Science.gov

Sample records for candida glabrata isolates

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Candida glabrata Isolates 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A, and 3B

    PubMed Central

    Håvelsrud, Othilde Elise

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequences of six Candida glabrata isolates. The isolates were taken from blood samples from patients after recurrent C. glabrata infection. Two isolates were taken from each of three patients a minimum 3 months apart. PMID:28280017

  2. Differentially expressed proteins in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant isolates of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yinzhong; Zhang, Lijun; Jia, Xiaofang; Zhang, Yongxin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-06-01

    The current study aimed to identify the differences presented in the proteome of fluconazole-susceptible isolates of Candida glabrata compared to those with fluconazole-resistant ones. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis was applied to identify proteins that were differentially expressed in fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant isolates of C. glabrata. Eight proteins including aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, translation elongation factor 3, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, ribosomal protein L5, coproporphyrinogen III oxidase, pyruvate kinase, G-beta like protein, and F1F0-ATPase alpha subunit were found to be more abundantly represented, while four proteins including vitamin B12-(cobalamin)-independent isozyme of methionine synthase, microtubule-associated protein, adenylosuccinate synthetase, and aldose reductase were found to be less abundantly represented in fluconazole-resistant strains versus those with fluconazole-susceptible ones. These differentially expressed proteins were primarily associated with energy metabolism, stress response, and macromolecule synthesis. Proteins associated with energy metabolism, stress response, and macromolecule synthesis may play a role in the development of fluconazole resistance in the clinical isolates of C. glabrata. Multiple different mechanisms are involved in the development of fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata. These findings provide a scientific basis for discovering new genes and mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata.

  3. In Vitro Activities of Six Antifungal Drugs Against Candida glabrata Isolates: An Emerging Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Amirrajab, Nasrin; Badali, Hamid; Didehdar, Mojtaba; Afsarian, Mohammad Hosein; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Lotfi, Nazanin; Shokohi, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida glabrata is a pathogenic yeast with several unique biological features and associated with an increased incidence rate of candidiasis. It exhibits a great degree of variation in its pathogenicity and antifungal susceptibility. Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of the following six antifungal drugs against clinical C. glabrata strains: amphotericin B (AmB), ketoconazole (KTZ), fluconazole (FCZ), itraconazole (ITZ), voriconazole (VCZ), and caspofungin (CASP). Materials and Methods Forty clinical C. glabrata strains were investigated using DNA sequencing. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility was determined as described in clinical laboratory standard institute (CLSI) documents (M27-A3 and M27-S4). Results The sequence analysis of the isolate confirmed as C. glabrata and deposited on NCBI GenBank under the accession number no. KT763084-KT763123. The geometric mean MICs against all the tested strains were as follows, in increasing order: CASP (0.17 g/mL), VCZ (0.67 g/mL), AmB (1.1 g/mL), ITZ (1.82 g/mL), KTZ (1.85 g/mL), and FCZ (6.7 g/mL). The resistance rates of the isolates to CASP, FCZ, ITZ, VZ, KTZ, and AmB were 5%, 10%, 72.5%, 37.5%, 47.5%, and 27.5%, respectively. Conclusions These findings confirm that CASP, compared to the other antifungals, is the potent agent for treating candidiasis caused by C. glabrata. However, the clinical efficacy of these novel antifungals remains to be determined. PMID:27540459

  4. Proteomic analysis of hyperadhesive Candida glabrata clinical isolates reveals a core wall proteome and differential incorporation of adhesins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Molero, Emilia; de Boer, Albert D; Dekker, Henk L; Moreno-Martínez, Ana; Kraneveld, Eef A; Ichsan; Chauhan, Neeraj; Weig, Michael; de Soet, Johannes J; de Koster, Chris G; Bader, Oliver; de Groot, Piet W J

    2015-12-01

    Attachment to human host tissues or abiotic medical devices is a key step in the development of infections by Candida glabrata. The genome of this pathogenic yeast codes for a large number of adhesins, but proteomic work using reference strains has shown incorporation of only few adhesins in the cell wall. By making inventories of the wall proteomes of hyperadhesive clinical isolates and reference strain CBS138 using mass spectrometry, we describe the cell wall proteome of C. glabrata and tested the hypothesis that hyperadhesive isolates display differential incorporation of adhesins. Two clinical strains (PEU382 and PEU427) were selected, which both were hyperadhesive to polystyrene and showed high surface hydrophobicity. Cell wall proteome analysis under biofilm-forming conditions identified a core proteome of about 20 proteins present in all C. glabrata strains. In addition, 12 adhesin-like wall proteins were identified in the hyperadherent strains, including six novel adhesins (Awp8-13) of which only Awp12 was also present in CBS138. We conclude that the hyperadhesive capacity of these two clinical C. glabrata isolates is correlated with increased and differential incorporation of cell wall adhesins. Future studies should elucidate the role of the identified proteins in the establishment of C. glabrata infections.

  5. Geographic variation in the frequency of isolation and fluconazole and voriconazole susceptibilities of Candida glabrata: an assessment from the ARTEMIS DISK Global Antifungal Surveillance Program.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Diekema, Daniel J; Gibbs, David L; Newell, Vance A; Barton, Richard; Bijie, Hu; Bille, Jacques; Chang, Shan-Chwen; da Luz Martins, Maria; Duse, Adriano; Dzierzanowska, Danuta; Ellis, David; Finquelievich, Jorge; Gould, Ian; Gur, Deniz; Hoosen, Anwar; Lee, Kyungwon; Mallatova, Nada; Mallie, Michele; Peng, N G Kee; Petrikos, George; Santiago, Axel; Trupl, Jan; VanDen Abeele, Ann Marie; Wadula, Jeannette; Zaidi, Mussaret

    2010-06-01

    Geographic differences in frequency and azole resistance among Candida glabrata may impact empiric antifungal therapy choice. We examined geographic variation in isolation and azole susceptibility of C. glabrata. We examined 23 305 clinical isolates of C. glabrata during ARTEMIS DISK global surveillance. Susceptibility testing to fluconazole and voriconazole was assessed by disk diffusion, and the results were grouped by geographic location: North America (NA) (2470 isolates), Latin America (LA) (2039), Europe (EU) (12 439), Africa and the Middle East (AME) (728), and Asia-Pacific (AP) (5629). Overall, C. glabrata accounted for 11.6% of 201 653 isolates of Candida and varied as a proportion of all Candida isolated from 7.4% in LA to 21.1% in NA. Decreased susceptibility (S) to fluconazole was observed in all geographic regions and ranged from 62.8% in AME to 76.7% in LA. Variation in fluconazole susceptibility was observed within each region: AP (range, 50-100% S), AME (48-86.9%), EU (44.8-88%), LA (43-92%), and NA (74.5-91.6%). Voriconazole was more active than fluconazole (range, 82.3-84.2% S) with similar regional variation. Among 22 sentinel sites participating in ARTEMIS from 2001 through 2007 (84 140 total isolates, 8163 C. glabrata), the frequency of C. glabrata isolation increased in 14 sites and the frequency of fluconazole resistance (R) increased in 11 sites over the 7-year period of study. The sites with the highest cumulative rates of fluconazole R were in Poland (22% R), the Czech Republic (27% R), Venezuela (27% R), and Greece (33% R). C. glabrata was most often isolated from blood, normally sterile body fluids and urine. There is substantial geographic and institutional variation in both frequency of isolation and azole resistance among C. glabrata. Prompt species identification and fluconazole susceptibility testing are necessary to optimize therapy for invasive candidiasis.

  6. Mechanistic Insights Underlying Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in Vaginal Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Diana V; Salazar, Sara B; Lopes, Maria M; Mira, Nuno P

    2017-01-01

    During colonization of the vaginal tract Candida glabrata cells are challenged with the presence of acetic acid at a low pH, specially when dysbiosis occurs. To avoid exclusion from this niche C. glabrata cells are expected to evolve efficient adaptive responses to cope with this stress; however, these responses remain largely uncharacterized, especially in vaginal strains. In this work a cohort of 18 vaginal strains and 2 laboratory strains (CBS138 and KUE100) were phenotyped for their tolerance against inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid at pH 4. Despite some heterogeneity has been observed among the vaginal strains tested, in general these strains were considerably more tolerant to acetic acid than the laboratory strains. To tackle the mechanistic insights behind this differential level of tolerance observed, a set of vaginal strains differently tolerant to acetic acid (VG281∼VG49 < VG99 < VG216) and the highly susceptible laboratory strain KUE100 were selected for further studies. When suddenly challenged with acetic acid the more tolerant vaginal strains exhibited a higher activity of the plasma membrane proton pump CgPma1 and a reduced internal accumulation of the acid, these being two essential features to maximize tolerance. Based on the higher level of resistance exhibited by the vaginal strains against the action of a β-1,3-glucanase, it is hypothesized that the reduced internal accumulation of acetic acid inside these strains may originate from them having a different cell wall structure resulting in a reduced porosity to undissociated acetic acid molecules. Both the vaginal and the two laboratory strains were found to consume acetic acid in the presence of glucose indicating that metabolization of the acid is used by C. glabrata species as a detoxification mechanism. The results gathered in this study advance the current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the increased competitiveness of C. glabrata in the vaginal tract, a knowledge that can

  7. Mechanistic Insights Underlying Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in Vaginal Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Diana V.; Salazar, Sara B.; Lopes, Maria M.; Mira, Nuno P.

    2017-01-01

    During colonization of the vaginal tract Candida glabrata cells are challenged with the presence of acetic acid at a low pH, specially when dysbiosis occurs. To avoid exclusion from this niche C. glabrata cells are expected to evolve efficient adaptive responses to cope with this stress; however, these responses remain largely uncharacterized, especially in vaginal strains. In this work a cohort of 18 vaginal strains and 2 laboratory strains (CBS138 and KUE100) were phenotyped for their tolerance against inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid at pH 4. Despite some heterogeneity has been observed among the vaginal strains tested, in general these strains were considerably more tolerant to acetic acid than the laboratory strains. To tackle the mechanistic insights behind this differential level of tolerance observed, a set of vaginal strains differently tolerant to acetic acid (VG281∼VG49 < VG99 < VG216) and the highly susceptible laboratory strain KUE100 were selected for further studies. When suddenly challenged with acetic acid the more tolerant vaginal strains exhibited a higher activity of the plasma membrane proton pump CgPma1 and a reduced internal accumulation of the acid, these being two essential features to maximize tolerance. Based on the higher level of resistance exhibited by the vaginal strains against the action of a β-1,3-glucanase, it is hypothesized that the reduced internal accumulation of acetic acid inside these strains may originate from them having a different cell wall structure resulting in a reduced porosity to undissociated acetic acid molecules. Both the vaginal and the two laboratory strains were found to consume acetic acid in the presence of glucose indicating that metabolization of the acid is used by C. glabrata species as a detoxification mechanism. The results gathered in this study advance the current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the increased competitiveness of C. glabrata in the vaginal tract, a knowledge that can

  8. Candida glabrata olecranon bursitis treated with bursectomy and intravenous caspofungin.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Keenan, Kendra E; Trachtenberg, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons are becoming more involved in the care of patients with septic arthritis and bursitis caused by yeast species. This case report involves a middle-aged immunocompromised female who developed a Candida glabrata septic olecranon bursitis that developed after she received a corticosteroid injection in the olecranon bursa for presumed aseptic bursitis. Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata is the second most frequently isolated Candida species from the bloodstream in the United States. Increased use of fluconazole and other azole antifungal agents as a prophylactic treatment for recurrent Candida albicans infections in immunocompromised individuals is one reason why there appears to be increased resistance of C. glabrata and other nonalbicans Candida (NAC) species to fluconazole. In this patient, this infection was treated with surgery (bursectomy) and intravenous caspofungin, an echinocandin. This rare infectious etiology coupled with this intravenous antifungal treatment makes this case novel among cases of olecranon bursitis caused by yeasts.

  9. Genetic Transformation of Candida glabrata by Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Tscherner, Michael; Kuchler, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a method for the transformation by electroporation of the human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata (C. glabrata). The protocol can be used for transformations in single well or in 96-well microtiter plates. It has been extensively used to generate a genome-scale gene deletion library using the C. glabrata background recipient strain ATCC2001 (Schwarzmüller et al., 2014). PMID:27774499

  10. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G.; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata. PMID:27029023

  11. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-03-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata.

  12. Genetic Drivers of Multidrug Resistance in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Kelley R.; Jimenez Ortigosa, Cristina; Shor, Erika; Perlin, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Both the incidence of invasive fungal infections and rates of multidrug resistance associated with fungal pathogen Candida glabrata have increased in recent years. In this perspective, we will discuss the mechanisms underlying the capacity of C. glabrata to rapidly develop resistance to multiple drug classes, including triazoles and echinocandins. We will focus on the extensive genetic diversity among clinical isolates of C. glabrata, which likely enables this yeast to survive multiple stressors, such as immune pressure and antifungal exposure. In particular, over half of C. glabrata clinical strains collected from U.S. and non-U.S. sites have mutations in the DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2, leading to a mutator phenotype and increased frequencies of drug-resistant mutants in vitro. Furthermore, recent studies and data presented here document extensive chromosomal rearrangements among C. glabrata strains, resulting in a large number of distinct karyotypes within a single species. By analyzing clonal, serial isolates derived from individual patients treated with antifungal drugs, we were able to document chromosomal changes occurring in C. glabrata in vivo during the course of antifungal treatment. Interestingly, we also show that both MSH2 genotypes and chromosomal patterns cluster consistently into specific strain types, indicating that C. glabrata has a complex population structure where genomic variants arise, perhaps during the process of adaptation to environmental changes, and persist over time. PMID:28018323

  13. Genome structure and dynamics of the yeast pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Khadija M; Kokošar, Janez; Guo, Xiaoxian; Gu, Zhenglong; Ishchuk, Olena P; Piškur, Jure

    2014-01-01

    The yeast pathogen Candida glabrata is the second most frequent cause of Candida infections. However, from the phylogenetic point of view, C. glabrata is much closer to Saccharomyces cerevisiae than to Candida albicans. Apparently, this yeast has relatively recently changed its life style and become a successful opportunistic pathogen. Recently, several C. glabrata sister species, among them clinical and environmental isolates, have had their genomes characterized. Also, hundreds of C. glabrata clinical isolates have been characterized for their genomes. These isolates display enormous genomic plasticity. The number and size of chromosomes vary drastically, as well as intra- and interchromosomal segmental duplications occur frequently. The observed genome alterations could affect phenotypic properties and thus help to adapt to the highly variable and harsh habitats this yeast finds in different human patients and their tissues. Further genome sequencing of pathogenic isolates will provide a valuable tool to understand the mechanisms behind genome dynamics and help to elucidate the genes contributing to the virulence potential. PMID:24528571

  14. Production of White Colonies on CHROMagar Candida(TM) by Members of the Candida glabrata Clade and Other Species with Overlapping Phenotypic Traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that species of the Candida glabrata clade and species with phenotypic traits overlapping with C. glabrata would produce white colonies on CHROMagar Candida. Of 154 isolates (seven species) tested, C. bracarensis, C. nivariensis, C. norvegensis, C. glabrata, and C. inconspicua produ...

  15. Assimilation of NAD(+) precursors in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Ma, Biao; Pan, Shih-Jung; Zupancic, Margaret L; Cormack, Brendan P

    2007-10-01

    The yeast pathogen Candida glabrata is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) auxotroph and its growth depends on the environmental supply of vitamin precursors of NAD(+). C. glabrata salvage pathways defined in this article allow NAD(+) to be synthesized from three compounds - nicotinic acid (NA), nicotinamide (NAM) and nicotinamide riboside (NR). NA is salvaged through a functional Preiss-Handler pathway. NAM is first converted to NA by nicotinamidase and then salvaged by the Preiss-Handler pathway. Salvage of NR in C. glabrata occurs via two routes. The first, in which NR is phosphorylated by the NR kinase Nrk1, is independent of the Preiss-Handler pathway. The second is a novel pathway in which NR is degraded by the nucleosidases Pnp1 and Urh1, with a minor role for Meu1, and ultimately converted to NAD(+) via the nicotinamidase Pnc1 and the Preiss-Handler pathway. Using C. glabrata mutants whose growth depends exclusively on the external NA or NR supply, we also show that C. glabrata utilizes NR and to a lesser extent NA as NAD(+) sources during disseminated infection.

  16. A nonsense mutation in the ERG6 gene leads to reduced susceptibility to polyenes in a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Patrick; Tronchin, Guy; Larcher, Gérald; Ernoult, Emilie; Bergès, Thierry; Chabasse, Dominique; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2008-10-01

    Unlike the molecular mechanisms that lead to azole drug resistance, the molecular mechanisms that lead to polyene resistance are poorly documented, especially in pathogenic yeasts. We investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the reduced susceptibility to polyenes of a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata. Sterol content was analyzed by gas-phase chromatography, and we determined the sequences and levels of expression of several genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis. We also investigated the effects of the mutation harbored by this isolate on the morphology and ultrastructure of the cell, cell viability, and vitality and susceptibility to cell wall-perturbing agents. The isolate had a lower ergosterol content in its membranes than the wild type, and the lower ergosterol content was found to be associated with a nonsense mutation in the ERG6 gene and induction of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. Modifications of the cell wall were also seen, accompanied by increased susceptibility to cell wall-perturbing agents. Finally, this mutation, which resulted in a marked fitness cost, was associated with a higher rate of cell mortality. Wild-type properties were restored by complementation of the isolate with a centromeric plasmid containing a wild-type copy of the ERG6 gene. In conclusion, we have identified the molecular event responsible for decreased susceptibility to polyenes in a clinical isolate of C. glabrata. The nonsense mutation detected in the ERG6 gene of this isolate led to a decrease in ergosterol content. This isolate may constitute a useful tool for analysis of the relevance of protein trafficking in the phenomena of azole resistance and pseudohyphal growth.

  17. Isolation of Candida glabrata Homologs of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae KRE9 and KNH1 Genes and Their Involvement in Cell Wall β-1,6-Glucan Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagahashi, Shigehisa; Lussier, Marc; Bussey, Howard

    1998-01-01

    The Candida glabrata KRE9 (CgKRE9) and KNH1 (CgKNH1) genes have been isolated as multicopy suppressors of the tetracycline-sensitive growth of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant with the disrupted KNH1 locus and the KRE9 gene placed under the control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter. Although a cgknh1Δ mutant showed no phenotype beyond slightly increased sensitivity to the K1 killer toxin, disruption of CgKRE9 resulted in several phenotypes similar to those of the S. cerevisiae kre9Δ null mutant: a severe growth defect on glucose medium, resistance to the K1 killer toxin, a 50% reduction of β-1,6-glucan, and the presence of aggregates of cells with abnormal morphology on glucose medium. Replacement in C. glabrata of the cognate CgKRE9 promoter with the tetracycline-responsive promoter in a cgknh1Δ background rendered cell growth tetracycline sensitive on media containing glucose or galactose. cgkre9Δ cells were shown to be sensitive to calcofluor white specifically on glucose medium. In cgkre9 mutants grown on glucose medium, cellular chitin levels were massively increased. PMID:9748432

  18. Production of White Colonies on CHROMagar Candida Medium by Members of the Candida glabrata Clade and Other Species with Overlapping Phenotypic Traits▿

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Justin A.; Chase, Nancy; Lee, Richard; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Merz, William G.

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that species of the Candida glabrata clade and species with phenotypic traits that overlap those of C. glabrata would produce white colonies on CHROMagar Candida medium. Of 154 isolates (seven species) tested, C. bracarensis, C. nivariensis, C. norvegensis, C. glabrata, and C. inconspicua produced white colonies; the Pichia fermentans group and C. krusei did not. Many of these species are difficult to identify phenotypically; white colonies may signal the need for the use of molecular approaches. PMID:18685009

  19. Candida glabrata infection in gastric carcinoma patient mimicking cutaneous histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Gugic, Dijana; Cleary, Timothy; Vincek, Vladimir

    2008-02-28

    Candida glabrata is the second most common Candida species detected among hospitalized patients in USA. In tissue C. glabrata present as yeasts, 3-5 microns in size, which are difficult to visualize on H&E stained slides but can be detected on Grocott methenamine silver (GMS) stained slides. The presence of yeasts only, without any hyphal elements, makes C. glabrata difficult to distinguish from Histoplasma capsulatum yeasts that are of similar size. Mycology culture is the method of choice for definitive identification of C. glabrata. Rapid identification is necessary, as mortality rate due to C. glabrata infection in immunocompromised patients is particularly high. We herein report a patient with inoperable gastric carcinoma, who developed cutaneous and septic form of C. glabrata infection.

  20. Candida glabrata among Candida spp. from environmental health practitioners of a Brazilian Hospital.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Catarina; de Oliveira Silva, Elisa; Gonçalves, Lindyanne Lemos; Nery, Jéssica Maria; Silva, Naiara Chaves; Dias, Amanda Latercia Tranches

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of the species Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida was evaluated in a Brazilian Tertiary Hospital from the environment and health practitioners. In a 12-month period we had a total positivity of 19.65% of Candida spp. The most recurring non-albicans Candida species was C. glabrata (37.62%), generally considered a species of low virulence, but with a higher mortality rate than C. albicans. Subsequently, C. parapsilosis (25.74%) and C. tropicalis (16.86%) were the second and third most commonly isolated species. Considering the total samples collected from the emergency room and from the inpatient and the pediatric sector, 19.10% were positive for Candida spp., with the predominance of non-albicans Candida species (89.42%). The high percentage of positivity occurred in the hands (24.32%) and the lab coats (21.88%) of the health care assistants. No sample of C. albicans presented a profile of resistance to the drugs. All the non-albicans Candida species presented a decreased susceptibility to miconazole and itraconazole, but they were susceptible to nystatin. Most of the isolates were susceptible to fluconazole and amphotericin B. As expected, a high resistance rate was observed in C. glabrata and C. krusei, which are intrinsically less susceptible to this antifungal agent. The contamination of environmental surfaces by Candida spp. through hand touching may facilitate the occurrence of Candida infections predominantly in immunocompromised patients. In addition to that, the antifungal agents used should be carefully evaluated considering local epidemiologic trends in Candida spp. infections, so that therapeutic choices may be better guided.

  1. Cytotoxic and cytokine inducing properties of Candida glabrata in single and mixed oral infection models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lulu; Kashleva, Helena; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection, with Candida albicans being the most prevalent etiologic agent and Candida glabrata emerging as an important pathogen. C. glabrata is frequently co-isolated with C. albicans from oral lesions. Although C. albicans has been shown to trigger significant cytokine responses and cell damage, C. glabrata has not been systematically studied yet. The purpose of this study was to characterize the ability of C. glabrata to induce proinflammatory cytokine responses and host damage as a single infecting organism and in combination with C. albicans, using in vitro models of the oral mucosa. In monolayer oral epithelial cell cultures, C. glabrata failed to induce a significant interleukin-1α and interleukin-8 cytokine response and showed lower cytotoxicity, compared to C. albicans. However, C. glabrata triggered a significantly higher granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor response than C. albicans. C. glabrata strains showed a strain-dependent tissue damaging ability and a superficial invasion of the mucosal compartment in a 3-dimensional (3-D) in vitro model of the human oral mucosa and submucosa. In the 3-D system, co-infection failed to promote host damage beyond the levels of infection with C. albicans alone. These studies indicate that C. glabrata induces cytokines in human oral epithelium in a strain-specific manner, but its tissue/cell damaging ability, compared to C. albicans, is low. Synergy between C. glabrata and C. albicans in cytokine induction and host damage was not observed with the strains tested. PMID:17306958

  2. Dose escalation studies with caspofungin against Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Domán, Marianna; Kovács, Renátó; Perlin, David S; Kardos, Gábor; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Juhász, Béla; Bozó, Aliz; Majoros, László

    2015-09-01

    Echinocandins are recommended as first-line agents against invasive fungal infections caused by Candida glabrata, which still carry a high mortality rate. Dose escalation of echinocandins has been suggested to improve the clinical outcome against C. glabrata. To address this possibility, we performed in vitro and in vivo experiments with caspofungin against four WT C. glabrata clinical isolates, a drug-susceptible ATCC 90030 reference strain and two echinocandin-resistant strains with known FKS mutations. MIC values for the clinical isolates in RPMI 1640 were ≤ 0.03 mg l(-1 ) but increased to 0.125-0.25 mg l(-1 )in RPMI 1640+50% serum. In RPMI 1640+50% serum, the replication of C. glabrata was weaker than in RPMI 1640.Caspofungin in RPMI 1640 at 1 and 4 mg l(-1) showed a fungicidal effect within 7 h against three of the four clinical isolates but was only fungistatic at 16 and 32 mg l(-1) (paradoxically decreased killing activity). In RPMI 1640+50% serum, caspofungin at ≥ 1 mg l(-1) was rapidly fungicidal (within 3.31 h) against three of the four isolates. In a profoundly neutropenic murine model, all caspofungin doses (1, 2, 3, 5 and 20 mg kg(-1) daily) decreased the fungal tissue burdens significantly (P < 0.05-0.001) without statistical differences between doses, but the mean fungal tissue burdens never fell below 105 cells (g tissue)(-1). The echinocandin-resistant strains were highly virulent in animal models and all doses were ineffective. These results confirm the clinical experience that caspofungin dose escalation does not improve efficacy.

  3. [Evaluation of a rapid trehalase test for the identification of Candida glabrata].

    PubMed

    Kirdar, Sevin; Gültekin, Berna; Evcil, Gonca; Ozkütük, Aydan; Sener, Asli Gamze; Aydin, Neriman

    2009-04-01

    Candida species which cause local infections, may also lead to fatal systemic infections. The increasing incidence of non-albicans Candida, especially fluconazole susceptible or resistant dose-dependent C. glabrata, increased the importance of rapid and accurate species level identification for Candida. Rapid and correct identification of C. glabrata is essential for the initiation of the appropriate antifungal therapy. This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the rapid trehalase test in the diagnosis of C. glabrata isolates. A total of 173 Candida strains isolated from various clinical specimens and identified according to germ tube test, growth on cornmeal Tween 80 agar and the colony morphologies on Mast-CHROMagar Candida medium (Mast Diagnostics, UK), were included to the study. The identification of non-albicans Candida species were also confirmed by API 20CAUX (BioMerieux, France) system. Accordingly 86 (50%) of the isolates were identified as C. glabrata, 48 (28%) C. albicans, 17 (10%) C. krusei, 13 (8%) C. tropicalis, 5 (3%) C. parapsilosis, 3 (2%) C. kefyr and 1 (1%) Cutilis. In order to detect the presence of trehalase enzyme in Condida strains, all isolates were grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar containing 4% glucose and then one yeast colony was emulsified in 50 microl of citrate buffer containing 4% (wt/vol) trehalose for 3 h at 37 degrees C. Presence of glucose which emerged after the action of trehalase on trehalose, was detected by a commercial "urinary glucose detection dipstick" (Spinreacta, Spain). All C. glabrata strains yielded positive result by trehalase test. None C. glabrata isolates were found negative by trehalase test except for one strain of C. tropicalis. In this study, the trehalase test allowed identification of C. globrata with 100% sensitivity and 98.9% specificity. It was concluded that trehalase test is a rapid, cost-effective and simple test that can be used for the accurate identification of C. glabrata.

  4. Two echinocandin-resistant Candida glabrata FKS mutants from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Serisha D; Magobo, Rindidzani E; Zulu, Thokozile G; Maphanga, Tsidiso G; Luthuli, Nkosinathi; Lowman, Warren; Govender, Nelesh P

    2016-03-01

    Echinocandins are recommended as first-line agents to treat invasive infections caused by Candida glabrata since this organism is inherently less susceptible to azoles. However, resistance to echinocandins has been described in C. glabrata due to amino acid changes in the hotspot regions of the FKS1 and FKS2 genes. In this report, we describe the first two South African C. glabrata isolates with echinocandin resistance mediated by mutations in the FKS2 gene. Both isolates were cultured from urine specimens from private-sector patients.

  5. Candida glabrata: new tools and technologies—expanding the toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hsueh-lui; Haynes, Ken

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a noticeable rise in fungal infections related to non-albicans Candida species, including Candida glabrata which has both intrinsic resistance to and commonly acquired resistance to azole antifungals. Phylogenetically, C. glabrata is more closely related to the mostly non-pathogenic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae than to other Candida species. Despite C. glabrata's designation as a pathogen by Wickham in 1957, relatively little is known about its mechanism of virulence. Over the past few years, technology to analyse the molecular basis of infection has developed rapidly, and here we briefly review the major advances in tools and technologies available to explore and investigate the virulence of C. glabrata that have occurred over the past decade. PMID:26205243

  6. Reduced susceptibility to polyenes associated with a missense mutation in the ERG6 gene in a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata with pseudohyphal growth.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Patrick; Tronchin, Guy; Bergès, Thierry; Hennequin, Christophe; Chabasse, Dominique; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2007-03-01

    Little information is available about the molecular mechanisms responsible for polyene resistance in pathogenic yeasts. A clinical isolate of Candida glabrata with a poor susceptibility to polyenes, as determined by disk diffusion method and confirmed by determination of MIC, was recovered from a patient treated with amphotericin B. Quantitative analysis of sterols revealed a lack of ergosterol and an accumulation of late sterol intermediates, suggesting a defect in the final steps of the ergosterol pathway. Sequencing of CgERG11, CgERG6, CgERG5, and CgERG4 genes revealed exclusively a unique missense mutation in CgERG6 leading to the substitution of a cysteine by a phenylalanine in the corresponding protein. In addition, real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated an overexpression of genes encoding enzymes involved in late steps of the ergosterol pathway. Moreover, this isolate exhibited a pseudohyphal growth whatever the culture medium used, and ultrastructural changes of the cell wall of blastoconidia were seen consisting in a thinner inner layer. Cell wall alterations were also suggested by the higher susceptibility of growing cells to Calcofluor white. Additionally, complementation of this isolate with a wild-type copy of the CgERG6 gene restored susceptibility to polyenes and a classical morphology. Together, these results demonstrated that mutation in the CgERG6 gene may lead to a reduced susceptibility to polyenes and to a pseudohyphal growth due to the subsequent changes in sterol content of the plasma membrane.

  7. Risk Factors for Fluconazole-Resistant Candida glabrata Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ingi; Fishman, Neil O.; Zaoutis, Theoklis E.; Morales, Knashawn H.; Weiner, Mark G.; Synnestvedt, Marie; Nachamkin, Irving; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2010-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by Candida glabrata have increased substantially. Candida glabrata is often associated with resistance to fluconazole therapy. However, to our knowledge, risk factors for fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs have not been studied. Methods A case-case-control study was conducted at 3 hospitals from January 1, 2003, to May 31, 2007. The 2 case groups included patients with fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs (minimum inhibitory concentration ≥16 μg/mL) and patients with fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSIs (minimum inhibitory concentration ≤8 μg/mL). Hospitalized patients without C glabrata BSIs were randomly selected for inclusion in the control group and were frequency matched to cases on the basis of time at risk. Two case-control studies were performed using this shared control group. The primary risk factor of interest, previous fluconazole use, was evaluated at multivariate analyses, adjusting for demographic data, comorbid conditions, and antimicrobial exposures. Results We included 76 patients with fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs, 68 patients with fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSIs, and 512 control patients. Previous fluconazole use (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 2.3 [1.3–4.2]) and linezolid use (4.6 [2.2–9.3]) were independent risk factors for fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs; previous cefepime use (2.2 [1.2–3.9]) and metronidazole use (2.0 [1.1–3.5]) were independent risk factors for fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSIs. Conclusions Previous fluconazole use is a significant risk factor for health care–associated fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs. Future studies will be needed to evaluate the effect of decreasing fluconazole use on rates of fluconazole-resistant C glabrata BSIs. PMID:19237722

  8. Candida glabrata survives and replicates in human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Duarte, Ana Rosa; Castrejón-Jiménez, Nayeli Shantal; Baltierra-Uribe, Shantal Lizbeth; Pérez-Rangel, Sofia Judith; Carapia-Minero, Natalee; Castañeda-Sánchez, Jorge Ismael; Luna-Herrera, Julieta; López-Santiago, Rubén; Rodríguez-Tovar, Aída Verónica; García-Pérez, Blanca Estela

    2016-06-01

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic pathogen that is considered the second most common cause of candidiasis after Candida albicans Many characteristics of its mechanisms of pathogenicity remain unknown. Recent studies have focused on determining the events that underlie interactions between C. glabrata and immune cells, but the relationship between this yeast and osteoblasts has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms of interaction between human osteoblasts and C. glabrata, and to identify the roles played by some of the molecules that are produced by these cells in response to infection. We show that C. glabrata adheres to and is internalized by human osteoblasts. Adhesion is independent of opsonization, and internalization depends on the rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. We show that C. glabrata survives and replicates in osteoblasts and that this intracellular behavior is related to the level of production of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species. Opsonized C. glabrata stimulates the production of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 cytokines. Adhesion and internalization of the pathogen and the innate immune response of osteoblasts require viable C. glabrata These results suggest that C. glabrata modulates immunological mechanisms in osteoblasts to survive inside the cell.

  9. Evaluation of Polymorphic Locus Sequence Typing for Candida glabrata Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Shiffrin, Eric; Shelton, Celeste; Healey, Kelley; Vermitsky, John-Paul; Edlind, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic yeast Candida glabrata is increasingly refractory to antifungal treatment or prophylaxis and relatedly is increasingly implicated in health care-associated infections. To elucidate the epidemiology of these infections, strain typing is required. Sequence-based typing provides multiple advantages over length-based methods, such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE); however, conventional multilocus sequence typing (targeting 6 conserved loci) and whole-genome sequencing are impractical for routine use. A commercial sequence-based typing service for C. glabrata that targets polymorphic tandem repeat-containing loci has recently been developed. These CgMT-J and CgMT-M services were evaluated with 56 epidemiologically unrelated isolates, 4 to 7 fluconazole-susceptible or fluconazole-resistant isolates from each of 5 center A patients, 5 matched pairs of fluconazole-susceptible/resistant isolates from center B patients, and 7 isolates from a center C patient who responded to then failed caspofungin therapy. CgMT-J and CgMT-M generated congruent results, resolving isolates into 24 and 20 alleles, respectively. Isolates from all but one of the center A patients shared the same otherwise rare alleles, suggesting nosocomial transmission. Unexpectedly, Pdr1 sequencing showed that resistance arose independently in each patient. Similarly, most isolates from center B also clustered together; however, this may reflect a dominant clone since their alleles were shared by multiple unrelated isolates. Although distinguishable by their echinocandin susceptibilities, all isolates from the center C patient shared alleles, in agreement with the previously reported relatedness of these isolates based on PFGE. Finally, we show how phylogenetic clusters can be used to provide surrogate parents to analyze the mutational basis for antifungal resistance. PMID:26842706

  10. Candida glabrata species complex prevalence and antifungal susceptibility testing in a culture collection: First description of Candida nivariensis in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Morales-López, Soraya Eugenia; Taverna, Constanza G; Bosco-Borgeat, María Eugenia; Maldonado, Ivana; Vivot, Walter; Szusz, Wanda; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo; Córdoba, Susana B

    2016-12-01

    The presence of the cryptic species belonging to the Candida glabrata complex has not been studied in Argentina. We analyzed a collection of 117 clinical isolates of C. glabrata complex belonging to a National Culture Collection of Instituto Nacional de Microbiología "Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán" from Argentina (40 isolates from blood samples, 18 from other normally sterile sites, 20 from vagina, 14 from urine, 7 from oral cavity, 3 from catheter, 1 from a stool sample and 14 isolates whose clinical origin was not recorded). The aims of this work were to determine the prevalence of the cryptic species Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis and to evaluate the susceptibility profile of isolates against nine antifungal drugs. Identification was carried out by using classical phenotypic tests, CHROMagar™ Candida, PCR and MALDI-TOF. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole, caspofungin and anidulafungin were determined according to the EDef 7.3 (EUCAST) reference document. Of the 117 isolates, 114 were identified as C. glabrata and three as C. nivariensis by using PCR and MALDI-TOF. There were no major differences between C. nivariensis and C. glabrata susceptibility profiles. No resistant strains were found to echinocandins. We have found that the percentage of C. nivariensis in our culture collection was 2.56. This is the first description of C. nivariensis in Argentina, and data obtained could contribute to the knowledge of the epidemiology of this cryptic species.

  11. Candida bracarensis Detected Among Isolates of Candida glabrata by Petide Nucleic Acid Fluorescence in Situ Hybirdization: Susceptibility Data and Documentation of Presumed Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular taxonomic studies have revealed new yeast (Candida) species among phenotypically-delineated species: the best example being Candida dubliniensis. This study was designed to determine the occurrence of two new molecularly-defined species, Candida bracarensis and Candida nivariensis, which ...

  12. Recurrent arthritis by Candida glabrata, a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Erami, Mahzad; Afzali, Hasan; Heravi, Mansoureh Momen; Rezaei-Matehkolaei, Ali; Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Moazeni, Maryam; Dolatabadi, Somayeh; Hosseinpour, Leila

    2014-06-01

    Infectious arthritis due to Candida glabrata is very rare. A 40-year-old Iranian man had developed a painful swelling on the left knee since a year ago. A surgery (meniscectomy) was performed on his knee. However, in follow-up visit after 2 months, the patient's condition was deteriorated. Direct examination of synovial fluid with Gram and hematoxylin-eosin stains were negative for any bacterial or fungal infection or crystal elements; however, inoculation into BACTEC™ Mycosis IC/F and Plus Aerobic/F culture bottles led to the isolation of a yeast strain. The macroscopic examination on CHROMagar™ Candida medium combined with microscopical examination on CMT80 agar made a presumptive identification of the isolate to be considered as C. glabrata, and it was later on confirmed by ITS sequencing. Initial empirical treatment was started with intravenous amphotericin B for 4 weeks followed by oral itraconazole which was unsuccessful. Prescription of an oral 150-mg tablet of fluconazole was considered for a 2-month course. All symptoms completely declined, and no recurrence of infection was detected. Antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST) was performed for this isolate, and the result showed sensitivity to both amphotericin B and itraconazole and less susceptibility to fluconazole while clinical recovery was achieved by fluconazole. In any suspected clinical case caused by infectious agents, application of an effective fungal diagnostic test should be considered to avoid complications due to misdiagnosis. The correlation of AFST result with real in vivo therapeutic responses can be strain or patient dependent, and this should be considered for a successive treatment.

  13. Opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata circulates between humans and yellow-legged gulls

    PubMed Central

    Al-Yasiri, Mohammed Hashim; Normand, Anne-Cécile; L’Ollivier, Coralie; Lachaud, Laurence; Bourgeois, Nathalie; Rebaudet, Stanislas; Piarroux, Renaud; Mauffrey, Jean-François; Ranque, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata is a component of the mycobiota of both humans and yellow-legged gulls that is prone to develop fluconazole resistance. Whether gulls are a reservoir of the yeast and facilitate the dissemination of human C. glabrata strains remains an open question. In this study, MLVA genotyping highlighted the lack of genetic structure of 190 C. glabrata strains isolated from either patients in three hospitals or fecal samples collected from gull breeding colonies located in five distinct areas along the French Mediterranean littoral. Fluconazole-resistant isolates were evenly distributed between both gull and human populations. These findings demonstrate that gulls are a reservoir of this species and facilitate the diffusion of C. glabrata and indirect transmission to human or animal hosts via environmental contamination. This eco-epidemiological view, which can be applied to other vertebrate host species, broadens our perspective regarding the reservoirs and dissemination patterns of antifungal-resistant human pathogenic yeast. PMID:27782182

  14. Opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata circulates between humans and yellow-legged gulls.

    PubMed

    Al-Yasiri, Mohammed Hashim; Normand, Anne-Cécile; L'Ollivier, Coralie; Lachaud, Laurence; Bourgeois, Nathalie; Rebaudet, Stanislas; Piarroux, Renaud; Mauffrey, Jean-François; Ranque, Stéphane

    2016-10-26

    The opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata is a component of the mycobiota of both humans and yellow-legged gulls that is prone to develop fluconazole resistance. Whether gulls are a reservoir of the yeast and facilitate the dissemination of human C. glabrata strains remains an open question. In this study, MLVA genotyping highlighted the lack of genetic structure of 190 C. glabrata strains isolated from either patients in three hospitals or fecal samples collected from gull breeding colonies located in five distinct areas along the French Mediterranean littoral. Fluconazole-resistant isolates were evenly distributed between both gull and human populations. These findings demonstrate that gulls are a reservoir of this species and facilitate the diffusion of C. glabrata and indirect transmission to human or animal hosts via environmental contamination. This eco-epidemiological view, which can be applied to other vertebrate host species, broadens our perspective regarding the reservoirs and dissemination patterns of antifungal-resistant human pathogenic yeast.

  15. Osteomyelitis Caused by Candida glabrata in the Distal Phalanx

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, Naohito; Sairyo, Koichi; Yoshioka, Shinji; Yamano, Masahiro; Henmi, Tatsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Osteomyelitis caused by Candida glabrata is rare and its optimal treatment is unknown. Here we report a case of osteomyelitis caused by C. glabrata in the distal phalanx in a 54-year-old woman. Despite partial resection of the nail and administering a 1-month course of antibiotics for paronychia, the local swelling remained and an osteolytic lesion was found. C. glabrata osteomyelitis of the distal phalanx was later diagnosed after curettage. Thereafter, the patient was treated with antifungal agents for 3 months. The infection eventually resolved, and radiological healing of the osteolytic lesion was achieved. Antifungal susceptibility testing should be performed in the case of osteomyelitis caused by nonalbicans Candida species, due to their resistance to fluconazole. PMID:25215255

  16. Two unlike cousins: Candida albicans and C. glabrata infection strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans and C. glabrata are the two most common pathogenic yeasts of humans, yet they are phylogenetically, genetically and phenotypically very different. In this review, we compare and contrast the strategies of C. albicans and C. glabrata to attach to and invade into the host, obtain nutrients and evade the host immune response. Although their strategies share some basic concepts, they differ greatly in their outcome. While C. albicans follows an aggressive strategy to subvert the host response and to obtain nutrients for its survival, C. glabrata seems to have evolved a strategy which is based on stealth, evasion and persistence, without causing severe damage in murine models. However, both fungi are successful as commensals and as pathogens of humans. Understanding these strategies will help in finding novel ways to fight Candida, and fungal infections in general. PMID:23253282

  17. Oxidative stress response to menadione and cumene hydroperoxide in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Castaño, Irene; Arroyo-Helguera, Omar; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2009-07-01

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that can cause severe invasive infections and can evade phagocytic cell clearance. We are interested in understanding the virulence of this fungal pathogen, in particular its oxidative stress response. Here we investigated C. glabrata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans responses to two different oxidants: menadione and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP). In log-phase, in the presence of menadione, C. glabrata requires Cta1p (catalase), while in a stationary phase (SP), Cta1p is dispensable. In addition, C. glabrata is less resistant to menadione than C. albicans in SP. The S. cerevisiae laboratory reference strain is less resistant to menadione than C. glabrata and C. albicans; however S. cerevisiaeclinical isolates (CIs) are more resistant than the lab reference strain. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae CIs showed an increased catalase activity. Interestingly, in SP C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae are more resistant to CHP than C. albicans and Cta1p plays no apparent role in detoxifying this oxidant.

  18. Clotrimazole Drug Resistance in Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates Correlates with Increased Expression of the Drug:H+ Antiporters CgAqr1, CgTpo1_1, CgTpo3, and CgQdr2

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Catarina; Ribeiro, Jonathan; Miranda, Isabel M.; Silva-Dias, Ana; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Rodrigues, Acácio G.; Teixeira, Miguel C.

    2016-01-01

    For years, antifungal drug resistance in Candida species has been associated to the expression of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters. More recently, a few drug efflux pumps from the Drug:H+ Antiporter (DHA) family have also been shown to play a role in this process, although to date only the Candida albicans Mdr1 transporter has been demonstrated to be relevant in the clinical acquisition of antifungal drug resistance. This work provides evidence to suggest the involvement of the C. glabrata DHA transporters CgAqr1, CgQdr2, CgTpo1_1, and CgTpo3 in the clinical acquisition of clotrimazole drug resistance. A screening for azole drug resistance in 138 C. glabrata clinical isolates, from patients attending two major Hospitals in Portugal, was performed. Based on this screening, 10 clotrimazole susceptible and 10 clotrimazole resistant isolates were selected for further analysis. The transcript levels of CgAQR1, CgQDR2, CgTPO1_1, and CgTPO3 were found to be significantly up-regulated in resistant isolates when compared to the susceptible ones, with a level of correlation that was found to be similar to that of CgCDR2, an ABC gene known to be involved in the clinical acquisition of resistance. As a proof-of-concept experiment, the CgTPO3 gene was deleted in an azole resistant C. glabrata isolate, exhibiting high levels of expression of this gene. The deletion of CgTPO3 in this isolate was found to lead to decreased resistance to clotrimazole and fluconazole, and increased accumulation of azole drugs, thus suggesting the involvement of this transporter in the manifestation of azole resistance. PMID:27148215

  19. Stress response in Candida glabrata: pieces of a fragmented picture.

    PubMed

    Jandric, Zeljkica; Schüller, Christoph

    2011-12-01

    Candida glabrata is closely related to yeast but obviously adapted to human commensalism. Communication with the environment is important to adjust allocation of resources between protection and proliferation in order to adapt to different situations in and outside of the host. Gene transcription regulated by environmental conditions is a major response strategy of simple fungal organisms. Differences to yeast include an extended repertoire of adhesive genes, and high drug, starvation and stress resistance. These properties largely do not originate from novel virulence genes but rather from adaptations of the transcriptional wiring. C. glabrata signaling pathways providing stress protection are adopted to meet conditions possibly encountered in a host-pathogen confrontation. The view on C. glabrata is getting clearer and points to a simple strategy combining resilience and a few adaptations.

  20. MALDI-TOF typing highlights geographical and fluconazole resistance clusters in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Dhieb, C; Normand, A C; Al-Yasiri, M; Chaker, E; El Euch, D; Vranckx, K; Hendrickx, M; Sadfi, N; Piarroux, R; Ranque, S

    2015-06-01

    Utilizing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra for Candida glabrata typing would be a cost-effective and easy-to-use alternative to classical DNA-based typing methods. This study aimed to use MALDI-TOF for the typing of C. glabrata clinical isolates from various geographical origins and test its capacity to differentiate between fluconazole-sensitive and -resistant strains.Both microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP) and MALDI-TOF mass spectra of 58 C. glabrata isolates originating from Marseilles (France) and Tunis (Tunisia) as well as collection strains from diverse geographic origins were analyzed. The same analysis was conducted on a subset of C. glabrata isolates that were either susceptible (MIC ≤ 8 mg/l) or resistant (MIC ≥ 64 mg/l) to fluconazole.According to the seminal results, both MALDI-TOF and MLP classifications could highlight C. glabrata population structures associated with either geographical dispersal barriers (p < 10(-5)) or the selection of antifungal drug resistance traits (<10(-5)).In conclusion, MALDI-TOF geographical clustering was congruent with MPL genotyping and highlighted a significant population genetic structure according to fluconazole susceptibility in C. glabrata. Furthermore, although MALDI-TOF and MLP resulted in distinct classifications, MALDI-TOF also classified the isolates with respect to their fluconazole susceptibility profile. Further prospective studies are required to evaluate the capacity of MALDI-TOF typing to investigate C. glabrata infection outbreaks and predict the antifungal susceptibility profile of clinical laboratory isolates.

  1. The mating type-like loci of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Robledo-Márquez, Karina A; Ramírez-Zavaleta, Candy Y; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a haploid and opportunistic fungal pathogen that has not known sexual cycle, has conserved the majority of the genes required for mating and cell type identity. The C. glabrata genome contains three mating-type-like loci called MTL1, MTL2 and MTL3. The three loci encode putative transcription factors, a1, α1 and α2 that regulate cell type identity and sexual reproduction in other fungi like the closely related Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MTL1 can contain either a or α information. MTL2, which contains a information and MTL3 with α information, are relatively close to two telomeres. MTL1 and MTL2 are transcriptionally active, while MTL3 is subject to an incomplete silencing nucleated at the telomere that depends on the silencing proteins Sir2, Sir3, Sir4, yKu70/80, Rif1, Rap1 and Sum1. C. glabrata does not seem to maintain cell type identity, as cell type-specific genes are expressed regardless of the type (or even absence) of mating information. These data highlight important differences in the control of mating and cell type identity between the non-pathogenic yeast S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata, which might explain the absence of a sexual cycle in C. glabrata. The fact that C. glabrata has conserved the vast majority of the genes involved in mating might suggest that some of these genes perhaps have been rewired to control other processes important for the survival inside the host as a commensal or as a human pathogen. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  2. A Murine Model of Candida glabrata Vaginitis Shows No Evidence of an Inflammatory Immunopathogenic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Evelyn E.; Peters, Brian M.; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common organism isolated from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in women with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of C. glabrata-associated VVC are unknown and have not been studied at any depth in animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate host responses to infection following efforts to optimize a murine model of C. glabrata VVC. For this, various designs were evaluated for consistent experimental vaginal colonization (i.e., type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice, exogenous estrogen, varying inocula, and co-infection with C. albicans). Upon model optimization, vaginal fungal burden and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) recruitment were assessed longitudinally over 21 days post-inoculation, together with vaginal concentrations of IL-1β, S100A8 alarmin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and in vivo biofilm formation. Consistent and sustained vaginal colonization with C. glabrata was achieved in estrogenized streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Vaginal PMN infiltration was consistently low, with IL-1β, S100A8, and LDH concentrations similar to uninoculated mice. Biofilm formation was not detected in vivo, and co-infection with C. albicans did not induce synergistic immunopathogenic effects. This data suggests that experimental vaginal colonization of C. glabrata is not associated with an inflammatory immunopathogenic response or biofilm formation. PMID:26807975

  3. In vitro activity of Caspofungin combined with Fluconazole on mixed Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pesee, Siripen; Angkananuwat, Chayanit; Tancharoensukjit, Sudarat; Muanmai, Somporn; Sirivan, Pattaraporn; Bubphawas, Manita; Tanarerkchai, Nissara

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal effect of caspofungin (CAS) combined with fluconazole (FLU) on the biofilm biomass and cultivable viability and microstructure of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata mixed biofilm in vitro.Biofilms were formed in a 96-well microtiter plate for crystal violet assay and colony forming unit (CFU) method and grown on plastic coverslip disks for scanning electron microscopy. MIC50 of CAS and FLU against single Candida spp.and mixed Candida spp.biofilms were evaluated using crystal violet assay. Additional,C. albicans and C. glabrata mixed biofilms were incubated with subinhibitory CAS concentration plus FLU and their percentages of Candida biofilm reduction were calculated. We found that percentages of biofilm reduction were significantly decreased when CAS at 0.25MIC and FLU (0.25 or 0.5MIC) were combined (P< .05) but not different when CAS at 0.5 MIC combined with FLU at 0.25 or 0.5MIC, compared to CAS treatment alone. Structural analyses revealed that CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms showed less hyphae and blastospores with some aberrant cells compared to control group. Although it was evident that a greater CFU of Candida glabrata were demonstrated in every group, the total viable cells derived from CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms at any ratio were not significantly different from positive control. Overall, CAS/FLU combinations appeared to affect the quantity and cell architecture, but number of viable cell, of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata mixed biofilm. This antifungal effect was CAS concentration dependent.

  4. Resistance reversal induced by a combination of fluconazole and tacrolimus (FK506) in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Chen, Zuozhong; Zhang, Caiqing; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Shujuan

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing concern about Candida glabrata due to its high isolation frequency in candidiasis recently and notorious drug resistance to fluconazole. Drug combination is one effective approach to counteract drug resistance. This study aimed to test whether a combination of fluconazole and tacrolimus (FK506) had a synergistic effect on C. glabrata, and to seek the potential mechanisms underlying the synergistic effects. In vitro effects of fluconazole and FK506 against C. glabrata with different susceptibilities were investigated by a chequerboard method and a time-kill curve method. The mechanistic studies against the resistant C. glabrata were performed from two aspects: quantification of expression levels of fluconazole resistance genes (ERG11, CDR1, PDH1 and SNQ2) by real-time quantitative PCR and functional assays of drug efflux pumps. The addition of FK506 resulted in a decrease in the MIC of fluconazole from 32 to 8 µg ml(-1) against the dose-dependent susceptible C. glabrata, and from 256 to 16 µg ml(-1) against the resistant C. glabrata, respectively. The synergy was further confirmed by the time-kill assay. The expression levels of the ERG11 and SNQ2 genes were significantly downregulated after exposure to the drug combination, whereas that of the CDR1 gene was significantly upregulated, and no significant change in expression of PDH1 gene was observed. Flow cytometric assays showed that FK506 reduced the efflux of fluconazole. Tacrolimus enhanced the susceptibility of fluconazole against resistant C. glabrata by reducing the expression levels of the ERG11 and SNQ2 genes and inhibiting fluconazole efflux.

  5. Application of CHROMagar Candida for rapid screening of clinical specimens for Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, and Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M A; Houston, A; Coffmann, S

    1996-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a new differential culture medium that allows selective isolation of yeasts and simultaneously identifies colonies of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. We evaluated the use of this medium with 316 yeast isolates including 247 isolated directly on CHROMagar from clinical material. Over 95% of stock and clinical isolates of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei were correctly identified on the basis of colony morphology and pigmentation on CHROMagar. Additionally, CHROMagar also allowed the identification of C. (Torulopsis) glabrata at a similar level of accuracy. The overall agreement between two observers in reading the CHROMagar plates was 95%. Growth of Candida sp. isolates on CHROMagar had no adverse effect on antifungal MICs or Vitek identification results. In parallel, cultures of 548 stool and rectal swab specimens set up on CHROMagar and Sabouraud glucose agar (SGA) were positive in 234 instances. CHROMagar was positive and SGA was negative for 11 specimens, and CHROMagar was negative and SGA was positive for 18 specimens. A single yeast species was isolated on both media from 162 specimens, and in 146 (90%) of these specimens the same species was detected on both CHROMagar and SGA. A total of 43 of the 234 positive cultures contained mixtures of yeast species. Twenty (47%) of these mixed cultures were detected only on CHROMagar. CHROMagar is extremely useful in making a rapid presumptive identification of common yeast species. This capability plus the ability to detect mixed cultures of Candida spp. promises to improve and streamline the work flow in the mycology and clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:8748273

  6. Silver colloidal nanoparticles: antifungal effect against adhered cells and biofilms of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, D R; Gorup, L F; Silva, S; Negri, M; de Camargo, E R; Oliveira, R; Barbosa, D B; Henriques, M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silver nanoparticles (SN) against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata adhered cells and biofilms. SN (average diameter 5 nm) were synthesized by silver nitrate reduction with sodium citrate and stabilized with ammonia. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests were performed for C. albicans (n = 2) and C. glabrata (n = 2) grown in suspension following the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute microbroth dilution method. SN were applied to adhered cells (2 h) or biofilms (48 h) and after 24 h of contact their effect was assessed by enumeration of colony forming units (CFUs) and quantification of total biomass (by crystal violet staining). The MIC results showed that SN were fungicidal against all strains tested at very low concentrations (0.4-3.3 μg ml(-1)). Furthermore, SN were more effective in reducing biofilm biomass when applied to adhered cells (2 h) than to pre-formed biofilms (48 h), with the exception of C. glabrata ATCC, which in both cases showed a reduction ∼90%. Regarding cell viability, SN were highly effective on adhered C. glabrata and respective biofilms. On C. albicans the effect was not so evident but there was also a reduction in the number of viable biofilm cells. In summary, SN may have the potential to be an effective alternative to conventional antifungal agents for future therapies in Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

  7. Candida glabrata: Review of Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Clinical Disease with Comparison to C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Fidel, Paul L.; Vazquez, Jose A.; Sobel, Jack D.

    1999-01-01

    Until recently, Candida glabrata was considered a relatively nonpathogenic commensal fungal organism of human mucosal tissues. However, with the increased use of immunosuppressive agents, mucosal and systemic infections caused by C. glabrata have increased significantly, especially in the human immunodeficiency virus-infected population. A major obstacle in C. glabrata infections is their innate resistance to azole antimycotic therapy, which is very effective in treating infections caused by other Candida species. Candida glabrata, formerly known as Torulopsis glabrata, contrasts with other Candida species in its nondimorphic blastoconidial morphology and haploid genome. C. glabrata currently ranks second or third as the causative agent of superficial (oral, esophageal, vaginal, or urinary) or systemic candidal infections, which are often nosocomial. Currently, however, there are few recognized virulence factors of C. glabrata and little is known about the host defense mechanisms that protect against infection. Two established animal models (systemic and vaginal) have been established to study treatment, pathogenesis, and immunity. Treatment of C. glabrata infections can include azoles but often requires amphotericin B or flucytosine. This review summarizes all known clinical and experimental information about C. glabrata infections with comparisons to C. albicans as a means of contrasting the two species commonly observed and emphasizing the many recognized differences. PMID:9880475

  8. Intracellular survival of Candida glabrata in macrophages: immune evasion and persistence.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lydia; Seider, Katja; Hube, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    Candida glabrata is a successful human opportunistic pathogen which causes superficial but also life-threatening systemic infections. During infection, C. glabrata has to cope with cells of the innate immune system such as macrophages, which belong to the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Candida glabrata is able to survive and even replicate inside macrophages while causing surprisingly low damage and cytokine release. Here, we present an overview of recent studies dealing with the interaction of C. glabrata with macrophages, from phagocytosis to intracellular growth and escape. We review the strategies of C. glabrata that permit intracellular survival and replication, including poor host cell activation, modification of phagosome maturation and phagosome pH, adaptation to antimicrobial activities, and mechanisms to overcome the nutrient limitations within the phagosome. In summary, these studies suggest that survival within macrophages may be an immune evasion and persistence strategy of C. glabrata during infection.

  9. Exogenous folates stimulate growth and budding of Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Porzoor, Afsaneh; Macreadie, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    Folate, vitamin B9, is well recognized as being essential for cell growth. The utilization of folate is common to all cells, but the source of it may be quite different. For example, mammalian cells depend on exogenous uptake of folates, while plants and microbes can synthesize them. There has been little consideration of uptake of folate in microbial cells, and studies on the effects of folates in mammalian cells, where conditions are restricted. This study shows that exogenous folates (folic acid or folinic acid), causes Candida glabrata cells suspended in water alone to undergo two cycles of cell division and to form multiple buds. The effect was limited to cells in the stationary phase and more profound in quiescent cells. These data indicate a novel response of yeast to folates that may increase the utility of yeast as a model to study folate transport and signaling. PMID:28357288

  10. Rapid identification of Candida glabrata by using a dipstick to detect trehalase-generated glucose.

    PubMed

    Peltroche-Llacsahuanga, H; Schnitzler, N; Lütticken, R; Haase, G

    1999-01-01

    Candida glabrata is a yeast frequently isolated from human specimens. Based upon its well-known ability to rapidly hydrolyze trehalose, we have developed a novel and cost-effective test incubating one yeast colony emulsified in 50 microl of citrate buffer (0.1 M [pH 5. 0]) containing 4% (wt/vol) trehalose for 3 h at 37 degrees C. Trehalase-generated glucose is detected with a commercially available dipstick (range, 1.0 to 50 g/liter). For evaluation, consecutive clinical isolates and several reference strains of C. glabrata (n = 160), C. albicans (n = 120), and other yeast species with potential ability for utilization of trehalose (C. dubliniensis, n = 11; C. famata, n = 15; C. guilliermondii, n = 5; C. lusitaniae, n = 16; C. parapsilosis, n = 20; C. tropicalis, n = 34; C. viswanathii, n = 5; Pichia angusta, n = 2; C. zeylanoides, n = 2; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, n = 16; C. neoformans, n = 7) were tested. Identification of C. glabrata is achieved within 3 h, with a specificity of 99.1% and a sensitivity of 98.8% when grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar supplemented with 4% glucose.

  11. In Vitro Fungicidal Activities of Anidulafungin, Caspofungin, and Micafungin against Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis Evaluated by Time-Kill Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Cantón, Emilia; Eraso, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin killing activities against Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis were evaluated by the time-kill methodology. The concentrations assayed were 0.06, 0.125, and 0.5 μg/ml, which are achieved in serum. Anidulafungin and micafungin required between 13 and 26 h to reach the fungicidal endpoint (99.9% killing) against C. glabrata and C. bracarensis. All echinocandins were less active against C. nivariensis. PMID:25801575

  12. Candida albicans isolates from a Malaysian hospital exhibit more potent phospholipase and haemolysin activities than non-albicans Candida isolates.

    PubMed

    Chin, V K; Foong, K J; Maha, A; Rusliza, B; Norhafizah, M; Ng, K P; Chong, P P

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed at determining the phospholipase and haemolysin activity of Candida isolates in Malaysia. A total of 37 Candida clinical isolates representing seven species, Candida albicans (12), Candida tropicalis (8), Candida glabrata (4), Candida parapsilosis (1), Candida krusei (4), Candida orthopsilosis (1) and Candida rugosa (7) were tested. In vitro phospholipase activity was determined by using egg yolk plate assay whereas in vitro haemolysin activity was tested by using blood plate assay on sheep blood Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA) enriched with glucose. Phospholipase activity was detected in 75% (9 out of 12) of the C. albicans isolates. Among the 25 non- C. albicans Candida isolates, phospholipase activity was detected in only 24% of these isolates. The phospholipase activity of C. albicans was significantly higher than that of the non- C. albicans Candida isolates (P=0.002). Haemolysin activity was detected in 100% of the C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis isolates while 75% of the C. krusei isolates and 12.3% of the C. rugosa isolates showed haemolysin activity. The haemolytic activity of C. albicans was significantly higher than that of the non- C. albicans Candida isolates (P=0.0001).The findings in this study indicate that C. albicans isolates in Malaysia may possess greater virulence potential than the non-albicans species.

  13. New Eugenol Glucoside-based Derivative Shows Fungistatic and Fungicidal Activity against Opportunistic Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Thiago Belarmino; Brito, Keila Mercês de Oliveira; Silva, Naiara Chaves; Rocha, Raissa Prado; de Sousa, Grasiely Faria; Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil; Dias, Amanda Latércia Tranches; Veloso, Marcia Paranho; Carvalho, Diogo Teixeira; Dias, Danielle Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    A new series of glucosides modified in their saccharide units were synthesized, evaluated against Candida sp., and compared to prototype 1, an eugenol tetracetyl glucoside previously synthesized and shown to be active against Candida glabrata. Among the new glucosides, benzyl derivative 5 was the most promising, showing fungistatic activity at IC50 18.1 μm against Candida glabrata (threefold higher than fluconazole) and fungicidal activity with a low IC90 value of 36.2 μm. Moreover, the cytotoxic activity of compound 5 (CC50 : 580.9 μm), tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, suggests its potential as an agent to treat Candida glabrata infections, with a selectivity index of 32. The new eugenol glucoside 5 may be considered as a novel structural pattern in the development of new anti-Candida drugs.

  14. In vitro activity of essential oils extracted from condiments against fluconazole-resistant and -sensitive Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Soares, I H; Loreto, É S; Rossato, L; Mario, D N; Venturini, T P; Baldissera, F; Santurio, J M; Alves, S H

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the antifungal activity of essential oils obtained from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon), Lippia graveolens (Mexican oregano), Thymus vulgaris (thyme), Salvia officinalis (sage), Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary), Ocimum basilicum (basil) and Zingiber officinale (ginger) were assessed against Candida glabrata isolates. One group contained 30 fluconazole-susceptible C. glabrata isolates, and the second group contained fluconazole-resistant isolates derived from the first group after the in vitro induction of fluconazole-resistance, for a total of 60 tested isolates. The broth microdilution methodology was used. Concentrations of 50μg/mL, 100μg/mL, 200μg/mL, 400μg/mL, 800μg/mL, 1600μg/mL and 3200μg/mL of the essential oils were used, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) were determined. Thyme, sage, rosemary, basil and ginger essential oils showed no antifungal activity at the tested concentrations. Antimicrobial activity less than or equal to 3200μg/mL was observed for oregano, Mexican oregano and cinnamon essential oils. Both the oregano and Mexican oregano essential oils showed high levels of antifungal activity against the fluconazole-susceptible C. glabrata group, whereas the cinnamon essential oil showed the best antifungal activity against the fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata isolates.

  15. Large-scale Phenotypic Profiling of Gene Deletion Mutants in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Tscherner, Michael; Kuchler, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a method enabling the phenotypic profiling of genome-scale deletion collections of fungal mutants to detect phenotypes for various stress conditions. These stress conditions include among many others antifungal drug susceptibility, temperature-induced and osmotic as well as heavy metal or oxidative stress. The protocol was extensively used to phenotype a collection of gene deletion mutants in the human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata (C. glabrata) (Schwarzmüller et al., 2014). PMID:27774498

  16. Direct Isolation of Candida spp. from Blood Cultures on the Chromogenic Medium CHROMagar Candida

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Lynn L.; Hospenthal, Duane R.; Murray, Clinton K.; Dooley, David P.

    2003-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a selective and differential chromogenic medium that has been shown to be useful for identification of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, and perhaps Candida glabrata. Colony morphology and color have been well defined when CHROMagar Candida has been used to isolate yeast directly from clinical specimens, including stool, urine, respiratory, vaginal, oropharyngeal, and esophageal sources. Direct isolation of yeast on CHROMagar Candida from blood cultures has not been evaluated. We evaluated whether the color and colony characteristics produced by Candida spp. on CHROMagar Candida were altered when yeasts were isolated directly from blood cultures. Fifty clinical isolates of Candida were inoculated into aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles and incubated at 35°C in an automated blood culture system. When growth was detected, an aliquot was removed and plated onto CHROMagar Candida. As a control, CHROMagar Candida plates were inoculated with the same isolate of yeast grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar simultaneously. No significant difference was detected in color or colony morphology between the blood and control isolates in any of the tested organisms. All C. albicans (n = 12), C. tropicalis (n = 12), C. glabrata (n = 9), and C. krusei (n = 5) isolates exhibited the expected species-specific colony characteristics and color, whether isolated directly from blood or from control cultures. CHROMagar Candida can be reliably used for direct isolation of yeast from blood cultures. Direct isolation could allow mycology laboratories to more rapidly identify Candida spp., enable clinicians to more quickly make antifungal agent selections, and potentially decrease patient morbidity and mortality. PMID:12791890

  17. Effect of tyrosol on adhesion of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to acrylic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Douglas Roberto; Feresin, Leonardo Perina; Arias, Laís Salomão; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Barbosa, Debora Barros; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2015-09-01

    The prevention of adhesion of Candida cells to acrylic surfaces can be regarded as an alternative to prevent denture stomatitis. The use of quorum sensing molecules, such as tyrosol, could potentially interfere with the adhesion process. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of tyrosol on adhesion of single and mixed cultures of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to acrylic resin surfaces. Tyrosol was diluted in each yeast inoculum (10(7) cells/ml in artificial saliva) at 25, 50, 100, and 200 mM. Then, each dilution was added to wells of 24-well plates containing the acrylic specimens, and the plates were incubated at 37°C for 2 h. After, the effect of tyrosol was determined by total biomass quantification, metabolic activity of the cells and colony-forming unit counting. Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) was used as a positive control. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Holm-Sidak post hoc test (α = 0.05). The results of total biomass quantification and metabolic activity revealed that the tyrosol promoted significant reductions (ranging from 22.32 to 86.16%) on single C. albicans and mixed cultures. Moreover, tyrosol at 200 mM and CHG significantly reduced (p < 0.05) the number of adhered cells to the acrylic surface for single and mixed cultures of both species, with reductions ranging from 1.74 to 3.64-log10. In conclusion, tyrosol has an inhibitory effect on Candida adhesion to acrylic resin, and further investigations are warranted to clarify its potential against Candida infections.

  18. Heteroresistance to Fluconazole Is a Continuously Distributed Phenotype among Candida glabrata Clinical Strains Associated with In Vivo Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ami, Ronen; Zimmerman, Offer; Finn, Talya; Amit, Sharon; Novikov, Anna; Wertheimer, Noa; Lurie-Weinberger, Mor

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida glabrata causes persistent infections in patients treated with fluconazole and often acquires resistance following exposure to the drug. Here we found that clinical strains of C. glabrata exhibit cell-to-cell variation in drug response (heteroresistance). We used population analysis profiling (PAP) to assess fluconazole heteroresistance (FLCHR) and to ask if it is a binary trait or a continuous phenotype. Thirty (57.6%) of 52 fluconazole-sensitive clinical C. glabrata isolates met accepted dichotomous criteria for FLCHR. However, quantitative grading of FLCHR by using the area under the PAP curve (AUC) revealed a continuous distribution across a wide range of values, suggesting that all isolates exhibit some degree of heteroresistance. The AUC correlated with rhodamine 6G efflux and was associated with upregulation of the CDR1 and PDH1 genes, encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transmembrane transporters, implying that HetR populations exhibit higher levels of drug efflux. Highly FLCHR C. glabrata was recovered more frequently than nonheteroresistant C. glabrata from hematogenously infected immunocompetent mice following treatment with high-dose fluconazole (45.8% versus 15%, P = 0.029). Phylogenetic analysis revealed some phenotypic clustering but also variations in FLCHR within clonal groups, suggesting both genetic and epigenetic determinants of heteroresistance. Collectively, these results establish heteroresistance to fluconazole as a graded phenotype associated with ABC transporter upregulation and fluconazole efflux. Heteroresistance may explain the propensity of C. glabrata for persistent infection and the emergence of breakthrough resistance to fluconazole. PMID:27486188

  19. Effect of pH on In Vitro Susceptibility of Candida glabrata and Candida albicans to 11 Antifungal Agents and Implications for Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Danby, Claire S.; Boikov, Dina; Rautemaa-Richardson, Rina

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) due to Candida glabrata is challenging, with limited therapeutic options. Unexplained disappointing clinical efficacy has been reported with systemic and topical azole antifungal agents in spite of in vitro susceptibility. Given that the vaginal pH of patients with VVC is unchanged at 4 to 4.5, we studied the effect of pH on the in vitro activity of 11 antifungal agents against 40 C. glabrata isolates and compared activity against 15 fluconazole-sensitive and 10 reduced-fluconazole-susceptibility C. albicans strains. In vitro susceptibility to flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, ciclopirox olamine, amphotericin B, and caspofungin was determined using the CLSI method for yeast susceptibility testing. Test media were buffered to pHs of 7, 6, 5, and 4. Under conditions of reduced pH, C. glabrata isolates remained susceptible to caspofungin and flucytosine; however, there was a dramatic increase in the MIC90 for amphotericin B and every azole drug tested. Although susceptible to other azole drugs tested at pH 7, C. albicans strains with reduced fluconazole susceptibility also demonstrated reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B and all azoles at pH 4. In contrast, fluconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates remained susceptible at low pH to azoles, in keeping with clinical observations. In selecting agents for treatment of recurrent C. glabrata vaginitis, clinicians should recognize the limitations of in vitro susceptibility testing utilizing pH 7.0. PMID:22232293

  20. Candida biotypes isolated from clinical specimens in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ng, K P; Madasamy, M; Saw, T L; Baki, A; He, J; Soo-Hoo, T S

    The distribution of Candida species was examined using 1114 yeasts isolated from various clinical specimens. The isolates were identified by germ tube test, hyphal/pseudohyphae and chlamydoconidia production and carbohydrate assimilation test using ten carbohydrates (glucose, sucrose, trehalose, cellobiose, arabinose, galactose, mannitol, raffinose, lactose and maltose). Among the 1114 isolates studied, 9 species of Candida were identified and the relative frequency of isolation was C. albicans (44.2%), C. parapsilosis (26.0%), C. tropicalis (17.7%), C. glabrata (9.6%), C. krusei (1.2%), C. rugosa (0.6%), C. guilliermondii (0.2%), C. lusitaniae (0.08%) and C. kefyr (0.08%). Non-C. albicans was the most common Candida species isolated from blood, respiratory system, urine and skin. The isolate from vaginal swabs was predominantly C. albicans. 82.2% of C. glabrata and 64.2% of C. krusei isolated in this study were from vaginal swabs.

  1. The oxidative stress response of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Briones-Martin-Del-Campo, Marcela; Orta-Zavalza, Emmanuel; Juarez-Cepeda, Jacqueline; Gutierrez-Escobedo, Guadalupe; Cañas-Villamar, Israel; Castaño, Irene; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Organisms have evolved different strategies to respond to oxidative stress generated as a by-product of aerobic respiration and thus maintain the redox homeostasis within the cell. In particular, fungal pathogens are exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) when they interact with the phagocytic cells of the host which are the first line of defense against fungal infections. These pathogens have co-opted the enzymatic (catalases, superoxide dismutases (SODs), and peroxidases) and non-enzymatic (glutathione) mechanisms used to maintain the redox homeostasis within the cell, to resist oxidative stress and ensure survival within the host. Several virulence factors have been related to the response to oxidative stress in pathogenic fungi. The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata (C. glabrata) is the second most common cause of candidiasis after Candida albicans (C. albicans). C. glabrata has a well defined oxidative stress response (OSR), which include both enzymatic and non-enzymatic mechanisms. C. glabrata OSR is controlled by the well-conserved transcription factors Yap1, Skn7, Msn2 and Msn4. In this review, we describe the OSR of C. glabrata, what is known about its core elements, its regulation and how C. glabrata interacts with the host. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  2. Comparative effects of micafungin, caspofungin, and anidulafungin against a difficult-to-treat fungal opportunistic pathogen, Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Spreghini, Elisabetta; Orlando, Fiorenza; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Giannini, Daniele; Manso, Esther; Barchiesi, Francesco

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro and in vivo activities of micafungin, caspofungin, and anidulafungin against Candida glabrata. The MICs against 28 clinical isolates showed that the overall susceptibilities to caspofungin and to micafungin were not statistically different in the absence of human serum, whereas the isolates were less susceptible to micafungin than to caspofungin in its presence. Minimum fungicidal concentrations, as well as time-kill experiments, showed that caspofungin was more active than anidulafungin, while micafungin was superior to either caspofungin or anidulafungin without serum; its addition rendered caspofungin and micafungin equally effective. A murine model of systemic candidiasis against a C. glabrata-susceptible isolate was performed to study the effects of all three echinocandins, and kidney burden counts showed that caspofungin, micafungin, and anidulafungin were active starting from 0.25, 1, and 5 mg/kg of body weight/day, respectively. Two echinocandin-resistant strains of C. glabrata were selected: C. glabrata 30, a laboratory strain harboring the mutation Fks2p-P667T, and C. glabrata 51, a clinical isolate harboring the mutation Fks2p-D666G. Micafungin activity was shown to be as effective as or more effective than that of caspofungin or anidulafungin in terms of MICs. In vivo studies against these resistant strains showed that micafungin was active starting from 1 mg/kg/day, while caspofungin was effective only when administrated at higher doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg/day. Although a trend toward colony reduction was observed with the highest doses of anidulafungin, a significant statistical difference was never reached.

  3. Expression Patterns of ABC Transporter Genes in Fluconazole-Resistant Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Atefeh Abdollahi; Badali, Hamid; Shokohi, Tahereh; Nabili, Mojtaba; Amirrajab, Nasrin; Moazeni, Maryam

    2017-04-01

    Clinical management of fungal diseases is compromised by the emergence of antifungal drug resistance in fungi, which leads to elimination of available drug classes as treatment options. An understanding of antifungal resistance at molecular level is, therefore, essential for the development of strategies to combat the resistance. This study presents the assessment of molecular mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in clinical Candida glabrata isolates originated from Iran. Taking seven distinct fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata isolates, real-time PCRs were performed to evaluate the alternations in the regulation of the genes involved in drug efflux including CgCDR1, CgCDR2, CgSNQ2, and CgERG11. Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in CgPDR1 alleles were determined by DNA sequencing. Cross-resistance to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole was observed in 2.5 % of the isolates. In the present study, six amino acid substitutions were identified in CgPdr1, among which W297R, T588A, and F575L were previously reported, whereas D243N, H576Y, and P915R are novel. CgCDR1 overexpression was observed in 57.1 % of resistant isolates. However, CgCDR2 was not co-expressed with CgCDR1. CgSNQ2 was upregulated in 71.4 % of the cases. CgERG11 overexpression does not seem to be associated with azole resistance, except for isolates that exhibited azole cross-resistance. The pattern of efflux pump gene upregulation was associated with GOF mutations observed in CgPDR1. These results showed that drug efflux mediated by adenosine-5-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters, especially CgSNQ2 and CgCDR1, is the predominant mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Iranian isolates of C. glabrata. Since some novel GOF mutations were found here, this study also calls for research aimed at investigating other new GOF mutations to reveal the comprehensive understanding about efflux-mediated resistance to azole antifungal agents.

  4. Iron-depletion promotes mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial integrity in pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Nagi, Minoru; Tanabe, Koichi; Nakayama, Hironobu; Ueno, Keigo; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Umeyama, Takashi; Ohno, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida glabrata, a haploid budding yeast, is the cause of severe systemic infections in immune-compromised hosts. The amount of free iron supplied to C. glabrata cells during systemic infections is severely limited by iron-chelating proteins such as transferrin. Thus, the iron-deficiency response in C. glabrata cells is thought to play important roles in their survival inside the host's body. In this study, we found that mitophagy was induced under iron-depleted conditions, and that the disruption of a gene homologous to ATG32, which is responsible for mitophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, blocked mitophagy in C. glabrata. The mitophagic activity in C. glabrata cells was not detected on short-period exposure to nitrogen-starved conditions, which is a mitophagy-inducing condition used in S. cerevisiae. The mitophagy-deficient atg32Δ mutant of C. glabrata also exhibited decreased longevity under iron-deficient conditions. The mitochondrial membrane potential in Cgatg32Δ cells was significantly lower than that in wild-type cells under iron-depleted conditions. In a mouse model of disseminated infection, the Cgatg32Δ strain resulted in significantly decreased kidney and spleen fungal burdens compared with the wild-type strain. These results indicate that mitophagy in C. glabrata occurs in an iron-poor host tissue environment, and it may contribute to the longevity of cells, mitochondrial quality control, and pathogenesis. PMID:27347716

  5. Clinical and economic outcomes of decreased fluconazole susceptibility in patients with Candida glabrata bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ingi; Morales, Knashawn H.; Zaoutis, Theoklis E.; Fishman, Neil O.; Nachamkin, Irving; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2011-01-01

    Background The impact of reduced fluconazole susceptibility on clinical and economic outcomes in patients with Candida glabrata bloodstream infections (BSI) is unknown. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate 30-day inpatient mortality and postculture hospital charges in patients with C glabrata BSI with decreased fluconazole susceptibility (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥ 16 μg/mL) versus fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSI (MIC ≤ 8 μg/mL). These analyses were adjusted for demographics, comorbidities, and time at risk. Secondary analyses limited the C glabrata group with decreased fluconazole susceptibility to MIC ≥ 64 μg/mL. Results There were 45 (31%) deaths among 144 enrolled patients: 19 deaths (25%) among 76 patients with C glabrata BSI with decreased fluconazole susceptibility and 26 deaths (38%) among 68 patients with fluconazole-susceptible C glabrata BSI. Decreased fluconazole susceptibility was not independently associated with increased 30-day inpatient mortality (adjusted odds ratio, .60; 95% confidence interval (CI): .26-1.35; P = 0.22) or hospital charges (multiplicative change in hospital charges, .93; 95% CI: .60-1.43; P = 0.73). Older age was associated with increased mortality and increased time at risk was associated with increased hospital charges. Conclusion Crude mortality rates remain high in patients with C glabrata BSI. However, decreased fluconazole susceptibility was not associated with increased mortality or hospital charges. PMID:20542354

  6. The effect of silver nanoparticles and nystatin on mixed biofilms of Candida glabrata and Candida albicans on acrylic.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sónia; Pires, Priscila; Monteiro, Douglas R; Negri, Melyssa; Gorup, Luiz F; Camargo, Emerson R; Barbosa, Débora B; Oliveira, Rosário; Williams, David W; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare biofilm formation by Candida glabrata and Candida albicans on acrylic, either individually or when combined (single and dual species) and then examine the antimicrobial effects of silver nanoparticles and nystatin on these biofilms. Candidal adhesion and biofilm assays were performed on acrylic surface in the presence of artificial saliva (AS) for 2 h and 48 h, respectively. Candida glabrata and C. albicans adherence was determined by the number of colony forming units (CFUs) recovered from the biofilms on CHROMagar(®) Candida. In addition, crystal violet (CV) staining was used as an indicator of biofilm biomass and to quantify biofilm formation ability. Pre-formed biofilms were treated either with silver nanoparticles or nystatin and the effect of these agents on the biofilms was evaluated after 24 h. Results showed that both species adhered to and formed biofilms on acrylic surfaces. A significantly (P < 0.05) higher number of CFUs was evident in C. glabrata biofilms compared with those formed by C. albicans. Comparing single and dual species biofilms, equivalent CFU numbers were evident for the individual species. Both silver nanoparticles and nystatin reduced biofilm biomass and the CFUs of single and dual species biofilms (P < 0.05). Silver nanoparticles had a significantly (P < 0.05) greater effect on reducing C. glabrata biofilm biomass compared with C. albicans. Similarly, nystatin was more effective in reducing the number of CFUs of dual species biofilms compared with those of single species (P < 0.05). In summary, C. glabrata and C. albicans can co-exist in biofilms without apparent antagonism, and both silver nanoparticles and nystatin exhibit inhibitory effects on biofilms of these species.

  7. Genome engineering in the yeast pathogen Candida glabrata using the CRISPR-Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Enkler, Ludovic; Richer, Delphine; Marchand, Anthony L.; Ferrandon, Dominique; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Among Candida species, the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata has become the second most common causative agent of candidiasis in the world and a major public health concern. Yet, few molecular tools and resources are available to explore the biology of C. glabrata and to better understand its virulence during infection. In this study, we describe a robust experimental strategy to generate loss-of-function mutants in C. glabrata. The procedure is based on the development of three main tools: (i) a recombinant strain of C. glabrata constitutively expressing the CRISPR-Cas9 system, (ii) an online program facilitating the selection of the most efficient guide RNAs for a given C. glabrata gene, and (iii) the identification of mutant strains by the Surveyor technique and sequencing. As a proof-of-concept, we have tested the virulence of some mutants in vivo in a Drosophila melanogaster infection model. Our results suggest that yps11 and a previously uncharacterized serine/threonine kinase are involved, directly or indirectly, in the ability of the pathogenic yeast to infect this model host organism. PMID:27767081

  8. Intracellular pH homeostasis in Candida glabrata in infection-associated conditions.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Azmat; Lopes, Maria Inês; Brul, Stanley; Smits, Gertien J

    2013-04-01

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic fungal pathogen which is a growing concern for immunocompromised patients. It is ranked as the second most common cause of candidiasis after Candida albicans. For pathogenic yeasts, intracellular pH (pHi) has been implicated in proliferation, dimorphic switching and virulence. We expressed the pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein variant ratiometric pHluorin in the cytosol of C. glabrata to study pHi dynamics in living cells. We evaluated the response of pHi to the various growth and stress conditions encountered during interaction with the host and during antifungal treatment. C. glabrata maintained a pHi higher than that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in all growth conditions. The pHi of S. cerevisiae cells appeared better controlled than the pHi in C. glabrata when the cells were exposed to food and fermentation-associated conditions. C. glabrata in turn maintained its pHi better when exposed to host-associated conditions.

  9. Detailed comparison of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilms under different conditions and their susceptibility to caspofungin and anidulafungin.

    PubMed

    Kucharíková, Sona; Tournu, Hélène; Lagrou, Katrien; Van Dijck, Patrick; Bujdáková, Helena

    2011-09-01

    Candida biofilm development can be influenced by diverse factors such as substrate, culture medium, carbohydrate source and pH. We have analysed biofilm formation of Candida albicans SC5314 and Candida glabrata ATCC 2001 wild-type strains in the presence of different media (RPMI 1640 versus YNB) and using different pH values (pH 5.6 or 7.0). We determined adhesion and biofilm formation on polystyrene, changes in the expression of adhesin genes during these processes and the susceptibility of mature biofilms to echinocandins. Biofilms formed on polystyrene by both Candida species proved to be influenced strongly by the composition of the medium rather than pH. C. albicans and C. glabrata formed thicker biofilms in RPMI 1640 medium, whereas in YNB medium, both species manifested adhesion rather than characteristic multilayer biofilm architecture. The stimulated biofilm formation in RPMI 1640 medium at pH 7.0 corroborated positively with increased expression of adhesin genes, essential to biofilm formation in vitro, including ALS3 and EAP1 in C. albicans and EPA6 in C. glabrata. The thicker biofilms grown in RPMI 1640 medium were more tolerant to caspofungin and anidulafungin than YNB-grown biofilms. We also observed that mature C. glabrata biofilms were less susceptible in RPMI 1640 medium to echinocandins than C. albicans biofilms. Environmental conditions, i.e. medium and pH, can significantly affect not only biofilm architecture, but also the expression profile of several genes involved during the different stages of biofilm development. In addition, growth conditions may also influence the antifungal-susceptibility profile of fungal populations within biofilm structures. Therefore, before designing any experimental biofilm set-up, it is important to consider the potential influence of external environmental factors on Candida biofilm development.

  10. Phospholipase and proteinase activities of Candida isolates from denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Arias, Cristina; Eraso, Elena; Madariaga, Lucila; Aguirre, Jose Manuel; Quindós, Guillermo

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterise phospholipase and proteinase activities of oral Candida isolates from 100 denture wearers and to study the relationship of these activities with denture stomatitis. Of 100 patients studied, 44 suffered from denture stomatitis. Specimens were collected by swabbing the denture and underlying mucosa. Isolates were previously identified by conventional mycological and genotypic methods. The phospholipase and proteinase activities were evaluated by agar plate methods. A total of 152 isolates were recovered from denture and underlying mucosa, including 101 Candida albicans, 18 Candida tropicalis, 14 Candida glabrata, 11 Candida guilliermondii, four Candida parapsilosis, two Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one isolate each of Candida dubliniensis and Candida krusei. Most C. albicans (97%) showed phospholipase activity; furthermore, the unique C. dubliniensis isolate showed a moderate phospholipase activity. The isolation of C. albicans (chi-square test, P = 0.0016) and phospholipase production by Candida spp. (chi-square test, P = 0.0213) was found to be significantly associated with denture stomatitis. Proteinase production was observed in <30% of isolates, and it was not related to the presence of denture stomatitis (P = 0.7675). Candida albicans isolates may produce both virulence factors, although the proteinase production was only observed in <30% of the isolates. Phospholipase production was exclusive of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  11. Partial Decay of Thiamine Signal Transduction Pathway Alters Growth Properties of Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Shaik, Noor F.; Neal, Erin M.; Leone, Sarah G.; Cali, Brian J.; Peel, Michael T.; Grannas, Amanda M.; Wykoff, Dennis D.

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylated form of thiamine (Vitamin B1), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) is essential for the metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates in all organisms. Plants and microorganisms, such as yeast, synthesize thiamine de novo whereas animals do not. The thiamine signal transduction (THI) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well characterized. The ~10 genes required for thiamine biosynthesis and uptake are transcriptionally upregulated during thiamine starvation by THI2, THI3, and PDC2. Candida glabrata, a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, is closely related to S. cerevisiae but is missing half of the biosynthetic pathway, which limits its ability to make thiamine. We investigated the changes to the THI pathway in C. glabrata, confirming orthologous functions. We found that C. glabrata is unable to synthesize the pyrimidine subunit of thiamine as well as the thiamine precursor vitamin B6. In addition, THI2 (the gene encoding a transcription factor) is not present in C. glabrata, indicating a difference in the transcriptional regulation of the pathway. Although the pathway is upregulated by thiamine starvation in both species, C. glabrata appears to upregulate genes involved in thiamine uptake to a greater extent than S. cerevisiae. However, the altered regulation of the THI pathway does not alter the concentration of thiamine and its vitamers in the two species as measured by HPLC. Finally, we demonstrate potential consequences to having a partial decay of the THI biosynthetic and regulatory pathway. When the two species are co-cultured, the presence of thiamine allows C. glabrata to rapidly outcompete S. cerevisiae, while absence of thiamine allows S. cerevisiae to outcompete C. glabrata. This simplification of the THI pathway in C. glabrata suggests its environment provides thiamine and/or its precursors to cells, whereas S. cerevisiae is not as reliant on environmental sources of thiamine. PMID:27015653

  12. Partial Decay of Thiamine Signal Transduction Pathway Alters Growth Properties of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Iosue, Christine L; Attanasio, Nicholas; Shaik, Noor F; Neal, Erin M; Leone, Sarah G; Cali, Brian J; Peel, Michael T; Grannas, Amanda M; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylated form of thiamine (Vitamin B1), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) is essential for the metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates in all organisms. Plants and microorganisms, such as yeast, synthesize thiamine de novo whereas animals do not. The thiamine signal transduction (THI) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well characterized. The ~10 genes required for thiamine biosynthesis and uptake are transcriptionally upregulated during thiamine starvation by THI2, THI3, and PDC2. Candida glabrata, a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, is closely related to S. cerevisiae but is missing half of the biosynthetic pathway, which limits its ability to make thiamine. We investigated the changes to the THI pathway in C. glabrata, confirming orthologous functions. We found that C. glabrata is unable to synthesize the pyrimidine subunit of thiamine as well as the thiamine precursor vitamin B6. In addition, THI2 (the gene encoding a transcription factor) is not present in C. glabrata, indicating a difference in the transcriptional regulation of the pathway. Although the pathway is upregulated by thiamine starvation in both species, C. glabrata appears to upregulate genes involved in thiamine uptake to a greater extent than S. cerevisiae. However, the altered regulation of the THI pathway does not alter the concentration of thiamine and its vitamers in the two species as measured by HPLC. Finally, we demonstrate potential consequences to having a partial decay of the THI biosynthetic and regulatory pathway. When the two species are co-cultured, the presence of thiamine allows C. glabrata to rapidly outcompete S. cerevisiae, while absence of thiamine allows S. cerevisiae to outcompete C. glabrata. This simplification of the THI pathway in C. glabrata suggests its environment provides thiamine and/or its precursors to cells, whereas S. cerevisiae is not as reliant on environmental sources of thiamine.

  13. Propensity Score Analysis of the Role of Initial Antifungal Therapy in the Outcome of Candida glabrata Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, M.; Aguado, J. M.; Merino, P.; Lora-Pablos, D.; Martín-Dávila, P.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata isolates have reduced in vitro susceptibility to azoles, which raises concerns about the clinical effectiveness of fluconazole for treating bloodstream infection (BSI) by this Candida species. We aimed to evaluate whether the choice of initial antifungal treatment (fluconazole versus echinocandins or liposomal amphotericin B [L-AmB]-based regimens) has an impact on the outcome of C. glabrata BSI. We analyzed data from a prospective, multicenter, population-based surveillance program on candidemia conducted in 5 metropolitan areas of Spain (May 2010 to April 2011). Adult patients with an episode of C. glabrata BSI were included. The main outcomes were 14-day mortality and treatment failure (14-day mortality and/or persistent C. glabrata BSI for ≥48 h despite antifungal initiation). The impact of using fluconazole as initial antifungal treatment on the patients' prognosis was assessed by logistic regression analysis with the addition of a propensity score approach. A total of 94 patients with C. glabrata BSI were identified. Of these, 34 had received fluconazole and 35 had received an echinocandin/L-AmB-based regimen. Patients in the echinocandin/L-AmB group had poorer baseline clinical status than did those in the fluconazole group. Patients in the fluconazole group were more frequently (55.9% versus 28.6%) and much earlier (median time, 3 versus 7 days) switched to another antifungal regimen. Overall, 14-day mortality was 13% (9/69) and treatment failure 34.8% (24/69), with no significant differences between the groups. On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for baseline characteristics by propensity score, fluconazole use was not associated with an unfavorable evolution (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for 14-day mortality, 1.16, with 95% confidence interval [CI] of 0.22 to 6.17; adjusted OR for treatment failure, 0.83, with 95% CI of 0.27 to 2.61). In conclusion, initial fluconazole treatment was not associated with a poorer outcome than that

  14. Gln3 is a main regulator of nitrogen assimilation in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Delos Santos, Francisco J; Riego-Ruiz, Lina

    2016-08-01

    After Candida albicans, the yeast Candida glabrata ranks second as an aetiological agent of candidaemia and is the most frequently encountered non-Candida albicans species in patients with invasive candidiasis. Transcriptome analysis in C. albicans, C. glabrata and Cryptoccocus neoformans has revealed that, when engulfed by macrophages, these yeasts upregulate genes involved in nutrient acquisition, including nitrogen transporters such as the general amino acid permease Gap1, the dicarboxylic amino acid permease Dip5, the basic amino acid permease Can1 and the ammonium permeases Mep1 and Mep2. Nitrogen assimilation has been well studied in model species of fungi, such as Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, little is known about nitrogen assimilation in C. glabrata. In the present study, we report a major role for Gln3 in the assimilation of glutamine, ammonium and proline. Ure2 also has a role in nitrogen assimilation, but it is only observable in ammonium and glutamine. In addition, Gat1 has a minor role, which is only observable in the absence of Ure2 and Gln3. Gln3 is absolutely necessary for full ammonium uptake from media. We have also shown that MEP2 gene expression in C. glabrata is completely dependent on Gln3, whereas GAP1 regulation is mainly exerted by Gln3, with the exception of proline where Gat1 has a minor role. In addition, in C. glabrata Ure2 appears to be a negative regulator of these NCR-sensitive genes, similarly to what has been described in S. cerevisiae. Our data place Gln3 as a key regulator of nitrogen assimilation.

  15. Sorbic acid stress activates the Candida glabrata high osmolarity glycerol MAP kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jandric, Zeljkica; Gregori, Christa; Klopf, Eva; Radolf, Martin; Schüller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Weak organic acids such as sorbic acid are important food preservatives and powerful fungistatic agents. These compounds accumulate in the cytosol and disturb the cellular pH and energy homeostasis. Candida glabrata is in many aspects similar to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, with regard to confrontation to sorbic acid, two of the principal response pathways behave differently in C. glabrata. In yeast, sorbic acid stress causes activation of many genes via the transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4. The C. glabrata homologs CgMsn2 and CgMsn4 are apparently not activated by sorbic acid. In contrast, in C. glabrata the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway is activated by sorbic acid. Here we show that the MAP kinase of the HOG pathway, CgHog1, becomes phosphorylated and has a function for weak acid stress resistance. Transcript profiling of weak acid treated C. glabrata cells suggests a broad and very similar response pattern of cells lacking CgHog1 compared to wild type which is over lapping with but distinct from S. cerevisiae. The PDR12 gene was the highest induced gene in both species and it required CgHog1 for full expression. Our results support flexibility of the response cues for general stress signaling pathways, even between closely related yeasts, and functional extension of a specific response pathway. PMID:24324463

  16. GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-linked aspartyl proteases regulate vacuole homoeostasis in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Bairwa, Gaurav; Rasheed, Mubashshir; Taigwal, Ritu; Sahoo, Rosalin; Kaur, Rupinder

    2014-03-01

    A family of 11 GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-linked cell surface-associated aspartyl proteases (yapsins) in the human opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is required for cell wall remodelling, pH homoeostasis, survival in macrophages and virulence in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. In the present paper, we report new roles for yapsins in C. glabrata physiology and implicate them for the first time in the regulation of vacuole homoeostasis. In the present study we show that a C. glabrata mutant lacking all 11 yapsins, Cgyps1-11∆, possesses an enlarged vacuole and displays vma- (vacuolar membrane ATPase)-like phenotypes with elevated metal ion susceptibility in an alkaline pH medium and diminished Vma activity. The results of the present study also demonstrate a singular role for CgYps1 (C. glabrata yapsin 1) in the maintenance of ion homoeostasis under normal and calcineurin-inhibited conditions. Elevated polyphosphate levels and diminished cellular CPY (carboxypeptidase Y) activity in the Cgyps1-11∆ mutant highlight the yapsin requirement for a properly functioning vacuole. Lastly, a gross perturbation of cellular homoeostasis in the Cgyps1-11∆ mutant, even in the absence of external stressors, characterized by reduced levels of ATP and stress metabolites, elevated ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels, cell surface abnormalities, and a constitutively activated PKC (protein kinase C) signalling pathway underscore diverse physiological functions of yapsins in C. glabrata.

  17. Potassium Uptake Mediated by Trk1 Is Crucial for Candida glabrata Growth and Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Llopis-Torregrosa, Vicent; Hušeková, Barbora; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of potassium homeostasis is crucial for all types of cells, including Candida glabrata. Three types of plasma-membrane systems mediating potassium influx with different transport mechanisms have been described in yeasts: the Trk1 uniporter, the Hak cation-proton symporter and the Acu ATPase. The C. glabrata genome contains only one gene encoding putative system for potassium uptake, the Trk1 uniporter. Therefore, its importance in maintaining adequate levels of intracellular potassium appears to be critical for C. glabrata cells. In this study, we first confirmed the potassium-uptake activity of the identified gene’s product by heterologous expression in a suitable S. cerevisiae mutant, further we generated a corresponding deletion mutant in C. glabrata and analysed its phenotype in detail. The obtained results show a pleiotropic effect on the cell physiology when CgTRK1 is deleted, affecting not only the ability of trk1Δ to grow at low potassium concentrations, but also the tolerance to toxic alkali-metal cations and cationic drugs, as well as the membrane potential and intracellular pH. Taken together, our results find the sole potassium uptake system in C. glabrata cells to be a promising target in the search for its specific inhibitors and in developing new antifungal drugs. PMID:27058598

  18. Systematic Phenotyping of a Large-Scale Candida glabrata Deletion Collection Reveals Novel Antifungal Tolerance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Ekkehard; Istel, Fabian; Tscherner, Michael; Brunke, Sascha; Ames, Lauren; Firon, Arnaud; Green, Brian; Cabral, Vitor; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Quintin, Jessica; Seider, Katja; Frohner, Ingrid; Glaser, Walter; Jungwirth, Helmut; Bachellier-Bassi, Sophie; Chauvel, Murielle; Zeidler, Ute; Ferrandon, Dominique; Gabaldón, Toni; Hube, Bernhard; d'Enfert, Christophe; Rupp, Steffen; Cormack, Brendan; Haynes, Ken; Kuchler, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is a frequent cause of candidiasis, causing infections ranging from superficial to life-threatening disseminated disease. The inherent tolerance of C. glabrata to azole drugs makes this pathogen a serious clinical threat. To identify novel genes implicated in antifungal drug tolerance, we have constructed a large-scale C. glabrata deletion library consisting of 619 unique, individually bar-coded mutant strains, each lacking one specific gene, all together representing almost 12% of the genome. Functional analysis of this library in a series of phenotypic and fitness assays identified numerous genes required for growth of C. glabrata under normal or specific stress conditions, as well as a number of novel genes involved in tolerance to clinically important antifungal drugs such as azoles and echinocandins. We identified 38 deletion strains displaying strongly increased susceptibility to caspofungin, 28 of which encoding proteins that have not previously been linked to echinocandin tolerance. Our results demonstrate the potential of the C. glabrata mutant collection as a valuable resource in functional genomics studies of this important fungal pathogen of humans, and to facilitate the identification of putative novel antifungal drug target and virulence genes. PMID:24945925

  19. Effects of fluconazole on Candida glabrata biofilms and its relationship with ABC transporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Elza; Silva, Sónia; Rodrigues, Célia Fortuna; Alves, Carlos Tiago; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata has emerged as the second most prevalent fungal pathogen and its ability to form biofilms has been considered one of the most important virulence factors, since biofilms present a high tolerance to antifungal agents used in fungal infection treatment. The mechanisms of biofilm tolerance to antifungal agents remain poorly understood. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of fluconazole (FLU) on the formation and control of C. glabrata biofilms and its relation with the expression of genes encoding for ABC transporters, CDR1, SNQ2, and PDR1. For that, minimal inhibitory concentration values for seven C. glabrata strains were determined and the effect of FLU against C. glabrata biofilms was evaluated by total biomass quantification and viable cell enumeration. Matrices from biofilms were analyzed in terms of protein, carbohydrate and DNA content. ABC transporter gene expression was analyzed for quantitative real-time PCR. In addition to the high amounts of proteins and carbohydrates detected in the extracellular matrices in the presence of FLU, this work showed that the overexpression of efflux pumps is a possible mechanism of biofilm tolerance to FLU and this phenomenon alters the structure of C. glabrata biofilms by creating cell clusters.

  20. Caspofungin MIC Distribution amongst Commonly Isolated Candida Species in a Tertiary Care Centre - An Indian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajarshi; Mehta, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Emergence of Candida species resistant to Amphotericin B and triazole has led to use of echinocandins, mostly caspofungin in the management of invasive candidiasis. There are some published reports of caspofungin resistance in Candida species yet no studies on caspofungin susceptibility pattern of Candida species exist in Indian setup. Aim To carry out the antifungal susceptibility of Candida isolates against caspofungin. Materials and Methods In a retrospective study at a tertiary care teaching hospital, 60 preserved Candida isolates from inpatients of invasive candidiasis obtained over a period of 6 months from January 2015 to June 2015 were subjected to antifungal susceptibility to caspofungin and the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of Candida species to caspofungin were determined by Epsilometer test (E-test). Results Thirty Candida albicans and 30 Non albicans Candida mainly Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis were tested for caspofungin susceptibitity by E-test. Caspofungin resistance was detected in 6.67% Candida albicans isolates. Caspofungin resistance was not observed in Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis. This shows that caspofungin resistance is still rare. Further elaborate studies with clinical correlation data are needed to detect prevalence of caspofungin resistance. Conclusion Emergence of resistance in our study warrants need of elaborate studies with clinical correlation data to detect prevalence of resistance to caspofungin. E-test method proved to be an easy and simple technique for testing susceptibility of Candida to caspofungin. PMID:28050365

  1. Identification of Genes in Candida glabrata Conferring Altered Responses to Caspofungin, a Cell Wall Synthesis Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Rosenwald, Anne G.; Arora, Gaurav; Ferrandino, Rocco; Gerace, Erica L.; Mohammednetej, Maedeh; Nosair, Waseem; Rattila, Shemona; Subic, Amanda Zirzow; Rolfes, Ronda

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is an important human fungal pathogen whose incidence continues to rise. Because many clinical isolates are resistant to azole drugs, the drugs of choice to treat such infections are members of the echinocandin family, although there are increasing reports of resistance to these drugs as well. In efforts to better understand the genetic changes that lead to altered responses to echinocandins, we screened a transposon-insertion library of mutants for strains to identify genes that are important for cellular responses to caspofungin, a member of this drug family. We identified 16 genes that, when disrupted, caused increased tolerance, and 48 genes that, when disrupted, caused increased sensitivity compared to the wild-type parental strain. Four of the genes identified as causing sensitivity are orthologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes encoding proteins important for the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway. In addition, several other genes are orthologs of the high affinity Ca2+ uptake system (HACS) complex genes. We analyzed disruption mutants representing all 64 genes under 33 different conditions, including the presence of cell wall disrupting agents and other drugs, a variety of salts, increased temperature, and altered pH. Further, we generated knockout mutants in different genes within the CWI pathway and the HACS complex, and found that they too exhibited phenotypes consistent with defects in cell wall construction. Our results indicate that small molecules that inhibit the CWI pathway, or that the HACS complex, may be an important means of increasing the efficacy of caspofungin. PMID:27449515

  2. Persistence of Pigment Production by Yeast Isolates Grown on CHROMagar Candida Medium

    PubMed Central

    Hospenthal, Duane R.; Murray, Clinton K.; Beckius, Miriam L.; Green, Judith A.; Dooley, David P.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the persistence of pigmentation in yeast isolates grown on the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida over 7 days. Candida, Cryptococcus, and Trichosporon isolates were inoculated alone or mixed onto duplicate sets of plates and incubated at 30 and 35°C. Candida albicans and Candida krusei were readily identified throughout the reading period, but Candida glabrata was difficult to differentiate from other species until the 3- or 4-day time point. Candida tropicalis produced colonies similar to those of rare Cryptococcus and Trichosporon species, and mixed cultures were often difficult to identify as such. PMID:12454192

  3. Antifungal activity of silver nanoparticles in combination with nystatin and chlorhexidine digluconate against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilms.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Douglas R; Silva, Sónia; Negri, Melyssa; Gorup, Luiz F; de Camargo, Emerson R; Oliveira, Rosário; Barbosa, Debora B; Henriques, Mariana

    2013-11-01

    Although silver nanoparticles (SN) have been investigated as an alternative to conventional antifungal drugs in the control of Candida-associated denture stomatitis, the antifungal activity of SN in combination with antifungal drugs against Candida biofilms remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal efficacy of SN in combination with nystatin (NYT) or chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilms. The drugs alone or combined with SN were applied on mature Candida biofilms (48 h), and after 24 h of treatment their antibiofilm activities were assessed by total biomass quantification (by crystal violet staining) and colony forming units enumeration. The structure of Candida biofilms was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The data indicated that SN combined with either NYT or CHG demonstrated synergistic antibiofilm activity, and this activity was dependent on the species and on the drug concentrations used. SEM images showed that some drug combinations were able to disrupt Candida biofilms. The results of this study suggest that the combination of SN with NYT or CHG may have clinical implications in the treatment of denture stomatitis. However, further studies are needed before recommending the use of these drugs safely in clinical situations.

  4. Candida isolates in tertiary hospitals in northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichsen, Sylvia Lemos; Falcão, érica; Vilella, Tatiana Aguiar Santos; Rêgo, Leandro; Lira, Conceição; Almeida, Luciano; Martins, Mízia; Araújo, Carmem; Duarte, Marcelo; Lopes, Geraldo

    2009-01-01

    Candida is an opportunistic pathogen that affects high–risk patients who are either immunocompromised or critically ill and is associated with almost 80% of all nosocomial fungal infections, representing the major cause of fungemia with high mortality rates (40%). Candida albicans is the main cause of candidemia and among the non-albicans species C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis are the most frequent agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of Candida species in two tertiary hospitals in Recife, Northeastern Brazil. It began by surveying all positive Candida cultures processed by the microbiology laboratory from September 2003 to September 2006. The cultures, originated from various types of biological material (blood, urine, tracheal, catheter and others), were processed by Vitec® system (Biomerieux SA, France). A total of 1.279 (hospital A: 837; hospital B: 442) sample isolates were positive for Candida. The most frequent species in both hospitals were: C. albicans (367), C. tropicalis (363), C. parapsilosis (147), C. glabrata (81), C. krusei (30) and C. guillermondii (14). The isolates were obtained from 746 hospitalized patients. A total of 221 positive hemocultures were detected in 166 different patients in both hospitals, and 113 (68.1%) of these patients with positive hemocultures presented Candida in other body sites. This study shows that Candida non-albicans was the main isolated agent and evidences the importante of C. tropicalis in nosocomial fungal infections. PMID:24031366

  5. Use of CHROMagar Candida medium for isolation of yeasts from dental samples.

    PubMed Central

    Beighton, D; Ludford, R; Clark, D T; Brailsford, S R; Pankhurst, C L; Tinsley, G F; Fiske, J; Lewis, D; Daly, B; Khalifa, N

    1995-01-01

    A new differential medium, CHROMagar Candida, for the isolation of clinically important yeasts was investigated to determine its usefulness in facilitating the study of oral yeasts. The recovery of yeasts on the medium was not significantly different from the recovery on Sabouraud dextrose agar. The identities of 450 green colonies on CHROMagar Candida, presumptively identified as Candida albicans on the basis of the manufacturer's instructions, were confirmed by testing for beta-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. Candida tropicalis also formed distinctive colonies, and other yeasts including Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata, Candida Parapsilosis, Candida Magnoliae, Candida lusitaniae, Candida Famata, Candida kefir, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were readily distinguished from C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates. CHROMagar Candida is a very useful medium, and its use will facilitate the study of yeasts associated with dental diseases. PMID:8576366

  6. Histidine degradation via an aminotransferase increases the nutritional flexibility of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Brunke, Sascha; Seider, Katja; Richter, Martin Ernst; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Ramachandra, Shruthi; Kiehntopf, Michael; Brock, Matthias; Hube, Bernhard

    2014-06-01

    The ability to acquire nutrients during infections is an important attribute in microbial pathogenesis. Amino acids are a valuable source of nitrogen if they can be degraded by the infecting organism. In this work, we analyzed histidine utilization in the fungal pathogen of humans Candida glabrata. Hemiascomycete fungi, like C. glabrata or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, possess no gene coding for a histidine ammonia-lyase, which catalyzes the first step of a major histidine degradation pathway in most other organisms. We show that C. glabrata instead initializes histidine degradation via the aromatic amino acid aminotransferase Aro8. Although ARO8 is also present in S. cerevisiae and is induced by extracellular histidine, the yeast cannot use histidine as its sole nitrogen source, possibly due to growth inhibition by a downstream degradation product. Furthermore, C. glabrata relies only on Aro8 for phenylalanine and tryptophan utilization, since ARO8, but not its homologue ARO9, was transcriptionally activated in the presence of these amino acids. Accordingly, an ARO9 deletion had no effect on growth with aromatic amino acids. In contrast, in S. cerevisiae, ARO9 is strongly induced by tryptophan and is known to support growth on aromatic amino acids. Differences in the genomic structure of the ARO9 gene between C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae indicate a possible disruption in the regulatory upstream region. Thus, we show that, in contrast to S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata has adapted to use histidine as a sole source of nitrogen and that the aromatic amino acid aminotransferase Aro8, but not Aro9, is the enzyme required for this process.

  7. Enhancement of acetoin production in Candida glabrata by in silico-aided metabolic engineering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acetoin is a promising chemical compound that can potentially serve as a high value-added platform for a broad range of applications. Many industrial biotechnological processes are moving towards the use of yeast as a platform. The multi-auxotrophic yeast, Candida glabrata, can accumulate a large amount of pyruvate, but produces only trace amounts of acetoin. Here, we attempted to engineer C. glabrata to redirect the carbon flux of pyruvate to increase acetoin production. Results Based on an in silico strategy, a synthetic, composite metabolic pathway involving two distinct enzymes, acetolactate synthase (ALS) and acetolactate decarboxylase (ALDC), was constructed, leading to the accumulation of acetoin in C. glabrata. Further genetic modifications were introduced to increase the carbon flux of the heterologous pathway, increasing the production of acetoin to 2.08 g/L. Additionally, nicotinic acid was employed to regulate the intracellular NADH level, and a higher production of acetoin (3.67 g/L) was obtained at the expense of 2,3-butanediol production under conditions of a lower NADH/NAD+ ratio. Conclusion With the aid of in silico metabolic engineering and cofactor engineering, C. glabrata was designed and constructed to improve acetoin production. PMID:24725668

  8. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  9. The birth of a deadly yeast: tracing the evolutionary emergence of virulence traits in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Gabaldón, Toni; Carreté, Laia

    2016-03-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen whose incidence has increased in the last two decades. Despite its name, this yeast is only distantly related to the model fungal pathogen C. albicans, and more closely related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeasts that underwent an ancient whole-genome duplication. Understanding what specific traits make C. glabrata a successful opportunistic pathogen within a clade of mostly innocuous yeasts, and how these compare to virulence traits in distant pathogens such as C. albicans is a focus of intense research. From an evolutionary perspective, uncovering how the ability to infect humans has emerged multiple, independent times in different lineages may reveal new disease mechanisms and provide us with the capacity to predict which genomic features in a clade may confer a higher potential to develop virulence against humans.

  10. Novel intein-containing DNA specific primers for rapid identification of Candida glabrata using Real-Time PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Satish; Ramesh, S

    2014-12-01

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic human pathogen known to cause systemic and vaginal candidiasis. Rapid detection of Candida glabrata is indispensable for appropriate selection of antifungal drugs for chemotherapy. The study describes a unique intein-containing DNA fragment for specific detection of C. glabrata. The designed oligonucleotides detected C. glabrata (Ct mean: 24.75 ± 1.1 and Tm: 70.08 ± 0.23°C) in Real-Time PCR assays. The fluorescent signals were negative when the primers were tested for cross-species and cross-genera amplifications. In conclusion, our study recommends a novel primer set for developing a quick identification system which does not require laborious and time-consuming experimentations.

  11. In vitro activity of xanthorrhizol against Candida glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rukayadi, Yaya; Han, Sunghwa; Yong, Dongeun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    The formation of Candida biofilms has important clinical ramifications, because these biofilms exhibit increased resistance to conventional antifungal therapies. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of xanthorrhizol on biofilms produced by non-C. albicans Candida (NCAC) species, including C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis. NCAC biofilms were generated in flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates and quantified using the XTT (2, 3 - bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenyl amino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide) reduction assay. The NCAC biofilms at adherent, intermediate, and mature growth phases were treated with 0.5-512 μg/ml of xanthorrhizol for 24 h. The ranges of sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) of xanthorrhizol against C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis biofilms were 8-32 μg/ml, 8-16 μg/ml, and 8-64 μg/ml, respectively. Xanthorrhizol affected cell density that had an indirect effect on the biofilm OD(490). The compound eradicated the viable cells of the C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis biofilms at the adherent growth phase at 16 μg/ml and that of C. guilliermondii at 8 μg/ml. Treatment with 128 μg/ml of xanthorrhizol reduced the OD(490) of C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis biofilms at the mature growth phase by 77.8%, 88.5%, and 64.5%, respectively. These results indicate that xanthorrhizol exhibits potent activity against NCAC biofilms in vitro. Therefore, xanthorrhizol has potential therapeutic value in treating biofilm-associated NCAC infections and should be further evaluated in vivo.

  12. Discontinuation of echinocandin and azole treatments led to the disappearance of an FKS alteration but not azole resistance during clonal Candida glabrata persistent candidaemia.

    PubMed

    Imbert, S; Castain, L; Pons, A; Jacob, S; Meyer, I; Palous, M; Vezinet, C; Langeron, O; Hennequin, C; Monsel, A; Fekkar, A

    2016-10-01

    To give an indication of a fitness cost conferred by FKS mutation-associated echinocandin resistance in Candida glabrata during human infection. Six C. glabrata clinical strains sequentially isolated from blood and a hepatic abscess in a solid organ transplant recipient were analysed. The patient had received long-term azole and echinocandin therapy for invasive aspergillosis and persistent candidaemia. Minimal inhibitory concentrations were determined by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution method. Molecular mechanisms of antifungal resistance were determined by sequencing hot spots of the FKS. Strain relatedness was determined using a microsatellite-based typing method. Typing analysis revealed an identical microsatellite pattern for all isolates, supporting a close relation. The first C. glabrata isolate showed wild-type phenotype (i.e. susceptibility to echinocandins and low level of azole resistance). After voriconazole therapy, the C. glabrata quickly acquired pan-azole resistance. Later, echinocandin treatment led to the emergence of a FKS2 S663P alteration and echinocandin resistance. After disruption of both azole and echinocandin therapy in favour of liposomal amphotericin B, C. glabrata isolates regained full susceptibility to echinocandin and lost the FKS2 S663P alteration while nonetheless maintaining their pan-azole resistance. Our clinical report supports the potential existence of a fitness cost conferred by FKS mutation in C. glabrata, as disruption of treatment led to a rapid disappearance of the resistant clone. This suggests that a more restricted use and/or a discontinuous administration of echinocandins may limit the spread of clinical resistance to this class.

  13. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from the patients with vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Masahito; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-02-01

    There have been the current Japanese data on susceptibility testing for Candida isolates from vaginal candidiasis. The in vitro activities of therapeutic antifungal drugs for vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC); miconazole (MCZ), itraconazole (ITCZ), fluconazole (FLCZ), clotrimazole (CTZ), oxiconazole (OCZ), isoconazole (ICZ) and bifonazole (BFZ) against vaginal isolates. Fifty-four strains Candida albicans and 19 strains of Candida glabrata were evaluated using a broth microdilution method specified by Clinical Laboratories Standard Institute (CLSI) document M27-A3. The MIC90 of each drug, MCZ, ITCZ, FLCZ, CTZ, OCZ, ICZ and BFZ, against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates were 0.25, 0.12, 1, 0.06, 0.12, 0.12 and 1 μg/ml and 1, 1, 8, 0.5, 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml respectively. The activities of these drugs, except for BFZ, against C. glabrata were lower than that of C. albicans. There was one azole-resistant isolate in C. glabrata of which MIC of FLCZ is > 64 μg/ml and this isolate had cross resistance to other antifungal drugs tested. These results suggest that antifungal drugs for treatment of VVC continues to have potent antifungal activities against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates from vaginitis. CTZ, OCZ and ICZ susceptibility of FLCZ low susceptibility C. glabrata are relatively higher than MCZ, ITCZ and FLCZ.

  14. Multicenter surveillance of species distribution and antifungal susceptibilities of Candida bloodstream isolates in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sook-In; Shin, Jong Hee; Song, Jae-Hoon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, Mi-Na; Chang, Hyun Ha; Moon, Chi Sook

    2010-06-01

    Multicenter data on in vitro susceptibility of Candida bloodstream isolates to echinocandin antifungal agents is still lacking in South Korea. We performed a prospective multicenter study to determine the species distribution of Candida bloodstream isolates and their susceptibility to five antifungal agents, including caspofungin and micafungin. A total of 639 isolates were collected from 20 tertiary hospitals between September 2006 and August 2007. Antifungal susceptibilities were determined through the use of the CLSI broth microdilution method M27-A3. The overall species distribution was as follows; Candida albicans (38%), Candida parapsilosis (26%), Candia tropicalis (20%), Candida glabrata (11%), and miscellaneous Candida species (5%). Although C. parapsilosis and miscellaneous Candida species were less susceptible to both echinocandins, all 639 isolates were susceptible to both caspofungin and micafungin (MIC, isolates (99.7%) had a MIC Candida isolates, with C. glabrata and C. krusei isolates displaying the greatest level of resistance. This is the largest multicenter candidemia study conducted in South Korea and shows that non-C. albicans Candida species, including C. parapsilosis, constitutes over 60% of all Candida species isolates recovered from the bloodstream. In addition, the rates of resistance to all five antifungals, including two echinocandins, are still low among bloodstream isolates in South Korea.

  15. Expression vectors for C-terminal fusions with fluorescent proteins and epitope tags in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Orta-Zavalza, Emmanuel; Gutiérrez-Escobedo, Guadalupe; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Candida glabrata is a haploid yeast considered the second most common of the Candida species found in nosocomial infections, accounting for approximately 18% of candidemias worldwide. Even though molecular biology methods are easily adapted to study this organism, there are not enough vectors that will allow probing the transcriptional and translational activity of any gene of interest in C. glabrata. In this work we have generated a set of expression vectors to systematically tag any gene of interest at the carboxy-terminus with three different fluorophores (CFP, YFP and mCherry) or three epitopes (HA, FLAG or cMyc) independently. This system offers the possibility to generate translational fusions in three versions: under the gene's own promoter integrated in its native locus in genome, on a replicative plasmid under its own promoter, or on a replicative plasmid under a strong promoter to overexpress the fusions. The expression of these translational fusions will allow determining the transcriptional and translational activity of the gene of interest as well as the intracellular localization of the protein. We have tested these expression vectors with two biosynthetic genes, HIS3 and TRP1. We detected fluorescence under the microscope and we were able to immunodetect the fusions using the three different versions of the system. These vectors permit coexpression of several different fusions simultaneously in the same cell, which will allow determining protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. This set of vectors adds a new toolbox to study expression and protein interactions in the fungal pathogen C. glabrata.

  16. Multi-drug resistant oral Candida species isolated from HIV-positive patients in South Africa and Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Abrantes, Pedro Miguel; McArthur, Carole P; Africa, Charlene Wilma Joyce

    2014-06-01

    Candida species are a common cause of infection in immune-compromised HIV-positive individuals, who are usually treated with the antifungal drug, fluconazole, in public hospitals in Africa. However, information about the prevalence of drug resistance to fluconazole and other antifungal agents on Candida species is very limited. This study examined 128 Candida isolates from South Africa and 126 Cameroonian Candida isolates for determination of species prevalence and antifungal drug susceptibility. The isolates were characterized by growth on chromogenic and selective media and by their susceptibility to 9 antifungal drugs tested using the TREK™ YeastOne9 drug panel (Thermo Scientific, USA). Eighty-three percent (82.8%) of South African isolates were Candida albicans (106 isolates), 9.4% were Candida glabrata (12 isolates), and 7.8% were Candida dubliniensis (10 isolates). Of the Cameroonian isolates, 73.02% were C. albicans (92 isolates); 19.05% C. glabrata (24 isolates); 3.2% Candida tropicalis (4 isolates); 2.4% Candida krusei (3 isolates); 1.59% either Candida kefyr, Candida parapsilopsis, or Candida lusitaneae (2 isolates); and 0.79% C. dubliniensis (1 isolate). Widespread C. albicans resistance to azoles was detected phenotypically in both populations. Differences in drug resistance were seen within C. glabrata found in both populations. Echinocandin drugs were more effective on isolates obtained from the Cameroon than in South Africa. A multiple-drug resistant C. dubliniensis strain isolated from the South African samples was inhibited only by 5-flucytosine in vitro on the YO9 panel. Drug resistance among oral Candida species is common among African HIV patients in these 2 countries. Regional surveillance of Candida species drug susceptibility should be undertaken to ensure effective treatment for HIV-positive patients.

  17. A strategy to prevent the occurrence of Lactobacillus strains using lactate-tolerant yeast Candida glabrata in bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Itsuki; Nakamura, Toshihide; Shima, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Contamination of Lactobacillus sp. in the fermentation broth of bioethanol production decreases ethanol production efficiency. Although the addition of lactate to the broth can effectively inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus sp., it also greatly reduces the fermentation ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To overcome this conflict, lactate-tolerant yeast strains were screened. Candida glabrata strain NFRI 3164 was found to exhibit both higher levels of lactate tolerance and fermentation ability. Co-cultivation of C. glabrata was performed with Lactobacillus brevis and Lb. fermentum, which were reported as major contaminating bacteria during bioethanol production, in culture medium containing 2% lactate. Under these culture conditions, the growth of Lactobacillus strains was greatly inhibited, but the ethanol production of C. glabrata was not significantly affected. Our data show the possibility of designing an effective fuel ethanol production process that eliminates contamination by Lactobacillus strains through the combined use of lactate addition and C. glabrata.

  18. Discriminative power of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis using the microbial identification system (MIS) for Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Peltroche-Llacsahuanga, H; Schmidt, S; Lütticken, R; Haase, G

    2000-12-01

    Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata is frequently isolated in cases of fungal infection and commonly shows acquired or innate fluconazole resistance. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an emerging opportunistic yeast pathogen, causes serious systemic infections in immunocompromised, and vaginitis and superficial infections in immunocompetent patients. For both species reliable identification in the routine laboratory is mandatory, but species identification of strains, e.g. trehalose-negative C. glabrata, may be difficult. Therefore, gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of whole cell fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles, that is independent of assimilation profiles of strains and suitable for reliable and rapid identification of clinically important yeasts, was applied. However, frequent misidentification of C. glabrata as S. cerevisiae has been reported when using the Yeast Clinical Database of MIS. Accuracy of MIS identification may be strongly influenced by the amounts of cell mass analyzed. Therefore, the present study compared the MIS results of these two yeasts achieved with different cell masses. Primarily we optimized, especially with respect to cost-effectiveness, the recommended streaking technique yielding a maximal recovery of 90-130 mg of cell mass from one plate, enabling testing of poor growing strains of C. glabrata. For all C. glabrata strains tested (n = 10) the highest identification scores (SI [Similarity Index] range 0.525-0.963, median 0.832) were achieved with 30 to 45 mg of cell mass. Only 5 of 10 S. cerevisiae strains revealed good library comparisons (SI > or = 0.5) when using 30 mg of cell mass, whereas with 45 mg all strains but two revealed this SI-level. For S. cerevisiae a higher amount of cell mass processed (up to 90 mg) was correlated with better identification scores (SI range using 90 mg: 0.464-0.870, median, 0.737). Several passages prior to FAME analysis of C. glabrata strains on recommended media revealed narrowing of SI ranges, but

  19. Oral Candida albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals have similar in vitro biofilm-forming ability and pathogenicity as invasive Candida isolates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Candida can cause mucocutaneous and/or systemic infections in hospitalized and immunosuppressed patients. Most individuals are colonized by Candida spp. as part of the oral flora and the intestinal tract. We compared oral and systemic isolates for the capacity to form biofilm in an in vitro biofilm model and pathogenicity in the Galleria mellonella infection model. The oral Candida strains were isolated from the HIV patients and included species of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, C. norvegensis, and C. dubliniensis. The systemic strains were isolated from patients with invasive candidiasis and included species of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. lusitaniae, and C. kefyr. For each of the acquired strains, biofilm formation was evaluated on standardized samples of silicone pads and acrylic resin. We assessed the pathogenicity of the strains by infecting G. mellonella animals with Candida strains and observing survival. Results The biofilm formation and pathogenicity in Galleria was similar between oral and systemic isolates. The quantity of biofilm formed and the virulence in G. mellonella were different for each of the species studied. On silicone pads, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis produced more biofilm (1.12 to 6.61 mg) than the other species (0.25 to 3.66 mg). However, all Candida species produced a similar biofilm on acrylic resin, material used in dental prostheses. C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis were the most virulent species in G. mellonella with 100% of mortality, followed by C. lusitaniae (87%), C. novergensis (37%), C. krusei (25%), C. glabrata (20%), and C. kefyr (12%). Conclusions We found that on silicone pads as well as in the Galleria model, biofilm formation and virulence depends on the Candida species. Importantly, for C. albicans the pathogenicity of oral Candida isolates was similar to systemic Candida isolates, suggesting that Candida

  20. Crz1p regulates pH homeostasis in Candida glabrata by altering membrane lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongni; Lin, Xiaobao; Qi, Yanli; Liu, Hui; Chen, Xiulai; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2016-09-23

    The asexual facultative aerobic haploid yeast Candida glabrata is widely used in the industrial production of various organic acids. To elucidate the physiological function of the transcription factor CgCrz1p and its role in tolerance to acid stress we deleted or overexpressed the corresponding gene CgCRZ1 Deletion of CgCRZ1 resulted in a 60% decrease in dry cell weight (DCW) and a 50% drop in cell viability compared to the wild type at pH 2.0. Expression of lipid metabolism-associated genes was also significantly down-regulated. Consequently, the proportion of C18:1 fatty acids, ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids, and ergosterol content decreased by 30%, 46%, and 30%, respectively. Additionally, membrane integrity, fluidity, and H(+)-ATPase activity were reduced by 45%, 9%, and 50%, respectively. In contrast, overexpression of CgCrz1p increased C18:1 and ergosterol content by 16% and 40%, respectively. Overexpression also enhanced membrane integrity, fluidity, and H(+)-ATPase activity by 31%, 6%, and 20%, respectively. Moreover, in the absence of pH buffering, DCW and pyruvate titer increased by 48% and 60%, respectively, compared to the wild type. Together, these results suggest that CgCrz1p regulates tolerance to acidic conditions by altering membrane lipid composition in C. glabrata IMPORTANCE: The present study provides an insight into the metabolism of Candida glabrata under acidic conditions, such as those encountered during industrial production of organic acids. We found that overexpression of the transcription factor CgCrz1p improved viability, biomass, and pyruvate yields at low pH. Analysis of plasma membrane lipid composition indicated that CgCrz1p might play an important role in its integrity and fluidity, and enhanced the pumping of protons in acidic environments. We propose that altering the structure of the cell membrane may provide a successful strategy for increasing C glabrata productivity at low pH.

  1. Echinocandin Resistance in Candida Species Isolates from Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Prigent, Gwénolé; Aït-Ammar, Nawel; Levesque, Eric; Fekkar, Arnaud; Costa, Jean-Marc; El Anbassi, Sarra; Foulet, Françoise; Duvoux, Christophe; Merle, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Liver transplant recipients are at risk of invasive fungal infections, especially candidiasis. Echinocandin is recommended as prophylactic treatment but is increasingly associated with resistance. Our aim was to assess echinocandin drug resistance in Candida spp. isolated from liver transplant recipients treated with this antifungal class. For this, all liver-transplanted patients in a University Hospital (Créteil, France) between January and June of 2013 and 2015 were included. Susceptibilities of Candida isolates to echinocandins were tested by Etest and the EUCAST reference method. Isolates were analyzed by FKS sequencing and genotyped based on microsatellites or multilocus sequence typing (MLST) profiles. Ninety-four patients were included, and 39 patients were colonized or infected and treated with echinocandin. Echinocandin resistance appeared in 3 (8%) of the treated patients within 1 month of treatment. One patient was colonized by resistant Candida glabrata, one by resistant Candida dubliniensis, and one by resistant Candida albicans. Molecular analysis found three mutations in FKS2 HS1 (F659S, S663A, and D666E) for C. glabrata and one mutation in FKS1 HS1 (S645P) for C. dubliniensis and C. albicans. Susceptible and resistant isolates belonged to the same genotype. To our knowledge, this is the first study on echinocandin resistance in Candida spp. in a liver transplant population. Most resistant isolates were found around/in digestive sites, perhaps due to lower diffusion of echinocandin in these sites. This work documents the risk of emergence of resistance to echinocandin, even after short-term treatment. PMID:27855078

  2. Comparison of a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and ATB ID 32C system for identification of clinical isolates of different Candida species.

    PubMed

    Baires-Varguez, Laura; Cruz-García, Alejandro; Villa-Tanaka, Lourdes; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio; Quindós, Guillermo; Hernández-Rodríguez, César

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this work was to compare the usefulness of a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay to that of the ATB ID32C kit (bioMérieux, France) for identification of different species of Candida isolated from clinical specimens. The RAPD-PCR patterns obtained with OPE-18 primer for identification of clinical isolates were consistent, and the different independent assays revealed reproduction of the band patterns. RAPD with the OPE-18 primer is a very specific and sensitive method for identification of Candida glabrata, Candida guilliermondii, Candida tropicalis, Candida pelliculosa, Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Candida lusitaniae.

  3. Force nanoscopy of hydrophobic interactions in the fungal pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Derclaye, Sylvie; Alsteens, David; Kucharíková, Soňa; Van Dijck, Patrick; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2015-02-24

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen which binds to surfaces mainly through the Epa family of cell adhesion proteins. While some Epa proteins mediate specific lectin-like interactions with human epithelial cells, others promote adhesion and biofilm formation on plastic surfaces via nonspecific interactions that are not yet elucidated. We report the measurement of hydrophobic forces engaged in Epa6-mediated cell adhesion by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we found that C. glabrata wild-type (WT) cells attach to hydrophobic surfaces via strongly adhesive macromolecular bonds, while mutant cells impaired in Epa6 expression are weakly adhesive. Nanoscale mapping of yeast cells using AFM tips functionalized with hydrophobic groups shows that Epa6 is massively exposed on WT cells and conveys strong hydrophobic properties to the cell surface. Our results demonstrate that Epa6 mediates strong hydrophobic interactions, thereby providing a molecular basis for the ability of this adhesin to drive biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces.

  4. Posaconazole Activity against Candida glabrata after Exposure to Caspofungin or Amphotericin B▿

    PubMed Central

    Spreghini, Elisabetta; Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Milici, Maria Eleonora; Scalise, Giorgio; Barchiesi, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of sequential therapy with caspofungin (CAS) or amphotericin B (AMB) followed by posaconazole (POS) against Candida glabrata. The susceptibilities to POS of yeast cells pre-exposed to CAS or AMB were identical to those of untreated cells as shown by standard Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth dilution, cell viability, and disk diffusion methods. We then investigated the activity of sequential regimens in an experimental model of disseminated candidiasis. CAS given at 1 mg/kg/day for 2 days followed by POS at either 15 or 30 mg/kg/day significantly reduced the counts compared to the controls, but this treatment was not superior to the use of CAS alone. Also, sequential regimens with AMB given at 1 mg/kg/day for 2 days followed by POS (AMB/POS) were effective at reducing the fungal burden against the controls. In addition, AMB/POS with both doses of the triazole were significantly more effective than AMB alone. Overall, our data showed that there is no therapeutic advantage in using CAS followed by POS, whereas an induction therapy with AMB followed by a maintenance regimen with POS might be a suitable strategy in managing C. glabrata infections. PMID:18056279

  5. Autoactivation by a Candida glabrata copper metalloregulatory transcription factor requires critical minor groove interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, K A; Thiele, D J

    1996-01-01

    Rapid transcriptional autoactivation of the Candida glabrata AMT1 copper metalloregulatory transcription factor gene is essential for survival in the presence of high extracellular copper concentrations. Analysis of the interactions between purified recombinant AMT1 protein and the AMT1 promoter metal regulatory element was carried out by a combination of missing-nucleoside analysis, ethylation interference, site-directed mutagenesis, and quantitative in vitro DNA binding studies. The results of these experiments demonstrate that monomeric AMT1 binds the metal regulatory element with very high affinity and utilizes critical contacts in both the major and minor grooves. A single adenosine residue in the minor groove, conserved in all known yeast Cu metalloregulatory transcription factor DNA binding sites, plays a critical role in both AMT1 DNA binding in vitro and Cu-responsive AMT1 gene transcription in vivo. Furthermore, a mutation in the AMT1 Cu-activated DNA binding domain which converts a single arginine, found in a conserved minor groove binding domain, to lysine markedly reduces AMT1 DNA binding affinity in vitro and results in a severe defect in the ability of C. glabrata cells to mount a protective response against Cu toxicity. PMID:8552101

  6. Fungicidal effect of thymoquinone involves generation of oxidative stress in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Almshawit, Hala; Macreadie, Ian

    2017-01-01

    The antifungal effect of thymoquinone, a component of black seed essential oil, has been studied on different types of fungi. Its mechanism of action as an antifungal has not been described yet. This study demonstrates the fungicidal effect of thymoquinone on different Candida species with particular emphasis on C. glabrata planktonic cells and biofilms. Since cell death was induced via the generation of oxidative stress as evidenced by the abrogation of thymoquinone toxicity in cells incubated with antioxidants, a part of thymoquinone's mechanism of action includes a direct involvement as a pro-oxidant. This was further confirmed by measuring the generation of reactive oxygen species, glutathione level reduction and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. The oxidative stress caused by thymoquinone was confirmed to be the cause of death and not a result of cell death.

  7. Time to positivity and detection of growth in anaerobic blood culture vials predict the presence of Candida glabrata in candidemia: a two-center European cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Kaasch, Achim J; Soriano, Alex; Torres, Jorge-Luis; Vergara, Andrea; Morata, Laura; Zboromyrska, Yuliya; De La Calle, Cristina; Alejo, Izaskun; Hernández, Cristina; Cardozo, Celia; Marco, Franscesc; Del Río, Ana; Almela, Manel; Mensa, Josep; Martínez, José Antonio

    2014-08-01

    This study shows the accuracy of exclusive or earlier growth in anaerobic vials to predict Candida glabrata in a large series of candidemic patients from two European hospitals using the Bactec 9240 system. Alternatively, C. glabrata can be predicted by a time to positivity cutoff value, which should be determined for each setting.

  8. Production of virulence factors in Candida strains isolated from patients with denture stomatitis and control individuals.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Domingues, Nádia; Araújo, Maria Izabel Daniel Santos Alves; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Back-Brito, Graziella Nuernberg; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of virulence factors in Candida isolates from the oral cavities of 50 patients with different degrees of denture stomatitis (DS, type I, II and III) and 50 individuals without signs of DS. We evaluated the enzymatic and hemolytic activities, the biofilm formation, and the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) in all isolates. Germ tube (GT) production was also evaluated in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis isolates. In C. albicans and C. dubliniensis the secretion of hemolysin and GT production was significantly different between isolates from patients with DS and individuals without DS. No significant difference was observed in the production of virulence factors by Candida glabrata isolates. Candida isolates expressed a wide range of virulence factors. However, in the majority of isolates from the type III lesions, the production of the virulence factors was higher than for the other groups.

  9. Structural basis for promiscuity and specificity during Candida glabrata invasion of host epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Diderrich, Rike; Veelders, Maik Stefan; Eulenburg, Georg; Kalugin, Vitali; Brückner, Stefan; Keller, Petra; Rupp, Steffen; Mösch, Hans-Ulrich; Essen, Lars-Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The human pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata harbors more than 20 surface-exposed, epithelial adhesins (Epas) for host cell adhesion. The Epa family recognizes host glycans and discriminates between target tissues by their adhesin (A) domains, but a detailed structural basis for ligand-binding specificity of Epa proteins has been lacking so far. In this study, we provide high-resolution crystal structures of the Epa1A domain in complex with different carbohydrate ligands that reveal how host cell mucin-type O-glycans are recognized and allow a structure-guided classification of the Epa family into specific subtypes. Further detailed structural and functional characterization of subtype-switched Epa1 variants shows that specificity is governed by two inner loops, CBL1 and CBL2, involved in calcium binding as well as by three outer loops, L1, L2, and L3. In summary, our study provides the structural basis for promiscuity and specificity of Epa adhesins, which might further contribute to developing anti-adhesive antimycotics and combating Candida colonization. PMID:23035251

  10. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Oral Candida Isolates from Patients Suffering from Caries and Chronic Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    De-la-Torre, Janire; Ortiz-Samperio, María Esther; Marcos-Arias, Cristina; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier; Eraso, Elena; Echebarria-Goicouria, María Ángeles; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel; Quindós, Guillermo

    2017-01-25

    Caries and chronic periodontitis are common oral diseases where a higher Candida colonization is reported. Antifungal agents could be adjuvant drugs for the therapy of both clinical conditions. The aim of the current study has been to evaluate the in vitro activities of conventional and new antifungal drugs against oral Candida isolates from patients suffering from caries and/or chronic periodontitis. In vitro activities of amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, nystatin, posaconazole and voriconazole against 126 oral Candida isolates (75 Candida albicans, 18 Candida parapsilosis, 11 Candida dubliniensis, six Candida guilliermondii, five Candida lipolytica, five Candida glabrata, four Candida tropicalis and two Candida krusei) from 61 patients were tested by the CLSI M27-A3 method. Most antifungal drugs were highly active, and resistance was observed in less than 5% of tested isolates. Miconazole was the most active antifungal drug, being more than 98% of isolates susceptible. Fluconazole, itraconazole, and the new triazoles, posaconazole and voriconazole, were also very active. Miconazole, fluconazole and voriconazole have excellent in vitro activities against all Candida isolates and could represent suitable treatment for a hypothetically adjunctive therapy of caries and chronic periodontitis.

  11. Oral mucositis caused by Candida glabrata biofilms: failure of the concomitant use of fluconazole and ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Célia F.; Henriques, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Candida glabrata is becoming one of the most prevalent pathogenic yeasts in cases of oral diseases. Mucositis is an recurrent oral infection in immunocompromised patients, and the actual guidelines recommend the use of fluconazole (Flu) for many cases. However, the azole resistance by C. glabrata is renowned, causing a reduced therapeutic response, especially when it occurs in biofilms. In this study, we performed an in vitro evaluation of an alternative pharmacotherapy for C. glabrata biofilm infections, combining ascorbic acid (AA) with Flu. AA is recognized for degrading β-glucans, an important compound of the biofilm matrices, which prevent drug diffusion. Materials and Methods: Routine clinical 30 or 40 mg/l doses of Flu were applied to C. glabrata biofilms simultaneously with 200 or 300 mg/l of AA. Results: The results showed that this combination effectively promoted the degradation of the biofilm network, but unfortunately, also stimulated the growth of the yeasts population due to release of several glucose monomers during β-glucans hydrolysis. Discussion: AA lead to the hydrolysis of the β-glucans of the matrix, liberating glucose molecules which are used as carbon souce by the yeasts, thus suppressing the desired antifungal effect of the drug combination with Flu. Conclusions: Unlike to what happens in treatment of bacterial infection, AA should not be used together with Flu in the treating oral mucositis caused by Candida. PMID:28357061

  12. [Evaluation of a new chromogenic medium (Candida ID) for the isolation and presumptive identification of Candida albicans and other medically important yeasts].

    PubMed

    Quindós, G; Alonso-Vargas, R; Helou, S; Arechavala, A; Martín-Mazuelos, E; Negroni, R

    2001-03-01

    Candidiasis is a frequent human infection caused mainly by Candida albicans. However, other species are emerging as important pathogens, as Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei or Candida guilliermondii. Rapid identification of clinical isolates could facilitate diagnosis and treatment. Candida ID (bioMerieux, Spain) is a new medium for the isolation and presumptive identification of yeasts: C. albicans grows as blue colonies, and C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, Candida kefyr and Candida lusitaniae as pink ones. The utility of Candida ID was evaluated with more than 700 clinical isolates and type culture collection strains from different genera including Candida, Cryptococcus, Saccharomyces, and Rhodotorula. Presumptive identification was confirmed by germ tube test, microscopic morphology and chlamydoconidia production on corn meal agar and carbohydrate assimilation on API-ATB ID 32C or Vitek (bioMerieux). Growth on Candida ID was rapid (18-24 h) for most of the yeast strains tested. Sensitivity and specificity of identification of C. albicans was significantly high (>98%), since a very low number of isolates were found to be false negative or false positive. A better result was obtained for species growing as pink colonies (>99.5%). Detection of different species of medical important yeasts was easy with Candida ID, as perfectly distinct colors and textures of colonies were observed on this medium. Candida ID allowed the discrimination between C. glabrata (creamy and smooth) and C. krusei (rough and white) colonies. Other species showed different colony textures and colours, white being the predominant colour. Candida ID was very useful for the presumptive identification C. albicans isolates.

  13. The CgHaa1-Regulon Mediates Response and Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Ruben T.; Cunha, Diana V.; Wang, Can; Pereira, Leonel; Silva, Sónia; Salazar, Sara B.; Schröder, Markus S.; Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Aoyama, Toshihiro; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Azeredo, Joana; Butler, Geraldine; Mira, Nuno Pereira

    2016-01-01

    To thrive in the acidic vaginal tract, Candida glabrata has to cope with high concentrations of acetic acid. The mechanisms underlying C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid at low pH remain largely uncharacterized. In this work, the essential role of the CgHaa1 transcription factor (encoded by ORF CAGL0L09339g) in the response and tolerance of C. glabrata to acetic acid is demonstrated. Transcriptomic analysis showed that CgHaa1 regulates, directly or indirectly, the expression of about 75% of the genes activated under acetic acid stress. CgHaa1-activated targets are involved in multiple physiological functions including membrane transport, metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids, regulation of the activity of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase, and adhesion. Under acetic acid stress, CgHaa1 increased the activity and the expression of the CgPma1 proton pump and contributed to increased colonization of vaginal epithelial cells by C. glabrata. CgHAA1, and two identified CgHaa1-activated targets, CgTPO3 and CgHSP30, are herein demonstrated to be determinants of C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid. The protective effect of CgTpo3 and of CgHaa1 was linked to a role of these proteins in reducing the accumulation of acetic acid inside C. glabrata cells. In response to acetic acid stress, marked differences were found in the regulons controlled by CgHaa1 and by its S. cerevisiae ScHaa1 ortholog, demonstrating a clear divergent evolution of the two regulatory networks. The results gathered in this study significantly advance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the success of C. glabrata as a vaginal colonizer. PMID:27815348

  14. The CgHaa1-Regulon Mediates Response and Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Ruben T; Cunha, Diana V; Wang, Can; Pereira, Leonel; Silva, Sónia; Salazar, Sara B; Schröder, Markus S; Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Aoyama, Toshihiro; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Azeredo, Joana; Butler, Geraldine; Mira, Nuno Pereira

    2017-01-05

    To thrive in the acidic vaginal tract, Candida glabrata has to cope with high concentrations of acetic acid. The mechanisms underlying C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid at low pH remain largely uncharacterized. In this work, the essential role of the CgHaa1 transcription factor (encoded by ORF CAGL0L09339g) in the response and tolerance of C. glabrata to acetic acid is demonstrated. Transcriptomic analysis showed that CgHaa1 regulates, directly or indirectly, the expression of about 75% of the genes activated under acetic acid stress. CgHaa1-activated targets are involved in multiple physiological functions including membrane transport, metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids, regulation of the activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, and adhesion. Under acetic acid stress, CgHaa1 increased the activity and the expression of the CgPma1 proton pump and contributed to increased colonization of vaginal epithelial cells by C. glabrata CgHAA1, and two identified CgHaa1-activated targets, CgTPO3 and CgHSP30, are herein demonstrated to be determinants of C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid. The protective effect of CgTpo3 and of CgHaa1 was linked to a role of these proteins in reducing the accumulation of acetic acid inside C. glabrata cells. In response to acetic acid stress, marked differences were found in the regulons controlled by CgHaa1 and by its S. cerevisiae ScHaa1 ortholog, demonstrating a clear divergent evolution of the two regulatory networks. The results gathered in this study significantly advance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the success of C. glabrata as a vaginal colonizer.

  15. Repeated applications of photodynamic therapy on Candida glabrata biofilms formed in acrylic resin polymerized.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo Freitas, Lírian Silva; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have been suggested that photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be used as an adjuvant treatment for denture stomatitis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of multiple sessions of PDT on Candida glabrata biofilms in specimens of polymerized acrylic resin formed after 5 days. Subsequently, four applications of PDT were performed on biofilms in 24-h intervals (days 6-9). Also, we evaluated two types of PDT, including application of laser and methylene blue or light-emitting diode (LED) and erythrosine. The control groups were treated with physiological solution. The effects of PDT on biofilm were evaluated after the first and fourth application of PDT. The biofilm analysis was performed by counting the colony-forming units. The results showed that between the days 6 and 9, the biofilms not treated by PDT had an increase of 5.53 to 6.05 log (p = 0.0271). Regarding the treatments, after one application of PDT, the biofilms decreased from 5.53 to 0.89 log. When it was done four applications, the microbial reduction ranged from 6.05 log to 0.11 log. We observed that one application of PDT with laser or LED caused a reduction of 3.36 and 4.64 compared to the control groups, respectively (p = 0.1708). When it was done four applications of PDT, the reductions achieved were 1.57 for laser and 5.94 for LED (p = 0.0001). It was concluded that repeated applications of PDT on C. glabrata biofilms showed higher antimicrobial activity compared to single application. PDT mediated by LED and erythrosine was more efficient than the PDT mediated by laser and methylene blue.

  16. In vitro and in vivo effects of 14alpha-demethylase (ERG11) depletion in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, H; Nakayama, N; Arisawa, M; Aoki, Y

    2001-11-01

    Sterol 14alpha-demethylase (ERG11) is the target enzyme of azole antifungals that are widely used for the treatment of fungal infections. Candida glabrata is known to be less susceptible to fluconazole than most Candida albicans strains, and the incidence of C. glabrata infection has been increasing mostly in conjunction with the use of azole antifungals. Recently, it has been reported that C. glabrata can rescue the defect of ergosterol biosynthesis by incorporating cholesterol from serum. To explore the effect of inactivating Erg11p in C. glabrata, we generated mutant strains in which the ERG11 gene was placed under the control of tetracycline-regulatable promoters. In these mutants, expression of the ERG11 gene can be repressed by doxycycline (DOX). All mutants showed a growth defect in the presence of DOX. The numbers of CFU of the mutants were lowered by only 1/10 with DOX treatment. In these mutants, accumulation of 4,14-dimethylzymosterol, which differs from an accumulated abnormal sterol detected in C. albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated with fluconazole, was observed by DOX treatment. Although such phenotypes were also observed in serum-containing media by DOX treatment, they were alleviated. Furthermore, the mutant could grow in DOX-treated mice without a severe reduction in the number of cells. Thus, depleting the expression of the ERG11 gene lowered the number of CFU by only 1/10 due to the accumulation of 4,14-demethylzymosterol in vitro, and it did not result in the defective growth of fungal cells in mice. These results suggested that Erg11p is not an ideal target molecule of antifungals for C. glabrata.

  17. Candida duobushaemulonii: an emerging rare pathogenic yeast isolated from recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Boatto, Humberto Fabio; Cavalcanti, Sarah Desirée Barbosa; Del Negro, Gilda Mb; Girão, Manoel João Bc; Francisco, Elaine Cristina; Ishida, Kelly; Gompertz, Olga Fischman

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Candida species isolated from women diagnosed with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) and their partners; and to evaluate the fluconazole (FLZ) susceptibility of the isolates. In a period of six years, among 172 patients diagnosed with vulvovaginal candidiasis, 13 women that presented RVVC and their partners were selected for this investigation. The isolates were obtained using Chromagar Candida medium, the species identification was performed by phenotypic and molecular methods and FLZ susceptibility was evaluated by E-test. Among 26 strains we identified 14 Candida albicans, six Candida duobushaemulonii, four Candida glabrata, and two Candida tropicalis. Agreement of the isolated species occurred in 100% of the couples. FLZ low susceptibility was observed for all isolates of C. duobushaemulonii (minimal inhibitory concentration values from 8-> 64 µg/mL), two C. glabrata isolates were FLZ-resistant and all C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates were FLZ-susceptible. This report emphasises the importance of accurate identification of the fungal agents by a reliable molecular technique in RVVC episodes besides the lower antifungal susceptibility profile of this rare pathogen C. duobushaemulonii to FLZ.

  18. Production of white colonies on CHROMagar Candida BD by species in the C. glabrata clade, and other species with overlapping phenotypic traits.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromogenic agars are important diagnostic media used in the clinical mycology laboratory. Candida spp. that produced white colonies on CHROMagar Candida (Becton Dickinson) (CAC) were found during a study designed to detect and identify C. bracarensis, a newly-described species in the C. glabrata c...

  19. Intestinal resident yeast Candida glabrata requires Cyb2p-mediated lactate assimilation to adapt in mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Keigo; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Uno, Jun; Sasamoto, Kaname; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kinjo, Yuki; Chibana, Hiroji

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal resident Candida glabrata opportunistically infects humans. However few genetic factors for adaptation in the intestine are identified in this fungus. Here we describe the C. glabrata CYB2 gene encoding lactate dehydrogenase as an adaptation factor for survival in the intestine. CYB2 was identified as a virulence factor by a silkworm infection study. To determine the function of CYB2, we analysed in vitro phenotypes of the mutant Δcyb2. The Δcyb2 mutant grew well in glucose medium under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, was not supersensitive to nitric oxide which has fungicidal-effect in phagocytes, and had normal levels of general virulence factors protease, lipase and adherence activities. A previous report suggested that Cyb2p is responsible for lactate assimilation. Additionally, it was speculated that lactate assimilation was required for Candida virulence because Candida must synthesize glucose via gluconeogenesis under glucose-limited conditions such as in the host. Indeed, the Δcyb2 mutant could not grow on lactate medium in which lactate is the sole carbon source in the absence of glucose, indicating that Cyb2p plays a role in lactate assimilation. We hypothesized that Cyb2p-mediated lactate assimilation is necessary for proliferation in the intestinal tract, as the intestine is rich in lactate produced by bacteria flora, but not glucose. The Δcyb2 mutant showed 100-fold decreased adaptation and few cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can adapt in mouse ceca. Interestingly, C. glabrata could assimilate lactate under hypoxic conditions, dependent on CYB2, but not yeast S. cerevisiae. Because accessible oxygen is limited in the intestine, the ability for lactate assimilation in hypoxic conditions may provide an advantage for a pathogenic yeast. From those results, we conclude that Cyb2p-mediated lactate assimilation is an intestinal adaptation factor of C. glabrata.

  20. Virulence factors of Candida species isolated from patients with urinary tract infection and obstructive uropathy

    PubMed Central

    Alenzi, Faris Q.B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Fungal urinary tract infections due to Candida have increased significantly in recent years. Our research objective was to study Candida species in urine samples of patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) associated with obstructive uropathy and to investigate the virulence factors of the isolated Candida. Methods: Patients were divided into two groups: Group I (cases): 50 patients with UTIs and obstructive uropathy. Group II (control): 50 patients with UTIs but with no functional or anatomical obstruction of their urinary tract. Clinical histories and physical examinations, together with laboratory investigations of urine samples were carried out in all patients in this study. Mid stream urine samples were examined microscopically and by fungal cell culture. The isolated Candida species were identified by analytical profile index (API). Candida Virulence factors were determined for the isolated Candida. The susceptibility to fluconazole was evaluated. Results: This study revealed an overall isolation rate of 27% of Candida species among all patient groups. The rate was 36% in cases, and 18% in controls, a difference found to be statistically significant (P<0.05). By API, C.albicans was detected in 44% of Candida species in cases, and in 33% in controls. While C.glabrata was detected in 28% of Candida species in cases, and in 22% in controls. C.tropicalis was detected in 17% of Candida species in cases, and in 22% in controls. Both C.krusei and C.kyfr were detected in 5.5% of Candida species in cases, and in 11% in controls. In terms of virulence factors the study showed that 11 out of 27 (40.5%) of Candida isolates were biofilm positive by tube adherence. Phospholipase activity was demonstrated in 12 out of 27 (44.5%) of Candida isolates. Secretory aspartic proteinase activity was demonstrated in 13 out of 27 (48%) of the Candida isolates. Conclusion: Candida is an important cause of UTIs and obstructive uropathy is a major predisposing factor

  1. The EPA2 adhesin encoding gene is responsive to oxidative stress in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Cepeda, Jacqueline; Orta-Zavalza, Emmanuel; Cañas-Villamar, Israel; Arreola-Gómez, Jorge; Pérez-Cornejo, Gloria Patricia; Hernández-Carballo, Carmen Yudith; Gutiérrez-Escobedo, Guadalupe; Castaño, Irene; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    Candida glabrata has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen in both mucosal and bloodstream infections. C. glabrata contains 67 adhesin-like glycosylphosphatidylinositol-cell-wall proteins (GPI-CWPs), which are classified into seven groups and the largest is the Epa family. Epa proteins are very diverse and their expression is differentially regulated. Like many of the EPA genes, EPA2 is localized in a subtelomeric region where it is subject to chromatin-based transcriptional silencing and its role remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that EPA2 gene is induced specifically in vitro in the presence of oxidative stress generated by H2O2. This induction is dependent on both Yap1 and Skn7, whereas Msn4 represses EPA2 expression. Interestingly, EPA2 is not induced during phagocytosis, but its expression can be identified in the liver in a murine model of systemic infection. Epa2 has no effect on the virulence of C. glabrata. The work presented herein provides a foundation for future studies to dissect the molecular mechanism(s) by which EPA2 of C. glabrata can be induced in the presence of oxidative stress in a region subject to subtelomeric silencing.

  2. Differentiation of Candida glabrata, C. nivariensis and C. bracarensis based on fragment length polymorphism of ITS1 and ITS2 and restriction fragment length polymorphism of ITS and D1/D2 regions in rDNA.

    PubMed

    Mirhendi, H; Bruun, B; Schønheyder, H C; Christensen, J J; Fuursted, K; Gahrn-Hansen, B; Johansen, H K; Nielsen, L; Knudsen, J D; Arendrup, M C

    2011-11-01

    Different molecular methods for the discrimination of Candida glabrata, C. bracarensis and C. nivariensis were evaluated and the prevalence of these species among Danish blood isolates investigated. Control strains were used to determine fragment length polymorphism in the ITS1, ITS2, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions and in the D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA using primers designed for this study. A total of 133 blood isolates previously identified as C. glabrata were examined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and the peptide nucleic acid-fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method. The size of ITS1 allowed differentiation between C. glabrata (483), C. nivariensis (361) and C. bracarensis (385), whereas the ITS2 region was of similar size in C. nivariensis (417) and C. glabrata (418). Sequence analysis of the ITS region suggested that many restriction enzymes were suitable for RFLP differentiation of the species. Enzymatic digestion of the D1/D2 domain with TatI produced unique band sizes for each of the three species. PCR-RFLP and PNA-FISH were in agreement for all of the isolates tested. None of the 133 Danish blood isolates were C. nivariensis or C. bracarensis. Fragment size polymorphism of ITS1 and RFLP of the D1/D2 domain or the ITS region are useful methods for the differentiation of the species within the C. glabrata group. C. bracarensis and C. nivariensis are rare among Danish C. glabrata blood isolates.

  3. Induction of ROS generation by fluconazole in Candida glabrata: activation of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Mahl, Camila Donato; Behling, Camile Saul; Hackenhaar, Fernanda S; de Carvalho e Silva, Mélany Natuane; Putti, Jordana; Salomon, Tiago B; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Fuentefria, Alexandre; Benfato, Mara S

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we assessed the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by subinhibitory concentration of fluconazole in susceptible and resistant Candida glabrata strains at stationary growth phase and measured their oxidative responses parameters: glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), consumption of hydrogen peroxide, and total glutathione, as well as oxidative damage in lipids, proteins, and DNA. Data showed that fluconazole increased generation of ROS and GPx and SOD enzymatic activity in treated cells; however, these enzymatic activities did not differ between resistant and susceptible strains. Susceptible strains exhibited higher GST activity than resistant, and when susceptible cells were treated with fluconazole, GST activity decreased. Fluconazole treatment cause oxidative damage only in DNA. There are a possible participation of ROS, as organic peroxides and O2(•-), in antifungal mechanism of fluconazole, which results in higher GPx and SOD enzymatic activities and oxidative DNA damage in C. glabrata.

  4. One Small Step for a Yeast - Microevolution within Macrophages Renders Candida glabrata Hypervirulent Due to a Single Point Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Daniel; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Kasper, Lydia; Jablonowski, Nadja; Wartenberg, Anja; Bader, Oliver; Enache-Angoulvant, Adela; Schaller, Martin; d'Enfert, Christophe; Hube, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata is one of the most common causes of candidemia, a life-threatening, systemic fungal infection, and is surpassed in frequency only by Candida albicans. Major factors contributing to the success of this opportunistic pathogen include its ability to readily acquire resistance to antifungals and to colonize and adapt to many different niches in the human body. Here we addressed the flexibility and adaptability of C. glabrata during interaction with macrophages with a serial passage approach. Continuous co-incubation of C. glabrata with a murine macrophage cell line for over six months resulted in a striking alteration in fungal morphology: The growth form changed from typical spherical yeasts to pseudohyphae-like structures – a phenotype which was stable over several generations without any selective pressure. Transmission electron microscopy and FACS analyses showed that the filamentous-like morphology was accompanied by changes in cell wall architecture. This altered growth form permitted faster escape from macrophages and increased damage of macrophages. In addition, the evolved strain (Evo) showed transiently increased virulence in a systemic mouse infection model, which correlated with increased organ-specific fungal burden and inflammatory response (TNFα and IL-6) in the brain. Similarly, the Evo mutant significantly increased TNFα production in the brain on day 2, which is mirrored in macrophages confronted with the Evo mutant, but not with the parental wild type. Whole genome sequencing of the Evo strain, genetic analyses, targeted gene disruption and a reverse microevolution experiment revealed a single nucleotide exchange in the chitin synthase-encoding CHS2 gene as the sole basis for this phenotypic alteration. A targeted CHS2 mutant with the same SNP showed similar phenotypes as the Evo strain under all experimental conditions tested. These results indicate that microevolutionary processes in host-simulative conditions can elicit

  5. Domain Organization in Candida glabrata THI6, a Bifunctional Enzyme Required for Thiamin Biosynthesis in Eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Debamita; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-15

    THI6 is a bifunctional enzyme found in the thiamin biosynthetic pathway in eukaryotes. The N-terminal domain of THI6 catalyzes the ligation of the thiamin thiazole and pyrimidine moieties to form thiamin phosphate, and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the phosphorylation of 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole in a salvage pathway. In prokaryotes, thiamin phosphate synthase and 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase are separate gene products. Here we report the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic THI6 along with several complexes that characterize the active sites responsible for the two chemical reactions. THI6 from Candida glabrata is a homohexamer in which the six protomers form a cage-like structure. Each protomer is composed of two domains, which are structurally homologous to their monofunctional bacterial counterparts. Two loop regions not found in the bacterial enzymes provide interactions between the two domains. The structures of different protein-ligand complexes define the thiazole and ATP binding sites of the 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase domain and the thiazole phosphate and 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine pyrophosphate binding sites of the thiamin phosphate synthase domain. Our structural studies reveal that the active sites of the two domains are 40 {angstrom} apart and are not connected by an obvious channel. Biochemical studies show 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole phosphate is a substrate for THI6; however, adenosine diphospho-5{beta}-ethyl-4-methylthiazole-2-carboxylic acid, the product of THI4, is not a substrate for THI6. This suggests that an unidentified enzyme is necessary to produce the substrate for THI6 from the THI4 product.

  6. Photodynamic inactivation of clinical isolates of Candida using Photodithazine®.

    PubMed

    Dovigo, L N; Carmello, J C; Carvalho, M T; Mima, E G; Vergani, C E; Bagnato, V S; Pavarina, A C

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the photodynamic inactivation (PDI) mediated by Photodithazine(®) (PDZ) against 15 clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis. Each isolate, in planktonic and biofilm form, was exposed to PDI by assessing a range of PDZ concentrations and light emitting diode fluences. Cell survival of the planktonic suspensions was determined by colony forming units (CFU ml(-1)). The antifungal effects of PDI against biofilms were evaluated by CFU ml(-1) and metabolic assay. Data were analyzed by non-parametric tests (α = 0.05). Regardless of the species, PDI promoted a significant viability reduction of planktonic yeasts. The highest reduction in cell viability of the biofilms was equivalent to 0.9 log10 (CFU ml(-1)) for C. albicans, while 1.4 and 1.5 log10 reductions were obtained for C. tropicalis and C. glabrata, respectively. PDI reduced the metabolic activity of biofilms by 62.1, 76.0, and 76.9% for C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata, respectively. PDZ-mediated PDI promoted significant reduction in the viability of Candida isolates.

  7. Antifungal potential of eugenyl acetate against clinical isolates of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Musthafa, Khadar Syed; Hmoteh, Jutharat; Thamjarungwong, Benjamas; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2016-10-01

    The study evaluated the efficiency of eugenyl acetate (EA), a phytochemical in clove essential oil, against clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Candida glabrata. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of EA against Candida isolates were in the range between 0.1% and 0.4% (v/v). Spot assay further confirmed the susceptibility of Candida isolates to the compound upon treatment with respective 1 × MIC. Growth profile measured in time kill study evidence that the compound at 1 × MIC and 1/2 × MIC retarded the growth of Candida cells, divulging the fungicidal activity. Light microscopic observation demonstrated that upon treated with EA, rough cell morphology, cell damage, and fragmented patterns were observed in C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. Furthermore, unusual morphological changes of the organism were observed in scanning electron microscopic study. Therefore, it is validated that the compound could cause cell damage resulting in the cell death of Candida clinical isolates. Eventually, the compound at sub-MIC (0.0125% v/v) significantly inhibited serum-induced germ tube formation by C. albicans. Eugenyl acetate inhibited biofilm forming ability of the organisms as well as reduced the adherence of Candida cells to HaCaT keratinocytes cells. In addition, upon treatment with EA, the phagocytic activity of macrophages was increased significantly against C. albicans (P < 0.05). The results demonstrated the potential of EA as a valuable phytochemical to fight against emerging Candida infections.

  8. Secretion of the acid trehalase encoded by the CgATH1 gene allows trehalose fermentation by Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Zilli, D M W; Lopes, R G; Alves, S L; Barros, L M; Miletti, L C; Stambuk, B U

    2015-10-01

    The emergent pathogen Candida glabrata differs from other yeasts because it assimilates only two sugars, glucose and the disaccharide trehalose. Since rapid identification tests are based on the ability of this yeast to rapidly hydrolyze trehalose, in this work a biochemical and molecular characterization of trehalose catabolism by this yeast was performed. Our results show that C. glabrata consumes and ferments trehalose, with parameters similar to those observed during glucose fermentation. The presence of glucose in the medium during exponential growth on trehalose revealed extracellular hydrolysis of the sugar by a cell surface acid trehalase with a pH optimum of 4.4. Approximately ∼30% of the total enzymatic activity is secreted into the medium during growth on trehalose or glycerol. The secreted enzyme shows an apparent molecular mass of 275 kDa in its native form, but denaturant gel electrophoresis revealed a protein with ∼130 kDa, which due to its migration pattern and strong binding to concanavalin A, indicates that it is probably a dimeric glycoprotein. The secreted acid trehalase shows high affinity and activity for trehalose, with Km and Vmax values of 3.4 mM and 80 U (mg protein)(-1), respectively. Cloning of the CgATH1 gene (CAGLOK05137g) from de C. glabrata genome, a gene showing high homology to fungal acid trehalases, allowed trehalose fermentation after heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  9. Species distribution and virulence factors of Candida spp. isolated from the oral cavity of kidney transplant recipients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Guilherme Maranhão; Diniz, Mariana Guimarães; da Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison Plinio; de Souza, Luanda Bárbara Ferreira Canário; Gondim, Libia Augusta Maciel; Ferreira, Maria Angela Fernandes; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; Milan, Eveline Pipolo

    2013-04-01

    Although yeasts belonging to the genus Candida are frequently seen as commensals in the oral cavity, they possess virulence attributes that contribute for pathogenicity. The aims of the present study were to study the prevalence of Candida spp. isolated from the oral cavity of renal transplant recipients and to analyze strains virulence factors. We isolated a total of 70 Candida strains from 111 transplant recipients, and Candida albicans was the most prevalent species (82.86 %). Oral candidiasis was diagnosed in 14.4 % kidney transplant patients, while 11 isolates (15.7 %) corresponded to non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species. C. albicans adhered to a higher extension than NCAC strains. Some isolates of Candida tropicalis were markedly adherent to human buccal epithelial cells and highly biofilm-forming strains. Regarding proteinase activity, Candida orthopsilosis was more proteolytic than Candida metapsilosis. Candida glabrata and Candida dubliniensis showed very low ability to form biofilm on polystyrene microtiter plates. We have demonstrated here diverse peculiarities of different Candida species regarding the ability to express virulence factors. This study will contribute for the understanding of the natural history and pathogenesis of yeasts belonging to the genus Candida in the oral cavity of patients who were submitted to kidney transplant and are under immunosuppressive therapies.

  10. Investigating Biofilm Production, Coagulase and Hemolytic Activity in Candida Species Isolated From Denture Stomatitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Nimet; Aktas, Esin; Dagistan, Saadettin; Ayyildiz, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Oral candidiasis, in the form of Candida-associated denture stomatitis, represents a common disease in a large percentage of denture wearers, and Candida albicans remains the most commonly isolated species. In this study, we aimed to evaluate biofilm production, coagulase and hemolytic activity of Candida species isolated from denture stomatitis patients. Materials and Methods: This study included 70 patients (31 female, 39 male). Forty-eight of the patients were found to have a positive culture. A total of 48 Candida isolates representing five species, C. albicans (n=17), C. glabrata (n=10), C. krusei (n=9), C. kefyr (n=7) and C. parapsilosis (n=5), were tested. Their coagulase activities were evaluated by a classical tube coagulase test with rabbit plasma. A blood plate assay on 3% enriched sheep blood Sabouraud-dextrose agar (SDA) was used to determine their in vitro hemolytic activities. Biofilm production was determined by a visual tube method. Results: Twenty-one Candida isolates exhibited coagulase activity, and the coagulase activities of the C. albicans (64.7%) isolates were higher than other species. C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. kefyr and C. krusei species demonstrated beta hemolysis. C. parapsilosis strains failed to demonstrate any hemolytic activities. Fifteen (88.0%) of the C. albicans strains were biofilm positive. Six (35.2%) of these strains were strongly positive, 8 (47.0%) C. albicans strains were moderately positive and 1 (5.8%) C. albicans strain was weakly positive. Sixteen (51.6%) of the non-albicans Candida strains were biofilm positive while 15 (48.3%) did not produce biofilms. Conclusion: The results of this present study indicate coagulase, hemolytic activity and biofilm production by Candida spp. isolated from patients with denture stomatitis. Investigations of these virulence factors might be helpful in gaining information about the possible virulence of oral Candida species related to denture stomatitis. PMID:25610156

  11. Identification of signature volatiles to discriminate Candida albicans, glabrata, krusei and tropicalis using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Moritz; Hartwig, Stefan; Schütte, Eyke; Gillissen, Bernhard; Preissner, Robert; Schmidt-Westhausen, Andrea Maria; Paris, Sebastian; Kastner, Isabell; Preissner, Saskia

    2016-02-01

    Oral candidiasis is the most frequent fungal infection of the oral cavity. Clinical diagnoses require mycological confirmation, which is time-consuming in case of culture testing. The aim of the study was to identify signature volatiles to develop a chairside breath test to diagnose oral candidiasis. Headspaces above Candida albicans, glabrata, tropicalis, krusei cultures, and growth media as control were analysed after eight and 24 h using offline gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The identification of signature volatiles was assisted using various microbial databases. Retrieved volatile patterns enabled Candida species discrimination in vitro. For C. albicans 3-methyl-2-butanone and styrene and for C. krusei a combination of p-xylene, 2-octanone, 2-heptanone and n-butyl acetate were found to be specific. 1-hexanol was found in C. tropicalis, but is emitted by a variety of other microorganisms. C. glabrata was characterised through the absence of these volatiles. The development of a breath test is a promising approach in confirming suspicions of oral candidiasis. To confirm the retrieved results in vivo, breath tests in affected and healthy subjects have to be performed.

  12. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of the beta-class enzyme from the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata with anions.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Alessio; Leewattanapasuk, Worraanong; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A; Mastrolorenzo, Antonio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2009-08-15

    A beta-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), the protein encoded by the NCE103 gene of Candida glabrata which also present in Candida albicans and Saccharomycescerevisiae, was cloned, purified, characterized kinetically and investigated for its inhibition by a series simple, inorganic anions such as halogenides, pseudohalogenides, bicarbonate, carbonate, nitrate, nitrite, hydrogen sulfide, bisulfite, perchlorate, sulfate and some isosteric species. The enzyme showed significant CO(2) hydrase activity, with a k(cat) of 3.8 x 10(5)s(-1) and k(cat)/K(M) of 4.8 x 10(7)M(-1)s(-1). The Cà glabrata CA (CgCA) was moderately inhibited by metal poisons (cyanide, azide, cyanate, thiocyanate, K(I)s of 0.60-1.12 mM) but strongly inhibited by bicarbonate, nitrate, nitrite and phenylarsonic acid (K(I)s of 86-98 microM). The other anions investigated showed inhibition constants in the low millimolar range, with the exception of bromide and iodide (K(I)s of 27-42 mM).

  13. Clinical significance of the isolation of Candida species from hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Yankee C; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Q; Melônio, Luciane C; Ribeiro, Patrícia C S; Cosme, Lécia M; Rhoden, Cristianne R; Marques, Sirlei G

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we isolated and phenotypically identified 108 yeast strains from various clinical specimens collected from 100 hospitalized patients at three tertiary hospitals in São Luís-Maranhão, Brazil, from July to December 2010. The isolates were analyzed for their susceptibility to four of the most widely used antifungal agents in the surveyed hospitals, amphotericin B, fluconazole, 5-flucytosine and voriconazole. The species identified were Candida albicans (41.4%), Candida tropicalis (30.1%), C. glabrata (7.4%), Candida parapsilosis (5.5%), Candida krusei (4.6%), Cryptococcus neoformans (4.6%), Trichosporon spp . (3.7%), Candida norvegensis (0.9%), Rhodotorula glutinis (0.9%) and Pichia farinosa (0.9%). A higher isolation rate was observed in the following clinical specimens: urine (54 isolates; 50%), respiratory tract samples (21 isolates; 19.4%) and blood (20 isolates; 18.6%). Candida albicans isolates were 100% sensitive to all antifungal agents tested, whereas Candida krusei and Crytococcus neoformans displayed intermediate resistance to 5-flucytosine, with Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values of 8 mg/mL and 16 mg/mL, respectively. Both strains were also S-DD to fluconazole with an MIC of 16 mg/mL. C. tropicalis was resistant to 5-flucytosine with an MIC of 32 μg/mL. This study demonstrates the importance of identifying the yeast species involved in community and nosocomial infections.

  14. Rapid detection and identification of Candida albicans and Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata in clinical specimens by species-specific nested PCR amplification of a cytochrome P-450 lanosterol-alpha-demethylase (L1A1) gene fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Burgener-Kairuz, P; Zuber, J P; Jaunin, P; Buchman, T G; Bille, J; Rossier, M

    1994-01-01

    PCR of a Candida albicans cytochrome P-450 lanosterol-alpha-demethylase (P450-L1A1) gene segment is a rapid and sensitive method of detection in clinical specimens. This enzyme is a target for azole antifungal action. In order to directly detect and identify the clinically most important species of Candida, we cloned and sequenced 1.3-kbp fragments of the cytochrome P450-L1A1 genes from Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata and from Candida krusei. These segments were compared with the published sequences from C. albicans and Candida tropicalis. Amplimers for gene sequences highly conserved throughout the fungal kingdom were first used; positive PCR results were obtained for C. albicans, T. glabrata, C. krusei, Candida parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Trichosporon beigelii DNA extracts. Primers were then selected for a highly variable region of the gene, allowing the species-specific detection from purified DNA of C. albicans, T. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis. The assay sensitivity as tested for C. albicans in seeded clinical specimens such as blood, peritoneal fluid, or urine was 10 to 20 cells per 0.1 ml. Compared with results obtained by culture, the sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of the species-specific nested PCR tested with 80 clinical specimens were 71, 95, and 83% for C. albicans and 100, 97, and 98% for T. glabrata, respectively. Images PMID:7989540

  15. Posttreatment Antifungal Resistance among Colonizing Candida Isolates in Candidemia Patients: Results from a Systematic Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, R. H.; Johansen, H. K.; Søes, L. M.; Lemming, L. E.; Rosenvinge, F. S.; Nielsen, L.; Olesen, B.; Kristensen, L.; Dzajic, E.; Astvad, K. M. T.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of intrinsic and acquired resistance among colonizing Candida isolates from patients after candidemia was investigated systematically in a 1-year nationwide study. Patients were treated at the discretion of the treating physician. Oral swabs were obtained after treatment. Species distributions and MIC data were investigated for blood and posttreatment oral isolates from patients exposed to either azoles or echinocandins for <7 or ≥7 days. Species identification was confirmed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing, susceptibility was examined by EUCAST EDef 7.2 methodology, echinocandin resistance was examined by FKS sequencing, and genetic relatedness was examined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). One hundred ninety-three episodes provided 205 blood and 220 oral isolates. MLST analysis demonstrated a genetic relationship for 90% of all paired blood and oral isolates. Patients exposed to azoles for ≥7 days (n = 93) had a significantly larger proportion of species intrinsically less susceptible to azoles (particularly Candida glabrata) among oral isolates than among initial blood isolates (36.6% versus 12.9%; P < 0.001). A similar shift toward species less susceptible to echinocandins among 85 patients exposed to echinocandins for ≥7 days was not observed (4.8% of oral isolates versus 3.2% of blood isolates; P > 0.5). Acquired resistance in Candida albicans was rare (<5%). However, acquired resistance to fluconazole (29.4%; P < 0.05) and anidulafungin (21.6%; P < 0.05) was common in C. glabrata isolates from patients exposed to either azoles or echinocandins. Our findings suggest that the colonizing mucosal microbiota may be an unrecognized reservoir of resistant Candida species, especially C. glabrata, following treatment for candidemia. The resistance rates were high, raising concern in general for patients exposed to antifungal

  16. Antifungal Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains Isolated from Natural Honey against Pathogenic Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Bulgasem, Bulgasem Y.; Lani, Mohd Nizam; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Fnaish, Sumaya G.

    2016-01-01

    The role of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in honey as antifungal activity has received little attention and their mechanism of inhibitory of fungi is not fully understood. In this study, LAB were isolated from honey samples from Malaysia, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. Twenty-five isolates were confirmed LAB by catalase test and Gram staining, and were screened for antifungal activity. Four LAB showed inhibitory activity against Candida spp. using the dual agar overlay method. And they were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum HS isolated from Al-Seder honey, Lactobacillus curvatus HH isolated from Al-Hanon honey, Pediococcus acidilactici HC isolated from Tualang honey and Pediococcus pentosaceus HM isolated from Al-Maray honey by the 16S rDNA sequence. The growth of Candida glabrata ATCC 2001 was strongly inhibited (>15.0 mm) and (10~15 mm) by the isolates of L. curvatus HH and P. pentosaceus HM, respectively. The antifungal activity of the crude supernatant (cell free supernatant, CFS) was evaluated using well diffusion method. The CFS showed high antifungal activity against Candida spp. especially The CFS of L. curvatus HH was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited growth of C. glabrata ATCC 2001, C. parapsilosis ATCC 2201, and C. tropicalis ATCC 750 with inhibitory zone 22.0, 15.6, and 14.7 mm, respectively. While CFS of P. pentosaceus HM was significantly (p < 0.05) effective against C. krusei, C. glabrata, and C. albicans with inhibition zone 17.2, 16.0, and 13.3 mm, respectively. The results indicated that LAB isolated from honey produced compounds which can be used to inhibit the growth of the pathogenic Candida species. PMID:28154488

  17. Antifungal Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains Isolated from Natural Honey against Pathogenic Candida Species.

    PubMed

    Bulgasem, Bulgasem Y; Lani, Mohd Nizam; Hassan, Zaiton; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Fnaish, Sumaya G

    2016-12-01

    The role of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in honey as antifungal activity has received little attention and their mechanism of inhibitory of fungi is not fully understood. In this study, LAB were isolated from honey samples from Malaysia, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. Twenty-five isolates were confirmed LAB by catalase test and Gram staining, and were screened for antifungal activity. Four LAB showed inhibitory activity against Candida spp. using the dual agar overlay method. And they were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum HS isolated from Al-Seder honey, Lactobacillus curvatus HH isolated from Al-Hanon honey, Pediococcus acidilactici HC isolated from Tualang honey and Pediococcus pentosaceus HM isolated from Al-Maray honey by the 16S rDNA sequence. The growth of Candida glabrata ATCC 2001 was strongly inhibited (>15.0 mm) and (10~15 mm) by the isolates of L. curvatus HH and P. pentosaceus HM, respectively. The antifungal activity of the crude supernatant (cell free supernatant, CFS) was evaluated using well diffusion method. The CFS showed high antifungal activity against Candida spp. especially The CFS of L. curvatus HH was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited growth of C. glabrata ATCC 2001, C. parapsilosis ATCC 2201, and C. tropicalis ATCC 750 with inhibitory zone 22.0, 15.6, and 14.7 mm, respectively. While CFS of P. pentosaceus HM was significantly (p < 0.05) effective against C. krusei, C. glabrata, and C. albicans with inhibition zone 17.2, 16.0, and 13.3 mm, respectively. The results indicated that LAB isolated from honey produced compounds which can be used to inhibit the growth of the pathogenic Candida species.

  18. Antifungal susceptibility of Candida species isolated from patients with candidemia in southern Taiwan, 2007-2012: impact of new antifungal breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Shu-Fang; Chen, Fang-Ju; Lee, Chen-Hsiang

    2017-02-01

    The Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) revised the clinical breakpoints (CBPs) for the azoles and echinocandins against Candida species in 2012. We aimed to report the epidemiology of candidemia and antifungal susceptibility of Candida species and evaluate the impact of new CBPs on antifungal susceptibility in our region. All blood isolates of Candida species were obtained from 2007 to 2012. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of fluconazole, voriconazole, echinocandins and flucytosine against Candida isolates were determined by Sensititre YeastOne system. Differences in susceptibility rates between the CBPs of previous and revised versions of CLSI were examined. Of 709 Candida isolates, the fluconazole-susceptible rate was 96.5% in Candida albicans, 85.8% in Candida tropicalis and 92.1% in Candida parapsilosis by the revised CBPs. Compared with the susceptibility results by previous CBPs, the marked reductions in susceptibility of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis to fluconazole, that of C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis to voriconazole, that of C. tropicalis and Candida glabrata to anidulafungin and that of C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and Candida krusei to caspofungin by revised CBPs were found. In conclusion, Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis remain highly susceptible to fluconazole. The non-susceptible rates of Candida species to azoles and echinocandins increase with interpretation by the revised CBPs.

  19. Antifungal Susceptibility in Serum and Virulence Determinants of Candida Bloodstream Isolates from Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Rajan, Suhasini; Wong, Sarah S. W.; Tsang, Dominic N. C.; Lai, Christopher K. C.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections (CBI) are one of the most common nosocomial infections globally, and they account for a high mortality rate. The increasing global prevalence of drug-resistant Candida strains has also been posing a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the biofilm formation and production of hemolysin and proteinase of 63 CBI isolates derived from a hospital setting in Hong Kong as well as their antifungal susceptibility both in the presence and in the absence of human serum, using standard methodology. Candida albicans was the predominant species among the 63 CBI isolates collected, and non-albicans Candida species accounted for approximately one third of the isolates (36.5%). Of them, Candida tropicalis was the most common non-albicans Candida species. A high proportion (31.7%) of the CBI isolates (40% of C. albicans isolates, 10% of C. tropicalis isolates, 11% of C. parapsilosis isolates, and 100% of C. glabrata isolates) were found to be resistant to fluconazole. One of the isolates (C. tropicalis) was resistant to amphotericin B. A rising prevalence of drug-resistance CBI isolates in Hong Kong was observed with reference to a previous study. Notably, all non-albicans Candida species, showed increased hemolytic activity relative to C. albicans, whilst C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis exhibited proteinase activities. Majority of the isolates were capable of forming mature biofilms. Interestingly, the presence of serum distorted the yeast sensitivity to fluconazole, but not amphotericin B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CBI isolates of Candida have the potential to express to varying extent their virulence attributes (e.g., biofilm formation, hemolysin production, and proteinase activity) and these, together with perturbations in their antifungal sensitivity in the presence of serum, may contribute to treatment complication in candidemia. The effect of serum on antifungal activity

  20. Isolation and characterization of Candida spp. in Jordanian cancer patients: prevalence, pathogenic determinants, and antifungal sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Abeid, Hanan M; Abu-Elteen, Khaled H; Elkarmi, Ali Z; Hamad, Mawieh A

    2004-12-01

    The presence of Candida spp. in the oral cavity was evaluated in 95 cancer patients (57 in-patients and 38 out-patients) and in 65 healthcare workers in Amman, Jordan. Candida carriage occurred in 72.6% of cancer patients and 33.8% of healthcare workers, with Candida albicans being the species most commonly recovered, followed by C. glabrata. In-patients were found to harbor Candida spp. at significantly higher levels than out-patients (P = 0.0044). The number of adhered C. albicans cells and the secretion of extracellular proteinase was significantly higher in the in-patient group than in the out-patient group (P = 0.0016 and 0.00007, respectively); this significant difference was not observed regarding phospholipase secretion. Antifungal sensitivity testing data suggest that isolates were most sensitive to amphotericin B and nystatin, and least sensitive to miconazole and fluconazole, which are commonly used antifungal agents in Jordan.

  1. Genome Sequencing of the Pyruvate-producing Strain Candida glabrata CCTCC M202019 and Genomic Comparison with Strain CBS138

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Nan; Ye, Chao; Chen, Xiulai; Liu, Jia; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata CCTCC M202019 as an industrial yeast strain that is widely used to produce α-oxocarboxylic acid. Strain M202019 has been proven to have a higher pyruvate-producing capacity than the reference strain CBS138. To characterize the genotype of the M202019 strain, we generated a draft sequence of its genome, which has a size of 12.1 Mbp and a GC content of 38.47%. Evidence accumulated during genome annotation suggests that strain M202019 has strong capacities for glucose transport and pyruvate biosynthesis, defects in pyruvate catabolism, as well as variations in genes involved in nutrient and dicarboxylic acid transport, oxidative phosphorylation, and other relevant aspects of carbon metabolism, which might promote pyruvate accumulation. In addition to differences in its central carbon metabolism, a genomic analysis revealed genetic differences in adhesion metabolism. Forty-nine adhesin-like proteins of strain M202019 were identified classified into seven subfamilies. Decreased amounts of adhesive proteins, and deletions or changes of low-complexity repeats and functional domains might lead to lower adhesion and reduced pathogenicity. Further virulence experiments validated the biological safety of strain M202019. Analysis of the C. glabrata CCTCC M202019 genome sequence provides useful insights into its genetic context, physical characteristics, and potential metabolic capacity. PMID:27713500

  2. Candida duobushaemulonii: an emerging rare pathogenic yeast isolated from recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Boatto, Humberto Fabio; Cavalcanti, Sarah Desirée Barbosa; Del Negro, Gilda MB; Girão, Manoel João BC; Francisco, Elaine Cristina; Ishida, Kelly; Gompertz, Olga Fischman

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Candida species isolated from women diagnosed with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) and their partners; and to evaluate the fluconazole (FLZ) susceptibility of the isolates. In a period of six years, among 172 patients diagnosed with vulvovaginal candidiasis, 13 women that presented RVVC and their partners were selected for this investigation. The isolates were obtained using Chromagar Candida medium, the species identification was performed by phenotypic and molecular methods and FLZ susceptibility was evaluated by E-test. Among 26 strains we identified 14Candida albicans, six Candida duobushaemulonii, four Candida glabrata, and twoCandida tropicalis. Agreement of the isolated species occurred in 100% of the couples. FLZ low susceptibility was observed for all isolates of C. duobushaemulonii (minimal inhibitory concentration values from 8-> 64 µg/mL), two C. glabrataisolates were FLZ-resistant and all C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates were FLZ-susceptible. This report emphasises the importance of accurate identification of the fungal agents by a reliable molecular technique in RVVC episodes besides the lower antifungal susceptibility profile of this rare pathogen C. duobushaemulonii to FLZ. PMID:27304096

  3. The Rho1 GTPase-activating Protein CgBem2 Is Required for Survival of Azole Stress in Candida glabrata*

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Sapan; Shivarathri, Raju; Kaur, Rupinder

    2011-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are common clinical complications of neonates, critically ill, and immunocompromised patients worldwide. Candida species are the leading cause of disseminated fungal infections, with Candida albicans being the most prevalent species. Candida glabrata, the second/third most common cause of candidemia, shows reduced susceptibility to a widely used antifungal drug fluconazole. Here, we present findings from a screen of 9134 C. glabrata Tn7 insertion mutants for altered survival profiles in the presence of fluconazole. We have identified two components of RNA polymerase II mediator complex, three players of Rho GTPase-mediated signaling cascade, and two proteins implicated in actin cytoskeleton biogenesis and ergosterol biosynthesis that are required to sustain viability during fluconazole stress. We show that exposure to fluconazole leads to activation of the protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated cell wall integrity pathway in C. glabrata. Our data demonstrate that disruption of a RhoGAP (GTPase activating protein) domain-containing protein, CgBem2, results in bud-emergence defects, azole susceptibility, and constitutive activation of CgRho1-regulated CgPkc1 signaling cascade and cell wall-related phenotypes. The viability loss of Cgbem2Δ mutant upon fluconazole treatment could be partially rescued by the PKC inhibitor staurosporine. Additionally, we present evidence that CgBEM2 is required for the transcriptional activation of genes encoding multidrug efflux pumps in response to fluconazole exposure. Last, we report that Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin renders fluconazole a fungicidal drug in C. glabrata. PMID:21832071

  4. Isolation of Candida Protoplasts from a Case of Candida Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Richard

    1966-01-01

    Rosner, Richard (St. Joseph's Hospital, Paterson, N.J.). Isolation of Candida protoplasts from a case of Candida endocarditis. J. Bacteriol. 91:1320–1326. 1966.—A case of endocarditis caused by Candida tropicalis is described. Even though the patient was receiving adequate therapy, and all routine blood cultures were negative for growth, the patient continued to give clinical evidence of active, progressive endocarditis. The isolation of osmotically fragile bodies from blood cultures placed in an osmotically controlled medium is described in detail. The role of these bodies, called protoplasts, in the active disease process of this patient is discussed in relation to the criteria for the implication of protoplasts in the disease process. Several explanations as to what caused the in vivo formation of protoplasts of C. tropicalis in this patient are discussed. Images PMID:4160231

  5. Performance of Chromogenic Candida agar and CHROMagar Candida in recovery and presumptive identification of monofungal and polyfungal vaginal isolates.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Kadri; Ilkit, Macit; Ates, Aylin; Turac-Bicer, Aygul; Demirhindi, Hakan

    2010-02-01

    Chromogenic Candida agar (OCCA) is a novel medium facilitating isolation and identification of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei, as well as indicating polyfungal population in clinical samples. We compare the performance of OCCA, to CHROMagar Candida (CAC) and Sabouraud chloramphenicol agar (SCA). Vaginal swab samples from 392 women were simultaneously inoculated onto three study media. A total of 161 (41.1%) were found to be positive for fungi of which 140 (87%) were monofungal, and 21 (13%) polyfungal. One-hundred and fifty-seven samples (97.5%) were positive on CAC, 156 (96.9%) on OCCA, 148 (91.9%) on SCA and 144 (89.4%) samples were positive on all three media. The yeasts were identified by conventional methods including germ tube test, microscopic morphology on cornmeal-Tween 80 agar, and the commercial API 20C AUX. The 182 isolates were C. albicans (n = 104), C. glabrata (n = 51), C. krusei (n = 7), C. tropicalis (n = 5), C. famata (n = 3), C. kefyr (n = 3), C. zeylanoides (n = 3), C. colliculosa (n = 2), and other species of Candida (n = 4). Among the 21 polyfungal populations, 20 (95.2%) were detected in OCCA, 14 (66.7%) in CAC, and 13 (61.9%) in CAC and OCCA (P <0.05). Most polyfungal populations (47.6%) yielded C. albicans + C. glabrata. The efficiency of both chromogenic media for C. albicans was >or=92.9% at 72 h. OCCA is more efficient and reliable for rapidly identifying C. albicans and polyfungal populations than CAC. However, CAC is more efficient for identifying C. krusei and C. tropicalis. A chromogenic agar with a higher isolation rate of yeasts and better detection of polyfungal populations than SCA, is suggested as a medium of first choice when available.

  6. Frequency of clinically isolated strains of oral Candida species at Kagoshima University Hospital, Japan, and their susceptibility to antifungal drugs in 2006–2007 and 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The isolation frequency and susceptibility to antifungal agents of oral Candida isolates from patients with oral candidiasis (OC) were compared between studies conducted in 2006–2007 and 2012–2013. Methods A total158 strains was isolated from 112 patients who visited Kagoshima University Hospital for the treatment of OC during the 14-month period from February 2012 and March 2013, and evaluated on the isolation frequency of each Candida strain and the susceptibility against antifungal drugs as compared to those evaluated in 2006–2007. Results There was a higher frequency of xerostomia as a chief complaint and of autoimmune disease in the 2012–2013 study than in the 2006–2007 study. More than 95% of Candida isolates were C. albicans and C. glabrata. In addition, the proportion of the latter increased from 12.3% in the 2006–2007 study to 23.4% in the 2012–2013 study, while the proportion of the former decreased from 86.2% to 72.8%, respectively. C. albicans was isolated in almost all patients, while C. glabrata was only isolated concomitantly with C. albicans. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were not significantly different between groups with a few exceptions. Candida isolates, of which MICs surpassed break points, apparently increased for miconazole and itraconazole against C. glabrata in the 2012–2013 study, but this was not statistically significant. As a result, more cases of autoimmune disease, a greater number of C. glabrata isolates, and higher resistance to azoles were seen in the 2012–2013 study than in the 2006–2007 study. Conclusion These data indicate that with recent increases in C. glabrata infection, a causative fungus of OC, and in C. glabrata resistance to azoles, caution is needed in the selection of antifungal drugs for the treatment of OC. PMID:24552136

  7. Colonization and antifungals susceptibility patterns of Candida species isolated from hospitalized patients in ICUs and NICUs

    PubMed Central

    Zarei Mahmoudabadi, Ali; Rezaei-Matehkolaei, Ali; Navid, Mojgan; Torabizadeh, Mehdi; Mazdarani, Shahnam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that there are an increasing in invasive candidiasis during 2-3 last decades. Although, Candida albicans is considered as the most common candidiasis agents, other non-albicans such as C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis were raised as infectious agents. Resistance to fluconazole among non-albicans species is an important problem for clinicians during therapy and prophylaxis. Objectives: The aim of current study was to detect the Candida species from hospitalized neonatal and children in intensive care units (ICUs) and neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). In addition, the susceptibility of isolated agents were also evaluated against three antifungals. Materials and Methods: In the present study 298 samples including 98 blood samples, 100 urines and 100 swabs from oral cavity were inoculated on CHROMagar Candida. Initial detection was done according to the coloration colonies on CHROMagar Candida . Morphology on cornmeal agar, germ tube formation and growth at 45°C were confirmed isolates. Amphotericin B, fluconazole and terbinafine (Lamisil) were used for the susceptibility tests using microdilution method. Results: In the present study 21% and 34% of urines and swabs from oral cavity were positive for Candida species, respectively. The most common species was C. albicans (62.5%) followed by C. tropicalis (15.6%), C. glabrata (6.3%) and Candida species (15.6%). Our study indicated that the most tested species of Candida, 70.3% were sensitive to fluconazole at the concentration of ≤8 μg/mL. Whereas 9 (14.1%) of isolates were resistant to amphotericine B at ≥8 μg/mL. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the importance of species identification and antifungals susceptibility testing for hospitalized patients in ICUs and NICUs wards. PMID:26312235

  8. In vitro biofilm production of Candida bloodstream isolates: any association with clinical characteristics?

    PubMed

    Pongrácz, Júlia; Benedek, Kálmán; Juhász, Emese; Iván, Miklós; Kristóf, Katalin

    2016-04-01

    Candida spp. are a leading cause of bloodstream infection (BSI) and are associated with high mortality rates. Biofilm production is a virulence factor of Candida spp., and has been linked with poor clinical outcome. The aim of our study was to assess biofilm production of Candida bloodstream isolates at our institute, and to determine whether in vitro biofilm production is associated with any clinical characteristics of infection. During the four-year study period, 93 cases of Candida BSI were analysed. The most frequently isolated species was C. albicans (66.7 %), followed by C. glabrata (9.7 %), C. parapsilosis (9.7 %), C. tropicalis (9.7 %) and C. krusei (4.3 %). Biofilm production was more prevalent among non-albicans Candida spp. (77.4 %) than C. albicans (30.6 %) (P = 0.02). Abdominal surgery was identified as a risk factor of BSI caused by biofilm producing non-albicans Candida isolates. No risk factors predisposing to bloodstream infection caused by a biofilm producing C. albicans isolate were identified. Biofilm production was not verified as a risk factor of mortality.

  9. Candida glabrata binds to glycosylated and lectinic receptors on the coronary endothelial luminal membrane and inhibits flow sense and cardiac responses to agonists.

    PubMed

    Torres-Tirado, David; Knabb, Maureen; Castaño, Irene; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Rubio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata (CG) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that initiates infection by binding to host cells via specific lectin-like adhesin proteins. We have previously shown the importance of lectin-oligosaccharide binding in cardiac responses to flow and agonists. Because of the lectinic-oligosaccharide nature of CG binding, we tested the ability of CG to alter the agonist- and flow-induced changes in cardiac function in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts. Both transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed strong attachment of CG to the coronary endothelium, even after extensive washing. CG shifted the coronary flow vs. auricular-ventricular (AV) delay relationship upward, indicating that greater flow was required to achieve the same AV delay. This effect was completely reversed with mannose, partially reversed with galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine, but hyaluronan had no effect. Western blot analysis was used to determine binding of CG to isolated coronary endothelial luminal membrane (CELM) receptors, and the results indicate that flow-sensitive CELM receptors, ANG II type I, α-adrenergic 1A receptor, endothelin-2, and VCAM-1 bind to CG. In addition, CG inhibited agonist-induced effects of bradykinin, angiotensin, and phenylephrine on AV delay, coronary perfusion pressure, and left ventricular pressure. Mannose reversed the inhibitory effects of CG on the agonist responses. These results suggest that CG directly binds to flow-sensitive CELM receptors via lectinic-oligosaccharide interactions with mannose and disrupts the lectin-oligosaccharide binding necessary for flow-induced cardiac responses.

  10. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danielly Beraldo dos Santos; Rodrigues, Luana Mireli Carbonera; Almeida, Adriana Araújo de; Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires de; Grisolia, Alexéia Barufatti

    2016-03-01

    The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51) which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candida species known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G) and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei--A497C (Y166S) and G1570A (G524R). The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. krusei demands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates.

  11. Candida glabrata Pneumonia in a Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Onur; Casim, Hasan; Cetinkaya, Erdogan; Mert, Ali; Benli, Ali Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality among infectious diseases. Streptococcus pneumoniae and viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia. Candidiasis in such patients has been associated with haemodialysis, fungal colonization, exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics, intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalization, and immunocompromised patients. The most common cause of infection is C. albicans. The case presented here is of a 66-year-old male patient diagnosed with C. glabrata. The patient suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:27882253

  12. Comparison of anidulafungin MICs determined by the clinical and laboratory standards institute broth microdilution method (M27-A3 document) and Etest for Candida species isolates.

    PubMed

    Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Canton, E; Peman, J; Martín-Mazuelo, E

    2010-03-01

    Anidulafungin Etest and CLSI MICs were compared for 143 Candida sp. isolates to assess essential (within 2 log(2) dilutions) and categorical agreements (according to three susceptibility breakpoints). Based on agreement percentages, our data indicated that Etest is not suitable to test anidulafungin against Candida parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii (54.4 to 82.4% essential and categorical agreements) but is more suitable for C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis (87.9 to 100% categorical agreement).

  13. Evaluation of CHROM-Pal medium for the isolation and direct identification of Candida dubliniensis in primary cultures from the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Sahand, Ismail H; Maza, José L; Eraso, Elena; Montejo, Miguel; Moragues, María D; Aguirre, José M; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2009-11-01

    Candida albicans is the species most frequently isolated from oral specimens, but the recovery of other Candida species such as Candida dubliniensis is increasing. Differentiation of C. dubliniensis from C. albicans requires special tests and both species are misidentified in some studies. CHROM-Pal (CH-P) is a novel chromogenic medium used in our laboratory for differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis on the basis of colony colour and morphology, and chlamydospore production. The performance of CH-P and CHROMagar Candida (CAC) was compared for primary isolation and presumptive identification of yeasts from oral specimens from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and uninfected individuals. The identification of Candida species on both media was compared with two reference identification methods (API ID 32 C and multiplex PCR). A total of 137/205 oral swabs (66.8 %) plated onto CH-P and CAC media were positive by culture and resulted in the growth of 171 isolates of Candida species on CH-P, whilst only 159 isolates grew on CAC. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species in both groups of patients, followed by Candida parapsilosis in the HIV-negative group, and by C. dubliniensis in the HIV-infected group. The other Candida species isolated were Candida guilliermondii, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Candida famata, Candida rugosa, Candida kefyr, Candida pelliculosa and Candida pulcherrima. The sensitivity and specificity for identifying C. albicans, C. krusei, C. tropicalis and C. dubliniensis on CH-P were over 98.5 %, always equal to or higher than those obtained when CAC was used. CH-P is a simple reliable medium for primary isolation and presumptive identification of yeast isolates from oral samples. The ability of CH-P to discriminate between C. dubliniensis and C. albicans was significantly higher (P <0.05) than that of CAC.

  14. Clinical isolates and laboratory reference Candida species and strains have varying abilities to form biofilms.

    PubMed

    Alnuaimi, Ali D; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Reynolds, Eric C; McCullough, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    Candida biofilms are a major virulence trait for this yeast. In this study, the biofilm-forming ability of the major medically important clinical and laboratory reference strains was compared. Biofilms were quantified using traditional methods, that is, crystal violet (CV), tetrazolium (XTT) reduction and colony-forming unit assays (CFU), and two new methods: an automated cell counter (ACC) and biofilm suspension turbidity (BST) method. Biofilms could be categorized based on biofilm biomass (high, medium and low) and growth state (high and low). Candida albicans genotypes, A, B and C, showed medium biofilm mass and low growth rate, and only one C. albicans laboratory strain, ATCC MYA-2719, matched this biofilm category. Of all non-albicans Candida species tested, only Candida dubliniensis and Candida glabrata laboratory and clinical isolates had similar biofilm development. The ACC and BST methods for measuring biofilm significantly correlated with CV and CFU biofilm mass measurements. Thus, biofilm mass can be rapidly assessed using biofilm disruptive/cellular nondestructive methods allowing yeast biofilm cells to be used for further analysis. In conclusion, Candida laboratory reference strains and clinical isolates have been shown to form biofilms at different rates; hence for validity, the selection of laboratory reference strains in biofilm studies may be critical for virulence assessment.

  15. Fluconazole susceptibility and ERG11 gene expression in vaginal candida species isolated from lagos Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Pam, Victoria K; Akpan, Juliet U; Oduyebo, Oyinlola O; Nwaokorie, Francisca O; Fowora, Muinah A; Oladele, Rita O; Ogunsola, Folasade T; Smith, Stella I

    2012-01-01

    Fluconazole resistance is an important type of resistance in Candida because in most countries, fluconazole is the drug of choice for vulvovaginal candidiasis. Candida species resist fluconazole by various mechanisms but there is paucity of data on these in our environment. Such mechanisms include among others, over-expression of the ERG11 gene, which codes for synthesis of the target enzymes in the fungus. The aim of this study was to screen Candida spp. resistant to fluconazole for the expression of ERG11 gene. Fluconazole susceptibility test was performed on 28 clinical strains of Candida species previously obtained from students of a School of Nursing in Lagos, Nigeria. They were identified by API Candida, CHROMagar candida and germ tube test. Using 25 mcg discs, fluconazole susceptibility was determined by the disc diffusion method and results were interpreted in accordance with the Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) criteria; sensitive (S), resistant (R) and susceptible dose dependent (SDD). The R and SDD isolates were subsequently evaluated for the presence of ERG11 gene. Of the 28 clinical isolates, 14 were identified as C. albicans and six as C. tropicalis. The remaining isolates were identified as C. glabrata (2), C. famata (2) C. kefyr (2) one each of C. parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii respectively. In this study, 18 were susceptible (S) to fluconazole, eight were SDD and two were resistant to the antifungal agent. Out of the 14 C. albicans isolates, 12 were susceptible, one showed high level resistance and similar number showed susceptible dose dependence. ERG11 was detected in three susceptible dose dependent Candida species. This analysis demonstrates that susceptible dose dependence should not be overlooked as it may be associated with the presence of ERG11 gene and resistance to fluconazole. There is a need to consider routine antifungal susceptibility testing for Candida species causing vulvovaginitis. PMID:22493755

  16. Atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex targeting domain of a Nup116 homologue from the yeast, Candida glabrata

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Manglicmot, Danalyn; Bain, Kevin T.; Gilmore, Jeremiah; Gheyi, Tarun; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Almo, Steven C.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-10-23

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), embedded in the nuclear envelope, is a large, dynamic molecular assembly that facilitates exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The yeast NPC is an eightfold symmetric annular structure composed of {approx}456 polypeptide chains contributed by {approx}30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Nup116, identified only in fungi, plays a central role in both protein import and mRNA export through the NPC. Nup116 is a modular protein with N-terminal 'FG' repeats containing a Gle2p-binding sequence motif and a NPC targeting domain at its C-terminus. We report the crystal structure of the NPC targeting domain of Candida glabrata Nup116, consisting of residues 882-1034 [CgNup116(882-1034)], at 1.94 {angstrom} resolution. The X-ray structure of CgNup116(882-1034) is consistent with the molecular envelope determined in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. Structural similarities of CgNup116(882-1034) with homologous domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup116, S. cerevisiae Nup145N, and human Nup98 are discussed.

  17. Establishment of an In vitro System to Study Intracellular Behavior of Candida glabrata in Human THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Maruti Nandan; Borah, Sapan; Gorityala, Neelima; Kaur, Rupinder

    2013-01-01

    A cell culture model system, if a close mimic of host environmental conditions, can serve as an inexpensive, reproducible and easily manipulatable alternative to animal model systems for the study of a specific step of microbial pathogen infection. A human monocytic cell line THP-1 which, upon phorbol ester treatment, is differentiated into macrophages, has previously been used to study virulence strategies of many intracellular pathogens including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here, we discuss a protocol to enact an in vitro cell culture model system using THP-1 macrophages to delineate the interaction of an opportunistic human yeast pathogen Candida glabrata with host phagocytic cells. This model system is simple, fast, amenable to high-throughput mutant screens, and requires no sophisticated equipment. A typical THP-1 macrophage infection experiment takes approximately 24 hr with an additional 24-48 hr to allow recovered intracellular yeast to grow on rich medium for colony forming unit-based viability analysis. Like other in vitro model systems, a possible limitation of this approach is difficulty in extrapolating the results obtained to a highly complex immune cell circuitry existing in the human host. However, despite this, the current protocol is very useful to elucidate the strategies that a fungal pathogen may employ to evade/counteract antimicrobial response and survive, adapt, and proliferate in the nutrient-poor environment of host immune cells. PMID:24378622

  18. Atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex targeting domain of a Nup116 homologue from the yeast, Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Manglicmot, Danalyn; Bain, Kevin T; Gilmore, Jeremiah; Gheyi, Tarun; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A; Emtage, J Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R; Rout, Michael P; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J Michael; Almo, Steven C; Burley, Stephen K

    2012-08-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), embedded in the nuclear envelope, is a large, dynamic molecular assembly that facilitates exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The yeast NPC is an eightfold symmetric annular structure composed of ~456 polypeptide chains contributed by ~30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Nup116, identified only in fungi, plays a central role in both protein import and mRNA export through the NPC. Nup116 is a modular protein with N-terminal "FG" repeats containing a Gle2p-binding sequence motif and a NPC targeting domain at its C-terminus. We report the crystal structure of the NPC targeting domain of Candida glabrata Nup116, consisting of residues 882-1034 [CgNup116(882-1034)], at 1.94 Å resolution. The X-ray structure of CgNup116(882-1034) is consistent with the molecular envelope determined in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. Structural similarities of CgNup116(882-1034) with homologous domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup116, S. cerevisiae Nup145N, and human Nup98 are discussed.

  19. Species Distribution and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Vulvovaginal Candida Isolates in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Dai; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Wu, Wen-Xiang; Bai, Hui-Hui; Dong, Han-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) was a common infection associated with lifelong harassment of woman's social and sexual life. The purpose of this study was to describe the species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida species (Candida spp.) isolated from patients with VVC over 8 years. Methods: Species which isolated from patients with VVC in Peking University First Hospital were identified using chromogenic culture media. Susceptibility to common antifungal agents was determined using agar diffusion method based on CLSI M44-A2 document. SPSS software (version 14.0, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was used for statistical analysis, involving statistical description and Chi-square test. Results: The most common strains were Candida (C.) albicans, 80.5% (n = 1775) followed by C. glabrata, 18.1% (n = 400). Nystatin exhibited excellent activity against all species (<4% resistant [R]). Resistance to azole drugs varied among different species. C. albicans: clotrimazole (3.1% R) < fluconazole (16.6% R) < itraconazole (51.5% R) < miconazole (54.0% R); C. glabrata: miconazole (25.6% R) < clotrimazole (50.5% R) < itraconazole (61.9% R) < fluconazole (73.3% R); Candida krusei: clotrimazole (0 R) < fluconazole (57.7% R) < miconazole (73.1% R) < itraconazole (83.3% R). The susceptibility of fluconazole was noticeably decreasing among all species in the study period. Conclusions: Nystatin was the optimal choice for the treatment of VVC at present. The species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. isolated from patients with VVC had changed over time. PMID:27174323

  20. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and Bayesian phylogenetic analysis to characterize Candida clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Angeletti, Silvia; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Crea, Francesca; Palazzotti, Bernardetta; Dedej, Etleva; Ciccozzi, Massimo; De Florio, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    Clinical Candida isolates from two different hospitals in Rome were identified and clustered by MALDI-TOF MS system and their origin and evolution estimated by Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. The different species of Candida were correctly identified and clustered separately, confirming the ability of these techniques to discriminate between different Candida species. Focusing MALDI-TOF analysis on a single Candida species, Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis strains clustered differently for hospital setting as well as for period of isolation than Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis isolates. The evolutionary rates of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (1.93×10(-2) and 1.17×10(-2)substitutions/site/year, respectively) were in agreement with a higher rate of mutation of these species, even in a narrow period, than what was observed in C. glabrata and C. tropicalis strains (6.99×10(-4) and 7.52×10(-3)substitutions/site/year, respectively). C. albicans resulted as the species with the highest between and within clades genetic distance values in agreement with the temporal-related clustering found by MALDI-TOF and the high evolutionary rate 1.93×10(-2)substitutions/site/year.

  1. High resistance to oxidative stress in the fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is mediated by a single catalase, Cta1p, and is controlled by the transcription factors Yap1p, Skn7p, Msn2p, and Msn4p.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Briones-Martin-del-Campo, Marcela; Cañas-Villamar, Israel; Montalvo-Arredondo, Javier; Riego-Ruiz, Lina; Castaño, Irene; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2008-05-01

    We characterized the oxidative stress response of Candida glabrata to better understand the virulence of this fungal pathogen. C. glabrata could withstand higher concentrations of H(2)O(2) than Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even Candida albicans. Stationary-phase cells were extremely resistant to oxidative stress, and this resistance was dependent on the concerted roles of stress-related transcription factors Yap1p, Skn7p, and Msn4p. We showed that growing cells of C. glabrata were able to adapt to high levels of H(2)O(2) and that this adaptive response was dependent on Yap1p and Skn7p and partially on the general stress transcription factors Msn2p and Msn4p. C. glabrata has a single catalase gene, CTA1, which was absolutely required for resistance to H(2)O(2) in vitro. However, in a mouse model of systemic infection, a strain lacking CTA1 showed no effect on virulence.

  2. High Resistance to Oxidative Stress in the Fungal Pathogen Candida glabrata Is Mediated by a Single Catalase, Cta1p, and Is Controlled by the Transcription Factors Yap1p, Skn7p, Msn2p, and Msn4p▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Briones-Martin-del-Campo, Marcela; Cañas-Villamar, Israel; Montalvo-Arredondo, Javier; Riego-Ruiz, Lina; Castaño, Irene; De Las Peñas, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    We characterized the oxidative stress response of Candida glabrata to better understand the virulence of this fungal pathogen. C. glabrata could withstand higher concentrations of H2O2 than Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even Candida albicans. Stationary-phase cells were extremely resistant to oxidative stress, and this resistance was dependent on the concerted roles of stress-related transcription factors Yap1p, Skn7p, and Msn4p. We showed that growing cells of C. glabrata were able to adapt to high levels of H2O2 and that this adaptive response was dependent on Yap1p and Skn7p and partially on the general stress transcription factors Msn2p and Msn4p. C. glabrata has a single catalase gene, CTA1, which was absolutely required for resistance to H2O2 in vitro. However, in a mouse model of systemic infection, a strain lacking CTA1 showed no effect on virulence. PMID:18375620

  3. Studying the Prevalence, Species Distribution, and Detection of In vitro Production of Phospholipase from Candida Isolated from Cases of Invasive Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Yukti; Chumber, Susheel Kumar; Kaur, Mandeep

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim: Candida spp. have emerged as successful pathogens both in invasive and mucosal infections. C. albicans is the sixth cause of most common nosocomial infections according to studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A shift toward non-albicans species has been reported. There is a dearth of knowledge regarding the virulence factors of Candida, especially from this part of India. The aim was to study the prevalence of Candida, speciate, and determine antifungal sensitivity along with the detection of in vitro production of phospholipases in 100 Candida isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 Candida isolates from various clinical specimens were studied (February 1, 2015–May 31, 2015; 4 months). Speciation was done by conventional methods and antifungal drugs fluconazole and voriconazole tested. Phospholipase activity (Pz value) was determined. Results: Of the 100 Candida spp., 35% were C. albicans and 65% were nonalbicans Candida (NAC). Species spectrum was of the 100 isolates as follows: 35 were C. albicans, 17 Candida tropicalis, 6 Candida glabrata, 8 Candida guilliermondi, 1 Candida kefyr, 6 Candida krusei, 14 Candida parapsilosis, 2 Candida lusitaniae, and 1 Trichosporon and 10 Candida spp. (not speciated). Phospholipase production was seen in 81 (81%) of the total isolates. The majority (63%) of phospholipase producers were NAC. Among NAC spp., the maximum phospholipase activity was seen in C. tropicalis (30%) and C. parapsilosis (24%). Of these, 60% of Candida was from patients admitted to the hospital. Sensitivity rates of C. albicans for fluconazole and voriconazole were 89.5% and 90.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Increasing usage of devices, total parenteral nutrition, broad-spectrum antibiotics, chemotherapies, and transplantation are factors contributing to the increase of candidal infections. Recent studies underline the increasing frequency of infections by NAC. The present study showcases the increased

  4. Use of micafungin as a surrogate marker to predict susceptibility and resistance to caspofungin among 3,764 clinical isolates of Candida by use of CLSI methods and interpretive criteria.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Diekema, Daniel J; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Due to unacceptably high interlaboratory variation in caspofungin MIC values, we evaluated the use of micafungin as a surrogate marker to predict the susceptibility of Candida spp. to caspofungin using reference methods and species-specific interpretive criteria. The MIC results for 3,764 strains of Candida (eight species), including 73 strains with fks mutations, were used. Caspofungin MIC values and species-specific interpretive criteria were compared with those of micafungin to determine the percent categorical agreement (%CA) and very major error (VME), major error (ME), and minor error rates as well as their ability to detect fks mutant strains of Candida albicans (11 mutants), Candida tropicalis (4 mutants), Candida krusei (3 mutants), and Candida glabrata (55 mutants). Overall, the %CA was 98.8% (0.2% VMEs and MEs, 0.8% minor errors) using micafungin as the surrogate marker. Among the 60 isolates of C. albicans (9 isolates), C. tropicalis (5 isolates), C. krusei (2 isolates), and C. glabrata (44 isolates) that were nonsusceptible (either intermediate or resistant) to both caspofungin and micafungin, 54 (90.0%) contained a mutation in fks1 or fks2. An additional 10 C. glabrata mutants, two C. albicans mutants, and one mutant each of C. tropicalis and C. krusei were classified as susceptible to both antifungal agents. Using the epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) of 0.12 μg/ml for caspofungin and 0.03 μg/ml for micafungin to differentiate wild-type (WT) from non-WT strains of C. glabrata, 80% of the C. glabrata mutants were non-WT for both agents (96% concordance). Micafungin may serve as an acceptable surrogate marker for the prediction of susceptibility and resistance of Candida to caspofungin.

  5. Pivotal Role for a Tail Subunit of the RNA Polymerase II Mediator Complex CgMed2 in Azole Tolerance and Adherence in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Sapan; Shivarathri, Raju; Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Ferrari, Sélène; Sanglard, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal therapy failure can be associated with increased resistance to the employed antifungal agents. Candida glabrata, the second most common cause of invasive candidiasis, is intrinsically less susceptible to the azole class of antifungals and accounts for 15% of all Candida bloodstream infections. Here, we show that C. glabrata MED2 (CgMED2), which codes for a tail subunit of the RNA polymerase II Mediator complex, is required for resistance to azole antifungal drugs in C. glabrata. An inability to transcriptionally activate genes encoding a zinc finger transcriptional factor, CgPdr1, and multidrug efflux pump, CgCdr1, primarily contributes to the elevated susceptibility of the Cgmed2Δ mutant toward azole antifungals. We also report for the first time that the Cgmed2Δ mutant exhibits sensitivity to caspofungin, a constitutively activated protein kinase C-mediated cell wall integrity pathway, and elevated adherence to epithelial cells. The increased adherence of the Cgmed2Δ mutant was attributed to the elevated expression of the EPA1 and EPA7 genes. Further, our data demonstrate that CgMED2 is required for intracellular proliferation in human macrophages and modulates survival in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Lastly, we show an essential requirement for CgMed2, along with the Mediator middle subunit CgNut1 and the Mediator cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin subunit CgSrb8, for the high-level fluconazole resistance conferred by the hyperactive allele of CgPdr1. Together, our findings underscore a pivotal role for CgMed2 in basal tolerance and acquired resistance to azole antifungals. PMID:25070095

  6. Fluconazole and Echinocandin Resistance of Candida glabrata Correlates Better with Antifungal Drug Exposure Rather than with MSH2 Mutator Genotype in a French Cohort of Patients Harboring Low Rates of Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dellière, Sarah; Healey, Kelley; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Carrara, Bastien; Barbaro, Alessandro; Guigue, Nicolas; Lecefel, Christophe; Touratier, Sophie; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Perlin, David S.; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is a major pathogenic yeast in humans that is known to rapidly acquire resistance to triazole and echinocandin antifungal drugs. A mutator genotype (MSH2 polymorphism) inducing a mismatch repair defect has been recently proposed to be responsible for resistance acquisition in C. glabrata clinical isolates. Our objectives were to evaluate the prevalence of antifungal resistance in a large cohort of patients in Saint-Louis hospital, Paris, France, some of whom were pre-exposed to antifungal drugs, as well as to determine whether MSH2 polymorphisms are associated with an increased rate of fluconazole or echinocandin resistance. We collected 268 isolates from 147 patients along with clinical data and previous antifungal exposure. Fluconazole and micafungin minimal inhibition concentrations (MICs) were tested, short tandem repeat genotyping was performed, and the MSH2 gene was sequenced. According to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility breakpoints, 15.7% of isolates were resistant to fluconazole (MIC > 32 mg/L) and 0.7% were resistant to micafungin (MIC > 0.03 mg/L). A non-synonymous mutation within MSH2 occurred in 44% of the isolates, and 17% were fluconazole resistant. In comparison, fluconazole resistant isolates with no MSH2 mutation represented 15% (P = 0.65). MSH2 polymorphisms were associated with the short tandem repeat genotype. The rate of echinocandin resistance is low and correlates with prior exposure to echinocandin. The mutator genotype was not associated with enrichment in fluconazole resistance but instead corresponded to rare and specific genotypes. PMID:28066361

  7. Identification and characterization of nine atypical Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Albaina, Olatz; Sahand, Ismail H; Brusca, María I; Sullivan, Derek J; Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo; Moragues, María D

    2015-02-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a pathogenic yeast of the genus Candida closely related to Candida albicans. The phenotypic similarity of these two species often leads to misidentification of C. dubliniensis isolates in clinical samples. DNA-based methods continue to be the most effective means of discriminating accurately between the two species. Here, we report on the identification of nine unusual Candida isolates that showed ambiguous identification patterns on the basis of their phenotypic and immunological traits. The isolates were categorized into two groups. Group I isolates were unable to produce germ tubes and chlamydospores, and to agglutinate commercial latex particles coated with a mAb highly specific for C. dubliniensis. Group II isolates grew as pink and white colonies on CHROMagar Candida and ChromID Candida, respectively. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles obtained with API/ID32C together with PCR amplification with specific primers and DNA sequencing allowed reliable identification of the nine unusual clinical isolates as C. dubliniensis.

  8. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Volmir Pitt; Savi, Daiani Cristina; Aluizio, Rodrigo; Adamoski, Douglas; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia V; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2%) and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%). The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated. PMID:27276363

  9. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Volmir Pitt; Savi, Daiani Cristina; Aluizio, Rodrigo; Adamoski, Douglas; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia V; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-06-07

    Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2%) and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%). The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated.

  10. The dual role of candida glabrata drug:H+ antiporter CgAqr1 (ORF CAGL0J09944g) in antifungal drug and acetic acid resistance.

    PubMed

    Costa, Catarina; Henriques, André; Pires, Carla; Nunes, Joana; Ohno, Michiyo; Chibana, Hiroji; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Teixeira, Miguel C

    2013-01-01

    Opportunistic Candida species often have to cope with inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, in the acidic environment of the vaginal mucosa. Given that the ability of these yeast species to tolerate stress induced by weak acids and antifungal drugs appears to be a key factor in their persistence and virulence, it is crucial to understand the underlying mechanisms. In this study, the drug:H(+) antiporter CgAqr1 (ORF CAGL0J09944g), from Candida glabrata, was identified as a determinant of resistance to acetic acid, and also to the antifungal agents flucytosine and, less significantly, clotrimazole. These antifungals were found to act synergistically with acetic acid against this pathogen. The action of CgAqr1 in this phenomenon was analyzed. Using a green fluorescent protein fusion, CgAqr1 was found to localize to the plasma membrane and to membrane vesicles when expressed in C. glabrata or, heterologously, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Given its ability to complement the susceptibility phenotype of its S. cerevisiae homolog, ScAqr1, CgAqr1 was proposed to play a similar role in mediating the extrusion of chemical compounds. Significantly, the expression of this gene was found to reduce the intracellular accumulation of (3)H-flucytosine and, to a moderate extent, of (3)H-clotrimazole, consistent with a direct role in antifungal drug efflux. Interestingly, no effect of CgAQR1 deletion could be found on the intracellular accumulation of (14)C-acetic acid, suggesting that its role in acetic acid resistance may be indirect, presumably through the transport of a still unidentified physiological substrate. Although neither of the tested chemicals induces changes in CgAQR1 expression, pre-exposure to flucytosine or clotrimazole was found to make C. glabrata cells more sensitive to acetic acid stress. Results from this study show that CgAqr1 is an antifungal drug resistance determinant and raise the hypothesis that it may play a role in C. glabrata persistent colonization

  11. Comparison of the rapid yeast plus panel with the API20C yeast system for identification of clinically significant isolates of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Heelan, J S; Sotomayor, E; Coon, K; D'Arezzo, J B

    1998-05-01

    The RapID Yeast Plus system (Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Norcross, Ga.) is a qualitative micromethod employing conventional tests and single-substrate chromogenic tests and having a 4-h incubation period. This system was compared with the API20C (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelwood, Mo.) system, a 24- to 72-h carbohydrate assimilation method. One hundred thirty-three clinical yeast isolates, including 57 of Candida albicans, 26 of Candida tropicalis, 23 of Candida glabrata, and 27 of other yeasts, were tested by both methods. When discrepancies occurred, isolates were further tested by the Automated Yeast Biochemical Card (bioMerieux Vitek). Germ tube production and microscopic morphology were used as needed to definitively identify yeast isolates. The RapID Yeast Plus system correctly identified 125 yeast isolates, with an overall accuracy of 94% (125 of 133). Excellent correlation was found in the recognition of the three yeasts most commonly isolated from human sources. The test was 99% (105 of 106 isolates) accurate with C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. The RapID Yeast Plus system compares favorably with the API20C system and provides a simple, accurate alternative to conventional assimilation methods for the rapid identification of the most commonly encountered isolates of Candida species.

  12. Comparison of the Rapid Yeast Plus Panel with the API20C Yeast System for Identification of Clinically Significant Isolates of Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Heelan, Judith S.; Sotomayor, Edgar; Coon, Kimberly; D’Arezzo, Julia B.

    1998-01-01

    The RapID Yeast Plus system (Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Norcross, Ga.) is a qualitative micromethod employing conventional tests and single-substrate chromogenic tests and having a 4-h incubation period. This system was compared with the API20C (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelwood, Mo.) system, a 24- to 72-h carbohydrate assimilation method. One hundred thirty-three clinical yeast isolates, including 57 of Candida albicans, 26 of Candida tropicalis, 23 of Candida glabrata, and 27 of other yeasts, were tested by both methods. When discrepancies occurred, isolates were further tested by the Automated Yeast Biochemical Card (bioMerieux Vitek). Germ tube production and microscopic morphology were used as needed to definitively identify yeast isolates. The RapID Yeast Plus system correctly identified 125 yeast isolates, with an overall accuracy of 94% (125 of 133). Excellent correlation was found in the recognition of the three yeasts most commonly isolated from human sources. The test was 99% (105 of 106 isolates) accurate with C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. The RapID Yeast Plus system compares favorably with the API20C system and provides a simple, accurate alternative to conventional assimilation methods for the rapid identification of the most commonly encountered isolates of Candida species. PMID:9574727

  13. Differentiation between Atypical Isolates of Candida lusitaniae and Candida pulcherrima by Determination of Mating Type

    PubMed Central

    Noël, Thierry; Favel, Anne; Michel-Nguyen, Annie; Goumar, Abdelhak; Fallague, Karim; Chastin, Christiane; Leclerc, Florence; Villard, Jean

    2005-01-01

    We report on five clinical isolates routinely identified as Candida lusitaniae that the ID 32C system was unable to discriminate from the closely related species Candida pulcherrima. When additional tests did not allow accurate identification, the less usual mating type test identified all of them as Clavispora lusitaniae. Mating type testing appears to be a valuable tool for assessing the true incidence of this emerging non-albicans Candida species. PMID:15750124

  14. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  15. Use of anidulafungin as a surrogate marker to predict susceptibility and resistance to caspofungin among 4,290 clinical isolates of Candida by using CLSI methods and interpretive criteria.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Diekema, Daniel J; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2014-09-01

    This study addressed the application of anidulafungin as a surrogate marker to predict the susceptibility of Candida to caspofungin due to unacceptably high interlaboratory variation of caspofungin MIC values. CLSI reference broth microdilution methods and species-specific interpretive criteria were used to test 4,290 strains of Candida (eight species), including 71 strains with documented fks mutations. Caspofungin MIC values were compared with those of anidulafungin to determine the percentage of categorical agreement (CA) and very major (VME), major (ME), and minor error rates, as well as the ability to detect fks mutants. For all 4,290 isolates the CA was 97.1% (0.2% VME and ME, 2.5% minor errors) using anidulafungin as the surrogate. Among the 62 isolates of Candida albicans (4 isolates), C. tropicalis (5 isolates), C. krusei (4 isolates), C. kefyr (2 isolates), and C. glabrata (47 isolates) that were nonsusceptible (NS; either intermediate [I] or resistant [R]) to both caspofungin and anidulafungin, 52 (83.8%) contained a mutation in fks1 or fks2. Eight mutants of C. glabrata, two of C. albicans, and one each of C. tropicalis and C. krusei were classified as susceptible (S) to both antifungal agents. The remaining 7 mutants (2 C. albicans and 5 C. glabrata) were susceptible to one of the agents and either intermediate or resistant to the other. Using the epidemiological cutoff value (ECV) of 0.12 μg/ml for both caspofungin and anidulafungin to differentiate wild-type (WT) from non-WT strains of C. glabrata, 42 of the 55 (76.4%) C. glabrata mutants were non-WT and 8 of the 55 (14.5%) were WT for both agents (90.9% concordance). Anidulafungin can accurately serve as a surrogate marker to predict S and R of Candida to caspofungin.

  16. Trends in Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida spp. Isolated from Pediatric and Adult Patients with Bloodstream Infections: SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, 1997 to 2000

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M. A.; Diekema, D. J.; Jones, R. N.; Messer, S. A.; Hollis, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    From 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2000, 2,047 bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to Candida spp. were reported from hospitals in the United States, Canada, Latin America, and Europe participating in the SENTRY Antifungal Surveillance Program. Among individuals in four age groups (≤1, 2 to 15, 16 to 64, and ≥65 years) Candida albicans was the most common species, causing 60, 55, 55, and 50% of infections, respectively. C. glabrata caused 17 to 23% of BSIs in those ages 16 to 64 and ≥65 years, whereas it caused only 3% of BSIs in the individuals in the two younger age groups (P < 0.001). C. parapsilosis (which caused 21 to 24% of BSIs) and C. tropicalis (which caused 7 to 10% of BSIs) were more common than C. glabrata in individuals ages ≤1 year and 2 to 15 years. Isolates of Candida spp. showed a trend of decreasing susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, and amphotericin B with increasing patient age (P ≤ 0.01). None of the C. glabrata isolates from individuals ≤1 year old were resistant to fluconazole, whereas they made up 5 to 9% of isolates from individuals ages 16 to 64 and ≥65 years. Isolates of C. tropicalis from patients ≤1 year old were more susceptible to flucytosine (MIC at which 90% of isolates are inhibited [MIC90], 0.5 μg/ml; 0% resistant isolates) than those from patients ≥65 years old (MIC90, 32 μg/ml; 11% resistant isolates). The investigational triazoles posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole were all highly active against all species of Candida from individuals in all age groups. These data demonstrate differences in the species distributions of pathogens and differences in antifungal resistance among isolates from individuals in the pediatric and adult age groups. Ongoing surveillance will enhance efforts to limit the extent of antifungal resistance in individuals in various age groups. PMID:11880404

  17. The Frequency, Antifungal Susceptibility and Enzymatic Profiles of Candida Species Isolated from Neutropenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gharaghani, Maral; Rezaei-Matehkolaei, Ali; Zarei Mahmoudabadi, Ali; Keikhaei, Bijan

    2016-01-01

    Background Neutropenia, as a predisposing factor for invasive candidiasis, is defined as a reduction in neutrophil count to less than 1500/mm3. It is a common condition in patients with hematological malignancy and cytostatic chemotherapy. Extensive chemotherapy and prophylaxis with antifungals have increased the resistance of Candida isolates to antifungal drugs. Although, Candida albicans is the most common causative agent among neutropenic patients, there is an increasing rate of non-albicans species. Extracellular enzymes activity pattern and antifungal agent sensitivity profiles are two important factors for spreading resistant strains. Objectives The aim of the present study was to identify the Candida strains isolated from hospitalized neutropenic patients. The patterns of antifungal susceptibility of the causative agents to antifungals and the extracellular enzymes activity of the isolates were also evaluated. Patients and Methods In the present study, 243 urine and 243 oral swab samples were collected from neutropenic patients and inoculated on CHROMagar Candida. In addition, 100 blood samples were also inoculated in biphasic Brain Heart Infusion medium. Several yeast isolates were isolated from samples and identified by classical and molecular techniques. The profiles of extracellular enzymes and the susceptibility of recovered agents to amphotericin B, fluconazole and caspofungin were also evaluated. Results A total of 110 yeast strains isolated from urine and oral cavities were identified as C. albicans (51.8%), C. krusei (25.5%), C. glabrata (6.4%) and other yeasts (16.3%). No yeast species was isolated from blood samples. Our result showed that in 90% of the isolates, the range of secretion of extracellular enzymes was medium (2+) and high (3+), however only a few isolates were negative for this characteristic. All isolates were sensitive to caspofungin and fluconazole, whereas 54.7% of isolates were resistant to amphotericin B. Conclusions We found a

  18. Lab-scale preparations of Candida albicans and dual Candida albicans-Candida glabrata biofilms on the surface of medical-grade polyvinyl chloride (PVC) perfusion tube using a modified gravity-supported free-flow biofilm incubator (GS-FFBI).

    PubMed

    Shao, Jing; Lu, KeQiao; Tian, Ge; Cui, YanYan; Yan, YuanYuan; Wang, TianMing; Zhang, XinLong; Wang, ChangZhong

    2015-02-01

    The assembly of a man-made gravity-supported free-flow biofilm incubator (GS-FFBI) was described, which was composed of a gas cushion injector and four incubators. The GS-FFBI had the characteristics of (i) a bottom-up flow direction, and (ii) lab-scale biofilm preparation without the use of a multichannel pump. Two opportunistic fungal strains, namely Candida albicans and Candida glabrata, were employed to incubate C. albicans and dual C. albicans-C. glabrata biofilms on the surface of medical-grade polyvinyl chloride perfusion tube. In terms of the results from {2, 3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide} (XTT) assay, dry weight measurement, colony-forming unit counting, susceptibility test, and scanning electron microscopy, it was demonstrated that GS-FFBI could form both stable single and dual Candida biofilms with no significant variations among the four incubators or the three daily incubations within 21h, and could operate for at least 96h smoothly with no contamination of stock medium. The results also indicated, for the first time, that C. albicans and C. glabrata might be co-existent competitively and symbiotically in the dual biofilms with flowing media. GS-FFBI would be a useful device to study in vitro morphological and physiological features of microbial biofilms in the medical settings.

  19. Activity of Isavuconazole and Other Azoles against Candida Clinical Isolates and Yeast Model Systems with Known Azole Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Alix T.

    2015-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a novel, broad-spectrum, antifungal azole. In order to evaluate its interactions with known azole resistance mechanisms, isavuconazole susceptibility among different yeast models and clinical isolates expressing characterized azole resistance mechanisms was tested and compared to those of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole. Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the Candida albicans and C. glabrata ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters (CDR1, CDR2, and CgCDR1), major facilitator (MDR1), and lanosterol 14-α-sterol-demethylase (ERG11) alleles with mutations were used. In addition, pairs of C. albicans and C. glabrata strains from matched clinical isolates with known azole resistance mechanisms were investigated. The expression of ABC transporters increased all azole MICs, suggesting that all azoles tested were substrates of ABC transporters. The expression of MDR1 did not increase posaconazole, itraconazole, and isavuconazole MICs. Relative increases of azole MICs (from 4- to 32-fold) were observed for fluconazole, voriconazole, and isavuconazole when at least two mutations were present in the same ERG11 allele. Upon MIC testing of azoles with clinical C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates with known resistance mechanisms, the MIC90s of C. albicans for fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and isavuconazole were 128, 2, 1, 0.5, and 2 μg/ml, respectively, while in C. glabrata they were 128, 2, 4, 4, and 16 μg/ml, respectively. In conclusion, the effects of azole resistance mechanisms on isavuconazole did not differ significantly from those of other azoles. Resistance mechanisms in yeasts involving ABC transporters and ERG11 decreased the activity of isavuconazole, while MDR1 had limited effect. PMID:26482310

  20. [Isolation of Candida spp. from ascites in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Saludes, Paula; Araguás, Cristina; Sánchez-Delgado, Jordi; Dalmau, Blai; Font, Bernat

    2016-10-01

    The isolation of Candida spp. in ascites of cirrhotic patients is an uncommon situation in clinical practice. Factors that have been associated with increased susceptibility to primary fungal peritonitis are exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics and immunosuppression, a typical situation of these patients. We report seven episodes of Candida spp. isolation in ascites of cirrhotic patients detected in our hospital during the past 15years.

  1. Comparison of species-level identification and antifungal susceptibility results from diagnostic and reference laboratories for bloodstream Candida surveillance isolates, South Africa, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Serisha D; Govender, Nevashan; Patel, Jaymati; Zietsman, Inge L; Wadula, Jeannette; Coovadia, Yacoob; Kularatne, Ranmini; Seetharam, Sharona; Govender, Nelesh P

    2016-11-01

    From February 2009 through August 2010, we compared species-level identification of bloodstream Candida isolates and susceptibility to fluconazole, voriconazole, and caspofungin between diagnostic and reference South African laboratories during national surveillance for candidemia. Diagnostic laboratories identified isolates to genus/species level and performed antifungal susceptibility testing, as indicated. At a reference laboratory, viable Candida isolates were identified to species-level using automated systems, biochemical tests, or DNA sequencing; broth dilution susceptibility testing was performed. Categorical agreement (CA) was calculated for susceptibility results of isolates with concordant species identification. Overall, 2172 incident cases were detected, 773 (36%) by surveillance audit. The Vitek 2 YST system (bioMérieux Inc, Marcy l'Etoile, France) was used for identification (360/863, 42%) and susceptibility testing (198/473, 42%) of a large proportion of isolates. For the five most common species (n = 1181), species-level identification was identical in the majority of cases (Candida albicans: 98% (507/517); Candida parapsilosis: 92% (450/488); Candida glabrata: 89% (89/100); Candida tropicalis: 91% (49/54), and Candida krusei: 86% (19/22)). However, diagnostic laboratories were significantly less likely to correctly identify Candida species other than C. albicans versus C. albicans (607/664, 91% vs. 507/517, 98%; P < .001). Susceptibility data were compared for isolates belonging to the five most common species and fluconazole, voriconazole, and caspofungin in 860, 580, and 99 cases, respectively. Diagnostic laboratories significantly under-reported fluconazole resistance in C. parapsilosis (225/393, 57% vs. 239/393, 61%; P < .001) but over-reported fluconazole non-susceptibility in C. albicans (36/362, 10% vs. 3/362, 0.8%; P < .001). Diagnostic laboratories were less likely to correctly identify Candida species other than C. albicans, under

  2. An in vitro study of antifungal drug susceptibility of Candida species isolated from human immunodeficiency virus seropositive and human immunodeficiency virus seronegative individuals in Lucknow population Uttar Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Mohammad Shafi; Sreedar, Gadiputi; Shukla, Abhilasha; Gupta, Prashant; Rehan, Ahmad Danish; George, Jiji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Candidiasis is the most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients, starting from asymptomatic colonization to pathogenic forms and gradual colonization of non-albicans in patients with advanced immunosuppression leads to resistance for azole group of antifungal drugs with high rate of morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To isolate the Candida species and determine of antifungal drug susceptibility against fluconazole, itraconazole, nystatin, amphotericin B, and clotrimazolein HIV seropositive and control individuals, with or without clinical oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC). Materials and Methods: Includes samples from faucial region of 70 subjects with and without clinical candidiasis in HIV seropositive and controls were aseptically inoculated onto Sabaraud's Dextrose Agar media and yeasts were identified for the specific species by Corn Meal Agar, sugar fermentation and heat tolerance tests. Antifungal drug susceptibility of the isolated species was done against above-mentioned drugs by E-test and disc diffusion method. Results: The commonly isolated species in HIV seropositive and controls were Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis Candida guilliermondii and Candida dubliniensis isolated only in HIV seropositive patients. Susceptibility against selected antifungal drugs was observed more in HIV-negative individuals whereas susceptible dose-dependent and resistance were predominant in HIV-positive patients. Conclusion: Resistance is the major problem in the therapy of OPC, especially in HIV seropositive patients due to aggressive and prolonged use of antifungal agents, therefore, our study emphasizes the need for antifungal drug susceptibility testing whenever antifungal treatment is desired, especially in HIV-infected subjects. PMID:26604498

  3. Candida species biofilm and Candida albicans ALS3 polymorphisms in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Bruder-Nascimento, Ariane; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Sugizaki, Maria Fátima; Sadatsune, Terue; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, there have been important changes in the epidemiology of Candida infections. In recent years, Candida species have emerged as important causes of invasive infections mainly among immunocompromised patients. This study analyzed Candida spp. isolates and compared the frequency and biofilm production of different species among the different sources of isolation: blood, urine, vulvovaginal secretions and peritoneal dialysis fluid. Biofilm production was quantified in 327 Candida isolates obtained from patients attended at a Brazilian tertiary public hospital (Botucatu, Sao Paulo). C. albicans ALS3 gene polymorphism was also evaluated by determining the number of repeated motifs in the central domain. Of the 198 total biofilm-positive isolates, 72 and 126 were considered as low and high biofilm producers, respectively. Biofilm production by C. albicans was significantly lower than that by non-albicans isolates and was most frequently observed in C. tropicalis. Biofilm production was more frequent among bloodstream isolates than other clinical sources, in urine, the isolates displayed a peculiar distribution by presenting two distinct peaks, one containing biofilm-negative isolates and the other containing isolates with intense biofilm production. The numbers of tandem-repeat copies per allele were not associated with biofilm production, suggesting the evolvement of other genetic determinants.

  4. In vitro activities of new triazole antifungal agents, posaconazole and voriconazole, against oral Candida isolates from patients suffering from denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Arias, Cristina; Eraso, Elena; Madariaga, Lucila; Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso Javier; Quindós, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Denture stomatitis is often treated with antifungal agents but recurrences or new episodes are common, and certain episodes can be resistant. New triazoles, such as posaconazole and voriconazole, may represent useful alternatives for management. In vitro activities of amphotericin B, nystatin, miconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole against 150 oral Candida (101 C. albicans, 18 C. tropicalis, 12 C. glabrata, 11 C. guilliermondii, 4 C. parapsilosis, 2 Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 1 C. dubliniensis and 1 C. krusei) from 100 denture wearers were tested by the CLSI M27-A3 method. Resistant isolates were retested by Sensititre YeastOne and Etest. Most antifungal agents were very active. However, 4 C. glabrata (33.3%), 2 C. tropicalis (11.1%), 6 C. albicans (5.6%) and 1 C. krusei were resistant to itraconazole. Posaconazole was active against 143 yeast isolates (95.3%): 6 C. albicans (5.9%) and 1 C. tropicalis (5.6%) were resistant. Geometric mean MICs were 0.036 μg/ml for C. parapsilosis, 0.062 μg/ml for C. albicans, 0.085 μg/ml for C. tropicalis, 0.387 μg/ml for C. guilliermondii and 0.498 μg/ml for C. glabrata. Voriconazole was active against 148 isolates (98.7%) with geometric mean MICs ranging from 0.030 μg/ml for C. parapsilosis, 0.042 μg/ml for C. albicans, 0.048 μg/ml for C. tropicalis, 0.082 μg/ml for C. guilliermondii, to 0.137 μg/ml for C. glabrata. Only 2 C. albicans (2%) were resistant to voriconazole showing cross-resistance to other azoles. Posaconazole and voriconazole have excellent in vitro activities against all Candida isolates and could represent useful alternatives for recalcitrant or recurrent candidiasis.

  5. The isolation of Candida rugosa and Candida mesorugosa from clinical samples in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Adjapong, Gloria; Bartlett, Michael; Hale, Marie; Garrill, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    Members of the Candida rugosa species complex have been described as emerging fungal pathogens and are responsible for a growing number of Candida infections. In this communication we report the isolation of Candida rugosa and Candida mesorugosa in Ghana. To the best of our knowledge this is the first description of this species complex from a clinical setting in Africa.The isolates were identified on the basis of their rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. For one isolate, obtained from sputum, the sequence grouped well with that of C. rugosa. Two other isolates from urine had sequences that grouped with Candida mesorugosa. Morphologically, C. rugosa formed white, wrinkled, and flat colonies on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA), whereas C. mesorugosa formed white, smooth colonies. On chromogenic medium, the isolates formed small, dry greenish-blue colonies with a pale or white border, similar to C. albicans. The C. rugosa isolate produced pseudohyphae in human serum and on CMA-Tween 80 agar. In contrast, the C. mesorugosa isolates did not generate pseudohyphae in human serum, but generated a few pseudohyphae with abundant blastoconidia on CMA-Tween 80 agar. Growth was observed at 37 °C and 42 °C but not at 45 °C.The two C. mesorugosa isolates had Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of 6 and 48 μg ml(-1) for fluconazole and are thus resistant. The C. rugosa isolate had an MIC of 24 μg ml(-1), indicative of resistance. All three isolates were susceptible to itraconazole and voriconazole (with respective MICs of < 0.125 μg ml(-1)).

  6. Membrane Proteome-Wide Response to the Antifungal Drug Clotrimazole in Candida glabrata: Role of the Transcription Factor CgPdr1 and the Drug:H+ Antiporters CgTpo1_1 and CgTpo1_2.

    PubMed

    Pais, Pedro; Costa, Catarina; Pires, Carla; Shimizu, Kiminori; Chibana, Hiroji; Teixeira, Miguel C

    2016-01-01

    Azoles are widely used antifungal drugs. This family of compounds includes triazoles, mostly used in the treatment of systemic infections, and imidazoles, such as clotrimazole, often used in the case of superficial infections. Candida glabrata is the second most common cause of candidemia worldwide and presents higher levels of intrinsic azole resistance when compared with Candida albicans, thus being an interesting subject for the study of azole resistance mechanisms in fungal pathogens.Since resistance often relies on the action of membrane transporters, including drug efflux pumps from the ATP-binding cassette family or from the Drug:H(+) antiporter (DHA)(1) family, an iTRAQ-based membrane proteomics analysis was performed to identify all the membrane-associated proteins whose abundance changes in C. glabrata cells exposed to the azole drug clotrimazole. Proteins found to have significant expression changes in this context were clustered into functional groups, namely: glucose metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial import, ribosome components and translation machinery, lipid metabolism, multidrug resistance transporters, cell wall assembly, and stress response, comprising a total of 37 proteins. Among these, the DHA transporter CgTpo1_2 (ORF CAGL0E03674g) was identified as overexpressed in the C. glabrata membrane in response to clotrimazole. Functional characterization of this putative drug:H(+) antiporter, and of its homolog CgTpo1_1 (ORF CAGL0G03927g), allowed the identification of these proteins as localized to the plasma membrane and conferring azole drug resistance in this fungal pathogen by actively extruding the drug to the external medium. The cell wall protein CgGas1 was also shown to confer azole drug resistance through cell wall remodeling. Finally, the transcription factor CgPdr1 in the clotrimazole response was observed to control the expression of 20 of the identified proteins, thus highlighting the existence of additional unforeseen

  7. Membrane Proteome-Wide Response to the Antifungal Drug Clotrimazole in Candida glabrata: Role of the Transcription Factor CgPdr1 and the Drug:H+ Antiporters CgTpo1_1 and CgTpo1_2*

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Pedro; Costa, Catarina; Pires, Carla; Shimizu, Kiminori; Chibana, Hiroji; Teixeira, Miguel C.

    2016-01-01

    Azoles are widely used antifungal drugs. This family of compounds includes triazoles, mostly used in the treatment of systemic infections, and imidazoles, such as clotrimazole, often used in the case of superficial infections. Candida glabrata is the second most common cause of candidemia worldwide and presents higher levels of intrinsic azole resistance when compared with Candida albicans, thus being an interesting subject for the study of azole resistance mechanisms in fungal pathogens. Since resistance often relies on the action of membrane transporters, including drug efflux pumps from the ATP-binding cassette family or from the Drug:H+ antiporter (DHA)1 family, an iTRAQ-based membrane proteomics analysis was performed to identify all the membrane-associated proteins whose abundance changes in C. glabrata cells exposed to the azole drug clotrimazole. Proteins found to have significant expression changes in this context were clustered into functional groups, namely: glucose metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial import, ribosome components and translation machinery, lipid metabolism, multidrug resistance transporters, cell wall assembly, and stress response, comprising a total of 37 proteins. Among these, the DHA transporter CgTpo1_2 (ORF CAGL0E03674g) was identified as overexpressed in the C. glabrata membrane in response to clotrimazole. Functional characterization of this putative drug:H+ antiporter, and of its homolog CgTpo1_1 (ORF CAGL0G03927g), allowed the identification of these proteins as localized to the plasma membrane and conferring azole drug resistance in this fungal pathogen by actively extruding the drug to the external medium. The cell wall protein CgGas1 was also shown to confer azole drug resistance through cell wall remodeling. Finally, the transcription factor CgPdr1 in the clotrimazole response was observed to control the expression of 20 of the identified proteins, thus highlighting the existence of additional unforeseen

  8. Activity of a long-acting echinocandin, CD101, determined using CLSI and EUCAST reference methods, against Candida and Aspergillus spp., including echinocandin- and azole-resistant isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Michael A.; Messer, Shawn A.; Rhomberg, Paul R.; Jones, Ronald N.; Castanheira, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of CD101, a novel echinocandin with a long serum elimination half-life, and comparator (anidulafungin and caspofungin) antifungal agents against a collection of Candida and Aspergillus spp. isolates. Methods CD101 and comparator agents were tested against 106 Candida spp. and 67 Aspergillus spp. isolates, including 27 isolates of Candida harbouring fks hotspot mutations and 12 itraconazole non-WT Aspergillus, using CLSI and EUCAST reference susceptibility broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Results Against WT and fks mutant Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis, the activity of CD101 [MIC90 = 0.06, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively (CLSI method values)] was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC90 = 0.03, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively) and caspofungin (MIC90 = 0.12, 0.25 and 0.12 mg/L, respectively). WT Candida krusei isolates were very susceptible to CD101 (MIC = 0.06 mg/L). CD101 activity (MIC50/90 = 1/2 mg/L) was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC50/90 = 2/2 mg/L) against Candida parapsilosis. CD101 (MIC mode = 0.06 mg/L for C. glabrata) was 2- to 4-fold more active against fks hotspot mutants than caspofungin (MIC mode = 0.5 mg/L). CD101 was active against Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus (MEC90 range = ≤0.008–0.03 mg/L). The essential agreement between CLSI and EUCAST methods for CD101 was 92.0%–100.0% among Candida spp. and 95.0%–100.0% among Aspergillus spp. Conclusions The activity of CD101 is comparable to that of other members of the echinocandin class for the prevention and treatment of serious fungal infections. Similar results for CD101 activity versus Candida and Aspergillus spp. may be obtained with either CLSI or EUCAST BMD methods. PMID:27287236

  9. Candida/Candida biofilms. First description of dual-species Candida albicans/C. rugosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Aline Oliveira; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida Martins; Singulani, Junya de Lacorte; Abrão, Fariza; Moraes, Thais de; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2016-04-01

    Denture liners have physical properties that favour plaque accumulation and colonization by Candida species, irritating oral tissues and causing denture stomatitis. To isolate and determine the incidence of oral Candida species in dental prostheses, oral swabs were collected from the dental prostheses of 66 patients. All the strains were screened for their ability to form biofilms; both monospecies and dual-species combinations were tested. Candida albicans (63 %) was the most frequently isolated microorganism; Candida tropicalis (14 %), Candida glabrata (13 %), Candida rugosa (5 %), Candida parapsilosis (3 %), and Candida krusei (2 %) were also detected. The XTT assay showed that C. albicans SC5314 possessed a biofilm-forming ability significantly higher (p < 0.001) than non-albicans Candida strains, after 6 h 37 °C. The total C. albicans CFU from a dual-species biofilm was less than the total CFU of a monospecies C. albicans biofilm. In contrast to the profuse hyphae verified in monospecies C. albicans biofilms, micrographies showed that the C. albicans/non-albicans Candida biofilms consisted of sparse yeast forms and profuse budding yeast cells that generated a network. These results suggested that C. albicans and the tested Candida species could co-exist in biofilms displaying apparent antagonism. The study provide the first description of C. albicans/C. rugosa mixed biofilm.

  10. CHROMagar Candida, a new differential isolation medium for presumptive identification of clinically important Candida species.

    PubMed Central

    Odds, F C; Bernaerts, R

    1994-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a novel, differential culture medium that is claimed to facilitate the isolation and presumptive identification of some clinically important yeast species. We evaluated the use of this medium with 726 yeast isolates, including 82 isolated directly on the medium from clinical material. After 2 days of incubation at 37 degrees C, 285 C. albicans isolates gave distinctive green colonies that were not seen with any of 441 other yeast isolates representing 21 different species. A total of 54 C. tropicalis isolates also developed distinctive dark blue-gray colonies with a halo of dark brownish purple in the surrounding agar. C. krusei isolates (n = 43) also formed highly characteristic rough, spreading colonies with pale pink centers and a white edge that was otherwise encountered only rarely with isolates of C. norvegensis. Trichosporon spp. (n = 34) formed small, pale colonies that became larger and characteristically rough with prolonged incubation. Most of the other 310 yeasts studied formed colonies with a color that ranged from white to pink to purple with a brownish tint. The only exceptions were found among isolates identified as Geotrichum sp. or Pichia sp., some of which formed colonies with a gray to blue color and which in two instances formed a green pigment or a dark halo in the agar. The specificity and sensitivity of the new medium for the presumptive identification of C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis exceeded 99% for all three species. A blinded reading test involving four personnel and 57 yeast isolates representing nine clinically important species confirmed that colonial appearance after 48 h of incubation on CHROMagar Candida afforded the correct presumptive recognition of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C, krusei, and Trichosporon spp. None of nine bacterial isolates grew on CHROMagar Candida within 72 h, and bacteria (Escherichia coli) grew from only 4 of 104 vaginal, 100 oral, and 99 anorectal swabs. The new medium

  11. Fenticonazole activity measured by the methods of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and CLSI against 260 Candida vulvovaginitis isolates from two European regions and annotations on the prevalent genotypes.

    PubMed

    Antonopoulou, Stavroula; Aoun, Michel; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C; Baka, Stavroula; Logothetis, Emanuel; Kalambokas, Theodoros; Zannos, Andreas; Papadias, Konstantine; Grigoriou, Odysseas; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Velegraki, Aristea

    2009-05-01

    The activity of fenticonazole was studied against 260 West and Southeast European vulvovaginal candidiasis isolates, and low MICs were displayed. Fenticonazole was assessed by European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and CLSI microdilution methods for the first time, and the results showed excellent agreement (97%) and significant interclass correlation coefficient (P < 0.0001). Also, the levels of agreement for the results for itraconazole, fluconazole, and ketoconazole were 84%, 90%, and 98% (P < 0.0001), respectively. Multilocus typing by PCR fingerprinting and subsequent cluster analysis delineated geographically associated alignments for Candida albicans and fluconazole resistance-related clusters for Candida glabrata.

  12. Fenticonazole Activity Measured by the Methods of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and CLSI against 260 Candida Vulvovaginitis Isolates from Two European Regions and Annotations on the Prevalent Genotypes▿

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulou, Stavroula; Aoun, Michel; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.; Baka, Stavroula; Logothetis, Emanuel; Kalambokas, Theodoros; Zannos, Andreas; Papadias, Konstantine; Grigoriou, Odysseas; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Velegraki, Aristea

    2009-01-01

    The activity of fenticonazole was studied against 260 West and Southeast European vulvovaginal candidiasis isolates, and low MICs were displayed. Fenticonazole was assessed by European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and CLSI microdilution methods for the first time, and the results showed excellent agreement (97%) and significant interclass correlation coefficient (P < 0.0001). Also, the levels of agreement for the results for itraconazole, fluconazole, and ketoconazole were 84%, 90%, and 98% (P < 0.0001), respectively. Multilocus typing by PCR fingerprinting and subsequent cluster analysis delineated geographically associated alignments for Candida albicans and fluconazole resistance-related clusters for Candida glabrata. PMID:19223627

  13. Candida alocasiicola sp. nov., Candida hainanensis sp. nov., Candida heveicola sp. nov. and Candida musiphila sp. nov., novel anamorphic, ascomycetous yeast species isolated from plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-An; Jia, Jian-Hua; Bai, Feng-Yan

    2008-08-01

    In a taxonomic study on the ascomycetous yeasts isolated from plant materials collected in tropical forests in Yunnan and Hainan Provinces, southern China, four strains isolated from tree sap (YJ2E(T)) and flowers (YF9E(T), YWZH3C(T) and YYF2A(T)) were revealed to represent four undescribed yeast species. Molecular phylogenetic analysis based on the large subunit (26S) rRNA gene D1/D2 domain sequences showed that strain YJ2E(T) was located in a clade together with Candida haemulonii and C. pseudohaemulonii. Strain YF9E(T) was most closely related to C. azyma and strain YWZH3C(T) to C. sorbophila and C. spandovensis. Strain YYF2A(T) was clustered in a clade containing small-spored Metschnikowia species and related anamorphic Candida species. The new strains differed from their closely related described species by more than 10% mismatches in the D1/D2 domain. No sexual states were observed for the four strains on various sporulation media. The new species are therefore assigned to the genus Candida and described as Candida alocasiicola sp. nov. (type strain, YF9E(T) = AS 2.3484(T) = CBS 10702(T)), Candida hainanensis sp. nov. (type strain, YYF2A(T) = AS 2.3478(T) = CBS 10696(T)), Candida heveicola sp. nov. (type strain, YJ2E(T) = AS 2.3483(T) = CBS 10701(T)) and Candida musiphila sp. nov. (type strain, YWZH3C(T) = AS 2.3479(T) = CBS 10697(T)).

  14. International Surveillance of Bloodstream Infections Due to Candida Species: Frequency of Occurrence and In Vitro Susceptibilities to Fluconazole, Ravuconazole, and Voriconazole of Isolates Collected from 1997 through 1999 in the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M. A.; Diekema, D. J.; Jones, R. N.; Sader, H. S.; Fluit, A. C.; Hollis, R. J.; Messer, S. A.

    2001-01-01

    A surveillance program (SENTRY) of bloodstream infections (BSI) in the United States, Canada, Latin America, and Europe from 1997 through 1999 detected 1,184 episodes of candidemia in 71 medical centers (32 in the United States, 23 in Europe, 9 in Latin America, and 7 in Canada). Overall, 55% of the yeast BSIs were due to Candida albicans, followed by Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis (15%), Candida tropicalis (9%), and miscellaneous Candida spp. (6%). In the United States, 45% of candidemias were due to non-C. albicans species. C. glabrata (21%) was the most common non-C. albicans species in the United States, and the proportion of non-C. albicans BSIs was highest in Latin America (55%). C. albicans accounted for 60% of BSI in Canada and 58% in Europe. C. parapsilosis was the most common non-C. albicans species in Latin America (25%), Canada (16%), and Europe (17%). Isolates of C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis were all highly susceptible to fluconazole (97 to 100% at ≤8 μg/ml). Likewise, 97 to 100% of these species were inhibited by ≤1 μg/ml of ravuconazole (concentration at which 50% were inhibited [MIC50], 0.007 to 0.03 μg/ml) or voriconazole (MIC50, 0.007 to 0.06 μg/ml). Both ravuconazole and voriconazole were significantly more active than fluconazole against C. glabrata (MIC90s of 0.5 to 1.0 μg/ml versus 16 to 32 μg/ml, respectively). A trend of increased susceptibility of C. glabrata to fluconazole was noted over the three-year period. The percentage of C. glabrata isolates susceptible to fluconazole increased from 48% in 1997 to 84% in 1999, and MIC50s decreased from 16 to 4 μg/ml. A similar trend was documented in both the Americas (57 to 84% susceptible) and Europe (22 to 80% susceptible). Some geographic differences in susceptibility to triazole were observed with Canadian isolates generally more susceptible than isolates from the United States and Europe. These observations suggest susceptibility patterns and trends

  15. A systematic analysis reveals an essential role for high-affinity iron uptake system, haemolysin and CFEM domain-containing protein in iron homoeostasis and virulence in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Suneetha, Korivi Jyothiraj; Kaur, Rupinder

    2014-10-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms and human pathogens employ a battery of factors to scavenge iron from the high-affinity iron-binding host proteins. In the present study, we have elucidated, via a candidate gene approach, major iron acquisition and homoeostatic mechanisms operational in an opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata. Phenotypic, biochemical and molecular analysis of a set of 13 C. glabrata strains, deleted for proteins potentially implicated in iron metabolism, revealed that the high-affinity reductive iron uptake system is required for utilization of alternate carbon sources and for growth under both in vitro iron-limiting and in vivo conditions. Furthermore, we show for the first time that the cysteine-rich CFEM (common in fungal extracellular membranes) domain-containing cell wall structural protein, CgCcw14, and a putative haemolysin, CgMam3, are essential for maintenance of intracellular iron content, adherence to epithelial cells and virulence. Consistent with their roles in iron homoeostasis, mitochondrial aconitase activity was lower and higher in mutants disrupted for high-affinity iron transport, and haemolysin respectively. Additionally, we present evidence that the mitochondrial frataxin, CgYfh1, is pivotal to iron metabolism. Besides yielding insights into major in vitro and in vivo iron acquisition strategies, our findings establish high-affinity iron uptake mechanisms as critical virulence determinants in C. glabrata.

  16. Prospective evaluation of the chromogenic medium CandiSelect 4 for differentiation and presumptive identification of non-Candida albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; de Hoog, G Sybren; Cornelissen, Akke; Lyu, Qian; Mou, Lili; Liu, Taohua; Cao, Yu; Vatanshenassan, Mansoureh; Kang, Yingqian

    2016-02-01

    Rapid identification of pathogenic yeasts is a crucial step in timely and appropriate antifungal therapy. For diagnostics in the clinical laboratory, simplified alternatives to barcoding are needed. CandiSelect 4 (CS4) medium, a chromogenic medium for isolation of clinical yeasts, allows routine recognition of Candida albicans and presumptive identification of Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei. We evaluated an extension of this method with 46 non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) and 7 Malassezia species. The medium supported growth of all species tested and a wide diversity of cultural types were observed. Colony colours were in violet, turquoise (including green and blue), or white tinges. Eight NCAC species produced violet pigmentation similar to that of C. albicans. Most NCAC species, including C. glabrata and C. tropicalis were distributed in the turquoise group. Malassezia species were invariably blue.

  17. Antifungal Drug Susceptibility of Candida Species Isolated from HIV-Positive Patients Recruited at a Public Hospital in São Luís, Maranhão, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Terças, Ana L. G.; Marques, Sirlei G.; Moffa, Eduardo B.; Alves, Márcia B.; de Azevedo, Conceição M. P. S.; Siqueira, Walter L.; Monteiro, Cristina A.

    2017-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common fungal infection in hospitalized patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Its progression results in invasive infections, which are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to quickly and accurately identify Candida spp. from oral mucosa of AIDS patients recruited at Presidente Vargas Hospital, in São Luís city, Brazil and to evaluate the sensitivity profile of these fungi to antifungals by using an automated system. Isolates were collected from oropharyngeal mucosa of 52 hospitalized AIDS patients, under anti-viral and antifungal therapies. Patients were included in research if they were HIV-positive, above 18 years of age and after obtaining their written consent. CHROMagar®Candida and the automated ViteK-2®system were used to isolate and identify Candida spp., respectively. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed using the ViteK-2®system, complemented with the Etest®, using the drugs amphotericin B, fluconazole, flucytosine, and voriconazole. Oropharyngeal candidiasis had a high prevalence in these hospitalized AIDS patients (83%), and the most prevalent species was Candida albicans (56%). Antifungal susceptibility test showed that 64.7% of the Candida spp. were susceptible, 11.8% were dose-dependent sensitive, and 23.5% were resistant. All the Candida krusei and Candida famata isolates and two of Candida glabrata were resistant to fluconazole. Most of AIDS patients presented oropharyngeal candidiasis and C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species. The results showed high variability in resistance among isolated species and indicates the need to identify the Candida spp. involved in the infection and the need to test antifungal susceptibility as a guide in drug therapy in patients hospitalized with AIDS. This is the first relate about AIDS patients monitoring in a public hospital in São Luís concerning the precise identification and establishing of

  18. Characterization of Candida isolates from pediatric burn patients.

    PubMed Central

    Neely, A N; Odds, F C; Basatia, B K; Holder, I A

    1988-01-01

    To provide more detailed information about Candida epidemiology and pathogenesis in pediatric burn patients, Candida isolates from 113 patients collected over 3 years were identified at the species level and the serotypes and biotypes of the C. albicans isolates were determined. A total of 85% of the patients were colonized or infected by C. albicans, 18% by C. tropicalis, and 11% by C. parapsilosis. Although colonization or infection often was found at multiple sites and times, 87% of the patients were colonized or infected by only one Candida species or strain; the other 13% showed multiple colonizations or infections, some of which occurred simultaneously at the same site. C. albicans biotyping determined the tolerance of the isolates to pH (pH 1.4) and salt; flucytosine, borate, and safranine resistance; and ability to produce proteinase and assimilate urea, sorbose, and citrate; results are expressed as three-digit numbers. For isolates from three different anatomical sites, the distribution of the nine biotype characteristics was similar in all cases but one. Significantly more fecal than wound or throat isolates were resistant to safranine. Sixty-four different serotype-biotype combinations were found in the 96 patients with C. albicans infections or colonizations. Twenty-nine percent of all C. albicans isolates had the partial biotype -57, while 20 of the 96 patients had specifically serotype B, biotype 557 colonizations or infections. Eleven patients had the B557 infection when admitted; nine patients acquired the yeast in-house. Thirty percent of the C. albicans isolated from 23 adult patients at a nearby hospital also showed the -57 biotype pattern, suggesting that C. albicans isolates expressing this biotype are either extremely prevalent in nature or are more virulent than other C. albicans isolates. PMID:3053771

  19. Antifungal Activity of Plant Extracts against Candida Species from Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, K.; Kumar, L. Sathish; Rajendran, S.; Chandrasekaran, M.; Bhaskar, K.; Sajit Khan, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    Seventy five patients with oral lesions attending the different departments of Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital, Annamalai University were screened for Candida. Forty six (61.3%) Candida strains were isolated from the oral lesions. Of the 46 Candida strains, Candida albicans accounted for 35 (76.08%), Candida glabrata for 5 (10.86%), Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei for 2 (4.34%) each and Candida parapsilosis and Candida guilliermondii for one (2.17%) each. Antifungal activity of ethanol extracts of five plant species that included Syzygium jambolanum, Cassia siamea, Odina wodier, Momordica charantia and Melia azedarach and two algal species, Sargassum wightii and Caulerpa scalpelliformis were tested against 25 isolated strains by disc diffusion method. Antifungal activity was observed at 100 mg/ml for Syzygium jambolanum, Cassia siamea and Caulerpa scalpelliformis and at 10 mg/ml for Sargassum wightii. PMID:21369447

  20. Antifungal Activity of Plant Extracts against Candida Species from Oral Lesions.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, K; Kumar, L Sathish; Rajendran, S; Chandrasekaran, M; Bhaskar, K; Sajit Khan, A K

    2008-11-01

    Seventy five patients with oral lesions attending the different departments of Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital, Annamalai University were screened for Candida. Forty six (61.3%) Candida strains were isolated from the oral lesions. Of the 46 Candida strains, Candida albicans accounted for 35 (76.08%), Candida glabrata for 5 (10.86%), Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei for 2 (4.34%) each and Candida parapsilosis and Candida guilliermondii for one (2.17%) each. Antifungal activity of ethanol extracts of five plant species that included Syzygium jambolanum, Cassia siamea, Odina wodier, Momordica charantia and Melia azedarach and two algal species, Sargassum wightii and Caulerpa scalpelliformis were tested against 25 isolated strains by disc diffusion method. Antifungal activity was observed at 100 mg/ml for Syzygium jambolanum, Cassia siamea and Caulerpa scalpelliformis and at 10 mg/ml for Sargassum wightii.

  1. Point prevalence, microbiology and antifungal susceptibility patterns of oral Candida isolates colonizing or infecting Mexican HIV/AIDS patients and healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio; Ortiz-López, Natalia Guadalupe; Villar, María; Moragues, María Dolores; Aguirre, José Manuel; Cashat-Cruz, Miguel; Lopez-Ribot, Jose Luis; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Quindós, Guillermo

    2005-06-01

    We have conducted a longitudinal study over a 3-year period to address the point prevalence, microbiological characteristics and antifungal susceptibility patterns of yeast isolates colonizing or infecting the oral cavities of 111 HIV-infected (51 adults, 60 children) and 201 non HIV-infected (109 adults, 92 children) Mexican persons. Regarding the epidemiology of oral candidiasis, Candida albicans was the most frequent species isolated. Seventy-one out of 85 isolates from colonized persons were C. albicans (83.5%), 27 isolates of them were from HIV-infected children and 44 from non HIV-infected patients. Sixty-two isolates belonged to serotype A which was the most prevalent serotype of C. albicans. Non-albicans species (Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilosis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were isolated from 16.5% of colonized patients and from 38.5% patients with candidiasis or Candida-related lesions. There were nine episodes of infection or colonization by at least 2 different yeast species. In the case of HIV/AIDS patients, it was determined that yeast carriage was not associated with the number of CD4+ cells or the viral load, but HAART reduced the prevalence of oral candidiasis. Overall, most patients harbored strains in vitro susceptible to fluconazole, however 10.8% of the yeasts were resistant to one or more azole antifungal agents and 29% were intermediate susceptible to them. On the contrary, 5-fluorocytosine was very active against all isolates tested, and amphotericin B was active against 97.9% of them.

  2. [Prevalence of Candida albicans and Candida non-albicans in clinical samples during 1999-2001].

    PubMed

    Mujica, M T; Finquelievich, J L; Jewtuchowicz, V; Iovannitti, C A

    2004-01-01

    The importance of epidemiological monitoring of yeasts involved in pathologic processes is unquestionable due to the increase of these infections over the last decade, the changes observed in species causing candidiasis, and empirical antifungal treatment. At the Mycology Center, 1006 isolates from a wide range of clinical samples were studied during 1999-2001. Candida albicans (40.3%) was the most isolated species, although, the Candida no albicans species with 54.9% showed the major prevalence. In blood cultures Candida parapsilosis (34.9%), C. albicans (30.2%) and C. tropicalis (25.6%) were recovered most frequently while C. glabrata represented only 2.3%. C. albicans with 60%-80% was the predominant specie in mucosal surface. We also detected Candida mediastinistis, which alert us over the importance at this location. Urinary tract infections caused by yeasts were more frequent in hospitalized patients, being C. albicans (47.7%), the most commonly isolated, followed by C. glabrata (24.8%) and C. tropicalis (20.0%). In the candidal onychomycoses, C. parapsilosis (37.7%) outplaced C. albicans (22.0%). Fluconazole susceptibility studies of Candida species allowed us to conclude that the majority of C. albicans islolates are susceptible, and that the highest resistance averages were observed in C. glabrata (21.41%) and C. krusei (69.23%).

  3. Multi-species biofilm of Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans Candida species on acrylic substrate

    PubMed Central

    K PATHAK, Apurva; SHARMA, Sanjay; SHRIVASTVA, Pallavi

    2012-01-01

    Objective In polymicrobial biofilms bacteria extensively interact with Candida species, but the interaction among the different species of the Candida is yet to be completely evaluated. In the present study, the difference in biofilm formation ability of clinical isolates of four species of Candida in both single-species and multi-species combinations on the surface of dental acrylic resin strips was evaluated. Material and Methods The species of Candida, isolated from multiple species oral candidiasis of the neutropenic patients, were used for the experiment. Organisms were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose broth with 8% glucose (SDB). Biofilm production on the acrylic resins strips was determined by crystal violet assay. Student's t-test and ANOVA were used to compare in vitro biofilm formation for the individual species of Candida and its different multi-species combinations. Results In the present study, differences between the mean values of the biofilm-forming ability of individual species (C. glabrata>C. krusei>C. tropicalis>C. albicans) and in its multi-species' combinations (the highest for C. albicans with C. glabrata and the lowest for all the four species combination) were reported. Conclusions The findings of this study showed that biofilm-forming ability was found greater for non-Candida albicans Candida species (NCAC) than for C. albicans species with intra-species variation. Presence of C. albicans in multi-species biofilms increased, whereas; C. tropicalis decreased the biofilm production with all other NCAC species. PMID:22437681

  4. [Evaluation of peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method in the identifi cation of Candida species isolated from blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Gonca; Koç, Ayşe Nedret; Atalay, Mustafa Altay

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, increased number of patients who are hospitalized in intensive care units, received immunosuppressive therapy and treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics that can lead an increase in the incidence of systemic candidiasis. In these patients, the most common clinical manifestation is candidemia. Since the identification of Candida species isolated from blood cultures is time consuming by conventional (morphological and biochemical) methods, rapid, reliable and accurate methods are needed. For this purpose novel systems have been developed to identify the agent directly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method for the identification of Candida species by comparing with the conventional methods. A total of 50 patients who were admitted to Erciyes University Medical Faculty Hospital clinics and followed with prediagnosis of systemic fungal infections whose blood cultures were positive for the yeasts between July 2011 and July 2012 were included in the study. The conventional identification of Candida isolates was performed by considering macroscopic and microscopic morphology, germ tube test, cycloheximide sensitivity, urease activity and carbohydrate assimilation patterns with API 20C AUX (bioMerieux, France) test. PNA FISH method was conducted by the use of a commercial kit namely Yeast Traffic Light(®) PNA FISH (AdvanDx, USA). According to morphological and biochemical characteristics (conventional methods), 19 (38%) out of 50 Candida isolates were identified as C.albicans, 12 (24%) as C.glabrata, five (10%) as C.parapsilosis, five (10%) as C.kefyr, four (8%) as C.krusei, two (4%) as C.guilliermondii, two (4%) as C.tropicalis and one (2%) as C.lusitaniae. On the other hand, 24 (48%) of the isolates were identified as C.albicans/C.parapsilosis (with green fluorescence), 16 (32%) as C.glabrata/C.krusei (with red fluorescence) and one (%2) as C.tropicalis (with yellow

  5. EFFECT OF HIGHLY ACTIVE ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY ON VAGINAL Candida spp. ISOLATION IN HIV-INFECTED COMPARED TO HIV-UNINFECTED WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    ALCZUK, Silvia de Souza Dantas; BONFIM-MENDONÇA, Patrícia de Souza; ROCHA-BRISCHILIARI, Sheila Cristina; SHINOBU-MESQUITA, Cristiane Suemi; MARTINS, Helen Priscilla Rodrigues; GIMENES, Fabrícia; de ABREU, André Luelsdorf Pimenta; CARVALHO, Maria Dalva de Barros; PELLOSO, Sandra Marisa; SVIDZINSKI, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; CONSOLARO, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2015-01-01

     Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) in HIV-infected women contributed to the impairment of their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) use on the vaginal Candida spp. isolation in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected women. This cross-sectional study included 178 HIV-infected (HIV group) and 200 HIV-uninfected women (control) that were studied at the Specialized Assistance Service (SAE) for sexually transmitted diseases (STD)/AIDS of the city of Maringá, Brazil, from April 1 to October 30, 2011. The yeasts were isolated and identified by phenotypic and molecular methods. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, nystatin and amphotericin B was tested by the reference microdilution method. Higher frequencies of total vaginal Candida spp. isolation were found in the HIV-infected group than in the control group. However, both groups showed a similar frequency of colonization and VVC. Although C. albicans was the most frequent and sensitive to azolics and polyenes in both HIV-infected and uninfected women, the emerging resistance of C. glabrata to amphotericin B in the HIV-infected women was observed. Although higher frequency of vaginal Candida spp. isolation had been observed in the HIV-infected than in HIV-uninfected women, colonization and VVC showed similar frequency in both groups, indicating that HAART appears to protect against vaginal colonization and VVC. PMID:25923898

  6. Candida albicans bloodstream isolates in a German university hospital are genetically heterogenous and susceptible to commonly used antifungals.

    PubMed

    Huyke, Johanna; Martin, Ronny; Walther, Grit; Weber, Michael; Kaerger, Kerstin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Elias, Johannes; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    From an eight-year-span, 99 Candida bloodstream isolates were collected at the University Hospital Wuerzburg, Germany. In this study, all strains were analyzed using molecular and phenotypic typing methods. Confirmatory species identification revealed three isolates that were initially diagnosed as C. albicans to be actually C. dubliniensis. Two isolates contained a mixed culture of C. albicans and C. glabrata, in one of the specimens both species could be separated while it was not possible to recover C. albicans in the other sample. The remaining 95 C. albicans isolates were profiled by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Phylogenetic analyses showed a highly heterogenous collection of strains, associated with many different clades and constituting a set of new diploid sequence types (DST). For all strains with identical DST, patient data were reviewed for potential nosocomial transmission. In addition, all isolates were tested for their susceptibility to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole. No clinically relevant resistance could be detected. Furthermore, these data underline that correlation between minimal inhibitory concentrations for caspofungin and anidulafungin is low.

  7. Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida albicans and Emerging Non-albicans Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Sarah G.; Berkow, Elizabeth L.; Rybak, Jeffrey M.; Nishimoto, Andrew T.; Barker, Katherine S.; Rogers, P. David

    2017-01-01

    Within the limited antifungal armamentarium, the azole antifungals are the most frequent class used to treat Candida infections. Azole antifungals such as fluconazole are often preferred treatment for many Candida infections as they are inexpensive, exhibit limited toxicity, and are available for oral administration. There is, however, extensive documentation of intrinsic and developed resistance to azole antifungals among several Candida species. As the frequency of azole resistant Candida isolates in the clinical setting increases, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms of such resistance in order to both preserve and improve upon the azole class of antifungals for the treatment of Candida infections. This review examines azole resistance in infections caused by C. albicans as well as the emerging non-albicans Candida species C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, and C. glabrata and in particular, describes the current understanding of molecular basis of azole resistance in these fungal species. PMID:28127295

  8. Two new species of the genus Candida in the Zygoascus clade, Candida lundiana sp. nov. and Candida suthepensis sp. nov., isolated from raw honey in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Saksinchai, Sujinan; Suzuki, Motofumi; Lumyong, Saisamorn; Ohkuma, Moriya; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2012-03-01

    During a survey of yeasts associated with raw honey collected in Thailand, two strains of the Zygoascus clade were isolated from the Asian cavity-nesting honeybee Apis cerana and the stingless bee Homotrigona fimbriata. Phylogeny based on 26S rDNA D1/D2 sequences placed these yeasts as members of a clade including Candida bituminiphila, Candida patagonica and Candida polysorbophila. The strains of the two novel species, CBS 12271(T) and CBS 12270(T), respectively, could be unquestionably distinguished from their relatives by rDNA sequences and other taxonomic characteristics. Therefore, the novel anamorphic species, Candida lundiana sp. nov. (type strain CBS 12271(T) = JCM 16823(T)) and Candida suthepensis sp. nov. (type strain CBS 12270(T) = JCM 16822(T)) are described.

  9. CHROMagar Candida as the Sole Primary Medium for Isolation of Yeasts and as a Source Medium for the Rapid-Assimilation-of-Trehalose Test

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Melissa P.; Zinchuk, Riva; Larone, Davise H.

    2005-01-01

    The chromogenic medium BBL CHROMagar Candida (CAC) was evaluated as a sole primary medium for the isolation of yeasts from clinical specimens in which yeasts are the primary concern. Additionally, the reliability of the rapid-assimilation-of-trehalose (RAT) test in yielding correct results with isolates taken from CAC was assessed. A total of 270 throat, urine, and genital (TUG) specimens were streaked onto CAC, Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA), inhibitory mold agar (IMA), and Mycosel (MYC). A total of 69 blood culture broths that were smear positive for yeast were streaked onto CAC and SDA. A 1-h RAT test (NCCLS M35-A) was performed simultaneously on isolates from CAC and SDA. A total of 112 TUG specimens yielded yeast colonies (CAC, 111 colonies; IMA, 105; SDA, 103; MYC, 91). The 69 blood culture yeasts grew on both CAC and SDA. Mixed cultures of yeasts were detected on 11 CAC plates but were unrecognized on other media. Colonies suspected of being C. glabrata on 32 CAC plates were all RAT test positive and confirmed to be C. glabrata; of 59 colonies with various characteristics of color and morphology on CAC, none were RAT positive, and all were conventionally identified as yeasts other than C. glabrata (sensitivity and specificity, 100%). The same isolates from SDA tested for RAT produced six false negatives and no false positives (sensitivity, 81%; specificity, 100%). The results show that CAC can be used as the sole primary medium for recovery of yeasts from clinical specimens. Additionally, isolates grown on CAC yield excellent results with the RAT test utilized in this study. PMID:15750085

  10. CHROMagar Candida as the sole primary medium for isolation of yeasts and as a source medium for the rapid-assimilation-of-trehalose test.

    PubMed

    Murray, Melissa P; Zinchuk, Riva; Larone, Davise H

    2005-03-01

    The chromogenic medium BBL CHROMagar Candida (CAC) was evaluated as a sole primary medium for the isolation of yeasts from clinical specimens in which yeasts are the primary concern. Additionally, the reliability of the rapid-assimilation-of-trehalose (RAT) test in yielding correct results with isolates taken from CAC was assessed. A total of 270 throat, urine, and genital (TUG) specimens were streaked onto CAC, Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA), inhibitory mold agar (IMA), and Mycosel (MYC). A total of 69 blood culture broths that were smear positive for yeast were streaked onto CAC and SDA. A 1-h RAT test (NCCLS M35-A) was performed simultaneously on isolates from CAC and SDA. A total of 112 TUG specimens yielded yeast colonies (CAC, 111 colonies; IMA, 105; SDA, 103; MYC, 91). The 69 blood culture yeasts grew on both CAC and SDA. Mixed cultures of yeasts were detected on 11 CAC plates but were unrecognized on other media. Colonies suspected of being C. glabrata on 32 CAC plates were all RAT test positive and confirmed to be C. glabrata; of 59 colonies with various characteristics of color and morphology on CAC, none were RAT positive, and all were conventionally identified as yeasts other than C. glabrata (sensitivity and specificity, 100%). The same isolates from SDA tested for RAT produced six false negatives and no false positives (sensitivity, 81%; specificity, 100%). The results show that CAC can be used as the sole primary medium for recovery of yeasts from clinical specimens. Additionally, isolates grown on CAC yield excellent results with the RAT test utilized in this study.

  11. CHROMagar Candida Medium for Direct Susceptibility Testing of Yeast from Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Grace L.; Peterson, Ellena M.

    2005-01-01

    An evaluation was performed on 95 blood cultures positive for Candida spp. to determine the correlation of direct susceptibility testing of fluconazole versus both standardized disk diffusion and MIC methods. For direct testing, an aliquot taken from BD BACTEC Plus and/or BD BACTEC Lytic/10 bottles (Becton Dickinson [BD], Sparks, MD) positive by gram stain for yeast was subcultured to CHROMagar Candida (BD), and a 25-μg fluconazole disk (BD) was placed on the plate. The area of growth inhibition surrounding the disk was measured at 24 and 48 h. In addition, a subculture of the isolate was tested by a microdilution MIC using YeastOne (TREK Diagnostics Systems Inc., OH) and disk diffusion (NCCLS M44-A) using a standardized inoculum plated onto CHROMagar Candida as well as Mueller-Hinton agar to which 2% glucose and 0.5 μg/ml methylene blue dye was added (MH-GMB). The categorical interpretation derived from the MIC was used as the reference to which the disk diffusion results were compared. There were a total of 41 Candida albicans, 23 Candida glabrata, 20 Candida parapsilosis, 9 Candida tropicalis, and 1 each of Candida krusei and Candida lusitaniae tested. At 24 h there was full agreement among the methods for all C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. lusitaniae, and C. krusei isolates. For the C. parapsilosis isolates at 24 h there was one very major discrepancy using the direct CHROMagar and one major error with the standardized MH-GMB. The majority of the errors were seen at 24 h with the C. glabrata isolates. Of the 23 C. glabrata isolates at 24 h by direct CHROMagar, there were 10 minor and 1 very major error; by MH-GMB there were 12 minor and 2 very major errors; and by standardized CHROMagar Candida there were 13 minor and 2 major errors. There were no very major errors with C. glabrata when all plates were read at 48 h. At 24 h by the direct and standardized CHROMagar the majority of C. glabrata isolates were more resistant, whereas by MH-GMB they were more

  12. CHROMagar Candida medium for direct susceptibility testing of yeast from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Tan, Grace L; Peterson, Ellena M

    2005-04-01

    An evaluation was performed on 95 blood cultures positive for Candida spp. to determine the correlation of direct susceptibility testing of fluconazole versus both standardized disk diffusion and MIC methods. For direct testing, an aliquot taken from BD BACTEC Plus and/or BD BACTEC Lytic/10 bottles (Becton Dickinson [BD], Sparks, MD) positive by gram stain for yeast was subcultured to CHROMagar Candida (BD), and a 25-microg fluconazole disk (BD) was placed on the plate. The area of growth inhibition surrounding the disk was measured at 24 and 48 h. In addition, a subculture of the isolate was tested by a microdilution MIC using YeastOne (TREK Diagnostics Systems Inc., OH) and disk diffusion (NCCLS M44-A) using a standardized inoculum plated onto CHROMagar Candida as well as Mueller-Hinton agar to which 2% glucose and 0.5 microg/ml methylene blue dye was added (MH-GMB). The categorical interpretation derived from the MIC was used as the reference to which the disk diffusion results were compared. There were a total of 41 Candida albicans, 23 Candida glabrata, 20 Candida parapsilosis, 9 Candida tropicalis, and 1 each of Candida krusei and Candida lusitaniae tested. At 24 h there was full agreement among the methods for all C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. lusitaniae, and C. krusei isolates. For the C. parapsilosis isolates at 24 h there was one very major discrepancy using the direct CHROMagar and one major error with the standardized MH-GMB. The majority of the errors were seen at 24 h with the C. glabrata isolates. Of the 23 C. glabrata isolates at 24 h by direct CHROMagar, there were 10 minor and 1 very major error; by MH-GMB there were 12 minor and 2 very major errors; and by standardized CHROMagar Candida there were 13 minor and 2 major errors. There were no very major errors with C. glabrata when all plates were read at 48 h. At 24 h by the direct and standardized CHROMagar the majority of C. glabrata isolates were more resistant, whereas by MH-GMB they were more

  13. Recombinant 3-Hydroxy 3-Methyl Glutaryl-CoA Reductase from Candida glabrata (Rec-CgHMGR) Obtained by Heterologous Expression, as a Novel Therapeutic Target Model for Testing Synthetic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Pavón, Dulce; Cuevas-Hernández, Roberto I; Trujillo-Ferrara, José G; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Ibarra, J Antonio; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2017-01-30

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) is a glycoprotein of the endoplasmic reticulum that participates in the mevalonate pathway, the precursor of cholesterol in human and ergosterol in fungi. This enzyme has three domains: transmembrane, binding, and soluble. In this study, we expressed and purified the soluble fraction of the HMGR enzyme from Candida glabrata (CgHMGR) in an Escherichia coli heterologous system and used it as a model for studying its inhibitory activity. The soluble fraction of CgHMGR was fused to the maltose binding protein (MBP), purified, and characterized. Optimal pH was 8.0, and its optimal temperature activity was 37 °C. The k m and V max for the HMG-CoA were 6.5 μM and 2.26 × 10(-3) μM min(-1), respectively. Recombinant CgHMGR was inhibited by simvastatin presenting an IC50 at 14.5 μM. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the recombinant HMGR version from C. glabrata may be used as a study model system for HMGR inhibitors such as statins and newly synthesized inhibitor compounds that might be used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia or mycosis.

  14. The effect of antifungal combination on transcripts of a subset of drug-resistance genes in clinical isolates of Candida species induced biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nermin H.; Melake, Nahla A.; Somily, Ali M.; Zakaria, Azza S.; Baddour, Manal M.; Mahmoud, Amany Z.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation is often associated with increased Candida resistance toward antifungal agents. Therefore, the current study aimed to assess the incidence of biofilm formation among Candida isolates and to investigate the effect of high doses of fluconazole {FLC}, voriconazole {VOC} and amphotericin B {AMB}, singly and in combination on mature biofilms. Moreover, it aimed to assess the expression of selected genes (CDR1, KRE1 and SKN1) responsible for Candida biofilm resistance. The study included 49 patients; samples were collected from the King Khalid Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Isolates were prepared for biofilm formation and quantification using 0.4% (w/v) crystal violet. Minimum Inhibitory concentration (MIC) and fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) were conducted by the broth microdilution method. Biofilm eradication was evaluated using counting, XTT stain intensity and observed under the inverted microscope. Selected genes were evaluated in Candida biofilms under the effect of antifungal exposure using QPCR. The major isolates were Candida albicans (65.3%) followed by Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata. 77.6% of the strains were biofilm formers. AMB showed susceptibility in 87.8% of isolates, followed by VOC (77.6%) and FLC (67.3%). MIC50 and MIC90 were (0.03, 0.125), (0.5, 8), (2, >128) μg/ml for AMB, VOC and FLC, respectively. 34.7% and 18.4% of the isolates were antagonistic to AMB/FLC and AMB/VOC, respectively. Mature biofilms of ten selected isolates were found resistant to FLC (1000 μg/ml). VOR and AMB concentration required to inhibit biofilm formation was 16–250 fold higher than the MIC for planktonic cells. Isolates showed significant reduction with antifungal combination when compared with the untreated controls (p value ⩽ 0.01), or using fluconazole alone (p value ⩽ 0.05). High doses of the antifungals were employed to assess the effect on the persisters’ selected gene expression. Marked over expression of SKN1 and

  15. Virulence attributes and genetic variability of oral Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis isolates.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Karen Regina Carim; Ferreira, Joseane Cristina; Lavrador, Marco Aurélio Sicchiroli; Baruffi, Marcelo Dias; Candido, Regina Celia

    2012-05-01

    The wide spectrum of candidiasis and its clinical importance encourage the research with the purpose of clarifying the mechanisms of pathogenicity and identification of virulence factors of Candida sp. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify the adhesion capacity, protease activity and genotypic diversity of oral C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates. The adhesion ability to the extracellular matrix glycoproteins laminin and fibronectin was evaluated using the ELISA technique. The research of proteases was carried out in agar plate containing bovine albumin and through a quantitative method in buffer solution containing haemoglobin. Intra and interspecies polymorphisms was verified through random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. All C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates binded to immobilised laminin and fibronectin. Ca33 and Ct13 isolates had relative adhesion index significantly higher than the other isolates for both glycoproteins (P < 0.001). Protease activity was observed in all isolates of C. albicans using either the semi-quantitative or quantitative assay. The protease activity of C. tropicalis was better detected through the quantitative assay. The genotypic diversity by RAPD revealed a heterogeneous population in both species. Nevertheless, C. tropicalis presented higher genetic variability than C. albicans strains.

  16. Presumptive identification of Candida species other than C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis with the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida

    PubMed Central

    Hospenthal, Duane R; Beckius, Miriam L; Floyd, Karon L; Horvath, Lynn L; Murray, Clinton K

    2006-01-01

    Background CHROMagar Candida (CaC) is increasingly being reported as a medium used to differentiate Candida albicans from non-albicans Candida (NAC) species. Rapid identification of NAC can assist the clinician in selecting appropriate antifungal therapy. CaC is a differential chromogenic medium designed to identify C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis based on colony color and morphology. Some reports have proposed that CaC can also reliably identify C. dubliniensis and C. glabrata. Methods We evaluated the usefulness of CaC in the identification of C. dubliniensis, C. famata, C. firmetaria, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. inconspicua, C. kefyr, C. lipolytica, C. lusitaniae, C. norvegensis, C. parapsilosis, and C. rugosa. Results Most NAC produced colonies that were shades of pink, lavender, or ivory. Several isolates of C. firmetaria and all C. inconspicua produced colonies difficult to differentiate from C. krusei. Most C. rugosa isolates produced unique colonies with morphology like C. krusei except in a light blue-green color. C. glabrata isolates produced small dark violet colonies that could be differentiated from the pink and lavender colors produced by other species. All seventeen isolates of C. dubliniensis produced green colonies similar to those produced by C. albicans. Conclusion C. glabrata and C. rugosa appear distinguishable from other species using CaC. Some NAC, including C. firmetaria and C. inconspicua, could be confused with C. krusei using this medium. PMID:16390552

  17. Isolation and characterization of yeast monomorphic mutants of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Elorza, M V; Sentandreu, R; Ruiz-Herrera, J

    1994-01-01

    A method was devised for the isolation of yeast monomorphic (LEV) mutants of Candida albicans. By this procedure, about 20 stable yeast-like mutants were isolated after mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate. The growth rate of the mutants in different carbon sources, both fermentable and not, was indistinguishable from that of the parental strain, but they were unable to grow as mycelial forms after application of any of the common effective inducers, i.e., heat shock, pH alterations, proline addition, or use of GlcNAc as the carbon source. Studies performed with one selected strain demonstrated that it had severe alterations in the chemical composition of the cell wall, mainly in the levels of chitin and glucans, and in specific mannoproteins, some of them recognizable by specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. It is suggested that these structural alterations hinder the construction of a normal hyphal wall. Images PMID:8157600

  18. Five novel Wickerhamomyces- and Metschnikowia-related yeast species, Wickerhamomyces chaumierensis sp. nov., Candida pseudoflosculorum sp. nov., Candida danieliae sp. nov., Candida robnettiae sp. nov. and Candida eppingiae sp. nov., isolated from plants.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Marizeth; Robert, Vincent; Smith, Maudy Th

    2011-08-01

    On the basis of nucleotide divergences in the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) domain of the rRNA gene, five novel yeast species, Wickerhamomyces chaumierensis sp. nov. (CBS 8565(T)  = JCM 17246(T)), Candida pseudoflosculorum sp. nov. (CBS 8584(T)  = JCM 17242(T)), Candida danieliae sp. nov. (CBS 8533(T)  = JCM 17247(T)), Candida robnettiae sp. nov. (CBS 8580(T)  = JCM 17243(T)) and Candida eppingiae sp. nov. (CBS 8586(T)  = JCM 17241(T)), isolated from plants in Thailand and Guyana, are proposed in this study.

  19. Evaluation of the New Chromogenic Medium Candida ID 2 for Isolation and Identification of Candida albicans and Other Medically Important Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Eraso, Elena; Moragues, María D.; Villar-Vidal, María; Sahand, Ismail H.; González-Gómez, Nagore; Pontón, José; Quindós, Guillermo

    2006-01-01

    The usefulness of Candida ID 2 (CAID2) reformulated medium (bioMérieux, France) has been compared with that of the former Candida ID (CAID; bioMérieux), Albicans ID 2 (ALB2; bioMérieux), and CHROMagar Candida (CAC; Chromagar, France) chromogenic media for the isolation and presumptive identification of clinically relevant yeasts. Three hundred forty-five stock strains from culture collections, and 103 fresh isolates from different clinical specimens were evaluated. CAID2 permitted differentiation based on colony color between Candida albicans (cobalt blue; sensitivity, 91.7%; specificity, 97.2%) and Candida dubliniensis (turquoise blue; sensitivity, 97.9%; specificity, 96.6%). Candida tropicalis gave distinguishable pink-bluish colonies in 97.4% of the strains in CAID2 (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 100%); the same proportion was reached in CAC, where colonies were blue-gray (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 98.7%). CAC and CAID2 showed 100% sensitivity values for the identification of Candida krusei. However, with CAID2, experience is required to differentiate the downy aspect of the white colonies of C. krusei from other white-colony-forming species. The new CAID2 medium is a good candidate to replace CAID and ALB2, and it compares well to CAC for culture and presumptive identification of clinically relevant Candida species. CAID2 showed better results than CAC in some aspects, such as quicker growth and color development of colonies from clinical specimens, detection of mixed cultures, and presumptive differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:16954270

  20. Evaluation of the new chromogenic medium Candida ID 2 for isolation and identification of Candida albicans and other medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Eraso, Elena; Moragues, María D; Villar-Vidal, María; Sahand, Ismail H; González-Gómez, Nagore; Pontón, José; Quindós, Guillermo

    2006-09-01

    The usefulness of Candida ID 2 (CAID2) reformulated medium (bioMérieux, France) has been compared with that of the former Candida ID (CAID; bioMérieux), Albicans ID 2 (ALB2; bioMérieux), and CHROMagar Candida (CAC; Chromagar, France) chromogenic media for the isolation and presumptive identification of clinically relevant yeasts. Three hundred forty-five stock strains from culture collections, and 103 fresh isolates from different clinical specimens were evaluated. CAID2 permitted differentiation based on colony color between Candida albicans (cobalt blue; sensitivity, 91.7%; specificity, 97.2%) and Candida dubliniensis (turquoise blue; sensitivity, 97.9%; specificity, 96.6%). Candida tropicalis gave distinguishable pink-bluish colonies in 97.4% of the strains in CAID2 (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 100%); the same proportion was reached in CAC, where colonies were blue-gray (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 98.7%). CAC and CAID2 showed 100% sensitivity values for the identification of Candida krusei. However, with CAID2, experience is required to differentiate the downy aspect of the white colonies of C. krusei from other white-colony-forming species. The new CAID2 medium is a good candidate to replace CAID and ALB2, and it compares well to CAC for culture and presumptive identification of clinically relevant Candida species. CAID2 showed better results than CAC in some aspects, such as quicker growth and color development of colonies from clinical specimens, detection of mixed cultures, and presumptive differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  1. Performance of chromogenic media for Candida in rapid presumptive identification of Candida species from clinical materials

    PubMed Central

    Pravin Charles, M. V.; Kali, Arunava; Joseph, Noyal Mariya

    2015-01-01

    Background: In perspective of the worldwide increase in a number of immunocompromised patients, the need for identification of Candida species has become a major concern. The development of chromogenic differential media, introduced recently, facilitate rapid speciation. However, it can be employed for routine mycology workup only after an exhaustive evaluation of its benefit and cost effectiveness. This study was undertaken to evaluate the benefit and cost effectiveness of chromogenic media for speciation of Candida clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: Sputum samples of 382 patients were screened for the presence of Candida spp. by Gram stain and culture on sabouraud dextrose agar. Candida species were identified using Gram stain morphology, germ tube formation, cornmeal agar with Tween-80, sugar fermentation tests and morphology on HiCrome Candida differential agar. All the Candida isolates were inoculated on HiCrome Candida agar (HiMedia, Mumbai, India). Results: The sensitivity and specificity of HiCrome agar for identification of Candida albicans were 90% and 96.42%, respectively whereas sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate fermentation test were 86.67% and 74.07%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity values of HiCrome agar for detection of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata were above 90%. Conclusions: We found HiCrome agar has high sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the conventional method. In addition, use of this differential media could significantly cut down the turnaround time as well as cost of sample processing. PMID:26109791

  2. Calcineurin signaling: lessons from Candida species.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shang-Jie; Chang, Ya-Lin; Chen, Ying-Lien

    2015-06-01

    Human fungal infections have significantly increased in recent years due to the emergence of immunocompromised patients with AIDS and cancer. Among them, Candida species are frequently isolated and associated with high mortality if not appropriately treated. Current antifungal drugs (azoles, echinocandins and polyenes) are not sufficient to combat Candida species particularly those that are drug resistant. Calcineurin, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, is an attractive antifungal drug target, and its inhibitor (FK506 or cyclosporin A) can be combined with azoles or echinocandins for use against multidrug-resistant Candida species. The role of calcineurin in the hyphal growth of Candida albicans is controversial, but its roles in C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis and C. lusitaniae can be demonstrated. In addition, calcineurin is required for virulence of Candida species in murine systemic, ocular or urinary infection models. However, the requirement for calcineurin substrate Crz1 in these infection models varies in Candida species, suggesting that Crz1 has diverse functions in different Candida species. Besides being critical for growth in serum of Candida species, calcineurin is critical for plasma membrane integrity and growth at body temperature (37°C) uniquely in C. glabrata, suggesting that Candida calcineurin controls pathogenesis via various novel mechanisms. In this review, we summarize studies of calcineurin signaling and hyphal growth, virulence and its relationship with drug tolerance in Candida species, focusing on the divergent and conserved functions.

  3. 40 CFR 180.1144 - Candida oleophila isolate I-182; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Candida oleophila isolate I-182... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1144 Candida oleophila isolate I-182; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Candida oleophila isolate I-182, when used as a post-harvest biological...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1144 - Candida oleophila isolate I-182; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Candida oleophila isolate I-182... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1144 Candida oleophila isolate I-182; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Candida oleophila isolate I-182, when used as a post-harvest biological...

  5. Novel Polymorphic Multilocus Microsatellite Markers to Distinguish Candida tropicalis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon; Kong, Fanrong; Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Hou, Xin; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Candida tropicalis is an important pathogen. Here we developed and evaluated a polymorphic multilocus microsatellite scheme employing novel genetic markers for genotyping of C. tropicalis. Using 10 isolates from 10 unique (separate) patients to screen over 4000 tandem repeats from the C. tropicalis genome (strain MYA-3404), six new candidate microsatellite loci (ctm1, ctm3, ctm8, ctm18, ctm24 and ctm26) were selected according to amplification success, observed polymorphisms and stability of flanking regions by preliminary testing. Two known microsatellite loci CT14 and URA3 were also studied. The 6-locus scheme was then tested against a set of 82 different isolates from 32 patients. Microsatellite genotypes of isolates from the same patient (two to five isolates per patient) were identical. The six loci produced eight to 17 allele types and identified 11 to 24 genotypes amongst 32 patients’ isolates, achieving a discriminatory power (DP) of 0.76 to 0.97 (versus 0.78 for both CT14 and URA3 loci, respectively). Testing of a combination of only three loci, ctm1, ctm3 and ctm24, also achieved maximum typing efficiency (DP = 0.99, 29 genotypes). The microsatellite typing scheme had good correlation compared with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, although was slightly less discriminatory. The new six-locus microsatellite typing scheme is a potentially valuable tool for genotyping and investigating microevolution of C. tropicalis. PMID:27820850

  6. Biofilms of non-Candida albicans Candida species: quantification, structure and matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sónia; Henriques, Mariana; Martins, António; Oliveira, Rosário; Williams, David; Azeredo, Joana

    2009-11-01

    Most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to C. albicans, but recently, non- Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species have been identified as common pathogens. The ability of Candida species to form biofilms has important clinical repercussions due to their increased resistance to antifungal therapy and the ability of yeast cells within the biofilms to withstand host immune defenses. Given this clinical importance of the biofilm growth form, the aim of this study was to characterize biofilms produced by three NCAC species, namely C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. The biofilm forming ability of clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata recovered from different sources, was evaluated by crystal violet staining. The structure and morphological characteristics of the biofilms were also assessed by scanning electron microscopy and the biofilm matrix composition analyzed for protein and carbohydrate content. All NCAC species were able to form biofilms although these were less extensive for C. glabrata compared with C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis. It was evident that C. parapsilosis biofilm production was highly strain dependent, a feature not evident with C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. Scanning electron microscopy revealed structural differences for biofilms with respect to cell morphology and spatial arrangement. Candida parapsilosis biofilm matrices had large amounts of carbohydrate with less protein. Conversely, matrices extracted from C. tropicalis biofilms had low amounts of carbohydrate and protein. Interestingly, C. glabrata biofilm matrix was high in both protein and carbohydrate content. The present work demonstrates that biofilm forming ability, structure and matrix composition are highly species dependent with additional strain variability occurring with C. parapsilosis.

  7. Comparison of virulence factors of oral Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans isolates in healthy people and patients with chronic candidosis.

    PubMed

    Hannula, J; Saarela, M; Dogan, B; Paatsama, J; Koukila-Kähkölä, P; Pirinen, S; Alakomi, H L; Perheentupa, J; Asikainen, S

    2000-08-01

    We determined differences in the expression of certain virulence factors between oral Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans species. In addition, clonal differences were sought among C. albicans isolates recovered from patients with and without compromised immune system. The material comprised 93 clinical yeast isolates originated in 40 subjects (1-5 isolates per subject). All 26 C. dubliniensis isolates and 46 C. albicans isolates originated from healthy routine dental clinic patients. Additionally, 21 C. albicans isolates were collected from patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidosis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), who have chronic candidosis as one manifestation of their immunocompromising disease. Polymerase chain reaction amplification using the random sequence primer OPE-03 enabled grouping of the C. dubliniensis isolates in 2 genotypes (I and II) and C. albicans isolates in 15 genotypes (I-XV). No significant difference was found in the distribution of genotypes between the patients with APECED and the healthy subjects. C. dubliniensis isolates exhibited high-frequency phenotypic switching significantly more frequently than did C. albicans isolates, and vice versa regarding phospholipase and proteinase production. Proteinase production was significantly more frequent among C. albicans genotype V than genotype IX isolates. No significant difference was found in expression of virulence factors of C. albicans isolates between the patients with APECED and the healthy subjects.

  8. Routine use of CHROMagar Candida medium for presumptive identification of Candida yeast species and detection of mixed fungal populations.

    PubMed

    Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Declerck, Philippe; Cimon, Bernard; Planchenault, Claire; de Gentile, Ludovic; Chabasse, Dominique

    1996-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the value of the new differential culture medium CHROMagar Candida for routine investigation of clinical specimens. METHODS: During a whole year, 6150 clinical samples were plated on CHROMagar Candida medium. After incubation, the green colonies were considered to be Candida albicans. The colonies of other colors were identified using Bichrolatex-krusei, or by their assimilation pattern on ID 32C test strips and their morphology on rice cream-agar-Tween. RESULTS: Among the 6150 clinical samples, 1643 were positive for fungi. Aspergillus fumigatus and Geotrichum sp. were the predominant filamentous fungi isolated. Candida albicans was the most common species isolated (1274 of the positive samples; 77.5%), and Candida glabrata was the second most common yeast isolated (174 positive samples; 10.6%). Other yeast species were detected at lower frequencies, mainly Candida tropicalis (3.8%), Candida krusei (2.7%), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (2.7%) and Candida kefyr (2.3%), and 16 samples revealed a lipophilic species, Malassezia furfur. Mixed fungal populations accounted for 14.7% of the positive samples. Two or more yeast species were detected in 206 of the 242 specimens containing mixed fungal populations, and five yeast species were detected in one sample. Additionally, we did not observe significant differences in the isolation of yeasts or filamentous fungi from the 366 samples simultaneously plated on CHROMagar Candida and Sabouraud dextrose agar. Close agreement between the two culture media was observed for 89.9% of these samples. CONCLUSIONS: CHROMagar Candida medium was shown to be extremely helpful in a routine clinical mycology service, facilitating the detection of mixed cultures of yeasts and allowing direct identification of C. albicans, as well as rapid presumptive identification of the other yeasts: C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. krusei and S. cerevisiae. This chromogenic medium thus appears to be suitable as a primary culture medium

  9. Two new anamorphic yeasts, Candida thailandica sp. nov. and Candida lignicola sp. nov., isolated from insect frass in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Limtong, Savitree; Yongmanitchai, Wichien; Tuntirungkij, Manee; Potacharoen, Wanchern; Kawasaki, Hiroko; Nakase, Takashi

    2007-12-01

    Two new yeast strains of the genus Candida were isolated from insect frass collected in Khao-Yai National Park, Nakhonrachasima, Thailand. Based on the morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, and sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of 26S rRNA gene, these two strains were found to represent two distinct undescribed species and were named Candida thailandica sp. nov. (ST-17 = BCC 7717(T) = NBRC 102562(T)=CBS 10 610) and Candida lignicola sp. nov. (ST-33 = BCC 7733(T) = NBRC 102564(T) = CBS 10612). In the D1/D2 domain of 26S rRNA gene, C. thailandica (GeneBank accession no. AY228491) differs from Candida tsuchiyae, the nearest species, in 66 nucleotide substitutions (10%) and C. lignicola (GeneBank accession no. AY845350) differs from Candida coipomoensis, the nearest species, in nine nucleotides (1.6%). These two new species are clearly distinguished from their closest species by the assimilation of several carbon compounds.

  10. [Investigation of the correlation between biofilm forming ability of urinary Candida isolates with the use of urinary catheters and change of antifungal susceptibility in the presence of biofilm].

    PubMed

    Aslan, Hacer; Gülmez, Dolunay

    2016-04-01

    Frequency of Candida species causing urinary tract infections is increasing, and this increase is outstanding in nosocomial urinary tract infections especially in intensive care units. The ability of biofilm formation that is contributed to the virulence of the yeast, plays a role in the pathogenesis of biomaterial-related infections and also constitutes a risk for treatment failure. The aims of this study were to compare biofilm forming abilities of Candida strains isolated from urine cultures of patients with and without urinary catheters, and to investigate the change of antifungal susceptibility in the presence of biofilm. A total of 50 Candida strains isolated from urine cultures of 25 patients with urinary catheters (10 C.tropicalis, 6 C.glabrata, 4 C.albicans, 4 C.parapsilosis, 1 C.krusei) and 25 without urinary catheters (8 C.tropicalis, 6 C.albicans, 4 C.krusei, 3 C.parapsilosis, 2 C.kefyr, 1 C.glabrata, 1 C.lusitaniae) were included in the study. Biofilm forming ability was tested by Congo red agar (CRA) and microplate XTT [2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction methods. Fluconazole (FLU) and amphotericin B (AMP-B) susceptibilities of the isolates were determined by reference microdilution method recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute for planktonic cells and by XTT reduction assay in case of biofilm presence. Biofilm formation was detected in 12 (24%) by CRA and 50 (100%) of the isolates by XTT reduction method. None of the C.albicans (n= 10) and C.tropicalis (n= 18) strains were detected as biofilm positive by CRA, however, these strains were strongly positive by XTT reduction method. No statistically significant correlation was detected between the presence of urinary catheter and biofilm forming ability of the isolate (p> 0.05). This might be caused by the advantage of biofilm forming strains in adhesion to bladder mucosa at the initial stages of infection. For all of the isolates in

  11. Molecular Identification of Candida Species Isolated from Onychomycosis in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaobo; Ling, Bo; Yang, Xianwei; Liao, Wanqing; Pan, Weihua; Yao, Zhirong

    2015-12-01

    Candida is a common cause of onychomycosis, especially for fingernail onychomycosis. In this study, two simple PCR-based assays combined with the internal transcribed spacers sequencing were performed to reveal the prevalence of Candida species including emerging species in onychomycosis, and triazole antifungal susceptibility profiles for Candida species were also evaluated. Among 210 Candida strains isolated from onychomycosis, Candida parapsilosis was the most common species (54.3%), followed by C. albicans (23.3%) and C. metapsilosis (9.5%). However, C. metapsilosis became the second leading species in toenail onychomycosis and accounted for 19.5% of Candida isolates from toenail samples. C. nivariensis, an emerging species, was firstly recovered from a toenail sample. Other emerging species such as C. orthopsilosis, C. pararugosa and C. fabryi were also identified by molecular tools. C. metapsilosis isolates exhibited significantly higher fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentrations than those exhibited by C. parapsilosis and C. albicans (P < 0.001). This study provides insight into the prevalence, distribution and susceptibility profiles of Candida species including emerging Candida species in onychomycosis.

  12. Candida species diversity and antifungal susceptibility patterns in oral samples of HIV/AIDS patients in Baja California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Clark-Ordóñez, Isadora; Callejas-Negrete, Olga A; Aréchiga-Carvajal, Elva T; Mouriño-Pérez, Rosa R

    2016-09-14

    Candidiasis is the most common opportunistic fungal infection in HIV patients. The aims of this study were to identify the prevalence of carriers of Candida, Candida species diversity, and in vitro susceptibility to antifungal drugs. In 297 HIV/AIDS patients in Baja California, Mexico, Candida strains were identified by molecular methods (PCR-RFLP) from isolates of oral rinses of patients in Tijuana, Mexicali, and Ensenada. 56.3% of patients were colonized or infected with Candida In Tijuana, there was a significantly higher percentage of carriers (75.5%). Out of the 181 strains that were isolated, 71.8% were Candida albicans and 28.2% were non-albicans species. The most common non-albicans species was Candida tropicalis (12.2%), followed by Candida glabrata (8.3%), Candida parapsilosis (2.2%), Candida krusei (1.7%), and Candida guilliermondii (1.1%). Candida dubliniensis was not isolated. Two associated species were found in 11 patients. In Mexicali and Ensenada, there was a lower proportion of Candida carriers compared to other regions in Mexico and worldwide, however, in Tijuana, a border town with many peculiarities, a higher carrier rate was found. In this population, only a high viral load was associated with oral Candida carriers. Other factors such as gender, use of antiretroviral therapy, CD4(+) T-lymphocyte levels, time since diagnosis, and alcohol/ tobacco consumption, were not associated with Candida carriers.

  13. [Detection of phospholipidolytic Candida albicans isolated from saliva of children with Down's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Evandro L; Campos, C De Castro; Crespo, A M Costa; Castro, Jovirês S; Rocha, Frederico P; Alves, Marcella; Goulart, Mariella S; Cardoso, Cléver; Ferreira, Wesley; Naves, Plínio Lázaro; Soares, A José; Miranda, Simone R; Pimenta, Fabiana C

    2002-01-01

    The childhood is one of the most propitious period of the life to the occurrence of infection by yeasts of the genus Candida. In children with Down's syndrome, besides the predispose factors to bucal candidiasis; macroglossia, bucal muscular incompetence, frequent respiratory diseases, motor difficulty and immunologic deficit are mentioned as additional elements for this fungus disease. It was verified that the children attacked by this syndrome have much more strains of Candida than other children. The aim of this study was to detect the prevalence of phospholipase producer, Candida on the saliva of children with Down's syndrome. Candida albicans was the only identified specie of Candida. The phospholipase production was found in isolated strains from both of study and control. However, the isolated strains of the group of children with Down's syndrome have strongly present phospholipidolitic.

  14. Differential Recovery of Candida Species from Subgingival Sites in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive and Healthy Children from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Portela, M. B.; Souza, I. P. R.; Costa, E. M. M. B.; Hagler, A. N.; Soares, R. M. A.; Santos, A. L. S.

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of subgingival Candida species was studied in 52 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and 42 HIV-negative children. Candida was cultured from 22 (42.3%) and 3 (7.1%) HIV-infected and control children, respectively. C. albicans was the most common Candida species isolated from HIV-infected children, followed by C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, and C. tropicalis. In the HIV-positive group, the prevalence of Candida isolation was significantly higher in children who presented with low CD4+-T-lymphocyte counts, elevated viral loads, and gingivitis. PMID:15583343

  15. Multi-probe real-time PCR identification of four common Candida species in blood culture broth.

    PubMed

    Foongladda, Suporn; Mongkol, Nanthanida; Petlum, Pornphan; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2014-06-01

    We developed a single-tube real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with multiple hybridization probes for detecting Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. Primers were designed to amplify 18S rRNA gene of the genus Candida, and DNA probes were designed to hybridize two areas of the amplicons. The amplification curves and specific melting peaks of the probes hybridized with PCR product were used for definite species identifications. The reaction specificity was 100 % when evaluating the assay using DNA samples from 21 isolates of fungal and bacterial species. The assay was further evaluated in 129 fungal blood culture broth samples which were culture positive for fungus. Of the 129 samples, 119 were positively identified as: C. albicans (39), C. tropicalis (30), C. parapsilosis (23), C. glabrata (20), Candida spp. (5), and two samples containing mixed C. glabrata/C. albicans and C. glabrata/C. tropicalis. The five Candida spp. were identified by sequencing analysis as C. krusei, C. dubliniensis, C. aquaetextoris, and two isolates of C. athensensis. Of the ten samples which showed negative PCR results, six were Cryptococcus neoformans, and the others were Trichosporon sp., Rhodotorula sp., Fusarium sp., and Penicillium marneffei. Our findings show that the assay was highly effective in identifying the four medically important Candida species. The results can be available within 3 h after positivity of a blood culture broth sample.

  16. Activity of the aqueous extract of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi on strains of the Candida genus.

    PubMed

    Torres, Kátia Andrea de Menezes; Lima, Sônia Maria Rolim Rosa; Ueda, Suely Mitoi Ykko

    2016-12-01

    Objectives To evaluate the antifungal susceptibility profile of the aqueous extract of the bark of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi against the strains of the genus Candida. Methods By using the disk diffusion method, 50 samples of the genus Candida (Candida albicans; Candida krusei; Candida glabrata; and Candida tropicalis), isolated from patients receiving treatment at Hospital Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, and 1 American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) sample of each species were tested against: the isolated aqueous extract of the bark of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi, isolated nystatin, and the association of nystatin and the aqueous extract of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi. Results There were no significant differences regarding the different strains of Candida tested. In the presence of the aqueous extract of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi, no inhibition halo was visible. Isolated nystatin formed an inhibition halo measuring respectively 18.50 mm and 19.50 mm for the Candida albicans species and the others referred to as non-Candida albicans (Candida krusei; Candida glabrata; and Candida tropicalis). The association of nystatin and the aqueous extract of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi resulted in inhibition halos measuring 14.25 mm and 16.50 mm respectively. The comparisons of these results are statistically significant (p < 0,001). Conclusion The aqueous extract of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi showed no antifungal activity in vitro against the strains tested, whereas the association of nystatin and the aqueous extract of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi caused a decrease in the inhibition halo when compared with isolated nystatin.

  17. Oral Candida Isolates Colonizing or Infecting Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected and Healthy Persons in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio; Ortiz-López, Natalia Guadalupe; Villar, María; Moragues, María Dolores; Aguirre, José Manuel; Cashat-Cruz, Miguel; Lopez-Ribot, Jose Luis; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Quindós, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    Oral yeast carriage was studied in 312 Mexican subjects. Candida albicans was the most frequent species, but other Candida spp. were isolated from 16.5 to 38.5% of patients. Colonization did not correlate with CD4+ number or viral load, but highly active antiretroviral therapy reduced the frequency of candidiasis. Most isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, but 10.8% were resistant to one or more azoles. PMID:16081965

  18. Oral Candida isolates colonizing or infecting human immunodeficiency virus-infected and healthy persons in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio; Ortiz-López, Natalia Guadalupe; Villar, María; Moragues, María Dolores; Aguirre, José Manuel; Cashat-Cruz, Miguel; Lopez-Ribot, Jose Luis; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Quindós, Guillermo

    2005-08-01

    Oral yeast carriage was studied in 312 Mexican subjects. Candida albicans was the most frequent species, but other Candida spp. were isolated from 16.5 to 38.5% of patients. Colonization did not correlate with CD4+ number or viral load, but highly active antiretroviral therapy reduced the frequency of candidiasis. Most isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, but 10.8% were resistant to one or more azoles.

  19. Membrane Proteomics Analysis of the Candida glabrata Response to 5-Flucytosine: Unveiling the Role and Regulation of the Drug Efflux Transporters CgFlr1 and CgFlr2

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Pedro; Pires, Carla; Costa, Catarina; Okamoto, Michiyo; Chibana, Hiroji; Teixeira, Miguel C.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to 5-flucytosine (5-FC), used as an antifungal drug in combination therapy, compromises its therapeutic action. In this work, the response of the human pathogen Candida glabrata to 5-FC was evaluated at the membrane proteome level, using an iTRAQ-based approach. A total of 32 proteins were found to display significant expression changes in the membrane fraction of cells upon exposure to 5-FC, 50% of which under the control of CgPdr1, the major regulator of azole drug resistance. These proteins cluster into functional groups associated to cell wall assembly, lipid metabolism, amino acid/nucleotide metabolism, ribosome components and translation machinery, mitochondrial function, glucose metabolism, and multidrug resistance transport. Given the obtained indications, the function of the drug:H+ antiporters CgFlr1 (ORF CAGL0H06017g) and CgFlr2 (ORF CAGL0H06039g) was evaluated. The expression of both proteins, localized to the plasma membrane, was found to confer flucytosine resistance. CgFlr2 further confers azole drug resistance. The deletion of CgFLR1 or CgFLR2 was seen to increase the intracellular accumulation of 5-FC, or 5-FC and clotrimazole, suggesting that these transporters play direct roles in drug extrusion. The expression of CgFLR1 and CgFLR2 was found to be controlled by the transcription factors CgPdr1 and CgYap1, major regulator of oxidative stress resistance. PMID:28066366

  20. Evaluation of caspofungin susceptibility testing by the new Vitek 2 AST-YS06 yeast card using a unique collection of FKS wild-type and hot spot mutant isolates, including the five most common candida species.

    PubMed

    Astvad, Karen M; Perlin, David S; Johansen, Helle K; Jensen, Rasmus H; Arendrup, Maiken C

    2013-01-01

    FKS mutant isolates associated with breakthrough or failure cases are emerging in clinical settings. Discrimination of these from wild-type (wt) isolates in a routine laboratory setting is complicated. We evaluated the ability of caspofungin MIC determination using the new Vitek 2 AST-Y06 yeast susceptibility card to correctly identify the fks mutants from wt isolates and compared the performance to those of the CLSI and EUCAST reference methods. A collection of 98 Candida isolates, including 31 fks hot spot mutants, were included. Performance was evaluated using the FKS genotype as the "gold standard" and compared to those of the CLSI and EUCAST methodologies. The categorical agreement for Vitek 2 was 93.9%, compared to 88.4% for the CLSI method and 98.7% for the EUCAST method. Vitek 2 misclassified 19.4% (6/31) of the fks mutant isolates as susceptible, in contrast to <4% for each of the reference methods. The overall essential agreement between the CLSI method and Vitek 2 MICs was 92.6% (88/95) but was substantially lower for fks mutant isolates (78.6% [22/28]). Correct discrimination between susceptible and intermediate Candida glabrata isolates was not possible, as the revised species-specific susceptibility breakpoint was not included in the Vitek 2 detection range (MIC of ≤0.250 to ≥4 mg/liter). In conclusion, the Vitek 2 allowed correct categorization of all wt isolates as susceptible. However, despite an acceptable categorical agreement, it failed to reliably classify isolates harboring fks hot spot mutations as intermediate or resistant, which was in part due to the fact that the detection range did not span the susceptibility breakpoint for C. glabrata.

  1. Association of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization or infection with Candida isolation and selection of non-albicans species.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Spiliopoulou, Anastasia; Fligou, Fotini; Manolopoulou, Patroula; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Vrettos, Theofanis; Dodou, Vasiliki; Filos, Kriton S; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Marangos, Markos; Christofidou, Myrto

    2014-11-01

    Clinical specimens from 565 patients hospitalized in 2 intensive care units (ICUs A and B) during a 28-month period were cultured on appropriate media for isolation of Candida. Forty-nine (9%) patients had at least a Candida spp.-positive sample. Candida albicans was the predominant species isolated from 26 (53%) patients. Seventeen patients (3%) developed candidemia. Multivariate analysis showed that obesity, female gender, hospitalization during summer months, admission at ICU B, parenteral nutrition, administration of metronidazole, transplantation, and KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) infection were independently associated with Candida spp. isolation. Candidemia was associated with cortisone administration, KPC-Kp infection, and presence of colostomy or abdominal catheter. Administration of fluconazole was a protective factor for both Candida spp. isolation and infection, leading to selection of Candida non-albicans species. Among several risk factors, KPC-Kp infection and colonization are identified as statistically significant factors associated with Candida isolation, especially of non-albicans species.

  2. Comparison of the susceptibilities of clinical isolates of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to essential oils.

    PubMed

    Pozzatti, Patrícia; Loreto, Erico Silva; Lopes, Paulo Guilherme Markus; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2010-01-01

    Here, a microdilution technique based on the M27-A2 protocol (NCCLS, 2002) was employed to compare the susceptibilities of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to essential oils extracted from plants used as spices. The chemical compositions of the essential oils were defined based on the analysis of retention indices obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Taken together, the results showed that the activity of the compounds against the two species was similar.

  3. Systemic Candida infection in University hospital 1997-1999: the distribution of Candida biotypes and antifungal susceptibility patterns.

    PubMed

    Ng, K P; Saw, T L; Na, S L; Soo-Hoo, T S

    2001-01-01

    A total of 102 Candida species were isolated from blood cultures from January 1997 to October 1999. Using assimilation of carbohydrate test, 52 (51.0%) of the Candida sp. were identified as C. parapsilosis, 25.5% (26) were C. tropicalis. C. albicans made up 11.8% (12), 6.9% (7) were C. rugosa, 3.8% (4) C. glabrata and 1% (1) C. guilliermondii. No C. dubliniensis was found in the study. In vitro antifungal susceptibility tests showed that all Candida species were sensitive to nystatin, amphotericin B and ketoconazole. Although all isolates remained sensitive to fluconazole, intermediate susceptibility was found in 3 C. rugosa isolates. Antifungal agents with high frequency of resistance were econazole, clotrimazole, miconazole and 5-fluorocytosine. Candida species found to have resistance to these antifungal agents were non-C. albicans.

  4. Demineralizing potential of dental biofilm added with Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis isolated from preschool children with and without caries.

    PubMed

    Caroline de Abreu Brandi, Thayse; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Lima, Paula Moraes; Castro, Gloria Fernanda Barbosa de Araújo; Maia, Lucianne Cople; Fonseca-Gonçalves, Andréa

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the demineralizing potential of dental biofilm added of Candida albicans (CA) and Candida parapsilosis (CP), isolated from preschoolers with and without caries. Bovine enamel blocks (n = 48), with initial hardness = 341.50 ± 21,83 kg/mm(2) were fixed in 24 well plates containing culture media. A pool of children saliva (PHS) was the inoculum for biofilm formation in the presence or absence of isolated CA or CP in accordance with each group (G n = 8): G1 - PHS; G2 - PHS + CA isolated from children with caries; G3 - PHS + CP isolated from children with caries; G4 - PHS + CA isolated from children without caries; G5 - PHS + CP isolated from children without caries; and G6 - blank control. The plates were incubated at 37 °C for 5 days, with daily changes of culture media. The microhardness loss percentage (MHL%) of the blocks was calculated, taking in account the hardness values before and after the experiment. Dental biofilm became more cariogenic, independently of the isolated Candida species. The highest MHL% was observed in G4 (85.90 ± 8.72%) and G5 (86.13 ± 6.74%) compared to the others (p < 0.001): G1 (34.30 ± 14,30%) < G2 (59.40 ± 10.56%) and G3 (65.80 ± 6.36%) < G6 (13.68 ± 4.86%) (p < 0.001). C. albicans and C. parapsilosis isolates induced the demineralization of the dental enamel.

  5. Susceptibility of Candida spp. isolated from blood cultures as evaluated using the M27-A3 and new M27-S4 approved breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Santos, Edileusa Rosa dos; Dal Forno, Camila F; Hernandez, Mari Glei; Kubiça, Thaís Felli; Venturini, Tarcieli P; Chassot, Francieli; Santurio, Janio M; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality rates associated with candidemia episodes and the emergence of resistance to antifungal agents necessitate the monitoring of the susceptibility of fungal isolates to antifungal treatments. The new, recently approved, species-specific clinical breakpoints (SS-CBPs)(M27-S4) for evaluating susceptibility require careful interpretation and comparison with the former proposals made using the M27-A3 breakpoints, both from CLSI. This study evaluated the susceptibility of the different species of Candida that were isolated from candidemias based on these two clinical breakpoints. Four hundred and twenty-two isolates were identified and, among them, C. parapsilosis comprised 46.68%, followed by C. albicans (35.78%), C. tropicalis (9.71%), C. glabrata (3.55%), C. lusitaniae (1.65%), C. guilliermondii (1.65%) and C. krusei (0.94%). In accordance with the M27-A3 criteria, 33 (7.81%) non-susceptible isolates were identified, of which 16 (3.79%) were resistant to antifungal agents. According to SS-CBPs, 80 (18.95%) isolates were non-susceptible, and 10 (2.36%) of these were drug resistant. When the total number of non-susceptible isolates was considered, the new SS-CBPs detected 2.4 times the number of isolates that were detected using the M27-A3 interpretative criteria. In conclusion, the detection of an elevated number of non-susceptible species has highlighted the relevance of evaluating susceptibility tests using new, species-specific clinical breakpoints (SS-CBPs), which could impact the profile of non-susceptible Candida spp. to antifungal agents that require continuous susceptibility monitoring.

  6. Elevated chitin content reduces the susceptibility of Candida species to caspofungin.

    PubMed

    Walker, Louise A; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A

    2013-01-01

    The echinocandin antifungal drugs inhibit synthesis of the major fungal cell wall polysaccharide β(1,3)-glucan. Echinocandins have good efficacy against Candida albicans but reduced activity against other Candida species, in particular Candida parapsilosis and Candida guilliermondii. Treatment of Candida albicans with a sub-MIC level of caspofungin has been reported to cause a compensatory increase in chitin content and to select for sporadic echinocandin-resistant FKS1 point mutants that also have elevated cell wall chitin. Here we show that elevated chitin in response to caspofungin is a common response in various Candida species. Activation of chitin synthesis was observed in isolates of C. albicans, Candida tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii and in some isolates of Candida krusei in response to caspofungin treatment. However, Candida glabrata isolates demonstrated no exposure-induced change in chitin content. Furthermore, isolates of C. albicans, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii which were stimulated to have higher chitin levels via activation of the calcineurin and protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways had reduced susceptibility to caspofungin. Isolates containing point mutations in the FKS1 gene generally had higher chitin levels and did not demonstrate a further compensatory increase in chitin content in response to caspofungin treatment. These results highlight the potential of increased chitin synthesis as a potential mechanism of tolerance to caspofungin for the major pathogenic Candida species.

  7. Photodynamic inactivation of virulence factors of Candida strains isolated from patients with denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Domingues, Nádia; Silva, Michelle Peneluppi; Costa, Anna Carolina Borges Pereira; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2015-12-01

    Candida species are major microorganisms isolated in denture stomatitis (DS), an inflammatory process of the mucosa underlying removable dental prostheses, and express a variety of virulence factors that can increase their pathogenicity. The potential of Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) in planktonic culture, biofilms and virulence factors of Candida strains was evaluated. A total of 48 clinical Candida isolates from individuals wearing removable maxillary prostheses with DS were included in the study. The effects of erythrosine (ER, 200 μM) and a green LED (λ 532 ± 10 nm, 237 mW/cm(2) and 42.63 J/cm(2)) in a planktonic culture were evaluated. The effect of the addition of ER at a concentration of 400 μM together with a green LED was evaluated in biofilms. The virulence factors of all of the Candida strains were evaluated before and after the PDI process in cells derived from biofilm and planktonic assays. All of the Candida species were susceptible to ER and green LED. However, the biofilm structures were more resistant to PDI than the planktonic cultures. PDI also promoted slight reductions in most of the virulence factors of C. albicans and some of the Candida tropicalis strains. These results suggest that the addition of PDI is effective for reducing yeasts and may also reduce the virulence of certain Candida species and decrease their pathogenicity.

  8. Molecular Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Clinical Isolates of the Candida rugosa Species Complex and Proposal of the New Species Candida neorugosa

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Katihuska; Sutton, Deanna A.; Cano, Josep; Fothergill, Annette W.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Zhang, Sean; Watkins, Jeffrey P.

    2012-01-01

    Candida rugosa is a poorly known fungal species occasionally involved in human infections. A molecular analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domains and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal genes of 24 clinical isolates phenotypically identified as C. rugosa demonstrated that only 10 (41.6%) isolates belonged to that species. The other isolates were identified as Candida pararugosa (41.6%) and Candida pseudorugosa (8.3%). The remaining two isolates, from human and equine infections, respectively, were clearly different from the others and represent a new species proposed here as Candida neorugosa. The closest species by D1/D2 sequences was the type strain of C. rugosa, with only 92.3% similarity. C. neorugosa can also be differentiated from all other species of the C. rugosa complex by phenotypic features. The eight antifungal drugs tested showed high in vitro activity against the 24 isolates included in the study. PMID:22553236

  9. Killer activity of yeasts isolated from natural environments against some medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Vadkertiová, Renata; Sláviková, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five yeast cultures, mainly of human origin, belonging to four pathogenic yeast species--Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis were tested for their sensitivity to ten basidiomycetous and eleven ascomycetous yeast species isolated from the water and soil environments and from tree leaves. The best killer activity among basidiomycetous species was exhibited by Rhodotorula glutinis, and R. mucilaginosa. The other carotenoid producing species Cystofilobasidium capitatum, Sporobolomyces salmonicolor, and S. roseus were active only against about 40% of the tested strains and exhibited weak activity. The broadest killer activity among ascomycetous yeasts was shown by the strains Pichia anomala and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. The species Debaryomyces castellii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia membranifaciens, and Williopsis californica did not show any killer activity. The best killer activity exhibited the strains isolated from leafy material. The lowest activity pattern was found among strains originating from soil environment.

  10. In vitro efficacy of liposomal amphotericin B, micafungin and fluconazole against non-albicans Candida species biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Akira; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2015-09-01

    Non-albicans Candida species are being isolated with increasing frequency. In this study, biofilm formation by Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata was evaluated and the activities of liposomal amphotericin B (LAB), micafungin (MFG) and fluconazole (FLC) against these biofilms were assessed using a clinically relevant in vitro model system. LAB exhibited strong activities against the three non-albicans Candida species and showed dose-dependent efficacy. MFG displayed a paradoxical growth effect against the C. tropicalis biofilm. FLC was ineffective for non-albicans biofilms. This study shows that Candida biofilms have unique susceptibility to LAB. The dose-dependent effects of LAB indicate that this drug may be a useful treatment for biofilm formation by non-albicans Candida species in cases in which the catheter cannot be removed for clinical reasons.

  11. Restriction enzyme analysis of ribosomal DNA shows that Candida inconspicua clinical isolates can be misidentified as Candida norvegensis with traditional diagnostic procedures.

    PubMed

    Majoros, L; Kardos, G; Belák, A; Maráz, A; Asztalos, L; Csánky, E; Barta, Z; Szabó, B

    2003-11-01

    We identified 29 yeast isolates from 22 patients using the API ID32C panel. Twenty-eight of these isolates were Candida norvegensis and one was C. inconspicua. Although C. norvegensis is considered a pseudohypha-producing species, only one isolate produced pseudohyphae. Restriction enzyme analysis of PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA with four different enzymes proved that all isolates were C. inconspicua.

  12. Time to overcome fluconazole resistant Candida isolates: Solid lipid nanoparticles as a novel antifungal drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Moazeni, Maryam; Kelidari, Hamid Reza; Saeedi, Majid; Morteza-Semnani, Ketayoun; Nabili, Mojtaba; Gohar, Atefeh Abdollahi; Akbari, Jafar; Lotfali, Ensieh; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Antifungal therapy results in complications in management due to changes in the patterns of epidemiology and drug susceptibility of invasive fungal infections. In this study, we prepared fluconazole-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (FLZ-SLNs) and investigated the efficacy of the optimal formulation on fluconazole (FLZ)-resistant strains of several Candida species. FLZ-SLN was produced using probe ultrasonication techniques. The morphology of the obtained SLNs was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The minimum inhibitory concentrations for the new formulations against fluconazole-resistant strains of Candida were investigated using CLSI document M27-A3. The FLZ-SLNs presented a spherical shape with a mean diameter, zeta potential and entrapment efficiency of 84.8nm, -25mV and 89.6%, respectively. The drug release from FLZ-SLNs exhibited burst release behaviour at the initial stage (the first 30min) followed by a sustained release over 24h FLZ-resistant yeast strains behaved as susceptible strains after treatment with FLZ-SLNs (≤8μg/ml). The MIC50 drug concentrations were 2μg/ml, 1μg/ml and 2μg/ml for FLZ-resistant strains of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata, respectively. In this study, we evaluated novel delivery systems for combating Candida strains that exhibit low susceptibility against the conventional formulation of FLZ as a first-line treatment.

  13. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida albicans and its related species Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana isolated from vulvovaginal samples in a hospital of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Theill, Laura; Dudiuk, Catiana; Morano, Susana; Gamarra, Soledad; Nardin, María Elena; Méndez, Emilce; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Candida africana taxonomical status is controversial. It was proposed as a separate species within the Candida albicans species complex; however, phylogenetic analyses suggested that it is an unusual variety of C. albicans. The prevalence of C. albicans-related species (Candida dubliniensis and C. africana) as vulvovaginal pathogens is not known in Argentina. Moreover, data on antifungal susceptibility of isolates causing vulvovaginal candidiasis is scarce. The aims of this study were to establish the prevalence of C. dubliniensis and C. africana in vaginal samples and to evaluate the antifungal susceptibilities of vaginal C. albicans species complex strains. We used a molecular-based method coupled with a new pooled DNA extraction methodology to differentiate C. dubliniensis and C. africana in a collection of 287 strains originally identified as C. albicans isolated from an Argentinian hospital during 2013. Antifungal susceptibilities to fluconazole, clotrimazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, nystatin, amphotericin B and terbinafine were evaluated by using the CLSI M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Of the 287 isolates, 4 C. dubliniensis and one C. africana strains (1.39% and 0.35% prevalence, respectively) were identified. This is the first description of C. africana in Argentina and its identification was confirmed by sequencing the ITS2 region and the hwp1 gene. C. dubliniensis and C. africana strains showed very low MIC values for all the tested antifungals. Fluconazole-reduced-susceptibility and azole cross-resistance were observed in 3.55% and 1.41% of the C. albicans isolates, respectively. These results demonstrate that antifungal resistance is still a rare phenomenon in this kind of isolates.

  14. Antifungal Activity of Cinnamon Oil and Olive Oil against Candida Spp. Isolated from Blood Stream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rohilla, Hina; Singh, Gajender; Punia, Parul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recently non-albicans Candida has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in blood stream infections. Some species of the Candida are becoming increasingly resistant to first line and second line antifungals such as echinocandins and fluconazole. In view of increasing global antifungal resistance, role of alternative and better antifungals like natural plant products need to be explored. Essential oils are known to exhibit antimicrobial activity against various fungi. Hence, we evaluated the efficacy of cinnamon oil and olive oil against Candida spp. Aim To evaluate the invitro antifungal activity of olive oil and cinnamon oil against blood stream Candida isolates. Materials and Methods The present prospective observational study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology at a tertiary care teaching hospital during one year June 2011-July 2012. Blood samples were collected from 1376 patients clinically suspected to have fungal septicaemia, out of which 100 (7.2%) Candida isolates obtained, were speciated by conventional methods. Antifungal susceptibility testing of all the isolates was done against fluconazole, voriconazole as per NCCL (M27-A2) and against olive oil and cinnamon oil by agar well diffusion method. Results Prevalence of Candidemia was 7.26%. C. albicans (85.3%) and C. parapsilosis (85.7%) were most sensitive to fluconazole followed by C. tropicalis (67.4%). All isolates were 100% sensitive to voriconazole. Both oils were found to be effective against nearly 50% of the Candida isolates. About 55.5% of fluconazole resistant C. krusei strains were sensitive to olive and cinnamon oil. Conclusion Fluconazole resistant non-albicans Candida has emerged as major cause of Candidemia. Cinnamon and olive oil show marked sensitivity against albicans and non-albicans spp. PMID:27656437

  15. Prospective Multicenter Study of the Epidemiology, Molecular Identification, and Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis Isolated from Patients with Candidemia ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cantón, Emilia; Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo; Eraso, Elena; Miranda-Zapico, Ilargi; Álvarez, María; Merino, Paloma; Campos-Herrero, Isolina; Marco, Francesc; de la Pedrosa, Elia Gomez G.; Yagüe, Genoveva; Guna, Remedios; Rubio, Carmen; Miranda, Consuelo; Pazos, Carmen; Velasco, David

    2011-01-01

    A 13-month prospective multicenter study including 44 hospitals was carried out to evaluate the epidemiology of Candida parapsilosis complex candidemia in Spain. Susceptibility to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin was tested by the microdilution colorimetric method. A total of 364 C. parapsilosis complex isolates were identified by molecular methods: C. parapsilosis (90.7%), Candida orthopsilosis (8.2%), and Candida metapsilosis (1.1%). Most candidemias (C. parapsilosis, 76.4%; C. orthopsilosis, 70.0%; C. metapsilosis, 100%) were observed in adults. No C. orthopsilosis or C. metapsilosis candidemias occurred in neonates. C. parapsilosis was most frequent in adult intensive care unit (28.8%), surgery (20.9%), and internal medicine (19.7%) departments; and C. orthopsilosis was most frequent in hematology (28.6%), pediatrics (12.0%), and neonatology (11.5%) departments. The geographic distribution of C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis was not uniform. According to CLSI clinical breakpoints, all C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis isolates were susceptible to the nine agents tested. Resistance (MICs > 1 mg/liter) was observed only in C. parapsilosis: amphotericin B, posaconazole, itraconazole, and caspofungin (0.3% each), anidulafungin (1.9%), and micafungin (2.5%). Applying the new species-specific fluconazole and echinocandin breakpoints, the rates of resistance to fluconazole for C. parapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis increased to 4.8% and 0.3%, respectively; conversely, for C. parapsilosis they shifted from 1.9 to 0.6% (anidulafungin) and from 2.5 to 0.6% (micafungin). Our study confirms the different prevalence of C. parapsilosis complex candidemia among age groups: neither C. orthopsilosis nor C. metapsilosis was isolated from neonates; interestingly, C. metapsilosis was isolated only from adults and the elderly. The disparity in antifungal susceptibility among species

  16. Candida sergipensis, a new asexual yeast species isolated from frozen pulps of tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Rita C; Resende, Maria A; Pimenta, Raphael S; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2004-07-01

    Sixteen strains of the new yeast species Candida sergipensis have been isolated from frozen pulps of the tropical fruits umbú ( Spondias tuberosa Avr. Cam.) and mangaba ( Hancornia speciosa Gom.). Candida sergipensis was one of the prevalent species in the yeast community of these substrates. The new asexual ascomycetous yeast is phylogenetically related to Candida spandovensis and Candida sorbophila, species belonging to the Wickerhamiella clade, as evidenced by the sequences of the D1/D2 domains of their large subunit ribosomal DNAs. The species C. sergipensis and C. spandovensis can be separated on the basis of growth on 50% glucose agar, xylose and succinate, negative for the first species and positive for the second. The type culture is strain UFMG-R188 (CBS 9567).

  17. Comparative Pathogenicity of United Kingdom Isolates of the Emerging Pathogen Candida auris and Other Key Pathogenic Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, Adrien; Johnson, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida auris, first described in 2009, has since emerged as an important, multidrug-resistant, nosocomial agent of candidemia, with large outbreaks reported worldwide and high mortality rates associated with therapeutic failure. The current study employed C. auris isolates from a variety of centers in the United Kingdom to evaluate the pathogenicity of this emerging pathogen compared to that of other common pathogenic yeast species in the invertebrate Galleria mellonella infection model. We showed that C. auris isolates differ in their growth characteristics in vitro, with a proportion of isolates failing to release daughter cells after budding, resulting in the formation of large aggregates of cells that cannot be physically disrupted. Our results also demonstrate strain-specific differences in the behavior of C. auris in G. mellonella, with the aggregate-forming isolates exhibiting significantly less pathogenicity than their nonaggregating counterparts. Importantly, the nonaggregating isolates exhibited pathogenicity comparable to that of C. albicans, which is currently accepted as the most pathogenic member of the genus, despite the fact that C. auris isolates do not produce hyphae and produce only rudimentary pseudohyphae either in vitro or in G. mellonella. IMPORTANCE The incidence of invasive candidiasis, which includes candidemia and deep tissue infections, continues to rise and is associated with considerable mortality rates. Candida albicans remains the most common cause of invasive candidiasis, although the prevalence of non-albicans species has increased over recent years. Since its first description in 2009, Candida auris has emerged as a serious nosocomial health risk, with widespread outbreaks in numerous hospitals worldwide. However, despite receiving considerable attention, little is known concerning the pathogenicity of this emerging fungal pathogen. Here, using the Galleria mellonella insect systemic infection model, we show

  18. Antifungal susceptibility and molecular typing of 115 Candida albicans isolates obtained from vulvovaginal candidiasis patients in 3 Shanghai maternity hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chunmei; Zhang, Hongju; Tang, Zhenhua; Chen, Huifen; Gao, Jing; Yue, Chaoyan

    2016-05-01

    In our multicenter study, we studied the distribution of Candida species in vulvovaginal candidiasis patients and investigated antifungal susceptibility profile and genotype of Candida albicans in vaginal swab. A total of 115 Candida albicans strains were detected in 135 clinical isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration determinations showed that 83% and 81% of the 115 Candida albicans strains were susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD) was applied to identify clonally related isolates from different patients at the local level. All tested strains were classified into genotype A (77.4%), genotype B (18.3%), and genotype C (4.3%). Genotype A was further classified into five subtypes and genotype B into two subtypes.Candida albicans was the dominant pathogen of vulvovaginal candidiasis, the majority belonging to genotype A in this study. Exposure to azoles is a risk factor for the emergence of azole resistance among Candida albicans isolated from VVC patients.

  19. Portrait of Candida Species Biofilm Regulatory Network Genes.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Daniela; Henriques, Mariana; Silva, Sónia

    2017-01-01

    Most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to Candida albicans, but Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis, designated as non-C. albicans Candida (NCAC), have been identified as frequent human pathogens. Moreover, Candida biofilms are an escalating clinical problem associated with significant rates of mortality. Biofilms have distinct developmental phases, including adhesion/colonisation, maturation and dispersal, controlled by complex regulatory networks. This review discusses recent advances regarding Candida species biofilm regulatory network genes, which are key components for candidiasis.

  20. In vitro activities of natural products against oral Candida isolates from denture wearers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Candida-associated denture stomatitis is a frequent infectious disease. Treatment of this oral condition is difficult because failures and recurrences are common. The aim of this study was to test the in vitro antifungal activity of pure constituents of essentials oils. Methods Eight terpenic derivatives (carvacrol, farnesol, geraniol, linalool, menthol, menthone, terpinen-4-ol, and α-terpineol), a phenylpropanoid (eugenol), a phenethyl alcohol (tyrosol) and fluconazole were evaluated against 38 Candida isolated from denture-wearers and 10 collection Candida strains by the CLSI M27-A3 broth microdilution method. Results Almost all the tested compounds showed antifungal activity with MIC ranges of 0.03-0.25% for eugenol and linalool, 0.03-0.12% for geraniol, 0.06-0.5% for menthol, α-terpineol and terpinen-4-ol, 0.03-0.5% for carvacrol, and 0.06-4% for menthone. These compounds, with the exception of farnesol, menthone and tyrosol, showed important in vitro activities against the fluconazole-resistant and susceptible-dose dependent Candida isolates. Conclusions Carvacrol, eugenol, geraniol, linalool and terpinen-4-ol were very active in vitro against oral Candida isolates. Their fungistatic and fungicidal activities might convert them into promising alternatives for the topic treatment of oral candidiasis and denture stomatitis. PMID:22118215

  1. Evaluation of the New Micronaut-Candida System Compared to the API ID32C Method for Yeast Identification▿

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Z.; Tóth, B.; Kovács, M.; Kardos, G.; Maráz, A.; Rozgonyi, F.; Majoros, L.

    2008-01-01

    A new system, Micronaut-Candida, was compared to API ID32C to identify 264 yeast (Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. inconspicua, C. norvegensis, C. lusitaniae, C. guilliermondii, C. dubliniensis, C. pulcherrima, C. famata, C. rugosa, C. glabrata, C. kefyr, C. lipolytica, C. catenulata, C. neoformans, Geotrichum and Trichosporon species, Rhodotorula glutinis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) clinical isolates. Results were in concordance in 244 cases. Eighteen out of the 20 of discordant results were correctly identified by Micronaut-Candida but not by API ID32C, as confirmed by PCR ribotyping. PMID:18322057

  2. Evaluation of the new Micronaut-Candida system compared to the API ID32C method for yeast identification.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Z; Tóth, B; Kovács, M; Kardos, G; Maráz, A; Rozgonyi, F; Majoros, L

    2008-05-01

    A new system, Micronaut-Candida, was compared to API ID32C to identify 264 yeast (Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. inconspicua, C. norvegensis, C. lusitaniae, C. guilliermondii, C. dubliniensis, C. pulcherrima, C. famata, C. rugosa, C. glabrata, C. kefyr, C. lipolytica, C. catenulata, C. neoformans, Geotrichum and Trichosporon species, Rhodotorula glutinis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) clinical isolates. Results were in concordance in 244 cases. Eighteen out of the 20 of discordant results were correctly identified by Micronaut-Candida but not by API ID32C, as confirmed by PCR ribotyping.

  3. Effect of Eugenol on Cell Surface Hydrophobicity, Adhesion, and Biofilm of Candida tropicalis and Candida dubliniensis Isolated from Oral Cavity of HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Suelen Balero; Bartelli, Thais Fernanda; Di Raimo, Vanessa; Santos, Jussevania Pereira; Morey, Alexandre Tadachi; Bosini, Marina Andrea; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie

    2014-01-01

    Most Candida spp. infections are associated with biofilm formation on host surfaces. Cells within these communities display a phenotype resistant to antimicrobials and host defenses, so biofilm-associated infections are difficult to treat, representing a source of reinfections. The present study evaluated the effect of eugenol on the adherence properties and biofilm formation capacity of Candida dubliniensis and Candida tropicalis isolated from the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients. All isolates were able to form biofilms on different substrate surfaces. Eugenol showed inhibitory activity against planktonic and sessile cells of Candida spp. No metabolic activity in biofilm was detected after 24 h of treatment. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that eugenol drastically reduced the number of sessile cells on denture material surfaces. Most Candida species showed hydrophobic behavior and a significant difference in cell surface hydrophobicity was observed after exposure of planktonic cells to eugenol for 1 h. Eugenol also caused a significant reduction in adhesion of most Candida spp. to HEp-2 cells and to polystyrene. These findings corroborate the effectiveness of eugenol against Candida species other than C. albicans, reinforcing its potential as an antifungal applied to limit both the growth of planktonic cells and biofilm formation on different surfaces.

  4. [Comparison of Phoenix™ Yeast ID Panel and API® ID 32C commercial systems for the identification of Candida species isolated from clinical samples].

    PubMed

    Gayibova, Ülkü; Dalyan Cılo, Burcu; Ağca, Harun; Ener, Beyza

    2014-07-01

    Opportunistic fungal pathogens are one of the important causes of nosocomial infections, and several different types of yeasts, especially Candida species are increasingly recovered from immunocompromised patients. Since many of the yeasts are resistant to the commonly used antifungal agents, the introduction of appropriate therapy depends on rapid and accurate identification. The aims of this study were to compare the commercial identification systems namely API® ID 32C (bioMerieux, France) and Phoenix™ Yeast ID Panel (Becton Dickinson Diagnostics, USA) for the identification of Candida species and to evaluate the effect of morphological findings in the identification process. A total of 211 yeast strains isolated from different clinical samples (111 urine, 34 blood/vascular catheter, 27 upper/lower respiratory tract, 16 abscess/pus, 13 throat/vagina swabs and 10 sterile body fluids) of 137 patients hospitalized in Uludag University Health and Research Center between October 2013 to January 2014, were included in the study. Samples were cultured on blood agar, chromogenic agar (CHROMagar Candida, BD, USA) and Saboraud's dextrose agar (SDA), and isolated yeast colonies were evaluated with germ tube test and morphological examination by microscopy on cornmeal/Tween-80 agar. The isolates were identified as well by two commercial systems according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Discrepant results between the systems were tried to be resolved by using morphological characteristics of the yeasts. Of the isolates 159 were identified identical by both of the systems, and the concordance between those systems were estimated as 75.4%. According to the concordant identification, the most frequently isolated species was C.albicans (44.1%) followed by C.tropicalis (9.9%), C.glabrata (9.5%), C.parapsilosis (8.5%) and C.kefyr (8.1%). The concordance rate was 81.7% in identification of frequently isolated species (C.albicans, C.tropicalis, C.parapsilosis, C.glabrata, C

  5. Comparison Between Biofilm Production, Phospholipase and Haemolytic Activity of Different Species of Candida Isolated from Dental Caries Lesions in Children

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Neetha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction C.albicans is the most commonly isolated fungal pathogen in the oral cavity, but isolation of non-albicans Candida is increasing in recent years. We wish to demonstrate the virulence factors of Candida spp. isolated from the dental caries lesion of the children as presence of virulence factors determines the pathogenic potential of any microorganism. Aim To compare biofilm production, phospholipase and haemolytic activity of C.albicans with that of non-albicans species of Candida isolated from dental caries lesions of children to evaluate the role of non- albicans species of Candida in formation of dental caries. Materials and Methods Oral swabs were collected from caries lesion of 100 school children of age 5-10 years with dental caries. Candida isolates were tested for biofilm production, phospholipase and haemolytic activity. Statistical analysis was done by Chi-Square test and Mann-Whitney U test wherever applicable using SPSS version 11.5. Results Out of the 100 children with dental caries 37 were positive for Candida by smear or culture and 31 by culture. C.albicans was the most prevalent isolate followed by C.krusei, C.tropicalis and C.albicans. Out of 21 C.albicans isolates, 10 (47.6%) showed phospholipase activity and 18 (85.71%) produced biofilm. Of the 10 non-albicans strains, 5 (50%) showed phospholipase activity and 6 (60%) produced biofilm. All isolates of Candida produced haemolysin (100%). Conclusion There was no statistically relevant difference between the virulence factor production by C.albicans and non-albicans species of Candida. In other words, our study shows that both C.albicans and non-albicans species of Candida isolated from caries lesions of the children, produce these virulence factors. So we can say that non-albicans species of Candida also are involved in caries formation. PMID:27190803

  6. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Candida albicans Isolates by Use of PNA FISHFlow▿

    PubMed Central

    Trnovsky, Jan; Merz, William; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Wu, Fann; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Stender, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We developed the simple, rapid (1 h), and accurate PNA FISHFlow method for the identification of Candida albicans. The method exploits unique in solution in situ hybridization conditions under which the cells are simultaneously fixed and hybridized. This method facilitates the accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates using two scoring techniques: flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18287325

  7. Isolation of Candida albicans and halophilic Vibrio spp. from aquatic birds in Connecticut and Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, J D

    1990-01-01

    Halophilic vibrios were recovered from feces of six types of aquatic birds (gulls, pelicans, Canada geese, swans, egrets, cormorants) from Connecticut and/or Florida shorelines. Candida albicans was isolated from gulls and Canada geese in Connecticut and from gulls and cormorants in Florida. PMID:2180374

  8. Identification of Candida Species Isolated from Renal Transplant Recipients with Candiduria

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, M. R.; Foroughifar, E.; Mohammadi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal transplantation has long been considered the gold standard medical care for patients with end-stage renal disease. Candiduria continue to be a significant complication for renal transplant recipients. The risk of infections depends on the amount of immunosuppression and exposure to the potential pathogens. Objective: Molecular identification of Candida species isolated from renal transplant recipients with candiduria. Methods: Between 2009 and 2014, 62 Candida isolates were collected from 485 renal transplant recipients. All isolates were identified by PCR-RFLP profiles after digestion with the restriction enzyme MspI. Results: C. albicans (44%) and C. parapsilosis complex (5%) had the most and the least prevalence, respectively. Male to female ratio was 26/36, ranging in age from 19 to 62 years. Conclusion: Due to the fact that candiduria is connected with increased mortality in renal transplant recipients, precise identification of Candida species by molecular techniques can lead to an appropriate therapy among high risk patients. C. albicans remains the most prevalent species isolated from renal transplant recipients, Nevertheless, the number of non-C. albicans Candida species looks to be emerging. PMID:28078059

  9. Candida aechmeae sp. nov. and Candida vrieseae sp. nov., novel yeast species isolated from the phylloplane of bromeliads in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Landell, Melissa Fontes; Billodre, Raisa; Ramos, Jesus P; Leoncini, Orílio; Vainstein, Marilene H; Valente, Patrícia

    2010-01-01

    Two novel yeast species, Candida aechmeae sp. nov. and Candida vrieseae sp. nov., were isolated from bromeliads in Itapuã Park, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. These species are genetically isolated from all other currently recognized ascomycetous yeasts based on their sequence divergence in the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rRNA gene. C. aechmeae sp. nov. is phylogenetically close to Candida ubatubensis, a species also isolated from bromeliads in Brazil, but the novel species can be differentiated on the basis of differences in the D1/D2 domain and positive results for the assimilation of l-arabinose, raffinose, inulin and citrate. Candida vrieseae sp. nov. is phylogenetically placed in a clade near Candida membranifaciens that is composed of several species associated with insects, but the novel species can be differentiated from them by the D1/D2 and ITS gene sequences, positive results for the assimilation of nitrite and a negative result for the assimilation of ethylamine. The type strain for Candida aechmeae sp. nov. is BI153(T) (=CBS 10831(T)=NRRL Y-48456(T)) and the type strain for C. vrieseae sp. nov. is BI146(T) (=CBS 10829(T)=NRRL Y-48461(T)).

  10. In vitro antimicrobial properties of coconut oil on Candida species in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogbolu, D O; Oni, A A; Daini, O A; Oloko, A P

    2007-06-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance, coupled with the availability of fewer antifungal agents with fungicidal actions, prompted this present study to characterize Candida species in our environment and determine the effectiveness of virgin coconut oil as an antifungal agent on these species. In 2004, 52 recent isolates of Candida species were obtained from clinical specimens sent to the Medical Microbiology Laboratory, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Their susceptibilities to virgin coconut oil and fluconazole were studied by using the agar-well diffusion technique. Candida albicans was the most common isolate from clinical specimens (17); others were Candida glabrata (nine), Candida tropicalis (seven), Candida parapsilosis (seven), Candida stellatoidea (six), and Candida krusei (six). C. albicans had the highest susceptibility to coconut oil (100%), with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 25% (1:4 dilution), while fluconazole had 100% susceptibility at an MIC of 64 microg/mL (1:2 dilution). C. krusei showed the highest resistance to coconut oil with an MIC of 100% (undiluted), while fluconazole had an MIC of > 128 microg/mL. It is noteworthy that coconut oil was active against species of Candida at 100% concentration compared to fluconazole. Coconut oil should be used in the treatment of fungal infections in view of emerging drug-resistant Candida species.

  11. Restriction Enzyme Analysis of Ribosomal DNA Shows that Candida inconspicua Clinical Isolates Can Be Misidentified as Candida norvegensis with Traditional Diagnostic Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Majoros, L.; Kardos, G.; Belák, Á.; Maráz, A.; Asztalos, L.; Csánky, E.; Barta, Z.; Szabó, B.

    2003-01-01

    We identified 29 yeast isolates from 22 patients using the API ID32C panel. Twenty-eight of these isolates were Candida norvegensis and one was C. inconspicua. Although C. norvegensis is considered a pseudohypha-producing species, only one isolate produced pseudohyphae. Restriction enzyme analysis of PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA with four different enzymes proved that all isolates were C. inconspicua. PMID:14605175

  12. Antifungal Susceptibilities of Candida Species Causing Vulvovaginitis and Epidemiology of Recurrent Cases

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Sandra S.; Galask, Rudolph P.; Messer, Shawn A.; Hollis, Richard J.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Pfaller, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    There are limited data regarding the antifungal susceptibility of yeast causing vulvovaginal candidiasis, since cultures are rarely performed. Susceptibility testing was performed on vaginal yeast isolates collected from January 1998 to March 2001 from 429 patients with suspected vulvovaginal candidiasis. The charts of 84 patients with multiple positive cultures were reviewed. The 593 yeast isolates were Candida albicans (n = 420), Candida glabrata (n = 112), Candida parapsilosis (n = 30), Candida krusei (n = 12), Saccharomyces cerevisiae ( n = 9), Candida tropicalis (n = 8), Candida lusitaniae (n = 1), and Trichosporon sp. (n = 1). Multiple species suggesting mixed infection were isolated from 27 cultures. Resistance to fluconazole and flucytosine was observed infrequently (3.7% and 3.0%); 16.2% of isolates were resistant to itraconazole (MIC ≥ 1 μg/ml). The four imidazoles (econazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, and ketoconazole) were active: 94.3 to 98.5% were susceptible at ≤1 μg/ml. Among different species, elevated fluconazole MICs (≥16 μg/ml) were only observed in C. glabrata (15.2% resistant [R], 51.8% susceptible-dose dependent [S-DD]), C. parapsilosis (3.3% S-DD), S. cerevisiae (11.1% S-DD), and C. krusei (50% S-DD, 41.7% R, considered intrinsically fluconazole resistant). Resistance to itraconazole was observed among C. glabrata (74.1%), C. krusei (58.3%), S. cerevisiae (55.6%), and C. parapsilosis (3.4%). Among 84 patients with recurrent episodes, non-albicans species were more common (42% versus 20%). A ≥4-fold rise in fluconazole MIC was observed in only one patient with C. parapsilosis. These results support the use of azoles for empirical therapy of uncomplicated candidal vulvovaginitis. Recurrent episodes are more often caused by non-albicans species, for which azole agents are less likely to be effective. PMID:15872235

  13. Anti-fungal resistance in candida isolated from oral and diaper rash candidiasis in neonates.

    PubMed

    Mohamadi, Jasem; Motaghi, Mahsa; Panahi, Jafar; Havasian, Mohamad Reza; Delpisheh, Ali; Azizian, Mitra; Pakzad, Iraj

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the sensitivity of Candida species isolated from oral candidiasis and diaper dermatitis infections in children. The children referring to private and public clinics in Ilam, Iran were exmined for oral candidiasis and diaper dermatitis. In this study, 248 oral candidiasis and diaper dermatitis samples were collected and cultured.Candida species were identified by using standard methods. Resistance and sensitivity to amphotericin B, nystatin, ketoconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole, clotrimazole, and posaconazole were determined using the CLSI M44-A standard disk diffusion method. From the 248 studied samples, 149 were positive for Candida, among which the Candida albicans was the most prevalent (64.4%). The resistance of different Candida species to nystatin, itraconazole, fluconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole were 4, 43, 34.2, 34.9, 21.5, 6, and 6.7%, respectively. No resistance to amphotericin B was observed. Considering rather low resistance to nystatin, this drug is the best choice for oral candidiasis and diaper dermatitis.

  14. Candida bromeliacearum sp. nov. and Candida ubatubensis sp. nov., two yeast species isolated from the water tanks of Canistropsis seidelii (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Ruivo, Carla C C; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A; Bacci, Maurício; Pagnocca, Fernando C

    2005-09-01

    Strains belonging to two novel yeast species, Candida bromeliacearum and Candida ubatubensis, were isolated from the bromeliad tank of Canistropsis seidelii (Bromeliaceae) in a sandy coastal plain (restinga) ecosystem site in an Atlantic rainforest of south-eastern Brazil. These species were genetically distinct from all other currently accepted ascomycetous yeasts, based on sequence divergence in the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rDNA and in the small-subunit rDNA. The species occupy basal positions in the Metschnikowiaceae clade. The type strains are Candida bromeliacearum UNESP 00-103(T) (=CBS 10002(T)=NRRL Y-27811(T)) and Candida ubatubensis UNESP 01-247R(T) (=CBS 10003(T)=NRRL Y-27812(T)).

  15. Effect of Ethiopian multiflora honey on fluconazole-resistant Candida species isolated from the oral cavity of AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Mulu, A; Diro, E; Tekleselassie, H; Belyhun, Y; Anagaw, B; Alemayehu, M; Gelaw, A; Biadglegne, F; Desalegn, K; Yifiru, S; Tiruneh, M; Kassu, A; Nishikawa, T; Isogai, E

    2010-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the antifungal effect of Ethiopian multiflora honey against Candida species isolated from the oral cavity of AIDS patients. Oral rinses were obtained from 13 AIDS patients and cultured on CHROMagar plates at 37°C for 48 hours. Candida species were identified by microbiological and molecular techniques. The antifungal effect of the honey sample on Candida was investigated by an agar dilution technique. Susceptibility of the Candida species to fluconazole was tested following a semi-modified microdilution method. Growth of both fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant Candida species was inhibited with a minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of 35-40% (v/v) honey. The MFC of different Candida species was not significantly different (P > 0.05). From the total of 25 Candida isolates tested for susceptibility, 11 (44%), eight (32%) and six (24%) of the isolates were sensitive (minimum inhibitory concentrations [MICs] < 8 µg/mL), susceptible (dose-dependent: MICs 16-32 µg/mL) and resistant (MICs > 64 µg/mL) to fluconazole, respectively. Ethiopian multiflora honey has antifungal activity against fluconazole-resistant Candida species isolated from the oral cavity of AIDS patients. This supports the existing folkloric practice of using honey to treat oral lesions. Nevertheless, identification of the bioactive agents in honey, their clinical evaluation and pharmacological standardization are crucial.

  16. Two new ascomycetous anamorphic yeast species related to Candida friedrichii--Candida jaroonii sp. nov., and Candida songkhlaensis sp. nov.--isolated in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Yumi; Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Mikata, Kozaburo; Nakagiri, Akira; Limtong, Savitree; Potacharoen, Wanchern; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Nakase, Takashi

    2008-08-01

    In a study of yeast diversity in Thailand, eight strains of hitherto undescribed anamorphic yeasts were isolated: four from insect frass, two from Marasmius sp. fruiting bodies, one from a flower, and one from jackfruit exudates. Phylogenetic analysis of the D1/D2 domain of 26S ribosomal DNA nucleotide sequences indicated that the eight strains represented two new species related to Candida friedrichii. Genetic separation of the two new species was further supported by DNA-DNA hybridization analysis, which resulted in between-species similarity values of less than 48%, and by electrophoretic karyotyping. The two new species are C. jaroonii sp. nov. (type strain, ST-300(T) = NBRC 103209(T) = BCC 11783(T) = CBS 10790(T)) and C. songkhlaensis sp. nov. (type strain, ST-328(T) = NBRC 103214(T) = BCC 11804(T) = CBS 10791(T)).

  17. In vitro adherence of Candida albicans isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Adriana Gadotti; KOMIYAMA, Edson Yukio; dos SANTOS, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; JORGE, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; BRIGHENTI, Fernanda Lourenção; KOGA-ITO, Cristiane Yumi

    2011-01-01

    Adherence is considered an extremely important virulence factor in yeast. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the adherence to epithelial cells of C. albicans isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis in comparison to healthy patients. Material and methods Candida albicans cells isolated from individuals with chronic periodontitis (n=25) and healthy controls (n=25) were included in this study. Suspensions of C. albicans (106 cells/mL) and epithelial cells (105 cells/mL) were mixed and incubated at 37ºC for 1 h. The number of yeasts adhered to 25 epithelial cells was counted. Results The number of C. albicans cells adhered to epithelial cells was statistically higher in the chronic periodontitis group than in the control group (Student's t-test, p=0.000). Conclusion The results of the present study suggest a higher Candida adherence of samples isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:21710096

  18. Prevalence of Candida spp. in cervical-vaginal samples and the in vitro susceptibility of isolates.

    PubMed

    Brandolt, Tchana Martinez; Klafke, Gabriel Baracy; Gonçalves, Carla Vitola; Bitencourt, Laura Riffel; Martinez, Ana Maria Barral de; Mendes, Josiara Furtado; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is an infection of the genital mucosa caused by different species of the genus Candida. Considering the lack of data on this topic in the south of Brazil, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of Candida spp. in the cervical-vaginal mucosa of patients treated at a university hospital in southern Rio Grande do Sul, as well as the etiology and the susceptibility of the isolates against fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole and nystatin. Samples were collected at the gynecology clinic of the Federal Hospital of the University of Rio Grande, and the isolates were identified using phenotypic and biochemical tests. The susceptibility analysis was performed according to the CLSI M27-A2 protocol. Of the 263 patients included, Candida spp. was isolated in 27%, corresponding to a prevalence of approximately 15% for both VVC and colonization. More than 60% of the isolates were identified as Candida albicans; C. non-albicans was isolated at a rate of 8.6% in symptomatic patients and 14.3% in asymptomatic patients. The prevalence of resistance against fluconazole and itraconazole was 42% and 48%, respectively; the minimal inhibitory concentration of miconazole ranged from 0.031 to 8μg/mL, and that of nystatin ranged from 2 to >16μg/mL. The high rate of resistance to triazoles observed in our study suggests the necessity of the association of laboratory exams to clinical diagnosis to minimize the practice of empirical treatments that can contribute to the development of resistance in the isolates.

  19. Effects of Treated versus Untreated Polystyrene on Caspofungin In Vitro Activity against Candida Species.

    PubMed

    Fothergill, Annette W; McCarthy, Dora I; Albataineh, Mohammad T; Sanders, Carmita; McElmeel, Maria; Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-03-01

    Significant interlaboratory variability is observed in testing the caspofungin susceptibility of Candida species by both the CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methodologies. We evaluated the influence of treated versus untreated polystyrene microtiter trays on caspofungin MICs using 209 isolates of four Candida species, including 16 C. albicans and 11 C. glabrata isolates with defined FKS mutations. Caspofungin MICs were also determined using the commercially available YeastOne and Etest assays and 102 isolates. All C. glabrata isolates had caspofungin MICs of ≥0.5 μg/ml, the clinical breakpoint for caspofungin resistance in this species, measured using trays made of treated polystyrene, regardless of the FKS status. In contrast, susceptible isolates could readily be distinguished from resistant/non-wild-type isolates when caspofungin MICs were measured using untreated polystyrene trays and both the YeastOne and Etest assays. Similar results were also observed for C. krusei isolates, as all isolates had caspofungin MICs above the threshold for resistance measured using treated polystyrene trays. In contrast, C. albicans isolates could be correctly identified as susceptible or resistant when caspofungin MICs were measured with treated or untreated trays and with the YeastOne and Etest assays. MICs falsely elevated above the resistance breakpoint were also not observed for C. tropicalis isolates. These results demonstrated that the use of treated polystyrene may be one factor that leads to falsely elevated caspofungin in vitro susceptibility results and that this may also be a greater issue for some Candida species than for others.

  20. Yeasts isolated from Algerian infants's feces revealed a burden of Candida albicans species, non-albicans Candida species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Seddik, Hamza Ait; Ceugniez, Alexandre; Bendali, Farida; Cudennec, Benoit; Drider, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at showing the yeast diversity in feces of Algerian infants, aged between 1 and 24 months, hospitalized at Bejaia hospital (northeast side of the country). Thus, 20 colonies with yeast characteristics were isolated and identified using biochemical (ID32C Api system) and molecular (sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) methods. Almost all colonies isolated (19 strains) were identified as Candida spp., with predominance of Candida albicans species, and one strain was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Screening of strains with inhibitory activities unveiled the potential of Candida parapsilosis P48L1 and Candida albicans P51L1 to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Further studies performed with these two Candida strains revealed their susceptibility to clinically used antifungal compounds and were then characterized for their cytotoxicity and hemolytic properties. On the other hand, Saccharomyces cerevisiae P9L1 isolated as well in this study was shown to be devoid of antagonism but resulted safe and overall usable as probiotic.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of coupled hydroxyanthracenones isolated from plants of the genus Karwinskia.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Ricardo; Rivas, Verónica; González, Gloria; Waksman, Noemí

    2006-07-01

    The in vitro activity of some isolated hydroxyanthracenones belonging to the genus Karwinskia against four bacteria, six filamentous fungi and four yeast are reported. These hydroxyanthracenones were found to possess antimicrobial activity, particularly against Streptococcus pyogenes, Candida albicans, C. boidinii, C. glabrata and Cryptococcus neoformans; minimal inhibitory concentrations range between 16 and 2 microg/ml.

  2. In Vitro Susceptibility and Trailing Growth Effect of Clinical Isolates of Candida Species to Azole Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Bandegani, Azadeh; Mirhendi, Hossein; Pakshir, Keyvan; Alinejhad, Navvab; Poostforoush Fard, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emergence of resistance to respective antifungal drugs is a primary concern for the treatment of candidiasis. Hence, determining antifungal susceptibility of the isolated yeasts is of special importance for effective therapy. For this purpose, the clinical laboratory standard institute (CLSI) has introduced a broth microdilution method to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). However, the so-called “Trailing effect” phenomenon might sometimes pose ambiguity in the interpretation of the results. Objectives: The present study aimed to determine the in vitro susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida against azoles and the frequency of the Trailing effect. Materials and Methods: A total of 193 Candida isolates were prospectively collected and identified through the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Using a broth microdilution test, according to the guidelines of CLSI M27-A3, antifungal susceptibilities of the isolated yeasts against Fluconazole (FLU), Itraconazole (ITR), Ketoconazole (KET) and Voriconazole (VOR) were assessed. Moreover, trailing growth was determined when a susceptible MIC was incubated for 24 hours, and turned into a resistant one after 48 hours of incubation. Results: Among the tested antifungal drugs in this study, the highest rate of resistance was observed against ITR (28.5%) followed by VOR (26.4%), FLU (20.8%) and KET (1.5%). The trailing effect was induced in 27 isolates (14.0%) by VOR, in 26 isolates (13.5%) by ITR, in 24 isolates (12.4%) by FLU, and in 19 isolates (9.8%) by KET. Conclusions: The monitoring of antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from clinical sources is highly recommended for the efficient management of patients. Moreover, the trailing effect should be taken into consideration once the interpretation of the results is intended. PMID:27127587

  3. Association between fluconazole susceptibility and genetic relatedness among Candida tropicalis isolates in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jang-Shiun; Li, Shu-Ying; Yang, Yun-Liang; Chou, Hsiao-Hui; Lo, Hsiu-Jung

    2007-05-01

    Among the 162 Candida tropicalis isolates collected in the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance of Yeasts in 1999, 23 (14.2 %) had fluconazole MICs > or = 64 mg l(-1), and thus fulfilled the definition of resistance. Random amplified polymorphic DNA assay showed that all 23 fluconazole-resistance C. tropicalis isolates collected from different hospitals around Taiwan were closely related. Two distinct pulsotypes associated with fluconazole susceptibility were identified when these 23 resistant isolates, along with 13 susceptible ones, were analysed by PFGE.

  4. Pathogenicity of Candida albicans isolates from bloodstream and mucosal candidiasis assessed in mice and Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, M; Mandelblat, M; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A; Mendlovic, S; Semis, R; Segal, E

    2016-03-01

    The working hypothesis of this study was to elucidate a possible association between the pathogenic potential of Candida albicans strains with a clinical entity, systemic versus superficial candidiasis. Specifically, we assessed the pathogenicity of two groups of clinical C. albicans isolates: isolates from bloodstream infection (S) versus isolates from vaginitis patients (M), in two experimental in vivo systems - mice and Galleria melonella, in comparison to a control strain (CBS 562). Mice and G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with CBS 562 and the different S and M isolates, and followed up for survival rate and survival time during 30 and 7 days, respectively. Candida kidney colonization of mice was assessed by histopathology and colony-forming units' enumeration. The results revealed: (1) S and M isolates had different behavior patterns in the two models and varied in different parameters; (2) no statistically significant difference in pathogenicity between S and M isolates as whole groups was noted; (3) S14 was the most virulent isolate and close to the standard strain CBS 562 in both models. This study is distinctive in its outline combining two different groups of C. albicans clinical isolates originating from two different clinical entities that were assessed in vivo concurrently in two models.

  5. 40 CFR 180.1144 - Candida oleophila isolate I-182; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1144 Candida oleophila isolate I-182; exemption from the..., is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all raw agricultural commodities....

  6. Possible role of azole and echinocandin lock solutions in the control of Candida biofilms associated with silicone.

    PubMed

    Cateau, Estelle; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc; Imbert, Christine

    2011-04-01

    Until now, management of candidiasis related to implanted devices has remained problematic. The aim of this study was to investigate antifungal lock strategies against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilms in vitro. Three antifungal agents were used against eight C. albicans and six C. glabrata clinical strains isolated from infected catheters. Caspofungin and micafungin, both echinocandins, as well as the azole posaconazole were tested. An in vitro model of Candida biofilm on 100% silicone catheters was used. Efficacy of the antifungal lock was tested against biofilms aged 12h and 5 days following exposure to caspofungin (5mg/L and 25mg/L), micafungin (5mg/L and 15 mg/L) and posaconazole (10mg/L) for 12h. Persistence of antibiofilm activity was investigated 1-3 days following drug elimination. Antifungal lock was considered effective in the event of a significant decrease (P<0.001) in the metabolic activity of the biofilm yeast. The results showed that micafungin had significant inhibitory effectiveness against young and mature C. albicans and C. glabrata biofilms. Moreover, this activity appeared to persist for up to 3 days. Caspofungin displayed similar activity against all C. albicans biofilms, but the activity was less persistent for C. glabrata biofilms. Posaconazole was less effective against C. albicans biofilms, but its activity was sustained. Echinocandin lock therapy could significantly enhance the management of candidiasis in patients with indwelling catheters by combating biofilms and enabling device maintenance in situ.

  7. [In vitro antifungal resistance in Candida albicans from HIV-infected patients with and without oral candidosis.].

    PubMed

    Ceballos Salobreña, A; Gaitán Cepeda, L A; Orihuela Cañada, F; Olea Barrionuevo, D; Ceballos García, L; Quindós, G

    1999-12-01

    The main purpose of this study has been to determine the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates from HIV-infected or AIDS patients, depending on the presence of oral candidosis. The oral cavity of 307 HIV-infected or AIDS patients was examined and an oral swab was cultured on Sabouraud glucose agar and studied by conventional mycological methods. In vitro antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B, nystatin, fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole was tested by disk diffusion with Neo-Sensitabs tablets (Rosco Diagnostica, Dinamarca). One hundred and thirty five Candida albicans isolates (91 serotype A, 38 serotype B, three C. albicans variety stellatoidea and three untyped isolates), three Candida krusei and two Candida glabrata were obtained. All the isolates were susceptible to nystatin and amphotericin B. However, 7.9% isolates were resistant to fluconazole and 2.9% isolates were resistant to ketoconazole or itraconazole. Nearly all C. krusei and C. glabrata isolates, 31% patients with candidosis and 20% Candida-colonized patients showed decreased susceptibility to azoles. This study shows that polyenes had a great in vitro efficacy against clinical isolates from HIV-infected patients and that in vitro resistance to azoles is not as high as observed in other countries.

  8. In Vitro Interactions of Micafungin with Amphotericin B against Clinical Isolates of Candida spp.▿

    PubMed Central

    Serena, Carolina; Mariné, Marçal; Quindós, Guillermo; Carrillo, Alfonso J.; Cano, J. F.; Pastor, F. Javier; Guarro, Josep

    2008-01-01

    The in vitro activity of amphotericin B in combination with micafungin was evaluated against 115 isolates representing seven species of Candida. Overall, the percentages of synergistic interactions were 50% and 20% when the MIC-2 (lowest drug concentration to cause a prominent reduction in growth) and MIC-0 (lowest drug concentration to cause 100% growth inhibition) end point criteria, respectively, were used. Antagonism was not observed. Some of the interactions were confirmed by time-kill assays. PMID:18227181

  9. Isolation of a gene encoding a putative polyamine transporter from Candida albicans, GPT1.

    PubMed

    McNemar, M D; Gorman, J A; Buckley, H R

    2001-04-01

    A gene encoding a transport protein from the pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans, has been isolated during a complementation experiment utilizing an ornithine decarboxylase-negative (spe1 Delta) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This gene restores gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport to a GABA transport-negative mutant of S. cerevisiae and encodes a protein which putatively allows transport of one or more of the polyamines. We have assigned the name GPT1 (GABA/polyamine transporter) to this gene.

  10. Impact of Candida spp. isolation in the respiratory tract in patients with intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Terraneo, S; Ferrer, M; Martín-Loeches, I; Esperatti, M; Di Pasquale, M; Giunta, V; Rinaudo, M; de Rosa, F; Li Bassi, G; Centanni, S; Torres, A

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompetent patients with nosocomial pneumonia, the relationship between Candida spp. isolation in respiratory samples and outcomes or association with other pathogens is controversial. We therefore compared the characteristics and outcomes of patients with intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia (ICUAP), with or without Candida spp. isolation in the respiratory tract. In this prospective non-interventional study, we assessed 385 consecutive immunocompetent patients with ICUAP, according to the presence or absence of Candida spp. in lower respiratory tract samples. Candida spp. was isolated in at least one sample in 82 (21%) patients. Patients with Candida spp. had higher severity scores and organ dysfunction at admission and at onset of pneumonia. In multivariate analysis, previous surgery, diabetes mellitus and higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score II at ICU admission independently predicted isolation of Candida spp. There were no significant differences in the rate of specific aetiological pathogens, the systemic inflammatory response, and length of stay between patients with and without Candida spp. Mortality was also similar, even adjusted for potential confounders in propensity-adjusted multivariate analyses (adjusted hazard ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.57-2.05, p 0.80 for 28-day mortality and adjusted hazard ratio 1.38, 95% CI 0.81-2.35, p 0.24 for 90-day mortality). Antifungal therapy was more frequently prescribed in patients with Candida spp. in respiratory samples but did not influence outcomes. Candida spp. airway isolation in patients with ICUAP is associated with more initial disease severity but does not influence outcomes in these patients, regardless of the use or not of antifungal therapy.

  11. Candida xinjiangensis sp. nov., a new anamorphic yeast species isolated from Scolytus scheryrewi Semenov in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Dian-Peng; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Qing-Wen

    2017-03-01

    Three yeast strains designated as S44, XF1 and XF2, respectively, were isolated from Scolytus scheryrewi Semenov of apricot tree in Shule County, Xinjiang, China, and were demonstrated to be a new member of the genus Candida by sequence comparisons of 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domain and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. BLASTn alignments on NCBI showed that the similarity of 26S rRNA gene sequences of S44 (type strain) to all sequences of other Candida yeasts was very low (≦93 %). The phylogenetic tree based on the 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domain and ITS region sequences revealed that the strain S44 is closely related to C. blattae, C. dosseyi, C. pruni, C. asparagi, C. fructus and C. musae. However, the strain S44 is distinguished from these Candida species by the physiological characteristics. Moreover, the strain S44 formed typical pseudohyphae when grown on cornmeal agar at 25 °C for 7 days, but did not form ascospores in sporulation medium for 3-4 weeks. Therefore, the name Candida xinjiangensis is proposed for the novel species, with S44 (=KCTC(T)27747) as the type strain.

  12. Virulence of Candida albicans isolated from HIV infected and non infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, Tri; Praseno; Aman, Abu Tholib

    2015-01-01

    Candida sp contributes 33.1 % of fungal infections among HIV patients. Among the species of the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated from HIV patients. This study aimed to analyze putative virulence factors of C. albicans isolated from oral cavities of HIV infected patients and healthy individuals. Twenty isolates from HIV infected patients and fourteen from healthy individuals were analyzed for phenotypic switching, cell growth rate, hyphae formation, hemolytic activity and biofilm formation characteristics. The frequency of phenotypic switching was low in both groups. The cell growth rate of C. albicans from HIV infected patients were significantly higher than those from healthy individuals (p < 0.001). After 48 h incubation, the concentration of C. albicans isolated from HIV infected patients was 8.6 × 10(6) cells/ml while the concentration of C. albicans isolated from healthy individuals was 7.8 × 10(6) cells/ml. After 72 h incubation, the concentration of C. albicans isolated from HIV infected patients was 9.5 × 10(6) cells/ml while the concentration of C. albicans isolated from healthy individuals was 8.2 × 10(6) cells/ml. In contrast, the hemolytic activity of C. albicans isolated from healthy individuals were significantly higher compared to those from HIV infected patients (p < 0.001) at both aerobic (6 vs. 3.5 mm) and anaerobic (3.8 vs. 1.3 mm) conditions. The percentages of hyphae forming cells were higher in C. albicans collected from HIV infected patients (27.5 %) compared to the healthy individual group (14.7 %). However, this trend was not statistically significant (p = 0.1). Candida albicans isolated from HIV infected patients have similar ability to develop biofilms compared to those from healthy individuals. (OR = 4.2; 95 % CI 0.724-26.559). The virulence factors of C. albicans isolated from HIV infected patients were not significantly different from those of healthy individuals. The results

  13. Miconazole activity against Candida biofilms developed on acrylic discs.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhin, S; Dorocka-Bobkowska, B; Prylinski, M; Konopka, K; Duzgunes, N

    2014-08-01

    Oral candidiasis in the form of Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CaDS) is associated with Candida adhesion and biofilm formation on the fitting surface of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) dentures. Candida biofilms show considerable resistance to most conventional antifungal agents, a phenomenon that is considered a developmental-phase-specific event that may help explain the high recurrence rates associated with CaDS. The aim of this study was to examine the activity of miconazole towards in vitro-grown mature Candida biofilms formed on heat-cured PMMA discs as a standardized model. The effect of miconazole nitrate on Candida biofilms developed on acrylic discs was determined for C. albicans MYA-2732 (ATCC), C. glabrata MYA-275 (ATCC), and clinical isolates, C. albicans 6122/06, C. glabrata 7531/06, C. tropicalis 8122/06, and C. parapsilosis 11375/07. Candida biofilms were developed on heat-cured poly(methyl methacrylate) discs and treated with miconazole (0.5 - 96 μg/ml). The metabolic activity of the biofilms was measured by the XTT reduction assay. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of miconazole against Candida species were determined by the microdilution method. The MICs for miconazole for the investigated strains ranged from 0.016-32 μg/ml. Treatment with miconazole resulted in a significant reduction of biofilm metabolic activity for all strains. The highest inhibition was observed at 96 μg/ml miconazole. In the case of C. glabrata MYA-275 and C. tropicalis 8122/06 this corresponded to 83.7% and 75.4% inhibition, respectively. The lowest reduction was observed for C. parapsilosis 11375/07-46.1%. For all Candida strains there was a strong correlation between MIC values and miconazole concentrations corresponding to a reduction of metabolic activity of the biofilm by 50%. Miconazole exhibits high antifungal activity against Candida biofilms developed on the surface of PMMA discs. The study provides support for the use of miconazole as an

  14. Genotypes of Candida albicans isolated from healthy individuals and their distribution in patients with oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yuki; Fukano, Hideo; Shimozato, Kazuo; Tanaka, Reiko; Horii, Toshinobu; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Kanbe, Toshio

    2013-12-01

    For the study of Candida albicans genotypes involved in development of candidiasis, Candida albicans isolates were collected from healthy volunteers and patients with oral candidiasis and genotyped on the basis of 25S rDNA and microsatellite polymorphisms. In the microsatellite analysis using two microsatellite markers (CDC3 and CAI), 63 healthy volunteer isolates were classified into 35 genotypes (allelic relations to CDC3 alleles 1:2/CAI alleles 1:2), among which genotypes II (115:119/23:23), III (115:123/18:27), and V (123:127/32:41) were found at frequencies of 12.7%, 7.9%, and 7.9%, respectively. In 68 oral candidiasis isolates classified into 39 genotypes, genotypes II and III were identified in 4.4% and 20.6% of the isolates, respectively. The frequency of genotype III was higher in the candidiasis isolates than in the healthy isolates (p < 0.05). These results suggest that genotype III C. albicans assigned by CDC3/CAI is related to the development of oral candidiasis.

  15. Evaluation of virulence factors of Candida albicans isolated from HIV-positive individuals using HAART.

    PubMed

    de Paula Menezes, Ralciane; de Melo Riceto, Érika Bezerra; Borges, Aércio Sebastião; de Brito Röder, Denise Von Dolingër; dos Santos Pedroso, Reginaldo

    2016-06-01

    The colonization by Candida species is one of the most important factors related to the development of oral candidiasis in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of the study was to evaluate and discuss the phospholipase, proteinase, DNAse and haemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity of HIV individuals with high efficiency antiretroviral therapy. Seventy-five isolates of C. albicans obtained from saliva samples of patients with HIV and 41 isolates from HIV-negative individuals were studied. Haemolytic activity was determined in Sabouraud dextrose agar plates containing 3% glucose and 7% sheep red cells. Culture medium containing DNA base-agar, egg yolk, and bovine albumin were used to determine DNase, phospholipase and proteinase activities, respectively. All isolates from the HIV patients group had haemolytic activity, 98% showed phospholipase activity, 92% were positive for proteinase and 32% DNAse activity. Regarding the group of indivídios HIV negative, all 41 isolates presented hemolytic activity, 90.2% showed phospholipase and proteinase activity and 12.2% were positive for DNAse. The phospholipase activity was more intense for the group of HIV positive individuals. DNase production was more frequently observed in the group of HIV-positive individuals. The percentage of isolates having DNAse activity was also significantly different between the groups of patients not using any antiretroviral therapy, those using transcriptase inhibitors and those using transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor in combination.

  16. Effects of antifungal agents in sap activity of Candida albicans isolates.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; Jesuíno, Rosália Santos Amorim; de Aquino Lemos, Janine; de Fátima Lisboa Fernandes, Orionalda; Hasimoto e Souza, Lúcia Kioko; Passos, Xisto Sena; do Rosário Rodrigues Silva, Maria

    2010-02-01

    Some antifungal agents have shown to exert effects on expression of virulent factors of Candida as the production of secretory aspartyl proteinase (Sap). In this study, we sought to determine and to compare the influence of fluconazole and voriconazole in proteinase activity of this microorganism. Thirty-one isolates obtained from oral mucosa of human immunodeficiency virus positive (HIV) patients were used in this study. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of fluconazole and voriconazole were determined using the broth microdilution method with RPMI 1640 medium and with yeast carbon base-bovine serum albumin (YCB-BSA) medium. The Sap activity following by digestion of BSA as substrate was determined for four Candida albicans strains arbitrarily chosen according to susceptibility (susceptible or resistant) to fluconazole or voriconazole. Besides, the SAP1 to SAP7 genes were screened by PCR for the same isolates that were determined by the Sap activity. In vitro susceptibility testing using the two media presented similar MIC values. Increased Sap activity was observed in resistant isolates on presence of drugs, but the Sap activity by susceptible isolates to azoles showed different behavior on the presence of drug. We detected the presence of SAP1 to SAP7 genes from all susceptible or resistant C. albicans isolates. The present study provides important data about the proteinase activity and the presence of genes of SAP family in fluconazole and voriconazole susceptible or resistant C. albicans isolates.

  17. Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Candida Species: A Comparison of Vitek-2 System with Conventional and Molecular Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ravinder; Dhakad, Megh Singh; Goyal, Ritu; Haque, Absarul; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga

    2016-01-01

    Background: Candida infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients; an accurate and early identification is a prerequisite need to be taken as an effective measure for the management of patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the conventional identification of Candida species with identification by Vitek-2 system and the antifungal susceptibility testing (AST) by broth microdilution method with Vitek-2 AST system. Materials and Methods: A total of 172 Candida isolates were subjected for identification by the conventional methods, Vitek-2 system, restriction fragment length polymorphism, and random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. AST was carried out as per the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 document and by Vitek-2 system. Results: Candida albicans (82.51%) was the most common Candida species followed by Candida tropicalis (6.29%), Candida krusei (4.89%), Candida parapsilosis (3.49%), and Candida glabrata (2.79%). With Vitek-2 system, of the 172 isolates, 155 Candida isolates were correctly identified, 13 were misidentified, and four were with low discrimination. Whereas with conventional methods, 171 Candida isolates were correctly identified and only a single isolate of C. albicans was misidentified as C. tropicalis. The average measurement of agreement between the Vitek-2 system and conventional methods was >94%. Most of the isolates were susceptible to fluconazole (88.95%) and amphotericin B (97.67%). The measurement of agreement between the methods of AST was >94% for fluconazole and >99% for amphotericin B, which was statistically significant (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The study confirmed the importance and reliability of conventional and molecular methods, and the acceptable agreements suggest Vitek-2 system an alternative method for speciation and sensitivity testing of Candida species infections. PMID:27942193

  18. Scope and frequency of fluconazole trailing assessed using EUCAST in invasive Candida spp. isolates.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Zambrano, Laura Judith; Escribano, Pilar; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Bouza, Emilio; Guinea, Jesús

    2016-10-01

    Trailing is a well-known phenomenon that is defined as reduced but persistent visible growth of Candida spp. at fluconazole concentrations above the MIC. Trailing is commonly detected using the CLSI M27-A3 method, although little is known about its frequency when investigated with EUCAST. We assessed the frequency and scope of fluconazole trailing after using EUCAST EDef 7.2. against a large number of Candida spp. isolates from patients with candidemia. We studied 639 fluconazole-susceptible non-krusei Candida spp. isolates from 570 patients admitted to Gregorio Marañón Hospital. Isolates were tested in vitro for fluconazole susceptibility according to the EUCAST EDef 7.2 procedure; trailing was defined as the presence of any residual growth in wells containing fluconazole concentrations above the MIC. According to the mean percentage of trailing observed, isolates were classified as residual trailers (0.1-5%), slight trailers (6%-10%), moderate trailers (11%-15%), and heavy trailers (>15%). The relationship between trailing and genotyping was assessed. The mean overall percentage of trailing was 6.8%, with C. albicans and C. tropicalis showing the highest percentages (9.75% and 9.29%, respectively; P < .001). C. albicans and C. tropicalis had the highest percentage of heavy trailers (>15%). Trailing was not genotype-specific. Fluconazole trailing was observed frequently when EUCAST was used for antifungal susceptibility testing, particularly in isolates of C. albicans and C. tropicalis The cut-off proposed enabled us to classify the isolates according to the degree of trailing and can be used as the basis for future studies to evaluate the clinical impact of this phenomenon.

  19. Wickerhamomyces queroliae sp. nov. and Candida jalapaonensis sp. nov., two yeast species isolated from Cerrado ecosystem in North Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Carlos A; Morais, Paula B; Lachance, Marc-André; Santos, Renata O; Melo, Weilan G P; Viana, Rodney H O; Bragança, Marcos A L; Pimenta, Raphael S

    2009-05-01

    Two novel yeast species, Wickerhamomyces queroliae sp. nov. and Candida jalapaonensis sp. nov., were isolated, respectively, from larvae of Anastrepha mucronata (Diptera: Tephritidae) collected from ripe fruit of Peritassa campestris ('Bacupari', Hippocrateaceae) and from flowers of Centropogon cornutus (Campanulaceae) in the Cerrado ecosystem of the state of Tocantins, Brazil. Analysis of the D1/D2 large-subunit rRNA gene sequences placed W. queroliae in the Wickerhamomyces clade near Wickerhamomyces ciferri and Candida silvicultrix. Candida jalapaonensis belongs to the Wickerhamiella clade and is related to Candida drosophilae. The type strain of Wickerhamomyces queroliae is UFMG-05-T200.1(T) (=CBS 10936(T)=NRRL Y-48478(T)) and the type strain of Candida jalapaonensis is UFMG-03-T210(T) (=CBS 10935(T)=NRRL Y-48477(T)).

  20. Candida bloodstream infection: a clinical microbiology laboratory perspective.

    PubMed

    Pongrácz, Júlia; Kristóf, Katalin

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of Candida bloodstream infection (BSI) has been on the rise in several countries worldwide. Species distribution is changing; an increase in the percentage of non-albicans species, mainly fluconazole non-susceptible C. glabrata was reported. Existing microbiology diagnostic methods lack sensitivity, and new methods need to be developed or further evaluation for routine application is necessary. Although reliable, standardized methods for antifungal susceptibility testing are available, the determination of clinical breakpoints remains challenging. Correct species identification is important and provides information on the intrinsic susceptibility profile of the isolate. Currently, acquired resistance in clinical Candida isolates is rare, but reports indicate that it could be an issue in the future. The role of the clinical microbiology laboratory is to isolate and correctly identify the infective agent and provide relevant and reliable susceptibility data as soon as possible to guide antifungal therapy.

  1. First isolation of Candida metapsilosis in Kuwait, an emerging global opportunistic pathogen.

    PubMed

    Asadzadeh, M; Ahmad, S; Al-Sweih, N; Gulati, R R; Khan, Z

    2016-03-01

    Invasive infections due to uncommon and rare yeast species are increasing worldwide in prevalence and are associated with high mortality rates. Here, we describe the first isolation and characterization of Candida metapsilosis cultured from the blood sample of a 10-year-old Saudi girl, who suffered from a neurodegenerative disorder, in Kuwait. The yeast isolate was identified by sequencing of ITS region and D1/D2 domains of rDNA. The report extends the geographic distribution of C. metapsilosis to the Middle East and highlights the emerging role of uncommon yeast species causing infections in susceptible hosts.

  2. Detection of Candida dubliniensis in Oropharyngeal Samples from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients in North America by Primary CHROMagar Candida Screening and Susceptibility Testing of Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, William R.; Revankar, Sanjay G.; Mcatee, Robert K.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Fothergill, Annette W.; McCarthy, Dora I.; Sanche, Stephen E.; Cantu, Rebecca A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Patterson, Thomas F.

    1998-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis has been associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). C. dubliniensis isolates may have been improperly characterized as atypical Candida albicans due to the phenotypic similarity between the two species. Prospective screening of oral rinses from 63 HIV-infected patients detected atypical dark green isolates on CHROMagar Candida compared to typical C. albicans isolates, which are light green. Forty-eight atypical isolates and three control strains were characterized by germ tube formation, differential growth at 37, 42, and 45°C, identification by API 20C, fluorescence, chlamydoconidium production, and fingerprinting by Ca3 probe DNA hybridization patterns. All isolates were germ tube positive. Very poor or no growth occurred at 42°C with 22 of 51 isolates. All 22 poorly growing isolates at 42°C and one isolate with growth at 42°C showed weak hybridization of the Ca3 probe with genomic DNA, consistent with C. dubliniensis identification. No C. dubliniensis isolate but only 18 of 28 C. albicans isolates grew at 45°C. Other phenotypic or morphologic tests were less reliable in differentiating C. dubliniensis from C. albicans. Antifungal susceptibility testing showed fluconazole MICs ranging from ≤0.125 to 64 μg/ml. Two isolates were resistant to fluconazole (MIC, 64 μg/ml) and one strain was dose dependent susceptible (MIC, 16 μg/ml). MICs of other azoles, including voriconazole, itraconazole, and SCH 56592, for these isolates were lower. C. dubliniensis was identified in 11 of 63 (17%) serially evaluated patients. Variability in phenotypic characteristics dictates the use of molecular and biochemical techniques to identify C. dubliniensis. This study identifies C. dubliniensis in HIV-infected patients from San Antonio, Tex., and shows that C. dubliniensis is frequently detected in those patients by using a primary CHROMagar screen. PMID:9738058

  3. Microsatellite-based genotyping of Candida albicans isolated from patients with superficial candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazue; Hattori, Hisao; Adachi, Hidesada; Oshima, Ryosuke; Horii, Toshinobu; Tanaka, Reiko; Yaguchi, Takashi; Tomita, Yasushi; Akiyama, Masashi; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Kanbe, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the genotype distribution of Candida albicans and the major genotypes involved in superficial candidiasis. The genotypes of C. albicans isolated from the infection sites of patients with superficial candidiasis (referred to as infection isolates) were analyzed by fragment analysis using 4 microsatellite markers (HIS3, CDC3, CAI and CAIII). Genotypes of the infection isolates were compared with those of C. albicans isolated from oral mucosa of non-candidiasis patients (referred to as oral isolates). Isolates of C. albicans showed 4 major genotypes for HIS3/CAI (" a " for 148 : 148 / 23 : 23," b " for 148 : 160 / 33 : 41," c " for 148 : 164 / 32 : 41 and " d " for 152 : 152 / 18 : 27). The genotypes " a "," b " and " d " were commonly found in oral (4.7, 8.8 and 7.6%, respectively) and infection (6.6, 9.2 and 15.4%, respectively) isolates. No isolates of genotype " c " were isolated from infection sites. The genotype " a " was found in the isolates from patients with genitalia candidiasis. Genotyping of multiple isolates from an individual patient showed that C. albicans from infection sites was genetically homogenous as compared with that of oral isolates, even in the same patient with candidiasis.

  4. Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans fungemia in an institutional hospital during a decade.

    PubMed

    Parmeland, Laurence; Gazon, Mathieu; Guerin, Claude; Argaud, Laurent; Lehot, Jean-Jacques; Bastien, Olivier; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Michallet, Mauricette; Picot, Stephane; Bienvenu, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    Since the outcomes of patients with candidemia is poor and Candida spp. with increased resistance to antifungal therapy may be associated with these results, the emergence of these blood infections caused by non-C. albicans Candida spp. was explored prospectively over a two-year period (2009-2010). Candidemia was defined as the recovery of Candida spp. in culture from a patient's blood sample. The in vitro susceptibility of each isolate to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole and voriconazole was determined. In addition, characteristics of patients and outcomes were investigated in real-time. The Candida distribution was compared to that observed in a similar study 10 years earlier in the same hospital. A total of 182 patients with candidemia were included in the study. While C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species (n = 102), non-C. albicans Candida spp. included; C. glabrata (n = 32), C. parapsilosis (n = 21), C. tropicalis (n = 13), C. krusei (n = 8), C. kefyr (n = 3), C. lusitaniae (n = 2), C. lipolytica (n = 2), C. famata (n = 1), C. guilliermondii (n = 1), C. inconspicua (n = 1), C. dubliniensis (n = 1), C. sake (n = 1) and C. nivariensis (n = 1). In seven patients, C. albicans was associated with another Candida spp. Surprisingly, this prospective study demonstrated that regardless of the department (intensive care unit or hematological department), Candida spp. distribution was no different from that found in the 1998-2001 survey, except for C. krusei. A reduction in the proportion of C. krusei isolates was observed from 2000-2010 (P = 0.028) as a result of its decreased recovery in the hematological department.

  5. Antifungal Activity of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Chrysobalanus icaco Against Oral Clinical Isolates of Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Silva, João Paulo Bastos; Peres, Ana Regina Maués Noronha; Paixão, Thiago Portal; Silva, Andressa Santa Brígida; Baetas, Ana Cristina; Barbosa, Wagner Luiz Ramos; Monteiro, Marta Chagas; Andrade, Marcieni Ataíde

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chrysobalanus icaco is a medicinal plant commonly used to treat fungal infections in Brazilian Amazonian region. Objective: This work aimed to evaluate the antifungal activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of C. icaco (HECi) against oral clinical isolates of Candida spp. and to determine the pharmacognostic parameters of the herbal drug and the phytochemical characteristics of HECi. Materials and Methods: The pharmacognostic characterization was performed using pharmacopoeial techniques. Phytochemical screening, total flavonoid content, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis were used to investigate the chemical composition of the HECi. A broth microdilution method was used to determine the antifungal activity of the extract against 11 oral clinical isolates of Candida spp. Results: Herbal drug presented parameters which were within the limits set forth in current Brazilian legislation. A high amount of flavonoid content (132,959.33 ± 12,598.23 μg quercetin equivalent/g of extract) was found in HECi. Flavonoids such as myricetin and rutin were detected in the extract by HPLC analyses. HECi showed antifungal activity against oral isolates of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis (minimum inhibitory concentrations [MIC] 3.12 and 6.25 mg/mL, respectively), and C. albicans American American Type Culture Collection (MIC <1.56 mg/mL). Conclusion: HECi was shown to possess antifungal activity against Candida species with clinical importance in the development of oral candidiasis, and these activities may be related to its chemical composition. The antifungal activity detected for C. icaco against Candida species with clinical importance in the development of oral candidiasis can be attributed to the presence of flavonoids in HECi, characterized by chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. SUMMARY Chrysobalanus icaco presents a high amount of flavonoids in its constitutionLC analysis was able to identify the flavonoids myricetin

  6. Candida species: new insights into biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; López-Romero, Everardo; Villagómez-Castro, Julio C; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2012-06-01

    Biofilms of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis are associated with high indices of hospital morbidity and mortality. Major factors involved in the formation and growth of Candida biofilms are the chemical composition of the medical implant and the cell wall adhesins responsible for mediating Candida-Candida, Candida-human host cell and Candida-medical device adhesion. Strategies for elucidating the mechanisms that regulate the formation of Candida biofilms combine tools from biology, chemistry, nanoscience, material science and physics. This review proposes the use of new technologies, such as synchrotron radiation, to study the mechanisms of biofilm formation. In the future, this information is expected to facilitate the design of new materials and antifungal compounds that can eradicate nosocomial Candida infections due to biofilm formation on medical implants. This will reduce dissemination of candidiasis and hopefully improve the quality of life of patients.

  7. Phenotypic variability and therapeutic implications of Candida species in patients with oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Arora, S; Verma, M; Gupta, S R; Urs, A B; Dhakad, M S; Kaur, R

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence and phenotypic variation of Candida species in oral lichen planus (OLP) and the therapeutic implications of our findings. Eighty patients with clinically and histopathologically confirmed cases of OLP (64 non-erosive, 16 erosive) and a control group of 80 healthy individuals with no predisposing factors for oral candidiasis were examined for evidence of Candida infection. Oral swabs and smears were obtained for cytology and culture. Identification, speciation and antifungal susceptibility tests of Candida isolates were performed using an automated microbial identification system. Fifty percent of erosive OLP cases, 28% of non-erosive cases and none of the controls showed evidence of Candida. Candida albicans was found predominantly in non-erosive OLP, while other Candida species were predominate in erosive OLP. Non-Candida albicans isolates (C. glabrata, C. krusei) were resistant to the commonly used antifungals, clotrimazole and fluconazole. Candida infection is common in cases of OLP. We recommend antifungal sensitivity testing prior to antifungal therapy for the erosive form of OLP.

  8. Epidemiology, Antifungal Susceptibility, and Pathogenicity of Candida africana Isolates from the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, Adrien; Linton, Chistopher J.; Palmer, Michael D.; Brown, Phillipa; Johnson, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Candida africana was previously proposed as a new species within the Candida albicans species complex, together with C. albicans and C. dubliniensis, although further phylogenetic analyses better support its status as an unusual variant within C. albicans. Here we show that C. africana can be distinguished from C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by pyrosequencing of a short region of ITS2, and we have evaluated its occurrence in clinical samples by pyrosequencing all presumptive isolates of C. albicans submitted to the Mycology Reference Laboratory over a 9-month period. The C. albicans complex constituted 826/1,839 (44.9%) of yeast isolates received over the study period and included 783 isolates of C. albicans, 28 isolates of C. dubliniensis, and 15 isolates of C. africana. In agreement with previous reports, C. africana was isolated exclusively from genital specimens, in women in the 18-to-35-year age group. Indeed, C. africana constituted 15/251 (6%) of “C. albicans” isolates from female genital specimens during the study period. C. africana isolates were germ tube positive, grew significantly more slowly than C. albicans and C. dubliniensis on conventional mycological media, could be distinguished from the other members of the C. albicans complex by appearance on chromogenic agar, and were incapable of forming chlamydospores. Here we present the detailed evaluation of epidemiological, phenotypic, and clinical features and antifungal susceptibility profiles of United Kingdom isolates of C. africana. Furthermore, we demonstrate that C. africana is significantly less pathogenic than C. albicans and C. dubliniensis in the Galleria mellonella insect systemic infection model. PMID:23303503

  9. Performance of CHROMAGAR candida and BIGGY agar for identification of yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Yücesoy, Mine; Marol, Serhat

    2003-01-01

    Background The importance of identifying the pathogenic fungi rapidly has encouraged the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of yeasts. In this study two differential media, CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar, were evaluated for the presumptive identification of yeast species. Methods A total number of 270 yeast strains including 169 Candida albicans, 33 C. tropicalis, 24 C. glabrata, 18 C. parapsilosis, 12 C. krusei, 5 Trichosporon spp., 4 C. kefyr, 2 C. lusitaniae, 1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 1 Geotrichum candidum were included. The strains were first identified by germ tube test, morphological characteristics on cornmeal tween 80 agar and Vitek 32 and API 20 C AUX systems. In parallel, they were also streaked onto CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar plates. The results were read according to the color, morphology of the colonies and the existance of halo around them after 48 hours of incubation at 37°C. Results The sensitivity and specificity values for C. albicans strains were found to be 99.4, 100% for CHROMagar Candida and 87.0, 75.2% for BiGGY agar, respectively. The sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida to identify C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei ranged between 90.9 and 100% while the specificity was 100%. The sensitivity rates for BiGGY agar were 66.6 and 100% while the specificity values were found to be 95.4 and 100% for C. tropicalis and C. krusei, respectively. Conclusions It can be concluded that the use of CHROMagar Candida is an easy and reliable method for the presumptive identification of most commonly isolated Candida species especially C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei. The lower sensitivity and specificity of BiGGY agar to identify commonly isolated Candida species potentially limits the clinical usefulness of this agar. PMID:14613587

  10. Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility of yeast isolates causing fungemia collected in a population-based study in Spain in 2010 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Guinea, Jesús; Zaragoza, Óscar; Escribano, Pilar; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Pemán, Javier; Sánchez-Reus, Ferrán; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    We report the molecular identifications and antifungal susceptibilities of the isolates causing fungemia collected in the CANDIPOP population-based study conducted in 29 Spanish hospitals. A total of 781 isolates (from 767 patients, 14 of them having mixed fungemia) were collected. The species found most frequently were Candida albicans (44.6%), Candida parapsilosis (24.5%), Candida glabrata (13.2%), Candida tropicalis (7.6%), Candida krusei (1.9%), Candida guilliermondii (1.7%), and Candida lusitaniae (1.3%). Other Candida and non-Candida species accounted for approximately 5% of the isolates. The presence of cryptic species was low. Compared to findings of previous studies conducted in Spain, the frequency of C. glabrata has increased. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed by using EUCAST and CLSI M27-A3 reference procedures; the two methods were comparable. The rate of fluconazole-susceptible isolates was 80%, which appears to be a decrease compared to findings of previous studies, explained mainly by the higher frequency of C. glabrata. Using the species-specific breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values, the rate of voriconazole and posaconazole in vitro resistance was low (<2%). In the case of C. tropicalis, using the EUCAST procedure, the rate of azole resistance was around 20%. There was a correlation between the previous use of azoles and the presence of fluconazole-resistant isolates. Resistance to echinocandins was very rare (2%), and resistance to amphotericin B also was very uncommon. The sequencing of the hot spot (HS) regions from FKS1 or FKS2 genes in echinocandin-resistant isolates revealed previously described point mutations. The decrease in the susceptibility to fluconazole in Spanish isolates should be closely monitored in future studies.

  11. Molecular Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility of Yeast Isolates Causing Fungemia Collected in a Population-Based Study in Spain in 2010 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Guinea, Jesús; Zaragoza, Óscar; Escribano, Pilar; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Pemán, Javier; Sánchez-Reus, Ferrán

    2014-01-01

    We report the molecular identifications and antifungal susceptibilities of the isolates causing fungemia collected in the CANDIPOP population-based study conducted in 29 Spanish hospitals. A total of 781 isolates (from 767 patients, 14 of them having mixed fungemia) were collected. The species found most frequently were Candida albicans (44.6%), Candida parapsilosis (24.5%), Candida glabrata (13.2%), Candida tropicalis (7.6%), Candida krusei (1.9%), Candida guilliermondii (1.7%), and Candida lusitaniae (1.3%). Other Candida and non-Candida species accounted for approximately 5% of the isolates. The presence of cryptic species was low. Compared to findings of previous studies conducted in Spain, the frequency of C. glabrata has increased. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed by using EUCAST and CLSI M27-A3 reference procedures; the two methods were comparable. The rate of fluconazole-susceptible isolates was 80%, which appears to be a decrease compared to findings of previous studies, explained mainly by the higher frequency of C. glabrata. Using the species-specific breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values, the rate of voriconazole and posaconazole in vitro resistance was low (<2%). In the case of C. tropicalis, using the EUCAST procedure, the rate of azole resistance was around 20%. There was a correlation between the previous use of azoles and the presence of fluconazole-resistant isolates. Resistance to echinocandins was very rare (2%), and resistance to amphotericin B also was very uncommon. The sequencing of the hot spot (HS) regions from FKS1 or FKS2 genes in echinocandin-resistant isolates revealed previously described point mutations. The decrease in the susceptibility to fluconazole in Spanish isolates should be closely monitored in future studies. PMID:24366741

  12. Candida ruelliae sp. nov., a novel yeast species isolated from flowers of Ruellia sp. (Acanthaceae).

    PubMed

    Saluja, Puja; Prasad, Gandham S

    2008-06-01

    Two novel yeast strains designated as 16Q1 and 16Q3 were isolated from flowers of the Ruellia species of the Acanthaceae family. The D1/D2 domain and ITS sequences of these two strains were identical. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of large-subunit rRNA gene indicated their relationship to species of the Candida haemulonii cluster. However, they differ from C. haemulonii by 14% nucleotide sequence divergence, from Candida pseudohaemulonii by 16.1% and from C. haemulonii type II by 16.5%. These strains also differ in 18 physiological tests from the type strain of C. haemulonii, and 12 and 16 tests, respectively, from C. pseudohaemulonii and C. haemulonii type II. They also differ from C. haemulonii and other related species by more than 13% sequence divergence in the internal transcribed spacer region. In the SSU rRNA gene sequences, strain 16Q1 differs by 1.7% nucleotide divergence from C. haemulonii. Sporulation was not observed in pure or mixed cultures on several media examined. All these data support the assignment of these strains to a novel species; we have named them as Candida ruelliae sp. nov., and designate strain 16Q1(T)=MTCC 7739(T)=CBS10815(T) as type strain of the novel species.

  13. Sensitivity of clinical isolates of Candida to essential oils from Burseraceae family

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Miloš; Smiljkovic, Marija; Markovic, Tatjana; Cirica, Ana; Glamoclija, Jasmina; Markovic, Dejan; Sokovic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and antifungal activity of four commercial essential oils from the Burseraceae family - two Boswellia carterii Flueck oils, Canarium luzonicum (Blume) A. Gray oil, and Commiphora myrrha (Nees) Engl oil, against most common Candida spp. recovered from the human oral cavity. The essential oil samples were analyzed by GC-FID and GC/MS. The analysis showed that major essential oils' components were α-pinene (23.04 % and 31.84 %), limonene (45.62 %) and curzerene (34.65 %), respectively. Minimum inhibitory (MIC) and minimum fungicidal (MFC) concentrations were determined using a microdilution standardized technique. All tested Candida spp. clinical isolates and ATCC strains showed susceptibility to tested essential oils in a dose dependent manner. The strongest antifungal activity was shown by essential oil of B. carterii, sample 2; the average MIC values ranged from 1.25 to 1.34 mg/ml, and MFC values ranged from 2.50 to 3.75 mg/ml, depending on the fungus. This study supports the possible use of essential oils from the Bursecaceae family in reduction and elimination of Candida spp. populations in patients with oral cavity fungal infections. PMID:27330531

  14. Biotypes of Candida albicans isolated from cardiovascular system and skin surveillance cultures of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Vazić-Babić, Verica; Mlinarić-Missoni, Emilija; Kalenić, Smilja

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to biotype 59 isolates of Candida (C.) albicans from cardiovascular system samples (blood and intravenous catheter) and 123 isolates of the same species from skin surveillance cultures (swabs of the armpit, groins and intravenous catheter insertion sites) of hospitalized patients using the Odds and Abbott biotyping method. Biotyping of 59 isolates of C. albicans taken from the cardiovascular system samples revealed the presence of 16 biotypes. Biotype 355 was the most common biotype, accounting for 35.6% of all biotype isolates from this system. Biotyping of 123 C. albicans isolates from skin surveillance cultures detected 21 biotypes. Biotype 355 was most common, accounting for 17.9% of all biotype isolates from these samples. The two systems had 10 biotypes in common: 355, 155, 257, 305, 105, 315, 300, 015, 157, and 345. These biotypes accounted for 88.3% and 81.4% of all C. albicans biotypes isolated from the cardiovascular system and skin surveillance cultures, respectively. Biotypes 355, 155, and 257 were the biotypes most frequently shared in isolates from the two systems. These biotypes accounted for 57.7% and 43.1% of all C. albicans biotypes isolated from the cardiovascular system and skin surveillance cultures, respectively.

  15. Candida species distribution, genotyping and virulence factors of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity of kidney transplant recipients of two geographic regions of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a diploid yeast that in some circumstances may cause oral or oropharyngeal infections. This investigation aimed to study the prevalence of Candida spp. and to analyze the ABC genotypes of 76 clinical isolates of C. albicans obtained from the oral cavity of kidney transplant patients from two distinct geographic regions of Brazil. Methods We typed 48 strains with ABC genotyping and Microsatelitte using primer M13 and tested three virulence factors in vitro: phospholipase activity, morphogenesis and the ability to evade from polymorphonuclear neutrophils phagocytosis. Results C. albicans was the most prevalent species (86.4%), followed by C. tropicalis (4.5%). C. albicans genotype A was the most prevalent (58 isolates; 76.4%), followed by genotype C (15 isolates; 19.7%) and genotype B (3 isolates; 3.9%). When Microsatellite technique with primer M13 was applied, 80% of the isolates from the South were placed within the same cluster. The majority of Genotype C strains were grouped together within two different clusters. Genotype C was considered more resistant to PMNs attack than genotypes A and B. Strains isolated from the South of Brazil showed also better ability to combat PMNs phagocytosis. Conclusions We found a high rate of C. albicans genotype C strains isolated from the oral cavity of this group of patients. This study characterized oral C. albicans strains isolated from kidney transplant recipients and will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. PMID:24628850

  16. Epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility, and ERG11 mutations of Candida species isolated from pregnant Chinese Han women.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Su, M Q; Ma, Y Y; Xin, Y J; Han, R B; Zhang, R; Wen, J; Hao, X K

    2016-04-28

    The widespread use of antifungal agents has led to increasing azole resistance in Candida species. A major azole-resistance mechanism involves point mutations in the ERG11 gene, which encodes cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14a-demethylase. In this study, vaginal swabs were obtained from 657 pregnant Chinese Han women and cultured appropriately. The open reading frame of the obtained fungal species were amplified by PCR and sequenced; additionally, the ERG11 gene of the isolated Candida species was amplified and sequenced, and the antifungal susceptibility of the isolated species was determined. The vaginal swabs of 124 women produced fungal cultures; five species of Candida were isolated from the patients, among which Candida albicans was predominant. Twelve C. albicans isolates (13.8%) were resistant to fluconazole and 2 (2.2%) were resistant to itraconazole. Seventeen mutations, including 9 silent and 8 missense mutations, were identified in the ERG11 gene of 31 C. albicans isolates. Our findings suggest that infection caused by C. albicans and non-C. albicansis common in Chinese Han women of reproductive age. Moreover, the relationship between Candida infection and certain epidemiological factors emphasizes the need to educate women about the precise diagnosis and punctual treatment of vaginitis.

  17. Candida Species Prevalence Profile in HIV Seropositive Patients from a Major Tertiary Care Hospital in New Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Monika; Kaur, Ravinder; Chadha, Sanjim

    2016-01-01

    Candida is a common opportunistic pathogen during the course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression. Changes in the clinical severity of candidiasis and the Candida species prevalence profile may be a reflection of immunological changes in HIV positive patients. The aim of this study was to document the changing pattern of Candida species prevalence profile in HIV seropositive patients from a tertiary care hospital in North India. One hundred and twenty HIV seropositive subjects were recruited for Candida microbial screening. Clinical specimens including blood, oral swabs, expectorated or induced sputum/bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and urine were collected depending on the patient's symptoms. A total of 128 Candida isolates were obtained from 88 cases and 7 different Candida species were identified. C. albicans (50%) was the most common species isolated followed by C. glabrata (17%) and C. dubliniensis (12.5%). Other species isolated were C. parapsilosis (7.8%), C. krusei, C. tropicalis (4.6% each), and C. kefyr (3%). Strong clinical suspicion along with optimal sampling of an accurate diagnosis of Candida species involved would go a long way in decreasing the morbidity associated with non-albicans Candida species. PMID:27092278

  18. Isolation of the alkane inducible cytochrome P450 (P450alk) gene from the yeast Candida tropicalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gene for the alkane-inducible cytochrome P450, P450alk, has been isolated from the yeast Candida tropicalis by immunoscreening a λgt11 library. Isolation of the gene has been identified on the basis of its inducibility and partial DNA sequence. Transcripts of this gene were i...

  19. Caspofungin-induced in-vitro post-antifungal effect and its impact on adhesion related traits of oral Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans isolates.

    PubMed

    Ellepola, Arjuna Nishantha Bandara; Chandy, Rachel; Khan, Zia Uddin; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (BEC) and denture acrylic surfaces (DAS), germ tube (GT) formation and cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) are all virulence traits involved in the pathogenicity of Candida. Post-antifungal effect (PAFE) also have a bearing on pathogenicity and virulence of Candida. Candida dubliniensis is associated with oral and systemic candidosis, which can be managed with caspofungin. There is no published information on caspofungin-induced PAFE and its impact on adhesion traits of C. dubliniensis isolates. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the in vitro duration of PAFE on 20 C. dubliniensis isolates following transient exposure to caspofungin. Furthermore the impacts of caspofungin-induced PAFE on adhesion to BEC and DAS, GT formation and CSH of these isolates were also determined. After establishing the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of caspofungin, C. dubliniensis isolates were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations (×3 MIC) of caspofungin for 1 hr. Thereafter the duration of PAFE, adhesion to BEC and DAS, GT formation and CSH were determined by previously described in-vitro assays. MIC (μg/mL) of C. dubliniensis isolates to caspofungin ranged from 0.004 to 0.19. Caspofungin-induced mean PAFE on C. dubliniensis isolates was 2.17 hr. Exposure to caspofungin suppressed the ability of C. dubliniensis isolates to adhere to BEC and DAS, form GT and CSH by 69.97%, 71.95%, 90.06% and 32.29% (P < 0.001 for all), respectively. Thus, transient exposure of C. dubliniensis isolates to caspofungin produces an antifungal effect not only by suppressing its growth but also by altering its adhesion traits.

  20. The efficacy of disinfectants on abattoirs’ Candida albicans isolates in Niger Delta region

    PubMed Central

    Olorode, Oluwayemisi A

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of common disinfectants- these are (parachlorometaxylenol) dettol, savlon purit and jik (sodium hypochlorite) on  Candida albicans isolated from displaying and cutting tables in five different abattoirs in Port Harcourt (Niger Delta region); the abattoirs include Trans Amadi, Agip, Woji, Rumuokoro, and Rumuodara. This research was carried out between January 2005 and June 2006. Swab samples were collected from abattoirs cutting tables with sterile swab sticks and immediately transferred and cultured in the laboratory on a selective medium Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA). The disinfectants’ concentrations were prepared at 10%, 20%, 40%, and 70%, in triplicates and the mean values calculated. 0.5 Mc Farland turbidity method of standardization and Agar diffusion method were used for disinfectants testing of the isolates. Statistical analysis of the data showed no significant difference in the effectiveness of these disinfectants at (p<0.05). In conclusion, this study has shown that savlon and dettol were the most potent antimicrobial agents at 10% concentration on  Candida albicans isolates when compared with purit and jik in this study, hence they are good sanitizing agents to be applied on the abattoirs cutting tables, before meat products can be displayed for sale. PMID:24358834

  1. In vitro susceptibility of 137 Candida sp. isolates from HIV positive patients to several antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Magaldi, S; Mata, S; Hartung, C; Verde, G; Deibis, L; Roldán, Y; Marcano, C

    2001-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis caused by various species of Candida is one of the most common infections in HIV seropositive or AIDS patients. Drug resistance among these yeasts is an increasing problem. We studied the frequency of resistance profile to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, amphotericin B and terbinafine of 137 isolates of Candida sp. From HIV positive or AIDS patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis at Instituto de Inmunología, U.C.V. and the Hospital "Jose Ignacio Baldó", Caracas Venezuela, using the well diffusion susceptibility test (Magaldi et al.). We found that nearly 10% of C. albicans isolates were primarily fluconazole resistant, 45% of C. albicans isolates from patients with previous treatment were resistant to fluconazole, of which 93% showed cross-resistance to itraconazole, and even about 30% of C. tropicalis (n = 13) were resistant to fluconazole and/or itraconazole. To this respect, several recent reports have been described antifungal cross-resistance among azoles. Therefore, we consider that C. tropicalis should be added to the growing list of yeast in which antifungal drug resistance is common. This report could be useful for therapeutic aspect in AIDS patients with oral candidiasis.

  2. Virulence factors of Candida albicans isolates from the oral cavities of HIV-1-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Tatiany O A; Gillet, Luciana C S; Menezes, Sílvio A F; Feitosa, Rosimar N M; Ishak, Marluísa O G; Ishak, Ricardo; Marques-da-Silva, Sílvia H; Vallinoto, Antonio C R

    2013-06-01

    The present study assessed the phenotypic aspects of oral-cavity Candida albicans isolates from 300 HIV-1- positive patients, relating the most commonly investigated virulence factors (enzyme typing and germ-tube formation) to the most common morphotypes. The samples were seeded into specific media for isolation and subsequent identification using the automated Vitek 2 system. The following assays were performed for phenotypic characterization: morphotyping, germ-tube formation and enzyme typing. Out of 300 collected samples, 144 tested positive for yeasts of the Candida genus, 98 (32.7 %) of which were identified as C. albicans. The latter samples were attributed to seven different morphotypes; the three most common morphotypes were 7208 (49 %), 7308 (14.3 %) and 3208 (13.3 %). All of the C. albicans isolate samples formed germ tubes and produced the enzymes proteinase and phospholipase, with an activity classified as intermediate to high. Due to the identification of virulence factors among the analyzed samples, monitoring of HIV-1-positive patients colonized by different morphotypes must be established because these morphotypes are extremely pathogenic and can trigger severe fungal infections.

  3. Rapid characterisation of Candida albicans by pyrolysis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    White, G C; Sisson, P R; Freeman, R; Cookson, B D

    1994-08-01

    Clinical isolates (41) of Candida spp. from three possible outbreaks of nosocomially-acquired infection were compared by pyrolysis mass spectrometry (PMS) and by a combined morphotyping and resistotyping (M-R typing) method. Both systems characterised all the isolates and distinguished one isolate of C. tropicalis and another of C. glabrata from the 39 isolates of C. albicans. Results from both systems suggested that cross-infection with a single strain contributed to two of the outbreaks. In several instances, more than one strain of C. albicans was found amongst multiple isolates from the same patient. PMS is a simple, rapid and objective technique capable of characterising C. albicans isolates; discrimination was similar to M-R typing.

  4. In vitro pharmacodynamic modelling of anidulafungin against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Ortega, Ignacio; Eraso, Elena; Suárez, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to fit anidulafungin in vitro static time-kill data from nine strains of Candida with a pharmacodynamic (PD) model in order to describe the antifungal activity of this drug against Candida spp. Time-kill data from strains of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis clades were best fit using an adapted sigmoidal Emax model and resulted in a set of PD parameters (Emax, EC50 and Hill factor) for each fungal strain. The data were analysed with NONMEM 7. Anidulafungin was effective in a species- and concentration-dependent manner against the strains of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis clades as observed with the EC50 estimates. Maximum killing rate constant (Emax) values were higher against C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis complex strains. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the activity of anidulafungin against Candida can be accurately described using an adapted sigmoidal Emax model.

  5. Expression of SAP5 and SAP9 in Candida albicans biofilms: comparison of bloodstream isolates with isolates from other sources.

    PubMed

    Joo, Min Young; Shin, Jong Hee; Jang, Hee-Chang; Song, Eun Song; Kee, Seung Jung; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2013-11-01

    Secreted aspartic proteases (Sap), encoded by a family of 10 SAP genes, are key virulence determinants in Candida albicans. Although biofilm-associated bloodstream infections (BSIs) are frequently caused by C. albicans, SAP gene expression in C. albicans biofilms formed by BSI isolates has not been evaluated. We compared the expression of two SAP genes, SAP5 and SAP9, in C. albicans biofilms formed by BSI isolates with those formed by isolates from other body sites. Sixty-three C. albicans isolates were analyzed, comprising 35 BSI isolates and 28 from other sites. A denture-strip biofilm model was used, and expression of the two SAP genes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR during planktonic or biofilm growth. Mean SAP5 expression levels of the BSI isolates were 3.59-fold and 3.86-fold higher in 24-h and 48-h biofilms, respectively, than in planktonic cells. These results did not differ from those for isolates from other sites (2.71-fold and 2.8-fold for 24-h and 48-h biofilms, respectively). By contrast, mean SAP9 expression during biofilm formation was higher in BSI isolates (2.89-fold and 3.29-fold at 24 and 48 h, respectively) than in isolates from other sites (1.27-fold and 1.32-fold at 24 and 48 h, respectively; both, P < 0.001). These results show, for the first time, that both SAP5 and SAP9 are upregulated in C. albicans biofilms formed by BSI isolates, and that BSI isolates may have a greater capacity to express SAP9 under biofilm conditions than isolates from other sites.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of fluconazole resistance in Candida parapsilosis isolates from a U.S. surveillance system.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Nina T; Pham, Cau D; Cleveland, Angela A; Lockhart, Shawn R

    2015-02-01

    Candida parapsilosis is the second or third most common cause of candidemia in many countries. The Infectious Diseases Society of America recommends fluconazole as the primary therapy for C. parapsilosis candidemia. Although the rate of fluconazole resistance among C. parapsilosis isolates is low in most U.S. institutions, the resistance rate can be as high as 7.5%. This study was designed to assess the mechanisms of fluconazole resistance in 706 incident bloodstream isolates from U.S. hospitals. We sequenced the ERG11 and MRR1 genes of 122 C. parapsilosis isolates with resistant (30 isolates; 4.2%), susceptible dose-dependent (37 isolates; 5.2%), and susceptible (55 isolates) fluconazole MIC values and used real-time PCR of RNA from 17 isolates to investigate the regulation of MDR1. By comparing these isolates to fully fluconazole-susceptible isolates, we detected at least two mechanisms of fluconazole resistance: an amino acid substitution in the 14-α-demethylase gene ERG11 and overexpression of the efflux pump MDR1, possibly due to point mutations in the MRR1 transcription factor that regulates MDR1. The ERG11 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found in 57% of the fluconazole-resistant isolates and in no susceptible isolates. The MRR1 SNPs were more difficult to characterize, as not all resulted in overexpression of MDR1 and not all MDR1 overexpression was associated with an SNP in MRR1. Further work to characterize the MRR1 SNPs and search for overexpression of other efflux pumps is needed.

  7. Comparison of 24-hour and 48-hour voriconazole MICs as determined by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution method (M27-A3 document) in three laboratories: results obtained with 2,162 clinical isolates of Candida spp. and other yeasts.

    PubMed

    Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Canton, E; Peman, J; Rinaldi, M G; Fothergill, A W

    2009-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of the 24-h broth microdilution voriconazole MIC by obtaining MICs for 2,162 clinical isolates of Candida spp. and other yeasts; the 24-h results were compared to 48-h reference MICs to assess essential, as well as categorical, agreement. Although the overall essential agreement was 88.6%, it ranged from 96.4 to 100% for 6 of the 11 species or groups of yeasts tested. The overall categorical agreement was 93.2%, and it was above 90% for eight species. However, unacceptable percentages of very major errors (false susceptibility) were observed for Candida albicans (2.7%), C. glabrata (4.1%), C. tropicalis (9.7%), and other less common yeast species (9.8%). Since it is essential to identify potentially resistant isolates and breakpoints are based on 48-h MICs, it appears that the 24-h MIC is not as clinically useful as the 48-h reference MIC. However, further characterization of these falsely susceptible MICs for three of the four common Candida spp. is needed to understand whether these errors are due to trailing misinterpretation or if the 48-h incubation is required to detect voriconazole resistance. Either in vivo versus in vitro correlations or the determination of resistance mechanisms should be investigated.

  8. Candida cabralensis sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from traditional Spanish blue-veined Cabrales cheese.

    PubMed

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Belloch, Carmela; Alvarez-Martín, Pablo; Querol, Amparo; Mayo, Baltasar

    2010-11-01

    Three yeast strains, 1AD8(T), 3AD15 and 3AD23, belonging to a previously unknown yeast species were isolated from two independent batches of the Spanish blue-veined Cabrales cheese, a traditional cheese manufactured without the addition of starter and mould cultures. Physiological characterization revealed that the unknown yeast is not fermentative and does not assimilate lactose; rather it assimilates dl-lactic acid and ethanol, major end products of lactic acid bacteria metabolism in cheese. The novel yeast is anamorphic. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction based on nucleotide sequence comparison of the D1/D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene showed that Pichia terricola and Pichia fermentans are the closest relatives of the unknown species. The name Candida cabralensis sp. nov. is proposed, and the isolate 1AD8(T) (=CECT 13027(T) =CBS 11679(T)) is the type strain of this novel taxon.

  9. Antifungal Activity of Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom against Clinically Isolated Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal effect of bee venom (BV) and sweet bee venom (SBV) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) clinical isolates. Methods: In this study, BV and SBV were examined for antifungal activities against the Korean Collection for Type Cultures (KCTC) strain and 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans. The disk diffusion method was used to measure the antifungal activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays were performed by using a broth microdilution method. Also, a killing curve assay was conducted to investigate the kinetics of the anti- fungal action. Results: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans that were cultured from blood and the vagina by using disk diffusion method. The MIC values obtained for clinical isolates by using the broth microdilution method varied from 62.5 μg/ mL to 125 μg/mL for BV and from 15.63 μg/mL to 62.5 μg/mL for SBV. In the killing-curve assay, SBV behaved as amphotericin B, which was used as positive control, did. The antifungal efficacy of SBV was much higher than that of BV. Conclusion: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against C. albicans clinical strains that were isolated from blood and the vagina. Especially, SBV might be a candidate for a new antifungal agent against C. albicans clinical isolates. PMID:27280049

  10. Synthetic Organotellurium Compounds Sensitize Drug-Resistant Candida albicans Clinical Isolates to Fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Reis de Sá, L F; Toledo, F T; Gonçalves, A C; Sousa, B A; Dos Santos, A A; Brasil, P F; Duarte da Silva, V A; Tessis, A C; Ramos, J A; Carvalho, M A; Lamping, E; Ferreira-Pereira, A

    2017-01-01

    Invasive Candida albicans infections are a serious health threat for immunocompromised individuals. Fluconazole is most commonly used to treat these infections, but resistance due to the overexpression of multidrug efflux pumps is of grave concern. This study evaluated the ability of five synthetic organotellurium compounds to reverse the fluconazole resistance of C. albicans clinical isolates. Compounds 1 to 4, at <10 μg/ml, ameliorated the fluconazole resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressing the major C. albicans multidrug efflux pumps Cdr1p and Mdr1p, whereas compound 5 only sensitized Mdr1p-overexpressing strains to fluconazole. Compounds 1 to 4 also inhibited efflux of the fluorescent substrate rhodamine 6G and the ATPase activity of Cdr1p, whereas all five of compounds 1 to 5 inhibited Nile red efflux by Mdr1p. Interestingly, all five compounds demonstrated synergy with fluconazole against efflux pump-overexpressing fluconazole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, isolate 95-142 overexpressing CDR1 and CDR2, isolate 96-25 overexpressing MDR1 and ERG11, and isolate 12-99 overexpressing CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, and ERG11 Overall, organotellurium compounds 1 and 2 were the most promising fluconazole chemosensitizers of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans isolates. Our data suggest that these novel organotellurium compounds inhibit pump efflux by two very important and distinct families of fungal multidrug efflux pumps: the ATP-binding cassette transporter Cdr1p and the major facilitator superfamily transporter Mdr1p.

  11. Biotypes of oral Candida albicans isolates in a Tanzanian child population.

    PubMed

    Matee, M I; Samaranayake, L P; Scheutz, F; Simon, E; Lyamuya, E F; Mwinula, J

    1996-09-01

    Although biotypes of Candida albicans from adult populations, especially in the West, have been described, there are no data either from a child population, or from the African continent. Hence a total of 200 oral C. albicans isolates from Tanzanian children aged 6-24 months were biotyped using two commercially available API micromethod kit systems and a boric acid resistance test. The predominant biotypes, which comprised two thirds of the organisms isolated, were J1S (19.5%), A1S (16.0%), J1R (14.5%), A1R (9.5%) and P1R (7.5%). In total, 16 new biotypes comprising 44 (22%) isolates which have not hitherto been described were found in this Tanzanian population and, of these, the P1R biotype predominated with 15 (7.5%) isolates. There was no significant association between predominant biotypes (with clusters > or = 15 isolates) and age, gender, breast feeding and malnutrition. These data indicate that the biotype profile of C. albicans isolates may differ in paediatric and adult populations, and/or global distribution of various subtypes of this common opportunistic pathogen.

  12. Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Bloodstream Yeast Isolates by Sensititre YeastOne over Nine Years at a Large Italian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Posteraro, Brunella; Spanu, Teresa; Fiori, Barbara; De Maio, Flavio; De Carolis, Elena; Giaquinto, Alessia; Prete, Valentina; De Angelis, Giulia; Torelli, Riccardo; D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Vella, Antonietta; De Luca, Alessio; Tumbarello, Mario; Ricciardi, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) is an affordable alternative to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference method for antifungal susceptibility testing. In this study, the MICs of yeast isolates from 1,214 bloodstream infection episodes, generated by SYO during hospital laboratory activity (January 2005 to December 2013), were reanalyzed using current CLSI clinical breakpoints/epidemiological cutoff values to assign susceptibility (or the wild-type [WT] phenotype) to systemic antifungal agents. Excluding Candida albicans (57.4% of all isolates [n = 1,250]), the most predominant species were Candida parapsilosis complex (20.9%), Candida tropicalis (8.2%), Candida glabrata (6.4%), Candida guilliermondii (1.6%), and Candida krusei (1.3%). Among the non-Candida species (1.9%), 7 were Cryptococcus neoformans and 17 were other species, mainly Rhodotorula species. Over 97% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to amphotericin B and flucytosine. Rates of susceptibility (WT phenotype) to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole were 98.7% in C. albicans, 92.3% in the C. parapsilosis complex, 96.1% in C. tropicalis, 92.5% in C. glabrata, 100% in C. guilliermondii, and 100% (excluding fluconazole) in C. krusei. The fluconazole-resistant isolates consisted of 6 C. parapsilosis complex isolates, 3 C. glabrata isolates, 2 C. albicans isolates, 2 C. tropicalis isolates, and 1 Candida lusitaniae isolate. Of the non-Candida isolates, 2 C. neoformans isolates had the non-WT phenotype for susceptibility to fluconazole, whereas Rhodotorula isolates had elevated azole MICs. Overall, 99.7% to 99.8% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to echinocandins, but 3 isolates were nonsusceptible (either intermediate or resistant) to caspofungin (C. albicans, C. guilliermondii, and C. krusei), anidulafungin (C. albicans and C. guilliermondii), and micafungin (C. albicans). However, when the intrinsically resistant non-Candida isolates were included

  13. Micafungin triggers caspase-dependent apoptosis in Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis biofilms, including caspofungin non-susceptible isolates.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, F; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2015-01-01

    Candida biofilms play an important role in infections associated with medical devices and are resistant to antifungals. We hypothesized that the echinocandin micafungin (MICA) exerts an enhanced antifungal activity against caspofungin (CAS)-susceptible (CAS-S) and CAS-non-susceptible (CAS-NS) Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis which is at least in part through apoptosis, even in the biofilm environment. Apoptosis was characterized by detecting reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), DNA fragmentation, lack of plasma membrane integrity, and metacaspase activation following exposure of Candida biofilm to MICA for 3h at 37°C in RPMI 1640 medium. The minimum inhibitory concentration was higher for CAS (2.0-16.0 μg/mL) than for MICA (1.0-8.0 μg/mL) for Candida biofilms. Elevated intracellular ROS levels and depolarization of MMP was evident in CAS-S C. albicans (3.0-4.2 fold) and C. parapsilosis (4.8-5.4 fold) biofilms compared with CAS-NS (1.2 fold) after exposure to MICA (0.25x-1xMIC). Elevated intracellular ROS levels and depolarization of MMP was evident in CAS-S C. albicans (3.0-4.2 fold) and C. parapsilosis (4.8-5.4 fold) biofilms compared with CAS-NS (1.2 fold) after exposure to MICA (0.25x-1xMIC). Finally higher ß-1, 3 glucan levels were seen in sessile cells compared to planktonic cells, especially in CAS-NS strains. MICA treatment might induce a metacaspase-dependent apoptotic process in biofilms of both CAS-S C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, and to some degree in CAS-NS strains.

  14. Antifungal Susceptibility Analysis of Clinical Isolates of Candida parapsilosis in Iran

    PubMed Central

    LOTFALI, Ensieh; KORDBACHEH, Parivash; MIRHENDI, Hossein; ZAINI, Farideh; GHAJARI, Ali; MOHAMMADI, Rasoul; NOORBAKHSH, Fatemeh; MOAZENI, Maryam; FALLAHI, Aliakbar; REZAIE, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Candida parapsilosis is an emergent agent of invasive fungal infections. This yeast is one of the five most widespread yeasts concerned in invasive candidiasis. C. parapsilosis stands out as the second most common yeast species isolated from patients with bloodstream infections especially in neonates with catheter. Recently several reports suggested that its reduced susceptibility to azoles and polyene might become a cause for clinical concern, although C. parapsilosis is not believed to be intensely prone to the development of antifungal resistance. Methods: In the present report, One hundred and twenty clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis complex were identified and differentiated by using PCR-RFLP analysis. The isolates were then analyzed to determine their susceptibility profile to fluconazole (FLU), itraconazole (ITC) and amphotericin B. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results were analyzed according to the standard CLSI guide. Results: All of isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis. No C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis strains were found. Evaluation of the antifungal susceptibility profile showed that only three (2.5%) C. parapsilosis were resistant to fluconazole, three (2.5%) C. parapsilosis were resistant to itraconazole and two (1.7%) C. parapsilosis were amphotericin B resistant. Conclusion: Profiles in clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis can provide important information for the control of antifungal resistance as well as distribution and susceptibility profiles in populations. PMID:27141494

  15. Hosting infection: experimental models to assay Candida virulence.

    PubMed

    Maccallum, Donna M

    2012-01-01

    Although normally commensals in humans, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei are capable of causing opportunistic infections in individuals with altered physiological and/or immunological responses. These fungal species are linked with a variety of infections, including oral, vaginal, gastrointestinal, and systemic infections, with C. albicans the major cause of infection. To assess the ability of different Candida species and strains to cause infection and disease requires the use of experimental infection models. This paper discusses the mucosal and systemic models of infection available to assay Candida virulence and gives examples of some of the knowledge that has been gained to date from these models.

  16. Metschnikowia chrysoperlae sp. nov., Candida picachoensis sp. nov. and Candida pimensis sp. nov., isolated from the green lacewings Chrysoperla comanche and Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Oui; Gibson, Cara M; Blackwell, Meredith

    2004-09-01

    Fourteen yeast isolates comprising three taxa were cultured from digestive tracts of adult Chrysoperla species (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and their eggs. The yeast taxa were distinguished based on an estimated molecular phylogeny, DNA sequences and traditional taxonomic criteria. The new yeasts are closely related to Metschnikowia pulcherrima but are sufficiently distinguished by sequence comparison of rRNA gene sequences to consider them as novel species. Here, three novel species are described and their relationships with other taxa in the Saccharomycetes are discussed. Metschnikowia chrysoperlae sp. nov. (type strain, NRRL Y-27615T = CBS 9803T) produced needle-shaped ascospores and was the only teleomorph found. Large numbers of chlamydospores similar to those observed in M. pulcherrima were also produced. The other two novel species are asexual yeasts, Candida picachoensis sp. nov. (type strain, NRRL Y-27607T = CBS 9804T) and Candida pimensis sp. nov. (type strain, NRRL Y-27619T = CBS 9805T), sister taxa of M. chrysoperlae and M. pulcherrima. A specialized relationship between yeasts and lacewing hosts may exist, because the yeasts were isolated consistently from lacewings only. Although M. chrysoperlae was isolated from eggs and adult lacewings, suggesting the possibility of vertical transmission, no yeast was isolated from larvae.

  17. Candida albicans and non-C. albicans Candida species: comparison of biofilm production and metabolic activity in biofilms, and putative virulence properties of isolates from hospital environments and infections.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A V; Prado, C G; Carvalho, R R; Dias, K S T; Dias, A L T

    2013-04-01

    Candida albicans and, more recently, non-C. albicans Candida spp. are considered the most frequent fungi in hospitals. This study analyzed Candida spp. isolates and compared the frequency of different species, that is, C. albicans and non-C. albicans Candida spp., and the origins of isolates, that is, from hospital environments or infections. Yeast virulence factors were evaluated based on biofilm production and metabolic activity. Hemolysin production and the antifungal susceptibility profiles of isolates were also evaluated. Candida spp. were highly prevalent in samples collected from hospital environments, which may provide a reservoir for continuous infections with these yeasts. There were no differences in the biofilm productivity levels and metabolic activities of the environmental and clinical isolates, although the metabolic activities of non-C. albicans Candida spp. biofilms were greater than those of the C. albicans biofilms (p < 0.05). Clinical samples had higher hemolysin production (p < 0.05) and lower susceptibility to fluconazole (p < 0.05). Non-C. albicans Candida spp. predominated in samples collected from hospital environments and infections (p < 0.05). These species had a lower susceptibility to fluconazole and amphotericin B, and their biofilms had higher metabolic activities than those produced by C. albicans, which may explain the increased incidence of fungal infections with these yeasts during recent years.

  18. Epidemiology and phospholipase activity of oral Candida SPP. Among patients with central nervous system diseases before and after dental cleaning procedure.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Aurélia Silva; Silva, Dágma Aparecida; Silva, Francislene Pereira; Santos, Gleicy Carla; Campos, Lívia Maria Soares; Oliveira, Lorena Vivien Neves; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2010-01-01

    Patients suffering of diseases that affect central nervous system may be considered more susceptible to the infectious diseases of mouth. Sixty-nine patients suffering of cerebral palsy, Down's syndrome and metal retardation were submitted to saliva examination for the presence of Candida spp. before and after a procedure of dental cleaning. The isolates were submitted to assay for verifying phospholipase production. 55.10% of the patients provided isolation of Candida spp. The frequency of isolation obtained before dental procedure was: C. albicans (83.33%), C. krusei (8.33%) and C. kefyr, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata (2.78% each). The frequency after the procedure was: C. albicans (68.57%), C. parapsilosis (11.43%), C. krusei and C. kefyr (8.57% each) and Candida glabrata (2.86%). We verified significantly difference (p < 0.01) between populations obtained at the two examinations. Phospholipase production was verified only among C. albicans strains and the proportion of producers was higher when testing isolates obtained after dental cleaning procedure. Studies focused on Candida spp. isolation are useful for better comprehension of the role of these yeasts on the oral flora from patients with cerebral palsy, Down's syndrome and metal retardation.

  19. Susceptibilities of Candida albicans mouth isolates to antifungal agents, essentials oils and mouth rinses.

    PubMed

    Carvalhinho, Sara; Costa, Ana Margarida; Coelho, Ana Cláudia; Martins, Eugénio; Sampaio, Ana

    2012-07-01

    Forty Candida albicans strains isolated from patient's mouth with fixed orthodontic appliances were analyzed to their susceptibilities to antifungal agents, mouth rinses and essential oils. Susceptibility to fluconazole, econazole, miconazole and ketoconazole, amphotericin B and nystatin was assessed by the disk diffusion (DD) method based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M44-A protocol, and by Etest (fluconazole and amphotericin B). The susceptibilities to mouth rinses and essential oils were also determined by the DD technique. All isolates tested were susceptible (S) to amphotericin B, nystatin and fluconazole. The overall concordance between the DD and the Etest was 100% for amphotericin and fluconazole. One isolate was resistant to econazole (2.5%) and the other to ketoconazole (2.5%). Econazole and ketoconazole had the highest percentages of susceptible dose dependent (SDD), 55 and 95%, respectively. Regarding to the susceptibility isolates profile, seven phenotypes were detected, and the 3 more represented (90% of the isolates) of them were SDD to one, two or three azoles. The study of mouth rinses showed a high variability of efficacy against C. albicans. The results showed that the isolates susceptibility to essential oils differed (P < 0.05). The profile activity was: cinnamon > laurel > mint > eucalyptus > rosemary > lemon > myrrh > tangerine. The main finding was that the susceptibility to cinnamon and laurel varied among the three more representative antifungal phenotypes (P < 0.05). The susceptibility of econazole-SDD isolates to cinnamon and lemon was higher than those of the econazole-S yeasts (P < 0.05). In contrast, econazole-SDD isolates were less affected by laurel than econazole-S counterparts (P < 0.05).

  20. [Species composition of yeast-like fungi isolated from HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, O I; Pokas, O V; V'ialykh, Zh E; Vasylenko, L H; Koltukova, N V

    2007-01-01

    The strains of yeast-like fungi isolated from HIV-infected people in 1994-2005 were examined. It was found that a share of non-albicans strains increased up to 46.2%, in monoculture they were present in 40% of examined patients, Candida glabrata (21.3%) being the dominant species. The definition of proteolytic activity as one of the factors of pathogenicity showed that it was typical of 90% of museum strains and 58% of fresh isolates.

  1. ISOLATION OF THE CANDIDA TROPICALIS GENE FOR P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE AND ITS EXPRESSION IN SACCAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have isolated the gene for cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14-demethylase (14DM) from the yeast Candida tropicalis. This was accomplished by screening genomic libraries of strain ATCC750 in E. coli using a DNA fragment containing the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14DM gene. Identi...

  2. [Identification and susceptibility against fluconazole and albaconazole of 100 yeasts' strains isolated from vaginal discharge].

    PubMed

    Arechavala, Alicia I; Bianchi, Mario H; Robles, Ana María; Santiso, Gabriela; Negroni, Ricardo

    2007-12-31

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a condition that affects a great number of fertile women. It is considered the second cause of genital infection after vaginosis due to GAM complex. Candida albicans is the most frequent isolated species from vaginal discharge. However, sometimes more than one yeast species could be found in the same clinical sample that are more resistant to antifungal drugs. Nowadays, it is necessary to identify properly up to species level the isolated microorganism and to determine the antifungal susceptibility profile. One hundred strains obtained from vaginal discharge of 94 patients suffering acute vulvovaginal candidiasis were studied. The identification of the isolates showed: C. albicans 86%, Candida glabrata 6%, Candida inconspicua 3%, Candida krusei 2% and Candida intermedia, Candida holmii and Trichosporon asahii one case each. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of all the yeasts against fluconazole and albaconazole were performed. C. glabrata, C. krusei and C. inconspicua were the most resistant against fluconazole, on the other hand albicans was susceptible to this drug. All the isolates presented MIC against albaconazole much lower than fluconazole.

  3. Candida parapsilosis (sensu lato) isolated from hospitals located in the Southeast of Brazil: Species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and virulence attributes.

    PubMed

    Ziccardi, Mariangela; Souza, Lucieri O P; Gandra, Rafael M; Galdino, Anna Clara M; Baptista, Andréa R S; Nunes, Ana Paula F; Ribeiro, Mariceli A; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2015-12-01

    Candida parapsilosis (sensu lato), which represents a fungal complex composed of three genetically related species - Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis, has emerged as an important yeast causing fungemia worldwide. The goal of the present work was to assess the prevalence, antifungal susceptibility and production of virulence traits in 53 clinical isolates previously identified as C. parapsilosis (sensu lato) obtained from hospitals located in the Southeast of Brazil. Species forming this fungal complex are physiologically/morphologically indistinguishable; however, polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism of FKS1 gene has solved the identification inaccuracy, revealing that 43 (81.1%) isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and 10 (18.9%) as C. orthopsilosis. No C. metapsilosis was found. The geographic distribution of these Candida species was uniform among the studied Brazilian States (São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Espírito Santo). All C. orthopsilosis and almost all C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (95.3%) isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin. Nevertheless, one C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolate was resistant to fluconazole and another one was resistant to caspofungin. C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates exhibited higher MIC mean values to amphotericin B, fluconazole and caspofungin than those of C. orthopsilosis, while C. orthopsilosis isolates displayed higher MIC mean to itraconazole compared to C. parapsilosis sensu stricto. Identical MIC mean values to voriconazole were measured for these Candida species. All the isolates of both species were able to form biofilm on polystyrene surface. Impressively, biofilm-growing cells of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. orthopsilosis exhibited a considerable resistance to all antifungal agents tested. Pseudohyphae were observed in 67.4% and 80

  4. Clonal Strain Persistence of Candida albicans Isolates from Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moorhouse, Alexander J.; Rennison, Claire; Raza, Muhammad; Lilic, Desa; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder characterised by susceptibility to chronic Candida and fungal dermatophyte infections of the skin, nails and mucous membranes. Molecular epidemiology studies of CMC infection are limited in number and scope and it is not clear whether single or multiple strains inducing CMC persist stably or are exchanged and replaced. We subjected 42 C. albicans individual single colony isolates from 6 unrelated CMC patients to multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Multiple colonies were typed from swabs taken from multiple body sites across multiple time points over a 17-month period. Among isolates from each individual patient, our data show clonal and persistent diploid sequence types (DSTs) that were stable over time, identical between multiple infection sites and exhibit azole resistant phenotypes. No shared origin or common source of infection was identified among isolates from these patients. Additionally, we performed C. albicans MLST SNP genotype frequency analysis to identify signatures of past loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events among persistent and azole resistant isolates retrieved from patients with autoimmune disorders including CMC. PMID:26849050

  5. Molecular typing of Candida albicans strains isolated from denture wearers by repetitive sequence-based PCR.

    PubMed

    Abaci, O; Haliki-Uztan, A; Ozturk, B; Toksavul, S; Ulusoy, M; Boyacioglu, H

    2011-02-01

    Long-term use of prosthesis is the most important risk factor for the colonization of Candida species on the mucosal surfaces, which can lead to the development of denture-related stomatitis (DRS). Some individuals wearing prosthesis develop DRS and others do not. C. albicans strains isolated from both groups were genotypically compared. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the strain causing prosthesis stomatitis was different from the other strains genotypically. The study included 90 individuals wearing different prostheses and 20 control individuals with natural teeth. In the study 109 C. albicans strains were used which were isolated from the saliva samples and the mucosal surfaces of the tongues and palates of 51 individuals and then defined phenotypically. Phenotypic diagnosis of the isolates was genotypically verified by using species-specific PCR. For molecular typing, repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR) was employed. The results of the study revealed that REP-PCR had the capability to separate 109 C. albicans strains and six reference strains into 44 genotypes. Whereas C. albicans strains showed heterogenic distribution, C. albicans strains isolated from the individuals suffering from prosthesis stomatitis showed no specific genotypes. REP-PCR is a simple, fast and low-cost method and helped work on a great number of samples.

  6. Microdilution in vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns of Candida Species, From Mild Cutaneous to Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rezazadeh, Elham; Sabokbar, Azar; Moazeni, Maryam; Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Badali, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida species, as opportunistic organisms, can cause various clinical manifestations, ranging from mild cutaneous infections to systemic candidiasis in otherwise healthy individuals. Remarkably, the incidence and mortality rates of candidemia have significantly increased worldwide, even after advances in medical interventions and the development of novel antifungal drugs. Objectives Given the possible resistance to antifungal agents, susceptibility testing can be useful in defining the activity spectrum of antifungals and determining the appropriate treatment regime. Materials and Methods The in vitro susceptibilities of molecularly identified Candida strains (n = 150) belonging to seven species recovered from clinical specimens, including vaginal, cutaneous, sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and blood samples, were determined for six antifungal drugs (amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, and caspofungin), based on the clinical and laboratory standards institute’s M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Results Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species (44.66%), followed by non-albicans Candida, including C. glabrata (20%), C. parapsilosis (13.33%), C. krusei (8%), C. tropicalis (7.3%), C. dubliniensis (4%), and C. africana (3.33%). Posaconazole had the lowest geometric mean minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (0.0122 µg/ml), followed by amphotericin B (0.0217 µg/mL), voriconazole (0.1022 µg/mL), itraconazole (0.1612 µg/mL), caspofungin (0.2525 µg/mL), and fluconazole (0.4874 µg/mL) against all isolated Candida species. Candida africana and C. parapsilosis were significantly more susceptible to fluconazole, compared to C. albicans and other Candida species (P < 0.001). However, their clinical effectiveness in the treatment of Candida infections remains to be determined. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of precise and correct species identification of clinical yeast isolates via

  7. Susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida spp. to terconazole and other azole antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Gerarden, T

    1989-01-01

    Terconazole is a triazole ketal derivative with potent, broad-spectrum antifungal activity. We investigated the in vitro activity of terconazole, miconazole, and clotrimazole, against 94 clinical isolates of Candida spp.: C. albicans (n = 68), C. tropicalis (n = 18), and C. parapsilosis (n = 8). In vitro susceptibility testing was performed using a broth microdilution method. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of terconazole were less than those of miconazole against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis but higher against C. tropicalis. Terconazole was more active than clotrimazole against C. parapsilosis and less active against C. albicans and C. tropicalis. Terconazole inhibited the uptake of 14C-labeled glucose, leucine, and hypoxanthine into C. albicans and caused the rapid release of intracellular K+. Based on these studies, terconazole has promising anticandidal activity and warrants further in vitro and in vivo investigation.

  8. [Isolated yeast species in urine samples in a Spanish regional hospital].

    PubMed

    Heras-Cañas, Victor; Ros, Luis; Sorlózano, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Soto, Blanca; Navarro-Marí, José María; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José

    2015-01-01

    Candiduria detection in hospitalized or immunocompromised patients is of great clinical significance. The aim of our study was to describe the isolation frequency of significant species of yeasts in urine samples processed in our hospital during the period 2010- 2013, and to analyze their susceptibility to commonly used antifungal agents. Species identification was performed by seeding on a chromogenic medium, the filamentation test and automated systems (ASM Vitek and MALDI Biotyper), while susceptibility was determined using the ASM Vitek system. Of the 632 yeast isolates in urine, 371 were Candida albicans species and 261 non-C. albicans Candida spp. The species with the highest number of resistant isolates were Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. Based on the results obtained, we believe that species identification and the susceptibility study should be current practice in the laboratories when species other than C. albicans are isolated.

  9. Candida gelsemii sp. nov., a yeast of the Metschnikowiaceae clade isolated from nectar of the poisonous Carolina jessamine.

    PubMed

    Manson, Jessamyn S; Lachance, Marc-André; Thomson, James D

    2007-07-01

    A new yeast species, Candida gelsemii, is described to accommodate three isolates recovered in Georgia, USA, from the toxic nectar of the Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens). The species resembles other members of the Metschnikowiaceae clade that have been recovered from nectar, but differs in a number of morphological and physiological characteristics. Analysis of rDNA sequences places the new species well into the clade, but in a basal position with respect to a group of Metschnikowia and Candida species known to occur in association with nectars and bees, as well as marine invertebrates. The type is strain UWOPS 06-24.1(T) (CBS 10509(T), NRRL Y-48212(T).

  10. Different Candida parapsilosis clinical isolates and lipase deficient strain trigger an altered cellular immune response

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Renáta; Alonso, Maria F.; Bain, Judith M.; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Erwig, Lars-Peter; Gácser, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Numerous human diseases can be associated with fungal infections either as potential causative agents or as a result of changed immune status due to a primary disease. Fungal infections caused by Candida species can vary from mild to severe dependent upon the site of infection, length of exposure, and past medical history. Patients with impaired immune status are at increased risk for chronic fungal infections. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed the increasing incidence of candidiasis caused by non-albicans species such as Candida parapsilosis. Due to its increasing relevance we chose two distinct C. parapsilosis strains, to describe the cellular innate immune response toward this species. In the first section of our study we compared the interaction of CLIB 214 and GA1 cells with murine and human macrophages. Both strains are commonly used to investigate C. parapsilosis virulence properties. CLIB 214 is a rapidly pseudohyphae-forming strain and GA1 is an isolate that mainly exists in a yeast form. Our results showed, that the phagocyte response was similar in terms of overall uptake, however differences were observed in macrophage migration and engulfment of fungal cells. As C. parapsilosis releases extracellular lipases in order to promote host invasion we further investigated the role of these secreted components during the distinct stages of the phagocytic process. Using a secreted lipase deficient mutant strain and the parental strain GA1 individually and simultaneously, we confirmed that fungal secreted lipases influence the fungi's virulence by detecting altered innate cellular responses. In this study we report that two isolates of a single species can trigger markedly distinct host responses and that lipase secretion plays a role on the cellular level of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:26528256

  11. Biotypes of oral Candida albicans isolated from AIDS patients and HIV-free subjects in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Teanpaisan, R; Nittayananta, W; Chongsuvivatwong, V

    2000-05-01

    This study was conducted to examine biotypes and antifungal susceptibility patterns of oral Candida albicans isolated from HIV-infected patients, HIV-free patients with candidiasis and healthy subjects. All isolates were biotyped using a typing system based on enzyme profiles, carbohydrate assimilation patterns and boric acid resistance. Thirty-eight biotypes were found amongst 218 oral C. albicans isolates. The major biotype found was A1S, which accounted for 32.6% of all isolates, and this biotype was the most common in all groups. There was a greater variety of biotypes of C. albicans in the HIV-infected group than in the other groups; however, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of a total of 118 isolates were determined for amphotericin B and for ketoconazole using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) broth macrodilution method and the E-test. When the antifungal susceptibility patterns among the groups were compared, a statistically significant difference was found only with amphotericin B. The median MIC of amphotericin B in the HIV-infected group was higher than in the healthy group (P=0.013, NCCLS method; P=0.002, E-test). However, this difference in sensitivity was not restricted to any sub-type investigated. Our results showed that the biotype patterns of C. albicans isolates that colonize HIV-infected patients are similar to those of HIV-free subjects, and there is no relationship between antifungal susceptibility patterns and the biotypes.

  12. [Comparative study of the Candida albicans genotypes isolated from immunocompromised patients and health carriers].

    PubMed

    Carnovale, S; Elias Costa, M R; Relloso, S; Negroni, R; Negroni, M B; Iovannitti, C

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Candida albicans strain genotype isolates from oral cavity of immunocompromised patients due to different immunologic impairments with apparently normal carriers. Four populations were studied: 1) HIV positive hospitalized patients, 2) HIV negative immunocompromised patients (leukemia, lymphoma, organ transplant recipients), 3) drug addicts prior to AIDS pandemia in Argentina, 4) apparently normal carriers. DNA extracted was digested with the enzyme Eco RI, electrophoresed, transferred to nitrocellulose membrane and hybridized with the 27A probe labelled with 32P. The comparison between the profiles obtained permitted the differentiation of 16 genotypes. The distribution of the strains led to the conclusion that: a) all the isolated strains from AIDS patients were closely related and distributed in only three genotypes (1, 3, 11); b) a major genetic relationship between the isolates from AIDS patients and HIV negative immunocompromised patients was observed; c) strains from carriers showed a minor genetic similarity with those obtained from AIDS patients; d) characteristic profiles belonging to any of the studied groups were not found; e) significant genomic changes have not been observed during the last twenty years.

  13. Effect of edible sesame oil on growth of clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toshiko; Nishio, Junko; Okada, Shinobu

    2014-07-01

    Elderly individuals are at increased risk of oral thrush (oral candidiasis) due to decreased saliva secretion. Due to their antimicrobial properties, edible oils can be effective natural agents for oral care. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of sesame oil, which is widely used for cooking in Asian countries, and two other edible oils on the growth of both mycelial and yeast forms of five clinical isolates of Candida albicans, a causative microorganism of oral thrush. We assessed the effect of each oil in concentrations of 0.078%, 0.156%, and 0.313% on growth of the mycelial forms of the clinical isolates over 24 hr using the crystal violet method. We also evaluated the effect of each oil on growth of the yeast forms by counting the number of viable yeast cells after culturing in the oils for 24 hr. Sesame oil inhibited the growth of both mycelial and yeast forms. Safflower and olive oil also inhibited the growth of both forms of C. albicans but to a lesser extent than sesame oil. The ability to inhibit the growth of the mycelial form correlated with sesame oil concentration. Roasting influenced growth inhibition ability and high-roasted sesame oil most effectively inhibited the yeast form. The growth inhibitory effect differed among the five isolates. We hypothesize that the sesamin and fatty acid components of sesame oil are involved in its antifungal activity.

  14. A multicentre study of antifungal strategies and outcome of Candida spp. peritonitis in intensive-care units.

    PubMed

    Montravers, P; Mira, J-P; Gangneux, J-P; Leroy, O; Lortholary, O

    2011-07-01

    Information on the species causing Candida peritonitis, their in vitro susceptibility, antifungal strategies in this setting and patient outcome is still scarce. AmarCand was a prospective, non-interventional study in 271 adult intensive-care unit (ICU) patients with proven invasive Candida infection who received systemic antifungal therapy (France, 2005-2006). Of these ICU patients, 93 (median age 65 years, simplified acute physiology score II 52) had Candida peritonitis, including 73 nosocomial peritonitis, 53 concomitant bacterial peritoneal infections and 26 candidaemias. Candida species were C. albicans (n = 63/108 isolates, 58%), C. glabrata (n = 22, 20%), C. krusei (n = 9), C. kefyr (n = 5), C. parapsilosis (n = 3), C. tropicalis (n = 3), C. ciferii (n = 2) and C. lusitaniae (n = 1). Of tested isolates, 28% were fluconazole-resistant or susceptible dose-dependent (C. albicans 3/32, C. glabrata 9/14, C. krusei 4/4). Empiric antifungal treatment was started 1 day (median) after peritonitis diagnosis, with fluconazole (n = 2 patients), caspofungin (n = 12), voriconazole (n = 3), amphotericin B (n = 2), or a combination (n = 4). Following susceptibility testing, empiric antifungal treatment was judged inadequate in 9/45 (20%) patients and modified in 30 patients (fluconazole was replaced by caspofungin (n = 14) or voriconazole (n = 4)). Mortality in ICU was 38% (35/93) and was not influenced by type of Candida species, fluconazole susceptibility, time to treatment, candidaemia, nosocomial acquisition, or concomitant bacterial infection. No specific factors for death were identified. In summary, a high proportion of fluconazole-resistant or susceptible dose-dependent strains was cultured. These results confirm the high mortality rates of Candida peritonitis and plead for additional investigation in this population. Antifungal treatment for severe cases of Candida peritonitis in ICU patients remains the standard care.

  15. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis complex isolates collected from oral cavities of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Moris, D V; Melhem, M S C; Martins, M A; Souza, L R; Kacew, S; Szeszs, M W; Carvalho, L R; Pimenta-Rodrigues, M V; Berghs, H A M; Mendes, R P

    2012-12-01

    At present, few data are available on the prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis complex isolates from HIV-infected individuals. The C. parapsilosis complex comprises three species, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis. Fifteen of 318 Candida isolates were identified as members of the C. parapsilosis complex by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The prevalence of C. parapsilosis complex isolates was 4.7 %, 2.2 % being identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and 2.5 % as C. metapsilosis, while no C. orthopsilosis was isolated. This is believed to be the first study that has identified isolates of C. metapsilosis obtained from the oral cavity of HIV-infected individuals. Antifungal susceptibility tests indicated that all the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FLC), ketoconazole (KTC), itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VRC) and caspofungin (CASPO). Although isolates of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. metapsilosis were susceptible to FLC, isolates of C. metapsilosis showed a tendency for higher MICs (≥1.0 µg ml(-1)). Based upon the frequency of candidiasis and the fact that certain isolates of the C. parapsilosis complex respond differently to FLC therapy, our data may be of therapeutic relevance with respect to susceptibility and potential resistance to specific antifungal agents. Our data suggest that C. metapsilosis can be a human commensal; its importance as a pathogen has yet to be confirmed.

  16. Species-specific and drug-specific differences in susceptibility of Candida biofilms to echinocandins: characterization of less common bloodstream isolates.

    PubMed

    Simitsopoulou, Maria; Peshkova, Pavla; Tasina, Efthymia; Katragkou, Aspasia; Kyrpitzi, Daniela; Velegraki, Aristea; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2013-06-01

    Candida species other than Candida albicans are increasingly recognized as causes of biofilm-associated infections. This is a comprehensive study that compared the in vitro activities of all three echinocandins against biofilms formed by different common and infrequently identified Candida isolates. We determined the activities of anidulafungin (ANID), caspofungin (CAS), and micafungin (MFG) against planktonic cells and biofilms of bloodstream isolates of C. albicans (15 strains), Candida parapsilosis (6 strains), Candida lusitaniae (16 strains), Candida guilliermondii (5 strains), and Candida krusei (12 strains) by XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] assay. Planktonic and biofilm MICs were defined as ≥ 50% fungal damage. Planktonic cells of all Candida species were susceptible to the three echinocandins, with MICs of ≤ 1 mg/liter. By comparison, differences in the MIC profiles of biofilms in response to echinocandins existed among the Candida species. Thus, C. lusitaniae and C. guilliermondii biofilms were highly recalcitrant to all echinocandins, with MICs of ≥ 32 mg/liter. In contrast, the MICs of all three echinocandins for C. albicans and C. krusei biofilms were relatively low (MICs ≤ 1 mg/liter). While echinocandins exhibited generally high MICs against C. parapsilosis biofilms, MFG exhibited the lowest MICs against these isolates (4 mg/liter). A paradoxical growth effect was observed with CAS concentrations ranging from 8 to 64 mg/liter against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis biofilms but not against C. krusei, C. lusitaniae, or C. guilliermondii. While non-albicans Candida planktonic cells were susceptible to all echinocandins, there were drug- and species-specific differences in susceptibility among biofilms of the various Candida species, with C. lusitaniae and C. guilliermondii exhibiting profiles of high MICs of the three echinocandins.

  17. Systemic neonatal candidosis: the karyotyping of Candida albicans strains isolated from neonates and health-workers.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdeljelil, J; Ben Saida, N; Saghrouni, F; Fathallah, A; Boukadida, J; Sboui, H; Ben Said, M

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans has become an important cause of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The aim of the present study was to compare C. albicans strains isolated from neonates (NN) suffering from systemic candidosis and from nurses in order to determine the relatedness between NN and health workers' strains. Thirty-one C. albicans strains were isolated from 18 NN admitted to the NICU of the neonatology service of Farhat Hached Hospital of Sousse, Tunisia and suffering from systemic candidosis, together with five strains recovered from nurses suffering from C. albicans onychomycosis. Two additional strains were tested, one from an adult patient who developed a systemic candidosis and the second from an adult with inguinal intertrigo. All strains were karyotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with a CHEF-DR II system. Analysis of PFGE patterns yielded by the 38 strains tested led to the identification of three pulsotypes that were designated I, II and III, and consisted of six chromosomal bands with a size ranging from 700 to >2500 kbp. The most widespread was the pulsotype I, which was shared by 17 NN and the five nurses' strains. The identity between NN and nurses' strains is very suggestive of a nosocomial acquisition from health-workers.

  18. Molecular mechanisms associated with Fluconazole resistance in clinical Candida albicans isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Mane, Arati; Vidhate, Pallavi; Kusro, Chanchal; Waman, Vaishali; Saxena, Vandana; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Risbud, Arun

    2016-02-01

    Resistance to azole antifungals is a significant problem in Candida albicans. An understanding of resistance at molecular level is essential for the development of strategies to tackle resistance and rationale design of newer antifungals and target-based molecular approaches. This study presents the first evaluation of molecular mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in clinical C.albicans isolates from India. Target site (ERG11) alterations were determined by DNA sequencing, whereas real-time PCRs were performed to quantify target and efflux pump genes (CDR1, CDR2, MDR1) in 87 [Fluconazole susceptible (n = 30), susceptible-dose dependent (n = 30) and resistant (n = 27)] C.albicans isolates. Cross-resistance to fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole was observed in 74.1% isolates. Six amino acid substitutions were identified, including 4 (E116D, F145L, E226D, I437V) previously reported ones and 2 (P406L, Q474H) new ones. CDR1 over-expression was seen in 77.7% resistant isolates. CDR2 was exclusively expressed with CDR1 and their concomitant over-expression was associated with azole cross-resistance. MDR1 and ERG11 over-expression did not seem to be associated with resistance. Our results show that drug efflux mediated by Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters, especially CDR1 is the predominant mechanism of fluconazole resistance and azole cross-resistance in C. albicans and indicate the need for research directed towards developing strategies to tackle efflux mediated resistance to salvage azoles.

  19. Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns of Candida Species Recovered from Endotracheal Tube in an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Baghdadi, Elham; Rezaie, Sassan; Abolghasem, Sara; Kiasat, Neda; Salehi, Zahra; Sharifynia, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Biofilms formed by Candida species which associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents. The aim of this study was to identify and determine the antifungal susceptibility pattern of Candida species isolated from endotracheal tubes from ICU patients. Methods. One hundred forty ICU patients with tracheal tubes who were intubated and mechanically ventilated were surveyed for endotracheal tube biofilms. Samples were processed for quantitative microbial culture. Yeast isolates were identified to the species level based on morphological characteristics and their identity was confirmed by PCR-RFLP. Antifungal susceptibility testing was determined according to CLSI document (M27-A3). Results. Ninety-five strains of Candida were obtained from endotracheal tubes of which C. albicans (n = 34; 35.7%) was the most frequently isolated species followed by other species which included C. glabrata (n = 24; 25.2%), C. parapsilosis (n = 16; 16.8%), C. tropicalis (n = 12; 12.6%), and C. krusei (n = 9; 9.4%). The resulting MIC90 for all Candida species were in increasing order as follows: caspofungin (0.5 μg/mL); amphotericin B (2 μg/mL); voriconazole (8.8 μg/mL); itraconazole (16 μg/mL); and fluconazole (64 μg/mL). Conclusion. Candida species recovered from endotracheal tube are the most susceptible to caspofungin. PMID:27642628

  20. Antifungal Long-Chain Alkenyl Sulphates Isolated from Culture Broths of the Fungus Chaetopsina sp.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Gloria; González-Menéndez, Víctor; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Martín, Jesús; Cautain, Bastien; Sánchez, Pilar; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Vicente, Francisca; Genilloud, Olga; Reyes, Fernando

    2016-10-05

    During a high-throughput screening program focused on the discovery and characterization of new antifungal compounds, a total of 8320 extracts from Fundacion MEDINA's collection were screened against a panel of 6 fungal parasitic strains, namely Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida albicans, and Aspergillus fumigatus. A total of 127 extracts displayed antifungal properties and, after LC/MS dereplication, 10 were selected for further fractionation. Bioassay-guided fractionation from a 1-L fermentation of one of these extracts, belonging to the fungus Chaetopsina sp., led to the isolation of linoleyl sulphate (1), linolenyl sulphate (2), and oleyl sulphate (3) as the compounds responsible for the antifungal activity. These molecules were previously described as synthetic products with the ability to produce the allosteric inhibition of soybean lipoxygenase and human lipoxygenase.

  1. Assessment of antifungal activity of herbal and conventional toothpastes against clinical isolates of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Adwan, Ghaleb; Salameh, Yousef; Adwan, Kamel; Barakat, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective To detect the anticandidal activity of nine toothpastes containing sodium fluoride, sodium monofluorophosphate and herbal extracts as an active ingredients against 45 oral and non oral Candida albicans (C. albicans) isolates. Methods The antifungal activity of these toothpaste formulations was determined using a standard agar well diffusion method. Statistical analysis was performed using a statistical package, SPSS windows version 15, by applying mean values using one-way ANOVA with post-hoc least square differences (LSD) method. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results All toothpastes studied in our experiments were effective in inhibiting the growth of all C. albicans isolates. The highest anticandidal activity was obtained from toothpaste that containing both herbal extracts and sodium fluoride as active ingredients, while the lowest activity was obtained from toothpaste containing sodium monofluorophosphate as an active ingredient. Antifungal activity of Parodontax toothpaste showed a significant difference (P< 0.001) against C. albicans isolates compared to toothpastes containing sodium fluoride or herbal products. Conclusions In the present study, it has been demonstrated that toothpaste containing both herbal extracts and sodium fluoride as active ingredients are more effective in control of C. albicans, while toothpaste that containing monofluorophosphate as an active ingredient is less effective against C. albicans. Some herbal toothpaste formulations studied in our experiments, appear to be equally effective as the fluoride dental formulations and it can be used as an alternative to conventional formulations for individuals who have an interest in naturally-based products. Our results may provide invaluable information for dental professionals. PMID:23569933

  2. [Current aspects of invasive diseases caused by Candida and other yeast fungi].

    PubMed

    Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is the most common invasive fungal disease causing an unacceptably high mortality. Candida albicans remains the predominant origin, but an epidemiological shift has been described in the last decades. Some species of Candida have emerged as an important cause of severe candidaemia and can exhibit reduced susceptibility to the current antifungal agents. Candida parapsilosis has been associated with candidaemia in neonates and young adults, whereas Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei are most frequently isolated in blood cultures from older patients (>65 years). Other yeasts are becoming important causes of invasive mycoses, such as Cryptococcus, Trichosporon, Malassezia, Geotrichum or Saprochaete/Magnusiomyces. Cryptococcosis is more relevant as a cause of meningitis in HIV-infected people, but cryptococcal infections are also a clinical challenge in transplant recipients. Diagnosis remains an important problem, causing unacceptable delays in starting a correct and direct treatment. However, there are some new approaches that can help in the prompt and specific diagnosis of invasive yeast infections, such as in situ hybridisation using PNA-FISH probes, causal agent identification in blood cultures using MALDi-TOF MS, or new and rapid nucleic acids detection assays.

  3. In vitro activity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against bacterial and Candida spp. isolates from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Banes-Marshall, L; Cawley, P; Phillips, C A

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the in vitro activity of tea tree oil (TTO) against a range of wild strains of microorganisms isolated from clinical specimens of leg ulcers and pressure sores. The antimicrobial effectiveness of TTO is determined in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) or minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC). The isolates include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), S. aureus, faecal streptococci, beta-haemolytic streptococci, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Pseudomonas spp. and coliform bacilli. Eleven Candida spp. isolates from skin and vaginal swabs also are tested. Using an agar dilution assay, the MICs of TTO in 88 out of 90 isolates was 0.5-1.0% (v/v), whilst with P. aeruginosa it was >2% (v/v). A broth microdilution method was used to determine MIC and minimum cidal concentration (MCC) of 80 isolates. In 64 isolates, TTO produced an inhibitory and cidal effect at 3% and 4% (v/v), respectively. S. aureus and Candida spp. were the most susceptible to TTO, with MICs and MBCs of 0.5% and 1%, respectively. P. aeruginosa and the faecal streptococci isolates, with MICs and MBCs of >8%, were resistant to TTO.

  4. Antifungal activity of cathelicidin peptides against planktonic and biofilm cultures of Candida species isolated from vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Scarsini, Michele; Tomasinsig, Linda; Arzese, Alessandra; D'Este, Francesca; Oro, Debora; Skerlavaj, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a frequent gynecological condition caused by Candida albicans and a few non-albicans Candida spp. It has a significant impact on the quality of life of the affected women also due to a considerable incidence of recurrent infections that are difficult to treat. The formation of fungal biofilm may contribute to the problematic management of recurrent VVC due to the intrinsic resistance of sessile cells to the currently available antifungals. Thus, alternative approaches for the prevention and control of biofilm-related infections are urgently needed. In this regard, the cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immunity are potential candidates for the development of novel antimicrobials as many of them display activity against biofilm formed by various microbial species. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antifungal activities of the cathelicidin peptides LL-37 and BMAP-28 against pathogenic Candida spp. also including C. albicans, isolated from vaginal infections, and against C. albicans SC5314 as a reference strain. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against planktonic and biofilm-grown Candida cells by using microdilution susceptibility and XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction assays and, in the case of established biofilms, also by CFU enumeration and fluorescence microscopy. BMAP-28 was effective against planktonically grown yeasts in standard medium (MIC range, 2-32μM), and against isolates of C. albicans and Candida krusei in synthetic vaginal simulated fluid (MIC range 8-32μM, depending on the pH of the medium). Established 48-h old biofilms formed by C. albicans SC5314 and C. albicans and C. krusei isolates were 70-90% inhibited within 24h incubation with 16μM BMAP-28. As shown by propidium dye uptake and CFU enumeration, BMAP-28 at 32μM killed sessile C. albicans SC5314 by membrane permeabilization with a faster killing kinetics

  5. [Candida carriage in the oral mucosa of a student population: adhesiveness of the strains and predisposing factors].

    PubMed

    Negroni, M; González, M I; Levin, B; Cuesta, A; Iovanniti, C

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish oral carriage of Candida and possible factors associated to their virulence in young adults and their relation with local and general situations considered as predisposing factors. Samples were obtained from dorsum tongue in 70 students attending the Faculty of Dentistry (University of Buenos Aires) average age: 23, all in healthy oral conditions. Of these, 21.42% were Candida positive. These samples were seeded in CHROMagar. Candida identification was completed in milk agar and Fungichrom 1. The following species were identified: 11 Candida albicans (C.a), 2 Candida parapsilosis (C.p) and 1 Candida glabrata (C.g). In one case, 2 species (C.a and C.g) were isolated in the same sample. Virulence was determined as adherence capacity by biofilm or in vitro plaque formation and hydrophobicity. Different host factors were analyzed statistically to establish their importance as predisposing factors to allow Candida colonization. Adherence of C.a. was found to be similar in all C.a. strains, whereas significant differences were found between C.a. and C.p. and between C.a. and C.g. Only the antiseptic mouthrinse and the diet were significant among the considered factors.

  6. Antifungal drug resistance pattern of Candida. spp isolated from vaginitis in Ilam-Iran during 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadi, Jasem; Havasian, Mohamad Reza; Panahi, Jafar; Pakzad, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal Candidiasis is the most common and important opportunistic fungal infection in women. By increasing use of antifungal drugs in recent years, it has caused drug resistance. This study aims to evaluate antifungal drugs susceptibility of Candida. spp isolated of women with vaginitis from Ilam-Iran during 2013-2014. samples were collected and cultured from 385 women with vaginitis, then Candida.spp was diagnosed by standard method. Antifungal drug susceptibility test for nystatin 100 unit/disk, fluconazole 10µg/disk, itraconazole 10µg/disk, ketoconazole 10µg/disk, amphotericinB 20µg/disk, clotrimazole 10µg/disk, posaconazole 5µg/disk, and voriconazole 1µg/disk were carried out by M44-A method(CLSI). From all culture positive samples, 150 isolates were Candida albicans and 89 isolates were non-albicans. The resistance to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, nystatin and amphotericin B was 76%, 62%, 72%, 55%, 6%, 7%, 1% and 0%. The highest resistance was seen for fluconazole , itraconazole, and the highest susceptible was seen for nystatin and amphotericin B. These results indicate nystatin and amphotericin B can be used as the first line for empirical therapy of vaginal candidiasis in the district. PMID:26124561

  7. Prevalence and exoenzyme secretion by Candida albicans isolates from oral and vaginal mucosas of HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mariceli Araujo; Miranda, Angelica Espinosa; Gambale, Walderez; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues

    2004-04-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate the prevalence and the aetiology of forms of mucosal fungal infections of HIV-negative and HIV-positive women. Candida albicans was the predominate specie isolated from both groups of patients, with remarkable proportion of isolation from symptomatic women. All 239 C. albicans isolates, regardless of their source, showed activity of proteinase and phospholipase. It was verified that isolates with particularly higher levels of exoenzymes production were significantly more common in HIV-positive patients. However, isolates obtained from the HIV-positive patients in use of HAART, with protease inhibitor, presented lower levels of these exoenzymes, similar to the levels observed in the isolates from HIV-negative patients.

  8. Epidemiological characteristics of Candida species colonizing oral and rectal sites of Jordanian infants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is evidence that Candida colonization contributes to increasing invasion of candidiasis in hospitalized neonates. Few studies investigated the epidemiology and risk factors of Candida colonization among hospitalized and non-hospitalized infants. This prospective study investigated the major epidemiological characteristics of Candida species colonizing oral and rectal sites of Jordanian infants. Methods Infants aged one year or less who were examined at the pediatrics outpatient clinic or hospitalized at the Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan, were included in this study. Culture swabs were collected from oral and rectal sites and inoculated on Sabouraud dextrose agar. All Candida isolates were confirmed by the Remel RapID yeast plus system, and further investigated for specific virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility MIC using E-test. Genotyping of C. albicans isolates was determined using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis method. Results A total of 61/492 (12.4%) infants were colonized with Candida species by either their oral/rectal sites or both. Rectal colonization was significantly more detected than oral colonization (64.6% verses 35.4%), particularly among hospitalized infants aged more than one month. The pattern and rates of colonization were as follows: C. albicans was the commonest species isolated from both sites and accounted for 67.1% of all isolates, followed by C.kefyr (11.4%), each C. tropicalis and C. glabrata (8.9%) and C. parapsilosis (3.8%). A various rates of Candida isolates proved to secrete putative virulence factors in vitro; asparatyl proteinase, phospholipase and hemolysin. C. albicans were associated significantly (P < 0.05) with these enzymes than other Candida species. All Candida isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B and caspofungin, whereas 97% of Candida species isolates were susceptible to fluconazole using E-test. The genetic similarity of 53 C. albicans isolates as

  9. Biodegradation of Basic Violet 3 by Candida krusei isolated from textile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Deivasigamani, Charumathi; Das, Nilanjana

    2011-11-01

    Basic Violet 3 (BV) belongs to the most important group of synthetic colorants and is used extensively in textile industries. It is considered as xenobiotic compound which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. As Candida krusei could not use BV as sole carbon source, experiments were conducted to study the effect of cosubstrates on decolorization of BV in semi synthetic medium using glucose, sucrose, lactose, maltose, yeast extract, peptone, urea and ammonium sulphate. Maximum decolorization (74%) was observed in media supplemented with sucrose. Use of sugarcane bagasse extract as sole nutrient source showed 100% decolorization of BV within 24 h under optimized condition. UV-visible, FTIR spectral analysis and HPLC analysis confirmed the biodegradation of BV. Six degradation products were isolated and identified. We propose the biodegradation pathway for BV which occurs via stepwise reduction and demethylation process to yield mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-demethylated BV species which was degraded completely. The study of the enzymes responsible for decolorization showed the activities of lignin peroxidase, lacasse, tyrosinase, NADH-DCIP reductase, MG reductase and azoreductase in cells before and after decolorization. A significant increase in activities of NADH-DCIP reductase and laccase was observed in the cells after decolorization. The yeast C. krusei could show the ability to decolorize the textile dye BV using inexpensive source like sugarcane bagasse extract for decolorization.

  10. Biodegradation of aniline by Candida tropicalis AN1 isolated from aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dianzhan; Zheng, Guanyu; Wang, Shimei; Zhang, Dewei; Zhou, Lixiang

    2011-01-01

    Aniline-degrading microbes were cultivated and acclimated with the initial activated sludge collected from a chemical wastewater treatment plant. During the acclimation processes, aerobic granular sludge being able to effectively degrade aniline was successfully formed, from which a preponderant bacterial strain was isolated and named as AN1. Effects of factors including pH, temperature, and second carbon/nitrogen source on the biodegradation of aniline were investigated. Results showed that the optimal conditions for the biodegradation of aniline by the strain AN1 were at pH 7.0 and 28-35 degrees C. At the optimal pH and temperature, the biodegradation rate of aniline could reach as high as 17.8 mg/(L x hr) when the initial aniline concentration was 400 mg/L. Further studies revealed that the addition of 1 g/L glucose or ammonium chloride as a second carbon or nitrogen source could slightly enhance the biodegradation efficiency from 93.0% to 95.1%-98.5%. However, even more addition of glucose or ammonium could not further enhance the biodegradation process but delayed the biodegradation of aniline by the strain AN1. Based on morphological and physiological characteristics as well as the phylogenetic analysis of 26S rDNA sequences, the strain AN1 was identified as Candida tropicalis.

  11. Co-isolation of Trichosporon inkin and Candida parapsilosis from a scalp white piedra case.

    PubMed

    Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Al-Ansari, Hamda I; Boekhout, Teun; Theelen, Bart

    2004-02-01

    White piedra is a rare fungal infection of the hair shaft characterized by small, firm, irregular white-brown nodules. The infection is caused by basidiomycetous yeasts in the genus Trichosporon. We report a case of a 28-year-old female patient who acquired the infection in Qatar. In this case, the scalp was the only site affected, but infection at that site was extensive. The hair had a Saccharomyces-like yeast odor and appeared to be beaded, with light-brown nodules of varying sizes up to 2 mm long. Trichosporon sp. accompanied by Candida parapsilosis grew out along hair shafts planted in primary isolation media. Molecular identification of the Trichosporon carried out by analyzing the 26S ribosomal gene gave a 100% match with Trichosporon inkin, a major cause of pubic white piedra. The patient was treated with daily applications of ketoconazole shampoo followed by econazole shampoo and cream, and was considered clinically and mycologically cured after 2 months. Novel findings in the present case are the first identification of T. inkin as an agent of scalp white piedra, and the heavy outgrowth of C. parapsilosis from the concretions, although in the latter case it is not clear if the co-occurring yeast was etiologically contributory to the pathogenesis of the white piedra.

  12. Decolorization of textile dye by Candida albicans isolated from industrial effluents.

    PubMed

    Vitor, Vivian; Corso, Carlos Renato

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to observe microbial decolorization and biodegradation of the Direct Violet 51 azo dye by Candida albicans isolated from industrial effluents and study the metabolites formed after degradation. C. albicans was used in the removal of the dye in order to further biosorption and biodegradation at different pH values in aqueous solutions. A comparative study of biodegradation analysis was carried out using UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy, which revealed significant changes in peak positions when compared to the dye spectrum. Theses changes in dye structure appeared after 72 h at pH 2.50; after 240 h at pH 4.50; and after 280 h at pH 6.50, indicating the different by-products formed during the biodegradation process. Hence, the yeast C. albicans was able to remove the color substance, demonstrating a potential enzymatic capacity to modify the chemical structure of pigments found in industrial effluents.

  13. Phospholipase and Aspartyl Proteinase Activities of Candida Species Causing Vulvovaginal Candidiasis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bassyouni, Rasha H; Wegdan, Ahmed Ashraf; Abdelmoneim, Abdelsamie; Said, Wessam; AboElnaga, Fatma

    2015-10-01

    Few research had investigated the secretion of phospholipase and aspartyl proteinase from Candida spp. causing infection in females with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This research aimed to investigate the prevalence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) in diabetic versus non-diabetic women and compare the ability of identified Candida isolates to secrete phospholipases and aspartyl proteinases with characterization of their genetic profile. The study included 80 females with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 100 non-diabetic females within the child-bearing period. Candida strains were isolated and identified by conventional microbiological methods and by API Candida. The isolates were screened for their extracellular phospholipase and proteinase activities by culturing them on egg yolk and bovine serum albumin media, respectively. Detection of aspartyl proteinase genes (SAP1 to SAP8) and phospholipase genes (PLB1, PLB2) were performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Our results indicated that vaginal candidiasis was significantly higher among the diabetic group versus nondiabetic group (50% versus 20%, respectively) (p = 0.004). C. albicans was the most prevalent species followed by C. glabrata in both groups. No significant association between diabetes mellitus and phospholipase activities was detected (p = 0.262), whereas high significant proteinase activities exhibited by Candida isolated from diabetic females were found (82.5%) (p = 0.000). Non-significant associations between any of the tested proteinase or phospholipase genes and diabetes mellitus were detected (p > 0.05). In conclusion, it is noticed that the incidence of C. glabrata causing VVC is increased. The higher prevalence of vaginal candidiasis among diabetics could be related to the increased aspartyl proteinase production in this group of patients.

  14. In vitro activity of inexpensive topical alternatives against Candida spp. isolated from the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, Rana S; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2008-03-01

    The use of inexpensive topical alternatives, e.g. oil of melaleuca (tea tree oil (TTO)), chlorhexidine (CHX), povidone iodine (PI) and gentian violet (GV), to treat oral candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients has been proposed in resource-poor countries. However, pre-clinical studies comparing the antifungal activity of these agents are lacking. This study compared the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of TTO, GV, PI, CHX and fluconazole (FLZ) against 91 clinical Candida strains using Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) methodology. Isolates were obtained from the oral cavity of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. Among the topical agents examined, GV showed the most potent activity against all Candida isolates tested (MIC range, MIC for 50% of the organisms (MIC(50)) and MIC for 90% of the organisms (MIC(90)) of 0.03-0.25 microg/mL, 0.06 microg/mL and 0.1 2microg/mL, respectively). CHX was 64 times less active than GV (MIC range, MIC(50) and MIC(90) of 0.5-16 microg/mL, 4 microg/mL and 8 microg/mL, respectively). The lowest antifungal activity was seen for PI (MIC(90)=0.25%). Moreover, GV, unlike the other topical agents tested, was fungicidal (minimum fungicidal concentration=1 microg/mL) against Candida albicans isolates (n=83). In addition, GV showed activity against FLZ-resistant C. albicans (n=3). The combination of GV and FLZ was not antagonistic and there was no interaction between the two compounds. GV possesses potent antifungal activity against FLZ-susceptible and -resistant Candida strains and is not antagonistic when used in combination with FLZ. In vivo evaluation is warranted.

  15. Rapid detection of Candida species in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with pulmonary symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zarrinfar, Hossein; Kaboli, Saeed; Dolatabadi, Somayeh; Mohammadi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Candida species, especially C. albicans, are commensals on human mucosal surfaces, but are increasingly becoming one of the important invasive pathogens as seen by a rise in its prevalence in immunocompromised patients and in antibiotic consumption. Thus, an accurate identification of Candida species in patients with pulmonary symptoms can provide important information for effective treatment. A total of 75 clinical isolates of Candida species were obtained from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients with pulmonary symptoms. Candida cultures were identified based on nuclear ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-ITS2 rDNA) sequence analysis by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP). Molecular identification indicated that the isolates belonged predominantly to C. albicans (52%), followed by C. tropicalis (24%), C. glabrata (14.7%), C. krusei (5.3%), C. parapsilosis (1.3%), C. kefyr (1.3%) and C. guilliermondii (1.3%). Given the increasing complexity of disease profiles and their management regimens in diverse patients, rapid and accurate identification of Candida species can lead to timely and appropriate antifungal therapy.

  16. Alternative Identification Test Relying upon Sexual Reproductive Abilities of Candida lusitaniae Strains Isolated from Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    François, Fabienne; Noël, Thierry; Pépin, Régis; Brulfert, Annie; Chastin, Christiane; Favel, Anne; Villard, Jean

    2001-01-01

    The in vitro mating ability of Candida lusitaniae (teleomorph Clavispora lusitaniae) clinical isolates has been investigated. Studying the effects of culture conditions, we showed that ammonium ion depletion in the medium is a major trigger of the sexual cycle. Moreover, a solid support is required for mating, suggesting a role for adhesion factors in addition to the mating type gene recognition function. Monitoring of mating and meiosis efficiency with auxotrophic strains showed great variations in ascospore yields, which appeared to be strain and temperature dependent, with an optimal range of 18 to 28°C. The morphogenetic events taking place from mating to ascospore release were studied by scanning and electron microscopy, and the ultrastructure of the conjugation canal, through which intercellular nuclear exchanges occur, was revealed. Labeling experiments with a lectin-fluorochrome system revealed that the nuclear transfer was predominantly polarized, thus allowing a distinction between the nucleus donor and the nucleus acceptor strains. The direction of the transfer depended on the strain combination used, rather than on the genotypes of the strains, and did not appear to be controlled by the mating type genes. Finally, we demonstrated that all of the 76 clinical isolates used in this study were able to reproduce sexually when mated with an opposite mating type strain, and we identified a 1:1 MATa/MATα ratio in the collection. These results support the idea that there is no anamorph state in C. lusitaniae. Accordingly, the mating type test, which is easy to use and can usually be completed within 48 h, is a reliable alternative identification system for C. lusitaniae. PMID:11682506

  17. Echinocandin and triazole antifungal susceptibility profiles for clinical opportunistic yeast and mold isolates collected from 2010 to 2011: application of new CLSI clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values for characterization of geographic and temporal trends of antifungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Woosley, Leah N; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    The SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program monitors global susceptibility and resistance rates of newer and established antifungal agents. We report the echinocandin and triazole antifungal susceptibility patterns for 3,418 contemporary clinical isolates of yeasts and molds. The isolates were obtained from 98 laboratories in 34 countries during 2010 and 2011. Yeasts not presumptively identified by CHROMagar, the trehalose test, or growth at 42°C and all molds were sequence identified using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 28S (yeasts) or ITS, translation elongation factor (TEF), and 28S (molds) genes. Susceptibility testing was performed against 7 antifungals (anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole) using CLSI methods. Rates of resistance to all agents were determined using the new CLSI clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff value criteria, as appropriate. Sequencing of fks hot spots was performed for echinocandin non-wild-type (WT) strains. Isolates included 3,107 from 21 Candida spp., 146 from 9 Aspergillus spp., 84 from Cryptococcus neoformans, 40 from 23 other mold species, and 41 from 9 other yeast species. Among Candida spp., resistance to the echinocandins was low (0.0 to 1.7%). Candida albicans and Candida glabrata that were resistant to anidulafungin, caspofungin, or micafungin were shown to have fks mutations. Resistance to fluconazole was low among the isolates of C. albicans (0.4%), Candida tropicalis (1.3%), and Candida parapsilosis (2.1%); however, 8.8% of C. glabrata isolates were resistant to fluconazole. Among echinocandin-resistant C. glabrata isolates from 2011, 38% were fluconazole resistant. Voriconazole was active against all Candida spp. except C. glabrata (10.5% non-WT), whereas posaconazole showed decreased activity against C. albicans (4.4%) and Candida krusei (15.2% non-WT). All agents except for the echinocandins were active against C. neoformans, and the

  18. Multicenter Comparison of the Etest and EUCAST Methods for Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Candida Isolates to Micafungin

    PubMed Central

    Bougnoux, M.-E.; Accoceberry, I.; Angoulvant, A.; Bailly, E.; Botterel, F.; Chevrier, S.; Chouaki, T.; Dalle, F.; Datry, A.; Dupuis, A.; Fekkar, A.; Gangneux, J. P.; Guitard, J.; Hennequin, C.; Le Govic, Y.; Le Pape, P.; Maubon, D.; Sautour, M.; Sendid, B.; Chandenier, J.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro susceptibility of 933 Candida isolates, from 16 French hospitals, to micafungin was determined using the Etest in each center. All isolates were then sent to a single center for determination of MICs by the EUCAST reference method. Overall essential agreement between the two tests was 98.5% at ±2 log2 dilutions and 90.2% at ±1 log2 dilutions. Categorical agreement was 98.2%. The Etest is a valuable alternative to EUCAST for the routine determination of micafungin MICs in medical mycology laboratories. PMID:27297480

  19. Multicenter Comparison of the Etest and EUCAST Methods for Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Candida Isolates to Micafungin.

    PubMed

    Bougnoux, M-E; Dannaoui, E; Accoceberry, I; Angoulvant, A; Bailly, E; Botterel, F; Chevrier, S; Chouaki, T; Cornet, M; Dalle, F; Datry, A; Dupuis, A; Fekkar, A; Gangneux, J P; Guitard, J; Hennequin, C; Le Govic, Y; Le Pape, P; Maubon, D; Ranque, S; Sautour, M; Sendid, B; Chandenier, J

    2016-08-01

    In vitro susceptibility of 933 Candida isolates, from 16 French hospitals, to micafungin was determined using the Etest in each center. All isolates were then sent to a single center for determination of MICs by the EUCAST reference method. Overall essential agreement between the two tests was 98.5% at ±2 log2 dilutions and 90.2% at ±1 log2 dilutions. Categorical agreement was 98.2%. The Etest is a valuable alternative to EUCAST for the routine determination of micafungin MICs in medical mycology laboratories.

  20. Biotypes of oral Candida albicans isolates in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients from diverse geographic locations.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P C; Samaranayake, L P; Philipsen, H P; McCulloug, M; Reichart, P A; Schmidt-Westhausen, A; Scully, C; Porter, S R

    1995-01-01

    Oral Candida albicans isolates from HIV-infected individuals in Hong Kong, Australia, Germany and England were characterised using a biotyping system based on enzyme profiles, carbohydrate assimilation patterns and boric acid resistance of the yeasts. A total of 44 biotypes were found amongst the 117 oral C. albicans isolates examined. The major biotype A1R accounted for 17.9% of all isolates while the second commonest biotype was A1S (11.1% of isolates). Whereas these two biotypes were isolated from all the regions studied, there were a number of other biotypes unique to individual countries. The data indicate that there are many different sub-strains of oral C. albicans in HIV-infected patients, some of which are globally prevalent. However, further work is required to ascertain the diversity of oral C. albicans biotypes, if any, in health and disease.

  1. Evaluation of virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility patterns of different Candida species isolated from the female camel (Camelus dromedarius) genital tract.

    PubMed

    Sharifzadeh, Aghil; Soltani, Minoo; Shokri, Hojjatollah

    2015-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the enzymatic activity of different Candida species and their antifungal susceptibility patterns. The study involved a total of 83 isolates of Candida from the genital tract of the female Camelus dromedarius. After species identification, the isolates were analysed for the production/activity of phospholipase, proteinase and haemolysin. In addition, the agar disc diffusion method was performed on the basis of CLSI guidelines M44-A2 protocol for antifungal susceptibility testing. All the isolates were able to produce phospholipase, proteinase and haemolysin. A total of 35.48%, 87.09% and 64.51% of C. albicans isolates exhibited very high phospholipase, proteinase and haemolytic activities, respectively, whereas very high phospholipase, proteinase and haemolytic activities were determined in 5.76%, 23.07% and 45.16% of non-C. albicans isolates respectively. Overall, 61 (73.5%) of Candida isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, 70 (84.3%) susceptible to clotrimazole, 82 (98.8%) susceptible to voriconazole, 76 (91.6%) susceptible to itraconazole, 75 (90.4%) susceptible to ketoconazole, 83 (100%) susceptible to amphotericin B, 81 (97.6%) susceptible to nystatin and 36 (43.4%) susceptible to flucytosine. Candida isolates showed higher haemolytic activity than that of other secreted hydrolases among vaginal Candida species. In addition, amphotericin B was the most in vitro effective antifungal drug and flucytosine had the poorest activity under such conditions.

  2. Cyclosporine A decreases the fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration of Candida albicans clinical isolates but not biofilm formation and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, T; Nurrokhman; Baly, I; Daeli, P R; Kartasasmita, G; Wijayanti, N

    2015-03-01

    Among the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most abundant species in humans. One of the virulent factors of C. albicans is its ability to develop biofilm. Biofilm forming microbes are characterized by decreasing of its susceptibility to antibiotics and antifungal. The fungicidal effect of fluconazole may be enhanced by cyclosporine A in laboratory engineered C. albicans strains. The aim of this work is to analyze the synergistic effect of cyclosporine A with fluconazole in C. albicans clinical isolates and the effect of cycolsporine A alone in the biofilm formation. Six fluconazole resistant and six sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates were analyzed for its minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs), biofilm formation, and cell growths. A semi-quantitative XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5- sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction assay was conducted to measure the biofilm formation. Cyclosporine A has synergistic effect with fluconazole that was shown by decreasing MICs of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. However, cyclosporine A alone did not influence the biofilm formation and cell growth of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. These results indicated that cyclosporine A might be a promising candidate of adjuvant therapy for fluconazole against both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates.

  3. In vitro antifungal activity of fluconazole and voriconazole against non-Candida yeasts and yeast-like fungi clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Mandras, Narcisa; Roana, Janira; Scalas, Daniela; Fucale, Giacomo; Allizond, Valeria; Banche, Giuliana; Barbui, Anna; Li Vigni, Nicolò; Newell, Vance A; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Tullio, Vivian

    2015-10-01

    The risk of opportunistic infections caused by non-Candida yeasts and yeast-like fungi is increasingly common, mainly in immunocompromised patients. Appropriate first-line therapy has not been defined and standardized, mainly due to the low number of cases reported. To improve empirical treatment guidelines, we describe the susceptibility profile to fluconazole and voriconazole of 176 non-Candida yeasts and yeast-like fungi collected from hospitals in Piedmont, North West Italy from January 2009 to December 2013. The results showed that most isolates are susceptible to voriconazole (94%), but less susceptible to fluconazole (78%), suggesting that voriconazole could be used as first-line therapy in infections caused by these fungi.

  4. Cluster of oral atypical Candida albicans isolates in a group of human immunodeficiency virus-positive drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Boerlin, P; Boerlin-Petzold, F; Durussel, C; Addo, M; Pagani, J L; Chave, J P; Bille, J

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-one chlamydospore-forming and germ tube-positive Candida albicans clinical isolates from 15 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and 3 HIV-negative patients were examined by two different genetic methods. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and hybridization with the C. albicans-specific Ca3 probe showed that such isolates can be split into two genetically distinct groups that can be clearly distinguished. One group mainly contained strains with atypical sugar assimilation patterns and could be distinguished from the other group by the absence of intracellular beta-glucosidase activity. All 13 strains belonging to this group were isolated from the oral cavities of asymptomatic HIV-positive drug users and may be less pathogenic than the eight strains from the other group isolated either from HIV-positive patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis or from HIV-negative patients with invasive candidiasis. PMID:7615716

  5. Hibiscus sabdariffa extract inhibits in vitro biofilm formation capacity of Candida albicans isolated from recurrent urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Alshami, Issam; Alharbi, Ahmed E

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the prevention of recurrent candiduria using natural based approaches and to study the antimicrobial effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa (H. sabdariffa) extract and the biofilm forming capacity of Candida albicans strains in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract. Methods In this particular study, six strains of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans isolated from recurrent candiduria were used. The susceptibility of fungal isolates, time-kill curves and biofilm forming capacity in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract were determined. Results Various levels minimum inhibitory concentration of the extract were observed against all the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration values ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 mg/mL. Time-kill experiment demonstrated that the effect was fungistatic. The biofilm inhibition assay results showed that H. sabdariffa extract inhibited biofilm production of all the isolates. Conclusions The results of the study support the potential effect of H. sabdariffa extract for preventing recurrent candiduria and emphasize the significance of the plant extract approach as a potential antifungal agent. PMID:25182280

  6. Comparative evaluation of Etest and sensititre yeastone panels against the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A2 reference broth microdilution method for testing Candida susceptibility to seven antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Barbara D; Byrne, Terry C; Smith, Kelly L; Hanson, Kimberly E; Anstrom, Kevin J; Perfect, John R; Reller, L Barth

    2007-03-01

    To assess their utility for antifungal susceptibility testing in our clinical laboratory, the Etest and Sensititre methods were compared with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M27-A2 reference broth microdilution method. Fluconazole (FL), itraconazole (I), voriconazole (V), posaconazole (P), flucytosine (FC), caspofungin (C), and amphotericin B (A) were tested with 212 Candida isolates. Reference MICs were determined after 48 h of incubation, and Etest and Sensititre MICs were determined after 24 h and 48 h of incubation. Overall, excellent essential agreement (EA) between the reference and test methods was observed for Etest (95%) and Sensititre (91%). Etest showed an >or=92% EA for MICs for all drugs tested; Sensititre showed a >or=92% EA for MICs for I, FC, A, and C but 82% for FL and 85% for V. The overall categorical agreement (CA) was 90% for Etest and 88% for Sensititre; minor errors accounted for the majority of all categorical errors for both systems. Categorical agreement was lowest for Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis with both test systems. Etest and Sensititre provided better CA at 24 h compared to 48 h for C. glabrata; however, CA for C. glabrata was <80% for FL with both test systems despite MIC determination at 24 h. Agreement between technologists for both methods was >or=98% for each agent against all organisms tested. Overall, Etest and Sensititre methods compared favorably with the CLSI reference method for determining the susceptibility of Candida. However, further evaluation of their performance for determining the MICs of azoles, particularly for C. glabrata, is warranted.

  7. Hemolytic Activities of the Candida Species in Liquid Medium

    PubMed Central

    Malcok, Hilal Kuzucu; Aktas, Esin; Ayyildiz, Ahmet; Yigit, Nimet; Yazgi, Halil

    2009-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro hemolytic activities of 107 Candida strains isolated from different clinical samples in liquid medium, and to examine the impact of glucose on this activity. Materials and Methods A total of 107 Candida isolates representing seven species (C. albicans, n=28; C. glabrata, n=23; C. tropicalis, n=17; C. parapsilosis, n=16; C. kefyr, n=14; C. krusei, n=5; C. guilliermondii, n=4) were included in the study. The hemolytic activities of the strains were tested on two different Sabouraud dextrose liquid media (SDB) containing 7% defibrinated human blood, one of which is supplemented with 3% glucose and the other without glucose. Cultures were evaluated at the end of a 48-hour incubation. The hemolysis in the media was detected spectrophotometrically by measuring the amount of released hemoglobin and compared with a standard hemolysate which was prepared prior to testing. The degree of hemolysis (percentage value) by an individual strain was calculated according to the following formula below: (Absorbance of supernatant media at 540 nm / Absorbance of standard hemolysate at 540 nm X 100). Results In the liquid medium without glucose, strains generally produced hemolysis at low levels. The degree of hemolysis produced by all species increased noticeably in the liquid medium with glucose. Strains of C. albicans and C.kefyr had demonstrated significant hemolytic activity, whereas others had lower activity. C. parapsilosis exerted very little hemolytic activity in the medium with glucose and showed no activity in the medium without glucose. Conclusion The hemolytic activities of most Candida species was found to be higher in the human blood-enriched SDB medium containing 3% additive glucose than in the one free from additives. This result indicates that increased blood glucose concentration may contribute to increased hemolytic activity in Candida species, and it suggests a parallel with possible pathogenesis of

  8. The prevalence of Candida onychomycosis in Southeastern Serbia from 2011 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Otašević, Suzana; Barac, Aleksandra; Pekmezovic, Marina; Tasic, Sinisa; Ignjatović, Aleksandra; Momčilović, Stefan; Stojanović, Predrag; Arsic Arsenijevic, Valentina; Hay, Roderick

    2016-03-01

    Despite the increasing of onychomycosis caused by Candida spp., in referent literature, there is still data insufficiency about this nail infection. The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine epidemiological characteristics of Candida onychomycosis, the antifungal susceptibility of isolated species in vitro, and to compare the results of antifungal susceptibility testing with conducted treatment in period from 2011 to the end of March 2015. Out of 761 patients who were underwent clinical and mycological examinations, 137 had Candida species isolated from nails. The dominant species was Candida albicans (C. albicans) (36.59%) followed by C. parapsilosis (23.78%), C. krusei (9.76%), and C. guilliermondii (6.71%). Antifungal susceptibility in vitro testing showed good susceptibility to antimycotics, except C. krusei, which was resistance to fluconazole (FCZ) and isolates of C. tropicalis and C. glabrata which were dose dependent to itraconazole (ITZ) and fluconazole. Evaluation of medical histories determined that combined therapy, which included pulsed systemic regimen of ITZ with topical application of clotrimazole, had better clinical outcomes regarding the proscribed only topical application of clotrimazole. Multidisciplinary approach of dermatologists and mycologists is required in solving the problem of onychomycosis, which is the dominant nail disease.

  9. The problems of urinary tract infections with Candida spp. aetiology in women.

    PubMed

    Tomczak, Hanna; Szałek, Edyta; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2014-08-29

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women are a growing clinical concern. The most frequent risk factors of UTIs with fungal aetiology in women are: antibiotic therapy (especially broad-spectrum antibiotics), immunosuppressive therapy, diabetes, malnutrition, pregnancy, and frequent intercourse. The aim of the study was to analyse urinary tract infections with Candida spp. aetiology in women hospitalised at the Clinical Hospital in Poznań, Poland, between 2009 and 2011. The investigations revealed that as many as 71% of positive urine cultures with Candida fungi came from women. The following fungi were most frequently isolated from the patients under analysis: C. albicans (47%), C. glabrata (31%), C. tropicalis (6%), C. krusei (3%). In order to diagnose a UTI the diagnosis cannot be based on a single result of a urine culture. Due to the small number of antifungal drugs and high costs of treatment, antifungal drugs should be applied with due consideration and care.

  10. Phytochemical Analysis and Modulation of Antibiotic Activity by Luehea paniculata Mart. & Zucc. (Malvaceae) in Multiresistant Clinical Isolates of Candida Spp.

    PubMed Central

    Calixto Júnior, João T.; Morais, Selene M.; Martins, Clécio G.; Vieira, Larissa G.; Morais-Braga, Maria Flaviana B.; Carneiro, Joara N. P.; Machado, Antonio J. P.; Menezes, Irwin R. A.; Tintino, Saulo R.; Coutinho, Henrique D. M.

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of fungal infections has led to the continuous search for new drugs. Extracts of Luehea paniculata, a tree of multiple medicinal uses, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity, as well as its modulator potential of the Fluconazole antibiotic. Chemical prospecting of ethanol extracts of leaf and bark was carried out, the quantification of total phenols and flavonoids, characterized by the HPLC-DAD technique. The rosmarinic acid and the vitexin flavonoid were observed as major constituents in ELELP and ESWELP, respectively. Antioxidant activity was also evaluated by the method of scavenging the free radical DPPH, and quercetin was used as standard, obtaining IC50 values: 0.341 (mg/mL) for ELELP and 0.235 (mg/mL) for ESWELP. The microdilution assay was performed for antifungal activity against strains of Candida albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis and showed minimum inhibitory concentrations values ≥1024 μg/mL. In the modulator action of extracts on Fluconazole against multiresistant clinical isolates of Candida (subinhibitory concentration minimum of 128 μg/mL), a significant synergism was observed, indicating that the extracts potentiated the antifungal effect against C. tropicalis, where antioxidant flavonoids could be responsible. This is the first report about modifying activity of the antibiotic action of a species of the genus Luehea. PMID:25821822

  11. Analysis of clinical and environmental Candida parapsilosis isolates by microsatellite genotyping--a tool for hospital infection surveillance.

    PubMed

    Sabino, R; Sampaio, P; Rosado, L; Videira, Z; Grenouillet, F; Pais, C

    2015-10-01

    Candida parapsilosis emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen, causing candidaemia worldwide. Nosocomial outbreaks triggered by this species have been frequently described, particularly in cancer patients. For a better understanding of its epidemiology, several typing methods are used and microsatellite analysis has been reported as highly discriminant. The main objective of this work was to study C. parapsilosis isolates by application of microsatellite genotyping to distinguish epidemiologically related strains, compare clinical and environmental isolates and determine possible routes of dispersion of the isolates in the hospital setting. A total of 129 C. parapsilosis isolates from different origins, including hospital environment and hands of healthcare workers, were genotyped using four microsatellite markers. The isolates were recovered from different health institutions. Analysis of C. parapsilosis isolates from hospital environment showed great genotypic diversity; however, the same or very similar genotypes were also found. The same multilocus genotype was shared by isolates recovered from the hand of a healthcare worker, from the hospital environment and from patients of the same healthcare institution, suggesting that these could be possible routes of transmission and that infections due to C. parapsilosis may be mainly related with exogenous transmission to the patient. Examination of sequential isolates from the same patients showed that colonizing and bloodstream isolates had the same multilocus genotype in the majority of cases. We demonstrate that this typing method is able to distinguish clonal clusters from genetically unrelated genotypes and can be a valuable tool to support epidemiologic investigations in the hospital setting.

  12. Antifungal susceptibilities of bloodstream isolates of Candida species from nine hospitals in Korea: application of new antifungal breakpoints and relationship to antifungal usage.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun Jeong; Shin, Jong Hee; Choi, Min Ji; Lee, Wee Gyo; Park, Yeon-Joon; Uh, Young; Kim, Shine-Young; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    We applied the new clinical breakpoints (CBPs) of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) to a multicenter study to determine the antifungal susceptibility of bloodstream infection (BSI) isolates of Candida species in Korea, and determined the relationship between the frequency of antifungal-resistant Candida BSI isolates and antifungal use at hospitals. Four hundred and fifty BSI isolates of Candida species were collected over a 1-year period in 2011 from nine hospitals. The susceptibilities of the isolates to four antifungal agents were determined using the CLSI M27 broth microdilution method. By applying the species-specific CBPs, non-susceptibility to fluconazole was found in 16.4% (70/428) of isolates, comprising 2.6% resistant and 13.8% susceptible-dose dependent isolates. However, non-susceptibility to voriconazole, caspofungin, or micafungin was found in 0% (0/370), 0% (0/437), or 0.5% (2/437) of the Candida BSI isolates, respectively. Of the 450 isolates, 72 (16.0%) showed decreased susceptibility to fluconazole [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥4 μg/ml]. The total usage of systemic antifungals varied considerably among the hospitals, ranging from 190.0 to 7.7 defined daily dose per 1,000 patient days, and fluconazole was the most commonly prescribed agent (46.3%). By Spearman's correlation analysis, fluconazole usage did not show a significant correlation with the percentage of fluconazole resistant isolates at hospitals. However, fluconazole usage was significantly correlated with the percentage of fluconazole non-susceptible isolates (r = 0.733; P = 0.025) or the percentage of isolates with decreased susceptibility to fluconazole (MIC ≥4 μg/ml) (r = 0.700; P = 0.036) at hospitals. Our work represents the first South Korean multicenter study demonstrating an association between antifungal use and antifungal resistance among BSI isolates of Candida at hospitals using the new CBPs of the CLSI.

  13. Supplementation of CHROMagar Candida medium with Pal's medium for rapid identification of Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Sahand, Ismail H; Moragues, María D; Eraso, Elena; Villar-Vidal, María; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2005-11-01

    CHROMagar Candida medium is used for the isolation and identification of Candida species, but it does not differentiate Candida albicans from Candida dubliniensis. This differentiation can be achieved by using Pal's agar, which cannot be used in primary isolation. We have combined both media to obtain a new medium that can be used for the isolation and identification of C. dubliniensis in primary cultures.

  14. In vitro activity of essential oils extracted from plants used as spices against fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Pozzatti, Patrícia; Scheid, Liliane Alves; Spader, Tatiana Borba; Atayde, Margareth Linde; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, the antifungal activity of selected essential oils obtained from plants used as spices was evaluated against both fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida spp. The Candida species studied were Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei. For comparison purposes, they were arranged in groups as C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and Candida non-albicans. The essential oils were obtained from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Breyn, Lippia graveolens HBK, Ocimum basilicum L., Origanum vulgare L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Thymus vulgaris L., and Zingiber officinale. The susceptibility tests were based on the M27-A2 methodology. The chemical composition of the essential oils was obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and by retention indices. The results showed that cinnamon, Mexican oregano, oregano, thyme, and ginger essential oils have different levels of antifungal activity. Oregano and ginger essential oils were found to be the most and the least efficient, respectively. The main finding was that the susceptibilities of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and Candida non-albicans to Mexican oregano, oregano, thyme, and ginger essential oils were higher than those of the fluconazole-susceptible yeasts (P<0.05). In contrast, fluconazole-resistant C. albicans and Candida non-albicans were less susceptible to cinnamon essential oil than their fluconazole-susceptible counterparts (P<0.05). A relationship between the yeasts' susceptibilities and the chemical composition of the essential oils studied was apparent when these 2 parameters were compared. Finally, basil, rosemary, and sage essential oils did not show antifungal activity against Candida isolates at the tested concentrations.

  15. Adhesion of different Candida spp. to plastic: XTT formazan determinations.

    PubMed

    Hawser, S

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion of synchronized yeast-phase Candida cells to tissue culture plastic was investigated using the tetrazolium salt, XTT. The procedure permits the direct enumeration of adherent yeasts following the metabolic conversion of the XTT tetrazolium salt, to its reduced formazan form, by mitochondrial dehydrogenases. Using this procedure, the formation of XTT formazan by Candida cells was typically related to the inoculum size. The adhesion of Candida yeast-phase cells from different Candida spp. to plastic was of the following order: C. krusei (n = 5) > C. albicans (n = 10) > C. glabrata (n = 6). Furthermore, preliminary experiments with several other species indicated that C. tropicalis (n = 2) may adhere as well as C. albicans and that one strain each of C. guilliermondii and C. parapsilosis appear to adhere to plastic in a similar fashion to C. glabrata. The data indicate the utility of the XTT tetrazolium based assay in enumerating the adhesion of different Candida spp. to plastic.

  16. Candida konsanensis sp. nov., a new yeast species isolated from Jasminum adenophyllum in Thailand with potentially carboxymethyl cellulase-producing capability.

    PubMed

    Sarawan, Somporn; Mahakhan, Polson; Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Vichitphan, Kanit; Vichitphan, Sukanda; Sawaengkaew, Jutaporn

    2013-08-01

    A new yeast species (KKU-FW10) belonging to the Candida genus was isolated from Jasminum adenophyllum in the Plant Genetic Conservation Project under The Royal Initiative of Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn area, Chulabhorn Dam, Konsan district within Chaiyaphum province in Thailand. The strain was identified via analysis of nucleotide sequences from the D1/D2 domain of 26S ribosomal DNA and based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics. The sequence obtained from yeast isolate KKU-FW10 was 97 percent identical to that of Candida chanthaburiensis (GenBank accession number AB500861.1), with 506/517 (nucleotides identity/total nucleotides) matching nucleotides, nine substitutions and two gaps being detected. This species belonged to the Candida clade. Regarding morphological characteristics, isolate KKU-FW10 presents cream-colored butyrous colonies, vegetative reproduction through budding and, round cells without filaments or ascospores. The major ubiquinone detected was Q-9. The above results suggest that isolate KKU-FW10 is a new member of the genus Candida, and the name Candida konsanensis is proposed for this yeast. The type strain of the new species is KKU-FW10(T) (= BCC 52588(T), = NBRC 109082(T), = CBS 12666(T)). In addition, this KKU-FW10 could potentially produce 58.24 Units/ml of carboxymethyl cellulase when it was cultured in YP broth containing 1.0 % carboxymethyl cellulose for 24 h.

  17. Effects of temperature on anti-Candida activities of antifungal antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Odds, F C

    1993-01-01

    The relative growth (percentage of growth relative to control growth) of 767 Candida isolates representing five species was measured in microcultures at 25 and 37 degrees C. In the presence of 10(-4) M flucytosine, the distribution of relative yeast growth data indicated that Candida albicans isolates were less susceptible at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C, while the opposite was found with 4 x 10(-5) M amorolfine for most of the isolates tested. Repetition of the experiments at four different temperatures with 99 C. albicans isolates and five antifungal agents confirmed a direct relationship between growth inhibition and increasing temperature from 25 to 40 degrees C with amphotericin B, flucytosine, and terconazole; a strong inverse relationship between inhibition and temperature with amorolfine; and a weak inverse relationship with terbinafine. However, these relationships were not always noted with other Candida spp.: in particular, the growth of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis isolates tended to be greater at 37 degrees C than at 25 degrees C in the presence of the azole-derivative antifungal agents itraconazole and terconazole. These findings stress the species-specific individuality of yeast susceptibility to azole antifungal agents. The results with C. albicans and amorolfine and terbinafine accord with their known in vivo efficacy in mycoses involving low-temperature superficial sites and poor activity against mycoses involving deep body sites. The data also reinforce the need for control of experimental variables such as temperature in the design of standardized yeast susceptibility tests. PMID:8494363

  18. Effects of temperature on anti-Candida activities of antifungal antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Odds, F C

    1993-04-01

    The relative growth (percentage of growth relative to control growth) of 767 Candida isolates representing five species was measured in microcultures at 25 and 37 degrees C. In the presence of 10(-4) M flucytosine, the distribution of relative yeast growth data indicated that Candida albicans isolates were less susceptible at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C, while the opposite was found with 4 x 10(-5) M amorolfine for most of the isolates tested. Repetition of the experiments at four different temperatures with 99 C. albicans isolates and five antifungal agents confirmed a direct relationship between growth inhibition and increasing temperature from 25 to 40 degrees C with amphotericin B, flucytosine, and terconazole; a strong inverse relationship between inhibition and temperature with amorolfine; and a weak inverse relationship with terbinafine. However, these relationships were not always noted with other Candida spp.: in particular, the growth of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis isolates tended to be greater at 37 degrees C than at 25 degrees C in the presence of the azole-derivative antifungal agents itraconazole and terconazole. These findings stress the species-specific individuality of yeast susceptibility to azole antifungal agents. The results with C. albicans and amorolfine and terbinafine accord with their known in vivo efficacy in mycoses involving low-temperature superficial sites and poor activity against mycoses involving deep body sites. The data also reinforce the need for control of experimental variables such as temperature in the design of standardized yeast susceptibility tests.

  19. Molecular Identification of Closely Related Candida Species Using Two Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Fingerprinting Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cornet, Muriel; Sendid, Boualem; Fradin, Chantal; Gaillardin, Claude; Poulain, Daniel; Nguyen, Huu-Vang

    2011-01-01

    Recent changes in the epidemiology of candidiasis highlighted an increase in non- Candida albicans species emphasizing the need for reliable identification methods. Molecular diagnostics in fungal infections may improve species characterization, particularly in cases of the closely related species in the Candida complexes. We developed two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, targeting either a part of the intergenic spacer 2 or the entire intergenic spacer (IGS) of ribosomal DNA using a panel of 270 isolates. A part of the intergenic spacer was used for discrimination between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and between species of the C. glabrata complex (C. glabrata/C. bracarensis/C. nivariensis). The whole IGS was applied to C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis, and to separate C. famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) from C. guilliermondii (Pichia guilliermondii) and from the other species within this complex (ie, C. carpophila, C. fermentati and C. xestobii). Sharing similar biochemical patterns, Pichia norvegensis and C. inconspicua exhibited specific IGS profiles. Our study confirmed that isolates of C. guilliermondii were frequently mis-identified as C. famata. As much as 67% of the clinical isolates phenotypically determined as C. famata were recognized mostly as true P. guilliermondii. Conversely, 44% of the isolates initially identified as C. guilliermondii were corrected by the IGS fingerprints as C. parapsilosis, C. fermentati, or C. zeylanoides. These two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism methods may be used as reference tools [either alternatively or adjunctively to the existing ribosomal DNA (26S or ITS) sequence comparisons] for unambiguous determination of the Candida species for which phenotypic characterization remains problematic. PMID:21227390

  20. Epidemiology and echinocandin susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis sensu lato species isolated from bloodstream infections at a Spanish university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Effron, Guillermo; Canton, Emilia; Pemán, Javier; Dilger, Amanda; Romá, Eva; Perlin, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this work were to study the epidemiological profiles, differences in echinocandin susceptibilities and clinical relevance of the Candida parapsilosis sensu lato species isolated from proven fungaemia cases at La Fe University Hospital of Valencia (Spain) from 1995 to 2007. Results The prevalence of these species was: C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 74.4%; Candida orthopsilosis, 23.54%; and Candida metapsilosis, 2.05%. The incidence of the species complex as agents of fungaemia remained stationary until 2005 and doubled in 2006. The incidence of C. orthopsilosis showed an increasing trend during the study period, while C. parapsilosis sensu stricto incidence diminished. Also, an important epidemiological change was observed starting in 2004, when 86.5% of the C. parapsilosis sensu lato strains were found in adult patients, while before that year only 13.5% of the isolates were found in this population. Conclusions Echinocandin drug susceptibility testing using the CLSI M27-A3 document showed a wide range of MIC values (0.015–4 mg/L), with micafungin being the most potent in vitro inhibitor followed by anidulafungin and caspofungin (MIC geometric mean of 0.68, 0.74 and 0.87 mg/L, respectively). C. metapsilosis was the most susceptible species of the complex to anidulafungin and micafungin in vitro (MIC50 for anidulafungin and micafungin: 0.06 mg/L), while there were no differences between C. parapsilosis sensu lato species when caspofungin MIC50s were compared (MIC50 1.00 mg/L). Differences in caspofungin in vitro susceptibility were observed between the different clinical service departments of La Fe Hospital. PMID:22868644

  1. Expression of the CDR1 efflux pump in clinical Candida albicans isolates is controlled by a negative regulatory element

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Naseem Akhtar; Manoharlal, Raman; Saini, Preeti; Prasad, Tulika; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Hoefer, Milan; Morschhaeuser, Joachim; Prasad, Rajendra . E-mail: rp47@hotmail.com

    2005-06-24

    Resistance to azole antifungal drugs in clinical isolates of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is often caused by constitutive overexpression of the CDR1 gene, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump of the ABC transporter superfamily. To understand the relevance of a recently identified negative regulatory element (NRE) in the CDR1 promoter for the control of CDR1 expression in the clinical scenario, we investigated the effect of mutation or deletion of the NRE on CDR1 expression in two matched pairs of azole-sensitive and resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans. Expression of GFP or lacZ reporter genes from the wild type CDR1 promoter was much higher in the azole-resistant C. albicans isolates than in the azole-susceptible isolates, reflecting the known differences in CDR1 expression in these strains. Deletion or mutation of the NRE resulted in enhanced reporter gene expression in azole-sensitive strains, but did not further increase the already high CDR1 promoter activity in the azole-resistant strains. In agreement with these findings, electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed a reduced binding to the NRE of nuclear extracts from the resistant C. albicans isolates as compared with extracts from the sensitive isolates. These results demonstrate that the NRE is involved in maintaining CDR1 expression at basal levels and that this repression is overcome in azole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates, resulting in constitutive CDR1 overexpression and concomitant drug resistance.

  2. Gentian violet exhibits activity against biofilms formed by oral Candida isolates obtained from HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, Rana S; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Chandra, Jyotsna; Salata, Robert A; Jurevic, Richard; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2011-06-01

    The effect of gentian violet against Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans biofilms formed on polymethylmethacrylate strips was evaluated using a dry weight assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The ability of gentian violet to inhibit Candida albicans germination was also assessed. Gentian violet activity against Candida biofilms was demonstrated by a reduction in dry weight, disruption of biofilm architecture, and reduced biofilm thickness. Additionally, gentian violet inhibited Candida germination in a concentration-dependent manner.

  3. Oral Candida albicans isolates from nonhospitalized normal carriers, immunocompetent hospitalized patients, and immunocompromised patients with or without acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, D L; Cutler, J E

    1989-01-01

    A total of 128 human oral isolates of Candida albicans were collected from asymptomatic healthy carriers (64 isolates); asymptomatic, nonimmunosuppressed, hospitalized patients (25 isolates); immunosuppressed transplant patients (19 isolates); and human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and oral candidiasis (20 isolates). Isolates were serotyped as A or B and tested for reactivity with an agglutinating immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibody (H9). Immunocompetent individuals colonized by oral C. albicans were almost equally likely to carry serotype A as serotype B cells, while immunocompromised individuals were at least twice as likely to be infected by serotype B than serotype A strains. The reactivity of isolates with H9 antibody followed a similar but more distinctive pattern. Approximately half of the strains from immunocompetent individuals reacted strongly with H9, and the remainder reacted weakly. However, up to 75% of the isolates from immunocompromised patients reacted weakly with H9, while the remainder reacted strongly. A correlation between H9 reactivity and the serotypes of these isolates existed (P = 0.16). The correlation between H9 reactivity and immune status was even stronger (P = 0.025). The monoclonal antibody activities described above were determined by agglutination tests during defined phases of C. albicans growth. Expression of antigen at various times during growth of several isolates was confirmed at the cellular level by analysis using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Despite the correlation between serotype A and H9 reactivity, H9 antigen was not identical to the serotype A antigen because four serotype A strains reacted only weakly with H9 antibody, and one strain reacted strongly with H9 but was serotype B. These data indicate that oral strains of C. albicans from immunocompetent individuals differ as a group from C. albicans isolated from those who are immunosuppressed. PMID

  4. Results from the ARTEMIS DISK Global Antifungal Surveillance Study, 1997 to 2007: a 10.5-year analysis of susceptibilities of Candida Species to fluconazole and voriconazole as determined by CLSI standardized disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Gibbs, D L; Newell, V A; Ellis, D; Tullio, V; Rodloff, A; Fu, W; Ling, T A

    2010-04-01

    Fluconazole in vitro susceptibility test results for 256,882 isolates of Candida spp. were collected from 142 sites in 41 countries from June 1997 to December 2007. Data were collected for 197,619 isolates tested with voriconazole from 2001 to 2007. A total of 31 different species of Candida were isolated. Increased rates of isolation of the common non-albicans species C. glabrata (10.2% to 11.7%), C. tropicalis (5.4% to 8.0%), and C. parapsilosis (4.8% to 5.6%) were noted when the time periods 1997 to 2000 and 2005 to 2007 were compared. Investigators tested clinical isolates of Candida spp. by the CLSI M44-A disk diffusion method. Overall, 90.2% of Candida isolates tested were susceptible (S) to fluconazole; however, 13 of 31 species identified exhibited decreased susceptibility (<75% S), similar to that seen with the resistant (R) species C. glabrata and C. krusei. Among 197,619 isolates of Candida spp. tested against voriconazole, 95.0% were S and 3% were R. About 30% of fluconazole-R isolates of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. rugosa, C. lipolytica, C. pelliculosa, C. apicola, C. haemulonii, C. humicola, C. lambica, and C. ciferrii remained S to voriconazole. An increase in fluconazole resistance over time was seen with C. parapsilosis, C. guilliermondii, C. lusitaniae, C. sake, and C. pelliculosa. Among the emerging fluconazole-R species were C. guilliermondii (11.4% R), C. inconspicua (53.2% R), C. rugosa (41.8% R), and C. norvegensis (40.7% R). The rates of isolation of C. rugosa, C. inconspicua, and C. norvegensis increased by 5- to 10-fold over the 10.5-year study period. C. guilliermondii and C. rugosa were most prominent in Latin America, whereas C. inconspicua and C. norvegensis were most common in Eastern European countries. This survey identifies several less-common species of Candida with decreased susceptibility to azoles. These organisms may pose a future threat to optimal antifungal therapy and underscore the importance of prompt and

  5. [Minimal inhibitory concentrations of Candida species to five antifungals by using the reference dilution micromethod and the E-test.].

    PubMed

    Torres-Rodríguez, J M; Madrenys, N; Jiménez, T; Saballs, P

    1997-09-01

    It is accepted that the frequency of candidosis has increased during the last decade, specially in hospitalized patients. The more frequent use of azole antifungals and the recognition of isolates of Candida sp resistant to these and other drugs such as 5-fluorocytosine constitute a great need for a reproducible and useful C. albicans in vitro susceptibility testing method for monitoring antifungal therapy in clinical mycological laboratories. The E-test is a novel agar diffussion technique for testing the susceptibility of yeasts against a defined continous gradient of drug and could be used by most clinical laboratories. In this study the E-test and the NCCLS reference microbroth method (M27-P guidelines) were used to determine the MICs of amphotericin B, 5-flucytosine, itraconazole, fluconazole and ketoconazole for 50 clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Torulopsis glabrata, C. tropicalis and Hansenula anomala and five reference ATCC strains. The main purpose of the study was to compare the results obtained by the two methods. In general good agreement (+/- 1 dilution) was otained between both methods, despite differences observed for some species-antifungal combinations in which the MICs were lower by the E-test than by the microbroth method. MICs for C. albicans and T. glabrata to amphotericin B were < 0.50 microg/mL. Two isolates of C. albicans and two others of H. anomala, showed MIC < 8 microg/mL for 5- flucytosine. All isolates of T. glabrata and 40% of C. albicans showed MICs > 16 microg/mL for fluconazole. The results of this study indicate that E-test is an alternative for susceptibility testing to the NCCLS reference method. Because its simplicity it seems to be an easier test for routine clinical laboratories.

  6. Comparison of multilocus sequence typing and Ca3 fingerprinting for molecular subtyping epidemiologically-related clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Anuradha; Lee-Yang, Wendy; Lasker, Brent A; Brandt, Mary E; Warnock, David W; Arthington-Skaggs, Beth A

    2006-08-01

    Southern hybridization with the complex probe Ca3 is a well established tool for molecular subtyping of Candida albicans. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is a DNA sequence-based subtyping method recently applied to C. albicans and shown to have a high degree of intraspecies discriminatory power. However, its utility for studying the molecular epidemiology of sequential isolates from recurrent disease has not been established. We compared Ca3 Southern hybridization and MLST using seven housekeeping genes (CaAAT1a, CaACC1, CaADP1, CaPMI, CaSYA1, CaVPS13, CaZWF1b) for their ability to discriminate among 37 C. albicans isolates from recurrent cases of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in ten HIV-positive patients from India and the US. Among the 37 isolates, MLST identified 23 distinct genotypes (index of diversity = 97%); Ca3 Southern hybridization identified 21 distinct genotypes (index of diversity = 95%). Both methods clustered isolates into seven genetically-related groups and, with one exception, isolates that were indistinguishable by MLST were indistinguishable or highly related by Ca3 Southern hybridization. These results demonstrate that MLST performs equally well or better compared to Ca3 Southern hybridization for defining genetic-relatedness of sequential C. albicans isolates from recurrent cases of OPC in HIV-positive patients.

  7. Susceptibility profile of vaginal isolates of Candida albicans prior to and following fluconazole introduction - impact of two decades.

    PubMed

    Bulik, C C; Sobel, J D; Nailor, M D

    2011-01-01

    Current treatment options for vulvovaginal candidiasis due to Candida albicans include over-the-counter and prescription antifungal agents. Fluconazole has been used extensively with an unknown impact on susceptibility. To investigate antifungal susceptibility trends in clinical vaginal isolates of C. albicans from 1986 to 2008, microdilution susceptibility was performed on randomly selected single isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for: fluconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, flucytosine and amphotericin B. The MIC(90) for each drug was then calculated for the time periods: 1986-1989, 1992-1996 and 2005-2007. A total of 250 C. albicans vaginal isolates were included. The MIC(90) (mcg ml(-1) ) for fluconazole was 0.25, 0.5 and 0.5 mcg ml(-1) for each grouping, respectively. The corresponding MIC(90) for flucytosine was 1, 2 and 8 mcg ml(-1) , respectively. The MIC(90) for the remaining agents remained unchanged across time periods mentioned. Of note, the percentage of isolates with MIC ≥1 and ≥2 mcg ml(-1) for fluconazole increased from 3% to 9% over the study period. Although the C. albicans MIC(90) to fluconazole in vaginal isolates has not shown a clinically significant increase since 1986, there is an increasing number of isolates with elevated MICs. The implications of this increase are unknown, but given the achievable vaginal concentrations of fluconazole, reduced susceptibility may have clinical relevance.

  8. White-opaque Switching in Different Mating Type-like Locus Gene Types of Clinical Candida albicans Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hou-Min; Shimizu-Imanishi, Yumi; Tanaka, Reiko; Li, Ruo-Yu; Yaguchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Candida albicans (C. albicans) can become a pathogen causing superficial as well as life-threatening systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Many phenotypic attributes contribute to its capacity to colonize human organs. In our study, 93 C. albicans isolates from patients of various candidiasis in a hospital of China were surveyed. We aimed to investigate the white-opaque (WO) switching competence, drug sensitivity, and virulence of mating type-like (MTL) a/α isolates. Methods: Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene and the MTL configuration were detected in all the isolates by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. White/opaque phenotype and doubling time of cell growth were determined. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of antifungal agent were measured using broth microdilution method. Results: Sixty-four isolates (69.6%) were classified to serotype A, 19 (20.6%) to serotype B, and 9 (9.8%) to serotype C. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis showed that these isolates were divided into four different subgroups of ITS genotypes. Most of our clinical isolates were MTLa/α type, while 6.8% remained MTLa or MTLα type. The frequency of opaque phenotype was 71.0% (66 isolates). Following the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3, all isolates were susceptible to caspofungin and a few (0.6–3.2%) of them showed resistance against amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole. Conclusions: From these analyses, there were comparatively more C. albicans strains classified into serotype B, and the frequency of opaque phase strains was significant in the clinical isolates from China. Genetic, phenotypic, or drug susceptibility patterns were not significantly different from previous studies. MTLa/α isolates could also undergo WO switching which facilitates their survival. PMID:27824006

  9. Detection of triazole resistance among Candida species by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Saracli, Mehmet A; Fothergill, Annette W; Sutton, Deanna A; Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2015-09-01

    MALDI-TOF MS can rapidly identify microorganisms to the species level and may be able to detect antimicrobial resistance. We evaluated the ability of this technology to detect triazole resistance in Candida species.35 C. albicans, 35 C. glabrata, and 37 C. tropicalis strains were exposed to fluconazole, voriconazole, or posaconazole at two different concentrations plus a drug-free control: a midrange concentration (CLSI clinical breakpoint or epidemiologic cut-off value), and a high concentration (fluconazole 64 μg/ml, voriconazole & posaconazole 16 μg/ml). The MALDI-TOF MS spectra at these concentrations were used to create the individual composite correlation index (CCI) matrices for each isolate. When the CCI of the midrange/highest concentration was lower than that of the midrange/null concentration, the strain was classified as resistant. These results were then compared to the classifications for susceptible or resistant obtained by measuring the MICs according to the CLSI M27-A3 antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST) method.The MALDI-TOF MS assay was able to classify triazole susceptibility against all strains. Overall, essential agreement between MALDI-TOF MS and AFST varied between 54% and 97%, and was highest for posaconazole against C. glabrata. The reproducibility of the MALDI-TOF MS assay varied between 54.3 and 82.9% and was best for fluconazole against C. albicans and posaconazole against C. glabrata. Reproducibility was also higher for C. glabrata isolates compared to C. albicans and C. tropicalis.These results demonstrate that MALDI-TOF MS may be used to simultaneously determine the Candida species and classification as susceptible or resistant to triazole antifungals. Further studies are needed to refine the methodology and improve the reproducibility of this assay.

  10. [In vitro synergistic effect of moxifloxacin and amphotericin B combination against Candida strains].

    PubMed

    Yalçin, Burçe; Kalkanci, Ayşe; Gürelik, Feryal; Fidan, Işil; Kustimur, Semra; Ozdek, Sengül

    2010-01-01

    Contradictory results such as synergy or indifferent effect, have been reported about the interactions between quinolones and antifungal drugs in different studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibilities of Candida spp. to moxifloxacin (MOX) alone and MOX + amphotericin B (AmB) combination. A total of 20 strains were included to the study, of which 19 were clinical isolates (10 Candida albicans, 4 Candida glabrata, 2 Candida parapsilosis, 1 Candida tropicalis, 1 Candida pelliculosa ve 1 Candida sake) and 1 was a standard strain (C. albicans ATCC 90028). In vitro susceptibilities of the strains to MOX with AmB were investigated by broth microdilution method according to the recommendations of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), and in vitro interaction of these drugs were determined by a chequerboard titration method. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of Candida spp. for MOX were found > or = 400 microg/ml indicating that MOX, by itself has no antifungal activity. AmB MIC values were found 1 microg/ml in 11 of the clinical isolates, and < or = 0.5 microg/ml in the other 8 clinical isolates and 1 standard strain. The inhibitor activity of AmB was slightly enhanced when combined with MOX, there being a decrease of 1-4 fold dilutions in the AmB MICs against all isolates tested. Synergistic effect between MOX and AmB, defined as a fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index as < or = 0.5, was observed in 90% (18/20; all were clinical isolates) of the strains, whereas indifferent effect (FIC = 1) was detected in 10% (2/20; 1 was clinical and 1 was standard strain) of the strains. Antagonistic effect was not observed for this combination even at 48th hours. It was concluded that these preliminary results should be confirmed by large-scaled in vitro and in vivo studies to evaluate MOX + AmB combination as a therapeutic option for the treatment of Candida infections.

  11. Multilaboratory Testing of Antifungal Combinations against a Quality Control Isolate of Candida krusei▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Ramani, Rama; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Killian, Scott B.; Holliday, Nicole; Knapp, Cindy; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Messer, Shawn A.; Pfaller, Michael A.; Iqbal, Naureen J.; Arthington-Skaggs, Beth A.; Vazquez, Jose A.; Sein, Tin; Rex, John H.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Candida krusei ATCC 6258 was tested by eight laboratories using 96-well plates containing checkerboard pairwise combinations of amphotericin B (AMB), posaconazole (PSC), caspofungin (CSP), and voriconazole (VRC). The methodology led to reproducible results across the laboratories. All drug combinations yielded MICs lower than the MICs of any two drugs tested singly, and combinations of AMB, PSC, CSP, and VRC were indifferent (no antagonism) by summations of fractional inhibitory concentration. PMID:18227180

  12. Competitive Interactions between C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei during Biofilm Formation and Development of Experimental Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; dos Santos, Jéssica Diane; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in mixed infections. Initially, these interactions were studied in biofilms formed in vitro. CFU/mL values of C. albicans were lower in mixed biofilms when compared to the single biofilms, verifying 77% and 89% of C. albicans reduction when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. After that, we expanded this study for in vivo host models of experimental candidiasis. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic Candida suspensions for analysis of survival rate and quantification of fungal cells in the haemolymph. In the groups with single infections, 100% of the larvae died within 18 h after infection with C. albicans. However, interaction groups achieved 100% mortality after 72 h of infection by C. albicans-C. glabrata and 96 h of infection by C. albicans-C. krusei. C. albicans CFU/mL values from larvae hemolymph were lower in the interacting groups compared with the monoespecies group after 12 h of infection. In addition, immunosuppressed mice were also inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic microbial suspensions to induce oral candidiasis. C. albicans CFU/mL values recovered from oral cavity of mice were higher in the group with single infection by C. albicans than the groups with mixed infections by C. albicans-C. glabrata and C. albicans-C. krusei. Moreover, the group with single infection by C. albicans had a higher degree of hyphae and epithelial changes in the tongue dorsum than the groups with mixed infections. We concluded that single infections by C. albicans were more harmful for animal models than mixed infections with non-albicans species, suggesting that C. albicans establish competitive interactions with C. krusei and C. glabrata during biofilm formation and development of experimental candidiasis. PMID:26146832

  13. Competitive Interactions between C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei during Biofilm Formation and Development of Experimental Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; dos Santos, Jéssica Diane; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in mixed infections. Initially, these interactions were studied in biofilms formed in vitro. CFU/mL values of C. albicans were lower in mixed biofilms when compared to the single biofilms, verifying 77% and 89% of C. albicans reduction when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. After that, we expanded this study for in vivo host models of experimental candidiasis. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic Candida suspensions for analysis of survival rate and quantification of fungal cells in the haemolymph. In the groups with single infections, 100% of the larvae died within 18 h after infection with C. albicans. However, interaction groups achieved 100% mortality after 72 h of infection by C. albicans-C. glabrata and 96 h of infection by C. albicans-C. krusei. C. albicans CFU/mL values from larvae hemolymph were lower in the interacting groups compared with the monoespecies group after 12 h of infection. In addition, immunosuppressed mice were also inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic microbial suspensions to induce oral candidiasis. C. albicans CFU/mL values recovered from oral cavity of mice were higher in the group with single infection by C. albicans than the groups with mixed infections by C. albicans-C. glabrata and C. albicans-C. krusei. Moreover, the group with single infection by C. albicans had a higher degree of hyphae and epithelial changes in the tongue dorsum than the groups with mixed infections. We concluded that single infections by C. albicans were more harmful for animal models than mixed infections with non-albicans species, suggesting that C. albicans establish competitive interactions with C. krusei and C. glabrata during biofilm formation and development of experimental candidiasis.

  14. FREQUENCY OF Candida SPECIES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN TRIANGULO MINEIRO, MINAS GERAIS STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    MENEZES, Ralciane de Paula; FERREIRA, Joseane Cristina; de SÁ, Walkiria Machado; MOREIRA, Tomaz de Aquino; MALVINO, Lucivânia Duarte Silva; de ARAUJO, Lucio Borges; RÖDER, Denise Von Dolinger de Brito; PENATTI, Mario Paulo Amante; CANDIDO, Regina Celia; PEDROSO, Reginaldo dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Infections by Candida species are a high-impact problem in public health due to their wide incidence in hospitalized patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate frequency, susceptibility to antifungals, and genetic polymorphism of Candida species isolated from clinical specimens of hospitalized patients. The Candida isolates included in this study were obtained from blood cultures, abdominal fluids, and central venous catheters (CVC) of hospitalized patients at the Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Uberlândia during the period of July 2010 - June 2011. Susceptibility tests were conducted by the broth microdilution method. The RAPD-PCR tests used employed initiator oligonucleotides OPA09, OPB11, and OPE06. Of the 63 Candida isolates, 18 (28.5%) were C. albicans, 20 (31.7%) were C. parapsilosis complex species, 14 (22.2%) C. tropicalis, four (6.4%) C. glabrata, four (6.4%) C. krusei, two (3.3%) C. kefyr, and one (1.6%) C. lusitaniae. In vitro resistance to amphotericin B was observed in 12.7% of isolates. In vitroresistance to azoles was not detected, except for C. krusei. The two primers, OPA09 and OPB11, were able to distinguish different species. Isolates of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis complex species presented six and five clusters, respectively, with the OPA09 marker by RAPD-PCR, showing the genetic variability of the isolates of those species. It was concluded that members of the C. parapsilosis complex were the most frequent species found, and most isolates were susceptible to the antifungals amphotericin B, flucozanole, and itraconazole. High genetic polymorphisms were observed for isolates of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis complex species, mainly with the OPA09 marker. PMID:26200956

  15. Biofilm formation by Candida species on silicone surfaces and latex pacifier nipples: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Luiz Cezar; Charone, Senda; Maia, Lucianne Cople; Soares, Rosangela Maria de Araújo; Portela, Maristela Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    The present study assessed the growth and development of biofilm formation by isolates of C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis on silicone and latex pacifier nipples. The silicone and latex surfaces were evaluated by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The plastic component of the nipple also seems to be an important factor regarding the biofilm formation by Candida spp. The biofilm growth was measured using the MTT reduction reaction. C. albicans was found to have a slightly greater capacity of forming biofilm compared to the other Candida species. Analysis of the pattern of biofilm development by C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis on latex and silicon pacifier shields showed an increased biofilm formation regarding the latter substrate. Silicone was shown to be more resistant to fungal colonization, particularly in the case of C. parapsilosis, despite the lack of any statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). In addition, silicone has a smoother surface compared to latex, whose surface was found to be rugose and irregular.

  16. Susceptibility and molecular characterization of Candida species from patients with vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Fornari, Gheniffer; Vicente, Vania Aparecida; Gomes, Renata Rodrigues; Muro, Marisol Dominguez; Pinheiro, Rosangela Lameira; Ferrari, Carolina; Herkert, Patricia Fernanda; Takimura, Marcos; Carvalho, Newton Sérgio de; Queiroz-Telles, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis affects women of reproductive age, which represents approximately 15-25% of vaginitis cases. The present study aimed to isolate and characterize yeast from the patients irrespective of the presentation of clinical symptoms. The isolates were subjected to in vitro susceptibility profile and characterization by molecular markers, which intended to assess the distribution of species. A total of 40 isolates were obtained and identified through the CHROMagar, API20aux and by ITS and D1/D2 regions sequencing of DNAr gene. Candida albicans strains were genotyped by the ABC system and the isolates were divided into two genotypic groups. The identity of the C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. kefyr and Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates was confirmed by the multilocus analysis. The strains of Candida, isolated from patients with complications, were found to be resistant to nystatin but sensitive to fluconazole, amphotericin B and ketoconazole, as observed by in vitro sensitivity profile. The isolates from asymptomatic patients, i.e., the colonized group, showed a dose-dependent sensitivity to the anti-fungal agents, fluconazole and amphotericin B. However, the isolates of C. albicans that belong to distinct genotypic groups showed the same in vitro susceptibility profile.

  17. Multicenter Study of Method-Dependent Epidemiological Cutoff Values for Detection of Resistance in Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. to Amphotericin B and Echinocandins for the Etest Agar Diffusion Method.

    PubMed

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Arendrup, M; Cantón, E; Cordoba, S; Dannaoui, E; García-Rodríguez, J; Gonzalez, G M; Govender, N P; Martin-Mazuelos, E; Lackner, M; Lass-Flörl, C; Linares Sicilia, M J; Rodriguez-Iglesias, M A; Pelaez, T; Shields, R K; Garcia-Effron, G; Guinea, J; Sanguinetti, M; Turnidge, J

    2017-01-01

    Method-dependent Etest epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) are not available for susceptibility testing of either Candida or Aspergillus species with amphotericin B or echinocandins. In addition, reference caspofungin MICs for Candida spp. are unreliable. Candida and Aspergillus species wild-type (WT) Etest MIC distributions (microorganisms in a species-drug combination with no detectable phenotypic resistance) were established for 4,341 Candida albicans, 113 C. dubliniensis, 1,683 C. glabrata species complex (SC), 709 C. krusei, 767 C. parapsilosis SC, 796 C. tropicalis, 1,637 Aspergillus fumigatus SC, 238 A. flavus SC, 321 A. niger SC, and 247 A. terreus SC isolates. Etest MICs from 15 laboratories (in Argentina, Europe, Mexico, South Africa, and the United States) were pooled to establish Etest ECVs. Anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, and amphotericin B ECVs (in micrograms per milliliter) encompassing ≥97.5% of the statistically modeled population were 0.016, 0.5, 0.03, and 1 for C. albicans; 0.03, 1, 0.03, and 2 for C. glabrata SC; 0.06, 1, 0.25, and 4 for C. krusei; 8, 4, 2, and 2 for C. parapsilosis SC; and 0.03, 1, 0.12, and 2 for C. tropicalis The amphotericin B ECV was 0.25 μg/ml for C. dubliniensis and 2, 8, 2, and 16 μg/ml for the complexes of A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, and A. terreus, respectively. While anidulafungin Etest ECVs classified 92% of the Candida fks mutants evaluated as non-WT, the performance was lower for caspofungin (75%) and micafungin (84%) cutoffs. Finally, although anidulafungin (as an echinocandin surrogate susceptibility marker) and amphotericin B ECVs should identify Candida and Aspergillus isolates with reduced susceptibility to these agents using the Etest, these ECVs will not categorize a fungal isolate as susceptible or resistant, as breakpoints do.

  18. Enhanced extracellular production of aspartyl proteinase, a virulence factor, by Candida albicans isolates following growth in subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Wu, T; Wright, K; Hurst, S F; Morrison, C J

    2000-05-01

    We examined the production of secreted aspartyl proteinase (Sap), a putative virulence factor of Candida albicans, by a series of 17 isolates representing a single strain obtained from the oral cavity of an AIDS patient before and after the development of clinical and in vitro resistance to fluconazole. Isolates were grown in Sap-inducing yeast carbon base-bovine serum albumin medium containing 0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1 MIC of fluconazole, and cultures were sampled daily for 14 days to determine extracellular Sap activity by enzymatic degradation of bovine serum albumin. Extracellular Sap activity was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner for the most fluconazole-susceptible isolate (MIC, 1.0 microg/ml) and significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner for the most fluconazole-resistant isolate (MIC, >64 microg/ml). Enhanced extracellular Sap production could not be attributed to cell death or nonspecific release of Sap, because there was no reduction in the number of CFU and no significant release of enolase, a constitutive enzyme of the glycolytic pathway. Conversely, intracellular Sap concentrations were significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner in the most fluconazole-susceptible isolate and decreased in the most fluconazole-resistant isolate. Enhanced Sap production correlated with the overexpression of a gene encoding a multidrug resistance (MDR1) efflux pump occurring in these isolates. These data indicate that exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole can result in enhanced extracellular production of Sap by isolates with the capacity to overexpress MDR1 and imply that patients infected with these isolates and subsequently treated with suboptimal doses of fluconazole may experience enhanced C. albicans virulence in vivo.

  19. Description of Groenewaldozyma gen. nov. for placement of Candida auringiensis, Candida salmanticensis and Candida tartarivorans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA sequence analyses have demonstrated that species of the polyphyletic anamorphic ascomycete genus Candida may be members of described teleomorphic genera, members of the Candida tropicalis clade upon which the genus Candida is circumscribed, or members of isolated clades that represent undescribe...

  20. Biotype stability of Candida albicans isolates after culture storage determined by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and phenotypical methods.

    PubMed

    Bacelo, Katia Leston; da Costa, Karen Regina Carim; Ferreira, Joseane Cristina; Candido, Regina Celia

    2010-11-01

    Typing methods to evaluate isolates in relation to their phenotypical and molecular characteristics are essential in epidemiological studies. In this study, Candida albicans biotypes were determined before and after storage in order to verify their stability. Twenty C. albicans isolates were typed by Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), production of phospholipase and proteinase exoenzymes (enzymotyping) and morphotyping before and after 180 days of storage in Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) and sterilised distilled water. Before the storage, 19 RAPD patterns, two enzymotypes and eight morphotypes were identified. The fragment patterns obtained by RAPD, on the one hand, were not significantly altered after storage. On the other hand, the majority of the isolates changed their enzymotype and morphotype after storage. RAPD typing provided the better discriminatory index (DI) among isolates (DI = 0.995) and maintained the profile identified, thereby confirming its utility in epidemiological surveys. Based on the low reproducibility observed after storage in SDA and distilled water by morphotyping (DI = 0.853) and enzymotyping (DI = 0.521), the use of these techniques is not recommended on stored isolates.

  1. Echinocandin Resistance in Candida.

    PubMed

    Perlin, David S

    2015-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections are an important infection concern for patients with underlying immunosuppression. Antifungal therapy is a critical component of patient care, but therapeutic choices are limited due to few drug classes. Antifungal resistance, especially among Candida species, aggravates the problem. The echinocandin drugs (micafungin, anidulafungin, and caspofungin) are the preferred choice to treat a range of candidiasis. They target the fungal-specific enzyme glucan synthase, which is responsible for the biosynthesis of a major cell wall polymer. Therapeutic failure involves acquisition of resistance, although it is a rare event among most Candida species. However, in some settings, higher-level resistance has been reported among Candida glabrata, which is also frequently resistant to azole drugs, resulting in difficult-to-treat multidrug-resistant strains. The mechanism of echinocandin resistance involves amino acid changes in "hot spot" regions of FKS-encoded subunits of glucan synthase, which decreases the sensitivity of enzyme to drug, resulting in higher minimum inhibitory concentration values. The cellular processes promoting the formation of resistant FKS strains involve complex stress response pathways that yield a variety of adaptive compensatory genetic responses. Standardized broth microdilution techniques can be used to distinguish FKS mutant strains from wild type, but testing C. glabrata with caspofungin should be approached cautiously. Finally, clinical factors that promote echinocandin resistance include prophylaxis, host reservoirs including biofilms in the gastrointestinal tract, and intra-abdominal infections. An understanding of clinical and molecular factors that promote echinocandin resistance is critical to develop better diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies to overcome resistance.

  2. Activity of a Long-Acting Echinocandin (CD101) and Seven Comparator Antifu