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Sample records for cancer vaccine strategy

  1. An autoimmune-mediated strategy for prophylactic breast cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jaini, Ritika; Kesaraju, Pavani; Johnson, Justin M; Altuntas, Cengiz Z; Jane-Wit, Daniel; Tuohy, Vincent K

    2010-07-01

    Although vaccination is most effective when used to prevent disease, cancer vaccine development has focused predominantly on providing therapy against established growing tumors. The difficulty in developing prophylactic cancer vaccines is primarily due to the fact that tumor antigens are variations of self proteins and would probably mediate profound autoimmune complications if used in a preventive vaccine setting. Here we use several mouse breast cancer models to define a prototypic strategy for prophylactic cancer vaccination. We selected alpha-lactalbumin as our target vaccine autoantigen because it is a breast-specific differentiation protein expressed in high amounts in the majority of human breast carcinomas and in mammary epithelial cells only during lactation. We found that immunoreactivity against alpha-lactalbumin provides substantial protection and therapy against growth of autochthonous tumors in transgenic mouse models of breast cancer and against 4T1 transplantable breast tumors in BALB/c mice. Because alpha-lactalbumin is conditionally expressed only during lactation, vaccination-induced prophylaxis occurs without any detectable inflammation in normal nonlactating breast tissue. Thus, alpha-lactalbumin vaccination may provide safe and effective protection against the development of breast cancer for women in their post-child-bearing, premenopausal years, when lactation is readily avoidable and risk for developing breast cancer is high.

  2. HPV vaccination: The most pragmatic cervical cancer primary prevention strategy.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2015-10-01

    The evidence that high-risk HPV infections cause cervical cancers has led to two new approaches for cervical cancer control: vaccination to prevent HPV infections, and HPV screening to detect and treat cervical precancerous lesions. Two vaccines are currently available: quadrivalent vaccine targeting oncogenic HPV types 16, 18, 6, and 11, and bivalent vaccine targeting HPV 16 and 18. Both vaccines have demonstrated remarkable immunogenicity and substantial protection against persistent infection and high-grade cervical cancer precursors caused by HPV 16 and 18 in HPV-naïve women, and have the potential to prevent 70% of cervical cancers in adequately vaccinated populations. HPV vaccination is now implemented in national programs in 62 countries, including some low- and middle-income countries. The early findings from routine national programs in high-income countries are instructive to encourage low- and middle-income countries with a high risk of cervical cancer to roll out HPV vaccination programs and to introduce resource-appropriate cervical screening programs.

  3. Combination strategies to enhance the potency of monocyte-derived dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fecek, Ronald J; Storkus, Walter J

    2016-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent inducers of adaptive immunity and their clinical use in cancer vaccine formulations remains an area of active translational and clinical investigation. Although cancer vaccines applied as monotherapies have had a modest history of clinical success, there is great enthusiasm for novel therapeutic strategies combining DC-based cancer vaccines with agents that 'normalize' immune function in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Broadly, these combination vaccines are designed to antagonize/remove immunosuppressive networks within the TME that serve to limit the antitumor action of vaccine-induced T cells and/or to condition the TME to facilitate the recruitment and optimal function and durability of vaccine-induced T cells. Such combination regimens are expected to dramatically enhance the clinical potency of DC-based cancer vaccine platforms. PMID:27605069

  4. Therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Acres, Bruce; Paul, Stephane; Haegel-Kronenberger, Helene; Calmels, Bastien; Squiban, Patrick

    2004-02-01

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer-associated antigens represents an attractive option for cancer therapy in view of the comparatively low toxicity and, so far, excellent safety profile of this treatment. Nevertheless, it is now recognized that the vaccination strategies used for prophylactic vaccinations against infectious diseases cannot necessarily be used for therapeutic cancer vaccination. Cancer patients are usually immunosuppressed, and most cancer-associated antigens are self antigens. Therefore, various immunostimulation techniques are under investigation in an effort to bolster immune systems and to overcome immune tolerance to self antigens. Various strategies to stimulate antigen presentation, T-cell reactivity and innate immune activity are under investigation. Similarly, strategies to produce an immunological 'danger signal' at the site of the tumor itself are under evaluation, as it is recognized that while tumor-specific T-cells can be activated at the site of vaccination, they require appropriate signals to be attracted to a tumor. The detection, evaluation and quantification of specific immune responses generated by vaccination with cancer-associated antigens is another important area of therapeutic cancer vaccine evaluation receiving much attention and novel strategies. Multiple clinical trials have been undertaken to evaluate therapeutic vaccines in patients. Aggressive protocols such as those combining specific stimulation of T-cells and chemotherapy or strategies to block immune regulation are having some success. PMID:15011780

  5. The rationale of vectored gene-fusion vaccines against cancer: evolving strategies and latest evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ragonnaud, Emeline

    2013-01-01

    The development of vaccines that target tumor antigens in cancer has proven difficult. A major reason for this is that T cells specific for tumor self-antigens and neoantigens are eliminated or inactivated through mechanisms of tolerance. Antigen fusion strategies which increase the ability of vaccines to stimulate T cells that have escaped tolerance mechanisms, may have a particular potential as immunotherapies. This review highlights antigen fusion strategies that have been successful in stimulating the induction of T-cell immunity against cancer and counteracting tumor-associated tolerance. In preclinical studies, these strategies have shown to improve the potency of vectored vaccines through fusion of tumor antigen to proteins or protein domains that increase CD4+ T-cell help, CD8+ T-cell responses or both the CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses. However, in clinical trials such strategies seem to be less efficient when provided as a DNA vaccine. The first clinical trial using a viral vectored fusion-gene vaccine is expected to be tested as a partner in a heterologous prime-boost regimen directed against cervical cancer. PMID:24757514

  6. Strategies for Developing Oral Vaccines for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Induced Cancer using Nanoparticle mediated Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Kouzi, Samir A; Hussain, Muhammad Delwar

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) are a diverse group of small non-enveloped DNA viruses. Some HPVs are classified as low-risk as they are very rarely associated with neoplasia or cancer in the general population, and cause lenient warts. Other HPVs are considered as high-risk types because they are responsible for several important human cancers, including cervical cancer, a large proportion of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Transmission of HPV occurs primarily by skin-to-skin contact. The risk of contracting genital HPV infection and cervical cancer is influenced by sexual activity. Currently two prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil® (Merck, USA) and Cervarix® (GlaxoSmithKline, UK), are available and recommended for mass immunization of adolescents. However, these vaccines have limitations as they are expensive and require cold chain storage and trained personnel to administer them by injection. The use of nano or micro particulate vaccines could address most of these limitations as they are stable at room temperature, inexpensive to produce and distribute to resource poor regions, and can be administered orally without the need for adjuvants in the formulation. Also it is possible to increase the efficiency of these particulate vaccines by decorating the surface of the nano or micro particulates with suitable ligands for targeted delivery. Oral vaccines, which can be delivered using particulate formulations, have the added potential to stimulate mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue located in the digestive tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, both of which are important for the induction of effective mucosal response against many viruses. In addition, oral vaccines provide the opportunity to reduce production and administration costs and are very patient compliant. This review elaborately discusses different strategies that can be pursued to develop a nano or micro particulate oral vaccine for HPV induced cancers and

  7. Strategies for Developing Oral Vaccines for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Induced Cancer using Nanoparticle mediated Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Kouzi, Samir A; Hussain, Muhammad Delwar

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) are a diverse group of small non-enveloped DNA viruses. Some HPVs are classified as low-risk as they are very rarely associated with neoplasia or cancer in the general population, and cause lenient warts. Other HPVs are considered as high-risk types because they are responsible for several important human cancers, including cervical cancer, a large proportion of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Transmission of HPV occurs primarily by skin-to-skin contact. The risk of contracting genital HPV infection and cervical cancer is influenced by sexual activity. Currently two prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil® (Merck, USA) and Cervarix® (GlaxoSmithKline, UK), are available and recommended for mass immunization of adolescents. However, these vaccines have limitations as they are expensive and require cold chain storage and trained personnel to administer them by injection. The use of nano or micro particulate vaccines could address most of these limitations as they are stable at room temperature, inexpensive to produce and distribute to resource poor regions, and can be administered orally without the need for adjuvants in the formulation. Also it is possible to increase the efficiency of these particulate vaccines by decorating the surface of the nano or micro particulates with suitable ligands for targeted delivery. Oral vaccines, which can be delivered using particulate formulations, have the added potential to stimulate mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue located in the digestive tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, both of which are important for the induction of effective mucosal response against many viruses. In addition, oral vaccines provide the opportunity to reduce production and administration costs and are very patient compliant. This review elaborately discusses different strategies that can be pursued to develop a nano or micro particulate oral vaccine for HPV induced cancers and

  8. Advances in Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wong, Karrie K; Li, WeiWei Aileen; Mooney, David J; Dranoff, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines aim to induce durable antitumor immunity that is capable of systemic protection against tumor recurrence or metastatic disease. Many approaches to therapeutic cancer vaccines have been explored, with varying levels of success. However, with the exception of Sipuleucel T, an ex vivo dendritic cell vaccine for prostate cancer, no therapeutic cancer vaccine has yet shown clinical efficacy in phase 3 randomized trials. Though disappointing, lessons learned from these studies have suggested new strategies to improve cancer vaccines. The clinical success of checkpoint blockade has underscored the role of peripheral tolerance mechanisms in limiting vaccine responses and highlighted the potential for combination therapies. Recent advances in transcriptome sequencing, computational modeling, and material engineering further suggest new opportunities to intensify cancer vaccines. This review will discuss the major approaches to therapeutic cancer vaccination and explore recent advances that inform the design of the next generation of cancer vaccines. PMID:26923002

  9. Cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2015-04-22

    Cancer vaccines are designed to promote tumor specific immune responses, particularly cytotoxic CD8 positive T cells that are specific to tumor antigens. The earliest vaccines, which were developed in 1994-95, tested non-mutated, shared tumor associated antigens that had been shown to be immunogenic and capable of inducing clinical responses in a minority of people with late stage cancer. Technological developments in the past few years have enabled the investigation of vaccines that target mutated antigens that are patient specific. Several platforms for cancer vaccination are being tested, including peptides, proteins, antigen presenting cells, tumor cells, and viral vectors. Standard of care treatments, such as surgery and ablation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, can also induce antitumor immunity, thereby having cancer vaccine effects. The monitoring of patients' immune responses at baseline and after standard of care treatment is shedding light on immune biomarkers. Combination therapies are being tested in clinical trials and are likely to be the best approach to improving patient outcomes.

  10. The impact of dendritic cell-tumor fusion cells on cancer vaccines - past progress and future strategies.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that can be used in cancer vaccines. Thus, various strategies have been developed to deliver tumor-associated antigens via DCs. One strategy includes administering DC-tumor fusion cells (DC-tumor FCs) to induce antitumor immune responses in cancer patients. However, clinical trials using this strategy have fallen short of expectations. Several factors might limit the efficacy of these anticancer vaccines. To induce efficient antitumor immune responses and enhance potential clinical benefits, DC-tumor FC-based cancer vaccines require manipulations that improve immunogenicity for both DCs and whole tumor cells. This review addresses recent progress in improving clinical outcomes using DC-tumor FC-based cancer vaccines. PMID:26507578

  11. Strategies to vaccinate against cancer of the cervix: feasibility of a school-based HPV vaccination program in Peru.

    PubMed

    Penny, Mary; Bartolini, Rosario; Mosqueira, N Rocio; LaMontagne, D Scott; Mendoza, Maria Ana; Ramos, Irma; Winkler, Jennifer L; Villafana, Jose; Janmohamed, Amynah; Jumaan, Aisha O

    2011-07-12

    Operational research using a mixed method, cross-sectional, case-study approach assessed the feasibility and health system impact of large-scale implementation of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination into routine vaccine delivery by the Ministry of Health in Peru. The strategy was school-based vaccination of fifth grade girls in 527 primary schools in Piura region. Our evaluation showed that school-based HPV vaccination is feasible without major changes in existing health systems. This was reflected in the opinions of health personnel, the lack of impact on other vaccine coverage, and the high HPV vaccine coverage documented in routine records and by an independent community-based survey.

  12. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control.

  13. Overview of cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kudrin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has seen a tremendous number of failures and only few recent regulatory successes. This is a review dedicated to determine major regulatory and developmental issues around cancer immunotherapeutics. A three pillar approach should be used in setting a development path: discovery platforms and sufficient pool of validated tumor antigens, product development strategy enabling to bring the product closer to the patient and clinical development strategy accounting for competitive landscape, treatment paradigm, technical and commercial risks. Regulatory framework existing around cancer vaccines in the EU, US, Japan and some developing countries is outlined. In addition, the review covers some specific issues on the design and conduct of clinical trials with cancer vaccines. PMID:22894970

  14. Cancer Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  15. A vaccine strategy with multiple prostatic acid phosphatase-fused cytokines for prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    FUJIO, KEI; WATANABE, MASAMI; UEKI, HIDEO; LI, SHUN-AI; KINOSHITA, RIE; OCHIAI, KAZUHIKO; FUTAMI, JUNICHIRO; WATANABE, TOYOHIKO; NASU, YASUTOMO; KUMON, HIROMI

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the attractive treatment strategies for advanced prostate cancer. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) previously approved the therapeutic vaccine, sipuleucel-T, which is composed of autologous antigen-presenting cells cultured with a fusion protein [prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF)]. Although sipuleucel-T has been shown to prolong the median survival of patients for 4.1 months, more robust therapeutic effects may be expected by modifying the vaccination protocol. In the present study, we aimed to develop and validate a novel vaccination strategy using multiple PAP-fused cytokines for prostate cancer treatment. Using a super gene expression (SGE) system that we previously established to amplify the production of a recombinant protein, significant amounts of PAP-fused cytokines [human GMCSF, interleukin-2 (IL2), IL4, IL7 and mouse GMCSF and IL4] were obtained. We examined the activity of the fusion proteins in vitro to validate their cytokine functions. A significant upregulation of dendritic cell differentiation from monocytes was achieved by PAP-GMCSF when used with the other PAP-fused cytokines. The PAP-fused human IL2 significantly increased the proliferation of lymphocytes, as determined by flow cytometry. We also investigated the in vivo therapeutic effects of multiple PAP-fused cytokines in a mouse prostate cancer model bearing prostate-specific antigen (PSA)- and PAP-expressing tumors. The simultaneous intraperitoneal administration of PAP-GMCSF, -IL2, -IL4 and -IL7 significantly prevented tumor induction and inhibited the tumor growth in the PAP-expressing tumors, yet not in the PSA-expressing tumors. The in vivo therapeutic effects with the multiple PAP-fused cytokines were superior to the effects of PAP-GMCSF alone. We thus demonstrated the advantages of the combined use of multiple PAP-fused cytokines including PAP-GMCSF, and propose a promising prostatic antigen-vaccination

  16. Strategies to vaccinate against cancer of the cervix: feasibility of a school-based HPV vaccination program in Peru.

    PubMed

    Penny, Mary; Bartolini, Rosario; Mosqueira, N Rocio; LaMontagne, D Scott; Mendoza, Maria Ana; Ramos, Irma; Winkler, Jennifer L; Villafana, Jose; Janmohamed, Amynah; Jumaan, Aisha O

    2011-07-12

    Operational research using a mixed method, cross-sectional, case-study approach assessed the feasibility and health system impact of large-scale implementation of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination into routine vaccine delivery by the Ministry of Health in Peru. The strategy was school-based vaccination of fifth grade girls in 527 primary schools in Piura region. Our evaluation showed that school-based HPV vaccination is feasible without major changes in existing health systems. This was reflected in the opinions of health personnel, the lack of impact on other vaccine coverage, and the high HPV vaccine coverage documented in routine records and by an independent community-based survey. PMID:21609748

  17. Therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Melief, Cornelis J M; van Hall, Thorbald; Arens, Ramon; Ossendorp, Ferry; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2015-09-01

    The clinical benefit of therapeutic cancer vaccines has been established. Whereas regression of lesions was shown for premalignant lesions caused by HPV, clinical benefit in cancer patients was mostly noted as prolonged survival. Suboptimal vaccine design and an immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment are the root causes of the lack of cancer eradication. Effective cancer vaccines deliver concentrated antigen to both HLA class I and II molecules of DCs, promoting both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses. Optimal vaccine platforms include DNA and RNA vaccines and synthetic long peptides. Antigens of choice include mutant sequences, selected cancer testis antigens, and viral antigens. Drugs or physical treatments can mitigate the immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment and include chemotherapeutics, radiation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitors, inhibitors of T cell checkpoints, agonists of selected TNF receptor family members, and inhibitors of undesirable cytokines. The specificity of therapeutic vaccination combined with such immunomodulation offers an attractive avenue for the development of future cancer therapies.

  18. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones Vaccine treatment for prostate cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  19. Human prostate cancer vaccines – proposed mechanisms of action and future combinatorial treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Sean M.; Lemke, Caitlin D.; Lubaroff, David M.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is responsible for the deaths of more than 33,000 American men annually. Once PCa has become metastatic there is no curative treatment. Oncologists worldwide are becoming increasingly convinced that alternative therapies to chemotherapy and radical prostatectomy need to be explored. Cancer vaccines (CaVacs) that promote the cancer patient’s own immune system to develop a tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated immune attack have been investigated in clinical trials with modest yet encouraging results. Here we look at the rationale behind different prostate CaVacs and propose key immune events that are likely to contribute to the efficacy of each vaccine. Finally, we prognosticate upon what improvements may be required to generate more effective CaVacs in the future with full consideration of the mechanisms of action. PMID:23399727

  20. Vaccination to Prevent Cancer.

    PubMed

    Clements, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines stimulate the immune system, mimicking infectious attacks and thereby promoting the development of protective antibodies and/or cellular immunity so that the body is immune to infection when live native infections attack. Some of these infections are associated with cancer-causing changes in the body; thus some vaccines may help prevent cancer. PMID:27621345

  1. The Future of Vaccines for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Warner K.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, making prophylactic cervical cancer vaccines an important focus for cervical cancer prevention. The increasing accessibility of these vaccines worldwide has the potential to greatly decrease the incidence and burden of disease in the future. However, current prophylactic vaccines offer no therapeutic benefit for persons already infected with human papillomavirus types targeted by vaccines or persons with precancerous lesions or cervical cancer. The protection offered by current vaccines is primarily against human papillomavirus types used to derive the vaccine, although partial cross-protection for related virus types has been observed. Herein, we describe findings from preclinical and clinical studies that employ vaccine strategies that have the potential to shape the future of vaccines against cervical cancer. Modalities include prophylactic strategies to target more oncogenic virus types by using the minor capsid antigen L2 and/or by increasing the number of types used to derive virus-like particle vaccines. Therapeutic strategies include the development of vaccines against human papillomavirus early proteins (targets for cellular immunity) for the resolution of precancerous lesions and cervical cancer. Future applications of existing VLP-based vaccines are also discussed. PMID:18482559

  2. Systems vaccinology for cancer vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Tagliamonte, Maria; Tornesello, Marialina; Buonaguro, Franco M; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2014-06-01

    Results of therapeutic vaccines for established chronic infections or cancers are still unsatisfactory. The only therapeutic cancer vaccine approved for clinical use is the sipuleucel-T, for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, which induces a limited 4-month improvement in the overall survival of vaccinated patients compared to controls. This represents a remarkable advancement in the cancer immunotherapy field, although the clinical outcome of cancer vaccines needs to be substantially improved. To this aim, a multipronged strategy is required, including the evaluation of mechanisms underlying the effective elicitation of immune responses by cancer vaccines. The recent development of new technologies and computational tools allows the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of the interactions between all of the components of innate and adaptive immunity over time. Here we review the potentiality of systems biology in providing novel insights in the mechanisms of action of vaccines to improve their design and effectiveness.

  3. Cancer-associated fibroblast-targeted strategy enhances antitumor immune responses in dendritic cell-based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ohshio, Yasuhiko; Teramoto, Koji; Hanaoka, Jun; Tezuka, Noriaki; Itoh, Yasushi; Asai, Tohru; Daigo, Yataro; Ogasawara, Kazumasa

    2015-02-01

    Given the close interaction between tumor cells and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME), TME-targeted strategies would be promising for developing integrated cancer immunotherapy. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the dominant stromal component, playing critical roles in generation of the pro-tumorigenic TME. We focused on the immunosuppressive trait of CAFs, and systematically explored the alteration of tumor-associated immune responses by CAF-targeted therapy. C57BL/6 mice s.c. bearing syngeneic E.G7 lymphoma, LLC1 Lewis lung cancer, or B16F1 melanoma were treated with an anti-fibrotic agent, tranilast, to inhibit CAF function. The infiltration of immune suppressor cell types, including regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, in the TME was effectively decreased through reduction of stromal cell-derived factor-1, prostaglandin E2 , and transforming growth factor-β. In tumor-draining lymph nodes, these immune suppressor cell types were significantly decreased, leading to activation of tumor-associated antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. In addition, CAF-targeted therapy synergistically enhanced multiple types of systemic antitumor immune responses such as the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response, natural killer activity, and antitumor humoral immunity in combination with dendritic cell-based vaccines; however, the suppressive effect on tumor growth was not observed in tumor-bearing SCID mice. These data indicate that systemic antitumor immune responses by various immunologic cell types are required to bring out the efficacy of CAF-targeted therapy, and these effects are enhanced when combined with effector-stimulatory immunotherapy such as dendritic cell-based vaccines. Our mouse model provides a novel rationale with TME-targeted strategy for the development of cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  4. Neuroendocrine cancer vaccines in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bridle, Byram W

    2011-06-01

    This article focuses on neuroendocrine cancer vaccines that have been evaluated in human clinical trials within the last 5 years. The definition of what constitutes a neuroendocrine tumor requires clarification. Strategies and barriers common to cancer vaccines are highlighted. In general, neuroendocrine cancer is rare; however, special attention will be paid to neuroblastoma and small-cell-lung cancer owing to their relatively higher prevalence. A variety of other neuroendocrine tumor vaccine trials will also be addressed. The common problem of generating only sporadic tumor-specific immune responses that are of low-magnitude will be discussed in detail, with recommendations for future directions.

  5. [Immune response in cervical cancer. Strategies for the development of therapeutic vaccines].

    PubMed

    Mora-García, María Lourdes; Monroy-García, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV), as HPV-16, evade immune recognition through the inactivation of cells of the innate immune response. HPV-16 E6 and E7 genes down-regulate type I interferon response. They do not produce viremia or cell death; therefore, they do not cause inflammation or damage signal that alerts the immune system. Virus-like particles (VLPs), consisting of structural proteins (L1 and L2) of the main HR-HPV types that infect the genitourinary tract, are the most effective prophylactic vaccines against HR-HPV infection. While for the high grade neoplastic lesions, therapeutic vaccines based on viral vectors, peptides, DNA or complete HR-HPV E6 and E7 proteins as antigens, have had limited effectiveness. Chimeric virus-like particles (cVLPs) that carry immunogenic peptides derived from E6 and E7 viral proteins, capable to induce activation of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, emerge as an important alternative to provide prophylactic and therapeutic activity against HR-HPV infection and cervical cancer.

  6. Cancer Vaccines: A Brief Overview.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sunil; Prendergast, George C

    2016-01-01

    Vaccine approaches for cancer differ from traditional vaccine approaches for infectious disease in tending to focus on clearing active disease rather than preventing disease. In this review, we provide a brief overview of different types of vaccines and adjuvants that have been investigated for the purpose of controlling cancer burdens in patients, some of which are approved for clinical use or in late-stage clinical trials, such as the personalized dendritic cell vaccine sipuleucel-T (Provenge) and the recombinant viral prostate cancer vaccine PSA-TRICOM (Prostvac-VF). Vaccines against human viruses implicated in the development and progression of certain cancers, such as human papillomavirus in cervical cancer, are not considered here. Cancers express "altered self" antigens that tend to induce weaker responses than the "foreign" antigens expressed by infectious agents. Thus, immune stimulants and adjuvant approaches have been explored widely. Vaccine types considered include autologous patient-derived immune cell vaccines, tumor antigen-expressing recombinant virus vaccines, peptide vaccines, DNA vaccines, and heterologous whole-cell vaccines derived from established human tumor cell lines. Opportunities to develop effective cancer vaccines may benefit from seminal recent advances in understanding how immunosuppressive barricades are erected by tumors to mediate immune escape. In particular, targeted ablation of these barricades with novel agents, such as the immune checkpoint drug ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4) approved recently for clinical use, may offer significant leverage to vaccinologists seeking to control and prevent malignancy.

  7. Assessing the effectiveness of a community-based sensitization strategy in creating awareness about HPV, cervical cancer and HPV vaccine among parents in North West Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Wamai, Richard G; Ayissi, Claudine Akono; Oduwo, Geofrey O; Perlman, Stacey; Welty, Edith; Manga, Simon; Ogembo, Javier Gordon

    2012-10-01

    In 2010, the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Services (CBCHS) received a donation of HPV vaccine (Gardasil®) to immunize girls of ages 9-13 years in the North West Region of Cameroon. We evaluated the effectiveness of the CBCHS campaign program in sensitizing parents/guardians to encourage HPV vaccine uptake, identified factors that influence parents' decisions to vaccinate girls, and examined the uptake of cervical cancer screening among mothers. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in four healthcare facilities run by CBCHS, churches and other social settings. A total of 350 questionnaires were distributed and 317 were used for the analysis. There were high levels of awareness about cervical cancer, HPV and HPV vaccine. 75.5% understood HPV is sexually transmitted and 90.3% were aware of the use of vaccine as a preventive measure. Effectiveness of the vaccine (31.8%) and side effects/safety (18.4%) were the major barriers for parents to vaccinate their daughters. Bivariate analysis further revealed that the level of education (p = 0.0006), income level (p = 0.0044) and perceived risks (p = 0.0044) are additional factors influencing parents' decisions to vaccinate girls. 35.3% of women had sought a cervical cancer screening, significantly higher than the general estimated rate of screening (<10%) in other parts of Cameroon and sub-Saharan Africa. These results support the viability of a community-tailored sensitization strategy to increase awareness among the targeted audience of parents/guardians, who are critical decision-makers for vaccine delivery to children. PMID:22302651

  8. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  9. Therapeutic cancer vaccines and combination immunotherapies involving vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang; Urban, Julie; Kalinski, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Recent US Food and Drug Administration approvals of Provenge® (sipuleucel-T) as the first cell-based cancer therapeutic factor and ipilimumab (Yervoy®/anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4) as the first “checkpoint blocker” highlight recent advances in cancer immunotherapy. Positive results of the clinical trials evaluating additional checkpoint blocking agents (blockade of programmed death [PD]-1, and its ligands, PD-1 ligand 1 and 2) and of several types of cancer vaccines suggest that cancer immunotherapy may soon enter the center stage of comprehensive cancer care, supplementing surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. This review discusses the current status of the clinical evaluation of different classes of therapeutic cancer vaccines and possible avenues for future development, focusing on enhancing the magnitude and quality of cancer-specific immunity by either the functional reprogramming of patients’ endogenous dendritic cells or the use of ex vivo-manipulated dendritic cells as autologous cellular transplants. This review further discusses the available strategies aimed at promoting the entry of vaccination-induced T-cells into tumor tissues and prolonging their local antitumor activity. Finally, the recent improvements to the above three modalities for cancer immunotherapy (inducing tumor-specific T-cells, prolonging their persistence and functionality, and enhancing tumor homing of effector T-cells) and rationale for their combined application in order to achieve clinically effective anticancer responses are addressed. PMID:27471705

  10. Injecting Hope--A Review of Breast Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Peoples, George E

    2016-05-01

    There is significant interest in investigating immunotherapeutic strategies to be used for the treatment of breast cancer patients. One form of immunotherapy under active investigation is the cancer vaccine. Vaccines are a form of active immune therapy designed to stimulate the immune system to recognize tumor cells as foreign. Vaccines include an antigen that serves as the target for the immune response, and an immunoadjuvant, which is a nonspecific stimulator of the immune response that promotes an environment conducive to immune stimulation. Vaccines are an appealing therapeutic strategy because they are specific and are associated with minimal toxicity. In addition, they stimulate the adaptive immune system, thereby producing a memory response allowing for sustained effect without repeated therapy. Currently, there are no US Food and Drug Administration-approved breast cancer vaccines; however, there are multiple vaccines and treatment strategies employing these vaccines that are being actively investigated in clinical trials. PMID:27188680

  11. Cancer vaccine THERATOPE- Biomira.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Biomira is developing a therapeutic cancer vaccine [THERATOPE] for treatment of breast and other cancers. This profile has been selected from R&D Insight, a pharmaceutical intelligence database produced by Adis International Ltd. THERATOPE consists of the mucin antigen, sialyl-Tn (STn), a carbohydrate located on the surface of breast, colorectal and ovarian cancer cells, conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH). Merck KGaA has acquired a worldwide licence to THERATOPE for treatment of breast cancer. Under the terms of the licence, Biomira and Merck KGaA, via its US affiliate, EMD Pharmaceuticals, will jointly market the vaccine in the US. Merck KGaA holds exclusive marketing rights for the rest of the world, except in Canada (where Biomira retains rights), Israel and the Palestine Autonomy Area. Merck KGaA is now collaborating on phase III development for breast cancer. Biomira stands to receive $US150 million in licence, milestone payments and equity investments. The development costs will be shared between the two companies in North America but Merck KGaA will be solely responsible for these costs in countries outside the US. Previously, Chiron Corporation had purchased a licence to THERATOPE in 1997; however, Chiron terminated this agreement in June 2000. Under the terms of the termination, Biomira paid Chiron $US2.25 million to compensate the company for its investment in the development of THERATOPE. In addition, Biomira will make another payment of $US3.25 million to Chiron upon FDA approval of the vaccine. No further payments or royalties will be made. In the third quarter of 2002, an independent review of interim data from the trial was conducted. This was the fifth scheduled review of the data by the Independent Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB), all of which produced a positive response. Following the completion of the review, the DSMB stated that the trial should continue and that it had no safety concerns regarding this trial. Although the data

  12. Cancer vaccine THERATOPE- Biomira.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Biomira is developing a therapeutic cancer vaccine [THERATOPE] for treatment of breast and other cancers. This profile has been selected from R&D Insight, a pharmaceutical intelligence database produced by Adis International Ltd. THERATOPE consists of the mucin antigen, sialyl-Tn (STn), a carbohydrate located on the surface of breast, colorectal and ovarian cancer cells, conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH). Merck KGaA has acquired a worldwide licence to THERATOPE for treatment of breast cancer. Under the terms of the licence, Biomira and Merck KGaA, via its US affiliate, EMD Pharmaceuticals, will jointly market the vaccine in the US. Merck KGaA holds exclusive marketing rights for the rest of the world, except in Canada (where Biomira retains rights), Israel and the Palestine Autonomy Area. Merck KGaA is now collaborating on phase III development for breast cancer. Biomira stands to receive $US150 million in licence, milestone payments and equity investments. The development costs will be shared between the two companies in North America but Merck KGaA will be solely responsible for these costs in countries outside the US. Previously, Chiron Corporation had purchased a licence to THERATOPE in 1997; however, Chiron terminated this agreement in June 2000. Under the terms of the termination, Biomira paid Chiron $US2.25 million to compensate the company for its investment in the development of THERATOPE. In addition, Biomira will make another payment of $US3.25 million to Chiron upon FDA approval of the vaccine. No further payments or royalties will be made. In the third quarter of 2002, an independent review of interim data from the trial was conducted. This was the fifth scheduled review of the data by the Independent Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB), all of which produced a positive response. Following the completion of the review, the DSMB stated that the trial should continue and that it had no safety concerns regarding this trial. Although the data

  13. Cancer vaccines: challenges and outlook in the field.

    PubMed

    Paul, Stéphane; Acres, Bruce; Limacher, Jean-Marc; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves

    2007-05-01

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer-associated antigens represents an attractive option for cancer therapy in view of its efficacy, the possibility of long-lasting immunity against the cancer, and safety profile. Nevertheless, it is now recognized that the same vaccination strategies used for prophylactic vaccinations against infectious diseases, cannot necessarily be used for therapeutic cancer vaccination. Cancer patients are usually immunosuppressed and most cancer-associated antigens are 'self-antigens', making it a significant challenge to vaccinate patients against a cancer-associated antigen. Various immunostimulation techniques are under investigation in an effort to bolster patients' immune systems and to overcome immune tolerance to self antigens. Strategies to stimulate antigen presentation, T-cell reactivity and innate immune activity are under investigation. Several clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate therapeutic cancer vaccines in patients, and attractive protocols, including those that combine the stimulation of specific T-cells and chemotherapy, or strategies to block immune regulation, are beginning to show some success. This feature review considers strategies for the development of effective therapeutic cancer vaccines, and highlights select vaccines that have already entered the clinic. PMID:17487784

  14. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Megan A; Nair, Smita K; Holl, Eda K

    2015-01-01

    RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s) of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  15. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Megan A.; Nair, Smita K.; Holl, Eda K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s) of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26665011

  16. Cancer vaccine--Antigenics.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    Antigenics is developing a therapeutic cancer vaccine based on heat-shock proteins (HSPs). The vaccine [HSPPC-96, Oncophage] is in a pivotal phase III clinical trial for renal cancer at 80 clinical sites worldwide. The trial is enrolling at least 500 patients who are randomised to receive surgical removal of the primary tumour followed by out-patient treatment with Oncophage((R)) or surgery only. This study was initiated on the basis of results from a pilot phase I/II study and preliminary results from a phase II study in patients with renal cell cancer. In October 2001, Oncophage was designated as a fast-track product by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Oncophage is in phase I/II trials in Italy for colorectal cancer (30 patients) and melanoma. The trials in Italy are being conducted at the Istituto dei Tumouri, Milan (in association with Sigma-Tau). Preliminary data from the phase II trial for melanoma was presented at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference in Florida, USA, in October 2001. Oncophage is also in a phase I/II (42 patients) and a phase II trial (84 patients) in the US for renal cell cancer, a phase II trial in the US for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (35 patients), a phase II trial in the US for sarcoma (20-35 patients), a phase I/II trial in the US for melanoma (36 patients), and phase I/II trials in Germany for gastric (30 patients) and pancreatic cancers. A pilot phase I trial in patients with pancreatic cancer began in the US in 1997 with 5 patients enrolled. In November 2000, Antigenics announced that this trial had been expanded to a phase I/II study which would now include survival as an endpoint and would enroll 5 additional patients. The US trials are being performed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The trials in Germany are being carried out at Johannes Gutenberg-University Hospital, Mainz. Oncophage is an autologous vaccine consisting of

  17. Discovery and development of therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Acres, Bruce; Limacher, Jean-Marc; Bonnefoy, Jeanoy

    2007-03-01

    Over the past century, various efforts have been made to induce the rejection of cancerous tissues by the stimulation of an immune reaction, using both non-specific and antigen-specific strategies. Non-specific approaches attempt to augment an immune response in and around the tumor by injecting immune stimulating substances, for example, bacterial extracts, cytokines or gene therapy agents. Antigen-specific approaches use either the tumor cells themselves as a source of antigens or incorporate identified tumor-associated antigens into vaccines. This review describes antigen-specific therapeutic cancer vaccines that are currently in development. PMID:17436554

  18. Economic Evaluation of Screening Strategies Combined with HPV Vaccination of Preadolescent Girls for the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in Vientiane, Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Several approaches to reduce the incidence of invasive cervical cancers exist. The approach adopted should take into account contextual factors that influence the cost-effectiveness of the available options. Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of screening strategies combined with a vaccination program for 10-year old girls for cervical cancer prevention in Vientiane, Lao PDR. Methods A population-based dynamic compartment model was constructed. The interventions consisted of a 10-year old girl vaccination program only, or this program combined with screening strategies, i.e., visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA), cytology-based screening, rapid human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing, or combined VIA and cytology testing. Simulations were run over 100 years. In base-case scenario analyses, we assumed a 70% vaccination coverage with lifelong protection and a 50% screening coverage. The outcome of interest was the incremental cost per Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALY) averted. Results In base-case scenarios, compared to the next best strategy, the model predicted that VIA screening of women aged 30–65 years old every three years, combined with vaccination, was the most attractive option, costing 2 544 international dollars (I$) per DALY averted. Meanwhile, rapid HPV DNA testing was predicted to be more attractive than cytology-based screening or its combination with VIA. Among cytology-based screening options, combined VIA with conventional cytology testing was predicted to be the most attractive option. Multi-way sensitivity analyses did not change the results. Compared to rapid HPV DNA testing, VIA had a probability of cost-effectiveness of 73%. Compared to the vaccination only option, the probability that a program consisting of screening women every five years would be cost-effective was around 60% and 80% if the willingness-to-pay threshold is fixed at one and three GDP per capita, respectively. Conclusions A VIA screening program

  19. Cancer Experts Endorse CDC's HPV Vaccine Guidelines

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Cancer Experts Endorse CDC's HPV Vaccine Guidelines Boys and girls should start the shots at age 11 or ... on HPV vaccination: HPV vaccination should begin for girls and boys at 11 or 12 years, but children as ...

  20. Efficacy of Vaccination against HPV Infections to Prevent Cervical Cancer in France: Present Assessment and Pathways to Improve Vaccination Policies

    PubMed Central

    Ribassin-Majed, Laureen; Lounes, Rachid; Clémençon, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Background Seventy percent of sexually active individuals will be infected with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) during their lifetime. These infections are incriminated for almost all cervical cancers. In France, 3,068 new cases of cervical cancer and 1,067 deaths from cervical cancer occurred in 2005. Two vaccines against HPV infections are currently available and vaccination policies aim to decrease the incidence of HPV infections and of cervical cancers. In France, vaccine coverage has been reported to be low. Methods We developed a dynamic model for the heterosexual transmission of Human Papillomavirus types 16 and 18, which are covered by available vaccines. A deterministic model was used with stratification on gender, age and sexual behavior. Immunity obtained from vaccination was taken into account. The model was calibrated using French data of cervical cancer incidence. Results In view of current vaccine coverage and screening, we expected a 32% and 83% reduction in the incidence of cervical cancers due to HPV 16/18, after 20 years and 50 years of vaccine introduction respectively. Vaccine coverage and screening rates were assumed to be constant. However, increasing vaccine coverage in women or vaccinating girls before 14 showed a better impact on cervical cancer incidence. On the other hand, performing vaccination in men improves the effect on cervical cancer incidence only moderately, compared to strategies in females only. Conclusion While current vaccination policies may significantly decrease cervical cancer incidence, other supplementary strategies in females could be considered in order to improve vaccination efficacy. PMID:22427828

  1. The Human Vaccines Project: A roadmap for cancer vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Romero, Pedro; Banchereau, Jacques; Bhardwaj, Nina; Cockett, Mark; Disis, Mary L; Dranoff, Glenn; Gilboa, Eli; Hammond, Scott A; Hershberg, Robert; Korman, Alan J; Kvistborg, Pia; Melief, Cornelis; Mellman, Ira; Palucka, A Karolina; Redchenko, Irina; Robins, Harlan; Sallusto, Federica; Schenkelberg, Theodore; Schoenberger, Stephen; Sosman, Jeffrey; Türeci, Özlem; Van den Eynde, Benoît; Koff, Wayne; Coukos, George

    2016-04-13

    Cancer vaccine development has been vigorously pursued for 40 years. Immunity to tumor antigens can be elicited by most vaccines tested, but their clinical efficacy remains modest. We argue that a concerted international effort is necessary to understand the human antitumor immune response and achieve clinically effective cancer vaccines.

  2. Vaccine Prevention of Cancer: Can Endogenous Antigens be Targeted?

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Louis M.; Surana, Rishi; Murray, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    This perspective on the report by Beatty et al. in this issue of the journal (beginning on page XX) discusses the prevention of cancer through vaccination strategies that target antigens associated with tumor promotion and progression. Such approaches were first developed for treating cancer. We address cancer vaccination in the context of a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease expressing MUC1, an epithelial mucin aberrantly expressed during chronic inflammation and in colorectal carcinogenesis, and in a broader context that includes the potential of targeting the tumor microenvironment for immunoprevention in humans. Obstacles in developing effective cancer vaccines, including antigen selection, immunoediting, and tumor-mediated immunosuppression, also are discussed. PMID:20332297

  3. Immune modulations during chemoimmunotherapy & novel vaccine strategies--in metastatic melanoma and non small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Trine Zeeberg

    2013-12-01

    used in standard dosage. In the third part we investigated if vaccination with a peptide derived from IDO was feasible in patients with metastatic NSCLC. This "First in Man" trial was safe and showed modest side effects only. Since IDO was expressed in NSCLC tissues it was found to be a relevant target. One patient achieved significant regression of liver metastases (confirmed partial response) and another 6/15 patients achieved prolonged disease stabilization. Furthermore, median overall survival was 25.9 months demonstrating a better survival in vaccinated compared to non-vaccinated comparable NSCLC patients. The presence of IDO specific CD8+ T cells were detected by IFNy Elispot. In patients with clinical effect of the vaccine IDO-specific CD8+ T cells at pre-treatment was significanctly increased. Moreover, low-frequent IDO positive tetramer CD8+ T cells were detected and led to effective killing of an IDO+ HLA-A2 positive cancer cell line (SW480) in 1 patient. Moreover, flow cytometry was performed and in general no significant changes in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells were seen, although patients with clinical response showed a trend towards increased mature CD8+ T cells during treatment. In addition, we found lower levels of Tregs as well as an increased level of NK cells after 6 vaccinations. Elevated Kyn/Trp ratio is suggested to mirror IDO activity. In 8/11 patients the level after the 6th vaccine was stable compared to baseline. No differences between patients with clinical benefit (4/5) and patients with progressive disease (4/6) were demonstrated. Two patients had an increase in Kyn/Trp ration meanwhile demonstrating a high expression of IDO. In 2 patients with clinical response long-term stabilization of Kyn/Trp was observed. Overall, the vaccine was well tolerated with no adverse toxicity. Median overall survival was 25.9 months with long term disease stabilization achieved in 47% of the treated patients. Based on the promising clinical results achieved in the

  4. Vaccination approach to anti-angiogenic treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Wentink, Madelon Q; Huijbers, Elisabeth J M; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Verheul, Henk M W; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Griffioen, Arjan W

    2015-04-01

    Improvement of patient survival by anti-angiogenic therapy has proven limited. A vaccination approach inducing an immune response against the tumor vasculature combines the benefits of immunotherapy and anti-angiogenesis, and may overcome the limitations of current anti-angiogenic drugs. Strategies to use whole endothelial cell vaccines and DNA- or protein vaccines against key players in the VEGF signaling axis, as well as specific markers of tumor endothelial cells, have been tested in preclinical studies. Current clinical trials are now testing the promise of this specific anti-cancer vaccination approach. This review will highlight the state-of-the-art in this exciting field of cancer research.

  5. HPV vaccination for prevention of skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vinzón, Sabrina E; Rösl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous papillomaviruses are associated with specific skin diseases, such as extensive wart formation and the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), especially in immunosuppressed patients. Hence, clinical approaches are required that prevent such lesions. Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines confer type-restricted protection against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18, responsible of 90% of genital warts and 70% of cervical cancers, respectively. However, they do not protect against less prevalent high-risk types or cutaneous HPVs. Over the past few years, several studies explored the potential of developing vaccines targeting cutaneous papillomaviruses. These vaccines showed to be immunogenic and prevent skin tumor formation in certain animal models. Furthermore, under conditions mimicking the ones found in the intended target population (i.e., immunosuppression and in the presence of an already established infection before vaccination), recent preclinical data shows that immunization can still be effective. Strategies are currently focused on finding vaccine formulations that can confer protection against a broad range of papillomavirus-associated diseases. The state-of-the-art of these approaches and the future directions in the field will be presented. PMID:25692212

  6. Improvement of different vaccine delivery systems for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cancer vaccines are the promising tools in the hands of the clinical oncologist. Many tumor-associated antigens are excellent targets for immune therapy and vaccine design. Optimally designed cancer vaccines should combine the best tumor antigens with the most effective immunotherapy agents and/or delivery strategies to achieve positive clinical results. Various vaccine delivery systems such as different routes of immunization and physical/chemical delivery methods have been used in cancer therapy with the goal to induce immunity against tumor-associated antigens. Two basic delivery approaches including physical delivery to achieve higher levels of antigen production and formulation with microparticles to target antigen-presenting cells (APCs) have demonstrated to be effective in animal models. New developments in vaccine delivery systems will improve the efficiency of clinical trials in the near future. Among them, nanoparticles (NPs) such as dendrimers, polymeric NPs, metallic NPs, magnetic NPs and quantum dots have emerged as effective vaccine adjuvants for infectious diseases and cancer therapy. Furthermore, cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have been known as attractive carrier having applications in drug delivery, gene transfer and DNA vaccination. This review will focus on the utilization of different vaccine delivery systems for prevention or treatment of cancer. We will discuss their clinical applications and the future prospects for cancer vaccine development. PMID:21211062

  7. NANOPARTICLE DELIVERY SYSTEMS IN CANCER VACCINES

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamachari, Yogita; Geary, Sean M.; Lemke, Caitlin D.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies that involve the manipulation of the host’s immune system are gaining momentum in cancer research. Antigen-loaded nanocarriers are capable of being actively taken up by antigen presenting cells (APCs) and have shown promising potential in cancer immunotherapy by initiating a strong immunostimulatory cascade that results in potent antigen-specific immune responses against the cancer. Such carrier systems offer versatility in that they can simultaneously co-deliver adjuvants with the antigens to enhance APC activation and maturation. Furthermore, modifying the surface properties of these nanocarriers affords active targeting properties to APCs and/or enhanced accumulation in solid tumors. Here we review some recent advances in these colloidal and particulate nanoscale systems designed for cancer immunotherapy and the potential for these systems to translate into clinical cancer vaccines. PMID:20721603

  8. Promise of cancer stem cell vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Lu, Lin; Wicha, Max S; Chang, Alfred E; Xia, Jian-chuan; Ren, Xiubao; Li, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines designed to target cancer stem cells (CSC) can induce significant antitumor responses via conferring host anti-CSC immunity. Our recent studies have demonstrated that CSC-DC vaccine could inhibit metastasis of primary tumors and induce humoral immune responses against cancer stem cells. This approach highlights the promise of cancer stem cell vaccine in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26337078

  9. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Douglas Lowy (left) and John Schiller developed the vaccine to prevent HPV infection in women, the cause ...

  10. Therapeutic uterine-cervix cancer vaccines in humans.

    PubMed

    Gariglio, P; Benitez-Bribiesca, L; Berumen, J; Alcocer, J M; Tamez, R; Madrid, V

    1998-01-01

    Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types is involved in early stages of uterine=cervix cancer development. The virally encoded E6 and E7 oncoproteins behave as tumor-specific antigens and represent targets for a vaccine designed to control HPV-induced tumors. Using either proteins or peptides based on E6 and E7 oncoproteins of HPV16 and 18, phase I clinical trials of therapeutic vaccines against HPV-associated cervical cancers have recently been reported. Although the effectiveness of these vaccines cannot be evaluated in such small studies, they constitute an important step toward the development of therapeutic uterine=cervix cancer vaccines. A polytope DNA vaccination approach combined with immunomodulatory cytokines may offer an excellent strategy to reduce the risk of relapse and metastasis following conventional therapies. PMID:9887543

  11. Preventive and Therapeutic Vaccines against Human Papillomaviruses Associated Cervical Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nayereh, Khadem Ghaebi; Khadem, Ghaeb

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is, globally known to be, one of the most common cancers among women especially in developing countries. More than 90% of cervical cancers are associated with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) particularly HPV types 16 and 18. Two major strategies have been developed for prevention and treatment of cervical cancer and other HPV-associated malignancies; the first one is based on HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) containing HPV structural proteins. VLP based vaccines can induce genotype specific virus neutralizing antibodies for preventing HPV infections. The other strategy is based on HPV early genes especially E6 and E7 for eliminating the established HPV infections; therefore they are classified as HPV therapeutic vaccines. This article reviews the preventive and therapeutic vaccines against HPV infections and cervical cancer. PMID:23493151

  12. DNA Immunization as an Efficient Strategy for Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bolhassani, Azam; Yazdi, Sima Rafati

    2009-01-01

    The field of vaccinology provides excellent promises to control different infectious and non-infectious diseases. Genetic immunization as a new tool in this area by using naked DNA has been shown to induce humoral as well as cellular immune responses with high efficiency. This demonstrates the enormous potential of this strategy for vaccination purposes. DNA vaccines have been widely used to develop vaccines against various pathogens as well as cancer, autoimmune diseases and allergy. However, despite their successful application in many pre-clinical disease models, their potency in human clinical trials has been insufficient to provide protective immunity. Several strategies have been applied to increase the potency of DNA vaccine. Among these strategies, the linkage of antigens to Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) and the utilization of different delivery systems have been demonstrated as efficient approaches for increasing the potency of DNA vaccines. The uptake of DNA plasmids by cells upon injection is inefficient. Two basic delivery approaches including physical delivery to achieve higher levels of antigen production and formulation with microparticles to target Antigen-Presenting Cells (APCs) are effective in animal models. Alternatively, different regimens called prime-boost vaccination are also effective. In this regimen, naked DNA is utilized to prime the immune system and either recombinant viral vector or purified recombinant protein with proper adjuvant is used for boosting. In this review, we discuss recent advances in upgrading the efficiency of DNA vaccination in animal models. PMID:23407787

  13. Vaccination strategies in lymphoproliferative disorders: Failures and successes.

    PubMed

    Allegra, A; Russo, S; Gerace, D; Calabrò, L; Maisano, V; Innao, V; Musolino, C

    2015-10-01

    Anti-tumor vaccines in lymphoproliferative disorders hold out the prospect of effective tumor therapies with minimal side effects. The addition of immunotherapy to old and new chemotherapy regimens has improved both response rates and disease-free survival, leading in many cases to an extended overall survival. Ideally, an antigen that is used for vaccination would be specifically expressed in the tumor; it must have an important, causal part in the multifactorial process that leads to cancer, and it must be expressed stably even after it is attacked by the immune system. Immunotherapies, which aim to activate the immune system to kill cancer cells, include strategies to increase the frequency or potency of antitumor T cells, to overcome suppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment, and to reduce T-cell suppression systemically. In this review, we focus on the results of clinical trials of vaccination in lymphoma, and discuss potential strategies to enhance the efficacy of immunotherapy in the future.

  14. Second-generation prophylactic HPV vaccines: current options and future strategies for vaccines development.

    PubMed

    Fruscalzo, Arrigo; Londero, Ambrogio P; Bertozzi, Serena; Lellè, Ralf J

    2016-02-01

    Two vaccines focused on the prevention of HPV-related diseases have been introduced in the last decade, the quadrivalent vaccine Gardasil and the bivalent vaccine Cervarix. They are targeted to prevent precancerous and cancerous lesions not only of the cervix, but also of the vulva, vagina, anal and head-neck region. Furthermore, the protection of the quadrivalent vaccine Gardasil includes also genital warts and recurrent respiratory Papillomatosis, two benign conditions with high socio-economic impact. Although their efficacy in reducing the burden of HPV-related pathologies has been already documented, second-generation HPV vaccines are being developed in order to overcome major limitations, above all the cost of production, distribution and acceptance, thus promoting an easier access to vaccination, especially in developing countries. Recently a new multivalent VLP vaccine active against nine HPV subtypes, called Gardasil 9 (Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA), has been approved, showing promising preliminary results. In this article, we outline the strategies adopted for second-generation HPV vaccine engineering, the latest HPV vaccines available at this time, as well as those currently in development.

  15. Strategy vaccination against Hepatitis B in China.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xueyan; Liang, Zhenglun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) is a serious public health problem in China. Up to now, the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination was the most cost-effective way to prevent HBV infection. Since 1992, when the Chinese government prioritized implementing the HBV vaccinations for newborns, China began to see a larger reduction in HBV infections. For children under 5 years, the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has decreased to 1.0%. However, many additional challenges for the prevention and control of HBV infection in China remain. There is a lack of knowledge of the significant impact of the HBV vaccination for the general public with 93 million HBV carriers and chronic HBV patients as infection sources. Therefore, the HBV vaccine application should focus on the optimization of immunization strategies according to HBV prevalence characteristics, improve the public's knowledge of HBV vaccinations, and help to ensure the protective effects of the HBV vaccine.

  16. Strategy vaccination against Hepatitis B in China

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xueyan; Liang, Zhenglun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) is a serious public health problem in China. Up to now, the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination was the most cost-effective way to prevent HBV infection. Since 1992, when the Chinese government prioritized implementing the HBV vaccinations for newborns, China began to see a larger reduction in HBV infections. For children under 5 years, the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has decreased to 1.0%. However, many additional challenges for the prevention and control of HBV infection in China remain. There is a lack of knowledge of the significant impact of the HBV vaccination for the general public with 93 million HBV carriers and chronic HBV patients as infection sources. Therefore, the HBV vaccine application should focus on the optimization of immunization strategies according to HBV prevalence characteristics, improve the public's knowledge of HBV vaccinations, and help to ensure the protective effects of the HBV vaccine. PMID:25881006

  17. Adolescent Vaccination Strategies: Interventions to Increase Coverage.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Corinne E; Brady, Rebecca C; Battley, Reuben O; Huggins, Jennifer L

    2016-08-01

    While vaccines have decreased the burden of disease, many adolescents still remain under-immunized, particularly for human papillomavirus (HPV) and influenza. We review the most current data regarding adolescent immunizations in the United States and discuss proven strategies that work for increasing vaccination rates. Strategies that have been shown to improve rates include provider feedback, immunization information systems (or registries), and enhanced access outside of provider offices, such as school-based immunization programs. Overall, practices may want to consider multimodal quality improvement approaches to enhance practice vaccination rates. The public health and cost benefits of immunizing adolescents are well known, yet recent measles outbreaks in the United States have highlighted issues with state immunization laws and vaccine refusals. Providers should be clear in their advice regarding vaccines and use effective reminder strategies as parents commonly cite not having enough information or knowledge that a vaccine was needed for their adolescent. Additional research is needed regarding adolescent consent for vaccines, as well as adolescent and parental refusal, in order to design systems that will help inform families and allow for widespread vaccine availability. PMID:27146296

  18. Vaccines and immunization strategies for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianying; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is currently the most significant arboviral disease afflicting tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. Dengue vaccines, such as the multivalent attenuated, chimeric, DNA and inactivated vaccines, have been developed to prevent dengue infection in humans, and they function predominantly by stimulating immune responses against the dengue virus (DENV) envelope (E) and nonstructural-1 proteins (NS1). Of these vaccines, a live attenuated chimeric tetravalent DENV vaccine developed by Sanofi Pasteur has been licensed in several countries. However, this vaccine renders only partial protection against the DENV2 infection and is associated with an unexplained increased incidence of hospitalization for severe dengue disease among children younger than nine years old. In addition to the virus-based vaccines, several mosquito-based dengue immunization strategies have been developed to interrupt the vector competence and effectively reduce the number of infected mosquito vectors, thus controlling the transmission of DENV in nature. Here we summarize the recent progress in the development of dengue vaccines and novel immunization strategies and propose some prospective vaccine strategies for disease prevention in the future. PMID:27436365

  19. Therapeutic Vaccine Strategies against Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Khallouf, Hadeel; Grabowska, Agnieszka K.; Riemer, Angelika B.

    2014-01-01

    High-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause over 500,000 cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal cancer cases per year. The transforming potential of HPVs is mediated by viral oncoproteins. These are essential for the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Thus, HPV-mediated malignancies pose the unique opportunity in cancer vaccination to target immunologically foreign epitopes. Therapeutic HPV vaccination is therefore an ideal scenario for proof-of-concept studies of cancer immunotherapy. This is reflected by the fact that a multitude of approaches has been utilized in therapeutic HPV vaccination design: protein and peptide vaccination, DNA vaccination, nanoparticle- and cell-based vaccines, and live viral and bacterial vectors. This review provides a comprehensive overview of completed and ongoing clinical trials in therapeutic HPV vaccination (summarized in tables), and also highlights selected promising preclinical studies. Special emphasis is given to adjuvant science and the potential impact of novel developments in vaccinology research, such as combination therapies to overcome tumor immune suppression, the use of novel materials and mouse models, as well as systems vaccinology and immunogenetics approaches. PMID:26344626

  20. Anti-Cancer Vaccines — A One-Hit Wonder?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Justin K.H.

    2014-01-01

    Immunization against common bacterial and viral diseases has helped prevent millions of deaths worldwide. More recently, the concept of vaccination has been developed into a potentially novel strategy to treat and prevent cancer formation, progression, and spread. Over the past few years, a handful of anti-cancer vaccines have been licensed and approved for use in clinical practice, thus providing a breakthrough in the field. However, the path has not always been easy, with many hurdles that have had to be overcome in order to reach this point. Nevertheless, with more anti-cancer vaccines currently in development, there is still hope that they can eventually become routine tools used in the treatment and prevention of cancer in the future. This review will discuss in detail both types of anti-cancer vaccine presently used in clinical practice — therapeutic and preventive — before considering some of the more promising anti-cancer vaccines that are currently in development. Finally, the issue of side effects and the debate surrounding the overall cost-effectiveness of anti-cancer vaccines will be examined. PMID:25506282

  1. Anti-cancer vaccines - a one-hit wonder?

    PubMed

    Liu, Justin K H

    2014-12-01

    Immunization against common bacterial and viral diseases has helped prevent millions of deaths worldwide. More recently, the concept of vaccination has been developed into a potentially novel strategy to treat and prevent cancer formation, progression, and spread. Over the past few years, a handful of anti-cancer vaccines have been licensed and approved for use in clinical practice, thus providing a breakthrough in the field. However, the path has not always been easy, with many hurdles that have had to be overcome in order to reach this point. Nevertheless, with more anti-cancer vaccines currently in development, there is still hope that they can eventually become routine tools used in the treatment and prevention of cancer in the future. This review will discuss in detail both types of anti-cancer vaccine presently used in clinical practice - therapeutic and preventive - before considering some of the more promising anti-cancer vaccines that are currently in development. Finally, the issue of side effects and the debate surrounding the overall cost-effectiveness of anti-cancer vaccines will be examined.

  2. DNA vaccines, electroporation and their applications in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si-Hyeong; Danishmalik, Sayyed Nilofar; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2015-01-01

    Numerous animal studies and recent clinical studies have shown that electroporation-delivered DNA vaccines can elicit robust Ag-specific CTL responses and reduce disease severity. However, cancer antigens are generally poorly immunogenic, requiring special conditions for immune response induction. To date, many different approaches have been used to elicit Ag-specific CTL and anti-neoplastic responses to DNA vaccines against cancer. In vivo electroporation is one example, whereas others include DNA manipulation, xenogeneic antigen use, immune stimulatory molecule and immune response regulator application, DNA prime-boost immunization strategy use and different DNA delivery methods. These strategies likely increase the immunogenicity of cancer DNA vaccines, thereby contributing to cancer eradication. However, cancer cells are heterogeneous and might become CTL-resistant. Thus, understanding the CTL resistance mechanism(s) employed by cancer cells is critical to develop counter-measures for this immune escape. In this review, the use of electroporation as a DNA delivery method, the strategies used to enhance the immune responses, the cancer antigens that have been tested, and the escape mechanism(s) used by tumor cells are discussed, with a focus on the progress of clinical trials using cancer DNA vaccines.

  3. Generation of more effective cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Fenoglio, Daniela; Traverso, Paolo; Parodi, Alessia; Kalli, Francesca; Zanetti, Maurizio; Filaci, Gilberto

    2013-01-01

    Cancer vaccines represent a promising therapeutic approach for which prime time is imminent. However, clinical efficacy must be improved in order for cancer vaccines to become a valid alternative or complement to traditional cancer treatments. Considerable efforts have been undertaken so far to better understand the fundamental requirements for clinically-effective cancer vaccines. Recent data emphasize that important requirements, among others, are (1) the use of multi-epitope immunogens, possibly deriving from different tumor antigens; (2) the selection of effective adjuvants; (3) the association of cancer vaccines with agents able to counteract the regulatory milieu present in the tumor microenvironment; and (4) the need to choose the definitive formulation and regimen of a vaccine after accurate preliminary tests comparing different antigen formulations. The first requirement deals with issues related to HLA restriction of tumor antigen presentation, as well as usefulness of tumor antigen spreading and counteraction of immune escape phenomena, linked to tumor antigen down-modulation, for an effective anti-cancer immune response. The second point underscores the necessity of optimal activation of innate immunity to achieve an efficient adaptive anti-cancer immune response. The third point focuses on the importance to inhibit subsets of regulatory cells. The last requirement stresses the concept that the regimen and formulation of the vaccine impacts profoundly on cancer vaccine efficacy. A new generation of cancer vaccines, provided with both immunological and clinical efficacy, will hopefully soon address these requirements. PMID:23978951

  4. Infections and cancer: debate about using vaccines as a cancer control tool.

    PubMed

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Buonaguro, Franco M

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, Infectious Agents and Cancer commissioned a thematic series collection of articles on Prevention of HPV related cancer. The articles have attracted wide interest and stimulated debate, including about the utility of vaccines in cancer control. The application of vaccines to cancer control fulfills a promise envisioned at the turn of the 20th century when remarkable experiments showed that some cancers were caused by infections. This suggested the possibility of applying infection-control strategies to cancer control. Vaccines represent the most practical cost-effective technology to prevent wide human suffering and death from many acute infectious diseases, such as small pox or polio. Hitherto applied to control of acute fatal infections, vaccines, if developed, might provide a potent way to control cancer. The articles in the HPV thematic series show success in developing and applying a vaccine against human papilloma virus (HPV). A vaccine is also available against hepatitis B virus (HBV), which causes liver cancer. These vaccines augment the tools available to control the associated cancers. Scientific endeavor continues for six other cancer-associated infections, mostly viruses. Not surprisingly, debate about the safety of vaccines targeting cancer has been triggered in the scientific community. Questions about safety have been raised for those populations where other means to control these cancers may be available. Although it is difficult to quantify risk from vaccines in individuals where other cancer control services exist, it is likely to be low. Vaccines are much safer today than before. Technological advancement in vaccine development and manufacture and improved regulatory review and efficient distribution have minimized substantially the risk for harm from vaccines. Formal and informal debate about the pros and cons of applying vaccines as a cancer control tools is ongoing in scientific journals and on the web. Infectious Agents and Cancer

  5. DIVA vaccination strategies for avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Suarez, David L

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination for both low pathogenicity avian influenza and highly pathogenic avian influenza is commonly used by countries that have become endemic for avian influenza virus, but stamping-out policies are still common for countries with recently introduced disease. Stamping-out policies of euthanatizing infected and at-risk flocks has been an effective control tool, but it comes at a high social and economic cost. Efforts to identify alternative ways to respond to outbreaks without widespread stamping out has become a goal for organizations like the World Organisation for Animal Health. A major issue with vaccination for avian influenza is trade considerations because countries that vaccinate are often considered to be endemic for the disease and they typically lose their export markets. Primarily as a tool to promote trade, the concept of DIVA (differentiate infected from vaccinated animals) has been considered for avian influenza, but the goal for trade is to differentiate vaccinated and not-infected from vaccinated and infected animals because trading partners are unwilling to accept infected birds. Several different strategies have been investigated for a DIVA strategy, but each has advantages and disadvantages. A review of current knowledge on the research and implementation of the DIVA strategy will be discussed with possible ways to implement this strategy in the field. The increased desire for a workable DIVA strategy may lead to one of these ideas moving from the experimental to the practical.

  6. Dengue vaccine development: strategies and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Lakshmy; Pillai, Madhavan Radhakrishna; Nair, Radhakrishnan R

    2015-03-01

    Infection with dengue virus may result in dengue fever or a more severe outcome, such as dengue hemorrhagic syndrome/shock. Dengue virus infection poses a threat to endemic regions for four reasons: the presence of four serotypes, each with the ability to cause a similar disease outcome, including fatality; difficulties related to vector control; the lack of specific treatment; and the nonavailability of a suitable vaccine. Vaccine development is considered challenging due to the severity of the disease observed in individuals who have acquired dengue-specific immunity, either passively or actively. Therefore, the presence of vaccine-induced immunity against a particular serotype may prime an individual to severe disease on exposure to dengue virus. Vaccine development strategies include live attenuated vaccines, chimeric, DNA-based, subunit, and inactivated vaccines. Each of the candidates is in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. Issues pertaining to selection pressures, viral interaction, and safety still need to be evaluated in order to induce a complete protective immune response against all four serotypes. This review highlights the various strategies that have been employed in vaccine development, and identifies the obstacles to producing a safe and effective vaccine.

  7. Adjuvants for peptide-based cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Khong, Hiep; Overwijk, Willem W

    2016-01-01

    Cancer therapies based on T cells have shown impressive clinical benefit. In particular, immune checkpoint blockade therapies with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1/PD-L1 are causing dramatic tumor shrinkage and prolonged patient survival in a variety of cancers. However, many patients do not benefit, possibly due to insufficient spontaneous T cell reactivity against their tumors and/or lacking immune cell infiltration to tumor site. Such tumor-specific T cell responses could be induced through anti-cancer vaccination; but despite great success in animal models, only a few of many cancer vaccine trials have demonstrated robust clinical benefit. One reason for this difference may be the use of potent, effective vaccine adjuvants in animal models, vs. the use of safe, but very weak, vaccine adjuvants in clinical trials. As vaccine adjuvants dictate the type and magnitude of the T cell response after vaccination, it is critical to understand how they work to design safe, but also effective, cancer vaccines for clinical use. Here we discuss current insights into the mechanism of action and practical application of vaccine adjuvants, with a focus on peptide-based cancer vaccines. PMID:27660710

  8. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN CANCER VACCINES1

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Banchereau, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The adoptive transfer of cancer antigen-specific effector T cells in patients can result in tumor rejection, thereby illustrating the immune system potential for cancer therapy. Ideally, one would like to directly induce efficient tumor-specific effector and memory T cells through vaccination. Therapeutic vaccines have two objectives: priming antigen-specific T cells and reprogramming memory T cells, i.e., a transformation from one type of immunity to another (e.g., regulatory to cytotoxic). Recent successful phase III clinical trials showing benefit to the patients revived cancer vaccines. Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential in generation of immune responses and as such represent targets and vectors for vaccination. We have learned that different DC subsets elicit different T cells. Similarly, different activation methods result in DCs able to elicit distinct T cells. We contend that a careful manipulation of activated DCs will allow cancer immunotherapists to produce the next generation of highly efficient cancer vaccines. PMID:21248270

  9. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-14

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  10. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  11. Emerging Respiratory Viruses: Challenges and Vaccine Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gillim-Ross, Laura; Subbarao, Kanta

    2006-01-01

    The current threat of avian influenza to the human population, the potential for the reemergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-associated coronavirus, and the identification of multiple novel respiratory viruses underline the necessity for the development of therapeutic and preventive strategies to combat viral infection. Vaccine development is a key component in the prevention of widespread viral infection and in the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with many viral infections. In this review we describe the different approaches currently being evaluated in the development of vaccines against SARS-associated coronavirus and avian influenza viruses and also highlight the many obstacles encountered in the development of these vaccines. Lessons learned from current vaccine studies, coupled with our increasing knowledge of the host and viral factors involved in viral pathogenesis, will help to increase the speed with which efficacious vaccines targeting newly emerging viral pathogens can be developed. PMID:17041137

  12. Cancer Vaccines and Carbohydrate Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Lum, Michelle; Vijay, Geraldine; Jain, Miten; Almogren, Adel; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) result from the aberrant glycosylation that is seen with transformation to a tumor cell. The carbohydrate antigens that have been found to be tumor-associated include the mucin related Tn, Sialyl Tn, and Thomsen-Friedenreich antigens, the blood group Lewis related LewisY, Sialyl LewisX and Sialyl LewisA, and LewisX, (also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1, SSEA-1), the glycosphingolipids Globo H and stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3), the sialic acid containing glycosphingolipids, the gangliosides GD2, GD3, GM2, fucosyl GM1, and Neu5GcGM3, and polysialic acid. Recent developments have furthered our understanding of the T-independent type II response that is seen in response to carbohydrate antigens. The selection of a vaccine target antigen is based on not only the presence of the antigen in a variety of tumor tissues but also on the role this antigen plays in tumor growth and metastasis. These roles for TACAs are being elucidated. Newly acquired knowledge in understanding the T-independent immune response and in understanding the key roles that carbohydrates play in metastasis are being applied in attempts to develop an effective vaccine response to TACAs. The role of each of the above mentioned carbohydrate antigens in cancer growth and metastasis and vaccine attempts using these antigens will be described. PMID:21964054

  13. Are Fewer Cervical Cancer Screenings Needed After HPV Vaccine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Fewer Cervical Cancer Screenings Needed After HPV Vaccine? Less testing could reduce risk of false positives ... cervical cancer screening depends on the type of vaccine she had, the researchers said. Women vaccinated with ...

  14. Current Perspectives in Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Arlen, Philip M.; Gulley, James L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of vaccines as a potential therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer has been extensively studied. Recent advances include identification and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, novel vaccine delivery systems, and the combination of vaccines with immune stimulants and other therapeutic modalities. Immunotherapy as a modality for treatment of prostate cancer has received significant attention. There are several characteristics of prostate cancer that make it an ideal target for immunotherapy. Prostate cancer’s relative indolence allows sufficient time to generate immune responses, which may take weeks or months to mount. In addition, prostate cancer-associated antigens direct the immune response to prostate cancer cells, thus sparing normal vital tissue. This review focuses on promising new vaccines and novel perspectives in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:19719454

  15. Transloading of tumor cells with foreign major histocompatibility complex class I peptide ligand: a novel general strategy for the generation of potent cancer vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, W; Steinlein, P; Buschle, M; Schweighoffer, T; Herbst, E; Mechtler, K; Kirlappos, H; Birnstiel, M L

    1996-01-01

    The major hurdle to be cleared in active immunotherapy of cancer is the poor immunogenicity of cancer cells. In previous attempts to overcome this problem, whole tumor cells have been used as vaccines, either admixed with adjuvant(s) or genetically engineered to express nonself proteins or immunomodulatory factors before application. We have developed a novel approach to generate an immunogeneic, highly effective vaccine: major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-positive cancer cells are administered together with MHC class I-matched peptide ligands of foreign, nonself origin, generated by a procedure we term transloading. Murine tumor lines of the H2-Kd or the H2-Db haplotype, melanoma M-3 and B16-F10, respectively, as well as colon carcinoma CT-26 (H2-Kd), were transloaded with MHC-matched influenza virus-derived peptides and applied as irradiated vaccines. Mice bearing a deposit of live M-3 melanoma cells were efficiently cured by this treatment. In the CT-26 colon carcinoma and the B16-F10 melanoma, high efficacies were obtained against tumor challenge, suggesting the universal applicability of this new type of vaccine. With foreign peptide ligands adapted to the requirements of a desired MHC class I haplotype, this concept may be used for the treatment of human cancers. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8790404

  16. Critical issues in cancer vaccine trial design.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Guy T; Kohrt, Holbrook E; Peoples, George E

    2015-12-16

    As the clinical experience with cancer vaccines and cancer immunotherapy increases, there are important lessons that can be learned from the successes and failures of past trials. Many lessons affect the design and conduct of clinical trials themselves. Appropriate patient selection, clinical trial design, immunologic monitoring, and appropriate endpoints are all essential to the efficiency and success of bringing cancer vaccines from conception to clinical use.

  17. Therapeutic vaccination strategies to treat nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham S; Steven, Neil M

    2016-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects most people worldwide. EBV has oncogenic potential and is strongly associated with several lymphomas and carcinomas, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), that together total 200,000 cases of cancer each year. All EBV-associated cancers express viral proteins that allow highly selective immunotherapeutic targeting of the malignant cells. A number of therapeutic EBV vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with evidence of immune boosting and clinical responses in NPC patients. Therapeutic vaccination could be used after adoptive T-cell transfer to increase and sustain the number of infused T-cells or combined with immunotherapies acting at different stages of the cancer immunity cycle to increase efficacy. The therapeutic EBV vaccines tested to date have been well tolerated with minimal off-target toxicity. A safe therapeutic vaccine that was also able to be mass produced could, in principle, be used to vaccinate large numbers of patients after first line therapy to reduce recurrence. PMID:27121883

  18. [Recent advance in carbohydrate-based cancer vaccines].

    PubMed

    Huo, Chang-Xin; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2012-03-01

    The abnormal glycans expressing on the surface of tumor cells are good targets to develop carbohydrate-based anti-cancer vaccines. However, one of the major problems is that carbohydrate antigens possess weak immunogenicity. This review summarizes the recent efforts to overcome this problem: glycoconjugates produced by coupling the carbohydrate antigens and proper carrier proteins improve their immunogenicity, many glycoconjugates have entered clinical trials; the vaccines become chemically well-defined when coupling the carbohydrate antigens with a T-cell peptide epitope and an immunostimulant to form fully synthetic multi-component glycoconjugate vaccines; the modification of carbohydrate antigens in combination with the technology of metabolic oligosaccharide engineering of tumor cells induces a strong immune response; and the fact that the antibodies elicited against the unnatural carbohydrate antigens can recognize the native carbohydrate antigens on tumor cells provides a new promising strategy for the development of anti-cancer vaccines.

  19. Is cancer vaccination feasible at older age?

    PubMed Central

    Gravekamp, Claudia; Jahangir, Arthee

    2014-01-01

    Age-related defects of the immune system are responsible for T cell unresponsiveness to cancer vaccination at older age. Major immune defects at older age are lack of naïve T cells, impaired activation pathways of T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC), and age-related changes in the tumor microenvironment (TME). This raises the question whether cancer vaccination is feasible at older age. We compared various cancer vaccine studies at young and old age, thereby focusing on the importance of both innate and adaptive immune responses for cancer immunotherapy. These analyses suggest that creating an immune-stimulating environment with help of the innate immune system may improve T cell responses in cancer vaccination at older age. PMID:24509231

  20. Strategies to eradicate minimal residual disease in small cell lung cancer: high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and BEC2 plus BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Krug, L M; Grant, S C; Miller, V A; Ng, K K; Kris, M G

    1999-10-01

    In the last 25 years, treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has improved with advances in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Standard chemotherapy regimens can yield 80% to 90% response rates and some cures when combined with thoracic irradiation in limited-stage patients. Nonetheless, small cell lung cancer has a high relapse rate due to drug resistance; this has resulted in poor survival for most patients. Attacking this problem requires a unique approach to eliminate resistant disease remaining after induction therapy. This review will focus on three potential strategies: high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and BEC2 plus BCG vaccination.

  1. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  2. Implementing strategies for hepatitis B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Fallahian, Farahnaz; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri

    2010-01-01

    This study reviewed the effects of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination programs on disease control and the need, if any, to introduce additional strategies taking into account the various risk factors of transmission. We performed a search conducted on vaccine administration, hepatitis B risk factors and the impact of HBV vaccination on prevention of disease, using the electronic database MEDLINE (1987 to 2008), EMBASE, OVID, Google (for Local websites and medical journals), Websites of Iranian universities and Iran medex in English and Persian language. We recommend in addition, to routinely practice the Extended Program of Immunization (EPI) schedules for infants as well as implementing HBV vaccination in selected adolescents at risk for HBV infection. Routine screening and immunization is mandatory in the following people: pregnant women and adults at risk for HBV infection including health-care workers, police, fire fighters, barbers, people with certain risk behaviors such as inmates of correctional facilities, injection-drug users and persons at risk for sexual transmission, as well as patients exposed to blood and blood products and those on chronic hemodialysis. Vaccine providers in areas with high rates of chronic HBV infection should assess infection screening by performing serologic tests in susceptible subjects to identify persons who require counseling and management. Also, additional studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of currently employed immunization strategies. PMID:20061687

  3. Therapeutic cancer vaccines: Using unique antigens

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jonathan J.

    2004-01-01

    A decade ago, it seemed rational that our rapidly increasing knowledge of the molecular identities of tumor antigens and a deeper understanding of basic immunology would point the way to an effective therapeutic cancer vaccine. Significant progress has been made, but we do not yet have a cancer vaccine that can reliably and consistently induce tumor destruction or improve patient survival. Random mutations in cancer cells generate unique antigens in each individual, and this may be important in terms of generating a therapeutic immune response. Autologous heat shock protein–peptide complexes produced from each patient's tumor is a logical personalized approach that may obviate the need to identify the unique antigens contained in the individual vaccine. Heat shock proteins elicit adaptive and innate immune responses and have been tested in a variety of animal models and different human cancers. Activity has been seen in several animal studies. Early-phase human studies have also suggested some activity in certain cancers. Large, randomized phase 3 studies are ongoing, and these will effectively answer the question of efficacy regarding this approach to therapeutic vaccination. There are sufficient data to support the notion that cancer vaccines can induce anti-tumor immune responses in humans with cancer. How best to translate this increase in immune responsiveness to consistently and reproducibly induce objective cancer regression or increased survival remains unclear at this time. PMID:15297620

  4. Study Hints At HPV Vaccine's Cancer Prevention Promise

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159696.html Study Hints at HPV Vaccine's Cancer Prevention Promise Fewer vaccinated young women had ... 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine appears to prevent abnormalities that can lead to ...

  5. Dengue Fever: Causes, Complications, and Vaccine Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a highly endemic infectious disease of the tropical countries and is rapidly becoming a global burden. It is caused by any of the 4 serotypes of dengue virus and is transmitted within humans through female Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease varies from mild fever to severe conditions of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome. Globalization, increased air travel, and unplanned urbanization have led to increase in the rate of infection and helped dengue to expand its geographic and demographic distribution. Dengue vaccine development has been a challenging task due to the existence of four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes, each capable of eliciting cross-reactive and disease-enhancing antibody response against the remaining three serotypes. Recently, Sanofi Pasteur's chimeric live-attenuated dengue vaccine candidate has been approved in Mexico, Brazil, and Philippines for usage in adults between 9 and 45 years of age. The impact of its limited application to the public health system needs to be evaluated. Simultaneously, the restricted application of this vaccine candidate warrants continued efforts in developing a dengue vaccine candidate which is additionally efficacious for infants and naïve individuals. In this context, alternative strategies of developing a designed vaccine candidate which does not allow production of enhancing antibodies should be explored, as it may expand the umbrella of efficacy to include infants and naïve individuals. PMID:27525287

  6. Dengue Fever: Causes, Complications, and Vaccine Strategies.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Niyati; Khanna, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a highly endemic infectious disease of the tropical countries and is rapidly becoming a global burden. It is caused by any of the 4 serotypes of dengue virus and is transmitted within humans through female Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease varies from mild fever to severe conditions of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome. Globalization, increased air travel, and unplanned urbanization have led to increase in the rate of infection and helped dengue to expand its geographic and demographic distribution. Dengue vaccine development has been a challenging task due to the existence of four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes, each capable of eliciting cross-reactive and disease-enhancing antibody response against the remaining three serotypes. Recently, Sanofi Pasteur's chimeric live-attenuated dengue vaccine candidate has been approved in Mexico, Brazil, and Philippines for usage in adults between 9 and 45 years of age. The impact of its limited application to the public health system needs to be evaluated. Simultaneously, the restricted application of this vaccine candidate warrants continued efforts in developing a dengue vaccine candidate which is additionally efficacious for infants and naïve individuals. In this context, alternative strategies of developing a designed vaccine candidate which does not allow production of enhancing antibodies should be explored, as it may expand the umbrella of efficacy to include infants and naïve individuals. PMID:27525287

  7. Prophylactic HPV vaccination and anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Chigurupati, Nagasudha L; Fung, Leslie

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing. High risk populations include HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), HIV-negative MSM, HIV-positive women and heterosexual men and women with a history of cervical cancer. HPV has been detected in over 90% of anal cancers. HPV16 is the most common genotype detected in about 70% of anal cancers. The quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine has been demonstrated to prevent vaccine associated persistent anal HPV infections as well as anal intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (AIN2+) in young MSM not previously infected. A retrospective analysis also suggests that qHPV vaccination of older MSM treated for AIN2+ may significantly decrease the risk of recurrence of the AIN2+. The HPV types detected in anal cancer are included in the 9-valent vaccine. Thus, the 9-valent HPV vaccine, when administered to boys and girls prior to the onset of sexual activity, should effectively prevent anal cancer. PMID:26933898

  8. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Herrada, Andrés A; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-11-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful "danger signals" by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance.

  9. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Herrada, Andrés A.; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful “danger signals” by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance. PMID:23111166

  10. Vaccination strategies for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Ramos, Marina; von Euler Chelpin, Marianne; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease in the world, but there is currently no available cure for it. Current treatments only alleviate some of the symptoms for a few years, but they become ineffective in the long run and do not stop the disease. Therefore it is of outmost importance to develop therapeutic strategies that can prevent, stop, or cure Parkinson disease. A very promising target for these therapies is the peripheral immune system due to its probable involvement in the disease and its potential as a tool to modulate neuroinflammation. But for such strategies to be successful, we need to understand the particular state of the peripheral immune system during Parkinson disease in order to avoid its weaknesses. In this review we examine the available data regarding how dopamine regulates the peripheral immune system and how this regulation is affected in Parkinson disease; the specific cytokine profiles observed during disease progression and the alterations documented to date in patients’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also review the different strategies used in Parkinson disease animal models to modulate the adaptive immune response to salvage dopaminergic neurons from cell death. After analyzing the evidence, we hypothesize the need to prime the immune system to restore natural tolerance against α-synuclein in Parkinson disease, including at the same time B and T cells, so that T cells can reprogram microglia activation to a beneficial pattern and B cell/IgG can help neurons cope with the pathological forms of α-synuclein. PMID:24670306

  11. Strategies for designing and optimizing new generation vaccines.

    PubMed

    Berzofsky, J A; Ahlers, J D; Belyakov, I M

    2001-12-01

    Although the field of immunology developed in part from the early vaccine studies of Edward Jenner, Louis Pasteur and others, vaccine development had largely become the province of virologists and other microbiologists, because the model for classic vaccines was to isolate the pathogen and prepare a killed or attenuated pathogen vaccine. Only recently has vaccinology returned to the realm of immunology, because a new understanding of immune mechanisms has allowed translation of basic discoveries into vaccine strategies. PMID:11905830

  12. Adenoviral vector-based strategies against infectious disease and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviral vectors are widely employed against infectious diseases or cancers, as they can elicit specific antibody responses and T cell responses when they are armed with foreign genes as vaccine carriers, and induce apoptosis of the cancer cells when they are genetically modified for cancer therapy. In this review, we summarize the biological characteristics of adenovirus (Ad) and the latest development of Ad vector-based strategies for the prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases or cancers. Strategies to circumvent the pre-existing neutralizing antibodies which dampen the immunogenicity of Ad-based vaccines are also discussed. PMID:27105067

  13. American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Howard H; Chuang, Linus T; duPont, Nefertiti C; Eng, Cathy; Foxhall, Lewis E; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Blanke, Charles D

    2016-05-20

    American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the leading medical professional oncology society, is committed to lessening the burden of cancer and as such will promote underused interventions that have the potential to save millions of lives through cancer prevention. As the main providers of cancer care worldwide, our patients, their families, and our communities look to us for guidance regarding all things cancer related, including cancer prevention. Through this statement and accompanying recommendations, ASCO hopes to increase awareness of the tremendous global impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) -caused cancers, refocus the discussion of HPV vaccination on its likely ability to prevent millions of cancer deaths, and increase HPV vaccination uptake via greater involvement of oncology professionals in ensuring accurate public discourse about HPV vaccination and calling for the implementation of concrete strategies to address barriers to vaccine access and acceptance.

  14. Recent Development in Carbohydrate Based Anti-cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaojun; Huang, Xuefei

    2012-01-01

    The development of carbohydrate based anti-cancer vaccines is of high current interests. Herein, the latest development in this exciting field is reviewed. After a general introduction about tumor associated carbohydrate antigens and immune responses, the review is focused on the various strategies that have been developed to enhance the immunogenecity of these antigens. The results from animal studies and clinical trials are presented. PMID:22468019

  15. Cancer vaccines: an update with special focus on ganglioside antigens.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Roberto J; Guthmann, Marcel D; Gabri, Mariano R; Carnero, Ariel J L; Alonso, Daniel F; Fainboim, Leonardo; Gomez, Daniel E

    2002-01-01

    the (CIM) from La Havana, Cuba, to developed new strategies for specific active immunotherapy. The project included two ganglioside based vaccines and one anti-idiotypic vaccine. We focused on two antigens: first GM3, an ubiquitous antigen which is over-expressed in several epithelial tumor types; and a second one, N-Glycolyl-GM3 a more molecule, not being expressed in normal tissues and recently found in several neoplastic cells, in particular breast, melanoma and neuroectodermal cancer cells. We developed two vaccines, one with each antigen, both using proteins derived from the outer membrane proteins (OMP) of Neisseria Meningitidis B, as carriers. We developed also the 1E10 vaccine; an anti-idiotype vaccine designed to mimic the N-Glycolyl-GM3 gangliosides. This monoclonal antibody is an Ab2-type-antibody which recognizes the Ab1 antibody called P3, the latter is a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes gangliosides as antigens. Since 1998 we initiated a clinical development program for these three compounds. Results of the phase I clinical trials proved that the three vaccines were safe and able to elicit specific antibody responses. In addition we were able to demonstrate the activation of the cellular arm of the immune response in patients treated with the GM3 vaccine. Although phase I trials are not designed to evaluate antitumor efficacy, it was encouraging to observe tumor shrinkage in some patients treated both with the GM3 and N-Glycolyl-GM3 vaccines. We have already begun a phase II program in several neoplastic diseases, with all three vaccines.

  16. Clinical Development of the E75 Vaccine in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Guy T; Gall, Victor; Peoples, George E; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-04-01

    E75 is an immunogenic peptide derived from the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein. A large amount of preclinical work evaluated the immunogenicity of E75, after which phase I trials investigated using E75 mixed with an immunoadjuvant as a vaccine. Those studies showed the vaccine to be safe and capable of stimulating an antigen-specific immune response. Subsequent to that, our group conducted trials evaluating E75 + granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the adjuvant setting. The studies enrolled node-positive and high-risk node-negative breast cancer patients, with the goal being to determine if vaccination could decrease the recurrence risk. The studies included 187 evaluable patients: 108 vaccinated ones and 79 controls. The 5-year disease-free survival for the vaccinated patients was 89.7% compared to 80.2% for the control patients, a 48% reduction in relative risk of recurrence. Based on these data, E75 + GM-CSF, now known as NeuVax™, is being evaluated in a phase III trial. In this article, we review preclinical data and results of the early-phase trials and provide an update on the ongoing phase III study. We also present additional strategies for employing the vaccine to be included as a component of combination immunotherapy as well as in the setting of ductal carcinoma in situ as an initial step towards primary prevention. PMID:27239173

  17. Anti-idiotype vaccine against cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya-Chatterjee, M; Chatterjee, S K; Foon, K A

    2000-09-15

    Immunization with anti-idiotype (Id) antibodies represents a novel new approach to active immunotherapy. Extensive studies in animal tumor models have demonstrated the efficacy of anti-Id vaccines in preventing tumor growth and curing mice with established tumor. We have developed and characterized several murine monoclonal anti-Id antibodies (Ab2) which mimic distinct human tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and can be used as surrogate antigens for triggering active anti-tumor immunity in cancer patients. Encouraging results have been obtained in recent clinical trials. In this article, we will review the existing literature and summarize our own findings showing the potential of this approach for various human cancers. We will also discuss where anti-Id vaccines may perform better than traditional antigen vaccines. PMID:10996628

  18. Strategies intended to address vaccine hesitancy: Review of published reviews.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Eve; Gagnon, Dominique; MacDonald, Noni E

    2015-08-14

    When faced with vaccine hesitancy, public health authorities are looking for effective strategies to address this issue. In this paper, the findings of 15 published literature reviews or meta-analysis that have examined the effectiveness of different interventions to reduce vaccine hesitancy and/or to enhance vaccine acceptance are presented and discussed. From the literature, there is no strong evidence to recommend any specific intervention to address vaccine hesitancy/refusal. The reviewed studies included interventions with diverse content and approaches that were implemented in different settings and targeted various populations. Few interventions were directly targeted to vaccine hesitant individuals. Given the paucity of information on effective strategies to address vaccine hesitancy, when interventions are implemented, planning a rigorous evaluation of their impact on vaccine hesitancy/vaccine acceptance will be essential.

  19. Potential influence of seasonal influenza vaccination requirement versus traditional vaccine promotion strategies on unvaccinated healthcare personnel.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mark G; McIntyre, Anne F; Naleway, Allison L; Black, Carla; Kennedy, Erin D; Ball, Sarah; Walker, Deborah Klein; Henkle, Emily M; Gaglani, Manjusha J

    2013-08-20

    In a prospective cohort study of 1670 healthcare personnel (HCP) providing direct patient care at Scott & White Healthcare in Texas and Kaiser Permanente Northwest in Oregon and Washington, we examined the potential impact of twelve vaccine promotion strategies on the likelihood of being vaccinated. Internet-based surveys were conducted at enrollment (Fall, 2010) and at post-season (Spring, 2011), which asked HCP whether twelve vaccination promotion strategies would make them "much less" to "much more" likely to be vaccinated next season (on a 5-point Likert scale). Overall, 366 of 1670 HCP (22%) were unvaccinated. Half (50%) of unvaccinated HCP self-reported that a vaccination requirement would make them more likely to be vaccinated and most (62%) identified at least one strategy other than a vaccination requirement that would make them more likely to be vaccinated. In sub-groups of unvaccinated HCPs with specific barriers to vaccination, about one in three (range=27-35%) indicated that interventions targeting specific vaccination barrier would increase the likelihood they would be vaccinated. However, in all cases, significantly more unvaccinated HCP reported that a vaccination requirement would increase the likelihood of vaccination than reported a targeted intervention would have this effect (range in difference scores=+11-23%).

  20. Theory and strategy for Pneumococcal vaccines in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Namkoong, Ho; Ishii, Makoto; Funatsu, Yohei; Kimizuka, Yoshifumi; Yagi, Kazuma; Asami, Takahiro; Asakura, Takanori; Suzuki, Shoji; Kamo, Testuro; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is the fourth-leading cause of death globally, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most important causative pathogen. Because the incidence of pneumococcal diseases is likely to increase with the aging society, we should determine an optimal strategy for pneumococcal vaccination. While consensus indicates that 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine prevents invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD), its effects on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remain controversial. Recently, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was released. The latest clinical study (CAPiTA study) showed that PCV13 reduced vaccine-type CAP and IPD. Based on these results, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended initial vaccination with PCV13 for the elderly. Scientific evidence regarding immunosenescence is needed to determine a more ideal vaccination strategy for the elderly with impaired innate and adaptive immunity. Continuing research on the cost effectiveness of new vaccine strategies considering constantly changing epidemiology is also warranted. PMID:26406267

  1. Theory and strategy for Pneumococcal vaccines in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Ho; Ishii, Makoto; Funatsu, Yohei; Kimizuka, Yoshifumi; Yagi, Kazuma; Asami, Takahiro; Asakura, Takanori; Suzuki, Shoji; Kamo, Testuro; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is the fourth-leading cause of death globally, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most important causative pathogen. Because the incidence of pneumococcal diseases is likely to increase with the aging society, we should determine an optimal strategy for pneumococcal vaccination. While consensus indicates that 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine prevents invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD), its effects on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remain controversial. Recently, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was released. The latest clinical study (CAPiTA study) showed that PCV13 reduced vaccine-type CAP and IPD. Based on these results, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended initial vaccination with PCV13 for the elderly. Scientific evidence regarding immunosenescence is needed to determine a more ideal vaccination strategy for the elderly with impaired innate and adaptive immunity. Continuing research on the cost effectiveness of new vaccine strategies considering constantly changing epidemiology is also warranted. PMID:26406267

  2. Evolution of animal models in cancer vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei-Zen; Jones, Richard F; Juhasz, Csaba; Gibson, Heather; Veenstra, Jesse

    2015-12-16

    Advances in cancer vaccine development are facilitated by animal models reflecting key features of human cancer and its interface with host immunity. Several series of transplantable preneoplastic and neoplastic mouse mammary lesions have been used to delineate mechanisms of anti-tumor immunity. Mimicking immune tolerance to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) such as HER2/neu, transgenic mice developing spontaneous mammary tumors are strong model systems for pre-clinical vaccine testing. In these models, HER2 DNA vaccines are easily administered, well-tolerated, and induce both humoral and cellular immunity. Although engineered mouse strains have advanced cancer immunotherapy, basic shortcomings remain. For example, multiple mouse strains have to be tested to recapitulate genetic regulation of immune tolerance in humans. Outbred domestic felines more closely parallel humans in the natural development of HER2 positive breast cancer and their varying genetic background. Electrovaccination with heterologous HER2 DNA induces robust adaptive immune responses in cats. Importantly, homologous feline HER2 DNA with a single amino acid substitution elicits unique antibodies to feline mammary tumor cells, unlocking a new vaccine principle. As an alternative approach to targeted vaccination, non-surgical tumor ablation such as cryoablation induces anti-tumor immunity via in situ immunization, particularly when combined with toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist. As strategies for vaccination advance, non-invasive monitoring of host response becomes imperative. As an example, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) scanning following administration of tryptophan metabolism tracer [11C]-alpha-methyl-tryptophan (AMT) provides non-invasive imaging of both tumor growth and metabolic activities. Because AMT is a substrate of indoleamine-pyrrole 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme that produces the immune regulatory molecule kynurenine, AMT imaging can provide

  3. Universal cancer vaccine: an update on the design of cancer vaccines generated from endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lokhov, Petr G; Balashova, Elena E

    2013-07-01

    Among the potential cancer immunotherapies, vaccination against antigens expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature represents one of the most attractive options because this approach may prevent the growth of any solid tumor. Therefore, endothelial cells can be used as a source of antigens for developing a so-called "universal" cancer vaccine. Unfortunately, efficient endothelial cell-based cancer vaccines have not yet been developed because previous approaches utilized direct endothelial cell immunizations which is not effective and can result in the elicitation of autoimmune responses associated with systemic autoimmune vasculitis. Recently, the heterogeneity of the endothelial cell surface was defined using an in vitro system as a means of developing antiangiogenic cancer vaccines. This analysis demonstrated that tumors induced specific changes to the microvascular of human endothelial cell (HMEC) surface thereby providing a basis for the design of endothelial cell-based vaccines that directly target the tumor endothelium. (1) This commentary further describes HMEC heterogeneity from the perspective of designing an endothelial cell-based universal (for the treatment of all solid tumors) cancer vaccine with high immunogenicity that does not pose the risk of eliciting autoimmunity.

  4. Trial watch: DNA vaccines for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Vacchelli, Erika; Garcia, Pauline; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-04-01

    The foundation of modern vaccinology dates back to the 1790s, when the English physician Edward Jenner uncovered the tremendous medical potential of prophylactic vaccination. Jenner's work ignited a wave of nationwide vaccination campaigns abating the incidence of multiple life-threatening infectious diseases and culminating with the eradication of natural smallpox virus, which was definitively certified by the WHO in 1980. The possibility of using vaccines against cancer was first proposed at the end of the 19th century by Paul Ehrlich and William Coley. However, it was not until the 1990s that such a hypothesis began to be intensively investigated, following the realization that the immune system is not completely unresponsive to tumors and that neoplastic cells express immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Nowadays, anticancer vaccines are rapidly moving from the bench to the bedside, and a few prophylactic and therapeutic preparations have already been approved by FDA for use in humans. In this setting, one interesting approach is constituted by DNA vaccines, i.e., TAA-encoding circularized DNA constructs, often of bacterial origin, that are delivered to patients as such or by means of specific vectors, including (but not limited to) liposomal preparations, nanoparticles, bacteria and viruses. The administration of DNA vaccines is most often performed via the intramuscular or subcutaneous route and is expected to cause (1) the endogenous synthesis of the TAA by myocytes and/or resident antigen-presenting cells; (2) the presentation of TAA-derived peptides on the cell surface, in association with MHC class I molecules; and (3) the activation of potentially therapeutic tumor-specific immune responses. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating DNA vaccines as therapeutic interventions against cancer. PMID:23734328

  5. Prophylactic HPV vaccines: prospects for eliminating ano-genital cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, M

    2007-01-01

    Virtually all cases of cervical cancer and its precursor intra-epithelial lesions are a result of infection with one or other of a subset of genital human papillomaviruses (HPVs), suggesting that prevention of HPV infection by prophylactic vaccination would be a highly effective anticancer strategy. Two HPV L1 virus-like particle vaccines have been developed, a quadrivalent HPV16/18/6/11 product and a bivalent HPV16/18 product; both have been shown to be highly immunogenic with a good safety profile and 100% efficacy against HPV16/18-related high-grade cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3), implying that they will be effective at preventing HPV16/18-related cervical cancer. PMID:17375045

  6. Clinical development of MVA-based therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Acres, Bruce; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves

    2008-09-01

    Tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been formulated into vaccines that, combined with adjuvants, cytokines or other strategies to boost the immune response, are now in clinical development. Both humoral and cellular immune responses to TAAs have been generated using these vaccines. This approach relies on the patient's own immune system generating an effective anti-tumor immune response. The advantage of this over therapy with monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of cancer is that multiple antigenic epitopes can be involved and the immune system is able to adapt to the most effective antigenic specificity for tumor growth control and rejection. In this article, we describe the clinical use of vaccinia virus, in particular modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA), to express TAAs in vivo and to stimulate an effective immune response to the cancer antigens. PMID:18767940

  7. Regulatory considerations for clinical development of cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Heelan, Bridget Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer vaccines are aimed at stimulating an immune response to tumor tissue. There is a high level of clinical activity in this rapidly advancing field with over 1,400 trials registered on Clincaltrials.gov. The recent approval of Sipuleucel-T which is the first cancer vaccine approved in the US and EU has encouraged developers in this field. In contrast to more established approaches for treating cancer such as chemotherapy, regulatory guidelines have been developed relatively recently for cancer vaccines. These guidelines advise on general clinical requirements. As there is an increase in innovative strategies with novel products, a 2-way dialog with regulators is recommended on a case-by-case basis to justify the clinical development plan, taking into account specific quality issues related to the product(s) in development. It is important that the rationale, background and justification for the planned development is convincing when interacting with the regulatory authorities, to enable drug developers and regulators to reach agreement. PMID:25625933

  8. A Generic Polymer-Protein Ligation Strategy for Vaccine Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lybaert, Lien; Vanparijs, Nane; Fierens, Kaat; Schuijs, Martijn; Nuhn, Lutz; Lambrecht, Bart N; De Geest, Bruno G

    2016-03-14

    Although the field of cancer immunotherapy is intensively investigated, there is still a need for generic strategies that allow easy, mild and efficient formulation of vaccine antigens. Here we report on a generic polymer-protein ligation strategy to formulate protein antigens into reversible polymeric conjugates for enhanced uptake by dendritic cells and presentation to CD8 T-cells. A N-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide (HPMA)-based copolymer was synthesized via RAFT polymerization followed by introduction of pyridyldisulfide moieties. To enhance ligation efficiency to ovalbumin, which is used as a model protein antigen, protected thiols were introduced onto lysine residues and deprotected in situ in the presence of the polymer. The ligation efficiency was compared for both the thiol-modified versus unmodified ovalbumin, and the reversibility was confirmed. Furthermore, the obtained nanoconjugates were tested in vitro for their interaction and association with dendritic cells, showing enhanced cellular uptake and antigen cross-presentation to CD8 T-cells.

  9. A simple analysis of vaccination strategies for rubella.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Bruno

    2011-07-01

    We consider an SEIR epidemic model with vertical transmission introduced by Li, Smith and Wang, [23], and apply optimal control theory to assess the effects of vaccination strategies on the model dynamics. The strategy is chosen to minimize the total number of infectious individuals and the cost associated with vaccination. We derive the optimality system and solve it numerically. The theoretical findings are then used to simulate a vaccination campaign for rubella in China. PMID:21675803

  10. Antibodies: At The Nexus of Antigens and Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Steplewski, Zenon; Thurin, Magdalena; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2015-07-15

    This review describes the development of monoclonal antibodies and the inception of their use in cancer therapy, their impact on defining cancer biomarkers, and their structural utility in new cancer vaccine development.

  11. Whole Cell Vaccines — Past Progress and Future Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Bridget P.; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines have shown success in curing tumors in pre-clinical models. Accumulating evidence also supports their ability to induce immune responses in patients. In many cases, these responses correlate with improved clinical outcomes. However, cancer vaccines have not yet demonstrated their true potential in clinical trials. This is likely due to the difficulty in mounting a significant antitumor response in patients with advanced disease because of preexisting tolerance mechanisms that are actively turning off immune recognition in cancer patients. This review will examine the recent progress being made in the design and implementation of whole cell cancer vaccines, one vaccine approach that simultaneously targets multiple tumor antigens to activate the immune response. These vaccines have been shown to induce antigen specific T cell responses. Pre-clinical studies evaluating these vaccines given in sequence with other agents and cancer treatment modalities support the use of immunomodulating doses of chemotherapy and radiation, as well as immune modulating pathway targeted monoclonal antibodies, to enhance the efficacy of cancer vaccines. Based on emerging pre-clinical data, clinical trials are currently exploring the use of combinatorial immune based therapies for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22595050

  12. Targeting tumor vasculature: expanding the potential of DNA cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; Facciponte, John G; De Sanctis, Francesco; Facciabene, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Targeting the tumor vasculature with anti-angiogenesis modalities is a bona fide validated approach that has complemented cancer treatment paradigms. Tumor vasculature antigens (TVA) can be immunologically targeted and offers multiple theoretical advantages that may enhance existing strategies against cancer. We focused on tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1/CD248) as a model TVA since it is broadly expressed on many different cancers. Our DNA-based vaccine approach demonstrated that CD248 can be effectively targeted immunologically; anti-tumor responses were generated in several mouse models; and CD8(+)/CD4(+) T cell responses were elicited against peptides derived from CD248 protein. Our work supports our contention that CD248 is a novel immunotherapeutic target for cancer treatment and highlights the efficient, safe and translatable use of DNA-based immunotherapy. We next briefly highlight ongoing investigations targeting CD248 with antibodies as a diagnostic imaging agent and as a therapeutic antibody in an early clinical trial. The optimal approach for generating effective DNA-based cancer vaccines for several tumor types may be a combinatorial approach that enhances immunogenicity such as combination with chemotherapy. Additional combination approaches are discussed and include those that alleviate the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment induced by myeloid-derived suppressor cells and T regulatory cells. Targeting the tumor vasculature by CD248-based immunological modalities expands the armamentarium against cancer.

  13. Peptide-based vaccines for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Parmiani, Giorgio; Russo, Vincenzo; Maccalli, Cristina; Parolini, Danilo; Rizzo, Nathalie; Maio, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Interest for cancer vaccination started more than 30 years ago after the demonstration that both in animal models and later on in patients it is possible to generate anti-tumor immune responses. The clinical application of this knowledge, however, was disappointing. In this review we summarize results on peptides epitopes recognized by T cells that have been studied thanks to their easy synthesis and the lack of significant side effects when administered in-vivo. To improve the clinical efficacy, peptides were modified in their aminoacid sequence to augment their immunogenicity. Peptides vaccines were recently shown to induce a high frequency of immune response in patients that were accompanied by clinical efficacy. These data are discussed at the light of recent progression of immunotherapy caused by the addition of check-point antibodies thus providing a general picture of the potential therapeutic efficacy of the peptide-based vaccines and their combination with other biological agents.

  14. Strategy of topical vaccination with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sascha; Patzelt, Alexa; Otberg, Nina; Thiede, Gisela; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2009-01-01

    Liposomes in the nanosize range have been recognized as a versatile drug delivery system of both hydrophilic and lipophilic molecules. In order to develop a liposome-based topical vaccination strategy, five different types of liposomes were tested as a putative vaccine delivery system on pig ear skin. The investigated liposomes mainly varied in size, lipid composition, and surface charge. Using hydrophilic and hydrophobic fluorescent dyes as model drugs, penetration behavior was studied by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy of intact skin and histological sections, respectively. Follicular penetration of the liposomes was measured in comparison to a standard, nonliposomal formulation at different time points. Dependent on time but independent of their different characters, the liposomes showed a significantly higher penetration depth into the hair follicles compared to the standard formulation. The standard formulation reached a relative penetration depth of 30% of the full hair follicle length after seven days, whereas amphoteric and cationic liposomes had reached approximately 70%. Penetration depth of negatively charged liposomes did not exceed 50% of the total follicle length. The fluorescence dyes were mainly detected in the hair follicle; only a small amount of dye was found in the upper parts of the epidermis.

  15. Strategy of topical vaccination with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sascha; Patzelt, Alexa; Otberg, Nina; Thiede, Gisela; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2009-03-01

    Liposomes in the nanosize range have been recognized as a versatile drug delivery system of both hydrophilic and lipophilic molecules. In order to develop a liposome-based topical vaccination strategy, five different types of liposomes were tested as a putative vaccine delivery system on pig ear skin. The investigated liposomes mainly varied in size, lipid composition, and surface charge. Using hydrophilic and hydrophobic fluorescent dyes as model drugs, penetration behavior was studied by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy of intact skin and histological sections, respectively. Follicular penetration of the liposomes was measured in comparison to a standard, nonliposomal formulation at different time points. Dependent on time but independent of their different characters, the liposomes showed a significantly higher penetration depth into the hair follicles compared to the standard formulation. The standard formulation reached a relative penetration depth of 30% of the full hair follicle length after seven days, whereas amphoteric and cationic liposomes had reached ~70%. Penetration depth of negatively charged liposomes did not exceed 50% of the total follicle length. The fluorescence dyes were mainly detected in the hair follicle; only a small amount of dye was found in the upper parts of the epidermis.

  16. Optimization model of vaccination strategy for dengue transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayani, H.; Kallista, M.; Nuraini, N.; Sari, M. Y.

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever is emerging tropical and subtropical disease caused by dengue virus infection. The vaccination should be done as a prevention of epidemic in population. The host-vector model are modified with consider a vaccination factor to prevent the occurrence of epidemic dengue in a population. An optimal vaccination strategy using non-linear objective function was proposed. The genetic algorithm programming techniques are combined with fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to construct the optimal vaccination. In this paper, the appropriate vaccination strategy by using the optimal minimum cost function which can reduce the number of epidemic was analyzed. The numerical simulation for some specific cases of vaccination strategy is shown.

  17. Clinical cancer chemoprevention: From the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Horng-Jyh

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 2 million new cancer cases are attributed to infectious agents each year worldwide. Vaccines for the hepatitis B virus (HBV), a risk factor of hepatocellular cancer, and human papillomavirus (HPV), a risk factor of cervical cancer, are considered major successes in clinical chemoprevention of cancer. In Taiwan, the first evidence of cancer prevention through vaccinations was provided by HBV vaccination data in infants. The Taiwanese HBV vaccination program has since become a model immunization schedule for newborns worldwide. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV is generally accepted as prerequisite for cervical cancer diagnosis; however, cervical cancer is a rare complication of HPV infections. This is due to the fact that such infections tend to be transient. The safety and efficacy of both available HPV quadrivalent vaccine and bivalent vaccine are not in doubt at the present time. Until a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccine becomes available, simple hygienic practices, such as hand washing, can prevent CMV infection both before and during pregnancy. Each country should establish her official guidelines regarding which vaccines should be used to treat various conditions, the target population (i.e., universal or limited to a selected population), and the immunization schedules. After a vaccine is recommended, decisions regarding reimbursement by the public health care fund are evaluated. The guidelines become part of the immunization schedule, which is updated annually and published in the official bulletin. In conclusion, both HBV and HPV vaccines are considered major successes in the chemoprevention of cancer.

  18. Trial watch: Peptide vaccines in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Martins, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jerome; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2012-12-01

    Prophylactic vaccination constitutes one of the most prominent medical achievements of history. This concept was first demonstrated by the pioneer work of Edward Jenner, dating back to the late 1790s, after which an array of preparations that confer life-long protective immunity against several infectious agents has been developed. The ensuing implementation of nation-wide vaccination programs has de facto abated the incidence of dreadful diseases including rabies, typhoid, cholera and many others. Among all, the most impressive result of vaccination campaigns is surely represented by the eradication of natural smallpox infection, which was definitively certified by the WHO in 1980. The idea of employing vaccines as anticancer interventions was first theorized in the 1890s by Paul Ehrlich and William Coley. However, it soon became clear that while vaccination could be efficiently employed as a preventive measure against infectious agents, anticancer vaccines would have to (1) operate as therapeutic, rather than preventive, interventions (at least in the vast majority of settings), and (2) circumvent the fact that tumor cells often fail to elicit immune responses. During the past 30 y, along with the recognition that the immune system is not irresponsive to tumors (as it was initially thought) and that malignant cells express tumor-associated antigens whereby they can be discriminated from normal cells, considerable efforts have been dedicated to the development of anticancer vaccines. Some of these approaches, encompassing cell-based, DNA-based and purified component-based preparations, have already been shown to exert conspicuous anticancer effects in cohorts of patients affected by both hematological and solid malignancies. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating purified peptides or full-length proteins as therapeutic interventions against cancer. PMID:23264902

  19. Prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccination and primary prevention of cervical cancer: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Poljak, M

    2012-10-01

    Two prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been recently approved: one quadrivalent and the other a bivalent vaccine. When administered in a three-dose course to HPV-naive individuals, both vaccines exhibited excellent safety profiles and were highly efficacious against targeted clinical endpoints in large-scale international phase III clinical trials. Where coverage has been high for the appropriate target population, a reduction of HPV-related diseases with the shortest incubation periods has already been seen. By March 2012, universal HPV vaccination had been introduced into national vaccination programmes in more than 40 countries, but only in a few low-income and middle-income countries. With the growing market for HPV vaccines and competition between manufacturers, negotiated prices are already beginning to decline although they still remain out of reach of many countries. The great majority of countries are struggling to reach a level of coverage that will have the most impact on cervical cancer rates. Increasing coverage and improving completion of the HPV vaccine schedule, particularly of sexually naive females, is now the most important public-health issue in HPV vaccine efforts. A clear strategy for integrating primary (HPV vaccination) and secondary (screening) cervical cancer prevention must be agreed as soon as possible. Several second-generation prophylactic vaccines are being developed with the aim of resolving some of the limitations of the two current HPV prophylactic vaccines. PMID:22862799

  20. Pneumococcal Vaccination Strategies. An Update and Perspective.

    PubMed

    Berical, Andrew C; Harris, Drew; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Possick, Jennifer D

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important global pathogen that causes a wide range of clinical disease in children and adults. Pneumococcal pneumonia is by far the common presentation of noninvasive and invasive pneumococcal disease and affects the young, the elderly, and the immunocompromised disproportionately. Patients with chronic pulmonary diseases are also at higher risk for pneumococcal infections. Substantial progress over the century has been made in the understanding of pneumococcal immunobiology and the prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease through vaccination. Currently, two pneumococcal vaccines are available for individuals at risk of pneumococcal disease: the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the 13-valent pneumococcal protein-conjugate vaccine (PCV13). The goal of pneumococcal vaccination is to stimulate effective antipneumococcal antibody and mucosal immunity response and immunological memory. Vaccination of infants and young children with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has led to significant decrease in nasal carriage rates and pneumococcal disease in all age groups. Recent pneumococcal vaccine indication and schedule recommendations on the basis of age and risk factors are outlined in this Focused Review. As new pneumococcal vaccine recommendations are being followed, continued efforts are needed to address the vaccine efficacy in the waning immunity of the ever-aging population, the implementation of vaccines using two different vaccines under very specific schedules and their real world clinical and cost effectiveness, and the development of next generation pneumococcal vaccines. PMID:27088424

  1. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi; Ishii, Ken J

    2016-07-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund's adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  2. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  3. Vaccines and vaccination strategies against human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Uzonna, Jude

    2009-05-01

    One might think that the development of a vaccine against cutaneous leishmaniasis would be relatively straightforward because the type of immune response required for protection is known and natural immunity occurs following recovery from primary infection. However, there is as yet no effective vaccine against the disease in humans. Although vaccination in murine studies has yielded promising results, these vaccines have failed miserably when tested in primates or humans. The reasons behind these failures are unknown and remain a major hurdle for vaccine design and development against cutaneous leishmaniasis. In contrast, recovery from natural, deliberate or experimental infections results in development of long-lasting immunity to re-infection. This so called infection-induced resistance is the strongest anti-Leishmania immunity known. Here, we briefly review the different approaches to vaccination against cutaneous leishmaniasis and argue that vaccines composed of genetically modified (attenuated) parasites, which induce immunity akin to infection-induced resistance, may provide best protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis in humans.

  4. Immunosenescence and Novel Vaccination Strategies for the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Dorrington, Michael G.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination remains the most effective prophylactic intervention for infectious disease in the healthcare professional’s toolkit. However, the efficacy and effectiveness of vaccines decrease with age. This becomes most apparent after an individual reaches 65–70 years old, and results from complex changes in the immune system that occur during aging. As such, new vaccine formulations and strategies that can accommodate age-related changes in immunity are required to protect this expanding population. Here, we summarize the consequences of immunosenescence on vaccination and how novel vaccination strategies can be designed to accommodate the aging immune system. We conclude that current vaccination protocols are not sufficient to protect our aging population and, in some cases, are an inefficient use of healthcare resources. However, researchers and clinicians are developing novel vaccination strategies that include modifying who and when we vaccinate and capitalize on existing vaccines, in addition to formulating new vaccines specifically tailored to the elderly in order to remedy this deficiency. PMID:23825474

  5. Gene-based cancer immunotherapy and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Acres, Bruce; Squiban, Patrick; Liu, Margaret

    2005-02-01

    Extract: Cancer cells are able to escape immune detection and/or rejection by a variety of measures. Cell surface molecules, which are required for the effective policing of tissues by the immune system, are often modified, reduced or eliminated. In addition cancer cells secrete soluble molecules that inhibit the patients' ability to develop an immune response. The ability of the immune system to recognize and reject cancerous growths has been demonstrated in a series of experimental model systems. Efforts are now being made to use this knowledge for the treatment of cancer. Described below are two different gene-based approaches to stimulate the rejection of an established cancer in patients. The first involves procedures which modify the tumor itself, render it a more attractive target to the immune system, and allow immune cells to penetrate the tumor and kill the cancerous cells. The second approach requires a very powerful vaccine to stimulate a strong immune response against the tumor associated antigens in patients with an established cancer. Early efforts to harness the power of the immune system to eliminate cancer were made by Dr. William Coley very early in the 20th century. Dr. Coley injected cancerous tissue, usually sarcomas (tumors of the supportive tissues such as bone, cartilage fat or muscle), with a mix of bacteria and/or their toxins. This would result in an inflammatory response in the tumor and the influx of many immune cells. PMID:20704919

  6. Is human papillomavirus vaccination likely to be a useful strategy in India?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudeep; Kerkar, Rajendra A.; Dikshit, Rajesh; Badwe, Rajendra A.

    2013-01-01

    Two vaccines that protect against infection by some of the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes have recently been licensed for use in population-based vaccination strategies in many countries. However, these products are being promoted as ‘cervical cancer vaccines’ based on inadequate data. Specifically, there remain several concerns about the duration of immunogenicity, length of follow-up of trial subjects, endpoints chosen in vaccine trials, applicability of trial results to real populations, the safety of these products, and their cost-effectiveness as public health interventions. Furthermore, it is unlikely that vaccination will obviate the need for setting up robust and cost-effective screening programs in countries like India. This article will discuss various aspects of HPV vaccination from a public health perspective, especially from the point of view of its relevance to India and other South Asian countries. PMID:24455622

  7. Dengue vaccine: an update on recombinant subunit strategies.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Hermida, L

    2016-03-01

    Dengue is an increasing public health problem worldwide, with the four serotypes of the virus infecting over 390 million people annually. There is no specific treatment or antiviral drug for dengue, and prevention is largely limited to controlling the mosquito vectors or disrupting the human-vector contact. Despite the considerable progress made in recent years, an effective vaccine against the virus is not yet available. The development of a dengue vaccine has been hampered by many unique challenges, including the need to ensure the absence of vaccine-induced enhanced severity of disease. Recombinant protein subunit vaccines offer a safer alternative to other vaccine approaches. Several subunit vaccine candidates are presently under development, based on different structural and non-structural proteins of the virus. Novel adjuvants or immunopotentiating strategies are also being tested to improve their immunogenicity. This review summarizes the current status and development trends of subunit dengue vaccines.

  8. Modelling vaccination strategies against foot-and-mouth disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, M. J.; Woolhouse, M. E. J.; May, R. M.; Davies, G.; Grenfell, B. T.

    2003-01-01

    Vaccination has proved a powerful defence against a range of infectious diseases of humans and animals. However, its potential to control major epidemics of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in livestock is contentious. Using an individual farm-based model, we consider either national prophylactic vaccination campaigns in advance of an outbreak, or combinations of reactive vaccination and culling strategies during an epidemic. Consistent with standard epidemiological theory, mass prophylactic vaccination could reduce greatly the potential for a major epidemic, while the targeting of high-risk farms increases efficiency. Given sufficient resources and preparation, a combination of reactive vaccination and culling might control ongoing epidemics. We also explore a reactive strategy, `predictive' vaccination, which targets key spatial transmission loci and can reduce markedly the long tail that characterizes many FMD epidemics. These analyses have broader implications for the control of human and livestock infectious diseases in heterogeneous spatial landscapes.

  9. Effective Strategies for HPV Vaccine Delivery: The Views of Pediatricians

    PubMed Central

    Tissot, Abbigail M.; Zimet, Gregory D.; Rosenthal, Susan L.; Bernstein, David I.; Wetzel, Caitlin; Kahn, Jessica A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Pediatricians will play a critical role in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine delivery. The objectives of this research were to examine pediatricians' views about key issues related to HPV vaccine delivery and identify their strategies for effective vaccine delivery. Methods A diverse sample of practicing pediatricians was recruited from a three-state region using a purposeful sampling strategy. Participants completed in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Qualitative data were analyzed using framework analysis. Results The mean age of the 31 participants was 47 (range 30-78) years, 17 (55%) were female, 9 (29%) black, and 4 (13%) Latino. Participants noted that cultural issues, including a family's religious and ethnic background, were important considerations when recommending an HPV vaccine. Almost all participants believed that vaccination should be universal rather than targeted, but opinions regarding legislative mandates for vaccination varied. Those in favor of mandates cited their potential to maximize the public health impact of immunization, while those opposed noted that HPV is not transmitted casually and were concerned about limited data on the long-term safety and efficacy of HPV vaccines. Pediatricians noted that specific strategies for effective vaccine delivery would be needed for an STI vaccine targeted toward adolescents, especially considering the poor public understanding of HPV. These included provision of HPV vaccines in alternative settings, guidance for pediatricians as to how to address parental concerns, and specific educational initiatives. Conclusions The views of pediatricians, who have extensive experience administering vaccines to children and adolescents, will be valuable as HPV vaccine delivery strategies are designed. PMID:17659214

  10. Vaccination Strategies to Combat an Infectious Globe: Oral Cholera Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    López-Gigosos, Rosa M; Plaza, Elena; Díez-Díaz, Rosa M; Calvo, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    Cholera is a substantial health burden in many countries in Africa and Asia, where it is endemic. It is as well responsible for ongoing epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa which are becoming greater in terms of frequency, extension, and duration. Given the availability of two oral cholera vaccines and the new data on their efficacy, field effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptance in cholera-affected populations and in travelers, these vaccines should be used in endemic areas, in travelers for these areas and should be considered in areas at risk for outbreaks. The two vaccines currently available in worldwide are: (1) The killed oral vaccine (Dukoral, licensed by SBL–Sweden to Crucell–Holland) is recommended since 1999 by WHO and consists of a mixture of four preparations of heat or formalin killed whole cell Vibrio cholera O1 (Inaba and Ogaba serotypes, and classical and El Tor biotypes) that are then added with purified recombinant cholera toxin (CT) B subunit. Because CT cross-reacts with Escherichia coli LT the vaccine also provides short-term protection against ETEC (enterotoxigenic E. coli) which is of added benefit for travelers. It is available in more than 60 countries. (2) A bivalent O1 and O139 whole cell oral vaccine without CT B subunit (Shanchol) has been lately developed in Vietnam (licensed by VaBiotech–Viet Nam to Shantha Biotechnics–India. It is available in India and Indonesia. A structured search of papers in PubMed and reports on cholera vaccines by WHO and CDC, as well as critical reading and synthesis of the information was accomplished. Inclusion criteria were defined according to reports quality and relevance. PMID:21572610

  11. Vaccination strategies to combat an infectious globe: oral cholera vaccines.

    PubMed

    López-Gigosos, Rosa M; Plaza, Elena; Díez-Díaz, Rosa M; Calvo, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    Cholera is a substantial health burden in many countries in Africa and Asia, where it is endemic. It is as well responsible for ongoing epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa which are becoming greater in terms of frequency, extension, and duration. Given the availability of two oral cholera vaccines and the new data on their efficacy, field effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptance in cholera-affected populations and in travelers, these vaccines should be used in endemic areas, in travelers for these areas and should be considered in areas at risk for outbreaks. The two vaccines currently available in worldwide are: (1) The killed oral vaccine (Dukoral, licensed by SBL-Sweden to Crucell-Holland) is recommended since 1999 by WHO and consists of a mixture of four preparations of heat or formalin killed whole cell Vibrio cholera O1 (Inaba and Ogaba serotypes, and classical and El Tor biotypes) that are then added with purified recombinant cholera toxin (CT) B subunit. Because CT cross-reacts with Escherichia coli LT the vaccine also provides short-term protection against ETEC (enterotoxigenic E. coli) which is of added benefit for travelers. It is available in more than 60 countries. (2) A bivalent O1 and O139 whole cell oral vaccine without CT B subunit (Shanchol) has been lately developed in Vietnam (licensed by VaBiotech-Viet Nam to Shantha Biotechnics-India. It is available in India and Indonesia. A structured search of papers in PubMed and reports on cholera vaccines by WHO and CDC, as well as critical reading and synthesis of the information was accomplished. Inclusion criteria were defined according to reports quality and relevance.

  12. Strategies for Early Vaccination During Novel Influenza Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, M.; Xiao, Y.; Charland, N.; Moghadas, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing research and technology developments hold the promise of rapid production and large-scale deployment of strain-specific or cross-protective vaccines for novel influenza viruses. We sought to investigate the impact of early vaccination on age-specific attack rates and evaluate the outcomes of different vaccination strategies that are influenced by the level of single or two-dose vaccine-induced protections. We developed and parameterized an agent-based model for two population demographics of urban and remote areas in Canada. Our results demonstrate that there is a time period before and after the onset of epidemic, during which the outcomes of vaccination strategies may differ significantly and are highly influenced by demographic characteristics. For the urban population, attack rates were lowest for children younger than 5 years of age in all vaccination strategies. However, for the remote population, the lowest attack rates were obtained for adults older than 50 years of age in most strategies. We found that the reduction of attack rates following the start of vaccination campaigns during the epidemic depends critically on the disease transmissibility, suggesting that for a sufficiently high transmissibility, vaccine delivery after the onset of epidemic has little or no effect, regardless of the population demographics. PMID:26658016

  13. Update on vaccine development in AIDS and cancer.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, D S

    1995-04-01

    Discussions at the Second International Conference on Engineered Vaccines for Cancer and AIDS on the similarities and differences between molecular biology, and the prevention and treatment of cancer and AIDS are summarized. Specific topics included peptide vaccines, the carcinoembryonic antigen as a potential target for specific immunotherapy, mucin-based vaccines, the downgrading of therapeutic AIDS vaccines to pursue the concept of prophylaxis, the problem of genetic sequence variation in HIV envelope glycoproteins, immune response enhancement, nucleic acid vaccination, and the use of viral vectors.

  14. Recent advances in design of immunogenic and effective naked DNA vaccines against cancer.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, Daniela; Iurescia, Sandra; Rinaldi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    A variety of clinical trials for vaccines against cancer have provided evidence that DNA vaccines are well tolerated and have an excellent safety profile. DNA vaccines require much improvement to make them sufficiently effective against cancer in the clinic. Nowadays, it is clear that an increased antigen expression correlates with improved immunogenicity and it is critical to vaccine performance in large animals and humans. Similarly, additional strategies are required to activate effective immunity against poorly immunogenic tumour antigens. This review discusses very recent scientific references focused on the development of sophisticated DNA vaccines against cancer. We report a selection of novel and relevant patents employed to improve their immunogenicity through several strategies such as the use of tissue-specific transcriptional elements, nuclear localisation signalling, codon-optimisation and by targeting antigenic proteins to secretory pathway. Recent patents validating portions or splice variants of tumour antigens as candidates for cancer DNA vaccines with improved specificity, such as mesothelin and hTERT, are also discussed. Lastly, we review novel patents on the use of genetic immunomodulators, such as "universal" T helper epitopes derived from tetanus toxin, E. coli heat labile enterotoxin and vegetable proteins, as well as cytokines, chemokines or costimulatory molecules such as IL-6, IL-15, IL- 21 to amplify immunity against cancer.

  15. New Strategies in Cancer Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in cancer nanomedicine, including stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems and nanoparticles responding to light for phototherapy or tumor imaging. In addition, several new strategies to improve the circulation of nanoparticles in vivo, tumor penetration, and tumor targeting are discussed. The application of nanomedicine in cancer immunology, a relatively new type of cancer therapy, is also highlighted.

  16. Immunostimulation, vaccine and phage therapy strategies in aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This invited article provides a comparison between fish and shrimp immunity, and reviews the use of immunostimulation, vaccination strategies and bacteriophage therapies. Immunostimulants, a heterogenous group of compounds that are derived from bacterial, plant and animal extracts are compounds bel...

  17. Strategies and hurdles using DNA vaccines to fish.

    PubMed

    Hølvold, Linn B; Myhr, Anne I; Dalmo, Roy A

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccinations against fish viral diseases as IHNV at commercial level in Canada against VHSV at experimental level are both success stories. DNA vaccination strategies against many other viral diseases have, however, not yet yielded sufficient results in terms of protection. There is an obvious need to combat many other viral diseases within aquaculture where inactivated vaccines fail. There are many explanations to why DNA vaccine strategies against other viral diseases fail to induce protective immune responses in fish. These obstacles include: 1) too low immunogenicity of the transgene, 2) too low expression of the transgene that is supposed to induce protection, 3) suboptimal immune responses, and 4) too high degradation rate of the delivered plasmid DNA. There are also uncertainties with regard distribution and degradation of DNA vaccines that may have implications for safety and regulatory requirements that need to be clarified. By combining plasmid DNA with different kind of adjuvants one can increase the immunogenicity of the transgene antigen - and perhaps increase the vaccine efficacy. By using molecular adjuvants with or without in combination with targeting assemblies one may expect different responses compared with naked DNA. This includes targeting of DNA vaccines to antigen presenting cells as a central factor in improving their potencies and efficacies by means of encapsulating the DNA vaccine in certain carriers systems that may increase transgene and MHC expression. This review will focus on DNA vaccine delivery, by the use of biodegradable PLGA particles as vehicles for plasmid DNA mainly in fish.

  18. Strategies and hurdles using DNA vaccines to fish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccinations against fish viral diseases as IHNV at commercial level in Canada against VHSV at experimental level are both success stories. DNA vaccination strategies against many other viral diseases have, however, not yet yielded sufficient results in terms of protection. There is an obvious need to combat many other viral diseases within aquaculture where inactivated vaccines fail. There are many explanations to why DNA vaccine strategies against other viral diseases fail to induce protective immune responses in fish. These obstacles include: 1) too low immunogenicity of the transgene, 2) too low expression of the transgene that is supposed to induce protection, 3) suboptimal immune responses, and 4) too high degradation rate of the delivered plasmid DNA. There are also uncertainties with regard distribution and degradation of DNA vaccines that may have implications for safety and regulatory requirements that need to be clarified. By combining plasmid DNA with different kind of adjuvants one can increase the immunogenicity of the transgene antigen – and perhaps increase the vaccine efficacy. By using molecular adjuvants with or without in combination with targeting assemblies one may expect different responses compared with naked DNA. This includes targeting of DNA vaccines to antigen presenting cells as a central factor in improving their potencies and efficacies by means of encapsulating the DNA vaccine in certain carriers systems that may increase transgene and MHC expression. This review will focus on DNA vaccine delivery, by the use of biodegradable PLGA particles as vehicles for plasmid DNA mainly in fish. PMID:24552235

  19. Pancreatic cancer: Role of the immune system in cancer progression and vaccine-based immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Amedei, Amedeo; Niccolai, Elena; Prisco, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the 5th leading cause of cancer related death in the developed world with more than 260,000 deaths annually worldwide and with a dismal 5-year survival. Surgery is the only potential hope of cure for PC, but, unfortunately, only 20% PC patients is resectable at the time of diagnosis. Therapeutic research efforts have mainly focused on improvements in radio/ chemo treatments and to date, there are only a few chemotherapeutic agents that have shown to be effective against PC, including gemcitabine with or without abraxane as well as a combination of 5-FU, leucovorin, oxaliplatin and irinotecan (the so-called FOLFIRINOX regimen). The survival of patients treated with these regimens is marginal and hence we are in urgent need of novel therapeutic approaches to treat pancreatic cancer. The success of immunotherapeutic strategies in other cancers and various evidences that pancreatic adenocarcinoma elicits antitumor immune responses, suggest that immunotherapies can be a promising alternative treatment modality for this deadly disease. PC immunotherapy treatments include passive immunotherapeutic approaches, such as the use of effector cells generated in vitro, and active immunotherapeutic strategies, which goal is to stimulate an antitumor response in vivo, by means of vaccination. In this review, we describe the immune suppressive mechanisms of pancreatic cancer and discuss recent preclinical and clinical efforts toward PC immunotherapy, including passive approaches, such as the use of antibodies and active strategies (vaccination), with a special mention of most recent treatment with CRS-207 and GVAX. PMID:25483688

  20. Cancer risks: Strategies for elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Bannasch, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book deals with the possibilities for identifying and eliminating cancer risk factors. The current state of knowledge on the detection, assessment and elimination of chemical, physical (radiation), and biological (viruses) risk factors are comprehensively presented in 15 contributions. Chemical risk factors resulting from smoking and environmental contamination are given special attention. The coverage of cancer risks by radiation includes some of the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster. Finally, the discussion of the possible risks that certain viruses hold for cancer in man is intended to further the development of vaccinations against these viral infections. The information is directed not only at specialists, but also at a wider interested audience. Its primary aim is to convey established findings that are already being used for cancer prevention. Furthermore, the book aims to promote more intense research in the field of primary cancer prevention. Contents: General aspects; chemical carcinogens: Risk assessment; chemical carcinogens: Primary prevention; physical carcinogens - Oncogenic viruses and subject index.

  1. [Vaccination safety and media publicity strategy].

    PubMed

    Tan, Jibin; Guo, Xiaomin; Li, Keli; Zhang, Xiumin

    2016-03-01

    Due to the over negative report of adverse event following immunization (AEFI) by media, some people began to question the safety of vaccination. Date published since 2005 were collected by literature retrieval, mainly including relative AEFI date, current status of media report of AEFI, public awareness about AEFI. Public concern about the vaccination safety mainly focused on the serious diseases which might be caused, influence on immune system. Media' s over negative reactions to AEFI and lack of related knowledge in general public have led to the public' s concern about vaccination safety. Vaccination is the most economical and effective measure for the prevention of diseases and AEFI incidence rate is very low. Therefore, it is necessary for media to give more positive report about vaccination safety.

  2. [Vaccination safety and media publicity strategy].

    PubMed

    Tan, Jibin; Guo, Xiaomin; Li, Keli; Zhang, Xiumin

    2016-03-01

    Due to the over negative report of adverse event following immunization (AEFI) by media, some people began to question the safety of vaccination. Date published since 2005 were collected by literature retrieval, mainly including relative AEFI date, current status of media report of AEFI, public awareness about AEFI. Public concern about the vaccination safety mainly focused on the serious diseases which might be caused, influence on immune system. Media' s over negative reactions to AEFI and lack of related knowledge in general public have led to the public' s concern about vaccination safety. Vaccination is the most economical and effective measure for the prevention of diseases and AEFI incidence rate is very low. Therefore, it is necessary for media to give more positive report about vaccination safety. PMID:27005553

  3. Relevance of the tumor antigen in the validation of three vaccination strategies for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bellone, M; Cantarella, D; Castiglioni, P; Crosti, M C; Ronchetti, A; Moro, M; Garancini, M P; Casorati, G; Dellabona, P

    2000-09-01

    Many preclinical studies of cancer immunotherapy are based on the testing of a single vaccination strategy in several tumor models. Moreover, most of those studies used xenogeneic Ags, which, owing to their high immunogenicity, may not represent realistic models for the validation of cancer immunotherapies. To address these issues, we compared the vaccination efficacy of three well established strategies (i.e., naked DNA; peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DC), or a mixture of peptide and the Escherichia coli toxin LTR72) using the xenogeneic OVA or the naturally expressed tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2) tumor Ag in the B16 melanoma model. C57BL/6 mice received one to three s.c. injections of peptide-pulsed DC or DNA, or one to four mucosal administrations of peptide-toxin mixture. One to 2 wk later, the animals were challenged s.c. with B16 or B16 cells expressing OVA (B16-OVA). Vaccination of mice with OVA induced in all cases melanoma-specific CTL and protection against B16-OVA. When TRP-2 was used, all three vaccines elicited B16-specific CTL, but only DC pulsed with the immunodominant T cell epitope TRP-2181-188 allowed protection against B16. Even more importantly, a vaccination regimen with TRP-2-pulsed DC, started 24 h after the injection of a lethal number of B16 cells, caused a therapeutic effect in 60% of the challenged animals. Our results strongly emphasize the relevance of the tumor Ag in the definition of immunotherapeutic strategies for cancer, and support the use of peptide-pulsed DC as cancer vaccine in humans. PMID:10946294

  4. HPV and Cervical Cancer Epidemiology - Current Status of HPV Vaccination in India.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sharmila; Chattopadhyay, Amit; Samanta, Luna; Panigrahi, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CaCx) is the second most fatal cancer contributing to 14% of cancers in Indian females, which account for 25.4% and 26.5% of the global burden of CaCx prevalence and mortality, respectively. Persistent infection with high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV- strains 16 and 18) is the most important risk factor for precursors of invasive CaCx. Comprehensive prevention strategies for CaCx should include screening and HPV vaccination. Three screening modalities for CaCx are cytology, visual inspection with acetic acid, and HPV testing. There is no Indian national policy on CaCx prevention, and screening of asymptomatic females against CaCx is practically non-existent. HPV vaccines can make a major breakthrough in the control of CaCx in India which has high disease load and no organized screening program. Despite the Indian Government's effort to introduce HPV vaccination in the National Immunization Program and bring down vaccine cost, challenges to implementing vaccination in India are strong such as: inadequate epidemiological evidence for disease prioritization, duration of vaccine use, parental attitudes, and vaccine acceptance. This paper reviews the current epidemiology of CaCx and HPV in India, and the current status of HPV vaccination in the country. This article stresses the need for more research in the Indian context, to evaluate interventions for CaCx and assess their applicability, success, scalability and sustainability within the constraints of the Indian health care system. PMID:27644600

  5. Harnessing Dendritic Cells to Generate Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy of cancer, i.e., transfer of T cells or antibodies, can lead to some objective clinical responses, thus demonstrating that the immune system can reject tumors. However, passive immunotherapy is not expected to yield memory T cells that might control tumor outgrowth. Active immunotherapy with dendritic cell (DCs) vaccines has the potential to induce tumor-specific effector and memory T cells. Clinical trials testing first generation DC vaccines pulsed with tumor antigens provided a proof-of-principle that therapeutic immunity can be elicited. Newer generation DC vaccines are build on the increased knowledge of the DC system including the existence of distinct DC subsets and their plasticity all leading to generation of distinct types of immunity. Rather than the quantity of IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T cells, we should aim at generating high quality high avidity poly-functional effector CD8+ T cells able to reject tumors and long-lived memory CD8+ T cells able to prevent relapse. PMID:19769741

  6. Preclinical and clinical development of DNA vaccines for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Colluru, V T; Johnson, Laura E; Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. It is also the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men, making it one of the largest public health concerns today. Prostate cancer is an ideal disease for immunotherapies because of the generally slow progression, the dispensability of the target organ in the patient population, and the availability of several tissue-specific antigens. As such, several therapeutic vaccines have entered clinical trials, with one autologous cellular vaccine (sipuleucel-T) recently gaining Food and Drug Administration approval after demonstrating overall survival benefit in randomized phase III clinical trials. DNA-based vaccines are safe, economical, alternative "off-the-shelf" approaches that have undergone extensive evaluation in preclinical models. In fact, the first vaccine approved in the United States for the treatment of cancer was a DNA vaccine for canine melanoma. Several prostate cancer-specific DNA vaccines have been developed in the last decade and have shown promising results in early phase clinical trials. This review summarizes anticancer human DNA vaccine trials, with a focus on those conducted for prostate cancer. We conclude with an outline of special considerations important for the development and successful translation of DNA vaccines from the laboratory to the clinic.

  7. Peptide vaccines in breast cancer: The immunological basis for clinical response.

    PubMed

    Peres, Lívia de Paula; da Luz, Felipe Andrés Cordero; Pultz, Brunna dos Anjos; Brígido, Paula Cristina; de Araújo, Rogério Agenor; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    This review discusses peptide-based vaccines in breast cancer, immune responses and clinical outcomes, which include studies on animal models and phase I, phase I/II, phase II and phase III clinical trials. Peptide-based vaccines are powerful neoadjuvant immunotherapies that can directly target proteins expressed in tumor cells, mainly tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). The most common breast cancer TAA epitopes are derived from MUC1, HER2/neu and CEA proteins. Peptides derived from TAAs could be successfully used to elicit CD8 and CD4 T cell-specific responses. Thus, choosing peptides that adapt to natural variations of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes is critical. The most attractive advantage is that the target response is more specific and less toxic than for other therapies and vaccines. Prominent studies on NeuVax - E75 (epitope for HER2/neu and GM-CSF) in breast cancer and DPX-0907 (HLA-A2-TAAs) expressed in breast cancer, ovarian and prostate cancer have shown the efficacy of peptide-based vaccines as neoadjuvant immunotherapy against cancer. Future peptide vaccine strategies, although a challenge to be applied in a broad range of breast cancers, point to the development of degenerate multi-epitope immunogens against multiple targets.

  8. Compliance to compulsory vaccination: strategies and results.

    PubMed

    Serafini, G; Caramello, S; Vaudetto, S

    1995-06-01

    This report is devoted to analyze the effect that compulsory vaccination has on the compliance of the population, compared with the results obtained by massive campaigns for optional vaccinations. The implementation of a specific software for the management of individual schedules helps to reach a substantial complete coverage of the individuals for the first ones, while improving but incomplete results regard the vaccines against pertussis and measles-mumps-rubella, optional in Italy. The optimization of data management at the local health unit level improves the quality and the satisfaction of the work performed by the personnel, but has a limited effect on the already nearly complete coverage for the compulsory immunizations. The mounting percentage of children immunized with optional vaccines can be explained both by the massive campaigns of information conducted in recent years and by the better tracking of individual immunization schedules.

  9. Therapeutic cancer vaccines: are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Acquavella, Nicholas; Yu, Zhiya; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Enthusiasm for therapeutic cancer vaccines has been rejuvenated with the recent completion of several large, randomized phase III clinical trials that in some cases have reported an improvement in progression free or overall survival. However, an honest appraisal of their efficacy reveals modest clinical benefit and a frequent requirement for patients with relatively indolent cancers and minimal or no measurable disease. Experience with adoptive cell transfer-based immunotherapies unequivocally establishes that T cells can mediate durable complete responses, even in the setting of advanced metastatic disease. Further, these findings reveal that the successful vaccines of the future must confront (i) a corrupted tumor microenvironment containing regulatory T cells and aberrantly matured myeloid cells, (ii) a tumor-specific T-cell repertoire that is prone to immunologic exhaustion and senescence, and (iii) highly mutable tumor targets capable of antigen loss and immune evasion. Future progress may come from innovations in the development of selective preparative regimens that eliminate or neutralize suppressive cellular populations, more effective immunologic adjuvants, and further refinement of agents capable of antagonizing immune check-point blockade pathways. PMID:21198663

  10. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; ...

  11. Bacterial otitis media: current vaccine development strategies.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Allan W; Kyd, Jennelle

    2003-02-01

    Otitis media is the most common reason for children less than 5 years of age to visit a medical practitioner. Whilst the disease rarely results in death, there is significant associated morbidity. The most common complication is loss of hearing at a critical stage of the development of speech, language and cognitive abilities in children. The cause and pathogenesis of otitis media is multifactorial. Among the contributing factors, the single most important are viral and bacterial infections. Infection with respiratory syncytial virus, influenza viruses, para-influenza viruses, enteroviruses and adenovirus are most commonly associated with acute and chronic otitis media. Streptococcus pneumoniae, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis are the most commonly isolated bacteria from the middle ears of children with otitis media. Treatment of otitis media has largely relied on the administration of antimicrobials and surgical intervention. However, attention has recently focused on the development of a vaccine. For a vaccine to be effective against bacterial otitis media, it must, at the very least, contain antigens that induce a protective immune response in the middle ear against the three most common infecting bacteria. Whilst over the past decade there has been significant progress in the development of vaccines against invasive S. pneumoniae disease, these vaccines are less efficacious for otitis media. The search for candidate vaccine antigens for non-typeable H. influenzae are well advanced whilst less progress has been made for M. catarrhalis. No human studies have been conducted for non-typeable H. influenzae or M. catarrhalis and the concept of a tribacterial vaccine remains to be tested in animal models. Only when vaccine antigens are determined and an understanding of the immune responses induced in the middle ear by infection and immunization is gained will the formulation of a tribacterial vaccine against otitis media be possible.

  12. Vaccination strategies for managing brucellosis in Yellowstone bison.

    PubMed

    Treanor, John J; Johnson, Joseph S; Wallen, Rick L; Cilles, Sara; Crowley, Philip H; Cox, John J; Maehr, David S; White, P J; Plumb, Glenn E

    2010-10-01

    Concerns over migratory bison (Bison bison) at Yellowstone National Park transmitting brucellosis (Brucella abortus) to cattle herds on adjacent lands led to proposals for bison vaccination. We developed an individual-based model to evaluate how brucellosis infection might respond under alternate vaccination strategies, including: (1) vaccination of female calves and yearlings captured at the park boundary when bison move outside the primary conservation area; (2) combining boundary vaccination with the remote delivery of vaccine to female calves and yearlings distributed throughout the park; and (3) vaccinating all female bison (including adults) during boundary capture and throughout the park using remote delivery of vaccine. Simulations suggested Alternative 3 would be most effective, with brucellosis seroprevalence decreasing by 66% (from 0.47 to 0.16) over a 30-year period resulting from 29% of the population receiving protection through vaccination. Under this alternative, bison would receive multiple vaccinations that extend the duration of vaccine protection and defend against recurring infection in latently infected animals. The initial decrease in population seroprevalence will likely be slow due to high initial seroprevalence (40-60%), long-lived antibodies, and the culling of some vaccinated bison that were subsequently exposed to field strain Brucella and reacted positively on serologic tests. Vaccination is unlikely to eradicate B. abortus from Yellowstone bison, but could be an effective tool for reducing the level of infection. Our approach and findings have applicability world-wide for managers dealing with intractable wildlife diseases that cross wildlife-livestock and wildlife-human interfaces and affect public health or economic well-being.

  13. Current therapeutic vaccination and immunotherapy strategies for HPV-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Skeate, Joseph G; Woodham, Andrew W; Einstein, Mark H; Da Silva, Diane M; Kast, W Martin

    2016-06-01

    Carcinomas of the anogenital tract, in particular cervical cancer, remains one of the most common cancers in women, and represent the most frequent gynecological malignancies and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced lesions are immunologically distinct in that they express viral antigens, which are necessary to maintain the cancerous phenotype. The causal relationship between HPV infection and anogenital cancer has prompted substantial interest in the development of therapeutic vaccines against high-risk HPV types targeting the viral oncoproteins E6 and E7. This review will focus on the most recent clinical trials for immunotherapies for mucosal HPV-induced lesions as well as emerging therapeutic strategies that have been tested in pre-clinical models for HPV-induced diseases. Progress in peptide- and protein-based vaccines, DNA-based vaccines, viral/bacterial vector-based vaccines, immune checkpoint inhibition, immune response modifiers, and adoptive cell therapy for HPV will be discussed.

  14. Tumor antigens for cancer immunotherapy: therapeutic potential of xenogeneic DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Roopa; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2004-01-01

    Preclinical animal studies have convincingly demonstrated that tumor immunity to self antigens can be actively induced and can translate into an effective anti-tumor response. Several of these observations are being tested in clinical trials. Immunization with xenogeneic DNA is an attractive approach to treat cancer since it generates T cell and antibody responses. When working in concert, these mechanisms may improve the efficacy of vaccines. The use of xenogeneic DNA in overcoming immune tolerance has been promising not only in inbred mice with transplanted tumors but also in outbred canines, which present with spontaneous tumors, as in the case of human. Use of this strategy also overcomes limitations seen in other types of cancer vaccines. Immunization against defined tumor antigens using a xenogeneic DNA vaccine is currently being tested in early phase clinical trials for the treatment of melanoma and prostate cancers, with proposed trials for breast cancer and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. PMID:15090064

  15. Emerging Cancer Vaccines: The Promise of Genetic Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs) as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP) is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost) are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost. PMID:24212974

  16. Therapeutic vaccines and cancer: focus on DPX-0907

    PubMed Central

    Karkada, Mohan; Berinstein, Neil L; Mansour, Marc

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to significantly enhance immunogenicity of peptide cancer vaccines, we developed a novel non-emulsion depot-forming vaccine platform called DepoVax™ (DPX). Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 restricted peptides naturally presented by cancer cells were used as antigens to create a therapeutic cancer vaccine, DPX-0907. In a phase I clinical study, the safety and immune-activating potential of DPX-0907 in advanced-stage breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer patients were examined, following encouraging results in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. The DPX-0907 vaccine was shown to be safe and well tolerated, with injection-site reactions being the most commonly reported adverse event. Vaccinated cancer patients exhibited a 61% immune response rate, with higher response rates in the breast and ovarian cancer patient cohorts. In keeping with the higher immune efficacy of this vaccine platform, antigen-specific responses were detected in 73% of immune responders after just one vaccination. In 83% of responders, peptide-specific T-cells were detected at two or more time points post-vaccination, with 64% of these patients showing evidence of immune persistence. Immune monitoring also demonstrated the generation of antigen-specific T-cell memory, with the ability to secrete multiple type 1 cytokines. The novel DPX formulation promotes multifunctional effector/memory responses to peptide-based tumor-associated antigens. The data support the capacity of DPX-0907 to elicit type-1 biased immune responses, warranting further clinical development of the vaccine. In this review, we discuss the rationale for developing DPX-based therapeutic cancer vaccine(s), with a focus on DPX-0907, aimed at inducing efficient anti-tumor immunity that may eventually be shown to prolong patient survival. PMID:24596453

  17. HPV vaccines and cancer prevention, science versus activism.

    PubMed

    Tomljenovic, Lucija; Wilyman, Judy; Vanamee, Eva; Bark, Toni; Shaw, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    The rationale behind current worldwide human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination programs starts from two basic premises, 1) that HPV vaccines will prevent cervical cancers and save lives and, 2) have no risk of serious side effects. Therefore, efforts should be made to get as many pre-adolescent girls vaccinated in order to decrease the burden of cervical cancer. Careful analysis of HPV vaccine pre- and post-licensure data shows however that both of these premises are at odds with factual evidence and are largely derived from significant misinterpretation of available data. PMID:23369430

  18. Human papillomavirus, current vaccines, and cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Teitelman, Anne M; Stringer, Marilyn; Averbuch, Tali; Witkoski, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infection, the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, is associated with the development of cervical cancer. The new human papillomavirus vaccine advances cervical cancer prevention; however, provider-recommended screening with Papanicolaou tests and lifestyle modifications are still needed. Widespread implementation of the vaccine and delivering cervical cancer screening to underserved populations remain a challenge. Nurses are ideally suited to address these needs by providing education to patients and families. PMID:19208050

  19. Advances in strategies and methodologies in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Samuel S K; Zhou, Feifan; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Raker, Joseph; Chen, Wei R

    2015-04-01

    Since the invention of Coley's toxin by William Coley in early 1900s, the path for cancer immunotherapy has been a convoluted one. Although still not considered standard of care, with the FDA approval of trastuzumab, Provenge and ipilimumab, the medical and scientific community has started to embrace the possibility that immunotherapy could be a new hope for cancer patients with otherwise untreatable metastatic diseases. This review aims to summarize the development of some major strategies in cancer immunotherapy, from the earliest peptide vaccine and transfer of tumor specific antibodies/T cells to the more recent dendritic cell (DC) vaccines, whole cell tumor vaccines, and checkpoint blockade therapy. Discussion of some major milestones and obstacles in the shaping of the field and the future perspectives is included. Photoimmunotherapy is also reviewed as an example of emerging new therapies combining phototherapy and immunotherapy.

  20. Guidance for peptide vaccines for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Yamaue, Hiroki; Okusaka, Takuji; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Otsu, Atsushi; Ohashi, Yasuo; Shimazawa, Rumiko; Nishio, Kazuto; Furuse, Junji; Minami, Hironobu; Tsunoda, Takuya; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2014-07-01

    Recent progress in fundamental understanding of tumor immunology has opened a new avenue of cancer vaccines. Currently, the development of new cancer vaccines is a global topic and has attracted attention as one of the most important issues in Japan. There is an urgent need for the development of guidance for cancer vaccine clinical studies in order to lead to drug development. Peptide vaccines characteristically have the effect of indirectly acting against cancer through the immune system - a mechanism of action that clearly differs from anticancer drugs that exert a direct effect. Thus, the clinical development of cancer peptide vaccines should be planned and implemented based on the mechanism of action, which differs significantly from conventional anticancer drug research. The Japanese Society for Biological Therapy has created and published Guidance for peptide vaccines for the treatment of cancer as part of its mission and responsibilities towards cancer peptide vaccine development, which is now pursued globally. We welcome comments from regulators and business people as well as researchers in this area.

  1. Guidance for peptide vaccines for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Yamaue, Hiroki; Okusaka, Takuji; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Otsu, Atsushi; Ohashi, Yasuo; Shimazawa, Rumiko; Nishio, Kazuto; Furuse, Junji; Minami, Hironobu; Tsunoda, Takuya; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2014-07-01

    Recent progress in fundamental understanding of tumor immunology has opened a new avenue of cancer vaccines. Currently, the development of new cancer vaccines is a global topic and has attracted attention as one of the most important issues in Japan. There is an urgent need for the development of guidance for cancer vaccine clinical studies in order to lead to drug development. Peptide vaccines characteristically have the effect of indirectly acting against cancer through the immune system - a mechanism of action that clearly differs from anticancer drugs that exert a direct effect. Thus, the clinical development of cancer peptide vaccines should be planned and implemented based on the mechanism of action, which differs significantly from conventional anticancer drug research. The Japanese Society for Biological Therapy has created and published Guidance for peptide vaccines for the treatment of cancer as part of its mission and responsibilities towards cancer peptide vaccine development, which is now pursued globally. We welcome comments from regulators and business people as well as researchers in this area. PMID:25040224

  2. Cancer Vaccine by Fusions of Dendritic and Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koido, Shigeo; Hara, Eiichi; Homma, Sadamu; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Tajiri, Hisao

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Therefore, their use for the active immunotherapy against cancers has been studied with considerable interest. The fusion of DCs with whole tumor cells represents in many ways an ideal approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad array of tumor-associated antigens, including those yet to be unidentified, in the context of DCs-derived costimulatory molecules. DCs/tumor fusion vaccine stimulates potent antitumor immunity in the animal tumor models. In the human studies, T cells stimulated by DC/tumor fusion cells are effective in lysis of tumor cells that are used as the fusion partner. In the clinical trials, clinical and immunological responses were observed in patients with advanced stage of malignant tumors after being vaccinated with DC/tumor fusion cells, although the antitumor effect is not as vigorous as in the animal tumor models. This review summarizes recent advances in concepts and techniques that are providing new impulses to DCs/tumor fusions-based cancer vaccination. PMID:20182533

  3. Current methods of epitope identification for cancer vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Cherryholmes, Gregory A; Stanton, Sasha E; Disis, Mary L

    2015-12-16

    The importance of the immune system in tumor development and progression has been emerging in many cancers. Previous cancer vaccines have not shown long-term clinical benefit possibly because were not designed to avoid eliciting regulatory T-cell responses that inhibit the anti-tumor immune response. This review will examine different methods of identifying epitopes derived from tumor associated antigens suitable for immunization and the steps used to design and validate peptide epitopes to improve efficacy of anti-tumor peptide-based vaccines. Focusing on in silico prediction algorithms, we survey the advantages and disadvantages of current cancer vaccine prediction tools.

  4. Systems Biology Approach for Cancer Vaccine Development and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Circelli, Luisa; Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Tagliamonte, Maria; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Buonaguro, Franco M; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2015-07-14

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines do not hold promise yet as an effective anti-cancer treatment. Lack of efficacy or poor clinical outcomes are due to several antigenic and immunological aspects that need to be addressed in order to reverse such trends and significantly improve cancer vaccines' efficacy. The newly developed high throughput technologies and computational tools are instrumental to this aim allowing the identification of more specific antigens and the comprehensive analysis of the innate and adaptive immunities. Here, we review the potentiality of systems biology in providing novel insights in the mechanisms of the action of vaccines to improve their design and effectiveness.

  5. An epidemiological model with vaccination strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, Dérek B.; Silva, Jaqueline M.; Gomes, Jessica L.; Kritz, Maurício V.

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical models can be widely found in the literature describing epidemics. The epidemical models that use differential equations to represent mathematically such description are especially sensible to parameters. This work analyze a variation of the SIR model when applied to a epidemic scenario including several aspects, as constant vaccination, pulse vaccination, seasonality, cross-immunity factor, birth and dead rate. The analysis and results are performed through numerical solutions of the model and a special attention is given to the discussion generated by the paramenters variation.

  6. On the robust optimization to the uncertain vaccination strategy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaerani, D.; Anggriani, N.; Firdaniza

    2014-02-01

    In order to prevent an epidemic of infectious diseases, the vaccination coverage needs to be minimized and also the basic reproduction number needs to be maintained below 1. This means that as we get the vaccination coverage as minimum as possible, thus we need to prevent the epidemic to a small number of people who already get infected. In this paper, we discuss the case of vaccination strategy in term of minimizing vaccination coverage, when the basic reproduction number is assumed as an uncertain parameter that lies between 0 and 1. We refer to the linear optimization model for vaccination strategy that propose by Becker and Starrzak (see [2]). Assuming that there is parameter uncertainty involved, we can see Tanner et al (see [9]) who propose the optimal solution of the problem using stochastic programming. In this paper we discuss an alternative way of optimizing the uncertain vaccination strategy using Robust Optimization (see [3]). In this approach we assume that the parameter uncertainty lies within an ellipsoidal uncertainty set such that we can claim that the obtained result will be achieved in a polynomial time algorithm (as it is guaranteed by the RO methodology). The robust counterpart model is presented.

  7. On the robust optimization to the uncertain vaccination strategy problem

    SciTech Connect

    Chaerani, D. Anggriani, N. Firdaniza

    2014-02-21

    In order to prevent an epidemic of infectious diseases, the vaccination coverage needs to be minimized and also the basic reproduction number needs to be maintained below 1. This means that as we get the vaccination coverage as minimum as possible, thus we need to prevent the epidemic to a small number of people who already get infected. In this paper, we discuss the case of vaccination strategy in term of minimizing vaccination coverage, when the basic reproduction number is assumed as an uncertain parameter that lies between 0 and 1. We refer to the linear optimization model for vaccination strategy that propose by Becker and Starrzak (see [2]). Assuming that there is parameter uncertainty involved, we can see Tanner et al (see [9]) who propose the optimal solution of the problem using stochastic programming. In this paper we discuss an alternative way of optimizing the uncertain vaccination strategy using Robust Optimization (see [3]). In this approach we assume that the parameter uncertainty lies within an ellipsoidal uncertainty set such that we can claim that the obtained result will be achieved in a polynomial time algorithm (as it is guaranteed by the RO methodology). The robust counterpart model is presented.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of adding vaccination with the AS04-adjuvanted human papillomavirus 16/18 vaccine to cervical cancer screening in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The cervical cancer screening program implemented in Hungary to date has not been successful. Along with screening, vaccination is an effective intervention to prevent cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of adding vaccination with the human papillomavirus 16/18 vaccine to the current cervical cancer screening program in Hungary. Methods We developed a cohort simulation state-transition Markov model to model the life course of 12-year-old girls. Eighty percent participation in the HPV vaccination program at 12 years of age was assumed. Transitional probabilities were estimated using data from the literature. Local data were used regarding screening participation rates, and the costs were estimated in US $. We applied the purchasing power parity exchange rate of 129 HUF/$ to the cost data. Only direct health care costs were considered. We used a 3.7% discount rate for both the cost and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The time horizon was 88 years. Results Inclusion of HPV vaccination at age 12 in the cervical cancer prevention program was predicted to be cost-effective. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of adding HPV vaccination to the current national cancer screening program was estimated to be 27 588 $/QALY. The results were sensitive to the price of the vaccine, the discount rate, the screening participation rate and whether herd immunity was taken into account. Conclusions Our modeling analysis showed that the vaccination of 12-year-old adolescent girls against cervical cancer with the AS04-adjuvanted human papillomavirus 16/18 vaccine would be a cost-effective strategy to prevent cervical cancer in Hungary. PMID:23110361

  9. DIVA vaccination strategies for avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccination for both low pathogenic and highly pathogenic avian influenza is commonly used for countries that have been endemic for avian influenza influenza virus, but stamping out policies are common for countries that are normally free of the disease. Stamping out policies of euthanizing infecte...

  10. A vaccination strategy to SEIR-CA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuzakki, Muhammad Zaki; Nuraini, Nuning

    2016-04-01

    A combination between Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Removed (SEIR) model and Cellular Automaton (CA) called SEIR-CA model has been proposed to simulate spreading diseases through populations. We make an improvement to the parameter which describe the impact of neighborhood in CA system. We also propose a vaccination strategy to the model. Three examples are given to illustrate the model. The first one shows that the previously established SEIR-CA model does not work properly in a population with randomly distributed individuals. After an improvement to the neighborhood impact parameter has been made, the model works properly in a population with randomly distributed individuals and it is shown in the second example. The last example shows the spreading mechanisms with a chosen vaccination strategy. We also show that the vaccination strategy can reduce the number of infected individuals and can suppress the spread of the diseases.

  11. Human papillomavirus vaccination guideline update: American Cancer Society guideline endorsement.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Andrews, Kimberly S; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Loomer, Lacey; Lam, Kristina E; Fisher-Borne, Marcie; Smith, Robert A; Fontham, Elizabeth T H

    2016-09-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society (ACS) reviewed and updated its guideline on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination based on a methodologic and content review of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) HPV vaccination recommendations. A literature review was performed to supplement the evidence considered by the ACIP and to address new vaccine formulations and recommendations as well as new data on population outcomes since publication of the 2007 ACS guideline. The ACS Guideline Development Group determined that the evidence supports ACS endorsement of the ACIP recommendations, with one qualifying statement related to late vaccination. The ACS recommends vaccination of all children at ages 11 and 12 years to protect against HPV infections that lead to several cancers and precancers. Late vaccination for those not vaccinated at the recommended ages should be completed as soon as possible, and individuals should be informed that vaccination may not be effective at older ages. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:375-385. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  12. Considerations of strategies to provide influenza vaccine year round.

    PubMed

    Lambach, Philipp; Alvarez, Alba Maria Ropero; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Ortiz, Justin R; Hombach, Joachim; Verweij, Marcel; Hendriks, Jan; Palkonyay, Laszlo; Pfleiderer, Michael

    2015-11-25

    There is potential for influenza vaccine programmes to make a substantial impact on severe disease in low-resource settings, however questions around vaccine composition and programmatic issues will require special attention. Some countries may benefit from immunization programmes that provide year-round supply of vaccine; however the best way to ensure adequate vaccine supply has yet to be determined. In this report, we discuss vaccine composition, availability, and programmatic issues that must be considered when developing year-round influenza immunization programmes. We then explore how these considerations have influenced immunization practices in the Latin American region as a case study. We identify three different approaches to achieve year-round supply: (1) alternating between Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere formulations, (2) extending the expiration date to permit extended use of a single hemisphere formulation, and (3) local vaccine manufacture with production timelines that align with local epidemiology. Each approach has its challenges and opportunities. The growing data suggesting high influenza disease burden in low resource countries underscores the compelling public health need to determine the best strategies for vaccine delivery.

  13. Overview of the cancer vaccine field: are we moving forward?

    PubMed

    Kudrin, Alex; Hanna, Michael G

    2012-08-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has seen a tremendous number of failures and only few recent regulatory successes. This review is a first in a series dedicated to evaluate the status of current global clinical pipeline for cancer vaccines. Apart from specific areas of medical need which can be addressed by cancer vaccines, the analysis of the pipeline by clinical indication suggests that a disproportionately large number of candidates is currently developed in prostate, breast, lung cancer and melanoma with significant gap of candidates in remaining oncology indications. With potential offering and benefits that cancer immunotherapy could bring to patient community and society as a whole, we require new innovative R&D, improved Antigen Discovery programs and business models to fill serious gaps in cancer vaccine R&D pipeline.

  14. Vaccine strategies to enhance immune responses in the aged

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Julie S.; Haynes, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The elderly population is more susceptible to infections with higher risks of morbidity and mortality. This is caused by the accumulation of immune defects with aging. The best way to protect people against infections is vaccination. Unfortunately, the same immune defects that render the elderly susceptible to infectious diseases also prevent the development of protective immunity following immunization. A good example of this is the influenza vaccine that only protects between 40–60% of the vaccinees over 65 years. In the past decade, tremendous efforts have been put toward improving the influenza vaccine for the elderly. We therefore use this example to present various strategies employed to overcome these age-associated immune defects and hence make vaccines more efficacious for the aged. PMID:23764092

  15. Risk factors for non-initiation of the human papillomavirus vaccine among adolescent survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Klosky, James L; Russell, Kathryn M; Canavera, Kristin E; Gammel, Heather L; Hodges, Jason R; Foster, Rebecca H; Parra, Gilbert R; Simmons, Jessica L; Green, Daniel M; Hudson, Melissa M

    2013-10-01

    Effective vaccination is now available to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection and cause of cervical cancer. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of HPV vaccination among childhood cancer survivors and identify factors associated with HPV vaccine initiation and completion. Mothers of daughters of ages 9 to 17 years with/without a history of childhood cancer (n = 235, Mage = 13.2 years, SD = 2.69; n = 70, Mage = 13.3 years, SD = 2.47, respectively) completed surveys querying HPV vaccination initiation and completion along with sociodemographic, medical, HPV knowledge and communication, and health belief factors, which may relate to vaccination outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors that associate with HPV vaccination initiation and completion. Among cancer survivors, 32.6% initiated and 17.9% completed the three-dose vaccine series, whereas 34.3% and 20.0% of controls initiated and completed, respectively. Univariate analyses indicated no differences between cancer/no cancer groups on considered risk factors. Among all participants, multivariate logistic regression analyses found vaccine initiation associated with older age of daughter and physician recommendation, whereas increased perceived barriers associated with a decreased likelihood of initiation (all P < 0.05). Among those having initiated, risk factors for noncompletion included being non-White, increased perceived severity of HPV, and increased perceived barriers to vaccination (all P < 0.05). A minority of adolescents surviving childhood cancer has completed vaccination despite their increased risk for HPV-related complication. These results inform the prioritization of strategies to be included in vaccine promotion efforts.

  16. Actual status of therapeutic vaccination in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramlau, Katarzyna; Goździk-Spychalska, Joanna; Spychalski, Łukasz; Bryl, Maciej; Gołda-Gocka, Iwona; Kopczyńska, Anna; Barinow-Wojewódzki, Aleksander; Ramlau, Rodryg

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Although treatment methods such as surgery, radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy have improved, prognosis remains unsatisfactory, and developing new therapeutic strategies is still an urgent matter. Immunotherapy is a novel therapeutic approach wherein activated immune cells can specifically kill tumour cells. Several lung cancer vaccines have demonstrated prolonged survival time in phase II and III trials, and several clinical trials are under investigation. However, many clinical trials involving cancer vaccination with defined tumour antigens have shown this method to work only in a small number of patients. Cancer immunotherapy is not completely effective in eradicating tumour cells because they evade host immune control. PMID:24966788

  17. Optimising vaccination strategies in equine influenza.

    PubMed

    Park, A W; Wood, J L N; Newton, J R; Daly, J; Mumford, J A; Grenfell, B T

    2003-06-20

    A stochastic model of equine influenza (EI) is constructed to assess the risk of an outbreak in a Thoroughbred population at a typical flat race training yard. The model is parameterised using data from equine challenge experiments conducted by the Animal Health Trust (relating to the latent and infectious period of animals) and also published data on previous epidemics (to estimate the transmission rate for equine influenza). Using 89 ponies, an empirical relationship between pre-challenge antibody and the probability of becoming infectious is established using logistic regression. Changes in antibody level over time are quantified using published and unpublished studies comprising 618 ponies and horses. A plausible Thoroughbred population is examined over the course of a year and the model is used to assess the risk of an outbreak of EI in the yard under the current minimum vaccination policy in the UK. The model is adapted to consider an alternative vaccination programme where the frequency of vaccination in older horses (2-year-olds and upwards) is increased. Model results show that this practical alternative would offer a significant increase in protection. Spread of infection between yards is also considered to ascertain the risk of secondary outbreaks.

  18. Cervical Cancer Screening in Partly HPV Vaccinated Cohorts – A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Steffie K.; Matthijsse, Suzette M.; Rozemeijer, Kirsten; Penning, Corine; de Kok, Inge M. C. M.; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein

    2016-01-01

    Background Vaccination against the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 will reduce the prevalence of these types, thereby also reducing cervical cancer risk in unvaccinated women. This (measurable) herd effect will be limited at first, but is expected to increase over time. At a certain herd immunity level, tailoring screening to vaccination status may no longer be worth the additional effort. Moreover, uniform screening may be the only viable option. We therefore investigated at what level of herd immunity it is cost-effective to also reduce screening intensity in unvaccinated women. Methods We used the MISCAN-Cervix model to determine the optimal screening strategy for a pre-vaccination population and for vaccinated women (~80% decreased risk), assuming a willingness-to-pay of €50,000 per quality-adjusted life year gained. We considered HPV testing, cytology testing and co-testing and varied the start age of screening, the screening interval and the number of lifetime screens. We then calculated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of screening unvaccinated women with the strategy optimized to the pre-vaccination population as compared to with the strategy optimized to vaccinated women, assuming different herd immunity levels. Results Primary HPV screening with cytology triage was the optimal strategy, with 8 lifetime screens for the pre-vaccination population and 3 for vaccinated women. The ICER of screening unvaccinated women 8 times instead of 3 was €28,085 in the absence of herd immunity. At around 50% herd immunity, the ICER reached €50,000. Conclusion From a herd immunity level of 50% onwards, screening intensity based on the pre-vaccination risk level becomes cost-ineffective for unvaccinated women. Reducing the screening intensity of uniform screening may then be considered. PMID:26824771

  19. In Situ Modulation of Dendritic Cells by Injectable Thermosensitive Hydrogels for Cancer Vaccines in Mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Attempts to develop cell-based cancer vaccines have shown limited efficacy, partly because transplanted dendritic cells (DCs) do not survive long enough to reach the lymph nodes. The development of biomaterials capable of modulating DCs in situ to enhance antigen uptake and presentation has emerged as a novel method toward developing more efficient cancer vaccines. Here, we propose a two-step hybrid strategy to produce a more robust cell-based cancer vaccine in situ. First, a significant number of DCs are recruited to an injectable thermosensitive mPEG–PLGA hydrogel through sustained release of chemoattractants, in particular, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Then, these resident DCs can be loaded with cancer antigens through the use of viral or nonviral vectors. We demonstrate that GM-CSF-releasing mPEG–PLGA hydrogels successfully recruit and house DCs and macrophages, allowing the subsequent introduction of antigens by vectors to activate the resident cells, thus, initiating antigen presentation and triggering immune response. Moreover, this two-step hybrid strategy generates a high level of tumor-specific immunity, as demonstrated in both prophylactic and therapeutic models of murine melanoma. This injectable thermosensitive hydrogel shows great promise as an adjuvant for cancer vaccines, potentially providing a new approach for cell therapies through in situ modulation of cells. PMID:25207465

  20. DNA vaccine prime and recombinant FPV vaccine boost: an important candidate immunization strategy to control bluetongue virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Junping; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Sun, Encheng; Feng, Yufei; Lv, Shuang; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Haixiu; Wu, Donglai

    2015-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of bluetongue (BT), an important sheep disease that caused great economic loss to the sheep industry. There are 26 BTV serotypes based on the outer protein VP2. However, the serotypes BTV-1 and BTV-16 are the two most prevalent serotypes in China. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing viral infections. Therefore, the need for an effective vaccine against BTV is urgent. In this study, DNA vaccines and recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) vaccines expressing VP2 alone or VP2 in combination with VP5 or co-expressing the VP2 and VP5 proteins of BTV-1 were evaluated in both mice and sheep. Several strategies were tested in mice, including DNA vaccine prime and boost, rFPV vaccine prime and boost, and DNA vaccine prime and rFPV vaccine boost. We then determined the best vaccine strategy in sheep. Our results indicated that a strategy combining a DNA vaccine prime (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) followed by an rFPV vaccine boost (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) induced a high titer of neutralizing antibodies in sheep. Therefore, our data suggest that a DNA vaccine consisting of a pCAG-(VP2+VP5) prime and an rFPV-(VP2+VP5) boost is an important candidate for the design of a novel vaccine against BTV-1.

  1. Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuchen; Moon, James J

    2015-08-27

    Recent studies have demonstrated great therapeutic potential of educating and unleashing our own immune system for cancer treatment. However, there are still major challenges in cancer immunotherapy, including poor immunogenicity of cancer vaccines, off-target side effects of immunotherapeutics, as well as suboptimal outcomes of adoptive T cell transfer-based therapies. Nanomaterials with defined physico-biochemical properties are versatile drug delivery platforms that may address these key technical challenges facing cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Nanoparticle systems have been shown to improve targeted delivery of tumor antigens and therapeutics against immune checkpoint molecules, amplify immune activation via the use of new stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials, and augment the efficacy of adoptive cell therapies. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art in nanoparticle-based strategies designed to potentiate cancer immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines with subunit antigens (e.g., oncoproteins, mutated neo-antigens, DNA and mRNA antigens) and whole-cell tumor antigens, dendritic cell-based vaccines, artificial antigen-presenting cells, and immunotherapeutics based on immunogenic cell death, immune checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell therapy.

  2. Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuchen; Moon, James J

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated great therapeutic potential of educating and unleashing our own immune system for cancer treatment. However, there are still major challenges in cancer immunotherapy, including poor immunogenicity of cancer vaccines, off-target side effects of immunotherapeutics, as well as suboptimal outcomes of adoptive T cell transfer-based therapies. Nanomaterials with defined physico-biochemical properties are versatile drug delivery platforms that may address these key technical challenges facing cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Nanoparticle systems have been shown to improve targeted delivery of tumor antigens and therapeutics against immune checkpoint molecules, amplify immune activation via the use of new stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials, and augment the efficacy of adoptive cell therapies. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art in nanoparticle-based strategies designed to potentiate cancer immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines with subunit antigens (e.g., oncoproteins, mutated neo-antigens, DNA and mRNA antigens) and whole-cell tumor antigens, dendritic cell-based vaccines, artificial antigen-presenting cells, and immunotherapeutics based on immunogenic cell death, immune checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:26350600

  3. Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuchen; Moon, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated great therapeutic potential of educating and unleashing our own immune system for cancer treatment. However, there are still major challenges in cancer immunotherapy, including poor immunogenicity of cancer vaccines, off-target side effects of immunotherapeutics, as well as suboptimal outcomes of adoptive T cell transfer-based therapies. Nanomaterials with defined physico-biochemical properties are versatile drug delivery platforms that may address these key technical challenges facing cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Nanoparticle systems have been shown to improve targeted delivery of tumor antigens and therapeutics against immune checkpoint molecules, amplify immune activation via the use of new stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials, and augment the efficacy of adoptive cell therapies. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art in nanoparticle-based strategies designed to potentiate cancer immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines with subunit antigens (e.g., oncoproteins, mutated neo-antigens, DNA and mRNA antigens) and whole-cell tumor antigens, dendritic cell-based vaccines, artificial antigen-presenting cells, and immunotherapeutics based on immunogenic cell death, immune checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:26350600

  4. An In silico Chimeric Vaccine Targeting Breast Cancer Containing Inherent Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Amani, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Today, Lack of efficient therapeutic strategy for breast cancer (the most common cause of death in women) is one of the momentous problematic topics for all health care committees. Designing new specific vaccine, based on antigens located on the surface of cancer cells can be useful. Over expression of ROR1, lacked of HER2/neu, and hormone receptors on cell surface in the breast cancer, introduce this protein as an appropriate candidate for designing cancer vaccine. Objectives: We hypothesized the extracellular domain of receptor tyrosine kinase like orphan receptor 1 (ROR-1) along with a super antigen such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B could be a potent vaccine for drug resistant breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Here, we assessed the findings of bioinformatics analysis to identify the antitumor immune properties of this chimeric construct. In addition, the stability, physic-chemical properties and allergic potency of designed fusion protein were investigated by valid bioinformatics software. Results: Our result suggested that chimeric model is capable to be a stimulant of both T-cell and B- cell mediated immune responses with an acceptable accessibility and solubility but without any allergenicity. Conclusions: The ROR-1 with an enterotoxin B could be a potent vaccine for breast cancer. PMID:26413246

  5. The FDA guidance on therapeutic cancer vaccines: the need for revision to include preventive cancer vaccines or for a new guidance dedicated to them.

    PubMed

    Finn, Olivera J; Khleif, Samir N; Herberman, Ronald B

    2015-11-01

    Cancer vaccines based on antigens derived from self molecules rather than pathogens have been under basic and clinical investigations for many years. Up until very recently, they had been tested primarily in the setting of metastatic disease with the goal to engage the immune system in slowing down disease progression. Many therapeutic vaccine trials, either investigator initiated or led by pharmaceutical companies, have been completed and many are currently ongoing, following the FDA Guidance on therapeutic cancer vaccines published in 2011. In recent years, the target of cancer vaccines is being shifted to early cancer and even premalignant disease with the goal of preventing cancer. Although some issues addressed in the FDA Guidance on therapeutic vaccines apply to preventive vaccines, many do not. Here, we discuss a set of recommendations for revising the current Guidance to also cover preventive vaccines, or to include in a new Guidance dedicated specifically to vaccines for cancer prevention.

  6. Outlining novel cellular adjuvant products for therapeutic vaccines against cancer.

    PubMed

    Tefit, Josianne Nitcheu; Serra, Vincent

    2011-08-01

    Despite the library of new adjuvants available for use in vaccines, we remain, at present, almost reliant on aluminum-based compounds for clinical use. The increasing use of recombinant subunit vaccines, however, makes the need for improved adjuvant of particular interest. Adjuvants are crucial components of all cancer vaccines whether they are composed of whole cells, proteins or peptides. For the purposes of this article, cellular adjuvant products are defined as adjuvants associated with cellular or T-cell immunity. Several pharmaceutical companies are developing new adjuvants or immune enhancers for the treatment of cancers such as melanoma and non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Several products are being developed and have entered clinical trials either alone or in combination. In this article, we discuss recent adjuvant development and novel cellular adjuvant products for therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  7. Meningococcal B vaccination strategies and their practical application in Italy.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, R; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Panatto, D

    2015-08-31

    Immunisation against meningococcal meningitis has a long history, which has passed through several phases: the studies by Flexner, extraction of the polysaccharide capsule, the development of monovalent and multivalent conjugate vaccines, the outer membrane vesicle vaccines up to the development of effective and safe vaccines for meningococcal B invasive disease through the application of the techniques of molecular biology and reverse vaccinology. The new available vaccines are Bexsero® and Trumenba®. Bexsero ® has been approved and is available in Europe, the USA, Canada, Australia and Chile, and is currently under review in Brazil for the prevention of MenB invasive disease in subjects ≥ 2 months. Trumemba® is currently approved only in the USA, for use in adolescents and young adults. At present, the greatest obstacle to the extensive use of these vaccines in industrialised countries is the high cost and the need administer multiple doses in infants. However, in some European countries and in some Italian Regions, strategies (free and active call) to fight the disease through vaccination (Bexsero®) are already in place.

  8. Exploiting dendritic cells in the development of cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bracci, Laura; Capone, Imerio; Moschella, Federica; Proietti, Enrico; Belardelli, Filippo

    2013-10-01

    Due to their central role in priming and modulating the immune response, dendritic cells (DCs) represent an ideal instrument for the design of effective immunotherapeutic strategies for cancer patients. Recent advancement on the knowledge of the numerous DC subtypes, their functions and T-cell polarizing abilities has led to the development of several protocols for the ex vivo differentiation of autologous DCs and their loading with tumor-associated antigens. Moreover, novel strategies for the in vivo targeting of tumor antigens and adjuvants to natural DC subsets have been developed. Despite the large number of clinical studies carried out in cancer patients, a consensus on the optimal treatment modalities has not been reached yet. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge on DC biology and on DC use in clinical trials. Special attention is given to the many open issues regarding DC-based vaccination to sensitize researchers in the field to the compelling need of conducting comparative studies systematically addressing the still unresolved problems.

  9. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    PubMed

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate. PMID:19835869

  10. Tumor cell lysates as immunogenic sources for cancer vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    González, Fermín E; Gleisner, Alejandra; Falcón-Beas, Felipe; Osorio, Fabiola; López, Mercedes N; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are a promising immunological tool for cancer therapy. These stimulate the antitumor response and immunological memory generation. Nevertheless, many patients remain refractory to DC approaches. Antigen (Ag) delivery to DCs is relevant to vaccine success, and antigen peptides, tumor-associated proteins, tumor cells, autologous tumor lysates, and tumor-derived mRNA have been tested as Ag sources. Recently, DCs loaded with allogeneic tumor cell lysates were used to induce a potent immunological response. This strategy provides a reproducible pool of almost all potential Ags suitable for patient use, independent of MHC haplotypes or autologous tumor tissue availability. However, optimizing autologous tumor cell lysate preparation is crucial to enhancing efficacy. This review considers the role of cancer cell-derived lysates as a relevant source of antigens and as an activating factor for ex vivo therapeutic DCs capable of responding to neoplastic cells. These promising therapies are associated with the prolonged survival of advanced cancer patients. PMID:25625929

  11. A theory of multi-site vaccination for cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming; Park, Jeong-Man; Deem, Michael W.

    2006-07-01

    What distinguishes cancer from other more treatable diseases is perhaps the random, multi-strain nature of the disease. Here we apply tools from statistical mechanics to model cancer vaccine design. The difficulty of controlling cancer by many of the standard therapies has led to substantial interest in control by the immune system. Escape of cancer from the immune system can be viewed as a percolation transition, with the immune system killing of cancer cells the parameter controlling whether the cancers cells proliferate. The model we develop suggests that vaccination with the different strains of cancer in different physical regions leads to an improved immune response against each strain. Our approach captures the recognition characteristics between the T cell receptors and tumor, the primary dynamics due to T cell resource competition, and the secondary dynamics due to competition between escape of tumor cells by epitope mutation and allele loss and elimination of tumor cells by T cells.

  12. Vaccine therapy in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Albright, Carol; Garst, Jennifer

    2007-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. First-line therapy is based on stage at diagnosis and can include chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. Despite advances, the prognosis for advanced-stage lung cancer is very poor. Vaccines with the capability to activate the host immune system may have a role in second-line therapy. Advances in the understanding of cellular and molecular immunology are forming the basis for improving vaccine therapy. Most trials to date have demonstrated safety but inconsistent efficacy. Further research is needed to enhance this potential. PMID:17588347

  13. Vaccine immunotherapy for prostate cancer: from mice to men.

    PubMed

    Lubaroff, David M; Vaena, Daniel; Brown, James A; Zehr, Pamela; Griffith, Karen C; Brown, Erica; Eastman, Julie; Nepple, Kenneth; Kattula, Ambika; Williams, Richard D

    2014-08-01

    Preclinical studies demonstrated the ability of an adenovirus/PSA (Ad/PSA) vaccine to induce strong anti-PSA immune responses, and these responses were capable of destroying prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-secreting mouse prostate tumors. A series of preclinical studies have demonstrated the superiority of the Ad/PSA vaccine to other PSA vaccines for the induction of anti-PSA immune responses, the ability of Ad/PSA vaccination combined with cytokine gene therapy and the TLR9 agonist CpG to enhance the anti-prostate tumor immunotherapy, and the reduction of negative regulatory elements when the vaccine was combined with 5-fluoruracil administration. A phase I clinical trial of the Ad/PSA vaccine in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer demonstrated the safety of the vaccine even at the highest single dose permitted by the FDA. Currently, a phase II trial of the Ad/PSA vaccine is underway treating patients in two protocols. Thus far 81 patients have been enrolled and vaccinated. Early results from the patients evaluated to date demonstrated the induction of anti-PSA T cell responses, and the majority of patients evaluated at this time had demonstrated an increase in PSA doubling times. PMID:24847764

  14. Vaccination Strategies: a comparative study in an epidemic scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, D. B.; Jardim, C. L. T. F.; Ferreira, L. A. F.; da Silva, J. M.; Kritz, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    Epidemics are an extremely important matter of study within the Mathematical Modeling area and can be widely found in the literature. Some epidemiological models use differential equations, which are very sensible to parameters, to represent and describe the diseases mathematically. For this work, a variation of the SIR model is discussed and applied to a certain epidemic scenario, wherein vaccination is introduced through two different strategies: constant vaccination and vaccination in pulses. Other epidemiological and population aspects are also considered, such as mortality/natality and infection rates. The analysis and results are performed through numerical solutions of the model and a special attention is given to the discussion generated by the paramenters variation.

  15. Immunotherapy of HPV-associated cancer: DNA/plant-derived vaccines and new orthotopic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Venuti, Aldo; Curzio, Gianfranca; Mariani, Luciano; Paolini, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    Under the optimistic assumption of high-prophylactic HPV vaccine coverage, a significant reduction of cancer incidence can only be expected after decades. Thus, immune therapeutic strategies are needed for persistently infected individuals who do not benefit from the prophylactic vaccines. However, the therapeutic strategies inducing immunity to the E6 and/or E7 oncoprotein of HPV16 are more effective for curing HPV-expressing tumours in animal models than for treating human cancers. New strategies/technologies have been developed to improve these therapeutic vaccines. Our studies focussed on preparing therapeutic vaccines with low-cost technologies by DNA preparation fused to either plant-virus or plant-toxin genes, such as saporin, and by plant-produced antigens. In particular, plant-derived antigens possess an intrinsic adjuvant activity that makes these preparations especially attractive for future development. Additionally, discrepancy in vaccine effectiveness between animals and humans may be due to non-orthotopic localization of animal models. Orthotopic transplantation leads to tumours giving a more accurate representation of the parent tumour. Since HPV can cause cancer in two main localizations, anogenital and oropharynx area, we developed two orthotopic tumour mouse models in these two sites. Both models are bioluminescent in order to follow up the tumour growth by imaging and are induced by cell injection without the need to intervene surgically. These models were utilized for immunotherapies with genetic or plant-derived therapeutic vaccines. In particular, the head/neck orthotopic model appears to be very promising for studies combining chemo-radio-immune therapy that seems to be very effective in patients.

  16. Immunotherapy of HPV-associated cancer: DNA/plant-derived vaccines and new orthotopic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Venuti, Aldo; Curzio, Gianfranca; Mariani, Luciano; Paolini, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    Under the optimistic assumption of high-prophylactic HPV vaccine coverage, a significant reduction of cancer incidence can only be expected after decades. Thus, immune therapeutic strategies are needed for persistently infected individuals who do not benefit from the prophylactic vaccines. However, the therapeutic strategies inducing immunity to the E6 and/or E7 oncoprotein of HPV16 are more effective for curing HPV-expressing tumours in animal models than for treating human cancers. New strategies/technologies have been developed to improve these therapeutic vaccines. Our studies focussed on preparing therapeutic vaccines with low-cost technologies by DNA preparation fused to either plant-virus or plant-toxin genes, such as saporin, and by plant-produced antigens. In particular, plant-derived antigens possess an intrinsic adjuvant activity that makes these preparations especially attractive for future development. Additionally, discrepancy in vaccine effectiveness between animals and humans may be due to non-orthotopic localization of animal models. Orthotopic transplantation leads to tumours giving a more accurate representation of the parent tumour. Since HPV can cause cancer in two main localizations, anogenital and oropharynx area, we developed two orthotopic tumour mouse models in these two sites. Both models are bioluminescent in order to follow up the tumour growth by imaging and are induced by cell injection without the need to intervene surgically. These models were utilized for immunotherapies with genetic or plant-derived therapeutic vaccines. In particular, the head/neck orthotopic model appears to be very promising for studies combining chemo-radio-immune therapy that seems to be very effective in patients. PMID:26138695

  17. Current trends in cancer vaccines--a bioinformatics perspective.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Shanju; Nayanar, Sangeetha K; Balasubramanian, Satheesan

    2013-01-01

    Cancer vaccine development is in the process of becoming reality in future, due to successful phase II/III clinical trials. However, there are still problems due to the specificity of tumor antigens and weakness of tumor associated antigens in eliciting an effective immune response. Computational models to assess the vaccine efficacy have helped to improve and understand what is necessary for personalized treatment. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms of activation of antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, decreased TREG number functionality and antigen cascade, so that overall improvement in vaccine efficacy and disease free survival can be attained. T cell epitomic based in sillico approaches might be very effective for the design and development of novel cancer vaccines.

  18. Immunological Evaluation of Recent MUC1 Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Wall, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    Aberrantly glycosylated mucin 1 (MUC1) is a recognized tumor-specific antigen on epithelial cell tumors. A wide variety of MUC1 glycopeptide anti-cancer vaccines have been formulated by many research groups. Some researchers have used MUC1 alone as an immunogen whereas other groups used different antigenic carrier proteins such as bovine serum albumin or keyhole limpet hemocyanin for conjugation with MUC1 glycopeptide. A variety of adjuvants have been used with MUC1 glycopeptides to improve their immunogenicity. Fully synthetic multicomponent vaccines have been synthesized by incorporating different T helper cell epitopes and Toll-like receptor agonists. Some vaccine formulations utilized liposomes or nanoparticles as vaccine delivery systems. In this review, we discuss the immunological evaluation of different conjugate or synthetic MUC1 glycopeptide vaccines in different tumor or mouse models that have been published since 2012. PMID:27472370

  19. Immunological Evaluation of Recent MUC1 Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Wall, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrantly glycosylated mucin 1 (MUC1) is a recognized tumor-specific antigen on epithelial cell tumors. A wide variety of MUC1 glycopeptide anti-cancer vaccines have been formulated by many research groups. Some researchers have used MUC1 alone as an immunogen whereas other groups used different antigenic carrier proteins such as bovine serum albumin or keyhole limpet hemocyanin for conjugation with MUC1 glycopeptide. A variety of adjuvants have been used with MUC1 glycopeptides to improve their immunogenicity. Fully synthetic multicomponent vaccines have been synthesized by incorporating different T helper cell epitopes and Toll-like receptor agonists. Some vaccine formulations utilized liposomes or nanoparticles as vaccine delivery systems. In this review, we discuss the immunological evaluation of different conjugate or synthetic MUC1 glycopeptide vaccines in different tumor or mouse models that have been published since 2012. PMID:27472370

  20. Influenza vaccination in children with cancer receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Cecinati, Valerio; Russo, Fabio Giovanni; Principi, Nicola

    2009-06-01

    Influenza has a significant clinical impact on pediatric cancer patients because it causes frequent febrile episodes and respiratory tract infections, possibly severe complications, delays in chemotherapy administration and even death, all of which supports the importance of prevention and the widespread use of influenza vaccination. Results from clinical studies show that influenza vaccination can be considered safe in children undergoing chemotherapy and, although weaker than in healthy children, the immune response seems to be sufficient in patients with leukemia or solid tumors even if it is less in children receiving chemotherapy than in those who are not. However, there is an urgent need for universally accepted guidelines concerning the type of vaccine that leads to the best immunological results, the number of administrations, and their timing in relation to the severity of immunosuppression and chemotherapy schedules. Such recommendations, together with a clear demonstration of vaccine efficacy, are also needed to increase influenza vaccination coverage in this high-risk category of patients.

  1. Are we missing an opportunity for cancer prevention? Human papillomavirus vaccination for survivors of pediatric and young adult cancers.

    PubMed

    Temkin, Sarah M; Seibel, Nita L

    2015-10-01

    Survivors of pediatric and young adult cancers remain at risk for subsequent diseases, including those related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Prevention of HPV acquisition through vaccination has become possible over the last decade. HPV vaccines have been shown to be safe and effective, yet rates of vaccination among childhood cancer survivors have remained low. Multiple factors, including stronger advocacy for this intervention from providers, could potentially increase vaccination and lead to lower HPV disease burdens for childhood cancer survivors. Health care providers for survivors of pediatric and adolescent cancers should prioritize counseling for HPV vaccination at follow-up visits. Cancer 2015;121:3435-43. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  2. Clinical evaluation strategies for a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Precioso, Alexander Roberto; Palacios, Ricardo; Thomé, Beatriz; Mondini, Gabriella; Braga, Patrícia; Kalil, Jorge

    2015-12-10

    Butantan Institute is a public Brazilian biomedical research-manufacturer center affiliated to the São Paulo State Secretary of Health. Currently, Butantan is one of the main public producers of vaccines, antivenoms, and antitoxins in Latin America. The partnership between Butantan and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the United Sates has been one of the longest and most successful partnerships in the development and manufacturing of new vaccines. Recently, Butantan Institute has developed and manufactured a lyophilized tetravalent live attenuated dengue vaccine with the four dengue viruses attenuated and licensed from the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at The National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (LID/NIAID/NIH). The objective of this paper is to describe the clinical evaluation strategies of a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (Butantan-DV) developed and manufactured by Butantan Institute. These clinical strategies will be used to evaluate the Butantan-DV Phase III trial to support the Butantan-DV licensure for protection against any symptomatic dengue caused by any serotype in people aged 2 to 59 years.

  3. 9-Valent HPV vaccine for cancers, pre-cancers and genital warts related to HPV.

    PubMed

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Velicer, Christine; Luxembourg, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of nearly all cervical cancer cases as well as a substantial proportion of anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal cancers, making it responsible for approximately 5% of the global cancer burden. The first-generation HPV vaccines that is, quadrivalent HPV type 6/11/16/18 vaccine and bivalent HPV type 16/18 vaccine were licensed in 2006 and 2007, respectively. A second-generation 9-valent HPV type 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine with broader cancer coverage was initiated even before the first vaccines were approved. By preventing HPV infection and disease due to HPV31/33/45/52/58, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to increase prevention of cervical cancer from 70 to 90%. In addition, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to prevent 85-95% of HPV-related vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. Overall, the 9vHPV vaccine addresses a significant unmet medical need, although further health economics and implementation research is needed.

  4. Persistent parasites and immunologic memory in cutaneous leishmaniasis: implications for vaccine designs and vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Uzonna, Jude

    2008-01-01

    Despite a plethora of publications on the murine model of cutaneous leishmaniasis and their contribution to our understanding of the factors that regulate the development of CD4+ T cell immunity in vivo, there is still no effective vaccine against the human disease. While recovery from natural or experimental infection with Leishmania major, the causative agent of human cutaneous leishmaniasis, results in persistence of parasites at the primary infection site and the development of long-lasting immunity to reinfection, vaccination with killed parasites or recombinant proteins induces only short-term protection. The reasons for the difference in protective immunity following recovery from live infection and vaccination with heat-killed parasites are not known. This may in part be related to persistence of live parasites following healing of primary cutaneous lesions, because complete clearance of parasites leads to rapid loss of infection-induced immunity. Recent reports indicate that in addition to persistent parasites, IL-10-producing natural regulatory T cells may also play critical roles in the maintenance and loss of infection-induced immunity. This review focuses on current understanding of the factors that regulate the development, maintenance and loss of anti-Leishmania memory responses and highlights the role of persistent parasites and regulatory T cells in this process. Understanding these factors is crucial for designing effective vaccines and vaccination strategies against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  5. DNA Vaccination: Using the Patient's Immune System to Overcome Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eschenburg, Georg; Stermann, Alexander; Preissner, Robert; Meyer, Hellmuth-Alexander; Lode, Holger N.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of today. Optimization of standard treatment protocols consisting of the main columns of chemo- and radiotherapy followed or preceded by surgical intervention is often limited by toxic side effects and induction of concomitant malignancies and/or development of resistant mechanisms. This requires the development of therapeutic strategies which are as effective as standard therapies but permit the patients a life without severe negative side effects. Along this line, the development of immunotherapy in general and the innovative concept of DNA vaccination in particular may provide a venue to achieve this goal. Using the patient's own immune system by activation of humoral and cellular immune responses to target the cancer cells has shown first promising results in clinical trials and may allow reduced toxicity standard therapy regimen in the future. The main challenge of this concept is to transfer the plethora of convincing preclinical and early clinical results to an effective treatment of patients. PMID:21197271

  6. New advances in vaccine technology and improved cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Huh, Warner K; Kendrick, James E; Alvarez, Ronald D

    2007-05-01

    Cervical cancer, which is caused by oncogenic types of the human papillomavirus (HPV), is the second most common cancer in women, responsible for 274,000 deaths worldwide in 2002. Approximately 70% of all cervical cancers are caused by the two most common oncogenic HPV types, HPV-16 and HPV-18; another 10% are caused by the next most common types, HPV-45 and HPV-31. Therefore, vaccines designed to prevent infection with oncogenic HPV types have the potential to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer and precancerous lesions. Vaccinology research recently has developed tools that may be used to improve the safety and efficacy of vaccines, and several of these tools have been used in the development of HPV vaccines. These advances include new insight into antigen selection, inclusion of adjuvants designed to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccines, and investigation into alternative routes of administration. Clinical studies of HPV vaccines that take advantage of these technological advances have reported excellent safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy results for prevention of HPV infection and incidence of associated cytopathologic abnormalities.

  7. The Florey lecture, 1986. Vaccine prevention of virus-induced human cancers.

    PubMed

    Epstein, M A

    1987-03-23

    Carcinogenic viruses have been discovered in numerous animal species over the last 80 years but their role in human cancer has only recently become an important issue. With EB virus involved with endemic Burkitt's lymphoma and undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, hepatitis B virus with primary liver cancer, papilloma viruses with carcinoma of the cervix, and T-cell leukaemia virus with adult T leukaemia, 20-25% of all human cancer appears to have a virus component in its causation. By analogy with certain virus-induced animal cancers, vaccine prevention of infection should greatly reduce subsequent tumour development; vaccines against hepatitis B virus are already on trial for this purpose in populations at risk. Experiments are described in which an EB virus subunit vaccine consisting of the virus-determined membrane antigen glycoprotein molecule of molecular mass 340 kDa (MA gp340) has been prepared by two purification methods. Material from one of these has successfully protected cotton-top tamarins against a 100% lymphomagenic dose of challenge virus and investigations are under way to identify an immunogen, based on MA gp340, suitable for use in man. Genetically engineered bacterial, yeast, and mammalian cells expressing the gp340 gene are already available; this gene has also been inserted into vaccinia and varicella virus vectors. Powerful new adjuvants are also considered, together with future strategies for human vaccine studies. PMID:2884667

  8. Knowledge on HPV Vaccine and Cervical Cancer Facilitates Vaccine Acceptability among School Teachers in Kitui County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Masika, Moses Muia; Ogembo, Javier Gordon; Chabeda, Sophie Vusha; Wamai, Richard G.; Mugo, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    Background Vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have the potential to reduce the burden of cervical cancer. School-based delivery of HPV vaccines is cost-effective and successful uptake depends on school teachers’ knowledge and acceptability of the vaccine. The aim of this study is to assess primary school teachers’ knowledge and acceptability of HPV vaccine and to explore facilitators and barriers of an ongoing Gavi Alliance-supported vaccination program in Kitui County, Kenya. Methods This was a cross-sectional, mixed methods study in Central Division of Kitui County where the Ministry of Health is offering the quadrivalent HPV vaccine to grade four girls. Data on primary school teachers’ awareness, knowledge and acceptability of HPV vaccine as well as facilitators and barriers to the project was collected through self-administered questionnaires and two focus group discussions. Results 339 teachers (60% female) completed the survey (62% response rate) and 13 participated in 2 focus group discussions. Vaccine awareness among teachers was high (90%), the level of knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer among teachers was moderate (48%, SD = 10.9) and females scored higher than males (50% vs. 46%, p = 0.002). Most teachers (89%) would recommend the vaccine to their daughter or close relatives. Those who would recommend the vaccine had more knowledge than those who would not (p = <0.001). The main barriers were insufficient information about the vaccine, poor accessibility of schools, absenteeism of girls on vaccine days, and fear of side effects. Conclusions Despite low to moderate levels of knowledge about HPV vaccine among school teachers, vaccine acceptability is high. Teachers with little knowledge on HPV vaccine are less likely to accept the vaccine than those who know more; this may affect uptake if not addressed. Empowering teachers to be vaccine champions in their community may be a feasible way of disseminating information about HPV

  9. Optimizing strategies for meningococcal C disease vaccination in Valencia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meningococcal C (MenC) conjugate vaccines have controlled invasive diseases associated with this serogroup in countries where they are included in National Immunization Programs and also in an extensive catch-up program involving subjects up to 20 years of age. Catch-up was important, not only because it prevented disease in adolescents and young adults at risk, but also because it decreased transmission of the bacteria, since it was in this age group where the organism was circulating. Our objective is to develop a new vaccination schedule to achieve maximum seroprotection in these groups. Methods A recent study has provided detailed age-structured information on the seroprotection levels against MenC in Valencia (Spain), where vaccination is routinely scheduled at 2 months and 6 months, with a booster dose at 18 months of age. A complementary catch-up campaign was also carried out in n for children from 12 months to 19 years of age. Statistical analyses of these data have provided an accurate picture on the evolution of seroprotection in the last few years. Results An agent-based model has been developed to study the future evolution of the seroprotection histogram. We have shown that the optimum strategy for achieving high protection levels in all infants, toddlers and adolescents is a change to a 2 months, 12 months and 12 years of age vaccination pattern. If the new schedule were implemented in January 2014, high-risk subjects between 15-19 years of age would have very low seroprotection for the next 6 years, thereby threatening the program. Conclusions High protection levels and a low incidence of meningococcal C disease can be achieved in the future by means of a cost-free change in vaccination program. However, we recommend a new catch-up program simultaneous to the change in regular vaccination program. PMID:24886054

  10. Infrastructure requirements for human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cancer screening in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Anorlu, Rose; Sangwa-Lugoma, Ghislain; Denny, Lynette A

    2013-12-29

    The availability of both human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and alternative screening tests has greatly improved the prospects of cervical cancer prevention in sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. The inclusion of HPV vaccine in the portfolio of new vaccines offered by the Gobal Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI) to GAVI-eligible countries has vastly improved the chances of introducing HPV vaccination. Further investments to improve vaccine storage, distribution and delivery infrastructure and human resources of the Extended Programme of Immunization will substantially contribute to the faster introduction of HPV vaccination in SSA countries through both school- and campaign-based approaches. Alternative methods to cytology for the prevention of cervical cancer through the early detection and treatment of cervical cancer precursors have been extensively evaluated in the past 15 years, in Africa as well as in other low-resource settings. Visual inspection with 3-5% dilute acetic acid (VIA) and HPV testing are the two alternative screening methods that have been most studied, in both cross-sectional and randomised clinical trials. VIA is particularly suitable to low-resource settings; however, its efficacy in reducing cervical cancer is likely to be significantly lower than HPV testing. The introduction of VIA screening programmes will help develop the infrastructure that will, in turn, facilitate the introduction of affordable HPV testing in future. Links with the existing HIV/AIDS control programmes is another strategy to improve the infrastructure and screening services in SSA. Infrastructural requirements for an integrated approach aiming to vaccinate single-year cohorts of girls in the 9-13 years age-range and to screen women over 30 years of age using VIA or affordable rapid HPV tests are outlined in this manuscript. This article forms part of a regional report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in the Sub

  11. Prevention strategies in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Trottier, Greg; Lawrentschuk, N; Fleshner, N E

    2010-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) prevention has been an exciting and controversial topic since the results of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) were published. With the recently published results of the reduce (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events) trial, interest in this topic is at a peak. Primary pca prevention will be unlikely to affect mortality significantly, but the reduction in overtreatment and the effect on quality of life from the avoidance of a cancer diagnosis are important factors to consider.This review provides a comparative update on the REDUCE and PCPT trials and some clinical recommendations. Other potential primary preventive strategies with statins, selective estrogen response modulators, and nutraceutical compounds-including current evidence for these agents and their roles in clinical practice-are discussed. Many substances that have been examined in the primary prevention of pca and for which clinical data are either negative or particularly weak are not covered.The future of PCa prevention continues to expand, with several ongoing clinical trials and much interest in tertiary prostate cancer prevention. PMID:20882132

  12. Cancer vaccines: harnessing the potential of anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    Although the presence of cancer suggests failure of the immune system to protect against development of tumors, the possibility that immunity can be redirected and focused to generate an anti-tumor response offers great translational possibility. The key to this is identifying antigens likely to be present in any given tumor and functionally critical to tumor survival and growth. Such tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are varied and optimally should be absent from normal tissue. Of particular interest are TAAs associated with the tumor stroma, as immunity directed against the stroma may restrict the ability of the tumor to grow and metastasize. Important to directing the immune system toward an effect anti-tumor response is the understanding of how TAAs are processed and how the tumor is able to evade immune elimination. The process of immunoediting happens in response to the selective pressure that the immune system places upon tumor cell populations and allows for emergence of tumor cells capable of escaping immune destruction. Efforts to harness the immune system for clinical application has been aided by vaccines based on purified recombinant protein or nucleic acid TAAs. For example, a vaccine for canine melanoma has been developed and approved based on immunization with DNA components of tyrosinase, a glycoprotein essential to melanin synthesis. The performance of cancer vaccines has been aided in some cases when supplemented with immunostimulatory molecules such as interleukin 2 or a novel extracellular matrix vaccine adjuvant. Vaccines with the broadest menu of antigenic targets may be those most likely to succeed against cancer. For this reason, tissue vaccines produced from harvested tumor material may offer significant benefit. With several cancer vaccines on the veterinary and human markets, efforts to understand basic tumor immunology are soon to yield great dividends. PMID:23850019

  13. Strategies toward vaccines against Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Bondi, Sara K; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2009-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria, and are the causative agents of the diseases glanders and melioidosis, respectively. These bacteria have been recognized as important pathogens for over 100 years, yet a relative dearth of available information exists regarding their virulence determinants and immunopathology. Infection with either of these bacteria presents with nonspecific symptoms and can be either acute or chronic, impeding rapid diagnosis. The lack of a vaccine for either bacterium also makes them potential candidates for bioweaponization. Together with their high rate of infectivity via aerosols and resistance to many common antibiotics, both bacteria have been classified as category B priority pathogens by the US NIH and US CDC, which has spurred a dramatic increase in interest in these microorganisms. Attempts have been made to develop vaccines for these infections, which would not only benefit military personnel, a group most likely to be targeted in an intentional release, but also individuals who may come in contact with glanders-infected animals or live in areas where melioidosis is endemic. This review highlights some recent attempts of vaccine development for these infections and the strategies used to improve the efficacy of vaccine approaches. PMID:18980539

  14. Economic Analysis of Vaccination Strategies for PRRS Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) is a swine-specific pathogen that causes significant increases in production costs. When a breeding herd becomes infected, in an attempt to hasten control and elimination of PRRSv, some veterinarians have adopted a strategy called load-close-expose which consists of interrupting replacement pig introductions into the herd for several weeks (herd closure) and exposing the whole herd to a replicating PRRSv to boost herd immunity. Either modified-live virus (MLV) vaccine or live field-virus inoculation (FVI) is used. This study consisted of partial budget analyses to compare MLV to FVI as the exposure method of load-close-expose program to control and eliminate PRRSv from infected breeding herds, and secondly to estimate benefit / cost of vaccinating sow herds preventatively. Under the assumptions used in this study, MLV held economic advantage over FVI. However, sensitivity analysis revealed that decreasing margin over variable costs below $ 47.32, or increasing PRRSv-attributed cost above $18.89 or achieving time-to-stability before 25 weeks resulted in advantage of FVI over MLV. Preventive vaccination of sow herds was beneficial when the frequency of PRRSv infection was at least every 2.1 years. The economics of preventative vaccination was minimally affected by cost attributed to field-type PRRSv infection on growing pigs or by the breeding herd productivity level. The models developed and described in this paper provide valuable tools to assist veterinarians in their efforts to control PRRSv. PMID:26673898

  15. Therapeutic cancer vaccines in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Limacher, Jean-Marc; Spring-Giusti, Clémentine; Bellon, Nadine; Ancian, Philippe; Rooke, Ronald; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves

    2013-03-01

    Therapeutic vaccines are different from the well-known prophylactic vaccines in that they are designed to treat patients already suffering from a disease instead of preventing the disease in healthy individuals. Several therapeutic vaccines are today in late-stage clinical development for non-small-cell lung cancer. These vaccines use different approaches including peptides, cell lines and viral vectors, and explore different settings within the pathology. Some are given in monotherapy while others are combined with the classic therapies used with non-small-cell lung cancer. This review gives a summary of the therapeutic vaccines currently in late-stage clinical development for non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:23496666

  16. Cancer stem cell vaccine expressing ESAT-6-gpi and IL-21 inhibits melanoma growth and metastases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fengshu; He, Xiangfeng; Sun, Jianan; Wu, Di; Pan, Meng; Li, Miao; Wu, Songyan; Zhang, Rong; Yan, Chunguang; Dou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vaccines may induce antitumor efficacy, however, weak immunogenicity of tumor antigens is one of the prime obstacles for excitation of the antitumor immune responses. Therefore, strategies that enhance immunogenicity of tumor vaccines are of particular interest. In this study, a novel melanoma B16F10 CD133+CD44+ cancer stem cell (CSC) vaccine expressing 6 kDa early secreted antigenic target (ESAT-6) in the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored form and secreting interleukin (IL)-21 was developed. Its anti-melanoma efficacy and mechanisms were investigated in mice. The results demonstrated that the B16F10-ESAT-6-gpi/IL-21 CD133+CD44+ CSC vaccine exhibited enhanced anti-melanoma efficacy as determined by inhibited melanoma growth, prolonged survival of melanoma bearing mice. The anti-melanoma immunity was associated with elevated levels of serum anti-ESAT-6 and interferon (IFN)-γ as well as increased cytotoxic activities of natural killer cells, splenocytes, and complement dependent cytotoxicity. Furthermore, this CSC-based vaccine apparently inhibited melanoma lung metastasis by decreasing the level of Vimentin while increasing the level of E-cadherin expression, suggesting an inhibited epithelial mesenchymal transition. Thus, the B16F10-ESAT-6-gpi/IL-21 CD133+CD44+ CSC vaccine may be used to reactivate the anti-tumor immunity and for treatment of melanoma. PMID:26692931

  17. Engineering nanoparticle-coated bacteria as oral DNA vaccines for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglian; Wu, Min; Fang, Chun; Cheng, Changyong; Zhao, Mengmeng; Fang, Weihuan; Chu, Paul K; Ping, Yuan; Tang, Guping

    2015-04-01

    Live attenuated bacteria are of increasing importance in biotechnology and medicine in the emerging field of cancer immunotherapy. Oral DNA vaccination mediated by live attenuated bacteria often suffers from low infection efficiency due to various biological barriers during the infection process. To this end, we herein report, for the first time, a new strategy to engineer cationic nanoparticle-coated bacterial vectors that can efficiently deliver oral DNA vaccine for efficacious cancer immunotherapy. By coating live attenuated bacteria with synthetic nanoparticles self-assembled from cationic polymers and plasmid DNA, the protective nanoparticle coating layer is able to facilitate bacteria to effectively escape phagosomes, significantly enhance the acid tolerance of bacteria in stomach and intestines, and greatly promote dissemination of bacteria into blood circulation after oral administration. Most importantly, oral delivery of DNA vaccines encoding autologous vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by this hybrid vector showed remarkable T cell activation and cytokine production. Successful inhibition of tumor growth was also achieved by efficient oral delivery of VEGFR2 with nanoparticle-coated bacterial vectors due to angiogenesis suppression in the tumor vasculature and tumor necrosis. This proof-of-concept work demonstrates that coating live bacterial cells with synthetic nanoparticles represents a promising strategy to engineer efficient and versatile DNA vaccines for the era of immunotherapy.

  18. Cancer anti-angiogenesis vaccines: Is the tumor vasculature antigenically unique?

    PubMed

    Wagner, Samuel C; Ichim, Thomas E; Ma, Hong; Szymanski, Julia; Perez, Jesus A; Lopez, Javier; Bogin, Vladimir; Patel, Amit N; Marincola, Francisco M; Kesari, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for the growth and metastasis of solid tumors. The tumor endothelium exists in a state of chronic activation and proliferation, fueled by the tumor milieu where angiogenic mediators are aberrantly over-expressed. Uncontrolled tumor growth, immune evasion, and therapeutic resistance are all driven by the dysregulated and constitutive angiogenesis occurring in the vasculature. Accordingly, great efforts have been dedicated toward identifying molecular signatures of this pathological angiogenesis in order to devise selective tumor endothelium targeting therapies while minimizing potential autoimmunity against physiologically normal endothelium. Vaccination with angiogenic antigens to generate cellular and/or humoral immunity against the tumor endothelium has proven to be a promising strategy for inhibiting or normalizing tumor angiogenesis and reducing cancer growth. Here we review tumor endothelium vaccines developed to date including active immunization strategies using specific tumor endothelium-associated antigens and whole endothelial cell-based vaccines designed to elicit immune responses against diverse target antigens. Among the novel therapeutic options, we describe a placenta-derived endothelial cell vaccine, ValloVax™, a polyvalent vaccine that is antigenically similar to proliferating tumor endothelium and is supported by pre-clinical studies to be safe and efficacious against several tumor types. PMID:26510973

  19. Bench-to-bedside review: Vaccine protection strategies during pandemic flu outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective means for the prevention of influenza, including pandemic strains. An ideal pandemic influenza vaccine should provide effective protection with the fewest number of doses in the shortest amount of time, and among the greatest proportion of the population. The current manufacturing processes required for embryonated chicken-egg-based influenza vaccines are limited in their ability to respond to pandemic situations - these limitations include problems with surge capacity, the need for egg-adapted strains, the possibility of contamination, and the presence of trace egg protein. Several vaccine strategies to circumvent the deficiencies intrinsic to an egg-based influenza vaccine are in various phases of development. These include the use of cell-culture-based growth systems, concomitant use of adjuvants, whole virus vaccines, recombinant protein vaccines, plasmid DNA vaccines, virus-like particle vaccines, and universal flu vaccines. PMID:20497595

  20. Dendritic cell-based vaccine for pancreatic cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Masato; Kobayashi, Masanori; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Koido, Shigeo; Homma, Sadamu

    2016-02-01

    "Vaccell" is a dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccine which has been established in Japan. The DCs play central roles in deciding the direction of host immune reactions as well as antigen presentation. We have demonstrated that DCs treated with a streptococcal immune adjuvant OK-432, produce interleukin-12, induce Th1-dominant state, and elicit anti-tumor effects, more powerful than those treated with the known DC-maturating factors. We therefore decided to mature DCs by the OK-432 for making an effective DC vaccine, Vaccell. The 255 patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer who received standard chemotherapy combined with DC vaccines, were analyzed retrospectively. Survival time of the patients with positive delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin reaction was significantly prolonged as compared with that of the patients with negative DTH. The findings strongly suggest that there may be "Responders" for the DC vaccine in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. We next conducted a small-scale prospective clinical study. In this trial, we pulsed HLA class II-restricted WT1 peptide (WT1-II) in addition to HLA class I-restricted peptide (WT1-I) into the DCs. Survival of the patients received WT1-I and -II pulsed DC vaccine was significantly extended as compared to that of the patients received DCs pulsed with WT1-I or WT1-II alone. Furthermore, WT1-specific DTH positive patients showed significantly improved the overall survival as well as progression-free survival as compared to the DTH negative patients. The activation of antigen-specific immune responses by DC vaccine in combination with standard chemotherapy may be associated with a good clinical outcome in advanced pancreatic cancer. We are now planning a pivotal study of the Vaccell in appropriate protocols in Japan. PMID:26855819

  1. Respiratory Homeostasis and Exploitation of the Immune System for Lung Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yagui-Beltrán, Adam; Coussens, Lisa M; Jablons, David M

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of all cancer deaths in the US. The international scientific and clinical community has made significant advances toward understanding specific molecular mechanisms underlying lung carcinogenesis; however, despite these insights and advances in surgery and chemoradiotherapy, the prognosis for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains poor. Nonetheless, significant effort is being focused on advancing translational research evaluating the efficacy of novel targeted therapeutic strategies for lung cancer. Illustrative examples of this include antagonists of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as gefitinib and erlotinib, and a diverse assortment of anti-angiogenic compounds targeting growth factors and/or their receptors that regulate tumor-associated angiogenic programs. In addition, with the increased awareness of the significant role chronically activated leukocytes play as potentiators of solid-tumor development, the role of innate and adaptive immune cells as regulators of lung carcinogenesis is being examined. While some of these studies are examining how novel therapeutic strategies may enhance the efficacy of lung cancer vaccines, others are evaluating the intrinsic characteristics of the immune response to lung cancer in order to identify rate-limiting molecular and/or cellular programs to target with novel anticancer therapeutics. In this article, we explore important aspects of the immune system and its role in regulating normal respiratory homeostasis compared with the immune response accompanying development of lung cancer. These hallmarks are then discussed in the context of recent efforts to develop lung cancer vaccines, where we have highlighted important concepts that must be taken into consideration for future development of novel therapeutic strategies and clinical trials assessing their efficacy.

  2. Therapeutic Vaccines Against Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursor intra-epithelial lesions are linked to infection by a subset of so-called “highrisk” human papillomavirus types, which are estimated to infect nearly four hundred million women worldwide. Two prophylactic vaccines have been commercialized recently targeting HPV16 and 18, the most prevalent viral types found in cervical cancer, which operate through induction of capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, in patients with persistent infection these vaccines have not been found to protect against progression to neoplasia. Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic vaccines targeting nonstructural early viral proteins. Among these, E6 and E7 are the preferred targets, since they are essential for induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype and are constitutively expressed by the transformed epithelial cells. Here are reviewed the most relevant potential vaccines based on HPV early antigens that have shown efficacy in preclinical models and that are being tested in clinical studies, which should determine their therapeutic capacity for eradicating HPV-induced premalignant and malignant lesions and cure cervical cancer. PMID:19915722

  3. Therapeutic vaccines against human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursor intra-epithelial lesions are linked to infection by a subset of so-called "highrisk" human papillomavirus types, which are estimated to infect nearly four hundred million women worldwide. Two prophylactic vaccines have been commercialized recently targeting HPV16 and 18, the most prevalent viral types found in cervical cancer, which operate through induction of capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, in patients with persistent infection these vaccines have not been found to protect against progression to neoplasia. Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic vaccines targeting nonstructural early viral proteins. Among these, E6 and E7 are the preferred targets, since they are essential for induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype and are constitutively expressed by the transformed epithelial cells. Here are reviewed the most relevant potential vaccines based on HPV early antigens that have shown efficacy in preclinical models and that are being tested in clinical studies, which should determine their therapeutic capacity for eradicating HPV-induced premalignant and malignant lesions and cure cervical cancer. PMID:19915722

  4. Comparative analysis of cancer vaccine settings for the selection of an effective protocol in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer vaccines are considered a promising therapeutic approach. However, their clinical results are not yet satisfactory. This may be due to the the difficulty of selection of an efficient tumor associated antigen (TAA) and immunization protocol. Indeed, the weak antigenicity of many TAA impairs the design of robust procedures, therefore a systematic analysis to identify the most efficient TAA is mandatory. Here, we performed a study to compare different gp100 vaccination strategies to identify the best strategy to provide a 100% protection against experimental melanoma in a reproducible manner. Methods C57BL/6J mice were challenged subcutaneously with B16F10 melanoma cells, after vaccination with: a) mouse or human gp10025-33 peptide plus CpG adjuvant; b) mouse or human gp100 gene; c) mouse or human gp10025-33 peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DC). Alternatively, a neutralizing anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was subcutaneously administered at the site of tumor challenge to counteract regulatory cells. Finally, combinatorial treatment was performed associating human gp10025-33 peptide-pulsed DC vaccination with administration of the anti-IL-10 mAb. Results Vaccination with human gp10025-33 peptide-pulsed DC was the most effective immunization protocol, although not achieving a full protection. Administration of the anti-IL-10 mAb showed also a remarkable protective effect, replicated in mice challenged with a different tumor, Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma. When immunization with gp10025-33 peptide-pulsed DC was associated with IL-10 counteraction, a 100% protective effect was consistently achieved. The analysis on the T-cell tumor infiltrates showed an increase of CD4+granzyme+ T-cells and a decreased number of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg elements from mice treated with either gp10025-33 peptide-pulsed DC vaccination or anti-IL-10 mAb administration. These data suggest that processes of intratumoral re-balance between effector and regulatory T cell

  5. Vaccination of adolescents with chronic medical conditions: Special considerations and strategies for enhancing uptake

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Annika M; LaRussa, Philip; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents with chronic medical conditions (CMCs), a growing population worldwide, possess a wide array of preventive health care needs. Vaccination is strongly recommended for the vast majority of these adolescents given their increased risk of vaccine preventable infection and associated complications. Not only should they receive routine vaccines, but some also require additional vaccines. Despite these guidelines, evidence suggests that adolescents with CMCs often fail to receive needed vaccines. Many factors contribute to this under-immunization, including lack of knowledge among parents and providers and suboptimal coordination of primary and subspecialty care. This review describes current vaccination recommendations for these adolescents as well as recent data related to infection risk, vaccine efficacy and safety, vaccination coverage, and the unique multilevel factors impacting uptake in this population. It also discusses strategies for improving coverage levels and reducing missed vaccination opportunities, with a particular focus on technology-based interventions. PMID:26212313

  6. Comparative Effectiveness of Different Strategies of Oral Cholera Vaccination in Bangladesh: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Dobromir T.; Troeger, Christopher; Halloran, M. Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M.; Chao, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Killed, oral cholera vaccines have proven safe and effective, and several large-scale mass cholera vaccination efforts have demonstrated the feasibility of widespread deployment. This study uses a mathematical model of cholera transmission in Bangladesh to examine the effectiveness of potential vaccination strategies. Methods & Findings We developed an age-structured mathematical model of cholera transmission and calibrated it to reproduce the dynamics of cholera in Matlab, Bangladesh. We used the model to predict the effectiveness of different cholera vaccination strategies over a period of 20 years. We explored vaccination programs that targeted one of three increasingly focused age groups (the entire vaccine-eligible population of age one year and older, children of ages 1 to 14 years, or preschoolers of ages 1 to 4 years) and that could occur either as campaigns recurring every five years or as continuous ongoing vaccination efforts. Our modeling results suggest that vaccinating 70% of the population would avert 90% of cholera cases in the first year but that campaign and continuous vaccination strategies differ in effectiveness over 20 years. Maintaining 70% coverage of the population would be sufficient to prevent sustained transmission of endemic cholera in Matlab, while vaccinating periodically every five years is less effective. Selectively vaccinating children 1–14 years old would prevent the most cholera cases per vaccine administered in both campaign and continuous strategies. Conclusions We conclude that continuous mass vaccination would be more effective against endemic cholera than periodic campaigns. Vaccinating children averts more cases per dose than vaccinating all age groups, although vaccinating only children is unlikely to control endemic cholera in Bangladesh. Careful consideration must be made before generalizing these results to other regions. PMID:25473851

  7. A clinical development paradigm for cancer vaccines and related biologics.

    PubMed

    Hoos, Axel; Parmiani, Giorgio; Hege, Kristen; Sznol, Mario; Loibner, Hans; Eggermont, Alexander; Urba, Walter; Blumenstein, Brent; Sacks, Natalie; Keilholz, Ulrich; Nichol, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines are a heterogeneous group of complex biologics with distinctly different clinical characteristics than cytotoxic agents. The current clinical development paradigm used for oncology drug development is based on criteria developed for cytotoxic agents. More flexible and focused developmental guidelines are needed to address the unique characteristics of therapeutic cancer vaccines. Over the course of 1 year, the Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group, representing academia and the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries with participation from the US Food and Drug Administration, defined in a consensus process the cornerstones of a new clinical development paradigm for cancer vaccines and related biologics. Four major topics were addressed: (1) end points for clinical trials, (2) trial designs and statistical methods, (3) technical and developmental challenges, and (4) combination therapy. The proposed paradigm suggests therapeutic cancer vaccines to be investigated in 2 general types of clinical studies: proof-of-principle trials and efficacy trials. Proof-of-principle trials, which introduce a novel cancer vaccine into humans, should include a minimum of 20 or more patients in a homogenous, well-defined population in an adjuvant setting or without rapidly progressive disease in a metastatic setting to allow vaccines adequate time to induce biologic activity and should incorporate immune and molecular markers. Objectives should include initiation of a safety database, determination of dose and schedule, and demonstration of biologic activity as proof-of-principle. Biologic activity is defined as any effect of the vaccine on the target disease or host immune system using biologic markers as study end points, for example, clinical, molecular, or immune response. Immune response is demonstrated if determined in 2 separate, established and reproducible assays at 2 consecutive follow-up time points after the baseline assessment. If

  8. Brachyury, a vaccine target, is overexpressed in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Duane H; Roselli, Mario; Ferroni, Patrizia; Costarelli, Leopoldo; Cavaliere, Francesco; Taffuri, Mariateresa; Palena, Claudia; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2016-10-01

    Patients diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) have a high rate of tumor metastasis and a poor prognosis. The treatment option for these patients is currently chemotherapy, which results in very low response rates. Strategies that exploit the immune system for the treatment of cancer have now shown the ability to improve survival in several tumor types. Identifying potential targets for immune therapeutic interventions is an important step in developing novel treatments for TNBC. In this study, in silico analysis of publicly available datasets and immunohistochemical analysis of primary and metastatic tumor biopsies from TNBC patients were conducted to evaluate the expression of the transcription factor brachyury, which is a driver of tumor metastasis and resistance and a target for cancer vaccine approaches. Analysis of breast cancer datasets demonstrated a predominant expression of brachyury mRNA in TNBC and in basal vs luminal or HER2 molecular breast cancer subtypes. At the protein level, variable levels of brachyury expression were detected both in primary and metastatic TNBC lesions. A strong association was observed between nuclear brachyury protein expression and the stage of disease, with nuclear brachyury being more predominant in metastatic vs primary tumors. Survival analysis also demonstrated an association between high levels of brachyury in the primary tumor and poor prognosis. Two brachyury-targeting cancer vaccines are currently undergoing clinical evaluation; the data presented here provide rationale for using brachyury-targeting immunotherapy approaches for the treatment of TNBC. PMID:27580659

  9. Building on Dendritic Cell Subsets to Improve Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Zurawski, Gerard; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY T cells can reject established tumors when adoptively transferred into patients, thereby demonstrating that the immune system can be harnessed for cancer therapy. However, such passive immunotherapy is unlikely to maintain memory T cells that might control tumor outgrowth on the long term. Active immunotherapy with vaccines has the potential to induce tumor-specific effector and memory T cells. Vaccines act through dendritic cells (DCs) which induce, regulate and maintain T cell immunity. Clinical trials testing first generation DC vaccines pulsed with tumor antigens provided a proof-of-principle that therapeutic immunity can be elicited. The increased knowledge of the DC system, including the existence of distinct DC subsets is leading to new trials which aim at improved immune and clinical outcomes. PMID:20226644

  10. A novel multi-epitope peptide vaccine against cancer: an in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Navid; Ghasemi, Younes; Javadi, Gholamreza; Khoshnoud, Mohammad Javad; Omidinia, Eskandar

    2014-05-21

    Cancer immunotherapy has an outstanding position in cancer prevention and treatment. In this kind of therapy, the immune system is activated to eliminate cancerous cells. Multi-epitope peptide cancer vaccines are manifesting as the next generation of cancer immunotherapy. In the present study, we have implemented various strategies to design an efficient multi-epitope vaccine. CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) epitopes, which have a pivotal role in cellular immune responses, helper epitopes and adjuvant, are three crucial components of peptide vaccine. CTL epitopes were determined from two high immunogenic protein Wilms tumor-1 (WT1) and human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 by various servers, which apply different algorithms. CTL epitopes were linked together by AAY and HEYGAEALERAG motifs to enhance epitope presentation. Pan HLA DR-binding epitope (PADRE) peptide sequence and helper epitopes, which have defined from Tetanus toxin fragment C (TTFrC) by various servers, were used to induce CD4+ helper T lymphocytes (HTLs) responses. Additionally, helper epitopes were conjugated together via GPGPG motifs that stimulate HTL immunity. Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin (HBHA), a novel TLR4 agonist was employed as an adjuvant to polarize CD4+ T cells toward T-helper 1 to induce strong CTL responses. Moreover, the EAAAK linker was introduced to N and C terminals of HBHA for efficient separation. 3D model of protein was generated and predicted B cell epitopes were determined from the surface of built structure. Our protein contains several linear and conformational B cell epitopes, which suggests the antibody triggering property of this novel vaccine. Hence, our final protein can be used for prophylactic or therapeutic usages, because it can potentially stimulate both cellular and humoral immune responses.

  11. Business models and opportunities for cancer vaccine developers.

    PubMed

    Kudrin, Alex

    2012-10-01

    Despite of growing oncology pipeline, cancer vaccines contribute only to a minor share of total oncology-attributed revenues. This is mainly because of a limited number of approved products and limited sales from products approved under compassionate or via early access entry in smaller and less developed markets. However revenue contribution from these products is extremely limited and it remains to be established whether developers are breaking even or achieving profitability with existing sales. Cancer vaccine field is well recognized for high development costs and risks, low historical rates of investment return and high probability of failures arising in ventures, partnerships and alliances. The cost of reimbursement for new oncology agents is not universally acceptable to payers limiting the potential for a global expansion, market access and reducing probability of commercial success. In addition, the innovation in cancer immunotherapy is currently focused in small and mid-size biotech companies and academic institutions struggling for investment. Existing R&D innovation models are deemed unsustainable in current "value-for-money" oriented healthcare environment. New business models should be much more open to collaborative, networked and federated styles, which could help to outreach global, markets and increase cost-efficiencies across an entire value chain. Lessons learned from some developing countries and especially from South Korea illustrate that further growth of cancer vaccine industry will depends not only on new business models but also will heavily rely on regional support and initiatives from different bodies, such as governments, payers and regulatory bodies.

  12. Business models and opportunities for cancer vaccine developers

    PubMed Central

    Kudrin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Despite of growing oncology pipeline, cancer vaccines contribute only to a minor share of total oncology-attributed revenues. This is mainly because of a limited number of approved products and limited sales from products approved under compassionate or via early access entry in smaller and less developed markets. However revenue contribution from these products is extremely limited and it remains to be established whether developers are breaking even or achieving profitability with existing sales. Cancer vaccine field is well recognized for high development costs and risks, low historical rates of investment return and high probability of failures arising in ventures, partnerships and alliances. The cost of reimbursement for new oncology agents is not universally acceptable to payers limiting the potential for a global expansion, market access and reducing probability of commercial success. In addition, the innovation in cancer immunotherapy is currently focused in small and mid-size biotech companies and academic institutions struggling for investment. Existing R&D innovation models are deemed unsustainable in current “value-for-money” oriented healthcare environment. New business models should be much more open to collaborative, networked and federated styles, which could help to outreach global, markets and increase cost-efficiencies across an entire value chain. Lessons learned from some developing countries and especially from South Korea illustrate that further growth of cancer vaccine industry will depends not only on new business models but also will heavily rely on regional support and initiatives from different bodies, such as governments, payers and regulatory bodies. PMID:22894953

  13. Allogeneic Antigen Composition for Preparing Universal Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Balashova, Elena E.

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that tumors induce specific changes to the surface of human endothelial cells thereby providing the basis for designing endothelial cell-based vaccines that directly target antigens expressed by the tumor endothelium. The present report extends these studies in vitro by investigating the efficacy of allogeneic antigens with regard to their ability to target immune responses against the tumor vasculature since alloantigens simplify vaccine development and implementation in clinical practice. We demonstrated that allogeneic SANTAVAC (Set of All Natural Target Antigens for Vaccination Against Cancer), which presents a specifically prepared composition of cell surface antigens from tumor-stimulated endothelial cells, allows targeting of the tumor vasculature with efficacy of 17, where efficacy represents the killing rate of target cells before normal cells are adversely affected, and efficacy of 60, where efficacy represents the fold decrease in the number of target cells and directly relates to tumor growth arrest. These data suggest that allogeneic SANTAVAC may be considered an antigenic composition that following administration in the presence of respective adjuvants may be clinically tested as a therapeutic or prophylactic universal cancer vaccine without adverse side effects to the normal vasculature. PMID:27781211

  14. Anti-idiotype antibody vaccine therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya-Chatterjee, Malaya; Chatterjee, Sunil K; Foon, Kenneth A

    2002-12-01

    The use of anti-idiotype (Id) antibodies as vaccines to stimulate antitumour immunity is one of several promising immunologic approaches to the therapy of cancer. Extensive studies in animal tumour models have demonstrated the efficacy of anti-Id vaccines in preventing tumour growth and curing mice with established tumours. A number of monoclonal anti-Id antibodies that mimic distinct human tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) have been developed and tested in the clinic, and demonstrate encouraging results. In general, the antigen mimicry by anti-Id antibodies has reflected structural homology in the majority of the cases, and amino acid sequence homology in a few of them. The greatest challenge of immunotherapy by means of anti-Id vaccines is to identify the optimal anti-Id antibody that will function as a true surrogate antigen for a TAA system, and ideally will generate both humoral and cellular immune responses. Although several clinical studies have shown enhanced survival of patients receiving anti-Id vaccines, the efficacy of these vaccines will depend on the results of several randomised Phase III clinical trials that are currently planned or ongoing. PMID:12517266

  15. New strategies against prostate cancer--Pt(II)-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Matos, C S; de Carvalho, A L M B; Lopes, R P; Marques, M P M

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the sixth cause of cancer-related death in men. When hormone therapy fails to control tumour growth, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) occurs and chemotherapy drugs must be administered. Since 2004, docetaxel administration is the standard of care in metastatic CRPC, although it presents severe limitations such as acquired resistance and poor prognosis. An analogue (cabazitaxel) was approved by the FDA in 2010 as a second-line chemotherapeutic agent. Novel immuno- and hormonal therapy agents, as well as tumour vaccines, have been recently developed, but new strategies are still needed for effectively handling this type of neoplasia. Platinum compounds, in particular, have been the object of a growing interest, despite the former belief that they should have modest activity against prostate cancer. Compounds such as carboplatin, oxaliplatin or satraplatin, either alone or in combination, have lately shown promising results. In order to overcome the deleterious side-effects usually associated to these metal-based agents, several approaches have been followed with a view to optimise drug delivery and targeting, some of which showed considerable success in CRPC. Platinum drugs may therefore have an important role in the chemotherapeutic management of human metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, mostly in second-line strategies. The present review addresses the most relevant studies on platinum-based antineoplastic agents towards CRPC in the last decade--from first--and second-generation complexes to newly developed compounds.

  16. Nitroaspirin corrects immune dysfunction in tumor-bearing hosts and promotes tumor eradication by cancer vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Santo, Carmela; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Bolla, Manlio; del Soldato, Piero; Melani, Cecilia; Guiducci, Cristiana; Colombo, Mario P.; Iezzi, Manuela; Musiani, Piero; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2005-03-01

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the immune-mediated destruction of cancer cells. Of the various strategies used by tumors to counteract immune attacks, myeloid suppressors recruited by growing cancers are particularly efficient, often resulting in the induction of systemic T lymphocyte dysfunction. We have previously shown that the mechanism by which myeloid cells from tumor-bearing hosts block immune defense strategies involves two enzymes that metabolize L-arginine: arginase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase. NO-releasing aspirin is a classic aspirin molecule covalently linked to a NO donor group. NO aspirin does not possess direct antitumor activity. However, by interfering with the inhibitory enzymatic activities of myeloid cells, orally administered NO aspirin normalized the immune status of tumor-bearing hosts, increased the number and function of tumor-antigen-specific T lymphocytes, and enhanced the preventive and therapeutic effectiveness of the antitumor immunity elicited by cancer vaccination. Because cancer vaccines and NO aspirin are currently being investigated in independent phase I/II clinical trials, these findings offer a rationale to combine these treatments in subjects with advanced neoplastic diseases. arginase | immunosuppression | myeloid cells | nitric oxide | immunotherapy

  17. Lessons learned from cancer vaccine trials and target antigen choice.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of tumor antigens have been targeted in cancer immunotherapy studies. Traditionally, the focus has been on commonly overexpressed antigens shared across many patients and/or tumor types. As the field has progressed, the identity of human tumor rejection antigens has broadened. Immunologic monitoring of clinical trials has slowly elucidated candidate biomarkers of immune response and clinical response, and conversely, of immune dysfunction and suppression. We have utilized MART-1/Melan-A in our melanoma studies and observed a high frequency of immune responses and several significant clinical responses in patients vaccinated with this melanosomal protein. Alpha-fetoprotein is a shared, overexpressed tumor antigen and secreted glycoprotein that we have tested in hepatocellular cancer vaccines. Our recent studies have identified immunosuppressive and immune-skewing activities of this antigen. The choice of target antigen and its form can have unexpected effects.

  18. Disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Literacy and Vaccine Completion among Asian American Pacific Islander Undergraduates: Implications for Cancer Health Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hee Yun; Kwon, Melissa; Vang, Suzanne; DeWolfe, Jessica; Kim, Nam Keol; Lee, Do Kyung; Yeung, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Low rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among young Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women need to be addressed, particularly given the high incidence of cervical cancer in this population. The current study aims to investigate predictors of HPV vaccination in young AAPI and non-Latina white (NLW) women. Methods: A…

  19. Mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by a single time vaccination strategy in mice.

    PubMed

    González Aznar, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Valdez, Yolanda; Fariñas, Mildrey; Pérez, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination is considered by the World Health Organization as the most cost-effective strategy for controlling infectious diseases. In spite of great successes with vaccines, many infectious diseases are still leading killers, because of the inadequate coverage of many vaccines. Several factors have been responsible: number of doses, high vaccine reactogenicity, vaccine costs, vaccination policy, among others. Contradictorily, few vaccines are of single dose and even less of mucosal administration. However, more common infections occur via mucosa, where secretory immunoglobulin A plays an essential role. As an alternative, we proposed a novel protocol of vaccination called Single Time Vaccination Strategy (SinTimVaS) by immunizing 2 priming doses at the same time: one by mucosal route and the other by parenteral route. Here, the mucosal and systemic responses induced by Finlay adjuvants (AF Proteoliposome 1 and AF Cochleate 1) implementing SinTimVaS in BALB/c mice were evaluated. One intranasal dose of AF Cochleate 1 and an intramuscular dose of AF Proteoliposome 1 adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, with bovine serum albumin or tetanus toxoid as model antigens, administrated at the same time, induced potent specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Also, we demonstrated that SinTimVaS using other mucosal routes like oral and sublingual, in combination with the subcutaneous route elicits immune responses. SinTimVaS, as a new immunization strategy, could increase vaccination coverage and reduce time-cost vaccines campaigns, adding the benefits of immune response in mucosa.

  20. A prospective highlight on exosomal nanoshuttles and cancer immunotherapy and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Mohammad A.; Omidi, Yadollah

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Exosomes (EXOs) and ectosomes (ECTOs) are nanoscale membranous extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from different cells mediating various cellular communications. EXOs are liberated based on the exocytosis of multivesicular bodies, while ECTOs are ubiquitously released from the plasma membranes. Methods: Here, in this paper, we go over the extracellular vesicular machineries and concisely highlight their clinical importance in solid tumors and their possible applications in cancer immunotherapy/vaccination. Results: In various types of cancers, these vesicles play central roles delivering cancer cell messages to the target cells, as a result both of them seem to provide a novel useful means for diagnosis and therapy of malignancies. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes (DEXOs) are able to activate the tumor antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) and hence induce antitumor responses in vivo. Within the tumor microenvironment (TME), however, tumor cells seem to generate exosomes (the so-called oncosoems) that may act in favor of tumor progression. Conclusions: As complex systems, these vesicular micro-/nano-machines convey important cellular messages dependent upon the cells/tissue setting(s). In addition to their potential in diagnosis of cancers, they have been exploited for cancer immunotherapy/vaccination. However, such treatment strategies need to be carefully designed to attain desired clinical outcomes. PMID:26457248

  1. Advances and perspectives of colorectal cancer stem cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Dou, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is essentially an environmental and genetic disease featured by uncontrolled cell growth and the capability to invade other parts of the body by forming metastases, which inconvertibly cause great damage to tissues and organs. It has become one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in the developed countries such as United States, and approximately 1.2 million new cases are yearly diagnosed worldwide, with the death rate of more than 600,000 annually and incidence rates are increasing in most developing countries. Apart from the generally accepted theory that pathogenesis of colorectal cancer consists of genetic mutation of a certain target cell and diversifications in tumor microenvironment, the colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) theory makes a different explanation, stating that among millions of colon cancer cells there is a specific and scanty cellular population which possess the capability of self-renewal, differentiation and strong oncogenicity, and is tightly responsible for drug resistance and tumor metastasis. Based on these characteristics, CCSCs are becoming a novel target cells both in the clinical and the basic studies, especially the study of CCSCs vaccines due to induced efficient immune response against CCSCs. This review provides an overview of CCSCs and preparation technics and targeting factors related to CCSCs vaccines in detail.

  2. Jabs and barbs: ways to address misleading vaccination and immunisation information using currently available strategies.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Jon; Stewart, Cameron; Parker, Malcolm

    2013-09-01

    Misleading vaccination information undermines confidence in vaccination and may lead to reductions in the effectiveness of vaccination programs. A number of regulatory techniques can be employed to challenge the spread of false information, including health care complaints, therapeutic goods laws, consumer protection laws and professional discipline. This article examines three case studies involving the publication of anti-vaccination information by non-professionally aligned organisations, by non-registered health professionals, and by registered health professionals under the National Law. The article examines the effectiveness of different regulatory responses and makes suggestions for future strategies to deal with the publication of demonstrably false information regarding vaccination. PMID:24218789

  3. Jabs and barbs: ways to address misleading vaccination and immunisation information using currently available strategies.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Jon; Stewart, Cameron; Parker, Malcolm

    2013-09-01

    Misleading vaccination information undermines confidence in vaccination and may lead to reductions in the effectiveness of vaccination programs. A number of regulatory techniques can be employed to challenge the spread of false information, including health care complaints, therapeutic goods laws, consumer protection laws and professional discipline. This article examines three case studies involving the publication of anti-vaccination information by non-professionally aligned organisations, by non-registered health professionals, and by registered health professionals under the National Law. The article examines the effectiveness of different regulatory responses and makes suggestions for future strategies to deal with the publication of demonstrably false information regarding vaccination.

  4. Development of a gonorrhoea vaccine: prospects, strategies and tactics.

    PubMed

    Gotschlich, E C

    1984-01-01

    The sexually transmitted diseases constitute an enormous public health problem in most parts of the world. This article concentrates on gonorrhea and summarizes the magnitude of the problem, reviews current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms employed by the gonococcus to establish infection, and describes the immunochemistry and genetics of the gonococcal surface antigens. It is pointed out that pili and protein II show marked heterogeneity, and that this probably represents a response by the organism to the selective pressure imposed by the human immune system. This evidence for the effectiveness of the immune system augurs well for the eventual success of a gonorrhea vaccine. The prospects for the antigens currently under study in a number of laboratories and strategies now being employed to circumvent the problems posed by antigenic heterogeneity are summarized.

  5. Evaluation of a vaccination strategy by serosurveillance data: The case of varicella.

    PubMed

    Tafuri, Silvio; Gallone, Maria Serena; Gallone, Maria Filomena; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Chironna, Maria; Germinario, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Serological studies have many important epidemiologic applications. They can be used to investigate acquisition of various infections in different populations, measure the induction of an immune response in the host, evaluate the persistence of antibody, identify appropriate target groups and the age for vaccination. Serological studies can also be used to determine the vaccine efficacy. Since 1995 a varicella vaccine is available and it has been recommended in several countries (e.g. USA, Australia, Canada, Costa Rica, Ecuador, etc.). Nevertheless few varicella seroprevalence studies in countries that adopted an URV are available. It is related to the relatively recent introduction of the vaccination and to the lack of structured and collaborative surveillance systems based on serosurvey at national or regional level. Varicella seroprevalence data collected before the introduction of vaccination strategies allowed to establish the age of vaccination (e.g., indicated the opportunity to offer the vaccine to Italian susceptible adolescents). In the post-vaccination era, seroprevalence data demonstrated vaccine as immunogenic and excluded an increase of the age of infection linked to the vaccination strategy. New seroprevalence studies should be performed to answer to open questions, such as the long-term immunity and the change of the herpes zoster epidemiological pattern related to the vaccine.

  6. Immune Evasion Pathways and the Design of Dendritic Cell-based Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Brent A.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data is suggesting that the process of dendritic cell (DC) tolerization is an important step in tumorigenesis. Our understanding of the networks within the tumor microenvironment that functionally tolerize DC function is evolving while methods for genetically manipulating DC populations in situ continue to develop. A more intimate understanding of the paracrine signaling pathways which mediate immune evasion by subverting DC function promises to provide novel strategies for improving the clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. This will likely require a better understanding of both the antigen expression profile and the immune evasion network of the tumor and its associated stromal tissues. PMID:27011049

  7. Production of a novel multi-epitope peptide vaccine for cancer immunotherapy in TC-1 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Navid; Sadraeian, Mohammad; Rahbar, Mohammad Reza; Khoshnoud, Mohammad Javad; Mohkam, Milad; Gholami, Ahmad; Banihashemi, Mehrzad; Ghasemi, Younes

    2015-01-01

    In our previous research, several bioinformatic strategies were utilized to design an efficient multi-epitope peptide vaccine (MEV) against cancer. The designed vaccine consists of Wilms tumor-1 (WT-1) and human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, tetanus toxin fragment C (TTFrC) and HLA-DR epitope (PADRE) helper T lymphocyte (HTL) epitopes and heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA) as an immunostimulatory adjuvant. All segments were fused together by suitable linkers. In the current study, we cloned and expressed the designed MEV in E. coli. We subsequently performed in vivo preventative and therapeutic assays to evaluate antitumor efficacy of the vaccine against the HPV-16 E7-expressing murine tumor cell line TC-1 as a model for cancer immunotherapy. The results showed that in preventive experiments, vaccination with MEV significantly augmented the IgG antibody titer and the percentage of tumor-free mice compared to control groups (PBS and E7). Moreover, in therapeutic experiments, vaccination with MEV led to a reduction in the number of metastatic nodules, lung weights and the ratio of lung weights to body weights compared to other groups. In sum, our epitope vaccine could efficiently induce preventive and therapeutic antitumor immunity in TC-1 tumor bearing mice.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of monophosphoryl lipid A derivatives as fully synthetic self-adjuvanting glycoconjugate cancer vaccine carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhifang; Mondal, Mohabul; Liao, Guochao; Guo, Zhongwu

    2014-05-28

    A fully synthetic carbohydrate-based cancer vaccine is an attractive concept, but an important topic in the area is to develop proper vaccine carriers that can improve the immunogenicity and other immunological properties of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). In this context, four monophosphoryl derivatives of Neisseria meningitidis lipid A were synthesized via a highly convergent and effective strategy and evaluated as vaccine carriers and adjuvants. The conjugates of these monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) derivatives with a modified form of the sTn antigen were found to elicit high titers of antigen-specific IgG antibodies, indicating a T cell-dependent immune response, in the absence of an external adjuvant. It was concluded that MPLAs could be utilized as potent vaccine carriers and built-in adjuvants to create fully synthetic self-adjuvanting carbohydrate-based cancer vaccines. The lipid composition and structure of MPLA were shown to have a significant influence on its immunological activity, and among the MPLAs examined, natural N. meningitidis MPLA exhibited the most promising properties. Moreover, Titermax Gold, a conventional vaccine adjuvant, was shown to inhibit, rather than promote, the immunological activity of MPLA conjugates, maybe via interacting with MPLA.

  9. An effective DNA priming-protein boosting approach for the cervical cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Ardestani, Susan K; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Farahmand, Behrokh; Abdoli, Asghar; Khatami, Maryam; Akbari, Khadijeh; Fotouhi, Fatemeh

    2015-03-01

    Considerable advances have been made in developing human papillomaviruses (HPV) prophylactic vaccines based on L1 virus-like particles (VLPs). However, there are limitations in the availability of these vaccines in developing countries, where most cases of cervical cancer occur. In the current study, the prime-boost immunization strategies were studied using a DNA vaccine carrying HPV-16 L1 gene (pcDNA/L1) and insect cell baculovirus-derived HPV-16 L1 VLP. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring the specific IgG levels, and the T-cell immune response was assessed by measuring different cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10. Results showed that although immunization with pcDNA/L1 alone could induce strong cellular immune responses, higher immunogenicity especially antibody response was achieved in pcDNA/L1 priming-VLP boosting regimen. Therefore, we suggest that prime-boost regimen can be considered as an efficient prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine.

  10. Current advancements and potential strategies in the development of MERS-CoV vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Naru; Jiang, Shibo; Du, Lanying

    2014-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a newly emerging infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, MERS-coronavirus (MERS-CoV), a new member in the lineage C of β-coronavirus (β-CoV). The increased human cases and high mortality rate of MERS-CoV infection make it essential to develop safe and effective vaccines. In this review, the current advancements and potential strategies in the development of MERS vaccines, particularly subunit vaccines based on MERS-CoV spike (S) protein and its receptor-binding domain (RBD), are discussed. How to improve the efficacy of subunit vaccines through novel adjuvant formulations and routes of administration as well as currently available animal models for evaluating the in vivo efficacy of MERS-CoV vaccines are also addressed. Overall, these strategies may have important implications for the development of effective and safe vaccines for MERS-CoV in the future. PMID:24766432

  11. American Cancer Society Guideline for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine use to prevent cervical cancer and its precursors.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Castle, Philip E; Cox, J Thomas; Davey, Diane D; Einstein, Mark H; Ferris, Daron G; Goldie, Sue J; Harper, Diane M; Kinney, Walter; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Noller, Kenneth L; Wheeler, Cosette M; Ades, Terri; Andrews, Kimberly S; Doroshenk, Mary K; Kahn, Kelly Green; Schmidt, Christy; Shafey, Omar; Smith, Robert A; Partridge, Edward E; Garcia, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) has developed guidelines for the use of the prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for the prevention of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer. These recommendations are based on a formal review of the available evidence. They address the use of prophylactic HPV vaccines, including who should be vaccinated and at what age, as well as a summary of policy and implementation issues. Implications for screening are also discussed.

  12. A game-theoretic approach to valuating toxoplasmosis vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Sykes, David; Rychtář, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite often found in wild and domestic cats, and it is the cause of the disease toxoplasmosis. More than 60 million people in the United States carry the parasite, and the Centers for Disease Control have placed toxoplasmosis in their disease classification group Neglected Parasitic Infections as one of five parasitic diseases targeted as priorities for public health action. In recent years, there has been significant progress toward the development of a practical vaccine, so vaccination programs may soon be a viable approach to controlling the disease. Anticipating the availability of a toxoplasmosis vaccine, we are interested in determining when cat owners should vaccinate their own pets. We have created a mathematical model describing the conditions under which vaccination is advantageous. Our model can be used to predict the average vaccination level in the population. We find that there is a critical vaccine cost threshold above which no one will use the vaccine. A vaccine cost slightly below this threshold, however, results in high usage of the vaccine, and consequently in a significant reduction in population seroprevalence. Not surprisingly, we find that populations may achieve herd immunity only if the cost of vaccine is zero.

  13. Dynamics of vaccination strategies via projected dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Monica-Gabriela; Bauch, Chris T; Johnston, Matthew D

    2007-07-01

    Previous game theoretical analyses of vaccinating behaviour have underscored the strategic interaction between individuals attempting to maximise their health states, in situations where an individual's health state depends upon the vaccination decisions of others due to the presence of herd immunity. Here, we extend such analyses by applying the theories of variational inequalities (VI) and projected dynamical systems (PDS) to vaccination games. A PDS provides a dynamics that gives the conditions for existence, uniqueness and stability properties of Nash equilibria. In this paper, it is used to analyse the dynamics of vaccinating behaviour in a population consisting of distinct social groups, where each group has different perceptions of vaccine and disease risks. In particular, we study populations with two groups, where the size of one group is strictly larger than the size of the other group (a majority/minority population). We find that a population with a vaccine-inclined majority group and a vaccine-averse minority group exhibits higher average vaccine coverage than the corresponding homogeneous population, when the vaccine is perceived as being risky relative to the disease. Our model also reproduces a feature of real populations: In certain parameter regimes, it is possible to have a majority group adopting high vaccination rates and simultaneously a vaccine-averse minority group adopting low vaccination rates. Moreover, we find that minority groups will tend to exhibit more extreme changes in vaccinating behaviour for a given change in risk perception, in comparison to majority groups. These results emphasise the important role played by social heterogeneity in vaccination behaviour, while also highlighting the valuable role that can be played by PDS and VI in mathematical epidemiology.

  14. Could mycobacterial Hsp70-containing fusion protein lead the way to an affordable therapeutic cancer vaccine?

    PubMed

    Brauns, Timothy; Leblanc, Pierre; Gelfand, Jeffrey A; Poznanski, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Cancer vaccine development efforts have recently gained momentum, but most vaccines showing clinical impact in human trials tend to be based on technology approaches that are very costly and difficult to produce at scale. With the projected doubling of the incidence of cancer and its related cost of care in the U.S. over the next two decades, the widespread clinical use of such vaccines will prove difficult to justify. Heat shock protein-based vaccines have shown the potential to elicit clinically meaningful immunologic responses in cancer, but the predominant development approach - heat shock protein-peptide complexes derived from a patient's own tumor - face similar challenges of cost and scalability. New innovative modalities for deploying heat shock proteins in cancer vaccines may open the door to vaccines that can generate potent cytotoxic responses against multiple tumor targets and can be made in a cost-effective and scalable manner.

  15. Tumor Immunogenicity and Responsiveness to Cancer Vaccine Therapy; The State of The Art

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Taylor H.; Raez, Luis; Rosenblatt, Joseph D.; Podack, Eckhard R.

    2010-01-01

    Despite enormous effort, promising pre-clinical data in animal studies and over 900 clinical trials in the United States, no cancer vaccine has ever been approved for clinical use. Over the past decade a great deal of progress has been in both laboratory and clinical studies defining the interactions between developing tumors and the immune system. The results of these studies provide a rationale that may help explain the failure of recent therapeutic cancer vaccines in terms of vaccine principles, in selecting which tumors are the most appropriate to target and instruct the design and implementation of state-of-the-art cancer vaccines. PMID:20226686

  16. Vaccine instability in the cold chain: mechanisms, analysis and formulation strategies.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Ozan S; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Smith, Dawn E; Middaugh, C Russell; Prusik, Ted; Volkin, David B

    2014-09-01

    Instability of vaccines often emerges as a key challenge during clinical development (lab to clinic) as well as commercial distribution (factory to patient). To yield stable, efficacious vaccine dosage forms for human use, successful formulation strategies must address a combination of interrelated topics including stabilization of antigens, selection of appropriate adjuvants, and development of stability-indicating analytical methods. This review covers key concepts in understanding the causes and mechanisms of vaccine instability including (1) the complex and delicate nature of antigen structures (e.g., viruses, proteins, carbohydrates, protein-carbohydrate conjugates, etc.), (2) use of adjuvants to further enhance immune responses, (3) development of physicochemical and biological assays to assess vaccine integrity and potency, and (4) stabilization strategies to protect vaccine antigens and adjuvants (and their interactions) during storage. Despite these challenges, vaccines can usually be sufficiently stabilized for use as medicines through a combination of formulation approaches combined with maintenance of an efficient cold chain (manufacturing, distribution, storage and administration). Several illustrative case studies are described regarding mechanisms of vaccine instability along with formulation approaches for stabilization within the vaccine cold chain. These include live, attenuated (measles, polio) and inactivated (influenza, polio) viral vaccines as well as recombinant protein (hepatitis B) vaccines.

  17. Impact of Coverage-Dependent Marginal Costs on Optimal HPV Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ryser, Marc D.; McGoff, Kevin; Herzog, David P.; Sivakoff, David J.; Myers, Evan R.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of vaccinating males against the human papillomavirus (HPV) remains a controversial subject. Many existing studies conclude that increasing female coverage is more effective than diverting resources into male vaccination. Recently, several empirical studies on HPV immunization have been published, providing evidence of the fact that marginal vaccination costs increase with coverage. In this study, we use a stochastic agent-based modeling framework to revisit the male vaccination debate in light of these new findings. Within this framework, we assess the impact of coverage-dependent marginal costs of vaccine distribution on optimal immunization strategies against HPV. Focusing on the two scenarios of ongoing and new vaccination programs, we analyze different resource allocation policies and their effects on overall disease burden. Our results suggest that if the costs associated with vaccinating males are relatively close to those associated with vaccinating females, then coverage-dependent, increasing marginal costs may favor vaccination strategies that entail immunization of both genders. In particular, this study emphasizes the necessity for further empirical research on the nature of coverage-dependent vaccination costs. PMID:25979280

  18. Chitin, Chitosan, and Glycated Chitosan Regulate Immune Responses: The Novel Adjuvants for Cancer Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaosong; Min, Min; Du, Nan; Gu, Ying; Hode, Tomas; Naylor, Mark; Chen, Dianjun; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-01-01

    With the development of cancer immunotherapy, cancer vaccine has become a novel modality for cancer treatment, and the important role of adjuvant has been realized recently. Chitin, chitosan, and their derivatives have shown their advantages as adjuvants for cancer vaccine. In this paper, the adjuvant properties of chitin and chitosan were discussed, and some detailed information about glycated chitosan and chitosan nanoparticles was also presented to illustrate the trend for future development. PMID:23533454

  19. Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy: Exploiting the HLA Class II Pathway in Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Doonan, Bently P; Haque, Azizul

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most diagnosed cancer in men and current treatment of advanced prostate cancer is ineffective. Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment option for metastatic prostate cancer but its clinical application is still in the early stages of development. In order to treat metastatic prostate tumors, new directions must be taken to improve current immunotherapeutic strategies. These include the identification of effective tumor antigens (Ags), the induction of the HLA class II pathway for Ag processing and CD4+ T cell activation, and the ability of tumor cells to act like Ag presenting cells. In this review, we suggest a model for tumor Ag selection, epitope modification and self-processing for presentation by class II proteins as a means of restoring immune activation and tumor clearance. We also outline the importance of a Gamma-IFN-inducible Lysosomal Thiol reductase (GILT) in Ag and modified peptide processing by tumor cells, generation of functional epitopes for T cell recognition, and inclusion of immune checkpoint blockers in cancer immunotherapy. Taken together, this review provides a framework for the future development of novel cancer vaccines and the improvement of existing immunotherapeutics in prostate cancer. PMID:26807308

  20. The introduction of new vaccines into developing countries. IV: Global Access Strategies.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Richard T; Krattiger, Anatole; Clemens, John D; Curtiss, Roy

    2007-05-16

    This paper offers a framework for managing a comprehensive Global Access Strategy for new vaccines in developing countries. It is aimed at strengthening the ability of public-sector entities to reach their goals. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and The Rockefeller Foundation have been leaders in stimulating the creation of new organizations - public/private product development partnerships (PDPs) - that seek to accelerate vaccine development and distribution to meet the health needs of the world's poor. Case studies of two of these PDPs - the Salmonella Anti-pneumococcal Vaccine Program and the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative - examine development of such strategies. Relying on the application of innovation theory, the strategy leads to the identification of six Components of Innovation which cover all aspects of the vaccine innovation process. Appropriately modified, the proposed framework can be applied to the development and introduction of other products in developing countries including drugs, and nutritional and agricultural products.

  1. The introduction of new vaccines into developing countries. IV: Global Access Strategies.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Richard T; Krattiger, Anatole; Clemens, John D; Curtiss, Roy

    2007-05-16

    This paper offers a framework for managing a comprehensive Global Access Strategy for new vaccines in developing countries. It is aimed at strengthening the ability of public-sector entities to reach their goals. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and The Rockefeller Foundation have been leaders in stimulating the creation of new organizations - public/private product development partnerships (PDPs) - that seek to accelerate vaccine development and distribution to meet the health needs of the world's poor. Case studies of two of these PDPs - the Salmonella Anti-pneumococcal Vaccine Program and the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative - examine development of such strategies. Relying on the application of innovation theory, the strategy leads to the identification of six Components of Innovation which cover all aspects of the vaccine innovation process. Appropriately modified, the proposed framework can be applied to the development and introduction of other products in developing countries including drugs, and nutritional and agricultural products. PMID:17363119

  2. Schistosomiasis elimination strategies and potential role of a vaccine in achieving global health goals.

    PubMed

    Mo, Annie X; Agosti, Jan M; Walson, Judd L; Hall, B Fenton; Gordon, Lance

    2014-01-01

    In March 2013, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation co-sponsored a meeting entitled "Schistosomiasis Elimination Strategy and Potential Role of a Vaccine in Achieving Global Health Goals" to discuss the potential role of schistosomiasis vaccines and other tools in the context of schistosomiasis control and elimination strategies. It was concluded that although schistosomiasis elimination in some focal areas may be achievable through current mass drug administration programs, global control and elimination will face several significant scientific and operational challenges, and will require an integrated approach with other, additional interventions. These challenges include vector (snail) control; environmental modification; water, sanitation, and hygiene; and other future innovative tools such as vaccines. Defining a clear product development plan that reflects a vaccine strategy as complementary to the existing control programs to combat different forms of schistosomiasis will be important to develop a vaccine effectively.

  3. The stem cell patent landscape as relevant to cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2011-10-01

    Cancer vaccine targeting cancer stem cells is proposed to serve as a potent immunotherapy. Thus, it would be useful to examine the main trends in stem cell patenting activity as a guide for those seeking to develop such cancer vaccines. We found that a substantial number of stem cell patents were granted up to the end of 2010, including ~2000 issued in the US. Many of these have been filed since 2001, including 7,551 applications in the US. Stem cell development, as evidenced by the numbers of PubMed articles, has matured steadily in recent years. However, the other metrics, such as the number of patent applications, the technology-science linkage and the number of patent assignees, have been stagnant. Moreover, the ownership of stem cell patents is still quiet fragmented across multiple organizations, and the number of stem cell patent assignees from the business sector has not increased significantly. Academic and nonprofit institutions not only account for a large share of stem cell patents but also apply for patents continually. Based on this analysis, the strength of stem cell resources seems to remain stagnant in recent years due to the ban on government funding of embryonic stem cell research. Furthermore, the patent prosecution or technical barriers in the field of stem cells would be another main reason that the number of US-issued stem cell patents for each application have been in gradual decline since 2000. Therefore, we consider stem cell technology to still be under development.

  4. Improved Vaccines for the Treatment of Prostate and Breast Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Vaccine Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to continue clinical development and/or license a multi-epitope therapeutic cancer vaccine. The research is in early-stage clinical evaluation, with in vitro and in vivo (animal and human) data available.

  5. 76 FR 68768 - Guidance for Industry: Clinical Considerations for Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... studies of these products. The guidance also provides recommendations for the design of clinical trials... provides recommendations for the design of clinical trials for cancer vaccines conducted under an IND... recommendations for the design of clinical trials for cancer vaccines conducted under an IND to support...

  6. TB vaccine development and the End TB Strategy: importance and current status

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Helen A.; Schrager, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    TB is now the leading, global cause of death due to a single infectious microbe. To achieve the End TB vision of reducing TB by 90% by 2035 we will need new interventions. The objectives of this manuscript are to summarize the status of the clinical TB vaccine pipeline; to assess the challenges facing the TB development field; and to discuss some of the key strategies being embraced by the field to overcome these challenges. Currently, 8 of the 13 vaccines in clinical development are subunit vaccines; 6 of these contain or express either Ag85A or Ag85B proteins. A major challenge to TB vaccine development is the lack of diversity in both the antigens included in TB vaccines, and the immune responses elicited by TB vaccine candidates. Both will need to be expanded to maximise the potential for developing a successful candidate by 2025. Current research efforts are focused on broadening both antigen selection and the range of vaccine-mediated immune responses. Previous and ongoing TB vaccine efficacy trials have built capacity, generated high quality data on TB incidence and prevalence, and provided insight into immune correlates of risk of TB disease. These gains will enable the design of better TB vaccines and, importantly, move these vaccines into efficacy trials more rapidly and at a lower cost than was possible for previous TB vaccine candidates. PMID:27076508

  7. Evolving Immunotherapy Strategies in Urothelial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brancato, Sam J.; Lewi, Keidren; Agarwal, Piyush K.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of nonmuscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) represents the importance of immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer. Despite its clinical efficacy, up to 30% of patients will ultimately experience progression to muscle-invasive disease. This, along with an improved understanding of the biologic pathways involved, has led to efforts to improve, enhance, or alter the immune response in the treatment of urothelial carcinoma. A number of novel therapeutic approaches currently are being pursued, including recombinant BCG to induce T helper type 1 (Th1) immune responses, nonlive Mycobacterium agents, targeted agents toward cancer-associated antigens, immune-modulating vaccines, and adoptive T-cell therapies. Here, we review the current and future immunotherapy treatment options for patients with urothelial cancer. PMID:25993187

  8. Therapeutic vaccines for cancer: an overview of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Melero, Ignacio; Gaudernack, Gustav; Gerritsen, Winald; Huber, Christoph; Parmiani, Giorgio; Scholl, Suzy; Thatcher, Nicholas; Wagstaff, John; Zielinski, Christoph; Faulkner, Ian; Mellstedt, Håkan

    2014-09-01

    The therapeutic potential of host-specific and tumour-specific immune responses is well recognized and, after many years, active immunotherapies directed at inducing or augmenting these responses are entering clinical practice. Antitumour immunization is a complex, multi-component task, and the optimal combinations of antigens, adjuvants, delivery vehicles and routes of administration are not yet identified. Active immunotherapy must also address the immunosuppressive and tolerogenic mechanisms deployed by tumours. This Review provides an overview of new results from clinical studies of therapeutic cancer vaccines directed against tumour-associated antigens and discusses their implications for the use of active immunotherapy.

  9. Different vaccination strategies in Spain and its impact on severe varicella and zoster.

    PubMed

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Walter, Stefan; Gonzalez-Escalada, Alba; Garcia-Garcia, Laura; Marín-García, Patricia; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Varicella vaccines available in Spain were marketed in 1998 and 2003 for non-routine use. Since 2006 some regions decided to include varicella vaccination in their regional routine vaccination programmes at 15-18 months of age. Other regions chose the strategy of vaccinating susceptible adolescents. This study shows the trends in severe varicella zoster virus infections through the analysis of the hospital discharges related to varicella and herpes zoster in the general population from 2005 to 2010 in Spain. A total of 11,125 hospital discharges related to varicella and 27,736 related to herpes zoster were reported during the study period. The overall annual rate of hospitalization was 4.14 cases per 100,000 for varicella and 10.33 cases per 100,000 for herpes zoster. In children younger than 5 years old varicella hospitalization rate significantly decreased from 46.77 in 2005 to 26.55 per 100,000 in 2010. The hospitalization rate related to herpes zoster slightly increased from 9.71 in 2005 to 10.90 per 100,000 in 2010. This increase was mainly due to the significant increase occurring in the >84 age group, from 69.55 to 97.68 per 100,000. When gathering for regions taking into account varicella vaccine strategy, varicella related hospitalizations decreased significantly more in those regions which included the vaccine at 15-18 months of age as a routine vaccine comparing with those vaccinating at 10-14 years old. No significant differences were found in herpes zoster hospitalization rates regarding the varicella vaccination strategy among regions. Severe varicella infections decreased after implementation of varicella vaccination in Spain. This decrease was significantly higher in regions including the vaccine at 15-18 months of age compared with those vaccinating susceptible adolescents.

  10. Robustness of networks against propagating attacks under vaccination strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Takehisa; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-09-01

    We study the effect of vaccination on the robustness of networks against propagating attacks that obey the susceptible-infected-removed model. By extending the generating function formalism developed by Newman (2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 108701), we analytically determine the robustness of networks that depends on the vaccination parameters. We consider the random defense where nodes are vaccinated randomly and the degree-based defense where hubs are preferentially vaccinated. We show that, when vaccines are inefficient, the random graph is more robust against propagating attacks than the scale-free network. When vaccines are relatively efficient, the scale-free network with the degree-based defense is more robust than the random graph with the random defense and the scale-free network with the random defense.

  11. [Strategies for BCG vaccination 1947 - 94].

    PubMed

    Harthug, Henrik

    2016-06-01

    The tuberculosis reform of 1947 stipulated a clear responsibility of the state to combat tuberculosis. This entailed sanctions directed at individuals, as well as compulsory vaccination. Universal vaccination was to be achieved through extensive information work that emphasised the responsibility of the individual. The decline in the disease, the dawning of human rights thinking and the decline of professional boards in public administration help to explain the downgrading of compulsory vaccination over time.

  12. Advanced antigen delivery of murine survivin: chimeric virus-like particles in cancer vaccine research.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Thomas; Ruehland, Claus; Schultheiss, Christine; Brinkman, Marc; Roedel, Franz; Reiser, Christian O A; Hess, Juergen; Reichel, Christoph

    2007-09-01

    Success in cancer immunotherapy depends on the identification and efficient targeting of specific tumor-associated antigens. Two pivotal strategies to prime patients' immune system against malignant cells are tumor-specific adoptive T-cell therapy and tumor-specific vaccination. Here, we will focus on immunotherapeutic vaccination and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different strategies to deliver tumor-specific T-cell epitopes. A particular focus will be put on virus-like particles (VLPs) as vehicle to deliver tumor-specific epitopes in the context of full-length proteins, as multi-epitope constructs or as individual tumor-associated T-cell epitopes. VLPs represent non-infectious and non-replicating antigen delivery systems devoid of any nucleic acid. They constitute innovative immunotherapeutic agents against cancer due to their superior, adjuvant-like antigenicity. We will present various tumor-associated antigens currently in different stages of development including survivin, as promising candidates for targeted tumor therapies. PMID:23675044

  13. Advanced Antigen Delivery of Murine Survivin: Chimeric Virus-Like Particles in Cancer Vaccine Research

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Thomas; Ruehland, Claus; Schultheiss, Christine; Brinkman, Marc; Roedel, Franz; Reiser, Christian O. A.; Hess, Juergen; Reichel, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Success in cancer immunotherapy depends on the identification and efficient targeting of specific tumor-associated antigens. Two pivotal strategies to prime patients’ immune system against malignant cells are tumor-specific adoptive T-cell therapy and tumor-specific vaccination. Here, we will focus on immunotherapeutic vaccination and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different strategies to deliver tumor-specific T-cell epitopes. A particular focus will be put on virus-like particles (VLPs) as vehicle to deliver tumor-specific epitopes in the context of full-length proteins, as multi-epitope constructs or as individual tumor-associated T-cell epitopes. VLPs represent non-infectious and non-replicating antigen delivery systems devoid of any nucleic acid. They constitute innovative immunotherapeutic agents against cancer due to their superior, adjuvant-like antigenicity. We will present various tumor-associated antigens currently in different stages of development including survivin, as promising candidates for targeted tumor therapies. PMID:23675044

  14. Advanced antigen delivery of murine survivin: chimeric virus-like particles in cancer vaccine research.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Thomas; Ruehland, Claus; Schultheiss, Christine; Brinkman, Marc; Roedel, Franz; Reiser, Christian O A; Hess, Juergen; Reichel, Christoph

    2007-09-01

    Success in cancer immunotherapy depends on the identification and efficient targeting of specific tumor-associated antigens. Two pivotal strategies to prime patients' immune system against malignant cells are tumor-specific adoptive T-cell therapy and tumor-specific vaccination. Here, we will focus on immunotherapeutic vaccination and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different strategies to deliver tumor-specific T-cell epitopes. A particular focus will be put on virus-like particles (VLPs) as vehicle to deliver tumor-specific epitopes in the context of full-length proteins, as multi-epitope constructs or as individual tumor-associated T-cell epitopes. VLPs represent non-infectious and non-replicating antigen delivery systems devoid of any nucleic acid. They constitute innovative immunotherapeutic agents against cancer due to their superior, adjuvant-like antigenicity. We will present various tumor-associated antigens currently in different stages of development including survivin, as promising candidates for targeted tumor therapies.

  15. Prevention strategies for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Dräger, B J; Lümmen, G; Bismarck, E; Fischer, C

    2012-12-01

    Through the last decade consideration of the role of vitamins and minerals in primary prevention of genitourinary tumors has dramatically changed. Despite all efforts efficacy of a specific compound has not been proven, so far. In consequence, recommendations for a use of vitamins or other supplements with the intention of prostate cancer prevention should be avoided today. In contrast, there is some evidence that life style modification might be helpful: recent investigations suggest that smoking may be involved in prostate cancer carcinogenesis. In addition, there is evidence that moderate food consumption, reduction of dairy products and an Asian or Mediterranean diet might not only prevent prostate cancer but also harbors additional beneficial effects on general health. This move from single compounds to more complex diets can be considered as a change of paradigm in prostate cancer prevention and could be the starting point of future epidemiological research. Disappointing findings with regards to nutritional cancer prevention contrast with a solid evidence concerning the efficacy of chemoprevention using 5a-reductase inhibitors: Long-term use of Finasteride and Dutasteride significantly reduces prostate cancer detection. Further candidate drugs are under investigation. However, translation of these findings into urological practice remains a matter of controversial discussion. PMID:23288209

  16. Poor HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among Utah Latinas overdue for recommended cancer screenings.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Brynn; Bodson, Julia; Warner, Echo L; Dyer, Jane; Kepka, Deanna

    2016-08-01

    Individuals overdue for recommended cancer screenings may not be receiving adequate cancer prevention education. Since Latinas have the highest incidence of cervical cancer among all racial/ethnic groups, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination education is especially important for this population. The correlates of HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge were assessed among Latinas who were overdue for recommended cancer screenings. N = 206 Latinas who were overdue for recommended cancer screenings were recruited by health educators from local community groups. Bivariate analyses and multivariable regression models were used to investigate factors associated with HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among participants as well as to assess correlates of HPV vaccine receipt for eligible children of participants. In multivariable regression analyses, years living in the U.S. (p = 0.05) and health insurance status (p = 0.03) were significantly related to HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures. Age (p < 0.01), birthplace (p = 0.02), years living in the U.S. (p = 0.05), annual household income (p = 0.05), cervical cancer screening status (p = 0.03), and HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures (p < 0.01) were significantly associated with HPV vaccination outcomes for eligible daughters of participants. Cervical cancer screening status (p = 0.02) and HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures (p = 0.01) were significantly associated with HPV vaccination outcomes for eligible sons of participants. Results indicate poor HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among Latinas. Interventions to improve HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge in Utah's growing Latino population should target vulnerable individuals (e.g., not employed outside the home, less educated, less acculturated, poor, uninsured, overdue for cervical cancer screening) by using materials that are culturally sensitive, linguistically appropriate, and easily accessible.

  17. Immunosenescence and vaccination of the elderly II. New strategies to restore age-related immune impairment.

    PubMed

    Ongrádi, J; Stercz, B; Kövesdi, Valéria; Vértes, L

    2009-12-01

    One of the greatest health-care challenges in the elderly is to ensure that vaccination against infections are optimally effective, but vaccination can only be effective if cells that are capable of responding are still present in the repertoire. The reversing of immunosenescence could be achieved by improving immune responses or altering vaccine formulation. Recent vaccination strategies in the elderly exert low effectiveness. Nutritional interventions and moderate exercise delay T cell senescence. Telomerase activity and expression of toll-like receptors can be improved by chemotherapy. Reversion of thymic atrophy could be achieved by thymus transplantation, depletion of accumulated dysfunctional naive T cells and herpesvirus-specific exhausted memory cells. Administration of immunostimulatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines show the best practical approach. Reduced dendritic cell activity and co-receptor expression might be increased by interleukin (IL)-2 administration. IL-7 protects both B and T lymphocytes, but IL-2, IL-10, keratinocyte growth factor, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, as well as leptin and growth hormone also have a stimulatory effect on thymopoiesis. In animals, several strategies have been explored to produce more efficacious vaccines including high dose vaccines, DNA vaccines with immunostimulatory patch, virosomal vaccines and vaccines containing new adjuvants. Hopefully, one of these approaches will be translated into human therapy in a short time.

  18. Use of standardized patients to examine physicians' communication strategies when addressing vaccine refusal: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Kristina A; Wesley, Gina C; Wood, Jo Ann; Hines, Carol; Marshall, Gary S

    2009-06-01

    Vaccine refusal is increasingly reported but few direct observations of the communication between physicians and parents skeptical about vaccines have been made. In a pilot study, a standardized patient posing as an expectant mother (standardized mother, SM) opposed to immunization met with blinded community physicians under the pretext of prenatal interviews. Persuasive communication strategies were scored using a standardized questionnaire. Recorded transcripts were evaluated for compliance with American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations for handling vaccine refusal. Nine encounters were conducted, representing 16% of pediatric and 3% of family practices in the area. Physicians scored high on listening, maintaining eye contact, spending time with the SM, using understandable terms, and avoiding a paternalistic posture. Lower scores were obtained on encouraging questions, checking for understanding, validating the importance of the SM's concerns, and assessing knowledge about vaccines. The median recorded encounter lasted 19 min. SMs represent a novel strategy for studying physician/parent communication about vaccines. PMID:19464542

  19. Chikungunya virus vaccines: Current strategies and prospects for developing plant-made vaccines.

    PubMed

    Salazar-González, Jorge A; Angulo, Carlos; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2015-07-17

    Chikungunya virus is an emerging pathogen initially found in East Africa and currently spread into the Indian Ocean Islands, many regions of South East Asia, and in the Americas. No licensed vaccines against this eminent pathogen are available and thus intensive research in this field is a priority. This review presents the current scenario on the developments of Chikungunya virus vaccines and identifies the use of genetic engineered plants to develop attractive vaccines. The possible avenues to develop plant-made vaccines with distinct antigenic designs and expression modalities are identified and discussed considering current trends in the field.

  20. Chikungunya virus vaccines: Current strategies and prospects for developing plant-made vaccines.

    PubMed

    Salazar-González, Jorge A; Angulo, Carlos; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2015-07-17

    Chikungunya virus is an emerging pathogen initially found in East Africa and currently spread into the Indian Ocean Islands, many regions of South East Asia, and in the Americas. No licensed vaccines against this eminent pathogen are available and thus intensive research in this field is a priority. This review presents the current scenario on the developments of Chikungunya virus vaccines and identifies the use of genetic engineered plants to develop attractive vaccines. The possible avenues to develop plant-made vaccines with distinct antigenic designs and expression modalities are identified and discussed considering current trends in the field. PMID:26073010

  1. Multiantigenic peptide-polymer conjugates as therapeutic vaccines against cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Waleed M; Liu, Tzu-Yu; Jia, Zhongfan; McMillan, Nigel A J; Monteiro, Michael J; Toth, Istvan; Skwarczynski, Mariusz

    2016-09-15

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising strategies for the treatment of cancer. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for virtually all cases of cervical cancer. The main purpose of a therapeutic HPV vaccine is to stimulate CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that can eradicate HPV infected cells. HPV oncoproteins E6 and E7 are continuously expressed and are essential for maintaining the growth of HPV-associated tumor cells. We designed polymer-based multi-antigenic formulations/constructs that were comprised of the E6 and E7 peptide epitopes. We developed an N-terminus-based epitope conjugation to conjugate two unprotected peptides to poly tert-butyl acrylate. This method allowed for the incorporation of the two antigens into a polymeric dendrimer in a strictly equimolar ratio. The most effective formulations eliminated tumors in up to 50% of treated mice. Tumor recurrence was not observed up to 3months post initial challenge.

  2. Multiantigenic peptide-polymer conjugates as therapeutic vaccines against cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Waleed M; Liu, Tzu-Yu; Jia, Zhongfan; McMillan, Nigel A J; Monteiro, Michael J; Toth, Istvan; Skwarczynski, Mariusz

    2016-09-15

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising strategies for the treatment of cancer. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for virtually all cases of cervical cancer. The main purpose of a therapeutic HPV vaccine is to stimulate CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that can eradicate HPV infected cells. HPV oncoproteins E6 and E7 are continuously expressed and are essential for maintaining the growth of HPV-associated tumor cells. We designed polymer-based multi-antigenic formulations/constructs that were comprised of the E6 and E7 peptide epitopes. We developed an N-terminus-based epitope conjugation to conjugate two unprotected peptides to poly tert-butyl acrylate. This method allowed for the incorporation of the two antigens into a polymeric dendrimer in a strictly equimolar ratio. The most effective formulations eliminated tumors in up to 50% of treated mice. Tumor recurrence was not observed up to 3months post initial challenge. PMID:27475535

  3. Pertussis vaccination strategies for neonates--an exploratory cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Scuffham, P A; McIntyre, P B

    2004-07-29

    Hospitalisation and death from pertussis in highly immunised populations largely occurs before the first vaccination at 2 months. A Markov model was constructed to estimate the costs and health consequences of three strategies to reduce pertussis over the first 6 months of an infant's life. Earlier vaccination (at either birth or 1 month in addition to current practice) or vaccination of the parents soon after birth was compared with the current practice of vaccination at 2, 4 and 6 months. The model was populated using data on the incidence and costs from Australia. Disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were used as the primary outcome measure. The cost to the Australian public health system was chosen as the economic perspective, and Monte-Carlo simulations were used to accommodate uncertainties in the variables. Vaccination at birth was estimated to cost (S.D.) an additional A$33.21 (A$1.60) per infant and to reduce cases, deaths and DALYs by 45%. Vaccination at 1 month was estimated to cost an additional A$43.24 (A$8.98) per infant and to reduce morbidity by approximately 25%. Parental vaccination at birth was the most expensive alternative, costing an additional A$73.38 (A$4.98) per infant and reducing pertussis morbidity by 38%. The costs per DALY averted were A$330,175 (A$15,461) A$735,994 (A$147,679) and A$787,504 (A$48,075) for the birth, 1 month and parental vaccination strategies, respectively. Changing the estimated factor by which hospitalisations and deaths are under-reported, and the efficacy of early vaccination, had large effects on results. Parental vaccination at birth was most cost-effective where protection persisted for subsequent children. The birth vaccination strategy appears to offer the greatest potential benefit for one-child families, but the efficacy at birth (and 1 month) needs to be established.

  4. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  5. [Therapeutic strategy in cancer pain].

    PubMed

    Pagni, C A; Franzini, A

    1981-01-14

    Surgical and pharmacological management of cancer pain is described and discussed according to the physiopathological mechanisms underlying this complex syndrome. The therapeutic approach is planned in three mayor phases which may be employed alone or in combination, following an accurate evaluation of the pathophysiology and the clinical pattern in every single patient. The first phase includes multifocal pharmacological therapy by nonnarcotic drugs in order to affect at different levels the physiopathological mechanisms of cancer pain. The second phase is indicated when nonnarcotic drugs cannot achieve complete pain relief; neurosurgical procedures (nerve blocks, rhizotomies, cordotomies, ecc...) are employed in this phase. The pharmacological treatment must be continued and associated to surgery. The third phase includes hypophysectomy, deep brain stimulation, psychosurgery and/or narcotic drug therapy, which are the last step in management of terminal cancer pain when all treatments have been ineffective. The results of this therapeutic program in 188 patients affected by pain of malignant origin are reported and discussed.

  6. Adjuvants and myeloid-derived suppressor cells: enemies or allies in therapeutic cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Audry; Oliver, Liliana; Alvarez, Rydell; Fernández, Luis E; Lee, Kelvin P; Mesa, Circe

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants are a critical but largely overlooked and poorly understood component included in vaccine formulations to stimulate and modulate the desired immune responses to an antigen. However, unlike in the protective infectious disease vaccines, adjuvants for cancer vaccines also need to overcome the effect of tumor-induced suppressive immune populations circulating in tumor-bearing individuals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are considered to be one of the key immunosuppressive populations that inhibit tumor-specific T cell responses in cancer patients. This review focuses on the different signals for the activation of the immune system induced by adjuvants, and the close relationship to the mechanisms of recruitment and activation of MDSC. This work explores the possibility that a cancer vaccine adjuvant may either strengthen or weaken the effect of tumor-induced MDSC, and the crucial need to address this in present and future cancer vaccines.

  7. [Current strategy to cure pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masao

    2002-03-01

    For more than a decade extensive retroperitoneal dissection, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy has not prolonged the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. Two prospective randomized studies addressing the clinical significance of extensive dissection or pancreatic resection for advanced cancer are now in progress. Nonetheless, at present, resection offers the patient the only possibility of cure. Although the diagnosis of curable pancreatic cancer is difficult, recent evidences have given a few hints. The first is pancreatic duct dilatation caused by cancerous stricture. The second is diabetes as a sign of pancreatic cancer. Our prospective pancreatographic screening of diabetic patients selected by our criteria(Table 1) revealed 7 cancers in 98 patients(7.1%). Within 3 years from diagnosis, the prevalence was 15%. Although the 7 cancers were advanced, this suggests that earlier examinations in diabetic patients may possibly lead to earlier diagnosis. The third is a small cystic lesion as a sentinel of pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with cytology of the pancreatic juice may show the presence of in situ cancer in patients with a pancreatic cyst. At the moment, careful checks for the presence of these hints seem to be the only strategy to offer a chance for cure to patients with pancreatic cancer.

  8. A novel "priming-boosting" strategy for immune interventions in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shujie; Zhang, Weina; Hu, Xiaoji; Wang, Wei; Deng, Dongrui; Wang, Hui; Wang, Changyu; Zhou, Jianfeng; Wang, Shixuan; Zhang, Hanwang; Ma, Ding

    2015-04-01

    Despite the encouraging development of a preventive vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), it cannot improve ongoing infections. Therefore, a new vaccine is urgently needed that can prevent and treat cervical cancer, and cure pre-cancerous lesions. In this study, we constructed two peptide-based vaccines. The first was a short-term, long-peptide (ST-LP) vaccine that simultaneously targeted three key carcinogenic epitopes (E5-E6-E7) on HPV16. We tested this vaccine in murine TC-1 cells infected with a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) fused with HPV16E5 DNA (rTC-1 cells), which served as a cell model; we also tested it in immune-competent mice loaded with rTC-1 cells, which served as an ectopic tumor model. The ST-LP injections resulted in strong, cell-mediated immunity, capable of attacking and eliminating abnormal antigen-bearing cells. Furthermore, to prolong immunogenic capability, we designed a unique rAAV that encoded the three predicted epitopes for a second, long-term, long-peptide (LT-LP) vaccine. Moreover, we used a new immune strategy of continuous re-injections, where three ST-LP injections were performed at one-week intervals (days 0, 7, 14), then one LT-LP injection was performed on day 120. Our in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that this strategy could boost the immune response to produce longer and stronger protection against target cells, and mice were thoroughly protected from tumor growth. Our results showed that priming the immune system with the ST-LP vaccine, followed by boosting the immune system with the LT-LP vaccine could generate a rapid, robust, durable cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to HPV16-positive tumors. PMID:25575128

  9. Cervical cancer and HPV: Awareness and vaccine acceptability among parents in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Mouallif, Mustapha; Bowyer, Harriet L; Festali, Soukaina; Albert, Adelin; Filali-Zegzouti, Younes; Guenin, Samuel; Delvenne, Philippe; Waller, Jo; Ennaji, Moulay Mustapha

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major public health concern in Morocco where it represents the second most common and lethal cancer in women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been licensed in Morocco since 2008 but there are no available data on their acceptability. This study aimed to assess awareness of HPV and the vaccine, and to identify factors associated with acceptability of the vaccine among parents in Morocco. We carried out a questionnaire-based survey using face-to-face interviews in a sample of 852 parents (670 mothers and 182 fathers) with at least one unmarried daughter ≤26 years. We collected data within public and private health centres and clinics in four regions in Morocco between July and August 2012. The main outcome measure was parental acceptability of the HPV vaccine for their daughter(s). Responses revealed very low awareness of HPV infection (4.7%) and the HPV vaccine (14.3%). None of the participants had vaccinated their daughter(s) against HPV and vaccine acceptability was low among mothers (32%) and fathers (45%). Higher education and income, previous awareness of the HPV vaccine and endorsement of the belief that a recommendation from the Ministry of Health or a doctor to have the vaccine would be encouraging, were associated with mothers' HPV vaccine acceptability. Non-acceptability among mothers was associated with having more than two daughters, believing the vaccine was expensive, lack of information and believing that whatever happens to an individual's health is God's will. The only factor associated with the fathers' acceptability of the vaccine was the cost of the vaccine. Increasing HPV and HPV vaccine awareness through educational campaigns, along with active recommendation by physicians and a publically funded vaccination programme could increase parental acceptability of the HPV vaccine in Morocco.

  10. Strategies for advancing cancer nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Vikash P.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-11-01

    Cancer nanomedicines approved so far minimize toxicity, but their efficacy is often limited by physiological barriers posed by the tumour microenvironment. Here, we discuss how these barriers can be overcome through innovative nanomedicine design and through creative manipulation of the tumour microenvironment.

  11. Cancer vaccines: identification of biomarkers predictive of clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Personalized medicine is playing an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients living with cancer. This landmark shift has been driven in part by statistics emerging from the "one size fits all" approach to the treatment of cancer patients. Some reports suggest that only a minority of individuals actually benefit from treatment and adverse effects of medications remain a major cause of hospitalization, morbidities and deaths. Although the side-effect profile of most immunotherapy treatment modalities is usually fairly benign, there is no reason to believe that immunotherapy is any different from other oncology therapies in that some patients are likely to receive more benefit than others. Indeed, the fact that generation of the therapeutic modality requires translation through multiple complex biological processes for an immunotherapy product to be effective may mean that such approaches require an even better understanding of the patient being treated. Furthermore, the very low success rate of cancer immunotherapy approaches to deliver benefit to patients demands a more detailed understanding of who will benefit and why. The identification of biomarkers predictive of treatment benefit is one route to improve the success rate of cancer vaccines.

  12. Exploiting the Immunogenic Potential of Cancer Cells for Improved Dendritic Cell Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberk, Lien; Belmans, Jochen; Van Woensel, Matthias; Riva, Matteo; Van Gool, Stefaan W.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is currently the hottest topic in the oncology field, owing predominantly to the discovery of immune checkpoint blockers. These promising antibodies and their attractive combinatorial features have initiated the revival of other effective immunotherapies, such as dendritic cell (DC) vaccinations. Although DC-based immunotherapy can induce objective clinical and immunological responses in several tumor types, the immunogenic potential of this monotherapy is still considered suboptimal. Hence, focus should be directed on potentiating its immunogenicity by making step-by-step protocol innovations to obtain next-generation Th1-driving DC vaccines. We review some of the latest developments in the DC vaccination field, with a special emphasis on strategies that are applied to obtain a highly immunogenic tumor cell cargo to load and to activate the DCs. To this end, we discuss the effects of three immunogenic treatment modalities (ultraviolet light, oxidizing treatments, and heat shock) and five potent inducers of immunogenic cell death [radiotherapy, shikonin, high-hydrostatic pressure, oncolytic viruses, and (hypericin-based) photodynamic therapy] on DC biology and their application in DC-based immunotherapy in preclinical as well as clinical settings. PMID:26834740

  13. Farmers' perception of the role of veterinary surgeons in vaccination strategies on British dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Richens, I F; Hobson-West, P; Brennan, M L; Lowton, R; Kaler, J; Wapenaar, W

    2015-11-01

    There is limited research investigating the motivators and barriers to vaccinating dairy cattle. Veterinary surgeons have been identified as important sources of information for farmers making vaccination and disease control decisions, as well as being farmers' preferred vaccine suppliers. Vets' perception of their own role and communication style can be at odds with farmers' reported preferences. The objective of this study was to investigate how dairy farmers perceived the role of vets in implementing vaccination strategies on their farm. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 dairy farmers from across Britain. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Analysis revealed that farmers perceive vets to have an important role in facilitating decision-making in all aspects of vaccination, including the aspects of vaccine distribution and advice on implementation. This important role is acknowledged by farmers who have regular veterinary contact, but also farmers with solely emergency veterinary contact. Given this finding, future work should investigate the attitudes of vets towards vaccination and how they perceive their role. Combining this knowledge will enable optimisation of vaccination strategies on British dairy farms. PMID:26530434

  14. [Immunization strategy of hepatitis B vaccine among adults in China: evidence based-medicine and consideration].

    PubMed

    Xu, A Q; Zhang, L

    2016-06-01

    With the effective control of hepatitis B infection among children, the adults especial the young ones become the main population for new hepatitis B virus infection. Now the adults receive hepatitis B vaccination voluntarily and at their own expense in China and the coverage is low. The high immunogenicity of hepatitis B vaccine has been proven among healthy adults. Although the safety of hepatitis B vaccination has been documented among high-risk population such as HIV-infected people, injecting drug users and patients with chronic hepatitis disease, their antibody seroconversion rate after hepatitis B vaccination is lower than the healthy adults. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended to population at high risk officially in many countries and some effects have been achieved. It is urgent to improve the strategy of hepatitis B vaccination among adults to fasten the control of hepatitis B in China, along with the researches about the long-term efficacy of hepatitis B vaccine among adults, the immunogenicity of hepatitis B vaccination among high-risk adults and the economical evaluation about different adult immunization strategy of hepatitis B.

  15. Farmers’ perception of the role of veterinary surgeons in vaccination strategies on British dairy farms

    PubMed Central

    Richens, I. F.; Hobson-West, P.; Brennan, M. L.; Lowton, R.; Kaler, J.; Wapenaar, W.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited research investigating the motivators and barriers to vaccinating dairy cattle. Veterinary surgeons have been identified as important sources of information for farmers making vaccination and disease control decisions, as well as being farmers’ preferred vaccine suppliers. Vets’ perception of their own role and communication style can be at odds with farmers’ reported preferences. The objective of this study was to investigate how dairy farmers perceived the role of vets in implementing vaccination strategies on their farm. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 dairy farmers from across Britain. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Analysis revealed that farmers perceive vets to have an important role in facilitating decision-making in all aspects of vaccination, including the aspects of vaccine distribution and advice on implementation. This important role is acknowledged by farmers who have regular veterinary contact, but also farmers with solely emergency veterinary contact. Given this finding, future work should investigate the attitudes of vets towards vaccination and how they perceive their role. Combining this knowledge will enable optimisation of vaccination strategies on British dairy farms. PMID:26530434

  16. Design of universal cancer vaccines using natural tumor vessel-specific antigens (SANTAVAC).

    PubMed

    Lokhov, Petr G; Balashova, Elena E

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination against endothelial cells (ECs) lining the tumor vasculature represents one of the most attractive potential cancer immunotherapy options due to its ability to prevent solid tumor growth. Using this approach, target antigens can be derived from ECs and used to develop a universal cancer vaccine. Unfortunately, direct immunization with EC preparations can elicit autoimmune vasculitis in normal tissues. Recently, tumor-induced changes to the human EC surface were described that provided a basis for designing efficient EC-based vaccines capable of eliciting immune responses that targeted the tumor endothelium directly. This review examines these data from the perspective of designing EC-based cancer vaccines for the treatment of all solid tumors, including the antigen composition of vaccine formulations, the selection ECs for antigen derivation, the production and control of antigens, and the method for estimating vaccine efficacy and safety. As the vaccine preparation requires a specifically derived set of natural cell surface antigens, a new vaccine preparation concept was formulated. Antigen compositions prepared according to this concept were named SANTAVAC (Set of All Natural Target Antigens for Vaccination Against Cancer).

  17. Bacterial survival strategies suggest rethinking cancer cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Coffey, Donald S; Levine, Herbert

    2012-09-01

    Despite decades of a much improved understanding of cancer biology, we are still baffled by questions regarding the deadliest traits of malignancy: metastatic colonization, dormancy and relapse, and the rapid evolution of multiple drug and immune resistance. New ideas are needed to resolve these critical issues. Relying on finding and demonstrating parallels between collective behavior capabilities of cancer cells and that of bacteria, we suggest communal behaviors of bacteria as a valuable model system for new perspectives and research directions. Understanding the ways in which bacteria thrive in competitive habitats and their cooperative strategies for surviving extreme stress can shed light on cooperativity in tumorigenesis and portray tumors as societies of smart communicating cells. This may translate into progress in fathoming cancer pathogenesis. We outline new experiments to test the cancer cooperativity hypothesis and reason that cancer may be outsmarted through its own 'social intelligence'. PMID:22750098

  18. Expanding the Repertoire of Modified Vaccinia Ankara-Based Vaccine Vectors via Genetic Complementation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Garber, David A.; O'Mara, Leigh A.; Zhao, Jun; Gangadhara, Sailaja; An, InChul; Feinberg, Mark B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is a safe, highly attenuated orthopoxvirus that is being developed as a recombinant vaccine vector for immunization against a number of infectious diseases and cancers. However, the expression by MVA vectors of large numbers of poxvirus antigens, which display immunodominance over vectored antigens-of-interest for the priming of T cell responses, and the induction of vector-neutralizing antibodies, which curtail the efficacy of subsequent booster immunizations, remain as significant impediments to the overall utility of such vaccines. Thus, genetic approaches that enable the derivation of MVA vectors that are antigenically less complex may allow for rational improvement of MVA-based vaccines. Principal Findings We have developed a genetic complementation system that enables the deletion of essential viral genes from the MVA genome, thereby allowing us to generate MVA vaccine vectors that are antigenically less complex. Using this system, we deleted the essential uracil-DNA-glycosylase (udg) gene from MVA and propagated this otherwise replication-defective variant on a complementing cell line that constitutively expresses the poxvirus udg gene and that was derived from a newly identified continuous cell line that is permissive for growth of wild type MVA. The resulting virus, MVAΔudg, does not replicate its DNA genome or express late viral gene products during infection of non-complementing cells in culture. As proof-of-concept for immunological ‘focusing’, we demonstrate that immunization of mice with MVAΔudg elicits CD8+ T cell responses that are directed against a restricted repertoire of vector antigens, as compared to immunization with parental MVA. Immunization of rhesus macaques with MVAΔudg-gag, a udg− recombinant virus that expresses an HIV subtype-B consensus gag transgene, elicited significantly higher frequencies of Gag-specific CD8 and CD4 T cells following both primary (2–4-fold) and booster (2

  19. Recent strategies targeting HIV glycans in vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Horiya, Satoru; MacPherson, Iain S; Krauss, Isaac J

    2014-12-01

    Although efforts to develop a vaccine against HIV have so far met with little success, recent studies of HIV-positive patients with strongly neutralizing sera have shown that the human immune system is capable of producing potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs), some of which neutralize up to 90% of HIV strains. These antibodies bind conserved vulnerable sites on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120, and identification of these sites has provided exciting clues about the design of potentially effective vaccines. Carbohydrates have a key role in this field, as a large fraction of bnAbs bind carbohydrates or combinations of carbohydrate and peptide elements on gp120. Additionally, carbohydrates partially mask some peptide surfaces recognized by bnAbs. The use of engineered glycoproteins and other glycostructures as vaccines to elicit antibodies with broad neutralizing activity is therefore a key area of interest in HIV vaccine design.

  20. Novel vaccine development strategies for inducing mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fujkuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kosuke; Gilbert, Rebekah S; McGhee, Jerry R; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance, instead of immune activation. Thus, induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task, and potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors or other special delivery systems are often used, especially in the elderly. By taking advantage of the common mucosal immune system, the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells and microfold epithelial cells may facilitate the induction of effective mucosal immunity. Thus, novel routes of immunization and antigen delivery systems also show great potential for the development of effective and safe mucosal vaccines against various pathogens. The purpose of this review is to introduce several recent approaches to induce mucosal immunity to vaccines, with an emphasis on mucosal tissue targeting, new immunization routes and delivery systems. Defining the mechanisms of mucosal vaccines is as important as their efficacy and safety, and in this article, examples of recent approaches, which will likely accelerate progress in mucosal vaccine development, are discussed. PMID:22380827

  1. Highest Vaccine Uptake after School-Based Delivery - A County-Level Evaluation of the Implementation Strategies for HPV Catch-Up Vaccination in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Rehn, Moa; Uhnoo, Ingrid; Kühlmann-Berenzon, Sharon; Wallensten, Anders; Sparén, Pär; Netterlid, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background The Swedish school-based vaccination programme offers HPV vaccine to girls born ≥1999 in 5-6th grade. In 2012, all counties introduced free-of-charge catch-up vaccination campaigns targeting girls born 1993–1998. Varying vaccine uptake in the catch-up group by December 2012 suggested that some implementation strategies were more successful than others. In order to inform future vaccination campaigns, we assessed the impact of different implementation strategies on the county-level catch-up vaccine uptake. Methods We conducted an ecological study including all Swedish counties (n = 21), asking regional health offices about the information channels they used and where vaccination of the catch-up target group took place in their counties. The uptake of ≥1 dose by 30 September 2014 was estimated using data from the voluntary national vaccination register. We investigated associations between counties’ catch-up vaccine uptake, information channels and vaccination settings by calculating incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), using negative binomial regression models. Results County level catch-up vaccine uptake varied between 49–84%. All counties offered vaccination through primary health care settings. Apart from this eight (34%) also offered the vaccine in some of their schools, four (19%) in all their schools, and two (10%) in other health care centres. The information channels most frequently used were: information at the national on-line health care consulting web-page (100%), letter/invitations (90%), and advertisement (81%). Counties offering vaccination to girls in all schools and counties offering vaccination in some of their schools, reached higher vaccine uptake compared to counties not offering vaccination in any of their schools (all schools adjusted IRR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1–1.5, some schools adjusted IRR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1–1.3). Conclusion Counties offering HPV vaccination to catch-up groups in schools reached

  2. The pharmaceuticalization of sexual risk: vaccine development and the new politics of cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Mamo, Laura; Epstein, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine development is a core component of pharmaceutical industry activity and a key site for studying pharmaceuticalization processes. In recent decades, two so-called cancer vaccines have entered the U.S. medical marketplace: a vaccine targeting hepatitis B virus (HBV) to prevent liver cancers and a vaccine targeting human papillomavirus (HPV) to prevent cervical and other cancers. These viruses are two of six sexually transmissible infectious agents (STIs) that are causally linked to the development of cancers; collectively they reference an expanding approach to apprehending cancer that focuses attention simultaneously "inward" toward biomolecular processes and "outward" toward risk behaviors, sexual practices, and lifestyles. This paper juxtaposes the cases of HBV and HPV and their vaccine trajectories to analyze how vaccines, like pharmaceuticals more generally, are emblematic of contemporary pharmaceuticalization processes. We argue that individualized risk, in this case sexual risk, is produced and treated by scientific claims of links between STIs and cancers and through pharmaceutical company and biomedical practices. Simultaneous processes of sexualization and pharmaceuticalization mark these cases. Our comparison demonstrates that these processes are not uniform, and that the production of risks, subjects, and bodies depends not only on the specificities of vaccine development but also on the broader political and cultural frames within which sexuality is understood. PMID:24560236

  3. Anticipating crisis: towards a pandemic flu vaccination strategy through alignment of public health and industrial policy.

    PubMed

    Daems, Rudi; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino

    2005-12-30

    Flu pandemics (worldwide epidemics) have occurred at irregular and unpredictable intervals, and have been associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and economic cost. In response to the emerging potential for a new pandemic to occur, national and international preparedness plans are being drawn up specifying the use of antivirals and vaccines. A number of challenges to pandemic vaccine development, large-scale production and the timing of distribution have also been highlighted. This article reviews the rationale and consequential policy for aligned public- and private sector planning in the present inter-pandemic period despite the prevalent risks and uncertainties. We propose a model for product development of pandemic flu vaccine based on public-private partnership, including push and pull incentive mechanisms for stimulating work in this therapeutic area. In addition, we argue that innovative vaccination strategies, together with special vaccine formulations which may offer cross-protection against multiple flu pandemic strains might avert the worse effects of an influenza infection.

  4. New Approaches to Prophylactic Human Papillomavirus Vaccines for Cervical Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gersch, Elizabeth D.; Gissmann, Lutz; Garcea, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The currently licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are safe and highly effective at preventing HPV infection for a select number of papillomavirus types, thus decreasing the incidence of precursors to cervical cancer. It is expected that vaccination will also ultimately reduce the incidence of this cancer. However, the licensed HPV vaccines are type-restricted and expensive, and also require refrigeration, multiple doses, and intramuscular injection. Second generation vaccines are currently being developed to address these shortcomings. New expression systems, viral and bacterial vectors for HPV L1 capsid protein delivery, and use of the HPV L2 capsid protein will hopefully aid in decreasing cost and increasing ease of use and breadth of protection. These second generation vaccines also could allow affordable immunization of women in developing countries, where the incidence of cervical cancer is high. PMID:22293302

  5. New approaches to prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines for cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Gersch, Elizabeth D; Gissmann, Lutz; Garcea, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    The currently licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are safe and highly effective at preventing HPV infection for a select number of papillomavirus types, thus decreasing the incidence of precursors to cervical cancer. It is expected that vaccination will also ultimately reduce the incidence of this cancer. The licensed HPV vaccines are, however, type restricted and expensive, and also require refrigeration, multiple doses and intramuscular injection. Second-generation vaccines are currently being developed to address these shortcomings. New expression systems, viral and bacterial vectors for HPV L1 capsid protein delivery, and use of the HPV L2 capsid protein will hopefully aid in decreasing cost and increasing ease of use and breadth of protection. These second-generation vaccines could also allow affordable immunization of women in developing countries, where the incidence of cervical cancer is high.

  6. FDA Approves Two HPV Vaccines: Cervarix for Girls, Gardasil for Boys | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The FDA has approved a second vaccine to prevent cervical cancer and cervical precancers, the vaccine’s manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), announced last week. The approval is based on data from a large clinical trial showing that the vaccine, Cervarix, prevented precancerous lesions in 93 percent of those who received the full vaccine sequence of three injections over 6 months. |

  7. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  8. Bioengineering Strategies for Designing Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    The goals of bioengineering strategies for targeted cancer therapies are (1) to deliver a high dose of an anticancer drug directly to a cancer tumor, (2) to enhance drug uptake by malignant cells, and (3) to minimize drug uptake by nonmalignant cells. Effective cancer-targeting therapies will require both passive- and active targeting strategies and a thorough understanding of physiologic barriers to targeted drug delivery. Designing a targeted therapy includes the selection and optimization of a nanoparticle delivery vehicle for passive accumulation in tumors, a targeting moiety for active receptor-mediated uptake, and stimuli-responsive polymers for control of drug release. The future direction of cancer targeting is a combinatorial approach, in which targeting therapies are designed to use multiple targeting strategies. The combinatorial approach will enable combination therapy for delivery of multiple drugs and dual ligand targeting to improve targeting specificity. Targeted cancer treatments in development and the new combinatorial approaches show promise for improving targeted anticancer drug delivery and improving treatment outcomes. PMID:23768509

  9. US Assessment of HPV Types in Cancers: Implications for Current and 9-Valent HPV Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Elizabeth R.; Thompson, Trevor D.; Lynch, Charles F.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Lyu, Christopher W.; Steinau, Martin; Watson, Meg; Wilkinson, Edward J.; Hopenhayn, Claudia; Copeland, Glenn; Cozen, Wendy; Peters, Edward S.; Huang, Youjie; Saber, Maria Sibug; Altekruse, Sean; Goodman, Marc T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study sought to determine the prevaccine type-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)–associated cancers in the United States to evaluate the potential impact of the HPV types in the current and newly approved 9-valent HPV vaccines. Methods: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention partnered with seven US population-based cancer registries to obtain archival tissue for cancers diagnosed from 1993 to 2005. HPV testing was performed on 2670 case patients that were fairly representative of all participating cancer registry cases by age and sex. Demographic and clinical data were evaluated by anatomic site and HPV status. Current US cancer registry data and the detection of HPV types were used to estimate the number of cancers potentially preventable through vaccination. Results: HPV DNA was detected in 90.6% of cervical, 91.1% of anal, 75.0% of vaginal, 70.1% of oropharyngeal, 68.8% of vulvar, 63.3% of penile, 32.0% of oral cavity, and 20.9% of laryngeal cancers, as well as in 98.8% of cervical cancer in situ (CCIS). A vaccine targeting HPV 16/18 potentially prevents the majority of invasive cervical (66.2%), anal (79.4%), oropharyngeal (60.2%), and vaginal (55.1%) cancers, as well as many penile (47.9%), vulvar (48.6%) cancers: 24 858 cases annually. The 9-valent vaccine also targeting HPV 31/33/45/52/58 may prevent an additional 4.2% to 18.3% of cancers: 3944 cases annually. For most cancers, younger age at diagnosis was associated with higher HPV 16/18 prevalence. With the exception of oropharyngeal cancers and CCIS, HPV 16/18 prevalence was similar across racial/ethnic groups. Conclusions: In the United States, current vaccines will reduce most HPV-associated cancers; a smaller additional reduction would be contributed by the new 9-valent vaccine. PMID:25925419

  10. Gene gun delivery systems for cancer vaccine approaches.

    PubMed

    Aravindaram, Kandan; Yang, Ning Sun

    2009-01-01

    Gene-based immunization with transgenic DNA vectors expressing tumor-associated antigens (TAA), cytokines, or chemokines, alone or in combination, provides an attractive approach to increase the cytotoxic T cell immunity against various cancer diseases. With this consideration, particle-mediated or gene gun technology has been developed as a nonviral method for gene transfer into various mammalian tissues. It has been shown to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in both small and large experimental animals. A broad range of somatic cell types, including primary cultures and established cell lines, has been successfully transfected ex vivo or in vitro by gene gun technology, either as suspension or adherent cultures. Here, we show that protocols and techniques for use in gene gun-mediated transgene delivery system for skin vaccination against melanoma using tumor-associated antigen (TAA) human gpl00 and reporter gene assays as experimental systems.

  11. Translational cancer vaccine: from mouse to human to cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenson, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Acanthomatous ameloblastoma is a locally invasive tumor arising in the gingiva that can progress rapidly, invade and destroy bone. If the lesion involves the upper jaw, surgical excision may not be possible and while local control is imperative, other therapies have not been fully evaluated. The primary author's personal cat, Gabriella, developed this tumor, with gingival masses around teeth in the upper jaw and evidence of widespread bony destruction of the hard palate. Because of his involvement with Immunophotonics Inc. as an advisor, the author was aware of an in situ autologous cancer vaccine (inCVAX) that is currently under development by the company. One session was performed in a veterinary clinic in Arkansas, and two follow-up sessions at the small animal hospital at the UC Davis veterinary school. No other therapy was provided. As of this writing, 3+ years after first treatment and 3 years, 4 months after presentation, Gabriella is well, with no evidence of disease.

  12. Rabies control in rural Africa: Evaluating strategies for effective domestic dog vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kaare, M.; Lembo, T.; Hampson, K.; Ernest, E.; Estes, A.; Mentzel, C.; Cleaveland, S.

    2012-01-01

    Effective vaccination campaigns need to reach a sufficient percentage of the population to eliminate disease and prevent future outbreaks, which for rabies is predicted to be 70%, at a cost that is economically and logistically sustainable. Domestic dog rabies has been increasing across most of sub-Saharan Africa indicating that dog vaccination programmes to date have been inadequate. We compare the effectiveness of a variety of dog vaccination strategies in terms of their cost and coverage in different community settings in rural Tanzania. Central-point (CP) vaccination was extremely effective in agro-pastoralist communities achieving a high coverage (>80%) at a low cost (vaccination was costly (>US$5/dog) and inadequate (<20% coverage); combined approaches using CP and either house-to-house vaccination or trained community-based animal health workers were most effective with coverage exceeding 70%, although costs were still high (>US$6 and >US$4/dog, respectively). No single vaccination strategy is likely to be effective in all populations and therefore alternative approaches must be deployed under different settings. CP vaccination is cost-effective and efficient for the majority of dog populations in rural Tanzania and potentially elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, whereas a combination strategy is necessary in remote pastoralist communities. These results suggest that rabies control is logistically feasible across most of the developing world and that the annual costs of effective vaccination campaigns in Tanzania are likely to be affordable. PMID:18848595

  13. HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africa: scientific opportunities, challenges and strategies.

    PubMed

    Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Ruhanya, Vurayai

    2015-01-01

    More than decades have already elapsed since human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was identified as the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The HIV has since spread to all parts of the world with devastating effects. In sub-saharan Africa, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has reached unprecedented proportions. Safe, effective and affordable HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africans are therefore urgently needed to contain this public health problem. Although, there are challenges, there are also scientific opportunities and strategies that can be exploited in the development of HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africa. The recent RV144 Phase III trial in Thailand has demonstrated that it is possible to develop a vaccine that can potentially elicit modest protective immunity against HIV infection. The main objective of this review is to outline the key scientific opportunities, challenges and strategies in HIV/AIDS vaccine development in Africa.

  14. The most effective and promising population health strategies to advance human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; Agunwamba, Amenah A; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2016-01-01

    The US is failing to make substantive progress toward improving rates of human papillomavirus vaccine uptake. While the Healthy People 2020 goal for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is 80%, the three-dose completion rate in the US in 2014 for 13- to 17-year-old females is less than 40%, and the rate for males is just above 20%. Experts point to a number of reasons for the poor HPV vaccination rates including parental concerns about safety, necessity, and timing. However, the evidence refuting these concerns is substantial. Efforts focusing on education and communication have not shown promise, but several population health strategies have reminder/recall systems; practice-focused strategies targeting staff, clinicians, and parents; assessment and feedback activities; and school-based HPV vaccination programs. PMID:26559567

  15. Enhancement of DNA vaccine efficacy by intracellular targeting strategies.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Elisabete Borges; Henriques, Ana Margarida; Fevereiro, Miguel; Prazeres, Duarte Miguel; Monteiro, Gabriel Amaro

    2014-01-01

    Immune response against an encoded antigenic protein can be elicited by including targeting sequences to DNA vaccines that promote protein sorting to processing pathways, related with antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complexes (MHC). Candidate DNA vaccines coding for neuraminidase 3 of the avian influenza virus were designed to encode different sequences that direct the protein to specific cellular compartments such as endoplasmic reticulum (i.e., adenovirus E1A), lysosomes (i.e., LAMP), and the combination of protein targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum and lysosome (i.e., E1A-LAMP). The DNA vaccine prototypes were engineered by biomolecular techniques and subsequently produced in E. coli cells. The biological activity of the vaccines was tested firstly in vitro, in Chinese hamster ovary cells, through flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Then, an essential in vivo study was performed in chickens, in order to evaluate the efficacy of DNA prototype vaccines, by measuring the antibody production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

  16. Development of a peptide-based vaccine targeting TMPRSS2:ERG fusion positive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Sanda, Martin George; Dunn, Laura Kathleen; Arredouani, Mohamed Simo

    2013-01-01

    Identification of novel vaccine targets is critical for the design and advancement of prostate cancer (PCa) immunotherapy. Ideal targets are proteins that are abundant in prostate tumors while absent in extra-prostatic tissues. The fusion of the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 gene with the ETS transcription factor ERG occurs in approximately 50% of prostate cancer cases and results in aberrant ERG expression. Because expression of ERG is very low in peripheral tissue, we evaluated the suitability of this protein as an antigen target in PCa vaccines. ERG-derived HLA-A*0201-restricted immunogenic epitopes were identified through a 3-step strategy that included in silico, in vitro, and in vivo validation. Algorithms were used to predict potential HLA-A*0201-binding epitopes. High scoring epitopes were tested for binding to HLA-A*0201 using the T2-based stabilization assay in vitro. Five peptides were found to bind HLA-A*0201 and were subsequently tested for immunogenicity in humanized HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. The in vivo screening identified three immunogenic peptides. One of these peptides, ERG295, overcame peripheral tolerance in HLA-A*0201 mice that expressed prostate restricted ERG. Also, this peptide induced an antigen specific response against ERG-expressing human prostate tumor cells. Finally, tetramer assay showed detectable and responsive ERG295-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes in peripheral blood of HLA-A*0201+ prostate cancer patients. Detection of ERG-specific CTLs in both mice and the blood of prostate cancer patients indicates that ERG-specific tolerance can be overcome. Additionally, these data suggest that ERG is a suitable target antigen for PCa immunotherapy. PMID:24149465

  17. Preventing cervical cancer and genital warts - How much protection is enough for HPV vaccines?

    PubMed

    Stanley, Margaret

    2016-07-01

    HPV associated disease is a global health problem: 5.2% of all cancers are HPV associated with HPV 16 and 18 accounting for 70% of cases of cervical cancer. Genital warts caused by HPV 6 and 11 have a lifetime risk of acquisition of 10%. HPV vaccines are subunit vaccines consisting of virus like particles comprised of the L1 major capsid protein. Two vaccines have been licenced since 2006/2007 and are in the National Immunisation programmes in 62 countries. Both vaccines include HPV 16 and 18 VLPs and one also includes HPV 6 and 11. The vaccines are highly immunogenic and well tolerated. Genital HPV is a sexually transmitted infection with peak incidence occurring just after the onset of sexual activity and the routine cohort for immunisation in almost all countries are adolescent girls 9-15 years of age with or without catch up for older adolescents and young women. Population effectiveness is now being demonstrated for these vaccines in countries with high vaccine coverage. HPV vaccines are highly immunogenic and effective and the original 3 dose schedules have already been reduced, for those 14 years and under, to 2 for both licenced vaccines. There is preliminary evidence that 1 dose of vaccine is as effective as 2 or 3 in preventing persistent HPV infection in the cervix in young women and further reductions in dosage may be possible if supported by appropriate virological, immunological and modelling studies.

  18. Association between human papillomavirus vaccine status and other cervical cancer risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, Harriet L; Dodd, Rachael H; Marlow, Laura A V; Waller, Jo

    2014-07-23

    Little is known about the relationship between HPV vaccine uptake and other risk factors for cervical cancer. This study aimed to measure the association between vaccine status and cervical cancer risk factors in adolescent girls. Girls (15-16 years) from the first two cohorts to be offered routine HPV vaccination in the NHS immunisation programme completed a survey 3 years post-vaccination. Recruitment took place at 13 schools in London. Of 2768 girls registered in Year 11, 1912 (69%) took part and provided analysable data. Questions assessed vaccine status, demographic characteristics, smoking status, sexual behaviour and intention to attend cervical screening. Overall, 78% had completed the three-dose vaccine course. There was no association between vaccine status and smoking behaviour or sexual experience. In adjusted analyses, girls from black or 'other' ethnic backgrounds were less likely to be fully-vaccinated than those from white backgrounds. Those with low intentions to attend cervical screening were less likely to be fully vaccinated than those with high intentions. Efforts will be needed to ensure that unvaccinated women understand the importance of cervical screening when they reach the age that screening begins. Ethnic inequalities in vaccine coverage need to be explored further.

  19. Preventing cervical cancer and genital warts - How much protection is enough for HPV vaccines?

    PubMed

    Stanley, Margaret

    2016-07-01

    HPV associated disease is a global health problem: 5.2% of all cancers are HPV associated with HPV 16 and 18 accounting for 70% of cases of cervical cancer. Genital warts caused by HPV 6 and 11 have a lifetime risk of acquisition of 10%. HPV vaccines are subunit vaccines consisting of virus like particles comprised of the L1 major capsid protein. Two vaccines have been licenced since 2006/2007 and are in the National Immunisation programmes in 62 countries. Both vaccines include HPV 16 and 18 VLPs and one also includes HPV 6 and 11. The vaccines are highly immunogenic and well tolerated. Genital HPV is a sexually transmitted infection with peak incidence occurring just after the onset of sexual activity and the routine cohort for immunisation in almost all countries are adolescent girls 9-15 years of age with or without catch up for older adolescents and young women. Population effectiveness is now being demonstrated for these vaccines in countries with high vaccine coverage. HPV vaccines are highly immunogenic and effective and the original 3 dose schedules have already been reduced, for those 14 years and under, to 2 for both licenced vaccines. There is preliminary evidence that 1 dose of vaccine is as effective as 2 or 3 in preventing persistent HPV infection in the cervix in young women and further reductions in dosage may be possible if supported by appropriate virological, immunological and modelling studies. PMID:27211079

  20. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease in China: Critical Community Size and Spatial Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Van Boeckel, Thomas P.; Takahashi, Saki; Liao, Qiaohong; Xing, Weijia; Lai, Shengjie; Hsiao, Victor; Liu, Fengfeng; Zheng, Yaming; Chang, Zhaorui; Yuan, Chen; Metcalf, C. Jessica E.; Yu, Hongjie; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Hand Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) constitutes a considerable burden for health care systems across China. Yet this burden displays important geographic heterogeneity that directly affects the local persistence and the dynamics of the disease, and thus the ability to control it through vaccination campaigns. Here, we use detailed geographic surveillance data and epidemic models to estimate the critical community size (CCS) of HFMD associated enterovirus serotypes CV-A16 and EV-A71 and we explore what spatial vaccination strategies may best reduce the burden of HFMD. We found CCS ranging from 336,979 (±225,866) to 722,372 (±150,562) with the lowest estimates associated with EV-A71 in the southern region of China where multiple transmission seasons have previously been identified. Our results suggest the existence of a regional immigration-recolonization dynamic driven by urban centers. If EV-A71 vaccines doses are limited, these would be optimally deployed in highly populated urban centers and in high-prevalence areas. If HFMD vaccines are included in China’s National Immunization Program in order to achieve high coverage rates (>85%), routine vaccination of newborns largely outperforms strategies in which the equivalent number of doses is equally divided between routine vaccination of newborns and pulse vaccination of the community at large. PMID:27125917

  1. Modelling the strategies for age specific vaccination scheduling during influenza pandemic outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Knipl, Diána H; Röst, Gergely

    2011-01-01

    Finding optimal policies to reduce the morbidity and mortality of the ongoing pandemic is a top public health priority. Using a compartmental model with age structure and vaccination status, we examined the effect of age specific scheduling of vaccination during a pandemic influenza outbreak, when there is a race between the vaccination campaign and the dynamics of the pandemic. Our results agree with some recent studies on that age specificity is paramount to vaccination planning. However, little is known about the effectiveness of such control measures when they are applied during the outbreak. Comparing five possible strategies, we found that age specific scheduling can have a huge impact on the outcome of the epidemic. For the best scheme, the attack rates were up to 10% lower than for other strategies. We demonstrate the importance of early start of the vaccination campaign, since ten days delay may increase the attack rate by up to 6%. Taking into account the delay between developing immunity and vaccination is a key factor in evaluating the impact of vaccination campaigns. We provide a general framework which will be useful for the next pandemic waves as well. PMID:21361404

  2. Vaccination strategies for future influenza pandemics: a severity-based cost effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A critical issue in planning pandemic influenza mitigation strategies is the delay between the arrival of the pandemic in a community and the availability of an effective vaccine. The likely scenario, born out in the 2009 pandemic, is that a newly emerged influenza pandemic will have spread to most parts of the world before a vaccine matched to the pandemic strain is produced. For a severe pandemic, additional rapidly activated intervention measures will be required if high mortality rates are to be avoided. Methods A simulation modelling study was conducted to examine the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of plausible combinations of social distancing, antiviral and vaccination interventions, assuming a delay of 6-months between arrival of an influenza pandemic and first availability of a vaccine. Three different pandemic scenarios were examined; mild, moderate and extreme, based on estimates of transmissibility and pathogenicity of the 2009, 1957 and 1918 influenza pandemics respectively. A range of different durations of social distancing were examined, and the sensitivity of the results to variation in the vaccination delay, ranging from 2 to 6 months, was analysed. Results Vaccination-only strategies were not cost effective for any pandemic scenario, saving few lives and incurring substantial vaccination costs. Vaccination coupled with long duration social distancing, antiviral treatment and antiviral prophylaxis was cost effective for moderate pandemics and extreme pandemics, where it saved lives while simultaneously reducing the total pandemic cost. Combined social distancing and antiviral interventions without vaccination were significantly less effective, since without vaccination a resurgence in case numbers occurred as soon as social distancing interventions were relaxed. When social distancing interventions were continued until at least the start of the vaccination campaign, attack rates and total costs were significantly lower, and

  3. Vaccine antigen production in transgenic plants: strategies, gene constructs and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sala, Francesco; Manuela Rigano, M; Barbante, Alessandra; Basso, Barbara; Walmsley, Amanda M; Castiglione, Stefano

    2003-01-30

    Stable integration of a gene into the plant nuclear or chloroplast genome can transform higher plants (e.g. tobacco, potato, tomato, banana) into bioreactors for the production of subunit vaccines for oral or parental administration. This can also be achieved by using recombinant plant viruses as transient expression vectors in infected plants. The use of plant-derived vaccines may overcome some of the major problems encountered with traditional vaccination against infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases and tumours. They also offer a convenient tool against the threat of bio-terrorism. State of the art, experimental strategies, safety and perspectives are discussed in this article.

  4. Recent advances in active specific cancer vaccine treatment for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Kiyotaka; Sugiura, Fumiaki; Itoh, Kyogo; Yoshida, Koji; Tsunoda, Takuya; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2012-06-01

    Cloning techniques to identify genes and peptides of tumor-associated antigens have created new possibilities for the immunotherapy of patients with advanced cancer. Here, we review recent clinical trials of specific cancer vaccines, mainly HLA-restricted peptides, and epitope-encoding vectors for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). Many researchers initially focused on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as an immunologic target antigen that is overexpressed on virtually all CRCs. A recombinant vaccine containing the CEA gene and dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with CEA peptide was administered to patients with CEA-elevated CRC. Although CEA-specific responses were detected, the clinical responses were limited. Recently, new types of clinical trials--namely, a personalized protocol to take into account the immunological diversity of cytotoxic T cell responses among patients and a novel cancer-testis antigen protocol that uses multiple peptides derived from genes identified by the cDNA array method--have been introduced. The personalized protocol seemed to be better than the classical (non-personalized) protocol in terms of clinical response and survival. Novel cancer-testis antigen protocols that use multiple CRC-derived peptides were recently conducted in patients with advanced CRC. The preliminary study yielded promising results regarding specific T cell responses to peptides and survival benefits. In this review, we summarize these results and discuss future perspectives. PMID:22339221

  5. Parental decisional strategies regarding HPV vaccination before media debates: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Robine; van Empelen, Pepijn; Vogel, Ineke; Raat, Hein; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Korfage, Ida J

    2013-01-01

    Before the introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, decisional strategies and factors that could guide HPV vaccination intentions were explored. The authors conducted 4 focus group discussions with 36 parents of children 8-15 years of age. Three groups consisted primarily of Dutch parents and 1 group of only Turkish parents. Discussions followed a semi-structured question route. Results showed that some parents used an approach of systematically seeking information as a way to prepare a decision, whereas others merely relied on trust in the message source. In general, parents believed that it was important to protect their child against negative outcomes that could result from vaccinating or not, and they felt that it is their responsibility to decide about uptake. Perceived susceptibility, vaccine effectiveness, and possibility of serious side effects were most important in the HPV vaccination decision-making process. In conclusion, parents perceived a lack of information and felt insecure about the vaccine's safety and effectiveness. This may result in ambivalent feelings toward HPV vaccination, which, in turn, may lead to postponing decisions about uptake. To facilitate informed decision making, which requires central processing, personally relevant messages about the knowns and unknowns regarding the effects of HPV vaccination should be provided. PMID:23521231

  6. A coordinated strategy for evaluating new vaccines for human and animal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    McMurray, D N

    2001-01-01

    There is a remarkable convergence in the current efforts to develop and evaluate new tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidates for use in humans, domestic animals, and wild animal reservoirs. It is quite likely that similar vaccination strategies will prove useful in these diverse host species. Many TB vaccine candidates are being screened for protective efficacy in conventional laboratory animals (e.g. mouse, guinea pig), in captive wild species under laboratory conditions (e.g. brushtail possum), and in the target hosts (e.g. cattle, deer). These systems share some important features, e.g. direct challenge infection of the lung by intratracheal or aerosol exposure, and the use of bacterial enumeration, and gross and microscopic histopathology, as the readouts. Some TB vaccine candidates have been tested in many models, yielding important insights into common mechanisms of resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis, and providing evidence of the vaccine's ability to induce protection under widely different circumstances. Coordination of this global search for better TB vaccines, irrespective of target species, would facilitate the rapid application of new technologies and maximize the sharing of materials and experiences between human and veterinary TB researchers. The creation of liaisons between TB vaccine research efforts of government-sponsored medical and agricultural research programs, international bodies such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the European Community (EC), private foundations and the vaccine industry, will yield a high return.

  7. Establishing the pig as a large animal model for vaccine development against human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Overgaard, Nana H.; Frøsig, Thomas M.; Welner, Simon; Rasmussen, Michael; Ilsøe, Mette; Sørensen, Maria R.; Andersen, Mads H.; Buus, Søren; Jungersen, Gregers

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has increased overall survival of metastatic cancer patients, and cancer antigens are promising vaccine targets. To fulfill the promise, appropriate tailoring of the vaccine formulations to mount in vivo cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses toward co-delivered cancer antigens is essential. Previous development of therapeutic cancer vaccines has largely been based on studies in mice, and the majority of these candidate vaccines failed to induce therapeutic responses in the subsequent human clinical trials. Given that antigen dose and vaccine volume in pigs are translatable to humans and the porcine immunome is closer related to the human counterpart, we here introduce pigs as a supplementary large animal model for human cancer vaccine development. IDO and RhoC, both important in human cancer development and progression, were used as vaccine targets and 12 pigs were immunized with overlapping 20mer peptides spanning the entire porcine IDO and RhoC sequences formulated in CTL-inducing adjuvants: CAF09, CASAC, Montanide ISA 51 VG, or PBS. Taking advantage of recombinant swine MHC class I molecules (SLAs), the peptide-SLA complex stability was measured for 198 IDO- or RhoC-derived 9-11mer peptides predicted to bind to SLA-1*04:01, −1*07:02, −2*04:01, −2*05:02, and/or −3*04:01. This identified 89 stable (t½ ≥ 0.5 h) peptide-SLA complexes. By IFN-γ release in PBMC cultures we monitored the vaccine-induced peptide-specific CTL responses, and found responses to both IDO- and RhoC-derived peptides across all groups with no adjuvant being superior. These findings support the further use of pigs as a large animal model for vaccine development against human cancer. PMID:26442104

  8. Vaccination against Alzheimer disease: an update on future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fettelschoss, Antonia; Zabel, Franziska; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a devastating chronic disease without adequate therapy. More than 10 years ago, it was demonstrated in transgenic mouse models that vaccination may be a novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer. Subsequent clinical development has been a roller-coaster with some positive and many negative news. Here, we would like to summarize evidence that next generation vaccines optimized for old people and focusing on patients with mild disease stand a good chance to proof efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer. PMID:24535580

  9. Vaccination against Alzheimer disease: an update on future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fettelschoss, Antonia; Zabel, Franziska; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a devastating chronic disease without adequate therapy. More than 10 years ago, it was demonstrated in transgenic mouse models that vaccination may be a novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer. Subsequent clinical development has been a roller-coaster with some positive and many negative news. Here, we would like to summarize evidence that next generation vaccines optimized for old people and focusing on patients with mild disease stand a good chance to proof efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer.

  10. Neoadjuvant radiotherapeutic strategies in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roeder, Falk

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the current status of neoadjuvant radiation approaches in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, including a description of modern radiation techniques, and an overview on the literature regarding neoadjuvant radio- or radiochemotherapeutic strategies both for resectable and irresectable pancreatic cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation for locally-advanced, primarily non- or borderline resectable pancreas cancer results in secondary resectability in a substantial proportion of patients with consecutively markedly improved overall prognosis and should be considered as possible alternative in pretreatment multidisciplinary evaluations. In resectable pancreatic cancer, outstanding results in terms of response, local control and overall survival have been observed with neoadjuvant radio- or radiochemotherapy in several phase I/II trials, which justify further evaluation of this strategy. Further investigation of neoadjuvant chemoradiation strategies should be performed preferentially in randomized trials in order to improve comparability of the current results with other treatment modalities. This should include the evaluation of optimal sequencing with newer and more potent systemic induction therapy approaches. Advances in patient selection based on new molecular markers might be of crucial interest in this context. Finally modern external beam radiation techniques (intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiation therapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy), new radiation qualities (protons, heavy ions) or combinations with alternative boosting techniques widen the therapeutic window and contribute to the reduction of toxicity. PMID:26909133

  11. Photocarcinogenesis and Skin Cancer Prevention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Seebode, Christina; Lehmann, Janin; Emmert, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    In this review the basic principles of UV-induced carcinogenesis are summarized and the state of the art diagnosis and therapeutic strategies are discussed. The prevalent keratinocyte-derived neoplasms of the skin are basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas. Cutaneous melanoma is less frequent but associated with high mortality. Common risk factors for all three tumor entities include sun exposure and DNA-repair deficiencies. Photocarcinogenesis follows a multistep model of cancer development in which ultraviolet-induced DNA damage leads to mutations resulting in activation of oncogenes or silencing of tumor-suppressor genes. This ends in a cellular mutator phenotype even more prone to mutation acquisition. DNA repair, especially the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, counteracts mutation formation and skin cancer development. This is vividly demonstrated by the NER-defective disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. Primary skin cancer preventative strategies, therefore, include reduction of DNA photodamage by protection from the sun. Secondary preventative strategies include skin cancer screening. This implies standard examination techniques with the naked eye, an epiluminescence microscope, or digital epiluminescence microscopy. More advanced techniques include confocal laser scan microscopy. PMID:26977038

  12. Photocarcinogenesis and Skin Cancer Prevention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Seebode, Christina; Lehmann, Janin; Emmert, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    In this review the basic principles of UV-induced carcinogenesis are summarized and the state of the art diagnosis and therapeutic strategies are discussed. The prevalent keratinocyte-derived neoplasms of the skin are basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas. Cutaneous melanoma is less frequent but associated with high mortality. Common risk factors for all three tumor entities include sun exposure and DNA-repair deficiencies. Photocarcinogenesis follows a multistep model of cancer development in which ultraviolet-induced DNA damage leads to mutations resulting in activation of oncogenes or silencing of tumor-suppressor genes. This ends in a cellular mutator phenotype even more prone to mutation acquisition. DNA repair, especially the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, counteracts mutation formation and skin cancer development. This is vividly demonstrated by the NER-defective disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. Primary skin cancer preventative strategies, therefore, include reduction of DNA photodamage by protection from the sun. Secondary preventative strategies include skin cancer screening. This implies standard examination techniques with the naked eye, an epiluminescence microscope, or digital epiluminescence microscopy. More advanced techniques include confocal laser scan microscopy.

  13. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tournigand, Christophe; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2012-01-01

    While surgery is the cornerstone treatment for early-stage colorectal cancer, chemotherapy is the first treatment option for metastatic disease when tumor lesions are frequently not fully resectable at presentation. Mortality from colon cancer has decreased over the past 30 years, but there is still a huge heterogeneity in survival rates that can be mainly explained by patient and tumor characteristics, host response factors, and treatment modalities. The management of unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer is a global treatment strategy, which applies several lines of therapy, salvage surgery, maintenance, and treatment-free intervals. The individualization of cancer treatment is based on the evaluation of prognostic factors for survival (serum lactate dehydrogenase level, performance status), and predictive factors for treatment efficacy [Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation status]. The available treatment modalities for metastatic colorectal cancer are chemotherapy (fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, irinotecan), anti-angiogenic agents (e.g. bevacizumab), and anti-epidermal growth factor agents (cetuximab, panitumumab). The increasing number of active compounds dictates the strategy of trials evaluating these treatments either in combination or sequentially. Alternative outcomes that can be measured earlier than overall survival are needed to shorten the duration and reduce the size and cost of clinical trials. PMID:22423266

  14. A case study using the United Republic of Tanzania: costing nationwide HPV vaccine delivery using the WHO Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing Tool

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose, methods, data sources and assumptions behind the World Health Organization (WHO) Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing (C4P) tool that was developed to assist low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with planning and costing their nationwide human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program are presented. Tanzania is presented as a case study where the WHO C4P tool was used to cost and plan the roll-out of HPV vaccines nationwide as part of the national comprehensive cervical cancer prevention and control strategy. Methods The WHO C4P tool focuses on estimating the incremental costs to the health system of vaccinating adolescent girls through school-, health facility- and/or outreach-based strategies. No costs to the user (school girls, parents or caregivers) are included. Both financial (or costs to the Ministry of Health) and economic costs are estimated. The cost components for service delivery include training, vaccination (health personnel time and transport, stationery for tally sheets and vaccination cards, and so on), social mobilization/IEC (information, education and communication), supervision, and monitoring and evaluation (M&E). The costs of all the resources used for HPV vaccination are totaled and shown with and without the estimated cost of the vaccine. The total cost is also divided by the number of doses administered and number of fully immunized girls (FIGs) to estimate the cost per dose and cost per FIG. Results Over five years (2011 to 2015), the cost of establishing an HPV vaccine program that delivers three doses of vaccine to girls at schools via phased national introduction (three regions in year 1, ten regions in year 2 and all 26 regions in years 3 to 5) in Tanzania is estimated to be US$9.2 million (excluding vaccine costs) and US$31.5 million (with vaccine) assuming a vaccine price of US$5 (GAVI 2011, formerly the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations). This is equivalent to a financial cost of US

  15. Natural killer cells: the secret weapon in dendritic cell vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Van Elssen, Catharina H M J; Oth, Tammy; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; Bos, Gerard M J; Vanderlocht, Joris

    2014-03-01

    In cancer therapy, dendritic cell (DC) vaccination is still being explored. Clinical responses, however, are diverse and there is a lack of immunologic readout systems that correspond with clinical outcome. Only in the minority of patients, T-cell responses correlate with clinical outcome, indicating that other immune cells also gain anticancer activity. We still have limited knowledge of the effect of DC vaccination on different immune effector cells. However, it has been shown that bidirectional cross-talk between natural killer (NK) cells and DCs is responsible for enhanced activation of both cell types and increases their antitumor activity. In this review, we postulate the possibility that NK cells are the secret weapons in DC vaccination and studying their behavior together with T-cell activation in vaccinated individuals might predict clinical outcome. PMID:24590885

  16. [BENEFITS AND RISKS AT IMPLEMENTATION OF PROPHILACTIC VACCINES FOR CERVICAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Zlatkov, V; Kostova, P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the benefits and risks of the implementation of prophylactic vaccines for cervical cancer. The classical understanding of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and its role for the cervical oncogenesis, as well as, the place of prophylactic HPV vaccines are discussed. Results concerning the effectiveness of vaccines 10 years after their introduction and data about their safety are presented. Reports of the use in practice of the new 9-valent HPV vaccine and the first results of its implementation are studied. PMID:27514142

  17. Vaccines

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    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  18. Therapeutic vaccines in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: principles in clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Madan, Ravi A; Mohebtash, Mahsa; Schlom, Jeffrey; Gulley, James L

    2010-01-01

    Although docetaxel was approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in 2004, additional therapies are still required. Prostate cancer is often slow-growing and expresses many tumor-associated antigens, making it a feasible target for immunotherapy. Several therapeutic cancer vaccines have been developed for prostate cancer, including antigen-presenting-cell-based, vector-based, and whole tumor cell vaccines. Initial trials demonstrated that vaccine approaches have limited toxicity. Clinical trials of targeted biologic therapies have demonstrated that patient selection is vital, and there is preliminary evidence that clinical parameters can be used to encompass metastatic prostate cancer patients who will more probably respond to vaccine treatment. In addition to appropriate patient selection, a successful clinical trial must have an appropriate primary endpoint as well. Three randomized, 'placebo'-controlled studies in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer have suggested a clinically significant survival advantage in spite of a lack of improvement in time to progression, implying that overall survival is the ideal endpoint for such trials. Careful examination of data from completed immunotherapy clinical trials in prostate cancer has identified appropriate patient populations and endpoints. Those principles need to be applied to future trial design to properly evaluate prostate cancer vaccines.

  19. Immunological evaluation of peptide vaccination for cancer patients with the HLA-A26 allele

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shinjiro; Matsueda, Satoko; Takamori, Shinzo; Toh, Uhi; Noguchi, Masanori; Yutani, Shigeru; Yamada, Akira; Shichijo, Shigeki; Yamada, Teppei; Suekane, Shigetaka; Kawano, Kouichiro; Sasada, Tetsuro; Hattori, Noboru; Kohno, Nobuoki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2015-01-01

    To develop a peptide vaccine for cancer patients with the HLA-A26 allele, which is a minor population worldwide, we investigated the immunological responses of HLA-A26+/A26+ cancer patients to four different CTL epitope peptides under personalized peptide vaccine regimens. In personalized peptide vaccine regimens, two to four peptides showing positive peptide-specific IgG responses in pre-vaccination plasma were selected from the four peptide candidates applicable for HLA-A26+/A26+ cancer patients and administered s.c. Peptide-specific CTL and IgG responses along with cytokine levels were measured before and after vaccination. Cell surface markers in PBMCs and plasma cytokine levels were also measured. In this study, 21 advanced cancer patients, including seven lung, three breast, two pancreas, and two colon cancer patients, were enrolled. Their HLA-A26 genotypes were HLA-A26:01 (n = 24), HLA-A26:03 (n = 10), and HLA-A26:02 (n = 8). One, 14, and 6 patients received two, three, and four peptides, respectively. Grade 1 or 2 skin reactions at the injection sites were observed in the majority of patients, but no severe adverse events related to the vaccination were observed. Peptide-specific CTL responses were augmented in 39% or 22% of patients after one or two cycles of vaccination, respectively. Notably, peptide-specific IgG were augmented in 63% or 100% of patients after one or two cycles of vaccination, respectively. Personalized peptide vaccines with these four CTL epitope peptides could be feasible for HLA-A26+ advanced cancer patients because of their safety and higher rates of immunological responses. PMID:26212219

  20. A postmarket safety comparison of 2 vaccination strategies for measles, mumps, rubella and varicella in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cocchio, Silvia; Zanoni, Giovanna; Opri, Roberta; Russo, Francesca; Baldo, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    It is strategically important to monitor the safety profile of vaccination schedules in order to achieve and maintain high levels of coverage. We analyzed the cohort of individuals actively invited for measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (MMRV) vaccination in the Veneto region (north-east Italy) from 8/1/2013 to 7/31/2014, assessing the onset of adverse events (AE) relating to 2 different vaccination strategies for MMRV (MMR+V vs MMRV). During the vaccination session at 14 months old, parents were given a form for recording local and systemic reactions to vaccinations for 4 weeks afterwards. Overall, 12,288 forms were returned, and 84.6% of them were included in this analysis (5,130 relating to MMR+V and 5,265 to MMRV); 37.3% of the sample reported no AEs, with no difference between the 2 groups. Local reactions were more common in the MMR+V group (9.6% vs 2.9%; RR 3.33; 95% CI 2.79-3.98), while there was no difference in general reactions between the 2 groups (50% MMR+V vs 52% MMRV). The events most often reported were "fever <39.5°C," which was more frequently associated with the MMRV strategy (p<0.001), and "skin blotches and marks," which occurred more often in the MMR+V group (p<0.001). Reports of "fever ≥39.5°C" were equally distributed between the 2 groups. Sixteen cases of febrile seizures were reported (0.14% in the MMR+V group and 0.17% in the MMRV group). Similar safety profiles were identified for the 2 vaccination strategies. Although the method used to record reactions to vaccination demanded considerable resources, it enabled important information to be collected on parents' perception of the AEs occurring in response to their child's vaccination.

  1. Recent progress in vaccination against human papillomavirus-mediated cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    McKee, Sara J; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Leggatt, Graham R

    2015-03-01

    It has been more than 7 years since the commercial introduction of highly successful vaccines protecting against high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes and the development of cervical cancer. From an immune standpoint, the dependence of cervical cancer on viral infection has meant that HPV proteins can be targeted as strong tumour antigens leading to clearance of the infection and the subsequent protection from cancer. Commercially available vaccines consisting of the L1 capsid protein assembled as virus-like particles (VLPs) induce neutralising antibodies that deny access of the virus to cervical epithelial cells. While greater than 90% efficacy has been demonstrated at the completion of large phase III trials in young women, vaccine developers are now addressing broader issues such as efficacy in boys, longevity of the protection and inducing cross-reactive antibody for oncogenic, non-vaccine HPV strains. For women with existing HPV infection, the prophylactic vaccines provide little protection, and consequently, the need for therapeutic vaccines will continue into the future. Therapeutic vaccines targeting HPVE6 and E7 proteins are actively being pursued with new adjuvants and delivery vectors, combined with an improved knowledge of the tumour microenvironment, showing great promise. This review will focus on recent progress in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine development and implementation since the publication of end of study data from phase III clinical trials between 2010 and 2012.

  2. HPV vaccines to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts: an update.

    PubMed

    Dochez, Carine; Bogers, Johannes J; Verhelst, Rita; Rees, Helen

    2014-03-20

    Cervical cancer is an important public health problem worldwide, and especially in developing countries. The link between cervical cancer and oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been clearly established. Furthermore, non-oncogenic HPV are responsible for the majority of genital warts. Two prophylactic HPV vaccines are available, which have the potential of considerably reducing HPV-related morbidity and mortality. Both vaccines are based on virus-like particles of the L1 capsid protein, and are highly efficacious and immunogenic if given before exposure to HPV, i.e. to adolescent girls between 9 and 13 years of age in a three-dose schedule. This review describes the immunology of natural HPV infections and the immune response evoked through vaccination. The current duration of protection is 8.4 years with the bivalent vaccine (HPV16/18) and 5 years with the quadrivalent vaccine (HPV6/11/16/18). Research is on-going to evaluate the efficacy of the current vaccines in a two-dose schedule, as compared to the recommended three-dose schedule. To increase the protection, the development and testing of a nine-valent prophylactic HPV vaccine (HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) is being undertaken. Research is also directed towards therapeutic vaccines and the development of a prophylactic L2 vaccine.

  3. Vaccines for established cancer: overcoming the challenges posed by immune evasion.

    PubMed

    van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Arens, Ramon; Ossendorp, Ferry; van Hall, Thorbald; Melief, Cornelis J M

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic vaccines preferentially stimulate T cells against tumour-specific epitopes that are created by DNA mutations or oncogenic viruses. In the setting of premalignant disease, carcinoma in situ or minimal residual disease, therapeutic vaccination can be clinically successful as monotherapy; however, in established cancers, therapeutic vaccines will require co-treatments to overcome immune evasion and to become fully effective. In this Review, we discuss the progress that has been made in overcoming immune evasion controlled by tumour cell-intrinsic factors and the tumour microenvironment. We summarize how therapeutic benefit can be maximized in patients with established cancers by improving vaccine design and by using vaccines to increase the effects of standard chemotherapies, to establish and/or maintain tumour-specific T cells that are re-energized by checkpoint blockade and other therapies, and to sustain the antitumour response of adoptively transferred T cells.

  4. The Development of a Novel Cancer Immunotherapeutic Platform Using Tumor-targeting Mesenchymal Stem Cells and a Protein Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hon-Jian; Wu, Alexander TH; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Lin, Yi-Ping; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Su, Ching-Hua; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Douglas, Frank L; Deng, Win-Ping

    2011-01-01

    An ideal anticancer strategy should target only the malignant cells but spare the normal ones. In this regard, we established a platform, consisting of an antigen-delivering vehicle and a protein vaccine, for developing an immunotherapeutic approach with the potential for eliminating various cancer types. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated capable of targeting tumors and integrating into the stroma. Moreover, we have developed a protein vaccine PE(ΔIII)-E7-KDEL3 which specifically recognized E7 antigen and elicited immunity against cervical cancer. Taking advantage of tumor-homing property of MSCs and PE(ΔIII)-E7-KDEL3, we used E6/E7-immortalized human MSCs (KP-hMSCs) as an E7 antigen-delivering vehicle to test if this protein vaccine could effectively eliminate non-E7-expressing tumor cells. Animals which received combined treatment of KP-hMSCs and PE(ΔIII)-E7-KDEL3 demonstrated a significant inhibition of tumor growth and lung-metastasis when compared to PE(ΔIII)-E7-KDEL3 only and KP-hMSCs only groups. The efficiency of tumor suppression correlated positively to the specific immune response induced by PE(ΔIII)-E7-KDEL3. In addition, this combined treatment inhibited tumor growth via inducing apoptosis. Our findings indicated that KP-hMSCs could be used as a tumor-targeting device and mediate antitumor effect of PE(ΔIII)-E7-KDEL3. We believe this strategy could serve as a platform for developing a universal vaccine for different cancer types. PMID:21792181

  5. Comparative efficacy of pre-erythrocytic whole organism vaccine strategies against the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Johannes; Matuschewski, Kai

    2011-09-16

    Despite major efforts over the past 50 years to develop a malaria vaccine, no product has been licensed yet. Irradiated sporozoites are the benchmark for an experimental live-attenuated malaria vaccine that induces potent protection against re-infection in humans and animal models. Lasting protection can also be elicited by parasite attenuation via tailored genetic modification or drug cover leading to renewed interest in whole-organism vaccination strategies. In this study, we systematically compared the protective efficacy of different whole-organism vaccination approaches in the Plasmodium berghei/C57bl/6 rodent malaria model. We applied blood stage parasitemia and quantitative RT-PCR of liver parasite loads as two complementary primary endpoints of a malaria challenge infection. We were able to demonstrate similar potency of genetic attenuation, i.e., uis3(-) and p36p(-) parasites, and prophylactic drug cover, i.e., azithromycin, pyrimethamine, primaquine and chloroquine, during sporozoite exposure in comparison to irradiated sporozoites. Importantly, when animals were covered with the antibiotic azithromycin during sporozoite exposure we observed superior protection. On the other end, immunizations with heat-killed and over-irradiated sporozoites failed to confer any detectable protection. Together, we show that systematic pre-clinical evaluation and quantification of vaccine efficacy is vital for identification of the most potent whole organism anti-malaria vaccine strategy.

  6. Therapeutic strategies impacting cancer cell glutamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lukey, Michael J; Wilson, Kristin F; Cerione, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic adaptations that support oncogenic growth can also render cancer cells dependent on certain nutrients. Along with the Warburg effect, increased utilization of glutamine is one of the metabolic hallmarks of the transformed state. Glutamine catabolism is positively regulated by multiple oncogenic signals, including those transmitted by the Rho family of GTPases and by c-Myc. The recent identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of glutaminase, which can selectively block cellular transformation, has revived interest in the possibility of targeting glutamine metabolism in cancer therapy. Here, we outline the regulation and roles of glutamine metabolism within cancer cells and discuss possible strategies for, and the consequences of, impacting these processes therapeutically. PMID:24047273

  7. Storytelling in the context of vaccine refusal: a strategy to improve communication and immunisation.

    PubMed

    Cawkwell, Philip B; Oshinsky, David

    2016-03-01

    The December 2014 outbreak of measles in California impacted over 100 children and served as a reminder that this disease still plagues the USA, even 50 years following the first licensed vaccine. Refusal of vaccination is a complicated and multifaceted issue, one that clearly demands a closer look by paediatricians and public health officials alike. While medical doctors and scientists are trained to practice 'evidence-based medicine', and studies of vaccine safety and efficacy speak the language of statistics, there is reason to believe that this is not the most effective strategy for communicating with all groups of parents. Herein, we consider other methods such as narrative practices that employ stories and appeal more directly to parents. We also examine how doctors are trained to disseminate information and whether there are reasonable supplementary methods that could be used to improve vaccine communication and ultimately immunisation rates. PMID:26438615

  8. Cervical cancer screening of HPV vaccinated populations: Cytology, molecular testing, both or none.

    PubMed

    El-Zein, Mariam; Richardson, Lyndsay; Franco, Eduardo L

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer control includes primary prevention through vaccination to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and secondary prevention through screening to detect and treat cervical precancerous lesions. This review summarizes the evidence for the population impact of vaccines against oncogenic HPV types in reducing the prevalence of cervical precancerous lesions. We examine the gradual shift in screening technology from cervical cytology alone to cytology and HPV cotesting, and finally to the recognition that HPV testing can serve alone as the new screening paradigm, particularly in the initial post-vaccination era. We should expect an impact on screening performance and practices, as cohorts of HPV-vaccinated girls and adolescents reach cervical cancer screening age. In preparation for changes in the screening paradigm for the vaccination era, we propose that policymaking on cervical cancer screening should mirror current practices with other cancers as benchmarks. Cervical precancerous lesions will become a very rare condition following the widespread implementation of HPV vaccines with broader coverage in the number of preventable oncogenic types. Irrespective of screening technology, the false positive results will far outnumber the true positive ones, a tipping point that will herald a new period when the harms from cervical cancer screening will outweigh its benefits. We present a conceptual framework to guide decision making when we reach this point within 25-30 years. PMID:26631958

  9. A VACCINE STRATEGY THAT INDUCES PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY AGAINST HEROIN

    PubMed Central

    Stowe, G. Neil; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Edwards, Scott; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Misra, Kaushik K.; Schulteis, Gery; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Zakhari, Joseph S.; Koob, George F.; Janda, Kim D.

    2011-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a wide-reaching problem with a spectrum of damaging social consequences. A vaccine capable of blocking heroin's effects could provide a long-lasting and sustainable adjunct to heroin addiction therapy. Heroin, however, presents a particularly challenging immunotherapeutic target as it is metabolized to multiple psychoactive molecules. To reconcile this dilemma we examined the idea of a singular vaccine with the potential to display multiple drug-like antigens; thus two haptens were synthesized, one heroin-like and another morphine-like in chemical structure. A key feature in this approach is that immunopresentation with the heroin-like hapten is thought to be immunochemically dynamic such that multiple haptens are simultaneously presented to the immune system. We demonstrate the significance of this approach though the extremely rapid generation of robust polyclonal antibody titers with remarkable specificity. Importantly, both the antinociceptive effects of heroin and acquisition of heroin self-administration were blocked in rats vaccinated using the heroin-like hapten. PMID:21692508

  10. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of cDNA vaccine encoded antigens by modulation of antigen processing.

    PubMed

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Marit de Groot, A; Keller, Christin; Andersen, Peter; Ovaa, Huib; Kloetzel, Peter M; Mishto, Michele; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2016-09-30

    Most vaccines are based on protective humoral responses while for intracellular pathogens CD8(+) T cells are regularly needed to provide protection. However, poor processing efficiency of antigens is often a limiting factor in CD8(+) T cell priming, hampering vaccine efficacy. The multistage cDNA vaccine H56, encoding three secreted Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, was used to test a complete strategy to enhance vaccine' immunogenicity. Potential CD8(+) T cell epitopes in H56 were predicted using the NetMHC3.4/ANN program. Mice were immunized with H56 cDNA using dermal DNA tattoo immunization and epitope candidates were tested for recognition by responding CD8(+) T cells in ex vivo assays. Seven novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes were identified. H56 immunogenicity could be substantially enhanced by two strategies: (i) fusion of the H56 sequence to cDNA of proteins that modify intracellular antigen processing or provide CD4(+) T cell help, (ii) by substitution of the epitope's hydrophobic C-terminal flanking residues for polar glutamic acid, which facilitated their proteasome-mediated generation. We conclude that this whole strategy of in silico prediction of potential CD8(+) T cell epitopes in novel antigens, followed by fusion to sequences with immunogenicity-enhancing properties or modification of epitope flanking sequences to improve proteasome-mediated processing, may be exploited to design novel vaccines against emerging or 'hard to treat' intracellular pathogens. PMID:27593157

  11. Poor HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among Utah Latinas overdue for recommended cancer screenings.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Brynn; Bodson, Julia; Warner, Echo L; Dyer, Jane; Kepka, Deanna

    2016-08-01

    Individuals overdue for recommended cancer screenings may not be receiving adequate cancer prevention education. Since Latinas have the highest incidence of cervical cancer among all racial/ethnic groups, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination education is especially important for this population. The correlates of HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge were assessed among Latinas who were overdue for recommended cancer screenings. N = 206 Latinas who were overdue for recommended cancer screenings were recruited by health educators from local community groups. Bivariate analyses and multivariable regression models were used to investigate factors associated with HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among participants as well as to assess correlates of HPV vaccine receipt for eligible children of participants. In multivariable regression analyses, years living in the U.S. (p = 0.05) and health insurance status (p = 0.03) were significantly related to HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures. Age (p < 0.01), birthplace (p = 0.02), years living in the U.S. (p = 0.05), annual household income (p = 0.05), cervical cancer screening status (p = 0.03), and HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures (p < 0.01) were significantly associated with HPV vaccination outcomes for eligible daughters of participants. Cervical cancer screening status (p = 0.02) and HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures (p = 0.01) were significantly associated with HPV vaccination outcomes for eligible sons of participants. Results indicate poor HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among Latinas. Interventions to improve HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge in Utah's growing Latino population should target vulnerable individuals (e.g., not employed outside the home, less educated, less acculturated, poor, uninsured, overdue for cervical cancer screening) by using materials that are culturally sensitive, linguistically appropriate, and easily accessible. PMID

  12. MHC class II tetramer analyses in AE37-vaccinated prostate cancer patients reveal vaccine-specific polyfunctional and long-lasting CD4(+) T-cells.

    PubMed

    Anastasopoulou, Eleftheria A; Voutsas, Ioannis F; Papamichail, Michael; Baxevanis, Constantin N; Perez, Sonia A

    2016-07-01

    Realizing the basis for generating long-lasting clinical responses in cancer patients after therapeutic vaccinations provides the means to further ameliorate clinical efficacy. Peptide cancer vaccines stimulating CD4(+) T helper cells are often promising for inducing immunological memory and persistent CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell responses. Recent reports from our clinical trial with the AE37 vaccine, which is a HER2 hybrid polypeptide, documented its efficacy to induce CD4(+) T cell immunity, which was associated with clinical improvements preferentially among HLA-DRB1*11(+) prostate cancer patients. Here, we performed in-depth investigation of the CD4(+) T cell response against the AE37 vaccine. We used the DR11/AE37 tetramer in combination with multicolor flow cytometry to identify and characterize AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells regarding memory and Tregs phenotype in HLA-DRB1*11(+) vaccinated patients. To verify vaccine-specific immunological memory in vivo, we also assessed AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells in defined CD4(+) memory subsets by cell sorting. Finally, vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells were assessed regarding their functional profile. AE37-specific memory CD4(+) T cells could be detected in peptide-stimulated cultures from prostate cancer patients following vaccination even 4 y post-vaccination. The vast majority of vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells exhibited a multifunctional, mostly Th1 cytokine signature, with the potential of granzyme B production. In contrast, we found relatively low frequencies of Tregs among AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells. This is the first report on the identification of vaccine-induced HER2-specific multifunctional long-lasting CD4(+) T cells in vaccinated prostate cancer patients. PMID:27622033

  13. MHC class II tetramer analyses in AE37-vaccinated prostate cancer patients reveal vaccine-specific polyfunctional and long-lasting CD4(+) T-cells.

    PubMed

    Anastasopoulou, Eleftheria A; Voutsas, Ioannis F; Papamichail, Michael; Baxevanis, Constantin N; Perez, Sonia A

    2016-07-01

    Realizing the basis for generating long-lasting clinical responses in cancer patients after therapeutic vaccinations provides the means to further ameliorate clinical efficacy. Peptide cancer vaccines stimulating CD4(+) T helper cells are often promising for inducing immunological memory and persistent CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell responses. Recent reports from our clinical trial with the AE37 vaccine, which is a HER2 hybrid polypeptide, documented its efficacy to induce CD4(+) T cell immunity, which was associated with clinical improvements preferentially among HLA-DRB1*11(+) prostate cancer patients. Here, we performed in-depth investigation of the CD4(+) T cell response against the AE37 vaccine. We used the DR11/AE37 tetramer in combination with multicolor flow cytometry to identify and characterize AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells regarding memory and Tregs phenotype in HLA-DRB1*11(+) vaccinated patients. To verify vaccine-specific immunological memory in vivo, we also assessed AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells in defined CD4(+) memory subsets by cell sorting. Finally, vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells were assessed regarding their functional profile. AE37-specific memory CD4(+) T cells could be detected in peptide-stimulated cultures from prostate cancer patients following vaccination even 4 y post-vaccination. The vast majority of vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells exhibited a multifunctional, mostly Th1 cytokine signature, with the potential of granzyme B production. In contrast, we found relatively low frequencies of Tregs among AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells. This is the first report on the identification of vaccine-induced HER2-specific multifunctional long-lasting CD4(+) T cells in vaccinated prostate cancer patients.

  14. Penile Rehabilitation Strategies Among Prostate Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in technical and surgical approaches, erectile dysfunction (ED) remains the most common complication among prostate cancer survivors, adversely impacting quality of life. This article analyzes the concept and rationale of ED rehabilitation programs in prostate cancer patients. Emphasis is placed on the pathophysiology of ED after diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer to understand the efficacy of rehabilitation programs in clinical practice. Available evidence shows that ED is a transient complication following prostate biopsy and cancer diagnosis, with no evidence to support rehabilitation programs in these patients. A small increase in ED and in the use of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors was reported in patients under active surveillance. Patients should be advised that active surveillance is unlikely to severely affect erectile function, but clinically significant changes in sexual function are possible. Focal therapy could be an intermediate option for patients demanding treatment/refusing active surveillance and invested in maintaining sexual activity. Unlike radical prostatectomy, there is no support for PDE5 inhibitor use to prevent ED after highly conformal external radiotherapy or low-dose rate brachytherapy. Despite progress in the understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for ED in prostate cancer patients, the success rates of rehabilitation programs remain low in clinical practice. Alternative strategies to prevent ED appear warranted, with attention toward neuromodulation, nerve grafting, nerve preservation, stem cell therapy, investigation of neuroprotective interventions, and further refinements of radiotherapy dosing and delivery methods. PMID:27222641

  15. Penile Rehabilitation Strategies Among Prostate Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in technical and surgical approaches, erectile dysfunction (ED) remains the most common complication among prostate cancer survivors, adversely impacting quality of life. This article analyzes the concept and rationale of ED rehabilitation programs in prostate cancer patients. Emphasis is placed on the pathophysiology of ED after diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer to understand the efficacy of rehabilitation programs in clinical practice. Available evidence shows that ED is a transient complication following prostate biopsy and cancer diagnosis, with no evidence to support rehabilitation programs in these patients. A small increase in ED and in the use of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors was reported in patients under active surveillance. Patients should be advised that active surveillance is unlikely to severely affect erectile function, but clinically significant changes in sexual function are possible. Focal therapy could be an intermediate option for patients demanding treatment/refusing active surveillance and invested in maintaining sexual activity. Unlike radical prostatectomy, there is no support for PDE5 inhibitor use to prevent ED after highly conformal external radiotherapy or low-dose rate brachytherapy. Despite progress in the understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for ED in prostate cancer patients, the success rates of rehabilitation programs remain low in clinical practice. Alternative strategies to prevent ED appear warranted, with attention toward neuromodulation, nerve grafting, nerve preservation, stem cell therapy, investigation of neuroprotective interventions, and further refinements of radiotherapy dosing and delivery methods. PMID:27222641

  16. Cancer and fertility: strategies to preserve fertility.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, K; Fauser, B C J M; Devroey, P

    2011-03-01

    Fertility preservation is a key component of cancer management in young people. The Fourth Evian Annual Reproduction Workshop Meeting was held in April 2009 to discuss cancer and fertility in young adults. Specialists in oncology, assisted reproduction, embryology and clinical genetics presented published data and ongoing research on cancer and fertility, with particular focus on strategies to preserve fertility. This report is based on the expert presentations and group discussions, supplemented with publications from literature searches and the authors' knowledge. Fertility preservation should be considered for all young people undergoing potentially gonadotoxic cancer treatment. A variety of options are required to facilitate safe and effective fertility preservation for individual patients. Sperm banking is a simple and low-cost intervention. Embryo cryopreservation is the only established method of female fertility preservation. Oocyte cryopreservation offers a useful option for women without a male partner. Emergency ovarian stimulation and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue (followed by tissue transplantation or in-vitro maturation of oocytes) are experimental techniques for women who require urgent cancer treatment. Further prospective studies are required to validate cryopreservation of oocytes and ovarian tissue, in-vitro maturation of oocytes and new vitrification techniques and to identify any long-term sequelae of slow freezing of embryos.

  17. Testicular Cancer Survivorship: Research Strategies and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Clair; Allan, James M.; Dahl, Alv A.; Feldman, Darren R.; Oldenburg, Jan; Daugaard, Gedske; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Hannigan, Robyn; Constine, Louis S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Okunieff, Paul; Armstrong, Greg; Wiljer, David; Miller, Robert C.; Gietema, Jourik A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Nichols, Craig R.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2010-01-01

    Testicular cancer represents the most curable solid tumor, with a 10-year survival rate of more than 95%. Given the young average age at diagnosis, it is estimated that effective treatment approaches, in particular, platinum-based chemotherapy, have resulted in an average gain of several decades of life. This success, however, is offset by the emergence of considerable long-term morbidity, including second malignant neoplasms, cardiovascular disease, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, pulmonary toxicity, hypogonadism, decreased fertility, and psychosocial problems. Data on underlying genetic or molecular factors that might identify those patients at highest risk for late sequelae are sparse. Genome-wide association studies and other translational molecular approaches now provide opportunities to identify testicular cancer survivors at greatest risk for therapy-related complications to develop evidence-based long-term follow-up guidelines and interventional strategies. We review research priorities identified during an international workshop devoted to testicular cancer survivors. Recommendations include 1) institution of lifelong follow-up of testicular cancer survivors within a large cohort setting to ascertain risks of emerging toxicities and the evolution of known late sequelae, 2) development of comprehensive risk prediction models that include treatment factors and genetic modifiers of late sequelae, 3) elucidation of the effect(s) of decades-long exposure to low serum levels of platinum, 4) assessment of the overall burden of medical and psychosocial morbidity, and 5) the eventual formulation of evidence-based long-term follow-up guidelines and interventions. Just as testicular cancer once served as the paradigm of a curable malignancy, comprehensive follow-up studies of testicular cancer survivors can pioneer new methodologies in survivorship research for all adult-onset cancer. PMID:20585105

  18. T-Regulatory Cells and Vaccination "Pay Attention and Do Not Neglect Them": Lessons from HIV and Cancer Vaccine Trials.

    PubMed

    Brezar, Vedran; Godot, Véronique; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan; Lévy, Yves; Seddiki, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    Efficient vaccines are characterized by the establishment of long-lived memory T cells, including T-helper (effectors and follicular) and T-regulatory cells (Tregs). While the former induces cytotoxic or antibody responses, the latter regulates immune responses by maintaining homeostasis. The role of Tregs in inflammatory conditions is ambiguous and their systematic monitoring in vaccination along with effector T-cells is not instinctive. Recent studies from the cancer field clearly showed that Tregs suppress vaccine-induced immune responses and correlate with poor clinical benefit. In HIV infection, Tregs are needed during acute infection to preserve tissue integrity from an overwhelmed activation, but are not beneficial in chronic infection as they suppress anti-HIV responses. Current assays used to evaluate vaccine-induced specific responses are limited as they do not take into account antigen-specific Tregs. However, new assays, such as the OX40 assay, which allow for the simultaneous detection of a full range of Th-responses including antigen-specific Tregs responses, can overcome these issues. In this review article we will revise the role of Tregs in vaccination and review the recent work performed in the field, including the available tools to monitor them, from novel assays to humanized mouse models. PMID:27608046

  19. Evaluation of prognostic significance of granulocyte-related factors in cancer patients undergoing personalized peptide vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shinjiro; Yoshitomi, Munehiro; Yutani, Shigeru; Terazaki, Yasuhiro; Yoshiyama, Koichi; Ioji, Tetsuya; Matsueda, Satoko; Yamada, Akira; Takamori, Shinzo; Itoh, Kyogo; Hattori, Noboru; Kohno, Nobuoki; Sasada, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Since cancer vaccines do not always elicit beneficial effects in treated patients, identification of biomarkers for predicting clinical outcomes would be highly desirable. We previously reported that abnormal granulocytes present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) may contribute to poor prognosis in advanced prostate cancer patients receiving personalized peptide vaccination (PPV). In the current study, we examined whether soluble factors derived from granulocytes, such as matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and arginase 1 (ARG1), and inhibitory cytokine TGFβ in pre-vaccination plasma were useful for predicting prognosis after PPV in advanced cancer patients. In biliary tract cancer (n=25), multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that patients with higher plasma MMP-9 levels had a significantly worse overall survival (OS) [hazard ratio (HR) = 4.637, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.670 - 12.877, P = 0.003], whereas MPO, ARG1, or TGFβ levels were not correlated with OS. Similarly, patients with higher MMP-9 levels showed worse prognosis than those with lower MMP-9 levels in other types of advanced cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (n=32, P = 0.037 by log-rank test), and pancreatic cancer (n=41, P = 0.042 by log-rank test). Taken together, plasma MMP-9 levels before vaccination might be potentially useful as a biomarker for selecting advanced cancer patients who would benefit from PPV. PMID:26325075

  20. Communication strategies to promote the uptake of childhood vaccination in Nigeria: a systematic map

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Afiong; Oyo-Ita, Angela; Glenton, Claire; Fretheim, Atle; Ames, Heather; Muloliwa, Artur; Kaufman, Jessica; Hill, Sophie; Cliff, Julie; Cartier, Yuri; Bosch-Capblanch, Xavier; Rada, Gabriel; Lewin, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective communication is a critical component in ensuring that children are fully vaccinated. Although numerous communication interventions have been proposed and implemented in various parts of Nigeria, the range of communication strategies used has not yet been mapped systematically. This study forms part of the ‘Communicate to vaccinate’ (COMMVAC) project, an initiative aimed at building research evidence for improving communication with parents and communities about childhood vaccinations in low- and middle-income countries. Objective This study aims to: 1) identify the communication strategies used in two states in Nigeria; 2) map these strategies against the existing COMMVAC taxonomy, a global taxonomy of vaccination communication interventions; 3) create a specific Nigerian country map of interventions organised by purpose and target; and 4) analyse gaps between the COMMVAC taxonomy and the Nigerian map. Design We conducted the study in two Nigerian states: Bauchi State in Northern Nigeria and Cross River State in Southern Nigeria. We identified vaccination communication interventions through interviews carried out among purposively selected stakeholders in the health services and relevant agencies involved in vaccination information delivery; through observations and through relevant documents. We used the COMMVAC taxonomy to organise the interventions we identified based on the intended purpose of the communication and the group to which the intervention was targeted. Results The Nigerian map revealed that most of the communication strategies identified aimed to inform and educate and remind or recall. Few aimed to teach skills, enhance community ownership, and enable communication. We did not identify any intervention that aimed to provide support or facilitate decision-making. Many interventions had more than one purpose. The main targets for most interventions were caregivers and community members, with few interventions directed at

  1. Human papillomavirus prevalence in oropharyngeal cancer before vaccine introduction, United States.

    PubMed

    Steinau, Martin; Saraiya, Mona; Goodman, Marc T; Peters, Edward S; Watson, Meg; Cleveland, Jennifer L; Lynch, Charles F; Wilkinson, Edward J; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Copeland, Glen; Saber, Maria S; Hopenhayn, Claudia; Huang, Youjie; Cozen, Wendy; Lyu, Christopher; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2014-05-01

    We conducted a study to determine prevalence of HPV types in oropharyngeal cancers in the United States and establish a prevaccine baseline for monitoring the impact of vaccination. HPV DNA was extracted from tumor tissue samples from patients in whom cancer was diagnosed during 1995-2005. The samples were obtained from cancer registries and Residual Tissue Repository Program sites in the United States. HPV was detected and typed by using PCR reverse line blot assays. Among 557 invasive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, 72% were positive for HPV and 62% for vaccine types HPV16 or 18. Prevalence of HPV-16/18 was lower in women (53%) than in men (66%), and lower in non-Hispanic Black patients (31%) than in other racial/ethnic groups (68%-80%). Results indicate that vaccines could prevent most oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, but their effect may vary by demographic variables.

  2. Low Mutation Burden in Ovarian Cancer May Limit the Utility of Neoantigen-Targeted Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Scott D.; Wick, Darin A.; Nielsen, Julie S.; Kroeger, David R.; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; Holt, Robert A.; Nelson, Brad H.

    2016-01-01

    Due to advances in sequencing technology, somatically mutated cancer antigens, or neoantigens, are now readily identifiable and have become compelling targets for immunotherapy. In particular, neoantigen-targeted vaccines have shown promise in several pre-clinical and clinical studies. However, to date, neoantigen-targeted vaccine studies have involved tumors with exceptionally high mutation burdens. It remains unclear whether neoantigen-targeted vaccines will be broadly applicable to cancers with intermediate to low mutation burdens, such as ovarian cancer. To address this, we assessed whether a derivative of the murine ovarian tumor model ID8 could be targeted with neoantigen vaccines. We performed whole exome and transcriptome sequencing on ID8-G7 cells. We identified 92 somatic mutations, 39 of which were transcribed, missense mutations. For the 17 top predicted MHC class I binding mutations, we immunized mice subcutaneously with synthetic long peptide vaccines encoding the relevant mutation. Seven of 17 vaccines induced robust mutation-specific CD4 and/or CD8 T cell responses. However, none of the vaccines prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice in either the prophylactic or therapeutic setting. Moreover, none of the neoantigen-specific T cell lines recognized ID8-G7 tumor cells in vitro, indicating that the corresponding mutations did not give rise to bonafide MHC-presented epitopes. Additionally, bioinformatic analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas data revealed that only 12% (26/220) of HGSC cases had a ≥90% likelihood of harboring at least one authentic, naturally processed and presented neoantigen versus 51% (80/158) of lung cancers. Our findings highlight the limitations of applying neoantigen-targeted vaccines to tumor types with intermediate/low mutation burdens. PMID:27192170

  3. Immune adjuvants as critical guides directing immunity triggered by therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Virgil; Tartour, Eric; Michalek, Jaroslav; Stathopoulos, Apostolos; Dobrovolskienė, Neringa T; Strioga, Marius M

    2014-04-01

    Tumor growth is controlled by natural antitumor immune responses alone or by augmented immune reactivity resulting from different forms of immunotherapy, which has demonstrated clinical benefit in numerous studies, although the overall percentage of patients with durable clinical responses remains limited. This is attributed to the heterogeneity of the disease, the inclusion of late-stage patients with no other treatment options and advanced tumor-associated immunosuppression, which may be consolidated by certain types of chemotherapy. Despite variable responsiveness to distinct types of immunotherapy, therapeutic cancer vaccination has shown meaningful efficacy for a variety of cancers. A key step during cancer vaccination involves the appropriate modeling of the functional state of dendritic cells (DCs) capable of co-delivering four critical signals for proper instruction of tumor antigen-specific T cells. However, the education of DCs, either directly in situ, or ex vivo by various complex procedures, lacks standardization. Also, it is questioned whether ex vivo-prepared DC vaccines are superior to in situ-administered adjuvant-guided vaccines, although both approaches have shown success. Evaluation of these variables is further complicated by a lack of consensus in evaluating vaccination clinical study end points. We discuss the role of signals needed for the preparation of classic in situ and modern ex vivo DC vaccines capable of proper reprogramming of antitumor immune responses in patients with cancer.

  4. Effectiveness of Ring Vaccination as Control Strategy for Ebola Virus Disease.

    PubMed

    Kucharski, Adam J; Eggo, Rosalind M; Watson, Conall H; Camacho, Anton; Funk, Sebastian; Edmunds, W John

    2016-01-01

    Using an Ebola virus disease transmission model, we found that addition of ring vaccination at the outset of the West Africa epidemic might not have led to containment of this disease. However, in later stages of the epidemic or in outbreaks with less intense transmission or more effective control, this strategy could help eliminate the disease.

  5. Failure of a Single Varicella Vaccination to Protect Children With Cancer From Life-Threatening Breakthrough Varicella

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, James; Tristram, Debra; Yamada, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    We report 2 children with life-threatening breakthrough varicella. Both had received 1 varicella vaccination before onset of cancer. Despite treatment with intravenous acyclovir, 1 child died of disseminated varicella. Because similar fatal cases have been reported, high-risk immunocompromised children with 1 varicella vaccination may warrant the same varicella prophylaxis as immunocompromised children who have never been vaccinated. PMID:25955833

  6. Media Use and the Cancer Communication Strategies of Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Heesoo; Sohn, Minsung; Jung, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    Communication related to health not only substantially affects perceptions and behaviors related to health but is also positively associated with the extent of health-information seeking and the practice of preventive behavior. Despite the fact that the number of cancer survivors has increased dramatically, there are few studies of the lack of health information, factors which act as barriers, and the difficulties in follow-up care experienced by cancer survivors. Therefore, we reviewed media utilization and the types of media used by cancer survivors with regard to risk communication and suggested appropriate strategies for cancer communication. According to the results, health communication contributed to health promotion by providing health-related information, consolidating social support factors such as social solidarity and trust, and reducing anxiety. In particular, participatory health communication may establish preventive programs which reflect the needs of communities, expand accessibility to better quality healthcare, and intensify healthy living by reducing health inequalities. Therefore, when people do not have an intention to obtain cancer screening, we need to intervene to change their behavior, norms, and degrees of self-efficacy. The findings of this study may help those involved in building partnerships by assisting in their efforts to understand and communicate with the public. PMID:27722138

  7. Efficacy of DNA vaccines forming e7 recombinant retroviral virus-like particles for the treatment of human papillomavirus-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Lescaille, Geraldine; Pitoiset, Fabien; Macedo, Rodney; Baillou, Claude; Huret, Christophe; Klatzmann, David; Tartour, Eric; Lemoine, François M; Bellier, Bertrand

    2013-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in the development of anogenital tumors and also in the development of oropharyngeal head and neck carcinomas, where HPV-16, expressing the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is the most frequent serotype. Although vaccines encoding L1 and L2 capsid HPV proteins are efficient for the prevention of HPV infection, they are inadequate for treating established tumors. Hence, development of innovative vaccine therapies targeting E6/E7 is important for controlling HPV-induced cancers. We have engineered a nononcogenic mutated E7-specific plasmo-retroVLP vaccine (pVLP-E7), consisting of plasmid DNA, that is able to form recombinant retrovirus-based virus-like particles (VLPs) that display E7 antigen into murine leukemia virus Gag proteins pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G). pVLP-E7 vaccinations were studied for their ability to generate specific immune responses and for induction of protective immunity against tumor cell challenge in preventive and therapeutic models. The produced VLPs induce the maturation of human dendritic cells in vitro and mount specific E7 T cell responses. Intradermic vaccinations of mice with pVLP-E7 show their efficacy to generate antigen-specific T cell responses, to prevent and protect animals from early TC-1 tumor development compared with standard DNA or VLP immunizations. The vaccine efficacy was also evaluated for advanced tumors in mice vaccinated at various time after the injection of TC-1 cells. Data show that pVLP-E7 vaccination can cure mice with already established tumors only when combined with Toll-like receptor-7 (TLR7) and TLR9 agonists. Our findings provide evidence that pVLPs, combining the advantages of DNA and VLP vaccines, appear to be a promising strategy for the treatment of HPV-induced cancers. PMID:23521528

  8. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Tests, Strategies, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Stracci, Fabrizio; Zorzi, Manuel; Grazzini, Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Screening has a central role in colorectal cancer (CRC) control. Different screening tests are effective in reducing CRC-specific mortality. Influence on cancer incidence depends on test sensitivity for pre-malignant lesions, ranging from almost no influence for guaiac-based fecal occult blood testing (gFOBT) to an estimated reduction of 66–90% for colonoscopy. Screening tests detect lesions indirectly in the stool [gFOBT, fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), and fecal DNA] or directly by colonic inspection [flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography (CTC), and capsule endoscopy]. CRC screening is cost-effective compared to no screening but no screening strategy is clearly better than the others. Stool tests are the most widely used in worldwide screening interventions. FIT will soon replace gFOBT. The use of colonoscopy as a screening test is increasing and this strategy has superseded all alternatives in the US and Germany. Despite its undisputed importance, CRC screening is under-used and participation rarely reaches 70% of target population. Strategies to increase participation include ensuring recommendation by physicians, introducing organized screening and developing new, more acceptable tests. Available evidence for DNA fecal testing, CTC, and capsule endoscopy is reviewed. PMID:25386553

  9. HPV Infection in Cervical and Other Cancers in Saudi Arabia: Implication for Prevention and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Alsbeih, Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is closely associated with cervical cancer that the incidence of this tumor is regarded as a surrogate marker for HPV infection in countries lacking epidemiological studies. HPV is also implicated in subsets of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. Although cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, its reported incidence is low in Saudi Arabia, ranking number 12 between all cancers in females and accounts only for 2.4% of all new cases, despite the lack of national screening programs. However, the limited available studies from Saudi Arabia indicate that HPV prevalence and genotypes’ distribution in invasive cervical cancer show similar pattern as in the world. Cytology screening (Pap smear) and HPV vaccinations are the two preventive measures against cervical cancer. The two available vaccines are effective against the two most common HPV genotypes (HPV-16 and -18). Since 92% of cervical tumors in the Kingdom are infected with HPV of which 78% are HPV-16 and -18 genotypes, vaccination is expected to protect against more than two-third of cervical cancers in Saudi Arabia. Nevertheless, due to its low incidence (2.1/100,000 women), a proper cost-effectiveness analysis is required to justify the implementation of a costly vaccine bearing in mind that HPV could potentially be associated with about 3% of all cancers. However, further studies are needed to ascertain the real prevalence of HPV at the population level at large, its association with various types of cancers, and also the impact of local tradition and emerging behavioral trends that could affect HPV transmission and consequently the effectiveness of applying national vaccination program. PMID:24744990

  10. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    PubMed Central

    Tandrup Schmidt, Signe; Foged, Camilla; Smith Korsholm, Karen; Rades, Thomas; Christensen, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the specific PRR

  11. Toward a cure for HIV--Seeking effective therapeutic vaccine strategies.

    PubMed

    Autran, Brigitte

    2015-12-01

    This review article focuses on the rationale and evaluation of therapeutic vaccines against HIV. This strategy has been developed in order to restore or restimulate HIV-specific immunity in patients treated with antiretroviral therapies. Despite the lack of good candidate vaccines against HIV, two objectives have been targeted during the past 15 years. Therapeutic immunization was first proposed to help control virus relapses during treatment interruptions. More recently, the concept of therapeutic immunization has been boosted by efforts to reach HIV remission or cure, in combination to HIV reactivating agents, to help purge HIV reservoirs in a "shock and kill" strategy. This review analyses the rationales for these strategies and the results of the most widely therapeutic vaccines designed to generate T-cell immunity, i.e. recombinant viral vectors and dendritic cell-based strategies, while extremely few strategies targeted HIV-specific Abs. Only marginal control of HIV was obtained with cellular-based strategies, suggesting that approaches targeting or using broadly neutralizing Abs, should be of benefit for future efforts of therapeutic immunization against HIV in the quest toward a cure for HIV.

  12. Vaccine therapies for pediatric malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Raphaël F; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2005-01-01

    Cancer vaccines are examples of active immunotherapy. In pediatric malignancy such active strategies may be particularly problematic because of immune suppression produced by the tumor or its intensive treatment with combined chemotherapy. Nonetheless, the expression of tumor-specific and tumor-associated antigens on a range of pediatric tumors has encouraged investigation of the approach in patients with either bulky or minimal residual disease. Here we describe promising results in neuroblastoma and acute leukemia, suing genetically modified whole cell vaccines, peptides, and dendritic cells. The difficulties of conducting and evaluating such studies in a pediatric population are also described, and a strategy for cancer vaccine development is outlined.

  13. Peptide vaccines and peptidomimetics targeting HER and VEGF proteins may offer a potentially new paradigm in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaumaya, Pravin TP; Foy, Kevin Chu

    2013-01-01

    The ErbB family (HER-1, HER-2, HER-3 and HER-4) of receptor tyrosine kinases has been the focus of cancer immunotherapeutic strategies while antiangiogenic therapies have focused on VEGF and its receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2. Agents targeting receptor tyrosine kinases in oncology include therapeutic antibodies to receptor tyrosine kinase ligands or the receptors themselves, and small-molecule inhibitors. Many of the US FDA-approved therapies targeting HER-2 and VEGF exhibit unacceptable toxicities, and show problems of efficacy, development of resistance and unacceptable safety profiles that continue to hamper their clinical progress. The combination of dif ferent peptide vaccines and peptidomimetics targeting specific molecular pathways that are dysregulated in tumors may potentiate anticancer immune responses, bypass immune tolerance and circumvent resistance mechanisms. The focus of this review is to discuss efforts in our laboratory spanning two decades of rationally developing peptide vaccines and therapeutics for breast cancer. This review highlights the prospective benefit of a new, untapped category of therapies biologically targeted to EGF receptor (HER-1), HER-2 and VEGF with potential peptide ‘blockbusters‘ that could lay the foundation of a new paradigm in cancer immunotherapy by creating clinical breakthroughs for safe and efficacious cancer cures. PMID:22894670

  14. Peptide vaccines and targeting HER and VEGF proteins may offer a potentially new paradigm in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kaumaya, Pravin T P; Foy, Kevin Chu

    2012-08-01

    The ErbB family (HER-1, HER-2, HER-3 and HER-4) of receptor tyrosine kinases has been the focus of cancer immunotherapeutic strategies while antiangiogenic therapies have focused on VEGF and its receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2. Agents targeting receptor tyrosine kinases in oncology include therapeutic antibodies to receptor tyrosine kinase ligands or the receptors themselves, and small-molecule inhibitors. Many of the US FDA-approved therapies targeting HER-2 and VEGF exhibit unacceptable toxicities, and show problems of efficacy, development of resistance and unacceptable safety profiles that continue to hamper their clinical progress. The combination of different peptide vaccines and peptidomimetics targeting specific molecular pathways that are dysregulated in tumors may potentiate anticancer immune responses, bypass immune tolerance and circumvent resistance mechanisms. The focus of this review is to discuss efforts in our laboratory spanning two decades of rationally developing peptide vaccines and therapeutics for breast cancer. This review highlights the prospective benefit of a new, untapped category of therapies biologically targeted to EGF receptor (HER-1), HER-2 and VEGF with potential peptide 'blockbusters' that could lay the foundation of a new paradigm in cancer immunotherapy by creating clinical breakthroughs for safe and efficacious cancer cures.

  15. Mature autologous dendritic cell vaccines in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a phase I pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Overall therapeutic outcomes of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are poor. The dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy has been developed as a new strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and immunologic responses in use in mature, antigen-pulsed autologous DC vaccine in NSCLC patients. Methods Five HLA-A2 patients with inoperable stage III or IV NSCLC were selected to receive two doses of 5 × 107 DC cells administered subcutaneous and intravenously two times at two week intervals. The immunologic response, safety and tolerability to the vaccine were evaluated by the lymphoproliferation assay and clinical and laboratorial evolution, respectively. Results The dose of the vaccine has shown to be safe and well tolerated. The lymphoproliferation assay showed an improvement in the specific immune response after the immunization, with a significant response after the second dose (p = 0.005). This response was not long lasting and a tendency to reduction two weeks after the second dose of the vaccine was observed. Two patients had a survival almost twice greater than the expected average and were the only ones that expressed HER-2 and CEA together. Conclusion Despite the small sample size, the results on the immune response, safety and tolerability, combined with the results of other studies, are encouraging to the conduction of a large clinical trial with multiples doses in patients with early lung cancer who underwent surgical treatment. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN45563569 PMID:21682877

  16. Knowledge and acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Martha P; Dune, Tanaka; Shetty, Prasanna K; Shetty, Avinash K

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in India; however, participation in prevention and screening is low and the reasons for this are not well understood. In a cross-sectional survey in August 2008, 202 healthy women in Karnataka, India completed a questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Factors associated with vaccination and Papanicolau (Pap) smear screening acceptance were explored. Thirty-six percent of women had heard of HPV while 15% had heard of cervical cancer. Five percent of women reported ever having a Pap smear, and 4% of women felt at risk of HPV infection. Forty-six percent of women were accepting of vaccination, but fewer (21%) were willing to have a Pap smear. Overall, knowledge related to HPV and cervical cancer topics was low. Women with negative attitudes toward HPV infection were 5.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-10) times more likely to accept vaccination but were not significantly more likely to accept Pap smear (odds ratio 1.5, 95% CI 0.7-3.0). Cost and a low level of perceived risk were the most frequent factors cited as potential barriers. Improving awareness of HPV and cervical cancer through health care providers in addition to increasing access to vaccination and screening through government-sponsored programs may be feasible and effective methods to reduce cervical cancer burden in India.

  17. [VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Bellver Capella, Vincente

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are an extraordinary instrument of immunization of the population against infectious diseases. Around them there are many ethical issues. One of the most debated is what to do with certain groups opposition to vaccination of their children. States have managed in different ways the conflict between the duty of vaccination and the refusal to use vaccines: some impose the vaccination and others simply promote it. In this article we deal with which of these two approaches is the most suitable from an ethical and legal point of view. We stand up for the second option, which is the current one in Spain, and we propose some measures which should be kept in mind to improve immunization programs.

  18. Personalized peptide vaccination for cervical cancer patients who have received prior platinum-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Kouichiro; Tsuda, Naotake; Waki, Kayoko; Matsueda, Satoko; Hata, Yoshiro; Ushijima, Kimio; Itoh, Kyogo; Yamada, Akira; Kamura, Toshiharu

    2015-09-01

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the immunological efficacy and safety of a personalized peptide vaccine (PPV) for cervical cancer patients who have received platinum-based chemotherapy. A total of 24 patients with standard chemotherapy-resistant cervical cancer, including 18 recurrent cases, were enrolled in this study and received a maximum of 4 peptides based on HLA-A types and IgG levels to the vaccine candidate peptides in pre-vaccination plasma. The parental protein expression of most of the vaccine peptides was confirmed in the cervical cancer tissues. No vaccine-related systemic grade 3 or 4 adverse events were observed in any patients. Due to disease progression, 2 patients failed to complete the first cycle of vaccinations (sixth vaccination). Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) or IgG responses specific for the peptides used for vaccination were augmented in half of cases after the first cycle. The median overall survival was 8.3 months. The clinical responses of the evaluable 18 cases consisted of 1 case with a partial response and 17 cases with disease progression; the remaining 6 cases were not evaluable. Performance status, injection site skin reaction and circulating PD-1(+) CD4(+) T-cells were significantly prognostic of overall survival, and multivariate analysis also indicated that the performance status and circulating PD-1(+) CD4(+) T-cells were prognostic. Because of the safety and immunological efficacy of PPV and the possible prolongation of overall survival, further clinical trials of PPV at a larger scale in advanced or recurrent cervical cancer patients who have received prior platinum-based chemotherapy are recommended.

  19. Effect of human papillomavirus vaccination on cervical cancer screening in Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong; Bell, Christopher; Sun, Maggie; Kliewer, Gordon; Xu, Linan; McInerney, Maria; Svenson, Lawrence W.; Yang, Huiming

    2016-01-01

    Background: A school-based program with quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was implemented in Alberta in 2008. We assessed the impact of this program on Pap test cytology results using databases of province-wide vaccination and cervical cancer screening. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study involving a cohort of women in Alberta born between 1994 and 1997 who had at least 1 Pap test between 2012 and 2015. Women with negative cytology results were controls. Women with low-grade (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) and high-grade (atypical squamous cells, cannot rule out a high-grade lesion; or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) cervical abnormalities were cases. Exposure status was assigned according to records of HPV vaccination. Odds ratios (ORs) for abnormal cytology results by vaccination status were adjusted for neighbourhood income, laboratory service, rural versus urban residency, and age. Results: The total study population was 10 204. Adjusting for age, vaccinated women had a higher screening rate than unvaccinated women (13.0% v. 11.4%, p < 0.001). Among women who received full vaccination (≥ 3 doses), the adjusted OR for cervical abnormalities was 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.63–0.82). For high-grade lesions, the adjusted OR was 0.50 (95% CI 0.30–0.85). With 2-dose HPV vaccination, the adjusted OR for cervical abnormalities was 1.08 (95% CI 0.84–1.38). Interpretation: Quadrivalent HPV vaccination significantly reduced high-grade cervical abnormalities but required 3 doses. Vaccination against HPV was associated with screening uptake. Population-based vaccination and screening programs should work together to optimize cervical cancer prevention. PMID:27378467

  20. Clinical evaluation of CpG oligonucleotides as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Scheiermann, Julia; Klinman, Dennis M

    2014-11-12

    Synthetic oligonucleotides (ODN) that express unmethylated "CpG motifs" trigger cells that express Toll-like receptor 9. In humans this includes plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B cells. CpG ODN induce an innate immune response characterized by the production of Th1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Their utility as vaccine adjuvants was evaluated in a number of clinical trials. Results indicate that CpG ODN improve antigen presentation and the generation of vaccine-specific cellular and humoral responses. This work provides an up-to-date overview of the utility of CpG ODN as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious agents and cancer. PMID:24975812

  1. In situ vaccination: Cancer immunotherapy both personalized and off-the-shelf.

    PubMed

    Hammerich, Linda; Binder, Adam; Brody, Joshua D

    2015-12-01

    As cancer immunotherapy continues to benefit from novel approaches which cut immune 'brake pedals' (e.g. anti-PD1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies) and push immune cell gas pedals (e.g. IL2, and IFNα) there will be increasing need to develop immune 'steering wheels' such as vaccines to guide the immune system specifically toward tumor associated antigens. Two primary hurdles in cancer vaccines have been: identification of universal antigens to be used in 'off-the-shelf' vaccines for common cancers, and 2) logistical hurdles of ex vivo production of individualized whole tumor cell vaccines. Here we summarize approaches using 'in situ vaccination' in which intratumoral administration of off-the-shelf immunomodulators have been developed to specifically induce (or amplify) T cell responses to each patient's individual tumor. Clinical studies have confirmed the induction of systemic immune and clinical responses to such approaches and preclinical models have suggested ways to further potentiate the translation of in situ vaccine trials for our patients.

  2. Plant-based vaccines: novel and low-cost possible route for Mediterranean innovative vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Ata, Aboul-Ata E; Vitti, Antonella; Nuzzaci, Maria; El-Attar, Ahmad K; Piazzolla, Giuseppina; Tortorella, Cosimo; Harandi, Ali M; Olson, Olof; Wright, Sandra A; Piazzolla, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    A plant bioreactor has enormous capability as a system that supports many biological activities, that is, production of plant bodies, virus-like particles (VLPs), and vaccines. Foreign gene expression is an efficient mechanism for getting protein vaccines against different human viral and nonviral diseases. Plants make it easy to deal with safe, inexpensive, and provide trouble-free storage. The broad spectrum of safe gene promoters is being used to avoid risk assessments. Engineered virus-based vectors have no side effect. The process can be manipulated as follows: (a) retrieve and select gene encoding, use an antigenic protein from GenBank and/or from a viral-genome sequence, (b) design and construct hybrid-virus vectors (viral vector with a gene of interest) eventually flanked by plant-specific genetic regulatory elements for constitutive expression for obtaining chimeric virus, (c) gene transformation and/or transfection, for transient expression, into a plant-host model, that is, tobacco, to get protocols processed positively, and then moving into edible host plants, (d) confirmation of protein expression by bioassay, PCR-associated tests (RT-PCR), Northern and Western blotting analysis, and serological assay (ELISA), (e) expression for adjuvant recombinant protein seeking better antigenicity, (f) extraction and purification of expressed protein for identification and dosing, (g) antigenicity capability evaluated using parental or oral delivery in animal models (mice and/or rabbit immunization), and (h) growing of construct-treated edible crops in protective green houses. Some successful cases of heterologous gene-expressed protein, as edible vaccine, are being discussed, that is, hepatitis C virus (HCV). R9 mimotope, also named hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), was derived from the HVR1 of HCV. It was used as a potential neutralizing epitope of HCV. The mimotope was expressed using cucumber mosaic virus coat protein (CP), alfalfa mosaic virus CP P3/RNA3, and

  3. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lizotte, P H; Wen, A M; Sheen, M R; Fields, J; Rojanasopondist, P; Steinmetz, N F; Fiering, S

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The 'in situ vaccination' immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic antitumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic antitumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the antitumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic antitumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer. PMID:26689376

  4. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lizotte, P H; Wen, A M; Sheen, M R; Fields, J; Rojanasopondist, P; Steinmetz, N F; Fiering, S

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The 'in situ vaccination' immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic antitumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic antitumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the antitumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic antitumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer.

  5. A novel vaccine for cervical cancer: quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16 and 18) recombinant vaccine (Gardasil®)

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Vandana A

    2008-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and remains a public health problem worldwide. There is strong evidence that HPV causes cervical, vulva and vaginal cancers, genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. The current treatments for HPV-induced infections are ineffective and recurrence is common-place. Therefore, to reduce the burden of HPV-induced infections, several studies have investigated the effi cacy of different prophylactic vaccines in clinical human trials directed against HPV types 6, 11, 16, or 18. Notably, these HPV types contribute to a signifi cant proportion of disease worldwide. This review will focus on the published results of Merck & Co’s prophylactic quadrivalent recombinant vaccine targeting HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18 (referred to as Gardasil®). Data from the Phase III trial demonstrated that Gardasil was 100% effi cacious in preventing precancerous lesions of the cervix, vulva, and vagina and effective against genital warts. Due to the success of these human clinical trials, the FDA approved the registration of Gardasil on the 8 June 2006. In addition, since Gardasil has been effi cacious for 5 years post vaccination, the longest evaluation of an HPV vaccine, it is expected to reduce the incidence of these type specifi c HPV-induced diseases in the future. PMID:18728721

  6. The case for vaccine development in the strategy to eradicate river blindness (onchocerciasis) from Africa.

    PubMed

    Makepeace, Benjamin L; Babayan, Simon A; Lustigman, Sara; Taylor, David W

    2015-01-01

    Onchocerciasis or river blindness is a neglected parasitic disease causing severe dermatitis and visual impairment, predominantly in Africa. Historically, onchocerciasis control targeted vector breeding sites, but the current strategy relies on mass administration of a single drug, ivermectin. As programmatic goals shift from reducing public health impact to active elimination, sole reliance on ivermectin is threatened by contraindications in areas coendemic for loiasis, an inability to break transmission in some foci, and the emergence of drug resistance. Here, we argue that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines would accelerate elimination efforts and safeguard the enormous strides made in onchocerciasis control. These vaccines could be based on one or more of three lead candidates identified by a newly formed transatlantic partnership, The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa Initiative. PMID:26091691

  7. The case for vaccine development in the strategy to eradicate river blindness (onchocerciasis) from Africa.

    PubMed

    Makepeace, Benjamin L; Babayan, Simon A; Lustigman, Sara; Taylor, David W

    2015-01-01

    Onchocerciasis or river blindness is a neglected parasitic disease causing severe dermatitis and visual impairment, predominantly in Africa. Historically, onchocerciasis control targeted vector breeding sites, but the current strategy relies on mass administration of a single drug, ivermectin. As programmatic goals shift from reducing public health impact to active elimination, sole reliance on ivermectin is threatened by contraindications in areas coendemic for loiasis, an inability to break transmission in some foci, and the emergence of drug resistance. Here, we argue that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines would accelerate elimination efforts and safeguard the enormous strides made in onchocerciasis control. These vaccines could be based on one or more of three lead candidates identified by a newly formed transatlantic partnership, The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa Initiative.

  8. Modelling influenza A H5N1 vaccination strategy scenarios in the household poultry sector in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Masry, Ihab; Rijks, Jolianne; Peyre, Marisa; Taylor, Nick; Lubroth, Juan; Jobre, Yilma

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) due to H5N1 virus was first reported in Egypt in February 2006; since then, the government has allowed avian influenza vaccination in poultry. The present study evaluated the impact of AI vaccination in terms of cumulative annual flock immunity (CAFI): the percentage of bird × weeks protected by immunity. This evaluation took account of the combined effects of vaccination coverage, vaccine efficacy (VE), and different characteristics of household poultry production on the effectiveness of the adopted vaccination strategy (VS), and provided alternative options for improvement. The evaluation used a population and vaccination model that calculates the CAFI. Participatory approaches were employed in 21 villages to develop the vaccination and flock parameters required for the model. The adopted VS were compared in the model with three alternative VS scenarios in terms of the CAFI. Vaccination coverage varied among villages but was generally low (between 1 and 48 %; median 14 %). Under the adopted VS, the CAFI predicted for the villages ranged from 2 to 31 %. It was concluded that despite the enormous effort put into rural household poultry AI vaccination by the Egyptian government, village CAFI is unlikely to be maintained at the levels required to significantly reduce the virus load and restrict transmission. In HPAI-endemic countries that consider AI vaccination as one of the disease control options, the high cost of mass AI vaccination campaigns and their achievable benefits must be compared with other available control measures, which may include targeted vaccination. Achievable vaccination coverage, VE and the different characteristics of commercial and household (village) poultry production are key parameters determining the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of different AI vaccination strategies.

  9. Anal Cancer: An Examination of Radiotherapy Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Lim, Faye

    2011-04-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9811, ACCORD-03, and ACT II Phase III trials in anal cancer showed no benefit for cisplatin-based induction and maintenance chemotherapy, or radiation dose-escalation >59 Gy. This review examines the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation (CRT) in anal cancer, and discusses potential alternative radiotherapy strategies. The evidence for the review was compiled from randomized and nonrandomized trials of radiation therapy and CRT. A total of 103 retrospective/observational studies, 4 Phase I/II studies, 16 Phase II prospective studies, 2 randomized Phase II studies, and 6 Phase III trials of radiotherapy or chemoradiation were identified. There are no meta-analyses based on individual patient data. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach for all stages of anal cancer is inappropriate. Early T1 tumors are probably currently overtreated, whereas T3/T4 lesions might merit escalation of treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy or the integration of biological therapy may play a role in future.

  10. A new immunization and treatment strategy for mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) associated cancers

    PubMed Central

    Braitbard, Ori; Roniger, Maayan; Bar-Sinai, Allan; Rajchman, Dana; Gross, Tamar; Abramovitch, Hillel; Ferla, Marco La; Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Chiara M.; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Hochman, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) causes mammary carcinoma or lymphoma in mice. An increasing body of evidence in recent years supports its involvement also in human sporadic breast cancer. It is thus of importance to develop new strategies to impair the development, growth and metastasis of MMTV-associated cancers. The signal peptide of the envelope precursor protein of this virus: MMTV-p14 (p14) is an excellent target for such strategies, due to unique characteristics distinct from its regular endoplasmic reticulum targeting function. These include cell surface expression in: murine cancer cells that harbor the virus, human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells that ectopically express p14, as well as cultured human cells derived from an invasive ductal breast carcinoma positive for MMTV sequences. These findings support its use in signal peptide-based immune targeting. Indeed, priming and boosting mice with p14 elicits a specific anti-signal peptide immune response sufficient for protective vaccination against MMTV-associated tumors. Furthermore, passive immunization using a combination of anti-p14 monoclonal antibodies or the transfer of T-cells from immunized mice (Adoptive Cell Transfer) is also therapeutically effective. With reports demonstrating involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer, we propose the immune-mediated targeting of p14 as a strategy for prevention, treatment and diagnosis of MMTV-associated cancers. PMID:26934560

  11. Maternal Antibodies: Clinical Significance, Mechanism of Interference with Immune Responses, and Possible Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Neonates have an immature immune system, which cannot adequately protect against infectious diseases. Early in life, immune protection is accomplished by maternal antibodies transferred from mother to offspring. However, decaying maternal antibodies inhibit vaccination as is exemplified by the inhibition of seroconversion after measles vaccination. This phenomenon has been described in both human and veterinary medicine and is independent of the type of vaccine being used. This review will discuss the use of animal models for vaccine research. I will review clinical solutions for inhibition of vaccination by maternal antibodies, and the testing and development of potentially effective vaccines. These are based on new mechanistic insight about the inhibitory mechanism of maternal antibodies. Maternal antibodies inhibit the generation of antibodies whereas the T cell response is usually unaffected. B cell inhibition is mediated through a cross-link between B cell receptor (BCR) with the Fcγ-receptor IIB by a vaccine–antibody complex. In animal experiments, this inhibition can be partially overcome by injection of a vaccine-specific monoclonal IgM antibody. IgM stimulates the B cell directly through cross-linking the BCR via complement protein C3d and antigen to the complement receptor 2 (CR2) signaling complex. In addition, it was shown that interferon alpha binds to the CD21 chain of CR2 as well as the interferon receptor and that this dual receptor usage drives B cell responses in the presence of maternal antibodies. In lieu of immunizing the infant, the concept of maternal immunization as a strategy to protect neonates has been proposed. This approach would still not solve the question of how to immunize in the presence of maternal antibodies but would defer the time of infection to an age where infection might not have such a detrimental outcome as in neonates. I will review successful examples and potential challenges of implementing this concept. PMID

  12. Immunological efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine strategies in HIV-infected adults: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sadlier, C; O'Dea, S; Bennett, K; Dunne, J; Conlon, N; Bergin, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immunologic response to a prime-boost immunization strategy combining the 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) with the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) versus the PPSV23 alone in HIV-infected adults. HIV-infected adults were randomized to receive PCV13 at week 0 followed by PPSV23 at week 4 (n = 31, prime-boost group) or PPSV23 alone at week 4 (n = 33, PPSV23-alone group). Serotype specific IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) and functional oposonophagocytic (OPA) geometric mean titer (GMT) were compared for 12 pneumococcal serotypes shared by both vaccines at week 8 and week 28. The prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥2-fold increase in IgG GMC and a GMC >1 ug/ml at week 8 (odds ratio (OR) 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46-2.74, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.40-2.70, p < 0.01). Similarly, the prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥4-fold increase in GMT at week 8 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.22-2.39, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.15-2.3, p < 0.01). This study adds to evidence supporting current pneumococcal vaccination recommendations combining the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines in the United States and Europe for HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27580688

  13. Immunological efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine strategies in HIV-infected adults: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Sadlier, C.; O’Dea, S.; Bennett, K.; Dunne, J.; Conlon, N.; Bergin, C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immunologic response to a prime-boost immunization strategy combining the 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) with the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) versus the PPSV23 alone in HIV-infected adults. HIV-infected adults were randomized to receive PCV13 at week 0 followed by PPSV23 at week 4 (n = 31, prime-boost group) or PPSV23 alone at week 4 (n = 33, PPSV23-alone group). Serotype specific IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) and functional oposonophagocytic (OPA) geometric mean titer (GMT) were compared for 12 pneumococcal serotypes shared by both vaccines at week 8 and week 28. The prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥2-fold increase in IgG GMC and a GMC >1 ug/ml at week 8 (odds ratio (OR) 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46–2.74, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.40–2.70, p < 0.01). Similarly, the prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥4-fold increase in GMT at week 8 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.22–2.39, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.15–2.3, p < 0.01). This study adds to evidence supporting current pneumococcal vaccination recommendations combining the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines in the United States and Europe for HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27580688

  14. Pneumococcal Disease Prevention Among Adults: Strategies for the Use of Pneumococcal Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pilishvili, Tamara; Bennett, Nancy M

    2015-12-01

    Use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines among children in the U.S. since 2000 has dramatically reduced pneumococcal disease burden among adults. Significant vaccine-preventable morbidity and mortality from pneumococcal infections still remains, especially among older adults. The U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recently recommended the routine use of both pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) and polysaccharide vaccines (PPSV23) for adults ≥65 years. These recommendations were based on the remaining burden of illness among adults and the importance of non-bacteremic pneumonia prevention in light of new evidence confirming the efficacy of PCV13 to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia among older adults. This paper reviews the evidence that led ACIP to make recommendations for PCV13 and PPSV23 use among adults, and highlights potential gaps to be addressed by future studies to inform adult vaccination policy. The changing epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumonia should be closely monitored to evaluate the effectiveness and continued utility of the current vaccination strategy, and to identify future directions for pneumococcal disease prevention among older adults.

  15. Pneumococcal disease prevention among adults: Strategies for the use of pneumococcal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pilishvili, Tamara; Bennett, Nancy M

    2015-11-27

    Use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines among children in the US since 2000 has dramatically reduced pneumococcal disease burden among adults. Significant vaccine-preventable morbidity and mortality from pneumococcal infections still remains, especially among older adults. The US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recently recommended the routine use of both pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) and polysaccharide vaccines (PPSV23) for adults ≥65 years. These recommendations were based on the remaining burden of illness among adults and the importance of non-bacteremic pneumonia prevention in light of new evidence confirming the efficacy of PCV13 to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia among older adults. This paper reviews the evidence that led the ACIP to make recommendations for PCV13 and PPSV23 use among adults, and highlights potential gaps to be addressed by future studies to inform adult vaccination policy. The changing epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumonia should be closely monitored to evaluate the effectiveness and continued utility of the current vaccination strategy, and to identify future directions for pneumococcal disease prevention among older adults.

  16. Development of a baited oral vaccine for use in reservoir-targeted strategies against Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debaditya; Bensaci, Mekki; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary; Wisdom, Steven; Telford, Sam R; Hu, Linden T

    2011-10-13

    Lyme disease is a major human health problem which continues to increase in incidence and geographic distribution. As a vector-borne zoonotic disease, Lyme disease may be amenable to reservoir targeted strategies for control. We have previously reported that a vaccinia virus (VV) based vaccine expressing outer surface protein A (OspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, protects inbred strains of laboratory mice against infection by feeding ticks and clears the ticks of infection when administered by gavage. Here we extend these studies to develop an effective bait formulation for delivery of the VV based vaccine and test its characteristics under simulated environmental conditions. We show that this vaccine is efficacious in decreasing acquisition of B. burgdorferi by uninfected larval ticks as well as in decreasing transmission from infected ticks to its natural reservoir, Peromyscus leucopus, when fed to mice in oral baits. Using live, in vivo imaging techniques, we describe the distribution of vaccinia virus infection after ingestion of the baited vaccines and establish the use of in vivo imaging technology for optimization of bait delivery. In summary, a VV based OspA vaccine is stable in an oral bait preparation and provides protection against infection for both the natural reservoir and the tick vector of Lyme disease. PMID:21816190

  17. Comparison of vaccination strategies for the control of dog rabies in Machakos District, Kenya.

    PubMed Central

    Kitala, P. M.; McDermott, J. J.; Coleman, P. G.; Dye, C.

    2002-01-01

    Demographic and epidemiological field data were used in a deterministic model to describe dog rabies transmission in Machakos District, Kenya and to predict the impact of potential vaccination strategies for its control. The basic reproduction number (R0) was estimated to be 2.44 (1.52-3.36, 95% confidence limits). There were three key model predictions. The first was that a threshold dog density (K(T)) of 4.5 dogs km(-2) (3.8-5.2 dogs km(-2), 95% confidence limits) was required to maintain transmission. The second was that the estimated annual vaccination rate of 24% failed to decrease incidence and actually increased the stability of transmission and may be counter-productive. Thirdly, to control rabies, it was predicted that 59% (34%-70%, 95% confidence limits) of dogs should be vaccinated at any one time. This requires approximately 70% coverage for annual but only 60% coverage for semi-annual vaccination campaigns. Community-level vaccination trials are needed to test these predictions. PMID:12211590

  18. Development of a baited oral vaccine for use in reservoir-targeted strategies against Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Debaditya; Bensaci, Mekki; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary; Wisdom, Steven; Telford, Sam R.; Hu, Linden T.

    2013-01-01

    Lyme disease is a major human health problem which continues to increase in incidence and geographic distribution. As a vector-borne zoonotic disease, Lyme disease may be amenable to reservoir targeted strategies for control. We have previously reported that a vaccinia virus (VV) based vaccine expressing outer surface protein A (OspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, protects inbred strains of laboratory mice against infection by feeding ticks and clears the ticks of infection when administered by gavage. Here we extend these studies to develop an effective bait formulation for delivery of the VV based vaccine and test its characteristics under simulated environmental conditions. We show that this vaccine is efficacious in decreasing acquisition of B. burgdorferi by uninfected larval ticks as well as in decreasing transmission from infected ticks to its natural reservoir, Peromyscus leucopus, when fed to mice in oral baits. Using live, in vivo imaging techniques, we describe the distribution of vaccinia virus infection after ingestion of the baited vaccines and establish the use of in vivo imaging technology for optimization of bait delivery. In summary, a VV based OspA vaccine is stable in an oral bait preparation and provides protection against infection for both the natural reservoir and the tick vector of Lyme disease. PMID:21816190

  19. Development of a baited oral vaccine for use in reservoir-targeted strategies against Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debaditya; Bensaci, Mekki; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary; Wisdom, Steven; Telford, Sam R; Hu, Linden T

    2011-10-13

    Lyme disease is a major human health problem which continues to increase in incidence and geographic distribution. As a vector-borne zoonotic disease, Lyme disease may be amenable to reservoir targeted strategies for control. We have previously reported that a vaccinia virus (VV) based vaccine expressing outer surface protein A (OspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, protects inbred strains of laboratory mice against infection by feeding ticks and clears the ticks of infection when administered by gavage. Here we extend these studies to develop an effective bait formulation for delivery of the VV based vaccine and test its characteristics under simulated environmental conditions. We show that this vaccine is efficacious in decreasing acquisition of B. burgdorferi by uninfected larval ticks as well as in decreasing transmission from infected ticks to its natural reservoir, Peromyscus leucopus, when fed to mice in oral baits. Using live, in vivo imaging techniques, we describe the distribution of vaccinia virus infection after ingestion of the baited vaccines and establish the use of in vivo imaging technology for optimization of bait delivery. In summary, a VV based OspA vaccine is stable in an oral bait preparation and provides protection against infection for both the natural reservoir and the tick vector of Lyme disease.

  20. Control of varicella in the post-vaccination era in Australia: a model-based assessment of catch-up and infant vaccination strategies for the future.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z; Wood, J G; Gidding, H F; Newall, A T; Menzies, R I; Wang, H; McIntyre, P B; MacIntyre, C R

    2015-05-01

    In Australia, varicella vaccine was universally funded in late 2005 as a single dose at 18 months. A school-based catch-up programme for children aged 10-13 years without a history of infection or vaccination was funded until 2015, when those eligible for universal infant vaccination would have reached the age of high school entry. This study projects the impact of discontinuing catch-up vaccination on varicella and zoster incidence and morbidity using a transmission dynamic model, in comparison with alternative policy options, including two-dose strategies. At current vaccine coverage (83% at 2 years and 90% at 5 years), ceasing the adolescent catch-up programme in 2015 was projected to increase varicella-associated morbidity between 2035 and 2050 by 39%. Although two-dose infant programmes had the lowest estimated varicella morbidity, the incremental benefit from the second dose fell by 70% if first dose coverage increased from 83% to 95% by age 24 months. Overall zoster morbidity was predicted to rise after vaccination, but differences between strategies were small. Our results suggest that feasibility of one-dose coverage approaching 95% is an important consideration in estimating incremental benefit from a second dose of varicella vaccine.

  1. Epidemiology of cancers of infectious origin and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    De Flora, S; La Maestra, S

    2015-01-01

    Infectious and parasitic diseases represent the third cause of cancer worldwide. A number of infectious and parasitic agents have been suspected or recognized to be associated with human cancers, including DNA viruses, such as papillomaviruses (several HPV types), herpesviruses (EBV and KSHV), polyomaviruses (SV40, MCV, BK, and JCV), and hepadnaviruses (HBV); RNA viruses, such as flaviviruses (HCV), defective viruses (HDV), and retroviruses (HTLV-I, HTLV-II, HIV-1, HIV-2,HERV-K, and XMRV); bacteria, such as H. pylori, S. typhi, S. bovis, Bartonella, and C. pneumoniae; protozoa, such as P. falciparum; trematodes, such as S. haematobium, S. japonicum, S. mansoni, O. viverrini, O. felineus, and C. sinensis. Each one of the chronic infections with H. pylori, HPV, and HBV/HCV is responsible for approximately the 5% of all human cancers. The primary prevention of infection-related cancers is addressed both to avoidance and eradication of chronic infections and to protection of the host organism. Vaccines provide fundamental tools for the prevention of infectious diseases and related cancers. The large-scale application of the HBV vaccine has already shown to favorably affect the epidemiological burden of primary hepatocellular carcinoma, and HPV vaccines have specifically been designed in order to prevent cervical cancer and other HPV-related cancers. The secondary prevention of infection-associated cancers has already found broad applications in the control of cervical cancer. Detection of early gastric cancer by endoscopy has been applied in Asian countries. Avoidance of local relapses, invasion, and metastasis may be achieved by applying tertiary prevention, which targets specific mechanisms, such as angiogenesis. PMID:26789827

  2. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide1826 combined with radioresistant cancer cell vaccine confers significant antitumor effects.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, X B; Xing, N; Zhang, Q; Yuan, S J; Chen, W; Qiao, T K

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a hot issue in cancer research over the years and tumor cell vaccine is one of the increasing number of studies. Although the whole tumor cell vaccine can provide the best source of immunizing antigens, there is still a limitation that most tumors are not naturally immunogenic. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs), synthetic oligonucleotides containing a cytosine-phosphate-guanine(CpG) motif, was shown to enhance immune responses to a wide variety of antigens. In this study, we generated the radioresistant Lewis lung cancer cell by repeated X-ray radiation and inactivated it as a whole tumor cell vaccine to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cell vaccine. Mice were subcutaneously immunized with this inactivated vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 and then inoculated with autologous Lewis lung cancer (LLC) to estimate the antitumor efficacy. The results showed that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 could significantly inhibit tumor growth, increased survival of the mice and with 20% of the mice surviving tumor free in vivo compared with the unimmunized mice bearing LLC tumor. A significant increase of apoptosis was also observed in the tumor prophylactically immunized with vaccine of inactivated radioresistant tumor cell plus CpG ODN1826. The potent antitumor effect correlated with higher secretion levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α) and lower levels of interleukin-10(IL-10) concentration in serum. Furthermore, the results suggested that the antitumor mechanism was probably depended on the decreased level of programmed death ligand-1(PD-L1) which plays an important role in the negative regulation of immune response by the inhibition of tumor antigen-specific T cell activation. These findings clearly demonstrated that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 as an appropriate adjuvant could induce effective antitumor immunity in vivo. PMID:26458317

  3. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics: News

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term effectiveness shown for Merck’s chickenpox vaccine Again—no link between vaccines and autism Experimental ovarian cancer vaccine successful in phase 1 Sinovac’s HFMD vaccine meets phase 3 study goal A vaccine for long-suffering cat allergy patients Vaccines are key to breaking infectious disease-malnutrition cycle Cancer vaccine failures due to the adjuvant IFA? Novartis’ typhoid vaccine make good progress

  4. Gene-based vaccines and immunotherapeutic strategies against neurodegenerative diseases: Potential utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Kudrna, Jeremy J; Ugen, Kenneth E

    2015-01-01

    There has been a recent expansion of vaccination and immunotherapeutic strategies from controlling infectious diseases to the targeting of non-infectious conditions including neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to conventional vaccine and immunotherapeutic modalities, gene-based methods that express antigens for presentation to the immune system by either live viral vectors or non-viral naked DNA plasmids have been developed and evaluated. This mini-review/commentary summarizes the advantages and disadvantages, as well as the research findings to date, of both of these gene-based vaccination approaches in terms of how they can be targeted against appropriate antigens within the Alzheimer and Parkinson disease pathogenesis processes as well as potentially against targets in other neurodegenerative diseases. Most recently, the novel utilization of these viral vector and naked DNA gene-based technologies includes the delivery of immunoglobulin genes from established biologically active monoclonal antibodies. This modified passive immunotherapeutic strategy has recently been applied to deliver passive antibody immunotherapy against the pathologically relevant amyloid β protein in Alzheimer disease. The advantages and disadvantages of this technological application of gene-based immune interventions, as well as research findings to date are also summarized. In sum, it is suggested that further evaluation of gene based vaccines and immunotherapies against neurodegenerative diseases are warranted to determine their potential clinical utility.

  5. Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus Infection, Cervical Cancer and Willingness to pay for Cervical Cancer Vaccination among Ethnically Diverse Medical Students in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Rajiah, Kingston; Num, Kelly Sze Fang; Yong, Ng Jin

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of medical students and determine variation between different cultural groups. A secondary aim was to find out the willingness to pay for cervical cancer vaccination and the relationships between knowledge and attitudes towards Human Papillomavirus vaccination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a private medical university between June 2014 and November 2014 using a convenient sampling method. A total of 305 respondents were recruited and interviewed with standard questionnaires for assessment of knowledge, attitudes and practice towards human papilloma virus and their willingness to pay for HPV vaccination. Knowledge regarding human papilloma virus, human papilloma virus vaccination, cervical cancer screening and cervical cancer risk factors was good. Across the sample, a majority (90%) of the pupils demonstrated a high degree of knowledge about cervical cancer and its vaccination. There were no significant differences between ethnicity and the participants' overall knowledge of HPV infection, Pap smear and cervical cancer vaccination. Some 88% of participants answered that HPV vaccine can prevent cervical cancer, while 81.5% of medical students said they would recommend HPV vaccination to the public although fewer expressed an intention to receive vaccination for themselves. PMID:26320444

  6. [Vaccination perspectives].

    PubMed

    Saliou, P; Plotkin, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of vaccinology is to improve the available vaccines and to develop new ones in the light of progress in immunology, molecular biology and biotechnologies. But it must go beyond this, and aim to protect all populations and control diseases, even eradicate them where possible. New vaccine strategies must be developed taking into account the epidemiology of diseases and the inherent logistic problems of implementing these strategies under local conditions. There are three major thrusts to the progress of the discipline. The improvement of the vaccines available. One of the drives of vaccinology is not only to deliver vaccines of increasing safety (replacement of the current vaccine for whooping cough with an acellular vaccine for example), but also to improve vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity (in particular for flu, tuberculosis, cholera and rabies vaccines). The optimisation of vaccination programmes and strategies for vaccinations. The ideal is to protect against the greatest possible number of diseases with the smallest number of vaccinations. The development of combinations of vaccines is central to this goal. The objective for the year 2000 is a hexavalent vaccine DTPP Hib HB. The development of new vaccines. Classic techniques continue to be successfully used (inactivated hepatitis A vaccine; attenuated live vaccines for chicken pox and dengue fever; conjugated polyosidic bacterial vaccines for meningococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae). However, it will become possible to prepare vaccines against most transmissible diseases using genetic engineering techniques.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Vaccination of metastatic colorectal cancer patients with matured dendritic cells loaded with multiple major histocompatibility complex class I peptides.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Brian; Ko, Andrew; Venook, Alan; Margolin, Kim; Zeh, Herbert; Lotze, Michael; Schillinger, Brian; Liu, Weihong; Lu, Ying; Mitsky, Peggie; Schilling, Marta; Bercovici, Nadege; Loudovaris, Maureen; Guillermo, Roy; Lee, Sun Min; Bender, James; Mills, Bonnie; Fong, Lawrence

    2007-10-01

    Developing a process to generate dendritic cells (DCs) applicable for multicenter trials would facilitate cancer vaccine development. Moreover, targeting multiple antigens with such a vaccine strategy could enhance the efficacy of such a treatment approach. We performed a phase 1/2 clinical trial administering a DC-based vaccine targeting multiple tumor-associated antigens to patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). A qualified manufacturing process was used to generate DC from blood monocytes using granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IL-13, and matured for 6 hours with Klebsiella-derived cell wall fraction and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). DCs were also loaded with 6 HLA-A*0201 binding peptides derived from carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), MAGE, and HER2/neu, as well as keyhole limpet hemocyanin protein and pan-DR epitope peptide. Four planned doses of 35x10(6) cells were administered intradermally every 3 weeks. Immune response was assessed by IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT). Matured DC possessed an activated phenotype and could prime T cells in vitro. In the trial, 21 HLA-A2+ patients were apheresed, 13 were treated with the vaccine, and 11 patients were evaluable. No significant treatment-related toxicity was reported. T-cell responses to a CEA-derived peptide were detected by ELISPOT in 3 patients. T cells induced to CEA possessed high avidity T-cell receptors. ELISPOT after in vitro restimulation detected responses to multiple peptides in 2 patients. All patients showed progressive disease. This pilot study in advanced CRC patients demonstrates DC-generated granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IL-13 matured with Klebsiella-derived cell wall fraction and IFN-gamma can induce immune responses to multiple tumor-associated antigens in patients with advanced CRC.

  8. Gene expression profiling in vaccine therapy and immunotherapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bedognetti, Davide; Wang, Ena; Sertoli, Mario Roberto; Marincola, Francesco M

    2012-01-01

    The identification of tumor antigens (TA) recognized by T cells led to the design of therapeutic strategies aimed at eliciting adaptive-immune responses. The last decade experience has shown that, although active immunization can induce enhancement of anti-cancer T cell precursors (easily detectable in standard assays), most often they are unable to induce tumor regression and, consequently, have scarce impact on overall survival. Moreover, in the few occasions when tumor rejection occurs, the mechanisms determining this phenomenon remain poorly understood, and data derived from in vivo human observations are rare. The advent of high-throughput gene expression analysis (microarrays) has cast new lights on unrecognized mechanisms that are now deemed as central for the development of an efficient immune-mediated tumor rejection. The aim of this article is to review the data about the molecular signature associated with this process. We believe that the description of how the mechanism of immune-mediated tissue destruction occurs would contribute to understand why it happens, thereby allowing to develop more effective immune-therapeutic strategies. PMID:20518712

  9. [Cancer of cervix in Chile. Too much vaccine amid a neglected Papanicolau].

    PubMed

    Fica, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    The Chilean Ministry of Health announced the incorporation of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to prevent cervix uterine cancer (CUC) into the national immunization program during year 2014 This decision was adopted despite of two opposing documents and a significant decrease in cervical cancer associated mortality due to cytological cervical screening. The burden of disease attributed to CUC has declined in Chile and current cost-effectiveness studies should be reviewed considering this decreasing trend, the progressive decrease in coverage rates observed during the past years, the potential need for aditional doses and lower vaccine costs if vaccine is acquired through the PAHO revolving fund. Moreover, serious adverse events associated with these vaccines, which in some countries are more frequent than CUC associated mortality, have not been thoroughly evaluated and are probably underreported. The decision to incorporate the vaccine occurs in a context of progressive weakening of the national cervical screening program leading to a reduced population coverage. This situation jepeordizes the achievements already obtained and poses a challenge to vaccine introduction considering that not all the high-risk viral subtypes are included and thus the risk for CUC does not disappear making cervical screening a vital component of the program that needs to be maintained. This governmental resolution requires a more solid scientific foundation and should not be implemented without resolving current cervical screening shortcomings.

  10. Immunobiology of the human immunodeficiency virus envelope and its relationship to vaccine strategies.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, D P

    1990-02-01

    The envelope of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an essential building block of the virus and it plays a major role in its life-cycle, particularly during the early stages of infection. It very likely determines, at least in part, the host range and tissue specificity of HIV, participates in pathogenic processes mediated by the virus and can itself be immunosuppressive. Because of its strategic location on the outer surface of the virion and the infected cell, it also represents an optimal (although not the only) target for immune attack and thus a prime candidate for development of vaccine and therapeutic strategies. Efforts to better understand its structural, functional and antigenic properties will thus be well worthwhile. Some of its principal features are reviewed herein and its role in vaccine strategies is discussed. PMID:2182967

  11. Cancer Registries and Monitoring the Impact of Prophylactic Human Papillomavirus Vaccines: The Potential Role

    PubMed Central

    Saraiya, Mona; Goodman, Marc T.; Datta, S. Deblina; Chen, Vivien W.; Wingo, Phyllis A.

    2009-01-01

    The recent US Food and Drug Administration licensure of a prophylactic vaccine against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18, the first of its kind, poses unique challenges in postmarketing vaccine surveillance, especially in measuring vaccine effectiveness against biologic endpoints of HPV infection. Historically, the national system of population-based cancer registries in the US has provided high-quality data on cancer incidence and mortality for the most important biologic endpoints, namely, anogenital cancers and some oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancers. There also has been some data collection on cancer precursors; however, this activity has been inconsistent and of lower priority. Because effectiveness against HPV-associated cancers will not be measurable for several decades, strengthening and possibly expanding the capacity of registries to collect precancer data, which are earlier manifestations of infection, must be considered. Collecting type-specific data on HPV-associated precancers and cancers. While keeping in mind the current limitations of registry operations, they discuss resources that may be needed to implement and sustain these types of activities. PMID:18980287

  12. IGF-1 Antisense Strategies for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y X; Anthony, D D

    2000-01-01

    The technical approaches to gene therapy for cancer utilize ex vivo and in vivo gene-transfer methodology. This chapter focuses on applicability and use of an ex vivo approach using an IGF-1 antisense RNA strategy of treatment. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-2 have pivotal roles in cell proliferation and development (for review, see 1-6). The preponderance of peptide synthesis and activity occur during fetal development, and protein synthesis is downregulated in most mature tissues except for adult liver. Further modulating the activities of these proteins are the levels of their respective cell-surface receptors and ligand-receptor interactions (3,5,6).

  13. Principles of Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zepp, Fred

    2016-01-01

    While many of the currently available vaccines have been developed empirically, with limited understanding on how they activate the immune system and elicit protective immunity, the recent progress in basic sciences like immunology, microbiology, genetics, and molecular biology has fostered our understanding on the interaction of microorganisms with the human immune system. In consequence, modern vaccine development strongly builds on the precise knowledge of the biology of microbial pathogens, their interaction with the human immune system, as well as their capacity to counteract and evade innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Strategies engaged by pathogens strongly determine how a vaccine should be formulated to evoke potent and efficient protective immune responses. The improved knowledge of immune response mechanisms has facilitated the development of new vaccines with the capacity to defend against challenging pathogens and can help to protect individuals particular at risk like immunocompromised and elderly populations. Modern vaccine development technologies include the production of highly purified antigens that provide a lower reactogenicity and higher safety profile than the traditional empirically developed vaccines. Attempts to improve vaccine antigen purity, however, may result in impaired vaccine immunogenicity. Some of such disadvantages related to highly purified and/or genetically engineered vaccines yet can be overcome by innovative technologies, such as live vector vaccines, and DNA or RNA vaccines. Moreover, recent years have witnessed the development of novel adjuvant formulations that specifically focus on the augmentation and/or control of the interplay between innate and adaptive immune systems as well as the function of antigen-presenting cells. Finally, vaccine design has become more tailored, and in turn has opened up the potential of extending its application to hitherto not accessible complex microbial pathogens plus providing new

  14. Comparison of depopulation and S19-RB51 vaccination strategies for control of bovine brucellosis in high prevalence areas.

    PubMed

    Saez, J L; Sanz, C; Durán, M; García, P; Fernandez, F; Minguez, O; Carbajo, L; Mardones, F; Perez, A; Gonzalez, S; Dominguez, L; Alvarez, J

    2014-06-21

    RB51 vaccination can minimise the diagnostic problems associated with S19 vaccination of adult cattle, but its use for bovine brucellosis (BB) control remains controversial. Here, the evolution of BB prevalence in five high prevalence areas in Spain subjected to different control measures is described: herd depopulation of infected herds (I-III) or mass vaccination with RB51 and S19-RB51 vaccination of replacement heifers (IV-V). Annual data from the eradication campaigns were analysed at the special incidence area (SIA) level and the time to obtain herd prevalence levels of <1 per cent ('controlled status') was obtained at the local veterinary unit (LVU) level and compared using Cox's proportional hazard model. A higher annual rate of decrease in herd prevalence was observed in the SIAs subjected to vaccination (46.9%, 95% CI 43.5% to 50.0%) compared with those managed using stamping out (14.9%, 95% CI 9.6% to 19.9%). No significant differences in the time to achieve controlled status were observed between the stamping-out and vaccination strategies used at the LVU level, with median times of 60 (stamping-out LVUs) and 63 (vaccination LVUs) months. These results suggest that RB51 mass vaccination, in combination with the S19-RB51 vaccination of replacement heifers and strict implementation of other eradication measures, may provide results at least comparable with those resulting from a herd depopulation based strategy.

  15. Cancer treatment strategies targeting sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Oskouian, Babak; Saba, Julie D

    2010-01-01

    Ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate are related sphingolipid metabolites that can be generated through a de novo biosynthetic route or derived from the recycling of membrane sphingomyelin. Both these lipids regulate cellular responses to stress, with generally opposing effects. Sphingosine-1-phosphate functions as a growth and survival factor, acting as a ligand for a family of G protein-coupled receptors, whereas ceramide activates intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways through receptor-independent mechanisms. A growing body of evidence has implicated ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and the genes involved in their synthesis, catabolism and signaling in various aspects of oncogenesis, cancer progression and drug- and radiation resistance. This may be explained in part by the finding that both lipids impinge upon the PI3K/ AKT pathway, which represses apoptosis and autophagy. In addition, sphingolipids influence cell cycle progression, telomerase function, cell migration and stem cell biology. Considering the central role of ceramide in mediating physiological as well as pharmacologically stimulated apoptosis, ceramide can be considered a tumor-suppressor lipid. In contrast, sphingosine-1-phosphate can be considered a tumor-promoting lipid, and the enzyme responsible for its synthesis functions as an oncogene. Not surprisingly, genetic mutations that result in reduced ceramide generation, increased sphingosine-1-phosphate synthesis or which reduce steady state ceramide levels and increase sphingosine-1-phosphate levels have been identified as mechanisms of tumor progression and drug resistance in cancer cells. Pharmacological tools for modulating sphingolipid pathways are being developed and represent novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer.

  16. Application of SCR priming VLP boosting as a novel vaccination strategy against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Seyed Mehdi; Zabihollahi, Rezvan; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Memarnejadian, Arash; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Parivar, Kazem

    2011-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection is a worldwide health problem and a protective vaccine is desperately needed to control the AIDS pandemics. To address this concern, we previously constructed single-cycle replicable (SCR) HIV-1 virions, which completely maintained the antigenic structures of HIV-1. Herein, to optimize a vaccination strategy, we studied the immunogenicity of produced SCR virions and adjuvant-formulated HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) in homologous and heterologous prime-boosting regimens. Accordingly, BALB/c mice received three doses of immunogens in 3-week intervals and their immune responses were evaluated using ELISA, cytokine and IFN-γ ELISpot assays. These analyses not only indicated the superiority of SCR prime-VLP boosting for strong induction of specific IFN-γ producing cells, but also showed the capability of this strategy over the others for better stimulation of humoral response, which was evidenced with the detection of highest titer of total IgG against HIV ENV glycoprotein. Furthermore, determination of IgG subclasses and IFN-γ/IL4 secretion ratio in cultured splenocytes demonstrated the efficient augmentation of mixed responses with the dominancy of Th1 immunity following SCR/VLP immunization strategy. Our results additionally pointed towards the applicability of Montanide ISA 720 + CpG as a potent Th1-directing adjuvant mixture. Overall, this study suggests SCR prime-VLP boosting as a promising approach in HIV vaccine development.

  17. Cancer Vaccines - SMi's Fourth Annual Conference (September 16-17, 2015 - London, UK).

    PubMed

    Searle, B

    2015-09-01

    Recent years have seen the academic, medical and pharmaceutical communities gain a new understanding of the central role of the immune system in fighting cancer. With the approval of the first cancer vaccine by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the success of immuno-oncology, new avenues are opening for the successful development of therapeutic cancer vaccines. Opportunity for combination therapies exploiting immune checkpoint inhibitors is being realized and delivery mechanisms and adjuvants are likewise being optimized. The incorporation of monoclonal antibodies alongside genetically engineered viral vectors is also being pursued. This year's conference focused on the development of personalized therapies and their commercial viability, with in-depth discussions of novel T-cell therapies, oncolytic viruses, gene therapies and adoptive T-cell transfer. The meeting brought together key academic and medical experts with leading industry figures to debate future directions and the next generations of tools in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26488036

  18. Strategies and Advancements in Harnessing the Immune System for Gastric Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Subhash, Vinod Vijay; Yeo, Mei Shi; Tan, Woei Loon; Yong, Wei Peng

    2015-01-01

    In cancer biology, cells and molecules that form the fundamental components of the tumor microenvironment play a major role in tumor initiation, and progression as well as responses to therapy. Therapeutic approaches that would enable and harness the immune system to target tumor cells mark the future of anticancer therapy as it could induce an immunological memory specific to the tumor type and further enhance tumor regression and relapse-free survival in cancer patients. Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortalities that has a modest survival benefit from existing treatment options. The advent of immunotherapy presents us with new approaches in gastric cancer treatment where adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, and antibody therapies have all been used with promising outcomes. In this paper, we review the current advances and prospects in the gastric cancer immunotherapy. Special focus is laid on new strategies and clinical trials that attempt to enhance the efficacy of various immunotherapeutic modalities in gastric cancer. PMID:26579545

  19. Increasing Cervical Cancer and Human Papillomavirus Prevention Knowledge and HPV Vaccine Uptake through Mother/Daughter Education.

    PubMed

    Obulaney, Patricia A; Gilliland, Irene; Cassells, Holly

    2016-01-01

    This evidence-based initiative assessed the impact of language-appropriate cervical cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV) prevention education on knowledge level and HPV vaccine uptake among mothers and their daughters. Forty-one mother/daughter dyads from a low-cost, faith-based clinic for the uninsured in southeastern Texas participated in the nurse practitioner-led cervical cancer prevention educational sessions. Spanish was the primary language for the majority of participating mothers. The project produced appreciable knowledge increase and HPV vaccine uptake intent. Aggregate HPV vaccine uptake numbers for the clinic increased considerably compared to HPV vaccine administration prior to educational intervention. PMID:26813054

  20. Influenza vaccination and associated factors among Korean cancer survivors : a cross-sectional analysis of the Fourth & Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Sang Min; Lee, Kiheon; Lee, Ju Hyun; Park, Joo-Sung

    2014-08-01

    Influenza vaccination is important for cancer survivors, a population with impaired immunity. This study was designed to assess influenza vaccination patterns among Korean cancer survivors. In this cross-sectional analysis, data were obtained from standardized questionnaires from 943 cancer survivors and 41,233 non-cancer survivors who participated in the Fourth and Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2007-2011). We identified the adjusted influenza vaccination rates and assessed factors associated with influenza vaccination using multivariate logistic regression. Cancer survivors tended to have a higher adjusted influenza vaccination rate than the general population. The rates for influenza vaccination in specific cancer types such as stomach, hepatic, colon, and lung cancers were significantly higher than non-cancer survivors. Among all cancer survivors, those with chronic diseases, elderly subjects, and rural dwellers were more likely to receive influenza vaccination; those with cervical cancer were less likely to receive influenza vaccination. Cancer survivors were more likely to receive influenza vaccinations than non-cancer survivors, but this was not true for particular groups, especially younger cancer survivors. Cancer survivors represent a sharply growing population; therefore, immunization against influenza among cancer survivors should be concerned as their significant preventative healthcare services.

  1. What Lies Within: Novel Strategies in Immunotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forde, Patrick M.; Reiss, Kim A.; Zeidan, Amer M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Immunotherapy has become an increasingly important therapeutic strategy for those with cancer, with phase III studies demonstrating survival advantages in melanoma and castration-resistant prostate cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a promising target for the next generation of immune-based strategies. In this article, we examine the current state of the art in lung cancer immunotherapy, including vaccines that specifically target lung tumor antigens and immune checkpoint antibodies such as antiprogrammed death 1 (anti-PD-1). Both approaches harness innate immunity against tumors by suppressing tumor-induced immune paresis. Methods. To identify relevant clinical trials of immunotherapy in NSCLC, PubMed and Medline databases were searched using the terms “immunotherapy” and “NSCLC,” and several other therapy-specific search terms (e.g., PD-1, NSCLC). Additionally, abstracts presented at international lung cancer symposia, the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, and the European Society of Medical Oncology annual meeting between 2005 and 2013 were evaluated. Results. Large international phase III trials of NSCLC vaccines have completed accrual in both the adjuvant and metastatic disease settings. Results of the START study were disappointing, but results from other studies are still awaited. Immune checkpoint modulation has shown promise, with separate phase I studies of the anti-PD-1 antibody, nivolumab, and anti-PD-L1 antibody, MPDL3280A, demonstrating good tolerance and durable responses for certain patients with NSCLC who were heavily pretreated. Conclusions. Immune-based strategies have shown initial promise for early- and advanced-stage NSCLC. Validating these findings in randomized studies and discovering durable biomarkers of response represent the next challenges for investigation. PMID:24105749

  2. Carbohydrate-based vaccines with a glycolipid adjuvant for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Lin; Hung, Jung-Tung; Cheung, Sarah K C; Lee, Hsin-Yu; Chu, Kuo-Ching; Li, Shiou-Ting; Lin, Yu-Chen; Ren, Chien-Tai; Cheng, Ting-Jen R; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Yu, Alice L; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2013-02-12

    Globo H (GH) is a hexasaccharide specifically overexpressed on a variety of cancer cells and therefore, a good candidate for cancer vaccine development. To identify the optimal carrier and adjuvant combination, we chemically synthesized and linked GH to a carrier protein, including keyhole limpet hemocyanion, diphtheria toxoid cross-reactive material (CRM) 197 (DT), tetanus toxoid, and BSA, and combined with an adjuvant, and it was administered to mice for the study of immune response. Glycan microarray analysis of the antiserum obtained indicated that the combination of GH-DT adjuvanted with the α-galactosylceramide C34 has the highest enhancement of anti-GH IgG. Compared with the phase III clinical trial vaccine, GH-keyhole limpet hemocyanion/QS21, the GH-DT/C34 vaccine elicited more IgG antibodies, which are more selective for GH and the GH-related epitopes, stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA3) and SSEA4, all of which were specifically overexpressed on breast cancer cells and breast cancer stem cells with SSEA4 at the highest level (>90%). We, therefore, further developed SSEA4-DT/C34 as a vaccine candidate, and after immunization, it was found that the elicited antibodies are also IgG-dominant and very specific for SSEA4.

  3. Prevention of cancer by prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kihyuck; Yemelyanova, Anna; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY OF RECENT ADVANCES Oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) are exclusively mucosal pathogens that are non-cytopathic and the basal epithelial cells harboring and maintaining an infection do not produce either capsid antigen or virus. The efficacy of the licensed L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines has encouraged development of several second generation vaccines aimed at expanding the coverage to all oncogenic HPV types and reducing barriers to global implementation. Currently there is no defined immune correlate of protection that can be used to determine if an individual patient is protected and for the evaluation of these second generation vaccines. Surprisingly, passive transfer of neutralizing serum antibody is protective in animal models. Recent studies suggest how neutralizing antibody mediates immunity against mucosal HPV and the possible impact of memory B cells. PMID:21185706

  4. Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD): emerging epidemiology and the need for a vaccine strategy.

    PubMed

    Aswathyraj, S; Arunkumar, G; Alidjinou, E K; Hober, D

    2016-10-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a contagious viral disease and mainly affects infants and young children. The main manifestations are fever, vesicular rashes on hand, feet and buttocks and ulcers in the oral mucosa. Usually, HFMD is self-limiting, but a small proportion of children may experience severe complications such as meningitis, encephalitis, acute flaccid paralysis and neurorespiratory syndrome. Historically, outbreaks of HFMD were mainly caused by two enteroviruses: the coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) and the enterovirus 71 (EV-A71). In the recent years, coxsackievirus A6 and coxsackievirus A10 have been widely associated with both sporadic cases and outbreaks of HFMD worldwide, particularly in India, South East Asia and Europe with an increased frequency of neurological complications as well as mortality. Currently, there is no pharmacological intervention or vaccine available for HFMD. A formalin-inactivated EV-A71 vaccine has completed clinical trial in several Asian countries. However, this vaccine cannot protect against other major emerging etiologies of HFMD such as CV-A16, CV-A6 and CV-A10. Therefore, the development of a globally representative multivalent HFMD vaccine could be the best strategy. PMID:27406374

  5. Evaluation of microparticulate ovarian cancer vaccine via transdermal route of delivery.

    PubMed

    Tawde, Suprita A; Chablani, Lipika; Akalkotkar, Archana; D'Souza, Martin J

    2016-08-10

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most commonly occurring malignancy in women, with the highest mortality rate among all the gynecological tumors. Microparticulate vaccine can serve as an immunotherapeutic approach with a promising antigenic delivery system without a need for conventional adjuvants. In this study, a microparticulate vaccine using whole cell lysate of a murine ovarian cancer cell line, ID8 was prepared by spray drying. Further, the effect of interleukins (ILs) such as IL-2 and IL-12 was evaluated in a separate study group by administering them with vaccine particles to enhance the immune response. The vaccine microparticles were administered to C57BL/6 female mice via transdermal alone and in combination with the oral route. The transdermal vaccine was delivered using a metallic microneedle device, AdminPen™. Orally administered microparticles also included an M-cell targeting ligand, Aleuria aurantia lectin, to enhance the targeted uptake from microfold cells (M-cells) in Peyer's patches of small intestine. In case of combination of routes, mice were given 5 transdermal doses and 5 oral doses administered alternatively, beginning with transdermal dose. At the end of vaccination, mice were challenged with live tumor cells. Vaccine alone resulted in around 1.5 times tumor suppression in case of transdermal and combination of routes at the end of 15th week when compared to controls. Inclusion of interleukins resulted in 3 times tumor suppression when administered with transdermal vaccine and around 9 times tumor suppression for the combination route of delivery in comparison to controls. These results were further potentiated by serum IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a titers. Moreover, CD8+ T-cell, CD4+ T-cell and NK (natural killer) cell populations in splenocytes were elevated in case of vaccinated mice. Thus, vaccine microparticles could trigger humoral as well as cellular immune response when administered transdermally and via combination of route of delivery

  6. Enhancement of immunogenicity of a therapeutic cervical cancer DNA-based vaccine by co-application of sequence-optimized genetic adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Ohlschläger, Peter; Quetting, Michael; Alvarez, Gerardo; Dürst, Matthias; Gissmann, Lutz; Kaufmann, Andreas M

    2009-07-01

    Treatment of patients with cervical cancer by conventional methods (mainly surgery, but also radiotherapy and chemotherapy) results in a significant loss in quality of life. A therapeutic DNA vaccine directed to tumor-specific antigens of the human papilloma virus (HPV) could be an attractive treatment option. We have developed a nontransforming HPV-16 E7-based DNA vaccine containing all putative T cell epitopes (HPV-16 E7SH). DNA vaccines, however, are less immunogenic than protein- or peptide-based vaccines in larger animals and humans. In this study, we have investigated an adjuvant gene support of the HPV-16 E7SH therapeutic cervical cancer vaccine. DNA encoded cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, GM-CSF, IFN-gamma) and the chemokine MIP1-alpha were co-applied either simultaneously or at different time points pre- or post-E7SH vaccination. In addition, sequence-optimized adjuvant genes were compared to wild type genes. Three combinations investigated lead to an enhanced IFN-gamma response of the induced T cells in mice. Interestingly, IFN-gamma secretion of splenocytes did not strictly correlate with tumor response in tumor regression experiments. Gene-encoded MIP-1alpha applied 5 days prior to E7SH-immunization combined with IFN-gamma or IL-12 (3 days) or IL-2 (5 days) postimmunization lead to a significantly enhanced tumor response that was clearly associated with granzyme B secretion and target cells lysis. Our results suggest that a conditioning application and combination with adjuvant genes may be a promising strategy to enhance synergistically immune responses by DNA immunization for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:19358269

  7. Evolving T-cell vaccine strategies for HIV, the virus with a thousand faces

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette

    2009-01-01

    HIV's rapid global spread and the human suffering it has left in its wake have made AIDS a global heath priority for the 25 years since its discovery. Yet its capacity to rapidly evolve has made combating this virus a tremendous challenge. The obstacles to creating an effective HIV vaccine are formidable, but there are advances in the field on many fronts, in terms of novel vectors, adjuvants, and antigen design strategies. SIV live attenuated vaccine models are able to confer protection against heterologous challenge, and this continues to provide opportunities to explore the biological underpinnings of a protective effect (9). More indirect, but equally important, is new understanding regarding the biology of acute infection (43), the role of immune response in long-term non-progression (6,62, 81), and defining characteristics of broadly neutralizing antibodies (4). In this review we will focus on summarizing strategies directed towards a single issue, that of contending with HIV variation in terms of designing aT-cell vaccine. The strategies that prove most effective in this area can ultimately be combined with the best strategies under development in other areas, with the hope of ultimately converging on a viable vaccine candidate. Only two large HIV vaccine efficacy trials have been completed and both have failed to prevent infection or confer a benefit to infected individual (23,34), but there is ample reason to continue our efforts. A historic breakthrough came in 1996, when it was realized that although the virus could escape from a single antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, it could be thwarted by a combination of medications that simultaneously targeted different parts of the virus (HAART) (38). This revelation came after 15 years of research, thought, and clinical testing; to enable that vital progress the research and clinical communities had to first define and understand, then develop a strategy to counter, the remarkable evolutionary potential of the virus

  8. Modeling the impact of vaccination control strategies on a foot and mouth disease outbreak in the Central United States.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, Sara W; Sanderson, Michael W; Reeves, Aaron; Hill, Ashley E

    2014-12-01

    The central United States (U.S.) has a large livestock population including cattle, swine, sheep and goats. Simulation models were developed to assess the impact of livestock herd types and vaccination on foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks using the North American Animal Disease Spread Model. In this study, potential FMD virus outbreaks in the central region of the U.S. were simulated to compare different vaccination strategies to a depopulation only scenario. Based on data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Service, a simulated population of 151,620 livestock operations characterized by latitude and longitude, production type, and herd size was generated. For the simulations, a single 17,000 head feedlot was selected as the initial latently infected herd in an otherwise susceptible population. Direct and indirect contact rates between herds were based on survey data of livestock producers in Kansas and Colorado. Control methods included ring vaccination around infected herds. Feedlots ≥3000 head were either the only production type that was vaccinated or were assigned the highest vaccination priority. Simulated vaccination scenarios included low and high vaccine capacity, vaccination zones of 10 km or 50 km around detected infected premises, and vaccination trigger of 10 or 100 detected infected herds. Probability of transmission following indirect contact, movement controls and contact rate parameters were considered uncertain and so were the subjects of sensitivity analysis. All vaccination scenarios decreased number of herds depopulated but not all decreased outbreak duration. Increased size of the vaccination zone during an outbreak decreased the length of the outbreak and number of herds destroyed. Increased size of the vaccination zone primarily resulted in vaccinating feedlots ≥3000 head across a larger area. Increasing the vaccination capacity had a smaller impact on the outbreak and may not be feasible if

  9. Prevalence of human papillomavirus types in invasive cervical cancers from seven US cancer registries prior to vaccine introduction

    PubMed Central

    Hopenhayn, Claudia; Christian, Amy; Christian, W. Jay; Watson, Meg; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Lynch, Charles F.; Peters, Edward S.; Wilkinson, Edward J.; Huang, Youjie; Copeland, Glenn; Cozen, Wendy; Saber, Maria Sibug; Goodman, Marc T.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Steinau, Martin; Lyu, Christopher; Tucker, Thomas T.; Saraiya, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Objective We conducted a baseline study of human papillomavirus (HPV) type prevalence in invasive cervical cancers (ICC) using data from seven cancer registries (CR) in the US. Cases were diagnosed between 1994 and 2005, before the implementation of the HPV vaccines. Materials and Methods CRs from Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Hawaii, Iowa and Los Angeles, California identified eligible ICC cases, and obtained sections from representative blocks of archived tumor specimens for DNA extraction. All extracts were assayed by Linear Array and if inadequate or HPV negative, re-tested with INNO-LiPA Genotype test. Clinical and demographic factors were obtained from the CRs and merged with the HPV typing data to analyze factors associated with different types and with HPV negativity. Results A total of 777 ICCs were included in this analysis, with broad geographic, age and race distribution. Overall, HPV was detected in 91% of cases, including 51% HPV16, 16% HPV18 (HPV16 negative), and 24% other oncogenic and rare types. After HPV16 and 18, the most common types were 45, 33, 31, 35 and 52. Older age and non-squamous histology were associated with HPV negative typing. Conclusions This study provides baseline pre-vaccine HPV types for post-vaccine ICC surveillance in the future. HPV16 and/or 18 were found in 67% of ICCs, indicating the potential for vaccines to prevent a significant number of cervical cancers. PMID:24477171

  10. A fresh perspective from immunologists and vaccine researchers: Active vaccination strategies to prevent and reverse Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Agadjanyan, M.G.; Petrovsky, N.; Ghochikyan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional vaccination against infectious diseases relies on generation of cellular and humoral immune responses that act to protect the host from overt disease even although they do not induce sterilizing immunity. More recently, attempts have been made with mixed success to generate therapeutic vaccines against a wide range of non-infectious diseases including neurodegenerative disorders. Following the exciting first report of successful vaccine prevention of progression of an AD animal model in 1999, various epitope-based vaccines targeting beta-amyloid (Aβ) have proceeded to human clinical trials, with varied results. More recently, AD vaccines based on tau protein have advanced into clinical testing too. This review seeks to put perspective to the mixed results obtained so far in clinical trials of AD vaccines, and discuss the many pitfalls and misconceptions encountered on the path to a successful AD vaccine, including better standardization of immunological efficacy measures of antibodies, immunogenicity of platform/carrier and adjuvants. PMID:26192465

  11. Mreg Activity in Tumor Response to Photodynamic Therapy and Photodynamic Therapy-Generated Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judith; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid regulatory cells (Mregs) are, together with regulatory T cells (Tregs), a dominant effector population responsible for restriction of the duration and strength of antitumor immune response. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and cancer vaccines generated by PDT are modalities whose effectiveness in tumor destruction is closely dependent on the associated antitumor immune response. The present study investigated whether the immunodepletion of granulocytic Mregs in host mice by anti-GR1 antibody would improve the response of tumors to PDT or PDT vaccines in these animals. Anti-GR1 administration immediately after Temoporfin-PDT of mouse SCCVII tumors abrogated curative effect of PDT. The opposite effect, increasing PDT-mediated tumor cure-rates was attained by delaying anti-GR1 treatment to 1 h post PDT. With PDT vaccines, multiple anti-GR1 administrations (days 0, 4, and 8 post vaccination) improved the therapy response with SCCVII tumors. The results with PDT suggest that neutrophils (boosting antitumor effect of this therapy) that are engaged immediately after photodynamic light treatment are within one hour replaced with a different myeloid population, presumably Mregs that hampers the therapy-mediated antitumor effect. Anti-GR1 antibody, when used with optimal timing, can improve the efficacy of both PDT of tumors in situ and PDT-generated cancer vaccines. PMID:27754452

  12. An Association of Cancer Physicians’ strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  13. An Association of Cancer Physicians' strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  14. Effect of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Status on Serological Response to Influenza Vaccine in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Manpreet K.; Fakih, Marwan; Muindi, Josephia; Tian, Lili; Mashtare, Terry; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epidemiologic data suggest that there is an association between vitamin D deficiency and influenza infection. We conducted a prospective influenza vaccination study to determine the influence of vitamin D status on serological response to influenza vaccine in prostate cancer (CaP) patients. METHODS During the 2006–2007 influenza season, CaP patients treated at Roswell Park Cancer Institute were offered vaccination with the trivalent influenza vaccine (Fluzone®, 2006–2007) and sera collected for hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay titers before and 3 months after vaccination. Response to vaccination was defined as ≥1:40 titer ratio or a fourfold increase in titer at 3 months, against any of the three strains. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-D3) levels were measured using DiaSorin 125I radioimmunoassay kits. RESULTS Thirty-five patients with CaP participated in the study. Median baseline 25-D3 level was 44.88 ng/ml (range: 9.16–71.98 ng/ml) Serological response against any of the three strains was noted in 80%. There was a significant effect of baseline 25-D3 level when tested as a continuous variable in relation to serological response (P = 0.0446). All patients in the upper quartile of 25-D3 level responded by mounting a serological response (P = 0.0344). None of the other baseline variables (age, race, chemotherapy status, or white cell count) had an effect on serological response. CONCLUSIONS In this study in CaP patients, a replete vitamin D status was associated with more frequent serological response to influenza vaccine. PMID:20812224

  15. Using MRI to evaluate and predict therapeutic success from depot-based cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    DeBay, Drew R; Brewer, Kimberly D; LeBlanc, Sarah A; Weir, Genevieve M; Stanford, Marianne M; Mansour, Marc; Bowen, Chris V

    2015-01-01

    In the preclinical development of immunotherapy candidates, understanding the mechanism of action and determining biomarkers that accurately characterize the induced host immune responses is critical to improving their clinical interpretation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate in vivo changes in lymph node size in response to a peptide-based cancer vaccine therapy, formulated using DepoVax (DPX). DPX is a novel adjuvant lipid-in-oil–based formulation that facilitates enhanced immune responses by retaining antigens at the injection site for extended latencies, promoting increased potentiation of immune cells. C57BL/6 mice were implanted with C3 (HPV) tumor cells and received either DPX or control treatments, 5 days post-implantation. Complete tumor eradication occurred in DPX-vaccinated animals and large volumetric increases were observed in the vaccine-draining right inguinal lymph node (VRILN) in DPX mice, likely corresponding to increased localized immune response to the vaccine. Upon evaluating the relative measure of vaccine-potentiated immune activation to tumor-induced immune response (VRILN/VLILN), receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves revealed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.90 (±0.07), indicating high specificity and sensitivity as a predictive biomarker of vaccine efficacy. We have determined that for this tumor model, early MRI lymph node volumetric changes are predictive of depot immunotherapeutic success. PMID:26730395

  16. Photodynamic-therapy Activates Immune Response by disrupting Immunity Homeostasis of Tumor Cells, which Generates Vaccine for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanhong; Yin, Guifang; Le, Vanminh; Zhang, Anle; Chen, Siyu; Liang, Xin; Liu, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a regulatory approved cancer treatment, is reported to be capable of causing immunogenic apoptosis. The current data reveal PDT can cause the dysregulation of “eat me” and “don't eat me” signal by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) -mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This dysregulation probably contribute to the increased uptake of PDT-killed Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells by homologous dendritic cells (DCs), accompanied by phenotypic maturation (CD80high, CD86high, and CD40high) and functional stimulation (NOhigh, IL-10absent) of dendritic cells as well as subsequent T-cell responses. Morevover, C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with PDT-treated LLCs (PDT-DCs) or PDT-treated LLCs alone (PDT-LLCs) exhibited potent immunity against LLC tumors. In the current study, the PDT-induced immune response was characterized as a process related with the dysregulation of “eat me” signal and “don't eat me” signal, revealing the possibility for developing PDT into an antitumor vaccination strategy for personalized cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26722223

  17. Acquired immune response to oncogenic human papillomavirus associated with prophylactic cervical cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H

    2008-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common infection among women and a necessary cause of cervical cancer. Oncogenic HPV types infecting the anogenital tract have the potential to induce natural immunity, but at present we do not clearly understand the natural history of infection in humans and the mechanisms by which the virus can evade the host immune response. Natural acquired immune responses against HPV may be involved in the clearance of infection, but persistent infection with oncogenic virus types leads to the development of precancerous lesions and cancer. B cell responses are important for viral neutralization, but antibody responses in patients with cervical cancer are poor. Prophylactic vaccines targeting oncogenic virus types associated with cervical cancer have the potential to prevent up to 80% of cervical cancers by targeting HPV types 16 and 18. Clinical data show that prophylactic vaccines are effective in inducing antibody responses and in preventing persistent infection with HPV, as well as the subsequent development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. This article reviews the known data regarding natural immune responses to HPV and those developed by prophylactic vaccination.

  18. Anti-cancer vaccination by transdermal delivery of antigen peptide-loaded nanogels via iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Mao; Hama, Susumu; Ikeda, Yutaka; Nagasaki, Yukio; Kogure, Kentaro

    2015-04-10

    Transdermal vaccination with cancer antigens is expected to become a useful anti-cancer therapy. However, it is difficult to accumulate enough antigen in the epidermis for effective exposure to Langerhans cells because of diffusion into the skin and muscle. Carriers, such as liposomes and nanoparticles, may be useful for the prevention of antigen diffusion. Iontophoresis, via application of a small electric current, is a noninvasive and efficient technology for transdermal drug delivery. Previously, we succeeded in the iontophoretic transdermal delivery of liposomes encapsulating insulin, and accumulation of polymer-based nanoparticle nanogels in the stratum corneum of the skin. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the use of iontophoresis with cancer antigen gp-100 peptide KVPRNQDWL-loaded nanogels for anti-cancer vaccination. Iontophoresis resulted in the accumulation of gp-100 peptide and nanogels in the epidermis, and subsequent increase in the number of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Moreover, tumor growth was significantly suppressed by iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels. Thus, iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels may serve as an effective transdermal delivery system for anti-cancer vaccination.

  19. A Human Vaccine Strategy Based On Chimpanzee Adenoviral and MVA Vectors That Primes, Boosts and Sustains Functional HCV Specific T-Cell Memory*

    PubMed Central

    Swadling, Leo; Capone, Stefania; Antrobus, Richard D.; Brown, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Newell, Evan W.; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Bowen, Dan; Fergusson, Joannah; Kurioka, Ayako; Ammendola, Virginia; Sorbo, Mariarosaria Del; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Siani, Loredana; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian; Colloca, Stefano; Davis, Mark; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    A protective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains an unmet clinical need. HCV infects millions of people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. Animal challenge experiments, immunogenetics studies and assessment of host immunity during acute infection highlight the critical role that effective T-cell immunity plays in viral control. In this first-in-man study we have induced antiviral immunity with functional characteristics analogous to those associated with viral control in natural infection, and improved upon a vaccine based on adenoviral vectors alone. We assessed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy based on a replicative defective simian adenoviral vector (ChAd3) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vector encoding the NS3, NS4, NS5A and NS5B proteins of HCV genotype-1b. Analysis employed single cell mass cytometry (CyTOF), and HLA class-I peptide tetramer technology in healthy human volunteers. We show that HCV specific T-cells induced by ChAd3 are optimally boosted with MVA, and generate very high levels of both CD8+ and CD4+ HCV specific T-cells targeting multiple HCV antigens. Sustained memory and effector T-cell populations are generated and T-cell memory evolved over time with improvement of quality (proliferation and polyfunctionality) following heterologous MVA boost. We have developed a HCV vaccine strategy, with durable, broad, sustained and balanced T-cell responses, characteristic of those associated with viral control, paving the way for the first efficacy studies of a prophylactic HCV vaccine. PMID:25378645

  20. Epigenetic potentiation of NY-ESO-1 vaccine therapy in human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Odunsi, Kunle; Matsuzaki, Junko; James, Smitha R; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Tsuji, Takemasa; Miller, Austin; Zhang, Wa; Akers, Stacey N; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Miliotto, Anthony; Beck, Amy; Batt, Carl A; Ritter, Gerd; Lele, Shashikant; Gnjatic, Sacha; Karpf, Adam R

    2014-01-01

    The cancer-testis/cancer-germline antigen NY-ESO-1 is a vaccine target in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but its limited expression is a barrier to vaccine efficacy. As NY-ESO-1 is regulated by DNA methylation, we hypothesized that DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors may augment NY-ESO-1 vaccine therapy. In agreement, global DNA hypomethylation in EOC was associated with the presence of circulating antibodies to NY-ESO-1. Pre-clinical studies using EOC cell lines showed that decitabine treatment enhanced both NY-ESO-1 expression and NY-ESO-1-specific CTL-mediated responses. Based on these observations, we performed a phase I dose-escalation trial of decitabine, as an addition to NY-ESO-1 vaccine and doxorubicin liposome (doxorubicin) chemotherapy, in 12 patients with relapsed EOC. The regimen was safe, with limited and clinically manageable toxicities. Both global and promoter-specific DNA hypomethylation occurred in blood and circulating DNAs, the latter of which may reflect tumor cell responses. Increased NY-ESO-1 serum antibodies and T cell responses were observed in the majority of patients, and antibody spreading to additional tumor antigens was also observed. Finally, disease stabilization or partial clinical response occurred in 6/10 evaluable patients. Based on these encouraging results, evaluation of similar combinatorial chemo-immunotherapy regimens in EOC and other tumor types is warranted.

  1. Curcumin improves the therapeutic efficacy of Listeriaat-Mage-b vaccine in correlation with improved T-cell responses in blood of a triple-negative breast cancer model 4T1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manisha; Ramos, Ilyssa; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Quispe-Tintaya, Wilber; Chandra, Dinesh; Jahangir, Arthee; Zang, Xingxing; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Success of cancer vaccination is strongly hampered by immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Interleukin (IL)-6 is particularly and highly produced by triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells, and has been considered as an important contributor to immune suppression in the TME. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-6 reduction may improve efficacy of vaccination against TNBC cancer through improved T-cell responses. To prove this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of curcumin, an inhibitor of IL-6 production, on vaccination of a highly attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Listeriaat), encoding tumor-associated antigens (TAA) Mage-b in a TNBC model 4T1. Two therapeutic vaccination strategies with Listeriaat-Mage-b and curcumin were tested. The first immunization strategy involved all Listeriaat-Mage-b vaccinations and curcumin after tumor development. As curcumin has been consumed all over the world, the second immunization strategy involved curcumin before and all therapeutic vaccinations with Listeriaat-Mage-b after tumor development. Here, we demonstrate that curcumin significantly improves therapeutic efficacy of Listeriaat-Mage-b with both immunization strategies particularly against metastases in a TNBC model (4T1). The combination therapy was slightly but significantly more effective against the metastases when curcumin was administered before compared to after tumor development. With curcumin before tumor development in the combination therapy, the production of IL-6 was significantly decreased and IL-12 increased by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), in correlation with improved CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in blood. Our study suggests that curcumin improves the efficacy of Listeriaat-Mage-b vaccine against metastases in TNBC model 4T1 through reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression. This study is focused on improving cancer vaccination by reducing immune suppression. Here we demonstrate that curcumin improves vaccine

  2. Extracellular Vesicles: Role in Inflammatory Responses and Potential Uses in Vaccination in Cancer and Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Campos, João Henrique; Soares, Rodrigo Pedro; Ribeiro, Kleber; Cronemberger Andrade, André; Batista, Wagner Luiz; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Almost all cells and organisms release membrane structures containing proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids called extracellular vesicles (EVs), which have a wide range of functions concerning intercellular communication and signaling events. Recently, the characterization and understanding of their biological role have become a main research area due to their potential role in vaccination, as biomarkers antigens, early diagnostic tools, and therapeutic applications. Here, we will overview the recent advances and studies of Evs shed by tumor cells, bacteria, parasites, and fungi, focusing on their inflammatory role and their potential use in vaccination and diagnostic of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:26380326

  3. Extracellular Vesicles: Role in Inflammatory Responses and Potential Uses in Vaccination in Cancer and Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Campos, João Henrique; Soares, Rodrigo Pedro; Ribeiro, Kleber; Andrade, André Cronemberger; Batista, Wagner Luiz; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Almost all cells and organisms release membrane structures containing proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids called extracellular vesicles (EVs), which have a wide range of functions concerning intercellular communication and signaling events. Recently, the characterization and understanding of their biological role have become a main research area due to their potential role in vaccination, as biomarkers antigens, early diagnostic tools, and therapeutic applications. Here, we will overview the recent advances and studies of Evs shed by tumor cells, bacteria, parasites, and fungi, focusing on their inflammatory role and their potential use in vaccination and diagnostic of cancer and infectious diseases.

  4. Technologies for enhanced efficacy of DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Fadi; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2012-01-01

    Despite many years of research, human DNA vaccines have yet to fulfill their early promise. Over the past 15 years, multiple generations of DNA vaccines have been developed and tested in preclinical models for prophylactic and therapeutic applications in the areas of infectious disease and cancer, but have failed in the clinic. Thus, while DNA vaccines have achieved successful licensure for veterinary applications, their poor immunogenicity in humans when compared with traditional protein-based vaccines has hindered their progress. Many strategies have been attempted to improve DNA vaccine potency including use of more efficient promoters and codon optimization, addition of traditional or genetic adjuvants, electroporation, intradermal delivery and various prime–boost strategies. This review summarizes these advances in DNA vaccine technologies and attempts to answer the question of when DNA vaccines might eventually be licensed for human use. PMID:22309668

  5. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact. PMID:26541249

  6. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact.

  7. Changes in knowledge of cervical cancer following introduction of human papillomavirus vaccine among women at high risk for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart Massad, L.; Evans, Charlesnika T.; Weber, Kathleen M.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Hessol, Nancy A.; Wright, Rodney L.; Colie, Christine; Strickler, Howard D.; Wilson, Tracey E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe changes in knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccination among women at high risk for cervical cancer in the first five years after introduction of HPV vaccination. Methods In 2007, 2008–9, and 2011, women in a multicenter U.S. cohort study completed 44-item self-report questionnaires assessing knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, HPV, and HPV vaccination. Results across time were assessed for individuals, and three study enrollment cohorts were compared. Knowledge scores were correlated with demographic variables, measures of education and attention, and medical factors. Associations were assessed in multivariable models. Results In all, 974 women completed three serial questionnaires; most were minority, low income, and current or former smokers. The group included 652 (67%) HIV infected and 322 (33%) uninfected. Summary knowledge scores (possible range 0–24) increased from 2007 (12.8, S.D. 5.8) to 2008–9 (13.9, S.D. 5.3, P < 0.001) and to 2011 (14.3, S.D. 5.2, P < 0.0001 vs 2007 and < 0.04 vs 2008–9). Higher knowledge scores at first and follow-up administration of questionnaires, higher income, and higher education level were associated with improved knowledge score at third administration. Women not previously surveyed had scores similar to those of the longitudinal group at baseline. Conclusion Substantial gaps in understanding of HPV and cervical cancer prevention exist despite years of health education. While more effective educational interventions may help, optimal cancer prevention may require opt-out vaccination programs that do not require nuanced understanding. PMID:25870859

  8. Curcumin improves the therapeutic efficacy of Listeria(at)-Mage-b vaccine in correlation with improved T-cell responses in blood of a triple-negative breast cancer model 4T1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manisha; Ramos, Ilyssa; Asafu-Adjei, Denise; Quispe-Tintaya, Wilber; Chandra, Dinesh; Jahangir, Arthee; Zang, Xingxing; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2013-08-01

    Success of cancer vaccination is strongly hampered by immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Interleukin (IL)-6 is particularly and highly produced by triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells, and has been considered as an important contributor to immune suppression in the TME. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-6 reduction may improve efficacy of vaccination against TNBC cancer through improved T-cell responses. To prove this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of curcumin, an inhibitor of IL-6 production, on vaccination of a highly attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Listeria(at)), encoding tumor-associated antigens (TAA) Mage-b in a TNBC model 4T1. Two therapeutic vaccination strategies with Listeria(at)-Mage-b and curcumin were tested. The first immunization strategy involved all Listeria(at)-Mage-b vaccinations and curcumin after tumor development. As curcumin has been consumed all over the world, the second immunization strategy involved curcumin before and all therapeutic vaccinations with Listeria(at)-Mage-b after tumor development. Here, we demonstrate that curcumin significantly improves therapeutic efficacy of Listeria(at)-Mage-b with both immunization strategies particularly against metastases in a TNBC model (4T1). The combination therapy was slightly but significantly more effective against the metastases when curcumin was administered before compared to after tumor development. With curcumin before tumor development in the combination therapy, the production of IL-6 was significantly decreased and IL-12 increased by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), in correlation with improved CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in blood. Our study suggests that curcumin improves the efficacy of Listeria(at)-Mage-b vaccine against metastases in TNBC model 4T1 through reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression. PMID:24156030

  9. Case-control study of cancer among US Army veterans exposed to simian virus 40-contaminated adenovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rollison, Dana E M; Page, William F; Crawford, Harriet; Gridley, Gloria; Wacholder, Sholom; Martin, Jennifer; Miller, Richard; Engels, Eric A

    2004-08-15

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) was an accidental contaminant of vaccines produced in monkey kidney tissue cultures in the 1950s and early 1960s, including a parenteral adenovirus vaccine given to several hundred thousand US military recruits. Detection of SV40 DNA in tumor tissues by some laboratories suggests that SV40 contributes to human cancers. To determine if entry into US Army service during periods of administration of SV40-contaminated adenovirus vaccine was associated with an increased risk of cancer, the authors conducted a case-control study of cancer occurring in male Army veterans who entered service in 1959-1961. Cases of brain tumors (n = 181), mesothelioma (n = 10), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 220) were identified through a Veterans Administration hospital discharge database, as were colon cancer and lung cancer controls (n = 221). Exposure to adenovirus vaccine was assigned on the basis of known periods of adenovirus vaccine administration and dates of Army entry obtained for cancer cases and controls. The odds ratios associated with exposure to SV40-contaminated adenovirus vaccine were 0.81 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.52, 1.24) for brain tumors, 1.41 (95% CI: 0.39, 5.15) for mesothelioma, and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.65, 1.44) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. These findings do not support a role for SV40 in the development of these cancers.

  10. Agility in adversity: Vaccines on Demand.

    PubMed

    De Groot, Anne S; Moise, Leonard; Olive, David; Einck, Leo; Martin, William

    2016-09-01

    Is the US ready for a biological attack using Ebola virus or Anthrax? Will vaccine developers be able to produce a Zika virus vaccine, before the epidemic spreads around the world? A recent report by The Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense argues that the US is not ready for these challenges, however, technologies and capabilities that could address these deficiencies are within reach. Vaccine technologies have advanced and readiness has improved in recent years, due to advances in sequencing technology and computational power making the 'vaccines on demand' concept a reality. Building a robust strategy to design effective biodefense vaccines from genome sequences harvested by real-time biosurveillance will benefit from technologies that are being brought to bear on the cancer cure 'moonshot'. When combined with flexible vaccine production platforms, vaccines on demand will relegate expensive and, in some cases, insufficiently effective vaccine stockpiles to the dust heap of history. PMID:27389971

  11. Agility in adversity: Vaccines on Demand.

    PubMed

    De Groot, Anne S; Moise, Leonard; Olive, David; Einck, Leo; Martin, William

    2016-09-01

    Is the US ready for a biological attack using Ebola virus or Anthrax? Will vaccine developers be able to produce a Zika virus vaccine, before the epidemic spreads around the world? A recent report by The Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense argues that the US is not ready for these challenges, however, technologies and capabilities that could address these deficiencies are within reach. Vaccine technologies have advanced and readiness has improved in recent years, due to advances in sequencing technology and computational power making the 'vaccines on demand' concept a reality. Building a robust strategy to design effective biodefense vaccines from genome sequences harvested by real-time biosurveillance will benefit from technologies that are being brought to bear on the cancer cure 'moonshot'. When combined with flexible vaccine production platforms, vaccines on demand will relegate expensive and, in some cases, insufficiently effective vaccine stockpiles to the dust heap of history.

  12. Human papillomavirus-related Diseases: Oropharynx Cancers and Potential Implications for Adolescent HPV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Gillison, Maura L.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular and epidemiological data now support an etiologic role for oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral cancers in women and men. Recent studies have demonstrated an increase in the incidence of HPV-associated oral cancers in the United States (US). Moreover, the incidence rates for these cancers are higher in men than women. Oral HPV infections acquired through oral sex appear to be the principal risk factor for HPV-associated oral cancers. Despite reports in the popular press that the prevalence of oral sexual behaviors is increasing in the adolescent population, trends in these behaviors over time are largely unavailable. However, data indicate that oral-genital contact is frequently practiced among adolescents; adolescents do not typically consider this a risky behavior. The majority of oral cancers (approximately 90%) caused by HPV are identified as HPV 16 positive. Therefore, HPV-associated oral cancers could be prevented by a prophylactic vaccine if the vaccine were demonstrated to be capable of preventing oral HPV 16 infection. These findings have created new potential opportunities for the primary prevention of oral cancers. PMID:18809146

  13. Evaluating Cancer Prevention Technology with Instructional Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohwer, John; Wandberg, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Investigated whether incorporating youth cancer risk-assessment software with a cancer prevention curriculum would increase student knowledge and enhance behavior related to cancer prevention. Pre- and postintervention surveys of 10th graders indicated that adding the software did not increase program effectiveness. Knowledge and behavior scores…

  14. DNA vaccines against influenza.

    PubMed

    Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Genetic vaccine technology has been considerably developed within the last two decades. This cost effective and promising strategy can be applied for therapy of cancers and for curing allergy, chronic and infectious diseases, such as a seasonal and pandemic influenza. Despite numerous advantages, several limitations of this technology reduce its performance and can retard its commercial exploitation in humans and its veterinary applications. Inefficient delivery of the DNA vaccine into cells of immunized individuals results in low intracellular supply of suitable expression cassettes encoding an antigen, in its low expression level and, in turn, in reduced immune responses against the antigen. Improvement of DNA delivery into the host cells might significantly increase effectiveness of the DNA vaccine. A vast array of innovative methods and various experimental strategies have been applied in order to enhance the effectiveness of DNA vaccines. They include various strategies improving DNA delivery as well as expression and immunogenic potential of the proteins encoded by the DNA vaccines. Researchers focusing on DNA vaccines against influenza have applied many of these strategies. Recent examples of the most successful modern approaches are discussed in this review.

  15. Review of strategies to enhance the uptake of seasonal influenza vaccination by Australian healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Michael J

    2012-09-01

    Annual vaccination of healthcare workers (HCWs) against seasonal influenza is recommended by The Australian Immunisation Handbook to prevent personal morbidity and transmission to patients. There are limited data available concerning the uptake of this vaccination by Australian healthcare workers, and few studies have investigated the determinants of this uptake. This report therefore aims to review the seasonal influenza immunisation uptake rates of Australian HCWs, the determinants of these rates, and strategies to improve them. The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for literature published online between January 2000 and May 2011. A manual search of the grey literature was also undertaken. Studies of influenza pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 immunisation were excluded. Eleven relevant studies were identified. The published data suggests that annual seasonal influenza immunisation rates among Australian HCWs are below recommended levels (range 22%-70%). Factors contributing to the decision to be immunised demonstrate only minor variations from those identified in international samples. There is little high quality evidence to support specific strategies and interventions to increase uptake of immunisation in HCWs. Further high quality research is needed to demonstrate the efficacy of strategies and interventions on HCW immunisation uptake, particularly in Australian samples, and if conventional interventions continue to prove ineffective, policy change to mandatory seasonal influenza immunisation should be considered. PMID:23186238

  16. Cervical Cancer Control for Hispanic Women in Texas: Effective Strategies from Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Maria E.; Savas, Lara S.; Lipizzi, Erica; Smith, Jennifer S.; Vernon, Sally W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hispanic women in Texas have among the highest rates of cervical cancer incidence and mortality in the country. Increasing regular Papanicolaou test screening and HPV vaccination are crucial to reduce the burden of cervical cancer among Hispanics. This paper presents lessons learned from community-based cervical cancer control programs in Texas and highlights effective intervention programs, methods and strategies. Methods We reviewed and summarized cervical cancer control efforts targeting Hispanic women in Texas, focusing on interventions developed by researchers at the University of Texas, School of Public Health. We identified commonalities across programs, highlighted effective methods, and summarized lessons learned to help guide future intervention efforts. Results Community-academic partnerships were fundamental in all steps of program development and implementation. Programs reviewed addressed psychosocial, cultural, and access barriers to cervical cancer control among low-income Hispanic women. Intervention approaches included lay health worker (LHW) and navigation models and used print media, interactive tailored media, photonovellas, client reminders, one-on-one and group education sessions. Conclusions Small media materials combined with LHW and navigation approaches were effective in delivering Pap test screening and HPV vaccination messages and in linking women to services. Common theoretical methods included in these approaches were modeling, verbal persuasion, and facilitating access. Adaptation of programs to an urban environment revealed that intensive navigation was needed to link women with multiple access barriers to health services. Collectively, this review reveals 1) the importance of using a systematic approach for planning and adapting cervical cancer control programs; 2) advantages of collaborative academic-community partnerships to develop feasible interventions with broad reach; 3) the use of small media and LHW approaches and

  17. Helicobacter pylori Eradication to Eliminate Gastric Cancer: The Japanese Strategy.

    PubMed

    Asaka, Masahiro; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Matsushima, Rumiko; Tsuda, Momoko

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy for chronic gastritis achieved world-first coverage by the Japanese national health insurance scheme in 2013, making a dramatic decrease of gastric cancer-related deaths more realistic. Combining H pylori eradication therapy with endoscopic surveillance can prevent the development of gastric cancer. Even if it develops, most patients are likely to be diagnosed at an early stage, possibly resulting in fewer gastric cancer deaths. Success with the elimination of gastric cancer in Japan could lead other countries with a high incidence to consider a similar strategy, suggesting the potential for elimination of gastric cancer around the world.

  18. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence in Invasive Anal Cancers in the United States prior to Vaccine Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Steinau, M; Unger, ER; Hernandez, BY; Goodman, MT; Copeland, G; Hopenhayn, C; Cozen, W; Saber, MS; Huang, Y; Peters, ES; Lynch, CF; Wilkinson, EJ; Rajeevan, MS; Lyu, C; Saraiya, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Conduct a representative survey of Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and its genotype distribution in invasive anal cancer specimens in the U.S. Methods Population-based archival anal cancer specimens were identified from Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana and Michigan cancer registries and SEER tissue repositories in Hawaii, Iowa and Los Angeles. Sections from one representative block per case were used for DNA extraction. All extracts were assayed first by Linear Array and re-tested with INNO-LiPA if inadequate or HPV negative. Results Among 146 unique invasive anal cancer cases, 93 (63.7%) were from women and 53 (36.3%) from men. HPV (any type) was detected in 133 (91.1%) cases and 129 (88.4%) contained at least one high risk type, most (80.1%) as a single genotype. HPV16 had the highest prevalence (113 cases, 77.4%); HPV6, 11, 18 and 33 were also found multiple times. Among HPV16 positive cases, 37% were identified as prototype variant Ep and 63% were non-prototypes: 33% Em, 12% E-G131G, 5% Af1, 4% AA/NA-1, 3% E-C109G, 3% E-G131T, 2% As and 1% Af2. No significant differences in the distributions of HPV (any), high-risk types, or HPV16/18 were seen between gender, race or age group. Conclusions The establishment of pre-vaccine HPV prevalence in the U.S. is critical to the surveillance of vaccine efficacy. Almost 80% of anal cancers were positive for the vaccine types HPV16 or HPV18 and in 70% these were the only types detected suggesting that a high proportion might be preventable by current vaccines. PMID:23609590

  19. Skin Vaccination against Cervical Cancer Associated Human Papillomavirus with a Novel Micro-Projection Array in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Holly J.; Fernando, Germain J. P.; Chen, Xianfeng; Frazer, Ian H.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Better delivery systems are needed for routinely used vaccines, to improve vaccine uptake. Many vaccines contain alum or alum based adjuvants. Here we investigate a novel dry-coated densely-packed micro-projection array skin patch (Nanopatch™) as an alternate delivery system to intramuscular injection for delivering an alum adjuvanted human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (Gardasil®) commonly used as a prophylactic vaccine against cervical cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Micro-projection arrays dry-coated with vaccine material (Gardasil®) delivered to C57BL/6 mouse ear skin released vaccine within 5 minutes. To assess vaccine immunogenicity, doses of corresponding to HPV-16 component of the vaccine between 0.43±0.084 ng and 300±120 ng (mean ± SD) were administered to mice at day 0 and day 14. A dose of 55±6.0 ng delivered intracutaneously by micro-projection array was sufficient to produce a maximal virus neutralizing serum antibody response at day 28 post vaccination. Neutralizing antibody titres were sustained out to 16 weeks post vaccination, and, for comparable doses of vaccine, somewhat higher titres were observed with intracutaneous patch delivery than with intramuscular delivery with the needle and syringe at this time point. Conclusions/Significance Use of dry micro-projection arrays (Nanopatch™) has the potential to overcome the need for a vaccine cold chain for common vaccines currently delivered by needle and syringe, and to reduce risk of needle-stick injury and vaccine avoidance due to the fear of the needle especially among children. PMID:20976136

  20. Mathematical analysis of a Chlamydia epidemic model with pulse vaccination strategy.

    PubMed

    Samanta, G P

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we have considered a dynamical model of Chlamydia disease with varying total population size, bilinear incidence rate and pulse vaccination strategy. We have defined two positive numbers R₀ and (R₁≤ R₀). It is proved that there exists an infection-free periodic solution which is globally attractive if R₀ < 1 and the disease is permanent if R₁> 1 The important mathematical findings for the dynamical behaviour of the Chlamydia disease model are also numerically verified using MATLAB. Finally epidemiological implications of our analytical findings are addressed critically.

  1. AACR 2010: Strategy for Mapping of 20 Cancers - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    TCGA held an NCI-sponsored session at the American Association for Cancer Research's (AACR) 101st Annual Meeting 2010 to address the program’s Phase II structure and strategies for sample acquisition, evolving technologies, data management and analysis.

  2. Glucosylceramide Administration as a Vaccination Strategy in Mouse Models of Cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Mor, Visesato; Farnoud, Amir M; Singh, Ashutosh; Rella, Antonella; Tanno, Hiromasa; Ishii, Keiko; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Sato, Toshiya; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen and the causative agent of the disease cryptococcosis. Cryptococcosis is initiated as a pulmonary infection and in conditions of immune deficiency disseminates to the blood stream and central nervous system, resulting in life-threatening meningoencephalitis. A number of studies have focused on the development of a vaccine against Cryptococcus, primarily utilizing protein-conjugated components of the Cryptococcus polysaccharide capsule as antigen. However, there is currently no vaccine against Cryptococcus in the clinic. Previous studies have shown that the glycosphingolipid, glucosylceramide (GlcCer), is a virulence factor in C. neoformans and antibodies against this lipid inhibit fungal growth and cell division. In the present study, we have investigated the possibility of using GlcCer as a therapeutic agent against C. neoformans infections in mouse models of cryptococcosis. GlcCer purified from a non-pathogenic fungus, Candida utilis, was administered intraperitoneally, prior to infecting mice with a lethal dose of C. neoformans. GlcCer administration prevented the dissemination of C. neoformans from the lungs to the brain and led to 60% mouse survival. GlcCer administration did not cause hepatic injury and elicited an anti-GlcCer antibody response, which was observed independent of the route of administration and the strains of mouse. Taken together, our results suggest that fungal GlcCer can protect mice against lethal doses of C. neoformans infection and can provide a viable vaccination strategy against Cryptococcus. PMID:27082428

  3. Glucosylceramide Administration as a Vaccination Strategy in Mouse Models of Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Visesato; Farnoud, Amir M.; Singh, Ashutosh; Rella, Antonella; Tanno, Hiromasa; Ishii, Keiko; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Sato, Toshiya; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen and the causative agent of the disease cryptococcosis. Cryptococcosis is initiated as a pulmonary infection and in conditions of immune deficiency disseminates to the blood stream and central nervous system, resulting in life-threatening meningoencephalitis. A number of studies have focused on the development of a vaccine against Cryptococcus, primarily utilizing protein-conjugated components of the Cryptococcus polysaccharide capsule as antigen. However, there is currently no vaccine against Cryptococcus in the clinic. Previous studies have shown that the glycosphingolipid, glucosylceramide (GlcCer), is a virulence factor in C. neoformans and antibodies against this lipid inhibit fungal growth and cell division. In the present study, we have investigated the possibility of using GlcCer as a therapeutic agent against C. neoformans infections in mouse models of cryptococcosis. GlcCer purified from a non-pathogenic fungus, Candida utilis, was administered intraperitoneally, prior to infecting mice with a lethal dose of C. neoformans. GlcCer administration prevented the dissemination of C. neoformans from the lungs to the brain and led to 60% mouse survival. GlcCer administration did not cause hepatic injury and elicited an anti-GlcCer antibody response, which was observed independent of the route of administration and the strains of mouse. Taken together, our results suggest that fungal GlcCer can protect mice against lethal doses of C. neoformans infection and can provide a viable vaccination strategy against Cryptococcus. PMID:27082428

  4. Heteroclitic serological response in esophageal and prostate cancer patients after NY-ESO-1 protein vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Junji; Wada, Hisashi; Isobe, Midori; Gnjatic, Sacha; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Jungbluth, Achim A; Okazaki, Nami; Uenaka, Akiko; Nakamura, Yurika; Fujiwara, Shinichi; Mizuno, Naoaki; Saika, Takashi; Ritter, Erika; Yamasaki, Makoto; Miyata, Hiroshi; Ritter, Gerd; Murphy, Roger; Venhaus, Ralph; Pan, Linda; Old, Lloyd J; Doki, Yuichiro; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2012-02-01

    NY-ESO-1 is a prototypic cancer/testis antigen. In a recent phase I clinical trial, we vaccinated 13 patients bearing NY-ESO-1-expressing tumors with a complex of cholesterol-bearing hydrophobized pullulan (CHP) and NY-ESO-1 protein (CHP-NY-ESO-1) and showed efficient induction of NY-ESO-1 antibody, and CD4 and CD8 T cell responses using peripheral blood from the patients. In our study, we analyzed heteroclitic serological responses in those patients after vaccination. Serological response against 11 tumor antigens including MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3, MAGE-A4, CT7/MAGEC1, CT10/MAGEC2, CT45, CT46/HORMAD1, SOX2, SSX2, XAGE1B and p53 was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using sera from ten vaccinated patients. Expression of tumor antigens was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction or immunohistochemistry. Eight of nine patients who showed antibody responses against NY-ESO-1 also showed an antibody response against at least 1 of these 11 tumor antigens after vaccination. In one patient, seven tumor antigens were recognized. Specificity analysis of the antibody response by ELISA using control recombinant proteins and synthetic peptides and by Western blot showed that the response was not against His6-tag and/or bacterial products included in a preparation of CHP-NY-ESO-1 used for vaccination. Thus, heteroclitic serological responses appear to be indicative of the overall immune response against the tumor, and their analysis could be useful for immune monitoring in cancer vaccine.

  5. Wilms Tumor Gene (WT1) Peptide–based Cancer Vaccine Combined With Gemcitabine for Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Sumiyuki; Koido, Shigeo; Takeda, Yutaka; Homma, Sadamu; Komita, Hideo; Takahara, Akitaka; Morita, Satoshi; Ito, Toshinori; Morimoto, Soyoko; Hara, Kazuma; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Yanagisawa, Satoru; Toyama, Yoichi; Ikegami, Masahiro; Kitagawa, Toru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Wada, Hiroshi; Nagano, Hiroaki; Nakata, Jun; Nakae, Yoshiki; Hosen, Naoki; Oji, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshio; Kawase, Ichiro; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Junichi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Tajiri, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    Wilms tumor gene (WT1) protein is an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of a combination therapy consisting of gemcitabine and WT1 peptide–based vaccine for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and to make initial assessments of its clinical efficacy and immunologic response. Thirty-two HLA-A*24:02+ patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Patients received HLA-A*24:02-restricted, modified 9-mer WT1 peptide (3 mg/body) emulsified with Montanide ISA51 adjuvant (WT1 vaccine) intradermally biweekly and gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. This combination therapy was well tolerated. The frequencies of grade 3–4 adverse events for this combination therapy were similar to those for gemcitabine alone. Objective response rate was 20.0% (6/30 evaluable patients). Median survival time and 1-year survival rate were 8.1 months and 29%, respectively. The association between longer survival and positive delayed-type hypersensitivity to WT1 peptide was statistically significant, and longer survivors featured a higher frequency of memory-phenotype WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes both before and after treatment. WT1 vaccine in combination with gemcitabine was well tolerated for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Delayed-type hypersensitivity-positivity to WT1 peptide and a higher frequency of memory-phenotype WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes could be useful prognostic markers for survival in the combination therapy with gemcitabine and WT1 vaccine. Further clinical investigation is warranted to determine the effectiveness of this combination therapy. PMID:24509173

  6. Vaccination with a mixed vaccine of autogenous and allogeneic breast cancer cells and tumor associated antigens CA15-3, CEA and CA125--results in immune and clinical responses in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X P; Yang, D C; Elliott, R L; Head, J F

    2000-10-01

    In breast cancer there is often overexpression of the breast cancer antigen CA15-3, the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and the ovarian cancer antigen CA125, which makes them potential target antigens for immunotherapy. In this study, we used a multi-antigen vaccine, which included the following antigens: autologous breast cancer cells (AUTOC), allogeneic breast cancer MCF-7 cells (ALLOC), and the tumor associated antigens CA15-3, CEA and CA125, plus low doses of granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 2 (IL-2). Forty-two breast cancer patients received weekly subcutaneous vaccination at the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 7th, 11th and 15th weeks. Their lymphocyte proliferative responses to AUTOC, ALLOC, CA15-3, CEA and CA125 were tested in lymphocyte blastogenesis assays (LBA) before and after vaccination. The disease stage and serum CA15-3, CEA and CA125 concentrations were also determined pre- and post-vaccination. We found that the vaccine was safe, and the only major side effects were swelling at the site of injection, muscle pain, and weakness or fatigue. The vaccine induced a significant increase in post-vaccination lymphocyte proliferative responses to AUTOC, CA15-3, CEA and CA125 but not ALLOC, compared to pre-vaccination (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, p < 0.01 and p > 0.05, respectively, a paired t Test). Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound or bone scan showed evidence of disease improvement in 2 (12%) patients after vaccination. Hepatic metastases were reduced in size and number and some actually disappeared one patient. Metastatic disease in the L5 vertebra and the skull decreased in size and some osteolytic sites completely healed in a second patient. In addition, 7 patients (44%) had stable disease and 7 patients (44%) had disease progression. We did not find vaccination significantly reduced serum tumor markers CA15-3, CEA and CA125 of these breast cancer patients. These results suggest that the vaccine mixture of autologous and

  7. Denial as a Strategy for Coping with Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matt, Denise A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Asserts that, in some situations, one of the most useful strategies for helping cancer patients to cope can be denial. Presents definitions of coping in general and denial in particular. Discusses potential positive functions of denial for cancer patients and provides an overview of potential negative consequences. Concludes with brief summary and…

  8. Simian virus 40, poliovirus vaccines, and human cancer: research progress versus media and public interests.

    PubMed Central

    Butel, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    From 1955 through early 1963, millions of people were inadvertently exposed to simian virus 40 (SV40) as a contaminant of poliovirus vaccines; the virus had been present in the monkey kidney cultures used to prepare the vaccines and had escaped detection. SV40 was discovered in 1960 and subsequently eliminated from poliovirus vaccines. This article reviews current knowledge about SV40 and considers public responses to reports in the media. SV40 is a potent tumour virus with broad tissue tropism that induces tumours in rodents and transforms cultured cells from many species. It is also an important laboratory model for basic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. SV40 neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated poliovirus vaccines. There have been many reports of detection of SV40 DNA in human tumours, especially mesotheliomas, brain tumours and osteosarcomas; and DNA sequence analyses have ruled out the possibility that the viral DNA in tumours was due to laboratory contamination or that the virus had been misidentified. However, additional studies are necessary to prove that SV40 is the cause of certain human cancers. A recently published review article evaluated the status of the field and received much media attention. The public response emphasized that there is great interest in the possibility of health risks today from vaccinations received in the past. PMID:10743284

  9. Simian virus 40, poliovirus vaccines, and human cancer: research progress versus media and public interests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    From 1955 through early 1963, millions of people were inadvertently exposed to simian virus 40 (SV40) as a contaminant of poliovirus vaccines; the virus had been present in the monkey kidney cultures used to prepare the vaccines and had escaped detection. SV40 was discovered in 1960 and subsequently eliminated from poliovirus vaccines. This article reviews current knowledge about SV40 and considers public responses to reports in the media. SV40 is a potent tumour virus with broad tissue tropism that induces tumours in rodents and transforms cultured cells from many species. It is also an important laboratory model for basic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. SV40 neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated poliovirus vaccines. There have been many reports of detection of SV40 DNA in human tumours, especially mesotheliomas, brain tumours and osteosarcomas; and DNA sequence analyses have ruled out the possibility that the viral DNA in tumours was due to laboratory contamination or that the virus had been misidentified. However, additional studies are necessary to prove that SV40 is the cause of certain human cancers. A recently published review article evaluated the status of the field and received much media attention. The public response emphasized that there is great interest in the possibility of health risks today from vaccinations received in the past.

  10. Acute hepatitis B caused by a vaccine-escape HBV strain in vaccinated subject: sequence analysis and therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Monica; Critelli, Rosina; Grottola, Antonella; Gitto, Stefano; Bernabucci, Veronica; Bevini, Mirco; Vecchi, Chiara; Montagnani, Giuliano; Villa, Erica

    2015-01-01

    HBV vaccine contains the 'a' determinant region, the major immune-target of antibodies (anti-HBs). Failure of immunization may be caused by vaccine-induced or spontaneous 'a' determinant surface gene mutants. Here, we evaluate the possible lack of protection by HBV vaccine, describing the case of an acute hepatitis B diagnosed in a 55-year-old Caucasian male unpaid blood donor, vaccinated against HBV. Sequencing data for preS-S region revealed multiple point mutations. Of all the substitutions found, Q129H, located in the "a" determinant region of HBsAg, can alter antigenicity, leading to mutants. This mutant may cause vaccine failure especially when associated with high viremia of infecting source.

  11. Cancer vaccine with mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens.

    PubMed

    Kozbor, Danuta

    2010-03-01

    The GD2 ganglioside, displayed by five carbohydrate Neu5Acalpha2-8Neu5Acalpha2-3(GalNAcbeta1-4)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta residues attached to a ceramide chain that anchors the ganglioside in the cell membrane, is expressed on neuroectodermally derived tumors. GD2 has been used as a target for passive and active immunotherapy in patients with malignant melanoma and neuroblastoma. We have generated 47-LDA mimotope of GD2 by screening a phage display peptide library with anti-GD2 mAb 14G2a and reported that vaccination with the 47-LDA mimotope elicited GD2 cross-reactive IgG antibody responses as well as MHC class I-restricted CD8(+) T cells to syngeneic neuroblastoma tumor cells. The cytotoxic activity of the vaccine-induced CTLs was independent of GD2 expression, suggesting recognition of a novel tumor-associated antigen cross-reacting with 47-LDA. Immunoblotting studies using 14G2a mAb demonstrated that this antibody cross-reacts with a 105 kDa glycoprotein expressed by GD2(+) and GD2(-) neuroblastoma and melanoma cells. Functional studies of tumor cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) collagen cultures with 14G2a mAb showed decreases in matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, a process regulated by 105 kDa activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (ALCAM/CD166). The CD166 glycoprotein was shown to be recognized by 14G2a antibody, and inhibition of CD166 expression by RNA interference ablated the cell sensitivity to lysis by 47-LDA-induced CD8(+) T cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the vaccine-induced CTLs recognize a 47-LDA cross-reactive epitope expressed by CD166 and reveal a novel mechanism of induction of potent tumor-specific cellular responses by mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens.

  12. Targeting immune response with therapeutic vaccines in premalignant lesions and cervical cancer: hope or reality from clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Vici, P; Pizzuti, L; Mariani, L; Zampa, G; Santini, D; Di Lauro, L; Gamucci, T; Natoli, C; Marchetti, P; Barba, M; Maugeri-Saccà, M; Sergi, D; Tomao, F; Vizza, E; Di Filippo, S; Paolini, F; Curzio, G; Corrado, G; Michelotti, A; Sanguineti, G; Giordano, A; De Maria, R; Venuti, A

    2016-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is widely known as a cause of cervical cancer (CC) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). HPVs related to cancer express two main oncogenes, i.e. E6 and E7, considered as tumorigenic genes; their integration into the host genome results in the abnormal regulation of cell cycle control. Due to their peculiarities, these oncogenes represent an excellent target for cancer immunotherapy. In this work the authors highlight the potential use of therapeutic vaccines as safe and effective pharmacological tools in cervical disease, focusing on vaccines that have reached the clinical trial phase. Many therapeutic HPV vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with promising results. Adoptive T-cell therapy showed clinical activity in a phase II trial involving advanced CC patients. A phase II randomized trial showed clinical activity of a nucleic acid-based vaccine in HPV16 or HPV18 positive CIN. Several trials involving peptide-protein-based vaccines and live-vector based vaccines demonstrated that these approaches are effective in CIN as well as in advanced CC patients. HPV therapeutic vaccines must be regarded as a therapeutic option in cervical disease. The synergic combination of HPV therapeutic vaccines with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, immunomodulators or immune checkpoint inhibitors opens a new and interesting scenario in this disease.

  13. Triple peptide vaccination as consolidation treatment in women affected by ovarian and breast cancer: Clinical and immunological data of a phase I/II clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    ANTONILLI, MORENA; RAHIMI, HASSAN; VISCONTI, VALERIA; NAPOLETANO, CHIARA; RUSCITO, ILARY; ZIZZARI, ILARIA GRAZIA; CAPONNETTO, SALVATORE; BARCHIESI, GIACOMO; IADAROLA, ROBERTA; PIERELLI, LUCA; RUGHETTI, AURELIA; BELLATI, FILIPPO; PANICI, PIERLUIGI BENEDETTI; NUTI, MARIANNA

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination with priming and expansion of tumour reacting T cells is an important therapeutic option to be used in combination with novel checkpoint inhibitors to increase the specificity of the T cell infiltrate and the efficacy of the treatment. In this phase I/II study, 14 high-risk disease-free ovarian (OC) and breast cancer (BC) patients after completion of standard therapies were vaccinated with MUC1, ErbB2 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) HLA-A2+-restricted peptides and Montanide. Patients were subjected to 6 doses of vaccine every two weeks and a recall dose after 3 months. ECOG grade 2 toxicity was observed at the injection site. Eight out of 14 patients showed specific CD8+ T cells to at least one antigen. None of 4 patients vaccinated for compassionate use showed a CD8 activation. An OC patient who suffered from a lymph nodal recurrence, showed specific anti-ErbB2 CD8+ T cells in the bulky aortic lymph nodes suggesting homing of the activated T cells. Results confirm that peptide vaccination strategy is feasible, safe and well tolerated. In particular OC patients appear to show a higher response rate compared to BC patients. Vaccination generates a long-lasting immune response, which is strongly enhanced by recall administrations. The clinical outcome of patients enrolled in the trial appears favourable, having registered no deceased patients with a minimum follow-up of 8 years. These promising data, in line with the results of similar studies, the high compliance of patients observed and the favourable toxicity profile, support future trials of peptide vaccination in clinically disease-free patients who have completed standard treatments. PMID:26892612

  14. Cervical cancer screening in the early post vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Alan G

    2008-12-01

    The Pap test is the foundation of cervical cancer screening in North America and most industrialized countries. It has been widely used in the United States since the 1950s. But are our current screening guidelines still justified? In this article, the author reviews the current recommendations for cervical cancer screening by the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the evidence supporting them, reviews the relative efficacy of liquid-based cytology versus the conventional Pap smear, and discusses the role of HPV DNA testing in primary screening.