Science.gov

Sample records for cancer vaccine strategy

  1. DNA vaccines: developing new strategies against cancer.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, Daniela; Iurescia, Sandra; Fazio, Vito Michele; Rinaldi, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Due to their rapid and widespread development, DNA vaccines have entered into a variety of human clinical trials for vaccines against various diseases including cancer. Evidence that DNA vaccines are well tolerated and have an excellent safety profile proved to be of advantage as many clinical trials combines the first phase with the second, saving both time and money. It is clear from the results obtained in clinical trials that such DNA vaccines require much improvement in antigen expression and delivery methods to make them sufficiently effective in the clinic. Similarly, it is clear that additional strategies are required to activate effective immunity against poorly immunogenic tumor antigens. Engineering vaccine design for manipulating antigen presentation and processing pathways is one of the most important aspects that can be easily handled in the DNA vaccine technology. Several approaches have been investigated including DNA vaccine engineering, co-delivery of immunomodulatory molecules, safe routes of administration, prime-boost regimen and strategies to break the immunosuppressive networks mechanisms adopted by malignant cells to prevent immune cell function. Combined or single strategies to enhance the efficacy and immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are applied in completed and ongoing clinical trials, where the safety and tolerability of the DNA platform are substantiated. In this review on DNA vaccines, salient aspects on this topic going from basic research to the clinic are evaluated. Some representative DNA cancer vaccine studies are also discussed.

  2. HPV vaccination: The most pragmatic cervical cancer primary prevention strategy.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2015-10-01

    The evidence that high-risk HPV infections cause cervical cancers has led to two new approaches for cervical cancer control: vaccination to prevent HPV infections, and HPV screening to detect and treat cervical precancerous lesions. Two vaccines are currently available: quadrivalent vaccine targeting oncogenic HPV types 16, 18, 6, and 11, and bivalent vaccine targeting HPV 16 and 18. Both vaccines have demonstrated remarkable immunogenicity and substantial protection against persistent infection and high-grade cervical cancer precursors caused by HPV 16 and 18 in HPV-naïve women, and have the potential to prevent 70% of cervical cancers in adequately vaccinated populations. HPV vaccination is now implemented in national programs in 62 countries, including some low- and middle-income countries. The early findings from routine national programs in high-income countries are instructive to encourage low- and middle-income countries with a high risk of cervical cancer to roll out HPV vaccination programs and to introduce resource-appropriate cervical screening programs.

  3. Tailoring DNA Vaccines: Designing Strategies Against HER2-Positive Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Cristina; Kalogris, Cristina; Garulli, Chiara; Pietrella, Lucia; Gabrielli, Federico; Curcio, Claudia; Quaglino, Elena; Cavallo, Federica; Amici, Augusto

    2013-01-01

    The crucial role of HER2 in epithelial transformation and its selective overexpression on cancer tissues makes it an ideal target for cancer immunotherapies such as passive immunotherapy with Trastuzumab. There are, however, a number of concerns regarding the use of monoclonal antibodies which include resistance, repeated treatments, considerable costs, and side effects that make active immunotherapies against HER2 desirable alternative approaches. The efficacy of anti-HER2 DNA vaccination has been widely demonstrated in transgenic cancer-prone mice, which recapitulate several features of human breast cancers. Nonetheless, the rational design of a cancer vaccine able to trigger a long-lasting immunity, and thus prevent tumor recurrence in patients, would require the understanding of how tolerance and immunosuppression regulate antitumor immune responses and, at the same time, the identification of the most immunogenic portions of the target protein. We herein retrace the findings that led to our most promising DNA vaccines that, by encoding human/rat chimeric forms of HER2, are able to circumvent peripheral tolerance. Preclinical data obtained with these chimeric DNA vaccines have provided the rationale for their use in an ongoing Phase I clinical trial (EudraCT 2011-001104-34). PMID:23675574

  4. The rationale of vectored gene-fusion vaccines against cancer: evolving strategies and latest evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ragonnaud, Emeline

    2013-01-01

    The development of vaccines that target tumor antigens in cancer has proven difficult. A major reason for this is that T cells specific for tumor self-antigens and neoantigens are eliminated or inactivated through mechanisms of tolerance. Antigen fusion strategies which increase the ability of vaccines to stimulate T cells that have escaped tolerance mechanisms, may have a particular potential as immunotherapies. This review highlights antigen fusion strategies that have been successful in stimulating the induction of T-cell immunity against cancer and counteracting tumor-associated tolerance. In preclinical studies, these strategies have shown to improve the potency of vectored vaccines through fusion of tumor antigen to proteins or protein domains that increase CD4+ T-cell help, CD8+ T-cell responses or both the CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses. However, in clinical trials such strategies seem to be less efficient when provided as a DNA vaccine. The first clinical trial using a viral vectored fusion-gene vaccine is expected to be tested as a partner in a heterologous prime-boost regimen directed against cervical cancer. PMID:24757514

  5. Novel metronomic chemotherapy and cancer vaccine combinatorial strategy for hepatocellular carcinoma in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Tagliamonte, Maria; Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Napolitano, Maria; Luciano, Antonio; Arra, Claudio; Maiolino, Piera; Izzo, Francesco; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Buonaguro, Franco M; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most frequent primary liver cancer and represents the third and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide in men and women, respectively. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infections account for pathogenesis of more than 80 % of primary HCC. HCC prognosis greatly varies according to stage at beginning of treatment, but the overall 5-year survival rate is approximately 5-6 %. Given the limited number of effective therapeutic strategies available, immunotherapies and therapeutic cancer vaccines may help in improving the clinical outcome for HCC patients. However, the few clinical trials conducted to date have shown contrasting results, indicating the need for improvements. In the present study, a novel combinatorial strategy, based on metronomic chemotherapy plus vaccine, is evaluated in a mouse model. The chemotherapy is a multi-drug cocktail including taxanes and alkylating agents, which is administered in a metronomic-like fashion. The vaccine is a multi-peptide cocktail including HCV as well as universal tumor antigen TERT epitopes. The combinatorial strategy designed and evaluated in the present study induces an enhanced specific T cell response, when compared to vaccine alone, which correlates to a reduced Treg frequency. Such results are highly promising and may pave way to relevant improvements in immunotherapeutic strategies for HCC and beyond.

  6. Cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2015-04-22

    Cancer vaccines are designed to promote tumor specific immune responses, particularly cytotoxic CD8 positive T cells that are specific to tumor antigens. The earliest vaccines, which were developed in 1994-95, tested non-mutated, shared tumor associated antigens that had been shown to be immunogenic and capable of inducing clinical responses in a minority of people with late stage cancer. Technological developments in the past few years have enabled the investigation of vaccines that target mutated antigens that are patient specific. Several platforms for cancer vaccination are being tested, including peptides, proteins, antigen presenting cells, tumor cells, and viral vectors. Standard of care treatments, such as surgery and ablation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, can also induce antitumor immunity, thereby having cancer vaccine effects. The monitoring of patients' immune responses at baseline and after standard of care treatment is shedding light on immune biomarkers. Combination therapies are being tested in clinical trials and are likely to be the best approach to improving patient outcomes.

  7. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control.

  8. Cancer therapy and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Aly, Hamdy A A

    2012-08-31

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide, both in developed and in developing nations. It may affect people at all ages, even fetuses, but the risk for most varieties increases with age. Current therapeutic approaches which include surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with adverse side effects arising from lack of specificity for tumors. The goal of any therapeutic strategy is to impact on the target tumor cells with limited detrimental effect to normal cell function. Immunotherapy is cancer specific and can target the disease with minimal impact on normal tissues. Cancer vaccines are capable of generating an active tumor-specific immune response and serve as an ideal treatment due to their specificity for tumor cells and long lasting immunological memory that may safeguard against recurrences. Cancer vaccines are designed to either prevent (prophylactic) or treat established cancer (therapeutic). Identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) has led to increased efforts to develop vaccination strategies. Vaccines may be composed of whole cells or cell extracts, genetically modified tumor cells to express costimulatory molecules, dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with TAAs, immunization with soluble proteins or synthetic peptides, recombinant viruses or bacteria encoding tumor-associated antigens, and plasmid DNA encoding TSAs or TAAs in conjunction with appropriate immunomodulators. All of these antitumor vaccination approaches aim to induce specific immunological responses and localized to TAAs, destroying tumor cells alone and leaving the vast majority of other healthy cells of the body untouched.

  9. Overview of cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kudrin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has seen a tremendous number of failures and only few recent regulatory successes. This is a review dedicated to determine major regulatory and developmental issues around cancer immunotherapeutics. A three pillar approach should be used in setting a development path: discovery platforms and sufficient pool of validated tumor antigens, product development strategy enabling to bring the product closer to the patient and clinical development strategy accounting for competitive landscape, treatment paradigm, technical and commercial risks. Regulatory framework existing around cancer vaccines in the EU, US, Japan and some developing countries is outlined. In addition, the review covers some specific issues on the design and conduct of clinical trials with cancer vaccines. PMID:22894970

  10. Cancer Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  11. Vaccine strategies: Optimising outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hardt, Karin; Bonanni, Paolo; King, Susan; Santos, Jose Ignacio; El-Hodhod, Mostafa; Zimet, Gregory D; Preiss, Scott

    2016-12-20

    Successful immunisation programmes generally result from high vaccine effectiveness and adequate uptake of vaccines. In the development of new vaccination strategies, the structure and strength of the local healthcare system is a key consideration. In high income countries, existing infrastructures are usually used, while in less developed countries, the capacity for introducing new vaccines may need to be strengthened, particularly for vaccines administered beyond early childhood, such as the measles or human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Reliable immunisation service funding is another important factor and low income countries often need external supplementary sources of finance. Many regions also obtain support in generating an evidence base for vaccination via initiatives created by organisations including World Health Organization (WHO), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the Agence de Médecine Préventive and the Sabin Vaccine Institute. Strong monitoring and surveillance mechanisms are also required. An example is the efficient and low-cost approaches for measuring the impact of the hepatitis B control initiative and evaluating achievement of goals that have been established in the WHO Western Pacific region. A review of implementation strategies reveals differing degrees of success. For example, in the Americas, PAHO advanced a measles-mumps-rubella vaccine strategy, targeting different population groups in mass, catch-up and follow-up vaccination campaigns. This has had much success but coverage data from some parts of the region suggest that children are still not receiving all appropriate vaccines, highlighting problems with local service infrastructures. Stark differences in coverage levels are also observed among high income countries, as is the case with HPV vaccine implementation in the USA versus the UK and Australia, reflecting differences in delivery settings. Experience and research have shown which vaccine strategies work well and the

  12. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back After Treatment Prostate Cancer Treating Prostate Cancer Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  13. Therapeutic cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Melief, Cornelis J.M.; van Hall, Thorbald; Arens, Ramon; Ossendorp, Ferry; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical benefit of therapeutic cancer vaccines has been established. Whereas regression of lesions was shown for premalignant lesions caused by HPV, clinical benefit in cancer patients was mostly noted as prolonged survival. Suboptimal vaccine design and an immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment are the root causes of the lack of cancer eradication. Effective cancer vaccines deliver concentrated antigen to both HLA class I and II molecules of DCs, promoting both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses. Optimal vaccine platforms include DNA and RNA vaccines and synthetic long peptides. Antigens of choice include mutant sequences, selected cancer testis antigens, and viral antigens. Drugs or physical treatments can mitigate the immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment and include chemotherapeutics, radiation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitors, inhibitors of T cell checkpoints, agonists of selected TNF receptor family members, and inhibitors of undesirable cytokines. The specificity of therapeutic vaccination combined with such immunomodulation offers an attractive avenue for the development of future cancer therapies. PMID:26214521

  14. Vaccination strategies against influenza.

    PubMed

    Hanon, E

    2009-01-01

    Every year, Influenza virus infection is at the origin of substantial excess in morbidity and mortality in developed as well as developing countries. Influenza viruses undergo antigenic drift which cause annual replacement of strain included in classical trivalent vaccines. Less frequently, this virus can also undergo antigenic shift, which corresponds to a major antigenic change and can lead to an extra medical burden. Several vaccines have been made available to immunize individuals against seasonal as well as pandemic influenza viruses. For seasonal Influenza vaccines, live attenuated and classical inactivated trivalent vaccines have been licensed and are widely used. Additionally, several strategies are under investigations to improve further the efficacy of existing seasonal vaccines in children and elderly. These include the use of adjuvant, increase in antigen content, or alternative route of delivery. Similarly, several approaches have been licensed to address additional challenge posed by pandemic viruses. The different vaccination strategies used to maximise protection against seasonal as well as pandemic influenza will be reviewed and discussed in the perspective the current threat posed by the H1N1v pandemic Influenza.

  15. Human prostate cancer vaccines – proposed mechanisms of action and future combinatorial treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Sean M.; Lemke, Caitlin D.; Lubaroff, David M.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is responsible for the deaths of more than 33,000 American men annually. Once PCa has become metastatic there is no curative treatment. Oncologists worldwide are becoming increasingly convinced that alternative therapies to chemotherapy and radical prostatectomy need to be explored. Cancer vaccines (CaVacs) that promote the cancer patient’s own immune system to develop a tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated immune attack have been investigated in clinical trials with modest yet encouraging results. Here we look at the rationale behind different prostate CaVacs and propose key immune events that are likely to contribute to the efficacy of each vaccine. Finally, we prognosticate upon what improvements may be required to generate more effective CaVacs in the future with full consideration of the mechanisms of action. PMID:23399727

  16. DNA vaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Jeang, Jessica; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as an attractive immunotherapeutic approach against cancer due to its simplicity, stability, and safety. Results from numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that DNA vaccines are well tolerated by patients and do not trigger major adverse effects. DNA vaccines are also very cost effective and can be administered repeatedly for long-term protection. Despite all the practical advantages, DNA vaccines face challenges in inducing potent antigen specific cellular immune responses as a result of immune tolerance against endogenous self-antigens in tumors. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of DNA vaccines against self-antigens have been investigated including encoding of xenogeneic versions of antigens, fusion of antigens to molecules that activate T cells or trigger associative recognition, priming with DNA vectors followed by boosting with viral vector, and utilization of immunomodulatory molecules. This review will focus on discussing strategies that circumvent immune tolerance and provide updates on findings from recent clinical trials. PMID:25625927

  17. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines: Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chunqing; Manjili, Masoud H.; Subjeck, John R.; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines represent a viable option for active immunotherapy of cancers that aim to treat late stage disease by using a patient's own immune system. The promising results from clinical trials recently led to the approval of the first therapeutic cancer vaccine by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This major breakthrough not only provides a new treatment modality for cancer management, but also paves the way for rationally designing and optimizing future vaccines with improved anticancer efficacy. Numerous vaccine strategies are currently being evaluated both pre-clinically and clinically. This review discusses therapeutic cancer vaccines of diverse platforms or targets as well as the preclinical and clinical studies employing these therapeutic vaccines. We will also consider tumor-induced immune suppression that hinders the potency of therapeutic vaccines, and potential strategies to counteract these mechanisms for generating more robust and durable antitumor immune responses. PMID:23870514

  18. Vaccines against cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Kathrin U

    2004-11-01

    Cervical cancer and precancerous lesions of the genital tract are a major threat to women's health worldwide. Although the introduction of screening tests to detect cervical cancer and its precursor lesions has reduced overall cervical cancer rates in the developed world, the approach was largely unsuccessful for developing countries, primarily due to a lack of appropriate infrastructures and high costs. Annually, 470,000 cervical cancer cases are diagnosed worldwide, of which 80% occur in developing countries. Despite advances in treatment of cervical cancer, approximately half of the women afflicted with the disease will die. Over 20 years of dedicated research has provided conclusive evidence that a subset of human papillomaviruses are the aetiological agents for cervical cancer. Finding a viral origin for this disease provided the basis to fight cervical cancer using prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination. Both vaccine approaches are reviewed here, with an emphasis on recent clinical data.

  19. [Immune response in cervical cancer. Strategies for the development of therapeutic vaccines].

    PubMed

    Mora-García, María Lourdes; Monroy-García, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV), as HPV-16, evade immune recognition through the inactivation of cells of the innate immune response. HPV-16 E6 and E7 genes down-regulate type I interferon response. They do not produce viremia or cell death; therefore, they do not cause inflammation or damage signal that alerts the immune system. Virus-like particles (VLPs), consisting of structural proteins (L1 and L2) of the main HR-HPV types that infect the genitourinary tract, are the most effective prophylactic vaccines against HR-HPV infection. While for the high grade neoplastic lesions, therapeutic vaccines based on viral vectors, peptides, DNA or complete HR-HPV E6 and E7 proteins as antigens, have had limited effectiveness. Chimeric virus-like particles (cVLPs) that carry immunogenic peptides derived from E6 and E7 viral proteins, capable to induce activation of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, emerge as an important alternative to provide prophylactic and therapeutic activity against HR-HPV infection and cervical cancer.

  20. Influenza vaccines and vaccination strategies in birds.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Thierry; Lambrecht, Bénédicte; Marché, Sylvie; Steensels, Mieke; Van Borm, Steven; Bublot, Michel

    2008-03-01

    Although it is well accepted that the present Asian H5N1 panzootic is predominantly an animal health problem, the human health implications and the risk of human pandemic have highlighted the need for more information and collaboration in the field of veterinary and human health. H5 and H7 avian influenza (AI) viruses have the unique property of becoming highly pathogenic (HPAI) during circulation in poultry. Therefore, the final objective of poultry vaccination against AI must be eradication of the virus and the disease. Actually, important differences exist in the control of avian and human influenza viruses. Firstly, unlike human vaccines that must be adapted to the circulating strain to provide adequate protection, avian influenza vaccination provides broader protection against HPAI viruses. Secondly, although clinical protection is the primary goal of human vaccines, poultry vaccination must also stop transmission to achieve efficient control of the disease. This paper addresses these differences by reviewing the current and future influenza vaccines and vaccination strategies in birds.

  1. Cancer Vaccines: A Brief Overview.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sunil; Prendergast, George C

    2016-01-01

    Vaccine approaches for cancer differ from traditional vaccine approaches for infectious disease in tending to focus on clearing active disease rather than preventing disease. In this review, we provide a brief overview of different types of vaccines and adjuvants that have been investigated for the purpose of controlling cancer burdens in patients, some of which are approved for clinical use or in late-stage clinical trials, such as the personalized dendritic cell vaccine sipuleucel-T (Provenge) and the recombinant viral prostate cancer vaccine PSA-TRICOM (Prostvac-VF). Vaccines against human viruses implicated in the development and progression of certain cancers, such as human papillomavirus in cervical cancer, are not considered here. Cancers express "altered self" antigens that tend to induce weaker responses than the "foreign" antigens expressed by infectious agents. Thus, immune stimulants and adjuvant approaches have been explored widely. Vaccine types considered include autologous patient-derived immune cell vaccines, tumor antigen-expressing recombinant virus vaccines, peptide vaccines, DNA vaccines, and heterologous whole-cell vaccines derived from established human tumor cell lines. Opportunities to develop effective cancer vaccines may benefit from seminal recent advances in understanding how immunosuppressive barricades are erected by tumors to mediate immune escape. In particular, targeted ablation of these barricades with novel agents, such as the immune checkpoint drug ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4) approved recently for clinical use, may offer significant leverage to vaccinologists seeking to control and prevent malignancy.

  2. Listeria Vaccines for Pancreatic Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0411 TITLE: Listeria vaccines for pancreatic cancer...29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Listeria vaccines for pancreatic cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0411 5c...explored the capacity of Listeria vaccines to induce anti-tumor T cell immunity in the KPC model. We have found that Listeria vaccines produce

  3. DNA vaccination strategies against infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Watts, A M; Kennedy, R C

    1999-08-01

    DNA immunisation represents a novel approach to vaccine and immunotherapeutic development. Injection of plasmid DNA encoding a foreign gene of interest can result in the subsequent expression of the foreign gene products and the induction of an immune response within a host. This is relevant to prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination strategies when the foreign gene represents a protective epitope from a pathogen. The recent demonstration by a number of laboratories that these immune responses evoke protective immunity against some infectious diseases and cancers provides support for the use of this approach. In this article, we attempt to present an informative and unbiased representation of the field of DNA immunisation. The focus is on studies that impart information on the development of vaccination strategies against a number of human and animal pathogens. Investigations that describe the mechanism(s) of protective immunity induced by DNA immunisation highlight the advantages and disadvantages of this approach to developing vaccines within a given system. A variety of systems in which DNA vaccination has resulted in the induction of protective immunity, as well as the correlates associated with these protective immune responses, will be described. Particular attention will focus on systems involving parasitic diseases. Finally, the potential of DNA immunisation is discussed as it relates to veterinary medicine and its role as a possible vaccine strategy against animal coccidioses.

  4. Vaccination strategies for neuro-oncology

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, John H.; Mitchell, Duane A.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination against cancer-associated antigens has long held the promise of inducting potent antitumor immunity, targeted cytotoxicity while sparing normal tissues, and long-lasting immunologic memory that can provide surveillance against tumor recurrence. Evaluation of vaccination strategies in preclinical brain tumor models has borne out the capacity for the immune system to effectively and safely eradicate established tumors within the central nervous system. Early phase clinical trials have established the feasibility, safety, and immunogenicity of several vaccine platforms, predominantly in patients with glioblastoma. Definitive demonstration of clinical benefit awaits further study, but initial results have been encouraging. With increased understanding of the stimulatory and regulatory pathways that govern immunologic responses and the enhanced capacity to identify novel antigenic targets using genomic interrogation of tumor cells, vaccination platforms for patients with malignant brain tumors are advancing with increasing personalized complexity and integration into combinatorial treatment paradigms. PMID:26516221

  5. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  6. Economic Evaluation of Screening Strategies Combined with HPV Vaccination of Preadolescent Girls for the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in Vientiane, Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Several approaches to reduce the incidence of invasive cervical cancers exist. The approach adopted should take into account contextual factors that influence the cost-effectiveness of the available options. Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of screening strategies combined with a vaccination program for 10-year old girls for cervical cancer prevention in Vientiane, Lao PDR. Methods A population-based dynamic compartment model was constructed. The interventions consisted of a 10-year old girl vaccination program only, or this program combined with screening strategies, i.e., visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA), cytology-based screening, rapid human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing, or combined VIA and cytology testing. Simulations were run over 100 years. In base-case scenario analyses, we assumed a 70% vaccination coverage with lifelong protection and a 50% screening coverage. The outcome of interest was the incremental cost per Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALY) averted. Results In base-case scenarios, compared to the next best strategy, the model predicted that VIA screening of women aged 30–65 years old every three years, combined with vaccination, was the most attractive option, costing 2 544 international dollars (I$) per DALY averted. Meanwhile, rapid HPV DNA testing was predicted to be more attractive than cytology-based screening or its combination with VIA. Among cytology-based screening options, combined VIA with conventional cytology testing was predicted to be the most attractive option. Multi-way sensitivity analyses did not change the results. Compared to rapid HPV DNA testing, VIA had a probability of cost-effectiveness of 73%. Compared to the vaccination only option, the probability that a program consisting of screening women every five years would be cost-effective was around 60% and 80% if the willingness-to-pay threshold is fixed at one and three GDP per capita, respectively. Conclusions A VIA screening program

  7. [Pertussis vaccine. Reemergence of the disease and new vaccination strategies].

    PubMed

    Moraga-Llop, Fernando A; Campins-Martí, Magda

    2015-03-01

    Pertussis continues to be a public health problem despite the significant decrease in its incidence due to routine vaccination. Resurgence of the disease in countries that have maintained high vaccination coverage has been observed in recent years. Although vaccination is the most effective preventive control measure, both natural and artificial immunity wane over time, and thus the protection offered by current vaccines is not long-lasting. Furthermore, acellular vaccines are less effective. The implementation of new vaccine strategies is required. Vaccination of pregnant women is the most effective strategy for preventing pertussis in young infants, who are the most vulnerable, and should be recommended together with cocooning, ie vaccination of future household and extra-domiciliary contacts who are the main transmitters of the disease.

  8. Developments in cancer vaccines for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Buonaguro, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for about 6 % of all new cancers diagnosed worldwide and represents one of the leading causes of cancer-related death globally in men and women, respectively. The overall prognosis for HCC patients is poor, especially in the majority of patients with more advanced stage of disease. Indeed, in such cases immunotherapeutic strategies may represent a novel and effective tool. A few immunotherapy trials conducted for HCC have provided divergent results, urging the scientific community to explore additional paths to improve efficacy of immunotherapeutic approaches. The "Cancer Vaccine development for Hepatocellular Carcinoma"-HEPAVAC Consortium has been funded by the EU within the FP7 with the goal of developing a novel therapeutic peptide-based cancer vaccine strategy for HCC including both "off-the-shelf" and personalized antigens. This will be one of the very few vaccine trials for HCC and the first multi-epitope, multi-target and multi-HLA allele therapeutic cancer vaccine for such a frequent and aggressive disease with a hitherto high unmet medical need. Feasibility, safety and biological efficacy will be evaluated in a randomized, controlled European multicenter phase I/II clinical trial.

  9. Cancer vaccines: emphasis on pediatric cancers.

    PubMed

    Guinipero, Terri; Finn, Olivera J

    2010-01-01

    The success that vaccines have had in the fight with infectious diseases has not been mirrored in their use in the fight against cancer. The major differences are that cancer vaccines have been tested in the therapeutic rather than the prophylactic setting, and in older adults rather than in the pediatric population. Cancers, as well as current standard treatments, are highly immunosuppressive, which further compromises the success of therapeutic vaccines. Cancer is considered to be primarily a disease of the older age and yet many children suffer from or succumb to cancers such as leukemias, glioblastomas, neuroblastomas and sarcomas. Standard therapy, even when curative, is accompanied by serious side effects, including secondary tumors later in life. Due to the greater capacity of a young immune system to recover after cancer treatment, therapeutic vaccines are expected to have a better chance to elicit protective immunity and prevent cancer recurrence in children. In this review, we discuss the current efforts at designing and testing cancer vaccines in children with the focus on specific tumor antigens expressed by pediatric cancers.

  10. DNA Vaccines for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McNeel, Douglas G.; Becker, Jordan T.; Johnson, Laura E.; Olson, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding an antigen of interest has been demonstrated to be an effective means of immunization, capable of eliciting antigen-specific T cells. Plasmid DNA vaccines offer advantages over other anti-tumor vaccine approaches in terms of simplicity, manufacturing, and possibly safety. The primary disadvantage is their poor transfection efficiency and subsequent lower immunogenicity relative to other genetic vaccine approaches. However, multiple preclinical models demonstrate anti-tumor efficacy, and many efforts are underway to improve the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effect of these vaccines. Clinical trials using DNA vaccines as treatments for prostate cancer have begun, and to date have demonstrated safety and immunological effect. This review will focus on DNA vaccines as a specific means of antigen delivery, advantages and disadvantages of this type of immunization, previous experience in preclinical models and human trials specifically conducted for the treatment of prostate cancer, and future directions for the application of DNA vaccines to prostate cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24587772

  11. Knowledge differences between male and female university students about human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer: Implications for health strategies and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Rui; Ramada, Diana

    2010-12-16

    Knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer (CC) depends on several factors such as gender and education, which brings implications for health strategies and vaccination. A survey was conducted in Portugal with a representative sample of 1706 university students. Only 55.4% (n=945) had already heard of HPV, although 88.3% (n=834) from that know that is a risk factor for CC. 89% students (n=841) wants to be vaccinated against it, but only 13.8% stated as main reason to be vaccinated "prevention of the disease". Mean scores of knowledge were calculated. Statistical differences were found, regarding "CC knowledge", in gender (p<0.001) and between health sciences schools and non-health sciences schools (p<0.001). Differences regarding the study area in "knowledge and beliefs of HPV" (p<0.001) and in "relation between HPV and CC" (p<0.001) were found. Therefore, these differences may help to develop effective strategies that lead to decline CC incidence and mortality.

  12. Cervical cancer in India and HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kaarthigeyan, K

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer, mainly caused by Human Papillomavirus infection, is the leading cancer in Indian women and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Though there are several methods of prevention of cervical cancer, prevention by vaccination is emerging as the most effective option, with the availability of two vaccines. Several studies have been published examining the vaccine's efficacy, immunogenicity and safety. Questions and controversy remain regarding mandatory vaccination, need for booster doses and cost-effectiveness, particularly in the Indian context.

  13. The Promise of Preventive Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lollini, Pier-Luigi; Cavallo, Federica; Nanni, Patrizia; Quaglino, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Years of unsuccessful attempts at fighting established tumors with vaccines have taught us all that they are only able to truly impact patient survival when used in a preventive setting, as would normally be the case for traditional vaccines against infectious diseases. While true primary cancer prevention is still but a long-term goal, secondary and tertiary prevention are already in the clinic and providing encouraging results. A combination of immunopreventive cancer strategies and recently approved checkpoint inhibitors is a further promise of forthcoming successful cancer disease control, but prevention will require a considerable reduction of currently reported toxicities. These considerations summed with the increased understanding of tumor antigens allow space for an optimistic view of the future. PMID:26343198

  14. Mimotope vaccines for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sharav, Tumenjargal; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Walden, Peter

    2007-04-20

    Cancer vaccines need to be designed to effectively induce tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells, the key effector cells in immune responses against tumors. These T cells recognize peptides generated from cellular proteins by limited proteolysis, and bound and presented at cell surfaces by MHC class I molecules. Mimotopes, mimetics of T cell epitopes, have been derived from known epitopes by sequence modification, or developed de novo using combinatorial peptide libraries to scan the entire sequence space for peptides that induce the desired T cell responses. Mimotopes of both types have been tested in clinical vaccination trials for treatment of cancer.

  15. MG7 mimotope-based DNA vaccination for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dexin; Chen, Yu; Fan, Daiming

    2006-04-01

    Gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Prevention and treatment of gastric cancer through vaccination has been difficult owing to lack of a specific target and poor immunity. A number of vaccination strategies have been used to augment immune responses against gastric cancer and some progress has been made. In a series of studies, the authors have focused on gastric cancer vaccination approaches based on MG7 mimotopes, which are mimicry epitopes selected from phage-displayed oligopeptide libraries with a gastric cancer cell-specific monoclonal antibody, MG7-Ab. Strategies employed in these studies include viral or plasmid vectors in combination with carrier sequence or unmethylated CpG with synthetic peptides in nanoemulsion. The results demonstrated that MG7 mimotopes could effectively and specifically induce both cellular and humoral immune reactions and in vivo antitumor responses. In particular, a four-MG7 mimotope DNA vaccine was found to elicit much stronger antitumor immune responses in mice compared with its single-mimotope counterpart. These encouraging findings might pave the way for the development of novel MG7 antigen-based vaccination approaches for human gastric cancer. The review also discusses other immune-enhancing vaccination strategies for gastric cancer.

  16. A novel cancer vaccine strategy with combined IL-18 and HSV-TK gene therapy driven by the hTERT promoter in a murine colorectal cancer model.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Kosuke; Hazama, Shoichi; Araki, Atsuhiro; Yoshimura, Kiyoshi; Iizuka, Norio; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Noma, Takafumi; Oka, Masaaki

    2014-10-01

    A therapeutic vaccine against minimal residual cancer cells is needed for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Several gene therapy studies have revealed that the combination of a suicide gene and cytokine gene might induce effective antitumor immunity. In this study, we constructed an interleukin (IL)-18 and herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) expression vector driven by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter to study the efficacy of combination gene therapy with IL-18 and the HSV-TK suicide gene. Low immunogenic colon 26 cells were used for transfection and inoculation into syngeneic BALB/c mice. Large established tumors of colon 26 transfectants expressing IL-18 and HSV-TK driven by the hTERT promoter were completely eradicated after GCV administration in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Immunohistochemical analysis at the tumor rejection sites revealed enormous infiltrations of CD8+ T lymphocytes as well as CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD11b+ monocytes. Moreover, established distant tumors were completely eradicated by vaccination with the IL-18 and HSV-TK transfectants in combination with GCV. These data suggest that the IL-18 and suicide gene therapy can elicit antitumor specific immunity. In conclusion, gene therapy with IL-18 and HSV-TK plasmid vector driven by the hTERT promoter may be useful for cancer vaccination.

  17. HPV vaccination for prevention of skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vinzón, Sabrina E; Rösl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous papillomaviruses are associated with specific skin diseases, such as extensive wart formation and the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), especially in immunosuppressed patients. Hence, clinical approaches are required that prevent such lesions. Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines confer type-restricted protection against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18, responsible of 90% of genital warts and 70% of cervical cancers, respectively. However, they do not protect against less prevalent high-risk types or cutaneous HPVs. Over the past few years, several studies explored the potential of developing vaccines targeting cutaneous papillomaviruses. These vaccines showed to be immunogenic and prevent skin tumor formation in certain animal models. Furthermore, under conditions mimicking the ones found in the intended target population (i.e., immunosuppression and in the presence of an already established infection before vaccination), recent preclinical data shows that immunization can still be effective. Strategies are currently focused on finding vaccine formulations that can confer protection against a broad range of papillomavirus-associated diseases. The state-of-the-art of these approaches and the future directions in the field will be presented. PMID:25692212

  18. [Benefit-risk assessment of vaccination strategies].

    PubMed

    Hanslik, Thomas; Boëlle, Pierre Yves

    2007-04-01

    This article summarises the various stages of the risk/benefit assessment of vaccination strategies. Establishing the awaited effectiveness of a vaccination strategy supposes to have an epidemiologic description of the disease to be prevented. The effectiveness of the vaccine strategy will be thus expressed in numbers of cases, hospitalizations or deaths avoided. The effectiveness can be direct, expressed as the reduction of the incidence of the infectious disease in the vaccinated subjects compared to unvaccinated subjects. It can also be indirect, the unvaccinated persons being protected by the suspension in circulation of the pathogenic agent, consecutive to the implementation of the vaccination campaign. The risks of vaccination related to the adverse effects detected during the clinical trials preceding marketing are well quantified, but other risks can occur after marketing: e.g., serious and unexpected adverse effects detected by vaccinovigilance systems, or risk of increase in the age of cases if the vaccination coverage is insufficient. The medico-economic evaluation forms a part of the risks/benefit assessment, by positioning the vaccine strategy comparatively with other interventions for health. Epidemiologic and vaccinovigilance informations must be updated very regularly, which underlines the need for having an operational and reliable real time monitoring system to accompany the vaccination strategies. Lastly, in the context of uncertainty which often accompanies the risks/benefit assessments, it is important that an adapted communication towards the public and the doctors is planned.

  19. Therapeutic vaccination strategies to treat nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham S; Steven, Neil M

    2016-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects most people worldwide. EBV has oncogenic potential and is strongly associated with several lymphomas and carcinomas, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), that together total 200,000 cases of cancer each year. All EBV-associated cancers express viral proteins that allow highly selective immunotherapeutic targeting of the malignant cells. A number of therapeutic EBV vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with evidence of immune boosting and clinical responses in NPC patients. Therapeutic vaccination could be used after adoptive T-cell transfer to increase and sustain the number of infused T-cells or combined with immunotherapies acting at different stages of the cancer immunity cycle to increase efficacy. The therapeutic EBV vaccines tested to date have been well tolerated with minimal off-target toxicity. A safe therapeutic vaccine that was also able to be mass produced could, in principle, be used to vaccinate large numbers of patients after first line therapy to reduce recurrence.

  20. Neonatal vaccination: Challenges and intervention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Surendran, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND While vaccines have been tremendously successful in reducing the incidence of serious infectious diseases, newborns remain particularly vulnerable in the first few months of their life to life-threatening infections. A number of challenges exist to neonatal vaccination. However, recent advances in the understanding of neonatal immunology offers insights to overcome many of those challenges. OBJECTIVE This review will present an overview of the features of neonatal immunity which make vaccination difficult, survey the mechanisms of action of available vaccine adjuvants with respect to the unique features of neonatal immunity, and propose a possible mechanism contributing to the inability of neonates to generate protective immune responses to vaccines. METHODS We surveyed recent published findings on the challenges to neonatal vaccination and possible intervention strategies including the use of novel vaccine adjuvants to develop efficacious neonatal vaccines. RESULTS Challenges in the vaccination of neonates include interference from maternal antibody and excessive skewing towards Th2 immunity, which can be counteracted by the use of proper adjuvants. CONCLUSION Synergistic stimulation of multiple Toll-like receptors by incorporating well defined agonist-adjuvant combinations to vaccines is a promising strategy to ensure a protective vaccine response in neonates. PMID:26757146

  1. Cervical cancer: is vaccination necessary in India?

    PubMed

    Farhath, Seema; Vijaya, P P; Mumtaj, P

    2013-01-01

    In India, cervical cancer is the most common woman-related cancer, followed by breast cancer. The rate of cervical cancer in India is fourth worldwide. Two vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, both targeting HPV-16 and 18 which account for 70% of invasive cervical carcinomas, are licensed in the United States and numerous countries worldwide. Both vaccine formulations have shown excellent efficacy with minimal toxicity in active female population but numerous questions arise in vaccinating like cost effectiveness, lack of proven efficacy against other HPV strains, social acceptance of HPV vaccination and other ethical issues. The main objective of this study is to emphasis the advantages and disadvantages of the vaccination in India.

  2. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Douglas Lowy (left) and John Schiller developed the vaccine to prevent HPV infection in women, the cause ...

  3. [Which vaccination strategies for African meningococcal meningitis?].

    PubMed

    Saliou, P; Debois, H

    2002-12-01

    In 1963, Lapeyssonnie published a masterful description of the epidemiology of cerebrospinal meningococcal meningitis in the Sahel region of Africa (essentially due to the Neisseria meningitidis sero-group A): geographic spread (meningitis belt), seasonal cycle (dry and cool season). When a combined polyosidic AC vaccine became available in the early 1970s, a disease control strategy was defined along the lines of epidemiological surveillance, prophylaxis of lethality by early treatment of cases and reactive vaccination, since the polyosidic vaccine could not be included in the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Despite some success, this strategy has not led to the control of cerebrospinal meningococcal meningitis in Africa. Amongst the obstacles encountered are the difficulty to define at what point an out-break becomes an epidemic, gaps in epidemiological surveillance, unavailable vaccine doses, delayed and complex vaccination campaigns. At the end of the 1990s, controversy ensued: since reactive vaccination was fraught with so many problems, why not consider a strategy of preventive AC vaccination for high risk areas? But this controversy may well die out with the emergence of the present-day W 135 serogroup responsible for the first large scale epidemic in Burkina Faso in 2002. If this is confirmed, a polyosidic vaCcine containing the W 135 antigen would be required, pending the availability for Africa of a conjugate tetravalent ACYW135 vaccine which could be included in the EPI.

  4. Second-generation prophylactic HPV vaccines: current options and future strategies for vaccines development.

    PubMed

    Fruscalzo, Arrigo; Londero, Ambrogio P; Bertozzi, Serena; Lellè, Ralf J

    2016-02-01

    Two vaccines focused on the prevention of HPV-related diseases have been introduced in the last decade, the quadrivalent vaccine Gardasil and the bivalent vaccine Cervarix. They are targeted to prevent precancerous and cancerous lesions not only of the cervix, but also of the vulva, vagina, anal and head-neck region. Furthermore, the protection of the quadrivalent vaccine Gardasil includes also genital warts and recurrent respiratory Papillomatosis, two benign conditions with high socio-economic impact. Although their efficacy in reducing the burden of HPV-related pathologies has been already documented, second-generation HPV vaccines are being developed in order to overcome major limitations, above all the cost of production, distribution and acceptance, thus promoting an easier access to vaccination, especially in developing countries. Recently a new multivalent VLP vaccine active against nine HPV subtypes, called Gardasil 9 (Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA), has been approved, showing promising preliminary results. In this article, we outline the strategies adopted for second-generation HPV vaccine engineering, the latest HPV vaccines available at this time, as well as those currently in development.

  5. Novel vaccine strategies against emerging viruses

    PubMed Central

    García-Sastre, Adolfo; Mena, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    One of the main public health concerns of emerging viruses is their potential introduction into and sustained circulation among populations of immunologically naïve, susceptible hosts. The induction of protective immunity through vaccination can be a powerful tool to prevent this concern by conferring protection to the population at risk. Conventional approaches to develop vaccines against emerging pathogens have significant limitations: lack of experimental tools for several emerging viruses of concern, poor immunogenicity, safety issues, or lack of cross-protection against antigenic variants. The unpredictability of the emergence of future virus threats demands the capability to rapidly develop safe, effective vaccines. We describe some recent advances in new vaccine strategies that are being explored as alternatives to classical attenuated and inactivated vaccines, and provide examples of potential novel vaccines for emerging viruses. These approaches might be applied to the control of many other emerging pathogens. PMID:23477832

  6. Strategy vaccination against Hepatitis B in China

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xueyan; Liang, Zhenglun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) is a serious public health problem in China. Up to now, the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination was the most cost-effective way to prevent HBV infection. Since 1992, when the Chinese government prioritized implementing the HBV vaccinations for newborns, China began to see a larger reduction in HBV infections. For children under 5 years, the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has decreased to 1.0%. However, many additional challenges for the prevention and control of HBV infection in China remain. There is a lack of knowledge of the significant impact of the HBV vaccination for the general public with 93 million HBV carriers and chronic HBV patients as infection sources. Therefore, the HBV vaccine application should focus on the optimization of immunization strategies according to HBV prevalence characteristics, improve the public's knowledge of HBV vaccinations, and help to ensure the protective effects of the HBV vaccine. PMID:25881006

  7. Vaccines and immunization strategies for dengue prevention

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianying; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is currently the most significant arboviral disease afflicting tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. Dengue vaccines, such as the multivalent attenuated, chimeric, DNA and inactivated vaccines, have been developed to prevent dengue infection in humans, and they function predominantly by stimulating immune responses against the dengue virus (DENV) envelope (E) and nonstructural-1 proteins (NS1). Of these vaccines, a live attenuated chimeric tetravalent DENV vaccine developed by Sanofi Pasteur has been licensed in several countries. However, this vaccine renders only partial protection against the DENV2 infection and is associated with an unexplained increased incidence of hospitalization for severe dengue disease among children younger than nine years old. In addition to the virus-based vaccines, several mosquito-based dengue immunization strategies have been developed to interrupt the vector competence and effectively reduce the number of infected mosquito vectors, thus controlling the transmission of DENV in nature. Here we summarize the recent progress in the development of dengue vaccines and novel immunization strategies and propose some prospective vaccine strategies for disease prevention in the future. PMID:27436365

  8. Vaccines and immunization strategies for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianying; Cheng, Gong

    2016-07-20

    Dengue is currently the most significant arboviral disease afflicting tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. Dengue vaccines, such as the multivalent attenuated, chimeric, DNA and inactivated vaccines, have been developed to prevent dengue infection in humans, and they function predominantly by stimulating immune responses against the dengue virus (DENV) envelope (E) and nonstructural-1 proteins (NS1). Of these vaccines, a live attenuated chimeric tetravalent DENV vaccine developed by Sanofi Pasteur has been licensed in several countries. However, this vaccine renders only partial protection against the DENV2 infection and is associated with an unexplained increased incidence of hospitalization for severe dengue disease among children younger than nine years old. In addition to the virus-based vaccines, several mosquito-based dengue immunization strategies have been developed to interrupt the vector competence and effectively reduce the number of infected mosquito vectors, thus controlling the transmission of DENV in nature. Here we summarize the recent progress in the development of dengue vaccines and novel immunization strategies and propose some prospective vaccine strategies for disease prevention in the future.

  9. Vaccine strategies against cystic fibrosis pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Le Moigne, Vincent; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A great number of cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Burkholderia cepacia and the Mycobacterium abscessus complex raised difficult therapeutic problems due to their intrinsic multi-resistance to numerous antibiotics. Vaccine strategies represent one of the key weapons against these multi-resistant bacteria in a number of clinical settings like CF. Different strategies are considered in order to develop such vaccines, linked either to priming the host response, or by exploiting genomic data derived from the bacterium. Interestingly, virulence factors synthesized by various pathogens might serve as targets for vaccine development and have been, for example, evaluated in the context of CF. PMID:26618824

  10. Cervical cancer in India and HPV vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kaarthigeyan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer, mainly caused by Human Papillomavirus infection, is the leading cancer in Indian women and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Though there are several methods of prevention of cervical cancer, prevention by vaccination is emerging as the most effective option, with the availability of two vaccines. Several studies have been published examining the vaccine's efficacy, immunogenicity and safety. Questions and controversy remain regarding mandatory vaccination, need for booster doses and cost-effectiveness, particularly in the Indian context. PMID:22754202

  11. New Immunotherapy Strategies in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin-Yu; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Cong-Min; Zeng, Wen-Jing; Yan, Han; Li, Mu-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women. Therapeutic treatments for breast cancer generally include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrinotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. With the development of molecular biology, immunology and pharmacogenomics, immunotherapy becomes a promising new field in breast cancer therapies. In this review, we discussed recent progress in breast cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, bispecific antibodies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Several additional immunotherapy modalities in early stages of development are also highlighted. It is believed that these new immunotherapeutic strategies will ultimately change the current status of breast cancer therapies. PMID:28085094

  12. New Immunotherapy Strategies in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Yu; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Cong-Min; Zeng, Wen-Jing; Yan, Han; Li, Mu-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-12

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women. Therapeutic treatments for breast cancer generally include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrinotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. With the development of molecular biology, immunology and pharmacogenomics, immunotherapy becomes a promising new field in breast cancer therapies. In this review, we discussed recent progress in breast cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, bispecific antibodies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Several additional immunotherapy modalities in early stages of development are also highlighted. It is believed that these new immunotherapeutic strategies will ultimately change the current status of breast cancer therapies.

  13. DIVA vaccination strategies for avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Suarez, David L

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination for both low pathogenicity avian influenza and highly pathogenic avian influenza is commonly used by countries that have become endemic for avian influenza virus, but stamping-out policies are still common for countries with recently introduced disease. Stamping-out policies of euthanatizing infected and at-risk flocks has been an effective control tool, but it comes at a high social and economic cost. Efforts to identify alternative ways to respond to outbreaks without widespread stamping out has become a goal for organizations like the World Organisation for Animal Health. A major issue with vaccination for avian influenza is trade considerations because countries that vaccinate are often considered to be endemic for the disease and they typically lose their export markets. Primarily as a tool to promote trade, the concept of DIVA (differentiate infected from vaccinated animals) has been considered for avian influenza, but the goal for trade is to differentiate vaccinated and not-infected from vaccinated and infected animals because trading partners are unwilling to accept infected birds. Several different strategies have been investigated for a DIVA strategy, but each has advantages and disadvantages. A review of current knowledge on the research and implementation of the DIVA strategy will be discussed with possible ways to implement this strategy in the field. The increased desire for a workable DIVA strategy may lead to one of these ideas moving from the experimental to the practical.

  14. Dengue vaccine development: strategies and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Lakshmy; Pillai, Madhavan Radhakrishna; Nair, Radhakrishnan R

    2015-03-01

    Infection with dengue virus may result in dengue fever or a more severe outcome, such as dengue hemorrhagic syndrome/shock. Dengue virus infection poses a threat to endemic regions for four reasons: the presence of four serotypes, each with the ability to cause a similar disease outcome, including fatality; difficulties related to vector control; the lack of specific treatment; and the nonavailability of a suitable vaccine. Vaccine development is considered challenging due to the severity of the disease observed in individuals who have acquired dengue-specific immunity, either passively or actively. Therefore, the presence of vaccine-induced immunity against a particular serotype may prime an individual to severe disease on exposure to dengue virus. Vaccine development strategies include live attenuated vaccines, chimeric, DNA-based, subunit, and inactivated vaccines. Each of the candidates is in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. Issues pertaining to selection pressures, viral interaction, and safety still need to be evaluated in order to induce a complete protective immune response against all four serotypes. This review highlights the various strategies that have been employed in vaccine development, and identifies the obstacles to producing a safe and effective vaccine.

  15. Composite peptide-based vaccines for cancer immunotherapy (Review).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Qing; Li, Ke; Yin, Hong; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2015-01-01

    The use of peptide-based vaccines as therapeutics aims to elicit immune responses through antigenic epitopes derived from tumor antigens. Peptide-based vaccines are easily synthesized and chemically stable entities, and of note, they are absent of oncogenic potential. However, their application is more complicated as the success of an effective peptide-based vaccine is determined by numerous parameters. The success thus far has been limited by the choice of tumor antigenic peptides, poor immunogenicity and incorporation of strategies to reverse cancer-mediated immune suppression. In the present review, an overview of the mechanisms of peptide-based vaccines is provided and antigenic peptides are categorized with respect to their tissue distribution in order to determine their usefulness as targets. Furthermore, certain approaches are proposed that induce and maintain T cells for immunotherapy. The recent progress indicates that peptide-based vaccines are preferential for targeted therapy in cancer patients.

  16. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines: Current Status and Moving Forward

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Concurrent with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the first therapeutic cancer vaccine, a wide spectrum of other cancer vaccine platforms that target a diverse range of tumor-associated antigens is currently being evaluated in randomized phase II and phase III trials. The profound influence of the tumor microenvironment and other immunosuppressive entities, however, can limit the effectiveness of these vaccines. Numerous strategies are currently being evaluated both preclinically and clinically to counteract these immunosuppressive entities, including the combined use of vaccines with immune checkpoint inhibitors, certain chemotherapeutics, small-molecule targeted therapies, and radiation. The potential influence of the appropriate patient population and clinical trial endpoint in vaccine therapy studies is discussed, as well as the potential importance of biomarkers in future directions of this field. PMID:22395641

  17. [Vaccination strategies for anthrax prevention].

    PubMed

    Beyer, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Apart from live spore vaccines with a certain amount of residual virulence for various animal species, there are two acellular protein vaccines for immunoprophylaxis against anthrax in humans. For ethical reasons there are no experimental data available on the efficacy and duration of the immunity they induce in men. Their efficacy was evaluated in laboratory animals, mainly rabbits and rhesus monkeys. Furthermore, it is well known that these vaccines elicit only partial protection in guinea pigs and almost no protection in mice against a challenge with fully virulent spores of Bacillus (B.) anthracis. Other disadvantages are the high amount of boosters necessary to elicit and to maintain a protective immune response, the variability in the composition of bacterial culture supernatants used for production, and the appearance of clinically relevant side effects. Therefore, there is ongoing work worldwide to improve the existing vaccines by substitution with recombinant antigens and to develop new vaccines on the basis of recombinant bacterial or viral live vectors, DNA-vectors, and by addition of new adjuvants. Special attention is given to supplementing the existing toxoid-vaccines with an anti-bacterial component.

  18. Generation of more effective cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fenoglio, Daniela; Traverso, Paolo; Parodi, Alessia; Kalli, Francesca; Zanetti, Maurizio; Filaci, Gilberto

    2013-12-01

    Cancer vaccines represent a promising therapeutic approach for which prime time is imminent. However, clinical efficacy must be improved in order for cancer vaccines to become a valid alternative or complement to traditional cancer treatments. Considerable efforts have been undertaken so far to better understand the fundamental requirements for clinically-effective cancer vaccines. Recent data emphasize that important requirements, among others, are (1) the use of multi-epitope immunogens, possibly deriving from different tumor antigens; (2) the selection of effective adjuvants; (3) the association of cancer vaccines with agents able to counteract the regulatory milieu present in the tumor microenvironment; and (4) the need to choose the definitive formulation and regimen of a vaccine after accurate preliminary tests comparing different antigen formulations. The first requirement deals with issues related to HLA restriction of tumor antigen presentation, as well as usefulness of tumor antigen spreading and counteraction of immune escape phenomena, linked to tumor antigen down-modulation, for an effective anti-cancer immune response. The second point underscores the necessity of optimal activation of innate immunity to achieve an efficient adaptive anti-cancer immune response. The third point focuses on the importance to inhibit subsets of regulatory cells. The last requirement stresses the concept that the regimen and formulation of the vaccine impacts profoundly on cancer vaccine efficacy. A new generation of cancer vaccines, provided with both immunological and clinical efficacy, will hopefully soon address these requirements.

  19. IL-13 receptor-directed cancer vaccines and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hideyuki; Husain, Syed R; Puri, Raj K

    2012-04-01

    Many immunotherapy approaches including therapeutic cancer vaccines targeting specific tumor-associated antigens are at various stages of development. Although the significance of overexpression of (IL-13Rα2) in cancer is being actively investigated, we have reported that IL-13Rα2 is a novel tumor-associated antigen. The IL-13Rα2-directed cancer vaccine is one of the most promising approaches to tumor immunotherapy, because of the selective expression of IL-13Rα2 in various solid tumor types but not in normal tissues. In this article, we will summarize its present status and potential strategies to improve IL-13Rα2-directed cancer vaccines for an optimal therapy of cancer.

  20. Infections and cancer: debate about using vaccines as a cancer control tool.

    PubMed

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Buonaguro, Franco M

    2013-05-04

    In 2012, Infectious Agents and Cancer commissioned a thematic series collection of articles on Prevention of HPV related cancer. The articles have attracted wide interest and stimulated debate, including about the utility of vaccines in cancer control. The application of vaccines to cancer control fulfills a promise envisioned at the turn of the 20th century when remarkable experiments showed that some cancers were caused by infections. This suggested the possibility of applying infection-control strategies to cancer control. Vaccines represent the most practical cost-effective technology to prevent wide human suffering and death from many acute infectious diseases, such as small pox or polio. Hitherto applied to control of acute fatal infections, vaccines, if developed, might provide a potent way to control cancer. The articles in the HPV thematic series show success in developing and applying a vaccine against human papilloma virus (HPV). A vaccine is also available against hepatitis B virus (HBV), which causes liver cancer. These vaccines augment the tools available to control the associated cancers. Scientific endeavor continues for six other cancer-associated infections, mostly viruses. Not surprisingly, debate about the safety of vaccines targeting cancer has been triggered in the scientific community. Questions about safety have been raised for those populations where other means to control these cancers may be available. Although it is difficult to quantify risk from vaccines in individuals where other cancer control services exist, it is likely to be low. Vaccines are much safer today than before. Technological advancement in vaccine development and manufacture and improved regulatory review and efficient distribution have minimized substantially the risk for harm from vaccines. Formal and informal debate about the pros and cons of applying vaccines as a cancer control tools is ongoing in scientific journals and on the web. Infectious Agents and Cancer

  1. Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    10-1-0225 TITLE: “Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines ” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christian R. Gomez, Ph.D...SUBTITLE “Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines ” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0225 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...cell CaP vaccines by taking into consideration tumor-associated hypoxia as a relevant determinant of tumor antigenicity. Major Findings: Gene

  2. Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0531 TITLE: Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William H. McBride CONTRACTING...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0531 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  3. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  4. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN CANCER VACCINES1

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Banchereau, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The adoptive transfer of cancer antigen-specific effector T cells in patients can result in tumor rejection, thereby illustrating the immune system potential for cancer therapy. Ideally, one would like to directly induce efficient tumor-specific effector and memory T cells through vaccination. Therapeutic vaccines have two objectives: priming antigen-specific T cells and reprogramming memory T cells, i.e., a transformation from one type of immunity to another (e.g., regulatory to cytotoxic). Recent successful phase III clinical trials showing benefit to the patients revived cancer vaccines. Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential in generation of immune responses and as such represent targets and vectors for vaccination. We have learned that different DC subsets elicit different T cells. Similarly, different activation methods result in DCs able to elicit distinct T cells. We contend that a careful manipulation of activated DCs will allow cancer immunotherapists to produce the next generation of highly efficient cancer vaccines. PMID:21248270

  5. Recombinant vaccines and the development of new vaccine strategies.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, I P; Leite, L C C

    2012-12-01

    Vaccines were initially developed on an empirical basis, relying mostly on attenuation or inactivation of pathogens. Advances in immunology, molecular biology, biochemistry, genomics, and proteomics have added new perspectives to the vaccinology field. The use of recombinant proteins allows the targeting of immune responses focused against few protective antigens. There are a variety of expression systems with different advantages, allowing the production of large quantities of proteins depending on the required characteristics. Live recombinant bacteria or viral vectors effectively stimulate the immune system as in natural infections and have intrinsic adjuvant properties. DNA vaccines, which consist of non-replicating plasmids, can induce strong long-term cellular immune responses. Prime-boost strategies combine different antigen delivery systems to broaden the immune response. In general, all of these strategies have shown advantages and disadvantages, and their use will depend on the knowledge of the mechanisms of infection of the target pathogen and of the immune response required for protection. In this review, we discuss some of the major breakthroughs that have been achieved using recombinant vaccine technologies, as well as new approaches and strategies for vaccine development, including potential shortcomings and risks.

  6. Cancer Vaccines and Carbohydrate Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Lum, Michelle; Vijay, Geraldine; Jain, Miten; Almogren, Adel; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) result from the aberrant glycosylation that is seen with transformation to a tumor cell. The carbohydrate antigens that have been found to be tumor-associated include the mucin related Tn, Sialyl Tn, and Thomsen-Friedenreich antigens, the blood group Lewis related LewisY, Sialyl LewisX and Sialyl LewisA, and LewisX, (also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1, SSEA-1), the glycosphingolipids Globo H and stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3), the sialic acid containing glycosphingolipids, the gangliosides GD2, GD3, GM2, fucosyl GM1, and Neu5GcGM3, and polysialic acid. Recent developments have furthered our understanding of the T-independent type II response that is seen in response to carbohydrate antigens. The selection of a vaccine target antigen is based on not only the presence of the antigen in a variety of tumor tissues but also on the role this antigen plays in tumor growth and metastasis. These roles for TACAs are being elucidated. Newly acquired knowledge in understanding the T-independent immune response and in understanding the key roles that carbohydrates play in metastasis are being applied in attempts to develop an effective vaccine response to TACAs. The role of each of the above mentioned carbohydrate antigens in cancer growth and metastasis and vaccine attempts using these antigens will be described. PMID:21964054

  7. Transloading of tumor cells with foreign major histocompatibility complex class I peptide ligand: a novel general strategy for the generation of potent cancer vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, W; Steinlein, P; Buschle, M; Schweighoffer, T; Herbst, E; Mechtler, K; Kirlappos, H; Birnstiel, M L

    1996-01-01

    The major hurdle to be cleared in active immunotherapy of cancer is the poor immunogenicity of cancer cells. In previous attempts to overcome this problem, whole tumor cells have been used as vaccines, either admixed with adjuvant(s) or genetically engineered to express nonself proteins or immunomodulatory factors before application. We have developed a novel approach to generate an immunogeneic, highly effective vaccine: major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-positive cancer cells are administered together with MHC class I-matched peptide ligands of foreign, nonself origin, generated by a procedure we term transloading. Murine tumor lines of the H2-Kd or the H2-Db haplotype, melanoma M-3 and B16-F10, respectively, as well as colon carcinoma CT-26 (H2-Kd), were transloaded with MHC-matched influenza virus-derived peptides and applied as irradiated vaccines. Mice bearing a deposit of live M-3 melanoma cells were efficiently cured by this treatment. In the CT-26 colon carcinoma and the B16-F10 melanoma, high efficacies were obtained against tumor challenge, suggesting the universal applicability of this new type of vaccine. With foreign peptide ligands adapted to the requirements of a desired MHC class I haplotype, this concept may be used for the treatment of human cancers. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8790404

  8. Immunotherapy in prostate cancer: emerging strategies against a formidable foe

    PubMed Central

    Bilusic, Marijo; Heery, Christopher; Madan, Ravi A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown therapeutic vaccines to be promising treatment modalities against prostate cancer. Unlike preventive vaccines that teach the immune system to fight off specific microorganisms, therapeutic vaccines stimulate the immune system to recognize and attack certain cancer-associated proteins. Additional strategies are being investigated that combine vaccines and standard therapeutics, including radiation, chemotherapy, targeted therapies, and hormonal therapy, to optimize the vaccines’ effects. Recent vaccine late-phase clinical trials have reported evidence of clinical benefit while maintaining excellent quality of life. One such vaccine, sipuleucel-T, was recently FDA-approved for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. Another vaccine, PSA-TRICOM, is also showing promise in completed and ongoing randomized multicenter clinical trials in both early and late stage prostate cancer. Clinical results available to date indicate that immune-based therapies could play a significant role in the treatment of prostate and other malignancies. PMID:21741424

  9. Overview of mimotopes and related strategies in tumor vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Liu, Zhiguo; Fan, Daiming

    2008-12-01

    Tumor vaccine has been studied extensively as an alternative or adjuvant therapy in the treatment of malignant tumors in the hope of prolonging the overall survival rates of cancer patients. The efficacy largely relies on the specificity of the target. In the last decade, many antibody epitopes, called mimotopes, have been revealed as candidates through phage-display technology. These mimotopes do not necessarily consist of amino acid sequences that are identical to the native antigen but they do mimic their structure. Tumor vaccines based on these mimotopes have been proposed as an important developing strategy. Some peptide mimotopes have produced encouraging clinical outcomes. Although most studies are still in the preclinical phase, these findings will possibly pave the way for the development of novel mimotope-based tumor vaccines.

  10. Optimal vaccination strategies and rational behaviour in seasonal epidemics.

    PubMed

    Doutor, Paulo; Rodrigues, Paula; Soares, Maria do Céu; Chalub, Fabio A C C

    2016-12-01

    We consider a SIRS model with time dependent transmission rate. We assume time dependent vaccination which confers the same immunity as natural infection. We study two types of vaccination strategies: (i) optimal vaccination, in the sense that it minimizes the effort of vaccination in the set of vaccination strategies for which, for any sufficiently small perturbation of the disease free state, the number of infectious individuals is monotonically decreasing; (ii) Nash-equilibria strategies where all individuals simultaneously minimize the joint risk of vaccination versus the risk of the disease. The former case corresponds to an optimal solution for mandatory vaccinations, while the second corresponds to the equilibrium to be expected if vaccination is fully voluntary. We are able to show the existence of both optimal and Nash strategies in a general setting. In general, these strategies will not be functions but Radon measures. For specific forms of the transmission rate, we provide explicit formulas for the optimal and the Nash vaccination strategies.

  11. Recent advances in the development of breast cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Andrea; Sangiolo, Dario; Aglietta, Massimo; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The manipulation of the immune system through the administration of a vaccine to direct an effective and long-lasting immune response against breast cancer (BC) cells is an attractive strategy. Vaccines would have several theoretical advantages over standard therapies, including low toxicities, high specificity, and long-lasting efficacy due to the establishment of immunological memory. However, BC vaccines have failed to demonstrate meaningful results in clinical trials so far. This reflects the intrinsic difficulty in breaking the complex immune-escaping mechanisms developed by cancer cells. New vaccines should be able to elicit complex immunologic response involving multiple immune effectors such as cytotoxic and antibody-secreting B cells, innate immunity effectors, and memory cells. Moreover, especially in patients with large tumor burdens and metastatic disease, combining vaccines with other strategies, such as systemic BC therapies, passive immunotherapy, or immunomodulatory agents, could increase the effectiveness of each approach. Here, we review recent advances in BC vaccines, focusing on suitable targets and innovative strategies. We report results of most recent trials investigating active immunotherapy in BC and provide possible future perspectives in this field of research. PMID:25339848

  12. Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0531 TITLE: Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William H. McBride CONTRACTING...FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiation-Induced Vaccination to...determine abscopal responses that are hypothesized to be due to RT- induced vaccination . RT was started 10 days after the first and 3rd dose of

  13. Prostate cancer vaccines in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lubaroff, David M

    2012-07-01

    This review presents important information about the current state of the art for vaccine immunotherapy of prostate cancer. It includes important preclinical research for each of the important prostate cancer vaccines to have reached clinical trials. To date, the only prostate cancer vaccine that has completed Phase III trials and has been approved and licensed by the US FDA is Sipuleucel-T, which immunizes patients against the prostate-associated antigen prostatic acid phosphatase. The benefits and concerns associated with the vaccine are presented. A current Phase III trial is currently underway using the vaccinia-based prostate-specific antigen vaccine Prostvac-TRICOM. Other immunotherapeutic vaccines in trials include the Ad/prostate-specific antigen vaccine Ad5-prostate-specific antigen and the DNA/prostatic acid phosphatase vaccine. A cellular vaccine, GVAX, has been in clinical trials but has not seen continuous study. This review also delves into the multiple immune regulatory elements that must be overcome in order to obtain strong antitumor-associated antigen immune responses capable of effectively destroying prostate tumor cells.

  14. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  15. Dengue Fever: Causes, Complications, and Vaccine Strategies.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Niyati; Khanna, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a highly endemic infectious disease of the tropical countries and is rapidly becoming a global burden. It is caused by any of the 4 serotypes of dengue virus and is transmitted within humans through female Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease varies from mild fever to severe conditions of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome. Globalization, increased air travel, and unplanned urbanization have led to increase in the rate of infection and helped dengue to expand its geographic and demographic distribution. Dengue vaccine development has been a challenging task due to the existence of four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes, each capable of eliciting cross-reactive and disease-enhancing antibody response against the remaining three serotypes. Recently, Sanofi Pasteur's chimeric live-attenuated dengue vaccine candidate has been approved in Mexico, Brazil, and Philippines for usage in adults between 9 and 45 years of age. The impact of its limited application to the public health system needs to be evaluated. Simultaneously, the restricted application of this vaccine candidate warrants continued efforts in developing a dengue vaccine candidate which is additionally efficacious for infants and naïve individuals. In this context, alternative strategies of developing a designed vaccine candidate which does not allow production of enhancing antibodies should be explored, as it may expand the umbrella of efficacy to include infants and naïve individuals.

  16. Dengue Fever: Causes, Complications, and Vaccine Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a highly endemic infectious disease of the tropical countries and is rapidly becoming a global burden. It is caused by any of the 4 serotypes of dengue virus and is transmitted within humans through female Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease varies from mild fever to severe conditions of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome. Globalization, increased air travel, and unplanned urbanization have led to increase in the rate of infection and helped dengue to expand its geographic and demographic distribution. Dengue vaccine development has been a challenging task due to the existence of four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes, each capable of eliciting cross-reactive and disease-enhancing antibody response against the remaining three serotypes. Recently, Sanofi Pasteur's chimeric live-attenuated dengue vaccine candidate has been approved in Mexico, Brazil, and Philippines for usage in adults between 9 and 45 years of age. The impact of its limited application to the public health system needs to be evaluated. Simultaneously, the restricted application of this vaccine candidate warrants continued efforts in developing a dengue vaccine candidate which is additionally efficacious for infants and naïve individuals. In this context, alternative strategies of developing a designed vaccine candidate which does not allow production of enhancing antibodies should be explored, as it may expand the umbrella of efficacy to include infants and naïve individuals. PMID:27525287

  17. Vaccination Strategies for Mucosal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ogra, Pearay L.; Faden, Howard; Welliver, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:11292646

  18. Breast cancer immunotherapy: monoclonal antibodies and peptide-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mohit, Elham; Hashemi, Atieh; Allahyari, Mojgan

    2014-07-01

    Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a treatment strategy in the adjuvant setting of breast cancer. In this review, monoclonal antibodies in passive and peptide-based vaccines, as one of the most commonly studied in active immunotherapy approaches, are discussed. Trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against HER-2/neu, has demonstrated considerable efficacy. However, resistance to trastuzumab has led to development of many targeted therapies which have been examined in clinical trials. Monoclonal antibodies against immune-checkpoint molecules that are dysregulated by tumors as an immune resistance mechanism are also explained in this review. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies with the ability to target breast cancer stem cells that play a role in cancer recurrence are mentioned. Here, clinical trials of HER-2/neu B and T cells, MUC1 and hTERT cancer peptide vaccines are also presented. In addition, various strategies for enhancing vaccine efficacy including combination with monoclonal antibodies and using different delivery systems for peptide/protein-based vaccine are described.

  19. Vaccination strategies for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Ramos, Marina; von Euler Chelpin, Marianne; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease in the world, but there is currently no available cure for it. Current treatments only alleviate some of the symptoms for a few years, but they become ineffective in the long run and do not stop the disease. Therefore it is of outmost importance to develop therapeutic strategies that can prevent, stop, or cure Parkinson disease. A very promising target for these therapies is the peripheral immune system due to its probable involvement in the disease and its potential as a tool to modulate neuroinflammation. But for such strategies to be successful, we need to understand the particular state of the peripheral immune system during Parkinson disease in order to avoid its weaknesses. In this review we examine the available data regarding how dopamine regulates the peripheral immune system and how this regulation is affected in Parkinson disease; the specific cytokine profiles observed during disease progression and the alterations documented to date in patients’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also review the different strategies used in Parkinson disease animal models to modulate the adaptive immune response to salvage dopaminergic neurons from cell death. After analyzing the evidence, we hypothesize the need to prime the immune system to restore natural tolerance against α-synuclein in Parkinson disease, including at the same time B and T cells, so that T cells can reprogram microglia activation to a beneficial pattern and B cell/IgG can help neurons cope with the pathological forms of α-synuclein. PMID:24670306

  20. Economic Analysis of Pandemic Influenza Vaccination Strategies in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vernon J.; Tok, Mei Yin; Chow, Vincent T.; Phua, Kai Hong; Ooi, Eng Eong; Tambyah, Paul A.; Chen, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    Background All influenza pandemic plans advocate pandemic vaccination. However, few studies have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different vaccination strategies. This paper compares the economic outcomes of vaccination compared with treatment with antiviral agents alone, in Singapore. Methodology We analyzed the economic outcomes of pandemic vaccination (immediate vaccination and vaccine stockpiling) compared with treatment-only in Singapore using a decision-based model to perform cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses. We also explored the annual insurance premium (willingness to pay) depending on the perceived risk of the next pandemic occurring. Principal Findings The treatment-only strategy resulted in 690 deaths, 13,950 hospitalization days, and economic cost of USD$497 million. For immediate vaccination, at vaccine effectiveness of >55%, vaccination was cost-beneficial over treatment-only. Vaccine stockpiling is not cost-effective in most scenarios even with 100% vaccine effectiveness. The annual insurance premium was highest with immediate vaccination, and was lower with increased duration to the next pandemic. The premium was also higher with higher vaccine effectiveness, attack rates, and case-fatality rates. Stockpiling with case-fatality rates of 0.4–0.6% would be cost-beneficial if vaccine effectiveness was >80%; while at case-fatality of >5% stockpiling would be cost-beneficial even if vaccine effectiveness was 20%. High-risk sub-groups warrant higher premiums than low-risk sub-groups. Conclusions The actual pandemic vaccine effectiveness and lead time is unknown. Vaccine strategy should be based on perception of severity. Immediate vaccination is most cost-effective, but requires vaccines to be available when required. Vaccine stockpiling as insurance against worst-case scenarios is also cost-effective. Research and development is therefore critical to develop and stockpile cheap, readily available effective vaccines. PMID:19771173

  1. Prophylactic HPV vaccination and anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Chigurupati, Nagasudha L; Fung, Leslie

    2016-06-02

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing. High risk populations include HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), HIV-negative MSM, HIV-positive women and heterosexual men and women with a history of cervical cancer. HPV has been detected in over 90% of anal cancers. HPV16 is the most common genotype detected in about 70% of anal cancers. The quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine has been demonstrated to prevent vaccine associated persistent anal HPV infections as well as anal intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (AIN2+) in young MSM not previously infected. A retrospective analysis also suggests that qHPV vaccination of older MSM treated for AIN2+ may significantly decrease the risk of recurrence of the AIN2+. The HPV types detected in anal cancer are included in the 9-valent vaccine. Thus, the 9-valent HPV vaccine, when administered to boys and girls prior to the onset of sexual activity, should effectively prevent anal cancer.

  2. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Herrada, Andrés A.; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful “danger signals” by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance. PMID:23111166

  3. Adenoviral vector-based strategies against infectious disease and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviral vectors are widely employed against infectious diseases or cancers, as they can elicit specific antibody responses and T cell responses when they are armed with foreign genes as vaccine carriers, and induce apoptosis of the cancer cells when they are genetically modified for cancer therapy. In this review, we summarize the biological characteristics of adenovirus (Ad) and the latest development of Ad vector-based strategies for the prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases or cancers. Strategies to circumvent the pre-existing neutralizing antibodies which dampen the immunogenicity of Ad-based vaccines are also discussed. PMID:27105067

  4. [Dendritic cell-based therapeutic cancer vaccines].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Manglio; Alaniz, Laura; Mazzolini, Guillermo D

    2016-01-01

    In recent years immunotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. The increased knowledge in the tumor immune-biology has allowed developing rational treatments by manipulation of the immune system with significant clinical impact. This rapid development has significantly changed the prognosis of many tumors without treatment options up to date. Other strategies have explored the use of therapeutic vaccines based on dendritic cells (DC) by inducing antitumor immunity. DC are cells of hematopoietic origin, constitutively expressing molecules capable to present antigens, that are functionally the most potent inducers of the activation and proliferation of antigen specific T lymphocytes. The CD8+ T cells proliferate and acquire cytotoxic capacity after recognizing their specific antigen presented on the surface of DC, although only some types of DC can present antigens internalized from outside the cell to precursors of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (this function is called cross-presentation) requiring translocation mechanisms of complex antigens. The induction of an effective adaptive immune response is considered a good option given its specificity, and prolonged duration of response. The DC, thanks to its particular ability of antigen presentation and lymphocyte stimulation, are able to reverse the poor antitumor immune response experienced by patients with cancer. The DC can be obtained from various sources, using different protocols to generate differentiation and maturation, and are administered by various routes such as subcutaneous, intravenous or intranodal. The wide variety of protocols resulted in heterogeneous clinical responses.

  5. T-Cell Epitope Discovery for Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Sri; Anderson, Karen S

    2016-01-01

    The success of recent immune checkpoint blockade trials in solid tumors has demonstrated the tremendous potential of immune-mediated treatment strategies for cancer therapy. These immune therapies activate preexisting cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells (CTL) to selectively target and eradicate malignant cells. In vitro models suggest that these therapies may be more effective in combination with priming of CTL using cancer vaccines. CTL-mediated tumor targeting is achieved by its recognition of tumor antigenic epitopes presented on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by tumor cells. Discovering CTL-antigenic epitopes is therefore central to the design of therapeutic T-cell vaccines and immune monitoring of these complex immunotherapies. However, selecting and monitoring T-cell epitopes remains difficult due to the extensive polymorphism of HLA alleles and the presence of confounding non-immunogenic self-peptides. To overcome these challenges, this chapter presents methodologies for the design of CTL-targeted vaccines using selection of target HLA alleles, novel integrated computational strategies to predict HLA-class I CTL epitopes, and epitope validation methods using short-term ex vivo T-cell stimulation. This strategy results in the improved efficiency for selecting antigenic epitopes for CTL-mediated vaccines and for immune monitoring of tumor antigens.

  6. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine as an Anticancer Vaccine: Collaborative Efforts to Promote Human Papillomavirus Vaccine in the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Julie S; Steele, C Brooke; Hayes, Nikki; Bhatt, Achal; Moore, Angela R

    2017-03-01

    Widespread use of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has the potential to reduce incidence from HPV-associated cancers. However, vaccine uptake among adolescents remains well below the Healthy People 2020 targets. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) awardees are well positioned to work with immunization programs to increase vaccine uptake. The CDC chronic disease management information system was queried for objectives and activities associated with HPV vaccine that were reported by NCCCP awardees from 2013 to 2016 as part of program reporting requirements. A content analysis was conducted on the query results to categorize interventions according to strategies outlined in The Guide to Community Preventive Services and the 2014 President's Cancer Panel report. Sixty-two percent of NCCCP awardees had planned or implemented at least one activity since 2013 to address low HPV vaccination coverage in their jurisdictions. Most NCCCP awardees (86%) reported community education activities, while 65% reported activities associated with provider education. Systems-based strategies such as client reminders or provider assessment and feedback were each reported by less than 25% of NCCCP awardees. Many NCCCP awardees report planning or implementing activities to address low HPV vaccination coverage, often in conjunction with state immunization programs. NCCCP awardees can play a role in increasing HPV vaccination coverage through their cancer prevention and control expertise and access to partners in the healthcare community.

  7. Clinical trial designs for therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines have characteristics that require a new paradigm for phase I and phase II clinical development. Effective development plans may take advantage of some of the following observations: Dose ranging safety trials are not appropriate for many cancer vaccines. Dose ranging trials to establish an optimal biologic dose are often not practical. We have presented an efficient design of Korn et al. (4) to identify an immunogenic dose. Vaccine efficacy can be efficiently evaluated with tumor response as endpoint utilizing a two stage design with only 9 patients in the first stage. If no partial or complete responses are observed in the initial 9 patients, accrual to the trial is terminated. Optimization of vaccine delivery by comparing results of single arm phase II studies using immunological response as endpoint is problematic because of assay variation and potential non-comparability of patients in different studies. Randomized screening studies can be used to efficiently optimize vaccine immunogenicity. Efficiency in use of patients depends on having assay variation and inter-patient variability small relative to the difference in immunogenicity to be detected. Phase II studies using time to progression as endpoint are most interpretable if they employ randomized designs with a no-vaccine control group. Such designs may use an inflated type 1 error rate, and need not be prohibitively large if patients with rapidly progressive disease are studied. Interim monitoring plans may effectively limit the size of the trials by terminating accrual early when results are not consistent with the targeted improvement.

  8. Cancer vaccines: an update with special focus on ganglioside antigens.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Roberto J; Guthmann, Marcel D; Gabri, Mariano R; Carnero, Ariel J L; Alonso, Daniel F; Fainboim, Leonardo; Gomez, Daniel E

    2002-01-01

    the (CIM) from La Havana, Cuba, to developed new strategies for specific active immunotherapy. The project included two ganglioside based vaccines and one anti-idiotypic vaccine. We focused on two antigens: first GM3, an ubiquitous antigen which is over-expressed in several epithelial tumor types; and a second one, N-Glycolyl-GM3 a more molecule, not being expressed in normal tissues and recently found in several neoplastic cells, in particular breast, melanoma and neuroectodermal cancer cells. We developed two vaccines, one with each antigen, both using proteins derived from the outer membrane proteins (OMP) of Neisseria Meningitidis B, as carriers. We developed also the 1E10 vaccine; an anti-idiotype vaccine designed to mimic the N-Glycolyl-GM3 gangliosides. This monoclonal antibody is an Ab2-type-antibody which recognizes the Ab1 antibody called P3, the latter is a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes gangliosides as antigens. Since 1998 we initiated a clinical development program for these three compounds. Results of the phase I clinical trials proved that the three vaccines were safe and able to elicit specific antibody responses. In addition we were able to demonstrate the activation of the cellular arm of the immune response in patients treated with the GM3 vaccine. Although phase I trials are not designed to evaluate antitumor efficacy, it was encouraging to observe tumor shrinkage in some patients treated both with the GM3 and N-Glycolyl-GM3 vaccines. We have already begun a phase II program in several neoplastic diseases, with all three vaccines.

  9. Clinical Development of the E75 Vaccine in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Guy T.; Gall, Victor; Peoples, George E.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary E75 is an immunogenic peptide derived from the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein. A large amount of preclinical work evaluated the immunogenicity of E75, after which phase I trials investigated using E75 mixed with an immunoadjuvant as a vaccine. Those studies showed the vaccine to be safe and capable of stimulating an antigen-specific immune response. Subsequent to that, our group conducted trials evaluating E75 + granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the adjuvant setting. The studies enrolled node-positive and high-risk node-negative breast cancer patients, with the goal being to determine if vaccination could decrease the recurrence risk. The studies included 187 evaluable patients: 108 vaccinated ones and 79 controls. The 5-year disease-free survival for the vaccinated patients was 89.7% compared to 80.2% for the control patients, a 48% reduction in relative risk of recurrence. Based on these data, E75 + GM-CSF, now known as NeuVax™, is being evaluated in a phase III trial. In this article, we review preclinical data and results of the early-phase trials and provide an update on the ongoing phase III study. We also present additional strategies for employing the vaccine to be included as a component of combination immunotherapy as well as in the setting of ductal carcinoma in situ as an initial step towards primary prevention. PMID:27239173

  10. Designing effective vaccines for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip P; Osada, Takuya; Lyerly, H Kim; Morse, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Achieving long-term control of colorectal cancers with therapeutic vaccines that generate potent anti-tumor T cell and antibody responses has been a goal for more than two decades. To date, clinical trials of these vaccines have demonstrated induction of immune responses, but clinical benefit has been limited. Improved vector delivery systems with enhanced immunostimulatory properties, decreased immunogenicity against vector and improved antigen presentation are some of the key features of modern tumor vaccines. Furthermore, an improved understanding of the various immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment and regional lymph nodes, coupled with a burgeoning ability to impair inhibitory immune synapses, highlights a growing opportunity to induce beneficial antigen-specific responses against tumor. The combination of improved antigenic delivery systems, coupled with therapeutic immune activation, represents state-of-the-art colorectal vaccine design concepts with the goal of augmenting immune responses against tumor and improving clinical outcomes.

  11. Cancer vaccines: the perspective of the Cancer Immunology Branch, NCI.

    PubMed

    Sogn, J A; Finerty, J F; Heath, A K; Shen, G L; Austin, F C

    1993-08-12

    The Cancer Immunology Branch, NCI, is supporting a great deal of exciting research relevant to cancer vaccine development. The few areas highlighted here are representative of ongoing research opportunities, but further progress depends largely on a continued infusion of investigator-initiated ideas to realize the potential of current research areas and open new ones.

  12. Challenges facing the development of cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Just like any other effective immunization in medicine, cancer vaccines need to have antigens with particular specificity and immunostimulatory features, the immune responses to be elicited in the body, and therapeutic effect-regression or prevention of the cancer-must be meaningful and clinically observable. There are many choices for cancer antigens, such as tissue-specific proteins, cancer-specific proteins, class I- or class II-restricted peptides derived from those, or in situ and whole-cell-derived products are some examples. Another translational issue is that cancer patients are heterogeneous with respect to the extent to which the immune system is already activated with potential to impact the tumor growth or, conversely, the extent to which the immune system has been impaired through a prior and ongoing interaction with the tumor. Conventional or immunologic tests have potential to define a subset of patients with better chance or response, so that particular vaccines can be tested. Treatment of cancer patients is expensive, and trials are slow. To meet these challenges in practical terms will require not only careful scientific technical work for product development, coordination with clinicians to define patient subsets with diseases that can show responses, but also a comprehensive, practical implementation so that we can unlock the full potential of anticancer vaccines.

  13. Combining synthetic carbohydrate vaccines with cancer cell glycoengineering for effective cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Gong, Xi; Wang, Qianli; Li, Jie; Hu, Honggang; Wu, Qiuye; Zhang, Junping; Guo, Zhongwu

    2012-11-01

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are useful targets for the development of cancer vaccines or immunotherapies. However, a major obstacle in this application of TACAs is their poor immunogenicity. To overcome the problem, a new immunotherapeutic strategy combining synthetic vaccines made of artificial TACA derivatives and metabolic glycoengineering of cancer cells to express the artificial TACA derivatives was explored. Using a murine leukemia model FBL3 with GM3 antigen as the target, it was shown that artificial GM3 N-phenylacetyl derivative (GM3NPhAc) elicited robust antigen-specific T cell-dependent immunity and that N-phenylacetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNPhAc) as the biosynthetic precursor of GM3NPhAc selectively glycoengineered cancer cells to express GM3NPhAc both in vitro and in vivo. It was also demonstrated that GM3NPhAc-specific antisera and antibodies mediated strong cytotoxicity to ManNPhAc-treated FBL3 cell. Furthermore, vaccination with a conjugate vaccine made of GM3NPhAc followed by ManNPhAc treatment could significantly suppress tumor growth and prolong the survival of tumor-bearing mouse. These results have proved the feasibility of the new cancer immunotherapeutic strategy, as well as its efficacy to cure cancer, which is of general significance.

  14. Evolution of animal models in cancer vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei-Zen; Jones, Richard F.; Juhasz, Csaba; Gibson, Heather; Veenstra, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Advances in cancer vaccine development are facilitated by animal models reflecting key features of human cancer and its interface with host immunity. Several series of transplantable preneoplastic and neoplastic mouse mammary lesions have been used to delineate mechanisms of anti-tumor immunity. Mimicking immune tolerance to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) such as HER2/neu, transgenic mice developing spontaneous mammary tumors are strong model systems for pre-clinical vaccine testing. In these models, HER2 DNA vaccines are easily administered, well-tolerated, and induce both humoral and cellular immunity. Although engineered mouse strains have advanced cancer immunotherapy, basic shortcomings remain. For example, multiple mouse strains have to be tested to recapitulate genetic regulation of immune tolerance in humans. Outbred domestic felines more closely parallel humans in the natural development of HER2 positive breast cancer and their varying genetic background. Electrovaccination with heterologous HER2 DNA induces robust adaptive immune responses in cats. Importantly, homologous feline HER2 DNA with a single amino acid substitution elicits unique antibodies to feline mammary tumor cells, unlocking a new vaccine principle. As an alternative approach to targeted vaccination, non-surgical tumor ablation such as cryoablation induces anti-tumor immunity via in situ immunization, particularly when combined with toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist. As strategies for vaccination advance, non-invasive monitoring of host response becomes imperative. As an example, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) scanning following administration of tryptophan metabolism tracer [11C]-alpha-methyl-tryptophan (AMT) provides non-invasive imaging of both tumor growth and metabolic activities. Because AMT is a substrate of indoleamine-pyrrole 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme that produces the immune regulatory molecule kynurenine, AMT imaging can provide

  15. Evolution of animal models in cancer vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei-Zen; Jones, Richard F; Juhasz, Csaba; Gibson, Heather; Veenstra, Jesse

    2015-12-16

    Advances in cancer vaccine development are facilitated by animal models reflecting key features of human cancer and its interface with host immunity. Several series of transplantable preneoplastic and neoplastic mouse mammary lesions have been used to delineate mechanisms of anti-tumor immunity. Mimicking immune tolerance to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) such as HER2/neu, transgenic mice developing spontaneous mammary tumors are strong model systems for pre-clinical vaccine testing. In these models, HER2 DNA vaccines are easily administered, well-tolerated, and induce both humoral and cellular immunity. Although engineered mouse strains have advanced cancer immunotherapy, basic shortcomings remain. For example, multiple mouse strains have to be tested to recapitulate genetic regulation of immune tolerance in humans. Outbred domestic felines more closely parallel humans in the natural development of HER2 positive breast cancer and their varying genetic background. Electrovaccination with heterologous HER2 DNA induces robust adaptive immune responses in cats. Importantly, homologous feline HER2 DNA with a single amino acid substitution elicits unique antibodies to feline mammary tumor cells, unlocking a new vaccine principle. As an alternative approach to targeted vaccination, non-surgical tumor ablation such as cryoablation induces anti-tumor immunity via in situ immunization, particularly when combined with toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist. As strategies for vaccination advance, non-invasive monitoring of host response becomes imperative. As an example, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) scanning following administration of tryptophan metabolism tracer [11C]-alpha-methyl-tryptophan (AMT) provides non-invasive imaging of both tumor growth and metabolic activities. Because AMT is a substrate of indoleamine-pyrrole 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme that produces the immune regulatory molecule kynurenine, AMT imaging can provide

  16. Strategy of topical vaccination with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sascha; Patzelt, Alexa; Otberg, Nina; Thiede, Gisela; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2009-03-01

    Liposomes in the nanosize range have been recognized as a versatile drug delivery system of both hydrophilic and lipophilic molecules. In order to develop a liposome-based topical vaccination strategy, five different types of liposomes were tested as a putative vaccine delivery system on pig ear skin. The investigated liposomes mainly varied in size, lipid composition, and surface charge. Using hydrophilic and hydrophobic fluorescent dyes as model drugs, penetration behavior was studied by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy of intact skin and histological sections, respectively. Follicular penetration of the liposomes was measured in comparison to a standard, nonliposomal formulation at different time points. Dependent on time but independent of their different characters, the liposomes showed a significantly higher penetration depth into the hair follicles compared to the standard formulation. The standard formulation reached a relative penetration depth of 30% of the full hair follicle length after seven days, whereas amphoteric and cationic liposomes had reached ~70%. Penetration depth of negatively charged liposomes did not exceed 50% of the total follicle length. The fluorescence dyes were mainly detected in the hair follicle; only a small amount of dye was found in the upper parts of the epidermis.

  17. Strategy of topical vaccination with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sascha; Patzelt, Alexa; Otberg, Nina; Thiede, Gisela; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2009-01-01

    Liposomes in the nanosize range have been recognized as a versatile drug delivery system of both hydrophilic and lipophilic molecules. In order to develop a liposome-based topical vaccination strategy, five different types of liposomes were tested as a putative vaccine delivery system on pig ear skin. The investigated liposomes mainly varied in size, lipid composition, and surface charge. Using hydrophilic and hydrophobic fluorescent dyes as model drugs, penetration behavior was studied by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy of intact skin and histological sections, respectively. Follicular penetration of the liposomes was measured in comparison to a standard, nonliposomal formulation at different time points. Dependent on time but independent of their different characters, the liposomes showed a significantly higher penetration depth into the hair follicles compared to the standard formulation. The standard formulation reached a relative penetration depth of 30% of the full hair follicle length after seven days, whereas amphoteric and cationic liposomes had reached approximately 70%. Penetration depth of negatively charged liposomes did not exceed 50% of the total follicle length. The fluorescence dyes were mainly detected in the hair follicle; only a small amount of dye was found in the upper parts of the epidermis.

  18. Optimization model of vaccination strategy for dengue transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayani, H.; Kallista, M.; Nuraini, N.; Sari, M. Y.

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever is emerging tropical and subtropical disease caused by dengue virus infection. The vaccination should be done as a prevention of epidemic in population. The host-vector model are modified with consider a vaccination factor to prevent the occurrence of epidemic dengue in a population. An optimal vaccination strategy using non-linear objective function was proposed. The genetic algorithm programming techniques are combined with fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to construct the optimal vaccination. In this paper, the appropriate vaccination strategy by using the optimal minimum cost function which can reduce the number of epidemic was analyzed. The numerical simulation for some specific cases of vaccination strategy is shown.

  19. Regulatory considerations for clinical development of cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Heelan, Bridget Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer vaccines are aimed at stimulating an immune response to tumor tissue. There is a high level of clinical activity in this rapidly advancing field with over 1,400 trials registered on Clincaltrials.gov. The recent approval of Sipuleucel-T which is the first cancer vaccine approved in the US and EU has encouraged developers in this field. In contrast to more established approaches for treating cancer such as chemotherapy, regulatory guidelines have been developed relatively recently for cancer vaccines. These guidelines advise on general clinical requirements. As there is an increase in innovative strategies with novel products, a 2-way dialog with regulators is recommended on a case-by-case basis to justify the clinical development plan, taking into account specific quality issues related to the product(s) in development. It is important that the rationale, background and justification for the planned development is convincing when interacting with the regulatory authorities, to enable drug developers and regulators to reach agreement. PMID:25625933

  20. Regulatory considerations for clinical development of cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Heelan, Bridget Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Cancer vaccines are aimed at stimulating an immune response to tumor tissue. There is a high level of clinical activity in this rapidly advancing field with over 1,400 trials registered on Clincaltrials.gov. The recent approval of Sipuleucel-T which is the first cancer vaccine approved in the US and EU has encouraged developers in this field. In contrast to more established approaches for treating cancer such as chemotherapy, regulatory guidelines have been developed relatively recently for cancer vaccines. These guidelines advise on general clinical requirements. As there is an increase in innovative strategies with novel products, a 2-way dialog with regulators is recommended on a case-by-case basis to justify the clinical development plan, taking into account specific quality issues related to the product(s) in development. It is important that the rationale, background and justification for the planned development is convincing when interacting with the regulatory authorities, to enable drug developers and regulators to reach agreement.

  1. 2013 update on current vaccination strategies in puppies and kittens.

    PubMed

    Davis-Wurzler, Gina M

    2014-03-01

    Vaccines remain one of the practitioner's greatest tools in preventing disease and maintaining individual and population health. This article is an update to "Current Vaccination Strategies in Puppies and Kittens" published in Veterinary Clinics of North America, Small Animal Practitioner, in May 2006. There are now comprehensive guidelines readily available for small animal practitioners regarding canine and feline pediatric (and adult) vaccination recommendations. Perhaps more importantly, there is an increased dialogue regarding all aspects of preventive medicine, of which vaccination is only a small, yet significant portion; and an increased drive to provide scientific evidence for developing vaccination recommendations.

  2. Antibodies: At The Nexus of Antigens and Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Steplewski, Zenon; Thurin, Magdalena; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the development of monoclonal antibodies and the inception of their use in cancer therapy, their impact on defining cancer biomarkers, and their structural utility in new cancer vaccine development. PMID:26116735

  3. Antibodies: At The Nexus of Antigens and Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Steplewski, Zenon; Thurin, Magdalena; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2015-07-15

    This review describes the development of monoclonal antibodies and the inception of their use in cancer therapy, their impact on defining cancer biomarkers, and their structural utility in new cancer vaccine development.

  4. Screening, HPV Vaccine Can Prevent Cervical Cancer: FDA

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163464.html Screening, HPV Vaccine Can Prevent Cervical Cancer: FDA Agency recommends getting ... by the human papillomavirus (HPV). An FDA-approved vaccine called Gardasil 9 protects against 9 HPV types ...

  5. Dendritic cell targeting vaccine for HPV-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjie; Duluc, Dorothée; Joo, HyeMee; Oh, SangKon

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen presenting cells that can efficiently prime and activate cellular immune responses. Delivering antigens to in vivo DCs has thus been considered as a promising strategy that could allow us to mount T cell-mediated therapeutic immunity against cancers in patients. Successful development of such types of cancer vaccines that can target in vivo DCs, however, requires a series of outstanding questions that need to be addressed. These include the proper selection of which DC surface receptors, specific DC subsets and DC activators that can further enhance the efficacy of vaccines by promoting effector T cell infiltration and retention in tumors and their actions against tumors. Supplementing these areas of research with additional strategies that can counteract tumor immune evasion mechanisms is also expected to enhance the efficacy of such therapeutic vaccines against cancers. After more than a decade of study, we have concluded that antigen targeting to DCs via CD40 to evoke cellular responses is more efficient than targeting antigens to the same types of DCs via eleven other DC surface receptors tested. In recent work, we have further demonstrated that a prototype vaccine (anti-CD40-HPV16.E6/7, a recombinant fusion protein of anti-human CD40 and HPV16.E6/7 protein) for HPV16-associated cancers can efficiently activate HPV16.E6/7-specific T cells, particularly CD8+ T cells, from the blood of HPV16+ head-and-neck cancer patients. Moreover, anti-CD40-HPV16.E6/7 plus poly(I:C) can mount potent therapeutic immunity against TC-1 tumor expressing HPV16.E6/7 protein in human CD40 transgenic mice. In this manuscript, we thus highlight our recent findings for the development of novel CD40 targeting immunotherapeutic vaccines for HPV16-associated malignancies. In addition, we further discuss several of key questions that still remain to be addressed for enhancing therapeutic immunity elicited by our prototype vaccine against HPV16

  6. Considerations for developing an immunization strategy with enterovirus 71 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yin, Hongzhang; An, Zhijie; Feng, Zijian

    2015-02-25

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a common pathogen for hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), which has significant morbidity and mortality, and for which children aged 6-59 months age are at highest risk. Due to lack of effective treatment options, control of EV71 epidemics has mainly focused on development of EV71 vaccines. Clinical trials have been completed on 3 EV71 vaccines, with trial results demonstrating good vaccine efficacy and safety. When EV71 vaccine is approved by China's national regulatory authority, an evidence-based strategy should be developed to optimize impact and safety. An immunization strategy for EV71 vaccine should consider several factors, including the target population age group, the number of doses for primary immunization, the need for a booster dose, concomitant administration of other vaccines, economic value, program capacity and logistics, and public acceptance. Once EV71 vaccines are in use, vaccine effectiveness and safety must be monitored in large populations, and the epidemiology of HFMD must be evaluated to assure a match between vaccination strategy and epidemiology. Evaluation in China is especially important because there are no other EV71 vaccines globally.

  7. Vaccines and vaccination strategies against human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Uzonna, Jude

    2009-05-01

    One might think that the development of a vaccine against cutaneous leishmaniasis would be relatively straightforward because the type of immune response required for protection is known and natural immunity occurs following recovery from primary infection. However, there is as yet no effective vaccine against the disease in humans. Although vaccination in murine studies has yielded promising results, these vaccines have failed miserably when tested in primates or humans. The reasons behind these failures are unknown and remain a major hurdle for vaccine design and development against cutaneous leishmaniasis. In contrast, recovery from natural, deliberate or experimental infections results in development of long-lasting immunity to re-infection. This so called infection-induced resistance is the strongest anti-Leishmania immunity known. Here, we briefly review the different approaches to vaccination against cutaneous leishmaniasis and argue that vaccines composed of genetically modified (attenuated) parasites, which induce immunity akin to infection-induced resistance, may provide best protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis in humans.

  8. Vaccination strategies based on the mimotope concept.

    PubMed

    Szalai, K; Jensen-Jarolim, E; Pali-Schöll, I

    2008-04-01

    Specific immunotherapies are in broad use for many diseases like allergies, cancer, autoimmune diseases or parasitic infections. Although clinical trials show successful application of these therapies, several disadvantages hinder the complete success. High production costs and repeated administrations represent the practical problems, while the possibly occurring side effects are the therapeutic troubles. To avoid these problems, the target specificity should be considered more intensely. Epitopes, the particular parts of antigens/allergens where they bind specific antibodies, are useful targets. To generate an epitope-specific vaccination, mimotopes can be identified via the biopanning technology. Mimotopes are small peptides mimicking the epitopes in the structural as well as in the immunological point of few. They are able to induce antigen-specific antibodies in active immunization form. These antibodies are directed against the natural antigen/allergen, and therefore they are able to block the outbreak of the diseases. Current research focuses on the development of mimotopes to achieve an epitope-specific induction of blocking antibodies, e.g. for allergy treatment. In cancer therapy, studies with mimotopes show successful interference with tumor cell growth in immunizations of mice. Also in the case of autoimmune diseases and parasitic infections this method was applied, targeting different molecules, which are key mediators in the disease mechanisms. Through the mimotope treatment via the specific antibody production, the disease symptoms could be hampered. This review gives an overview of the use of the mimotope concept and also of related therapeutic trials for the treatment of allergy, cancer, autoimmune and infectious diseases.

  9. Is human papillomavirus vaccination likely to be a useful strategy in India?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudeep; Kerkar, Rajendra A.; Dikshit, Rajesh; Badwe, Rajendra A.

    2013-01-01

    Two vaccines that protect against infection by some of the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes have recently been licensed for use in population-based vaccination strategies in many countries. However, these products are being promoted as ‘cervical cancer vaccines’ based on inadequate data. Specifically, there remain several concerns about the duration of immunogenicity, length of follow-up of trial subjects, endpoints chosen in vaccine trials, applicability of trial results to real populations, the safety of these products, and their cost-effectiveness as public health interventions. Furthermore, it is unlikely that vaccination will obviate the need for setting up robust and cost-effective screening programs in countries like India. This article will discuss various aspects of HPV vaccination from a public health perspective, especially from the point of view of its relevance to India and other South Asian countries. PMID:24455622

  10. Clinical cancer chemoprevention: From the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Horng-Jyh

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 2 million new cancer cases are attributed to infectious agents each year worldwide. Vaccines for the hepatitis B virus (HBV), a risk factor of hepatocellular cancer, and human papillomavirus (HPV), a risk factor of cervical cancer, are considered major successes in clinical chemoprevention of cancer. In Taiwan, the first evidence of cancer prevention through vaccinations was provided by HBV vaccination data in infants. The Taiwanese HBV vaccination program has since become a model immunization schedule for newborns worldwide. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV is generally accepted as prerequisite for cervical cancer diagnosis; however, cervical cancer is a rare complication of HPV infections. This is due to the fact that such infections tend to be transient. The safety and efficacy of both available HPV quadrivalent vaccine and bivalent vaccine are not in doubt at the present time. Until a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccine becomes available, simple hygienic practices, such as hand washing, can prevent CMV infection both before and during pregnancy. Each country should establish her official guidelines regarding which vaccines should be used to treat various conditions, the target population (i.e., universal or limited to a selected population), and the immunization schedules. After a vaccine is recommended, decisions regarding reimbursement by the public health care fund are evaluated. The guidelines become part of the immunization schedule, which is updated annually and published in the official bulletin. In conclusion, both HBV and HPV vaccines are considered major successes in the chemoprevention of cancer.

  11. Prospects for the future of prostate cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Madan, Ravi A; Gulley, James L

    2016-01-01

    Cancer therapy is undergoing a revolution fueled by clinical data demonstrating that the immune system has significant anti-tumor capability. Although the main focus of this revolution currently rests upon immune checkpoint inhibitors in diseases such as melanoma, lung and bladder cancer, it was actually a therapeutic cancer vaccine in prostate cancer that provided the first data demonstrating that a modern immunotherapy, beyond cytokines, could enhance clinical outcomes. As immunotherapy is poised to take center stage among cancer therapies, the role of cancer vaccines remains somewhat undefined in prostate cancer, though emerging data suggest that vaccines could play a crucial therapeutic role.

  12. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  13. Modelling vaccination strategies against foot-and-mouth disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, M. J.; Woolhouse, M. E. J.; May, R. M.; Davies, G.; Grenfell, B. T.

    2003-01-01

    Vaccination has proved a powerful defence against a range of infectious diseases of humans and animals. However, its potential to control major epidemics of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in livestock is contentious. Using an individual farm-based model, we consider either national prophylactic vaccination campaigns in advance of an outbreak, or combinations of reactive vaccination and culling strategies during an epidemic. Consistent with standard epidemiological theory, mass prophylactic vaccination could reduce greatly the potential for a major epidemic, while the targeting of high-risk farms increases efficiency. Given sufficient resources and preparation, a combination of reactive vaccination and culling might control ongoing epidemics. We also explore a reactive strategy, `predictive' vaccination, which targets key spatial transmission loci and can reduce markedly the long tail that characterizes many FMD epidemics. These analyses have broader implications for the control of human and livestock infectious diseases in heterogeneous spatial landscapes.

  14. Dengue vaccine: an update on recombinant subunit strategies.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Hermida, L

    2016-03-01

    Dengue is an increasing public health problem worldwide, with the four serotypes of the virus infecting over 390 million people annually. There is no specific treatment or antiviral drug for dengue, and prevention is largely limited to controlling the mosquito vectors or disrupting the human-vector contact. Despite the considerable progress made in recent years, an effective vaccine against the virus is not yet available. The development of a dengue vaccine has been hampered by many unique challenges, including the need to ensure the absence of vaccine-induced enhanced severity of disease. Recombinant protein subunit vaccines offer a safer alternative to other vaccine approaches. Several subunit vaccine candidates are presently under development, based on different structural and non-structural proteins of the virus. Novel adjuvants or immunopotentiating strategies are also being tested to improve their immunogenicity. This review summarizes the current status and development trends of subunit dengue vaccines.

  15. Strategies for design and application of enteric viral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Roth, James A; Saif, Linda J

    2015-01-01

    Enteric viral infections in domestic animals cause significant economic losses. The recent emergence of virulent enteric coronaviruses [porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV)] in North America and Asia, for which no vaccines are available, remains a challenge for the global swine industry. Vaccination strategies against rotavirus and coronavirus (transmissible gastroenteritis virus) infections are reviewed. These vaccination principles are applicable against emerging enteric infections such as PEDV. Maternal vaccines to induce lactogenic immunity, and their transmission to suckling neonates via colostrum and milk, are critical for early passive protection. Subsequently, in weaned animals, oral vaccines incorporating novel mucosal adjuvants (e.g., vitamin A, probiotics) may provide active protection when maternal immunity wanes. Understanding intestinal and systemic immune responses to experimental rotavirus and transmissible gastroenteritis virus vaccines and infection in pigs provides a basis and model for the development of safe and effective vaccines for young animals and children against established and emerging enteric infections.

  16. Trial watch: Peptide vaccines in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Martins, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jerome; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2012-12-01

    Prophylactic vaccination constitutes one of the most prominent medical achievements of history. This concept was first demonstrated by the pioneer work of Edward Jenner, dating back to the late 1790s, after which an array of preparations that confer life-long protective immunity against several infectious agents has been developed. The ensuing implementation of nation-wide vaccination programs has de facto abated the incidence of dreadful diseases including rabies, typhoid, cholera and many others. Among all, the most impressive result of vaccination campaigns is surely represented by the eradication of natural smallpox infection, which was definitively certified by the WHO in 1980. The idea of employing vaccines as anticancer interventions was first theorized in the 1890s by Paul Ehrlich and William Coley. However, it soon became clear that while vaccination could be efficiently employed as a preventive measure against infectious agents, anticancer vaccines would have to (1) operate as therapeutic, rather than preventive, interventions (at least in the vast majority of settings), and (2) circumvent the fact that tumor cells often fail to elicit immune responses. During the past 30 y, along with the recognition that the immune system is not irresponsive to tumors (as it was initially thought) and that malignant cells express tumor-associated antigens whereby they can be discriminated from normal cells, considerable efforts have been dedicated to the development of anticancer vaccines. Some of these approaches, encompassing cell-based, DNA-based and purified component-based preparations, have already been shown to exert conspicuous anticancer effects in cohorts of patients affected by both hematological and solid malignancies. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating purified peptides or full-length proteins as therapeutic interventions against cancer.

  17. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  18. Designing a vaccination strategy against dengue.

    PubMed

    Amaku, Marcos; Coudeville, Laurent; Massad, Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    In this work we propose a mathematical approach to estimate the dengue force of infection, the average age of dengue first infection, the optimum age to vaccinate children against dengue in a routine fashion and the optimum age interval to introduce the dengue vaccine in a mass vaccination campaign. The model is based on previously published models for vaccination against other childhood infections, which resulted in actual vaccination programmes in Brazil. The model was applied for three areas of distinct levels of endemicity of the city of Recife in Northeastern State of Pernambuco, Brazil. Our results point to an optimal age to introduce the dengue vaccine in the routine immunization programme at two years of age and an age interval to introduce a mass vaccination between three and 14 years of age.

  19. Introduction of human papillomavirus vaccines into developing countries - international strategies for funding and procurement.

    PubMed

    Andrus, Jon Kim; Sherris, Jacqueline; Fitzsimmons, John W; Kane, Mark A; Aguado, M Teresa

    2008-08-19

    This paper explores different international vaccine financing and procurement strategies used by the Pan American Health Organization, United Nation's Children's Fund, the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization, the Gulf Cooperation Model, and the Advanced Market Commitments. The aim is to identify lessons learned to help ensure equitable distribution of life-saving vaccines for cervical cancer prevention, with particular emphasis on sustainability. A critical first step in the cascade of activities necessary for Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine introduction should be the creation of an informed policy decision making process that is grounded in the best available information at a national level. This process will help ensure that decisions are financially sustainable. Any vaccine purchasing mechanisms should address the following essential points: 1) prioritization of cost-saving interventions; 2) flexible participation; 3) sufficient support to confront in-country challenges for managing vaccine procurement mechanisms; 4) a definite time-line for country ownership of vaccine purchases; 5) accuracy of vaccine demand forecasting; 6) maintenance of vaccine supply chains; and 7) well-functioning surveillance and regulatory bodies. In mapping the way forward, using the lessons learned and maintaining flexibility of financing and procurement mechanisms remain critical issues.

  20. Epitope-vaccine strategy against HIV-1: today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuqiang; Xiao, Yi; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2003-01-01

    Vaccines play important roles in preventing infectious diseases caused by different pathogens. However, some pathogens such as HIV-1 challenge current vaccine strategy. Poor immunogenicity and the high mutation rate of HIV-1 make great difficulties in inducing potent immune responses strong enough to prevent infection via vaccination. Epitope-vaccine, which could intensively enhance predefined epitope-specific immune responses, was suggested as a new strategy against HIV-1 and HIV-1 mutation. Epitope-vaccines afford powerful approaches to elicit potent, broad and complete immune protection against not only primary homologous viral isolates but also heterologous viral mutants. Although most studies are still preliminary now, epitope-vaccine as a novel strategy against the AIDS epidemic has great developmental potential. To trigger T-cell-dependent IgG antibody responses and improve affinities of the epitope-specific antibodies, approaches such as recombinant multi-epitope-vaccination and prime-boosting vaccination were suggested. Cellular immune responses, especially CTL responses, could also be elicited and enhanced in addition to humoral immune responses. Developed epitope-vaccines activating both arms of the immune system would benefit prevention and immunotherapy not only against HIV but also other chronic infections.

  1. Mutants of plant genes for developing cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Massa, Silvia; Paolini, Francesca; Spanò, Laura; Franconi, Rosella; Venuti, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    Preventive Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is an expensive practice and it may be an insufficient tool to tackle cervical cancer worldwide. Therapeutic intervention is seeking for safe/effective vaccines inducing the activation of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that is required to clear the tumor. Linking a tumor-specific antigen (i.e. the E7 oncoprotein of the 'high risk' HPVs) to molecules able to increase its immune 'visibility' represents a strategy to force the immune system to fight cancer. We focused on plants as sources of innovative immunostimulatory sequences. We have already shown the anti-cancer activity obtained by fusing E7GGG (a mutagenized E7 gene from the high risk HPV type 16) to the coat protein of a plant virus, the Potato Virus X. We are now investigating plant-derived carriers, such as the 'Ribosome inactivating proteins' (RIPs), so far used to develop immunotoxins for targeted cancer therapy. Beside toxicity, RIPs have other features (i.e. immunogenicity, ability to modulate immune functions and apoptosis induction) that could be useful tools to use in tumor immunotherapy. A non toxic mutant of saporin (SAP-KQ) was used as a carrier for the E7GGG gene in the context of a DNA-based vaccine. We show here that fusion constructs of SAP-KQ with E7GGG can induce E7-specific Immunoglobulins (IgGs), CTLs and Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity (DTH) affecting the growth of E7-expressing tumors in mice. These data demonstrate that mutant plant genes hold promise to improve the poor immunogenicity of tumor-associated cancer antigens and could contribute to the evolution of new cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Vaccination Strategies to Combat an Infectious Globe: Oral Cholera Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    López-Gigosos, Rosa M; Plaza, Elena; Díez-Díaz, Rosa M; Calvo, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    Cholera is a substantial health burden in many countries in Africa and Asia, where it is endemic. It is as well responsible for ongoing epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa which are becoming greater in terms of frequency, extension, and duration. Given the availability of two oral cholera vaccines and the new data on their efficacy, field effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptance in cholera-affected populations and in travelers, these vaccines should be used in endemic areas, in travelers for these areas and should be considered in areas at risk for outbreaks. The two vaccines currently available in worldwide are: (1) The killed oral vaccine (Dukoral, licensed by SBL–Sweden to Crucell–Holland) is recommended since 1999 by WHO and consists of a mixture of four preparations of heat or formalin killed whole cell Vibrio cholera O1 (Inaba and Ogaba serotypes, and classical and El Tor biotypes) that are then added with purified recombinant cholera toxin (CT) B subunit. Because CT cross-reacts with Escherichia coli LT the vaccine also provides short-term protection against ETEC (enterotoxigenic E. coli) which is of added benefit for travelers. It is available in more than 60 countries. (2) A bivalent O1 and O139 whole cell oral vaccine without CT B subunit (Shanchol) has been lately developed in Vietnam (licensed by VaBiotech–Viet Nam to Shantha Biotechnics–India. It is available in India and Indonesia. A structured search of papers in PubMed and reports on cholera vaccines by WHO and CDC, as well as critical reading and synthesis of the information was accomplished. Inclusion criteria were defined according to reports quality and relevance. PMID:21572610

  3. [Peptide vaccination for castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Koga, Noriko; Noguchi, Masanori

    2014-12-01

    Since both tumor cells and host immune cell repertoires are diverse and heterogeneous, immune responses against tumor associated antigens shall be substantially different among individual patients with prostate cancer. Subsequently, selection of suitable peptide vaccines for individual patients based on the pre-existing host immunity before vaccination could induce potent anti-tumor responses capable of providing clinical benefit for prostate cancer patients. We have developed a novel immunotherapeutic approach of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) in which a maximum of four human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-class IA-matched peptides were selected for vaccination among pooled peptides based on both HLA-class IA type and the pre-existing host immunity before vaccination. We discuss our recent results of clinical studies of peptide vaccination for castration-resistant prostate cancer and the future direction of therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  4. Vaccine Development for Zika Virus-Timelines and Strategies.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Anna P

    2016-09-01

    Zika virus is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that spread rapidly through South and Central America in 2015 to 2016. Microcephaly has been causally associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy and the World Health Organization declared Zika virus as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. To address this crisis, many groups have expressed their commitment to developing a Zika virus vaccine. Different strategies for Zika virus vaccine development are being considered including recombinant live attenuated vaccines, purified inactivated vaccines (PIVs), DNA vaccines, and viral vectored vaccines. Important to Zika virus vaccine development will be the target group chosen for vaccination and which end point(s) is chosen for efficacy determination. The first clinical trials of Zika virus vaccine candidates will begin in Q3/4 2016 but the pathway to licensure for a Zika virus vaccine is expected to take several years. Efforts are ongoing to accelerate Zika virus vaccine development and evaluation with the ultimate goal of reducing time to licensure.

  5. Strategies for Early Vaccination During Novel Influenza Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, M.; Xiao, Y.; Charland, N.; Moghadas, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing research and technology developments hold the promise of rapid production and large-scale deployment of strain-specific or cross-protective vaccines for novel influenza viruses. We sought to investigate the impact of early vaccination on age-specific attack rates and evaluate the outcomes of different vaccination strategies that are influenced by the level of single or two-dose vaccine-induced protections. We developed and parameterized an agent-based model for two population demographics of urban and remote areas in Canada. Our results demonstrate that there is a time period before and after the onset of epidemic, during which the outcomes of vaccination strategies may differ significantly and are highly influenced by demographic characteristics. For the urban population, attack rates were lowest for children younger than 5 years of age in all vaccination strategies. However, for the remote population, the lowest attack rates were obtained for adults older than 50 years of age in most strategies. We found that the reduction of attack rates following the start of vaccination campaigns during the epidemic depends critically on the disease transmissibility, suggesting that for a sufficiently high transmissibility, vaccine delivery after the onset of epidemic has little or no effect, regardless of the population demographics. PMID:26658016

  6. New Strategies Toward Edible Vaccines: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Aryamvally, Anjali; Gunasekaran, Vignesh; Narenthiran, Keerthana Ragavi; Pasupathi, Rathinasabapathi

    2016-04-11

    With the ever growing population, advancements in edible vaccines and related technologies have seen a rise in popularity. Antigenic peptides incorporated into an edible part of a plant can be administered raw as a vaccine. While conventional vaccines have improved the quality of life by drastically reducing the onset of diseases, edible vaccines are able to perform the same with greater accessibility and at an affordable price. Low cost of production, ease of storage, transportation and administration are some of the many reasons behind the push for the development of edible vaccines. This article aims at giving an overview of the different plant systems used to produce vaccines in various experiments, as well as the merits and demerits of using that particular expression system. Further, the article elaborates on the problems faced in the production of edible vaccines and the measures adopted to surpass them. The major obstacle in the process is attaining a sufficiently large concentration of foreign antigen in the plant system. The article discusses various plant expression systems like banana, rice, alfalfa, mushroom, potato, tomato, pea, tobacco, and maize. When these were reviewed, it was found that the inability to produce the desired antigen concentration was one of the primary reasons why edible vaccines sometimes fail to generate the desired level of immune response in the recipient. We conclude with a promising solution to the problem by incorporating nano-technological advancements to the already existing protocols for edible vaccine development.

  7. Society of behavioral medicine supports increasing HPV vaccination uptake: an urgent opportunity for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Caryn E; Dykens, J Andrew; Brewer, Noel T; Buscemi, Joanna; Watson, Karriem; Comer-Hagans, DeLawnia; Ramamonjiarivelo, Zo; Fitzgibbon, Marian

    2016-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage remains low in the USA. The Society for Behavioral Medicine (SBM) supports the goals outlined by Healthy People 2020, the President's Cancer Panel, and the National Vaccine Advisory Committee to increase vaccination coverage among both males and females. SBM makes the following recommendations in support of efforts to reduce structural and other barriers to HPV vaccination services in order to increase rates of series completion. We encourage legislators and other policymakers to improve administration authority, insurance coverage, and reimbursement rates to healthcare providers who make the HPV vaccine available to adolescents; provide instrumental support to fund the development of school curricula on HPV vaccination; and increase public awareness that HPV vaccination can prevent cancer. We urge healthcare providers and healthcare systems to increase the strength, quality, and consistency of HPV vaccination recommendations for all eligible patients; to treat HPV vaccination as a routine preventive service; employ culturally appropriate communication strategies in clinical settings to educate eligible patients, parents, and guardians about the importance, effectiveness, and safety of HPV vaccination; and to strengthen and better coordinate the use of electronic medical records and immunization information systems.

  8. Chicken HSP70 DNA vaccine inhibits tumor growth in a canine cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Ying; Chuang, Tien-Fu; Guichard, Cécile; El-Garch, Hanane; Tierny, Dominique; Laio, Albert Taiching; Lin, Ching-Si; Chiou, Kuo-Hao; Tsai, Cheng-Long; Liu, Chen-Hsuan; Li, Wen-Chiuan; Fischer, Laurent; Chu, Rea-Min

    2011-04-18

    Immunization with xenogeneic DNA is a promising cancer treatment to overcome tolerance to self-antigens. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is over-expressed in various kinds of tumors and is believed to be involved in tumor progression. This study tested a xenogeneic chicken HSP70 (chHSP70) DNA vaccine in an experimental canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) model. Three vaccination strategies were compared: the first (PE) was designed to evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of chHSP70 DNA vaccination by delivering the vaccine before tumor inoculation in a prime boost setting, the second (T) was designed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the same prime boost vaccine by vaccinating the dogs after tumor inoculation; the third (PT) was similar to the first strategy (PE), with the exception that the electroporation booster injection was replaced with a transdermal needle-free injection. Tumor growth was notably inhibited only in the PE dogs, in which the vaccination program triggered tumor regression significantly sooner than in control dogs (NT). The CD4(+) subpopulation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and canine HSP70 (caHSP70)-specific IFN-γ-secreting lymphocytes were significantly increased during tumor regression in the PE dogs as compared to control dogs, demonstrating that specific tolerance to caHSP70 has been overcome. In contrast, no benefit of the therapeutic strategy (T) could be noticed and the (PT) strategy only led to partial control of tumor growth. In summary, antitumor prophylactic activity was demonstrated using the chHSP70 DNA vaccine including a boost via electroporation. Our data stressed the importance of DNA electroporation as a booster to get the full benefit of DNA vaccination but also of cancer immunotherapy initiation as early as possible. Xenogeneic chHSP70 DNA vaccination including an electroporation boost is a potential vaccine to HSP70-expressing tumors, although further research is still required to better understand true

  9. Immunostimulation, vaccine and phage therapy strategies in aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This invited article provides a comparison between fish and shrimp immunity, and reviews the use of immunostimulation, vaccination strategies and bacteriophage therapies. Immunostimulants, a heterogenous group of compounds that are derived from bacterial, plant and animal extracts are compounds bel...

  10. Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Center IRB, and the I owa City VA Medical Center Research and Development Committee. During the second and t hird years we have been recruiting pa...American Urologic Association (AUA). (3) Talks to prostate cancer survivor support groups in at the University of I owa , Mercy Medical Center in Cedar

  11. Strategies and hurdles using DNA vaccines to fish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccinations against fish viral diseases as IHNV at commercial level in Canada against VHSV at experimental level are both success stories. DNA vaccination strategies against many other viral diseases have, however, not yet yielded sufficient results in terms of protection. There is an obvious need to combat many other viral diseases within aquaculture where inactivated vaccines fail. There are many explanations to why DNA vaccine strategies against other viral diseases fail to induce protective immune responses in fish. These obstacles include: 1) too low immunogenicity of the transgene, 2) too low expression of the transgene that is supposed to induce protection, 3) suboptimal immune responses, and 4) too high degradation rate of the delivered plasmid DNA. There are also uncertainties with regard distribution and degradation of DNA vaccines that may have implications for safety and regulatory requirements that need to be clarified. By combining plasmid DNA with different kind of adjuvants one can increase the immunogenicity of the transgene antigen – and perhaps increase the vaccine efficacy. By using molecular adjuvants with or without in combination with targeting assemblies one may expect different responses compared with naked DNA. This includes targeting of DNA vaccines to antigen presenting cells as a central factor in improving their potencies and efficacies by means of encapsulating the DNA vaccine in certain carriers systems that may increase transgene and MHC expression. This review will focus on DNA vaccine delivery, by the use of biodegradable PLGA particles as vehicles for plasmid DNA mainly in fish. PMID:24552235

  12. New Strategies in Cancer Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in cancer nanomedicine, including stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems and nanoparticles responding to light for phototherapy or tumor imaging. In addition, several new strategies to improve the circulation of nanoparticles in vivo, tumor penetration, and tumor targeting are discussed. The application of nanomedicine in cancer immunology, a relatively new type of cancer therapy, is also highlighted.

  13. Recent advances in design of immunogenic and effective naked DNA vaccines against cancer.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, Daniela; Iurescia, Sandra; Rinaldi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    A variety of clinical trials for vaccines against cancer have provided evidence that DNA vaccines are well tolerated and have an excellent safety profile. DNA vaccines require much improvement to make them sufficiently effective against cancer in the clinic. Nowadays, it is clear that an increased antigen expression correlates with improved immunogenicity and it is critical to vaccine performance in large animals and humans. Similarly, additional strategies are required to activate effective immunity against poorly immunogenic tumour antigens. This review discusses very recent scientific references focused on the development of sophisticated DNA vaccines against cancer. We report a selection of novel and relevant patents employed to improve their immunogenicity through several strategies such as the use of tissue-specific transcriptional elements, nuclear localisation signalling, codon-optimisation and by targeting antigenic proteins to secretory pathway. Recent patents validating portions or splice variants of tumour antigens as candidates for cancer DNA vaccines with improved specificity, such as mesothelin and hTERT, are also discussed. Lastly, we review novel patents on the use of genetic immunomodulators, such as "universal" T helper epitopes derived from tetanus toxin, E. coli heat labile enterotoxin and vegetable proteins, as well as cytokines, chemokines or costimulatory molecules such as IL-6, IL-15, IL- 21 to amplify immunity against cancer.

  14. Tailoring the strategies to specific shortages: pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Peter, Georges

    2006-03-01

    Less than 1 year after recommendations for the routine vaccination of infants with the newly licensed 7-valent polysaccharide-protein conjugate pneumococcal vaccine were issued in February 2000, shortages of the 7-valent polysaccharide-protein conjugate pneumococcal vaccine supply began to occur. A national shortage developed in 2001, involving both the public and private sectors, and it resulted in temporary recommendations to conserve vaccine supply for infants and young children at the highest risk for invasive disease. Multiple factors contributed to this vaccine shortage, including demand that exceeded the expectations of the manufacturer and the need for compliance with the Good Manufacturing Practice of the US Food and Drug Administration. Of the possible strategies that might have averted this shortage, establishment of a vaccine stockpile is the most likely solution. However, establishing a stockpile for a newly licensed vaccine, such as 7-valent polysaccharide-protein conjugate pneumococcal vaccine, presents unique challenges. Improved communication with physicians and parents regarding changes in vaccine schedules also will promote better adherence to recommended changes and conservation of limited vaccine supplies during a shortage.

  15. Protection Against Dengue Virus by Non-Replicating and Live Attenuated Vaccines Used Together in a Prime Boost Vaccination Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Protection against dengue virus by non-replicating and live attenuated vaccines used together in a prime boost vaccination strategy Monika Simmons a...Dengue DNA Punfied inacdvared virus Uvc artenuatcd virus Jlnmc boost A new vaccination strategy for dengue virus (DENV) was eval uated in rhesus...region (TDNA) then boosting 2 months l,ltcr with a tetravalent live aucnuated virus (TLAV) vaccine . Both vaccine combinations elicited virus

  16. Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE...growth of androgen-dependent cancer cells, and result in clinical tumor control . After a median time of 2 years, patients progress into a clinical...calculogenesis. Finally, Bischoff and Goerttler (38) used Gelfoam in human prostate therapeutic embolization with success. Our laboratory, in collaboration

  17. Tumor lysate-loaded biodegradable microparticles as cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vijaya B.; Geary, Sean M.; Gross, Brett P; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Norian, Lyse A.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer vaccines that use tumor lysate (TL) as a source of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have significant potential for generating therapeutic anti-tumor immune responses. Vaccines encompassing TL bypass the limitations of single antigen vaccines by simultaneously stimulating immunity against multiple TAAs, thereby broadening the repertoire of TAA-specific T cell clones available for activation. Administration of TL in particulate form, such as when encapsulated in biodegradable microparticles, increases its immunostimulatory capacity and produces more robust immune responses than when TL is given in soluble form. These effects can be further enhanced by co-administering TL with adjuvants. A number of recent studies using polymeric microparticle delivery of TL, with or without adjuvants, have produced promising results in preclinical studies. In this review, we will discuss current experimental approaches involving TL being pursued in the oncoimmunology field, and comment on strategies such as combining specific chemotherapeutic agents with TL microparticle delivery that may eventually lead to improved survival outcomes for cancer patients. PMID:24219096

  18. Alpha fetoprotein is more than a hepatocellular cancer biomarker: from spontaneous immune response in cancer patients to the development of an AFP-based cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bei, R; Mizejewski, G J

    2011-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide, with a poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Due to its overexpression in the majority of HCCs, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) represents one of the most useful markers for hepatocarcinomas and for monitoring patients' response to therapy. Although it was earlier reported that AFP has immunosuppressive properties, it has been recently demonstrated that AFP induces spontaneous T and B cells responses in HCC patients. The characterization of AFP-immunogenic epitopes gives the opportunity to design AFP-based cancer vaccines for human HCC. The activity of AFP-based vaccines has been investigated in HCC mouse models in order to develop novel strategies to treat patients with HCC. This review will discuss the rationale for using the AFP-based vaccination strategy and recent results corroborating the usefulness of AFP vaccines as a potential tool for cancer therapy.

  19. Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0423 TITLE: Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Smita...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0423 Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...immune modulation of CTLA4 and have generated a lead cellular therapy that will safely enhance vaccine -mediated immunity. This lead cellular

  20. Th1 epitope selection for clinically effective cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Disis, Mary L; Watt, William C; Cecil, Denise L

    2014-10-01

    New cancer immunotherapies mark progress in our understanding of tumor biology and harnessing the immune system's management of self. However, protein- and peptide-based vaccines are not yet consistently efficacious. Recent work uncovers principles governing the genesis of T helper type-restrictive immunity to self-antigens elicited by vaccine epitopes, enabling vaccines to skew the balance from tolerogenic Type II (Th2) to inflammatory Type I (Th1) T cells, and invigorating this cancer immunotherapeutic approach.

  1. Cancer vaccines: Where are we going?

    PubMed

    Cebon, Jonathan

    2010-03-01

    Abstract The discovery that the immune system can distinguish molecular targets on cancer cells has led to efforts to develop cancer immunotherapeutics that can improve the recognition and effective elimination of tumor cells. Several types of tumor antigens are recognized by T lymphocytes, which are classified according to patterns of gene expression or protein distribution. Of particular interest is the group of molecules known as cancer-germline or cancer-testis antigens. As the relationship between the immune system and cancer has become clearer, so too have the challenges in designing effective cancer immunotherapeutics: (i) antigens need to be specifically selected based on ideal characteristics, such as tissue distribution that is restricted to tumors; (ii) selected antigens need to be combined with adjuvant agents that enhance their immunogenicity and yield robust responses; (iii) vaccination should be timed to pre-empt the development of regulatory suppressive immune mechanisms; and (iv) if suppressive regulatory mechanisms do arise, specific antagonists may be needed to enhance pro-immune outcomes. These challenges are shaping current and future research in this area.

  2. [Immunotherapy for cancer--modern immunologic strategies in oncology].

    PubMed

    Halama, N; Zoernig, I; Jäger, D

    2008-10-01

    Immunotherapies have become an integral part of modern treatment concepts in oncology. The complexity of the regulation of the immune system gives rise to a multitude of different treatment approaches. Antibody based strategies are already used routinely in clinical day to day practice. Identification of new target antigens and the analysis of broader immunologic implications of antibody therapy are recent developments in this field. Antigen selection is also of high importance in the field of vaccination strategies. Vaccination strategies are now being investigated in adjuvant treatment settings but also the combination of vaccination and other treatment modalities show promising results in clinical trials. Another promising emerging field are T cell based therapies, with the clinically successful adoptive T cell transfer now being complemented by T cell receptor transfer strategies. This review summarizes the current concepts and future perspectives in immunotherapies for cancer.

  3. Vaccination strategies for managing brucellosis in Yellowstone bison.

    PubMed

    Treanor, John J; Johnson, Joseph S; Wallen, Rick L; Cilles, Sara; Crowley, Philip H; Cox, John J; Maehr, David S; White, P J; Plumb, Glenn E

    2010-10-01

    Concerns over migratory bison (Bison bison) at Yellowstone National Park transmitting brucellosis (Brucella abortus) to cattle herds on adjacent lands led to proposals for bison vaccination. We developed an individual-based model to evaluate how brucellosis infection might respond under alternate vaccination strategies, including: (1) vaccination of female calves and yearlings captured at the park boundary when bison move outside the primary conservation area; (2) combining boundary vaccination with the remote delivery of vaccine to female calves and yearlings distributed throughout the park; and (3) vaccinating all female bison (including adults) during boundary capture and throughout the park using remote delivery of vaccine. Simulations suggested Alternative 3 would be most effective, with brucellosis seroprevalence decreasing by 66% (from 0.47 to 0.16) over a 30-year period resulting from 29% of the population receiving protection through vaccination. Under this alternative, bison would receive multiple vaccinations that extend the duration of vaccine protection and defend against recurring infection in latently infected animals. The initial decrease in population seroprevalence will likely be slow due to high initial seroprevalence (40-60%), long-lived antibodies, and the culling of some vaccinated bison that were subsequently exposed to field strain Brucella and reacted positively on serologic tests. Vaccination is unlikely to eradicate B. abortus from Yellowstone bison, but could be an effective tool for reducing the level of infection. Our approach and findings have applicability world-wide for managers dealing with intractable wildlife diseases that cross wildlife-livestock and wildlife-human interfaces and affect public health or economic well-being.

  4. Preclinical and clinical development of DNA vaccines for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Colluru, V T; Johnson, Laura E; Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. It is also the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men, making it one of the largest public health concerns today. Prostate cancer is an ideal disease for immunotherapies because of the generally slow progression, the dispensability of the target organ in the patient population, and the availability of several tissue-specific antigens. As such, several therapeutic vaccines have entered clinical trials, with one autologous cellular vaccine (sipuleucel-T) recently gaining Food and Drug Administration approval after demonstrating overall survival benefit in randomized phase III clinical trials. DNA-based vaccines are safe, economical, alternative "off-the-shelf" approaches that have undergone extensive evaluation in preclinical models. In fact, the first vaccine approved in the United States for the treatment of cancer was a DNA vaccine for canine melanoma. Several prostate cancer-specific DNA vaccines have been developed in the last decade and have shown promising results in early phase clinical trials. This review summarizes anticancer human DNA vaccine trials, with a focus on those conducted for prostate cancer. We conclude with an outline of special considerations important for the development and successful translation of DNA vaccines from the laboratory to the clinic.

  5. Harnessing Dendritic Cells to Generate Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy of cancer, i.e., transfer of T cells or antibodies, can lead to some objective clinical responses, thus demonstrating that the immune system can reject tumors. However, passive immunotherapy is not expected to yield memory T cells that might control tumor outgrowth. Active immunotherapy with dendritic cell (DCs) vaccines has the potential to induce tumor-specific effector and memory T cells. Clinical trials testing first generation DC vaccines pulsed with tumor antigens provided a proof-of-principle that therapeutic immunity can be elicited. Newer generation DC vaccines are build on the increased knowledge of the DC system including the existence of distinct DC subsets and their plasticity all leading to generation of distinct types of immunity. Rather than the quantity of IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T cells, we should aim at generating high quality high avidity poly-functional effector CD8+ T cells able to reject tumors and long-lived memory CD8+ T cells able to prevent relapse. PMID:19769741

  6. Peptide vaccines in breast cancer: The immunological basis for clinical response.

    PubMed

    Peres, Lívia de Paula; da Luz, Felipe Andrés Cordero; Pultz, Brunna dos Anjos; Brígido, Paula Cristina; de Araújo, Rogério Agenor; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    This review discusses peptide-based vaccines in breast cancer, immune responses and clinical outcomes, which include studies on animal models and phase I, phase I/II, phase II and phase III clinical trials. Peptide-based vaccines are powerful neoadjuvant immunotherapies that can directly target proteins expressed in tumor cells, mainly tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). The most common breast cancer TAA epitopes are derived from MUC1, HER2/neu and CEA proteins. Peptides derived from TAAs could be successfully used to elicit CD8 and CD4 T cell-specific responses. Thus, choosing peptides that adapt to natural variations of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes is critical. The most attractive advantage is that the target response is more specific and less toxic than for other therapies and vaccines. Prominent studies on NeuVax - E75 (epitope for HER2/neu and GM-CSF) in breast cancer and DPX-0907 (HLA-A2-TAAs) expressed in breast cancer, ovarian and prostate cancer have shown the efficacy of peptide-based vaccines as neoadjuvant immunotherapy against cancer. Future peptide vaccine strategies, although a challenge to be applied in a broad range of breast cancers, point to the development of degenerate multi-epitope immunogens against multiple targets.

  7. Beyond Cancer Vaccines: A Reason for Future Optimism with Immunomodulatory Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Postow, Michael; Callahan, Margaret K.; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant scientific knowledge in the field of cancer immunology, therapeutic strategies using cancer vaccines to generate antitumor immunity have historically resulted in only modest clinical benefit. Disappointing results from prior cancer vaccine trials are likely due to multifactorial causes. Perhaps, most importantly, is the role of inherent tumor induced immune suppression and enhanced immunologic tolerance. Current research directed towards understanding the mechanisms of immunologic tolerance has led to the development of promising therapeutic immune regulatory antibodies that inhibit immunologic checkpoints and subsequently enhance immunologic antitumor activity. This review discusses the prior challenges associated with cancer vaccines and describes how, by breaking immune inhibition and facilitating immune stimulation, immune regulatory antibodies show great promise in the treatment of a variety of tumors. PMID:21952288

  8. Carbohydrate vaccines as immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Slovin, Susan F; Keding, Stacy J; Ragupathi, Govind

    2005-08-01

    Carbohydrates have established themselves as the most clinically relevant antigens of those tested and subsequently developed for vaccines against infectious diseases. However, in cancer patients, many of the defined carbohydrate antigens are really altered 'self' antigens and for unclear reasons, the body does not react to them immunologically. Although these self antigens have been found to be potentially suitable targets for immune recognition and killing, the development of vaccines for cancer treatment is actually more challenging compared with those for infectious diseases mainly because of the difficulty associated with breaking the body's immunological tolerance to the antigen. These antigens lack the inherent immunogenicity associated with bacterial antigens and, therefore, methods to enhance immunological recognition and induction of immunity in vivo are under investigation. These include defining the appropriate tumour-associated antigen, successfully synthesizing the antigen to mimic the original molecule, inducing an immune response, and subsequently enhancing the immunological reactivity so that all components can work together. This has been successfully accomplished with several glycolipid and glycoprotein antigens using carriers such as keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) together with a saponin adjuvant, QS-21. Not only can high titre IgM and IgG antibodies be induced, which are specific for the antigen used for immunization, but the antibodies can mediate complement lysis. The approaches for synthesis, conjugation, clinical administration and immunological potential are discussed.

  9. Therapeutic cancer vaccines: are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Acquavella, Nicholas; Yu, Zhiya; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Enthusiasm for therapeutic cancer vaccines has been rejuvenated with the recent completion of several large, randomized phase III clinical trials that in some cases have reported an improvement in progression free or overall survival. However, an honest appraisal of their efficacy reveals modest clinical benefit and a frequent requirement for patients with relatively indolent cancers and minimal or no measurable disease. Experience with adoptive cell transfer-based immunotherapies unequivocally establishes that T cells can mediate durable complete responses, even in the setting of advanced metastatic disease. Further, these findings reveal that the successful vaccines of the future must confront (i) a corrupted tumor microenvironment containing regulatory T cells and aberrantly matured myeloid cells, (ii) a tumor-specific T-cell repertoire that is prone to immunologic exhaustion and senescence, and (iii) highly mutable tumor targets capable of antigen loss and immune evasion. Future progress may come from innovations in the development of selective preparative regimens that eliminate or neutralize suppressive cellular populations, more effective immunologic adjuvants, and further refinement of agents capable of antagonizing immune check-point blockade pathways. PMID:21198663

  10. Meningococcal disease: risk for international travellers and vaccine strategies.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2008-07-01

    International travel and migration facilitate the rapid intercontinental spread of meningococcal disease. Serogroup A and, less so serogroup C, have been responsible for epidemics in the past (mainly in Africa). In recent years, W135 has emerged (first in Saudi Arabia, then in West Africa) as a serogroup that requires attention. Serogroups X and Y are infrequent, but associated with slowly rising trends. There are significant variations in the incidence of meningococcal disease and the distribution of serogroups responsible for meningococcal disease, both geographically and with time. Vaccine strategies need to address this variation, and broad coverage against all serogroups for which vaccines are currently available should be offered to travellers. Tetravalent polysaccharide meningococcal vaccines are limited by their poor immunogenicity in small infants and by the lack of long-term protection. In contrast, the novel tetravalent conjugate vaccine that is currently only available in North America is immunogenic in young infants, induces long-term protection and reduces nasopharyngeal carriage. The tetravalent conjugate meningococcal vaccine will be a leap forward in the control of meningococcal epidemics in affected countries. It will also boost the uptake of meningococcal vaccines in travellers because the duration of protection is longer and it eliminates the problem of immune hyporesponsiveness of serogroup C with repeated dosing. Current vaccine recommendations are to vaccinate all Hajj pilgrims, all travellers to areas with current outbreaks, travellers to the SubSaharan meningitis belt, and individuals with certain medical conditions.

  11. Emerging cancer vaccines: the promise of genetic vectors.

    PubMed

    Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2011-09-22

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs) as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP) is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost) are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost.

  12. Emerging Cancer Vaccines: The Promise of Genetic Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs) as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP) is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost) are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost. PMID:24212974

  13. Therapeutic vaccines and cancer: focus on DPX-0907

    PubMed Central

    Karkada, Mohan; Berinstein, Neil L; Mansour, Marc

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to significantly enhance immunogenicity of peptide cancer vaccines, we developed a novel non-emulsion depot-forming vaccine platform called DepoVax™ (DPX). Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 restricted peptides naturally presented by cancer cells were used as antigens to create a therapeutic cancer vaccine, DPX-0907. In a phase I clinical study, the safety and immune-activating potential of DPX-0907 in advanced-stage breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer patients were examined, following encouraging results in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. The DPX-0907 vaccine was shown to be safe and well tolerated, with injection-site reactions being the most commonly reported adverse event. Vaccinated cancer patients exhibited a 61% immune response rate, with higher response rates in the breast and ovarian cancer patient cohorts. In keeping with the higher immune efficacy of this vaccine platform, antigen-specific responses were detected in 73% of immune responders after just one vaccination. In 83% of responders, peptide-specific T-cells were detected at two or more time points post-vaccination, with 64% of these patients showing evidence of immune persistence. Immune monitoring also demonstrated the generation of antigen-specific T-cell memory, with the ability to secrete multiple type 1 cytokines. The novel DPX formulation promotes multifunctional effector/memory responses to peptide-based tumor-associated antigens. The data support the capacity of DPX-0907 to elicit type-1 biased immune responses, warranting further clinical development of the vaccine. In this review, we discuss the rationale for developing DPX-based therapeutic cancer vaccine(s), with a focus on DPX-0907, aimed at inducing efficient anti-tumor immunity that may eventually be shown to prolong patient survival. PMID:24596453

  14. On the robust optimization to the uncertain vaccination strategy problem

    SciTech Connect

    Chaerani, D. Anggriani, N. Firdaniza

    2014-02-21

    In order to prevent an epidemic of infectious diseases, the vaccination coverage needs to be minimized and also the basic reproduction number needs to be maintained below 1. This means that as we get the vaccination coverage as minimum as possible, thus we need to prevent the epidemic to a small number of people who already get infected. In this paper, we discuss the case of vaccination strategy in term of minimizing vaccination coverage, when the basic reproduction number is assumed as an uncertain parameter that lies between 0 and 1. We refer to the linear optimization model for vaccination strategy that propose by Becker and Starrzak (see [2]). Assuming that there is parameter uncertainty involved, we can see Tanner et al (see [9]) who propose the optimal solution of the problem using stochastic programming. In this paper we discuss an alternative way of optimizing the uncertain vaccination strategy using Robust Optimization (see [3]). In this approach we assume that the parameter uncertainty lies within an ellipsoidal uncertainty set such that we can claim that the obtained result will be achieved in a polynomial time algorithm (as it is guaranteed by the RO methodology). The robust counterpart model is presented.

  15. An epidemiological model with vaccination strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, Dérek B.; Silva, Jaqueline M.; Gomes, Jessica L.; Kritz, Maurício V.

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical models can be widely found in the literature describing epidemics. The epidemical models that use differential equations to represent mathematically such description are especially sensible to parameters. This work analyze a variation of the SIR model when applied to a epidemic scenario including several aspects, as constant vaccination, pulse vaccination, seasonality, cross-immunity factor, birth and dead rate. The analysis and results are performed through numerical solutions of the model and a special attention is given to the discussion generated by the paramenters variation.

  16. Current and future vaccines and vaccination strategies against infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) respiratory disease of poultry.

    PubMed

    García, Maricarmen

    2016-12-24

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an economically important respiratory disease of poultry that affects the industry worldwide. Vaccination is the principal tool in the control of the disease. Two types of vaccines, live attenuated and recombinant viral vector, are commercially available. The first generation of GaHV-1 vaccines available since the early 1960's are live viruses, attenuated by continuous passages in cell culture or embryos. These vaccines significantly reduce mortalities and, in particular, the chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines have shown to limit outbreaks of the disease. However, the CEO vaccines can regain virulence and become the source of outbreaks. Recombinant viral vector vaccines, the second generation of GaHV-1 vaccines, were first introduced in the early 2000's. These are Fowl Pox virus (FPV) and Herpes virus of turkeys (HVT) vectors expressing one or multiple GaHV-1 immunogenic proteins. Recombinant viral vector vaccines are considered a much safer alternative because they do not regain virulence. In the face of challenge, they improve bird performance and ameliorate clinical signs of the disease but fail to reduce shedding of the challenge virus increasing the likelihood of outbreaks. At the moment, several new strategies are being evaluated to improve both live attenuated and viral vector vaccines. Potential new live vaccines attenuated by deletion of genes associated with virulence or by selection of CEO viral subpopulations that do not exhibit increased virulence upon passages in birds are being evaluated. Also new vector alternatives to express GaHV-1 glycoproteins in Newcastle diseases virus (NDV) or in modified very virulent (vv) serotype I Marek's disease virus (MDV) were developed and evaluated.

  17. Guidance for peptide vaccines for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Yamaue, Hiroki; Okusaka, Takuji; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Otsu, Atsushi; Ohashi, Yasuo; Shimazawa, Rumiko; Nishio, Kazuto; Furuse, Junji; Minami, Hironobu; Tsunoda, Takuya; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2014-07-01

    Recent progress in fundamental understanding of tumor immunology has opened a new avenue of cancer vaccines. Currently, the development of new cancer vaccines is a global topic and has attracted attention as one of the most important issues in Japan. There is an urgent need for the development of guidance for cancer vaccine clinical studies in order to lead to drug development. Peptide vaccines characteristically have the effect of indirectly acting against cancer through the immune system - a mechanism of action that clearly differs from anticancer drugs that exert a direct effect. Thus, the clinical development of cancer peptide vaccines should be planned and implemented based on the mechanism of action, which differs significantly from conventional anticancer drug research. The Japanese Society for Biological Therapy has created and published Guidance for peptide vaccines for the treatment of cancer as part of its mission and responsibilities towards cancer peptide vaccine development, which is now pursued globally. We welcome comments from regulators and business people as well as researchers in this area.

  18. Linked CD4 T Cell Help: Broadening Immune Attack Against Cancer by Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Savelyeva, Natalia; Allen, Alex; Chotprakaikiat, Warayut; Harden, Elena; Jobsri, Jantipa; Godeseth, Rosemary; Wang, Yidao; Stevenson, Freda; Ottensmeier, Christian

    2016-10-05

    In the last decade, immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting immunological check points has become a breakthrough therapeutic modality for solid cancers. However, only up to 50 % of patients benefit from this powerful approach. For others vaccination might provide a plausible addition or alternative. For induction of effective anticancer immunity CD4+ T cell help is required, which is often difficult to induce to self cancer targets because of tolerogenic mechanisms. Our approach for cancer vaccines has been to incorporate into the vaccine design sequences able to activate foreign T cell help, through genetically linking cancer targets to microbial sequences (King et al. in Nat Med 4(11):1281-1286, 1998; Savelyeva et al. in Nat Biotechnol 19(8):760-764, 2001). This harnesses the non-tolerized CD4 T cell repertoire available in patients to help induction of effective immunity against fused cancer antigens. Multiple immune effector mechanisms including antibody, CD8+ T cells as well as CD4 effector T cells can be activated using this strategy. Delivery via DNA vaccines has already indicated clinical efficacy. The same principle of linked T cell help has now been transferred to other novel vaccine modalities to further potentiate immunity against cancer targets.

  19. A vaccination strategy to SEIR-CA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuzakki, Muhammad Zaki; Nuraini, Nuning

    2016-04-01

    A combination between Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Removed (SEIR) model and Cellular Automaton (CA) called SEIR-CA model has been proposed to simulate spreading diseases through populations. We make an improvement to the parameter which describe the impact of neighborhood in CA system. We also propose a vaccination strategy to the model. Three examples are given to illustrate the model. The first one shows that the previously established SEIR-CA model does not work properly in a population with randomly distributed individuals. After an improvement to the neighborhood impact parameter has been made, the model works properly in a population with randomly distributed individuals and it is shown in the second example. The last example shows the spreading mechanisms with a chosen vaccination strategy. We also show that the vaccination strategy can reduce the number of infected individuals and can suppress the spread of the diseases.

  20. DNA vaccination for prostate cancer, from preclinical to clinical trials - where we stand?

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sarfraz; Sweeney, Paul; Sullivan, Gerald C; Tangney, Mark

    2012-10-09

    Development of various vaccines for prostate cancer (PCa) is becoming an active research area. PCa vaccines are perceived to have less toxicity compared with the available cytotoxic agents. While various immune-based strategies can elicit anti-tumour responses, DNA vaccines present increased efficacy, inducing both humoural and cellular immunity. This immune activation has been proven effective in animal models and initial clinical trials are encouraging. However, to validate the role of DNA vaccination in currently available PCa management paradigms, strong clinical evidence is still lacking. This article provides an overview of the basic principles of DNA vaccines and aims to provide a summary of preclinical and clinical trials outlining the benefits of this immunotherapy in the management of PCa.

  1. Recent Development in Carbohydrate-Based Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhongwu; Wang, Qianli

    2009-01-01

    Summary Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are important molecular markers on the cancer cell surface, useful for the development of therapeutic cancer vaccines or cancer immunotherapies. However, due to their poor immunogenicity and/or immunotolerance, most TACAs fail to induce T cell-mediated immunity that is critical for cancer therapy. This review summarizes the recent effort to overcome this problem via constructing TACA conjugates with improved immunogenicity, such as by covalently coupling TACAs to proper carrier molecules to form clustered or multi-epitopic conjugate vaccines, coupling TACAs to a T cell peptide epitope and/or an immunostimulant epitope to form fully synthetic multi-component glycoconjugate vaccines, and developing vaccines based on chemically modified TACAs, which is combined with metabolic engineering of cancer cells. PMID:19766052

  2. Considerations of strategies to provide influenza vaccine year round.

    PubMed

    Lambach, Philipp; Alvarez, Alba Maria Ropero; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Ortiz, Justin R; Hombach, Joachim; Verweij, Marcel; Hendriks, Jan; Palkonyay, Laszlo; Pfleiderer, Michael

    2015-11-25

    There is potential for influenza vaccine programmes to make a substantial impact on severe disease in low-resource settings, however questions around vaccine composition and programmatic issues will require special attention. Some countries may benefit from immunization programmes that provide year-round supply of vaccine; however the best way to ensure adequate vaccine supply has yet to be determined. In this report, we discuss vaccine composition, availability, and programmatic issues that must be considered when developing year-round influenza immunization programmes. We then explore how these considerations have influenced immunization practices in the Latin American region as a case study. We identify three different approaches to achieve year-round supply: (1) alternating between Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere formulations, (2) extending the expiration date to permit extended use of a single hemisphere formulation, and (3) local vaccine manufacture with production timelines that align with local epidemiology. Each approach has its challenges and opportunities. The growing data suggesting high influenza disease burden in low resource countries underscores the compelling public health need to determine the best strategies for vaccine delivery.

  3. Immunotherapy for cancer: synthetic carbohydrate-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Buskas, Therese; Thompson, Pamela; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2009-09-28

    Aberrant glycosylation of glycoproteins and glycolipids of cancer cells, which correlates with poor survival rates, is being exploited for the development of immunotherapies for cancer. In particular, advances in the knowledge of cooperation between the innate and adaptive system combined with the implementation of efficient synthetic methods for assembly of oligosaccharides and glycopeptides is providing avenues for the rationale design of vaccine candidates. In this respect, fully synthetic vaccine candidates show great promise because they incorporate only those elements requires for relevant immune responses, and hence do not suffer from immune suppression observed with classical carbohydrate-protein conjugate vaccines. Such vaccines are chemically well-defined and it is to be expected that they can be produced in a reproducible fashion. In this feature article, recent advances in the development of fully synthetic sub-unit carbohydrate-based cancer vaccines will be discussed.

  4. Novel Immune Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0423 TITLE: Novel immune modulating cellular vaccine for prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Smita Nair...2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sept 2013 to 29 Sept 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Novel immune modulating cellular vaccine for...that will safely enhance vaccine -mediated immunity. This lead cellular therapy, called DC-PAPvac-C, consists of dendritic cells (DCs) co-transfected

  5. Human papillomavirus vaccination guideline update: American Cancer Society guideline endorsement.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Andrews, Kimberly S; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Loomer, Lacey; Lam, Kristina E; Fisher-Borne, Marcie; Smith, Robert A; Fontham, Elizabeth T H

    2016-09-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society (ACS) reviewed and updated its guideline on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination based on a methodologic and content review of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) HPV vaccination recommendations. A literature review was performed to supplement the evidence considered by the ACIP and to address new vaccine formulations and recommendations as well as new data on population outcomes since publication of the 2007 ACS guideline. The ACS Guideline Development Group determined that the evidence supports ACS endorsement of the ACIP recommendations, with one qualifying statement related to late vaccination. The ACS recommends vaccination of all children at ages 11 and 12 years to protect against HPV infections that lead to several cancers and precancers. Late vaccination for those not vaccinated at the recommended ages should be completed as soon as possible, and individuals should be informed that vaccination may not be effective at older ages. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:375-385. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  6. Anti-angiogenic vaccines as a treatment modality for cancer.

    PubMed

    Plum, Stacy M; Fogler, William E

    2004-12-01

    Targeting angiogenesis to inhibit tumor development is now considered a valid approach to disease modulation. Recently, a number of laboratories have focused their research on the development of cancer vaccines that target modulators of angiogenesis. In this review we describe a number of novel vaccines that target mediators of angiogenesis and inhibit tumor progression in preclinical models.

  7. Active immunotherapy for cancer patients using tumor lysate pulsed dendritic cell vaccine: a safety study.

    PubMed

    Ovali, E; Dikmen, T; Sonmez, M; Yilmaz, M; Unal, A; Dalbasti, T; Kuzeyli, K; Erturk, M; Omay, S B

    2007-06-01

    Cancer vaccine therapy represents a promising therapeutical option. Consistently, with these new treatment strategies, the use of dendritic cell vaccines is becoming increasingly widespread and currently in the forefront for cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccine in patients with advanced cancers. For this purpose, eighteen patients with relapsed or refractory cancer were vaccinated with peripheral monocyte-derived DCs generated with GM-CSF and IL-4, and pulsed consequently with 100 microg/ml of tumor lysate before maturation in culture in the presence of IL-1beta, PGE2 and TNF alpha for two days. The first two vaccinations were given intradermally every two weeks while further injections were given monthly. Tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell injections were well-tolerated in all patients with no more than grade 1 injection-related toxicity. Local inflammatory response was mainly erythematous which subsided in 48 hrs time. No end organ toxicity or autoimmune toxicity was identified. Clinical responses observed in our study were satisfactory for a phase I clinical study. We observed 4 (22%) objective clinical responses. These responses are significantly correlated with delayed type hypersensitivity testing (DTH) (p < 0.01). The results showed that this active immunotherapy is feasible, safe, and may be capable of eliciting immune responses against cancer.

  8. Approaches to improve development methods for therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ogi, Chizuru; Aruga, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines are an immunotherapy that amplify or induce an active immune response against tumors. Notably, limitations in the methodology for existing anti-cancer drugs may subsist while applying them to cancer vaccine therapy. A retrospective analysis was performed using information obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov, PubMed, and published articles. Our research evaluated the optimal methodologies for therapeutic cancer vaccines based on (1) patient populations, (2) immune monitoring, (3) tumor response evaluation, and (4) supplementary therapies. Failure to optimize these methodologies at an early phase may impact development at later stages; thus, we have proposed some points to be considered during the early phase. Moreover, we compared our proposal with the guidance for industry issued by the US Food and Drug Administration in October 2011 entitled "Clinical Considerations for Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines". Consequently, while our research was aligned with the guidance, we hope it provides further insights in order to predict the risks and benefits and facilitate decisions for a new technology. We identified the following points for consideration: (1) include in the selection criteria the immunological stage with a prognostic value, which is as important as the tumor stage; (2) select immunological assays such as phenotype analysis of lymphocytes, based on their features and standardize assay methods; (3) utilize optimal response criteria for immunotherapy in therapeutic cancer vaccine trials; and (4) consider supplementary therapies, including immune checkpoint inhibitors, for future therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  9. DNA vaccine prime and recombinant FPV vaccine boost: an important candidate immunization strategy to control bluetongue virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Junping; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Sun, Encheng; Feng, Yufei; Lv, Shuang; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Haixiu; Wu, Donglai

    2015-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of bluetongue (BT), an important sheep disease that caused great economic loss to the sheep industry. There are 26 BTV serotypes based on the outer protein VP2. However, the serotypes BTV-1 and BTV-16 are the two most prevalent serotypes in China. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing viral infections. Therefore, the need for an effective vaccine against BTV is urgent. In this study, DNA vaccines and recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) vaccines expressing VP2 alone or VP2 in combination with VP5 or co-expressing the VP2 and VP5 proteins of BTV-1 were evaluated in both mice and sheep. Several strategies were tested in mice, including DNA vaccine prime and boost, rFPV vaccine prime and boost, and DNA vaccine prime and rFPV vaccine boost. We then determined the best vaccine strategy in sheep. Our results indicated that a strategy combining a DNA vaccine prime (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) followed by an rFPV vaccine boost (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) induced a high titer of neutralizing antibodies in sheep. Therefore, our data suggest that a DNA vaccine consisting of a pCAG-(VP2+VP5) prime and an rFPV-(VP2+VP5) boost is an important candidate for the design of a novel vaccine against BTV-1.

  10. Novel strategies for development of next-generation glycoconjugate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Avci, Fikri Y

    2013-01-01

    Most bacterial pathogens are decorated with surface glycans called capsular polysaccharides (CPSs). Each CPS has a unique structure that is distinctively recognized by our immune cells. These polysaccharides are important vaccine candidates given that they are located on the surface of pathogens, are easily accessible by the immune system, and often result in formation of protective antibodies. To induce CPS specific adaptive immune response (i.e., T cell-mediated B cell response), CPSs are conjugated with carrier proteins, and the conjugation products are called glycoconjugate vaccines. Immunization with glycoconjugate vaccines has had significant health benefits in controlling infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. However, owing to insufficient understanding of their immune activation mechanisms, glycoconjugate vaccines have been designed and synthesized empirically. In recent years, we have witnessed important advancements in the glycoconjugate vaccine field: the discovery of the mechanism of action for glycoconjugate vaccines, a novel in vivo conjugation strategy, and progress in the use of novel carriers. These studies will be reviewed in detail herein.

  11. An Overview of Vaccination Strategies and Antigen Delivery Systems for Streptococcus agalactiae Vaccines in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Paul, Joydeb; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-12-13

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an emerging infectious disease adversely affecting Nile tilapia (Niloticus oreochromis) production in aquaculture. Research carried out in the last decade has focused on developing protective vaccines using different strategies, although no review has been carried out to evaluate the efficacy of these strategies. The purpose of this review is to provide a synopsis of vaccination strategies and antigen delivery systems currently used for S. agalactiae vaccines in tilapia. Furthermore, as shown herein, current vaccine designs include the use of replicative antigen delivery systems, such as attenuated virulent strains, heterologous vectors and DNA vaccines, while non-replicative vaccines include the inactivated whole cell (IWC) and subunit vaccines encoding different S. agalactiae immunogenic proteins. Intraperitoneal vaccination is the most widely used immunization strategy, although immersion, spray and oral vaccines have also been tried with variable success. Vaccine efficacy is mostly evaluated by use of the intraperitoneal challenge model aimed at evaluating the relative percent survival (RPS) of vaccinated fish. The major limitation with this approach is that it lacks the ability to elucidate the mechanism of vaccine protection at portals of bacterial entry in mucosal organs and prevention of pathology in target organs. Despite this, indications are that the correlates of vaccine protection can be established based on antibody responses and antigen dose, although these parameters require optimization before they can become an integral part of routine vaccine production. Nevertheless, this review shows that different approaches can be used to produce protective vaccines against S. agalactiae in tilapia although there is a need to optimize the measures of vaccine efficacy.

  12. An Overview of Vaccination Strategies and Antigen Delivery Systems for Streptococcus agalactiae Vaccines in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Munang’andu, Hetron Mweemba; Paul, Joydeb; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an emerging infectious disease adversely affecting Nile tilapia (Niloticus oreochromis) production in aquaculture. Research carried out in the last decade has focused on developing protective vaccines using different strategies, although no review has been carried out to evaluate the efficacy of these strategies. The purpose of this review is to provide a synopsis of vaccination strategies and antigen delivery systems currently used for S. agalactiae vaccines in tilapia. Furthermore, as shown herein, current vaccine designs include the use of replicative antigen delivery systems, such as attenuated virulent strains, heterologous vectors and DNA vaccines, while non-replicative vaccines include the inactivated whole cell (IWC) and subunit vaccines encoding different S. agalactiae immunogenic proteins. Intraperitoneal vaccination is the most widely used immunization strategy, although immersion, spray and oral vaccines have also been tried with variable success. Vaccine efficacy is mostly evaluated by use of the intraperitoneal challenge model aimed at evaluating the relative percent survival (RPS) of vaccinated fish. The major limitation with this approach is that it lacks the ability to elucidate the mechanism of vaccine protection at portals of bacterial entry in mucosal organs and prevention of pathology in target organs. Despite this, indications are that the correlates of vaccine protection can be established based on antibody responses and antigen dose, although these parameters require optimization before they can become an integral part of routine vaccine production. Nevertheless, this review shows that different approaches can be used to produce protective vaccines against S. agalactiae in tilapia although there is a need to optimize the measures of vaccine efficacy. PMID:27983591

  13. Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuchen; Moon, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated great therapeutic potential of educating and unleashing our own immune system for cancer treatment. However, there are still major challenges in cancer immunotherapy, including poor immunogenicity of cancer vaccines, off-target side effects of immunotherapeutics, as well as suboptimal outcomes of adoptive T cell transfer-based therapies. Nanomaterials with defined physico-biochemical properties are versatile drug delivery platforms that may address these key technical challenges facing cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Nanoparticle systems have been shown to improve targeted delivery of tumor antigens and therapeutics against immune checkpoint molecules, amplify immune activation via the use of new stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials, and augment the efficacy of adoptive cell therapies. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art in nanoparticle-based strategies designed to potentiate cancer immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines with subunit antigens (e.g., oncoproteins, mutated neo-antigens, DNA and mRNA antigens) and whole-cell tumor antigens, dendritic cell-based vaccines, artificial antigen-presenting cells, and immunotherapeutics based on immunogenic cell death, immune checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:26350600

  14. Cancer vaccines inducing antibody production: more pros than cons.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Singer, Josef

    2011-09-01

    To date, passive immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies is a well-established option in clinical oncology. By contrast, anticancer vaccines are less advanced, with the exception of successfully applied prophylactic vaccines against oncogenic virus infections. The creation of therapeutic vaccines is still a great challenge mostly due to the self-nature of tumor antigens. Therapeutic vaccines may be based on patient-specific material including pulsed effector cells, or tumor-associated antigens and derivatives thereof, such as peptides, mimotopes and nucleic acids. The latter represents a more universal approach, which would set an ideal economic framework resulting in broad patient access. In this article we focus on cancer vaccines for antibody production, in particular mimotope vaccines. The collected evidence suggests that they will open up new treatment options in minimal residual disease and early stage disease.

  15. Cancer vaccines at an inflexion point: what next?

    PubMed

    Bot, Adrian; Obrocea, Mihail; Marincola, Francesco M

    2011-09-09

    With the approval of the first therapeutic cancer vaccines for veterinarian and human use, the field reached a significant milestone after a considerable interval of tumultuous research and development marked by numerous ups and downs. As the mechanism of action and clinical benefit afforded by this class of agents are starkly different from that of conventional or small targeted therapies for cancer, there are still numerous hurdles that need to be overcome to fully unleash their potential. These challenges and efforts are illustrated in a book just published on this subject, a non-exhaustive yet representative synopsis of the latest advances in cancer vaccine technologies in various stages of development. Major lessons resulting from clinical testing of cancer vaccines and other immune interventions, are being integrated in novel, cutting edge platform technologies that blur the distinction between passive and active immunotherapies as well as carry the promise of fundamentally changing and improving the management of patients with cancer.

  16. Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccination in Cancer: Therapeutic Implications Emerging from Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Mac Keon, Soledad; Ruiz, María Sol; Gazzaniga, Silvina; Wainstok, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel-T), there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts toward an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment. PMID:26042126

  17. Enhancing the Breadth of Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jill E. Slansky CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Colorado School of Medicine Auro...COVERED 2 2013 – 24 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing the Breadth of Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer 5a...15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer, tumor antigens, T cell receptor, cancer vaccine 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  18. Autologous lysate-pulsed dendritic cell vaccination followed by adoptive transfer of vaccine-primed ex vivo co-stimulated T cells in recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kandalaft, Lana E; Powell, Daniel J; Chiang, Cheryl L; Tanyi, Janos; Kim, Sarah; Bosch, Marnix; Montone, Kathy; Mick, Rosemarie; Levine, Bruce L; Torigian, Drew A; June, Carl H; Coukos, George

    2013-01-01

    Novel strategies for the therapy of recurrent ovarian cancer are warranted. We report a study of a combinatorial approach encompassing dendritic cell (DC)-based autologous whole tumor vaccination and anti-angiogenesis therapy, followed by the adoptive transfer of autologous vaccine-primed CD3/CD28-co-stimulated lymphocytes. Recurrent ovarian cancer patients for whom tumor lysate was available from prior cytoreductive surgery underwent conditioning with intravenous bevacizumab and oral metronomic cyclophosphamide, sequentially followed by (1) bevacizumab plus vaccination with DCs pulsed with autologous tumor cell lysate supernatants, (2) lymphodepletion and (3) transfer of 5 × 10(9) autologous vaccine-primed T-cells in combination with the vaccine. Feasibility, safety as well as immunological and clinical efficacy were evaluated. Six subjects received this vaccination. Therapy was feasible, well tolerated, and elicited antitumor immune responses in four subjects, who also experienced clinical benefits. Of these, three patients with residual measurable disease received outpatient lymphodepletion and adoptive T-cell transfer, which was well tolerated and resulted in a durable reduction of circulating regulatory T cells and increased CD8(+) lymphocyte counts. The vaccine-induced restoration of antitumor immunity was achieved in two subjects, who also demonstrated clinical benefits, including one complete response. Our findings indicate that combinatorial cellular immunotherapy for the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer is well tolerated and warrants further investigation. Several modifications of this approach can be envisioned to optimize immunological and clinical outcomes.

  19. Tumor cell lysates as immunogenic sources for cancer vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    González, Fermín E; Gleisner, Alejandra; Falcón-Beas, Felipe; Osorio, Fabiola; López, Mercedes N; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are a promising immunological tool for cancer therapy. These stimulate the antitumor response and immunological memory generation. Nevertheless, many patients remain refractory to DC approaches. Antigen (Ag) delivery to DCs is relevant to vaccine success, and antigen peptides, tumor-associated proteins, tumor cells, autologous tumor lysates, and tumor-derived mRNA have been tested as Ag sources. Recently, DCs loaded with allogeneic tumor cell lysates were used to induce a potent immunological response. This strategy provides a reproducible pool of almost all potential Ags suitable for patient use, independent of MHC haplotypes or autologous tumor tissue availability. However, optimizing autologous tumor cell lysate preparation is crucial to enhancing efficacy. This review considers the role of cancer cell-derived lysates as a relevant source of antigens and as an activating factor for ex vivo therapeutic DCs capable of responding to neoplastic cells. These promising therapies are associated with the prolonged survival of advanced cancer patients. PMID:25625929

  20. Vaccination Strategies: a comparative study in an epidemic scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, D. B.; Jardim, C. L. T. F.; Ferreira, L. A. F.; da Silva, J. M.; Kritz, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    Epidemics are an extremely important matter of study within the Mathematical Modeling area and can be widely found in the literature. Some epidemiological models use differential equations, which are very sensible to parameters, to represent and describe the diseases mathematically. For this work, a variation of the SIR model is discussed and applied to a certain epidemic scenario, wherein vaccination is introduced through two different strategies: constant vaccination and vaccination in pulses. Other epidemiological and population aspects are also considered, such as mortality/natality and infection rates. The analysis and results are performed through numerical solutions of the model and a special attention is given to the discussion generated by the paramenters variation.

  1. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    PubMed

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate.

  2. Potential population health outcomes and expenditures of HIV vaccination strategies in the United States.

    PubMed

    Long, Elisa F; Brandeau, Margaret L; Owens, Douglas K

    2009-08-27

    Estimating the potential health benefits and expenditures of a partially effective HIV vaccine is an important consideration in the debate about whether HIV vaccine research should continue. We developed an epidemic model to estimate HIV prevalence, new infections, and the cost-effectiveness of vaccination strategies in the U.S. Vaccines with modest efficacy could prevent 300,000-700,000 HIV infections and save $30 billion in healthcare expenditures over 20 years. Targeted vaccination of high-risk individuals is economically efficient, but difficulty in reaching these groups may mitigate these benefits. Universal vaccination is cost-effective for vaccines with 50% efficacy and price similar to other infectious disease vaccines.

  3. An optimized peptide vaccine strategy capable of inducing multivalent CD8+ T cell responses with potent antitumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Il; Jung, Soo-Hyun; Sohn, Hyun-Jung; Celis, Esteban; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines are an attractive alternative to conventional therapies for treating malignant tumors, and successful tumor eradication depends primarily on obtaining high numbers of long-lasting tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells. Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines constitute a promising approach for treating cancer, but in most instances low immune responses and suboptimal therapeutic effects are achieved indicating that further optimization is required. We describe here a novel vaccination strategy with peptide-loaded DCs followed by a mixture of synthetic peptides, polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (poly-IC) and anti-CD40 antibodies (TriVax) for improving the immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy of DC-based vaccines in a melanoma mouse model. TriVax immunization 7–12 d after priming with antigen-loaded DCs generated large numbers of long-lasting multiple antigen-specific CD8+ T cells capable of recognizing tumor cells. These responses were far superior to those generated by homologous immunizations with either TriVax or DCs. CD8+ T cells but not CD4+ T cells or NK cells mediated the therapeutic efficacy of this heterologous prime-boost strategy. Moreover, combinations of this vaccination regimen with programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) blockade or IL2 anti-IL2 antibody complexes led to complete disease eradication and survival enhancement in melanoma-bearing mice. The overall results suggest that similar strategies would be applicable for the design of effective therapeutic vaccination for treating viral diseases and various cancers, which may circumvent current limitations of cell-based cancer vaccines. PMID:26451316

  4. Finding optimal vaccination strategies under parameter uncertainty using stochastic programming.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Matthew W; Sattenspiel, Lisa; Ntaimo, Lewis

    2008-10-01

    We present a stochastic programming framework for finding the optimal vaccination policy for controlling infectious disease epidemics under parameter uncertainty. Stochastic programming is a popular framework for including the effects of parameter uncertainty in a mathematical optimization model. The problem is initially formulated to find the minimum cost vaccination policy under a chance-constraint. The chance-constraint requires that the probability that R(*) vaccination reproduction number. We also show how to formulate the problem in two additional cases: (a) finding the optimal vaccination policy when vaccine supply is limited and (b) a cost-benefit scenario. The class of epidemic models for which this method can be used is described and we present an example formulation for which the resulting problem is a mixed-integer program. A short numerical example based on plausible parameter values and distributions is given to illustrate how including parameter uncertainty improves the robustness of the optimal strategy at the cost of higher coverage of the population. Results derived from a stochastic programming analysis can also help to guide decisions about how much effort and resources to focus on collecting data needed to provide better estimates of key parameters.

  5. Voluntary vaccination strategy and the spread of sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Cressman, Ross

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the spread and control of sexually transmitted diseases when a game-theory based vaccination strategy is involved. An individual's decision on vaccination uptake may follow a cost-benefit analysis since the individual obtains immunity against the disease from the vaccination and, at the same time, may have some perceived side effects. Evolutionary game theory is integrated into the epidemic model to reveal the relationship between individuals' voluntary decisions on vaccination uptake and the spread and control of such diseases. We show that decreasing the perceived cost of taking vaccine or increasing the payoff from social obligation is beneficial to controlling the disease. It is also shown how the "degree of rationality" of males and females affects the disease spread through the net payoff of the game. In particular, individual awareness of the consequences of the disease on the infectives also contributes to slowing down the disease spread. By analyzing an asymmetric version of our evolutionary game, it is shown that the disease is better controlled when individuals are more sensitive to fitness differences when net payoff is positive than when it is negative.

  6. Clinical evaluation strategies for a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Precioso, Alexander Roberto; Palacios, Ricardo; Thomé, Beatriz; Mondini, Gabriella; Braga, Patrícia; Kalil, Jorge

    2015-12-10

    Butantan Institute is a public Brazilian biomedical research-manufacturer center affiliated to the São Paulo State Secretary of Health. Currently, Butantan is one of the main public producers of vaccines, antivenoms, and antitoxins in Latin America. The partnership between Butantan and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the United Sates has been one of the longest and most successful partnerships in the development and manufacturing of new vaccines. Recently, Butantan Institute has developed and manufactured a lyophilized tetravalent live attenuated dengue vaccine with the four dengue viruses attenuated and licensed from the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at The National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (LID/NIAID/NIH). The objective of this paper is to describe the clinical evaluation strategies of a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (Butantan-DV) developed and manufactured by Butantan Institute. These clinical strategies will be used to evaluate the Butantan-DV Phase III trial to support the Butantan-DV licensure for protection against any symptomatic dengue caused by any serotype in people aged 2 to 59 years.

  7. Update: Immunological Strategies for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in US men. Along with initial therapy using surgery, radiotherapy, or cryotherapy, hormonal therapy is the mainstay of treatment. For men with advanced (metastatic) disease, docetaxel-based chemotherapy is US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved, and provides a significant survival advantage. This relative paucity of treatment options drives an ongoing quest for additional treatment modalities; among these is immunotherapy. The concept that prostate cancer is a malignancy that can be targeted by the immune system may seem counterintuitive; certainly kidney cancer and melanoma are more traditionally thought of as immune responsive cancers. However, prostate cancer arises in a relatively unique organ and may express a number of proteins (antigens) against which an immune response can be generated. More importantly, several of these agents have now demonstrated a significant survival benefit in randomized controlled clinical trials, and one agent in particular (Sipuleucel-T, Dendreon Corporation, Seattle, WA) could be FDA-approved in 2010. This update summarizes recent clinical developments in the field of prostate cancer immunotherapy, with a focus on dendritic cell vaccines, virus-based vaccines, DNA-based vaccines, and cell-based vaccines. In addition, the notion of agents that target immune checkpoints is introduced. Enthusiasm for prostate cancer immunotherapy is founded upon its potential to mediate targeted, specific, tumor cell destruction without significant systemic toxicity; however, this has yet to be fully realized in the clinical arena. PMID:20425628

  8. Update: immunological strategies for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Drake, Charles G; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2010-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in US men. Along with initial therapy using surgery, radiotherapy, or cryotherapy, hormonal therapy is the mainstay of treatment. For men with advanced (metastatic) disease, docetaxel-based chemotherapy is US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved, and provides a significant survival advantage. This relative paucity of treatment options drives an ongoing quest for additional treatment modalities; among these is immunotherapy. The concept that prostate cancer is a malignancy that can be targeted by the immune system may seem counterintuitive; certainly kidney cancer and melanoma are more traditionally thought of as immune responsive cancers. However, prostate cancer arises in a relatively unique organ and may express a number of proteins (antigens) against which an immune response can be generated. More importantly, several of these agents have now demonstrated a significant survival benefit in randomized controlled clinical trials, and one agent in particular (Sipuleucel-T, Dendreon Corporation, Seattle, WA) could be FDA-approved in 2010. This update summarizes recent clinical developments in the field of prostate cancer immunotherapy, with a focus on dendritic cell vaccines, virus-based vaccines, DNA-based vaccines, and cell-based vaccines. In addition, the notion of agents that target immune checkpoints is introduced. Enthusiasm for prostate cancer immunotherapy is founded upon its potential to mediate targeted, specific, tumor cell destruction without significant systemic toxicity; however, this has yet to be fully realized in the clinical arena.

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of cancer stem cell vaccines in the adjuvant setting

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yangyang; Lu, Lin; Xia, Yang; Chen, Xin; Chang, Alfred E.; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Hurt, Elaine; Owen, John; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Prince, Mark E.P.; Dai, Fu; Bao, Yangyi; Wang, Yi; Whitfield, Joel; Xia, Jian-chuan; Huang, Shiang; Wicha, Max S.; Li, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine strategies aimed at targeting cancer stem-like cells (CSC) may be most efficacious if deployed in the adjuvant setting. In this study, we offer preclinical evidence this is the case for a CSC-DC vaccine as tested in murine models of SCC7 squamous cell cancer and D5 melanoma. Vaccination of mice with an ALDHhigh SCC7 CSC-DC vaccine after surgical excision of established SCC7 tumors reduced local tumor relapse and prolonged host survival. This effect was augmented significantly by simultaneous administration of anti-PD-L1, an immune checkpoint inhibitor. In the minimal disease setting of D5 melanoma, treatment of mice with ALDHhigh CSC-DC vaccination inhibited primary tumor growth, reduced spontaneous lung metastases and increased host survival. In this setting, CCR10 and its ligands were downregulated on ALDHhigh D5 CSCs and in lung tissues respectively after vaccination with ALDHhigh D5 CSC-DC. RNAi-mediated attenuation of CCR10 blocked tumor cell migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. T cells harvested from mice vaccinated with ALDHhigh D5 CSC-DC selectively killed ALDHhigh D5 CSCs, with additional evidence of humoral immunological engagement and a reduction in ALDHhigh cells in residual tumors. Overall, our results offered a preclinical proof of concept for the use of ALDHhigh CSC-DC vaccines in the adjuvant setting to more effectively limit local tumor recurrence and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, as compared with traditional DC vaccines, with increased host survival further accentuated by simultaneous PD-L1 blockade. PMID:27325649

  10. NK Cells: Key to Success of DC-Based Cancer Vaccines?

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Evelien L.J.M.; Berneman, Zwi N.; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.I.

    2012-01-01

    The cytotoxic and regulatory antitumor functions of natural killer (NK) cells have become attractive targets for immunotherapy. Manipulation of specific NK cell functions and their reciprocal interactions with dendritic cells (DCs) might hold therapeutic promise. In this review, we focus on the engagement of NK cells in DC-based cancer vaccination strategies, providing a comprehensive overview of current in vivo experimental and clinical DC vaccination studies encompassing the monitoring of NK cells. From these studies, it is clear that NK cells play a key regulatory role in the generation of DC-induced antitumor immunity, favoring the concept that targeting both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms may synergistically promote clinical outcome. However, to date, DC vaccination trials are only infrequently accompanied by NK cell monitoring. Here, we discuss different strategies to improve DC vaccine preparations via exploitation of NK cells and provide a summary of relevant NK cell parameters for immune monitoring. We underscore that the design of DC-based cancer vaccines should include the evaluation of their NK cell stimulating potency both in the preclinical phase and in clinical trials. PMID:22907975

  11. Persistent parasites and immunologic memory in cutaneous leishmaniasis: implications for vaccine designs and vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Uzonna, Jude

    2008-01-01

    Despite a plethora of publications on the murine model of cutaneous leishmaniasis and their contribution to our understanding of the factors that regulate the development of CD4+ T cell immunity in vivo, there is still no effective vaccine against the human disease. While recovery from natural or experimental infection with Leishmania major, the causative agent of human cutaneous leishmaniasis, results in persistence of parasites at the primary infection site and the development of long-lasting immunity to reinfection, vaccination with killed parasites or recombinant proteins induces only short-term protection. The reasons for the difference in protective immunity following recovery from live infection and vaccination with heat-killed parasites are not known. This may in part be related to persistence of live parasites following healing of primary cutaneous lesions, because complete clearance of parasites leads to rapid loss of infection-induced immunity. Recent reports indicate that in addition to persistent parasites, IL-10-producing natural regulatory T cells may also play critical roles in the maintenance and loss of infection-induced immunity. This review focuses on current understanding of the factors that regulate the development, maintenance and loss of anti-Leishmania memory responses and highlights the role of persistent parasites and regulatory T cells in this process. Understanding these factors is crucial for designing effective vaccines and vaccination strategies against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  12. Transient Treg depletion enhances therapeutic anti‐cancer vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Wayne J.; Chee, Jonathan; Khong, Andrea; Cleaver, Amanda L.; Solin, Jessica N.; Ma, Shaokang; Lesterhuis, W. Joost; Dick, Ian; Holt, Robert A.; Creaney, Jenette; Boon, Louis; Robinson, Bruce; Lake, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Regulatory T cells (Treg) play an important role in suppressing anti‐ immunity and their depletion has been linked to improved outcomes. To better understand the role of Treg in limiting the efficacy of anti‐cancer immunity, we used a Diphtheria toxin (DTX) transgenic mouse model to specifically target and deplete Treg. Methods Tumor bearing BALB/c FoxP3.dtr transgenic mice were subjected to different treatment protocols, with or without Treg depletion and tumor growth and survival monitored. Results DTX specifically depleted Treg in a transient, dose‐dependent manner. Treg depletion correlated with delayed tumor growth, increased effector T cell (Teff) activation, and enhanced survival in a range of solid tumors. Tumor regression was dependent on Teffs as depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells completely abrogated any survival benefit. Severe morbidity following Treg depletion was only observed, when consecutive doses of DTX were given during peak CD8 T cell activation, demonstrating that Treg can be depleted on multiple occasions, but only when CD8 T cell activation has returned to base line levels. Finally, we show that even minimal Treg depletion is sufficient to significantly improve the efficacy of tumor‐peptide vaccination. Conclusions BALB/c.FoxP3.dtr mice are an ideal model to investigate the full therapeutic potential of Treg depletion to boost anti‐tumor immunity. DTX‐mediated Treg depletion is transient, dose‐dependent, and leads to strong anti‐tumor immunity and complete tumor regression at high doses, while enhancing the efficacy of tumor‐specific vaccination at low doses. Together this data highlight the importance of Treg manipulation as a useful strategy for enhancing current and future cancer immunotherapies. PMID:28250921

  13. PROVENGE (Sipuleucel-T) in prostate cancer: the first FDA-approved therapeutic cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cheever, Martin A; Higano, Celestia S

    2011-06-01

    Sipuleucel-T (PROVENGE; Dendreon) is the first therapeutic cancer vaccine to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. In men who have metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with no or minimal symptoms, sipuleucel-T prolongs median survival by 4.1 months compared with results in those treated with placebo. At 3 years, the proportion of patients in the vaccine group who were alive was 50% higher than that in the control group (31.7% versus 21.7%, respectively). Sipuleucel-T, which is designed to elicit an immune response to prostatic acid phosphatase, uses the patient's own immune system to recognize and combat his cancer. Currently, no other agents are available that offer a survival benefit for this population of asymptomatic patients who have not been treated with chemotherapy, except for docetaxel (whose inherent toxicities often lead patients and physicians to delay administration until symptoms develop). Straightforward strategies to increase the efficacy of sipuleucel-T are likely to provide even greater benefit. The preclinical and clinical development of sipuleucel-T is reviewed, and approaches to enhance efficacy are considered herein.

  14. Vaccine Acquisition Strategies - The Force Health Protection Gamble

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Wayne Foxworth Project Advisor The views expressed in this academic research paper are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official...NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR (S) Deutsch , Mary R. ; 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39.18 ii iii ABSTRACT AUTHOR : Mary R. Deutsch TITLE: Vaccine Acquisition Strategies-The Force Health Protection Gamble FORMAT

  15. Immunological Evaluation of Recent MUC1 Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Wall, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrantly glycosylated mucin 1 (MUC1) is a recognized tumor-specific antigen on epithelial cell tumors. A wide variety of MUC1 glycopeptide anti-cancer vaccines have been formulated by many research groups. Some researchers have used MUC1 alone as an immunogen whereas other groups used different antigenic carrier proteins such as bovine serum albumin or keyhole limpet hemocyanin for conjugation with MUC1 glycopeptide. A variety of adjuvants have been used with MUC1 glycopeptides to improve their immunogenicity. Fully synthetic multicomponent vaccines have been synthesized by incorporating different T helper cell epitopes and Toll-like receptor agonists. Some vaccine formulations utilized liposomes or nanoparticles as vaccine delivery systems. In this review, we discuss the immunological evaluation of different conjugate or synthetic MUC1 glycopeptide vaccines in different tumor or mouse models that have been published since 2012. PMID:27472370

  16. Are we missing an opportunity for cancer prevention? Human papillomavirus vaccination for survivors of pediatric and young adult cancers.

    PubMed

    Temkin, Sarah M; Seibel, Nita L

    2015-10-01

    Survivors of pediatric and young adult cancers remain at risk for subsequent diseases, including those related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Prevention of HPV acquisition through vaccination has become possible over the last decade. HPV vaccines have been shown to be safe and effective, yet rates of vaccination among childhood cancer survivors have remained low. Multiple factors, including stronger advocacy for this intervention from providers, could potentially increase vaccination and lead to lower HPV disease burdens for childhood cancer survivors. Health care providers for survivors of pediatric and adolescent cancers should prioritize counseling for HPV vaccination at follow-up visits. Cancer 2015;121:3435-43. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  17. Optimizing strategies for meningococcal C disease vaccination in Valencia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meningococcal C (MenC) conjugate vaccines have controlled invasive diseases associated with this serogroup in countries where they are included in National Immunization Programs and also in an extensive catch-up program involving subjects up to 20 years of age. Catch-up was important, not only because it prevented disease in adolescents and young adults at risk, but also because it decreased transmission of the bacteria, since it was in this age group where the organism was circulating. Our objective is to develop a new vaccination schedule to achieve maximum seroprotection in these groups. Methods A recent study has provided detailed age-structured information on the seroprotection levels against MenC in Valencia (Spain), where vaccination is routinely scheduled at 2 months and 6 months, with a booster dose at 18 months of age. A complementary catch-up campaign was also carried out in n for children from 12 months to 19 years of age. Statistical analyses of these data have provided an accurate picture on the evolution of seroprotection in the last few years. Results An agent-based model has been developed to study the future evolution of the seroprotection histogram. We have shown that the optimum strategy for achieving high protection levels in all infants, toddlers and adolescents is a change to a 2 months, 12 months and 12 years of age vaccination pattern. If the new schedule were implemented in January 2014, high-risk subjects between 15-19 years of age would have very low seroprotection for the next 6 years, thereby threatening the program. Conclusions High protection levels and a low incidence of meningococcal C disease can be achieved in the future by means of a cost-free change in vaccination program. However, we recommend a new catch-up program simultaneous to the change in regular vaccination program. PMID:24886054

  18. Recent advances in immunomodulation and vaccination strategies against coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Dalloul, Rami A; Lillehoj, Hyun S

    2005-03-01

    Coccidiosis is a ubiquitous intestinal protozoan infection of poultry seriously impairing the growth and feed utilization of infected animals. Conventional disease control strategies rely heavily on chemoprophylaxis, which is a tremendous cost to the industry. Existing vaccines consist of live virulent or attenuated Eimeria strains with limited scope of protection against an ever-evolving and widespread pathogen. The continual emergence of drug-resistant strains of Eimeria, coupled with the increasing regulations and bans on the use of anticoccidial drugs in commercial poultry production, urges the need for novel approaches and alternative control strategies. Because of the complexity of the host immunity and the parasite life cycle, a comprehensive understanding of host-parasite interactions and protective immune mechanisms becomes necessary for successful prevention and control practices. Recent progress in functional genomics technology would facilitate the identification and characterization of host genes involved in immune responses as well as parasite genes and proteins that elicit protective host responses. This study reviews recent coccidiosis research and provides information on host immunity, immunomodulation, and the latest advances in live and recombinant vaccine development against coccidiosis. Such information will help magnify our understanding of host-parasite biology and mucosal immunology, and we hope it will lead to comprehensive designs of nutritional interventions and vaccination strategies for coccidiosis.

  19. Strategies for improved stability of Peste des Petits Ruminants Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Carina; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M

    2011-07-12

    The main focus of this work was the improvement of the stability of the current PPRV vaccine. First, new formulations based on the Tris buffer were tested, with and without the addition of sucrose and trehalose and compared with the formulation normally used to stabilize the vaccine, the Weybridge medium. The results show a virus half-life of 21 h at 37°C and 1 month at 4°C for the Tris/trehalose liquid formulation and, in the lyophilized form, the formulation was able to maintain the viral titer above the 1 × 10(4) TCID(50)/mL (>10 doses/mL) for at least 21 months at 4°C (0.6 log lost), 144 h at 37°C (0.6 log lost) and 120 h at 45°C (1 log lost). Secondly, a strategy based on culture medium composition manipulation aiming at improving the intrinsic PPRV vaccine stability was also evaluated. The addition of 25 mM fructose resulted in a higher virus production (1log increase) with higher stability (2.6-fold increase compared to glucose 25 mM) at 37°C. Increased concentrations of NaCl, improved virus release, reducing the cell-associated fraction of the virus produced. Moreover this harvesting strategy is scalable and more suitable for a larger scale production than the freeze/thaw cycles normally used. The information gathered in this work showed that it is possible for the PPRV vaccine to have adequate short-term stability at non-freezing temperatures to support manufacturing, short-term shipping and storage. The identification of a more stable formulation should significantly enhance the utility of the vaccine in the control of a PPRV outbreak.

  20. Invariant NKT Cell Ligands for Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    NUMBER Invariant NKT Cell Ligands for Prostate Cancer Vaccines 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0156 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...efficacy in tumor bearing mice. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer , immunotherapy, NKT cells 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...proposal have shown that mice bearing prostate cancers in the TRAMP model ( prostate specific expression on SV40 T antigen, Tag, oncogene) do not respond

  1. 9-Valent HPV vaccine for cancers, pre-cancers and genital warts related to HPV.

    PubMed

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Velicer, Christine; Luxembourg, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of nearly all cervical cancer cases as well as a substantial proportion of anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal cancers, making it responsible for approximately 5% of the global cancer burden. The first-generation HPV vaccines that is, quadrivalent HPV type 6/11/16/18 vaccine and bivalent HPV type 16/18 vaccine were licensed in 2006 and 2007, respectively. A second-generation 9-valent HPV type 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine with broader cancer coverage was initiated even before the first vaccines were approved. By preventing HPV infection and disease due to HPV31/33/45/52/58, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to increase prevention of cervical cancer from 70 to 90%. In addition, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to prevent 85-95% of HPV-related vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. Overall, the 9vHPV vaccine addresses a significant unmet medical need, although further health economics and implementation research is needed.

  2. Adjunct Strategies for Tuberculosis Vaccines: Modulating Key Immune Cell Regulatory Mechanisms to Potentiate Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Jayashankar, Lakshmi; Hafner, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat of alarming proportions, resulting in 1.5 million deaths worldwide. The only available licensed vaccine, Bacillus Calmette–Guérin, does not confer lifelong protection against active TB. To date, development of an effective vaccine against TB has proven to be elusive, and devising newer approaches for improved vaccination outcomes is an essential goal. Insights gained over the last several years have revealed multiple mechanisms of immune manipulation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in infected macrophages and dendritic cells that support disease progression and block development of protective immunity. This review provides an assessment of the known immunoregulatory mechanisms altered by Mtb, and how new interventions may reverse these effects. Examples include blocking of inhibitory immune cell coreceptor checkpoints (e.g., programed death-1). Conversely, immune mechanisms that strengthen immune cell effector functions may be enhanced by interventions, including stimulatory immune cell coreceptors (e.g., OX40). Modification of the activity of key cell “immunometabolism” signaling pathway molecules, including mechanistic target of rapamycin, glycogen synthase kinase-3β, wnt/β-catenin, adenosine monophosophate-activated protein kinase, and sirtuins, related epigenetic changes, and preventing induction of immune regulatory cells (e.g., regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells) are powerful new approaches to improve vaccine responses. Interventions to favorably modulate these components have been studied primarily in oncology to induce efficient antitumor immune responses, often by potentiation of cancer vaccines. These agents include antibodies and a rapidly increasing number of small molecule drug classes that have contributed to the dramatic immune-based advances in treatment of cancer and other diseases. Because immune responses to malignancies and to Mtb share many similar mechanisms

  3. Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Peter P. Lee, MD...September 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT...TERMS Breast cancer, immunotherapy, vaccine , antigens 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a

  4. 76 FR 68768 - Guidance for Industry: Clinical Considerations for Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... No. FDA-2009-D-0427] Guidance for Industry: Clinical Considerations for Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines... Considerations for Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines'' dated October 2011. The guidance document provides sponsors who wish to submit an Investigational New Drug application (IND) for a therapeutic cancer vaccine...

  5. Strategies toward vaccines against Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Bondi, Sara K; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2009-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria, and are the causative agents of the diseases glanders and melioidosis, respectively. These bacteria have been recognized as important pathogens for over 100 years, yet a relative dearth of available information exists regarding their virulence determinants and immunopathology. Infection with either of these bacteria presents with nonspecific symptoms and can be either acute or chronic, impeding rapid diagnosis. The lack of a vaccine for either bacterium also makes them potential candidates for bioweaponization. Together with their high rate of infectivity via aerosols and resistance to many common antibiotics, both bacteria have been classified as category B priority pathogens by the US NIH and US CDC, which has spurred a dramatic increase in interest in these microorganisms. Attempts have been made to develop vaccines for these infections, which would not only benefit military personnel, a group most likely to be targeted in an intentional release, but also individuals who may come in contact with glanders-infected animals or live in areas where melioidosis is endemic. This review highlights some recent attempts of vaccine development for these infections and the strategies used to improve the efficacy of vaccine approaches. PMID:18980539

  6. Manipulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity through Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Duane A.

    2017-01-01

    Although cancer immunotherapy has shown significant promise in mediating efficacious responses, it remains encumbered by tumor heterogeneity, loss of tumor-specific antigen targets, and the regulatory milieu both regionally and systemically. Cross talk between the innate and adaptive immune response may be requisite to polarize sustained antigen specific immunity. Cancer vaccines can serve as an essential fulcrum in initiating innate immunity while molding and sustaining adaptive immunity. Although peptide vaccines have shown tepid responses in a therapeutic setting with poor correlates for immune activity, RNA vaccines activate innate immune responses and have shown promising effects in preclinical and clinical studies based on enhanced DC migration. While the mechanistic insights behind the interplay between innate and adaptive immunity may be unique to the immunotherapeutic being investigated, understanding this dynamic is important to coordinate the different arms of the immune response in a focused response against cancer antigens. PMID:28265580

  7. Control of HPV infection and related cancer through vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nam Phuong; Hung, Chien-Fu; Roden, Richard; Wu, T-C

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted virus, and its associated diseases continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in over 600 million infected individuals. Major progress has been made with preventative vaccines, and clinical data have emerged regarding the efficacy and cross-reactivity of the two FDA approved L1 virus like particle (VLP)-based vaccines. However, the cost of the approved vaccines currently limits their widespread use in developing countries which carry the greatest burden of HPV-associated diseases. Furthermore, the licensed preventive HPV vaccines only contain two high-risk types of HPV (HPV-16 and HPV-18) which can protect only up to 75 % of all cervical cancers. Thus, second generation preventative vaccine candidates hope to address the issues of cost and broaden protection through the use of more multivalent L1-VLPs, vaccine formulations, or alternative antigens such as L1 capsomers, L2 capsid proteins, and chimeric VLPs. Preventative vaccines are crucial to controlling the transmission of HPV, but there are already hundreds of millions of infected individuals who have HPV-associated lesions that are silently progressing toward malignancy. This raises the need for therapeutic HPV vaccines that can trigger T cell killing of established HPV lesions, including HPV-transformed tumor cells. In order to stimulate such antitumor immune responses, therapeutic vaccine candidates deliver HPV antigens in vivo by employing various bacterial, viral, protein, peptide, dendritic cell, and DNA-based vectors. This book chapter will review the commercially available preventive vaccines, present second generation candidates, and discuss the progress of developing therapeutic HPV vaccines.

  8. Targeting the Heterogeneity of Cancer with Individualized Neoepitope Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Türeci, Özlem; Vormehr, Mathias; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Huber, Christoph; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-04-15

    Somatic mutations binding to the patient's MHC and recognized by autologous T cells (neoepitopes) are ideal cancer vaccine targets. They combine a favorable safety profile due to a lack of expression in healthy tissues with a high likelihood of immunogenicity, as T cells recognizing neoepitopes are not shaped by central immune tolerance. Proteins mutated in cancer (neoantigens) shared by patients have been explored as vaccine targets for many years. Shared ("public") mutations, however, are rare, as the vast majority of cancer mutations in a given tumor are unique for the individual patient. Recently, the novel concept of truly individualized cancer vaccination emerged, which exploits the vast source of patient-specific "private" mutations. Concurrence of scientific advances and technological breakthroughs enables the rapid, cost-efficient, and comprehensive mapping of the "mutanome," which is the entirety of somatic mutations in an individual tumor, and the rational selection of neoepitopes. How to transform tumor mutanome data to actionable knowledge for tailoring individualized vaccines "on demand" has become a novel research field with paradigm-shifting potential. This review gives an overview with particular focus on the clinical development of such vaccines.

  9. Carbon nanotubes as a novel tool for vaccination against infectious diseases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Due to their unusual properties, carbon nanotubes have been extensively employed in electronics, nanotechnology and optics, amongst other. More recently, they have also been used as vehicles for drug and antigen delivery, the latter being a novel immunization strategy against infectious diseases and cancer. Here we discuss the potential of carbon nanotubes as an antigen delivery tool and suggest further directions in the field of vaccination. PMID:24025216

  10. Infrastructure requirements for human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cancer screening in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Anorlu, Rose; Sangwa-Lugoma, Ghislain; Denny, Lynette A

    2013-12-29

    The availability of both human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and alternative screening tests has greatly improved the prospects of cervical cancer prevention in sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. The inclusion of HPV vaccine in the portfolio of new vaccines offered by the Gobal Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI) to GAVI-eligible countries has vastly improved the chances of introducing HPV vaccination. Further investments to improve vaccine storage, distribution and delivery infrastructure and human resources of the Extended Programme of Immunization will substantially contribute to the faster introduction of HPV vaccination in SSA countries through both school- and campaign-based approaches. Alternative methods to cytology for the prevention of cervical cancer through the early detection and treatment of cervical cancer precursors have been extensively evaluated in the past 15 years, in Africa as well as in other low-resource settings. Visual inspection with 3-5% dilute acetic acid (VIA) and HPV testing are the two alternative screening methods that have been most studied, in both cross-sectional and randomised clinical trials. VIA is particularly suitable to low-resource settings; however, its efficacy in reducing cervical cancer is likely to be significantly lower than HPV testing. The introduction of VIA screening programmes will help develop the infrastructure that will, in turn, facilitate the introduction of affordable HPV testing in future. Links with the existing HIV/AIDS control programmes is another strategy to improve the infrastructure and screening services in SSA. Infrastructural requirements for an integrated approach aiming to vaccinate single-year cohorts of girls in the 9-13 years age-range and to screen women over 30 years of age using VIA or affordable rapid HPV tests are outlined in this manuscript. This article forms part of a regional report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in the Sub

  11. Cancer vaccines: Trafficking of tumor-specific T cells to tumor after therapeutic vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Hailemichael, Yared; Overwijk, Willem W.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer vaccines can induce robust activation of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells that can destroy tumors. Understanding the mechanism by which cancer vaccines work is essential in designing next-generation vaccines with more potent therapeutic activity. We recently reported that short peptides emulsified in poorly biodegradable, Incomplete Freund’s Adjuvant (IFA) primed CD8+ T cells that did not localize to the tumor site but accumulated at the persisting, antigen-rich vaccination site. The vaccination site eventually became a T cell graveyard where T cells responded to chronically released gp100 peptide by releasing cytokines, including interferon - γ (IFN-γ), which in turn upregulated Fas ligand (FasL) on host cells, causing apoptosis of Fas+ T cells. T cells that escaped apoptosis rapidly became exhausted, memory formation was poor, and therapeutic impact was minimal. Replacing the non-biodegradable IFA-based formulation with water-based, short-lived formulation in the presence of immunostimulatory molecules allowed T cells to traffic to tumors, causing their regression. In this review, we discuss recent advances in immunotherapeutic approaches that could enhance vaccine-primed immune cells fitness and render the tumor microenvironment more accessible for immune cell infiltration. PMID:24796845

  12. Plant-Made Vaccines in the Fight Against Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong-Arce, Alejandra; González-Ortega, Omar; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2017-03-01

    Immunotherapies constitute an important trend in developing new cancer treatments, and several promising candidates are under evaluation in clinical trials. Plants have entered the fight against cancer because they constitute low-cost and efficient hosts for biopharmaceutical production that can also serve as oral delivery vehicles. This review is focused on the knowledge gained through the development of anticancer plant-made vaccines reported thus far, and highlights the potential of this technology - its success being reflected in the number of candidates that are close to market. Future prospects for anticancer plant-made vaccines are also identified.

  13. Covalent bond or noncovalent bond: a supramolecular strategy for the construction of chemically synthesized vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yue; Sun, Zhan-Yi; Huang, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Pu-Guang; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Li, Yan-Mei

    2014-10-13

    A novel noncovalent strategy to construct chemically synthesized vaccines has been designed to trigger a robust immune response and to dramatically improve the efficiency of vaccine preparation. Glycosylated MUC1 tripartite vaccines were constructed through host-guest interactions with cucurbit[8]uril. These vaccines elicited high levels of IgG antibodies that were recognized by transformed cells and induced the secretion of cytokines. The antisera also mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. This noncovalent strategy with good suitability, scalability, and feasibility can be applied as a universal strategy for the construction of chemically synthesized vaccines.

  14. Cancer vaccines: harnessing the potential of anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    Although the presence of cancer suggests failure of the immune system to protect against development of tumors, the possibility that immunity can be redirected and focused to generate an anti-tumor response offers great translational possibility. The key to this is identifying antigens likely to be present in any given tumor and functionally critical to tumor survival and growth. Such tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are varied and optimally should be absent from normal tissue. Of particular interest are TAAs associated with the tumor stroma, as immunity directed against the stroma may restrict the ability of the tumor to grow and metastasize. Important to directing the immune system toward an effect anti-tumor response is the understanding of how TAAs are processed and how the tumor is able to evade immune elimination. The process of immunoediting happens in response to the selective pressure that the immune system places upon tumor cell populations and allows for emergence of tumor cells capable of escaping immune destruction. Efforts to harness the immune system for clinical application has been aided by vaccines based on purified recombinant protein or nucleic acid TAAs. For example, a vaccine for canine melanoma has been developed and approved based on immunization with DNA components of tyrosinase, a glycoprotein essential to melanin synthesis. The performance of cancer vaccines has been aided in some cases when supplemented with immunostimulatory molecules such as interleukin 2 or a novel extracellular matrix vaccine adjuvant. Vaccines with the broadest menu of antigenic targets may be those most likely to succeed against cancer. For this reason, tissue vaccines produced from harvested tumor material may offer significant benefit. With several cancer vaccines on the veterinary and human markets, efforts to understand basic tumor immunology are soon to yield great dividends.

  15. Vaccination strategies to prevent emerging diseases for Spanish aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Romalde, J L; Ravelo, C; López-Romalde, S; Avendaño-Herrera, R; Magariños, B; Toranzo, A E

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, three serious diseases have emerged in Spanish aquaculture. These are lactococcosis caused by Lactococcus garvieae, which is of economical importance in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss); pseudomonadiasis caused by Pseudomonas anguilliseptica which affects gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) and turbot (Scophthalmus maximus); and flexibacteriosis caused by Tenacibaculum maritimum which became a devastating problem in the emerging culture of sole (Solea spp). To obtain useful information for the design and development of new vaccines, antigenic characterisation of representative strains was performed. In this work we present the strategies adopted for the vaccine formulation (strains included, use of adjuvants) and administration (route, necessity of booster, etc.). The results from laboratory and/or field vaccination trials performed showed that for lactococcosis, protection lasting for five months was obtained with an oil-adjuvanted bacterin formulation. Unadjuvanted bacterin gave only a short duration of protection, which could, however, be prolonged by an antigen boost administered via the feed. A bacterin against Pseudomonas anguilliseptica gave protection for 12 weeks when tested in an experimental challenge trial in turbot. Besides the flexibacteriosis vaccine developed by our group for turbot, and due to the antigenic host-associated variability within T. maritimum, a new bacterin was developed against this bacterium to be used specifically in sole. This new bacterin, administered to sole by intraperitoneal injection, yielded RPS values of 94 % six weeks after immunization. In conclusion, these results suggest that vaccination constitutes a cost-effective method of controlling diseases that have emerged in the most important fish species being cultured in Spain.

  16. Strategies for Vaccine Design Using Phage Display-Derived Peptides.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Luiz R; Santos, Paula de S

    2016-01-01

    Development of peptide vaccines through the phage display technology is a powerful strategy that relies on short peptides expressed in the phage capsid surface to induce highly targeted immune responses. Phage display-derived immunogenic peptides can be used directly as a phage-fused peptide reagent or as a synthetic peptide with specific modifications, according to target molecule and disease pathogen/parasite. Peptides' selection (mimotopes) can be performed against monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies to disclose determinant regions (epitopes) that can induce a neutralizing response. Validations of mimotopes are performed in vitro and in vivo, based on cell culture and animal models, to demonstrate its immunogenic potential for final vaccine formulations with an appropriate adjuvant. Here we present specific methods for the discovery of novel immunogenic peptides based on phage display.

  17. What about the ducks? An alternative vaccination strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Durland

    2005-01-01

    Like most emerging disease threats, avian influenza is a zoonotic disease maintained in nature by wildlife. In this case, the reservoir of infection is migratory waterfowl, primarily ducks. Rather than trying to vaccinate most of the world's human population in response to the threat of an avian influenza pandemic, it might be more prudent to vaccinate key reservoir wildlife species from which pandemic strains evolve. This strategy would require a much more intensive research effort to understand the evolution of avian influenza viruses in nature, but it would be far less costly than any of the alternatives. Research priorities for emerging zoonoses, such as new strains of avian influenza viruses, should be re-evaluated with an emphasis on ways to intervene at their source, the natural reservoir hosts from which they originate, rather than focusing up on human-based interventions, which are too often too late. PMID:17132336

  18. What about the ducks? An alternative vaccination strategy.

    PubMed

    Fish, Durland

    2005-10-01

    Like most emerging disease threats, avian influenza is a zoonotic disease maintained in nature by wildlife. In this case, the reservoir of infection is migratory waterfowl, primarily ducks. Rather than trying to vaccinate most of the world's human population in response to the threat of an avian influenza pandemic, it might be more prudent to vaccinate key reservoir wildlife species from which pandemic strains evolve. This strategy would require a much more intensive research effort to understand the evolution of avian influenza viruses in nature, but it would be far less costly than any of the alternatives. Research priorities for emerging zoonoses, such as new strains of avian influenza viruses, should be re-evaluated with an emphasis on ways to intervene at their source, the natural reservoir hosts from which they originate, rather than focusing up on human-based interventions, which are too often too late.

  19. IMA901: A multi-peptide cancer vaccine for treatment of renal cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kirner, Alexandra; Mayer-Mokler, Andrea; Reinhardt, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Despite a major improvement in the treatment of advanced kidney cancer by the recent introduction of targeted agents such as multi-kinase inhibitors, long-term benefits are still limited and a significant unmet medical need remains for this disease. Cancer immunotherapy has shown its potential by the induction of long-lasting responses in a small subset of patients, however, the unspecific immune interventions with (high dose) cytokines used so far are associated with significant side effects. Specific cancer immunotherapy may circumvent these problems by attacking tumor cells while sparing normal tissue with the use of multi-peptide vaccination being one of the most promising strategies. We here summarize the clinical and translational data from phase I and II trials investigating IMA901. Significant associations of clinical benefit with detectable T cell responses against the IMA901 peptides and encouraging survival data in treated patients has prompted the start of a randomized, controlled phase III trial in 1st line advanced RCC with survival results expected toward the end of 2015. Potential combination strategies with the recently discovered so-called checkpoint inhibitors are also discussed. PMID:25625928

  20. Immune modulation by dendritic-cell-based cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Chaitanya; Kohli, Sakshi; Bapsy, Poonamalle Parthasarathy; Vaid, Ashok Kumar; Jain, Minish; Attili, Venkata Sathya Suresh; Sharan, Bandana

    2017-03-01

    The interplay between host immunity and tumour cells has opened the possibility of targeting tumour cells by modulation of the human immune system. Cancer immunotherapy involves the treatment of a tumour by utilizing the recombinant human immune system components to target the pro-tumour microenvironment or by revitalizing the immune system with the ability to kill tumour cells by priming the immune cells with tumour antigens. In this review, current immunotherapy approaches to cancer with special focus on dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines are discussed. Some of the DC-based vaccines under clinical trials for various cancer types are highlighted. Establishing tumour immunity involves a plethora of immune components and pathways; hence, combining chemotherapy, radiation therapy and various arms of immunotherapy, after analysing the benefits of individual therapeutic agents, might be beneficial to the patient.

  1. Injectable Cryogel-based Whole Cell Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bencherif, Sidi A.; Sands, R. Warren; Ali, Omar A.; Li, Weiwei A.; Lewin, Sarah A.; Braschler, Thomas M.; Shih, Ting-Y.S.; Verbeke, Catia S.; Bhatta, Deen; Dranoff, Glenn; Mooney, David J.

    2016-01-01

    A biomaterial-based vaccination system that uses minimal extracorporeal manipulation could provide in situ enhancement of dendritic cell (DC) numbers, a physical space where DCs interface with transplanted tumor cells, and an immunogenic context. Here we encapsulate GM-CSF, serving as a DC enhancement factor, and CpG ODN, serving as a DC activating factor, into sponge-like macroporous cryogels. These cryogels are injected subcutaneously into mice to localize transplanted tumor cells and deliver immunomodulatory factors in a controlled spatio-temporal manner. These vaccines elicit local infiltrates composed of conventional and plasmacytoid DCs, with the subsequent induction of potent, durable, and specific anti-tumor T cell responses in a melanoma model. These cryogels can be delivered in a minimally invasive manner, bypass the need for genetic modification of transplanted cancer cells, and provide sustained release of immunomodulators. Altogether, these findings indicate the potential for cryogels to serve as a platform for cancer cell vaccinations. PMID:26265369

  2. Cancer vaccines: looking to the future. Interview by Jenaid Rees.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulos, Vasso

    2013-10-01

    Interview by Jenaid Rees (Commissioning Editor) Vasso Apostolopoulos has been working in the field of cancer vaccines since 1991, and human clinical trials on her work have been conducted since 1994. Her work has been at the forefront of scientific research into the development of a vaccine for cancer and she has received over 90 awards and honours in recognition of her achievements. Some notable awards include, the Premier's Award for medical research, was named Young Australian of the Year (Victoria), recipient of the Channel 10/Herald Sun Young Achiever of the Year Award as well as being awarded the Order of Brigadier General of the Phoenix Battalion by the Greek President. In 1998 Apostolopoulos received the NHMRC CJ Martin Research Fellowship and worked at the Scripps Research Institute in California, USA, for 3.5 years and returned to the Austin Research Institute (VIC, Australia), and headed the Immunology and Vaccine Laboratory receiving the NHMRC RD Wright Fellowship. Upon her return to Australia, Apostolopoulos received the Victorian Tall Poppy Award, the Bodossaki Foundation Academic Prize, was inducted into the Victorian Honour roll of Women, was a torchbearer for the Melbourne leg of the International Athens 2004 Olympic Torch Relay, was named Woman of the Year, and is an Australia Day Ambassador. Her contribution into cancer research, vaccines and immunology has been extensive - publishing over 200 scientific papers and books, an inventor on 14 patents and collaborates with over 50 national and international Research Institutes and Universities. Her current research interests are in the development of new improved cancer vaccines and new modes of antigen delivery for immune stimulation. She is also interested in chronic diseases treatment and prevention through immunotherapy. She serves on the Editorial Board for Expert Review of Vaccines.

  3. Design of multi-epitope, analogue-based cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fikes, John D; Sette, Alessandro

    2003-09-01

    The current objective of our cancer programme is to develop an effective vaccine based on rationally designed T cell epitope analogues, for use in the adjuvant setting for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and colon cancer. Analogue epitopes, enhanced for either human leukocyte antigen (HLA) binding or T cell receptor (TCR) signalling, have been shown to be more effective at breaking immunological tolerance than cognate wild-type epitopes. Although encouraging early-phase clinical data has been obtained by others using a limited number of HLA-A2-restricted epitope analogues, the clinical benefits and immune correlates for vaccines comprised of multiple epitope analogues restricted by multiple HLA supertypes remains to be investigated. Clinical studies are currently being conducted on EP-2101, a prototype vaccine that delivers multiple HLA-A2-restricted analogue epitopes. In parallel, fixed anchor and heteroclitic analogues restricted by three other commonly expressed HLA supertypes are being identified. These analogues will be incorporated into future vaccines including optimised minigenes (epigenes) and tested in preclinical and clinical studies addressing various different cancer indications.

  4. Immunotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer: checkpoint blockade, cancer vaccines, and future directions in combination immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Heather L; Page, David B

    2016-11-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses both vaccines that direct immune responses to tumor-associated antigens, and checkpoint blocking antibodies that inhibit immune system suppression by targeting key pathways mediated by cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, programmed death 1 (PD-1), and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Both of these approaches currently are being explored as potential strategies for the treatment of breast cancer. Recent studies suggest that immunotherapy is poised to change the therapeutic landscape for some breast cancers. Specifically, overall response rates of 19% with PD-1/PD-L1-directed antibodies have been reported in 2 small studies of women with PD-L1-positive, heavily pretreated advanced triple-negative breast cancer. In combination with nab-paclitaxel, confirmed response rates were 46% in a PD-L1-unselected population in the first-line metastatic triple-negative breast cancer setting. Checkpoint-blocking antibodies also have been evaluated in small studies of women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer, and in women whose breast cancers lack PD-L1 expression, with more modest response rates. It has been hypothesized that some breast cancers are not inherently recognized by the immune system; however, preclinical and preliminary clinical data suggest that inherently modest immunogenicity may be overcome with novel vaccination strategies, as well as strategies that combine immune checkpoint blockade with methods of optimizing antigen presentation, such as tumor ablation, radiation, chemotherapy, or other approaches. If ongoing registrational trials support the use of immunotherapy, it could revolutionize the care of early-stage and metastatic breast cancer, and ideally improve cure rates.

  5. HIV/AIDS: vaccines and alternate strategies for treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Voronin, Yegor; Phogat, Sanjay

    2010-09-01

    The symposium "HIV/AIDS: Vaccines and Alternate Strategies for Treatment and Prevention" brought together HIV vaccine researchers to discuss the latest developments in the field. From basic discoveries in virus diversity and mechanisms of neutralization by antibodies to nonhuman primate research and clinical trials of vaccine candidates in volunteers, scientists are making great strides in understanding the mechanisms that may protect against HIV and pathways to achieve this protection through vaccination.

  6. Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    vaccine antigens for her tumor. Another novel aspect of this project is the identification of altered peptides ( mimotopes ) that may more efficiently...Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul T. Spellman, PhD...2011 – 24 September 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  7. Progress in the development of photodynamic-therapy-generated cancer vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Sun, Jinghai

    2003-07-01

    Upon giving an outline on vaccines in general, their history and priorities for future development, this paper gives a brief summary of the advances in the generation of cancer vaccines from the first attempts made over 100 years ago to those currently evaluted in clinical trials. This is followed by discussing hte intitial achievements in the investigation of cancer vaccines generated by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Recent contributions from our research to the understanding of how PDT-generated cancer vaccines work and their advantages compared to other types of cancer vaccines are discussed.

  8. A novel microparticulate vaccine for melanoma cancer using transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Tuhin; D'Souza, Bernadette; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Oettinger, Carl; Selvaraj, Periasamy; D'Souza, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we formulated a microparticulate melanoma cancer vaccine via the transdermal route. The vaccine was delivered using microneedle-based Dermaroller® which is available for cosmetic purposes. Unlike subcutaneous injections, administration using microneedles is painless and in general can increase the permeability of many compounds ranging in size from small molecules to proteins and microparticles that do not normally penetrate the skin. The vaccine microparticles were taken up by the antigen presenting cells which demonstrated a strong IgG titre level of 930 ug/mL in serum samples. The formulation increased the immunogenicity of the vaccine by incorporating the antigen into an albumin matrix having a size range of around 0.63-1.4 µm which acted as a synthetic adjuvant. The animals were vaccinated with 1 prime and 4 booster doses administered every 14 days over 8 weeks duration, followed by challenge with live tumour cells which showed protection after transdermal vaccination.

  9. Enhancing the Breadth of Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0550 TITLE: Enhancing the Breadth of Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing the Breadth of Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0550 5b. GRANT NUMBER...new bc epitopes and mimotopes. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer, tumor antigens, T cell receptor, cancer vaccine 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  10. The future of cancer research: prevention, screening, vaccines, and tumor-specific drug combos.

    PubMed

    Blanck, George

    2014-01-01

    New cancer research strategies have developed very rapidly over the past five years, including extensive DNA sequencing of tumor and normal cells; use of highly sensitive cancer cell detection methods; vaccine development and tumor-specific (designer) drugs. These developments have raised questions about where to concentrate efforts in the near future when establishing clinical trials, particularly important in an age of diminishing resources and during a period when competing strategies for cancer control are likely to overwhelm the opportunities for establishing large, effective clinical trials. In particular, it behooves the research community to be mindful of the inevitable, challenging obligation to responsibly choose between clinical trials that offer the credible hope of incremental advances vs. trials that are less traditional but may have revolutionary outcomes.

  11. Genes to vaccines for immunotherapy: how the molecular biology revolution has influenced cancer immunology.

    PubMed

    Laheru, Dan A; Pardoll, Drew M; Jaffee, Elizabeth M

    2005-11-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the complex signaling pathways involved in immune system regulation, along with analyses of genetic differences between tumors and their normal cellular counterparts, have accelerated development of immune-based strategies for cancer treatment and prevention. More clinically relevant animal models have shown that successful immune-based strategies will require the integration of interventions that target specific tumor antigens with regulators of the antitumor immune response. Immunotherapy for cancer is at a critical crossroad, as therapeutics designed to target cancer-associated antigens and regulatory signaling molecules enter clinical trials. We outline here a paradigm for early-stage clinical development of immunotherapy combinations that use vaccines to drive tumor antigen-specific responses while simultaneously targeting immune regulatory pathways.

  12. Cancer prevention: Strategies in the workplace

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, C.E.; Coye, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses cancer prevention strategies for the workplace. Contents include: The exposure-potency index; ranking carcinogenic hazards of volatile industrial chemicals; ethylene dibromide toxicity and fatal consequences; danger of handling oncological agents, asbestos contamination of drinking water; sunlight and occupation skin cancer; smoking and occupational lung cancer; and controversies in the assessment of carcinogenic risk of formaldehyde.

  13. Innovative Strategies for Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0223 TITLE: Innovative Strategies for Breast Cancer Immunotherapy ...studies (2). A promising approach in cancer treatment is adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells to redirect...multiple tissues. DISCUSSION Adoptive immunotherapy is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer , and observations from preclinical and

  14. A clinical development paradigm for cancer vaccines and related biologics.

    PubMed

    Hoos, Axel; Parmiani, Giorgio; Hege, Kristen; Sznol, Mario; Loibner, Hans; Eggermont, Alexander; Urba, Walter; Blumenstein, Brent; Sacks, Natalie; Keilholz, Ulrich; Nichol, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines are a heterogeneous group of complex biologics with distinctly different clinical characteristics than cytotoxic agents. The current clinical development paradigm used for oncology drug development is based on criteria developed for cytotoxic agents. More flexible and focused developmental guidelines are needed to address the unique characteristics of therapeutic cancer vaccines. Over the course of 1 year, the Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group, representing academia and the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries with participation from the US Food and Drug Administration, defined in a consensus process the cornerstones of a new clinical development paradigm for cancer vaccines and related biologics. Four major topics were addressed: (1) end points for clinical trials, (2) trial designs and statistical methods, (3) technical and developmental challenges, and (4) combination therapy. The proposed paradigm suggests therapeutic cancer vaccines to be investigated in 2 general types of clinical studies: proof-of-principle trials and efficacy trials. Proof-of-principle trials, which introduce a novel cancer vaccine into humans, should include a minimum of 20 or more patients in a homogenous, well-defined population in an adjuvant setting or without rapidly progressive disease in a metastatic setting to allow vaccines adequate time to induce biologic activity and should incorporate immune and molecular markers. Objectives should include initiation of a safety database, determination of dose and schedule, and demonstration of biologic activity as proof-of-principle. Biologic activity is defined as any effect of the vaccine on the target disease or host immune system using biologic markers as study end points, for example, clinical, molecular, or immune response. Immune response is demonstrated if determined in 2 separate, established and reproducible assays at 2 consecutive follow-up time points after the baseline assessment. If

  15. DNA vaccines against cancer come of age.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Freda K; Ottensmeier, Christian H; Rice, Jason

    2010-04-01

    Genetic technology allows construction of DNA vaccines encoding selected tumor antigens together with molecules to direct and amplify the desired effector pathways. Their enormous promise has been marred by a problem of scaling up to human subjects. This is now largely overcome by electroporation, which increases both antigen expression and the inflammatory milieu. While the principles of vaccine design can be developed in mouse models, the real operative test is in the clinic, using patients in temporary remission. Monitoring of induced immunity, although commonly limited to blood, is providing objective qualitative and quantitative data on T-cell and antibody responses. Prolongation of remission is the goal and an activated immune system should achieve this.

  16. A novel multi-epitope peptide vaccine against cancer: an in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Navid; Ghasemi, Younes; Javadi, Gholamreza; Khoshnoud, Mohammad Javad; Omidinia, Eskandar

    2014-05-21

    Cancer immunotherapy has an outstanding position in cancer prevention and treatment. In this kind of therapy, the immune system is activated to eliminate cancerous cells. Multi-epitope peptide cancer vaccines are manifesting as the next generation of cancer immunotherapy. In the present study, we have implemented various strategies to design an efficient multi-epitope vaccine. CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) epitopes, which have a pivotal role in cellular immune responses, helper epitopes and adjuvant, are three crucial components of peptide vaccine. CTL epitopes were determined from two high immunogenic protein Wilms tumor-1 (WT1) and human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 by various servers, which apply different algorithms. CTL epitopes were linked together by AAY and HEYGAEALERAG motifs to enhance epitope presentation. Pan HLA DR-binding epitope (PADRE) peptide sequence and helper epitopes, which have defined from Tetanus toxin fragment C (TTFrC) by various servers, were used to induce CD4+ helper T lymphocytes (HTLs) responses. Additionally, helper epitopes were conjugated together via GPGPG motifs that stimulate HTL immunity. Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin (HBHA), a novel TLR4 agonist was employed as an adjuvant to polarize CD4+ T cells toward T-helper 1 to induce strong CTL responses. Moreover, the EAAAK linker was introduced to N and C terminals of HBHA for efficient separation. 3D model of protein was generated and predicted B cell epitopes were determined from the surface of built structure. Our protein contains several linear and conformational B cell epitopes, which suggests the antibody triggering property of this novel vaccine. Hence, our final protein can be used for prophylactic or therapeutic usages, because it can potentially stimulate both cellular and humoral immune responses.

  17. Building on Dendritic Cell Subsets to Improve Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Zurawski, Gerard; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY T cells can reject established tumors when adoptively transferred into patients, thereby demonstrating that the immune system can be harnessed for cancer therapy. However, such passive immunotherapy is unlikely to maintain memory T cells that might control tumor outgrowth on the long term. Active immunotherapy with vaccines has the potential to induce tumor-specific effector and memory T cells. Vaccines act through dendritic cells (DCs) which induce, regulate and maintain T cell immunity. Clinical trials testing first generation DC vaccines pulsed with tumor antigens provided a proof-of-principle that therapeutic immunity can be elicited. The increased knowledge of the DC system, including the existence of distinct DC subsets is leading to new trials which aim at improved immune and clinical outcomes. PMID:20226644

  18. Business models and opportunities for cancer vaccine developers.

    PubMed

    Kudrin, Alex

    2012-10-01

    Despite of growing oncology pipeline, cancer vaccines contribute only to a minor share of total oncology-attributed revenues. This is mainly because of a limited number of approved products and limited sales from products approved under compassionate or via early access entry in smaller and less developed markets. However revenue contribution from these products is extremely limited and it remains to be established whether developers are breaking even or achieving profitability with existing sales. Cancer vaccine field is well recognized for high development costs and risks, low historical rates of investment return and high probability of failures arising in ventures, partnerships and alliances. The cost of reimbursement for new oncology agents is not universally acceptable to payers limiting the potential for a global expansion, market access and reducing probability of commercial success. In addition, the innovation in cancer immunotherapy is currently focused in small and mid-size biotech companies and academic institutions struggling for investment. Existing R&D innovation models are deemed unsustainable in current "value-for-money" oriented healthcare environment. New business models should be much more open to collaborative, networked and federated styles, which could help to outreach global, markets and increase cost-efficiencies across an entire value chain. Lessons learned from some developing countries and especially from South Korea illustrate that further growth of cancer vaccine industry will depends not only on new business models but also will heavily rely on regional support and initiatives from different bodies, such as governments, payers and regulatory bodies.

  19. Business models and opportunities for cancer vaccine developers

    PubMed Central

    Kudrin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Despite of growing oncology pipeline, cancer vaccines contribute only to a minor share of total oncology-attributed revenues. This is mainly because of a limited number of approved products and limited sales from products approved under compassionate or via early access entry in smaller and less developed markets. However revenue contribution from these products is extremely limited and it remains to be established whether developers are breaking even or achieving profitability with existing sales. Cancer vaccine field is well recognized for high development costs and risks, low historical rates of investment return and high probability of failures arising in ventures, partnerships and alliances. The cost of reimbursement for new oncology agents is not universally acceptable to payers limiting the potential for a global expansion, market access and reducing probability of commercial success. In addition, the innovation in cancer immunotherapy is currently focused in small and mid-size biotech companies and academic institutions struggling for investment. Existing R&D innovation models are deemed unsustainable in current “value-for-money” oriented healthcare environment. New business models should be much more open to collaborative, networked and federated styles, which could help to outreach global, markets and increase cost-efficiencies across an entire value chain. Lessons learned from some developing countries and especially from South Korea illustrate that further growth of cancer vaccine industry will depends not only on new business models but also will heavily rely on regional support and initiatives from different bodies, such as governments, payers and regulatory bodies. PMID:22894953

  20. Mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by a single time vaccination strategy in mice.

    PubMed

    González Aznar, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Valdez, Yolanda; Fariñas, Mildrey; Pérez, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination is considered by the World Health Organization as the most cost-effective strategy for controlling infectious diseases. In spite of great successes with vaccines, many infectious diseases are still leading killers, because of the inadequate coverage of many vaccines. Several factors have been responsible: number of doses, high vaccine reactogenicity, vaccine costs, vaccination policy, among others. Contradictorily, few vaccines are of single dose and even less of mucosal administration. However, more common infections occur via mucosa, where secretory immunoglobulin A plays an essential role. As an alternative, we proposed a novel protocol of vaccination called Single Time Vaccination Strategy (SinTimVaS) by immunizing 2 priming doses at the same time: one by mucosal route and the other by parenteral route. Here, the mucosal and systemic responses induced by Finlay adjuvants (AF Proteoliposome 1 and AF Cochleate 1) implementing SinTimVaS in BALB/c mice were evaluated. One intranasal dose of AF Cochleate 1 and an intramuscular dose of AF Proteoliposome 1 adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, with bovine serum albumin or tetanus toxoid as model antigens, administrated at the same time, induced potent specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Also, we demonstrated that SinTimVaS using other mucosal routes like oral and sublingual, in combination with the subcutaneous route elicits immune responses. SinTimVaS, as a new immunization strategy, could increase vaccination coverage and reduce time-cost vaccines campaigns, adding the benefits of immune response in mucosa.

  1. Nitroaspirin corrects immune dysfunction in tumor-bearing hosts and promotes tumor eradication by cancer vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Santo, Carmela; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Bolla, Manlio; del Soldato, Piero; Melani, Cecilia; Guiducci, Cristiana; Colombo, Mario P.; Iezzi, Manuela; Musiani, Piero; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2005-03-01

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the immune-mediated destruction of cancer cells. Of the various strategies used by tumors to counteract immune attacks, myeloid suppressors recruited by growing cancers are particularly efficient, often resulting in the induction of systemic T lymphocyte dysfunction. We have previously shown that the mechanism by which myeloid cells from tumor-bearing hosts block immune defense strategies involves two enzymes that metabolize L-arginine: arginase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase. NO-releasing aspirin is a classic aspirin molecule covalently linked to a NO donor group. NO aspirin does not possess direct antitumor activity. However, by interfering with the inhibitory enzymatic activities of myeloid cells, orally administered NO aspirin normalized the immune status of tumor-bearing hosts, increased the number and function of tumor-antigen-specific T lymphocytes, and enhanced the preventive and therapeutic effectiveness of the antitumor immunity elicited by cancer vaccination. Because cancer vaccines and NO aspirin are currently being investigated in independent phase I/II clinical trials, these findings offer a rationale to combine these treatments in subjects with advanced neoplastic diseases. arginase | immunosuppression | myeloid cells | nitric oxide | immunotherapy

  2. Nitroaspirin corrects immune dysfunction in tumor-bearing hosts and promotes tumor eradication by cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Carmela; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Bolla, Manlio; Del Soldato, Piero; Melani, Cecilia; Guiducci, Cristiana; Colombo, Mario P; Iezzi, Manuela; Musiani, Piero; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2005-03-15

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the immune-mediated destruction of cancer cells. Of the various strategies used by tumors to counteract immune attacks, myeloid suppressors recruited by growing cancers are particularly efficient, often resulting in the induction of systemic T lymphocyte dysfunction. We have previously shown that the mechanism by which myeloid cells from tumor-bearing hosts block immune defense strategies involves two enzymes that metabolize L-arginine: arginase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase. NO-releasing aspirin is a classic aspirin molecule covalently linked to a NO donor group. NO aspirin does not possess direct antitumor activity. However, by interfering with the inhibitory enzymatic activities of myeloid cells, orally administered NO aspirin normalized the immune status of tumor-bearing hosts, increased the number and function of tumor-antigen-specific T lymphocytes, and enhanced the preventive and therapeutic effectiveness of the antitumor immunity elicited by cancer vaccination. Because cancer vaccines and NO aspirin are currently being investigated in independent phase I/II clinical trials, these findings offer a rationale to combine these treatments in subjects with advanced neoplastic diseases.

  3. A game dynamic model for delayer strategies in vaccinating behaviour for pediatric infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Samit; Bauch, C T

    2010-12-07

    Several studies have found that some parents delay the age at which their children receive pediatric vaccines due to perception of higher vaccine risk at the recommended age of vaccination. This has been particularly apparently during the Measles-Mumps-Rubella scare in the United Kingdom. Under a voluntary vaccination policy, vaccine coverage in certain age groups is a potentially complex interplay between vaccinating behaviour, disease dynamics, and age-specific risk factors. Here, we construct an age-structured game dynamic model, where individuals decide whether to vaccinate according to imitation dynamics depending on age-dependent disease prevalence and perceived risk of vaccination. Individuals may be timely vaccinators, delayers, or non-vaccinators. The model exhibits multiple equilibria and a broad range of possible dynamics. For certain parameter regimes, the proportion of timely vaccinators and delayers oscillate in an anti-phase fashion in response to oscillations in infection prevalence. Under an exogenous change to the perceived risk of vaccination as might occur during a vaccine scare, the model can also capture an increase in delayer strategists similar in magnitude to that observed during the Measles-Mumps-Rubella vaccine scare in the United Kingdom. Our model also shows that number of delayers steadily increases with increasing severity of the scare, whereas it saturates to specific value with increases in duration of the scare. Finally, by comparing the model dynamics with and without the option of a delayer strategy, we show that adding a third delayer strategy can have a stabilizing effect on model dynamics. In an era where individual choice--rather than accessibility--is becoming an increasingly important determinant of vaccine uptake, more infectious disease models may need to use game theory or related techniques to determine vaccine uptake.

  4. [Research and development strategies, examples among new vaccines].

    PubMed

    Denis, F; Ploy, M-C

    2009-05-01

    Classical methods are still providing new vaccines, but molecular biology and genetic engineering have enabled new approaches to development. Changes in vaccinology have involved the isolation, presentation and administration of vaccinal antigens or attenuated vaccinal strains. New methods of vaccine delivery other than injection will be used (e.g. mucosal administration) and new vectors or adjuvants will be added to vaccines in order to stimulate specific responses. New vaccines can also be obtained by using viral-like particles (VLP of papillomavirus), conjugate polysaccharides (N. meningitidis, S. pneumoniae) or the reassortment of segmented genomes (rotavirus, influenza). Here, we analyze the different steps of a vaccine's life using concrete cases of two new vaccines against papillomavirus and rotavirus. Vaccination has a promising future.

  5. Allogeneic Antigen Composition for Preparing Universal Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Balashova, Elena E.

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that tumors induce specific changes to the surface of human endothelial cells thereby providing the basis for designing endothelial cell-based vaccines that directly target antigens expressed by the tumor endothelium. The present report extends these studies in vitro by investigating the efficacy of allogeneic antigens with regard to their ability to target immune responses against the tumor vasculature since alloantigens simplify vaccine development and implementation in clinical practice. We demonstrated that allogeneic SANTAVAC (Set of All Natural Target Antigens for Vaccination Against Cancer), which presents a specifically prepared composition of cell surface antigens from tumor-stimulated endothelial cells, allows targeting of the tumor vasculature with efficacy of 17, where efficacy represents the killing rate of target cells before normal cells are adversely affected, and efficacy of 60, where efficacy represents the fold decrease in the number of target cells and directly relates to tumor growth arrest. These data suggest that allogeneic SANTAVAC may be considered an antigenic composition that following administration in the presence of respective adjuvants may be clinically tested as a therapeutic or prophylactic universal cancer vaccine without adverse side effects to the normal vasculature. PMID:27781211

  6. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Hepatitis B Vaccination Strategies to Prevent Perinatal Transmission in North Korea: Selective Vaccination vs. Universal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghoon; Park, Sang Min

    2016-01-01

    Background To tackle the high prevalence of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in North Korea, it is essential that birth doses of HBV vaccines should be administered within 24 hours of birth. As the country fails to provide a Timely Birth Dose (TBD) of HBV vaccine, the efforts of reducing the high prevalence of HBV have been significantly hampered. Methods To examine the cost-effectiveness of vaccination strategies to prevent perinatal transmission of HBV in North Korea, we established a decision tree with a Markov model consisting of selective, universal, and the country’s current vaccination program against HBV. The cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from societal and payer’s perspectives and evaluated by Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY). Results The results suggest that introducing the universal vaccination would prevent 1,866 cases of perinatal infections per 100,000 of the birth cohort of 2013. Furthermore, 900 cases of perinatal infections per 100,000 could be additionally averted if switching to the selective vaccination. The current vaccination is a dominated strategy both from the societal and payer’s perspective. The Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) between universal and selective vaccination is $267 from the societal perspective and is reported as $273 from the payer’s perspective. Conclusion Based on the assumption that the 2012 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita in North Korea, $582.6 was set for cost-effectiveness criteria, the result of this study indicates that selective vaccination may be a highly cost-effective strategy compared to universal vaccination. PMID:27802340

  7. Jabs and barbs: ways to address misleading vaccination and immunisation information using currently available strategies.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Jon; Stewart, Cameron; Parker, Malcolm

    2013-09-01

    Misleading vaccination information undermines confidence in vaccination and may lead to reductions in the effectiveness of vaccination programs. A number of regulatory techniques can be employed to challenge the spread of false information, including health care complaints, therapeutic goods laws, consumer protection laws and professional discipline. This article examines three case studies involving the publication of anti-vaccination information by non-professionally aligned organisations, by non-registered health professionals, and by registered health professionals under the National Law. The article examines the effectiveness of different regulatory responses and makes suggestions for future strategies to deal with the publication of demonstrably false information regarding vaccination.

  8. Disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Literacy and Vaccine Completion among Asian American Pacific Islander Undergraduates: Implications for Cancer Health Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hee Yun; Kwon, Melissa; Vang, Suzanne; DeWolfe, Jessica; Kim, Nam Keol; Lee, Do Kyung; Yeung, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Low rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among young Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women need to be addressed, particularly given the high incidence of cervical cancer in this population. The current study aims to investigate predictors of HPV vaccination in young AAPI and non-Latina white (NLW) women. Methods: A…

  9. Lessons learned from cancer vaccine trials and target antigen choice.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of tumor antigens have been targeted in cancer immunotherapy studies. Traditionally, the focus has been on commonly overexpressed antigens shared across many patients and/or tumor types. As the field has progressed, the identity of human tumor rejection antigens has broadened. Immunologic monitoring of clinical trials has slowly elucidated candidate biomarkers of immune response and clinical response, and conversely, of immune dysfunction and suppression. We have utilized MART-1/Melan-A in our melanoma studies and observed a high frequency of immune responses and several significant clinical responses in patients vaccinated with this melanosomal protein. Alpha-fetoprotein is a shared, overexpressed tumor antigen and secreted glycoprotein that we have tested in hepatocellular cancer vaccines. Our recent studies have identified immunosuppressive and immune-skewing activities of this antigen. The choice of target antigen and its form can have unexpected effects.

  10. Vaccination models and optimal control strategies to dengue.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Monteiro, M Teresa T; Torres, Delfim F M

    2014-01-01

    As the development of a dengue vaccine is ongoing, we simulate an hypothetical vaccine as an extra protection to the population. In a first phase, the vaccination process is studied as a new compartment in the model, and different ways of distributing the vaccines investigated: pediatric and random mass vaccines, with distinct levels of efficacy and durability. In a second step, the vaccination is seen as a control variable in the epidemiological process. In both cases, epidemic and endemic scenarios are included in order to analyze distinct outbreak realities.

  11. Comparison of suburban vaccine distribution strategies to control raccoon rabies.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Jason R; Bigler, Laura L; Curtis, Paul D; Lein, Donald H; Lembo, Arthur J

    2008-10-01

    Helicopters and hand baiting are commonly used to distribute vaccine-laden baits to help control raccoon (Procyon lotor) rabies in suburban landscapes, but these techniques may be labor intensive, costly, or unavailable in some areas. We tested conventional baiting strategies against polyvinyl-chloride (PVC) bait stations in Erie County (New York, USA) during July and August 2003-05. Hand, helicopter, and bait station treatments were randomly assigned to six 25-km(2) suburban study sites. To estimate the proportion of raccoons that ingested baits, tooth and blood samples from 954 raccoons were collected and examined for tetracycline biomarker and rabies-neutralizing antibodies, respectively. Overall, 38% (358/954) of the raccoons in Erie County tested positive for tetracycline; 16% (155/954) tested seropositive for rabies virus. Year of study significantly impacted biomarker prevalence; fewer raccoons tested positive for tetracycline in 2004. Probability of seropositivity increased with raccoon age. No statistically significant differences existed between baiting strategies and frequencies of biomarker and antibody-positive raccoons across all years combined. Thus, bait stations could be used as part of an integrated rabies control strategy.

  12. Identification of Novel Mimotopes for the Development for the Development of Multivalent Breast Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Identification of Novel Mimotopes for the Development of Multivalent Breast Cancer Vaccines 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1... mimotopes specific for antibodies in breast cancer patient serum that could be used as the basis of a vaccine . Any group of breast cancer patients will...conclusions about the suitability of this method to identify novel mimotopes for vaccine development. While we have shown that this method can be

  13. Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jill E. Slansky CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Colorado, REPORT...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH11-1-0550 5b. GRANT...receptor, cancer vaccine 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC

  14. Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0548 TITLE: Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0548...antigen discovery. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer, immunotherapy, vaccine , antigens 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18

  15. Synergy of SOCS-1 Inhibition and Microbial-Based Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    AD ____________ __ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0292 TITLE: Synergy of SOCS-1 Inhibition and Microbial-Based Cancer Vaccines PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Synergy of SOCS-1 Inhibition and Microbial-Based Cancer Vaccines Sb. GRANT NUMBER W81 XWH-12-1 -0292 Sc...growth or even complete eradication of the tumor. Vaccines capable of teaching the immune system to recognize cancer cells must be extremely potent

  16. Interview. Cancer vaccines and immunotherapy of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulos, Vasso

    2009-01-01

    Vasso Apostolopoulos heads the Immunology and Vaccine Laboratory of Burnet Institute (Australia). She completed her PhD in 1995 at the Austin Research Institute (Australia). Her work on cancer vaccine development has been in clinical trial since 1994. In the last 16 years, she has received more than 100 awards/honors for her achievements. Most notable are the Premiers Award for Medical Research, Victorian Young Australian of the Year, Channel 10/Herald Sun Young Achiever of the Year, Victorian Tall Poppy, inductee into the Victorian Honour Roll of Women, a torchbearer in the International Athens 2004 Olympic Torch Relay and was named Woman of the Year. In 1998, she received the prestigious NHMRC CJ Martin Fellowship and undertook research at the Scripps Research Institute (CA, USA) until 2001. In 2001, she returned to the Austin Research Institute (now the Burnet Institute) and was a NHMRC RD Wright Fellow until 2007. She is currently a Professor, Principle Research Fellow, Sir Zelman Cowen Cancer Research Fellow, Australia Day Ambassador and a Patron of the Womens Health Network. She has published more than 120 papers and books and is an inventor on 12 patents. She is on the board and a regular reviewer for a number of journals. Her current interests are in the development of new improved cancer vaccines and new modes of antigen delivery for immune stimulation. She is also interested in the 3D x-ray crystal structures of peptide-MHC complexes.

  17. Therapeutic vaccination with an interleukin-2-interferon-gamma-secreting allogeneic tumor vaccine in patients with progressive castration-resistant prostate cancer: a phase I/II trial.

    PubMed

    Brill, Thomas H; Kübler, Hubert R; Pohla, Heike; Buchner, Alexander; Fend, Falko; Schuster, Tibor; van Randenborgh, Heiner; Paul, Roger; Kummer, Tania; Plank, Christian; Eisele, Bernd; Breul, Jürgen; Hartung, Rudolf; Schendel, Dolores J; Gansbacher, Bernd

    2009-12-01

    Immunotherapy with whole cell cancer vaccines has been tested in various tumor types. This study investigated the safety profile and antitumor activity of an allogeneic prostate carcinoma cell line, LNCaP, expressing recombinant human interleukin-2 and human interferon-gamma. Thirty HLA-A*0201-matched patients with progressive, castration-resistant prostate cancer received four intradermal injections on days 1, 15, 29, and 92, and then every 90 days, as long as no tumor progression occurred. Three patients received a dose level of 7.5 million cells, and 27 patients received 15 million cells per injection. The primary study criteria were safety and the difference in prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), determined in the pretreatment phase (before the start of vaccination) and in the trial treatment phase (during vaccination). No dose-limiting or autoimmune toxicity was seen. During vaccination there was a significant prolongation of the PSA-DT compared with the prevaccination period (prolongation from 63 to 114 days; p < 0.01; intention to treat). In addition, results showed a period of PSA stabilization of at least 12 weeks, together with stable bone scans in 12 of 30 patients, and 3 patients sustained a >50% decrease in PSA versus baseline. The median overall survival time from first vaccination was 32 months (mean value, 34 months). Immune monitoring revealed T cell stimulation in the majority of patients. This vaccine strategy was found to be safe and well tolerated and was accompanied by prolongation of PSA-DT. The results of this trial warrant clinical development of this vaccine.

  18. Advances and perspectives of colorectal cancer stem cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Dou, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is essentially an environmental and genetic disease featured by uncontrolled cell growth and the capability to invade other parts of the body by forming metastases, which inconvertibly cause great damage to tissues and organs. It has become one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in the developed countries such as United States, and approximately 1.2 million new cases are yearly diagnosed worldwide, with the death rate of more than 600,000 annually and incidence rates are increasing in most developing countries. Apart from the generally accepted theory that pathogenesis of colorectal cancer consists of genetic mutation of a certain target cell and diversifications in tumor microenvironment, the colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) theory makes a different explanation, stating that among millions of colon cancer cells there is a specific and scanty cellular population which possess the capability of self-renewal, differentiation and strong oncogenicity, and is tightly responsible for drug resistance and tumor metastasis. Based on these characteristics, CCSCs are becoming a novel target cells both in the clinical and the basic studies, especially the study of CCSCs vaccines due to induced efficient immune response against CCSCs. This review provides an overview of CCSCs and preparation technics and targeting factors related to CCSCs vaccines in detail.

  19. Vaccines against human papillomavirus infections: protection against cancer, genital warts or both?

    PubMed

    Joura, E A; Pils, S

    2016-12-01

    Since 2006, three vaccines against infections and disease caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) became available in Europe-in 2006 a quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine, in 2007 a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine and in 2015 a nonavalent HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine. HPV 16 and 18 are the most oncogenic HPV strains, causing about 70% of cervical and other HPV-related cancers, HPV 6 and 11 cause 85% of all genital warts. The additional types of the polyvalent vaccine account for about 20% of invasive cervical cancer and >35% of pre-cancer. The potential differences between these vaccines caused some debate. All three vaccines give a robust and long-lasting protection against the strains in the various vaccines. The promise of cross-protection against other types (i.e. HPV 31/33/45) and hence a broader cancer protection was not fulfilled because these observations were confounded by the vaccine efficacy against the vaccine types. Furthermore, cross-protection was not consistent over various studies, not durable and not consistently seen in the real world experience. The protection against disease caused by oncogenic HPV strains was not compromised by the protection against low-risk types causing genital warts. The most effective cancer protection to date can be expected by the nonavalent vaccine, data indicate a 97% efficacy against cervical and vulvovaginal pre-cancer caused by these nine HPV types.

  20. Impact of 2-, 4- and 9-valent HPV vaccines on morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Luckett, Rebecca; Feldman, Sarah

    2016-06-02

    Cervical cancer causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Most cervical cancers are associated with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV), and vaccination with any of 3 available HPV vaccines is anticipated to greatly reduce the burden of cervical cancer. This review provides an overview of the burden of HPV, the efficacy and clinical effectiveness of the bivalent (HPV 16, 18), quadrivalent (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18) and 9vHPV (HPV 6, 11, 16, 1831, 33, 45, 52, 58) vaccines in order to assess the anticipated impact on cervical cancer. All three vaccines show high efficacy in prevention of vaccine-specific HPV-type infection and associated high-grade cervical dysplasia in HPV-naïve women. Early clinical effectiveness data for the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccine demonstrate reduced rates of HPV 16 and 18 prevalence in vaccinated cohorts; data evaluating cervical dysplasia and cervical procedures as outcomes will shed further light on the clinical effectiveness of both vaccines. The bivalent vaccine has demonstrated cross-protection to non-vaccine HPV types, including the types in the 9vHPV vaccine. No clinical effectiveness data is yet available for the 9vHPV vaccine.  While HPV vaccination has great promise to reduce cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, estimated benefits are largely theoretical at present. Large population-based clinical effectiveness studies will provide long-term immunogenicity and effectiveness, as well as assessment of cervical cancer as an endpoint, particularly as young vaccinated women enter the appropriate age range to initiate screening for cervical cancer. Strengthening screening and treatment programs will likely have the greatest impact in the short-term on cervical cancer morbidity and mortality.

  1. Current advancements and potential strategies in the development of MERS-CoV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Naru; Jiang, Shibo; Du, Lanying

    2014-06-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a newly emerging infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, MERS-coronavirus (MERS-CoV), a new member in the lineage C of β-coronavirus (β-CoV). The increased human cases and high mortality rate of MERS-CoV infection make it essential to develop safe and effective vaccines. In this review, the current advancements and potential strategies in the development of MERS vaccines, particularly subunit vaccines based on MERS-CoV spike (S) protein and its receptor-binding domain (RBD), are discussed. How to improve the efficacy of subunit vaccines through novel adjuvant formulations and routes of administration as well as currently available animal models for evaluating the in vivo efficacy of MERS-CoV vaccines are also addressed. Overall, these strategies may have important implications for the development of effective and safe vaccines for MERS-CoV in the future.

  2. Current advancements and potential strategies in the development of MERS-CoV vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Naru; Jiang, Shibo; Du, Lanying

    2014-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a newly emerging infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, MERS-coronavirus (MERS-CoV), a new member in the lineage C of β-coronavirus (β-CoV). The increased human cases and high mortality rate of MERS-CoV infection make it essential to develop safe and effective vaccines. In this review, the current advancements and potential strategies in the development of MERS vaccines, particularly subunit vaccines based on MERS-CoV spike (S) protein and its receptor-binding domain (RBD), are discussed. How to improve the efficacy of subunit vaccines through novel adjuvant formulations and routes of administration as well as currently available animal models for evaluating the in vivo efficacy of MERS-CoV vaccines are also addressed. Overall, these strategies may have important implications for the development of effective and safe vaccines for MERS-CoV in the future. PMID:24766432

  3. Vaccination strategies and vaccine formulations for epidemic and pandemic influenza control.

    PubMed

    Kreijtz, Joost H C M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2009-03-01

    Influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype cause an ever-increasing number of bird-to-human transmissions and a pandemic outbreak caused by these viruses is imminent. Therefore, the availability of safe and effective vaccines is highly desirable and their development considered a priority. However, using production and use of seasonal influenza vaccine as template for the production of pandemic H5N1 vaccines did not yield effective vaccines. High antigen doses were required to induce appreciable antibody responses. In addition, limited production capacity and long production times are other disadvantages of conventional influenza vaccine preparations. Here, we review recent developments that will contribute to a more rapid availability of sufficient doses of highly efficacious and safe pandemic influenza vaccines. The new developments include the establishment of novel methods to prepare vaccine strains, novel production technologies and the use of novel adjuvants and alternative vaccine formulations.

  4. Vaccination with Necroptotic Cancer Cells Induces Efficient Anti-tumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Aaes, Tania Løve; Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Delvaeye, Tinneke; De Craene, Bram; De Koker, Stefaan; Heyndrickx, Liesbeth; Delrue, Iris; Taminau, Joachim; Wiernicki, Bartosz; De Groote, Philippe; Garg, Abhishek D; Leybaert, Luc; Grooten, Johan; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Agostinis, Patrizia; Berx, Geert; Declercq, Wim; Vandenabeele, Peter; Krysko, Dmitri V

    2016-04-12

    Successful immunogenic apoptosis in experimental cancer therapy depends on the induction of strong host anti-tumor responses. Given that tumors are often resistant to apoptosis, it is important to identify alternative molecular mechanisms that elicit immunogenic cell death. We have developed a genetic model in which direct dimerization of FADD combined with inducible expression of RIPK3 promotes necroptosis. We report that necroptotic cancer cells release damage-associated molecular patterns and promote maturation of dendritic cells, the cross-priming of cytotoxic T cells, and the production of IFN-γ in response to tumor antigen stimulation. Using both FADD-dependent and FADD-independent RIPK3 induction systems, we demonstrate the efficient vaccination potential of immunogenic necroptotic cells. Our study broadens the current concept of immunogenic cell death and opens doors for the development of new strategies in cancer therapy.

  5. Next-generation dengue vaccines: novel strategies currently under development.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Anna P; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2011-10-01

    Dengue has become the most important arboviral infection worldwide with more than 30 million cases of dengue fever estimated to occur each year. The need for a dengue vaccine is great and several live attenuated dengue candidate vaccines are proceeding through clinical evaluation. The need to induce a balanced immune response against all four DENV serotypes with a single vaccine has been a challenge for dengue vaccine developers. A live attenuated DENV chimeric vaccine produced by Sanofi Pasteur has recently entered Phase III evaluation in numerous dengue-endemic regions of the world. Viral interference between serotypes contained in live vaccines has required up to three doses of the vaccine be given over a 12-month period of time. For this reason, novel DENV candidate vaccines are being developed with the goal of achieving a protective immune response with an immunization schedule that can be given over the course of a few months. These next-generation candidates include DNA vaccines, recombinant adenovirus vectored vaccines, alphavirus replicons, and sub-unit protein vaccines. Several of these novel candidates will be discussed.

  6. Immune Evasion Pathways and the Design of Dendritic Cell-based Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Brent A.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data is suggesting that the process of dendritic cell (DC) tolerization is an important step in tumorigenesis. Our understanding of the networks within the tumor microenvironment that functionally tolerize DC function is evolving while methods for genetically manipulating DC populations in situ continue to develop. A more intimate understanding of the paracrine signaling pathways which mediate immune evasion by subverting DC function promises to provide novel strategies for improving the clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. This will likely require a better understanding of both the antigen expression profile and the immune evasion network of the tumor and its associated stromal tissues. PMID:27011049

  7. Mimotope vaccines: epitope mimics induce anti-cancer antibodies.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Angelika B; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2007-10-31

    Mimotopes are epitope-mimicking structures. When applied for immunizations they induce desired antibody specificities exclusively based on the principle of molecular mimicry. This is important as antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens may harbor diverse biological effects depending on their epitope specificity. Thus they may inhibit or promote tumor growth. This review gives an update on different vaccination strategies based on the mimotope concept.

  8. Production of a novel multi-epitope peptide vaccine for cancer immunotherapy in TC-1 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Navid; Sadraeian, Mohammad; Rahbar, Mohammad Reza; Khoshnoud, Mohammad Javad; Mohkam, Milad; Gholami, Ahmad; Banihashemi, Mehrzad; Ghasemi, Younes

    2015-01-01

    In our previous research, several bioinformatic strategies were utilized to design an efficient multi-epitope peptide vaccine (MEV) against cancer. The designed vaccine consists of Wilms tumor-1 (WT-1) and human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, tetanus toxin fragment C (TTFrC) and HLA-DR epitope (PADRE) helper T lymphocyte (HTL) epitopes and heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA) as an immunostimulatory adjuvant. All segments were fused together by suitable linkers. In the current study, we cloned and expressed the designed MEV in E. coli. We subsequently performed in vivo preventative and therapeutic assays to evaluate antitumor efficacy of the vaccine against the HPV-16 E7-expressing murine tumor cell line TC-1 as a model for cancer immunotherapy. The results showed that in preventive experiments, vaccination with MEV significantly augmented the IgG antibody titer and the percentage of tumor-free mice compared to control groups (PBS and E7). Moreover, in therapeutic experiments, vaccination with MEV led to a reduction in the number of metastatic nodules, lung weights and the ratio of lung weights to body weights compared to other groups. In sum, our epitope vaccine could efficiently induce preventive and therapeutic antitumor immunity in TC-1 tumor bearing mice.

  9. Impact of Coverage-Dependent Marginal Costs on Optimal HPV Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ryser, Marc D.; McGoff, Kevin; Herzog, David P.; Sivakoff, David J.; Myers, Evan R.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of vaccinating males against the human papillomavirus (HPV) remains a controversial subject. Many existing studies conclude that increasing female coverage is more effective than diverting resources into male vaccination. Recently, several empirical studies on HPV immunization have been published, providing evidence of the fact that marginal vaccination costs increase with coverage. In this study, we use a stochastic agent-based modeling framework to revisit the male vaccination debate in light of these new findings. Within this framework, we assess the impact of coverage-dependent marginal costs of vaccine distribution on optimal immunization strategies against HPV. Focusing on the two scenarios of ongoing and new vaccination programs, we analyze different resource allocation policies and their effects on overall disease burden. Our results suggest that if the costs associated with vaccinating males are relatively close to those associated with vaccinating females, then coverage-dependent, increasing marginal costs may favor vaccination strategies that entail immunization of both genders. In particular, this study emphasizes the necessity for further empirical research on the nature of coverage-dependent vaccination costs. PMID:25979280

  10. Impact of coverage-dependent marginal costs on optimal HPV vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Ryser, Marc D; McGoff, Kevin; Herzog, David P; Sivakoff, David J; Myers, Evan R

    2015-06-01

    The effectiveness of vaccinating males against the human papillomavirus (HPV) remains a controversial subject. Many existing studies conclude that increasing female coverage is more effective than diverting resources into male vaccination. Recently, several empirical studies on HPV immunization have been published, providing evidence of the fact that marginal vaccination costs increase with coverage. In this study, we use a stochastic agent-based modeling framework to revisit the male vaccination debate in light of these new findings. Within this framework, we assess the impact of coverage-dependent marginal costs of vaccine distribution on optimal immunization strategies against HPV. Focusing on the two scenarios of ongoing and new vaccination programs, we analyze different resource allocation policies and their effects on overall disease burden. Our results suggest that if the costs associated with vaccinating males are relatively close to those associated with vaccinating females, then coverage-dependent, increasing marginal costs may favor vaccination strategies that entail immunization of both genders. In particular, this study emphasizes the necessity for further empirical research on the nature of coverage-dependent vaccination costs.

  11. Vaccine therapy with sipuleucel-T (Provenge) for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Thara, Eddie; Dorff, Tanya B; Pinski, Jacek K; Quinn, David I

    2011-08-01

    As the most common malignancy among North American males, prostate cancer causes more than 30,000 deaths each year. After local and hormonal treatments, a great number of patients ultimately progressed to castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), in which chemotherapy provides a small survival advantage, but with significant toxicities. In the past decade, prostate cancer has become a target for several immunotherapeutic approaches. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge®, or APC8015) is a novel cancer vaccine developed from autologous dendritic cells (DC) loaded with engineered fusion protein of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Phase I and Phase II trials show that the vaccine is safe and effective in creating immune responses toward the fusion-protein target antigen, PAP-GM-CSF also call PA2024. Recent Phase III studies also demonstrated sipuleucel-T's efficacy in prolonging median survival in patients with CRPC, despite little or no effect on clinical disease progression or surrogates such as serum PSA kinetics. Subsequently, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved sipuleucel-T for the treatment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic CRPC in April 2010. Filings are projected with international regulatory agencies in 2011. While the development of sipuleucel-T provides an option for patients with early CRPC, it also introduces physicians and researchers to new unanswered questions regarding its optimal clinical use and questions about mechanism of action and combination and sequencing with other agents.

  12. Schistosomiasis Elimination Strategies and Potential Role of a Vaccine in Achieving Global Health Goals

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Annie X.; Agosti, Jan M.; Walson, Judd L.; Hall, B. Fenton; Gordon, Lance

    2014-01-01

    In March 2013, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation co-sponsored a meeting entitled “Schistosomiasis Elimination Strategy and Potential Role of a Vaccine in Achieving Global Health Goals” to discuss the potential role of schistosomiasis vaccines and other tools in the context of schistosomiasis control and elimination strategies. It was concluded that although schistosomiasis elimination in some focal areas may be achievable through current mass drug administration programs, global control and elimination will face several significant scientific and operational challenges, and will require an integrated approach with other, additional interventions. These challenges include vector (snail) control; environmental modification; water, sanitation, and hygiene; and other future innovative tools such as vaccines. Defining a clear product development plan that reflects a vaccine strategy as complementary to the existing control programs to combat different forms of schistosomiasis will be important to develop a vaccine effectively. PMID:24402703

  13. Schistosomiasis elimination strategies and potential role of a vaccine in achieving global health goals.

    PubMed

    Mo, Annie X; Agosti, Jan M; Walson, Judd L; Hall, B Fenton; Gordon, Lance

    2014-01-01

    In March 2013, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation co-sponsored a meeting entitled "Schistosomiasis Elimination Strategy and Potential Role of a Vaccine in Achieving Global Health Goals" to discuss the potential role of schistosomiasis vaccines and other tools in the context of schistosomiasis control and elimination strategies. It was concluded that although schistosomiasis elimination in some focal areas may be achievable through current mass drug administration programs, global control and elimination will face several significant scientific and operational challenges, and will require an integrated approach with other, additional interventions. These challenges include vector (snail) control; environmental modification; water, sanitation, and hygiene; and other future innovative tools such as vaccines. Defining a clear product development plan that reflects a vaccine strategy as complementary to the existing control programs to combat different forms of schistosomiasis will be important to develop a vaccine effectively.

  14. Vaccination strategies for epidemic cholera in Haiti with implications for the developing world.

    PubMed

    Chao, Dennis L; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M

    2011-04-26

    In October 2010, a virulent South Asian strain of El Tor cholera began to spread in Haiti. Interventions have included treatment of cases and improved sanitation. Use of cholera vaccines would likely have further reduced morbidity and mortality, but such vaccines are in short supply and little is known about effective vaccination strategies for epidemic cholera. We use a mathematical cholera transmission model to assess different vaccination strategies. With limited vaccine quantities, concentrating vaccine in high-risk areas is always most efficient. We show that targeting one million doses of vaccine to areas with high exposure to Vibrio cholerae, enough for two doses for 5% of the population, would reduce the number of cases by 11%. The same strategy with enough vaccine for 30% of the population with modest hygienic improvement could reduce cases by 55% and save 3,320 lives. For epidemic cholera, we recommend a large mobile stockpile of enough vaccine to cover 30% of a country's population to be reactively targeted to populations at high risk of exposure.

  15. Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Butterworth, K. T., McCarthy, H. O., Devlin , A., Ming, L., Robson, T., McKeown, S. R. and Wo rthington, J., Hypoxia selects for androgen in dependent...55905 Office: 507-284-4008, Laboratory: 507-284-1744, FAX: 507-284-8566 Education 1988 - 1995 B.S. and M.S. in Biochemistry , School of Chemical and...Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Rochester, MN 2009 - Date Assistant Professor of Biochemistry /Molecular Biology, Mayo

  16. Immunotherapy of Uveal Melanoma: Vaccination Against Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Mirko; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice

    2017-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most frequently occurring primary intraocular tumor in adults, with an incidence of about 5 out of 100,000 per year, the incidence rising with increasing age (Lipski, Klin Monbl Augenheilkd 230:1005-1019, 2013; Metz et al., Klin Monbl Augenheilkd 230:686-691, 2013; Singh and Topham, Ophthalmology 110:956-961, 2003). Often diagnosed late due to a lack of early symptoms, this kind of melanoma is associated with a poor prognosis. Approximately 50 % of the patients develop distant metastases (Lipski, Klin Monbl Augenheilkd 230:1005-1019, 2013; Metz et al., Klin Monbl Augenheilkd 230:686-691, 2013; Singh and Topham, Ophthalmology 110:956-961, 2003). In sharp contrast to cutaneous melanoma, uveal melanoma shows a strong liver tropism and spreads exclusively via the hematogenous route (except for tumors with extraocular expansion) (Heindl et al., Arch Ophthalmol 128:1001-1008, 2010). The most likely reason for this observation is the lack of lymphatic vessels in the choroid and alymphatic barrier of the sclera (Schlereth et al., Exp Eye Res 125:203-209, 2014; Schroedl et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 49:5222-5229, 2008). Due to its location in the immune-privileged eye, the uveal melanoma is widely protected from the immune system. Therefore, the goal of the approach presented here, of a "personalized vaccination therapy" is to help the immune system recognize and fight the tumor.

  17. A novel DNA vaccine containing four mimicry epitopes for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Wu, Kaichun; Guo, Changcun; Liu, Changjiang; Han, Shuang; Lin, Tao; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Shi, Rui; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Daiming

    2005-03-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. This paper focuses on the development of a DNA vaccine containing four mimotopes of MG7Ag for gastric cancer (multi-epitope vaccine). By inoculating BALB/c mice, the vaccine was characterized and compared with a similar vaccine containing only one mimotope (mono-epitope vaccine) and other controls. Cellular ELISA indicated that serum titer of antibody against MG7Ag was significantly higher in mice immunized with the multi-epitope vaccine than that in the group immunized with the mono-epitope vaccine (0.8627 vs 0.6754, P < 0.05). And ELISPOT assay showed that the number of INF-gamma spots induced by multi-epitope vaccine was significantly larger than that of the group immunized with mono-epitope vaccine(93.3 vs 70.7, P < 0.05). Two weeks after tumor challenge, the weight of tumor in each mouse was evaluated, and the tumor masses formed in the mice immunized with multi-epitope vaccine were markedly smaller than those formed in the mice immunized with mono-epitope vaccine. These studies demonstrated that both humoral and cellular response were induced by the two vaccines and the efficiency of multi-epitope vaccine is stronger than that of the mono-epitope vaccine.

  18. Optimal vaccine scheduling in cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccoli, B.; Castiglione, F.

    2006-10-01

    Cancer immunotherapy aims at stimulating the immune system to react against cancer stealth capabilities. It consists of repeatedly injecting small doses of a tumor-associated molecule one wants the immune system to recognize, until a consistent immune response directed against the tumor cells is observed. We have applied the theory of optimal control to the problem of finding the optimal schedule of injections of an immunotherapeutic agent against cancer. The method employed works for a general ODE system and can be applied to find the optimal protocol in a variety of clinical problems where the kinetics of the drug or treatment and its influence on the normal physiologic functions have been described by a mathematical model. We show that the choice of the cost function has dramatic effects on the kind of solution the optimization algorithm is able to find. This provides evidence that a careful ODE model and optimization schema must be designed by mathematicians and clinicians using their proper different perspectives.

  19. Issues and challenges in implementing cervical cancer screenings in the emergence of HPV vaccination in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Juntasopeepun, Phanida; Davidson, Patricia M; Srisomboon, Jatupol

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of the HPV vaccine has been a major breakthrough in preventing cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases around the globe. Cervical cancer is a significant public health problem in Thailand. Despite the long-time availability of cervical cancer screening programs in Thailand, the uptake among the target female population remains low. HPV vaccines were approved by the Food and Drug Administration of Thailand in 2007. As of March 2011, due to financial limitations, HPV vaccines have still not been included in the national immunization program under the public health benefit plans although individuals has the option to pay privately for the vaccine. This paper discusses the issues and challenges in implementing cervical cancer screening programs in the era of HPV vaccination in Thailand. Recommendations to increase the uptake of cervical cancer screening and further research to inform a policy regarding the cervical cancer screening measures are proposed.

  20. Immunosuppressive networks and checkpoints controlling antitumor immunity and their blockade in the development of cancer immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Butt, A Q; Mills, K H G

    2014-09-18

    Vaccines that promote protective adaptive immune responses have been successfully developed against a range of infectious diseases, and these are normally administered prior to exposure with the relevant virus or bacteria. Adaptive immunity also plays a critical role in the control of tumors. Immunotherapeutics and vaccines that promote effector T cell responses have the potential to eliminate tumors when used in a therapeutic setting. However, the induction of protective antitumor immunity is compromised by innate immunosuppressive mechanisms and regulatory cells that often dominate the tumor microenvironment. Recent studies have shown that blocking these suppressor cells and immune checkpoints to allow induction of antitumor immunity is a successful immunotherapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer. Furthermore, stimulation of innate and consequently adaptive immune responses with concomitant inhibition of immune suppression, especially that mediated by regulatory T (Treg) cells, is emerging as a promising approach to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines against cancer. This review describes the immunosuppressive mechanisms controlling antitumor immunity and the novel strategies being employed to design effective immunotherapeutics against tumors based on inhibition of suppressor cells or blockade of immune checkpoints to allow induction of more potent effector T cell responses. This review also discusses the potential of using a combination of adjuvants with inhibition of immune checkpoint or suppressor cells for therapeutic vaccines and the translation of pre-clinical studies to the next-generation vaccines against cancer in humans.

  1. TB vaccine development and the End TB Strategy: importance and current status.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Helen A; Schrager, Lewis

    2016-04-01

    TB is now the leading, global cause of death due to a single infectious microbe. To achieve the End TB vision of reducing TB by 90% by 2035 we will need new interventions. The objectives of this manuscript are to summarize the status of the clinical TB vaccine pipeline; to assess the challenges facing the TB development field; and to discuss some of the key strategies being embraced by the field to overcome these challenges. Currently, 8 of the 13 vaccines in clinical development are subunit vaccines; 6 of these contain or express either Ag85A or Ag85B proteins. A major challenge to TB vaccine development is the lack of diversity in both the antigens included in TB vaccines, and the immune responses elicited by TB vaccine candidates. Both will need to be expanded to maximise the potential for developing a successful candidate by 2025. Current research efforts are focused on broadening both antigen selection and the range of vaccine-mediated immune responses. Previous and ongoing TB vaccine efficacy trials have built capacity, generated high quality data on TB incidence and prevalence, and provided insight into immune correlates of risk of TB disease. These gains will enable the design of better TB vaccines and, importantly, move these vaccines into efficacy trials more rapidly and at a lower cost than was possible for previous TB vaccine candidates.

  2. Human Papillomavirus-mediated cervical cancer awareness and Gardasil vaccination: a pilot survey among North Indian women.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Saumya; Chandravati

    2013-10-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated cervical cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women worldwide, including Indian women. Cervical cancer control and prevention strategies are being adopted in developing nations to reduce the increasing burden of HPV infection in the vaccine era. The present study, therefore, aimed to evaluate cervical cancer awareness and knowledge of Gardasil vaccination in North Indian women. A pilot survey was conducted among 103 women of North Indian ethnicity residing in Lucknow/adjoining areas in state of Uttar Pradesh, during routine screening/clinic visits from June 2012 to December 2012. The study subjects were interviewed in either Hindi or English; subsequently the awareness of HPV-mediated cervical cancer and knowledge of Gardasil vaccination was assessed in terms of "yes", "no" and "no response". The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. Written informed consent was taken from the participants. Overall, the response of participants (n = 103) in our single-centre survey-based pilot study was well-defined. The response regarding HPV-mediated cervical cancer awareness in terms of "yes", "no" and "no response" among the study subjects was 43.7, 44.7 and 11.6 %, respectively. Furthermore, in response to knowledge of HPV vaccine Gardasil, out of 103 subjects, 28.1 % answered "yes" while 37.9 and 34.0 % stated "no" and "no response", respectively. Our pilot survey may help in assessing knowledge of HPV-mediated cervical cancer and Gardasil vaccination awareness in women, and accordingly develop cost-effective cervical cancer control and prevention/public health counseling sessions in a clinical setting.

  3. Potential Target Antigens for a Universal Vaccine in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Renee; Daemen, Toos; de Bock, Geertruida H.; de Graeff, Pauline; Leffers, Ninke; Lambeck, Annechien; ten Hoor, Klaske A.; Hollema, Harry; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Nijman, Hans W.

    2010-01-01

    The prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the primary cause of death from gynaecological malignancies, has only modestly improved over the last decades. Immunotherapeutic treatment using a cocktail of antigens has been proposed as a “universal” vaccine strategy. We determined the expression of tumor antigens in the context of MHC class I expression in 270 primary tumor samples using tissue microarray. Expression of tumor antigens p53, SP17, survivin, WT1, and NY-ESO-1 was observed in 120 (48.0%), 173 (68.9%), 208 (90.0%), 129 (56.3%), and 27 (11.0%) of 270 tumor specimens, respectively. In 93.2% of EOC, at least one of the investigated tumor antigens was (over)expressed. Expression of MHC class I was observed in 78.1% of EOC. In 3 out 4 primary tumors, (over)expression of a tumor antigen combined with MHC class I was observed. These results indicate that a multiepitope vaccine, comprising these antigens, could serve as a universal therapeutic vaccine for the vast majority of ovarian cancer patients. PMID:20885926

  4. New strategies for the development of H5N1 subtype influenza vaccines: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Steel, John

    2011-10-01

    The emergence and spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) viruses among poultry in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa have fueled concerns of a possible human pandemic, and spurred efforts towards developing vaccines against H5N1 influenza viruses, as well as improving vaccine production methods. In recent years, promising experimental reverse genetics-derived H5N1 live attenuated vaccines have been generated and characterized, including vaccines that are attenuated through temperature-sensitive mutation, modulation of the interferon antagonist protein, or disruption of the M2 protein. Live attenuated influenza virus vaccines based on each of these modalities have conferred protection against homologous and heterologous challenge in animal models of influenza virus infection. Alternative vaccine strategies that do not require the use of live virus, such as virus-like particle (VLP) and DNA-based vaccines, have also been vigorously pursued in recent years. Studies have demonstrated that influenza VLP vaccination can confer homologous and heterologous protection from lethal challenge in a mouse model of infection. There have also been improvements in the formulation and production of vaccines following concerns over the threat of H5N1 influenza viruses. The use of novel substrates for the growth of vaccine virus stocks has been intensively researched in recent years, and several candidate cell culture-based systems for vaccine amplification have emerged, including production systems based on Madin-Darby canine kidney, Vero, and PerC6 cell lines. Such systems promise increased scalability of product, and reduced reliance on embryonated chicken eggs as a growth substrate. Studies into the use of adjuvants have shown that oil-in-water-based adjuvants can improve the immunogenicity of inactivated influenza vaccines and conserve antigen in such formulations. Finally, efforts to develop more broadly cross-protective immunization strategies through the inclusion

  5. Recombinant cancer vaccines and new vaccine targets. Interview by Jenaid Rees.

    PubMed

    Schlom, Jeffrey

    2013-10-01

    Interview by Jenaid Rees, Commissioning Editor Jeffrey Schlom obtained his PhD from Rutgers University (NJ, USA). After obtaining his PhD, he worked at Columbia University (NY, USA) before moving in 1973 to the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (MD, USA). Since then he has served as the Chief of several sections, including his present position as the Chief of the Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology in the Center for Cancer Research which he has held for the past 30 years. During this period, he has worked as an Adjunct Professor at George Washington University (Washington, DC, USA), served on the Editorial Board of several journals and holds membership in a number of committees. He holds over 30 patents and patent applications in the areas of vaccines, tumor antigens and monoclonal antibodies and has received honors and awards throughout his career. Jeffrey Schlom has been involved in translational research involving the immunotherapy of a range of carcinomas and predominantly works in the areas of tumor immunology, mechanisms of tumor cell-immune cell interactions and immune mechanisms. He has recently been working on the design and characterization of recombinant vaccines for cancer therapy.

  6. American Cancer Society Guideline for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine use to prevent cervical cancer and its precursors.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Castle, Philip E; Cox, J Thomas; Davey, Diane D; Einstein, Mark H; Ferris, Daron G; Goldie, Sue J; Harper, Diane M; Kinney, Walter; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Noller, Kenneth L; Wheeler, Cosette M; Ades, Terri; Andrews, Kimberly S; Doroshenk, Mary K; Kahn, Kelly Green; Schmidt, Christy; Shafey, Omar; Smith, Robert A; Partridge, Edward E; Garcia, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) has developed guidelines for the use of the prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for the prevention of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer. These recommendations are based on a formal review of the available evidence. They address the use of prophylactic HPV vaccines, including who should be vaccinated and at what age, as well as a summary of policy and implementation issues. Implications for screening are also discussed.

  7. Different vaccination strategies in Spain and its impact on severe varicella and zoster.

    PubMed

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Walter, Stefan; Gonzalez-Escalada, Alba; Garcia-Garcia, Laura; Marín-García, Patricia; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel

    2014-01-03

    Varicella vaccines available in Spain were marketed in 1998 and 2003 for non-routine use. Since 2006 some regions decided to include varicella vaccination in their regional routine vaccination programmes at 15-18 months of age. Other regions chose the strategy of vaccinating susceptible adolescents. This study shows the trends in severe varicella zoster virus infections through the analysis of the hospital discharges related to varicella and herpes zoster in the general population from 2005 to 2010 in Spain. A total of 11,125 hospital discharges related to varicella and 27,736 related to herpes zoster were reported during the study period. The overall annual rate of hospitalization was 4.14 cases per 100,000 for varicella and 10.33 cases per 100,000 for herpes zoster. In children younger than 5 years old varicella hospitalization rate significantly decreased from 46.77 in 2005 to 26.55 per 100,000 in 2010. The hospitalization rate related to herpes zoster slightly increased from 9.71 in 2005 to 10.90 per 100,000 in 2010. This increase was mainly due to the significant increase occurring in the >84 age group, from 69.55 to 97.68 per 100,000. When gathering for regions taking into account varicella vaccine strategy, varicella related hospitalizations decreased significantly more in those regions which included the vaccine at 15-18 months of age as a routine vaccine comparing with those vaccinating at 10-14 years old. No significant differences were found in herpes zoster hospitalization rates regarding the varicella vaccination strategy among regions. Severe varicella infections decreased after implementation of varicella vaccination in Spain. This decrease was significantly higher in regions including the vaccine at 15-18 months of age compared with those vaccinating susceptible adolescents.

  8. The Five Immune Forces Impacting DNA-Based Cancer Immunotherapeutic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Suneetha; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup

    2017-01-01

    DNA-based vaccine strategy is increasingly realized as a viable cancer treatment approach. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity utilizing tumor associated antigens have been investigated in several pre-clinical and clinical studies. The promising outcomes of these studies have suggested that DNA-based vaccines induce potent T-cell effector responses and at the same time cause only minimal side-effects to cancer patients. However, the immune evasive tumor microenvironment is still an important hindrance to a long-term vaccine success. Several options are currently under various stages of study to overcome immune inhibitory effect in tumor microenvironment. Some of these approaches include, but are not limited to, identification of neoantigens, mutanome studies, designing fusion plasmids, vaccine adjuvant modifications, and co-treatment with immune-checkpoint inhibitors. In this review, we follow a Porter’s analysis analogy, otherwise commonly used in business models, to analyze various immune-forces that determine the potential success and sustainable positive outcomes following DNA vaccination using non-viral tumor associated antigens in treatment against cancer. PMID:28304339

  9. Barriers and strategies to improve influenza vaccination in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Farrukh, Muhammad Junaid; Ming, Long Chiau; Zaidi, Syed Tabish Razi; Khan, Tahir Mehmood

    2017-02-06

    Influenza vaccination is strongly recommended by World Health Organisation on a yearly basis. The rate of immunization in Pakistan is suboptimal. High cost, traditional norms, customs and low levels of education in Pakistan are preventing people from getting vaccinated. It is timely to include influenza vaccination in the expanded programme on immunization (EPI), which is a disease prevention programme aiming to eradicate preventable diseases through subsidized or free immunization. The Ministry of National Health Services, Regulation and Coordination, Government of Pakistan should launch a national influenza vaccine policy in view of this current situation and oversee its implementation. Healthcare professionals should promote influenza vaccination and focus on high risk groups such as the elderly, pregnant women and children. Convincing and educating family members regarding immunization of pregnant women and follow-up with parents regarding a second influenza shot for their children will further improve vaccination rates in Pakistan.

  10. Robustness of networks against propagating attacks under vaccination strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Takehisa; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-09-01

    We study the effect of vaccination on the robustness of networks against propagating attacks that obey the susceptible-infected-removed model. By extending the generating function formalism developed by Newman (2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 108701), we analytically determine the robustness of networks that depends on the vaccination parameters. We consider the random defense where nodes are vaccinated randomly and the degree-based defense where hubs are preferentially vaccinated. We show that, when vaccines are inefficient, the random graph is more robust against propagating attacks than the scale-free network. When vaccines are relatively efficient, the scale-free network with the degree-based defense is more robust than the random graph with the random defense and the scale-free network with the random defense.

  11. Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy: Exploiting the HLA Class II Pathway in Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Doonan, Bently P; Haque, Azizul

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most diagnosed cancer in men and current treatment of advanced prostate cancer is ineffective. Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment option for metastatic prostate cancer but its clinical application is still in the early stages of development. In order to treat metastatic prostate tumors, new directions must be taken to improve current immunotherapeutic strategies. These include the identification of effective tumor antigens (Ags), the induction of the HLA class II pathway for Ag processing and CD4(+) T cell activation, and the ability of tumor cells to act like Ag presenting cells. In this review, we suggest a model for tumor Ag selection, epitope modification and self-processing for presentation by class II proteins as a means of restoring immune activation and tumor clearance. We also outline the importance of a Gamma-IFN-inducible Lysosomal Thiol reductase (GILT) in Ag and modified peptide processing by tumor cells, generation of functional epitopes for T cell recognition, and inclusion of immune checkpoint blockers in cancer immunotherapy. Taken together, this review provides a framework for the future development of novel cancer vaccines and the improvement of existing immunotherapeutics in prostate cancer.

  12. Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy: Exploiting the HLA Class II Pathway in Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Doonan, Bently P; Haque, Azizul

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most diagnosed cancer in men and current treatment of advanced prostate cancer is ineffective. Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment option for metastatic prostate cancer but its clinical application is still in the early stages of development. In order to treat metastatic prostate tumors, new directions must be taken to improve current immunotherapeutic strategies. These include the identification of effective tumor antigens (Ags), the induction of the HLA class II pathway for Ag processing and CD4+ T cell activation, and the ability of tumor cells to act like Ag presenting cells. In this review, we suggest a model for tumor Ag selection, epitope modification and self-processing for presentation by class II proteins as a means of restoring immune activation and tumor clearance. We also outline the importance of a Gamma-IFN-inducible Lysosomal Thiol reductase (GILT) in Ag and modified peptide processing by tumor cells, generation of functional epitopes for T cell recognition, and inclusion of immune checkpoint blockers in cancer immunotherapy. Taken together, this review provides a framework for the future development of novel cancer vaccines and the improvement of existing immunotherapeutics in prostate cancer. PMID:26807308

  13. A Pan American Health Organization strategy for cervical cancer prevention and control in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Silvana; Andrus, Jon Kim

    2008-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women in Latin America and the Caribbean, and disproportionately affects poorer women. Mortality rates in the region are seven times greater than in North America. In light of the significant public health burden, the Pan American Health Organization has drafted a Regional Strategy for Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control. The Strategy calls for increased action to strengthen programmes through an integrated package of services: health information and education; screening and pre-cancer treatment; invasive cervical cancer treatment and palliative care; and evidence-based policy decisions on whether and how to introduce human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. It calls for a seven-point plan of action: conduct a situation analysis; intensify information, education and counselling; scale up screening and link to pre-cancer treatment; strengthen information systems and cancer registries; improve access to and quality of cancer treatment and palliative care; generate evidence to facilitate decision-making regarding HPV vaccine introduction; and advocate for equitable access and affordable HPV vaccines. This proposed strategy, approved by the PAHO Directing Council on 1 October 2008, has the possibility of stimulating and accelerating the introduction of new screening technology and HPV vaccines into programmes throughout Latin America and the Caribbean.

  14. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-01-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  15. Enhancing the Breadth of Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    antigens  and  identify  novel  tumor   antigens/ mimotopes  as  candidates  for   vaccine   immunotherapy.       In  the...Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jill E. Slansky...24 September 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing the Breadth of Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  16. Improved Vaccines for the Treatment of Prostate and Breast Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Vaccine Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to continue clinical development and/or license a multi-epitope therapeutic cancer vaccine. The research is in early-stage clinical evaluation, with in vitro and in vivo (animal and human) data available.

  17. Mumps: a current epidemiologic pattern as a necessary background for the choice of a vaccination strategy.

    PubMed

    Zotti, C; Ossola, O; Barberis, R; Castella, A; Ruggenini, A M

    1999-08-01

    Before the measles mumps rubella (MMR) vaccination was widely offered, the epidemiologic data about mumps (morbidity, immunization level, vaccine coverage) were analyzed in Piedmont region (Italy). The disease had a 3- to 5-year epidemic recurrence with morbidity rate between 40 and 150/100,000; the surveillance conducted by 'sentinel' pediatricians showed that the notifications underestimated the real data by about 5- to 7-fold. The 12-year-old subjects showed an immunization level (reached by the disease or the vaccination) of about 50% and their parents tended to refuse the MMR vaccination. Only 54% of the 3- to 5-year-old children received the MMR vaccine in the second year of life and the frequency of the vaccination failure was about 10%. The strategy of vaccination should take into account this epidemiologic pattern, to program an offer adequate to reach mumps control/elimination; the strategy of our region should include the active offer in the second year of life to reach higher coverage, a second offer at 4-6 and/or 12 years of life, when other vaccinations are given and the choice of a highly efficacious vaccine. The improvement of the notification system could also allow a more sensitive surveillance of epidemiologic patterns.

  18. Strategies for pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccination of schoolchildren in the United States.

    PubMed

    Basta, Nicole E; Chao, Dennis L; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Matrajt, Laura; Longini, Ira M

    2009-09-15

    Vaccinating school-aged children against influenza can reduce age-specific and population-level illness attack rates. Using a stochastic simulation model of influenza transmission, the authors assessed strategies for vaccinating children in the United States, varying the vaccine type, coverage level, and reproductive number R (average number of secondary cases produced by a typical primary case). Results indicated that vaccinating children can substantially reduce population-level illness attack rates over a wide range of scenarios. The greatest absolute reduction in influenza illness cases per season occurred at R values ranging from 1.2 to 1.6 for a given vaccine coverage level. The indirect, total, and overall effects of vaccinating children were strong when transmission intensity was low to intermediate. The indirect effects declined rapidly as transmission intensity increased. In a mild influenza season (R = 1.1), approximately 19 million influenza cases could be prevented by vaccinating 70% of children. At most, nearly 100 million cases of influenza illness could be prevented, depending on the proportion of children vaccinated and the transmission intensity. Given the current worldwide threat of novel influenza A (H1N1), with an estimated R of 1.4-1.6, health officials should consider strategies for vaccinating children against novel influenza A (H1N1) as well as seasonal influenza.

  19. The personal touch: strategies toward personalized vaccines and predicting immune responses to them

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Richard B.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Lambert, Nathaniel D.; Haralambieva, Iana H.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of vaccines on public health and well-being has been profound. Smallpox has been eradicated, polio is nearing eradication, and multiple diseases have been eliminated from certain areas of the world. Unfortunately, we now face diseases such as: hepatitis C, malaria, or tuberculosis, as well as new and re-emerging pathogens for which lack effective vaccines. Empirical approaches to vaccine development have been successful in the past, but may not be up to the current infectious disease challenges facing us. New, directed approaches to vaccine design, development, and testing need to be developed. Ideally these approaches will capitalize on cutting-edge technologies, advanced analytical and modeling strategies, and up-to-date knowledge of both pathogen and host. These approaches will pay particular attention to the causes of inter-individual variation in vaccine response in order to develop new vaccines tailored to the unique needs of individuals and communities within the population. PMID:24702429

  20. GITR agonist enhances vaccination responses in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li X; Davoodi, Michael; Srivastava, Minu K; Kachroo, Puja; Lee, Jay M; St John, Maie; Harris-White, Marni; Huang, Min; Strieter, Robert M; Dubinett, Steven; Sharma, Sherven

    2015-04-01

    An immune tolerant tumor microenvironment promotes immune evasion of lung cancer. Agents that antagonize immune tolerance will thus aid the fight against this devastating disease. Members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family modulate the magnitude, duration and phenotype of immune responsiveness to antigens. Among these, GITR expressed on immune cells functions as a key regulator in inflammatory and immune responses. Here, we evaluate the GITR agonistic antibody (DTA-1) as a mono-therapy and in combination with therapeutic vaccination in murine lung cancer models. We found that DTA-1 treatment of tumor-bearing mice increased: (i) the frequency and activation of intratumoral natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes, (ii) the antigen presenting cell (APC) activity in the tumor, and (iii) systemic T-cell specific tumor cell cytolysis. DTA-1 treatment enhanced tumor cell apoptosis as quantified by cleaved caspase-3 staining in the tumors. DTA-1 treatment increased expression of IFNγ, TNFα and IL-12 but reduced IL-10 levels in tumors. Furthermore, increased anti-angiogenic chemokines corresponding with decreased pro-angiogenic chemokine levels correlated with reduced expression of the endothelial cell marker Meca 32 in the tumors of DTA-1 treated mice. In accordance, there was reduced tumor growth (8-fold by weight) in the DTA-1 treatment group. NK cell depletion markedly inhibited the antitumor response elicited by DTA-1. DTA-1 combined with therapeutic vaccination caused tumor rejection in 38% of mice and a 20-fold reduction in tumor burden in the remaining mice relative to control. Mice that rejected tumors following therapy developed immunological memory against subsequent re-challenge. Our data demonstrates GITR agonist antibody activated NK cell and T lymphocyte activity, and enhanced therapeutic vaccination responses against lung cancer.

  1. Strategies for mitigating an influenza pandemic with pre-pandemic H5N1 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Milne, George; Kelso, Joel; Kelly, Heath

    2010-04-06

    The recent worldwide spread of the swine-origin H1N1 2009 influenza outbreak has resulted in its designation as a pandemic by the World Health Organization. While it appears to result in mild symptoms, concern still exists that a more severe influenza pandemic with a high case fatality ratio might arise by reassortment or mutation of the currently circulating avian influenza (H5N1) virus. Given that recently developed candidate pre-pandemic H5N1 vaccines have shown potential for cross-strain protection, we investigated alternative vaccination strategies that exploit such vaccines using an agent-based simulation model of an actual community of approximately 30 000 people in a developed country. Assuming that a two-dose vaccination regimen would be required, we examined three vaccination strategies: pre-emptive, with vaccination applied prior to emergence of human-transmissible H5N1 influenza; reactive, where vaccination was initiated immediately after the first cases in the community were diagnosed; and a 'split' strategy where the first dose was administered pre-emptively during the pre-pandemic phase, with the second dose administered reactively. We showed that by effectively moving the delay between first and second doses into the pre-pandemic period, the split vaccination strategy achieved a substantially better attack rate reduction than the reactive strategy. Our results for an influenza strain with a reproduction number of 1.5 suggest reactive vaccination strategies that may be applicable to the current H1N1 2009 pandemic.

  2. Evaluating vaccination strategies to control foot-and-mouth disease: a model comparison study.

    PubMed

    Roche, S E; Garner, M G; Sanson, R L; Cook, C; Birch, C; Backer, J A; Dube, C; Patyk, K A; Stevenson, M A; Yu, Z D; Rawdon, T G; Gauntlett, F

    2015-04-01

    Simulation models can offer valuable insights into the effectiveness of different control strategies and act as important decision support tools when comparing and evaluating outbreak scenarios and control strategies. An international modelling study was performed to compare a range of vaccination strategies in the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). Modelling groups from five countries (Australia, New Zealand, USA, UK, The Netherlands) participated in the study. Vaccination is increasingly being recognized as a potentially important tool in the control of FMD, although there is considerable uncertainty as to how and when it should be used. We sought to compare model outputs and assess the effectiveness of different vaccination strategies in the control of FMD. Using a standardized outbreak scenario based on data from an FMD exercise in the UK in 2010, the study showed general agreement between respective models in terms of the effectiveness of vaccination. Under the scenario assumptions, all models demonstrated that vaccination with 'stamping-out' of infected premises led to a significant reduction in predicted epidemic size and duration compared to the 'stamping-out' strategy alone. For all models there were advantages in vaccinating cattle-only rather than all species, using 3-km vaccination rings immediately around infected premises, and starting vaccination earlier in the control programme. This study has shown that certain vaccination strategies are robust even to substantial differences in model configurations. This result should increase end-user confidence in conclusions drawn from model outputs. These results can be used to support and develop effective policies for FMD control.

  3. Chikungunya virus vaccines: Current strategies and prospects for developing plant-made vaccines.

    PubMed

    Salazar-González, Jorge A; Angulo, Carlos; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2015-07-17

    Chikungunya virus is an emerging pathogen initially found in East Africa and currently spread into the Indian Ocean Islands, many regions of South East Asia, and in the Americas. No licensed vaccines against this eminent pathogen are available and thus intensive research in this field is a priority. This review presents the current scenario on the developments of Chikungunya virus vaccines and identifies the use of genetic engineered plants to develop attractive vaccines. The possible avenues to develop plant-made vaccines with distinct antigenic designs and expression modalities are identified and discussed considering current trends in the field.

  4. Occurrence and severity of lung lesions in slaughter pigs vaccinated against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae with different strategies.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Sonja; von Berg, Stephan; Köhler, Kernt; Reinacher, Manfred; Willems, Hermann; Reiner, Gerald

    2014-03-01

    Different vaccination strategies against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae have been adopted worldwide. Reports from the field indicate varying levels of protection among currently available vaccines. The goal of the present study was to compare the efficacies of three widespread commercial vaccination strategies against M. hyopneumoniae under field conditions. 20 farms were included. 14 farms used different single dose vaccines (vaccine 1 [V1], 8 herds; vaccine 2 [V2], 6 herds); another 6 farms (V3) used a two dose vaccination strategy. Gross lesions of 854 lungs and histopathology from 140 lungs were quantified, and a quantitative PCR was applied to detect M. hyopneumoniae and porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) DNA in lung tissue (n=140). In addition, porcine reproductive and respiratory disease virus (PRRSV), swine influenza virus (SIV), Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and Pasteurella multocida were tested by qualitative PCR. 53% of lungs were positive for M. hyopneumoniae. 55.9% of lungs showed macroscopic enzootic pneumonia (EP)-like lesions. Lung lesion scores (P<0.001) and M. hyopneumoniae-loads (P<0.008) differed significantly among the vaccination groups, with the most severe cases and highest amounts occurring in V1. Histological alterations differed (P<0.001) between V1 and V3. Lung lesion scores and histopathological changes were significantly correlated, with prevalence and load of M. hyopneumoniae indicating that the applied diagnostic tools are valuable in confirming the prevalence and severity of M. hyopneumoniae infections. Comparing different vaccination strategies against M. hyopneumoniae indicates varying levels of protection. M. hyopneumoniae is still a major problem despite the widely applied vaccination.

  5. [Constipation and cancer: Current strategies].

    PubMed

    Gervais, Claire; Ducrotté, Philippe; Piche, Thierry; Di Palma, Mario; Jovenin, Nicolas; Scotté, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Digestive disorders, in particular constipation, are symptoms very often reported by cancer patients as having a major impact on their quality of life. An accurate diagnosis of bowel delayed transit and defecation disorders is required to best adapt therapeutic management. Constipation associated with cancer may be related to several causes, which can be placed in three nosological categories that sometimes overlap: chronic constipation prior to cancer and having its own evolution; constipation related to the cancer condition, in particular the occlusive syndrome, and constipation induced by cancer therapies. The stricter application of diet and lifestyle measures is often necessary and sometimes sufficient. Laxative drug treatments come under various galenic forms and administration routes and must be selected according to the clinical features of constipation. Surgical management can be indicated in case of ileus or pelvic static disorders. In the case of refractory constipation induced by opioids and within the framework of palliative care to treat an advanced pathology, a peripheral morphinic antagonist can offer fast symptom relief. A way forward to improve the patients' quality of life could be to identify the contributing factors (in particular, genetic factors) to determine which patients are the more at risk and anticipate their management.

  6. Poor HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among Utah Latinas overdue for recommended cancer screenings.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Brynn; Bodson, Julia; Warner, Echo L; Dyer, Jane; Kepka, Deanna

    2016-08-01

    Individuals overdue for recommended cancer screenings may not be receiving adequate cancer prevention education. Since Latinas have the highest incidence of cervical cancer among all racial/ethnic groups, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination education is especially important for this population. The correlates of HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge were assessed among Latinas who were overdue for recommended cancer screenings. N = 206 Latinas who were overdue for recommended cancer screenings were recruited by health educators from local community groups. Bivariate analyses and multivariable regression models were used to investigate factors associated with HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among participants as well as to assess correlates of HPV vaccine receipt for eligible children of participants. In multivariable regression analyses, years living in the U.S. (p = 0.05) and health insurance status (p = 0.03) were significantly related to HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures. Age (p < 0.01), birthplace (p = 0.02), years living in the U.S. (p = 0.05), annual household income (p = 0.05), cervical cancer screening status (p = 0.03), and HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures (p < 0.01) were significantly associated with HPV vaccination outcomes for eligible daughters of participants. Cervical cancer screening status (p = 0.02) and HPV vaccine-related knowledge measures (p = 0.01) were significantly associated with HPV vaccination outcomes for eligible sons of participants. Results indicate poor HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge among Latinas. Interventions to improve HPV vaccine-related awareness and knowledge in Utah's growing Latino population should target vulnerable individuals (e.g., not employed outside the home, less educated, less acculturated, poor, uninsured, overdue for cervical cancer screening) by using materials that are culturally sensitive, linguistically appropriate, and easily accessible.

  7. Knowledge and attitudes about Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in rural Uganda (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    about Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in rural Uganda NKONWA INNOCENT H 1,2,3* , MICHAEL J...cancer and HPV in Uganda has been limited even among health workers. Objectives: To establish the level of knowledge in regard to HPV vaccination among...parents/guardians of the vaccinated girls and to assess the attitudes to HPV vaccination among parents/guardians of the vaccinated girls. Methods: A

  8. Diaminosulfide based polymer microparticles as cancer vaccine delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Geary, Sean M; Hu, Qiaohong; Joshi, Vijaya B; Bowden, Ned B; Salem, Aliasger K

    2015-12-28

    The aim of the research presented here was to determine the characteristics and immunostimulatory capacity, in vivo, of antigen and adjuvant co-loaded into microparticles made from a novel diaminosulfide polymer, poly(4,4'-trimethylenedipiperdyl sulfide) (PNSN), and to assess their potential as cancer vaccine vectors. PNSN microparticles co-loaded with the antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), and adjuvant, CpG 1826, (PNSN(OVA + CpG)) were fabricated and characterized for size (1.64 μm diameter; PDI=0.62), charge (-23.1 ± 0.3), and loading efficiencies of antigen (7.32 μg/mg particles) and adjuvant (0.95 μg/mg particles). The ability of PNSN(OVA + CpG) to stimulate cellular and humoral immune responses in vivo was compared with other PNSN microparticle formulations as well as with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)(PLGA)-based microparticles, co-loaded with OVA and CpG (PLGA(OVA + CpG)), an adenovirus encoding OVA (Ad5-OVA), and OVA delivered with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA(OVA)). In vivo OVA-specific IgG1 responses, after subcutaneous prime/boosts in mice, were similar when PNSN(OVA + CpG) and PLGA(OVA + CpG) were compared and the presence of CpG 1826 within the PNSN microparticles demonstrated significantly improved responses when compared to PNSN microparticles loaded with OVA alone (PNSN(OVA)), plus or minus soluble CpG 1826. Cellular immune responses to all particle-based vaccine formulations ranged from being negligible to modest with PNSN(OVA + CpG) generating the greatest responses, displaying significantly increased levels of OVA-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes compared to controls and IFA(OVA) treated mice. Finally, it was shown that of all vaccination formulations tested PNSN(OVA + CpG) was the most protective against subsequent challenge with an OVA-expressing tumor cell line, E.G7. Thus, microparticles made from poly(diaminosulfide)-based macromolecules possess promising potential as vaccine vectors and, as demonstrated here, may have impact as cancer vaccines

  9. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  10. Knowledge and Attitudes About Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Vaccination and Cervical Cancer Screening Among Women in Rural Uganda

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-15

    1- Knowledge and attitudes about Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in rural Uganda Authors... vaccination among parents/guardians of the vaccinated girls and to assess the attitudes to HPV vaccination among parents/guardians of the vaccinated girls...Methods: A cross-sectional study where 384 mothers/ female guardians of vaccinated girls were recruited into the study. One hundred and sixty four

  11. Farmers' perception of the role of veterinary surgeons in vaccination strategies on British dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Richens, I F; Hobson-West, P; Brennan, M L; Lowton, R; Kaler, J; Wapenaar, W

    2015-11-07

    There is limited research investigating the motivators and barriers to vaccinating dairy cattle. Veterinary surgeons have been identified as important sources of information for farmers making vaccination and disease control decisions, as well as being farmers' preferred vaccine suppliers. Vets' perception of their own role and communication style can be at odds with farmers' reported preferences. The objective of this study was to investigate how dairy farmers perceived the role of vets in implementing vaccination strategies on their farm. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 dairy farmers from across Britain. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Analysis revealed that farmers perceive vets to have an important role in facilitating decision-making in all aspects of vaccination, including the aspects of vaccine distribution and advice on implementation. This important role is acknowledged by farmers who have regular veterinary contact, but also farmers with solely emergency veterinary contact. Given this finding, future work should investigate the attitudes of vets towards vaccination and how they perceive their role. Combining this knowledge will enable optimisation of vaccination strategies on British dairy farms.

  12. Farmers’ perception of the role of veterinary surgeons in vaccination strategies on British dairy farms

    PubMed Central

    Richens, I. F.; Hobson-West, P.; Brennan, M. L.; Lowton, R.; Kaler, J.; Wapenaar, W.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited research investigating the motivators and barriers to vaccinating dairy cattle. Veterinary surgeons have been identified as important sources of information for farmers making vaccination and disease control decisions, as well as being farmers’ preferred vaccine suppliers. Vets’ perception of their own role and communication style can be at odds with farmers’ reported preferences. The objective of this study was to investigate how dairy farmers perceived the role of vets in implementing vaccination strategies on their farm. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 dairy farmers from across Britain. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Analysis revealed that farmers perceive vets to have an important role in facilitating decision-making in all aspects of vaccination, including the aspects of vaccine distribution and advice on implementation. This important role is acknowledged by farmers who have regular veterinary contact, but also farmers with solely emergency veterinary contact. Given this finding, future work should investigate the attitudes of vets towards vaccination and how they perceive their role. Combining this knowledge will enable optimisation of vaccination strategies on British dairy farms. PMID:26530434

  13. [Immunization strategy of hepatitis B vaccine among adults in China: evidence based-medicine and consideration].

    PubMed

    Xu, A Q; Zhang, L

    2016-06-01

    With the effective control of hepatitis B infection among children, the adults especial the young ones become the main population for new hepatitis B virus infection. Now the adults receive hepatitis B vaccination voluntarily and at their own expense in China and the coverage is low. The high immunogenicity of hepatitis B vaccine has been proven among healthy adults. Although the safety of hepatitis B vaccination has been documented among high-risk population such as HIV-infected people, injecting drug users and patients with chronic hepatitis disease, their antibody seroconversion rate after hepatitis B vaccination is lower than the healthy adults. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended to population at high risk officially in many countries and some effects have been achieved. It is urgent to improve the strategy of hepatitis B vaccination among adults to fasten the control of hepatitis B in China, along with the researches about the long-term efficacy of hepatitis B vaccine among adults, the immunogenicity of hepatitis B vaccination among high-risk adults and the economical evaluation about different adult immunization strategy of hepatitis B.

  14. [Pertussis: Where do we stand 10years after the introduction of cocooning vaccination strategy in France?

    PubMed

    Beaufils, E; Dommergues, M-A; Gaillat, J; Guiso, N; Knezovic-Daniel, N; Pinquier, D; Riethmuller, D

    2016-10-01

    The goals of this article are to review the pertussis cocooning strategy, which has been recommended in France since 2004 to protect infants not yet vaccinated from becoming infected by vaccinating their immediate entourage, and to present room for improvement. The analysis of the literature between 2004 and 2015 shows that pertussis vaccine coverage in new parents is lower than 50% and that attempts that have already been implemented to increase it are effective. Pertussis vaccine coverage improvement requires all health actors to collaborate and be trained in informing and motivating parents to get vaccinated before, during and after pregnancy (the parents then will act as relays to their relatives); generalization in maternity wards of systematic checking of the vaccination card; extension to the midwives of the right to prescribe and administer pertussis vaccine to spouses; vaccination facilitation in maternity wards with the support of health organizations. Exchange and sharing of experiences between health care professionals are essential. Pregnancy is the ideal period to promote pertussis vaccination.

  15. Adjuvants and myeloid-derived suppressor cells: enemies or allies in therapeutic cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Audry; Oliver, Liliana; Alvarez, Rydell; Fernández, Luis E; Lee, Kelvin P; Mesa, Circe

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants are a critical but largely overlooked and poorly understood component included in vaccine formulations to stimulate and modulate the desired immune responses to an antigen. However, unlike in the protective infectious disease vaccines, adjuvants for cancer vaccines also need to overcome the effect of tumor-induced suppressive immune populations circulating in tumor-bearing individuals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are considered to be one of the key immunosuppressive populations that inhibit tumor-specific T cell responses in cancer patients. This review focuses on the different signals for the activation of the immune system induced by adjuvants, and the close relationship to the mechanisms of recruitment and activation of MDSC. This work explores the possibility that a cancer vaccine adjuvant may either strengthen or weaken the effect of tumor-induced MDSC, and the crucial need to address this in present and future cancer vaccines.

  16. Recent Strategies Targeting HIV Glycans in Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Horiya, Satoru; MacPherson, Iain S.; Krauss, Isaac J.

    2015-01-01

    Although efforts to develop a vaccine against HIV have so far met with little success, recent studies of HIV-positive patients with strongly neutralizing sera have shown that the human immune system is capable of producing potent and broadly-neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs), some of which neutralize up to 90 % of HIV strains. These antibodies bind to conserved vulnerable sites on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120, and identification of these sites has provided tantalizing clues about the design of potentially effective vaccines. Carbohydrates play a key role in this field, as a large fraction of bnAbs bind to carbohydrates or combinations of carbohydrate and peptide elements on gp120. Additionally, carbohydrates partially mask some peptide surfaces recognized by bnAbs. The use of engineered glycoproteins and other glycostructures as vaccines to elicit antibodies with broad neutralizing activity is therefore a key area of interest in HIV vaccine design. PMID:25393493

  17. Cervical cancer and HPV: Awareness and vaccine acceptability among parents in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Mouallif, Mustapha; Bowyer, Harriet L; Festali, Soukaina; Albert, Adelin; Filali-Zegzouti, Younes; Guenin, Samuel; Delvenne, Philippe; Waller, Jo; Ennaji, Moulay Mustapha

    2014-01-09

    Cervical cancer is a major public health concern in Morocco where it represents the second most common and lethal cancer in women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been licensed in Morocco since 2008 but there are no available data on their acceptability. This study aimed to assess awareness of HPV and the vaccine, and to identify factors associated with acceptability of the vaccine among parents in Morocco. We carried out a questionnaire-based survey using face-to-face interviews in a sample of 852 parents (670 mothers and 182 fathers) with at least one unmarried daughter ≤26 years. We collected data within public and private health centres and clinics in four regions in Morocco between July and August 2012. The main outcome measure was parental acceptability of the HPV vaccine for their daughter(s). Responses revealed very low awareness of HPV infection (4.7%) and the HPV vaccine (14.3%). None of the participants had vaccinated their daughter(s) against HPV and vaccine acceptability was low among mothers (32%) and fathers (45%). Higher education and income, previous awareness of the HPV vaccine and endorsement of the belief that a recommendation from the Ministry of Health or a doctor to have the vaccine would be encouraging, were associated with mothers' HPV vaccine acceptability. Non-acceptability among mothers was associated with having more than two daughters, believing the vaccine was expensive, lack of information and believing that whatever happens to an individual's health is God's will. The only factor associated with the fathers' acceptability of the vaccine was the cost of the vaccine. Increasing HPV and HPV vaccine awareness through educational campaigns, along with active recommendation by physicians and a publically funded vaccination programme could increase parental acceptability of the HPV vaccine in Morocco.

  18. [Prevention of cervical cancer (II): prophylactic HPV vaccination, current knowledge, practical procedures and new issues].

    PubMed

    Monsonego, Joseph

    2007-04-01

    Despite the considerable success of early screening for prevention of cervical cancer, Pap smears have not fulfilled the hopes that it would lead to a large-scale reduction of this cancer's incidence. Screening appears to be useful for a tiny portion of the world population, although a relatively large portion must put up with its limitations and disadvantages. Human papilloma viruses (HPV) 16 and 18 are responsible for two thirds of all cervical cancers worldwide. The condylomata (condyloma acuminatum), or genital warts, induced by HPV 6 and 11 are frequent among the young and difficult to manage. The extent and burden of HPV infection are considerable, as is the psychological and emotional impact of the diseases associated with it. Because cancer of the cervix is the final consequence of chronic HPV infection, it can be prevented by vaccination. A prophylactic vaccine to protect against the precancerous and cancerous lesions associated with HPV should save lives, reduce expensive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, and have substantial individual and collective benefits. Clinical trials of anti-HPV vaccines for the prevention of cervical cancer and condyloma have shown remarkable results and an efficacy unequaled in the history of vaccination against infectious diseases. Vaccine efficacy has been shown only in young girls never exposed to the virus and only for the lesions associated with the specific viral types in the vaccine. Preliminary data indicate that the vaccination is effective in women who have previously eliminated naturally the virus. It has no therapeutic effects on existing lesions or in healthy virus carriers. Practical questions remain to be resolved. If the vaccination is left to individual initiative and vaccination coverage is insufficient, there will be no perceptible reduction in the frequency of cervical cancer. Vaccination policies will not be identical in poor countries, where the disease represents one of the leading causes of

  19. Exploiting the Immunogenic Potential of Cancer Cells for Improved Dendritic Cell Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberk, Lien; Belmans, Jochen; Van Woensel, Matthias; Riva, Matteo; Van Gool, Stefaan W.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is currently the hottest topic in the oncology field, owing predominantly to the discovery of immune checkpoint blockers. These promising antibodies and their attractive combinatorial features have initiated the revival of other effective immunotherapies, such as dendritic cell (DC) vaccinations. Although DC-based immunotherapy can induce objective clinical and immunological responses in several tumor types, the immunogenic potential of this monotherapy is still considered suboptimal. Hence, focus should be directed on potentiating its immunogenicity by making step-by-step protocol innovations to obtain next-generation Th1-driving DC vaccines. We review some of the latest developments in the DC vaccination field, with a special emphasis on strategies that are applied to obtain a highly immunogenic tumor cell cargo to load and to activate the DCs. To this end, we discuss the effects of three immunogenic treatment modalities (ultraviolet light, oxidizing treatments, and heat shock) and five potent inducers of immunogenic cell death [radiotherapy, shikonin, high-hydrostatic pressure, oncolytic viruses, and (hypericin-based) photodynamic therapy] on DC biology and their application in DC-based immunotherapy in preclinical as well as clinical settings. PMID:26834740

  20. Demystifying Immunotherapy in Prostate Cancer: Understanding Current and Future Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Ravi A.; Gulley, James L.; Kantoff, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy has emerged as a viable therapeutic option for patients with prostate cancer. There are multiple potential strategies that employ the immune system including therapeutic cancer vaccines that are designed to stimulate immune cells to target antigens expressed by cancer cells. Sipuleucel-T is a vaccine currently approved for the treatment of minimally symptomatic metastatic prostate cancer, while the vaccine PSA-TRICOM and the immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab are in phase III testing. Although there are no short term changes in disease progression or available biomarkers to assess response, these agents appear to improve survival. One hypothesis suggests that this apparent paradox can be explained by the growth moderating effects of these treatments which do not cause tumor size to diminish, but rather stall or slow their growth rate over time. For this reason the use of immunotherapy earlier in the disease process is being investigated. Another approach is to block immune regulatory mechanisms mediated by the molecules CTLA-4 and PD-1. Additional future strategies will combine immunotherapy with other standard therapies, potentially enhancing the latter’s clinical impact and thereby improving both time to progression and overall survival due to the combined effects of both treatments. Prospective trials are currently evaluating these hypotheses and will ultimately serve to optimize immunotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:23337757

  1. Innovations in HPV vaccination and roles of nurses in cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Julide Gulizar; Arabaci, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) is the main aetiological agent for cervical cancer, one of the most frequent cancers observed in women throughout the world. There are effective programs for reducing the incidence of cervical cancer with HPV vaccination. The objective of this study was to discuss the applicability of the HPV vaccination and the role of nurses in prevention of cervical cancer. Use of bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines has been initiated against the types of HPV which are the primary cause of cancer. The quadrivalent HPV vaccination has entered into the routine vaccination schedule in many European countries for use in children and adolescents between 9-15 years of age and for women between 16-26 years of age, whereas it has been proposed that the bivalent vaccination should be given to girls between 9-18 years of age. While cervical cancer is among the cancers that can be prevented, it is essential to continue screening tests while introducing vaccination in a systematic manner for protection. On this subject, among the most important roles of nurses is to implement the screening programs by fulfilling the caregiving, training and consultancy roles for the society and especially, for high risk groups and to increase the awareness of the people.

  2. Highest Vaccine Uptake after School-Based Delivery - A County-Level Evaluation of the Implementation Strategies for HPV Catch-Up Vaccination in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Rehn, Moa; Uhnoo, Ingrid; Kühlmann-Berenzon, Sharon; Wallensten, Anders; Sparén, Pär; Netterlid, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background The Swedish school-based vaccination programme offers HPV vaccine to girls born ≥1999 in 5-6th grade. In 2012, all counties introduced free-of-charge catch-up vaccination campaigns targeting girls born 1993–1998. Varying vaccine uptake in the catch-up group by December 2012 suggested that some implementation strategies were more successful than others. In order to inform future vaccination campaigns, we assessed the impact of different implementation strategies on the county-level catch-up vaccine uptake. Methods We conducted an ecological study including all Swedish counties (n = 21), asking regional health offices about the information channels they used and where vaccination of the catch-up target group took place in their counties. The uptake of ≥1 dose by 30 September 2014 was estimated using data from the voluntary national vaccination register. We investigated associations between counties’ catch-up vaccine uptake, information channels and vaccination settings by calculating incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), using negative binomial regression models. Results County level catch-up vaccine uptake varied between 49–84%. All counties offered vaccination through primary health care settings. Apart from this eight (34%) also offered the vaccine in some of their schools, four (19%) in all their schools, and two (10%) in other health care centres. The information channels most frequently used were: information at the national on-line health care consulting web-page (100%), letter/invitations (90%), and advertisement (81%). Counties offering vaccination to girls in all schools and counties offering vaccination in some of their schools, reached higher vaccine uptake compared to counties not offering vaccination in any of their schools (all schools adjusted IRR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1–1.5, some schools adjusted IRR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1–1.3). Conclusion Counties offering HPV vaccination to catch-up groups in schools reached

  3. Strategies & recent development of transmission-blocking vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Neha; Bharti, Praveen K.; Tiwari, Archana; Singh, Neeru

    2016-01-01

    Transmission blocking malaria vaccines are aimed to block the development and maturity of sexual stages of parasite within mosquitoes. The vaccine candidate antigens (Pfs25, Pfs48/45, Pfs230) that have shown transmission blocking immunity in model systems are in different stages of development. These antigens are immunogenic with limited genetic diversity. Pfs25 is a leading candidate and currently in phase I clinical trial. Efforts are now focused on the cost-effective production of potent antigens using safe adjuvants and optimization of vaccine delivery system that are capable of inducing strong immune responses. This review addresses the potential usefulness, development strategies, challenges, clinical trials and current status of Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage malaria vaccine candidate antigens for the development of transmission-blocking vaccines. PMID:27748294

  4. Cytotoxic immunotherapy strategies for cancer: mechanisms and clinical development.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Laura K; Guzik, Brian W; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo

    2011-08-01

    Traditional therapies for cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Chemotherapy has widespread systemic cytotoxic effects against tumor cells but also affects normal cells. Radiation has more targeted local cytotoxicity but is limited to killing cells in the radiation field. Immunotherapy has the potential for systemic, specific killing of tumor cells. However, if the immune response is specific to a single antigen, tumor evasion can occur by down-regulation of that antigen. An immunotherapy approach that induces polyvalent immunity to autologous tumor antigens can provide a personalized vaccine with less potential for immunologic escape. A cytotoxic immunotherapy strategy creates such a tumor vaccine in situ. Immunogenic tumor cell death provides tumor antigen targets for the adaptive immune response and stimulates innate immunity. Attraction and activation of antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells is important to process and present tumor antigens to T cells. These include cytotoxic T cells that kill tumor cells and T cells which positively and negatively regulate immunity. Tipping the balance in favor of anti-tumor immunity is an important aspect of an effective strategy. Clinically, immunotherapies may be most effective when combined with standard therapies in a complimentary way. An example is gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy (GMCI) which uses an adenoviral vector, AdV-tk, to deliver a cytotoxic and immunostimulatory gene to tumor cells in vivo in combination with standard therapies creating an immunostimulatory milieu. This approach, studied extensively in animal models and early stage clinical trials, is now entering a definitive Phase 3 trial for prostate cancer.

  5. A novel minigene scaffold for therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Aurisicchio, Luigi; Fridman, Arthur; Bagchi, Ansuman; Scarselli, Elisa; La Monica, Nicola; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Genetic vaccines are emerging as a powerful modality to induce T-cell responses to target tumor associated antigens (TAA). Viral or plasmid DNA or RNA vectors harbor an expression cassette encoding the antigen of choice delivered in vivo by vaccination. In this context, immunizations with minigenes containing selected, highly antigenic, T-cell epitopes of TAAs may have several advantages relative to full-length proteins. The objective of this study was to identify an optimal scaffold for minigene construction. We generated a number of minigenes containing epitopes from the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) model TAA and utilized muscle DNA electro-gene-transfer (DNA-EGT) to vaccinate HLA-A*0201 (HHD) and CEA/HHD double transgenic mice. The components utilized to construct the minigenes included CD8(+) T cell epitopes and (or) anchor modified analogs that were selected on the basis of their predicted binding to HLA-*A0201, their uniqueness in the human proteome, and the likelihood of cancer cell natural processing and presentation via MHC-I. Other candidate components comparatively tested included: helper CD4(+) T-cell epitopes, flanking regions for optimal epitope processing (including both proteasome-dependent and furin-dependent polypeptide processing mechanisms), and immunoenhancing moieties. Through a series of comparative studies and iterations we have identified an optimal minigene scaffold comprising the following elements: human tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) signal peptide, T-cell epitopes connected by furin sensitive linkers, and the E. Coli enterotoxin B subunit. The selected epitope modified minigenes (EMM) delivered by DNA-EGT were able to break immune tolerance in CEA/HHD mice and induce a strong immune response against all epitopes tested, independently of their relative positions within the scaffold. Furthermore, the optimized EMMs delivered via DNA-EGT were more immunogenic and exerted more powerful antitumor effects in a B16-CEA/HHD metastatic

  6. A novel minigene scaffold for therapeutic cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Aurisicchio, Luigi; Fridman, Arthur; Bagchi, Ansuman; Scarselli, Elisa; La Monica, Nicola; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Genetic vaccines are emerging as a powerful modality to induce T-cell responses to target tumor associated antigens (TAA). Viral or plasmid DNA or RNA vectors harbor an expression cassette encoding the antigen of choice delivered in vivo by vaccination. In this context, immunizations with minigenes containing selected, highly antigenic, T-cell epitopes of TAAs may have several advantages relative to full-length proteins. The objective of this study was to identify an optimal scaffold for minigene construction. We generated a number of minigenes containing epitopes from the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) model TAA and utilized muscle DNA electro-gene-transfer (DNA-EGT) to vaccinate HLA-A*0201 (HHD) and CEA/HHD double transgenic mice. The components utilized to construct the minigenes included CD8+ T cell epitopes and (or) anchor modified analogs that were selected on the basis of their predicted binding to HLA-*A0201, their uniqueness in the human proteome, and the likelihood of cancer cell natural processing and presentation via MHC-I. Other candidate components comparatively tested included: helper CD4+ T-cell epitopes, flanking regions for optimal epitope processing (including both proteasome-dependent and furin-dependent polypeptide processing mechanisms), and immunoenhancing moieties. Through a series of comparative studies and iterations we have identified an optimal minigene scaffold comprising the following elements: human tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) signal peptide, T-cell epitopes connected by furin sensitive linkers, and the E. Coli enterotoxin B subunit. The selected epitope modified minigenes (EMM) delivered by DNA-EGT were able to break immune tolerance in CEA/HHD mice and induce a strong immune response against all epitopes tested, independently of their relative positions within the scaffold. Furthermore, the optimized EMMs delivered via DNA-EGT were more immunogenic and exerted more powerful antitumor effects in a B16-CEA/HHD metastatic

  7. Sensitization strategies in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Peiying

    2016-01-01

    The commonly used treatment avenues employed by cancer physicians include surgery, radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy in addition to rapid developmental and confirmatory studies on the efficacy of targeted therapies. However, the success rate in these commonly used treatments remains relatively low due to associated side effects, such as normal cell targeting/toxicity and resistance. In addition, investigators are continuing their efforts to enhance the efficacy of RT and chemotherapy to prevent associated side effects and improve the survival rate of the affected patient in order to increase patient survival. In the present study, we have reviewed the sensitization approaches used to improve chemotherapy and RT sensitivity in tumors. PMID:27900051

  8. A poxviral-based cancer vaccine targeting the transcription factor Twist inhibits primary tumor growth and metastases in a model of metastatic breast cancer and improves survival in a spontaneous prostate cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Kwilas, Anna R.; Ardiani, Andressa; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Wottawah, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Several transcription factors play a role in the alteration of gene expression that occurs during cancer metastasis. Twist expression has been shown to be associated with the hallmarks of the metastatic process, as well as poor prognosis and drug resistance in many tumor types. However, primarily due to their location within the cell and the lack of a hydrophobic groove required for drug attachment, transcription factors such as Twist are difficult to target with conventional therapies. An alternative therapeutic strategy is a vaccine comprised of a Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), incorporating the Twist transgene and a TRIad of COstimulatory Molecules (B7-1, ICAM-1, LFA-3; TRICOM). Here we characterize an MVA-TWIST/TRICOM vaccine that induced both CD4+ and CD8+ Twist-specific T-cell responses in vivo. In addition, administration of this vaccine reduced both the primary tumor growth and metastasis in the 4T1 model of metastatic breast cancer. In the TRAMP transgenic model of spontaneous prostate cancer, MVA-TWIST/TRICOM alone significantly improved survival, and when combined with the androgen receptor antagonist enzalutamide, the vaccine further improved survival. These studies thus provide a rationale for the use of active immunotherapy targeting transcription factors involved in the metastatic process and for the combination of cancer vaccines with androgen deprivation. PMID:26317648

  9. Educating on professional habits: attitudes of medical students towards diverse strategies for promoting influenza vaccination and factors associated with the intention to get vaccinated

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza vaccination coverage in medical students is usually low. Unlike health care workers, there is little information on the attitudes to and predictors of vaccination among medical students, and their attitudes towards institutional strategies for improving rates are unknown. Methods This cross-sectional study evaluated the effect of three influenza vaccination promotional strategies (Web page, video and tri-fold brochure) on medical students’ intention to get vaccinated and associated factors. A total of 538 medical students were asked to answer an anonymous questionnaire assessing the intention to get vaccinated after exposure to any of the promotional strategies. Sociodemographic data collected included: sex, age, university year, influenza risk group and cohabiting with member of a risk group. Results Four hundred twenty-one students answered the questionnaire, of whom 312 (74.1%) were female, 113 (26.8%) had done clinical rotations, and 111 (26.6%) reported intention to get the flu shot. Logistic regression showed the web group had a greater intention to get vaccinated than the reference group (OR: 2.42 95% CI: 1.16-5.03). Having done clinical rotations (OR: 2.55 95% CI: 1.36-4.38) and having received the shot in previous flu seasons (OR: 13.69 95% CI: 7.86-23.96) were independently associated with the intention to get vaccinated. Conclusion Given that previous vaccination is a factor associated with the intention to get vaccinated, education on vaccination of health care workers should begin while they are students, thereby potentiating the habit. In addition, the intention to get vaccinated was greater during the clinical phase of the university career, suggesting this is a good time to introduce promotion strategies. Online promotional campaigns, such as a thematic Web to promote vaccination of health workers, could improve the intention to get vaccinated. PMID:23866902

  10. Rabies control in rural Africa: Evaluating strategies for effective domestic dog vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kaare, M.; Lembo, T.; Hampson, K.; Ernest, E.; Estes, A.; Mentzel, C.; Cleaveland, S.

    2012-01-01

    Effective vaccination campaigns need to reach a sufficient percentage of the population to eliminate disease and prevent future outbreaks, which for rabies is predicted to be 70%, at a cost that is economically and logistically sustainable. Domestic dog rabies has been increasing across most of sub-Saharan Africa indicating that dog vaccination programmes to date have been inadequate. We compare the effectiveness of a variety of dog vaccination strategies in terms of their cost and coverage in different community settings in rural Tanzania. Central-point (CP) vaccination was extremely effective in agro-pastoralist communities achieving a high coverage (>80%) at a low cost (vaccination was costly (>US$5/dog) and inadequate (<20% coverage); combined approaches using CP and either house-to-house vaccination or trained community-based animal health workers were most effective with coverage exceeding 70%, although costs were still high (>US$6 and >US$4/dog, respectively). No single vaccination strategy is likely to be effective in all populations and therefore alternative approaches must be deployed under different settings. CP vaccination is cost-effective and efficient for the majority of dog populations in rural Tanzania and potentially elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, whereas a combination strategy is necessary in remote pastoralist communities. These results suggest that rabies control is logistically feasible across most of the developing world and that the annual costs of effective vaccination campaigns in Tanzania are likely to be affordable. PMID:18848595

  11. HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africa: scientific opportunities, challenges and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Ruhanya, Vurayai

    2015-01-01

    More than decades have already elapsed since human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was identified as the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The HIV has since spread to all parts of the world with devastating effects. In sub-saharan Africa, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has reached unprecedented proportions. Safe, effective and affordable HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africans are therefore urgently needed to contain this public health problem. Although, there are challenges, there are also scientific opportunities and strategies that can be exploited in the development of HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africa. The recent RV144 Phase III trial in Thailand has demonstrated that it is possible to develop a vaccine that can potentially elicit modest protective immunity against HIV infection. The main objective of this review is to outline the key scientific opportunities, challenges and strategies in HIV/AIDS vaccine development in Africa. PMID:26185576

  12. A rapid and potent DNA vaccination strategy defined by in vivo monitoring of antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Bins, Adriaan D; Jorritsma, Annelies; Wolkers, Monika C; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C; Schumacher, Ton N M; Haanen, John B A G

    2005-08-01

    Induction of immunity after DNA vaccination is generally considered a slow process. Here we show that DNA delivery to the skin results in a highly transient pulse of antigen expression. Based on this information, we developed a new rapid and potent intradermal DNA vaccination method. By short-interval intradermal DNA delivery, robust T-cell responses, of a magnitude sufficient to reject established subcutaneous tumors, are generated within 12 d. Moreover, this vaccination strategy confers protecting humoral immunity against influenza A infection within 2 weeks after the start of vaccination. The strength and speed of this newly developed strategy will be beneficial in situations in which immunity is required in the shortest possible time.

  13. HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africa: scientific opportunities, challenges and strategies.

    PubMed

    Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Ruhanya, Vurayai

    2015-01-01

    More than decades have already elapsed since human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was identified as the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The HIV has since spread to all parts of the world with devastating effects. In sub-saharan Africa, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has reached unprecedented proportions. Safe, effective and affordable HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africans are therefore urgently needed to contain this public health problem. Although, there are challenges, there are also scientific opportunities and strategies that can be exploited in the development of HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africa. The recent RV144 Phase III trial in Thailand has demonstrated that it is possible to develop a vaccine that can potentially elicit modest protective immunity against HIV infection. The main objective of this review is to outline the key scientific opportunities, challenges and strategies in HIV/AIDS vaccine development in Africa.

  14. Phase I study of a new cancer vaccine of ten mixed peptides for advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Satoru; Yamada, Yasuhide; Heike, Yuji; Shoji, Hirokazu; Honma, Yoshitaka; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Matsueda, Satoko; Yamada, Akira; Morita, Michi; Yamaguchi, Rin; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kawahara, Akihiko; Kage, Masayoshi; Shichijo, Shigeki; Sasada, Tetsuro; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-05-01

    A phase I study of a new cancer vaccine (KRM-10), consisting of a mixture of 10 different short peptides, was conducted for patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancers. Primary or secondary endpoints included the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), or safety and immune responses, respectively. Peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), together with soluble inflammatory factors, were measured before and after vaccination. Twenty-one patients were vaccinated with KRM-10 at dose levels of 10 (n = 6), 20 (n = 8) or 30 mg (n = 7) of peptides every week for 6 weeks. No DLT were observed in the dose range evaluated. Common treatment-related adverse events were a grade 1 injection site reaction in 15 patients, and fever in three patients (grade 1 in two patients and grade 2 in one patient). CTL activity to at least one peptide at the time of the third and sixth vaccination increased in 2 and 3 of 6 (10 mg), 2 of 8 and 4 of 6 (20 mg), or 2 and 1 of 6 (30 mg) patients, respectively. IgG levels, at the third and sixth vaccination, were also increased in 1 and 1 of 6 (10 mg), 2 of 8 and 4 of 6 (20 mg), or 1 and 3 of 6 (30 mg) patients, respectively. The KRM-10 vaccine consisting of 20 mg of peptides was determined as the optimal dose for a coming phase II trial because of its safety, and also for demonstrating the most potent activity for augmenting the immune response of the three doses tested. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000008820.

  15. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease in China: Critical Community Size and Spatial Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Van Boeckel, Thomas P.; Takahashi, Saki; Liao, Qiaohong; Xing, Weijia; Lai, Shengjie; Hsiao, Victor; Liu, Fengfeng; Zheng, Yaming; Chang, Zhaorui; Yuan, Chen; Metcalf, C. Jessica E.; Yu, Hongjie; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Hand Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) constitutes a considerable burden for health care systems across China. Yet this burden displays important geographic heterogeneity that directly affects the local persistence and the dynamics of the disease, and thus the ability to control it through vaccination campaigns. Here, we use detailed geographic surveillance data and epidemic models to estimate the critical community size (CCS) of HFMD associated enterovirus serotypes CV-A16 and EV-A71 and we explore what spatial vaccination strategies may best reduce the burden of HFMD. We found CCS ranging from 336,979 (±225,866) to 722,372 (±150,562) with the lowest estimates associated with EV-A71 in the southern region of China where multiple transmission seasons have previously been identified. Our results suggest the existence of a regional immigration-recolonization dynamic driven by urban centers. If EV-A71 vaccines doses are limited, these would be optimally deployed in highly populated urban centers and in high-prevalence areas. If HFMD vaccines are included in China’s National Immunization Program in order to achieve high coverage rates (>85%), routine vaccination of newborns largely outperforms strategies in which the equivalent number of doses is equally divided between routine vaccination of newborns and pulse vaccination of the community at large. PMID:27125917

  16. Informing rubella vaccination strategies in East Java, Indonesia through transmission modelling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Wood, James; Khandaker, Gulam; Waddington, Claire; Snelling, Thomas

    2016-11-04

    An estimated 110,000 babies are born with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) worldwide annually; a significant proportion of cases occur in Southeast Asia. Rubella vaccine programs have led to successful control of rubella and CRS, and even the elimination of disease in many countries. However, if vaccination is poorly implemented it might increase the number of women reaching childbearing age who remain susceptible to rubella and thereby paradoxically increase CRS. We used an age-structured transmission model to compare seven alternative vaccine strategies for their impact on reducing CRS disease burden in East Java, a setting which is yet to implement a rubella vaccine program. We also investigated the robustness of model predictions to variation in vaccine coverage and other key epidemiological factors. Without rubella vaccination, approximately 700 babies are estimated to be born with CRS in East Java every year at an incidence of 0.77 per 1000live births. This incidence could be reduced to 0.0045 per 1000 live births associated with 99.9% annual reduction in rubella infections after 20 years if the existing two doses of measles vaccine are substituted with two doses of measles plus rubella combination vaccine with the same coverage (87.8% of 9-month-old infants and 80% of 6-year-old children). By comparison a single dose of rubella vaccine will take longer to reduce the burden of rubella and CRS and will be less robust to lower vaccine coverage. While the findings of this study should be informative for settings similar to East Java, the conclusions are dependent on vaccine coverage which would need consideration before applying to all of Indonesia and elsewhere in Asia.

  17. Vaccine antigen production in transgenic plants: strategies, gene constructs and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sala, Francesco; Manuela Rigano, M; Barbante, Alessandra; Basso, Barbara; Walmsley, Amanda M; Castiglione, Stefano

    2003-01-30

    Stable integration of a gene into the plant nuclear or chloroplast genome can transform higher plants (e.g. tobacco, potato, tomato, banana) into bioreactors for the production of subunit vaccines for oral or parental administration. This can also be achieved by using recombinant plant viruses as transient expression vectors in infected plants. The use of plant-derived vaccines may overcome some of the major problems encountered with traditional vaccination against infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases and tumours. They also offer a convenient tool against the threat of bio-terrorism. State of the art, experimental strategies, safety and perspectives are discussed in this article.

  18. Molecular Strategy for the Construction of a Genetically Engineered Vaccine for Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-29

    AD-A236 920 MOLECULAR STRATEGY FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A GENETICALLY ENGINEERED VACCINE FOR VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS FINAL REPORT ROBERT...89-C-9089 engineered vaccine for Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus 62787A 3M162787A871 AD Robert Edward Johnston WUDA318408 Nancy Lee Davis...multiple mutants were more attenuated than those containing a single attenuating Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) full-length clones; In vitro

  19. Parental decisional strategies regarding HPV vaccination before media debates: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Robine; van Empelen, Pepijn; Vogel, Ineke; Raat, Hein; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Korfage, Ida J

    2013-01-01

    Before the introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, decisional strategies and factors that could guide HPV vaccination intentions were explored. The authors conducted 4 focus group discussions with 36 parents of children 8-15 years of age. Three groups consisted primarily of Dutch parents and 1 group of only Turkish parents. Discussions followed a semi-structured question route. Results showed that some parents used an approach of systematically seeking information as a way to prepare a decision, whereas others merely relied on trust in the message source. In general, parents believed that it was important to protect their child against negative outcomes that could result from vaccinating or not, and they felt that it is their responsibility to decide about uptake. Perceived susceptibility, vaccine effectiveness, and possibility of serious side effects were most important in the HPV vaccination decision-making process. In conclusion, parents perceived a lack of information and felt insecure about the vaccine's safety and effectiveness. This may result in ambivalent feelings toward HPV vaccination, which, in turn, may lead to postponing decisions about uptake. To facilitate informed decision making, which requires central processing, personally relevant messages about the knowns and unknowns regarding the effects of HPV vaccination should be provided.

  20. The pharmaceuticalization of sexual risk: vaccine development and the new politics of cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Mamo, Laura; Epstein, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine development is a core component of pharmaceutical industry activity and a key site for studying pharmaceuticalization processes. In recent decades, two so-called cancer vaccines have entered the U.S. medical marketplace: a vaccine targeting hepatitis B virus (HBV) to prevent liver cancers and a vaccine targeting human papillomavirus (HPV) to prevent cervical and other cancers. These viruses are two of six sexually transmissible infectious agents (STIs) that are causally linked to the development of cancers; collectively they reference an expanding approach to apprehending cancer that focuses attention simultaneously "inward" toward biomolecular processes and "outward" toward risk behaviors, sexual practices, and lifestyles. This paper juxtaposes the cases of HBV and HPV and their vaccine trajectories to analyze how vaccines, like pharmaceuticals more generally, are emblematic of contemporary pharmaceuticalization processes. We argue that individualized risk, in this case sexual risk, is produced and treated by scientific claims of links between STIs and cancers and through pharmaceutical company and biomedical practices. Simultaneous processes of sexualization and pharmaceuticalization mark these cases. Our comparison demonstrates that these processes are not uniform, and that the production of risks, subjects, and bodies depends not only on the specificities of vaccine development but also on the broader political and cultural frames within which sexuality is understood.

  1. Enhancing the efficacy of cancer vaccines in urologic oncology: new directions.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Vieweg, Johannes

    2009-10-01

    Immunotherapeutic interventions have long been utilized in urologic oncology for the treatment of metastatic renal cell or superficial transitional cell carcinoma. Most recently, the first active specific immunotherapeutic approach, a cancer vaccine, has passed the final phase of human testing and its approval by the FDA is pending. However, evidence suggests that the full protective and therapeutic potential of cancer vaccines has not yet been achieved. Through multiple mechanisms, tumors promote conditions in the tumor-bearing host that mitigate or even eliminate the vaccine-induced antitumor response. Restoration of the impaired immune function is, therefore, imperative for achieving optimum vaccine efficacy. Targeted pharmacological interventions are capable of overcoming tumor-mediated immunosuppression, and thereby enable cancer vaccination to reach its full therapeutic potential.

  2. FDA Approves Two HPV Vaccines: Cervarix for Girls, Gardasil for Boys | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The FDA has approved a second vaccine to prevent cervical cancer and cervical precancers, the vaccine’s manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), announced last week. The approval is based on data from a large clinical trial showing that the vaccine, Cervarix, prevented precancerous lesions in 93 percent of those who received the full vaccine sequence of three injections over 6 months. |

  3. Vaccination against Alzheimer disease: an update on future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fettelschoss, Antonia; Zabel, Franziska; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a devastating chronic disease without adequate therapy. More than 10 years ago, it was demonstrated in transgenic mouse models that vaccination may be a novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer. Subsequent clinical development has been a roller-coaster with some positive and many negative news. Here, we would like to summarize evidence that next generation vaccines optimized for old people and focusing on patients with mild disease stand a good chance to proof efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer.

  4. In situ vaccine, immunological memory and cancer cure.

    PubMed

    Tsung, Kangla; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    As surgery is able to remove primary tumors and limit metastases, the major challenge in cancer management is the prevention of post-resection recurrence and metastases. From the immune point of view, tumor resection removes the supply of tumor antigens that maintain an active concomitant antitumor immunity elicited by the primary tumor, and may also signal for deposition of immunological memory against future metastases. However, the natural course of this antitumor immunity in many cancer patients following complete tumor resection may not be favorable because protection is often lost after 1-3 years. Recent studies suggest that chemotherapy is able to activate this pre-existing antitumor immunity, and tumor resection following immune activation may lead to higher levels of immunological memory against future tumor antigens (in the form of metastases). Interleukin-12 added to chemotherapy mimics the function of a vaccine adjuvant in that it helps to enhance the antitumor immunity activated by chemotherapy and leaves a much stronger antitumor immune memory. This finding, when applied to cancer management, may help to maintain a strong and long lasting antitumor immunity following complete tumor resection, thus eliminating post-surgery recurrence and metastases.

  5. US Assessment of HPV Types in Cancers: Implications for Current and 9-Valent HPV Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Elizabeth R.; Thompson, Trevor D.; Lynch, Charles F.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Lyu, Christopher W.; Steinau, Martin; Watson, Meg; Wilkinson, Edward J.; Hopenhayn, Claudia; Copeland, Glenn; Cozen, Wendy; Peters, Edward S.; Huang, Youjie; Saber, Maria Sibug; Altekruse, Sean; Goodman, Marc T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study sought to determine the prevaccine type-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)–associated cancers in the United States to evaluate the potential impact of the HPV types in the current and newly approved 9-valent HPV vaccines. Methods: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention partnered with seven US population-based cancer registries to obtain archival tissue for cancers diagnosed from 1993 to 2005. HPV testing was performed on 2670 case patients that were fairly representative of all participating cancer registry cases by age and sex. Demographic and clinical data were evaluated by anatomic site and HPV status. Current US cancer registry data and the detection of HPV types were used to estimate the number of cancers potentially preventable through vaccination. Results: HPV DNA was detected in 90.6% of cervical, 91.1% of anal, 75.0% of vaginal, 70.1% of oropharyngeal, 68.8% of vulvar, 63.3% of penile, 32.0% of oral cavity, and 20.9% of laryngeal cancers, as well as in 98.8% of cervical cancer in situ (CCIS). A vaccine targeting HPV 16/18 potentially prevents the majority of invasive cervical (66.2%), anal (79.4%), oropharyngeal (60.2%), and vaginal (55.1%) cancers, as well as many penile (47.9%), vulvar (48.6%) cancers: 24 858 cases annually. The 9-valent vaccine also targeting HPV 31/33/45/52/58 may prevent an additional 4.2% to 18.3% of cancers: 3944 cases annually. For most cancers, younger age at diagnosis was associated with higher HPV 16/18 prevalence. With the exception of oropharyngeal cancers and CCIS, HPV 16/18 prevalence was similar across racial/ethnic groups. Conclusions: In the United States, current vaccines will reduce most HPV-associated cancers; a smaller additional reduction would be contributed by the new 9-valent vaccine. PMID:25925419

  6. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  7. Translational cancer vaccine: from mouse to human to cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenson, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Acanthomatous ameloblastoma is a locally invasive tumor arising in the gingiva that can progress rapidly, invade and destroy bone. If the lesion involves the upper jaw, surgical excision may not be possible and while local control is imperative, other therapies have not been fully evaluated. The primary author's personal cat, Gabriella, developed this tumor, with gingival masses around teeth in the upper jaw and evidence of widespread bony destruction of the hard palate. Because of his involvement with Immunophotonics Inc. as an advisor, the author was aware of an in situ autologous cancer vaccine (inCVAX) that is currently under development by the company. One session was performed in a veterinary clinic in Arkansas, and two follow-up sessions at the small animal hospital at the UC Davis veterinary school. No other therapy was provided. As of this writing, 3+ years after first treatment and 3 years, 4 months after presentation, Gabriella is well, with no evidence of disease.

  8. Development of a peptide-based vaccine targeting TMPRSS2:ERG fusion positive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Sanda, Martin George; Dunn, Laura Kathleen; Arredouani, Mohamed Simo

    2013-01-01

    Identification of novel vaccine targets is critical for the design and advancement of prostate cancer (PCa) immunotherapy. Ideal targets are proteins that are abundant in prostate tumors while absent in extra-prostatic tissues. The fusion of the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 gene with the ETS transcription factor ERG occurs in approximately 50% of prostate cancer cases and results in aberrant ERG expression. Because expression of ERG is very low in peripheral tissue, we evaluated the suitability of this protein as an antigen target in PCa vaccines. ERG-derived HLA-A*0201-restricted immunogenic epitopes were identified through a 3-step strategy that included in silico, in vitro, and in vivo validation. Algorithms were used to predict potential HLA-A*0201-binding epitopes. High scoring epitopes were tested for binding to HLA-A*0201 using the T2-based stabilization assay in vitro. Five peptides were found to bind HLA-A*0201 and were subsequently tested for immunogenicity in humanized HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. The in vivo screening identified three immunogenic peptides. One of these peptides, ERG295, overcame peripheral tolerance in HLA-A*0201 mice that expressed prostate restricted ERG. Also, this peptide induced an antigen specific response against ERG-expressing human prostate tumor cells. Finally, tetramer assay showed detectable and responsive ERG295-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes in peripheral blood of HLA-A*0201+ prostate cancer patients. Detection of ERG-specific CTLs in both mice and the blood of prostate cancer patients indicates that ERG-specific tolerance can be overcome. Additionally, these data suggest that ERG is a suitable target antigen for PCa immunotherapy. PMID:24149465

  9. Development of a peptide-based vaccine targeting TMPRSS2:ERG fusion-positive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Sanda, Martin George; Dunn, Laura Kathleen; Arredouani, Mohamed Simo

    2013-12-01

    Identification of novel vaccine targets is critical for the design and advancement of prostate cancer (PCa) immunotherapy. Ideal targets are proteins that are abundant in prostate tumors while absent in extra-prostatic tissues. The fusion of the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 gene with the ETS transcription factor ERG occurs in approximately 50 % of prostate cancer cases and results in aberrant ERG expression. Because expression of ERG is very low in peripheral tissue, we evaluated the suitability of this protein as an antigen target in PCa vaccines. ERG-derived HLA-A*0201-restricted immunogenic epitopes were identified through a 3-step strategy that included in silico, in vitro, and in vivo validation. Algorithms were used to predict potential HLA-A*0201-binding epitopes. High-scoring epitopes were tested for binding to HLA-A*0201 using the T2-based stabilization assay in vitro. Five peptides were found to bind HLA-A*0201 and were subsequently tested for immunogenicity in humanized, HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. The in vivo screening identified three immunogenic peptides. One of these peptides, ERG295, overcame peripheral tolerance in HLA-A*0201 mice that expressed prostate-restricted ERG. Also, this peptide induced an antigen-specific response against ERG-expressing human prostate tumor cells. Finally, tetramer assay showed detectable and responsive ERG295-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes in peripheral blood of HLA-A*0201(+) prostate cancer patients. Detection of ERG-specific CTLs in both mice and the blood of prostate cancer patients indicates that ERG-specific tolerance can be overcome. Additionally, these data suggest that ERG is a suitable target antigen for PCa immunotherapy.

  10. Photocarcinogenesis and Skin Cancer Prevention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Seebode, Christina; Lehmann, Janin; Emmert, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    In this review the basic principles of UV-induced carcinogenesis are summarized and the state of the art diagnosis and therapeutic strategies are discussed. The prevalent keratinocyte-derived neoplasms of the skin are basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas. Cutaneous melanoma is less frequent but associated with high mortality. Common risk factors for all three tumor entities include sun exposure and DNA-repair deficiencies. Photocarcinogenesis follows a multistep model of cancer development in which ultraviolet-induced DNA damage leads to mutations resulting in activation of oncogenes or silencing of tumor-suppressor genes. This ends in a cellular mutator phenotype even more prone to mutation acquisition. DNA repair, especially the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, counteracts mutation formation and skin cancer development. This is vividly demonstrated by the NER-defective disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. Primary skin cancer preventative strategies, therefore, include reduction of DNA photodamage by protection from the sun. Secondary preventative strategies include skin cancer screening. This implies standard examination techniques with the naked eye, an epiluminescence microscope, or digital epiluminescence microscopy. More advanced techniques include confocal laser scan microscopy.

  11. Universal Breast Cancer Antigens as Targets Linking Early Detection and Therapeutic Vaccination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    the presence of carcinoma. We further hypothesize that immunologic responses can be elicited in advanced breast cancer patients using vaccines...trial. Immunologic responses were assessed and the optimal dose level was chosen and an additional four patients were treated at that dose...which to assess presence of tumor- associated antigens and therefore the potential for preventative vaccination. Evidence of immunologic response to

  12. A novel cancer immunotherapy based on the combination of a synthetic carbohydrate-pulsed dendritic cell vaccine and glycoengineered cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shichong; Wang, Qianli; Li, Yinghua; Hu, Zhenlin; Wu, Qiuye; Guo, Zhongwu; Zhang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Immune tolerance to tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) has severely restricted the usefulness of most TACAs. To overcome this problem, we selected a sialylated trisaccharide TACA, GM3, as a target antigen, and tested a new immunotherapeutic strategy by combining metabolic bioengineering with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. We engineered cancer cells to express an artificial structure, N-phenylacetyl-D-neuraminic acid, in place of the natural N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid of GM3 by using N-phenylacetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNPhAc) as a biosynthetic precursor. Next, we selectively targeted the bioengineered cancer cells by vaccination with DCs pulsed with the GM3 N-phenylacetyl derivative. Vaccination with GM3NPhAc-KLH-loaded DCs elicited robust GM3NPhAc-specific T cell-dependent immunity. The results showed that this strategy could significantly inhibit FBL3 tumor growth and prolong the survival of tumor-bearing mice; B16F10 lung metastases could also be reduced. These findings lay out a new strategy for overcoming immune tolerance to TACAs, such as GM3, for the development of effective tumor immunotherapies. PMID:25760071

  13. A novel cancer immunotherapy based on the combination of a synthetic carbohydrate-pulsed dendritic cell vaccine and glycoengineered cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Li, Jie; Yu, Shichong; Wang, Qianli; Li, Yinghua; Hu, Zhenlin; Wu, Qiuye; Guo, Zhongwu; Zhang, Junping

    2015-03-10

    Immune tolerance to tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) has severely restricted the usefulness of most TACAs. To overcome this problem, we selected a sialylated trisaccharide TACA, GM3, as a target antigen, and tested a new immunotherapeutic strategy by combining metabolic bioengineering with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. We engineered cancer cells to express an artificial structure, N-phenylacetyl-D-neuraminic acid, in place of the natural N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid of GM3 by using N-phenylacetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNPhAc) as a biosynthetic precursor. Next, we selectively targeted the bioengineered cancer cells by vaccination with DCs pulsed with the GM3 N-phenylacetyl derivative. Vaccination with GM3NPhAc-KLH-loaded DCs elicited robust GM3NPhAc-specific T cell-dependent immunity. The results showed that this strategy could significantly inhibit FBL3 tumor growth and prolong the survival of tumor-bearing mice; B16F10 lung metastases could also be reduced. These findings lay out a new strategy for overcoming immune tolerance to TACAs, such as GM3, for the development of effective tumor immunotherapies.

  14. DNA vaccines: roles against diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kishwar Hayat

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is the most successful application of immunological principles to human health. Vaccine efficacy needs to be reviewed from time to time and its safety is an overriding consideration. DNA vaccines offer simple yet effective means of inducing broad-based immunity. These vaccines work by allowing the expression of the microbial antigen inside host cells that take up the plasmid. These vaccines function by generating the desired antigen inside the cells, with the advantage that this may facilitate presentation through the major histocompatibility complex. This review article is based on a literature survey and it describes the working and designing strategies of DNA vaccines. Advantages and disadvantages for this type of vaccines have also been explained, together with applications of DNA vaccines. DNA vaccines against cancer, tuberculosis, Edwardsiella tarda, HIV, anthrax, influenza, malaria, dengue, typhoid and other diseases were explored. PMID:24432284

  15. Novel strategies for managing pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loc, Welley S; Smith, Jill P; Matters, Gail; Kester, Mark; Adair, James H

    2014-01-01

    With the incidence reports of pancreatic cancer increasing every year, research over the last several decades has been focused on the means to achieve early diagnosis in patients that are at a high risk of developing the malignancy. This review covers current strategies for managing pancreatic cancer and further discusses efforts in understanding the role of early onset symptoms leading to tumor progression. Recent investigations in this discussion include type 3c diabetes, selected biomarkers and pathways related to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions, drug resistance, and advances in nanomedicine which may provide significant solutions for improving early detection and treatments in future medicine. PMID:25356034

  16. Vaccination with ErbB-2 peptides prevents cancer stem cell expansion and suppresses the development of spontaneous tumors in MMTV-PyMT transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gil, Eun-Young; Jo, Uk-Hyun; Lee, Hye Jin; Kang, Jinho; Seo, Jae Hong; Lee, Eun Sook; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, InSun; Phan-Lai, Vy; Disis, Mary L; Park, Kyong Hwa

    2014-08-01

    ErbB-2 has been implicated as a target for cancer-initiating cells in breast and other cancers. ErbB-2-directed peptide vaccines have been shown to be effective in prevention of spontaneous tumorigenesis of breast in neu transgenic mouse model, and cellular immunity is proposed as a mechanism for the anti-tumor efficacy. However, there has been no explanation as to how immunity suppresses tumorigenesis from the early stage carcinogenesis, when ErbB-2 expression in breast is low. Here, we investigated a peptide-based vaccine, which consists of two MHC class II epitopes derived from murine ErbB-2, to prevent the occurrence of spontaneous tumors in breast and assess immune impact on breast cancer stem cells. Female MMTV-PyMT transgenic mice were immunized with either ErbB-2 peptide vaccine, or a peptide from tetanus toxoid, or PBS in immune adjuvant. ErbB-2 peptides vaccine completely suppressed spontaneous breast tumors, and the efficacy was correlated with antigen-specific T-cell and antibody responses. In addition, immune serum from the mice of ErbB-2 vaccine group had an inhibitory effect on mammosphere-forming capacity and signaling through ErbB-2 and downstream Akt pathway in ErbB-2 overexpressing mouse mammary cancer cells. We provide evidence that multi-epitope class II peptides vaccine suppresses tumorigenesis of breast potentially by inhibiting the growth of cancer stem cells. We also suggest that a strategy of inducing strong immune responses using multi-epitope ErbB-2-directed helper vaccine might be useful in preventing breast cancer recurrence.

  17. DNA vaccines against infectious agents: recent strategies for enhancing immune responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There have been widespread efforts to develop plasmid DNA vaccines against animal and human pathogens, and for use as therapies in the treatment of cancers, autoimmune diseases, and allergies. The impetus for this research activity was based on early promising results in laboratory animals that sho...

  18. Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul T. Spellman, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: REPORT DATE...SUBTITLE Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b . ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 12 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code

  19. Adjuvant treatment strategies for early colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Waterston, Ashita M; Cassidy, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Colon cancer remains a major cause of death; however, in the last 3 years a number of trials have been published that have led to changes in the treatment of patients with this disease. Initially, the adjuvant treatment of patients following curative resection was based on their Dukes staging; this is now being refined by consideration of other pathological factors, as well as the investigation of newer prognostic markers such as p53, Ki67 and a number of genes on chromosome 18. Tumours generally develop from the progressive accumulation of genetic events, although some develop through mutation or inactivation of DNA mismatch repair proteins leading to microsatellite instability; this is particularly important in Lynch's syndrome. The loss of gene expression can occur by deletion or mutation of genes or by aberrant methylation of CpG islands. In patients with Dukes C colon cancer the standard of care for adjuvant chemotherapy was previously based on bolus fluorouracil (5-fluorouracil) and folinic acid (leucovorin) administered 5 days per month or weekly for 6 months. Recent studies with a combination of infusional fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin have been found to be superior. A further study replacing fluorouracil with oral capecitabine has also demonstrated equivalent disease-free survival. Although some debate remains regarding the benefit of adjuvant treatment for patients with Dukes B colon cancer, the emerging consensus is that, for those patients who are younger and have high-risk features, chemotherapy should be discussed. A number of large vaccine trials have also been conducted in the adjuvant setting and, overall, these have been disappointing. This is a rapidly advancing area of therapy and the results of new trials are awaited to determine whether additional benefits can be achieved with biological therapies such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and anti-epithelial growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies, which have already

  20. Protein engineering strategies for the development of viral vaccines and immunotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Koellhoffer, Jayne F; Higgins, Chelsea D; Lai, Jonathan R

    2014-01-21

    Vaccines that elicit a protective broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) response and monoclonal antibody therapies are critical for the treatment and prevention of viral infections. However, isolation of protective neutralizing antibodies has been challenging for some viruses, notably those with high antigenic diversity or those that do not elicit a bNAb response in the course of natural infection. Here, we discuss recent work that employs protein engineering strategies to design immunogens that elicit bNAbs or engineer novel bNAbs. We highlight the use of rational, computational, and combinatorial strategies and assess the potential of these approaches for the development of new vaccines and immunotherapeutics.

  1. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  2. Mucosal HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through oral compared to vaginal and rectal routes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingke; Vajdy, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field There are currently over thirty million people infected with HIV and there are no vaccines available to prevent HIV infections or disease. The genitourinary, rectal and oral mucosa are the mucosal HIV transmission routes. An effective vaccine that can induce both systemic and local mucosal immunity is generally accepted as a major means of protection against mucosal HIV transmission and AIDS. What the reader will gain Structure and cells that comprise the oral, vaginal and rectal mucosa pertaining to HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through each mucosal route to prevent mucosal and systemic infection will be discussed. Areas covered in this review Covering publications from 1980’s through 2010, mucosal transmission of HIV and current and previous approaches to vaccinations are discussed. Take home message Although oral transmission of HIV is far less common than vaginal and rectal transmissions, infections through this route do occur through oral sex as well as vertically from mother to child. Mucosal vaccination strategies against oral and other mucosal HIV transmissions are under intense research but the lack of consensus on immune correlates of protection and lack of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants and delivery systems hamper progress towards a licensed vaccine. PMID:20624114

  3. Xenogeneic therapeutic cancer vaccines as breakers of immune tolerance for clinical application: to use or not to use?

    PubMed

    Strioga, Marius M; Darinskas, Adas; Pasukoniene, Vita; Mlynska, Agata; Ostapenko, Valerijus; Schijns, Virgil

    2014-07-07

    Accumulation of firm evidence that clinically apparent cancer develops only when malignant cells manage to escape immunosurveillance led to the introduction of tumor immunotherapy strategies aiming to reprogramm the cancer-dysbalanced antitumor immunity and restore its capacity to control tumor growth. There are several immunotherapeutical strategies, among which specific active immunotherapy or therapeutic cancer vaccination is one of the most promising. It targets dendritic cells (DCs) which have a unique ability of inducing naive and central memory T cell-mediated immune response in the most efficient manner. DCs can be therapeutically targeted either in vivo/in situ or by ex vivo manipulations followed by their re-injection back into the same patient. The majority of current DC targeting strategies are based on autologous or allogeneic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) which possess various degrees of inherent tolerogenic potential. Therefore still limited efficacy of various tumor immunotherapy approaches may be attributed, among various other mechanisms, to the insufficient immunogenicity of self-protein-derived TAAs. Based on such an idea, the use of homologous xenogeneic antigens, derived from different species was suggested to overcome the natural immune tolerance to self TAAs. Xenoantigens are supposed to differ sufficiently from self antigens to a degree that renders them immunogenic, but at the same time preserves an optimal homology range with self proteins still allowing xenoantigens to induce cross-reactive T cells. Here we discuss the concept of xenogeneic vaccination, describe the cons and pros of autologous/allogeneic versus xenogeneic therapeutic cancer vaccines, present the results of various pre-clinical and several clinical studies and highlight the future perspectives of integrating xenovaccination into rapidly developing tumor immunotherapy regimens.

  4. Perspective on Global Measles Epidemiology and Control and the Role of Novel Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Melissa M.; Beck, Andrew S.; Bankamp, Bettina; Rota, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Measles is a highly contagious, vaccine preventable disease. Measles results in a systemic illness which causes profound immunosuppression often leading to severe complications. In 2010, the World Health Assembly declared that measles can and should be eradicated. Measles has been eliminated in the Region of the Americas, and the remaining five regions of the World Health Organization (WHO) have adopted measles elimination goals. Significant progress has been made through increased global coverage of first and second doses of measles-containing vaccine, leading to a decrease in global incidence of measles, and through improved case based surveillance supported by the WHO Global Measles and Rubella Laboratory Network. Improved vaccine delivery methods will likely play an important role in achieving measles elimination goals as these delivery methods circumvent many of the logistic issues associated with subcutaneous injection. This review highlights the status of global measles epidemiology, novel measles vaccination strategies, and describes the pathway toward measles elimination. PMID:28106841

  5. Perspective on Global Measles Epidemiology and Control and the Role of Novel Vaccination Strategies.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Melissa M; Beck, Andrew S; Bankamp, Bettina; Rota, Paul A

    2017-01-19

    Measles is a highly contagious, vaccine preventable disease. Measles results in a systemic illness which causes profound immunosuppression often leading to severe complications. In 2010, the World Health Assembly declared that measles can and should be eradicated. Measles has been eliminated in the Region of the Americas, and the remaining five regions of the World Health Organization (WHO) have adopted measles elimination goals. Significant progress has been made through increased global coverage of first and second doses of measles-containing vaccine, leading to a decrease in global incidence of measles, and through improved case based surveillance supported by the WHO Global Measles and Rubella Laboratory Network. Improved vaccine delivery methods will likely play an important role in achieving measles elimination goals as these delivery methods circumvent many of the logistic issues associated with subcutaneous injection. This review highlights the status of global measles epidemiology, novel measles vaccination strategies, and describes the pathway toward measles elimination.

  6. Identification Of Protein Vaccine Candidates Using Comprehensive Proteomic Analysis Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    subcellular localization can be found using the TargetP 105 localization predictor. Identification of possible cell membrane or cell wall...analyzed as vaccine candidates. Examples of this include membrane proteins that localized to subcellular organelle membranes, or proteins with...403-410. 105. Emanuelsson, O., H. Nielsen, S. Brunak, et al. 2000. Predicting subcellular localization of proteins based on their N-terminal amino

  7. Novel Strategies to Enhance Vaccine Immunity against Coccidioidomycosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-19

    of disease caused by these environmental pathogens ranges from a mild infection that resolves spontaneously to a disseminated mycosis. Inhaled spores...microenvironment at infection sites due to their release of ammonia, which contributes to the pathogen’s virulence [3]. Need for a Vaccine The incidence...individuals are diagnosed with reactivated infection months to years after returning home. Risk of infection is particularly high during dust storms

  8. Fueling the engine and releasing the break: combinational therapy of cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kleponis, Jennifer; Skelton, Richard; Zheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are increasingly drawing much attention in the therapeutic development for cancer treatment. However, many cancer patients do not respond to treatments with immune checkpoint inhibitors, partly because of the lack of tumor-infiltrating effector T cells. Cancer vaccines may prime patients for treatments with immune checkpoint inhibitors by inducing effector T-cell infiltration into the tumors and immune checkpoint signals. The combination of cancer vaccine and an immune checkpoint inhibitor may function synergistically to induce more effective antitumor immune responses, and clinical trials to test the combination are currently ongoing. PMID:26487965

  9. Possible global strategies for stopping polio vaccination and how they could be harmonized.

    PubMed

    Cochi, S L; Sutter, R W; Aylward, R B

    2001-01-01

    One of the challenges of the polio eradication initiative over the next few years will be the formulation of an optimal strategy for stopping poliovirus vaccination after global certification of polio eradication has been accomplished. This strategy must maximize the benefits and minimize the risks. A number of strategies are currently under consideration, including: (i) synchronized global discontinuation of use of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV); (ii) regional or subregional coordinated OPV discontinuation; and (iii) moving from trivalent to bivalent or monovalent OPV. Other options include moving from OPV to global use of IPV for an interim period before cessation of IPV use (to eliminate circulation of vaccine-derived poliovirus, if necessary) or development of new OPV strains that are not transmissible. Each of these strategies is associated with specific advantages (financial benefits for OPV discontinuation) and disadvantages (cost of switch to IPV) and inherent uncertainties (risk of continued poliovirus circulation in certain populations or prolonged virus replication in immunodeficient persons). An ambitious research agenda addresses the remaining questions and issues. Nevertheless, several generalities are already clear. Unprecedented collaboration between countries, regions, and indeed the entire world will be required to implement a global OPV discontinuation strategy Regulatory approval will be needed for an interim bivalent OPV or for monovalent OPV in many countries. Manufacturers will need sufficient lead time to produce sufficient quantities of IPV Finally, the financial implications for any of these strategies need to be considered. Whatever strategy is followed it will be necessary to stockpile supplies of a poliovirus-containing vaccine (most probably all three types of monovalent OPV), and to develop contingency plans to respond should an outbreak of polio occur after stopping vaccination.

  10. Directed antigen delivery as a vaccine strategy for an intracellular bacterial pathogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwer, H. G. Archie; Alberti-Segui, Christine; Montfort, Megan J.; Berkowitz, Nathan D.; Higgins, Darren E.

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a vaccine strategy for generating an attenuated strain of an intracellular bacterial pathogen that, after uptake by professional antigen-presenting cells, does not replicate intracellularly and is readily killed. However, after degradation of the vaccine strain within the phagolysosome, target antigens are released into the cytosol for endogenous processing and presentation for stimulation of CD8+ effector T cells. Applying this strategy to the model intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, we show that an intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strain is cleared rapidly in normal and immunocompromised animals, yet antigen-specific CD8+ effector T cells are stimulated after immunization. Furthermore, animals immunized with the intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strain are resistant to lethal challenge with a virulent WT strain of L. monocytogenes. These studies suggest a general strategy for developing safe and effective, attenuated intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strains for stimulation of protective immune responses against intracellular bacterial pathogens. CD8+ T cell | replication-deficient | Listeria monocytogenes

  11. Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0549 TITLE: Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0549 Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT...and CD4 anti-tumor T cells in vivo, as CD4 T cells are needed to optimally sustain vaccine -elicited CD8 T cells in vivo [1]. Identified antigens

  12. Synergy of SOCS-1 Inhibition and Microbial-Based Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    to modify a live- attenuated vaccine vector based on the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to promote a tumor-specific immune response while...immune response and improve the effectiveness of these cancer vaccines. 15. SUBJECT TERMS T Cells, Listeria monocytogenes, cancer vaccines 16...6 Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………… 7 Supporting Data…………………………………………………………………….. 7 INTRODUCTION Listeria

  13. Knowledge of cervical cancer and acceptance of HPV vaccination among secondary school students in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rashwan, Hesham; Lubis, Syarif Husin; Ni, Kiat Aun

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women in peninsular Malaysia and very prevalent worldwide. HPV vaccination and routine Pap smear testing are the best preventive measures. The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge level of secondary school students from Sarawak, East Malaysia regarding cervical cancer and its prevention. Multistage random sampling with various methods in each step was employed to select the sample of 76 students. Results showed that 61.8% had poor knowledge level of cervical cancer and its prevention. There were 60.5% of students who were aware of cervical cancer with Chinese and form four students showing significantly the highest awareness (p<0.05). The main source of cervical cancer information was from their parents (25.9%). HPV vaccination acceptance among students was 22.3% and an association was found between knowledge of cervical cancer with race and HPV vaccination acceptance (p<0.05). In conclusion, the students had poor knowledge level of cervical cancer, its prevention and HPV vaccination acceptance. More efforts should be made to improve cervical cancer knowledge and awareness of the public especially secondary school students in Sarawak. This in turn will enhance the practice of prevention against cervical cancer among students.

  14. HPV vaccines to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts: an update.

    PubMed

    Dochez, Carine; Bogers, Johannes J; Verhelst, Rita; Rees, Helen

    2014-03-20

    Cervical cancer is an important public health problem worldwide, and especially in developing countries. The link between cervical cancer and oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been clearly established. Furthermore, non-oncogenic HPV are responsible for the majority of genital warts. Two prophylactic HPV vaccines are available, which have the potential of considerably reducing HPV-related morbidity and mortality. Both vaccines are based on virus-like particles of the L1 capsid protein, and are highly efficacious and immunogenic if given before exposure to HPV, i.e. to adolescent girls between 9 and 13 years of age in a three-dose schedule. This review describes the immunology of natural HPV infections and the immune response evoked through vaccination. The current duration of protection is 8.4 years with the bivalent vaccine (HPV16/18) and 5 years with the quadrivalent vaccine (HPV6/11/16/18). Research is on-going to evaluate the efficacy of the current vaccines in a two-dose schedule, as compared to the recommended three-dose schedule. To increase the protection, the development and testing of a nine-valent prophylactic HPV vaccine (HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) is being undertaken. Research is also directed towards therapeutic vaccines and the development of a prophylactic L2 vaccine.

  15. Modeling flow cytometry data for cancer vaccine immune monitoring.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Jacob; Ottinger, Janet; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn

    2010-09-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is widely used in cancer research for diagnosis, detection of minimal residual disease, as well as immune monitoring and profiling following immunotherapy. In all these applications, the challenge is to detect extremely rare cell subsets while avoiding spurious positive events. To achieve this objective, it helps to be able to analyze FCM data using multiple markers simultaneously, since the additional information provided often helps to minimize the number of false positive and false negative events, hence increasing both sensitivity and specificity. However, with manual gating, at most two markers can be examined in a single dot plot, and a sequential strategy is often used. As the sequential strategy discards events that fall outside preceding gates at each stage, the effectiveness of the strategy is difficult to evaluate without laborious and painstaking back-gating. Model-based analysis is a promising computational technique that works using information from all marker dimensions simultaneously, and offers an alternative approach to flow analysis that can usefully complement manual gating in the design of optimal gating strategies. Results from model-based analysis will be illustrated with examples from FCM assays commonly used in cancer immunotherapy laboratories.

  16. 5th European conference on Progress in Vaccination Against Cancer. 20-21 September 2005, Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Federica

    2005-12-01

    'Progress In Vaccination Against Cancer' (PIVAC) examines the latest advances in tumour immunology and their clinical applications. Previous conferences were held in Blaubeuren, London, Cambridge, Oxford, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Nottingham and Freudenstadt-Lauterbad in the Black Forest. The residential format of these conferences encourages interactions between participants and permits a focussed discussion on the new data and concepts. The main topic of the 5th European PIVAC was the induction and maintenance of an active immune memory against cancer. The results of clinical trials with different cancer vaccines were presented. The correlations between tumour regression and immune response, the role of innate and specific immunity, and ways of enhancing these two arms of the antitumour response were explored. Particular attention was devoted to the presence and function of regulatory T cells as a prelude to improving the design of these trials and understanding why they have produced unimpressive results. A consensus was reached on the need to combine vaccination with strategies for suppressing regulatory T cell function. The immune-escape mechanisms of tumours and the emerging importance of some newly discovered mutations were also fully discussed.

  17. Complex adaptive therapeutic strategy (CATS) for cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Woo; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, In-San

    2014-02-10

    Tumors begin with a single cell, but as each tumor grows and evolves, it becomes a wide collection of clones that display remarkable heterogeneity in phenotypic features, which has posed a big challenge to current targeted anticancer therapy. Intra- and inter-tumoral heterogeneity is attributable in part to genetic mutations but also to adaptation and evolution of tumors to heterogeneity in tumor microenvironments. If tumors are viewed not only as a disease but also as a complex adaptive system (CAS), tumors should be treated as such and a more systemic approach is needed. Some of many tumors therapeutic strategies are discussed here from a view of a tumor as CAS, which can be collectively called a complex adaptive therapeutic strategy (CATS). The central theme of CATS is based on three intermediate concepts: i) disruption of artifacts, ii) disruption of connections, and iii) reprogramming of cancer-immune dynamics. Each strategy presented here is a piece of the puzzle for CATS. Although each piece by itself may be neither novel nor profound, an assembled puzzle could be a novel and innovative cancer therapeutic strategy.

  18. Cancer and fertility: strategies to preserve fertility.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, K; Fauser, B C J M; Devroey, P

    2011-03-01

    Fertility preservation is a key component of cancer management in young people. The Fourth Evian Annual Reproduction Workshop Meeting was held in April 2009 to discuss cancer and fertility in young adults. Specialists in oncology, assisted reproduction, embryology and clinical genetics presented published data and ongoing research on cancer and fertility, with particular focus on strategies to preserve fertility. This report is based on the expert presentations and group discussions, supplemented with publications from literature searches and the authors' knowledge. Fertility preservation should be considered for all young people undergoing potentially gonadotoxic cancer treatment. A variety of options are required to facilitate safe and effective fertility preservation for individual patients. Sperm banking is a simple and low-cost intervention. Embryo cryopreservation is the only established method of female fertility preservation. Oocyte cryopreservation offers a useful option for women without a male partner. Emergency ovarian stimulation and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue (followed by tissue transplantation or in-vitro maturation of oocytes) are experimental techniques for women who require urgent cancer treatment. Further prospective studies are required to validate cryopreservation of oocytes and ovarian tissue, in-vitro maturation of oocytes and new vitrification techniques and to identify any long-term sequelae of slow freezing of embryos.

  19. Testicular Cancer Survivorship: Research Strategies and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Clair; Allan, James M.; Dahl, Alv A.; Feldman, Darren R.; Oldenburg, Jan; Daugaard, Gedske; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Hannigan, Robyn; Constine, Louis S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Okunieff, Paul; Armstrong, Greg; Wiljer, David; Miller, Robert C.; Gietema, Jourik A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Nichols, Craig R.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2010-01-01

    Testicular cancer represents the most curable solid tumor, with a 10-year survival rate of more than 95%. Given the young average age at diagnosis, it is estimated that effective treatment approaches, in particular, platinum-based chemotherapy, have resulted in an average gain of several decades of life. This success, however, is offset by the emergence of considerable long-term morbidity, including second malignant neoplasms, cardiovascular disease, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, pulmonary toxicity, hypogonadism, decreased fertility, and psychosocial problems. Data on underlying genetic or molecular factors that might identify those patients at highest risk for late sequelae are sparse. Genome-wide association studies and other translational molecular approaches now provide opportunities to identify testicular cancer survivors at greatest risk for therapy-related complications to develop evidence-based long-term follow-up guidelines and interventional strategies. We review research priorities identified during an international workshop devoted to testicular cancer survivors. Recommendations include 1) institution of lifelong follow-up of testicular cancer survivors within a large cohort setting to ascertain risks of emerging toxicities and the evolution of known late sequelae, 2) development of comprehensive risk prediction models that include treatment factors and genetic modifiers of late sequelae, 3) elucidation of the effect(s) of decades-long exposure to low serum levels of platinum, 4) assessment of the overall burden of medical and psychosocial morbidity, and 5) the eventual formulation of evidence-based long-term follow-up guidelines and interventions. Just as testicular cancer once served as the paradigm of a curable malignancy, comprehensive follow-up studies of testicular cancer survivors can pioneer new methodologies in survivorship research for all adult-onset cancer. PMID:20585105

  20. Safety, immunogenicity and preliminary efficacy of multiple-site vaccination with an Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) based cancer vaccine in advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with advanced non small cell lung (NSCLC) cancer remains dismal. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor is over-expressed in many epithelial derived tumors and its role in the development and progression of NSCLC is widely documented. CimaVax-EGF is a therapeutic cancer vaccine composed by human recombinant Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) conjugated to a carrier protein, P64K from Neisseria Meningitides. The vaccine is intended to induce antibodies against self EGF that would block EGF-EGFR interaction. CimaVax-EGF has been evaluated so far in more than 1000 advanced NSCLC patients, as second line therapy. Two separate studies were compared to assess the impact of high dose vaccination at multiple anatomic sites in terms of immunogenicity, safety and preliminary efficacy in stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients. In both clinical trials, patients started vaccination 1 month after finishing first line chemotherapy. Vaccination at 4 sites with 2.4 mg of EGF (high dose) was very safe. The most frequent adverse events were grade 1 or 2 injection site reactions, fever, headache and vomiting. Patients had a trend toward higher antibody response. The percent of very good responders significantly augmented and there was a faster decrease of circulating EGF. All vaccinated patients and those classified as good responders immunized with high dose at 4 sites, had a large tendency to improved survival. PMID:22024351

  1. Modelling Vaccination Strategies against Rift Valley Fever in Livestock in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Njenga, M. Kariuki; Kitala, Philip; Bett, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Background The impacts of vaccination on the transmission of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) have not been evaluated. We have developed a RVFV transmission model comprising two hosts—cattle as a separate host and sheep and goats as one combined host (herein after referred to as sheep)—and two vectors—Aedes species (spp) and Culex spp—and used it to predict the impacts of: (1) reactive vaccination implemented at various levels of coverage at pre-determined time points, (2) targeted vaccination involving either of the two host species, and (3) a periodic vaccination implemented biannually or annually before an outbreak. Methodology/Principal Findings The model comprises coupled vector and host modules where the dynamics of vectors and hosts are described using a system of difference equations. Vector populations are structured into egg, larva, pupa and adult stages and the latter stage is further categorized into three infection categories: susceptible, exposed and infectious mosquitoes. The survival rates of the immature stages (egg, larva and pupa) are dependent on rainfall densities extracted from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) for a Rift Valley fever (RVF) endemic site in Kenya over a period of 1827 days. The host populations are structured into four age classes comprising young, weaners, yearlings and adults and four infection categories including susceptible, exposed, infectious, and immune categories. The model reproduces the 2006/2007 RVF outbreak reported in empirical surveys in the target area and other seasonal transmission events that are perceived to occur during the wet seasons. Mass reactive vaccination strategies greatly reduce the potential for a major outbreak. The results also suggest that the effectiveness of vaccination can be enhanced by increasing the vaccination coverage, targeting vaccination on cattle given that this species plays a major role in the transmission of the virus, and using both periodic and reactive

  2. Perspectives on the development of a therapeutic HER-2 cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Renard, Valéry; Leach, Dana R

    2007-09-27

    With good reason, the majority of cancer vaccines tested, or being tested, have targeted the induction of anti-tumour CTL responses. However, the clinical success of monoclonal antibodies such as Rituximab/CD20, Trastuzumab/HER-2, Cetuximab/EGFR and Bevacisumab/VEGF suggests that their respective targets may also be relevant for cancer vaccines aiming at the induction of an effective humoral anti-tumour response to mimic, or potentially improve upon, the effects of monoclonal therapies. We report here an overview of the development of a protein vaccine targeting HER-2/neu, with an emphasis on the immunologic results obtained from the testing of the vaccine in animal models of disease and in toxicology programs, to its evaluation in three clinical trials in breast cancer patients.

  3. Cervical cancer screening of HPV vaccinated populations: Cytology, molecular testing, both or none.

    PubMed

    El-Zein, Mariam; Richardson, Lyndsay; Franco, Eduardo L

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer control includes primary prevention through vaccination to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and secondary prevention through screening to detect and treat cervical precancerous lesions. This review summarizes the evidence for the population impact of vaccines against oncogenic HPV types in reducing the prevalence of cervical precancerous lesions. We examine the gradual shift in screening technology from cervical cytology alone to cytology and HPV cotesting, and finally to the recognition that HPV testing can serve alone as the new screening paradigm, particularly in the initial post-vaccination era. We should expect an impact on screening performance and practices, as cohorts of HPV-vaccinated girls and adolescents reach cervical cancer screening age. In preparation for changes in the screening paradigm for the vaccination era, we propose that policymaking on cervical cancer screening should mirror current practices with other cancers as benchmarks. Cervical precancerous lesions will become a very rare condition following the widespread implementation of HPV vaccines with broader coverage in the number of preventable oncogenic types. Irrespective of screening technology, the false positive results will far outnumber the true positive ones, a tipping point that will herald a new period when the harms from cervical cancer screening will outweigh its benefits. We present a conceptual framework to guide decision making when we reach this point within 25-30 years.

  4. Communication strategies to promote the uptake of childhood vaccination in Nigeria: a systematic map

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Afiong; Oyo-Ita, Angela; Glenton, Claire; Fretheim, Atle; Ames, Heather; Muloliwa, Artur; Kaufman, Jessica; Hill, Sophie; Cliff, Julie; Cartier, Yuri; Bosch-Capblanch, Xavier; Rada, Gabriel; Lewin, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective communication is a critical component in ensuring that children are fully vaccinated. Although numerous communication interventions have been proposed and implemented in various parts of Nigeria, the range of communication strategies used has not yet been mapped systematically. This study forms part of the ‘Communicate to vaccinate’ (COMMVAC) project, an initiative aimed at building research evidence for improving communication with parents and communities about childhood vaccinations in low- and middle-income countries. Objective This study aims to: 1) identify the communication strategies used in two states in Nigeria; 2) map these strategies against the existing COMMVAC taxonomy, a global taxonomy of vaccination communication interventions; 3) create a specific Nigerian country map of interventions organised by purpose and target; and 4) analyse gaps between the COMMVAC taxonomy and the Nigerian map. Design We conducted the study in two Nigerian states: Bauchi State in Northern Nigeria and Cross River State in Southern Nigeria. We identified vaccination communication interventions through interviews carried out among purposively selected stakeholders in the health services and relevant agencies involved in vaccination information delivery; through observations and through relevant documents. We used the COMMVAC taxonomy to organise the interventions we identified based on the intended purpose of the communication and the group to which the intervention was targeted. Results The Nigerian map revealed that most of the communication strategies identified aimed to inform and educate and remind or recall. Few aimed to teach skills, enhance community ownership, and enable communication. We did not identify any intervention that aimed to provide support or facilitate decision-making. Many interventions had more than one purpose. The main targets for most interventions were caregivers and community members, with few interventions directed at

  5. Identification of peptides applicable as vaccines for HLA-A26-positive cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yamei; Terasaki, Yasunobu; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Noguchi, Masanori; Shichijo, Shigeki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2009-11-01

    One-fifth of the Japanese population is positive for HLA-A26, but few peptides are available as potential cancer vaccines for HLA-A26-positive cancer patients. The objective of this study was to identify peptide vaccine candidates for HLA-A26-positive cancer patients. The HLA-A*2601-crossbinding activity of 24 peptides currently under clinical trial as vaccines for HLA-A2, -A24, or HLA-A3 supertype-positive cancer patients was evaluated by stabilization assay. Three peptides with HLA-A2-binding activity could bind the HLA-A*2601 molecule. These three peptides induced HLA-A26-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes from HLA-A*2601-, -A*2602-, or -A*2603-positive prostate cancer patients against HLA-A*2601- and HLA-A*2603-positive cancer cells in CD8-dependent and peptide-specific manners. In addition, one peptide with HLA-A24-binding activity could bind to HLA-A*2601 and induced HLA-A26-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes from HLA-A*2601-, -A*2602-, or -A*2603-positive prostate cancer patients against HLA-A*2603-positive cancer cells. These results may provide novel information for the development of a peptide-based cancer vaccine for HLA-A26-positive patients.

  6. MHC class II tetramer analyses in AE37-vaccinated prostate cancer patients reveal vaccine-specific polyfunctional and long-lasting CD4(+) T-cells.

    PubMed

    Anastasopoulou, Eleftheria A; Voutsas, Ioannis F; Papamichail, Michael; Baxevanis, Constantin N; Perez, Sonia A

    2016-07-01

    Realizing the basis for generating long-lasting clinical responses in cancer patients after therapeutic vaccinations provides the means to further ameliorate clinical efficacy. Peptide cancer vaccines stimulating CD4(+) T helper cells are often promising for inducing immunological memory and persistent CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell responses. Recent reports from our clinical trial with the AE37 vaccine, which is a HER2 hybrid polypeptide, documented its efficacy to induce CD4(+) T cell immunity, which was associated with clinical improvements preferentially among HLA-DRB1*11(+) prostate cancer patients. Here, we performed in-depth investigation of the CD4(+) T cell response against the AE37 vaccine. We used the DR11/AE37 tetramer in combination with multicolor flow cytometry to identify and characterize AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells regarding memory and Tregs phenotype in HLA-DRB1*11(+) vaccinated patients. To verify vaccine-specific immunological memory in vivo, we also assessed AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells in defined CD4(+) memory subsets by cell sorting. Finally, vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells were assessed regarding their functional profile. AE37-specific memory CD4(+) T cells could be detected in peptide-stimulated cultures from prostate cancer patients following vaccination even 4 y post-vaccination. The vast majority of vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells exhibited a multifunctional, mostly Th1 cytokine signature, with the potential of granzyme B production. In contrast, we found relatively low frequencies of Tregs among AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells. This is the first report on the identification of vaccine-induced HER2-specific multifunctional long-lasting CD4(+) T cells in vaccinated prostate cancer patients.

  7. Recombinant Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins of Clostridium perfringens: Production Strategies and Applications as Veterinary Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Marcos Roberto A.; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal S. G.; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P.; Mendonça, Marcelo; Salvarani, Felipe M.; Moreira, Ângela N.; Conceição, Fabricio R.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a spore-forming, commensal, ubiquitous bacterium that is present in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans and animals. This bacterium produces up to 18 toxins. The species is classified into five toxinotypes (A–E) according to the toxins that the bacterium produces: alpha, beta, epsilon, or iota. Each of these toxinotypes is associated with myriad different, frequently fatal, illnesses that affect a range of farm animals and humans. Alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are the main causes of disease. Vaccinations that generate neutralizing antibodies are the most common prophylactic measures that are currently in use. These vaccines consist of toxoids that are obtained from C. perfringens cultures. Recombinant vaccines offer several advantages over conventional toxoids, especially in terms of the production process. As such, they are steadily gaining ground as a promising vaccination solution. This review discusses the main strategies that are currently used to produce recombinant vaccines containing alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins of C. perfringens, as well as the potential application of these molecules as vaccines for mammalian livestock animals. PMID:27879630

  8. Recombinant Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins of Clostridium perfringens: Production Strategies and Applications as Veterinary Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcos Roberto A; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal S G; Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P da; Mendonça, Marcelo; Salvarani, Felipe M; Moreira, Ângela N; Conceição, Fabricio R

    2016-11-21

    Clostridium perfringens is a spore-forming, commensal, ubiquitous bacterium that is present in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans and animals. This bacterium produces up to 18 toxins. The species is classified into five toxinotypes (A-E) according to the toxins that the bacterium produces: alpha, beta, epsilon, or iota. Each of these toxinotypes is associated with myriad different, frequently fatal, illnesses that affect a range of farm animals and humans. Alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are the main causes of disease. Vaccinations that generate neutralizing antibodies are the most common prophylactic measures that are currently in use. These vaccines consist of toxoids that are obtained from C. perfringens cultures. Recombinant vaccines offer several advantages over conventional toxoids, especially in terms of the production process. As such, they are steadily gaining ground as a promising vaccination solution. This review discusses the main strategies that are currently used to produce recombinant vaccines containing alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins of C. perfringens, as well as the potential application of these molecules as vaccines for mammalian livestock animals.

  9. T-Regulatory Cells and Vaccination "Pay Attention and Do Not Neglect Them": Lessons from HIV and Cancer Vaccine Trials.

    PubMed

    Brezar, Vedran; Godot, Véronique; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan; Lévy, Yves; Seddiki, Nabila

    2016-09-05

    Efficient vaccines are characterized by the establishment of long-lived memory T cells, including T-helper (effectors and follicular) and T-regulatory cells (Tregs). While the former induces cytotoxic or antibody responses, the latter regulates immune responses by maintaining homeostasis. The role of Tregs in inflammatory conditions is ambiguous and their systematic monitoring in vaccination along with effector T-cells is not instinctive. Recent studies from the cancer field clearly showed that Tregs suppress vaccine-induced immune responses and correlate with poor clinical benefit. In HIV infection, Tregs are needed during acute infection to preserve tissue integrity from an overwhelmed activation, but are not beneficial in chronic infection as they suppress anti-HIV responses. Current assays used to evaluate vaccine-induced specific responses are limited as they do not take into account antigen-specific Tregs. However, new assays, such as the OX40 assay, which allow for the simultaneous detection of a full range of Th-responses including antigen-specific Tregs responses, can overcome these issues. In this review article we will revise the role of Tregs in vaccination and review the recent work performed in the field, including the available tools to monitor them, from novel assays to humanized mouse models.

  10. Deriving effective vaccine allocation strategies for pandemic influenza: Comparison of an agent-based simulation and a compartmental model

    PubMed Central

    Dalgıç, Özden O.; Özaltın, Osman Y.; Ciccotelli, William A.; Erenay, Fatih S.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals are prioritized based on their risk profiles when allocating limited vaccine stocks during an influenza pandemic. Computationally expensive but realistic agent-based simulations and fast but stylized compartmental models are typically used to derive effective vaccine allocation strategies. A detailed comparison of these two approaches, however, is often omitted. We derive age-specific vaccine allocation strategies to mitigate a pandemic influenza outbreak in Seattle by applying derivative-free optimization to an agent-based simulation and also to a compartmental model. We compare the strategies derived by these two approaches under various infection aggressiveness and vaccine coverage scenarios. We observe that both approaches primarily vaccinate school children, however they may allocate the remaining vaccines in different ways. The vaccine allocation strategies derived by using the agent-based simulation are associated with up to 70% decrease in total cost and 34% reduction in the number of infections compared to the strategies derived by using the compartmental model. Nevertheless, the latter approach may still be competitive for very low and/or very high infection aggressiveness. Our results provide insights about potential differences between the vaccine allocation strategies derived by using agent-based simulations and those derived by using compartmental models. PMID:28222123

  11. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    PubMed Central

    Tandrup Schmidt, Signe; Foged, Camilla; Smith Korsholm, Karen; Rades, Thomas; Christensen, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the specific PRR

  12. Media Use and the Cancer Communication Strategies of Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Heesoo; Sohn, Minsung; Jung, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    Communication related to health not only substantially affects perceptions and behaviors related to health but is also positively associated with the extent of health-information seeking and the practice of preventive behavior. Despite the fact that the number of cancer survivors has increased dramatically, there are few studies of the lack of health information, factors which act as barriers, and the difficulties in follow-up care experienced by cancer survivors. Therefore, we reviewed media utilization and the types of media used by cancer survivors with regard to risk communication and suggested appropriate strategies for cancer communication. According to the results, health communication contributed to health promotion by providing health-related information, consolidating social support factors such as social solidarity and trust, and reducing anxiety. In particular, participatory health communication may establish preventive programs which reflect the needs of communities, expand accessibility to better quality healthcare, and intensify healthy living by reducing health inequalities. Therefore, when people do not have an intention to obtain cancer screening, we need to intervene to change their behavior, norms, and degrees of self-efficacy. The findings of this study may help those involved in building partnerships by assisting in their efforts to understand and communicate with the public. PMID:27722138

  13. Efficacy of DNA vaccines forming e7 recombinant retroviral virus-like particles for the treatment of human papillomavirus-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Lescaille, Geraldine; Pitoiset, Fabien; Macedo, Rodney; Baillou, Claude; Huret, Christophe; Klatzmann, David; Tartour, Eric; Lemoine, François M; Bellier, Bertrand

    2013-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in the development of anogenital tumors and also in the development of oropharyngeal head and neck carcinomas, where HPV-16, expressing the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is the most frequent serotype. Although vaccines encoding L1 and L2 capsid HPV proteins are efficient for the prevention of HPV infection, they are inadequate for treating established tumors. Hence, development of innovative vaccine therapies targeting E6/E7 is important for controlling HPV-induced cancers. We have engineered a nononcogenic mutated E7-specific plasmo-retroVLP vaccine (pVLP-E7), consisting of plasmid DNA, that is able to form recombinant retrovirus-based virus-like particles (VLPs) that display E7 antigen into murine leukemia virus Gag proteins pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G). pVLP-E7 vaccinations were studied for their ability to generate specific immune responses and for induction of protective immunity against tumor cell challenge in preventive and therapeutic models. The produced VLPs induce the maturation of human dendritic cells in vitro and mount specific E7 T cell responses. Intradermic vaccinations of mice with pVLP-E7 show their efficacy to generate antigen-specific T cell responses, to prevent and protect animals from early TC-1 tumor development compared with standard DNA or VLP immunizations. The vaccine efficacy was also evaluated for advanced tumors in mice vaccinated at various time after the injection of TC-1 cells. Data show that pVLP-E7 vaccination can cure mice with already established tumors only when combined with Toll-like receptor-7 (TLR7) and TLR9 agonists. Our findings provide evidence that pVLPs, combining the advantages of DNA and VLP vaccines, appear to be a promising strategy for the treatment of HPV-induced cancers.

  14. Human papillomavirus prevalence in oropharyngeal cancer before vaccine introduction, United States.

    PubMed

    Steinau, Martin; Saraiya, Mona; Goodman, Marc T; Peters, Edward S; Watson, Meg; Cleveland, Jennifer L; Lynch, Charles F; Wilkinson, Edward J; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Copeland, Glen; Saber, Maria S; Hopenhayn, Claudia; Huang, Youjie; Cozen, Wendy; Lyu, Christopher; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2014-05-01

    We conducted a study to determine prevalence of HPV types in oropharyngeal cancers in the United States and establish a prevaccine baseline for monitoring the impact of vaccination. HPV DNA was extracted from tumor tissue samples from patients in whom cancer was diagnosed during 1995-2005. The samples were obtained from cancer registries and Residual Tissue Repository Program sites in the United States. HPV was detected and typed by using PCR reverse line blot assays. Among 557 invasive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, 72% were positive for HPV and 62% for vaccine types HPV16 or 18. Prevalence of HPV-16/18 was lower in women (53%) than in men (66%), and lower in non-Hispanic Black patients (31%) than in other racial/ethnic groups (68%-80%). Results indicate that vaccines could prevent most oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, but their effect may vary by demographic variables.

  15. NGcGM3 Ganglioside: A Privileged Target for Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Luis E.; Gabri, Mariano R.; Guthmann, Marcelo D.; Gomez, Roberto E.; Gold, Silvia; Fainboim, Leonardo; Gomez, Daniel E.; Alonso, Daniel F.

    2010-01-01

    Active specific immunotherapy is a promising field in cancer research. N-glycolyl (NGc) gangliosides, and particularly NGcGM3, have received attention as a privileged target for cancer therapy. Many clinical trials have been performed with the anti-NGc-containing gangliosides anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody racotumomab (formerly known as 1E10) and the conjugated NGcGM3/VSSP vaccine for immunotherapy of melanoma, breast, and lung cancer. The present paper examines the role of NGc-gangliosides in tumor biology as well as the available preclinical and clinical data on these vaccine products. A brief discussion on the relevance of prioritization of cancer antigens in vaccine development is also included. PMID:21048926

  16. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence in Oropharyngeal Cancer before Vaccine Introduction, United States

    PubMed Central

    Saraiya, Mona; Goodman, Marc T.; Peters, Edward S.; Watson, Meg; Cleveland, Jennifer L.; Lynch, Charles F.; Wilkinson, Edward J.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Copeland, Glen; Saber, Maria S.; Hopenhayn, Claudia; Huang, Youjie; Cozen, Wendy; Lyu, Christopher; Unger, Elizabeth R.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a study to determine prevalence of HPV types in oropharyngeal cancers in the United States and establish a prevaccine baseline for monitoring the impact of vaccination. HPV DNA was extracted from tumor tissue samples from patients in whom cancer was diagnosed during 1995–2005. The samples were obtained from cancer registries and Residual Tissue Repository Program sites in the United States. HPV was detected and typed by using PCR reverse line blot assays. Among 557 invasive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, 72% were positive for HPV and 62% for vaccine types HPV16 or 18. Prevalence of HPV-16/18 was lower in women (53%) than in men (66%), and lower in non-Hispanic Black patients (31%) than in other racial/ethnic groups (68%–80%). Results indicate that vaccines could prevent most oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, but their effect may vary by demographic variables. PMID:24751181

  17. Low Mutation Burden in Ovarian Cancer May Limit the Utility of Neoantigen-Targeted Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Scott D.; Wick, Darin A.; Nielsen, Julie S.; Kroeger, David R.; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; Holt, Robert A.; Nelson, Brad H.

    2016-01-01

    Due to advances in sequencing technology, somatically mutated cancer antigens, or neoantigens, are now readily identifiable and have become compelling targets for immunotherapy. In particular, neoantigen-targeted vaccines have shown promise in several pre-clinical and clinical studies. However, to date, neoantigen-targeted vaccine studies have involved tumors with exceptionally high mutation burdens. It remains unclear whether neoantigen-targeted vaccines will be broadly applicable to cancers with intermediate to low mutation burdens, such as ovarian cancer. To address this, we assessed whether a derivative of the murine ovarian tumor model ID8 could be targeted with neoantigen vaccines. We performed whole exome and transcriptome sequencing on ID8-G7 cells. We identified 92 somatic mutations, 39 of which were transcribed, missense mutations. For the 17 top predicted MHC class I binding mutations, we immunized mice subcutaneously with synthetic long peptide vaccines encoding the relevant mutation. Seven of 17 vaccines induced robust mutation-specific CD4 and/or CD8 T cell responses. However, none of the vaccines prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice in either the prophylactic or therapeutic setting. Moreover, none of the neoantigen-specific T cell lines recognized ID8-G7 tumor cells in vitro, indicating that the corresponding mutations did not give rise to bonafide MHC-presented epitopes. Additionally, bioinformatic analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas data revealed that only 12% (26/220) of HGSC cases had a ≥90% likelihood of harboring at least one authentic, naturally processed and presented neoantigen versus 51% (80/158) of lung cancers. Our findings highlight the limitations of applying neoantigen-targeted vaccines to tumor types with intermediate/low mutation burdens. PMID:27192170

  18. Immune adjuvants as critical guides directing immunity triggered by therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Virgil; Tartour, Eric; Michalek, Jaroslav; Stathopoulos, Apostolos; Dobrovolskienė, Neringa T; Strioga, Marius M

    2014-04-01

    Tumor growth is controlled by natural antitumor immune responses alone or by augmented immune reactivity resulting from different forms of immunotherapy, which has demonstrated clinical benefit in numerous studies, although the overall percentage of patients with durable clinical responses remains limited. This is attributed to the heterogeneity of the disease, the inclusion of late-stage patients with no other treatment options and advanced tumor-associated immunosuppression, which may be consolidated by certain types of chemotherapy. Despite variable responsiveness to distinct types of immunotherapy, therapeutic cancer vaccination has shown meaningful efficacy for a variety of cancers. A key step during cancer vaccination involves the appropriate modeling of the functional state of dendritic cells (DCs) capable of co-delivering four critical signals for proper instruction of tumor antigen-specific T cells. However, the education of DCs, either directly in situ, or ex vivo by various complex procedures, lacks standardization. Also, it is questioned whether ex vivo-prepared DC vaccines are superior to in situ-administered adjuvant-guided vaccines, although both approaches have shown success. Evaluation of these variables is further complicated by a lack of consensus in evaluating vaccination clinical study end points. We discuss the role of signals needed for the preparation of classic in situ and modern ex vivo DC vaccines capable of proper reprogramming of antitumor immune responses in patients with cancer.

  19. Strategies and actions of multi-purpose health communication on vaccine preventable infectious diseases in order to increase vaccination coverage in the population: The ESCULAPIO project.

    PubMed

    Bechini, Angela; Bonanni, Paolo; Lauri, Sara; Tiscione, Emilia; Levi, Miriam; Prato, Rosa; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Domenico; Gasparini, Roberto; Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Coppola, Rosa Cristina; Pellizzari, Barbara; Tabacchi, Garden; Costantino, Claudio; Vitale, Francesco; Iannazzo, Stefania; Boccalini, Sara

    2017-02-01

    The ESCULAPIO Project aims at increasing awareness on vaccine preventable infectious diseases (VPID) and vaccinations in different target populations and to spread the culture of prevention. Information/training interventions on VPID have been developed and health promotion activities for the general population, students and their parents, teachers and health care workers (HCWs) were set up. In Tuscany, educational courses on VPID in high schools were organized and students were stimulated to prepare informative materials on VPID for lower grade school pupils. In Liguria, an educational card game (named 'Vaccine at the Fair') was presented to children of primary schools. Stands in shopping centers were used in Palermo to distribute the regional vaccination schedule and gadgets, also providing indications on reliable websites where to find correct information on vaccinations. A music video played by health care workers (HCWs) was created and used in the University Hospital of Cagliari to promote the anti-flu vaccination campaign in HCWs. In Apulia, meetings with the general population were organized to collect controversial issues about vaccinations and a national call center was launched to create a direct line from the general population to experts in vaccines and vaccination strategies. In Veneto, meetings in the birth centers and home visits for subjects refusing vaccination have been organized. All activities are useful and effective tools to increase knowledge about VPID and confidence in vaccination, which are crucial aspects in order to increase vaccine uptake. The project was funded by the Italian Ministry of Health, Center for Disease Prevention and Control (CCM) in 2013.

  20. Using quality improvement methods to increase use of pain prevention strategies for childhood vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Schurman, Jennifer Verrill; Deacy, Amanda D; Johnson, Rebecca J; Parker, Jolynn; Williams, Kristi; Wallace, Dustin; Connelly, Mark; Anson, Lynn; Mroczka, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    AIM To increase evidence-based pain prevention strategy use during routine vaccinations in a pediatric primary care clinic using quality improvement methodology. METHODS Specific intervention strategies (i.e., comfort positioning, nonnutritive sucking and sucrose analgesia, distraction) were identified, selected and introduced in three waves, using a Plan-Do-Study-Act framework. System-wide change was measured from baseline to post-intervention by: (1) percent of vaccination visits during which an evidence-based pain prevention strategy was reported as being used; and (2) caregiver satisfaction ratings following the visit. Additionally, self-reported staff and caregiver attitudes and beliefs about pain prevention were measured at baseline and 1-year post-intervention to assess for possible long-term cultural shifts. RESULTS Significant improvements were noted post-intervention. Use of at least one pain prevention strategy was documented at 99% of patient visits and 94% of caregivers were satisfied or very satisfied with the pain prevention care received. Parents/caregivers reported greater satisfaction with the specific pain prevention strategy used [t(143) = 2.50, P ≤ 0.05], as well as greater agreement that the pain prevention strategies used helped their children’s pain [t(180) = 2.17, P ≤ 0.05] and that they would be willing to use the same strategy again in the future [t(179) = 3.26, P ≤ 0.001] as compared to baseline. Staff and caregivers also demonstrated a shift in attitudes from baseline to 1-year post-intervention. Specifically, staff reported greater agreement that the pain felt from vaccinations can result in harmful effects [2.47 vs 3.10; t(70) = -2.11, P ≤ 0.05], less agreement that pain from vaccinations is “just part of the process” [3.94 vs 3.23; t(70) = 2.61, P ≤ 0.05], and less agreement that parents expect their children to experience pain during vaccinations [4.81 vs 4.38; t(69) = 2.24, P ≤ 0.05]. Parents/caregivers reported

  1. Novel human vaccine strategies and the 5th Framework Programme: pushing the envelope.

    PubMed

    Tagliabue, Aldo; Cesaroni, Maria Paola; Lewis, David J M

    2003-06-01

    Mucosal vaccines could result in a great scientific and practical achievement. More than three decades of research in experimental models have shown promising results in stimulating mucosal immune responses, thus, it was expected that within a short time mucosal vaccines for human use could be achieved. Indeed this is not being the case. In the last few years, the most important oral vaccine, the anti-polio developed by Sabin in the fifties, has been progressively abandoned in developed countries to avoid the few cases of disease caused by the vaccine. Furthermore, two recently developed mucosal vaccines for human use against rotavirus diarrhoea and influenza were withdrawn after a short period in the market because of adverse reactions among the vaccinees. This controversial situation has created a difficult future for research on mucosal vaccine at the industrial level. A great help and encouragement for believers in mucosal vaccines has been given by the EU Commission through the 5th Framework Programme (5FP). At the end of the first projects of the 5FP, it is quite clear that mucosal vaccines are experiencing a real renaissance. The Euroconference/Workshop "Novel Strategies of Mucosal Immunisation through Exploitation of Mechanisms of Innate Immunity in Pathogen-Host Interaction", organised under the sponsorship of the EU Commission and reported in this special issue of Vaccine, witnesses a very creative moment of European groups involved in mucosal immunology. This conclusive paper of the issue is intended to describe a positive experience of some European scientists that have been working together in organised fashion within two EU projects. The first, defined by the acronym MUCIMM, was aimed to pave the way to tackle mucosal vaccines with different approaches, mainly that of new delivery systems and adjuvants, that of dissecting the fine mechanisms of basic mucosal responses and that of obtaining meaningful assays to measure human immune responses to mucosal

  2. A Platform for Designing Genome-Based Personalized Immunotherapy or Vaccine against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudheer; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Kumar, Rahul; Kumar, Shailesh; Sehgal, Manika; Nagpal, Gandharva

    2016-01-01

    Due to advancement in sequencing technology, genomes of thousands of cancer tissues or cell-lines have been sequenced. Identification of cancer-specific epitopes or neoepitopes from cancer genomes is one of the major challenges in the field of immunotherapy or vaccine development. This paper describes a platform Cancertope, developed for designing genome-based immunotherapy or vaccine against a cancer cell. Broadly, the integrated resources on this platform are apportioned into three precise sections. First section explains a cancer-specific database of neoepitopes generated from genome of 905 cancer cell lines. This database harbors wide range of epitopes (e.g., B-cell, CD8+ T-cell, HLA class I, HLA class II) against 60 cancer-specific vaccine antigens. Second section describes a partially personalized module developed for predicting potential neoepitopes against a user-specific cancer genome. Finally, we describe a fully personalized module developed for identification of neoepitopes from genomes of cancerous and healthy cells of a cancer-patient. In order to assist the scientific community, wide range of tools are incorporated in this platform that includes screening of epitopes against human reference proteome (http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/cancertope/). PMID:27832200

  3. Mature autologous dendritic cell vaccines in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a phase I pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Overall therapeutic outcomes of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are poor. The dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy has been developed as a new strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and immunologic responses in use in mature, antigen-pulsed autologous DC vaccine in NSCLC patients. Methods Five HLA-A2 patients with inoperable stage III or IV NSCLC were selected to receive two doses of 5 × 107 DC cells administered subcutaneous and intravenously two times at two week intervals. The immunologic response, safety and tolerability to the vaccine were evaluated by the lymphoproliferation assay and clinical and laboratorial evolution, respectively. Results The dose of the vaccine has shown to be safe and well tolerated. The lymphoproliferation assay showed an improvement in the specific immune response after the immunization, with a significant response after the second dose (p = 0.005). This response was not long lasting and a tendency to reduction two weeks after the second dose of the vaccine was observed. Two patients had a survival almost twice greater than the expected average and were the only ones that expressed HER-2 and CEA together. Conclusion Despite the small sample size, the results on the immune response, safety and tolerability, combined with the results of other studies, are encouraging to the conduction of a large clinical trial with multiples doses in patients with early lung cancer who underwent surgical treatment. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN45563569 PMID:21682877

  4. HPV Infection in Cervical and Other Cancers in Saudi Arabia: Implication for Prevention and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Alsbeih, Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is closely associated with cervical cancer that the incidence of this tumor is regarded as a surrogate marker for HPV infection in countries lacking epidemiological studies. HPV is also implicated in subsets of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. Although cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, its reported incidence is low in Saudi Arabia, ranking number 12 between all cancers in females and accounts only for 2.4% of all new cases, despite the lack of national screening programs. However, the limited available studies from Saudi Arabia indicate that HPV prevalence and genotypes’ distribution in invasive cervical cancer show similar pattern as in the world. Cytology screening (Pap smear) and HPV vaccinations are the two preventive measures against cervical cancer. The two available vaccines are effective against the two most common HPV genotypes (HPV-16 and -18). Since 92% of cervical tumors in the Kingdom are infected with HPV of which 78% are HPV-16 and -18 genotypes, vaccination is expected to protect against more than two-third of cervical cancers in Saudi Arabia. Nevertheless, due to its low incidence (2.1/100,000 women), a proper cost-effectiveness analysis is required to justify the implementation of a costly vaccine bearing in mind that HPV could potentially be associated with about 3% of all cancers. However, further studies are needed to ascertain the real prevalence of HPV at the population level at large, its association with various types of cancers, and also the impact of local tradition and emerging behavioral trends that could affect HPV transmission and consequently the effectiveness of applying national vaccination program. PMID:24744990

  5. Perception of Human Papillomavirus Infection, Cervical Cancer and HPV Vaccination in North Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Showket; Nasare, Vilas; Kumari, Malasha; Sharma, Shashi; Khan, Mohammad Aijaz; Das, Bhudev C.; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2014-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) -associated cervical cancer is the second-most common cancer in women worldwide but it is the most frequent gynaecological cancer and cancer associated death in India women. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge about cervical cancer, HPV, HPV vaccine, HPV vaccine acceptance among school and undergraduates students and their parent’s perception about acceptance of HPV vaccine in Northern part of India (Delhi and NCR regions). Materials and Methods A qualitative questionnaire based survey among 2500 urban/rural students aged 12–22 years was conducted. Results Overall, a low frequency (15%) of HPV and cervical cancer awareness was observed in students and their parents. However, the awareness was much higher in females belonging to urban setup compared to boys with a perception that HPV causes cervical cancer in women only. Additionally, only (13%) participants who were aware of cervical cancer and HPV) were willing to accept HPV vaccination. Apparently, parents of female students were two times more willing to accept HPV vaccination for their ward than male students (p<0.001; OR 95%CI = 2.09 (1.58–2.76). Conclusion Cervical cancer and HPV awareness among school, undergraduate students and also to their parents was found to be very low in this part of India. The level of awareness and education appears to be insignificant determinants in rural compared to urban setup. Better health education will be needed to maximize public awareness for cervical cancer prevention. PMID:25386964

  6. Development Of A Vaccine Targeting Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    15%; p=0.001) (Fig 5). To choose peptides for the multi - epitope vaccine that induced increased IFN-g without inducing IL-10, we created a...chosen for the multi - epitope vaccine . Though not in the top four peptides , p1311-1325 was chosen to be included since it was very similar to p1307...a multi - epitope vaccine . Vaccination with peptides p1166-1181, p1212-1227, p1301-1316, 1307-1322 and p1311- 1326 in C3T(ag) mice demonstrated a

  7. Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics: news.

    PubMed

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2013-10-01

    Infant rotavirus vaccination provides for herd immunity Nonreplicating sporozoite vaccine protects humans against malaria Personalized brain cancer vaccine enters phase 2 trial Novel implantable therapeutic cancer vaccine to be tested in humans Clostridium difficile vaccine candidate successful in phase 1 CDC reports strong uptake of HPV vaccine in boys Whooping cough outbreak in Texas.

  8. Plant-based vaccines: novel and low-cost possible route for Mediterranean innovative vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Ata, Aboul-Ata E; Vitti, Antonella; Nuzzaci, Maria; El-Attar, Ahmad K; Piazzolla, Giuseppina; Tortorella, Cosimo; Harandi, Ali M; Olson, Olof; Wright, Sandra A; Piazzolla, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    A plant bioreactor has enormous capability as a system that supports many biological activities, that is, production of plant bodies, virus-like particles (VLPs), and vaccines. Foreign gene expression is an efficient mechanism for getting protein vaccines against different human viral and nonviral diseases. Plants make it easy to deal with safe, inexpensive, and provide trouble-free storage. The broad spectrum of safe gene promoters is being used to avoid risk assessments. Engineered virus-based vectors have no side effect. The process can be manipulated as follows: (a) retrieve and select gene encoding, use an antigenic protein from GenBank and/or from a viral-genome sequence, (b) design and construct hybrid-virus vectors (viral vector with a gene of interest) eventually flanked by plant-specific genetic regulatory elements for constitutive expression for obtaining chimeric virus, (c) gene transformation and/or transfection, for transient expression, into a plant-host model, that is, tobacco, to get protocols processed positively, and then moving into edible host plants, (d) confirmation of protein expression by bioassay, PCR-associated tests (RT-PCR), Northern and Western blotting analysis, and serological assay (ELISA), (e) expression for adjuvant recombinant protein seeking better antigenicity, (f) extraction and purification of expressed protein for identification and dosing, (g) antigenicity capability evaluated using parental or oral delivery in animal models (mice and/or rabbit immunization), and (h) growing of construct-treated edible crops in protective green houses. Some successful cases of heterologous gene-expressed protein, as edible vaccine, are being discussed, that is, hepatitis C virus (HCV). R9 mimotope, also named hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), was derived from the HVR1 of HCV. It was used as a potential neutralizing epitope of HCV. The mimotope was expressed using cucumber mosaic virus coat protein (CP), alfalfa mosaic virus CP P3/RNA3, and

  9. Knowledge and acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Martha P; Dune, Tanaka; Shetty, Prasanna K; Shetty, Avinash K

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in India; however, participation in prevention and screening is low and the reasons for this are not well understood. In a cross-sectional survey in August 2008, 202 healthy women in Karnataka, India completed a questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Factors associated with vaccination and Papanicolau (Pap) smear screening acceptance were explored. Thirty-six percent of women had heard of HPV while 15% had heard of cervical cancer. Five percent of women reported ever having a Pap smear, and 4% of women felt at risk of HPV infection. Forty-six percent of women were accepting of vaccination, but fewer (21%) were willing to have a Pap smear. Overall, knowledge related to HPV and cervical cancer topics was low. Women with negative attitudes toward HPV infection were 5.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-10) times more likely to accept vaccination but were not significantly more likely to accept Pap smear (odds ratio 1.5, 95% CI 0.7-3.0). Cost and a low level of perceived risk were the most frequent factors cited as potential barriers. Improving awareness of HPV and cervical cancer through health care providers in addition to increasing access to vaccination and screening through government-sponsored programs may be feasible and effective methods to reduce cervical cancer burden in India.

  10. Organic chemistry and immunochemical strategies in the design of potent carbohydrate-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Roy, René; Shiao, Tze Chieh

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview of carbohydrate antigens processing and uptakes involved in the adaptive immune system is highlighted. To counter balance the poor immunogenicity and T-cell independent characteristics of carbohydrate antigens, chemists have developed original hybrid molecules aimed at targeting specific competent immune cell receptors. Amongst several potential vaccine candidates dedicated against diseases, this short report will focused on those most advance and state of the art organic chemistry involved therein. One case has led to the first example of a commercial vaccine entirely prepared from a synthetic carbohydrate antigen against infections caused by the Gram-negative bacteria Haemophilus influenza type b responsible for pneumonia and acute bacterial meningitis in infants. Other commendable examples will illustrate the immunochemical strategies engaged in the development of anticancer carbohydrate-based vaccines.

  11. Rational design of vaccine targets and strategies for HIV: a crossroad of statistical physics, biology, and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Arup K.; Barton, John P.

    2017-03-01

    Vaccination has saved more lives than any other medical procedure. Pathogens have now evolved that have not succumbed to vaccination using the empirical paradigms pioneered by Pasteur and Jenner. Vaccine design strategies that are based on a mechanistic understanding of the pertinent immunology and virology are required to confront and eliminate these scourges. In this perspective, we describe just a few examples of work aimed to achieve this goal by bringing together approaches from statistical physics with biology and clinical research.

  12. Rational design of vaccine targets and strategies for HIV: a crossroad of statistical physics, biology, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arup K; Barton, John P

    2017-03-01

    Vaccination has saved more lives than any other medical procedure. Pathogens have now evolved that have not succumbed to vaccination using the empirical paradigms pioneered by Pasteur and Jenner. Vaccine design strategies that are based on a mechanistic understanding of the pertinent immunology and virology are required to confront and eliminate these scourges. In this perspective, we describe just a few examples of work aimed to achieve this goal by bringing together approaches from statistical physics with biology and clinical research.

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a cervical cancer vaccine in five Latin American countries.

    PubMed

    Colantonio, Lisandro; Gómez, Jorge A; Demarteau, Nadia; Standaert, Baudouin; Pichón-Rivière, Andrés; Augustovski, Federico

    2009-09-04

    Implementation of cervical cancer (CC) vaccination in Latin America is expected to reduce the high CC burden in those countries. But the efficiency of such vaccination programs in the region still remains unknown. This study assesses the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of introducing vaccination into the current CC disease management of five Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru). The modelling results indicate that universal mass vaccination is cost-effective in the current health care setting of each country (<3x gross domestic product per capita, per country) with a substantial number of CC cases and deaths avoided in addition to an increase of quality-adjusted life years. This study will help guide the design of future clinical programmes and health-related policies. It will assist early and effective decision-making processes related to vaccine implementation in Latin America.

  14. Modelling influenza A H5N1 vaccination strategy scenarios in the household poultry sector in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Masry, Ihab; Rijks, Jolianne; Peyre, Marisa; Taylor, Nick; Lubroth, Juan; Jobre, Yilma

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) due to H5N1 virus was first reported in Egypt in February 2006; since then, the government has allowed avian influenza vaccination in poultry. The present study evaluated the impact of AI vaccination in terms of cumulative annual flock immunity (CAFI): the percentage of bird × weeks protected by immunity. This evaluation took account of the combined effects of vaccination coverage, vaccine efficacy (VE), and different characteristics of household poultry production on the effectiveness of the adopted vaccination strategy (VS), and provided alternative options for improvement. The evaluation used a population and vaccination model that calculates the CAFI. Participatory approaches were employed in 21 villages to develop the vaccination and flock parameters required for the model. The adopted VS were compared in the model with three alternative VS scenarios in terms of the CAFI. Vaccination coverage varied among villages but was generally low (between 1 and 48 %; median 14 %). Under the adopted VS, the CAFI predicted for the villages ranged from 2 to 31 %. It was concluded that despite the enormous effort put into rural household poultry AI vaccination by the Egyptian government, village CAFI is unlikely to be maintained at the levels required to significantly reduce the virus load and restrict transmission. In HPAI-endemic countries that consider AI vaccination as one of the disease control options, the high cost of mass AI vaccination campaigns and their achievable benefits must be compared with other available control measures, which may include targeted vaccination. Achievable vaccination coverage, VE and the different characteristics of commercial and household (village) poultry production are key parameters determining the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of different AI vaccination strategies.

  15. Human papillomavirus vaccines and cervical cancer: awareness, knowledge, and risk perception among Turkish undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Rathfisch, Gülay; Güngör, İlkay; Uzun, Ece; Keskin, Özlem; Tencere, Zeliha

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate awareness, knowledge, and risk perception about human papillomavirus (HPV), cervical cancer, and HPV vaccines among undergraduate students in Turkey. The convenience sample of this descriptive cross-sectional study consisted of 605 undergraduate students in Istanbul University during a semester. Demographic characteristics of students, their reproductive health and lifestyle behaviors, and knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccine were questioned using self-administered forms. The overall proportion of students who had heard about HPV infection was 48.8%, while the proportion of students who had heard of the HPV vaccine was 44.5%. Forty eight percent of females and 60% of males reported never having heard of the HPV. Only 45.7% of females had knowledge about HPV as a cause of genital warts, and 58.1% correctly indicated that HPV caused cervical cancer. The majority of students in both genders (>80%) knew that the infection is primarily transmitted through sexual intercourse. Females were more concerned than males about having cervical/penile cancer associated with HPV in the future. Only 46.4% of females and 39% of males reported having heard of the HPV vaccine. The majority of the female and male students did not know who should get the HPV vaccine and when to get vaccinated. Among males, 25.8% reported that they would consider getting vaccinated (if available) and 38.4% intended to vaccinate their children. Turkish undergraduate students had a low to moderate level of knowledge regarding HPV infection and HPV vaccine. In order to increase awareness about HPV and develop positive behaviors, young people should be provided with accurate information through educational activities in the community and health care services.

  16. A new immunization and treatment strategy for mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) associated cancers

    PubMed Central

    Braitbard, Ori; Roniger, Maayan; Bar-Sinai, Allan; Rajchman, Dana; Gross, Tamar; Abramovitch, Hillel; Ferla, Marco La; Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Chiara M.; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Hochman, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) causes mammary carcinoma or lymphoma in mice. An increasing body of evidence in recent years supports its involvement also in human sporadic breast cancer. It is thus of importance to develop new strategies to impair the development, growth and metastasis of MMTV-associated cancers. The signal peptide of the envelope precursor protein of this virus: MMTV-p14 (p14) is an excellent target for such strategies, due to unique characteristics distinct from its regular endoplasmic reticulum targeting function. These include cell surface expression in: murine cancer cells that harbor the virus, human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells that ectopically express p14, as well as cultured human cells derived from an invasive ductal breast carcinoma positive for MMTV sequences. These findings support its use in signal peptide-based immune targeting. Indeed, priming and boosting mice with p14 elicits a specific anti-signal peptide immune response sufficient for protective vaccination against MMTV-associated tumors. Furthermore, passive immunization using a combination of anti-p14 monoclonal antibodies or the transfer of T-cells from immunized mice (Adoptive Cell Transfer) is also therapeutically effective. With reports demonstrating involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer, we propose the immune-mediated targeting of p14 as a strategy for prevention, treatment and diagnosis of MMTV-associated cancers. PMID:26934560

  17. Maternal Antibodies: Clinical Significance, Mechanism of Interference with Immune Responses, and Possible Vaccination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Neonates have an immature immune system, which cannot adequately protect against infectious diseases. Early in life, immune protection is accomplished by maternal antibodies transferred from mother to offspring. However, decaying maternal antibodies inhibit vaccination as is exemplified by the inhibition of seroconversion after measles vaccination. This phenomenon has been described in both human and veterinary medicine and is independent of the type of vaccine being used. This review will discuss the use of animal models for vaccine research. I will review clinical solutions for inhibition of vaccination by maternal antibodies, and the testing and development of potentially effective vaccines. These are based on new mechanistic insight about the inhibitory mechanism of maternal antibodies. Maternal antibodies inhibit the generation of antibodies whereas the T cell response is usually unaffected. B cell inhibition is mediated through a cross-link between B cell receptor (BCR) with the Fcγ-receptor IIB by a vaccine–antibody complex. In animal experiments, this inhibition can be partially overcome by injection of a vaccine-specific monoclonal IgM antibody. IgM stimulates the B cell directly through cross-linking the BCR via complement protein C3d and antigen to the complement receptor 2 (CR2) signaling complex. In addition, it was shown that interferon alpha binds to the CD21 chain of CR2 as well as the interferon receptor and that this dual receptor usage drives B cell responses in the presence of maternal antibodies. In lieu of immunizing the infant, the concept of maternal immunization as a strategy to protect neonates has been proposed. This approach would still not solve the question of how to immunize in the presence of maternal antibodies but would defer the time of infection to an age where infection might not have such a detrimental outcome as in neonates. I will review successful examples and potential challenges of implementing this concept. PMID

  18. A Universal Influenza Vaccine Can Lead to Disease Exacerbation or Viral Control Depending on Delivery Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bernelin-Cottet, Cindy; Deloizy, Charlotte; Stanek, Ondrej; Barc, Céline; Bouguyon, Edwige; Urien, Céline; Boulesteix, Olivier; Pezant, Jérémy; Richard, Charles-Adrien; Moudjou, Mohammed; Da Costa, Bruno; Jouneau, Luc; Chevalier, Christophe; Leclerc, Claude; Sebo, Peter; Bertho, Nicolas; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The development of influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines, which elicits cross-strain immunity against seasonal and pandemic viruses is a major public health goal. As pigs are susceptible to human, avian, and swine-adapted IAV, they would be key targets of so called universal IAV vaccines, for reducing both the zoonotic risk and the economic burden in the swine industry. They also are relevant preclinical models. However, vaccination with conserved IAV antigens (AGs) in pigs was reported to elicit disease exacerbation. In this study, we assessed whether delivery strategies, i.e., dendritic cell (DC) targeting by the intradermal (ID) or intramuscular (IM) routes, impact on the outcome of the vaccination with three conserved IAV AGs (M2e, NP, and HA2) in pigs. The AGs were addressed to CD11c by non-covalent binding to biotinylated anti-CD11c monoclonal antibody. The CD11c-targeted AGs given by the ID route exacerbated disease. Conversely, CD11c-targeted NP injected by the IM route promoted T cell response compared to non-targeted NP. Furthermore, the conserved IAV AGs injected by the IM route, independently of DC targeting, induced both a reduction of viral shedding and a broader IgG response as compared to the ID route. Our findings highlight in a relevant animal species that the route of vaccine delivery impacts on the protection induced by conserved IAV AGs and on vaccine adverse effects. Finally, our results indicate that HA2 stands as the most promising conserved IAV AG for universal vaccine development. PMID:28082980

  19. Immunological efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine strategies in HIV-infected adults: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sadlier, C; O'Dea, S; Bennett, K; Dunne, J; Conlon, N; Bergin, C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immunologic response to a prime-boost immunization strategy combining the 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) with the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) versus the PPSV23 alone in HIV-infected adults. HIV-infected adults were randomized to receive PCV13 at week 0 followed by PPSV23 at week 4 (n = 31, prime-boost group) or PPSV23 alone at week 4 (n = 33, PPSV23-alone group). Serotype specific IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) and functional oposonophagocytic (OPA) geometric mean titer (GMT) were compared for 12 pneumococcal serotypes shared by both vaccines at week 8 and week 28. The prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥2-fold increase in IgG GMC and a GMC >1 ug/ml at week 8 (odds ratio (OR) 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46-2.74, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.40-2.70, p < 0.01). Similarly, the prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥4-fold increase in GMT at week 8 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.22-2.39, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.15-2.3, p < 0.01). This study adds to evidence supporting current pneumococcal vaccination recommendations combining the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines in the United States and Europe for HIV-infected individuals.

  20. Anal Cancer: An Examination of Radiotherapy Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Lim, Faye

    2011-04-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9811, ACCORD-03, and ACT II Phase III trials in anal cancer showed no benefit for cisplatin-based induction and maintenance chemotherapy, or radiation dose-escalation >59 Gy. This review examines the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation (CRT) in anal cancer, and discusses potential alternative radiotherapy strategies. The evidence for the review was compiled from randomized and nonrandomized trials of radiation therapy and CRT. A total of 103 retrospective/observational studies, 4 Phase I/II studies, 16 Phase II prospective studies, 2 randomized Phase II studies, and 6 Phase III trials of radiotherapy or chemoradiation were identified. There are no meta-analyses based on individual patient data. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach for all stages of anal cancer is inappropriate. Early T1 tumors are probably currently overtreated, whereas T3/T4 lesions might merit escalation of treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy or the integration of biological therapy may play a role in future.

  1. Assessment of national strategies for control of high-pathogenicity avian influenza and low-pathogenicity notifiable avian influenza in poultry, with emphasis on vaccines and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Swayne, D E; Pavade, G; Hamilton, K; Vallat, B; Miyagishima, K

    2011-12-01

    programmes, accounting for 8.1% of the total H5/H7 AI vaccine usage, as compared to 91.9% of the vaccine used against HPAI. Of the six countries that have used vaccine to control LPNAI, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador and Italy have been the biggest users. In countries with enzootic HPAI and LPNAI, development and implementation of exit strategies has been difficult.

  2. Invasive and in situ cervical cancer reported to the vaccine adverse event reporting system (VAERS).

    PubMed

    Wong, Charlene; Krashin, Jamie; Rue-Cover, Alison; Saraiya, Mona; Unger, Elizabeth; Calugar, Angela; Markowitz, Lauri

    2010-03-01

    The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was recommended in 2006 for routine vaccination of 11 or 12-year-old girls, with catchup through age 26 years, for the prevention of genital HPV-related diseases. The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) is a national spontaneous surveillance system of adverse events following vaccination in the United States. The objective of this study was to identify and review VAERS reports of invasive and in situ cervical cancer in women immunized with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine. A VAERS database search was performed to identify such cases reported in the United States from January 1, 2006, through April 9, 2009. Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) search terms used were "cervix carcinoma," "cervix carcinoma stage 0," "cervix carcinoma stage III," "carcinoma in situ," and "cervical dysplasia." Case inclusion required a report to contain a clear statement of a cervical carcinoma or carcinoma in situ diagnosis on any screening or diagnostic test after at least one dose of the HPV vaccine. All reports were reviewed by two investigators. Four VAERS reports for MedDRA term "cervix carcinoma," one for "cervix carcinoma stage 0," none for "cervix carcinoma stage III," three for "carcinoma in situ," and 53 for "cervical dysplasia" were identified. Of these, three cases of carcinoma in situ and one case of microinvasive cervical cancer met study inclusion criteria. Cases of cervical cancer and precancers are not unexpected in vaccinated women. Cervical cancer screening continues to be important, even for women who have received the HPV vaccine.

  3. Emerging human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Barbara; Maraj, Bharat; Tran, Nam Phuong; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Alvarez, Ronald D; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the etiologic factor of cervical, anogenital, and a subset of head and neck cancers has stimulated the development of preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines to control HPV-associated malignancies. Excitement has been generated by the commercialization of two preventive L1-based vaccines, which use HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) to generate capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, factors such as high cost and requirement for cold chain have prevented widespread implementation where they are needed most. Areas covered Next generation preventive HPV vaccine candidates have focused on cost-effective stable alternatives and generating broader protection via targeting multivalent L1 VLPs, L2 capsid protein, and chimeric L1/L2 VLPs. Therapeutic HPV vaccine candidates have focused on enhancing T cell-mediated killing of HPV-transformed tumor cells, which constitutively express HPV-encoded proteins, E6 and E7. Several therapeutic HPV vaccines are in clinical trials. Expert opinion Although progress is being made, cost remains an issue inhibiting the use of preventive HPV vaccines in countries that carry the majority of the cervical cancer burden. In addition, progression of therapeutic HPV vaccines through clinical trials may require combination strategies employing different therapeutic modalities. As research in the development of HPV vaccines continues, we may generate effective strategies to control HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:23163511

  4. Effect of human papillomavirus vaccination on cervical cancer screening in Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong; Bell, Christopher; Sun, Maggie; Kliewer, Gordon; Xu, Linan; McInerney, Maria; Svenson, Lawrence W.; Yang, Huiming

    2016-01-01

    Background: A school-based program with quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was implemented in Alberta in 2008. We assessed the impact of this program on Pap test cytology results using databases of province-wide vaccination and cervical cancer screening. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study involving a cohort of women in Alberta born between 1994 and 1997 who had at least 1 Pap test between 2012 and 2015. Women with negative cytology results were controls. Women with low-grade (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) and high-grade (atypical squamous cells, cannot rule out a high-grade lesion; or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) cervical abnormalities were cases. Exposure status was assigned according to records of HPV vaccination. Odds ratios (ORs) for abnormal cytology results by vaccination status were adjusted for neighbourhood income, laboratory service, rural versus urban residency, and age. Results: The total study population was 10 204. Adjusting for age, vaccinated women had a higher screening rate than unvaccinated women (13.0% v. 11.4%, p < 0.001). Among women who received full vaccination (≥ 3 doses), the adjusted OR for cervical abnormalities was 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.63–0.82). For high-grade lesions, the adjusted OR was 0.50 (95% CI 0.30–0.85). With 2-dose HPV vaccination, the adjusted OR for cervical abnormalities was 1.08 (95% CI 0.84–1.38). Interpretation: Quadrivalent HPV vaccination significantly reduced high-grade cervical abnormalities but required 3 doses. Vaccination against HPV was associated with screening uptake. Population-based vaccination and screening programs should work together to optimize cervical cancer prevention. PMID:27378467

  5. Clinical evaluation of CpG oligonucleotides as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Scheiermann, Julia; Klinman, Dennis M

    2014-11-12

    Synthetic oligonucleotides (ODN) that express unmethylated "CpG motifs" trigger cells that express Toll-like receptor 9. In humans this includes plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B cells. CpG ODN induce an innate immune response characterized by the production of Th1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Their utility as vaccine adjuvants was evaluated in a number of clinical trials. Results indicate that CpG ODN improve antigen presentation and the generation of vaccine-specific cellular and humoral responses. This work provides an up-to-date overview of the utility of CpG ODN as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious agents and cancer.

  6. Clinical evaluation of CpG oligonucleotides as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious diseases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scheiermann, Julia; Klinman, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides (ODN) that express unmethylated “CpG motifs” trigger cells that express Toll-like receptor 9. In humans this includes plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B cells. CpG ODN induce an innate immune response characterized by the production of Th1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Their utility as vaccine adjuvants was evaluated in a number of clinical trials. Results indicate that CpG ODN improve antigen presentation and the generation of vaccine-specific cellular and humoral responses. This work provides an up-to-date overview of the utility of CpG ODN as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious agents and cancer. PMID:24975812

  7. Human papillomavirus vaccination: the policy debate over the prevention of cervical cancer--a commentary.

    PubMed

    Hoops, Katherine E M; Twiggs, Leo B

    2008-07-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) family causes a variety of benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions in men and women. HPV types 16 and 18 are responsible for causing 70% of all cases of cervical cancer each year. Recently, a vaccine that can prevent cervical cancer by protecting women from infection with the most common types of HPV has been made available. Following Food and Drug Administration approval and endorsement by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it is the right and the duty of the state legislatures to implement vaccination programs. This vaccine, a vaccine for a sexually transmitted disease, has stirred a fierce debate. Religion and sexuality have dominated the discussion, and political calculations are inherent to the process; nonetheless, epidemiological analyses are also essential to the decision to mandate the HPV vaccine. HPV vaccine program implementation processes are at many stages in many states, and programs vary widely. Some provide information to families, whereas others allot a range of funding for voluntary vaccination. Virginia is, thus far, the only state to have enacted a mandate. This article discusses the various programs in place, the proposed legislation, and the debate surrounding the political process.

  8. Transcription factor Fos-related antigen 1 is an effective target for a breast cancer vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yunping; Zhou, He; Mizutani, Masato; Mizutani, Noriko; Reisfeld, Ralph A.; Xiang, Rong

    2003-07-01

    Protection against breast cancer was achieved with a DNA vaccine against murine transcription factor Fos-related antigen 1, which is overexpressed in aggressively proliferating D2F2 murine breast carcinoma. Growth of primary s.c. tumor and dissemination of pulmonary metastases was markedly suppressed by this oral DNA vaccine, carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium, encoding murine Fos-related antigen 1, fused with mutant polyubiquitin, and cotransformed with secretory murine IL-18. The life span of 60% of vaccinated mice was tripled in the absence of detectable tumor growth after lethal tumor cell challenge. Immunological mechanisms involved activation of T, natural killer, and dendritic cells, as indicated by up-regulation of their activation markers and costimulatory molecules. Markedly increased specific target cell lysis was mediated by both MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cells and natural killer cells isolated from splenocytes of vaccinated mice, including a significant release of proinflammatory cytokines IFN- and IL-2. Importantly, fluorescence analysis of fibroblast growth factor 2 and tumor cell-induced vessel growth in Matrigel plugs demonstrated marked suppression of angiogenesis only in vaccinated animals. Taken together, this multifunctional DNA vaccine proved effective in protecting against growth and metastases of breast cancer by combining the action of immune effector cells with suppression of tumor angiogenesis. vaccine | tumor | metastases | antiangiogenesis

  9. Human papillomavirus related cervical cancer and anticipated vaccination challenges in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, TeweldeTesfaye

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women in Ethiopia. This may be due to the high prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) genotypes in the population. So far, few studies have been done that showed the presence of HR-HPV genotypes. The HR-HPV-16, -18, -52, -56, -31 and -58 were the most common genotypes reported in Ethiopia. The introduction of HPV vaccines in Ethiopia is likely to go a long way in reducing cervical cancer deaths. However, there are few challenges to the introduction of the vaccines. The target population for HPV vaccination is at the moment not well-defined. Besides, the current HPV vaccines confer only type-specific (HPV-16 and -18) immunity, leaving a small proportion of Ethiopian women unprotected against other HR-HPV genotypes such as 52, 56, 31 and 58. Thus, future HPV vaccines such as the nanovalent vaccine may be more useful to Ethiopia as they will protect women against more genotypes.

  10. Human papillomavirus related cervical cancer and anticipated vaccination challenges in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gebremariam, TeweldeTesfaye

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women in Ethiopia. This may be due to the high prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) genotypes in the population. So far, few studies have been done that showed the presence of HR-HPV genotypes. The HR-HPV-16, -18, -52, -56, -31 and -58 were the most common genotypes reported in Ethiopia. The introduction of HPV vaccines in Ethiopia is likely to go a long way in reducing cervical cancer deaths. However, there are few challenges to the introduction of the vaccines. The target population for HPV vaccination is at the moment not well-defined. Besides, the current HPV vaccines confer only type-specific (HPV-16 and -18) immunity, leaving a small proportion of Ethiopian women unprotected against other HR-HPV genotypes such as 52, 56, 31 and 58. Thus, future HPV vaccines such as the nanovalent vaccine may be more useful to Ethiopia as they will protect women against more genotypes. PMID:27004064

  11. Prophylactic vaccine approach for colon and pancreatic cancers: present and future.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, N B; Mohammed, A; Bronze, M S; Rao, C V

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines against cancers have not been as effective as vaccines against infectious diseases. However, recent studies have advanced our understanding of the stages of tumor cell development and of mechanisms of immune surveillance, immune suppression, and of tumor escape from the immune system. The development of animal models that mimic development of human cancers has helped advance the understanding of these processes and is aiding the development of greatly improved vaccines. Here we review the recent progress in developing vaccines and prophylactic approaches for pancreatic and colon cancers. Improved understanding of the expression of various oncogenes and tumor-associated antigens helps in selecting antigenic targets for stage-specific immune prevention. Identification of the earliest alterations in precancerous lesions and selection of epitopes unique to the aberrant cells and capable of triggering strong cytotoxic and helper T cell responses may aid the development of safe and effective vaccines for use in those at high risk of progressing to invasive cancers. The responses can be enhanced with carefully selected adjuvants to boost immunity and by selecting epitopes that are expressed on dendritic cells, thereby promoting T cell responses. Tumor resistance via loss of the targeted antigen can be mitigated by inclusion of multiple tumor epitopes in vaccine constructs. Tumor immune escape can be diminished by targeting various immunosuppressive mechanisms used by different tumors, such as tumor production of immunosuppressive cytokines (e.g., interleukin 10, and Transforming Growth Factor-beta, which can promote activity of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells), or by inhibiting production of inflammatory prostanoids with combined cyclooxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitors. Finally, prevention of many cancers may be enhanced by carefully selecting and scheduling of vaccine administration in combination with other chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents

  12. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-based cancer vaccines: recent patents and antitumor effects from experimental models to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Mario; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Izzi, Valerio; Masuelli, Laura; Sacchetti, Pamela; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a glycosylated protein of MW 180 kDa, is overexpressed in a wide range of human carcinomas, including colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, non-small cell lung and breast carcinomas. Accordingly, CEA is one of several oncofetal antigens that may serve as a target for active anti-cancer specific immunotherapy. Experimental results obtained by employing animal models have supported the design of clinical trials using a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of different types of human cancers. This review reports findings from experimental models and clinical evidence on the use of a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of cancer patients. Among the diverse CEA-based cancer vaccines, DCs- and recombinant viruses-based vaccines seem the most valid. However, although vaccination was shown to induce a strong immune response to CEA, resulting in a delay in tumor progression and prolonged survival in some cancer patients, it failed to eradicate the tumor in most cases, owing partly to the negative effect exerted by the tumor microenvironment on immune response. Thus, in order to develop more efficient and effective cancer vaccines, it is necessary to design new clinical trials combining cancer vaccines with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and drugs which target those factors responsible for immunosuppression of immune cells. This review also discusses relevant patents relating to the use of CEA as a cancer vaccine.

  13. Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Mediated by Listeria -Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David J. Chung, M D , Ph D...CONTRACT NUMBER Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria -Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy 5b...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to study the immunomodulatory effect of Listeria on

  14. Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria-Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    by Listeria -Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David J. Chung, MD, PhD...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Evaluation of Immune Responses Mediated by Listeria -Stimulated Human Dendritic Cells: Implications for Cancer Vaccine...ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to study the immunomodulatory effect of Listeria on human dendritic cells (DCs) to optimize Listeria - based

  15. Cervical Cancer and Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge and Acceptance of Vaccination among Medical Students in Southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adejuyigbe, Funmilayo F; Balogun, M R; Balogun, Balogun R; Sekoni, Adekemi O; Adegbola, Adebukola A

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the commonest viral sexually transmitted infection in the world and the leading cause of cervical cancer. Medical students as future healthcare providers will play a role in influencing patients' decision to receive HPV vaccination. This study was aimed at determining the knowledge of cervical cancer and HPV as well as the acceptance of HPV vaccination among medical students of the University of Lagos. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among 280 medical students sampled using stratified sampling technique. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect relevant data. Most respondents were aware of cervical cancer (95.4%), HPV (85.4%) and HPV vaccination (69.3%) and the most common source of information was school teaching. Good knowledge of cervical cancer, HPV and HPV vaccination was demonstrated by 51.8%, 67.1% and 21.1% respectively; only 39.6% fully accepted HPV vaccination. Inadequate information and high costs were the obstacles identified to receiving vaccine and recommending it to others. Older age and higher levels of study were significantly associated with good knowledge of HPV. Good knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccination respectively were significantly associated with full acceptance of vaccination. There is need for more education on cervical cancer, HPV infection and HPV vaccination for the medical students via school teaching and other media, and inclusion of the HPV vaccine in the National Program on Immunization to improve access.

  16. Gene-based vaccines and immunotherapeutic strategies against neurodegenerative diseases: Potential utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Kudrna, Jeremy J; Ugen, Kenneth E

    2015-01-01

    There has been a recent expansion of vaccination and immunotherapeutic strategies from controlling infectious diseases to the targeting of non-infectious conditions including neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to conventional vaccine and immunotherapeutic modalities, gene-based methods that express antigens for presentation to the immune system by either live viral vectors or non-viral naked DNA plasmids have been developed and evaluated. This mini-review/commentary summarizes the advantages and disadvantages, as well as the research findings to date, of both of these gene-based vaccination approaches in terms of how they can be targeted against appropriate antigens within the Alzheimer and Parkinson disease pathogenesis processes as well as potentially against targets in other neurodegenerative diseases. Most recently, the novel utilization of these viral vector and naked DNA gene-based technologies includes the delivery of immunoglobulin genes from established biologically active monoclonal antibodies. This modified passive immunotherapeutic strategy has recently been applied to deliver passive antibody immunotherapy against the pathologically relevant amyloid β protein in Alzheimer disease. The advantages and disadvantages of this technological application of gene-based immune interventions, as well as research findings to date are also summarized. In sum, it is suggested that further evaluation of gene based vaccines and immunotherapies against neurodegenerative diseases are warranted to determine their potential clinical utility.

  17. Enhanced immunogenicity and antitumour effects with heterologous prime-boost regime using vaccines based on MG7-Ag mimotope of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, T; Liang, S; Meng, F; Han, Q; Guo, C; Sun, L; Chen, Y; Liu, Z; Yu, Z; Xie, H; Ding, J; Fan, D

    2006-05-01

    MG7-Ag, gastric cancer-associated antigen, has been shown to be immunogenic and has been used as marker molecule for prognosis. In a previous study, we developed an oral DNA vaccine based on MG7-Ag mimotope. However, we failed to detect cellular immune response using the oral MG7-Ag mimotope DNA vaccine. To induce significant T cell response, we developed a recombinant adenovirus vaccine based on MG7-Ag mimotope and evaluated the efficacy and protective effects of heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol with an oral DNA vaccine previously developed. We found that both vaccines were able to elicit a significant humoral response against MG7-Ag, while the highest serum titre MG7 antibody was detected in mice immunized with the heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol. Enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay demonstrated that the heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy was more efficient in inducing T cell response than the homologous prime-boost strategy. In the tumour challenge assay, 2 of 5 mice immunized with the heterologous prime-boost protocol were tumour free, while none of the mice in homologous prime-boost groups or control groups was tumour free. Those tumour-bearing mice in the heterologous prime-boost regime had smaller tumour masses than their counterparts in the homologous prime-boost groups or control groups. Therefore, our study suggests that vaccines against MG7-Ag induce significant immune response against gastric cancer, and that the heterologous prime-boost protocol using different types of vaccines could achieve better protective effect than the homologous prime-boost protocol.

  18. Immunology and breast cancer: toward a new way of understanding breast cancer and developing novel therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Isabelle; Azim, Hatem A; Ignatiadis, Michail; Sotiriou, Christos

    2015-06-01

    Every cancer triggers an immune response that constitutes an important first-line protection against cancer progression. In breast cancer, there is an increasing awareness of the relationship between the immune system and tumor evolution. The tumor microenvironment is composed of a variety of immune cells that can control or arrest malignant progression. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy have been shown to modulate this immune microenvironment. Recently, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes have emerged as a predictive and prognostic biomarker in early breast cancer. In addition, immune gene expression signatures have been shown to be associated with prognosis in triple-negative and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer. Such findings have increased interest in the development of immunotherapeutic agents for breast cancer, and multiple clinical trials of anticancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors are ongoing. In this review, we summarize what is known about the relationship between immunity and breast carcinoma, explore the relevance of this information to the clinical and research settings, and give a portrait of new therapeutic strategies using immunotherapy in breast cancer.

  19. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide1826 combined with radioresistant cancer cell vaccine confers significant antitumor effects.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, X B; Xing, N; Zhang, Q; Yuan, S J; Chen, W; Qiao, T K

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a hot issue in cancer research over the years and tumor cell vaccine is one of the increasing number of studies. Although the whole tumor cell vaccine can provide the best source of immunizing antigens, there is still a limitation that most tumors are not naturally immunogenic. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs), synthetic oligonucleotides containing a cytosine-phosphate-guanine(CpG) motif, was shown to enhance immune responses to a wide variety of antigens. In this study, we generated the radioresistant Lewis lung cancer cell by repeated X-ray radiation and inactivated it as a whole tumor cell vaccine to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cell vaccine. Mice were subcutaneously immunized with this inactivated vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 and then inoculated with autologous Lewis lung cancer (LLC) to estimate the antitumor efficacy. The results showed that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 could significantly inhibit tumor growth, increased survival of the mice and with 20% of the mice surviving tumor free in vivo compared with the unimmunized mice bearing LLC tumor. A significant increase of apoptosis was also observed in the tumor prophylactically immunized with vaccine of inactivated radioresistant tumor cell plus CpG ODN1826. The potent antitumor effect correlated with higher secretion levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α) and lower levels of interleukin-10(IL-10) concentration in serum. Furthermore, the results suggested that the antitumor mechanism was probably depended on the decreased level of programmed death ligand-1(PD-L1) which plays an important role in the negative regulation of immune response by the inhibition of tumor antigen-specific T cell activation. These findings clearly demonstrated that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 as an appropriate adjuvant could induce effective antitumor immunity in vivo.

  20. Comparison of depopulation and S19-RB51 vaccination strategies for control of bovine brucellosis in high prevalence areas.

    PubMed

    Saez, J L; Sanz, C; Durán, M; García, P; Fernandez, F; Minguez, O; Carbajo, L; Mardones, F; Perez, A; Gonzalez, S; Dominguez, L; Alvarez, J

    2014-06-21

    RB51 vaccination can minimise the diagnostic problems associated with S19 vaccination of adult cattle, but its use for bovine brucellosis (BB) control remains controversial. Here, the evolution of BB prevalence in five high prevalence areas in Spain subjected to different control measures is described: herd depopulation of infected herds (I-III) or mass vaccination with RB51 and S19-RB51 vaccination of replacement heifers (IV-V). Annual data from the eradication campaigns were analysed at the special incidence area (SIA) level and the time to obtain herd prevalence levels of <1 per cent ('controlled status') was obtained at the local veterinary unit (LVU) level and compared using Cox's proportional hazard model. A higher annual rate of decrease in herd prevalence was observed in the SIAs subjected to vaccination (46.9%, 95% CI 43.5% to 50.0%) compared with those managed using stamping out (14.9%, 95% CI 9.6% to 19.9%). No significant differences in the time to achieve controlled status were observed between the stamping-out and vaccination strategies used at the LVU level, with median times of 60 (stamping-out LVUs) and 63 (vaccination LVUs) months. These results suggest that RB51 mass vaccination, in combination with the S19-RB51 vaccination of replacement heifers and strict implementation of other eradication measures, may provide results at least comparable with those resulting from a herd depopulation based strategy.

  1. Prioritization of pandemic influenza vaccine: rationale and strategy for decision making.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Benjamin; Orenstein, Walter A

    2009-01-01

    Few catastrophes can compare with the global impact of a severe influenza pandemic. The 1918-1919 pandemic was associated with more than 500,000 deaths in the USA and an estimated 20-40 million deaths worldwide, though some place the global total much higher. In an era when infectious disease mortality had been steadily decreasing, the 1918-1919 pandemic caused a large spike in overall population mortality, temporarily reversing decades of progress. The US Department of Health and Human Services, extrapolating from the 1918-1919 pandemic to the current US population size and demographics, has estimated that a comparable pandemic today would result in almost two million deaths. Vaccination is an important component of a pandemic response. Public health measures such as reduction of close contacts with others, improved hygiene, and respiratory protection with facemasks or respirators can reduce the risk of exposure and illness (Germann et al. 2006; Ferguson et al. 2006), but would not reduce susceptibility among the population. Prophylaxis with antiviral medications also may prevent illness but depends on the availability of large antiviral drug stockpiles and also does not provide long-term immunity. By contrast, immunization with a well-matched pandemic vaccine would provide active immunity and represent the most durable pandemic response. However, given current timelines for the development of a pandemic influenza vaccine and its production capacity, vaccine is likely not to be available in sufficient quantities to protect the entire population before pandemic outbreaks occur, and thus potentially limited stocks may need to be prioritized. This chapter reviews information on influenza vaccine production capacity, describes approaches used in the USA to set priorities for vaccination in the setting of limited supply, and presents a proposed strategy for prioritization.

  2. Application of SCR priming VLP boosting as a novel vaccination strategy against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Seyed Mehdi; Zabihollahi, Rezvan; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Memarnejadian, Arash; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Parivar, Kazem

    2011-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection is a worldwide health problem and a protective vaccine is desperately needed to control the AIDS pandemics. To address this concern, we previously constructed single-cycle replicable (SCR) HIV-1 virions, which completely maintained the antigenic structures of HIV-1. Herein, to optimize a vaccination strategy, we studied the immunogenicity of produced SCR virions and adjuvant-formulated HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) in homologous and heterologous prime-boosting regimens. Accordingly, BALB/c mice received three doses of immunogens in 3-week intervals and their immune responses were evaluated using ELISA, cytokine and IFN-γ ELISpot assays. These analyses not only indicated the superiority of SCR prime-VLP boosting for strong induction of specific IFN-γ producing cells, but also showed the capability of this strategy over the others for better stimulation of humoral response, which was evidenced with the detection of highest titer of total IgG against HIV ENV glycoprotein. Furthermore, determination of IgG subclasses and IFN-γ/IL4 secretion ratio in cultured splenocytes demonstrated the efficient augmentation of mixed responses with the dominancy of Th1 immunity following SCR/VLP immunization strategy. Our results additionally pointed towards the applicability of Montanide ISA 720 + CpG as a potent Th1-directing adjuvant mixture. Overall, this study suggests SCR prime-VLP boosting as a promising approach in HIV vaccine development.

  3. Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus Infection, Cervical Cancer and Willingness to pay for Cervical Cancer Vaccination among Ethnically Diverse Medical Students in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Rajiah, Kingston; Num, Kelly Sze Fang; Yong, Ng Jin

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of medical students and determine variation between different cultural groups. A secondary aim was to find out the willingness to pay for cervical cancer vaccination and the relationships between knowledge and attitudes towards Human Papillomavirus vaccination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a private medical university between June 2014 and November 2014 using a convenient sampling method. A total of 305 respondents were recruited and interviewed with standard questionnaires for assessment of knowledge, attitudes and practice towards human papilloma virus and their willingness to pay for HPV vaccination. Knowledge regarding human papilloma virus, human papilloma virus vaccination, cervical cancer screening and cervical cancer risk factors was good. Across the sample, a majority (90%) of the pupils demonstrated a high degree of knowledge about cervical cancer and its vaccination. There were no significant differences between ethnicity and the participants' overall knowledge of HPV infection, Pap smear and cervical cancer vaccination. Some 88% of participants answered that HPV vaccine can prevent cervical cancer, while 81.5% of medical students said they would recommend HPV vaccination to the public although fewer expressed an intention to receive vaccination for themselves.

  4. [Cancer vaccine therapy using genetically modified induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells expressing the TAA gene].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Hiromitsu; Ojima, Toshiyasu; Nakamori, Mikihito; Nakamura, Masaki; Hayata, Keiji; Katsuda, Masahiro; Iida, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Motoki; Iwahashi, Makoto; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2013-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the difficulty in obtaining a sufficient number of functional dendritic cells (DCs) poses a serious problem in DC-based immunotherapy. Therefore, we used induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived DCs (iPSDCs) instead. If the therapeutic efficacy of iPSDCs was equivalent to that of bone marrow-derived DCs( BMDCs), then the above-mentioned problems may be solved. In this study, we generated iPSDCs from iPS cells and compared their capacity to mature and migrate to the regional lymph nodes with that of BMDCs. We adenovirally transduced the hgp100 gene, which codes for a natural tumor antigen, into the DCs and immunized the mice with these genetically modified DCs. The cytotoxic activity of CD8( +) cytotoxic T lymphocytes( CTLs) was assayed using a 51Cr-release assay. The therapeutic efficacy of the vaccination was examined in a subcutaneous tumor model. Our results demonstrated that iPSDCs equaled BMDCs in terms of their maturation and migration capacity. Furthermore, hgp100-specific CTLs were generated in mice that were immunized with the genetically modified iPSDCs. These CTLs exhibited a high level of cytotoxicity against B16 cells, which is similar to that exhibited by CTLs generated in BMDCs immunized mice. Moreover, vaccination with genetically modified iPSDCs elicited a high level of therapeutic efficacy equaling that of vaccination with BMDCs. This study clarified experimentally that genetically modified iPSDCs are equivalent to BMDCs in terms of tumor-associated antigen-specific therapeutic antitumor immunity. This vaccination strategy may therefore be useful for future clinical application as a cancer vaccine.

  5. Are age-based strategies effective in increasing influenza vaccination coverage?: the Spanish experience.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Herńndez-Barrera, Valentín; Rodríguez-Rieiro, Cristina; de Andrés, Ana López; Miguel-Diez, Javier de; Trujillo, Isabel Jimenez; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of applying age-based strategies to improve influenza vaccination coverage in Spain. We described and compared influenza vaccination coverage from 2003 to 2010 between those Spanish autonomous regions (AR) that lowered the age limit to 60 y and those regions that maintained the limit at 65 y. We used data collected from two surveys covering a representative sample of the Spanish population aged ≥ 16 y [Spanish National Health Survey (SNHS) 2003/2004 and the European Health Survey for Spain (EHSS) 2009/2010]. The study population (persons aged ≥ 60 y) comprised 7,496 persons in the SNHS and 7,686 in the EHSS. In 2010, those AR which had reduced the age limit had higher coverage for all age groups analyzed-regardless of the presence of associated chronic conditions-than AR which continued vaccination for those ≥ 65 y. The greatest differences appeared in individuals aged 60 to 64 y (36.9% vs. 24.4% for individuals without chronic conditions, 59.1% vs. 52.9% for those with chronic conditions, and 43.3% vs. 32.3% for the entire age group). Multivariate analysis showed that those AR which lowered the age limit increased total coverage for all age groups, specifically among individuals with chronic conditions aged 60 to 64 y (IRR 1.18; 95% CI, 1.01-1.54) and ≥ 65 y (IRR 1.07; 95% CI, 1.00-1.14). No significant changes were observed over time for the AR that continued vaccinating people aged ≥ 65 y. Our results suggest that age-based strategies are effective for improving influenza vaccination coverage in Spain.

  6. Principles of Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zepp, Fred

    2016-01-01

    While many of the currently available vaccines have been developed empirically, with limited understanding on how they activate the immune system and elicit protective immunity, the recent progress in basic sciences like immunology, microbiology, genetics, and molecular biology has fostered our understanding on the interaction of microorganisms with the human immune system. In consequence, modern vaccine development strongly builds on the precise knowledge of the biology of microbial pathogens, their interaction with the human immune system, as well as their capacity to counteract and evade innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Strategies engaged by pathogens strongly determine how a vaccine should be formulated to evoke potent and efficient protective immune responses. The improved knowledge of immune response mechanisms has facilitated the development of new vaccines with the capacity to defend against challenging pathogens and can help to protect individuals particular at risk like immunocompromised and elderly populations. Modern vaccine development technologies include the production of highly purified antigens that provide a lower reactogenicity and higher safety profile than the traditional empirically developed vaccines. Attempts to improve vaccine antigen purity, however, may result in impaired vaccine immunogenicity. Some of such disadvantages related to highly purified and/or genetically engineered vaccines yet can be overcome by innovative technologies, such as live vector vaccines, and DNA or RNA vaccines. Moreover, recent years have witnessed the development of novel adjuvant formulations that specifically focus on the augmentation and/or control of the interplay between innate and adaptive immune systems as well as the function of antigen-presenting cells. Finally, vaccine design has become more tailored, and in turn has opened up the potential of extending its application to hitherto not accessible complex microbial pathogens plus providing new

  7. Strategies and Advancements in Harnessing the Immune System for Gastric Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Subhash, Vinod Vijay; Yeo, Mei Shi; Tan, Woei Loon; Yong, Wei Peng

    2015-01-01

    In cancer biology, cells and molecules that form the fundamental components of the tumor microenvironment play a major role in tumor initiation, and progression as well as responses to therapy. Therapeutic approaches that would enable and harness the immune system to target tumor cells mark the future of anticancer therapy as it could induce an immunological memory specific to the tumor type and further enhance tumor regression and relapse-free survival in cancer patients. Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortalities that has a modest survival benefit from existing treatment options. The advent of immunotherapy presents us with new approaches in gastric cancer treatment where adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, and antibody therapies have all been used with promising outcomes. In this paper, we review the current advances and prospects in the gastric cancer immunotherapy. Special focus is laid on new strategies and clinical trials that attempt to enhance the efficacy of various immunotherapeutic modalities in gastric cancer. PMID:26579545

  8. Error-Prone PCR-Based Mutagenesis Strategy for Rapidly Generating High-Yield Influenza Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jianqiang; Wen, Feng; Xu, Yifei; Zhao, Nan; Long, Liping; Sun, Hailiang; Yang, Jialiang; Cooley, Jim; Pharr, G. Todd; Webby, Richard; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is the primary strategy for the prevention and control of influenza outbreaks. However, the manufacture of influenza vaccine requires a high-yield seed strain, and the conventional methods for generating such strains are time consuming. In this study, we developed a novel method to rapidly generate high-yield candidate vaccine strains by integrating error-prone PCR, site-directed mutagenesis strategies, and reverse genetics. We used this method to generate seed strains for the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and produced six high-yield candidate strains. We used a mouse model to assess the efficacy of two of the six candidate strains as a vaccine seed virus: both strains provided complete protection in mice against lethal challenge, thus validating our method. Results confirmed that the efficacy of these candidate vaccine seed strains was not affected by the yield-optimization procedure. PMID:25899178

  9. Gene expression profiling in vaccine therapy and immunotherapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bedognetti, Davide; Wang, Ena; Sertoli, Mario Roberto; Marincola, Francesco M

    2012-01-01

    The identification of tumor antigens (TA) recognized by T cells led to the design of therapeutic strategies aimed at eliciting adaptive-immune responses. The last decade experience has shown that, although active immunization can induce enhancement of anti-cancer T cell precursors (easily detectable in standard assays), most often they are unable to induce tumor regression and, consequently, have scarce impact on overall survival. Moreover, in the few occasions when tumor rejection occurs, the mechanisms determining this phenomenon remain poorly understood, and data derived from in vivo human observations are rare. The advent of high-throughput gene expression analysis (microarrays) has cast new lights on unrecognized mechanisms that are now deemed as central for the development of an efficient immune-mediated tumor rejection. The aim of this article is to review the data about the molecular signature associated with this process. We believe that the description of how the mechanism of immune-mediated tissue destruction occurs would contribute to understand why it happens, thereby allowing to develop more effective immune-therapeutic strategies. PMID:20518712

  10. Improving antigenic peptide vaccines for cancer immunotherapy using a dominant tumor-specific T cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Jordan, Kimberly R; Munson, Daniel J; Moore, Brandon L; Kappler, John W; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-11-15

    Vaccines that incorporate peptide mimics of tumor antigens, or mimotope vaccines, are commonly used in cancer immunotherapy and function by eliciting increased numbers of T cells that cross-react with the native tumor antigen. Unfortunately, they often elicit T cells that do not cross-react with or that have low affinity for the tumor antigen. Using a high affinity tumor-specific T cell clone, we identified a panel of mimotope vaccines for the dominant peptide antigen from a mouse colon tumor that elicits a range of tumor protection following vaccination. The TCR from this high affinity T cell clone was rarely identified in ex vivo evaluation of tumor-specific T cells elicited by mimotope vaccination. Conversely, a low affinity clone found in the tumor and following immunization was frequently identified. Using peptide libraries, we determined if this frequently identified TCR improved the discovery of efficacious mimotopes. We demonstrated that the representative TCR identified more protective mimotopes than the high affinity TCR. These results suggest that targeting a dominant fraction of tumor-specific T cells generates potent immunity and that consideration of the available T cell repertoire is necessary for targeted T cell therapy. These results have important implications when optimizing mimotope vaccines for cancer immunotherapy.

  11. Prophylactic vaccination targeting ERBB3 decreases polyp burden in a mouse model of human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bautz, David J.; Sherpa, Ang T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prophylactic vaccination is typically utilized for the prevention of communicable diseases such as measles and influenza but, with the exception of vaccines to prevent cervical cancer, is not widely used as a means of preventing or reducing the incidence of cancer. Here, we utilize a peptide-based immunotherapeutic approach targeting ERBB3, a pseudo-kinase member of the EGFR/ERBB family of receptor tyrosine kinases, as a means of preventing occurrence of colon polyps. Administration of the peptide resulted in a significant decrease in the development of intestinal polyps in C57BL/6J-ApcMin mice, a model of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). In addition, even though they were not vaccinated, ApcMin offspring born to vaccinated females developed significantly fewer polyps than offspring born to control females. Lastly, to validate ERBB as a valid target for vaccination, we found no overt toxicity, increases in apoptosis, or morphological changes in tissues where Erbb3 was ablated in adult mice. These results indicate that prophylactic vaccination targeting ERBB3 could prevent the development of colon polyps in an at-risk patient population. PMID:28197371

  12. Fusogenic oncolytic herpes simplex viruses as a potent and personalized cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi-Xiang; Liu, Guohong; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2012-07-01

    The recent FDA approval of Sipuleucel-T for the treatment of prostate cancer represents an important milestone of cancer immunotherapy, which, for the first time, validates the concept of bringing true clinical benefit to cancer patients by stimulating patients' own anti-tumor immunity. Among the different experimental cancer immunotherapies, oncolytic virotherapy may represent a low-cost yet potent and personalized cancer vaccine for the treatment of solid tumors. This review describes the constructions of several human herpes simplex virus (HSV)-derived oncolytic viruses as candidate cancer vaccines, which induce specific and potent anti-tumor immunity in pre-clinical models, and thus resulting in stronger overall anti-tumor efficacy as compared to oncolytic effect alone. This article also describes the approaches to enhance the antitumor immunity of oncolytic HSVs, and in particular, the key role played by integrating membrane-fusion activity into these viruses. Additionally, this article reviews the potential effect of certain chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. cyclophosphamide) in boosting antitumor immunity induced by oncolytic HSV, and the mechanisms behind it. In summary, all the preclinical and clinical data have suggested that HSV-based oncolytic virotherapies could likely be developed as a new generation of cancer vaccines for the treatment of solid tumors.

  13. Prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 and attitudes toward HPV vaccination trials in patients with cervical cancer in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Téguété, Ibrahima; Dolo, Amadou; Sangare, Kotou; Sissoko, Abdoulaye; Rochas, Mali; Beseme, Sarah; Tounkara, Karamoko; Yekta, Shahla; De Groot, Anne S.; Koita, Ousmane A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the most common and lethal cancers in West Africa. Even though vaccines that protect against the most common Human papillomavirus (HPV) strains, 16 and 18, are currently in use in developed countries, the implementation of these vaccines in developing countries has been painfully slow, considering the pre-eminence of HPV-associated cervical cancer among women in those countries. Aim We performed serological and PCR-based assessment of blood and tissue specimens obtained from women undergoing cervical cancer-related surgery at a major urban hospital in Bamako. Since several therapeutic HPV vaccines are currently in clinical trials, we also assessed willingness to participate in HPV cancer vaccine trials. Methods Blood and biopsy samples of 240 women were evaluated for HPV types 16 and 18 by serology and PCR. Knowledge regarding the HPV vaccine and autonomy to decide to vaccinate their own child was assessed with a standardized questionnaire. Results HPV 16 and 18 were identified in 137/166 (82.5%) cervical cancer biopsy samples by PCR. Co-infection with both HPV 16 and 18 was significantly more frequent in women over 50 years of age than in younger women (63.0% vs. 37.0%). 44% of study participants said they would be willing to vaccinate their child with HPV vaccine. Only 39% of women participating in this study reported that they would be able to make an autonomous decision to receive HPV vaccination. Permission from a male spouse or head of household was identified as important for participation by 59% of the women. Conclusion This study provides strong support for the introduction of currently available HPV vaccines in Mali, and also provides key information about conditions for obtaining informed consent for HPV vaccine trials and HPV vaccination in Mali. PMID:28231334

  14. ABO blood type correlates with survival on prostate cancer vaccine therapy.

    PubMed

    Muthana, Saddam M; Gulley, James L; Hodge, James W; Schlom, Jeffrey; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C

    2015-10-13

    Immunotherapies for cancer are transforming patient care, but clinical responses vary considerably from patient to patient. Simple, inexpensive strategies to target treatment to likely responders could substantially improve efficacy while simultaneously reducing health care costs, but identification of reliable biomarkers has proven challenging. Previously, we found that pre-treatment serum IgM to blood group A (BG-A) correlated with survival for patients treated with PROSTVAC-VF, a therapeutic cancer vaccine in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of prostate cancer. These results suggested that ABO blood type might influence efficacy. Unfortunately, blood types were not available in the clinical records for all but 8 patients and insufficient amounts of sera were left for standard blood typing methods. To test the hypothesis, therefore, we developed a new glycan microarray-based method for determining ABO blood type. The method requires only 4 μL of serum, provides 97% accuracy, and allows simultaneous profiling of many other serum anti-glycan antibodies. After validation with 220 healthy subjects of known blood type, the method was then applied to 74 PROSTVAC-VF patients and 37 control patients from a phase II trial. In this retrospective study, we found that type B and O PROSTVAC-VF patients demonstrated markedly improved clinical outcomes relative to A and AB patients, including longer median survival, longer median survival relative to Halabi predicted survival, and improved overall survival via Kaplan-Meier survival analysis (p = 0.006). Consequently, blood type may provide an inexpensive screen to pre-select patients likely to benefit from PROSTVAC-VF therapy.

  15. Humoral and cellular immune responses to influenza vaccination in children with cancer receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    WONG-CHEW, ROSA MARÍA; FRÍAS, MARGARITA NAVA; GARCÍA-LEÓN, MIGUEL LEONARDO; ARRIAGA-PIZANO, LOURDES; SANSON, AURORA MEDINA; LOPEZ-MACÍAS, CONSTANTINO; ISIBASI, ARMANDO; SANTOS-PRECIADO, JOSÉ IGNACIO

    2012-01-01

    The immune response to influenza vaccination in children with cancer is controversial. The objective of this study was to characterize the cellular and humoral immune responses to an influenza vaccine in children with cancer who were receiving chemotherapy. In this study, children with cancer, who were not previously immunized, received an influenza vaccine via intramuscular injection. Blood samples were obtained prior to and at 4 weeks after immunization. Antibodies were measured using a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Cell-mediated immunity was measured by specific lymphoproliferation with 3H-thymidine incorporation and by measuring cell frequencies following staining with monoclonal antibodies (CD8, CD4, CD19, CD45RA and CD27) using flow cytometry following incubation with the influenza antigen for 5 days. Geometric mean titers (GMT), mean counts per minute (cpm), cell frequencies prior to and following vaccination and percentage patient responses were compared using the Mann-Whitney non-parametric U and Chi-square tests; where p<0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant result. A total of 56 children were included. Their mean age was 6.64±3.61 years. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was diagnosed in 75, solid tumors in 23 and lymphoma in 2% of the children. Subjects with titers ≥40 hemagglutination units (HU) increased from 43% prior to vaccination to 73% following vaccination (p=0.01), whereas the GMT increased from 31.35 [95% confidence interval (CI), 29–111] to 143.45 HU (95% CI, 284–640) following vaccination (p<0.001). An increase in CD45RA expression in CD8+ T cells was observed following vaccination (p=0.01). An increase in CD27 expression was observed in the CD4/8-negative cell population stimulated with the influenza antigen following vaccination (p<0.05). No serious adverse effects were observed. An increase in the seropositivity rate and GMT values following influenza vaccination were also observed. Influenza

  16. Cervical cancer screening, human papillomavirus vaccination practices and current infrastructure in Israel.

    PubMed

    Schejter, Eduardo; Bornstein, Jacob; Siegler, Efraim

    2013-11-22

    The incidence rates for premalignant lesions in Jewish women in Israel are similar to those observed in Western countries, but the incidence of cervical cancer in Israel is low; this discrepancy is not yet clearly understood. Because of the low incidence of cervical cancer in Israel, it was decided to base cervical cancer prevention on opportunistic screening: every woman from the ages of 35-54 years can have a Pap test smear free of charge every 3 years. Over the last decade 12.2% of the women population had an annual Pap test. From 36 to 50% of women who attended the Clalit Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) and the Maccabi HMO, the two largest HMOs in Israel, did so. There were also discrepancies between women of different socio-economic status (SES): <10% in the lowest SES level were screened compared to almost 55% in the higher level. HPV vaccination was opportunistic but it will be introduced to the school-based vaccine program at age of 13 years old as of September 2013. The Israel Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology recommends continuing cytologic screening in vaccinated women as recommended for the general population. This article forms part of a regional report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in Israel" Vaccine Volume 31, Supplement 8, 2013. Updates of the progress in the field are presented in a separate monograph entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012.

  17. Human papillomavirus therapeutic vaccines: targeting viral antigens as immunotherapy for precancerous disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Matthew P; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2013-03-01

    Infections with oncogenic HPV types have the potential to lead to the induction of several types of cancer, notably cervical, vulvar, anal, and head and neck cancer. While prophylactic vaccines are currently available and show high efficacy against the establishment of HPV infection, low rates of initiation and lower rates of completion of the vaccination regimen, as well as the lack of an opportunity to be vaccinated prior to infection, has lead to the development of a patient population for whom no immune-based therapy for infection is available. In the current review the authors examine clinical approaches to HPV-targeted immune therapies, the bulk of which target the regulatory proteins E6 and E7 that are constitutively expressed in HPV-associated cancer cells. Early studies demonstrate a correlation between induction of T-cell responses and clearance of HPV-associated precancerous lesions. The clinical data corroborates these findings and highlight the importance of Th1 skewing. Improvements in our understanding of tumor immunology and development of more potent Th1-directed vaccine platforms make it feasible to foresee a HPV therapeutic vaccine in the coming years.

  18. Is there a role for therapeutic cancer vaccines in the age of checkpoint inhibitors?

    PubMed Central

    Dillman, Robert O.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because of the recent success of monoclonal antibody checkpoint inhibitors, and the disappointing results of most therapeutic cancer vaccine trials, it has been questioned whether there is any potential role for such products going forward. In my opinion the answer is “yes” based on the following: [1] there is a persistent unmet clinical need because the majority of patients do not benefit from anti-checkpoint therapy, [2] there is evidence that not all patients make immune responses to their tumors, [3] there is evidence that immune responses to autologous tumor antigens can be induced by patient-specific vaccines, [4] there is clinical evidence from the pre-checkpoint era that suggests survival can be positively impacted by such patient-specific vaccines, and [5] the 2 available therapeutic vaccines that have received regulatory approval are quite limited in terms of their therapeutic benefit. PMID:27808593

  19. Increasing Cervical Cancer and Human Papillomavirus Prevention Knowledge and HPV Vaccine Uptake through Mother/Daughter Education.

    PubMed

    Obulaney, Patricia A; Gilliland, Irene; Cassells, Holly

    2016-01-01

    This evidence-based initiative assessed the impact of language-appropriate cervical cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV) prevention education on knowledge level and HPV vaccine uptake among mothers and their daughters. Forty-one mother/daughter dyads from a low-cost, faith-based clinic for the uninsured in southeastern Texas participated in the nurse practitioner-led cervical cancer prevention educational sessions. Spanish was the primary language for the majority of participating mothers. The project produced appreciable knowledge increase and HPV vaccine uptake intent. Aggregate HPV vaccine uptake numbers for the clinic increased considerably compared to HPV vaccine administration prior to educational intervention.

  20. Surface engineering tumor cells with adjuvant-loaded particles for use as cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kawther K; Geary, Sean M; Salem, Aliasger K

    2017-02-28

    Cell surface engineering is an expanding field and whilst extensive research has been performed decorating cell surfaces with biomolecules, the engineering of cell surfaces with particles has been a largely unexploited area. This study reports on the assembly of cell-particle hybrids where irradiated tumor cells were surface engineered with adjuvant-loaded, biodegradable, biocompatible, polymeric particles, with the aim of generating a construct capable of functioning as a therapeutic cancer vaccine. Successfully assembled cell-particle hybrids presented here comprised either melanoma cells or prostate cancer cells stably adorned with Toll-like receptor-9 ligand-loaded particles using streptavidin-biotin cross-linking. Both cell-particle assemblies were tested in vivo for their potential as therapeutic cancer vaccines yielding promising therapeutic results for the prostate cancer model. The ramifications of results obtained for both tumor models are openly discussed.

  1. Translation of genomics-guided RNA-based personalised cancer vaccines: towards the bedside

    PubMed Central

    Boisguérin, V; Castle, J C; Loewer, M; Diekmann, J; Mueller, F; Britten, C M; Kreiter, S; Türeci, Ö; Sahin, U

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a disease caused by DNA mutations. Cancer therapies targeting defined functional mutations have shown clinical benefit. However, as 95% of the mutations in a tumour are unique to that single patient and only a small number of mutations are shared between patients, the addressed medical need is modest. A rapidly determined patient-specific tumour mutation pattern combined with a flexible mutation-targeting drug platform could generate a mutation-targeting individualised therapy, which would benefit each single patient. Next-generation sequencing enables the rapid identification of somatic mutations in individual tumours (the mutanome). Immunoinformatics enables predictions of mutation immunogenicity. Mutation-targeting RNA-based vaccines can be rapidly and affordably synthesised as custom GMP drug products. Integration of these cutting-edge technologies into a clinically applicable process holds the promise of a disruptive innovation benefiting cancer patients. Here, we describe our translation of the individualised RNA-based cancer vaccine concept into clinic trials. PMID:25314223

  2. Paradigm Shift in the Management Strategy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Keiichi; McAlpine, Jessica N; Lheureux, Stephanie; Matsumura, Noriomi; Oza, Amit M

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis on the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer continues to evolve. Although epithelial ovarian cancer had been assumed to arise from the coelomic epithelium of the ovarian surface, it is now becoming clearer that the majority of serous carcinomas arise from epithelium of the distal fallopian tube, whereas clear cell and endometrioid cancers arise from endometriosis. Molecular and genomic characteristics of epithelial ovarian cancer have been extensively investigated. Our understanding of pathogenesis of the various histologic types of ovarian cancer have begun to inform changes to the strategies for management of epithelial ovarian cancer, which represent a paradigm shift not only for treatment but also for prevention, which previously had not been considered achievable. In this article, we will discuss novel attempts at the prevention of high-grade serous ovarian cancer and treatment strategies for two distinct entities in epithelial ovarian cancer: low-grade serous and clear cell ovarian carcinomas, which are relatively rare and resistant to conventional chemotherapy.

  3. Evolving T-cell vaccine strategies for HIV, the virus with a thousand faces

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette

    2009-01-01

    HIV's rapid global spread and the human suffering it has left in its wake have made AIDS a global heath priority for the 25 years since its discovery. Yet its capacity to rapidly evolve has made combating this virus a tremendous challenge. The obstacles to creating an effective HIV vaccine are formidable, but there are advances in the field on many fronts, in terms of novel vectors, adjuvants, and antigen design strategies. SIV live attenuated vaccine models are able to confer protection against heterologous challenge, and this continues to provide opportunities to explore the biological underpinnings of a protective effect (9). More indirect, but equally important, is new understanding regarding the biology of acute infection (43), the role of immune response in long-term non-progression (6,62, 81), and defining characteristics of broadly neutralizing antibodies (4). In this review we will focus on summarizing strategies directed towards a single issue, that of contending with HIV variation in terms of designing aT-cell vaccine. The strategies that prove most effective in this area can ultimately be combined with the best strategies under development in other areas, with the hope of ultimately converging on a viable vaccine candidate. Only two large HIV vaccine efficacy trials have been completed and both have failed to prevent infection or confer a benefit to infected individual (23,34), but there is ample reason to continue our efforts. A historic breakthrough came in 1996, when it was realized that although the virus could escape from a single antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, it could be thwarted by a combination of medications that simultaneously targeted different parts of the virus (HAART) (38). This revelation came after 15 years of research, thought, and clinical testing; to enable that vital progress the research and clinical communities had to first define and understand, then develop a strategy to counter, the remarkable evolutionary potential of the virus

  4. A fresh perspective from immunologists and vaccine researchers: Active vaccination strategies to prevent and reverse Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Agadjanyan, M.G.; Petrovsky, N.; Ghochikyan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional vaccination against infectious diseases relies on generation of cellular and humoral immune responses that act to protect the host from overt disease even although they do not induce sterilizing immunity. More recently, attempts have been made with mixed success to generate therapeutic vaccines against a wide range of non-infectious diseases including neurodegenerative disorders. Following the exciting first report of successful vaccine prevention of progression of an AD animal model in 1999, various epitope-based vaccines targeting beta-amyloid (Aβ) have proceeded to human clinical trials, with varied results. More recently, AD vaccines based on tau protein have advanced into clinical testing too. This review seeks to put perspective to the mixed results obtained so far in clinical trials of AD vaccines, and discuss the many pitfalls and misconceptions encountered on the path to a successful AD vaccine, including better standardization of immunological efficacy measures of antibodies, immunogenicity of platform/carrier and adjuvants. PMID:26192465

  5. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  6. Is There Still Room for Cancer Vaccines at the Era of Checkpoint Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Soumaya; Anson, Marie; Tran, Thi; Giusti, Delphine; Blanc, Charlotte; Oudard, Stephane; Tartour, Eric

    2016-11-03

    Checkpoint inhibitor (CPI) blockade is considered to be a revolution in cancer therapy, although most patients (70%-80%) remain resistant to this therapy. It has been hypothesized that only tumors with high mutation rates generate a natural antitumor T cell response, which could be revigorated by this therapy. In patients with no pre-existing antitumor T cells, a vaccine-induced T cell response is a rational option to counteract clinical resistance. This hypothesis has been validated in preclinical models using various cancer vaccines combined with inhibitory pathway blockade (PD-1-PDL1-2, CTLA-4-CD80-CD86). Enhanced T cell infiltration of various tumors has been demonstrated following this combination therapy. The timing of this combination appears to be critical to the success of this therapy and multiple combinations of immunomodulating antibodies (CPI antagonists or costimulatory pathway agonists) have reinforced the synergy with cancer vaccines. Only limited results are available in humans and this combined approach has yet to be validated. Comprehensive monitoring of the regulation of CPI and costimulatory molecules after administration of immunomodulatory antibodies (anti-PD1/PD-L1, anti-CTLA-4, anti-OX40, etc.) and cancer vaccines should help to guide the selection of the best combination and timing of this therapy.

  7. Is There Still Room for Cancer Vaccines at the Era of Checkpoint Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Karaki, Soumaya; Anson, Marie; Tran, Thi; Giusti, Delphine; Blanc, Charlotte; Oudard, Stephane; Tartour, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Checkpoint inhibitor (CPI) blockade is considered to be a revolution in cancer therapy, although most patients (70%–80%) remain resistant to this therapy. It has been hypothesized that only tumors with high mutation rates generate a natural antitumor T cell response, which could be revigorated by this therapy. In patients with no pre-existing antitumor T cells, a vaccine-induced T cell response is a rational option to counteract clinical resistance. This hypothesis has been validated in preclinical models using various cancer vaccines combined with inhibitory pathway blockade (PD-1-PDL1-2, CTLA-4-CD80-CD86). Enhanced T cell infiltration of various tumors has been demonstrated following this combination therapy. The timing of this combination appears to be critical to the success of this therapy and multiple combinations of immunomodulating antibodies (CPI antagonists or costimulatory pathway agonists) have reinforced the synergy with cancer vaccines. Only limited results are available in humans and this combined approach has yet to be validated. Comprehensive monitoring of the regulation of CPI and costimulatory molecules after administration of immunomodulatory antibodies (anti-PD1/PD-L1, anti-CTLA-4, anti-OX40, etc.) and cancer vaccines should help to guide the selection of the best combination and timing of this therapy. PMID:27827885

  8. Immunosuppressive mechanisms in cancer: consequences for the development of therapeutic vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gross, Stefanie; Geldmacher, Astrid; Sharav, Tumenjargal; Losch, Florian; Walden, Peter

    2009-05-26

    Recent investigations revealed strong immunosuppressive mechanisms in tumors that may block anti-tumor T cells and be responsible for failures of immunotherapies. Current attempts to overcome this immunosuppression include blockade of co-inhibitory factors on T cells. Reports from the respective trials indicate that the strategy can improve efficacy of therapeutic vaccination, but at the cost of severe inflammatory and autoimmune reactions. We tried to circumvent tumor-associated immunosuppression by mimotope vaccination to broaden reactive anti-tumor T cell repertoires to include T cells that have not been rendered anergic by the tumor. Initial clinical observations suggest that this strategy bears considerable promise.

  9. Simulation of control strategies for the cattle tick Boophilus microplus employing vaccination with a recombinant Bm86 antigen preparation.

    PubMed

    Labarta, V; Rodríguez, M; Penichet, M; Lleonart, R; Luaces, L L; de la Fuente, J

    1996-05-01

    Current strategies for the control of the cattle tick Boophilus microplus include the use of chemicals as the principal control method. These methods, however, have met with partially successful results. The recent development of immunological methods for the control of the cattle tick has opened new possibilities for the design of control strategies. Employing the results obtained by us in experiments testing the effect of vaccination with the recombinant vaccine, Gavac (Heber Biotec S.A.), on tick populations, we have developed a model to evaluate, through a computer program, the efficacy of the vaccine as a control method. The action of the vaccine on the control of tick populations was simulated and the specific serum antibody titers required to decrease the tick population in the field were calculated. The specific serum antibody titer required to decrease the tick population in the field after the first vaccination scheme was found to be > or = 57,200 and the antibody titer required to maintain this effect when the vaccine is already acting and after successive revaccinations was found to be > or = 27,500. Considerations about revaccination schemes and combination between vaccination and acaricide treatments as possible control strategies are discussed.

  10. HLA typing demands for peptide-based anti-cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nagorsen, Dirk; Thiel, Eckhard

    2008-12-01

    Immunological treatment of cancer has made some very promising advances during the last years. Anti-cancer vaccination using peptides or peptide-pulsed dendritic cells and adoptive transfer of in vitro generated, epitope-specific T cells depend on a well-fitting interaction of HLA molecule and epitope. Accurate HLA-typing is a key factor for successful anti-cancer vaccination. No comprehensive data and no suggestion exist on the HLA-typing in this setting. We performed a systematic review of PubMed analyzing HLA-typing data in cancer vaccination trials over the last 4 years (2004-2007). Then, using the SYFPEITHI database, we calculated the peptide binding prediction of the eight most often used HLA-A*0201 binding epitopes. Finally, high-resolution typing [by sequence-specific primers (SSP)] data of a HLA-A*02 or HLA-A*24 positive population in Berlin, Germany, were analyzed. Forty-five cancer vaccination trials with 764 patients were included. Eighteen studies were performed in the USA, 13 in Europe, 12 in Asia (mainly Japan), and two in Australia. Most common diseases targeted were melanoma, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, renal cell cancer, and breast cancer. The trials tested protocols using peptide plus adjuvants without DC or protocols using peptide-pulsed DC. In 38 trials (84%) HLA-A2 positive patients were vaccinated, in 11 studies (24%) HLA-A24 positive patients were vaccinated. Nineteen studies with 291 patients (38%) presented the HLA type as four-digit code (high-resolution), 26 studies with 473 patients (62%) presented the HLA-type in a low-resolution code. The method of HLA determination was given in six out of 45 trials (13%). Using the SYFPEITHI database we calculated the peptide binding prediction of the eight most often used HLA-A*0201 binding tumor antigen-derived epitopes for binding to HLA-A*0203. While the epitopes had a binding score of 17-28 for HLA-A*0201, the score for binding to HLA-A*0203 was zero in seven out of eight tested peptides

  11. A Human Vaccine Strategy Based On Chimpanzee Adenoviral and MVA Vectors That Primes, Boosts and Sustains Functional HCV Specific T-Cell Memory*

    PubMed Central

    Swadling, Leo; Capone, Stefania; Antrobus, Richard D.; Brown, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Newell, Evan W.; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Bowen, Dan; Fergusson, Joannah; Kurioka, Ayako; Ammendola, Virginia; Sorbo, Mariarosaria Del; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Siani, Loredana; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian; Colloca, Stefano; Davis, Mark; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    A protective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains an unmet clinical need. HCV infects millions of people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. Animal challenge experiments, immunogenetics studies and assessment of host immunity during acute infection highlight the critical role that effective T-cell immunity plays in viral control. In this first-in-man study we have induced antiviral immunity with functional characteristics analogous to those associated with viral control in natural infection, and improved upon a vaccine based on adenoviral vectors alone. We assessed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy based on a replicative defective simian adenoviral vector (ChAd3) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vector encoding the NS3, NS4, NS5A and NS5B proteins of HCV genotype-1b. Analysis employed single cell mass cytometry (CyTOF), and HLA class-I peptide tetramer technology in healthy human volunteers. We show that HCV specific T-cells induced by ChAd3 are optimally boosted with MVA, and generate very high levels of both CD8+ and CD4+ HCV specific T-cells targeting multiple HCV antigens. Sustained memory and effector T-cell populations are generated and T-cell memory evolved over time with improvement of quality (proliferation and polyfunctionality) following heterologous MVA boost. We have developed a HCV vaccine strategy, with durable, broad, sustained and balanced T-cell responses, characteristic of those associated with viral control, paving the way for the first efficacy studies of a prophylactic HCV vaccine. PMID:25378645

  12. A human vaccine strategy based on chimpanzee adenoviral and MVA vectors that primes, boosts, and sustains functional HCV-specific T cell memory.