  15. The Treatment of Cancer through Hypnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Bruce

    1985-01-01

    This report traces the immunological components of the cancer process and illustrates how vital a role is played by stress. The work of the Simontons is used to discuss the relationship between stress, the immune system and cancer. Hypnotic visualization techniques and their effects on the immune system are also reviewed. (Author)

  16. Treatment Options (by Stage) for Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer.gov on the Managing Cancer Care page. Contact Us More information about contacting us or receiving ... Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT INFORMATION Contact Us LiveHelp Online Chat MORE INFORMATION ...

  17. Treatment of Cancer Pain by Targeting Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Vendrell, I; Macedo, D; Alho, I; Dionísio, M R; Costa, L

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important causes of the majority of cancer symptoms, including pain, fatigue, cachexia, and anorexia. Cancer pain affects 17 million people worldwide and can be caused by different mediators which act in primary efferent neurons directly or indirectly. Cytokines can be aberrantly produced by cancer and immune system cells and are of particular relevance in pain. Currently, there are very few strategies to control the release of cytokines that seems to be related to cancer pain. Nevertheless, in some cases, targeted drugs are available and in use for other diseases. In this paper, we aim to review the importance of cytokines in cancer pain and targeted strategies that can have an impact on controlling this symptom.

  18. Treatment of Cancer Pain by Targeting Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, I.; Macedo, D.; Alho, I.; Dionísio, M. R.; Costa, L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important causes of the majority of cancer symptoms, including pain, fatigue, cachexia, and anorexia. Cancer pain affects 17 million people worldwide and can be caused by different mediators which act in primary efferent neurons directly or indirectly. Cytokines can be aberrantly produced by cancer and immune system cells and are of particular relevance in pain. Currently, there are very few strategies to control the release of cytokines that seems to be related to cancer pain. Nevertheless, in some cases, targeted drugs are available and in use for other diseases. In this paper, we aim to review the importance of cytokines in cancer pain and targeted strategies that can have an impact on controlling this symptom. PMID:26538839

  19. Many Patients with Cancer Need Better Treatments for Pain

    Cancer.gov

    Inadequate pain treatment in patients with cancer remains a significant problem and appears to be more frequent among minorities, according to a new study published online April 16, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  20. Effects of Cancer Treatment on Fertility (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... there's a chance that treatment might affect the reproductive system. Once armed with this knowledge, you and your ... Therapy Caring for a Seriously Ill Child Male Reproductive System Female Reproductive System Chemotherapy Cancer Center Can I ...

  1. Ribociclib as First-Line Treatment for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of interim results from a phase III trial testing ribociclib plus letrozole (Femara®) as a first-line treatment for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

  2. For Some Breast Cancers, New Drug May Be Treatment Option

    Cancer.gov

    Results from an international clinical trial suggest that women with metastatic, HER2-positive breast cancer that is no longer responding to the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) may soon have a new treatment option.

  3. Combining Immunotherapy and Targeted Therapies in Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vanneman, Matthew; Dranoff, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Preface During the past two decades, the paradigm for cancer treatment has evolved from relatively non-specific cytotoxic agents to selective, mechanism-based therapeutics. Cancer chemotherapies were initially identified through screens for compounds that killed rapidly dividing cells. These drugs remain a backbone of current treatment, but are limited by a narrow therapeutic index, significant toxicities, and frequently acquired resistance. More recently, an improved understanding of cancer pathogenesis has given rise to new treatment options, including targeted agents and cancer immunotherapy. Targeted approaches aim to inhibit molecular pathways that are critical to tumor growth and maintenance, whereas immunotherapy endeavors to stimulate a host response that effectuates long-lived tumor destruction. Targeted therapies and cytotoxic agents also modulate immune responses, which raises the possibility that these treatment strategies might be effectively combined with immunotherapy to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:22437869

  4. Hedgehog Signal Transduction Inhibitors in Breast Cancer Treatment and Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    a series of human mammary epithelial cell lines for changes in their growth behavior. if cyclopamine can slow or prevent neoplastic growth, this class of inhibitors may be useful in breast cancer treatment or prevention

  5. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy in adjuvant treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ismaili, Nabil; Mellas, Nawfel; Masbah, Ouafae; Elmajjaoui, Sanaa; Arifi, Samia; Bekkouch, Imane; Ahid, Samir; Bazid, Zakaria; Tazi, Mohammed Adnane; Erraki, Abdelouahed; El Mesbahi, Omar; Benjaafar, Noureddine; El Gueddari, Brahim El Khalil; Ismaili, Mohammed; Afqir, Said; Errihani, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    -regional free survival at 5 years was equal to 98.6% in group A and 94% in group B (Log-rank test: p = 0,033). The rate of grade II and grade III anaemia was 13.9% and 6.7% in anthracycline group and CMF group respectively (Khi2-test: p = 0.009). The rate of grade II and grade III skin dermatitis toxicity was 4.5% in the group A and 0% in the group B (Khi2-test: p = 0.013). Conclusion From the 5 years retrospective investigation we showed similar disease free survival and overall survival in the two concurrent chemo-radiotherapy treatments based on anthracycline and CMF. However in the loco-regional breast cancer the treatment based on anthracycline was significantly better than that of the treatment based on CMF. There was more haematological and skin dermatitis toxicity in the anthracycline group. PMID:19351405

  6. Colon cancer: cancer stem cells markers, drug resistance and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kozovska, Zuzana; Gabrisova, Veronika; Kucerova, Lucia

    2014-10-01

    Malignant tumours consist of heterogeneous populations of tumour cells. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a population of cells within a tumour with highly tumorigenic and chemoresistant properties. These cells may be identified by the expression of CSC markers. There are several key stem cells markers specified for colon cancer: CD133, CD44, ALDH1, ALCAM. These days, a major obstacle to effective cancer management is development of a multidrug resistance (MDR). The principal mechanism responsible for development of MDR phenotype is the over-expression of ABC transporters. Tumours and relapsing tumours after therapy are drived by subpopulations of tumour cells with aggressive phenotype resistant to chemotherapeutics. These cells are called CSC or tumour-initiating cells (TIC). Here we outline recent information about MDR of colon cancer and CSC markers. We have focused on novel therapeutic strategies which have been developed to prevent or overcome MDR. One such strategy is a combination of chemotherapy and modulators of MDR pumps or chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF. Colon cancer is characterized by the presence of colon CSC expressing specific stem cell markers. The divergent presence of these markers can help to adjust personalized therapy. The review provides a detailed overview of resistance of colon cancer cells and discusses how the presence of CSC markers can influence therapy and prognosis of patients.

  7. A Social Network Analysis of Treatment Discoveries in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Barnes, Laura; Hozo, Iztok; Skvoretz, John; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Controlled clinical trials are widely considered to be the vehicle to treatment discovery in cancer that leads to significant improvements in health outcomes including an increase in life expectancy. We have previously shown that the pattern of therapeutic discovery in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) can be described by a power law distribution. However, the mechanism generating this pattern is unknown. Here, we propose an explanation in terms of the social relations between researchers in RCTs. We use social network analysis to study the impact of interactions between RCTs on treatment success. Our dataset consists of 280 phase III RCTs conducted by the NCI from 1955 to 2006. The RCT networks are formed through trial interactions formed i) at random, ii) based on common characteristics, or iii) based on treatment success. We analyze treatment success in terms of survival hazard ratio as a function of the network structures. Our results show that the discovery process displays power law if there are preferential interactions between trials that may stem from researchers' tendency to interact selectively with established and successful peers. Furthermore, the RCT networks are “small worlds”: trials are connected through a small number of ties, yet there is much clustering among subsets of trials. We also find that treatment success (improved survival) is proportional to the network centrality measures of closeness and betweenness. Negative correlation exists between survival and the extent to which trials operate within a limited scope of information. Finally, the trials testing curative treatments in solid tumors showed the highest centrality and the most influential group was the ECOG. We conclude that the chances of discovering life-saving treatments are directly related to the richness of social interactions between researchers inherent in a preferential interaction model. PMID:21464896

  8. Perspectives of the Breast Cancer Survivorship Continuum: Diagnosis through 30 Months Post-Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hulett, Jennifer M.; Armer, Jane M.; Stewart, Bob R.; Wanchai, Ausanee

    2015-01-01

    This study explored breast cancer survivors’ perspectives regarding their experiences of the survivorship continuum from diagnosis through 30 months post-treatment. The sample included women (N = 379) with newly-diagnosed breast cancer undergoing treatment at a Midwestern university-affiliated cancer center. Semi-structured interviews were conducted using the Lymphedema and Breast Cancer Questionnaire at time of diagnosis, post-operatively, quarterly during the first year, and then semi-annually thereafter through 30 months post-treatment. A mixed-methodology was used to analyze participants’ comments. Themes central to long-term survivorship experiences included social support, positive worldviews, breast cancer and lymphedema health literacy, religious/spiritual beliefs, self-empowerment, and recovery expectations. These themes were consistent with a psychoneuroimmunological model of health in which psychosocial variables mediate stress and influence health outcomes. Qualitative data showed that social support and positive worldviews were the two themes with the most significant impact on long-term breast cancer survivorship experiences. Survivors expressed a need to advance their health care literacy in order to share ownership of breast cancer and lymphedema treatment decisions. Since breast cancer is an immune-mediated disease, long-term survivorship planning should address psychosocial factors that influence the long-term psychological distress associated with immune dysfunction. PMID:26030800

  9. Distance as a Barrier to Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment: Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ambroggi, Massimo; Biasini, Claudia; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Fornari, Fabio; Cavanna, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    The burden of travel from a patient's residence to health care providers is an important issue that can influence access to diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Although several studies have shown that the travel burden can result in delays in diagnosis and treatment of many common cancers, its role appears underestimated in the treatment of patients in clinical practice. Therefore, we performed a review of the published data on the role of travel burden influencing four items: delay of diagnosis, adequate treatment of cancer, outcome, and quality of life of cancer patients. Forty-seven studies published up to December 2014 were initially identified. Twenty studies were excluded because they did not regard specifically the four items of our review. Twenty-seven studies formed the basis of our study and involved 716,153 patients. The associations between travel burden and (a) cancer stage at diagnosis (12 studies), (b) appropriate treatment (8 studies), (c) outcome (4 studies), and (d) quality of life (1 study) are reported. In addition, in two studies, the relation between travel burden and compliance with treatment was examined. The results of our review show that increasing travel requirements are associated with more advanced disease at diagnosis, inappropriate treatment, a worse prognosis, and a worse quality of life. These results suggest that clinical oncologists should remember the specific travel burden problem for cancer patients, who often need health care services every week or every month for many years.

  10. Treatment of fatigue and sleep disorders in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Goforth, Harold W; Davis, Mellar P

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disorders are highly prevalent among cancer patients. These disorders can include disorders of sleep onset or maintenance or disorders of excessive sleepiness. A broad differential diagnosis is required to adequately treat these disorders. This review discusses current diagnoses and treatment associated with sleep difficulties that may be seen in cancer patients. With appropriate diagnosis and treatment, the prognosis is good for sleep improvement and improvements in quality of life.

  11. Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0225 TITLE: Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS- Mutant Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Eric Collisson...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS- Mutant Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0225 5c...one RAS-dependent. This Aim is underway and has verified that KRAS is indeed essential in the KRAS mutant mouse cell lines. Specific Aim 2. To

  12. Prediction of Erectile Function Following Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Regan, Meredith M.; Cooperberg, Matthew R.; Wei, John T.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Sandler, Howard M.; Hembroff, Larry; Sadetsky, Natalia; Saigal, Christopher S.; Litwin, Mark S.; Klein, Eric; Kibel, Adam S.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Pisters, Louis L.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Kaplan, Irving D.; Wood, David P.; Ciezki, Jay; Dunn, Rodney L.; Carroll, Peter R.; Sanda, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    Context Sexual function is the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) domain most commonly impaired after prostate cancer treatment; however, validated tools to enable personalized prediction of erectile dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment are lacking. Objective To predict long-term erectile function following prostate cancer treatment based on individual patient and treatment characteristics. Design Pretreatment patient characteristics, sexual HRQOL, and treatment details measured in a longitudinal academic multicenter cohort (Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction With Treatment Quality Assessment; enrolled from 2003 through 2006), were used to develop models predicting erectile function 2 years after treatment. A community-based cohort (community-based Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor [CaPSURE]; enrolled 1995 through 2007) externally validated model performance. Patients in US academic and community-based practices whose HRQOL was measured pretreatment (N = 1201) underwent follow-up after prostatectomy, external radiotherapy, or brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Sexual outcomes among men completing 2 years’ follow-up (n = 1027) were used to develop models predicting erectile function that were externally validated among 1913 patients in a community-based cohort. Main Outcome Measures Patient-reported functional erections suitable for intercourse 2 years following prostate cancer treatment. Results Two years after prostate cancer treatment, 368 (37% [95% CI, 34%–40%]) of all patients and 335 (48% [95% CI, 45%–52%]) of those with functional erections prior to treatment reported functional erections; 531 (53% [95% CI, 50%–56%]) of patients without penile prostheses reported use of medications or other devices for erectile dysfunction. Pretreatment sexual HRQOL score, age, serum prostate-specific antigen level, race/ethnicity, body mass index, and intended treatment details were associated with functional erections 2

  13. Treatment of Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Associated Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, Dirk P.; Richards, Kristy L.; Damania, Blossom

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is the most frequent AIDS-defining cancer worldwide. KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiological agent of KS, and the virus is also associated with two lymphoproliferative diseases. Both KS and KSHV-associated lymphomas, are cancers of unique molecular composition. They represent a challenge for cancer treatment and an opportunity to identify new mechanisms of transformation. Here, we review the current clinical insights into KSHV-associated cancers and discuss scientific insights into the pathobiology of KS, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman’s disease. PMID:22529843

  14. Surveillance and Survivorship after Treatment for Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makhoul, Rami; Alva, Suraj; Wilkins, Kirsten B.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in the United States. Majority of patients have localized disease that is amenable to curative resection. Disease recurrence remains a major concern after resection. In addition, patients are at an increased risk for developing a second or metachronous colon cancer. The principal goal of surveillance following treatment of colon cancer is to improve disease-free and overall survival. Survivorship is a distinct phase following surveillance to help improve quality of life and promote longevity. PMID:26648797

  15. [Pharmacists in community medicine: especially in cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Masakazu

    2011-01-01

    It is important for clinics and hospitals to cooperate in treating cancer patients in the community health. We are treating cancer patients in cooperation with five general hospitals in Shizuoka and about 100 clinics in the same community. In this system, it is required that pharmacists in the community should have knowledge about beneficial effects and adverse events of anticancer drugs as do hospital pharmacists, and furthermore they should have good communication with cancer patients. The expectation for pharmacists is great in community medicine especially in the treatment of cancer patients.

  16. Treatment planning in the radiation therapy of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vaeth, J.M.; Meyer, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of aspects involved in the most advanced radiotherapy techniques, and examines in detail their application in planning and delivering optimal treatments in a large number of different forms of cancer. Coverage is given to squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, carcinoma of the lung, breast cancer, cancers of the genitourinary system, tumors of the central nervous system, cancer of the esophagus, pancreas, stomach and rectum, soft tissue sarcomas, pediatric radiotherapy, Hodgkin's disease, and finally non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. A general discussion concludes the text.

  17. Recent Progress in Cancer-Related Lymphedema Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Cromwell, Kate D.; Rasmussen, John C.; Stout, Nicole L.; Armer, Jane M.; Lasinski, Bonnie B.; Cormier, Janice N.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the recent developments in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer-related lymphedema. Lymphedema incidence by tumor site is evaluated. Measurement techniques and trends in patient education and treatment are also summarized to include current trends in therapeutic and surgical treatment options as well as longer-term management. Finally, an overview of the policies related to insurance coverage and reimbursement will give the clinician an overview of important trends in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of cancer-related lymphedema. PMID:25410402

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair genes, cancer treatment, and head and neck cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Annah B.; Weissler, Mark C.; Avery, Christy L.; Herring, Amy H.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Funkhouser, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Head and neck cancers (HNC) are commonly treated with radiation and platinum-based chemotherapy, which produce bulky DNA adducts to eradicate cancerous cells. Because nucleotide excision repair (NER) enzymes remove adducts, variants in NER genes may be associated with survival among HNC cases both independently and jointly with treatment. Methods Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate race-stratified (White, African American) hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals for overall (OS) and disease-specific (DS) survival based on treatment (combinations of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy) and 84 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 15 NER genes among 1,227 HNC cases from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Study. Results None of the NER variants evaluated were associated with survival at a Bonferroni-corrected alpha of 0.0006. However, rs3136038 [OS HR = 0.79 (0.65, 0.97), DS HR = 0.69 (0.51, 0.93)] and rs3136130 [OS HR = 0.78 (0.64, 0.96), DS HR = 0.68 (0.50, 0.92)] of ERCC4 and rs50871 [OS HR = 0.80 (0.64, 1.00), DS HR = 0.67 (0.48, 0.92)] of ERCC2 among Whites, and rs2607755 [OS HR = 0.62 (0.45, 0.86), DS HR = 0.51 (0.30, 0.86)] of XPC among African Americans were suggestively associated with survival at an uncorrected alpha of 0.05. Three SNP-treatment joint effects showed possible departures from additivity among Whites. Conclusions Our study, a large and extensive evaluation of SNPs in NER genes and HNC survival, identified mostly null associations, though a few variants were suggestively associated with survival and potentially interacted additively with treatment. PMID:24487794

  19. Autonomy and reason: treatment choice in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Mary

    2012-10-01

    The practice of offering choice to those women with breast cancer for whom either breast conserving surgery or mastectomy would be equally beneficial has come to be seen as an important aspect of medical care. As well as improving satisfaction with treatment, this is seen as satisfying the ethical principle of respect for autonomy. A number of studies, however, show that women are not always comfortable with such choice, preferring to leave treatment decisions to their surgeons. A question then arises as to the extent that these women can be seen as autonomous or as exercising autonomy. This paper argues, however, that the understanding of autonomy which is applied in current approaches to breast cancer care does not adequately support the exercise of autonomy, and that the clinical context of care means that women are not able to engage in the kind of reasoning that might promote the exercise of autonomy. Where respect for autonomy is limited to informed consent and choice, there is a danger that women's interests are overlooked in those aspects of their care where choice is not appropriate, with very real, long-term consequences for some women. Promoting the exercise of autonomy, it is argued, needs to go beyond the conception of autonomy as rational individuals making their own decisions, and clinicians need to work with an understanding of autonomy as relational in order to better involve women in their care.

  20. Theranostic nanomedicine for cancer detection and treatment.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen; Fu, Peter P; Yu, Hongtao; Ray, Paresh C

    2014-03-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the USA according to the American Cancer Society. In the past 5 years, "theranostic nanomedicine", for both therapeutics and imaging, has shown to be "the right drug for the right patient at the right moment" to manage deadly cancers. This review article presents an overview of recent developments, mainly from the authors' laboratories, along with potential medical applications for theranostic nanomedicine including basic concepts and critical properties. Finally, we outline the future research direction and possible challenges for theranostic nanomedicine research.

  1. Update and Debate Issues in Surgical Treatment of Middle and Low Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sung; AL-Asari, Sami F.

    2012-01-01

    Based on a review of the literature, this paper provides an update on surgical treatment of middle and low rectal cancer and discusses issues of debate surrounding that treatment. The main goal of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer is radical resection of the tumor and surrounding lymphatic tissue. Local excision of early rectal cancer can be another treatment option, in which the patient can avoid possible complications related to radical surgery. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has been recommended for patients with cT3-4N0 or any T N+ rectal cancer because CRT shows better local control and less toxicity than adjuvant CRT. However, recent clinical trials showed promising results for local excision after neoadjuvant CRT in selected patients with low rectal cancer. In addition, the "wait and see" concept is another modality that has been reported for the management of tumors that show complete clinical remission after neoadjuvant CRT. Although radical surgery for middle and low rectal cancer is the cornerstone therapy, an ultralow anterior resection with or without intersphincteric resection (ISR) has become an alternative standard surgical method for selected patients. Many studies have reported on the oncological safety of the ISR, but few of them have addressed the issue the functional outcome. Furthermore, an abdominoperineal resection (APR) has problems with high rates of tumor perforations and positive circumferential resection margins, and those factors have contributed to its having a high rate of local recurrence and a poor survival rate for rectal cancer compared with sphincter-saving procedures. Recently, great efforts have been made to reduce these problems, and the total levator excision or the extended APR concept has emerged. Surgical management for low rectal cancer should aim to radically excise the tumor and to preserve as much of the sphincter function as possible by using multidisciplinary approaches. However, further prospective

  2. Green tea compounds in breast cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Jing; Yin, Yan-Cun; Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2014-08-10

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. In recent years, many in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that green tea possesses anti-cancer effects. The epidemiological studies, however, have produced inconclusive results in humans. Likewise, results from animal models about the preventive or therapeutic effects of green tea components are inconclusive. The mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence the risk of breast cancer in humans remain elusive mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence. Here, we review recent studies of green tea polyphenols and their applications in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the effect of green tea components on breast cancer by reviewing epidemiological studies, animal model studies and clinical trials. At last, we discuss the mechanisms by which green tea components suppress the development and recurrence of breast cancer. A better understanding of the mechanisms will improve the utilization of green tea in breast cancer prevention and therapy and pave the way to novel prevention and treatment strategies for breast cancer.

  3. Green tea compounds in breast cancer prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min-Jing; Yin, Yan-Cun; Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. In recent years, many in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that green tea possesses anti-cancer effects. The epidemiological studies, however, have produced inconclusive results in humans. Likewise, results from animal models about the preventive or therapeutic effects of green tea components are inconclusive. The mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence the risk of breast cancer in humans remain elusive mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence. Here, we review recent studies of green tea polyphenols and their applications in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the effect of green tea components on breast cancer by reviewing epidemiological studies, animal model studies and clinical trials. At last, we discuss the mechanisms by which green tea components suppress the development and recurrence of breast cancer. A better understanding of the mechanisms will improve the utilization of green tea in breast cancer prevention and therapy and pave the way to novel prevention and treatment strategies for breast cancer. PMID:25114865

  4. The treatment landscape in thyroid cancer: a focus on cabozantinib

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, Steven P; Cabanillas, Maria E

    2015-01-01

    Although patients with thyroid cancer generally fare well, there is a subset for which this is not necessarily true. Progress in understanding the molecular aberrations in thyroid cancer has led to a change in the management of these cases. Since 2011, four multikinase inhibitors (MKIs) have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for thyroid cancer – cabozantinib and vandetanib for medullary thyroid cancer and sorafenib and lenvatinib for differentiated thyroid cancer. This change in the treatment landscape has raised challenges for practitioners who may not be familiar with the use of MKIs or with the treatment and natural history of advanced thyroid cancer in general. This article reviews the epidemiology, molecular drivers, and initial treatment of patients with thyroid cancer and offers practical guidance to assist with the determination of when to appropriately start an MKI. As an example, cabozantinib and its efficacy are discussed in detail. Close monitoring is required for all patients on targeted agents to assess for adverse effects and response to therapy. An approach to managing drug-related adverse events is detailed. Since these drugs are not curative and have not yet proven to prolong overall survival, it is critical to weigh the risks and benefits of treatment at every visit. The potential value of changing to a different agent following failure of an MKI is also addressed. PMID:26316818

  5. Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sliva, Daniel

    2003-12-01

    The popular edible mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) has been widely used for the general promotion of health and longevity in Asian countries. The dried powder of Ganoderma lucidum was popular as a cancer chemotherapy agent in ancient China. The authors recently demonstrated that Ganoderma lucidum inhibits constitutively active transcription factors nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and AP-1, which resulted in the inhibition of expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor uPAR. Ganoderma lucidum also suppressed cell adhesion and cell migration of highly invasive breast and prostate cancer cells, suggesting its potency to reduce tumor invasiveness. Thus, Ganoderma lucidum clearly demonstrates anticancer activity in experiments with cancer cells and has possible therapeutic potential as a dietary supplement for an alternative therapy for breast and prostate cancer. However, because of the availability of Ganoderma lucidum from different sources, it is advisable to test its biologic activity.

  6. Follow-up Care After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... a cancer information system that offers access to electronic mailing lists and websites, provides a list of ... primary care providers. Journey Forward also provides an electronic tool, the Medical History Builder, to help patients ...

  7. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy ( metabolism ). Control the amount of calcium ... test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient ...

  8. Types of Cancer Treatment: Hormone Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Describes how hormone therapy slows or stops the growth of breast and prostate cancers that use hormones to grow. Includes information about the types of hormone therapy and side effects that may happen.

  9. Treatment Options by Stage (Nasopharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol . Signs of nasopharyngeal cancer include trouble breathing, speaking, or hearing. These and other signs and symptoms ... or neck. A sore throat. Trouble breathing or speaking. Nosebleeds. Trouble hearing. Pain or ringing in the ...

  10. Treatment Options by Stage (Pancreatic Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) ... hormones help the body use and store the energy it gets from food. The digestive juices are ...

  11. Effects of Presurgical Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this study, men diagnosed with androgen-sensitive prostate cancer with intermediate- or high-risk features will be examined with mpMRI, undergo targeted biopsies, and be treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy.

  12. What Happens After Treatment for Nasopharyngeal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... refer you to a therapist for help with rehabilitation. Imaging tests such as CT or PET/CT ... of Nasopharyngeal Cancer . For more general information on dealing with a recurrence, you may also want to ...

  13. Cisplatin loaded albumin mesospheres for lung cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Goldberg, Eugene P; Kaye, Frederic; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2015-01-01

    The low solubility of cisplatin in aqueous solution limits the treatment effectiveness and the application of cisplatin in various kinds of drug-eluting devices. Although cisplatin has a high solubility in Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the toxicity of cisplatin can be greatly reduced while dissolved in DMSO. In this study, the solid powder of cisplatin-loaded albumin mesospheres (CDDP/DMSO-AMS), in a size range of 1 to 10 µm, were post-loaded with cisplatin and showed high cisplatin content (16% w/w) and effective cytotoxicity to lung cancer cells. Cisplatin were efficiently absorbed into the albumin mesospheres (AMS) in DMSO and, most importantly, the toxicity of cisplatin was remained at 100% after the loading process. This CDDP/DMSO-AMS was designed for the intratumoral injection through the bronchoscopic catheter or dry powder inhalation (DPI) due to its high stability in air or in solution. This CDDP/DMSO-AMS showed a fast cisplatin release within 24 hours. In the in vitro study, CDDP/DMSO-AMS showed high effectiveness on killing the lung cancer cells including the non-small cell lung cancer (NCL-H23 and A549), malignant mesothelioma (CRL-2081) and the mouse lung carcinoma (Lewis lung carcinoma) cell lines. The albumin based mesospheres provide an ideal loading matrix for cisplatin and other metal-based drugs due to the high swelling degree and fast uptake rate in the organic solvents with high polarity. In addition, to investigate the effects of polysaccharides, such as chitosan and chondroitin, on enhancing loading efficiency and lasting cytotoxicity of cisplatin, the polysaccharide-modified albumin mesospheres were synthesized and loaded with cisplatin in this study. PMID:25973300

  14. Current treatment options for colon cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC), the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the lining of the abdominal cavity, is the second most common presentation of colon cancer distant metastasis. Despite remarkable advances in cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy for colon cancer over the last 15 years, it has been repeatedly shown that these therapies remain ineffective for colon cancer PC. Recently, there has been a rapid accumulation of reports that cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) prolongs the life of colon cancer PC patients. Here, we will review the clinical presentation, the mechanisms of disease progression, and current treatment options for colon cancer PC, with a focus on the benefits and limitations of CRS-HIPEC. PMID:25253949

  15. Current treatment options for colon cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-09-21

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC), the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the lining of the abdominal cavity, is the second most common presentation of colon cancer distant metastasis. Despite remarkable advances in cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy for colon cancer over the last 15 years, it has been repeatedly shown that these therapies remain ineffective for colon cancer PC. Recently, there has been a rapid accumulation of reports that cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) prolongs the life of colon cancer PC patients. Here, we will review the clinical presentation, the mechanisms of disease progression, and current treatment options for colon cancer PC, with a focus on the benefits and limitations of CRS-HIPEC.

  16. BET inhibition as a new strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Raquel C; Clark, Peter G K; Howarth, Alison; Wan, Xiao; Ceroni, Alessandro; Siejka, Paulina; Nunez-Alonso, Graciela A; Monteiro, Octovia; Rogers, Catherine; Gamble, Vicki; Burbano, Rommel; Brennan, Paul E; Tallant, Cynthia; Ebner, Daniel; Fedorov, Oleg; O'Neill, Eric; Knapp, Stefan; Dixon, Darren; Müller, Susanne

    2016-07-12

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The prognosis of stomach cancer is generally poor as this cancer is not very sensitive to commonly used chemotherapies. Epigenetic modifications play a key role in gastric cancer and contribute to the development and progression of this malignancy. In order to explore new treatment options in this target area we have screened a library of epigenetic inhibitors against gastric cancer cell lines and identified inhibitors for the BET family of bromodomains as potent inhibitors of gastric cancer cell proliferations. Here we show that both the pan-BET inhibitor (+)-JQ1 as well as a newly developed specific isoxazole inhibitor, PNZ5, showed potent inhibition of gastric cancer cell growth. Intriguingly, we found differences in the antiproliferative response between gastric cancer cells tested derived from Brazilian patients as compared to those from Asian patients, the latter being largely resistant to BET inhibition. As BET inhibitors are entering clinical trials these findings provide the first starting point for future therapies targeting gastric cancer.

  17. BET inhibition as a new strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, Raquel C.; Clark, Peter G.K.; Howarth, Alison; Wan, Xiao; Ceroni, Alessandro; Siejka, Paulina; Nunez-Alonso, Graciela A.; Monteiro, Octovia; Rogers, Catherine; Gamble, Vicki; Burbano, Rommel; Brennan, Paul E.; Tallant, Cynthia; Ebner, Daniel; Fedorov, Oleg; O'Neill, Eric; Knapp, Stefan; Dixon, Darren; Müller, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The prognosis of stomach cancer is generally poor as this cancer is not very sensitive to commonly used chemotherapies. Epigenetic modifications play a key role in gastric cancer and contribute to the development and progression of this malignancy. In order to explore new treatment options in this target area we have screened a library of epigenetic inhibitors against gastric cancer cell lines and identified inhibitors for the BET family of bromodomains as potent inhibitors of gastric cancer cell proliferations. Here we show that both the pan-BET inhibitor (+)-JQ1 as well as a newly developed specific isoxazole inhibitor, PNZ5, showed potent inhibition of gastric cancer cell growth. Intriguingly, we found differences in the antiproliferative response between gastric cancer cells tested derived from Brazilian patients as compared to those from Asian patients, the latter being largely resistant to BET inhibition. As BET inhibitors are entering clinical trials these findings provide the first starting point for future therapies targeting gastric cancer. PMID:27259267

  18. Restoration of body image and self-esteem for women after cancer treatment: a rehabilitative strategy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, M S; Johnson, J

    1994-01-01

    Cancer treatment has the potential for limited or permanent impact on body image and self-esteem. Physical changes that impose cosmetic and appearance challenges can be psychologically immobilizing for women with cancer. Their ability to function within social roles may also be affected. This paper describes a restorative strategy as part of a comprehensive cancer rehabilitation program. Women who have had cancer are invited to an informal event that combines fashion modeling with practical suggestions for adaptive and cosmetic needs. Fashion and beauty products are displayed and informational materials provided. It incorporates components of Look Good ... Feel Better, a joint program of the American Cancer Society, the National Cosmetology Association and the Cosmetic, Toiletry, and Fragrance Association Foundation. Evaluations show this program to be helpful and enjoyable for attendees. Health professionals can utilize this strategy in a variety of settings as a component of a cancer rehabilitation program.

  19. PP2A inhibition determines poor outcome and doxorubicin resistance in early breast cancer and its activation shows promising therapeutic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zazo, Sandra; Arpí, Oriol; Menéndez, Silvia; Manso, Rebeca; Lluch, Ana; Eroles, Pilar; Rovira, Ana; Albanell, Joan; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Rojo, Federico

    2015-01-01

    The protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a key tumor suppressor which has emerged as a novel molecular target in some human cancers. Here, we show that PP2A inhibition is a common event in breast cancer and identified PP2A phosphorylation and deregulation SET and CIP2A as molecular contributing mechanisms to inactivate PP2A. Interestingly, restoration of PP2A activity after FTY720 treatment reduced cell growth, induced apoptosis and decreased AKT and ERK activation. Moreover, FTY720 led to PP2A activation then enhancing doxorubicin-induced antitumor effects both in vitro and in vivo. PP2A inhibition (CPscore: PP2A phosphorylation and/or CIP2A overexpression) was detected in 27% of cases (62/230), and associated with grade (p = 0.017), relapse (p < 0.001), negative estrogen (p < 0.001) and progesterone receptor expression (p < 0.001), HER2-positive tumors (p = 0.049), Ki-67 expression (p < 0.001), and higher AKT (p < 0.001) and ERK (p < 0.001) phosphorylation. Moreover, PP2A inhibition determined shorter overall (p = 0.006) and event-free survival (p = 0.003), and multivariate analysis confirmed its independent prognostic impact. Altogether, our results indicate that PP2A is frequently inactivated in breast cancer and determines worse outcome, and its restoration using PP2A activators represents an alternative therapeutic strategy in this disease. PMID:25726524

  20. PP2A inhibition determines poor outcome and doxorubicin resistance in early breast cancer and its activation shows promising therapeutic effects.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Raúl; Cristóbal, Ion; Zazo, Sandra; Arpí, Oriol; Menéndez, Silvia; Manso, Rebeca; Lluch, Ana; Eroles, Pilar; Rovira, Ana; Albanell, Joan; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Rojo, Federico

    2015-02-28

    The protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a key tumor suppressor which has emerged as a novel molecular target in some human cancers. Here, we show that PP2A inhibition is a common event in breast cancer and identified PP2A phosphorylation and deregulation SET and CIP2A as molecular contributing mechanisms to inactivate PP2A. Interestingly, restoration of PP2A activity after FTY720 treatment reduced cell growth, induced apoptosis and decreased AKT and ERK activation. Moreover, FTY720 led to PP2A activation then enhancing doxorubicin-induced antitumor effects both in vitro and in vivo. PP2A inhibition (CPscore: PP2A phosphorylation and/or CIP2A overexpression) was detected in 27% of cases (62/230), and associated with grade (p = 0.017), relapse (p < 0.001), negative estrogen (p < 0.001) and progesterone receptor expression (p < 0.001), HER2-positive tumors (p = 0.049), Ki-67 expression (p < 0.001), and higher AKT (p < 0.001) and ERK (p < 0.001) phosphorylation. Moreover, PP2A inhibition determined shorter overall (p = 0.006) and event-free survival (p = 0.003), and multivariate analysis confirmed its independent prognostic impact. Altogether, our results indicate that PP2A is frequently inactivated in breast cancer and determines worse outcome, and its restoration using PP2A activators represents an alternative therapeutic strategy in this disease.

  1. Therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chames, Patrick; Kerfelec, Brigitte; Baty, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with the worst mortality rate and an overall 5-year survival rate lower than 5%. In the United States, this disease is the fourth leading cause of death and represents 6% of all cancer related deaths. Gemcitabine, the current standard first-line treatment offers marginal benefits to patients in terms of symptom control and prolongation of life. Since 1996, about 20 randomized phase III trials have been performed to improve the efficacy of gemcitabine with little success regarding a significant improvement in survival outcomes. The need for novel therapeutic strategies such as target therapy is obvious. Monoclonal antibodies have finally come of age as therapeutics and several molecules are now approved for cancer therapies. This review aims at giving a general view on the clinical results obtained so far by antibodies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and describes the most promising avenues toward a significant improvement in the treatment of this frustrating disease. PMID:20563534

  2. The unpaved journey of vitamin C in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Polireddy, Kishore; Chen, Ping; Dong, Ruochen

    2015-12-01

    Effectiveness and low-toxicity to normal tissues are ideal properties for a cancer treatment, and one that numerous research programs are aiming for. Vitamin C has long been used in the field of Complementary and Alternative Medicine as a cancer treatment, with profound safety and anecdotal efficacy. Recent studies revealed the scientific basis for this use, and indicated that vitamin C, at supra-nutritional doses, holds considerable promise as an effective and low-toxic therapeutic strategy to treat cancer. Reviewed here are the early controversies surrounding vitamin C and cancer treatment, the breakthrough discoveries that led to the current advancement, and recent clinical studies, as well as research into its mechanisms of action.

  3. Old Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Newcomers in Gastrointestinal Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Erika; Zoratto, Federica; Strudel, Martina; Papa, Anselmo; Rossi, Luigi; Minozzi, Marina; Caruso, Davide; Zaccarelli, Eleonora; Verrico, Monica; Tomao, Silverio

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer treatment is based more on molecular biology that has provided increasing knowledge about cancer pathogenesis on which targeted therapy is being developed. Precisely, targeted therapy is defined as a "type of treatment that uses drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors, to identify and attack specific cancer cells". Nowadays, the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved many targeted therapies for gastrointestinal cancer treatment, as many are in various phases of development as well. In a previous review we discussed the main monoclonal antibodies used and studied in gastrointestinal cancer. In addition to monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent another class of targeted therapy and following the approval of imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumours, other tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been approved for gastrointestinal cancers treatment such as sunitinib, regoragenib, sorafenib and erlotinib. Moving forward, the purpose of this review is to focus on the efficacy data of main tyrosine kinase inhibitors commonly used in the personalized treatment of each gastrointestinal tumour and to provide a comprehensive overview about experimental targeted therapies ongoing in this setting.

  4. [Modern surgical treatment of breast cancer. 3rd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference].

    PubMed

    Lázár, György; Bursics, Attila; Farsang, Zoltán; Harsányi, László; Kósa, Csaba; Maráz, Róbert; Mátrai, Zoltán; Paszt, Attila; Pavlovics, Gábor; Tamás, Róbert

    2016-09-01

    Therapy for breast cancer today is characterised by ever more precise diagnostic methods and ever more effective oncological treatments, a trend which will certainly continue into the future. Breast preservation and the application of oncoplastic principles are increasingly popular. A sentinel lymph node biopsy in the surgical treatment of the axilla is primary, with the indication for axillary block dissection (ABD) narrowing and radiation therapy becoming an alternative to ABD in certain cases. This publication summarises our recommendations on the surgical treatment of breast cancer based on the content of the 3rd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference and considering the latest international studies and professional recommendations.

  5. Travel time to hospital and treatment for breast, colon, rectum, lung, ovary and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, A P; Haynes, R; Sauerzapf, V; Crawford, S M; Zhao, H; Forman, D

    2008-05-01

    The aim was to examine the effect of geographical access to treatment services on cancer treatment patterns. Records for patients in northern England with breast, colon, rectal, lung, ovary and prostate tumours were augmented with estimates of travel time to the nearest hospital providing surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Using logistic regression to adjust for age, sex, tumour stage, selected tumour pathology characteristics and deprivation of place of residence, the likelihood of receiving radiotherapy was reduced for all sites studied with increasing travel time to the nearest radiotherapy hospital. Lung cancer patients living further from a thoracic surgery hospital were less likely to receive surgery, and both lung cancer and rectal cancer patients were less likely to receive chemotherapy if they lived distant from these services. Services provided in only a few specialised centres, involving longer than average patient journeys, all showed an inverse association between travel time and treatment take-up.

  6. Dual fatty acid synthase and HER2 signaling blockade shows marked antitumor activity against breast cancer models resistant to anti-HER2 drugs.

    PubMed

    Blancafort, Adriana; Giró-Perafita, Ariadna; Oliveras, Glòria; Palomeras, Sònia; Turrado, Carlos; Campuzano, Òscar; Carrión-Salip, Dolors; Massaguer, Anna; Brugada, Ramon; Palafox, Marta; Gómez-Miragaya, Jorge; González-Suárez, Eva; Puig, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Blocking the enzyme Fatty Acid Synthase (FASN) leads to apoptosis of HER2-positive breast carcinoma cells. The hypothesis is that blocking FASN, in combination with anti-HER2 signaling agents, would be an effective antitumor strategy in preclinical HER2+ breast cancer models of trastuzumab and lapatinib resistance. We developed and molecularly characterized in vitro HER2+ models of resistance to trastuzumab (SKTR), lapatinib (SKLR) and both (SKLTR). The cellular interactions of combining anti-FASN polyphenolic compounds (EGCG and the synthetic G28UCM) with anti-HER2 signaling drugs (trastuzumab plus pertuzumab and temsirolimus) were analyzed. Tumor growth inhibition after treatment with EGCG, pertuzumab, temsirolimus or the combination was evaluated in two in vivo orthoxenopatients: one derived from a HER2+ patient and another from a patient who relapsed on trastuzumab and lapatinib-based therapy. SKTR, SKLR and SKLTR showed hyperactivation of EGFR and p-ERK1/2 and PI3KCA mutations. Dual-resistant cells (SKLTR) also showed hyperactivation of HER4 and recovered levels of p-AKT compared with mono-resistant cells. mTOR, p-mTOR and FASN expression remained stable in SKTR, SKLR and SKLTR. In vitro, anti-FASN compounds plus pertuzumab showed synergistic interactions in lapatinib- and dual- resistant cells and improved the results of pertuzumab plus trastuzumab co-treatment. FASN inhibitors combined with temsirolimus displayed the strongest synergistic interactions in resistant cells. In vivo, both orthoxenopatients showed strong response to the antitumor activity of the combination of EGCG with pertuzumab or temsirolimus, without signs of toxicity. We showed that the simultaneous blockade of FASN and HER2 pathways is effective in cells and in breast cancer models refractory to anti-HER2 therapies.

  7. Dual Fatty Acid Synthase and HER2 Signaling Blockade Shows Marked Antitumor Activity against Breast Cancer Models Resistant to Anti-HER2 Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Blancafort, Adriana; Giró-Perafita, Ariadna; Oliveras, Glòria; Palomeras, Sònia; Turrado, Carlos; Campuzano, Òscar; Carrión-Salip, Dolors; Massaguer, Anna; Brugada, Ramon; Palafox, Marta; Gómez-Miragaya, Jorge; González-Suárez, Eva; Puig, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Blocking the enzyme Fatty Acid Synthase (FASN) leads to apoptosis of HER2-positive breast carcinoma cells. The hypothesis is that blocking FASN, in combination with anti-HER2 signaling agents, would be an effective antitumor strategy in preclinical HER2+ breast cancer models of trastuzumab and lapatinib resistance. We developed and molecularly characterized in vitro HER2+ models of resistance to trastuzumab (SKTR), lapatinib (SKLR) and both (SKLTR). The cellular interactions of combining anti-FASN polyphenolic compounds (EGCG and the synthetic G28UCM) with anti-HER2 signaling drugs (trastuzumab plus pertuzumab and temsirolimus) were analyzed. Tumor growth inhibition after treatment with EGCG, pertuzumab, temsirolimus or the combination was evaluated in two in vivo orthoxenopatients: one derived from a HER2+ patient and another from a patient who relapsed on trastuzumab and lapatinib-based therapy. SKTR, SKLR and SKLTR showed hyperactivation of EGFR and p-ERK1/2 and PI3KCA mutations. Dual-resistant cells (SKLTR) also showed hyperactivation of HER4 and recovered levels of p-AKT compared with mono-resistant cells. mTOR, p-mTOR and FASN expression remained stable in SKTR, SKLR and SKLTR. In vitro, anti-FASN compounds plus pertuzumab showed synergistic interactions in lapatinib- and dual- resistant cells and improved the results of pertuzumab plus trastuzumab co-treatment. FASN inhibitors combined with temsirolimus displayed the strongest synergistic interactions in resistant cells. In vivo, both orthoxenopatients showed strong response to the antitumor activity of the combination of EGCG with pertuzumab or temsirolimus, without signs of toxicity. We showed that the simultaneous blockade of FASN and HER2 pathways is effective in cells and in breast cancer models refractory to anti-HER2 therapies. PMID:26107737

  8. HER2-directed therapy: current treatment options for HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shahid; Sami, Amer; Xiang, Jim

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, the management of HER2-positive breast cancer has evolved dramatically. In addition to advances in screening, genetic testing, imaging, surgical and radiation techniques, innovations in medical therapy including widespread use of HER2-directed therapy in early and advanced breast cancer have revolutionized breast cancer care and changed the natural history of HER2-positive breast cancer. A substantial number of HER2-targeted agents are being developed including monoclonal antibodies, small molecule inhibitors, and antibody drug conjugates. Trastuzumab is the prototype HER2-directed therapy that was introduced in the late 1990s for the management of metastatic breast cancer and later showed efficacy in early stage disease. Despite the practice changing impact of trastuzumab and improvement in outcomes of women with HER2-positive breast cancer resistance to trrastuzumab is a major clinical issue, occurring in both early stage and advanced disease, and new treatment strategies are clearly required. Combining HER2-targeted agents and dual HER2 blockade has been successful in early and advanced breast cancer. Furthermore, selected delivery of potent chemotherapeutic agent coupled with HER2 inhibition promises new treatment options. This review is focused on current HER2-directed treatments for women with HER2-positive breast cancer including monoclonal antibodies, small molecule inhibitors, and antibody drug conjugates.

  9. [Specific treatment situations in metastatic colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Arnold, Dirk; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Lang, Hauke; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Ridwelski, Karsten; Trarbach, Tanja; Staib, Ludger; Kirchner, Thomas; Geissler, Michael; Seufferlein, Thomas; Amthauer, Holger; Riess, Hanno; Schlitt, Hans J; Piso, Pompiliu

    2010-01-01

    As far as the management of primary resectable liver metastases is concerned, three approaches are currently competing with each other: surgery alone, surgery with pre- and postoperative chemotherapy, and surgery with postoperative chemotherapy alone. The core of the argument for pre- and postoperative chemotherapy in these patients is the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 40983 study, which concluded that, in comparison with surgery alone, perioperative chemotherapy improved the 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) by 7 months. In contrast to this, there are two smaller studies--at a somewhat lower strength of evidence-- indicating that adjuvant chemotherapy extends PFS by 9.1 months compared with surgery alone. In Germany, the adjuvant approach continues to be favored in many places; this can also be seen in the formulation of the S3 guideline. In patients with unresectable liver metastases--with the associated difficulty of classification due to the lack of clear and definitive criteria--preoperative systemic therapy to induce 'conversion' is indicated, in order to allow secondary resection. In KRAS wild-type tumors, high response rates (in terms of a reduction in size of the metastases, such as according to RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors)) and a high conversion rate are achieved using a cetuximab/chemotherapy combination. Triple chemotherapy combinations with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and irinotecan also produce high response rates. Bevacizumab/chemotherapy combinations have led to a high number of complete and partial pathohistological remissions in phase II studies; these seem to correlate with long survival times. In the absence of long-term survival data, it therefore seems to remain unclear as to what is the best parameter to use in order to assess the success of preoperative treatment. Lung metastases, too, or local peritoneal carcinomatosis can nowadays be operated on in selected patients

  10. Patient Reflections on Decision Making for Laryngeal Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Andrew G; Larkin, Knoll; Thomas, Dorothy; Palmer, Frank L; Fins, Joseph J; Baxi, Shrujal S; Lee, Nancy; Shah, Jatin P; Fagerlin, Angela; Patel, Snehal G

    2017-02-01

    Objective To describe the reflections of patients treated for laryngeal cancer with regard to treatment-related decision making. Study Design Cross-sectional survey-based pilot study. Setting Single-institution tertiary care cancer center. Subjects/Methods Adults with laryngeal carcinoma were eligible to participate (N = 57; 46% treated surgically, 54% nonsurgically). Validated surveys measuring decisional conflict and regret explored patients' reflections on their preferences and priorities regarding treatment-related decision making for laryngeal cancer and how patient-reported functional outcomes, professional referral patterns, and desired provider input influenced these reflections. Results When considering the level of involvement of surgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical oncologists in their care, patients were more likely to believe that the specialist whom they saw first was the most important factor in deciding how to treat their cancer (Fisher's exact, ~χ(2) = 16.2, df = 6, P = .02). Patients who were treated for laryngeal cancer who reported worse voice-related quality of life recalled more decisional conflict ( P = .01) and experienced more decisional regret ( P < .001). Of the patients for whom speech was a top priority prior to treatment, better voice-related quality of life overall scores were correlated with less decision regret about treatment decisions ( P < .02). Of the patients for whom eating and drinking were top priorities prior to treatment, better MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory global scores were correlated with less decision regret about treatment decisions ( P < .002). Conclusion Patient priorities and attitudes, coupled with functional outcomes and professional referral patterns, influence how patients reflect on their choices regarding management of laryngeal cancer. Better understanding of these variables may assist in ensuring that patients' voices are integrated into individualized laryngeal cancer treatment planning.

  11. Satisfaction with Information Used to Choose Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Scott M.; Sanda, Martin G.; Dunn, Rodney L.; Greenfield, Thomas K.; Hembroff, Larry; Klein, Eric; Saigal, Christopher S.; Pisters, Louis; Michalski, Jeff; Sandler, Howard M.; Litwin, Mark S.; Wei, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose After being diagnosed with prostate cancer men must assimilate information regarding the cancer. Satisfaction with information reflects the evaluation of information sources used before treatment to select a therapy. We describe the use and helpfulness of several information sources available to prostate cancer survivors. We also identified factors associated with satisfaction with information. Materials and Methods A total of 1,204 men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer were enrolled in the prospective, multicenter Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction with Therapy Quality Assessment study. The validated satisfaction with information domain of the Service Satisfaction Scale-Cancer was administered to subjects 2 months after treatment. The relationship between several factors, such as demographics, socioeconomic factors, cancer severity and types of information sources, and satisfaction with information were evaluated using multiple regression. Results Sources of information endorsed by subjects varied by race, education and study site. The most helpful sources were treatment description by the treating physician (33.1%), Internet sites (18.9%) and books (18.1%). In multiple variable models patient age (p = 0.005) and information provided by the physician regarding outcomes in their patients (p = 0.01) were independently associated with patient satisfaction with the information provided. Conclusions Various information sources were used and endorsed as helpful by subjects, although results for physician patients was the only source independently associated with satisfaction with information. Providing patients with information about possible or expected courses of care and outcomes may improve satisfaction. PMID:24333514

  12. Follow-up after treatment for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sisler, Jeffrey; Chaput, Genevieve; Sussman, Jonathan; Ozokwelu, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To offer FPs a summary of evidence-based recommendations to guide their follow-up survivorship care of women treated for breast cancer. Quality of evidence A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE from 2000 to 2016 using the search words breast cancer, survivorship, follow-up care, aftercare, guidelines, and survivorship care plans, with a focus on review of recent guidelines published by national cancer organizations. Evidence ranges from level I to level III. Main message Survivorship care involves 4 main tasks: surveillance and screening, management of long-term effects, health promotion, and care coordination. Surveillance for recurrence involves only annual mammography, and screening for other cancers should be done according to population guidelines. Management of the long-term effects of cancer and its treatment addresses common issues of pain, fatigue, lymphedema, distress, and medication side effects, as well as longer-term concerns for cardiac and bone health. Health promotion emphasizes the benefits of active lifestyle change in cancer survivors, with an emphasis on physical activity. Survivorship care is enhanced by the involvement of various health professionals and services, and FPs play an important role in care coordination. Conclusion Family physicians are increasingly the main providers of follow-up care after breast cancer treatment. Breast cancer should be viewed as a chronic medical condition even in women who remain disease free, and patients benefit from the approach afforded other chronic conditions in primary care. PMID:27737976

  13. CAM Provider Use and Expenditures by Cancer Treatment Phase

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, William E.; Tyree, Patrick T.; Devlin, Sean M.; Andersen, M. Robyn; Diehr, Paula K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess cancer patients’ utilization of complementary and alternative medical providers and the associated expenditures by specific treatment phases. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis of medical services utilization and expenditures during three therapeutic intervals: an initial treatment phase, continuing care, and end-of-life. Methods Analysis of an insurance claims database that had been matched to the Washington State SEER cancer registry. Results Of 2,900 registry-matched cancer patients 63.2% were female, the median age was 54 years, and 92.7% were white. Breast cancer was the most frequent diagnosis (52.7%), followed by prostate cancer (24.7%), lung cancer (10.1%), colon cancer (7.0%), and hematologic malignancies (5.6%). CAM provider using patients were 26.5% of the overall cohort (18.5% used chiropractors, 7.7% naturopathic physicians, 5.3% massage therapists, and 4.2% saw acupuncturists). The proportion of CAM using patients was similar during each treatment phase. All patients used some conventional care. Female gender, a breast cancer diagnosis, age, and white race were significant predictors of CAM use. Diagnosis of a musculoskeletal problem occurred at sometime during the study for 72.1% of cancer patients. CAM provider visits were 7.2% of total outpatient medical visits and 85.1% of CAM visits resulted in a musculoskeletal diagnosis. Expenditures for CAM providers were 0.3%, 1.0%, and 0.1% of all expenditures during the initial, continuing, and end-of-life phases respectively. Conclusion For cancer patients, musculoskeletal issues were the most commonly listed diagnosis made by a CAM provider. Although expenditures associated with CAM are a small proportion of the total, additional studies are necessary to determine the importance patients place on access to these services. PMID:18471036

  14. Family Functioning and Sibling Adjustment Following Treatment of Childhood Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Cindy L.; Hansen, James C.; Zevon, Michael A.

    Childhood cancer and its treatment have been identified as significant stressors for individuals and families. The impact of this experience on healthy siblings has not been clearly determined. This study was designed to assess siblings regarding their adjustment and their perceptions of their families following a sick sibling's treatment.…

  15. Cancer testis antigen SPAG9 is a promising marker for the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Biqiong; Wei, Xiaobin; Zou, Guoying; He, Junyu; Xu, Guofeng; Xu, Fei; Huang, Yiran; Zhu, Haowen; Li, Yong; Ma, Guoan; Yu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Cancer testis antigen sperm-associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) is highly expressed in many types of cancers. In the present study, to obtain a better understanding of the relevance of SPAG9 in cancer diagnosis and treatment, the expression of SPAG9 mRNA and protein in lung cancer specimens was evaluated by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. ELISA was used to quantify the SPAG9 autoantibody in the peripheral blood of lung cancer patients. The results showed that the expression of SPAG9 mRNA and protein in the lung cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues (P<0.01). The level of the SPAG9 autoantibody in the serum of lung cancer patients was significantly higher than the level in the healthy controls (P<0.001), and the level of the SPAG9 autoantibody in the serum of untreated patients was significantly higher than that in treated patients (P=0.002). SPAG9 IgG antibody levels were significantly lower in treated adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer patients than these levels in the untreated patients (P=0.006, P=0.026, respectively), while no statistical difference was found between treated and untreated squamous cell carcinoma patients. Our results suggest that the SPAG9 antibody in serum is a promising marker for the diagnosis of lung cancer, and the level of the humoral immune response to this antigen appears to be related to the type of lung cancer.

  16. Cancer testis antigen SPAG9 is a promising marker for the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    REN, BIQIONG; WEI, XIAOBIN; ZOU, GUOYING; HE, JUNYU; XU, GUOFENG; XU, FEI; HUANG, YIRAN; ZHU, HAOWEN; LI, YONG; MA, GUOAN; YU, PING

    2016-01-01

    Cancer testis antigen sperm-associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) is highly expressed in many types of cancers. In the present study, to obtain a better understanding of the relevance of SPAG9 in cancer diagnosis and treatment, the expression of SPAG9 mRNA and protein in lung cancer specimens was evaluated by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. ELISA was used to quantify the SPAG9 autoantibody in the peripheral blood of lung cancer patients. The results showed that the expression of SPAG9 mRNA and protein in the lung cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues (P<0.01). The level of the SPAG9 autoantibody in the serum of lung cancer patients was significantly higher than the level in the healthy controls (P<0.001), and the level of the SPAG9 autoantibody in the serum of untreated patients was significantly higher than that in treated patients (P=0.002). SPAG9 IgG antibody levels were significantly lower in treated adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer patients than these levels in the untreated patients (P=0.006, P=0.026, respectively), while no statistical difference was found between treated and untreated squamous cell carcinoma patients. Our results suggest that the SPAG9 antibody in serum is a promising marker for the diagnosis of lung cancer, and the level of the humoral immune response to this antigen appears to be related to the type of lung cancer. PMID:26934841

  17. A conjugate of methotrexate and an analog of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone shows increased efficacy against prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shengsheng; Wang, Qinxia; Jiang, Juan; Luo, Yongwei; Sun, Zuyue

    2016-01-01

    LHRH receptor, is over-expressed in a variety of human tumors and, is a potential binding site for targeted metastatic prostate cancer therapy. The objectives of our study were to synthesize a bioconjugate of the LHRH analog [DLys6]-LHRH and the anti-tumor agent methotrexate and test the hypothesis that [DLys6]-LHRH-MTX targets and inhibits prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. The results of in vitro studies, showed that both [DLys6]-LHRH-MTX and MTX displayed superior cytotoxicity against prostate cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manners, with IC50 concentrations for PC-3 cells of, 1.02 ± 0.18 μmol/L and 6.34 ± 1.01 μmol/L; for DU-145 cells, 1.53 ± 0.27 μmol/L and 8.03 ± 1.29 μmol/L; and for LNCaP cells, 1.93 ± 0.19 μmol/L and 9.68 ± 1.24 μmol/L, respectively. The IC50 values of [DLys6]-LHRH-MTX and MTX were 110.77 ± 15.31 μmol/L and 42.33 ± 7.25 μmol/L, respectively. Finally, [DLys6]-LHRH-MTX significantly improved the anti-tumor activity of MTX in nude mice bearing PC-3 tumor xenografts. The inhibition ratios of tumor volume and tumor weight in the [DLys6]-LHRH-MTX treated group were significantly higher than those in the MTX-treated group. Tumor volume doubling time was also significantly extended from 6.13 days in control animals to 9.67 days in mice treated with [DLys6]-LHRH-MTX. In conclusion, [DLys6]-LHRH -MTX may be useful in treating prostate cancer. PMID:27654169

  18. Intratumoral iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and radiation cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, P. J.; Strawbridge, R. R.; Gibson, U. J.; Zeng, Q.; Pierce, Z. E.; Savellano, M.; Tate, J. A.; Ogden, J. A.; Baker, I.; Ivkov, R.; Foreman, A. R.

    2007-02-01

    The potential synergism and benefit of combined hyperthermia and radiation for cancer treatment is well established, but has yet to be optimized clinically. Specifically, the delivery of heat via external arrays /applicators or interstitial antennas has not demonstrated the spatial precision or specificity necessary to achieve appropriate a highly positive therapeutic ratio. Recently, antibody directed and possibly even non-antibody directed iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia has shown significant promise as a tumor treatment modality. Our studies are designed to determine the effects (safety and efficacy) of iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and external beam radiation in a murine breast cancer model. Methods: MTG-B murine breast cancer cells (1 x 106) were implanted subcutaneous in 7 week-old female C3H/HeJ mice and grown to a treatment size of 150 mm3 +/- 50 mm3. Tumors were then injected locally with iron oxide nanoparticles and heated via an alternating magnetic field (AMF) generator operated at approximately 160 kHz and 400 - 550 Oe. Tumor growth was monitored daily using standard 3-D caliper measurement technique and formula. specific Mouse tumors were heated using a cooled, 36 mm diameter square copper tube induction coil which provided optimal heating in a 1 cm wide region in the center of the coil. Double dextran coated 80 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (Triton Biosystems) were used in all studies. Intra-tumor, peri-tumor and rectal (core body) temperatures were continually measured throughout the treatment period. Results: Preliminary in vivo nanoparticle-AMF hyperthermia (167 KHz and 400 or 550 Oe) studies demonstrated dose responsive cytotoxicity which enhanced the effects of external beam radiation. AMF associated eddy currents resulted in nonspecific temperature increases in exposed tissues which did not contain nanoparticles, however these effects were minor and not injurious to the mice. These studies also suggest that iron oxide nanoparticle

  19. Advances in the treatment of testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Margel, David; Lubin, Marc Alan; Baniel, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCT) are relatively uncommon, accounting for only 1% of male malignancies in the United States. It has become an important oncological disease for several reasons. It is the most common malignancy in young men 15-35 years old. GCTs are among a unique numbers of neoplasms where biochemical markers play a critical role. Finally, it is a model of curable cancer. In this review we discuss cancer epidemiology, genetics, and therapeutic principles. Recent advances in the management of stage I GCT and controversies in the management of post chemotherapy residual mass are presented. PMID:26816836

  20. Vectors for Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    which were infiltrating the tumor 8.00% tissue. The level of mRNA transcript encoding the CCL3 (2.8 fold 04o.00% increase) and CCR5 (16 fold increase...with viral vectors: implications for gene therapy. Blood 2005;105:3824- 32 . 14. Trakatelli M, Toungouz M, Lambermont M, Heenen M, Velu T, Bruyns C. Immune...Fluorocytosine of human colorectal cancer xenografts. Cancer Res 2000;60:6649-55. 32 . Lake RA, Robinson BWS. Immunotherapy and chemotherapy- a practical

  1. Ovarian cancer treatment: The end of empiricism?

    PubMed

    Lheureux, Stephanie; Karakasis, Katherine; Kohn, Elise C; Oza, Amit M

    2015-09-15

    The diagnosis, investigation, and management of ovarian cancer are in a state of flux-balancing ever rapid advances in our understanding of its biology with 3 decades of clinical trials. Clinical trials that started with empirically driven selections have evolved in an evidence-informed manner to gradually improve outcome. Has this improved understanding of the biology and associated calls to action led to appropriate changes in therapy? In this review, the authors discuss incorporating emerging data on biology, combinations, dose, and scheduling of new and existing agents with patient preferences in the management of women with ovarian cancer.

  2. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome: Improving outcome with lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Westerink, N L; Nuver, J; Lefrandt, J D; Vrieling, A H; Gietema, J A; Walenkamp, A M E

    2016-12-01

    Increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors face important treatment related adverse effects. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome (CTIMetS) is an especially prevalent and harmful condition. The aetiology of CTIMetS likely differs from metabolic syndrome in the general population, but effective treatment and prevention methods are probably similar. In this review, we summarize the potential mechanisms leading to the development of CTIMetS after various types of cancer treatment. Furthermore, we propose a safe and accessible method to treat or prevent CTIMetS through lifestyle change. In particular, we suggest that a lifestyle intervention and optimization of energy balance can prevent or mitigate the development of CTIMetS, which may contribute to optimal survivorship care.

  3. Relapsed small cell lung cancer: treatment options and latest developments

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuni, Yoshihiro; Kaneko, Norihiro; Yamaguchi, Etsuro; Kubo, Akihito

    2014-01-01

    According to recent analyses, there was a modest yet significant improvement in median survival time and 5-year survival rate of limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in North America, Europe, Japan and other countries over the last 30 years. The median survival time of limited stage SCLC is 15–20 months and 5-year survival rate is 15% or less. In terms of extensive stage SCLC, a median survival time of 9.4–12.8 months and 2-year survival of 5.2–19.5% are still disappointing. Despite being highly sensitive to first-line chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments, most patients with SCLC experience relapse within 2 years and die from systemic metastasis. While several clinical trials of cytotoxic chemotherapies and molecular targeting agents have been investigated in the treatment of relapsed SCLC, none showed a significant clinical activity to be able to exceed topotecan as second-line chemotherapy. There are problematic issues to address for relapsed SCLC, such as standardizing the treatment for third-line chemotherapy. Topotecan alone was the first approved therapy for second-line treatment for relapsed SCLC. Amrubicin is a promising drug and a variety of trials evaluating its efficacy have been carried out. Amrubicin has shown superiority to topotecan in a Japanese population, but was not superior in a study of western patients. There are some controversial issues for relapsed SCLC, such as treatment for older patients, third-line chemotherapy and efficacy of molecular targeting therapy. This article reviews current standard treatment, recent clinical trials and other topics on relapsed SCLC. PMID:24587832

  4. Molecular targets in urothelial cancer: detection, treatment, and animal models of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smolensky, Dmitriy; Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer remains one of the most expensive cancers to treat in the United States due to the length of required treatment and degree of recurrence. In order to treat bladder cancer more effectively, targeted therapies are being investigated. In order to use targeted therapy in a patient, it is important to provide a genetic background of the patient. Recent advances in genome sequencing, as well as transcriptome analysis, have identified major pathway components altered in bladder cancer. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad background on bladder cancer, including its causes, diagnosis, stages, treatments, animal models, as well as signaling pathways in bladder cancer. The major focus is given to the PI3K/AKT pathway, p53/pRb signaling pathways, and the histone modification machinery. Because several promising immunological therapies are also emerging in the treatment of bladder cancer, focus is also given on general activation of the immune system for the treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:27784990

  5. Advanced gastric cancer: Current treatment landscape and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Digklia, Antonia; Wagner, Anna Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer currently ranks fourth in cancer-related mortality worldwide. In the western world, it is most often diagnosed at an advanced stage, after becoming metastatic at distant sites. Patients with advanced disease (locally advanced or metastatic) have a somber prognosis, with a median overall survival of 10-12 mo, and palliative chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. In recent years, novel approaches using inhibition of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in first-line treatment of patients with overexpression of HER2. In addition, both second-line chemotherapy and treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-inhibitor ramucirumab demonstrated significant benefits in terms of overall survival, compared with best supportive care, in randomized studies. Moreover, ramucirumab in combination with chemotherapy demonstrated further significant benefits in terms of progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in second-line treatment for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. A recently published molecular classification of gastric cancer is expected to improve patient stratification and selection for clinical trials and provide a roadmap for future drug development. Nevertheless, despite these developments the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer remains poor. In this review we discuss current standards of care and outline major topics of drug development in gastric cancer. PMID:26937129

  6. Combination of Rapamycin and Resveratrol for Treatment of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alayev, Anya; Salamon, Rachel S; Schwartz, Naomi S; Berman, Adi Y; Wiener, Sara L; Holz, Marina K

    2017-02-01

    Loss of TSC1 function, a crucial negative regulator of mTOR signaling, is a common alteration in bladder cancer. Mutations in other members of the PI3K pathway, leading to mTOR activation, are also found in bladder cancer. This provides rationale for targeting mTOR for treatment of bladder cancer characterized by TSC1 mutations and/or mTOR activation. In this study, we asked whether combination treatment with rapamycin and resveratrol could be effective in concurrently inhibiting mTOR and PI3K signaling and inducing cell death in bladder cancer cells. In combination with rapamycin, resveratrol was able to block rapamycin-induced Akt activation, while maintaining mTOR pathway inhibition. In addition, combination treatment with rapamycin and resveratrol induced cell death specifically in TSC1(-/-) MEF cells, and not in wild-type MEFs. Similarly, resveratrol alone or in combination with rapamycin induced cell death in human bladder cancer cell lines. These data indicate that administration of resveratrol together with rapamycin may be a promising therapeutic option for treatment of bladder cancer. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 436-446, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effectiveness of maintenance treatments for nonsmall cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eadens, Matthew J; Robinson, Steven I; Price, Katharine AR

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance therapy for advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer has shown some clinical benefit for patients by improving progression-free survival and, to a lesser extent, overall survival. Two main strategies exist for maintenance therapy, ie, continuation and switch maintenance. Continuation maintenance involves the continued use of one of the induction drugs beyond 4–6 cycles of initial treatment. Switch maintenance utilizes a third agent initiated after first-line chemotherapy. Both cytotoxic agents and targeted agents have been studied. Switch maintenance therapy with pemetrexed in nonsquamous tumors and erlotinib appear to show the most clear clinical benefit. Continuation maintenance with bevacizumab has shown improvement in progression-free survival. Data concerning the role of cetuximab for maintenance is conflicting. Toxicity, quality of life, and cost are important confounding issues that need to be considered. Several ongoing Phase III trials are investigating strategies to improve on the current agents as well as testing promising new therapies. PMID:28210116

  8. Translational potential of cancer stem cells: A review of the detection of cancer stem cells and their roles in cancer recurrence and cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2015-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cancer cells with many clinical implications in most cancer types. One important clinical implication of CSCs is their role in cancer metastases, as reflected by their ability to initiate and drive micro and macro-metastases. The other important contributing factor for CSCs in cancer management is their function in causing treatment resistance and recurrence in cancer via their activation of different signalling pathways such as Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Hedgehog, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and JAK/STAT pathways. Thus, many different therapeutic approaches are being tested for prevention and treatment of cancer recurrence. These may include treatment strategies targeting altered genetic signalling pathways by blocking specific cell surface molecules, altering the cancer microenvironments that nurture cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation of CSCs, immunotherapy based on CSCs associated antigens, exploiting metabolites to kill CSCs, and designing small interfering RNA/DNA molecules that especially target CSCs. Because of the huge potential of these approaches to improve cancer management, it is important to identify and isolate cancer stem cells for precise study and application of prior the research on their role in cancer. Commonly used methodologies for detection and isolation of CSCs include functional, image-based, molecular, cytological sorting and filtration approaches, the use of different surface markers and xenotransplantation. Overall, given their significance in cancer biology, refining the isolation and targeting of CSCs will play an important role in future management of cancer.

  9. Drinking water safely during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Control and Prevention. A guide to drinking water treatment technologies for household use. Updated March 14, 2014. www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/travel/household_water_treatment.html . Accessed March 20, 2016.

  10. Treatment Options by Stage (Laryngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... New types of treatment are being tested in clinical trials. This summary section describes treatments that are ... want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. For some patients, taking part in a ...

  11. When your child's cancer treatment stops working

    MedlinePlus

    End of life care - children; Palliative care - children; Advance care planning - children ... line of treatment. Your family and child's health care providers may need to decide whether further treatment ...

  12. Emerging minimally invasive procedures for focal treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Habibian, David J; Katz, Aaron E

    2016-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy amongst American men. However, the majority of prostate cancer diagnoses are of low risk, organ-confined disease. Many men elect to undergo definitive treatment, but may benefit from focal therapy to maintain continence and potency. This review reports the mechanism of action and outcomes of emerging focal therapies for prostate cancer. We report the mechanism of action of focal cryotherapy, high intensity focused ultrasound, focal laser ablation, and irreversible electroporation. In addition, we reviewed the largest studies available reporting rates of urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, biochemical recurrence-free survival (ASTRO), and post-operative adverse events for each procedure. Each treatment modality stated has a unique mechanism in the ablation of cancerous cells. Genito-urinary symptoms following these studies report incontinence and erectile dysfunction rates ranging from 0-15% and 0-53%, respectively. Biochemical disease-free survival was reported using the ASTRO definition. Some treatment modalities lack the necessary follow-up to determine effectiveness in cancer control. No focal therapy studies reported serious adverse events. These minimally invasive procedures are feasible in a clinical setting and show promising functional and disease control results with short to medium-term follow-up. However, each treatment requires additional robust prospective studies as well as its own unique domain to determine biochemical recurrence free survival to properly determine their role in treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer.

  13. Own Experience in Treatment of Patients with Penile Cancer Using Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Filonenko, Elena; Kaprin, Andrey; Alekseev, Boris; Urlova, Antonina

    2015-01-01

    Penile cancer is a rare pathology. For penile cancer surgical treatment, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and combined modality treatment are available. Because of great importance of this organ for mental condition of patient, the development of organ-preserving methods allowing to minimize impact on patient's quality of life without compromising of oncological results is desirable. In the Center of Laser and Photodynamic diagnosis and treatment of tumors in P.A. Herzen Moscow Cancer Research Institute the methods of photodynamic therapy in patients with penile cancer have been developed. From 2011 to 2013 the treatment was conducted in 11 patients with precancer and cancer of penile. The average age was 56.6. According to morphological diagnosis photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed using two methods. One method included topical application of agent for PDT and the second intravenous administration of photosensitizer. For topical application alasens was used and for intravenous injection we applied radachlorine. All patients had no complications. Complete regression was achieved in 9 patients, and partial regression in 2. Thus, the results showed that photodynamic therapy for penile cancer stage Tis-1N0M0 permits performing organ-preserving treatment with satisfactory oncological results and no impairment of patient's quality of life. PMID:25834812

  14. Targeting the Ubiquitin Pathway for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Shaik, Shavali; Dai, Xiangpeng; Wu, Qiong; Zhou, Xiuxia; Wang, Zhiwei; Wei, Wenyi

    2015-01-01

    Proteasome-mediated degradation is a common mechanism by which cells renew their intracellular proteins and maintain protein homeostasis. In this process, the E3 ubiquitin ligases are responsible for targeting specific substrates (proteins) for ubiquitin-mediated degradation. However, in cancer cells, the stability and the balance between oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins are disturbed in part due to deregulated proteasome-mediated degradation. This ultimately leads to either stabilization of oncoprotein(s) or increased degradation of tumor suppressor(s), contributing to tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Therefore, E3 ubiquitin ligases including the SCF types of ubiquitin ligases have recently evolved as promising therapeutic targets for the development of novel anti-cancer drugs. In this review, we highlighted the critical components along the ubiquitin pathway including E1, E2, various E3 enzymes and DUBs that could serve as potential drug targets and also described the available bioactive compounds that target the ubiquitin pathway to control various cancers. PMID:25481052

  15. Treating the Treatment: Toxicity of Cancer Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Plenderleith, Ian H.

    1990-01-01

    Many cancer chemotherapeutic agents can produce toxicity, even at the usual therapeutic doses. Family physicians are often called upon to treat symptoms of these toxicities and to advise patients about them. This brief discussion may help family physicians to anticipate some of the problems, to avoid some, and to manage others more effectively. PMID:21234006

  16. Stem Cell Transplants in Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in cancer patients who have had theirs destroyed by very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Learn about the types of transplants and side effects that may occur.

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Vulvar Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may have chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that ... lymph node , nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Radiation therapy for patients who cannot have surgery . Check the list of ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Small Intestine Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may be given radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that ... palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and improve the patient's quality of ... therapy with radiosensitizers , with or without chemotherapy . A clinical ...

  19. Neoadjuvant Treatment Approach: The Rosetta Stone for Breast Cancer?

    PubMed

    Generali, Daniele; Ardine, Mara; Strina, Carla; Milani, Manuela; Cappelletti, Maria Rosa; Zanotti, Laura; Forti, Michela; Bedussi, Francesca; Martinotti, Mario; Amoroso, Vito; Sigala, Sandra; Simoncini, Edda; Berruti, Alfredo; Bottini, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    Breast cancer represents a heterogeneous group of diseases with varied biological features, behavior, and response to therapy; thus, management of breast cancer relies on the availability of robust predictive and prognostic factors to support therapy decision-making. Traditionally, neoadjuvant treatment for breast cancer was preserved for locally advanced, converting an inoperable to a surgical resectable cancer. Neoadjuvant trials, additionally, offer: 1) the opportunity to evaluate new treatment options in a faster way and with fewer patients than large adjuvant trials; 2) to identify and validate the prognostic and predictive value of a marker with its association with clinical outcome in relation to the administered treatment. In this setting, thanks to new, affordable technologies which help to detail the molecular profiles of tumors, new trial designs based on new target therapies, like window-of-opportunity, are also suggested, as they represent the chance to identify tumor sensitivity or to overcome tumor resistance to the treatment used, based on its interaction with tumor biology in early tumor stages. However, clinicians and researchers should pay particular attention: In this setting, the safety of patients is paramount, given the exposure of potentially curable patients to investigational agents with limited safety experience, the definition of the study population and the study design, such as adaptive strategies, should limit patient exposure to ineffective agents, and intensify safety monitoring in the course of the treatment. Here, issues related to outcome determination in breast cancer, including some critical points of view, are presented.

  20. A Novel Theranostic Platform for Targeted Cancer Therapy and Treatment Monitoring | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Cancer treatment currently relies heavily upon administration of cytotoxic drugs that attack both cancerous and healthy cells due to limited selectivity of drugs. Therapeutic efficacy and systemic toxicity can be improved by employing a multifunctional drug delivery system that allows targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release and therapeutic effect monitoring. The integration of therapeutic and diagnostic treatments has created a new genre in patient care and personalized medicine termed theranostics. |