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Sample records for candida spp aisladas

  1. Adhesion of different Candida spp. to plastic: XTT formazan determinations.

    PubMed

    Hawser, S

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion of synchronized yeast-phase Candida cells to tissue culture plastic was investigated using the tetrazolium salt, XTT. The procedure permits the direct enumeration of adherent yeasts following the metabolic conversion of the XTT tetrazolium salt, to its reduced formazan form, by mitochondrial dehydrogenases. Using this procedure, the formation of XTT formazan by Candida cells was typically related to the inoculum size. The adhesion of Candida yeast-phase cells from different Candida spp. to plastic was of the following order: C. krusei (n = 5) > C. albicans (n = 10) > C. glabrata (n = 6). Furthermore, preliminary experiments with several other species indicated that C. tropicalis (n = 2) may adhere as well as C. albicans and that one strain each of C. guilliermondii and C. parapsilosis appear to adhere to plastic in a similar fashion to C. glabrata. The data indicate the utility of the XTT tetrazolium based assay in enumerating the adhesion of different Candida spp. to plastic.

  2. Direct isolation of Candida spp. from blood cultures on the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Lynn L; Hospenthal, Duane R; Murray, Clinton K; Dooley, David P

    2003-06-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a selective and differential chromogenic medium that has been shown to be useful for identification of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, and perhaps Candida glabrata. Colony morphology and color have been well defined when CHROMagar Candida has been used to isolate yeast directly from clinical specimens, including stool, urine, respiratory, vaginal, oropharyngeal, and esophageal sources. Direct isolation of yeast on CHROMagar Candida from blood cultures has not been evaluated. We evaluated whether the color and colony characteristics produced by Candida spp. on CHROMagar Candida were altered when yeasts were isolated directly from blood cultures. Fifty clinical isolates of Candida were inoculated into aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles and incubated at 35 degrees C in an automated blood culture system. When growth was detected, an aliquot was removed and plated onto CHROMagar Candida. As a control, CHROMagar Candida plates were inoculated with the same isolate of yeast grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar simultaneously. No significant difference was detected in color or colony morphology between the blood and control isolates in any of the tested organisms. All C. albicans (n = 12), C. tropicalis (n = 12), C. glabrata (n = 9), and C. krusei (n = 5) isolates exhibited the expected species-specific colony characteristics and color, whether isolated directly from blood or from control cultures. CHROMagar Candida can be reliably used for direct isolation of yeast from blood cultures. Direct isolation could allow mycology laboratories to more rapidly identify Candida spp., enable clinicians to more quickly make antifungal agent selections, and potentially decrease patient morbidity and mortality.

  3. Direct Isolation of Candida spp. from Blood Cultures on the Chromogenic Medium CHROMagar Candida

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Lynn L.; Hospenthal, Duane R.; Murray, Clinton K.; Dooley, David P.

    2003-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a selective and differential chromogenic medium that has been shown to be useful for identification of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, and perhaps Candida glabrata. Colony morphology and color have been well defined when CHROMagar Candida has been used to isolate yeast directly from clinical specimens, including stool, urine, respiratory, vaginal, oropharyngeal, and esophageal sources. Direct isolation of yeast on CHROMagar Candida from blood cultures has not been evaluated. We evaluated whether the color and colony characteristics produced by Candida spp. on CHROMagar Candida were altered when yeasts were isolated directly from blood cultures. Fifty clinical isolates of Candida were inoculated into aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles and incubated at 35°C in an automated blood culture system. When growth was detected, an aliquot was removed and plated onto CHROMagar Candida. As a control, CHROMagar Candida plates were inoculated with the same isolate of yeast grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar simultaneously. No significant difference was detected in color or colony morphology between the blood and control isolates in any of the tested organisms. All C. albicans (n = 12), C. tropicalis (n = 12), C. glabrata (n = 9), and C. krusei (n = 5) isolates exhibited the expected species-specific colony characteristics and color, whether isolated directly from blood or from control cultures. CHROMagar Candida can be reliably used for direct isolation of yeast from blood cultures. Direct isolation could allow mycology laboratories to more rapidly identify Candida spp., enable clinicians to more quickly make antifungal agent selections, and potentially decrease patient morbidity and mortality. PMID:12791890

  4. Candida glabrata among Candida spp. from environmental health practitioners of a Brazilian Hospital.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Catarina; de Oliveira Silva, Elisa; Gonçalves, Lindyanne Lemos; Nery, Jéssica Maria; Silva, Naiara Chaves; Dias, Amanda Latercia Tranches

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of the species Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida was evaluated in a Brazilian Tertiary Hospital from the environment and health practitioners. In a 12-month period we had a total positivity of 19.65% of Candida spp. The most recurring non-albicans Candida species was C. glabrata (37.62%), generally considered a species of low virulence, but with a higher mortality rate than C. albicans. Subsequently, C. parapsilosis (25.74%) and C. tropicalis (16.86%) were the second and third most commonly isolated species. Considering the total samples collected from the emergency room and from the inpatient and the pediatric sector, 19.10% were positive for Candida spp., with the predominance of non-albicans Candida species (89.42%). The high percentage of positivity occurred in the hands (24.32%) and the lab coats (21.88%) of the health care assistants. No sample of C. albicans presented a profile of resistance to the drugs. All the non-albicans Candida species presented a decreased susceptibility to miconazole and itraconazole, but they were susceptible to nystatin. Most of the isolates were susceptible to fluconazole and amphotericin B. As expected, a high resistance rate was observed in C. glabrata and C. krusei, which are intrinsically less susceptible to this antifungal agent. The contamination of environmental surfaces by Candida spp. through hand touching may facilitate the occurrence of Candida infections predominantly in immunocompromised patients. In addition to that, the antifungal agents used should be carefully evaluated considering local epidemiologic trends in Candida spp. infections, so that therapeutic choices may be better guided. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  5. Candida spp. in oral cancer and oral precancerous lesions.

    PubMed

    Gall, Francesca; Colella, Giuseppe; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Rossiello, Raffaele; Angelillo, Italo Francesco; Liguori, Giorgio

    2013-07-01

    To assess the presence of Candida spp. in lesions of the oral cavity in a sample of patients with precancer or cancer of the mouth and evaluate the limitations and advantages of microbiological and histological methods, 103 subjects with precancerous or cancerous lesions and not treated were observed between 2007 and 2009. The presence of Candida in the lesions was analyzed by microbiological and histological methods. Cohen's k statistic was used to assess the agreement between culture method and staining techniques. Forty-eight (47%) patients had cancer and 55 (53%) patients had precancerous lesions. Candida spp. were isolated from 31 (30%) patients with cancerous lesions and 33 (32%) with precancerous lesions. C. albicans was the most frequent species isolated in the lesions. The k value showed a fair overall agreement for comparisons between culture method and PAS (0.2825) or GMS (0.3112). This study supports the frequent presence of Candida spp. in cancer and precancerous lesions of the oral cavity. Both microbiological investigations and histological techniques were reliable for detection of Candida spp. It would be desirable for the two techniques to be considered complementary in the detection of yeast infections in these types of lesions.

  6. [Isolation of Candida spp. from ascites in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Saludes, Paula; Araguás, Cristina; Sánchez-Delgado, Jordi; Dalmau, Blai; Font, Bernat

    2016-10-01

    The isolation of Candida spp. in ascites of cirrhotic patients is an uncommon situation in clinical practice. Factors that have been associated with increased susceptibility to primary fungal peritonitis are exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics and immunosuppression, a typical situation of these patients. We report seven episodes of Candida spp. isolation in ascites of cirrhotic patients detected in our hospital during the past 15years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. In vitro pharmacodynamic modelling of anidulafungin against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Ortega, Ignacio; Eraso, Elena; Suárez, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to fit anidulafungin in vitro static time-kill data from nine strains of Candida with a pharmacodynamic (PD) model in order to describe the antifungal activity of this drug against Candida spp. Time-kill data from strains of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis clades were best fit using an adapted sigmoidal Emax model and resulted in a set of PD parameters (Emax, EC50 and Hill factor) for each fungal strain. The data were analysed with NONMEM 7. Anidulafungin was effective in a species- and concentration-dependent manner against the strains of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis clades as observed with the EC50 estimates. Maximum killing rate constant (Emax) values were higher against C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis complex strains. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the activity of anidulafungin against Candida can be accurately described using an adapted sigmoidal Emax model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Adhesion of Candida spp. and Pichia spp. to Wooden Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tomičić, Ružica; Tomičić, Zorica

    2017-01-01

    Summary Yeast adhesion to and biofilm formation on surfaces is present in many different environments. In food industry, biofilms may be a source of contaminations, causing food spoilage and reducing quality of products. Candida and Pichia are two common yeast genera involved in the spoilage of some food products. The aim of this study is to assess the potential of Candida and Pichia species to adhere to two types of wooden surfaces (smooth and rough), one of the materials typical for the food processing industry, and investigate the influence of surface roughness of wood on the degree of yeast adhesion. The adhesion of the cells to the wooden surfaces was determined by rinsing them from the surface, followed by methylene blue staining, and quantification after imaging under microscope by automatic counting of viable cells. The results showed that all Candida and Pichia strains were able to adhere to the wooden surfaces in a species- and strain-dependent manner. On the other hand, our data indicated that adhesion by these yeasts was not significantly affected by the roughness of the wood surfaces. PMID:28559743

  9. In vitro combination therapy with isavuconazole against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Katragkou, Aspasia; McCarthy, Matthew; Meletiadis, Joseph; Hussain, Kaiser; Moradi, Patriss W; Strauss, Gittel E; Myint, Kyaw L; Zaw, Myo H; Kovanda, Laura L; Petraitiene, Ruta; Roilides, Emmanuel; Walsh, Thomas J; Petraitis, Vidmantas

    2017-11-01

    Combination therapy may be an alternative therapeutic approach for difficult-to-treat Candida infections with the aim of increasing efficacy of antifungal therapy. Whether isavuconazole, an extended-spectrum triazole, possesses synergistic activity in combination therapy with echinocandins or polyenes for the treatment of invasive candidiasis has not been studied. We used Bliss independence drug interaction analysis and time-kill assays to examine the in vitro interactions of isavuconazole with amphotericin B or micafungin, an echinocandin, against strains of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. The Bliss independence-based drug interactions modeling showed that the combination of isavuconazole and micafungin resulted in synergistic interactions against C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. krusei. The degree of synergy ranged from 1.8% to 16.7% (mean %ΔΕ value) with the highest synergy occurring against C. albicans (⊙SYN% = 8.8%-110%). Time-kill assays showed that the isavuconazole-micafungin combination demonstrated concentration-depended synergy against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. The combined interaction by Bliss analysis between isavuconazole and amphotericin B was indifferent for C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis while for C. glabrata was antagonistic (-2% to -6%) and C. krusei synergistic (3.4% to 7%). The combination of isavuconazole-amphotericin B by time-kill assay was antagonistic against C. krusei and C. glabrata. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that combinations of isavuconazole and micafungin are synergistic against Candida spp., while those of isavuconazole and amphotericin B are indifferent in vitro. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Identification of Candida spp. by phenotypic tests and PCR

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Teixeira, Alice Becker; Santos, Otávio Silveira; Cazanova, Ricardo Flores; Ferreira, Carlos Alexandre Sanchez; Cherubini, Karen; de Oliveira, Sílvia Dias

    2010-01-01

    The correct identification of Candida species is of great importance, as it presents prognostic and therapeutical significance, allowing an early and appropriate antifungical therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify isolates of Candida spp. from oral mucosa of 38 patients with oral candidosis evaluated in 2004 by phenotypic methods and PCR, discriminating C. albicans from the other Candida species. The tests used for phenotypic analysis were germ-tube and chlamydoconidia production, culture in CHROMAgar™ Candida, carbohydrate assimilation test, growth at 45ºC and culture in Tween 80 agar. Genotypic confirmation was performed by PCR. Phenotypic tests showed that 63.2% strains formed germ-tubes, 73.7% produced chlamydoconidia, and 63.2% showed green colonies in chromogenic medium, presumptively indicating C. albicans or C. dubliniensis. The carbohydrate assimilation test confirmed these results. A total of 21% strains were identified as C. krusei and 13.2% were indicative of C. tropicalis. Of these later strains, three produced chlamydoconidia. The association of other phenotypic tests with culture in Tween 80 agar identified 95.8% of strains as C. albicans and 4.2% as C. dubliniensis. All 24 strains indicative of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis were confirmed by PCR as C. albicans. PMID:24031493

  11. Phospholipase and proteinase activities of Candida spp. isolates from vulvovaginitis in Iran.

    PubMed

    Shirkhani, S; Sepahvand, A; Mirzaee, M; Anbari, K

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to characterize phospholipase and proteinase activities of Candida isolates from 82 vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and to study the relationship of these activities with vulvovaginitis. Totally 82 Candida isolates from vagina samples of VVC patients were randomly collected over the period between September and December 2014 from hospitalized patients at the general hospitals of Lorestan province, Iran. Isolates were previously identified by conventional mycological methods. The phospholipase and proteinase activities were evaluated by Egg yolk agar, Tween 80 opacity medium and agar plate methods. The most common Candida species was identified Candida albicans (n=34, 41.5%), followed by Candida famata (n=13, 15.8%), Candida tropicalis (n=11, 13.4%), and Candida parapsilosis (n=9, 11%). The most phospholipase activity was observed in Candida colliculosa (40%), followed by C. famata (38.5%), and Candida krusei (33.3%). The findings revealed that the correlation between phospholipase production by Candida spp. and the presence of VVC was not found to be statistically significant (P=0.91). All Candida spp. exhibited considerable proteinase activity; so that 100% of C. colliculosa, C. parapsilosis, Candida kefyr, and Candida intermedia isolates produced high proteinase activity with Pz 4+ scores. There was a significant correlation between proteinase production by Candida spp. and the presence of VVC (P=0.009). The obtained findings revealed that Candida spp. isolates may produce both virulence factors, phospholipase and proteinase. Although the phospholipase production was only observed in <40% of the isolates; however there was a significant association between proteinase production by Candida spp. and VVC. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Miltefosine inhibits Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida spp. biofilms and impairs the dispersion of infectious cells.

    PubMed

    Vila, Taissa; Ishida, Kelly; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Rozental, Sonia

    2016-11-01

    Candida spp. can adhere to and form biofilms over different surfaces, becoming less susceptible to antifungal treatment. Resistance of biofilms to antifungal agents is multifactorial and the extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important role. Among the few available antifungals for treatment of candidaemia, only the lipid formulations of amphotericin B (AmB) and the echinocandins are effective against biofilms. Our group has previously demonstrated that miltefosine has an important effect against Candida albicans biofilms. Thus, the aim of this work was to expand the analyses of the in vitro antibiofilm activity of miltefosine to non-albicans Candida spp. Miltefosine had significant antifungal activity against planktonic cells and the development of biofilms of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata. The activity profile in biofilms was superior to fluconazole and was similar to that of AmB and caspofungin. Biofilm-derived cells with their ECM extracted became as susceptible to miltefosine as planktonic cells, confirming the importance of the ECM in the biofilm resistant behaviour. Miltefosine also inhibited biofilm dispersion of cells at the same concentration needed to inhibit planktonic cell growth. The data obtained in this work reinforce the potent inhibitory activity of miltefosine on biofilms of the four most pathogenic Candida spp. and encourage further studies for the utilisation of this drug and/or structural analogues on biofilm-related infections.

  13. Antifungal activity of silver nanoparticles against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Panácek, Ales; Kolár, Milan; Vecerová, Renata; Prucek, Robert; Soukupová, Jana; Krystof, Vladimír; Hamal, Petr; Zboril, Radek; Kvítek, Libor

    2009-10-01

    The antifungal activity of the silver nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by the modified Tollens process was evaluated for pathogenic Candida spp. by means of the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC), and the time-dependency of yeasts growth inhibition. Simultaneously the cytotoxicity of the silver NPs to human fibroblasts was determined. The silver NPs exhibited inhibitory effect against the tested yeasts at the concentration as low as 0.21 mg/L of Ag. The inhibitory effect of silver NPs was enhanced through their stabilization and the lowest MIC equal to 0.05 mg/L was determined for silver NPs stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate against Candida albicans II. The obtained MICs of the silver NPs and especially of the stabilized silver NPs were comparable and in some cases even better than MICs of the conventional antifungal agents determined by E-test. The silver NPs effectively inhibited the growth of the tested yeasts at the concentrations below their cytotoxic limit against the tested human fibroblasts determined at a concentration equal to 30 mg/L of Ag. In contrast, ionic silver inhibited the growth of the tested yeasts at the concentrations comparable to the cytotoxic level (approx. 1mg/L) of ionic silver against the tested human fibroblasts.

  14. Oral Candida spp carriage and periodontal diseases in HIV-infected patients in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Alan Grupioni; Ribeiro, Ana Elisa Rodrigues Alves; Nakao, Cristiano; Motta, Ana Carolina Fragoso; Antonio, Luana Grupioni Lourenço; Machado, Alcyone Artioli; Komesu, Marilena Chinali

    2017-06-01

    The majority of HIV-infected patients develop Candida spp-associated clinical oral lesions. Studies have shown that asymptomatic oral colonization of Candida spp may lead to oral lesions or become a source of disseminated infections. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of periodontal conditions on Candida spp prevalence and Candida spp carriage in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients compared to non-infected patients. Twenty-five patients not infected with HIV and 48 HIV-infected patients were classified according to periodontal conditions as being periodontal healthy or with periodontal disease. Candida spp carriage and classification were performed in oral rinse samples. Viral load and CD4+ T lymphocyte (CD4+L) counts were performed in blood samples from HIV-infected patients. No differences in Candida spp prevalence related to HIV status or periodontal condition were detected. However, Candida spp carriage was increased in periodontally affected HIV-infected patients when compared to periodontally healthy HIV-infected patients (p= 0.04). Periodontally healthy HIV-infected patients presented Candida spp carriage in similar levels as healthy or periodontally affected non-HIV-infected patients. Candida spp carriage was correlated with CD4+L counting in HIV-infected patients. We concluded that periodontal disease is associated with increased Candida spp carriage in HIV-infected patients and may be a predisposing factor to clinical manifestations of candidiasis.

  15. Oral Candida spp carriage and periodontal diseases in HIV-infected patients in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Alan Grupioni; Ribeiro, Ana Elisa Rodrigues Alves; Nakao, Cristiano; Motta, Ana Carolina Fragoso; Antonio, Luana Grupioni Lourenço; Machado, Alcyone Artioli; Komesu, Marilena Chinali

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The majority of HIV-infected patients develop Candida spp-associated clinical oral lesions. Studies have shown that asymptomatic oral colonization of Candida spp may lead to oral lesions or become a source of disseminated infections. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of periodontal conditions on Candida spp prevalence and Candida spp carriage in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients compared to non-infected patients. Twenty-five patients not infected with HIV and 48 HIV-infected patients were classified according to periodontal conditions as being periodontal healthy or with periodontal disease. Candida spp carriage and classification were performed in oral rinse samples. Viral load and CD4+ T lymphocyte (CD4+L) counts were performed in blood samples from HIV-infected patients. No differences in Candida spp prevalence related to HIV status or periodontal condition were detected. However, Candida spp carriage was increased in periodontally affected HIV-infected patients when compared to periodontally healthy HIV-infected patients (p= 0.04). Periodontally healthy HIV-infected patients presented Candida spp carriage in similar levels as healthy or periodontally affected non-HIV-infected patients. Candida spp carriage was correlated with CD4+L counting in HIV-infected patients. We concluded that periodontal disease is associated with increased Candida spp carriage in HIV-infected patients and may be a predisposing factor to clinical manifestations of candidiasis. PMID:28591257

  16. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of lucknomycin, a new polyenic derivative, for Candida and Aspergillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Quesada, J; Torres-Rodriguez, J M; Rosés-Codinachs, M; Amaral-Olivera, M

    1983-01-01

    The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of lucknomycin, a new polyenic derivative, were determined for 101 clinical isolates of Candida, 38 clinical or environmental strains of Aspergillus fumigatus, and 30 isolates of A. niger. The most susceptible species were Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis (mean MIC, 0.4 micrograms/ml). Aspergillus spp. were less susceptible, with mean MICs of 0.60 micrograms/ml for Aspergillus niger and 9.2 micrograms/ml for Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:6625552

  17. Role of Non Albicans Candida Spp. and Biofilm in Neonatal ICU.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shagun; Mittal, Seema; Chaudhary, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Candida spp. remains the fungal species most commonly associated with biofilm formation. Increase in Candida infections in last decades has almost paralleled the increase and wide spread use of a broad range of medical implant devices mainly in population with impaired host defences. One of the most important characteristics of biofilms is their high level of resistance to antimicrobial drugs. This study was conducted to know the prevalence of different Candida spp. causing blood stream infections and ability to form biofilm and to evaluate the co relation of biofilm with antifungal drug resistance. The present study was conducted on 12464 blood samples for the identification and speciation of various Candida spp. causing blood stream infection over a period of one year. Antifungal susceptibility was performed as per clinical laboratory standard institute guidelines and biofilm formation was detected by method described by Christensen's et al. Out of total 12464 blood culture received, 1378 (11.05%) were culture positive rest and among culture positive 100 (7.25%) Candida isolates were recovered. C. tropicalis was the commonest (43%) species followed by C. albicans (41%), C. krusei (9%) and C. parapsilosis (7%). A total of 41 Candida isolates were biofilm producers and rest 59 isolates were non-biofilm producers. A changing trend of increased prevalence of non albicans Candida spp. was observed which were resistant to commonly used antifungal fluconazole. Multi drug resistance was more common in biofilm forming Candida isolates.

  18. [Investigation of the activity of the preparation cerbiden against Candida spp].

    PubMed

    Hladun, N P; Bondarenko, A S; Nahorna, S S; Smyrnova, O V

    2002-01-01

    Antifungal activity of a new complex antibiotical preparation cerbiden obtained from medical plant Bidens cernua L. of the Asteraceae family, was investigated in vitro against the clinical and museum strains of Candida spp. High cerbiden activity against clinical and museum strains of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. guilliermondii, sensitive and resistant to nystatin, amphotericin B and clotrimazole was determined.

  19. Antifungal activity of the honeybee products against Candida spp. and Trichosporon spp.

    PubMed

    Koç, Ayşe Nedret; Silici, Sibel; Kasap, Filiz; Hörmet-Oz, Hatice Tuna; Mavus-Buldu, Hikmet; Ercal, Bariş Derya

    2011-01-01

    Honeybee products (honey, royal jelly, pollen, and propolis) were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of 40 yeast strains of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, and Trichosporon spp. The broth microdilution method was used to assess the antifungal activity of honeybee products against yeasts. Fluconazole was selected as the antifungal control agent. Using the broth microdilution method, minimal inhibitory concentration ranges with regard to all isolates were 5-80% (vol/vol), 0.06-1 μg/mL, 0.002-0.25 μg/mL, 0.006-0.1 μg/mL, and 0.02-96 μg/mL for honey, royal jelly, pollen, propolis, and fluconazole, respectively. The antifungal activities of each product decreased in the following order: propolis >pollen > royal jelly > > honey. This study demonstrated that honeybee products, particularly propolis and pollen, can help to control some fluconazole-resistant fungal strains.

  20. Support for the role of Candida spp. in extensive caries lesions of children.

    PubMed

    Signoretto, Caterina; Burlacchini, Gloria; Faccioni, Fiorenzo; Zanderigo, Massimiliano; Bozzola, Nicolò; Canepari, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Candida spp. are frequently detected in the mouths of children with extensive caries lesions compared with caries-free subjects. In this study we evaluated the presence of Candida spp. in association with mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in the saliva of children with dental decay, before and after anti-caries treatment. Samples of saliva from 14 children with caries lesions and from 13 caries-free subjects were evaluated for the presence of mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and Candida spp. by culture. Eleven of 14 carious subjects hosted Candida spp. in their saliva as against only 2 out of 13 subjects without caries lesions. Carious subjects were treated by adopting a conventional protocol for caries disease (rinses with a mouthwash containing 0.2% chlorhexidine and fluorine). After treatment, the salivary bacterial counts decreased for mutans streptococci and in some cases for lactobacilli, but large numbers of Candida spp. remained in the saliva of several children. The latter were treated with the antifungal drug nystatin (oral rinses) and evaluation of the level of yeasts in the saliva showed disappearance of the microorganism in several cases. The results indicate that antiseptic treatment alone for dental decay is not sufficient for the eradication of microorganisms potentially responsible for caries lesions, in particular when yeasts are present. We hypothesize that the oral cavity of children could act as a reservoir of fungi, and eradication could be needed to prevent both exacerbation of caries lesions, and colonization by Candida spp. of other host sites.

  1. Candida spp. airway colonization: A potential risk factor for Acinetobacter baumannii ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaojiang; Zhu, Song; Yan, Dongxing; Chen, Weiping; Chen, Ruilan; Zou, Jian; Yan, Jingdong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to identify potential risk factors for Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and evaluate the association between Candida spp. airway colonization and A. baumannii VAP. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients who were on mechanical ventilation (MV) for ≥48 hours were divided into the following groups: patients with and without Candida spp. airway colonization; colonized patients receiving antifungal treatment or not; patients with A. baumannii VAP and those without VAP. Logistic regression analysis and propensity score matching were used to identify factors independently associated with A. baumannii VAP. Among 618 eligible patients, 264 (43%) had Candida spp. airway colonization and 114 (18%) developed A. baumannii VAP. Along with MV for ≥7 days (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 8.9, 95% confidence intervals [95% CI] 4.9-15.8) and presence of a central venous catheter (aOR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9), Candida spp. airway colonization (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.6-4.3) was identified as an independent risk factor for A. baumannii VAP. Patients with Candida spp. airway colonization were more likely to develop A. baumannii VAP than non-colonized patients (23% vs 15%, P=.01 and 34% vs. 15%, P<.001 in propensity score-matched subgroups). Administration of antifungal agents was not associated with A. baumannii VAP (29% vs. 21%, P=.153) but with higher in-hospital mortality (53% vs. 39%, P=.037). Candida spp. airway colonization (43%) and A. baumannii VAP (18%) were common in ICU patients who were on mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours. Candida spp. airway colonization was an independent risk factor for subsequent A. baumannii VAP. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Evaluation of Genetic Diversity of Candida spp. and Klebsiella spp. Isolated from the Denture Plaque of COPD Patients.

    PubMed

    Przybyłowska, D; Piskorska, K; Gołaś, M; Sikora, M; Swoboda-Kopeć, E; Kostrzewa-Janicka, J; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E

    2017-01-01

    Yeast-like fungi and gram-negative bacilli are the most frequent potential pathogens of the respiratory tract isolated from the denture plaque of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Dominant species among yeast-like fungi are Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis. Significant frequency is also exhibited by Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca. The purpose of this study was to analyze genetic diversity of the strains of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and Klebsiella spp. present in patients in stable phases of COPD. The analysis was conducted by the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method on clinical strains isolated from patients with COPD and control patients in overall good health. Forty one strains of Candida albicans, 12 of Candida tropicalis, as well as 9 strains of K. pneumoniae and 7 of K. oxytoca were scrutinized. The dominant species in clinical material from COPD patients was Candida albicans with a substantial degree of variations of genetic profiles. On the basis of affinity analysis, 19 genetic types were identified within this strain. An analysis of the banding patterns among C. tropicalis strains indicated the existence of 6 genetic types. A considerable diversity of genetic profiles among Klebsiella spp. also was established. The genotype diversity of Klebsiella spp. strains may indicate the endogenic character of the majority of infections, regardless of the therapy applied for the underlying condition.

  3. Impact of antifungal prescription on relative distribution and susceptibility of Candida spp. - Trends over 10 years.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Sébastien; Maubon, Danièle; Fournier, Pierre; Pelloux, Hervé; Schwebel, Carole; Chapuis, Claire; Foroni, Luc; Cornet, Muriel; Timsit, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of Candida spp. infections is worrisome, particularly in critically ill patients. Previous reports suggested that increasing use of antifungal therapy might affect resistance profiles of invasive strains. The study objective was to describe the distribution resistance profile of Candida spp. strains, and to correlate it with antifungal consumptions within one ICU. Antifungal drug consumption was measured as the number of defined daily doses per 1000 hospital days. The distribution of Candida spp. over a 10 year period 2004-2013 and the MICs of antifungal drugs over 2007-2013 were determined. Time series analyses were performed. Of 2403 identified Candida spp. from 5360 patients, Candida albicans predominated (53.1%), followed by Candida glabrata (16.2%), Candida parapsilosis (7.9%) and Candida tropicalis (7.5%). C. parapsilosis increased from 5.7% in 2004 to 8.4% in 2013 (P = 0.02). The increase in caspofungin use is correlated with the increase in caspofungin MICs of C. parapsilosis (P = 0.01), C. glabrata (P = 0.001) and C. albicans (P = 0.02). Polyenes consumption correlated with an increase in amphotericin B MICs of C. glabrata (P = 0.04). Previous history of antifungal prescription within an ICU influences Candida species distribution and susceptibility profile to antifungal agents. The significant selective pressure exerted by caspofungin and amphotericin B on C. glabrata is a concern. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In vitro interactions between anidulafungin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on biofilms of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Antonio; Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Carrieri, Antonio; Carone, Addolorata; Caggiano, Giuseppina; Franchini, Carlo; Corbo, Filomena; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2016-03-01

    Candida spp. are responsible for many biomaterial-related infections; they give rise to infective pathologies typically associated with biofilm formation. We recently reported that the echinocandin anidulafungin (ANF) showed a strong in vitro activity against both planktonic and biofilms cells. Herein, we report the antifungal activities of ANF alone and in association with some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) against nine Candida strain biofilms: four Candida albicans, two Candida glabrata and three Candida guilliermondii. The activity of ANF was assessed using an in vitro microbiological model relevant for clinical practice. ANF proved oneself to be active against biofilms cells, and a clear-cut synergism was found against Candida species biofilms when ANF was used in combination with three NSAIDs: aspirin, diclofenac, ibuprofen. The positive synergism against Candida spp. of ANF in association with aspirin or the other NSAIDs proved to be a very effective antifungal treatment (FICI<0.5). These results may provide the starting point for new combination therapies of ANF with NSAIDs against Candida biofilm pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Isolation and characterization of Candida spp. in Jordanian cancer patients: prevalence, pathogenic determinants, and antifungal sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Abeid, Hanan M; Abu-Elteen, Khaled H; Elkarmi, Ali Z; Hamad, Mawieh A

    2004-12-01

    The presence of Candida spp. in the oral cavity was evaluated in 95 cancer patients (57 in-patients and 38 out-patients) and in 65 healthcare workers in Amman, Jordan. Candida carriage occurred in 72.6% of cancer patients and 33.8% of healthcare workers, with Candida albicans being the species most commonly recovered, followed by C. glabrata. In-patients were found to harbor Candida spp. at significantly higher levels than out-patients (P = 0.0044). The number of adhered C. albicans cells and the secretion of extracellular proteinase was significantly higher in the in-patient group than in the out-patient group (P = 0.0016 and 0.00007, respectively); this significant difference was not observed regarding phospholipase secretion. Antifungal sensitivity testing data suggest that isolates were most sensitive to amphotericin B and nystatin, and least sensitive to miconazole and fluconazole, which are commonly used antifungal agents in Jordan.

  6. Prevalence of Staphylococcus spp and Candida spp in the oral cavity and periodontal pockets of periodontal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Alicia I; Jewtuchowicz, Virginia; Brusca, María I; Nastri, María L; Rosa, Alcira C

    2010-01-01

    The oral cavity can act as a reservoir of certain pathogens that can cause systemic infections. The periodontal pocket is an ecological niche appropriate for hosting microorganisms that could act as opportunistic pathogens. The ability of Staphylococcus spp and Candida spp to form a biofilm and live within certain niches allows them to develop mechanisms that increase persistence, such as the evasion of host defenses and antibiotic efficacy. These microorganisms can easily be or become resistant to antibiotics and lead to superinfection. The aims of this study were to assess the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus spp in biofilm in subgingival plaque and oral cavity of individuals with gingival-periodontal disease, to identify isolates and the relationship with Candida spp. The study included eighty-two patients, aged 18-70 years with periodontal disease and at least two sites with probing depth > or = 3 mm. Participants' data were evaluated individually. Subgingival biofilm samples were obtained using Gracey curettes 7/8, after supragingival biofilm removal, and a sample from the oral cavity (buccal mucosa, tongue and cheek mucosa) by sterile swab. Of all the patients studied, 42.7% exhibited Staphylococcus spp in the periodontal pocket and 69.5% in the oral cavity while 25.6% exhibited Candida spp in the periodontal pocket and 42.7% in the oral cavity. However, 13.4% had both microorganisms in the periodontal pocket and 36.6% in the oral cavity. The prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus was 13.4% in the periodontal pocket and 15.8% in the oral cavity. Candida albicans was the most prevalent yeast in the periodontal pocket (76.2%) and in the oral cavity (63.0%).

  7. Biofilm production and evaluation of antifungal susceptibility amongst clinical Candida spp. isolates, including strains of the Candida parapsilosis complex.

    PubMed

    Melo, Analy S; Bizerra, Fernando C; Freymüller, Edna; Arthington-Skaggs, Beth A; Colombo, Arnaldo L

    2011-04-01

    Candida cells can form biofilms that frequently are sources of infections and are less susceptible to antifungal drugs. Some authors have reported that Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis isolates are not able to produce biofilms in vitro and there are no studies available on biofilm susceptibility for these species to antifungals. The aims of this study were to (i) quantify Candida spp. biofilms in vitro, and (ii) test the in vitro susceptibilities of Candida spp. biofilms to fluconazole (FLC) and amphotericin B (AMB). Isolates studied included four Candida albicans, six C. tropicalis, seven C. parapsilosis, eight C. orthopsilosis, and five C. metapsilosis. We compared two different methods to evaluate biofilm production, i.e., crystal violet (CV) staining and XTT-reduction assays (XTT). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe high, medium and low biofilm producing isolates screened by these two methods. To determine the minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) for FLC and AMB, XTT-reduction assay was used to measure cell metabolic activity. Biofilm quantification by CV and XTT showed that C. tropicalis isolates were the highest biofilm producer, followed by C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Examination of SEM images revealed that the extent of biofilms formed by high, medium, and low producers was highly correlated to the results generated by CV assay. Biofilm of all the isolates evaluated were resistant to FLC (MBEC(80) ≥ 256 ug/ml) but, in general, susceptible to AMB, except for six C. parapsilosis strains (MBEC(80) ≥ 8 ug/ml).

  8. 7-hydroxycalamenene Effects on Secreted Aspartic Proteases Activity and Biofilm Formation of Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Mariana M. B.; Almeida, Catia A.; Chaves, Francisco C. M.; Rodrigues, Igor A.; Bizzo, Humberto R.; Alviano, Celuta S.; Alviano, Daniela S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The 7-hydroxycalamenenene-rich essential oil (EO) obtained from the leaves of Croton cajucara (red morphotype) have been described as active against bacteria, protozoa, and fungi species. In this work, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of 7-hydroxycalamenenene against Candida albicans and nonalbicans species. Materials and Methods: C. cajucara EO was obtained by hydrodistillation and its major compound, 7-hydroxycalamenene, was purified using preparative column chromatography. The anti-candidal activity was investigated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and secreted aspartic proteases (SAP) and biofilm inhibition assays. Results: 7-hydroxycalamenene (98% purity) displayed anti-candidal activity against all Candida species tested. Higher activity was observed against Candida dubliniensis, Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans, showing MIC values ranging from 39.06 μg/ml to 78.12 μg/ml. The purified 7-hydroxycalamenene was able to inhibit 58% of C. albicans ATCC 36801 SAP activity at MIC concentration (pH 7.0). However, 7-hydroxycalamenene demonstrated poor inhibitory activity on C. albicans ATCC 10231 biofilm formation even at the highest concentration tested (2500 μg/ml). Conclusion: The bioactive potential of 7-hydroxycalamenene against planktonic Candida spp. further supports its use for the development of antimicrobials with anti-candidal activity. SUMMARY Croton cajucara Benth. essential oil provides high amounts of 7-hydroxycalamenene7-Hydroxycalameneneisolated from C. cajucarais active against Candida spp7-Hydroxycalameneneinhibits C. albicans aspartic protease activity7-Hydroxycalamenene was not active against C. albicans biofilm formation. Figure PMID:27019560

  9. High Oral Carriage of Non-albicans Candida spp. among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Mushi, Martha F; Mtemisika, Conjester I; Bader, Oliver; Bii, Christine; Mirambo, Mariam M; Groß, Uwe; Mshana, Stephen E

    2016-08-01

    Non-albicans Candida (NAC) spp. in immunocompromised patients are linked to invasive infections with narrow treatment choice. This study aimed at comparing the oral colonization of NAC spp. between HIV and non-HIV infected individuals in Mwanza, Tanzania. Oral rinse of 351 HIV-infected and 639 non-HIV infected individuals were collected between March and July 2015. Phenotypic identifications of Candida spp. was done using Candida Chromogenic agar and confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS. NAC spp. were detected in 36/351 (10.3%) HIV-infected individuals compared to 28/639 (4.4%) of non-HIV infected individuals; P=0.0003. In HIV infected individuals, commonly isolated NAC spp. were Candida tropicalis, 10(2.8%), C. krusei (Issatschenki orientalis) 9(2.6%) and C. glabrata 8(2.3%). While for non-HIV infected individuals C. dubliniensis 8(1.3%) and C. tropicalis 5(0.9%) were commonly detected. As CD4 count/μl decreases by one unit the risk of being colonized by NAC spp. among HIV infected individuals increases by 1% (OR 1.01, 95% CI; 1.001-1.004, P=0.001). The prevalence of NAC spp. is high among HIV-infected individuals with low CD4 count placing them at higher risk of invasive infections. Further studies to investigate the role of NAC spp. in causing invasive infections among immunocompromised patients are recommended. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Antifungal activity of Turkish honey against Candida spp. and Trichosporon spp: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ayşe Nedret; Silici, Sibel; Ercal, Bariş Derya; Kasap, Filiz; Hörmet-Oz, Hatice Tuna; Mavus-Buldu, Hikmet

    2009-11-01

    Abstract Honey samples from different floral sources were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of 40 yeast strains (Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. glabrata and Trichosoporon spp.). Broth microdilution method (CLSI, M27-A2) was used to assess the activity of the honeys against yeasts at different concentrations ranging from 1.25-80% (v/v). All of the yeast strains tested were inhibited by honeys in this study. Broth microdilution assay revealed that inhibition of growth depends on the type and concentration of honey as well as the test pathogen. Little or no antifungal activity was seen at honey concentrations <2%. Rhododendron and multifloral honeys have generally more inhibitory effect than eucalyptus and orange honeys (P<0.05). Fluconazole-resistant yeast strains were examined for their susceptibility to honeys. This study demonstrated that, in vitro, these honeys had antifungal activity at the high concentration of 80% (v/v) in these fluconazole-resistant strains. Further studies are now required to demonstrate if this antifungal activity has any clinical application.

  11. Occurrence, isolation and differentiation of Candida spp. and prevalence of variables associated to chronic atrophic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Lund, Rafael Guerra; da Silva Nascente, Patrícia; Etges, Adriana; Ribeiro, Gladis Aver; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Del Pino, Francisco Augusto Burkert

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the frequency of Candida spp. in patients with chronic atrophic candidiasis (CAC), to differentiate Candida species and to assess the prevalence of certain infection-associated variables to this disease. Patients with CAC and wearing partial or complete dentures were recruited. Data were obtained by means of a questionnaire with details involving identification of the subject, demographic characteristics, behaviour and medical history, clinical and mycological evaluation and identification of yeast. The sample collection was carried out in the palate or palate and tongue of the subjects using sterilised swabs. Data were submitted to statistical analyses using Fischer's test. Forty-three (53%) cases of CAC showed the presence of Candida albicans. Females (75.2%) wearing complete dentures (60.1%) for more than 10 years (58%) were risk factors to CAC development. It could be concluded that: (a) the results did not confirm a significant difference among patients with CAC concerning the presence or absence of Candida spp.; (b) the occurrence of Candida was negatively related to important factors associated to this opportunistic infection; and (c) mycological findings did not indicate that the variables investigated have a significant effect on oral infections by C. albicans or other Candida species.

  12. Comparison between multiplex PCR and phenotypic systems for Candida spp. identification.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Giorgio; Gallé, Francesca; Lucariello, Angela; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Albano, Luciana; Mazzarella, Gennaro; D'Amora, Maurizio; Rossano, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the performances of three phenotypic systems (RapID Yeast panel, Vitek2 YST card, and API 20 C AUX) and multiplex PCR for Candida spp. identification. Four-hundred and fifty clinical strains of Candida spp. were identified with the four systems and results of multiplex PCR were compared with those of phenotypic methods. The best correspondence was obtained between Multiplex PCR and API 20 C AUX (83.7%), but the other comparisons showed similar values (81.7% and 79.3% for Vitek2 and RapID Yeast panel respectively). The correspondence was lower for all the methods in identification of C. krusei; this may be of concern in addition to the azole resistance and the often endogenous origin of this yeast. In the comparison with the three phenotypic methods, multiplex PCR could be reliable and time-saving in the identification of Candida spp. for diagnostics purposes. Nowadays, a large variety of both traditional and molecular methods for Candida spp. identification are commercially available. Multiplex PCR applied in this study may be more rapid and sensitive than phenotypic systems, and less expensive than other molecular methods.

  13. In Vitro Activity of Tea Tree Oil Vaginal Suppositories against Candida spp. and Probiotic Vaginal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Di Vito, Maura; Mattarelli, Paola; Modesto, Monica; Girolamo, Antonietta; Ballardini, Milva; Tamburro, Annunziata; Meledandri, Marcello; Mondello, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the in vitro microbicidal activity of vaginal suppositories (VS) containing tea tree oil (TTO-VS) towards Candida spp. and vaginal probiotics. A total of 20 Candida spp. strains, taken from patients with vaginitis and from an established type collection, including reference strains, were analysed by using the CLSI microdilution method. To study the action of VS towards the beneficial vaginal microbiota, the sensitivity of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (DSM 10140) and Lactobacillus spp. (Lactobacillus casei R-215 and Lactobacillus acidophilus R-52) was tested. Both TTO-VS and TTO showed fungicidal activity against all strains of Candida spp. whereas placebo-VS or the Aloe gel used as controls were ineffective. The study of fractional fungicidal concentrations (FFC) showed synergistic interaction with the association between Amphotericin B and TTO (0.25 to 0.08 µg/ml, respectively) against Candida albicans. Instead, the probiotics were only affected by TTO concentration ≥ 4% v/v, while, at concentrations < 2% v/v, they remained viable. TTO-VS exhibits, in vitro, a selective fungicidal action, slightly affecting only the Bifidobacteriun animalis strain growth belonging to the vaginal microbiota. In vivo studies are needed to confirm the efficacy to prevent acute or recurrent vaginal candidiasis.

  14. The immune response against Candida spp. and Sporothrix schenckii.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Álvarez, José A; Pérez-García, Luis A; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the main causative agent of systemic candidiasis, a condition with high mortality rates. The study of the interaction between C. albicans and immune system components has been thoroughly studied and nowadays there is a model for the anti-C. albicans immune response; however, little is known about the sensing of other pathogenic species of the Candida genus. Sporothrix schenckii is the causative agent of sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis, and thus far there is limited information about its interaction with the immune system. In this paper, we review the most recent information about the immune sensing of species from genus Candida and S. schenckii. Thoroughly searches in scientific journal databases were performed, looking for papers addressing either Candida- or Sporothrix-immune system interactions. There is a significant advance in the knowledge of non-C. albicans species of Candida and Sporothrix immune sensing; however, there are still relevant points to address, such as the specific contribution of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for sensing by different immune cells and the immune receptors involved in such interactions. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of Candida spp. isolation in the respiratory tract in patients with intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Terraneo, S; Ferrer, M; Martín-Loeches, I; Esperatti, M; Di Pasquale, M; Giunta, V; Rinaudo, M; de Rosa, F; Li Bassi, G; Centanni, S; Torres, A

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompetent patients with nosocomial pneumonia, the relationship between Candida spp. isolation in respiratory samples and outcomes or association with other pathogens is controversial. We therefore compared the characteristics and outcomes of patients with intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia (ICUAP), with or without Candida spp. isolation in the respiratory tract. In this prospective non-interventional study, we assessed 385 consecutive immunocompetent patients with ICUAP, according to the presence or absence of Candida spp. in lower respiratory tract samples. Candida spp. was isolated in at least one sample in 82 (21%) patients. Patients with Candida spp. had higher severity scores and organ dysfunction at admission and at onset of pneumonia. In multivariate analysis, previous surgery, diabetes mellitus and higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score II at ICU admission independently predicted isolation of Candida spp. There were no significant differences in the rate of specific aetiological pathogens, the systemic inflammatory response, and length of stay between patients with and without Candida spp. Mortality was also similar, even adjusted for potential confounders in propensity-adjusted multivariate analyses (adjusted hazard ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.57-2.05, p 0.80 for 28-day mortality and adjusted hazard ratio 1.38, 95% CI 0.81-2.35, p 0.24 for 90-day mortality). Antifungal therapy was more frequently prescribed in patients with Candida spp. in respiratory samples but did not influence outcomes. Candida spp. airway isolation in patients with ICUAP is associated with more initial disease severity but does not influence outcomes in these patients, regardless of the use or not of antifungal therapy. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Presumptive identification of Candida spp. and other clinically important yeasts: usefulness of Brilliance Candida Agar].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Claudia; López, Mónica; Arechavala, Alicia; Perrone, María Del Carmen; Guelfand, Liliana; Bianchi, Mario

    2010-06-30

    Fungal infections caused by yeasts have increased during the last decades and invasive forms represent a serious problem for human health. Candida albicans is the species most frequently isolated from clinical samples. However, other emerging yeast pathogens are increasingly responsible for mycotic infections, and some of them are resistant to some antifungal drugs. Consequently, it is necessary to have methods that can provide a rapid presumptive identification at species level. Numerous chromogenic agar media have been shown to be of value as diagnostic tools. We have compared a chromogenic medium, Brilliance Candida Agar, with CHROMagar Candida, the chromogenic medium most used in our country. A multicentre study was conducted in 16 Hospitals belonging to the Mycology Net of Buenos Aires City Government. A total of 240 yeast isolates were included in this research. The new chromogenic agar showed results very similar to those obtained with CHROMagar Candida. Copyright 2009 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Antifungal Activity of Cinnamon Oil and Olive Oil against Candida Spp. Isolated from Blood Stream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rohilla, Hina; Singh, Gajender; Punia, Parul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recently non-albicans Candida has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in blood stream infections. Some species of the Candida are becoming increasingly resistant to first line and second line antifungals such as echinocandins and fluconazole. In view of increasing global antifungal resistance, role of alternative and better antifungals like natural plant products need to be explored. Essential oils are known to exhibit antimicrobial activity against various fungi. Hence, we evaluated the efficacy of cinnamon oil and olive oil against Candida spp. Aim To evaluate the invitro antifungal activity of olive oil and cinnamon oil against blood stream Candida isolates. Materials and Methods The present prospective observational study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology at a tertiary care teaching hospital during one year June 2011-July 2012. Blood samples were collected from 1376 patients clinically suspected to have fungal septicaemia, out of which 100 (7.2%) Candida isolates obtained, were speciated by conventional methods. Antifungal susceptibility testing of all the isolates was done against fluconazole, voriconazole as per NCCL (M27-A2) and against olive oil and cinnamon oil by agar well diffusion method. Results Prevalence of Candidemia was 7.26%. C. albicans (85.3%) and C. parapsilosis (85.7%) were most sensitive to fluconazole followed by C. tropicalis (67.4%). All isolates were 100% sensitive to voriconazole. Both oils were found to be effective against nearly 50% of the Candida isolates. About 55.5% of fluconazole resistant C. krusei strains were sensitive to olive and cinnamon oil. Conclusion Fluconazole resistant non-albicans Candida has emerged as major cause of Candidemia. Cinnamon and olive oil show marked sensitivity against albicans and non-albicans spp. PMID:27656437

  18. Comparison of susceptibility patterns using commercially available susceptibility testing methods performed on prevalent Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Cretella, David; Barber, Katie E; King, S Travis; Stover, Kayla R

    2016-12-01

    The rising rates of invasive fungal infections caused by non-albicans Candida and the increasing emergence of antifungal resistance complicate the management of invasive candidiasis. Accurate and timely antifungal susceptibility testing is critical to targeting antifungal therapy. The purpose of this study was to compare commercially available susceptibility testing methods using prospectively collected Candida isolates. Susceptibility testing was performed on 74 Candida isolates collected from July 2014 to March 2015 using broth microdilution according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute method, Etest, Vitek 2 (YS-05) and Sensititre. Essential agreement and categorical agreement (CA) were assessed using the reference method. Of the 34 total blood isolates collected, Candida albicans comprised only 38 % (13) of the Candida spp. with Candidaglabrata being nearly as prevalent (29 %, 10). CA using Etest was 86 % for fluconazole, 72 % for caspofungin, 98 % for micafungin and 97 % for anidulafungin. Vitek 2 CA was 90 % for fluconazole and 98 % for caspofungin. Sensititre CA was 93 % for fluconazole, 98 % for caspofungin, 98 % for micafungin and 100 % for anidulafungin. Although our study tested a small population of Candida isolates, our results were variable by method. When implementing antifungal susceptibility testing, clinicians should be aware of the strengths and limitations of each testing method.

  19. Do Candida spp. "read" Nietzsche? Can xenobiotics modulate their aggressiveness? Proposition that chemicals may interfere in their virulence attributes.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    As well as the host, opportunist Candida spp. enface all sorts of exogenous chemicals, so-called xenobiotics. It is plausible that xenobiotics exert some effects on such microorganisms; among them, the modulation of virulence attributes.

  20. Species distribution and virulence factors of Candida spp. isolated from the oral cavity of kidney transplant recipients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Guilherme Maranhão; Diniz, Mariana Guimarães; da Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison Plinio; de Souza, Luanda Bárbara Ferreira Canário; Gondim, Libia Augusta Maciel; Ferreira, Maria Angela Fernandes; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; Milan, Eveline Pipolo

    2013-04-01

    Although yeasts belonging to the genus Candida are frequently seen as commensals in the oral cavity, they possess virulence attributes that contribute for pathogenicity. The aims of the present study were to study the prevalence of Candida spp. isolated from the oral cavity of renal transplant recipients and to analyze strains virulence factors. We isolated a total of 70 Candida strains from 111 transplant recipients, and Candida albicans was the most prevalent species (82.86 %). Oral candidiasis was diagnosed in 14.4 % kidney transplant patients, while 11 isolates (15.7 %) corresponded to non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species. C. albicans adhered to a higher extension than NCAC strains. Some isolates of Candida tropicalis were markedly adherent to human buccal epithelial cells and highly biofilm-forming strains. Regarding proteinase activity, Candida orthopsilosis was more proteolytic than Candida metapsilosis. Candida glabrata and Candida dubliniensis showed very low ability to form biofilm on polystyrene microtiter plates. We have demonstrated here diverse peculiarities of different Candida species regarding the ability to express virulence factors. This study will contribute for the understanding of the natural history and pathogenesis of yeasts belonging to the genus Candida in the oral cavity of patients who were submitted to kidney transplant and are under immunosuppressive therapies.

  1. Effectiveness of Photodynamic Therapy for the Inactivation of Candida spp. on Dentures: In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Daniela Garcia; Dovigo, Livia Nordi; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This in vitro study evaluated the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the inactivation of different species of Candida on maxillary complete dentures. Background data: The treatment of denture stomatitis requires the inactivation of Candida spp. on dentures. PDT has been reported as an effective method for Candida inactivation. Methods: Reference strains of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. dubliniensis and C. krusei were tested. Thirty-four dentures were fabricated in a standardized procedure and subjected to ethylene oxide sterilization. The dentures were individually inoculated with one of the strains and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Dentures submitted to PDT (P+L+) were individually sprayed with 50 mg/L of Photogem® (PS) and, after 30 min, illuminated by LED light for 26 min (37.5 J/cm2). Additional dentures were treated only with PS (P+L-) or light (P-L+) or neither (P-L-). Samples of serial dilutions were spread on Sabouraud dextrose agar and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. The colonies were counted and the values of log (cfu/mL) were analyzed by Kruskall-Wallis and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Results: For all species of Candida, PDT resulted in significant reduction (p<0.05) of cfu/mL values from dentures when compared with P-L- (reductions from 1.73 to 3.99 log10). Significant differences (p<0.05), but lower reductions, were also observed for P+L- and P-L+when compared with P-L- for some species of Candida. Conclusions: PDT was an effective method for reducing Candida spp. on dentures. PMID:21916614

  2. Effectiveness of photodynamic therapy for the inactivation of Candida spp. on dentures: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Ribeiro, Daniela Garcia; Dovigo, Livia Nordi; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2011-12-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the inactivation of different species of Candida on maxillary complete dentures. The treatment of denture stomatitis requires the inactivation of Candida spp. on dentures. PDT has been reported as an effective method for Candida inactivation. Reference strains of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. dubliniensis and C. krusei were tested. Thirty-four dentures were fabricated in a standardized procedure and subjected to ethylene oxide sterilization. The dentures were individually inoculated with one of the strains and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Dentures submitted to PDT (P+L+) were individually sprayed with 50 mg/L of Photogem(®) (PS) and, after 30 min, illuminated by LED light for 26 min (37.5 J/cm(2)). Additional dentures were treated only with PS (P+L-) or light (P-L+) or neither (P-L-). Samples of serial dilutions were spread on Sabouraud dextrose agar and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. The colonies were counted and the values of log (cfu/mL) were analyzed by Kruskall-Wallis and Dunn tests (p<0.05). For all species of Candida, PDT resulted in significant reduction (p<0.05) of cfu/mL values from dentures when compared with P-L- (reductions from 1.73 to 3.99 log(10)). Significant differences (p<0.05), but lower reductions, were also observed for P+L- and P-L+when compared with P-L- for some species of Candida. PDT was an effective method for reducing Candida spp. on dentures.

  3. Amphotericin B releasing nanoparticle topical treatment of Candida spp. in the setting of a burn wound.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, David A; Schairer, David; Tuckman-Vernon, Chaim; Chouake, Jason; Kutner, Allison; Makdisi, Joy; Friedman, Joel M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam J

    2014-01-01

    Candida spp. infection in the context of burn wounds leads to invasive disease with a 14-70% mortality rate. Unfortunately, current administrations of AmB, an important therapeutic demonstrating minimal resistance, are only available via potentially cytotoxic IV infusions. In order to circumvent these sequelae, we investigated the efficacy of nanoparticle encapsulated AmB (AmB-np) as a topical therapeutic against Candida spp. (drug release equilibrated solubilized AmB [AmB-sol] included as control). Clinical strains demonstrated equal or enhanced killing efficacy with 72.4-91.1% growth reduction by 4 hours. AmB-nps resulted in statistically significant reduction of fungal biofilm metabolic activity ranging from 80% to 95% viability reduction (P<0.001). Using a murine full-thickness burn model, AmB-np exhibited a quicker efficiency in fungal clearance versus AmB-sol by day three, although wound healing rates were similar. These data support the concept that AmB-np can function as a topical antifungal in the setting of a burn wound. The control of fungal infections with Candida species remains a challenge in the context of burn wounds. A nanoencapsulated topical amphotericin-B compound was studied in a murine model of full thickness burn injury, showing remarkable efficacy in controlling Candida infection. This may become a viable alternative to the potentially toxic intravenous formulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. In vitro photodynamic inactivation of Candida spp. by different doses of low power laser light.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, A S; Trajano, V N; Lima, E O; Ferreira, A F M; Queiroga, A S; Limeira, F A

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of PDT in photoinactivation of Candida species using methylene blue (MB) and irradiation with a diode laser (660nm, 40mW). Suspensions of Candida species were obtained containing 10(6)cfu/ml, transferred to 96-holes plates and exposed to 03 doses of laser light (60J/cm(2), 120J/cm(2), 180J/cm(2)) in the presence of MB. Additional suspensions were treated with only the MB, the laser light or with 0.85% saline (control groups). After the treatments, 1μl aliquot of the suspensions was plated in duplicate on SDA. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 24-48h and after this period there was the counting of colonies (cfu/ml). The three evaluated doses determined meaningful inactivation of Candida spp. (p<0.05). The 180J/cm(2) dose was the most effective, inactivating 78% of cfu/ml. At a dose of 180J/cm(2)C. albicans was the most susceptible specie. PDT has demonstrated effectiveness in the inactivation of Candida spp.

  5. Aspartic proteinases of Candida spp.: role in pathogenicity and antifungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Naiara C; Nery, Jéssica M; Dias, Amanda L T

    2014-01-01

    Fungal infections represent a serious health risk as they are particularly prevalent in immunocompromised individuals. Candida spp. pathogenicity depends on several factors and secreted aspartic proteinases (Sap) are considered one of the most critical factors as they are associated with adhesion, invasion and tissue damage. The production of proteinases is encoded by a family of 10 genes known as SAP, which are distributed differently among the species. The expression of these genes may be influenced by environmental conditions, which generally result in a higher fungal invasive potential. Non-pathogenic Candida spp. usually have fewer SAP genes, which are not necessarily expressed in the genome. Exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antifungal agents promotes the development of resistant strains with an increased expression of SAP genes. In general, Candida spp. isolates that are resistant to antifungals show a higher secretion of Sap than the susceptible isolates. The relationship between Sap secretion and the susceptibility profile of the isolates is of great interest, although the role of SAPs in the development of resistance to antifungal agents remains still unclear. This review is the first one to address these issues.

  6. Candida spp. and gingivitis in children with nephrotic syndrome or type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota; Pyrżak, Beata; Dąbkowska, Maria; Pańczyk-Tomaszewska, Małgorzata; Miszkurka, Grażyna; Rogozińska, Izabela; Swoboda-Kopeć, Ewa; Gozdowski, Dariusz; Kalińska, Angelika; Piróg, Anna; Mizerska-Wasiak, Małgorzata; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria

    2015-05-08

    Diabetes and Nephrotic syndrome (NS) promote plaque-related gingivitis and yeast-like fungal infections. The study assesses the impact of Candida spp. and general disease- or treatment-related factors on plaque-related gingivitis severity in children and adolescents with Nephrotic syndrome /diabetes. Body mass index (BMI), BMI standard deviation score, and oral cavity (Plaque Index--PLI, Gingival Index--GI, mucosa status, presence and Candida enzymatic activity) were assessed in 96 patients (32 with NS: 30- immunosuppressive treatment, 35--type 1 diabetes, and 29 generally healthy), aged; 3-18 years. Laboratory included cholesterol and triglyceride measurements; in diabetic subjects- glycated haemoglobin, in NS: total protein, albumin, creatinine, haemoglobin, haematocrit, white cell count, urinary protein excretion. Medical records supplied information on disease duration and treatment. A statistical analysis was performed; Kendall Tau coefficient, chi-square test, t-test, and multiple regression analysis ( P < 0.05). Candida spp. often occurred in healthy patients, but oral candidiasis was found only in the NS and diabetes groups (9.37% and 11.43%). Gingivitis occurred more frequently in patients with NS/diabetes. Gingivitis severity was correlated with PLI, age, and yeast enzyme activity in NS--to with immunosuppressive treatment with >1 drug, drug doses, treatment duration, lipid disorders, and BMI; in diabetes, with blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin >8%. Poor hygiene control is the main cause of gingivitis. Gingivitis severity is most likely related to age, lipid disorders and increase in body mass. Candida spp., in uncompensated diabetes and in those using immunosuppressive treatment, might intensify plaque-related gingivitis.

  7. Nosocomial Bloodstream Infection Due to Candida spp. in China: Species Distribution, Clinical Features, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Du, Mingmei; Chen, Liang-An; Liu, Yunxi; Liang, Zhixin

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the distribution of Candida spp., predictors of mortality, and effects of therapeutic measures on outcomes of nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI) due to Candida spp. This retrospective, population-based study enrolled adult patients with Candida nosocomial BSI from January 2010 to December 2014 in one tertiary care hospital. The demographics, comorbidities, species distribution, risk factors, and effects of antifungal treatment were assessed. In total, 190 episodes of Candida BSI were identified. The most prevalent species was C. albicans (38.9 %), followed by C. parapsilosis (23.2 %) and C. tropicalis (20.5 %). In vitro susceptibility testing showed that 88.9 % of Candida isolates were susceptible to fluconazole. The 30-day hospital mortality was 27.9 %, while the early mortality (within 7 days) was 16.3 %. In a multivariate regression analysis, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [odds ratio (OR) 1.23; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.080-1.390; P = 0.002] and severe sepsis or septic shock (OR 15.35; 95 % CI 2.391-98.502; P = 0.004) were independently correlated with early mortality. Severe sepsis or septic shock (OR 24.75; 95 % CI 5.099-120.162; P < 0.001) was an independent risk factor for 30-day mortality, while proven catheter-related candidemia (OR 0.16; 95 % CI 0.031-0.810; P = 0.027) was a positive factor for 30-day mortality. Early central venous catheter removal and adequate antifungal treatment were closely related to decreased mortality in patients with primary candidemia. The proportion of candidemia caused by C. albicans was lower than that caused by non-albicans species. The severity of illness influenced early mortality, and the origin of the central venous catheter remarkably affected 30-day mortality.

  8. [Species distribution and antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. causing superficial mycosis. Coro, Falcon state, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Saúl-García, Yotsabeth; Humbría-García, Leyla; Hernández-Valles, Rosaura

    2015-09-01

    Candida species other than C. albicans are often described as causative agents of superficial mycosis and are more resistant to treatment with azoles. In order to determine the distribution of species and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp., one ambispective study, which analyzed 18 yeast isolates obtained from samples from patients diagnosed with superficial mycosis, was performed. Taxonomic identification was performed by macroscopic visualization of the growth characteristics in chromogenic agar and by conventional methods. The susceptibility to fluconazole and voriconazole was evaluated by the disc diffusion method. Most of the isolates (88.8%), came from nail samples. C. parapsilosis was the most common species, followed by C. tropicalis, C. albicans and C. krusei, which confirmed the prevalence of non-albicans species as a cause of superficial mycoses. The pattern of susceptibility to fluconazole and voriconazole was similar: all isolates of C. parapsilosis and C. albicans were susceptible, while 83.3% of C. tropicalis showed sensitivity to both antifungals. C. krusei, fluconazole-resistant species showed intermediate susceptibility io voriconazole. The use of chromogenic agar allowed to detect mixed infections in nail samples, involving Candida spp. and C. tropicalis in one case, the latter with resistance to both fluconazole and voriconazole. The results demonstrate the importance of species identification and susceptibility testing to avoid therapeutic failures in superficial mycoses.

  9. The influence of photodynamic therapy parameters on the inactivation of Candida spp: in vitro and in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, F.; Mima, E. G.; Dovigo, L. N.; Bagnato, V. S.; Jorge, J. H.; de Souza Costa, C. A.; Pavarina, A. C.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of parameters of photodynamic therapy (PDT), such as pre-irradiation time (PIT), on the inactivation of Candida spp. was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Suspensions of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata were treated with Photogem®, incubated for 5, 10 or 15 min and illuminated with a blue LED light. Colonies were cultivated and log values of CFU ml-1 were analyzed by ANOVA and Kruskall-Wallis test. For in vivo evaluation, immunosuppressed mice were inoculated with C. albicans. PDT was performed on the dorsum of the tongue by topical administration of Photogem® and illumination after 5, 10 or 15 min. C. albicans was recovered from the tongue and the number of CFU ml-1 was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test. Animals were killed and the tongues were surgically removed for histological analysis. Susceptibility of Candida spp. suspensions to PDT was in decreasing order: C. albicans = C. tropicalis < C. krusei < C. glabrata. No significant difference was observed among the different PIT (p > 0.05), both in vivo and in vitro. A significant reduction (p < 0.05) of log(CFU ml-1) of C. albicans from tongues of mice was observed with no adverse effects in the tissue. PDT was effective to inactivate in vitroCandida spp. and for reduction of C. albicans in vivo, independently of the PIT used.

  10. Use of phylogenetical analysis to predict susceptibility of pathogenic Candida spp. to antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Andrée F; Sellam, Adnane; Piché, Yves; Boissinot, Maurice; Pelletier, René; Boudreau, Dominique K; Picard, François J; Trépanier, Hélène; Boily, Marie-Josée; Ouellette, Marc; Roy, Paul H; Bergeron, Michel G

    2016-12-01

    Successful treatment of a Candida infection relies on 1) an accurate identification of the pathogenic fungus and 2) on its susceptibility to antifungal drugs. In the present study we investigated the level of correlation between phylogenetical evolution and susceptibility of pathogenic Candida spp. to antifungal drugs. For this, we compared a phylogenetic tree, assembled with the concatenated sequences (2475-bp) of the ATP2, TEF1, and TUF1 genes from 20 representative Candida species, with published minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the four principal antifungal drug classes commonly used in the treatment of candidiasis: polyenes, triazoles, nucleoside analogues, and echinocandins. The phylogenetic tree revealed three distinct phylogenetic clusters among Candida species. Species within a given phylogenetic cluster have generally similar susceptibility profiles to antifungal drugs and species within Clusters II and III were less sensitive to antifungal drugs than Cluster I species. These results showed that phylogenetical relationship between clusters and susceptibility to several antifungal drugs could be used to guide therapy when only species identification is available prior to information pertaining to its resistance profile. An extended study comprising a large panel of clinical samples should be conducted to confirm the efficiency of this approach in the treatment of candidiasis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Genetic dissimilarity of commensal strains of Candida spp. carried in different anatomical locations of the same healthy women.

    PubMed Central

    Soll, D R; Galask, R; Schmid, J; Hanna, C; Mac, K; Morrow, B

    1991-01-01

    Candida spp. carriage and strain relatedness were assessed in 52 healthy women at 17 anatomical locations by using an isolation procedure which assesses carriage intensity and by using a computer-assisted DNA fingerprinting system which computes genetic similarity between strains on the basis of the patterns of Southern blots probed with the moderately repetitive sequence Ca3. Candida spp. were cultured from 73% of the test individuals, most frequently from the oral (56%), vulvovaginal (40%), and anorectal (24%) regions. Half of the test individuals with Candida spp. carried the organism simultaneously in more than one of the three general areas of carriage. Isolates from different body locations of the same individual were either completely unrelated, identical, or highly similar but nonidentical. In 11 cases in which Candida spp. were simultaneously isolated from the oral cavity and vaginal canal, seven pairs of isolates were genetically unrelated and four pairs were similar but nonidentical. In the latter cases, the isolate pairs each appear to have arisen by genetic divergence from a single progenitor. A comparison of the genetic relatedness of isolates from different individuals further uncovered a single strain which was vaginospecific in the Iowa City, Iowa area and reduced genetic diversity among vulvovaginal strains compared with those isolated from other body locations. These results suggest that strains adapt to different anatomical locations and, conversely, that in a healthy individual there is anatomical selection of vaginotropic, anotropic and orotropic strains of Candida spp. Images PMID:1761692

  12. The problems of urinary tract infections with Candida spp. aetiology in women.

    PubMed

    Tomczak, Hanna; Szałek, Edyta; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2014-08-29

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women are a growing clinical concern. The most frequent risk factors of UTIs with fungal aetiology in women are: antibiotic therapy (especially broad-spectrum antibiotics), immunosuppressive therapy, diabetes, malnutrition, pregnancy, and frequent intercourse. The aim of the study was to analyse urinary tract infections with Candida spp. aetiology in women hospitalised at the Clinical Hospital in Poznań, Poland, between 2009 and 2011. The investigations revealed that as many as 71% of positive urine cultures with Candida fungi came from women. The following fungi were most frequently isolated from the patients under analysis: C. albicans (47%), C. glabrata (31%), C. tropicalis (6%), C. krusei (3%). In order to diagnose a UTI the diagnosis cannot be based on a single result of a urine culture. Due to the small number of antifungal drugs and high costs of treatment, antifungal drugs should be applied with due consideration and care.

  13. Prevalence of Candida spp. in cervical-vaginal samples and the in vitro susceptibility of isolates.

    PubMed

    Brandolt, Tchana Martinez; Klafke, Gabriel Baracy; Gonçalves, Carla Vitola; Bitencourt, Laura Riffel; Martinez, Ana Maria Barral de; Mendes, Josiara Furtado; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is an infection of the genital mucosa caused by different species of the genus Candida. Considering the lack of data on this topic in the south of Brazil, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of Candida spp. in the cervical-vaginal mucosa of patients treated at a university hospital in southern Rio Grande do Sul, as well as the etiology and the susceptibility of the isolates against fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole and nystatin. Samples were collected at the gynecology clinic of the Federal Hospital of the University of Rio Grande, and the isolates were identified using phenotypic and biochemical tests. The susceptibility analysis was performed according to the CLSI M27-A2 protocol. Of the 263 patients included, Candida spp. was isolated in 27%, corresponding to a prevalence of approximately 15% for both VVC and colonization. More than 60% of the isolates were identified as Candida albicans; C. non-albicans was isolated at a rate of 8.6% in symptomatic patients and 14.3% in asymptomatic patients. The prevalence of resistance against fluconazole and itraconazole was 42% and 48%, respectively; the minimal inhibitory concentration of miconazole ranged from 0.031 to 8μg/mL, and that of nystatin ranged from 2 to >16μg/mL. The high rate of resistance to triazoles observed in our study suggests the necessity of the association of laboratory exams to clinical diagnosis to minimize the practice of empirical treatments that can contribute to the development of resistance in the isolates.

  14. Chemical composition and antifungal potential of Brazilian propolis against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Freires, I A; Queiroz, V C P P; Furletti, V F; Ikegaki, M; de Alencar, S M; Duarte, M C T; Rosalen, P L

    2016-06-01

    Propolis is known to have biological properties against numerous microorganisms of clinical interest. This study aimed to determine the chemical composition and antifungal activity of Brazilian propolis (types 3 and 13) against Candida spp. and their effects on the morphology of preformed and mature Candida biofilms. Samples of propolis (3 and 13) collected by Apis mellifera honeybees were obtained from different regions in Brazil. Ethanolic extracts of propolis (EEP) were prepared, fractionated and submitted to chemical analysis by GC/MS. The extracts and their hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions were tested for their ability to inhibit Candida spp. (C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. kruzei, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis) by determination of the minimum inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations (MIC/MFC). Additionally, their effects on morphology of preformed and mature biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The phenolic compounds p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), kaempferol and quercetin were identified in the EEP-3 and its bioactive dichloromethane fraction; and isoflavonoids such as medicarpin, vestitol and formononetin were found in the EEP-13, and triterpenes in its bioactive hexane fraction. The EEP-3 and EEP-13 and their bioactive fractions showed MIC values ranging from 0.2 to 125μg/mL and MFC values between 125 and 500μg/mL. The EEP and fractions were predominantly fungistatic agents. All extracts and fractions disrupted biofilm structures at 500μg/mL and amorphous areas with cell damage were clearly observed in preformed and mature biofilms. Propolis types 3 and 13 have strong anti-Candida activity and should be considered as promising candidates to treat oral and systemic candidiasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Scope and frequency of fluconazole trailing assessed using EUCAST in invasive Candida spp. isolates.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Zambrano, Laura Judith; Escribano, Pilar; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Bouza, Emilio; Guinea, Jesús

    2016-10-01

    Trailing is a well-known phenomenon that is defined as reduced but persistent visible growth of Candida spp. at fluconazole concentrations above the MIC. Trailing is commonly detected using the CLSI M27-A3 method, although little is known about its frequency when investigated with EUCAST. We assessed the frequency and scope of fluconazole trailing after using EUCAST EDef 7.2. against a large number of Candida spp. isolates from patients with candidemia. We studied 639 fluconazole-susceptible non-krusei Candida spp. isolates from 570 patients admitted to Gregorio Marañón Hospital. Isolates were tested in vitro for fluconazole susceptibility according to the EUCAST EDef 7.2 procedure; trailing was defined as the presence of any residual growth in wells containing fluconazole concentrations above the MIC. According to the mean percentage of trailing observed, isolates were classified as residual trailers (0.1-5%), slight trailers (6%-10%), moderate trailers (11%-15%), and heavy trailers (>15%). The relationship between trailing and genotyping was assessed. The mean overall percentage of trailing was 6.8%, with C. albicans and C. tropicalis showing the highest percentages (9.75% and 9.29%, respectively; P < .001). C. albicans and C. tropicalis had the highest percentage of heavy trailers (>15%). Trailing was not genotype-specific. Fluconazole trailing was observed frequently when EUCAST was used for antifungal susceptibility testing, particularly in isolates of C. albicans and C. tropicalis The cut-off proposed enabled us to classify the isolates according to the degree of trailing and can be used as the basis for future studies to evaluate the clinical impact of this phenomenon. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Study of strains of Candida spp. Isolated from catheters in UHC of Oran (Algeria): Identification and antifungal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bendjelloul, M; Boucherit-Otmani, Z; Boucherit, K

    2016-09-01

    The increasing incidence of Candida spp., and the vital prognosis often compromise for patients with Candida species make urgent the exact knowledge of their distribution worldwide and exhaust action antifungals currently used in clinical. That why we carry out an epidemiological study of Candida species and testing their susceptibility against two antifungals: amphotericin B and caspofungin. Samplings of peripheral venous catheters (PVC) were carried out from during 8months on the services of Internal medicine, Surgery A and Neonatology of Oran's University Hospital Center (UHC). The study of the susceptibility of Candida species to antifungal agents was performed according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI 2008). From 300 samples, 25 yeasts were isolated. The rate of colonization PVC was 8.33% by Candida spp. The most isolated strains were Candida parapsilosis with 64% of cases, followed by Candida albicans (12%) then 8% for Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. However, only 4% of isolates were Candida famata or Candida lusitaniae. Furthermore all isolated strains were susceptible to amphotericin B with Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) ranging from 0.25 to 1μg/mL. MIC obtained with caspofungin vary from 0.0625 to 2μg/mL for all strains. Moreover, one strain of C. krusei is resistant to caspofungin with a MIC superior to 8μg/mL. All though caspofungin is at least as effective as amphotericin B, it is better tolerated for the treatment of invasive fungal infections. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Fatal Plasmodium falciparum, Clostridium perfringens, and Candida spp. Coinfections in a Traveler to Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Genrich, Gillian L.; Bhatnagar, Julu; Paddock, Christopher D.; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2009-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common causes of febrile illness in travelers. Coinfections with bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens may not be suspected unless a patient fails to respond to malaria treatment. Using novel immunohistochemical and molecular techniques, Plasmodium falciparum, Clostridium perfringens, and Candida spp. coinfections were confirmed in a German traveler to Haiti. Plasmodium falciparum-induced ischemia may have increased this patient's susceptibility to C. perfringens and disseminated candidiasis leading to his death. When a patient presents with P. falciparum and shock and is unresponsive to malaria treatment, secondary infections should be suspected to initiate appropriate treatment. PMID:20339463

  18. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of nanoemulsions containing Eucalyptus globulus oil against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Quatrin, Priscilla Maciel; Verdi, Camila Marina; Ebling de Souza, Márcia; Nunes de Godoi, Samantha; Klein, Bruna; Gundel, Andre; Wagner, Roger; de Almeida Vaucher, Rodrigo; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Vianna Santos, Roberto Christ

    2017-09-29

    Candida species are the main responsible microorganisms for causing fungal infections worldwide, and Candida albicans is most frequently associated with infectious processes. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium commonly found in immunocompromised patients. The infection persistence caused by these microorganisms is often related to antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation. In this context, the objective of the present study was to prepare and characterize nanoemulsions containing Eucalyptus globulus oil and to verify its antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities against P. aeruginosa and Candida spp. The nanoemulsions had a size of approximately 76 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.22, a zeta potential of - 9,42 mV and a pH of approximately 5.0. The E. globulus oil was characterized by gas chromatography, being possible to observe its main components, such as 1-8-Cineol (75.8%), p- Cymene (7.5%), α-Pinene (7.4%) and Limonene (6.4%). The antimicrobial activity of the nanoemulsion was determined from the macrodilution tests and the cell viability curve, where the minimum fungicidal concentration of 0.7 mg/mL for C. albicans and 1.4 mg/mL for C. tropicalis and C. glabrata were obtained. However, the nanoemulsions did not present antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, since it contains only 5% of the oil, being ineffective for this microorganism. The nanoencapsulated oil action against the formed biofilm was evaluated by atomic force microscopy and calcofluor staining, and the nanoemulsion was more efficient for two of the three Candida species when compared to free oil. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Hydrophobic properties of Candida spp. under the influence of selected essential oils.

    PubMed

    Rajkowska, Katarzyna; Kunicka-Styczyńska, Alina; Pęczek, Marlena

    2015-01-01

    Processes of colonization of biotic and abiotic surfaces and biofilm formation depend inter alia on hydrophobic properties of Candida spp. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of tea tree, thyme and clove essential oils on hydrophobic properties of environmental and clinical Candida isolates. The relative cell surface hydrophobicity of strains tested was high, and ranged from 68.7% to 91.2%, with the highest value for a C. rugosa food-borne strain. The effectiveness of essential oils was diversified and depended on the type of essential oil, concentration and yeast strain. Statistically significant decrease of hydrophobicity indexes was observed after application of tea tree oil for C. krusei, clove oil for C. albicans reference strain, and all essential oils tested for C. rugosa. Only in the case of C. famata food-borne strain and C. albicans clinical isolate, solely used essential oils did not affect their hydrophobic properties. To determine the interactions of essential oils, their mixtures (1 MIC:1 MIC, 1 MIC:2 MIC and 2 MIC:1 MIC) were applied. Generally, essential oils used in combinations influenced yeast's hydrophobic properties much more than applied separately. The essential oils' mixtures reduced hydrophobicity of Candida yeasts in the range of 8.2 to 45.1%, depending on combination and strain. The interaction indexes of essential oils used in combinations predominantly indicate their additive effect. The application of tea tree, thyme and clove essential oils, especially in combinations, decreases hydrophobicity of the tested Candida isolates with implications of a probable advantageous limitation of their ability to colonize the food production industry environment.

  20. Susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida spp. to terconazole and other azole antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Gerarden, T

    1989-01-01

    Terconazole is a triazole ketal derivative with potent, broad-spectrum antifungal activity. We investigated the in vitro activity of terconazole, miconazole, and clotrimazole, against 94 clinical isolates of Candida spp.: C. albicans (n = 68), C. tropicalis (n = 18), and C. parapsilosis (n = 8). In vitro susceptibility testing was performed using a broth microdilution method. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of terconazole were less than those of miconazole against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis but higher against C. tropicalis. Terconazole was more active than clotrimazole against C. parapsilosis and less active against C. albicans and C. tropicalis. Terconazole inhibited the uptake of 14C-labeled glucose, leucine, and hypoxanthine into C. albicans and caused the rapid release of intracellular K+. Based on these studies, terconazole has promising anticandidal activity and warrants further in vitro and in vivo investigation.

  1. Oral Candidiasis in children and adolescents with cancer. Identification of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    González Gravina, Haylen; González de Morán, Evelyn; Zambrano, Olga; Lozano Chourio, María; Rodríguez de Valero, Sofía; Robertis, Sandra; Mesa, Luz

    2007-10-01

    Oral candidiasis represents a serious problem for children with cancer. The mortality rate of this infection has increased due to fungal septicemia, associated with a primary buccal infection. Identify the Candida spp. in buccal lesions of patients with cancer, establish the predominant species and correlate them to age and sex of the patient, clinical presentation, type of neoplasic disease and cytostatic therapy received. 62 patients, between 0-16 years, were investigated in a cross sectional study. SAMPLE INCLUSION CRITERIA: Patients with malignant neoplasic disease that were receiving cytostatic treatment and had suspicious lesions of oral candidiasis. Patients with antifungal therapy, active caries, calculus or intraoral appliances were excluded. A clinical evaluation was carried out. The lesion sample was taken and studied by direct exam and culture in CHROMagar-Candida and Sabouraud-Dextrose Agar with chloramphenicol. The identification of the isolated yeast was done by the filamentation test, carbohydrate fermentation and assimilation. Most of the cases (69.35%) were positive to oral candidiasis, C. albicans was the most frequent species found, followed by C. parapsilosis (14.89%), C. tropicalis (12.77%), C. krusei (4.26%), C. glabrata (2.13%) and C. lusitaniae (2.13%). In some cases more than one specie were isolated (9.30%). The most frequent location of the lesion was in the tongue (72.70%). The pseudomembranous candidiasis was the most frequent clinical presentation found (78.71%). There were not significant statistically differences with regard to sex and age of the patient, type of neoplasic disease and cytostatic agent received. The results suggest that oral candidiasis is a frequent complication in the pediatric oncological population, being C. albicans the main etiological agent, however, there is an important participation of other Candida species.

  2. Candida spp. biotypes in the oral cavity of school children from different socioeconomic categories in Piracicaba-SP, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moreira, D; Spolidório, D M; Rodrigues, J A; Boriollo, M F; Pereira, C V; Rosa, E A; Höfling, J F

    2001-01-01

    Two hundred and thirty-nine (239) Brazilian children, distributed into five distinct socioeconomic categories (A to E) were studied. Saliva samples were analyzed as to flow rate, pH, buffer capacity and microbial parameters. The results revealed the presence of Candida spp. in 47.3% of the samples. The most commonly isolated species was C. albicans, in all socioeconomic categories, followed by C. tropicalis, C. krusei and C. parapsilosis. There was no statistical correlation between secretion rate, buffer capacity and Candida spp. CFU/ml. The prevalence of Candida spp. did not differ substantially among the groups; however the microorganisms were more detected in categories B and C. Among all species, C. albicans was the most prevalent. Only 5% of the sample presented more than one species--C. albicans associated with C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis or C. krusei. It was possible to detect a significant correlation between caries indices and the socioeconomic categories. All categories presented increased caries indices; however the studied population was considered of low caries risk. There was no positive correlation between the presence of Candida and caries risk in the analyzed population.

  3. Conditioning film and environmental effects on the adherence of Candida spp. to silicone and poly(vinylchloride) biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Jones, D S; McGovern, J G; Adair, C G; Woolfson, A D; Gorman, S P

    2001-05-01

    The reported incidence of colonization of oropharyngeal medical devices with Candida spp. has increased in recent years, although few studies that have systematically examined the adherence of yeast cells to such biomaterials, the primary step in the process of colonization. This study, therefore, examined the effects of oropharyngeal atmospheric conditions (5% v/v carbon dioxide) and the presence of a salivary conditioning film on both the surface properties and adherence of Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida tropicalis to PVC and silicone. Furthermore, the effects of the salivary conditioning film on the surface properties of these biomaterials are reported. Growth of the three Candida spp. in an atmosphere containing 5% v/v CO2 significantly increased their cell surface hydrophobicity and reduced the zeta potential of C. albicans and C. krusei yet increased the zeta potential of C. tropicalis (p<0.05). Furthermore, growth in 5% v/v CO2 decreased the adherence of C. tropicalis and C. albicans to both PVC and silicone, however, increased adherence of C. krusei (p<0.05). Pre-treatment of the microorganisms with pooled human saliva significantly decreased their cell surface hydrophobicity and increased their adherence to either biomaterial in comparison to yeast cells that had been pre-treated with PBS (p<0.05). Saliva treatment of the microorganisms had no consistent effect on microbial zeta potential. Interestingly, adherence of the three, saliva-treated Candida spp. to saliva-treated silicone and PVC was significantly lower than whenever the microorganisms and biomaterials had been treated with PBS (p<0.05). Treatment of silicone and PVC with saliva significantly altered the surface properties, notably reducing both the advancing and receding contact angles and, additionally, the microrugosity. These effects may contribute to the decreased adherence of saliva-treated microorganisms to these biomaterials. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated the

  4. Antimicrobial activity, synergism and inhibition of germ tube formation by Crocus sativus-derived compounds against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Simone; Chimenti, Paola; Fazzari, Marina; Granese, Arianna; Angiolella, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The limited arsenal of synthetic antifungal agents and the emergence of resistant Candida strains have prompted the researchers towards the investigation of naturally occurring compounds or their semisynthetic derivatives in order to propose new innovative hit compounds or new antifungal combinations endowed with reduced toxicity. We explored the anti-Candida effects, for the first time, of two bioactive compounds from Crocus sativus stigmas, namely crocin 1 and safranal, and some semisynthetic derivatives of safranal obtaining promising biological results in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration/minimum fungicidal concentration (MIC/MFC) values, synergism and reduction in the germ tube formation. Safranal and its thiosemicarbazone derivative 5 were shown to display good activity against Candida spp.

  5. Chemical composition and antifungal activity of Carica papaya Linn. seed essential oil against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    He, X; Ma, Y; Yi, G; Wu, J; Zhou, L; Guo, H

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, the incidence of clinical yeast infections has increased dramatically. Due to the extensive use of broad-spectrum antifungal agents, there has been a notable increase in drug resistance among infections yeast species. As one of the most popular natural antimicrobial agents, essential oils (EOs) have attracted a lot of attention from the scientific community. The aim of this study was to analyse the chemical composition and examine the antifungal activity of the EO extracted from the seeds of Carica papaya Linn. The papaya seed EO was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major constituent is benzyl isothiocyanate (99·36%). The filter paper disc diffusion method and broth dilution method were employed. The EO showed inhibitory effect against all the tested Candida strains including C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis and C. tropical with inhibition zone diameters in the range of 14·2-33·2 mm, the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in the range of 4·0-16·0 μg ml(-1) and the minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) in the range of 16·0-64·0 μg ml(-1) . Here, we found that the papaya seed EO has promising anticandida activity and identify C. papaya L. as a potential natural source of antifungal agents. The chemical composition and antifungal activity of essential oil of Carica papaya seeds were studied. The oil of papaya seeds could inhibit the growth of Candida spp. for the first report. Carica Papaya may be recognized as a possible new source of natural antifungal agents. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Molecular detection of Candida spp. and Aspergillus fumigatus in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Khorvash, Farzin; Abbasi, Saeed; Yaran, Majid; Abdi, Fateme; Ataei, Behrooz; Fereidooni, Farzaneh; Hoseini, Shervin Ghaffari; Ahmadi-Ahvaz, Nasrin; Parsazadeh, Malihe; Haghi, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common nosocomial infection in critically ill patients with high morbidity and mortality rates. The etiology of VAP is usually bacterial. Opportunistic fungi such as Candida and Aspergillus species (spp.) are found frequently in the respiratory track secretions of immunocompetent critically ill patients known as colonization. Contribution of fungi colonization to severe bacterial VAP and poor prognosis of these patients has been documented in several studies. The aim of this study was to detect Candida spp. and Aspergillus fumigatus colonization in patients with a clinical diagnosis of VAP as a marker of high risk pneumonia. Materials and Methods: Bronchoscopic alveolar lavage (BAL) fluids from patients with VAP in central intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary university hospital in Isfahan were examined by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect Candida spp. or A. fumigatus. Rate of fungi colonization and its association with clinical criteria of the patients was determined. Results: BAL fluids from 38 patients were tested from which six samples (15.8%) were positive for Candida spp. and five (13.2%) for A. fumigatus. Fungi colonization was not associated with age, sex, or mortality rate of patients. Rate of A. fumigatus colonization was significantly more in traumatic patients (P = 0.036), and higher in patients ventilated more than 4 weeks (P = 0.022). Conclusion: High rate of A. fumigatus colonization in our ICU patients indicates that underlying causes such as unfavorable ICU conditions and other patient related factors such as unnecessary antibiotic therapy should be further evaluated. PMID:25002894

  7. SIXTEEN YEARS OF DERMATOMYCOSIS CAUSED BY Candida spp. IN THE METROPOLITAN AREA OF PORTO ALEGRE, SOUTHERN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    HEIDRICH, Daiane; STOPIGLIA, Cheila Denise Ottonelli; MAGAGNIN, Cibele Massotti; DABOIT, Tatiane Caroline; VETTORATO, Gerson; AMARO, Taís Guarienti; SCROFERNEKER, Maria Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    The yeasts of the genus Candida infect skin, nails, and mucous membranes of the gastrointestinal and the genitourinary tract. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dermatomycoses caused by Candida spp., and their etiological aspects in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, Brazil. A retrospective study with data obtained from tertiary hospital patients, from 1996 to 2011, was performed. The analyzed parameters were date, age, gender, ethnicity, anatomical region of lesions, and the direct examination results. For all the statistical analyses, a = 0.05 was considered. Among positive results in the direct mycological examination, 12.5% of the total of 4,815 cases were positive for Candida spp. The angular coefficient (B) was -0.7%/ year, showing a decrease over the years. The genus Candida was more prevalent in women (15.9% of women versus 5.84% of men), and in addition, women were older than men (54 versus 47 years old, respectively). There was no difference between ethnic groups. The nails were more affected than the skin, with 80.37% of the infections in the nails (72.9% in fingernails and 7.47% in toenails). Our study corroborates the literature regarding the preference for gender, age, and place of injury. Moreover, we found a decrease in infection over the studied period. PMID:27007557

  8. Influence of Glucose Supplementation and Inoculum Size on Growth Kinetics and Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Díaz-Guerra, Teresa M.; Mellado, Emilia; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2001-01-01

    The influences of inoculum size and glucose supplementation on the growth kinetics of 60 Candida spp. clinical isolates (Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, and Candida lusitaniae [10 isolates each]) are assessed. The combined influence of growth and reading method (visual or spectrophotometric) on the determination of the MICs of amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, and voriconazole is also analyzed, and the MICs are compared with those determined by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards standard microdilution method (NCCLS document M27-A). Glucose supplementation and inoculum size had a significant influence on the growth cycles of these yeasts, and a statistically significant denser growth (optical density at 540 nm) was seen for both incubation periods, 24 and 48 h (P < 0.01). A longer exponential phase and shorter lag phase were also observed. The A540 values at 24 h of incubation with medium containing glucose and an inoculum of 105 CFU/ml were >0.4 U for all species, with the exception of that for C. parapsilosis (A540 = 0.26 ± 0.025). The MICs at 24 h determined by testing with 2% glucose and an inoculum of 105 CFU/ml showed the strongest agreement (96.83%) with MICs determined by the reference method. MICs were not falsely elevated, and good correlation indexes were obtained. The reproducibility of results with this medium-inoculum combination was high (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.955). The best agreement and reproducibility of results for spectrophotometric readings were achieved with endpoints of 50% growth inhibition for flucytosine and azoles and 95% for amphotericin B. Supplementation of test media with glucose and an inoculum size of 105 CFU/ml yielded a reproducible technique that shows elevated agreement with the reference procedures and a shorter incubation period for obtaining reliable MIC determinations. The spectrophotometric

  9. Antifungal drug resistance pattern of Candida. spp isolated from vaginitis in Ilam-Iran during 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadi, Jasem; Havasian, Mohamad Reza; Panahi, Jafar; Pakzad, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal Candidiasis is the most common and important opportunistic fungal infection in women. By increasing use of antifungal drugs in recent years, it has caused drug resistance. This study aims to evaluate antifungal drugs susceptibility of Candida. spp isolated of women with vaginitis from Ilam-Iran during 2013-2014. samples were collected and cultured from 385 women with vaginitis, then Candida.spp was diagnosed by standard method. Antifungal drug susceptibility test for nystatin 100 unit/disk, fluconazole 10µg/disk, itraconazole 10µg/disk, ketoconazole 10µg/disk, amphotericinB 20µg/disk, clotrimazole 10µg/disk, posaconazole 5µg/disk, and voriconazole 1µg/disk were carried out by M44-A method(CLSI). From all culture positive samples, 150 isolates were Candida albicans and 89 isolates were non-albicans. The resistance to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, nystatin and amphotericin B was 76%, 62%, 72%, 55%, 6%, 7%, 1% and 0%. The highest resistance was seen for fluconazole , itraconazole, and the highest susceptible was seen for nystatin and amphotericin B. These results indicate nystatin and amphotericin B can be used as the first line for empirical therapy of vaginal candidiasis in the district. PMID:26124561

  10. In vitro activity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against bacterial and Candida spp. isolates from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Banes-Marshall, L; Cawley, P; Phillips, C A

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the in vitro activity of tea tree oil (TTO) against a range of wild strains of microorganisms isolated from clinical specimens of leg ulcers and pressure sores. The antimicrobial effectiveness of TTO is determined in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) or minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC). The isolates include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), S. aureus, faecal streptococci, beta-haemolytic streptococci, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Pseudomonas spp. and coliform bacilli. Eleven Candida spp. isolates from skin and vaginal swabs also are tested. Using an agar dilution assay, the MICs of TTO in 88 out of 90 isolates was 0.5-1.0% (v/v), whilst with P. aeruginosa it was >2% (v/v). A broth microdilution method was used to determine MIC and minimum cidal concentration (MCC) of 80 isolates. In 64 isolates, TTO produced an inhibitory and cidal effect at 3% and 4% (v/v), respectively. S. aureus and Candida spp. were the most susceptible to TTO, with MICs and MBCs of 0.5% and 1%, respectively. P. aeruginosa and the faecal streptococci isolates, with MICs and MBCs of >8%, were resistant to TTO.

  11. Correlation between microdilution, E-test, and disk diffusion methods for antifungal susceptibility testing of posaconazole against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Sims, Charles R; Paetznick, Victor L; Rodriguez, Jose R; Chen, Enuo; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis

    2006-06-01

    Agar-based antifungal susceptibility testing is an attractive alternative to the microdilution method. We examined the correlation between the microdilution, E-test, and disk diffusion methods for posaconazole against Candida spp. A total of 270 bloodstream isolates of Candida spp. with a broad range of posaconazole MICs were tested using the CLSI M27-A2 method for microdilution, as well as the M-44A method and E-test methods for agar-based testing on Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 2% glucose and 0.5 microg of methylene blue. MICs and inhibitory zone diameters at the prominent growth reduction endpoint were recorded at 24 and 48 h. The Candida isolates included Candida albicans (n = 124), C. parapsilosis (n = 44), C. tropicalis (n = 41), C. glabrata (n = 36), C. krusei (n = 20), C. lusitaniae (n = 3), and C. dubliniensis (n = 2). The overall concordance (i.e., the percentage of isolates within two dilutions) between the E-test and microdilution was 64.8% at 24 h and 82.6% at 48 h. When we considered an arbitrary breakpoint of < or = 1 microg/ml, the agreement between the E-test and microdilution methods was 87.8% at 24 h and 93.0% at 48 h. The correlation of MICs with disk diffusion zone diameters was better for the E-test than the microdilution method. Zone correlation for diameters produced by the disks of two manufacturers was high, with a Pearson test value of 0.941 at 24 h. The E-test and microdilution MICs show good concordance and interpretative agreement. The disk diffusion zone diameters are highly reproducible and correlate well with both the E-test and the microdilution method, making agar-based methods a viable alternative to microdilution for posaconazole susceptibility testing.

  12. Oral Candida spp carriers: its prevalence in patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus*

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ramon Felipe Fernandez; Jaimes-Aveldañez, Alejandra; Hernández-Pérez, Francisco; Arenas, Roberto; Miguel, Guadalupe Fabián-San

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prevalence of oral candidiasis in diabetic patients is 13.7-64%. Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species (75-86.5%). OBJECTIVE: To obtain the prevalence of Candida carriers among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to identify the species of the yeast. Study design: It is an open, observational, descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective study. METHODS: We included voluntary patients from the National Diabetes Marathon and performed a blood glucose measurement, sialometry test, Gram-stained exfoliative cytology, and culture on Sabouraud dextrose agar and CHROMagar Candida TM. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: We examined 141 patients (mean age 57 years): 103 women (73%) and 38 men (26.9%). Exfoliative cytology was positive in 32 cases (23 with oral lesions); 78 had oral lesions but no Candida (93.9%). Candida was isolated in 58 patients (41.1%), 21 (45.6 %) had blood glucose greater than 126 mg/dl, and 37 (38.9%) had less than 126 mg/dl. The most frequent species was C. albicans (82.7%). Forty-two Candida carriers had salivary flow greater than 20 mm (72.4%), and 16 (27.5%) had hyposalivation. Candida was isolated in 25 of 79 patients with dental prosthesis (31.6%), 9 of 15 were smokers (60%), and 22 of 71 had symptoms (30.9%). CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of oral Candida carriers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico was similar to that found in other countries; exfoliative cytology was effective in finding Candida; salivary flow rate, use of prosthesis, and presence of oral lesions and symptoms were similar in oral Candida carriers and negative patients. Most smokers were Candida carriers. PMID:23739717

  13. Oral Candida spp carriers: its prevalence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ramon Felipe Fernandez; Jaimes-Aveldañez, Alejandra; Hernández-Pérez, Francisco; Arenas, Roberto; Miguel, Guadalupe Fabián-San

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of oral candidiasis in diabetic patients is 13.7-64%. Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species (75-86.5%). To obtain the prevalence of Candida carriers among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to identify the species of the yeast. It is an open, observational, descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective study. We included voluntary patients from the National Diabetes Marathon and performed a blood glucose measurement, sialometry test, Gram-stained exfoliative cytology, and culture on Sabouraud dextrose agar and CHROMagar Candida TM. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. We examined 141 patients (mean age 57 years): 103 women (73%) and 38 men (26.9%). Exfoliative cytology was positive in 32 cases (23 with oral lesions); 78 had oral lesions but no Candida (93.9%). Candida was isolated in 58 patients (41.1%), 21 (45.6 %) had blood glucose greater than 126 mg/dl, and 37 (38.9%) had less than 126 mg/dl. The most frequent species was C. albicans (82.7%). Forty-two Candida carriers had salivary flow greater than 20 mm (72.4%), and 16 (27.5%) had hyposalivation. Candida was isolated in 25 of 79 patients with dental prosthesis (31.6%), 9 of 15 were smokers (60%), and 22 of 71 had symptoms (30.9%). Prevalence of oral Candida carriers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico was similar to that found in other countries; exfoliative cytology was effective in finding Candida; salivary flow rate, use of prosthesis, and presence of oral lesions and symptoms were similar in oral Candida carriers and negative patients. Most smokers were Candida carriers.

  14. Assessment of Antifungal Activity of Bakuchiol on Oral-Associated Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Mohd-Al-Faisal; Abdul Razak, Fathilah; Himratul-Aznita, Wan Harun

    2015-01-01

    Bakuchiol is an active component of Psoralea glandulosa and Psoralea corylifolia, used in traditional Chinese medicine. The study aimed at investigating the antifungal activity of bakuchiol on planktonic and biofilm forms of orally associated Candida species. The antifungal susceptibility testing was determined by the broth micro dilution technique. Growth kinetics and cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of Candida were measured to assess the inhibitory effect of bakuchiol on Candida planktonic cells. Biofilm biomass and cellular metabolic activity were quantitatively estimated by the crystal violet (CV) and the 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT) assays. All Candida strains have been shown to be susceptible to bakuchiol with the MIC ranges from 12.5 to 100 μg/mL. Significant decrease in specific growth rates and viable counts demonstrates the inhibitory effect of bakuchiol on Candida planktonic cells. A brief exposure to bakuchiol also reduced CSH of Candida (P < 0.05), indicating altered surface properties of yeast cells towards hydrophobic interfaces. Biofilm biomass and cell metabolic activity were mostly decreased, except for C. glabrata (P = 0.29). The antifungal properties of bakuchiol on Candida species in this in vitro study may give insights into the application in therapeutic strategy against Candida infections. PMID:26633986

  15. Activity of a long-acting echinocandin, CD101, determined using CLSI and EUCAST reference methods, against Candida and Aspergillus spp., including echinocandin- and azole-resistant isolates.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Rhomberg, Paul R; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of CD101, a novel echinocandin with a long serum elimination half-life, and comparator (anidulafungin and caspofungin) antifungal agents against a collection of Candida and Aspergillus spp. isolates. CD101 and comparator agents were tested against 106 Candida spp. and 67 Aspergillus spp. isolates, including 27 isolates of Candida harbouring fks hotspot mutations and 12 itraconazole non-WT Aspergillus, using CLSI and EUCAST reference susceptibility broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Against WT and fks mutant Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis, the activity of CD101 [MIC90 = 0.06, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively (CLSI method values)] was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC90 = 0.03, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively) and caspofungin (MIC90 = 0.12, 0.25 and 0.12 mg/L, respectively). WT Candida krusei isolates were very susceptible to CD101 (MIC = 0.06 mg/L). CD101 activity (MIC50/90 = 1/2 mg/L) was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC50/90 = 2/2 mg/L) against Candida parapsilosis. CD101 (MIC mode = 0.06 mg/L for C. glabrata) was 2- to 4-fold more active against fks hotspot mutants than caspofungin (MIC mode = 0.5 mg/L). CD101 was active against Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus (MEC90 range = ≤0.008-0.03 mg/L). The essential agreement between CLSI and EUCAST methods for CD101 was 92.0%-100.0% among Candida spp. and 95.0%-100.0% among Aspergillus spp. The activity of CD101 is comparable to that of other members of the echinocandin class for the prevention and treatment of serious fungal infections. Similar results for CD101 activity versus Candida and Aspergillus spp. may be obtained with either CLSI or EUCAST BMD methods. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  16. Activity of a long-acting echinocandin, CD101, determined using CLSI and EUCAST reference methods, against Candida and Aspergillus spp., including echinocandin- and azole-resistant isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Michael A.; Messer, Shawn A.; Rhomberg, Paul R.; Jones, Ronald N.; Castanheira, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of CD101, a novel echinocandin with a long serum elimination half-life, and comparator (anidulafungin and caspofungin) antifungal agents against a collection of Candida and Aspergillus spp. isolates. Methods CD101 and comparator agents were tested against 106 Candida spp. and 67 Aspergillus spp. isolates, including 27 isolates of Candida harbouring fks hotspot mutations and 12 itraconazole non-WT Aspergillus, using CLSI and EUCAST reference susceptibility broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Results Against WT and fks mutant Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis, the activity of CD101 [MIC90 = 0.06, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively (CLSI method values)] was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC90 = 0.03, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively) and caspofungin (MIC90 = 0.12, 0.25 and 0.12 mg/L, respectively). WT Candida krusei isolates were very susceptible to CD101 (MIC = 0.06 mg/L). CD101 activity (MIC50/90 = 1/2 mg/L) was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC50/90 = 2/2 mg/L) against Candida parapsilosis. CD101 (MIC mode = 0.06 mg/L for C. glabrata) was 2- to 4-fold more active against fks hotspot mutants than caspofungin (MIC mode = 0.5 mg/L). CD101 was active against Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus (MEC90 range = ≤0.008–0.03 mg/L). The essential agreement between CLSI and EUCAST methods for CD101 was 92.0%–100.0% among Candida spp. and 95.0%–100.0% among Aspergillus spp. Conclusions The activity of CD101 is comparable to that of other members of the echinocandin class for the prevention and treatment of serious fungal infections. Similar results for CD101 activity versus Candida and Aspergillus spp. may be obtained with either CLSI or EUCAST BMD methods. PMID:27287236

  17. Synthesis, antimicrobial evaluation and theoretical prediction of NMR chemical shifts of thiazole and selenazole derivatives with high antifungal activity against Candida spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łączkowski, Krzysztof Z.; Motylewska, Katarzyna; Baranowska-Łączkowska, Angelika; Biernasiuk, Anna; Misiura, Konrad; Malm, Anna; Fernández, Berta

    2016-03-01

    Synthesis and investigation of antimicrobial activities of novel thiazoles and selenazoles is presented. Their structures were determined using NMR, FAB(+)-MS, HRMS and elemental analyses. To support the experiment, theoretical calculations of the 1H NMR shifts were carried out for representative systems within the DFT B3LYP/6-311++G** approximation which additionally confirmed the structure of investigated compounds. Among the derivatives, compounds 4b, 4h, 4j and 4l had very strong activity against reference strains of Candida albicans ATCC and Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 with MIC = 0.49-7.81 μg/ml. In the case of compounds 4b, 4c, 4h - 4j and 4l, the activity was very strong against of Candida spp. isolated from clinical materials, i.e. C. albicans, Candida krusei, Candida inconspicua, Candida famata, Candida lusitaniae, Candida sake, C. parapsilosis and Candida dubliniensis with MIC = 0.24-15.62 μg/ml. The activity of several of these was similar to the activity of commonly used antifungal agent fluconazole. Additionally, compounds 4m - 4s were found to be active against Gram-positive bacteria, both pathogenic staphylococci Staphylococcus aureus ATCC with MIC = 31.25-125 μg/ml and opportunistic bacteria, such as Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228 and Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240 with MIC = 7.81-31.25 μg/ml.

  18. Disinfection efficacy of chlorine and peracetic acid alone or in combination against Aspergillus spp. and Candida albicans in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Maurizio; Brandi, Giorgio; De Santi, Mauro; Rinaldi, Laura; Schiavano, Giuditta F

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fungicidal activity of chlorine and peracetic acid in drinking water against various pathogenic Aspergillus spp. and Candida albicans strains. A. nidulans exhibited the greatest resistance, requiring 10 ppm of chlorine for 30 min contact time for a complete inactivation. Under the same experimental conditions, peracetic acid was even less fungicidal. In this case, A. niger proved to be the most resistant species (50 ppm for 60 min for complete inactivation). All Aspergillus spp. were insensitive to 10 ppm even with extended exposure (>5 h). The combination of chlorine and peracetic acid against Aspergillus spp. did not show synergistic effects except in the case of A. flavus. Complete growth inhibition of C. albicans was observed after about 3 h contact time with 0.2 ppm. C. albicans was less sensitive to peracetic acid. Hence the concentrations of chlorine that are usually present in drinking water distribution systems are ineffective against several Aspergillus spp. and peracetic acid cannot be considered an alternative to chlorine for disinfecting drinking water. The combination of the two biocides is not very effective in eliminating filamentous fungi at the concentrations permitted for drinking water disinfection.

  19. Evaluating the resistance to posaconazole by E-test and CLSI broth microdilution methodologies of Candida spp. and pathogenic moulds.

    PubMed

    Araujo, R; Costa-de-Oliveira, S; Coutinho, I; Rodrigues, A G; Pina-Vaz, C

    2009-09-01

    E-test methodology was compared with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution, particularly concerning the detection of resistance to posaconazole among clinical fungal isolates. The susceptibility of a large set of fungal strains (n = 300) was evaluated following 24 and 48 h in two different culture media (RPMI 1640 and Sabouraud agar). Fungal strains were highly susceptible to posaconazole; however, few less susceptible strains were found, mostly regarding Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Acremonium sp., Cladosporium sp. and Scedosporium apiospermum. Broth microdilution and E-test methods provided similar results for posaconazole-susceptible strains, while the less susceptible fungal strains (10.3% of the strains showed MIC > or =2 microg/mL) resulted in higher discrepancies between the two methodologies, particularly concerning Candida spp. E-test susceptibility values were critically affected by the pH of the culture media. Sabouraud medium provided similar susceptibility results for moulds to those for RPMI, soon after 24 h. Posaconazole resistance was rare in this study, but routine susceptibility methods, such as the E-test, should be able to detect fungal strains with reduced susceptibility. E-test methodology still needs improvements to recognise accurately strains less susceptible to posaconazole.

  20. Activity of MK-3118, a new oral glucan synthase inhibitor, tested against Candida spp. by two international methods (CLSI and EUCAST).

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Messer, Shawn A; Motyl, Mary R; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the activity of the orally bioavailable enfumafungin derivative MK-3118 and comparator antifungal agents tested against a collection of 113 clinical isolates of Candida spp. using CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Candida spp. isolates (n=113) were tested by CLSI and EUCAST methods. The collection contained 29 Candida albicans, 29 Candida glabrata, 21 Candida tropicalis, 15 Candida parapsilosis and 19 Candida krusei, including azole- and echinocandin-resistant isolates. CLSI and EUCAST MIC endpoints of 50% and 100% inhibition were determined using visual reading at 24 and 48 h of incubation and spectrophotometric reading at 24 h of incubation, respectively. MK-3118 CLSI MIC results ranged from 0.06 to 16 mg/L depending on species, duration of incubation and endpoint criteria (EC) used. Comparison of CLSI and EUCAST following 24 h of incubation and either 50% or 100% inhibition revealed an essential agreement (EA; ± 2 doubling dilutions) of 99.1% using the 50% inhibition EC and 93.2% using the 100% inhibition EC. MK-3118 (24 h of incubation and 50% EC) was active against all the species tested and displayed similar potency to caspofungin (using CLSI BMD) against C. albicans (MIC90, 1 and 2 mg/L, respectively), C. tropicalis (1 and 1 mg/L, respectively), C. parapsilosis (0.5 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively) and C. krusei (2 and 1 mg/L, respectively), but was 8-fold more potent than caspofungin against C. glabrata strains (MIC90, 2 and 16 mg/L, respectively). MK-3118 was active against fluconazole-resistant strains as well as caspofungin-resistant strains with documented fks mutations. MK-3118 was documented to have potent in vitro activity against Candida spp. when tested by both CLSI and EUCAST BMD methods, with the highest overall EA (99.1%) obtained when MK-3118 MIC results were read after 24 h of incubation using a partial inhibition EC (50%).

  1. In-vitro activity of essential oils, in particular Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil and tea tree oil products, against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Hammer, K A; Carson, C F; Riley, T V

    1998-11-01

    The in-vitro activity of a range of essential oils, including tea tree oil, against the yeast candida was examined. Of the 24 essential oils tested by the agar dilution method against Candida albicans ATCC 10231, three did not inhibit C. albicans at the highest concentration tested, which was 2.0% (v/v) oil. Sandalwood oil had the lowest MIC, inhibiting C. albicans at 0.06%. Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil was investigated for activity against 81 C. albicans isolates and 33 non-albicans Candida isolates. By the broth microdilution method, the minimum concentration of oil inhibiting 90% of isolates for both C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species was 0.25% (v/v). The minimum concentration of oil killing 90% of isolates was 0.25% for C. albicans and 0.5% for non-albicans Candida species. Fifty-seven Candida isolates were tested for sensitivity to tea tree oil by the agar dilution method; the minimum concentration of oil inhibiting 90% of isolates was 0.5%. Tests on three intra-vaginal tea tree oil products showed these products to have MICs and minimum fungicidal concentrations comparable to those of non-formulated tea tree oil, indicating that the tea tree oil contained in these products has retained its anticandidal activity. These data indicate that some essential oils are active against Candida spp., suggesting that they may be useful in the topical treatment of superficial candida infections.

  2. In vitro activity of essential oils extracted from plants used as spices against fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Pozzatti, Patrícia; Scheid, Liliane Alves; Spader, Tatiana Borba; Atayde, Margareth Linde; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, the antifungal activity of selected essential oils obtained from plants used as spices was evaluated against both fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida spp. The Candida species studied were Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei. For comparison purposes, they were arranged in groups as C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and Candida non-albicans. The essential oils were obtained from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Breyn, Lippia graveolens HBK, Ocimum basilicum L., Origanum vulgare L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Thymus vulgaris L., and Zingiber officinale. The susceptibility tests were based on the M27-A2 methodology. The chemical composition of the essential oils was obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and by retention indices. The results showed that cinnamon, Mexican oregano, oregano, thyme, and ginger essential oils have different levels of antifungal activity. Oregano and ginger essential oils were found to be the most and the least efficient, respectively. The main finding was that the susceptibilities of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and Candida non-albicans to Mexican oregano, oregano, thyme, and ginger essential oils were higher than those of the fluconazole-susceptible yeasts (P<0.05). In contrast, fluconazole-resistant C. albicans and Candida non-albicans were less susceptible to cinnamon essential oil than their fluconazole-susceptible counterparts (P<0.05). A relationship between the yeasts' susceptibilities and the chemical composition of the essential oils studied was apparent when these 2 parameters were compared. Finally, basil, rosemary, and sage essential oils did not show antifungal activity against Candida isolates at the tested concentrations.

  3. Influence of growth conditions on adhesion of yeast Candida spp. and Pichia spp. to stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tomičić, Ružica; Raspor, Peter

    2017-08-01

    An understanding of adhesion behavior of Candida and Pichia yeast under different environmental conditions is key to the development of effective preventive measures against biofilm-associated infection. Hence in this study we investigated the impact of growth medium and temperature on Candida and Pichia adherence using stainless steel (AISI 304) discs with different degrees of surface roughness (Ra = 25.20-961.9 nm), material typical for the food processing industry as well as medical devices. The adhesion of the yeast strains to stainless steel surfaces grown in Malt Extract broth (MEB) or YPD broth at three temperatures (7 °C, 37 °C, 43 °C for Candida strains and 7 °C, 27 °C, 32 °C for Pichia strains) was assessed by crystal violet staining. The results showed that the nutrient content of medium significantly influenced the quantity of adhered cells by the tested yeasts. Adhesion of C. albicans and C. glabrata on stainless steel surfaces were significantly higher in MEB, whereas for C. parapsilosis and C. krusei it was YPD broth. In the case with P. pijperi and P. membranifaciens, YPD broth was more effective in promoting adhesion than MEB. On the other hand, our data indicated that temperature is a very important factor which considerably affects the adhesion of these yeast. There was also significant difference in cell adhesion on all types of stainless steel surfaces for all tested yeast. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Activity of Scorpion Venom-Derived Antifungal Peptides against Planktonic Cells of Candida spp. and Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Guilhelmelli, Fernanda; Vilela, Nathália; Smidt, Karina S.; de Oliveira, Marco A.; da Cunha Morales Álvares, Alice; Rigonatto, Maria C. L.; da Silva Costa, Pedro H.; Tavares, Aldo H.; de Freitas, Sônia M.; Nicola, André M.; Franco, Octávio L.; Derengowski, Lorena da Silveira; Schwartz, Elisabeth F.; Mortari, Márcia R.; Bocca, Anamélia L.; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of fungal infections has been increasing in the last decades, while the number of available antifungal classes remains the same. The natural and acquired resistance of some fungal species to available therapies, associated with the high toxicity of these drugs on the present scenario and makes an imperative of the search for new, more efficient and less toxic therapeutic choices. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a potential class of antimicrobial drugs consisting of evolutionarily conserved multifunctional molecules with both microbicidal and immunomodulatory properties being part of the innate immune response of diverse organisms. In this study, we evaluated 11 scorpion-venom derived non-disulfide-bridged peptides against Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida spp., which are important human pathogens. Seven of them, including two novel molecules, showed activity against both genera with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 3.12 to 200 μM and an analogous activity against Candida albicans biofilms. Most of the peptides presented low hemolytic and cytotoxic activity against mammalian cells. Modifications in the primary peptide sequence, as revealed by in silico and circular dichroism analyses of the most promising peptides, underscored the importance of cationicity for their antimicrobial activity as well as the amphipathicity of these molecules and their tendency to form alpha helices. This is the first report of scorpion-derived AMPs against C. neoformans and our results underline the potential of scorpion venom as a source of antimicrobials. Further characterization of their mechanism of action, followed by molecular optimization to decrease their cytotoxicity and increase antimicrobial activity, is needed to fully clarify their real potential as antifungals. PMID:27917162

  5. Progress in Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Candida spp. by Use of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Broth Microdilution Methods, 2010 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida has been standardized and refined and now may play a useful role in managing Candida infections. Important new developments include validation of 24-h reading times for all antifungal agents and the establishment of species-specific epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) for the systemically active antifungal agents and both common and uncommon species of Candida. The clinical breakpoints (CBPs) for fluconazole, voriconazole, and the echinocandins have been revised to provide species-specific interpretive criteria for the six most common species. The revised CBPs not only are predictive of clinical outcome but also provide a more sensitive means of identifying those strains with acquired or mutational resistance mechanisms. This brief review serves as an update on the new developments in the antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida spp. using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution (BMD) methods. PMID:22740712

  6. Antifungal susceptibility of 205 Candida spp. isolated primarily during invasive Candidiasis and comparison of the Vitek 2 system with the CLSI broth microdilution and Etest methods.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, N; Dehandschoewercker, L; Bertout, S; Bousquet, P-J; Rispail, P; Lachaud, L

    2010-01-01

    Infections due to Candida spp. are frequent, particularly in immunocompromised and intensive care unit patients. Antifungal susceptibility tests are now required to optimize antifungal treatment given the emergence of acquired antifungal resistance in some Candida species. An antifungal susceptibility automated method, the Vitek 2 system (VK2), was evaluated. VK2 was compared to the CLSI broth microdilution reference method and the Etest procedure. For this purpose, 205 clinical isolates of Candida spp., including 11 different species, were tested for fluconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B susceptibility. For azoles, essential agreement ranged from 25% to 100%, depending on the method used and the Candida species tested. Categorical agreements for all of the species averaged 92.2% and ranged from 14.3 to 100%, depending on the 24-h or 48-h MIC reading by the Etest and CLSI methods and on the Candida species. Results obtained for Candida albicans showed excellent categorical and essential agreements with the two comparative methods. For Candida glabrata, the essential agreement was high with the CLSI method but low with the Etest method, and several very major errors in interpretation were observed between VK2 and the Etest method for both azoles. Low MICs of fluconazole were obtained for all of the Candida krusei isolates, but the VK2 expert software corrected all of the results obtained to resistant. Amphotericin B results showed MICs of < or = 1 mg/liter for 201 (VK2), 190 (CLSI), and 202 (Etest) isolates. The AST-YS01 Vitek 2 card system (bioMérieux) is a reliable and practical standardized automated antifungal susceptibility test. Nevertheless, more assays are needed to better evaluate C. glabrata fluconazole sensitivity.

  7. Antifungal Susceptibility of 205 Candida spp. Isolated Primarily during Invasive Candidiasis and Comparison of the Vitek 2 System with the CLSI Broth Microdilution and Etest Methods▿

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, N.; Dehandschoewercker, L.; Bertout, S.; Bousquet, P.-J.; Rispail, P.; Lachaud, L.

    2010-01-01

    Infections due to Candida spp. are frequent, particularly in immunocompromised and intensive care unit patients. Antifungal susceptibility tests are now required to optimize antifungal treatment given the emergence of acquired antifungal resistance in some Candida species. An antifungal susceptibility automated method, the Vitek 2 system (VK2), was evaluated. VK2 was compared to the CLSI broth microdilution reference method and the Etest procedure. For this purpose, 205 clinical isolates of Candida spp., including 11 different species, were tested for fluconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B susceptibility. For azoles, essential agreement ranged from 25% to 100%, depending on the method used and the Candida species tested. Categorical agreements for all of the species averaged 92.2% and ranged from 14.3 to 100%, depending on the 24-h or 48-h MIC reading by the Etest and CLSI methods and on the Candida species. Results obtained for Candida albicans showed excellent categorical and essential agreements with the two comparative methods. For Candida glabrata, the essential agreement was high with the CLSI method but low with the Etest method, and several very major errors in interpretation were observed between VK2 and the Etest method for both azoles. Low MICs of fluconazole were obtained for all of the Candida krusei isolates, but the VK2 expert software corrected all of the results obtained to resistant. Amphotericin B results showed MICs of ≤1 mg/liter for 201 (VK2), 190 (CLSI), and 202 (Etest) isolates. The AST-YS01 Vitek 2 card system (bioMérieux) is a reliable and practical standardized automated antifungal susceptibility test. Nevertheless, more assays are needed to better evaluate C. glabrata fluconazole sensitivity. PMID:19889902

  8. Isolation of Candida albicans and halophilic Vibrio spp. from aquatic birds in Connecticut and Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, J D

    1990-01-01

    Halophilic vibrios were recovered from feces of six types of aquatic birds (gulls, pelicans, Canada geese, swans, egrets, cormorants) from Connecticut and/or Florida shorelines. Candida albicans was isolated from gulls and Canada geese in Connecticut and from gulls and cormorants in Florida. PMID:2180374

  9. Characterization of thiamine uptake and utilization in Candida spp. subjected to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wolak, Natalia; Tomasi, Massimo; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Candida species are associated with an increasing number of life-threatening infections (candidiases), mainly due to the high resistance of these yeast-like fungi to antifungal drugs and oxidative stress. Recently, thiamine (vitamin B1) was found to alleviate stress responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; however, thiamine influence on defense systems in pathogenic fungi has never been investigated. The current work was aimed to elucidate the role of thiamine in stress reactions of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis and C. dubliniensis, subjected to hydrogen peroxide treatment. As compared to S. cerevisiae, Candida strains exposed to oxidative stress showed: (i) a much higher dependence on exogenous thiamine; (ii) an increased demand for thiamine diphosphate (TDP) and TDP-dependent enzyme, transketolase; (iii) no changes in gene expression of selected stress markers - superoxide dismutase and catalase - depending on thiamine availability in medium; (iv) a similar decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the presence of thiamine. Moreover, the addition of therapeutic doses of thiamine to yeast culture medium revealed differences in its accumulation between various Candida species. The current findings implicate that the protective action of thiamine observed in S. cerevisiae differs significantly form that in pathogenic Candida strains, both in terms of the cofactor functions of TDP and the effects on fungal defense systems.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of various ethanolic plant extracts against pathogenic multi drug resistant Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shaista; Imran, Mohd; Imran, Mohammed; Pindari, Nuzhat

    2017-01-01

    A total of 50 Candida isolates were isolated and identified from clinical specimens and these were tested for resistance to various antifungal drugs. It was observed multi-drug resistance in all candida isolates by 84%, 62%, 60%, 76%, 46, 30%, and 22% against fluconazole, clotrimazole, Amphotericin B, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole and nystatin tested respectively. The isolates, which were found to be resistant to antifungal drugs were selected and subjected to antifungal testing against six ethanolic plants, extract namely Azadiracta indica, Allium sativum, Cordia dichotoma Ocimum sanctum, Syzygium cumini and Trigonella foenum grecum. All the plant extracts tested were found to effective against all MDR Candida isolates with inhibition zone ranging from 10- 18mm in diameter. Ethanolic extract of Allium sativum was observed most effective against the isolates among all the plants extracts tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all ethanolic plant extract was recorded ranging from 1.56-25mg/ml against MDR candida isolates. Phytochemical analysis of the alcoholic plant extracts revealed the presence of alkaloid, flavanoid, glycosoid, phenol; phenol, tannins, saponins in all the plants studied. The present study may be successful in identifying the plants with different antimicrobial activity. These plants containing various phytochemicals may be exploited in the treatment of infectious diseases caused by drug-resistant microorganisms.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of various ethanolic plant extracts against pathogenic multi drug resistant Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shaista; Imran, Mohd; Imran, Mohammed; Pindari, Nuzhat

    2017-01-01

    A total of 50 Candida isolates were isolated and identified from clinical specimens and these were tested for resistance to various antifungal drugs. It was observed multi-drug resistance in all candida isolates by 84%, 62%, 60%, 76%, 46, 30%, and 22% against fluconazole, clotrimazole, Amphotericin B, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole and nystatin tested respectively. The isolates, which were found to be resistant to antifungal drugs were selected and subjected to antifungal testing against six ethanolic plants, extract namely Azadiracta indica, Allium sativum, Cordia dichotoma Ocimum sanctum, Syzygium cumini and Trigonella foenum grecum. All the plant extracts tested were found to effective against all MDR Candida isolates with inhibition zone ranging from 10- 18mm in diameter. Ethanolic extract of Allium sativum was observed most effective against the isolates among all the plants extracts tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all ethanolic plant extract was recorded ranging from 1.56-25mg/ml against MDR candida isolates. Phytochemical analysis of the alcoholic plant extracts revealed the presence of alkaloid, flavanoid, glycosoid, phenol; phenol, tannins, saponins in all the plants studied. The present study may be successful in identifying the plants with different antimicrobial activity. These plants containing various phytochemicals may be exploited in the treatment of infectious diseases caused by drug-resistant microorganisms. PMID:28584446

  12. Alginate Oligosaccharides Inhibit Fungal Cell Growth and Potentiate the Activity of Antifungals against Candida and Aspergillus spp

    PubMed Central

    Tøndervik, Anne; Sletta, Håvard; Klinkenberg, Geir; Emanuel, Charlotte; Powell, Lydia C.; Pritchard, Manon F.; Khan, Saira; Craine, Kieron M.; Onsøyen, Edvar; Rye, Phil D.; Wright, Chris; Thomas, David W.; Hill, Katja E.

    2014-01-01

    The oligosaccharide OligoG, an alginate derived from seaweed, has been shown to have anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm properties and potentiates the activity of selected antibiotics against multi-drug resistant bacteria. The ability of OligoG to perturb fungal growth and potentiate conventional antifungal agents was evaluated using a range of pathogenic fungal strains. Candida (n = 11) and Aspergillus (n = 3) spp. were tested using germ tube assays, LIVE/DEAD staining, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high-throughput minimum inhibition concentration assays (MICs). In general, the strains tested showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in cell growth at ≥6% OligoG as measured by optical density (OD600; P<0.05). OligoG (>0.5%) also showed a significant inhibitory effect on hyphal growth in germ tube assays, although strain-dependent variations in efficacy were observed (P<0.05). SEM and AFM both showed that OligoG (≥2%) markedly disrupted fungal biofilm formation, both alone, and in combination with fluconazole. Cell surface roughness was also significantly increased by the combination treatment (P<0.001). High-throughput robotic MIC screening demonstrated the potentiating effects of OligoG (2, 6, 10%) with nystatin, amphotericin B, fluconazole, miconazole, voriconazole or terbinafine with the test strains. Potentiating effects were observed for the Aspergillus strains with all six antifungal agents, with an up to 16-fold (nystatin) reduction in MIC. Similarly, all the Candida spp. showed potentiation with nystatin (up to 16-fold) and fluconazole (up to 8-fold). These findings demonstrate the antifungal properties of OligoG and suggest a potential role in the management of fungal infections and possible reduction of antifungal toxicity. PMID:25409186

  13. Antifungal activity, mode of action and anti-biofilm effects of Laurus nobilis Linnaeus essential oil against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Larissa Rangel; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Ferreira, Gabriela Lacet Silva; Freires, Irlan Almeida; de Carvalho, Fabíola Galbiatti; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto; de Castro, Ricardo Dias

    2017-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the antifungal potential of the chemically characterized essential oil (EO) of Laurus nobilis L. (bay laurel) against Candida spp. biofilm adhesion and formation, and further established its mode of action on C. albicans. L. nobilis EO was obtained and tested for its minimum inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations (MIC/MFC) against Candida spp., as well as for interaction with cell wall biosynthesis and membrane ionic permeability. Then we evaluated its effects on the adhesion, formation, and reduction of 48hC. albicans biofilms. The EO phytochemical profile was determined by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The MIC and MFC values of the EO ranged from (250 to 500) μg/mL. The MIC values increased in the presence of sorbitol (osmotic protector) and ergosterol, which indicates that the EO may affect cell wall biosynthesis and membrane ionic permeability, respectively. At 2 MIC the EO disrupted initial adhesion of C. albicans biofilms (p<0.05) and affected biofilm formation with no difference compared to nystatin (p>0.05). When applied for 1min, every 8h, for 24h and 48h, the EO reduced the amount of C. albicans mature biofilm with no difference in relation to nystatin (p>0.05). The phytochemical analysis identified isoeugenol as the major compound (53.49%) in the sample. L. nobilis EO has antifungal activity probably due to monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in its composition. This EO may affect cell wall biosynthesis and membrane permeability, and showed deleterious effects against C. albicans biofilms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Alginate oligosaccharides inhibit fungal cell growth and potentiate the activity of antifungals against Candida and Aspergillus spp.

    PubMed

    Tøndervik, Anne; Sletta, Håvard; Klinkenberg, Geir; Emanuel, Charlotte; Powell, Lydia C; Pritchard, Manon F; Khan, Saira; Craine, Kieron M; Onsøyen, Edvar; Rye, Phil D; Wright, Chris; Thomas, David W; Hill, Katja E

    2014-01-01

    The oligosaccharide OligoG, an alginate derived from seaweed, has been shown to have anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm properties and potentiates the activity of selected antibiotics against multi-drug resistant bacteria. The ability of OligoG to perturb fungal growth and potentiate conventional antifungal agents was evaluated using a range of pathogenic fungal strains. Candida (n = 11) and Aspergillus (n = 3) spp. were tested using germ tube assays, LIVE/DEAD staining, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high-throughput minimum inhibition concentration assays (MICs). In general, the strains tested showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in cell growth at ≥6% OligoG as measured by optical density (OD600; P<0.05). OligoG (>0.5%) also showed a significant inhibitory effect on hyphal growth in germ tube assays, although strain-dependent variations in efficacy were observed (P<0.05). SEM and AFM both showed that OligoG (≥2%) markedly disrupted fungal biofilm formation, both alone, and in combination with fluconazole. Cell surface roughness was also significantly increased by the combination treatment (P<0.001). High-throughput robotic MIC screening demonstrated the potentiating effects of OligoG (2, 6, 10%) with nystatin, amphotericin B, fluconazole, miconazole, voriconazole or terbinafine with the test strains. Potentiating effects were observed for the Aspergillus strains with all six antifungal agents, with an up to 16-fold (nystatin) reduction in MIC. Similarly, all the Candida spp. showed potentiation with nystatin (up to 16-fold) and fluconazole (up to 8-fold). These findings demonstrate the antifungal properties of OligoG and suggest a potential role in the management of fungal infections and possible reduction of antifungal toxicity.

  15. Validation of an immunologic diagnostic kit for infectious vaginitis by Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida spp., and Gardnerella vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Arsenio Betancourt; Miranda, Lilian Sánchez; Lima, Octavio Fernández; Cambas, Alexandra Villoch; Hernández, Maite Lorenzo; Alvarez, Juan Manuel

    2009-03-01

    FemPure is a kit for the rapid diagnosis of vaginitis by Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida spp., and Gardnerella vaginalis, based on aggregation of latex particles joined to specific antibodies. The validation of the method involved the parameters specificity, detection limit, robustness, clinical sensitivity, and clinical specificity. Also, samples analyzed in parallel by the validated test and other recognized tests conducted by external laboratory were included. The method was specific for the 3 infectious agents, and no cross-reaction with other microorganisms usually present in vaginal exudates. The detection limit > or =1 x 10(6) CFU/mL for Candida albicans and G. vaginalis avoids the detection of concentrations considered normal flora, whereas T. vaginalis was detected until 1 x 10(5) cells/mL. Values of clinical sensitivity > or =80% and clinical specificity > or =90% and concordance > or =90% were found between samples evaluated in parallel by different methods. Robustness showed that the test can be used in laboratories with different management systems; its simple implementation without equipment allows the use in primary health care areas.

  16. Epidemiology and phospholipase activity of oral Candida SPP. Among patients with central nervous system diseases before and after dental cleaning procedure.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Aurélia Silva; Silva, Dágma Aparecida; Silva, Francislene Pereira; Santos, Gleicy Carla; Campos, Lívia Maria Soares; Oliveira, Lorena Vivien Neves; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2010-01-01

    Patients suffering of diseases that affect central nervous system may be considered more susceptible to the infectious diseases of mouth. Sixty-nine patients suffering of cerebral palsy, Down's syndrome and metal retardation were submitted to saliva examination for the presence of Candida spp. before and after a procedure of dental cleaning. The isolates were submitted to assay for verifying phospholipase production. 55.10% of the patients provided isolation of Candida spp. The frequency of isolation obtained before dental procedure was: C. albicans (83.33%), C. krusei (8.33%) and C. kefyr, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata (2.78% each). The frequency after the procedure was: C. albicans (68.57%), C. parapsilosis (11.43%), C. krusei and C. kefyr (8.57% each) and Candida glabrata (2.86%). We verified significantly difference (p < 0.01) between populations obtained at the two examinations. Phospholipase production was verified only among C. albicans strains and the proportion of producers was higher when testing isolates obtained after dental cleaning procedure. Studies focused on Candida spp. isolation are useful for better comprehension of the role of these yeasts on the oral flora from patients with cerebral palsy, Down's syndrome and metal retardation.

  17. Epidemiology and phospholipase activity of oral Candida SPP. Among patients with central nervous system diseases before and after dental cleaning procedure

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Aurélia Silva; Silva, Dágma Aparecida; Silva, Francislene Pereira; Santos, Gleicy Carla; Campos, Lívia Maria Soares; Oliveira, Lorena Vivien Neves; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Patients suffering of diseases that affect central nervous system may be considered more susceptible to the infectious diseases of mouth. Sixty-nine patients suffering of cerebral palsy, Down’s syndrome and metal retardation were submitted to saliva examination for the presence of Candida spp. before and after a procedure of dental cleaning. The isolates were submitted to assay for verifying phospholipase production. 55.10% of the patients provided isolation of Candida spp. The frequency of isolation obtained before dental procedure was: C. albicans (83.33%), C. krusei (8.33%) and C. kefyr, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata (2.78% each). The frequency after the procedure was: C. albicans (68.57%), C. parapsilosis (11.43%), C. krusei and C. kefyr (8.57% each) and Candida glabrata (2.86%). We verified significantly difference (p < 0.01) between populations obtained at the two examinations. Phospholipase production was verified only among C. albicans strains and the proportion of producers was higher when testing isolates obtained after dental cleaning procedure. Studies focused on Candida spp. isolation are useful for better comprehension of the role of these yeasts on the oral flora from patients with cerebral palsy, Down’s syndrome and metal retardation. PMID:24031457

  18. IL-27 Induced by Select Candida spp. via TLR7/NOD2 Signaling and IFN-β Production Inhibits Fungal Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Patin, Emmanuel C.; Jones, Adam V.; Thompson, Aiysha; Clement, Mathew; Liao, Chia-Te; Griffiths, James S.; Wallace, Leah E.; Bryant, Clare E.; Lang, Roland; Rosenstiel, Philip; Humphreys, Ian R.; Taylor, Philip R.

    2016-01-01

    Candida spp. elicit cytokine production downstream of various pathogen recognition receptors, including C-type lectin-like receptors, TLRs, and nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)–like receptors. IL-12 family members IL-12p70 and IL-23 are important for host immunity against Candida spp. In this article, we show that IL-27, another IL-12 family member, is produced by myeloid cells in response to selected Candida spp. We demonstrate a novel mechanism for Candida parapsilosis–mediated induction of IL-27 in a TLR7-, MyD88-, and NOD2-dependent manner. Our data revealed that IFN-β is induced by C. parapsilosis, which in turn signals through the IFN-α/β receptor and STAT1/2 to induce IL-27. Moreover, IL-27R (WSX-1)–deficient mice systemically infected with C. parapsilosis displayed enhanced pathogen clearance compared with wild-type mice. This was associated with increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the serum and increased IFN-γ and IL-17 responses in the spleens of IL-27R–deficient mice. Thus, our data define a novel link between C. parapsilosis, TLR7, NOD2, IFN-β, and IL-27, and we have identified an important role for IL-27 in the immune response against C. parapsilosis. Overall, these findings demonstrate an important mechanism for the suppression of protective immune responses during infection with C. parapsilosis, which has potential relevance for infections with other fungal pathogens. PMID:27259855

  19. Effectiveness of Different Cleaning Agents against the Colonization of Candida spp and the in Vitro Detection of the Adherence of These Yeast Cells to Denture Acrylic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kalkanci, Ayse; Filiz, Banu; Kustimur, Semra

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to examine the effect Klorhex and Fittydent, which are used as cleaning agents on the adhesion of Candida on the surfaces of acrylic denture and palatal mucosa. In addition, ability of yeasts to adhere to acrylic strips was evaluated after applying these agents in vitro. Materials and Methods Each group of 15 patients cleaned their dentures with either Klorhex or with Fittydent. The control group cleaned their dentures with water. Results It was found that 62.2% of the patients had colonies of Candida species on their palatal mucosa which was reduced to 51.1% after using these cleaning agents. The colonization rate with Candida spp on their dentures was reduces from 82.2% to 68.8% using these cleaning agents. The mean adhesion value of the Candida strains isolated from the acrylic strips were found to be 75 cell/strip prior to applying the Klorhex and Fittydent and 37.5 cell/strip and 15 cell/strip after applying these agents, respectively. Conclusion These results showed that Klorhex and Fittydent have a certain preventive effect on the colonization rate of Candida spp on the surface of these dentures, the palatal mucosa, as well as on the acrylic strips in vitro. PMID:18729309

  20. An evaluation of manual and mechanical methods to identify Candida spp. from human and animal sources.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Geraldo dos Santos; Ribeiro, Elizabeth Teixeira; Baroni, Francisco de Assis

    2006-01-01

    To compare two yeast identification methods, i. e, the manual and the VITEK mechanical methods, 62 clinical samples from hemocultures and animal sources were analyzed. After identification as Candida yeasts by the VITEK method, the strains were recharacterized using manual assimilation methods and sugar fermentation tests. Our findings reveal 58% concurrent identification between the two methods for animal strains, and 51% for human hemoculture strains.

  1. In Vitro Interactions of Micafungin with Amphotericin B against Clinical Isolates of Candida spp.▿

    PubMed Central

    Serena, Carolina; Mariné, Marçal; Quindós, Guillermo; Carrillo, Alfonso J.; Cano, J. F.; Pastor, F. Javier; Guarro, Josep

    2008-01-01

    The in vitro activity of amphotericin B in combination with micafungin was evaluated against 115 isolates representing seven species of Candida. Overall, the percentages of synergistic interactions were 50% and 20% when the MIC-2 (lowest drug concentration to cause a prominent reduction in growth) and MIC-0 (lowest drug concentration to cause 100% growth inhibition) end point criteria, respectively, were used. Antagonism was not observed. Some of the interactions were confirmed by time-kill assays. PMID:18227181

  2. In vitro sensitivity of Candida spp. to hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether-mediated photodynamic inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yucheng; Wang, Ying; Wu, Sumin; Gu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Background: An increasing prevalence of Candida infections has emerged with the wide use of immune-suppressants and antibiotics. Current antifungal drugs exhibit low efficiency and high toxicity to the normal organs. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) provides an alternative therapeutic strategy involving the use of photosensitizer (PS) and light irradiation. This study evaluated PDI effects against strains of C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei and C. glabrata, using the PS of hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME), which is a second-generation PS clinically approved in China. Methods: Suspensions (~106 CFU/ml) were incubated with seven HMME concentrations (0.25~50 μM) for 30 min followed by 532-nm laser irradiation for 10 min at 40 mW/cm2. Viability of cells was assayed by CFU counting. Furthermore, fetal calf serum (10%) and singlet oxygen quencher sodium azide (100mM) were respectively added to the suspension of C. krusei to evaluate their roles in PDI process. Results: Among the four species, C. albicans was the most sensitive to PDI; 4 log10 killing was achieved at the concentration of 7.5 μM. C. glabrata was the most resistant; 3 log10 killing was not obtained even at PS concentration of 50 μM. PDI effects against C. krusei were inhibited by both serum and sodium azide. Conclusions: HMME-mediated PDI was able to effectively kill Candida in our experimental conditions, mainly through a Type Ⅱ photoprocess. However, the effects could be intensively reversed by the presence of serum. Thus, there might be a long way before HMME can be used in fighting against Candida in real infectious foci.

  3. Antifungal activity of low molecular weight chitosan against clinical isolates of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Alburquenque, Claudio; Bucarey, Sergio A; Neira-Carrillo, Andrónico; Urzúa, Blanca; Hermosilla, Germán; Tapia, Cecilia V

    2010-12-01

    Chitosan is a natural polymer derived from chitin, a structural component of fungi, insects and shrimp, which exerts antimicrobial effects against bacteria and fungi. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro antifungal activity of low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC), and the potential synergy between chitosan and a currently used antifungal drug, fluconazole. The in vitro minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of chitosan and fluconazole against 105 clinical Candida isolates were measured by the broth microdilution method. LMWC exhibited a significant antifungal activity, inhibiting over 89.9% of the clinical isolates examined (68.6% of which was completely inhibited). The species included several fluconazole-resistant strains and less susceptible species such as C. glabrata, which was inhibited at a concentration of 4.8 mg/l LMWC. Although some strains were susceptible at pH 7.0, a greater antifungal activity of LMWC was observed at pH 4.0. There was no evidence of a synergistic effect of the combination of LMWC and fluconazole at pH 7.0. This is the first report in which the antifungal activity of LMWC was investigated with clinical Candida strains. The use of LMWC as an antifungal compound opens new therapeutic perspectives, as the low toxicity of LMWC in humans supports its use in new applications in an environment of pH 4.0-4.5, such as a topical agent for vulvovaginal candidiasis.

  4. Efficacy of dental unit disinfectants against Candida spp. and Hartmannella vermiformis.

    PubMed

    Barbot, Vanessa; Costa, Damien; Deborde, Marie; Imbert, Christine

    2014-04-01

    Human oral commensal Candida yeasts, as well as environmental free-living amoebae (FLA) such as Hartmannella, are known to be direct or indirect human pathogens. These microorganisms may be isolated from dental unit waterlines (DUWL), because of contamination coming from the tap water and/or a patient's mouth. This study compared the efficacy of commonly used DUWL disinfectants (chlorine, H2 O2 , and Oxygenal 6©) against three species of Candida (C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis) and one FLA species (H. vermiformis), growing either as single or as mixed biofilms in tap water. Results showed variable efficacies: H2 O2 had no significant activity, while chlorine was effective but only at the highest doses tested, probably not compatible with DUWL uses. Oxygenal 6© was the most efficacious in preventing the growth of yeasts in tap water. However, in the presence of FLA, Oxygenal 6© displayed a reduced antimicrobial activity against sessile C. albicans. In conclusion, none of the tested disinfectants could eradicate yeasts or FLA. Moreover, the antiyeast activity of Oxygenal 6© was reduced in the presence of FLA. Both sessile or planktonic and mixed or single-species conditions should be considered when evaluating the activity of disinfectants for DUWL maintenance. This study also highlighted that FLA should be included in the testing protocols. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Novel Azole R126638 Is a Selective Inhibitor of Ergosterol Synthesis in Candida albicans, Trichophyton spp., and Microsporum canis

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Bossche, Hugo; Ausma, Jannie; Bohets, Hilde; Vermuyten, Karen; Willemsens, Gustaaf; Marichal, Patrick; Meerpoel, Lieven; Odds, Frank; Borgers, Marcel

    2004-01-01

    R126638 is a novel triazole with in vitro activity similar to that of itraconazole against dermatophytes, Candida spp., and Malassezia spp. In animal models of dermatophyte infections, R126638 showed superior antifungal activity. R126638 inhibits ergosterol synthesis in Candida albicans, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum, and Microsporum canis at nanomolar concentrations, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) similar to those of itraconazole. The decreased synthesis of ergosterol and the concomitant accumulation of 14α-methylsterols provide indirect evidence that R126638 inhibits the activity of CYP51 that catalyzes the oxidative removal of the 14α-methyl group of lanosterol or eburicol. The IC50s for cholesterol synthesis from acetate in human hepatoma cells were 1.4 μM for itraconazole and 3.1 μM for R126638. Compared to itraconazole (IC50 = 3.5 μM), R126638 is a poor inhibitor of the 1α-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (IC50 > 10 μM). Micromolar concentrations of R126638 and itraconazole inhibited the 24-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and the conversion of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 into polar metabolites. At concentrations up to 10 μM, R126638 had almost no effect on cholesterol side chain cleavage (CYP11A1), 11β-hydroxylase (CYP11B1), 17-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase (CYP17), aromatase (CYP19), or 4-hydroxylation of all-trans retinoic acid (CYP26). At 10 μM, R126638 did not show clear inhibition of CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2D6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C10, CYP2C19, or CYP2E1. Compared to itraconazole, R126638 had a lower interaction potential with testosterone 6β hydroxylation and cyclosporine hydroxylation, both of which are catalyzed by CYP3A4, whereas both antifungals inhibited the CYP3A4-catalyzed hydroxylation of midazolam similarly. The results suggest that R126638 has promising properties and merits further in vivo investigations for the treatment of dermatophyte and yeast infections. PMID:15328084

  6. EFFECT OF HIGHLY ACTIVE ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY ON VAGINAL Candida spp. ISOLATION IN HIV-INFECTED COMPARED TO HIV-UNINFECTED WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    ALCZUK, Silvia de Souza Dantas; BONFIM-MENDONÇA, Patrícia de Souza; ROCHA-BRISCHILIARI, Sheila Cristina; SHINOBU-MESQUITA, Cristiane Suemi; MARTINS, Helen Priscilla Rodrigues; GIMENES, Fabrícia; de ABREU, André Luelsdorf Pimenta; CARVALHO, Maria Dalva de Barros; PELLOSO, Sandra Marisa; SVIDZINSKI, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; CONSOLARO, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2015-01-01

     Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) in HIV-infected women contributed to the impairment of their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) use on the vaginal Candida spp. isolation in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected women. This cross-sectional study included 178 HIV-infected (HIV group) and 200 HIV-uninfected women (control) that were studied at the Specialized Assistance Service (SAE) for sexually transmitted diseases (STD)/AIDS of the city of Maringá, Brazil, from April 1 to October 30, 2011. The yeasts were isolated and identified by phenotypic and molecular methods. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, nystatin and amphotericin B was tested by the reference microdilution method. Higher frequencies of total vaginal Candida spp. isolation were found in the HIV-infected group than in the control group. However, both groups showed a similar frequency of colonization and VVC. Although C. albicans was the most frequent and sensitive to azolics and polyenes in both HIV-infected and uninfected women, the emerging resistance of C. glabrata to amphotericin B in the HIV-infected women was observed. Although higher frequency of vaginal Candida spp. isolation had been observed in the HIV-infected than in HIV-uninfected women, colonization and VVC showed similar frequency in both groups, indicating that HAART appears to protect against vaginal colonization and VVC. PMID:25923898

  7. Comparison of results of fluconazole and voriconazole disk diffusion testing for Candida spp. with results from a central reference laboratory in the ARTEMIS DISK Global Antifungal Surveillance Program.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Boyken, Linda; Hollis, Richard J; Kroeger, Jennifer; Messer, Shawn A; Tendolkar, Shailesh; Diekema, Daniel J

    2009-09-01

    The accuracy of antifungal susceptibility testing is important for reliable resistance surveillance and for the clinical management of patients with serious infections due to Candida spp. Our primary objective was to compare the results of fluconazole and voriconazole disk diffusion testing of 3227 Candida spp. performed by 47 centers participating in the ARTEMIS program with disk diffusion and MIC results obtained by the central reference laboratory. The overall categoric agreement between participant disk diffusion test results and reference MIC results was 87% for fluconazole and 95.2% for voriconazole. Likewise good agreement was observed between participant disk diffusion test results and reference laboratory disk diffusion test results, with an agreement of 90.5%, 1% very major error (VME), and 3.4% major error (ME) for fluconazole and 94.2%, 1.1% VME, and 2.5% ME for voriconazole. The disk diffusion test was reliable for detecting those isolates of Candida spp. that were characterized as resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole by MIC testing. External quality assurance data obtained by surveillance programs such as the ARTEMIS Global Antifungal Surveillance Program ensure the generation of useful surveillance data and result in the continued improvement of antifungal susceptibility testing protocols.

  8. Lactobacillus fermentum ATCC 23271 Displays In vitro Inhibitory Activities against Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    do Carmo, Monique S.; Noronha, Francisca M. F.; Arruda, Mariana O.; Costa, Ênnio P. da Silva; Bomfim, Maria R. Q.; Monteiro, Andrea S.; Ferro, Thiago A. F.; Fernandes, Elizabeth S.; Girón, Jorge A.; Monteiro-Neto, Valério

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli are involved in the microbial homeostasis in the female genital tract. Due to the high prevalence of many bacterial diseases of the female genital tract and the resistance of microorganisms to various antimicrobial agents, alternative means to control these infections are necessary. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the probiotic properties of well-characterized Lactobacillus species, including L. acidophilus (ATCC 4356), L. brevis (ATCC 367), L. delbrueckii ssp. delbrueckii (ATCC 9645), L. fermentum (ATCC 23271), L. paracasei (ATCC 335), L. plantarum (ATCC 8014), and L. rhamnosus (ATCC 9595), against Candida albicans (ATCC 18804), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ATCC 9826), and Streptococcus agalactiae (ATCC 13813). The probiotic potential was investigated by using the following criteria: (i) adhesion to host epithelial cells and mucus, (ii) biofilm formation, (iii) co-aggregation with bacterial pathogens, (iv) inhibition of pathogen adhesion to mucus and HeLa cells, and (v) antimicrobial activity. Tested lactobacilli adhered to mucin, co-aggregated with all genital microorganisms, and displayed antimicrobial activity. With the exception of L. acidophilus and L. paracasei, they adhered to HeLa cells. However, only L. fermentum produced a moderate biofilm and a higher level of co-aggregation and mucin binding. The displacement assay demonstrated that all Lactobacillus strains inhibit C. albicans binding to mucin (p < 0.001), likely due to the production of substances with antimicrobial activity. Clinical isolates belonging to the most common Candida species associated to vaginal candidiasis were inhibited by L. fermentum. Collectively, our data suggest that L. fermentum ATCC 23271 is a potential probiotic candidate, particularly to complement candidiasis treatment, since presented with the best probiotic profile in comparison with the other tested lactobacilli strains. PMID:27833605

  9. Effect of serine-type protease of Candida spp. isolated from linear gingival erythema of HIV-positive children: critical factors in the colonization.

    PubMed

    Portela, Maristela B; Souza, Ivete P R; Abreu, Celina M; Bertolini, Martinna; Holandino, Carla; Alviano, Celuta S; Santos, André L S; Soares, Rosangela M A

    2010-11-01

      There are several kinds of oral soft tissue lesions that are common manifestations observed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children; for example, linear gingival erythema (LGE) that is a distinctive fiery red band along the margin of the gingivae. The etiology and pathogenesis of LGE are questionable, but a candidal origin has been suggested. Proteases are key virulence attributes produced by a variety of pathogenic fungi, including Candida. The objective of the present study is to identify the protease production in Candida species including, C. albicans (n=5), C. dubliniensis (n=1) and C. tropicalis (n=1), isolated directly from typical LGE lesions observed in six HIV-positive children, and also to test the effect of a serine protease inhibitor on the interaction of Candida spp. and epithelial cells in vitro. The ability of Candida strains to release proteases in the culture supernatant fluids was visualized by gelatin-SDS-PAGE. Gel strips containing 30-fold concentrated supernatant (1.5×10(8) yeasts) were incubated at 37°C for 48 h in 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 5.5. The concentrated supernatants were also incubated with fibronectin, laminin, immunoglobulin G, bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin. The effect of serine protease inhibitor on the interaction of Candida spp. and epithelial cells (MA 104) was measured after pre-treatment of fungi with the inhibitor (phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, PMSF). All the extracellular proteases were completely inhibited by PMSF, identifying these activities as serine-type proteases. Interestingly, a common 62-kDa serine protease was observed in all Candida strains. The culture supernatants, rich in serine protease activities, cleaved several soluble proteinaceous substrates. Additionally, we demonstrated that pre-treatment of C. albicans, C. dubliniensis and C. tropicalis with PMSF diminished the interaction with epithelial cells. Collectively, our results show that Candida spp. isolated

  10. Comparison of the probability of target attainment of anidulafungin against Candida spp. in patients with acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Doan, Tan N; Kong, David C M; Patel, Kashyap; Walker, Patricia; Spencer, Andrew; Kirkpatrick, Carl M J

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the probability of target attainment (PTA) of various anidulafungin dosing regimens against Candida spp. in patients with acute leukaemia. A Monte Carlo simulation was performed using a previously published population pharmacokinetic model. The following dosing scenarios were evaluated: 200 mg loading dose (LD) on Day 1 then 100 mg daily (manufacturer's recommended dosing regimen); 200 mg LD on Day 1 then 100 mg every 48 h (q48 h); and 200 mg q48 h, 200 mg every 72 h (q72 h) and 300 mg q72 h. For each dosing regimen, free drug concentrations were calculated to evaluate the effect of 99% protein binding. The PTA at various pharmacodynamic (PD) targets was determined as the percentage of subjects who achieved a free drug area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the minimum inhibitory concentration ratio (ƒAUC/MIC) or a free drug maximum plasma concentration over the minimum inhibitory concentration ratio (ƒC(max)/MIC) above the PD targets. PTA expectation values were then calculated for each dosing regimen. The currently recommended dosing regimen of anidulafungin was not optimal for invasive candidiasis in patients with acute leukaemia. Alternate dosing strategies with higher doses and extended dosing intervals (intermittent dosing) achieved better target attainment. This is the first study to optimise therapy with anidulafungin using Monte Carlo simulation. These results provide a rationale in support of future clinical investigation of intermittent dosing of anidulafungin.

  11. Streptococcus thermophilus and its biosurfactants inhibit adhesion by Candida spp. on silicone rubber.

    PubMed

    Busscher, H J; van Hoogmoed, C G; Geertsema-Doornbusch, G I; van der Kuijl-Booij, M; van der Mei, H C

    1997-10-01

    The adhesion of yeasts, two Candida albicans and two Candida tropicalis strains isolated from naturally colonized voice prostheses, to silicone rubber with and without a salivary conditioning film in the absence and presence of adhering Streptococcus thermophilus B, a biosurfactant-releasing dairy isolate, was studied. Coverage of 1 to 4% of the surface of silicone rubber substrata with adhering S. thermophilus B gave significant reductions in the initial yeast adhesion regardless of the presence of a conditioning film. Mechanistically, this interference in yeast adhesion by S. thermophilus B was not due to direct physical effects but to biosurfactant release by the adhering bacteria, because experiments with S. thermophilus B cells that had released their biosurfactants prior to adhesion to silicone rubber and competition with yeasts did not show interference with initial yeast adhesion. The amounts of biosurfactants released were highest for mid-exponential- and early-stationary-phase bacteria (37 mg.g of cells-1 [dry weight]), but biosurfactants released by stationary-phase bacteria (14 mg.g of cells-1 [dry weight]) were the most surface active. The crude biosurfactants released were mixtures of various components, with a glycolipid-like component being the most surface active. A lipid-enriched biosurfactant fraction reduced the surface tension of an aqueous solution to about 35 mJ.m-2 at a concentration of only 0.5 mg.ml-1. The amount of biosurfactant released per S. thermophilus B cell was estimated to be sufficient to cover approximately 12 times the area of the cross section of the bacterium, making biosurfactant release a powerful defense weapon in the postadhesion competition of the bacterium with microorganisms such as yeasts. Preadsorption of biosurfactants to the silicone rubber prior to allowing yeasts to adhere was as effective against C. albicans GB 1/2 adhesion as covering 1 to 2% of the silicone rubber surface with adhering S. thermophilus B, but a

  12. Streptococcus thermophilus and its biosurfactants inhibit adhesion by Candida spp. on silicone rubber.

    PubMed Central

    Busscher, H J; van Hoogmoed, C G; Geertsema-Doornbusch, G I; van der Kuijl-Booij, M; van der Mei, H C

    1997-01-01

    The adhesion of yeasts, two Candida albicans and two Candida tropicalis strains isolated from naturally colonized voice prostheses, to silicone rubber with and without a salivary conditioning film in the absence and presence of adhering Streptococcus thermophilus B, a biosurfactant-releasing dairy isolate, was studied. Coverage of 1 to 4% of the surface of silicone rubber substrata with adhering S. thermophilus B gave significant reductions in the initial yeast adhesion regardless of the presence of a conditioning film. Mechanistically, this interference in yeast adhesion by S. thermophilus B was not due to direct physical effects but to biosurfactant release by the adhering bacteria, because experiments with S. thermophilus B cells that had released their biosurfactants prior to adhesion to silicone rubber and competition with yeasts did not show interference with initial yeast adhesion. The amounts of biosurfactants released were highest for mid-exponential- and early-stationary-phase bacteria (37 mg.g of cells-1 [dry weight]), but biosurfactants released by stationary-phase bacteria (14 mg.g of cells-1 [dry weight]) were the most surface active. The crude biosurfactants released were mixtures of various components, with a glycolipid-like component being the most surface active. A lipid-enriched biosurfactant fraction reduced the surface tension of an aqueous solution to about 35 mJ.m-2 at a concentration of only 0.5 mg.ml-1. The amount of biosurfactant released per S. thermophilus B cell was estimated to be sufficient to cover approximately 12 times the area of the cross section of the bacterium, making biosurfactant release a powerful defense weapon in the postadhesion competition of the bacterium with microorganisms such as yeasts. Preadsorption of biosurfactants to the silicone rubber prior to allowing yeasts to adhere was as effective against C. albicans GB 1/2 adhesion as covering 1 to 2% of the silicone rubber surface with adhering S. thermophilus B, but a

  13. Selected Essential Oils as Antifungal Agents Against Antibiotic-Resistant Candida spp.: In Vitro Study on Clinical and Food-Borne Isolates.

    PubMed

    Rajkowska, Katarzyna; Kunicka-Styczyńska, Alina; Maroszyńska, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Candida spp. cause significant health problems, inducing various types of superficial and deep-seated mycoses in humans. As a result of the increasing antibiotic resistance among pathogenic yeasts, the interest in alternative agents of antifungal activity is growing. This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of selected essential oils (EOs) against Candida clinical and food-borne strains, including antibiotic-resistant isolates, in relation to yeast cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH). Candida strains showed different range of susceptibility to tea tree, thyme, peppermint, and clove oils, and peppermint oil demonstrated the lowest anticandidal activity with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 0.03-8.0% v/v. MIC values for thyme and clove oils ranged from 0.03% to 0.25% v/v, and for tea tree oil-from 0.12% to 2.0% v/v. The exception was Candida tropicalis food-borne strain, the growth of which was inhibited after application of EOs at concentration of 8% v/v. Due to diverse yeast susceptibility to EOs, isolates were divided into five clusters in a principal component analysis model, each containing both clinical and food-borne strains. Hydrophobic properties of yeast were also diversified, and 37% of clinical and 50% of food-borne strains exhibited high hydrophobicity. The study indicates high homology of clinical and food-borne Candida isolates in relation to their susceptibility to anticandidal agents and hydrophobic properties. The susceptibility of yeasts to EOs could be partially related to their CSH. High antifungal activity of examined EOs, also against antibiotic-resistant isolates, indicates their usefulness as agents preventing the development of Candida strains of different origin.

  14. Azole resistance in Candida spp. isolated from Catú Lake, Ceará, Brazil: an efflux-pump-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Brilhante, Raimunda S.N.; Paiva, Manoel A.N.; Sampaio, Célia M.S.; Castelo-Branco, Débora S.C.M.; Teixeira, Carlos E.C.; de Alencar, Lucas P.; Bandeira, Tereza J.P.G.; Monteiro, André J.; Cordeiro, Rossana A.; Pereira-Neto, Waldemiro A.; Sidrim, José J.C.; Moreira, José L.B.; Rocha, Marcos F.G.

    2016-01-01

    Since, there is no study reporting the mechanism of azole resistance among yeasts isolated from aquatic environments; the present study aims to investigate the occurrence of antifungal resistance among yeasts isolated from an aquatic environment, and assess the efflux-pump activity of the azole-resistant strains to better understand the mechanism of resistance for this group of drugs. For this purpose, monthly water and sediment samples were collected from Catú Lake, Ceará, Brazil, from March 2011 to February 2012. The obtained yeasts were identified based on morphological and biochemical characteristics. Of the 46 isolates, 37 were Candida spp., 4 were Trichosporon asahii, 3 were Cryptococcus laurentii, 1 Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and 1 was Kodamaea ohmeri. These isolates were subjected to broth microdilution assay with amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole, according to the methodology standardized by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole were 0.03125–2 μg/mL, 0.0625 to ≥16 μg/mL, and 0.5 to ≥64 μg/mL, respectively, and 13 resistant azole-resistant Candida isolates were detected. A reduction in the azole MICs leading to the phenotypical reversal of the azole resistance was observed upon addition of efflux-pump inhibitors. These findings suggest that the azole resistance among environmental Candida spp. is most likely associated with the overexpression of efflux-pumps. PMID:26887224

  15. Multicenter Study of Method-Dependent Epidemiological Cutoff Values for Detection of Resistance in Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. to Amphotericin B and Echinocandins for the Etest Agar Diffusion Method.

    PubMed

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Arendrup, M; Cantón, E; Cordoba, S; Dannaoui, E; García-Rodríguez, J; Gonzalez, G M; Govender, N P; Martin-Mazuelos, E; Lackner, M; Lass-Flörl, C; Linares Sicilia, M J; Rodriguez-Iglesias, M A; Pelaez, T; Shields, R K; Garcia-Effron, G; Guinea, J; Sanguinetti, M; Turnidge, J

    2017-01-01

    Method-dependent Etest epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) are not available for susceptibility testing of either Candida or Aspergillus species with amphotericin B or echinocandins. In addition, reference caspofungin MICs for Candida spp. are unreliable. Candida and Aspergillus species wild-type (WT) Etest MIC distributions (microorganisms in a species-drug combination with no detectable phenotypic resistance) were established for 4,341 Candida albicans, 113 C. dubliniensis, 1,683 C. glabrata species complex (SC), 709 C. krusei, 767 C. parapsilosis SC, 796 C. tropicalis, 1,637 Aspergillus fumigatus SC, 238 A. flavus SC, 321 A. niger SC, and 247 A. terreus SC isolates. Etest MICs from 15 laboratories (in Argentina, Europe, Mexico, South Africa, and the United States) were pooled to establish Etest ECVs. Anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, and amphotericin B ECVs (in micrograms per milliliter) encompassing ≥97.5% of the statistically modeled population were 0.016, 0.5, 0.03, and 1 for C. albicans; 0.03, 1, 0.03, and 2 for C. glabrata SC; 0.06, 1, 0.25, and 4 for C. krusei; 8, 4, 2, and 2 for C. parapsilosis SC; and 0.03, 1, 0.12, and 2 for C. tropicalis The amphotericin B ECV was 0.25 μg/ml for C. dubliniensis and 2, 8, 2, and 16 μg/ml for the complexes of A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, and A. terreus, respectively. While anidulafungin Etest ECVs classified 92% of the Candida fks mutants evaluated as non-WT, the performance was lower for caspofungin (75%) and micafungin (84%) cutoffs. Finally, although anidulafungin (as an echinocandin surrogate susceptibility marker) and amphotericin B ECVs should identify Candida and Aspergillus isolates with reduced susceptibility to these agents using the Etest, these ECVs will not categorize a fungal isolate as susceptible or resistant, as breakpoints do. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Multicenter Study of Method-Dependent Epidemiological Cutoff Values for Detection of Resistance in Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. to Amphotericin B and Echinocandins for the Etest Agar Diffusion Method

    PubMed Central

    Arendrup, M.; Cantón, E.; Cordoba, S.; García-Rodríguez, J.; Gonzalez, G. M.; Martin-Mazuelos, E.; Lackner, M.; Lass-Flörl, C.; Linares Sicilia, M. J.; Rodriguez-Iglesias, M. A.; Pelaez, T.; Shields, R. K.; Garcia-Effron, G.; Sanguinetti, M.; Turnidge, J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Method-dependent Etest epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) are not available for susceptibility testing of either Candida or Aspergillus species with amphotericin B or echinocandins. In addition, reference caspofungin MICs for Candida spp. are unreliable. Candida and Aspergillus species wild-type (WT) Etest MIC distributions (microorganisms in a species-drug combination with no detectable phenotypic resistance) were established for 4,341 Candida albicans, 113 C. dubliniensis, 1,683 C. glabrata species complex (SC), 709 C. krusei, 767 C. parapsilosis SC, 796 C. tropicalis, 1,637 Aspergillus fumigatus SC, 238 A. flavus SC, 321 A. niger SC, and 247 A. terreus SC isolates. Etest MICs from 15 laboratories (in Argentina, Europe, Mexico, South Africa, and the United States) were pooled to establish Etest ECVs. Anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, and amphotericin B ECVs (in micrograms per milliliter) encompassing ≥97.5% of the statistically modeled population were 0.016, 0.5, 0.03, and 1 for C. albicans; 0.03, 1, 0.03, and 2 for C. glabrata SC; 0.06, 1, 0.25, and 4 for C. krusei; 8, 4, 2, and 2 for C. parapsilosis SC; and 0.03, 1, 0.12, and 2 for C. tropicalis. The amphotericin B ECV was 0.25 μg/ml for C. dubliniensis and 2, 8, 2, and 16 μg/ml for the complexes of A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, and A. terreus, respectively. While anidulafungin Etest ECVs classified 92% of the Candida fks mutants evaluated as non-WT, the performance was lower for caspofungin (75%) and micafungin (84%) cutoffs. Finally, although anidulafungin (as an echinocandin surrogate susceptibility marker) and amphotericin B ECVs should identify Candida and Aspergillus isolates with reduced susceptibility to these agents using the Etest, these ECVs will not categorize a fungal isolate as susceptible or resistant, as breakpoints do. PMID:27799206

  17. β-Lactam antibiotics and vancomycin inhibit the growth of planktonic and biofilm Candida spp.: an additional benefit of antibiotic-lock therapy?

    PubMed

    Sidrim, José J C; Teixeira, Carlos E C; Cordeiro, Rossana A; Brilhante, Raimunda S N; Castelo-Branco, Débora S C M; Bandeira, Silviane P; Alencar, Lucas P; Oliveira, Jonathas S; Monteiro, André J; Moreira, José L B; Bandeira, Tereza J P G; Rocha, Marcos F G

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cefepime, meropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam (TZP) and vancomycin on strains of Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis in planktonic and biofilm forms. Twenty azole-derivative-resistant strains of C. albicans (n=10) and C. tropicalis (n=10) were tested. The susceptibility of planktonic Candida spp. to the antibacterial agents was investigated by broth microdilution. The XTT reduction assay was performed to evaluate the viability of growing and mature biofilms following exposure to these drugs. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranged from 0.5 mg/mL to 2 mg/mL for cefepime, TZP and vancomycin and from 0.5 mg/mL to 1 mg/mL for meropenem and the drugs also caused statistically significant reductions in biofilm cellular activity both in growing and mature biofilm. Since all of the tested drugs are commonly used in patients with hospital-acquired infections and in those with catheter-related infections under antibiotic-lock therapy, it may be possible to obtain an additional benefit from antibiotic-lock therapy with these drugs, namely the control of Candida biofilm formation.

  18. In vitro activity of fluconazole and voriconazole against clinical isolates of Candida spp. by E-test method.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, P; Jamal, F; Chong, P P; Ng, K P

    2010-08-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of clinical Candida isolates towards fluconazole and voriconazole was determined using the E-test method. A total of 41 clinical isolates recovered from patients since 2004 until 2009 from two local hospitals in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were used. These comprised Candida tropicalis, Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida rugosa, Candida dubliniensis and Candida glabrata. Strains from American Type Culture Collection were used as quality control. Lawn cultures of the isolates on RPMI-1640 agar medium supplemented with 2% glucose were incubated with the E-test strips at 35ºC for 48 h. Our results show that 71% were susceptible to fluconazole and 90% were susceptible to voriconazole. All strains of C. krusei were resistant to fluconazole and 50% were susceptible in a dose-dependent manner to voriconazole. There were 66% and 33% of C. glabrata that were resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole. Our study revealed that majority of the clinical Candida isolates was susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole with a small percentage being resistant to both the drugs.

  19. Trends in Antifungal Susceptibility of Candida spp. Isolated from Pediatric and Adult Patients with Bloodstream Infections: SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, 1997 to 2000

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M. A.; Diekema, D. J.; Jones, R. N.; Messer, S. A.; Hollis, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    From 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2000, 2,047 bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to Candida spp. were reported from hospitals in the United States, Canada, Latin America, and Europe participating in the SENTRY Antifungal Surveillance Program. Among individuals in four age groups (≤1, 2 to 15, 16 to 64, and ≥65 years) Candida albicans was the most common species, causing 60, 55, 55, and 50% of infections, respectively. C. glabrata caused 17 to 23% of BSIs in those ages 16 to 64 and ≥65 years, whereas it caused only 3% of BSIs in the individuals in the two younger age groups (P < 0.001). C. parapsilosis (which caused 21 to 24% of BSIs) and C. tropicalis (which caused 7 to 10% of BSIs) were more common than C. glabrata in individuals ages ≤1 year and 2 to 15 years. Isolates of Candida spp. showed a trend of decreasing susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, and amphotericin B with increasing patient age (P ≤ 0.01). None of the C. glabrata isolates from individuals ≤1 year old were resistant to fluconazole, whereas they made up 5 to 9% of isolates from individuals ages 16 to 64 and ≥65 years. Isolates of C. tropicalis from patients ≤1 year old were more susceptible to flucytosine (MIC at which 90% of isolates are inhibited [MIC90], 0.5 μg/ml; 0% resistant isolates) than those from patients ≥65 years old (MIC90, 32 μg/ml; 11% resistant isolates). The investigational triazoles posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole were all highly active against all species of Candida from individuals in all age groups. These data demonstrate differences in the species distributions of pathogens and differences in antifungal resistance among isolates from individuals in the pediatric and adult age groups. Ongoing surveillance will enhance efforts to limit the extent of antifungal resistance in individuals in various age groups. PMID:11880404

  20. The performance of 4 different supplements and 5 blood culture bottles types in detection of bacteria and Candida spp. in simulated sterile body fluid cultures.

    PubMed

    Nylén, Therese; Saeedi, Baharak; Borg, Camilla; Ullberg, Måns; Özenci, Volkan

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the performance of 4 supplements: horse blood, fastidious organisms supplement (FOS), haemin isovitalex albumine (HIA), and brain heart infusion-haemin isovitalex albumine (BHI-HIA) and 5 blood culture bottles: Bactec Mycosis IC/F, Plus Aerobic/F, Peds Plus/F from the Bactec 9240 system, and BacT/Alert FA and BacT/Alert PF from the BacT/Alert 3D system, in detection of bacteria and Candida spp. in simulated sterile body fluids other than blood models. In total, 8 reference strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria monocytogenes, Candida albicans, and Candida parapsilosis) and 11 clinical bacteria and yeast isolates (6 isolates from cerebrospinal fluid and 5 isolates from blood) were included in this study. Horse blood, FOS, and HIA were significantly better than no supplements (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0002, and P = 0.05, respectively) in detection of bacteria. Interestingly, there was no significant difference between BHI-HIA and bottles without any supplements. Sixty bottles analyzed of which 59 (98.33%) bottles with horse blood, 53 (88.33%) with FOS, 45 (75.00%) with HIA, and 43 (71.67%) with BHI-HIA signaled positive. The positivity rates with horse blood were significantly higher than with HIA and BHI-HIA (P < 0.0005 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Similarly, the blood culture bottles with horse blood had shorter time to detection (TTD) compared to bottles with FOS and HIA (P < 0.05 and P < 0.0001, respectively). When yeasts were analyzed, almost all (124/125) blood culture bottles with Candida spp. signaled positive even in the absence of supplements. Bactec Mycosis IC/F had significantly shorter TTD compared to Bactec Peds Plus/F, Bactec Plus Aerobic/F, BacT/Alert FA, and BacT/Alert PF bottles in detection of Candida spp. (P < 0.005, P < 0.05, P < 0.001, and P < 0.001, respectively). The present study showed that

  1. Phenotypic characterization and adhesive properties of vaginal Candida spp. strains provided by the CHU Farhat Hached (Sousse, Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Noumi, Emira; Snoussi, Mejdi; Noumi, Inès; Saghrouni, Fatma; Aouni, Mahjoub; Valentin, Eulogio

    2015-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a common infection among women worldwide, being Candida albicans the most commonly isolated species. Therefore, controlling this opportunistic yeast is one of the key factors for reducing nosocomial infection. We investigated several virulence properties of 28 vaginal strains of Candida isolated from Tunisian women suffering from vulvovaginitis. We also analyzed the virulence properties of a clinical Candida krusei strain and five Candida reference strains. Candida strains were subjected to microscopic analysis and culture in Candida ID2 chromogenic medium. The adhesive properties of these strains were estimated by the microtiter plate - the safranin-staining - and the Congo red agar (CRA) methods, for determining yeast ability to form biofilms on biomaterials used in urinary catheter manufacturing. Their potency to produce hydrolytic enzymes was also studied. Our results showed that nine out of the total studied strains produced phospholipase. In addition, very high protease activity was detected in 23 Candida strains. All Candida strains were beta-hemolytic and adhered to polystyrene microtiter plates in varying degrees. Two vaginal C. albicans strains were strongly adhesive to polystyrene and glass slides. Also, our results showed that vaginal Candida strains were more adhesive to the three tested materials than the reference strains. This study shows the presence of a range of virulence and adhesion factors in clinical isolates of vaginal Candida. Consequently, control and treatment of vaginal candidiasis as a means to prevent biofilm formation on urinary catheters is of crucial importance. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of fluconazole as a surrogate marker to predict susceptibility and resistance to voriconazole among 13,338 clinical isolates of Candida spp. Tested by clinical and laboratory standards institute-recommended broth microdilution methods.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Messer, S A; Boyken, L; Rice, C; Tendolkar, S; Hollis, R J; Diekema, D J

    2007-01-01

    Clinical laboratories frequently face the problem of delayed availability of commercially prepared approved reagents for performing susceptibility testing of new antimicrobials. Although this problem is encountered more often with antibacterial agents, it is also an issue with antifungal agents. A current example is voriconazole, a new triazole antifungal with an expanded spectrum and potency against Candida spp., Aspergillus spp., and other opportunistic fungal pathogens. The present study addresses the use of fluconazole as a surrogate marker to predict the susceptibility of Candida spp. to voriconazole. Reference broth microdilution MIC results for 13,338 strains of Candida spp. isolated from more than 200 medical centers worldwide were used. Voriconazole MICs and interpretive categories (susceptible, < or =1 microg/ml; susceptible dose dependent, 2 microg/ml; resistant, > or =4 microg/ml) were compared with those of fluconazole by regression statistics and error rate bounding analyses. For all 13,338 isolates, the absolute categorical agreement was 91.6% (false susceptible or very major error [VME], 0.0%). Since voriconazole is 16- to 32-fold more potent than fluconazole, the performance of fluconazole as a surrogate marker for voriconazole susceptibility was improved by designating those isolates with fluconazole MICs of < or =32 microg/ml as being susceptible to voriconazole, resulting in a categorical agreement of 97% with 0.1% VME. Clinical laboratories performing antifungal susceptibility testing of fluconazole against Candida spp. can reliably use these results as surrogate markers until commercial FDA-approved voriconazole susceptibility tests become available.

  3. Antifungal Resistance and Virulence Among Candida spp. from Captive Amazonian manatees and West Indian Manatees: Potential Impacts on Animal and Environmental Health.

    PubMed

    Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Carvalho, Vitor Luz; de Souza Collares Maia Castelo-Branco, Débora; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; de Melo Guedes, Gláucia Morgana; Barbosa, Giovanna Riello; Lazzarini, Stella Maris; Oliveira, Daniella Carvalho Ribeiro; de Meirelles, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Attademo, Fernanda Löffler Niemeyer; da Bôaviagem Freire, Augusto Carlos; de Aquino Pereira-Neto, Waldemiro; de Aguiar Cordeiro, Rossana; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2016-06-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the antifungal susceptibility and production of virulence factors by Candida spp. isolated from sirenians in Brazil. The isolates (n = 105) were recovered from the natural cavities of Amazonian and West Indian manatees and were tested for the susceptibility to amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole and for the production of phospholipases, proteases, and biofilm. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for amphotericin B ranged from 0.03 to 1 µg/mL, and no resistant isolates were detected. Itraconazole and fluconazole MICs ranged from 0.03 to 16 µg/mL and from 0.125 to 64 µg/mL, respectively, and 35.2% (37/105) of the isolates were resistant to at least one of these azole drugs. Concerning the production of virulence factors, phospholipase activity was observed in 67.6% (71/105) of the isolates, while protease activity and biofilm production were detected in 50.5% (53/105) and 32.4% (34/105) of the isolates, respectively. Since the natural cavities of manatees are colonized by resistant and virulent strains of Candida spp., these animals can act as sources of resistance and virulence genes for the environment, conspecifics and other animal species, demonstrating the potential environmental impacts associated with their release back into their natural habitat.

  4. Comparison of four reading methods of broth microdilution based on the clinical and laboratory standards institute M27-A3 method for Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Hiromi; Mano, Yoko; Oguri, Toyoko; Furuya, Nobuhiko

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the susceptibilities of 5 reference strains and 28 isolates of Candida spp., to micafungin, amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, and miconazole, obtained by visually determined minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using the agitation method (V-A), as described in the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 document; visual determinations without agitation (V-NA); and spectrophotometric determinations for the presence or absence of agitation (SP-A and SP-NA, respectively). Our results indicate that when the V-NA, SP-A, and SP-NA-the 3 alternative microdilution procedures for MIC endpoint determinations-were compared with the V-A, excellent agreements were observed between the V-NA and V-A rather than with the spectrophotometric methods (between the SP-A or SP-NA, and V-A). Furthermore, many errors occurred while using the SP-A method in the presence of agitation and some isolates showed major errors. Three of 5 isolates that showed very major errors between the spectrophotometric SP-A or SP-NA, and the reference V-A method were trailing isolates. Therefore, it was suggested that the MICs of Candida spp. obtained by the V-NA method were more precise than those by the conventional SP-A method.

  5. Multicenter study of epidemiological cutoff values and detection of resistance in Candida spp. to anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin using the Sensititre YeastOne colorimetric method.

    PubMed

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Alvarez-Fernandez, M; Cantón, E; Carver, P L; Chen, S C-A; Eschenauer, G; Getsinger, D L; Gonzalez, G M; Govender, N P; Grancini, A; Hanson, K E; Kidd, S E; Klinker, K; Kubin, C J; Kus, J V; Lockhart, S R; Meletiadis, J; Morris, A J; Pelaez, T; Quindós, G; Rodriguez-Iglesias, M; Sánchez-Reus, F; Shoham, S; Wengenack, N L; Borrell Solé, N; Echeverria, J; Esperalba, J; Gómez-G de la Pedrosa, E; García García, I; Linares, M J; Marco, F; Merino, P; Pemán, J; Pérez Del Molino, L; Roselló Mayans, E; Rubio Calvo, C; Ruiz Pérez de Pipaon, M; Yagüe, G; Garcia-Effron, G; Guinea, J; Perlin, D S; Sanguinetti, M; Shields, R; Turnidge, J

    2015-11-01

    Neither breakpoints (BPs) nor epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) have been established for Candida spp. with anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin when using the Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) broth dilution colorimetric method. In addition, reference caspofungin MICs have so far proven to be unreliable. Candida species wild-type (WT) MIC distributions (for microorganisms in a species/drug combination with no detectable phenotypic resistance) were established for 6,007 Candida albicans, 186 C. dubliniensis, 3,188 C. glabrata complex, 119 C. guilliermondii, 493 C. krusei, 205 C. lusitaniae, 3,136 C. parapsilosis complex, and 1,016 C. tropicalis isolates. SYO MIC data gathered from 38 laboratories in Australia, Canada, Europe, Mexico, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States were pooled to statistically define SYO ECVs. ECVs for anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin encompassing ≥97.5% of the statistically modeled population were, respectively, 0.12, 0.25, and 0.06 μg/ml for C. albicans, 0.12, 0.25, and 0.03 μg/ml for C. glabrata complex, 4, 2, and 4 μg/ml for C. parapsilosis complex, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.06 μg/ml for C. tropicalis, 0.25, 1, and 0.25 μg/ml for C. krusei, 0.25, 1, and 0.12 μg/ml for C. lusitaniae, 4, 2, and 2 μg/ml for C. guilliermondii, and 0.25, 0.25, and 0.12 μg/ml for C. dubliniensis. Species-specific SYO ECVs for anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin correctly classified 72 (88.9%), 74 (91.4%), 76 (93.8%), respectively, of 81 Candida isolates with identified fks mutations. SYO ECVs may aid in detecting non-WT isolates with reduced susceptibility to anidulafungin, micafungin, and especially caspofungin, since testing the susceptibilities of Candida spp. to caspofungin by reference methodologies is not recommended.

  6. Multicenter Study of Epidemiological Cutoff Values and Detection of Resistance in Candida spp. to Anidulafungin, Caspofungin, and Micafungin Using the Sensititre YeastOne Colorimetric Method

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Fernandez, M.; Cantón, E.; Carver, P. L.; Chen, S. C.-A.; Eschenauer, G.; Getsinger, D. L.; Gonzalez, G. M.; Grancini, A.; Hanson, K. E.; Kidd, S. E.; Klinker, K.; Kubin, C. J.; Kus, J. V.; Lockhart, S. R.; Meletiadis, J.; Morris, A. J.; Pelaez, T.; Rodriguez-Iglesias, M.; Sánchez-Reus, F.; Shoham, S.; Wengenack, N. L.; Borrell Solé, N.; Echeverria, J.; Esperalba, J.; Gómez-G. de la Pedrosa, E.; García García, I.; Linares, M. J.; Marco, F.; Merino, P.; Pemán, J.; Pérez del Molino, L.; Roselló Mayans, E.; Rubio Calvo, C.; Ruiz Pérez de Pipaon, M.; Yagüe, G.; Garcia-Effron, G.; Perlin, D. S.; Sanguinetti, M.; Shields, R.; Turnidge, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neither breakpoints (BPs) nor epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) have been established for Candida spp. with anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin when using the Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) broth dilution colorimetric method. In addition, reference caspofungin MICs have so far proven to be unreliable. Candida species wild-type (WT) MIC distributions (for microorganisms in a species/drug combination with no detectable phenotypic resistance) were established for 6,007 Candida albicans, 186 C. dubliniensis, 3,188 C. glabrata complex, 119 C. guilliermondii, 493 C. krusei, 205 C. lusitaniae, 3,136 C. parapsilosis complex, and 1,016 C. tropicalis isolates. SYO MIC data gathered from 38 laboratories in Australia, Canada, Europe, Mexico, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States were pooled to statistically define SYO ECVs. ECVs for anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin encompassing ≥97.5% of the statistically modeled population were, respectively, 0.12, 0.25, and 0.06 μg/ml for C. albicans, 0.12, 0.25, and 0.03 μg/ml for C. glabrata complex, 4, 2, and 4 μg/ml for C. parapsilosis complex, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.06 μg/ml for C. tropicalis, 0.25, 1, and 0.25 μg/ml for C. krusei, 0.25, 1, and 0.12 μg/ml for C. lusitaniae, 4, 2, and 2 μg/ml for C. guilliermondii, and 0.25, 0.25, and 0.12 μg/ml for C. dubliniensis. Species-specific SYO ECVs for anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin correctly classified 72 (88.9%), 74 (91.4%), 76 (93.8%), respectively, of 81 Candida isolates with identified fks mutations. SYO ECVs may aid in detecting non-WT isolates with reduced susceptibility to anidulafungin, micafungin, and especially caspofungin, since testing the susceptibilities of Candida spp. to caspofungin by reference methodologies is not recommended. PMID:26282428

  7. A multicentre study of antifungal strategies and outcome of Candida spp. peritonitis in intensive-care units.

    PubMed

    Montravers, P; Mira, J-P; Gangneux, J-P; Leroy, O; Lortholary, O

    2011-07-01

    Information on the species causing Candida peritonitis, their in vitro susceptibility, antifungal strategies in this setting and patient outcome is still scarce. AmarCand was a prospective, non-interventional study in 271 adult intensive-care unit (ICU) patients with proven invasive Candida infection who received systemic antifungal therapy (France, 2005-2006). Of these ICU patients, 93 (median age 65 years, simplified acute physiology score II 52) had Candida peritonitis, including 73 nosocomial peritonitis, 53 concomitant bacterial peritoneal infections and 26 candidaemias. Candida species were C. albicans (n = 63/108 isolates, 58%), C. glabrata (n = 22, 20%), C. krusei (n = 9), C. kefyr (n = 5), C. parapsilosis (n = 3), C. tropicalis (n = 3), C. ciferii (n = 2) and C. lusitaniae (n = 1). Of tested isolates, 28% were fluconazole-resistant or susceptible dose-dependent (C. albicans 3/32, C. glabrata 9/14, C. krusei 4/4). Empiric antifungal treatment was started 1 day (median) after peritonitis diagnosis, with fluconazole (n = 2 patients), caspofungin (n = 12), voriconazole (n = 3), amphotericin B (n = 2), or a combination (n = 4). Following susceptibility testing, empiric antifungal treatment was judged inadequate in 9/45 (20%) patients and modified in 30 patients (fluconazole was replaced by caspofungin (n = 14) or voriconazole (n = 4)). Mortality in ICU was 38% (35/93) and was not influenced by type of Candida species, fluconazole susceptibility, time to treatment, candidaemia, nosocomial acquisition, or concomitant bacterial infection. No specific factors for death were identified. In summary, a high proportion of fluconazole-resistant or susceptible dose-dependent strains was cultured. These results confirm the high mortality rates of Candida peritonitis and plead for additional investigation in this population. Antifungal treatment for severe cases of Candida peritonitis in ICU patients remains the standard care.

  8. Candida in mouth or on dummy?

    PubMed Central

    Manning, D J; Coughlin, R P; Poskitt, E M

    1985-01-01

    Mouth and dummy swabs for Candida spp. were obtained from 100 children under 18 months old admitted with acute medical conditions. Forty four per cent of dummies were colonised by Candida spp. Children who sucked dummies had clinical thrush and positive mouth swabs for candida more frequently than those who did not. PMID:4004318

  9. Berberine Antifungal Activity in Fluconazole-Resistant Pathogenic Yeasts: Action Mechanism Evaluated by Flow Cytometry and Biofilm Growth Inhibition in Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Anderson Ramos; de Andrade Neto, João Batista; da Silva, Cecília Rocha; Campos, Rosana de Sousa; Costa Silva, Rose Anny; Freitas, Daniel Domingues; do Nascimento, Francisca Bruna Stefany Aires; de Andrade, Larissa Nara Dantas; Sampaio, Letícia Serpa; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa; Magalhães, Hemerson Iury Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of fungal infections and, in particular, the incidence of fungal antibiotic resistance, which is associated with biofilm formation, have significantly increased, contributing to morbidity and mortality. Thus, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. In this context, natural products have emerged as a major source of possible antifungal agents. Berberine is a protoberberine-type isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the roots, rhizomes, and stem bark of natural herbs, such as Berberis aquifolium, Berberis vulgaris, Berberis aristata, and Hydrastis canadensis, and of Phellodendron amurense. Berberine has been proven to have broad antibacterial and antifungal activity. In the present study, the potential antifungal effect of berberine against fluconazole-resistant Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans strains, as well as against the biofilm form of Candida spp., was assessed. The antifungal effect of berberine was determined by a broth microdilution method (the M27-A3 method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) and flow cytometry techniques, in which the probable mechanism of action of the compound was also assessed. For biofilm assessment, a colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the susceptibility of sessile cells. The isolates used in the study belonged to the Laboratory of Bioprospection and Experiments in Yeast (LABEL) of the Federal University of Ceará. After 24 and 72 h, fluconazole-resistant Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans strains showed berberine MICs equal to 8 μg/ml and 16 μg/ml, respectively. Cytometric analysis showed that treatment with berberine caused alterations to the integrity of the plasma and mitochondrial membranes and DNA damage, which led to cell death, probably by apoptosis. Assessment of biofilm-forming isolates after treatment showed statistically significant reductions in biofilm cell activity (P < 0.001). PMID:27021328

  10. Coriandrum sativum L. (Coriander) essential oil: antifungal activity and mode of action on Candida spp., and molecular targets affected in human whole-genome expression.

    PubMed

    Freires, Irlan de Almeida; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça; Furletti, Vivian Fernandes; Sartoratto, Adilson; Alencar, Severino Matias de; Figueira, Glyn Mara; de Oliveira Rodrigues, Janaina Aparecida; Duarte, Marta Cristina Teixeira; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic fungal infection of the oral cavity with increasingly worldwide prevalence and incidence rates. Novel specifically-targeted strategies to manage this ailment have been proposed using essential oils (EO) known to have antifungal properties. In this study, we aim to investigate the antifungal activity and mode of action of the EO from Coriandrum sativum L. (coriander) leaves on Candida spp. In addition, we detected the molecular targets affected in whole-genome expression in human cells. The EO phytochemical profile indicates monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes as major components, which are likely to negatively impact the viability of yeast cells. There seems to be a synergistic activity of the EO chemical compounds as their isolation into fractions led to a decreased antimicrobial effect. C. sativum EO may bind to membrane ergosterol, increasing ionic permeability and causing membrane damage leading to cell death, but it does not act on cell wall biosynthesis-related pathways. This mode of action is illustrated by photomicrographs showing disruption in biofilm integrity caused by the EO at varied concentrations. The EO also inhibited Candida biofilm adherence to a polystyrene substrate at low concentrations, and decreased the proteolytic activity of Candida albicans at minimum inhibitory concentration. Finally, the EO and its selected active fraction had low cytotoxicity on human cells, with putative mechanisms affecting gene expression in pathways involving chemokines and MAP-kinase (proliferation/apoptosis), as well as adhesion proteins. These findings highlight the potential antifungal activity of the EO from C. sativum leaves and suggest avenues for future translational toxicological research.

  11. Coriandrum sativum L. (Coriander) Essential Oil: Antifungal Activity and Mode of Action on Candida spp., and Molecular Targets Affected in Human Whole-Genome Expression

    PubMed Central

    Freires, Irlan de Almeida; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça; Furletti, Vivian Fernandes; Sartoratto, Adilson; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Figueira, Glyn Mara; de Oliveira Rodrigues, Janaina Aparecida; Duarte, Marta Cristina Teixeira; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic fungal infection of the oral cavity with increasingly worldwide prevalence and incidence rates. Novel specifically-targeted strategies to manage this ailment have been proposed using essential oils (EO) known to have antifungal properties. In this study, we aim to investigate the antifungal activity and mode of action of the EO from Coriandrum sativum L. (coriander) leaves on Candida spp. In addition, we detected the molecular targets affected in whole-genome expression in human cells. The EO phytochemical profile indicates monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes as major components, which are likely to negatively impact the viability of yeast cells. There seems to be a synergistic activity of the EO chemical compounds as their isolation into fractions led to a decreased antimicrobial effect. C. sativum EO may bind to membrane ergosterol, increasing ionic permeability and causing membrane damage leading to cell death, but it does not act on cell wall biosynthesis-related pathways. This mode of action is illustrated by photomicrographs showing disruption in biofilm integrity caused by the EO at varied concentrations. The EO also inhibited Candida biofilm adherence to a polystyrene substrate at low concentrations, and decreased the proteolytic activity of Candida albicans at minimum inhibitory concentration. Finally, the EO and its selected active fraction had low cytotoxicity on human cells, with putative mechanisms affecting gene expression in pathways involving chemokines and MAP-kinase (proliferation/apoptosis), as well as adhesion proteins. These findings highlight the potential antifungal activity of the EO from C. sativum leaves and suggest avenues for future translational toxicological research. PMID:24901768

  12. Berberine Antifungal Activity in Fluconazole-Resistant Pathogenic Yeasts: Action Mechanism Evaluated by Flow Cytometry and Biofilm Growth Inhibition in Candida spp.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Anderson Ramos; de Andrade Neto, João Batista; da Silva, Cecília Rocha; Campos, Rosana de Sousa; Costa Silva, Rose Anny; Freitas, Daniel Domingues; do Nascimento, Francisca Bruna Stefany Aires; de Andrade, Larissa Nara Dantas; Sampaio, Letícia Serpa; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa; Magalhães, Hemerson Iury Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Nobre Júnior, Hélio Vitoriano

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of fungal infections and, in particular, the incidence of fungal antibiotic resistance, which is associated with biofilm formation, have significantly increased, contributing to morbidity and mortality. Thus, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. In this context, natural products have emerged as a major source of possible antifungal agents. Berberine is a protoberberine-type isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the roots, rhizomes, and stem bark of natural herbs, such as Berberis aquifolium, Berberis vulgaris, Berberis aristata, and Hydrastis canadensis, and of Phellodendron amurense Berberine has been proven to have broad antibacterial and antifungal activity. In the present study, the potential antifungal effect of berberine against fluconazole-resistant Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans strains, as well as against the biofilm form of Candida spp., was assessed. The antifungal effect of berberine was determined by a broth microdilution method (the M27-A3 method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) and flow cytometry techniques, in which the probable mechanism of action of the compound was also assessed. For biofilm assessment, a colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the susceptibility of sessile cells. The isolates used in the study belonged to the Laboratory of Bioprospection and Experiments in Yeast (LABEL) of the Federal University of Ceará. After 24 and 72 h, fluconazole-resistant Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans strains showed berberine MICs equal to 8 μg/ml and 16 μg/ml, respectively. Cytometric analysis showed that treatment with berberine caused alterations to the integrity of the plasma and mitochondrial membranes and DNA damage, which led to cell death, probably by apoptosis. Assessment of biofilm-forming isolates after treatment showed statistically significant reductions in biofilm cell activity (P < 0.001). Copyright © 2016 da

  13. Interlaboratory variability of Caspofungin MICs for Candida spp. Using CLSI and EUCAST methods: should the clinical laboratory be testing this agent?

    PubMed

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Arendrup, M C; Pfaller, M A; Bonfietti, L X; Bustamante, B; Canton, E; Chryssanthou, E; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Dannaoui, E; Fothergill, A; Fuller, J; Gaustad, P; Gonzalez, G M; Guarro, J; Lass-Flörl, C; Lockhart, S R; Meis, J F; Moore, C B; Ostrosky-Zeichner, L; Pelaez, T; Pukinskas, S R B S; St-Germain, G; Szeszs, M W; Turnidge, J

    2013-12-01

    Although Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) clinical breakpoints (CBPs) are available for interpreting echinocandin MICs for Candida spp., epidemiologic cutoff values (ECVs) based on collective MIC data from multiple laboratories have not been defined. While collating CLSI caspofungin MICs for 145 to 11,550 Candida isolates from 17 laboratories (Brazil, Canada, Europe, Mexico, Peru, and the United States), we observed an extraordinary amount of modal variability (wide ranges) among laboratories as well as truncated and bimodal MIC distributions. The species-specific modes across different laboratories ranged from 0.016 to 0.5 μg/ml for C. albicans and C. tropicalis, 0.031 to 0.5 μg/ml for C. glabrata, and 0.063 to 1 μg/ml for C. krusei. Variability was also similar among MIC distributions for C. dubliniensis and C. lusitaniae. The exceptions were C. parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii MIC distributions, where most modes were within one 2-fold dilution of each other. These findings were consistent with available data from the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) (403 to 2,556 MICs) for C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis. Although many factors (caspofungin powder source, stock solution solvent, powder storage time length and temperature, and MIC determination testing parameters) were examined as a potential cause of such unprecedented variability, a single specific cause was not identified. Therefore, it seems highly likely that the use of the CLSI species-specific caspofungin CBPs could lead to reporting an excessive number of wild-type (WT) isolates (e.g., C. glabrata and C. krusei) as either non-WT or resistant isolates. Until this problem is resolved, routine testing or reporting of CLSI caspofungin MICs for Candida is not recommended; micafungin or anidulafungin data could be used instead.

  14. Interlaboratory Variability of Caspofungin MICs for Candida spp. Using CLSI and EUCAST Methods: Should the Clinical Laboratory Be Testing This Agent?

    PubMed Central

    Arendrup, M. C.; Pfaller, M. A.; Bonfietti, L. X.; Bustamante, B.; Canton, E.; Chryssanthou, E.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Dannaoui, E.; Fothergill, A.; Fuller, J.; Gaustad, P.; Gonzalez, G. M.; Guarro, J.; Lass-Flörl, C.; Lockhart, S. R.; Meis, J. F.; Moore, C. B.; Ostrosky-Zeichner, L.; Pelaez, T.; Pukinskas, S. R. B. S.; St-Germain, G.; Szeszs, M. W.; Turnidge, J.

    2013-01-01

    Although Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) clinical breakpoints (CBPs) are available for interpreting echinocandin MICs for Candida spp., epidemiologic cutoff values (ECVs) based on collective MIC data from multiple laboratories have not been defined. While collating CLSI caspofungin MICs for 145 to 11,550 Candida isolates from 17 laboratories (Brazil, Canada, Europe, Mexico, Peru, and the United States), we observed an extraordinary amount of modal variability (wide ranges) among laboratories as well as truncated and bimodal MIC distributions. The species-specific modes across different laboratories ranged from 0.016 to 0.5 μg/ml for C. albicans and C. tropicalis, 0.031 to 0.5 μg/ml for C. glabrata, and 0.063 to 1 μg/ml for C. krusei. Variability was also similar among MIC distributions for C. dubliniensis and C. lusitaniae. The exceptions were C. parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii MIC distributions, where most modes were within one 2-fold dilution of each other. These findings were consistent with available data from the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) (403 to 2,556 MICs) for C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis. Although many factors (caspofungin powder source, stock solution solvent, powder storage time length and temperature, and MIC determination testing parameters) were examined as a potential cause of such unprecedented variability, a single specific cause was not identified. Therefore, it seems highly likely that the use of the CLSI species-specific caspofungin CBPs could lead to reporting an excessive number of wild-type (WT) isolates (e.g., C. glabrata and C. krusei) as either non-WT or resistant isolates. Until this problem is resolved, routine testing or reporting of CLSI caspofungin MICs for Candida is not recommended; micafungin or anidulafungin data could be used instead. PMID:24018263

  15. [Evaluation of the API ZYM system and RPMI agar plates supplemented with Tween 40 for detection of lipolytic enzymes of Candida spp].

    PubMed

    Ciok-Pater, Emilia; Wróblewska, Joanna; Białucha, Agata; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    Lipolytic activity of 40 strains of Candida spp. was tested on API ZYM system and on RPMI agar plates supplemented with 1% Tween 40. Lipolytic activity was indicated by opaque zones around the inoculum cylindrical holes were punched in the medium. Clearing of the medium around the bacterial colonies indicated that an isolate produce lipase. Only 4 (21.1%) strains of C. albicans, and 3 (14.1%) strains of non-C. albicans which hydrolyzed 2-naftylomirystylan by use of the API ZYM system was observed. In contrast, 16 (78.9%) strains of C. albicans and 17 (80.7%) strains of non-C. albicans produced lipases on the agar plate using RPMI agar plates supplemented with 1.0% Tween 40. Determination oflipase activities with the API ZYM system were in no agreement with lipase tests in RPMI supplemented with Tween 40. Our study verify greater usefulness of RPMI supplemented with Tween 40 for detection of lipolytic enzymes of Candida species in comparison to the API ZYM.

  16. [Susceptibility to azoles and amphotericin B of isolates of Candida spp. Experience of a university health network, between 2004 and 2010].

    PubMed

    Porte, Lorena; León, Pilar; Gárate, Cynthia; Guzmán, Ana María; Labarca, Jaime; García, Patricia

    2012-04-01

    To describe antifungal susceptibility testing surveillance (December 2004-September 2010) in Candida spp., for amphotericin B, fluconazole and voriconazole, at the Laboratorio de Microbiología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. The study was performed utilizing E test and included yeasts from invasive origin and isolates in which antifungal susceptibility testing was asked for by the patient's physician. The yeasts were mainly recovered from urine samples (n: 64), blood cultures (n: 51) and secretions (n: 24). Two hundred ninety three isolates were studied: C. albicans (38%), C. glabrata (30%), C. tropicalis (11%), C. parapsilosis (10%), C. krusei (4%) and others (7%). All Candida species were 100% susceptible to amphotericin B, except C. krusei (1/12). Fluconazole's global susceptibility in C. albicans was 91.8%, but 100% in isolates from blood cultures versus 76% in isolates from urine. C. tropicalis was 93.9% susceptible to fluconazole, C. parapsilosis, 90% and C. glabrata 30.3%. C. krusei had no susceptible isolates to fluconazole. Voriconazole resistance was mainly present in C. glabrata (11.5%). We recommend the study of antifungal susceptibility in isolates from invasive origin, selected urine strains and C. glabrata. Fluconazole remains effective in C. albicans from blood.

  17. Comparative study of agar diffusion test and the NCCLS macrobroth method for in vitro susceptibility testing of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Soni, L M; Burattini, M N; Pignatari, A C; Gompertz, O F; Colombo, A L

    1999-01-01

    We performed a prospective double-blind study to evaluate the correlation between inhibition zones obtained by a disk-diffusion test, using Neo-sensitabs of fluconazole (Rosco Diagnostica), and the MICs generated by the NCCLS macrobroth dilution assay. Eighty clinical isolates, representing 5 of the clinically relevant species of Candida, were tested simultaneously by both methods. A clear inverse correlation was found between the results obtained by both tests (r = -0.69). In addition, there was high degree of agreement between methods in the identification of susceptible isolates. However, the resistance definition by disk-diffusion test had a positive predictive value of only 17%. Our data support the hypothesis that Rosco Fluconazole Neo-sensitabs have potential as a screening test for the identification of Candida isolates susceptible to fluconazole. Resistant isolates should be further investigated by standardized broth procedures.

  18. In vitro activity of inexpensive topical alternatives against Candida spp. isolated from the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, Rana S; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2008-03-01

    The use of inexpensive topical alternatives, e.g. oil of melaleuca (tea tree oil (TTO)), chlorhexidine (CHX), povidone iodine (PI) and gentian violet (GV), to treat oral candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients has been proposed in resource-poor countries. However, pre-clinical studies comparing the antifungal activity of these agents are lacking. This study compared the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of TTO, GV, PI, CHX and fluconazole (FLZ) against 91 clinical Candida strains using Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) methodology. Isolates were obtained from the oral cavity of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. Among the topical agents examined, GV showed the most potent activity against all Candida isolates tested (MIC range, MIC for 50% of the organisms (MIC(50)) and MIC for 90% of the organisms (MIC(90)) of 0.03-0.25 microg/mL, 0.06 microg/mL and 0.1 2microg/mL, respectively). CHX was 64 times less active than GV (MIC range, MIC(50) and MIC(90) of 0.5-16 microg/mL, 4 microg/mL and 8 microg/mL, respectively). The lowest antifungal activity was seen for PI (MIC(90)=0.25%). Moreover, GV, unlike the other topical agents tested, was fungicidal (minimum fungicidal concentration=1 microg/mL) against Candida albicans isolates (n=83). In addition, GV showed activity against FLZ-resistant C. albicans (n=3). The combination of GV and FLZ was not antagonistic and there was no interaction between the two compounds. GV possesses potent antifungal activity against FLZ-susceptible and -resistant Candida strains and is not antagonistic when used in combination with FLZ. In vivo evaluation is warranted.

  19. Phytochemical Analysis and Modulation of Antibiotic Activity by Luehea paniculata Mart. & Zucc. (Malvaceae) in Multiresistant Clinical Isolates of Candida Spp.

    PubMed Central

    Calixto Júnior, João T.; Morais, Selene M.; Martins, Clécio G.; Vieira, Larissa G.; Morais-Braga, Maria Flaviana B.; Carneiro, Joara N. P.; Machado, Antonio J. P.; Menezes, Irwin R. A.; Tintino, Saulo R.; Coutinho, Henrique D. M.

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of fungal infections has led to the continuous search for new drugs. Extracts of Luehea paniculata, a tree of multiple medicinal uses, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity, as well as its modulator potential of the Fluconazole antibiotic. Chemical prospecting of ethanol extracts of leaf and bark was carried out, the quantification of total phenols and flavonoids, characterized by the HPLC-DAD technique. The rosmarinic acid and the vitexin flavonoid were observed as major constituents in ELELP and ESWELP, respectively. Antioxidant activity was also evaluated by the method of scavenging the free radical DPPH, and quercetin was used as standard, obtaining IC50 values: 0.341 (mg/mL) for ELELP and 0.235 (mg/mL) for ESWELP. The microdilution assay was performed for antifungal activity against strains of Candida albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis and showed minimum inhibitory concentrations values ≥1024 μg/mL. In the modulator action of extracts on Fluconazole against multiresistant clinical isolates of Candida (subinhibitory concentration minimum of 128 μg/mL), a significant synergism was observed, indicating that the extracts potentiated the antifungal effect against C. tropicalis, where antioxidant flavonoids could be responsible. This is the first report about modifying activity of the antibiotic action of a species of the genus Luehea. PMID:25821822

  20. Wild-type MIC distributions and epidemiological cutoff values for posaconazole and voriconazole and Candida spp. as determined by 24-hour CLSI broth microdilution.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Boyken, L; Hollis, R J; Kroeger, J; Messer, S A; Tendolkar, S; Diekema, D J

    2011-02-01

    We tested 16,191 strains of Candida against posaconazole and voriconazole, using the CLSI M27-A3 broth microdilution (BMD) method (24-h incubation), in order to define wild-type (WT) populations and epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs). From 2001 to 2009, 8,619 isolates of Candida albicans, 2,415 isolates of C. glabrata, 2,278 isolates of C. parapsilosis, 1,895 isolates of C. tropicalis, 508 isolates of C. krusei, 205 isolates of C. lusitaniae, 177 isolates of C. guilliermondii, and 93 isolates of C. kefyr were obtained from over 100 centers worldwide. The modal MICs (μg/ml) for posaconazole and voriconazole, respectively, were as follows: for C. albicans, 0.016 and 0.007; for C. glabrata, 0.5 and 0.06; for C. parapsilosis, 0.06 and 0.007; for C. tropicalis, 0.03 and 0.015; for C. krusei, 0.25 and 0.12; for C. lusitaniae, 0.03 and 0.007; for C. guilliermondii, 0.12 and 0.03; and for C. kefyr, 0.06 and 0.007. The ECVs (μg/ml [% of isolates that had MICs equal to or less than the ECV]) for posaconazole and voriconazole, respectively, were as follows: 0.06 (98.5) and 0.03 (98.9) for C. albicans, 2 (96.2) and 0.5 (90.4%) for C. glabrata, 0.25 (99.3) and 0.12 (97.9) for C. parapsilosis, 0.12 (97.6) and 0.06 (97.2) for C. tropicalis, 0.5 (99.8) and 0.5 (99.4) for C. krusei, 0.12 (95.6) and 0.03 (96.6) for C. lusitaniae, 0.5 (98.9) and 0.25 (98.3) for C. guilliermondii, and 0.25 (100.0) and 0.015 (100.0) for C. kefyr. In the absence of clinical breakpoints (CBPs) for posaconazole, these WT distributions and ECVs will be useful in surveillance for emergence of reduced susceptibility to posaconazole among Candida spp. Whereas a CBP for susceptibility of ≤ 1 μg/ml has been established for voriconazole and all species of Candida, it is notable that ECVs for this agent range from 10- to >100-fold lower than the CBP, depending on the species of Candida. The CBP is inadequate in detecting the emergence of voriconazole resistance among most Candida species encountered

  1. Wild-Type MIC Distributions and Epidemiological Cutoff Values for Posaconazole and Voriconazole and Candida spp. as Determined by 24-Hour CLSI Broth Microdilution▿

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M. A.; Boyken, L.; Hollis, R. J.; Kroeger, J.; Messer, S. A.; Tendolkar, S.; Diekema, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    We tested 16,191 strains of Candida against posaconazole and voriconazole, using the CLSI M27-A3 broth microdilution (BMD) method (24-h incubation), in order to define wild-type (WT) populations and epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs). From 2001 to 2009, 8,619 isolates of Candida albicans, 2,415 isolates of C. glabrata, 2,278 isolates of C. parapsilosis, 1,895 isolates of C. tropicalis, 508 isolates of C. krusei, 205 isolates of C. lusitaniae, 177 isolates of C. guilliermondii, and 93 isolates of C. kefyr were obtained from over 100 centers worldwide. The modal MICs (μg/ml) for posaconazole and voriconazole, respectively, were as follows: for C. albicans, 0.016 and 0.007; for C. glabrata, 0.5 and 0.06; for C. parapsilosis, 0.06 and 0.007; for C. tropicalis, 0.03 and 0.015; for C. krusei, 0.25 and 0.12; for C. lusitaniae, 0.03 and 0.007; for C. guilliermondii, 0.12 and 0.03; and for C. kefyr, 0.06 and 0.007. The ECVs (μg/ml [% of isolates that had MICs equal to or less than the ECV]) for posaconazole and voriconazole, respectively, were as follows: 0.06 (98.5) and 0.03 (98.9) for C. albicans, 2 (96.2) and 0.5 (90.4%) for C. glabrata, 0.25 (99.3) and 0.12 (97.9) for C. parapsilosis, 0.12 (97.6) and 0.06 (97.2) for C. tropicalis, 0.5 (99.8) and 0.5 (99.4) for C. krusei, 0.12 (95.6) and 0.03 (96.6) for C. lusitaniae, 0.5 (98.9) and 0.25 (98.3) for C. guilliermondii, and 0.25 (100.0) and 0.015 (100.0) for C. kefyr. In the absence of clinical breakpoints (CBPs) for posaconazole, these WT distributions and ECVs will be useful in surveillance for emergence of reduced susceptibility to posaconazole among Candida spp. Whereas a CBP for susceptibility of ≤1 μg/ml has been established for voriconazole and all species of Candida, it is notable that ECVs for this agent range from 10- to >100-fold lower than the CBP, depending on the species of Candida. The CBP is inadequate in detecting the emergence of voriconazole resistance among most Candida species encountered

  2. Susceptibility of Candida spp. isolated from blood cultures as evaluated using the M27-A3 and new M27-S4 approved breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Santos, Edileusa Rosa dos; Dal Forno, Camila F; Hernandez, Mari Glei; Kubiça, Thaís Felli; Venturini, Tarcieli P; Chassot, Francieli; Santurio, Janio M; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality rates associated with candidemia episodes and the emergence of resistance to antifungal agents necessitate the monitoring of the susceptibility of fungal isolates to antifungal treatments. The new, recently approved, species-specific clinical breakpoints (SS-CBPs)(M27-S4) for evaluating susceptibility require careful interpretation and comparison with the former proposals made using the M27-A3 breakpoints, both from CLSI. This study evaluated the susceptibility of the different species of Candida that were isolated from candidemias based on these two clinical breakpoints. Four hundred and twenty-two isolates were identified and, among them, C. parapsilosis comprised 46.68%, followed by C. albicans (35.78%), C. tropicalis (9.71%), C. glabrata (3.55%), C. lusitaniae (1.65%), C. guilliermondii (1.65%) and C. krusei (0.94%). In accordance with the M27-A3 criteria, 33 (7.81%) non-susceptible isolates were identified, of which 16 (3.79%) were resistant to antifungal agents. According to SS-CBPs, 80 (18.95%) isolates were non-susceptible, and 10 (2.36%) of these were drug resistant. When the total number of non-susceptible isolates was considered, the new SS-CBPs detected 2.4 times the number of isolates that were detected using the M27-A3 interpretative criteria. In conclusion, the detection of an elevated number of non-susceptible species has highlighted the relevance of evaluating susceptibility tests using new, species-specific clinical breakpoints (SS-CBPs), which could impact the profile of non-susceptible Candida spp. to antifungal agents that require continuous susceptibility monitoring.

  3. Biofilms of Candida spp. from the ocular conjunctiva of horses with reduced azole susceptibility: a complicating factor for the treatment of keratomycosis?

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Bittencourt, Paula Vago; de Souza Collares Castelo-Branco, Débora; de Melo Guedes, Glaucia Morgana; de Oliveira, Jonathas Sales; Alencar, Lucas Pereira; de Aguiar Cordeiro, Rossana; Pinheiro, Mariana; Nogueira-Filho, Evilázio Fernandes; de Aquino Pereira-Neto, Waldemiro; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2017-04-18

    This study aimed to assess the biofilm-forming ability of Candida spp. from the ocular conjunctiva of horses and to investigate the antifungal susceptibility of these biofilms. Initially, the biofilm-forming ability of 15 strains was assessed by crystal violet staining, which reveals the fungal biomass adhered to the polystyrene plates, and scanning electron microscopy. Then, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, and caspofungin were initially determined against strains in planktonic form. Afterward, antifungal susceptibility of mature biofilms was evaluated by exposing them to 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC of the tested drugs, followed by the assessment of their metabolic activity, using the oxidoreduction indicator XTT. Results were analyzed through ANOVA and Tukey's post-test, and P-values below 5% led to significant conclusions. Eight strains produced biofilms and were classified as strong (1/15), moderate (3/15) and weak (4/15) producers, according to the amount of crystal violet retained by the adhered fungal biomass. Biofilm metabolic activity of one C. tropicalis did not decrease after exposure to the tested antifungals, while biofilm metabolic activity of five strains was reduced by amphotericin B, but not the other drugs. One C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and one C. glabrata showed significant reduction in biofilm metabolic activity after exposure to fluconazole, itraconazole, and caspofungin, but not amphotericin B. The results demonstrate that Candida from the ocular conjunctiva of horses can pose as a risk to animal health as they are capable of forming biofilms, which are commonly involved in fungal keratitis. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Essential Oil from the Seed of Anethum graveolens L. against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong; Tian, Jun; Zheng, Yuechen; Ban, Xiaoquan; Zeng, Jingsi; Mao, Yehong; Wang, Youwei

    2011-01-01

    The essential oil produced from the seed of Anethum graveolens L. (Umbelliferae) was tested in vitro and in vivo anti-Candida activity. The microbroth dilution method was used in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), according to M27-A3 of the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI). And then, efficacy evaluation of essential oil in the prophylaxis and treatment of experimental vaginal candidiasis was performed in immunosuppressed mice. The anti-Candida activity was analyzed by microbiological and histological techniques and was compared with that of fluconazole (FCZ). The results showed essential oil was active in vitro against all tested strains, with MICs ranging from 0.312 μL/mL (for C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. krusei) to 0.625 μL/mL (for 6 isolated C. albicans strains). Essential oil (2% v/v) was highly efficacious in accelerating C. albicans 09-1555 clearance from experimentally infected mice vagina by prophylaxis and therapeutic treatments. In both therapeutic efficacy and prophylaxis studies, the histological findings confirmed the microbiological results. The experimental results revealed that the tested essential oil is effective against vulvovaginal candidiasis in immunosuppressed mice.

  5. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Essential Oil from the Seed of Anethum graveolens L. against Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hong; Tian, Jun; Zheng, Yuechen; Ban, Xiaoquan; Zeng, Jingsi; Mao, Yehong; Wang, Youwei

    2011-01-01

    The essential oil produced from the seed of Anethum graveolens L. (Umbelliferae) was tested in vitro and in vivo anti-Candida activity. The microbroth dilution method was used in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), according to M27-A3 of the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI). And then, efficacy evaluation of essential oil in the prophylaxis and treatment of experimental vaginal candidiasis was performed in immunosuppressed mice. The anti-Candida activity was analyzed by microbiological and histological techniques and was compared with that of fluconazole (FCZ). The results showed essential oil was active in vitro against all tested strains, with MICs ranging from 0.312 μL/mL (for C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. krusei) to 0.625 μL/mL (for 6 isolated C. albicans strains). Essential oil (2% v/v) was highly efficacious in accelerating C. albicans 09-1555 clearance from experimentally infected mice vagina by prophylaxis and therapeutic treatments. In both therapeutic efficacy and prophylaxis studies, the histological findings confirmed the microbiological results. The experimental results revealed that the tested essential oil is effective against vulvovaginal candidiasis in immunosuppressed mice. PMID:21716714

  6. In vitro susceptibilities of bloodstream isolates of Candida spp.: results from a multicenter active surveillance program in Andalusia.

    PubMed

    Flórez, Carmen; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Ruiz, Maite; Cisneros, José Miguel; Herrero, Marta; García, M Victoria; García, Ma Victoria; Márquez, Manuel; Porras, José; Martín, Patricia; Gamero, Carmen; Castón, Juan José

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antifungal drug susceptibilities of Candida bloodstream isolates in Andalusia, obtained through a multicenter active laboratory-based surveillance between October 2005 and September 2006. One hundred and ninety-seven Candida isolates were collected. The MICs of amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole were established using the Sensititre YeastOne panel. The MICs of posaconazole and caspofungin were determined by Etest. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species (49.2%), followed by C. parapsilosis (17.3%), C. tropicalis (15.2%), C. glabrata (13.7%) and C. krusei (3.6%). All strains were inhibited at MICs of or = 64 mg/L) and 7 (3.6%) were considered resistant to itraconazole (MIC > or = 1 mg/L). All the isolates were susceptible to voriconazole and caspofungin. In our study C. krusei and C. glabrata were identified in over 18% of cases of candidemia. Most clinical isolates of these species are resistant or susceptible-dose-dependent to fluconazole but susceptible to voriconazole and caspofungin. These agents must be used in the empiric treatment of candidemia rather than fluconazole.

  7. Wild-Type MIC Distributions and Epidemiological Cutoff Values for Amphotericin B, Flucytosine, and Itraconazole and Candida spp. as Determined by CLSI Broth Microdilution

    PubMed Central

    Espinel-Ingroff, A.; Canton, E.; Castanheira, M.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Diekema, D. J.; Fothergill, A.; Fuller, J.; Ghannoum, M.; Jones, R. N; Lockhart, S. R.; Martin-Mazuelos, E.; Melhem, M. S. C.; Ostrosky-Zeichner, L.; Pappas, P.; Pelaez, T.; Peman, J.; Rex, J.; Szeszs, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical breakpoints (CBPs) and epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) have been established for several Candida spp. and the newer triazoles and echinocandins but are not yet available for older antifungal agents, such as amphotericin B, flucytosine, or itraconazole. We determined species-specific ECVs for amphotericin B (AMB), flucytosine (FC) and itraconazole (ITR) for eight Candida spp. (30,221 strains) using isolates from 16 different laboratories in Brazil, Canada, Europe, and the United States, all tested by the CLSI reference microdilution method. The calculated 24- and 48-h ECVs expressed in μg/ml (and the percentages of isolates that had MICs less than or equal to the ECV) for AMB, FC, and ITR, respectively, were 2 (99.8)/2 (99.2), 0.5 (94.2)/1 (91.4), and 0.12 (95.0)/0.12 (92.9) for C. albicans; 2 (99.6)/2 (98.7), 0.5 (98.0)/0.5 (97.5), and 2 (95.2)/4 (93.5) for C. glabrata; 2 (99.7)/2 (97.3), 0.5 (98.7)/0.5 (97.8), and 05. (99.7)/0.5 (98.5) for C. parapsilosis; 2 (99.8)/2 (99.2), 0.5 (93.0)/1 (90.5), and 0.5 (97.8)/0.5 (93.9) for C. tropicalis; 2 (99.3)/4 (100.0), 32 (99.4)/32 (99.3), and 1 (99.0)/2 (100.0) for C. krusei; 2 (100.0)/4 (100.0), 0.5 (95.3)/1 (92.9), and 0.5 (95.8)/0.5 (98.1) for C. lusitaniae; −/2 (100.0), 0.5 (98.8)/0.5 (97.7), and 0.25 (97.6)/0.25 (96.9) for C. dubliniensis; and 2 (100.0)/2 (100.0), 1 (92.7)/−, and 1 (100.0)/2 (100.0) for C. guilliermondii. In the absence of species-specific CBP values, these wild-type (WT) MIC distributions and ECVs will be useful for monitoring the emergence of reduced susceptibility to these well-established antifungal agents. PMID:22461672

  8. Seaweed-mediated biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Gracilaria corticata for its antifungal activity against Candida spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Senthamil Selvi, S.; Govindaraju, M.

    2013-12-01

    The present study was demonstrated with simple and rapid synthesis of silver (Ag) nanoparticles using marine seaweed, Gracilaria corticata. The visibility of prominent color change at 60 °C within 20 min indicates the formation of Ag nanoparticles. The synthesized Ag nanoparticles were well characterized by UV-vis spectrum, Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering measurements (DLS). Prominent FTIR peaks were obtained corresponding to phenolic compounds, amide I group and aromatic rings which involved in the stabilization of Ag nanoparticles. G. corticata resulted in spherical shaped nanospheres of 18-46 nm as revealed by TEM. The average size distributions of Ag nanoparticles were 51.82 nm and are fairly stable with a zeta potential value of -26.2 mV. The result showed that, biosynthesized Ag nanoparticles from G. corticata have an effective antifungal activity against Candida albicans and C. glabrata.

  9. Experimental evidence for the role of lipids in adherence of Candida spp. to human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghannoum, M A; Burns, G R; Elteen, K A; Radwan, S S

    1986-01-01

    Lipids extracted from Candida albicans and C. tropicalis, but not from the weakly adherent C. pseudotropicalis, significantly blocked in vitro adherence of the respective yeast cells to buccal epithelial cells. The percentage of reduction from control values ranged between 16.4 and 42.1%, depending on the species, the strain, and the solvent used for lipid extraction. The constituent lipid classes of both the acetone and chloroform-methanol extracts of C. albicans ATCC 10231 were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. The individual classes were isolated by preparative thin-layer chromatography and then tested for their effects on the adherence of this strain to buccal epithelial cells. Individual phospholipids, sterols, and steryl esters blocked adherence significantly (between 15.5 and 55.7% reduction). Triacylglycerols and free fatty acids showed no effect whatsoever. The same results were obtained when standard lipid samples were investigated. Images PMID:3759234

  10. Bifunctional fluorescent benzimidazo[1,2-α]quinolines for Candida spp. biofilm detection and biocidal activity.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Igor O P; Schrekker, Clarissa M L; Lopes, William; Orru, Romano V A; Hranjec, Marijana; Perin, Nataša; Machado, Michel; Oliveira, Luís F; Donato, Ricardo K; Stefani, Valter; Fuentefria, Alexandre M; Schrekker, Henri S

    2016-10-01

    Biofilms provide an ideal environment for protecting the microbial cells from damage caused by humoral and cellular immune system components, promoting resistance, infections and increasing mortality and morbidity of patients in health facilities. In an attempt to provide an innovative solution for preventing contamination in hospital environments, this study evaluated nine structural complementary fluorescent benzimidazo[1,2-α]quinolines as bifunctional agents that both detect and have biocidal activity against yeast biofilms on stainless steel surfaces. The benzimidazoles' staining capability was determined by a fluorescence microscopy study and spraying the substance on yeast biofilm contaminated stainless steel surfaces. Furthermore, their in vitro human leukocyte cytotoxicity was evaluated with trypan blue and their biocidal activity was determined as the minimum inhibitory concentration against Candida tropicalis, C. albicans and C. parapsilosis strains. Moreover, scanning electron micrographs were recorded to study the biocidal activity. This resulted in the identification of 7, which presents all the desired characteristics (such as solubility) and capabilities (staining and biocide activity against all tested biofilm forming yeast strains) at the same time. As such, benzimidazole 7 has the potential to guarantee the use of disinfected medical and surgical instruments in clinical and surgical procedures, consequently, contributing to an increased safety for patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Surveillance of Candida spp Bloodstream Infections: Epidemiological Trends and Risk Factors of Death in Two Mexican Tertiary Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Corzo-Leon, Dora E.; Alvarado-Matute, Tito; Colombo, Arnaldo L.; Cornejo-Juarez, Patricia; Cortes, Jorge; Echevarria, Juan I.; Guzman-Blanco, Manuel; Macias, Alejandro E.; Nucci, Marcio; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Ponce-de-Leon, Alfredo; Queiroz-Telles, Flavio; Santolaya, Maria E.; Thompson-Moya, Luis; Tiraboschi, Iris N.; Zurita, Jeannete; Sifuentes-Osornio, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Larger populations at risk, broader use of antibiotics and longer hospital stays have impacted on the incidence of Candida sp. bloodstream infections (CBSI). Objective To determine clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of patients with CBSI in two tertiary care reference medical institutions in Mexico City. Design Prospective and observational laboratory-based surveillance study conducted from 07/2008 to 06/2010. Methods All patients with CBSI were included. Identification and antifungal susceptibility were performed using CLSI M27-A3 standard procedures. Frequencies, Mann-Whitney U test or T test were used as needed. Risk factors were determined with multivariable analysis and binary logistic regression analysis. Results CBSI represented 3.8% of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Cumulative incidence was 2.8 per 1000 discharges (incidence rate: 0.38 per 1000 patient-days). C. albicans was the predominant species (46%), followed by C. tropicalis (26%). C. glabrata was isolated from patients with diabetes (50%), and elderly patients. Sixty-four patients (86%) received antifungals. Amphotericin-B deoxycholate (AmBD) was the most commonly used agent (66%). Overall mortality rate reached 46%, and risk factors for death were APACHE II score ≥16 (OR = 6.94, CI95% = 2.34–20.58, p<0.0001), and liver disease (OR = 186.11, CI95% = 7.61–4550.20, p = 0.001). Full susceptibility to fluconazole, AmBD and echinocandins among C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis was observed. Conclusions The cumulative incidence rate in these centers was higher than other reports from tertiary care hospitals from Latin America. Knowledge of local epidemiologic patterns permits the design of more specific strategies for prevention and preemptive therapy of CBSI. PMID:24830654

  12. Comparison of the Susceptibilities of Candida spp. to Fluconazole and Voriconazole in a 4-Year Global Evaluation Using Disk Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, Kevin C.; Baron, Ellen Jo; Lopes Colombo, Arnaldo; Girmenia, Corrado; Sanchez-Sousa, Aurora; del Palacio, Amalia; de Bedout, Catalina; Gibbs, David L.

    2003-01-01

    From June 1997 to December 2001, results of in vitro susceptibility tests of yeast isolates from 35 countries were collected. For 2001 alone, fluconazole results were reported for 22,111 yeast isolates from 77 institutions in 30 countries. Of these isolates, 18,569 were also tested for susceptibility to voriconazole. All study sites tested clinical yeast isolates by recently endorsed NCCLS disk diffusion method M44-P. Disk test plates were automatically read and results were recorded with the BIOMIC Image Analysis System. Species, drug, zone diameter, susceptibility category, MIC, and quality control results were electronically submitted by e-mail quarterly for analysis. Duplicate test results (same patient and same species with same sensitivity-resistance profile and biotype results during any 7-day period) and uncontrolled test results were eliminated from this analysis. The proportion of Candida albicans isolates decreased from 69.7% in 1997 to 1998 to 63.0% in 2001, and this decrease was accompanied by a concomitant increase in C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis. The susceptibility (susceptible [S]or susceptible-dose dependent [S-DD]) of C. albicans isolates to fluconazole was virtually unchanged, from 99.2% in 1997 to 99% in 2001; the C. glabrata response to fluconazole was unchanged, from 81.5% S or S-DD in 1997 to 81.7% in 2001, although the percentage of resistant isolates from blood and upper respiratory tract samples appeared to increase over the study period; the percentage of S C. parapsilosis isolates decreased slightly, from 98% S or S-DD in 1997 to 96% in 2001; and the percentage of S isolates of C. tropicalis increased slightly, from 95.7% in 1997 to 96.9% in 2001. The highest rate of resistance to fluconazole among C. albicans isolates was noted in Ecuador (7.6%, n = 250). Results from this investigation indicate that the susceptibility of yeast isolates to fluconazole has changed minimally worldwide over the 4.5-year study period and that

  13. Comparison of the Vitek 2 yeast susceptibility system with CLSI microdilution for antifungal susceptibility testing of fluconazole and voriconazole against Candida spp., using new clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Diekema, Daniel J; Procop, Gary W; Rinaldi, Michael G

    2013-09-01

    A commercially available, fully automated yeast susceptibility test system (Vitek 2; bioMérieux, Marcy d'Etoile, France) was compared in 3 different laboratories with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference microdilution (BMD) method by testing 2 quality control strains, 10 reproducibility strains, and 425 isolates of Candida spp. against fluconazole and voriconazole. Reference CLSI BMD MIC endpoints and Vitek 2 MIC endpoints were read after 24 hours and 9.1-27.1 hours incubation, respectively. Excellent essential agreement (within 2 dilutions) between the reference and Vitek 2 MICs was observed for fluconazole (97.9%) and voriconazole (96.7%). Categorical agreement (CA) between the 2 methods was assessed using the new species-specific clinical breakpoints (CBPs): susceptible (S) ≤2 μg/mL, susceptible dose-dependent (SDD) 4 μg/mL, and resistant (R) ≥8 μg/mL for fluconazole and Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, and Candida parapsilosis and ≤32 μg/mL (SDD), ≥64 μg/mL (R) for Candida glabrata; S ≤0.12 μg/mL, SDD 0.25-0.5 μg/mL, R ≥1 μg/mL for voriconazole and C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis, and ≤0.5 μg/mL (S), 1 μg/mL (SDD), ≥2 μg/mL (R) for Candida krusei. The epidemiological cutoff value (ECV) of 0.5 μg/mL for voriconazole and C. glabrata was used to differentiate wild-type (WT; MIC ≤ ECV) from non-WT (MIC > ECV) strains of this species. Due to the lack of CBPs for the less common species, the ECVs for fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively, were used for Candida lusitaniae (2 μg/mL and 0.03 μg/mL), Candida dubliniensis (0.5 μg/mL and 0.03 μg/mL), Candida guilliermondii (8 μg/mL and 0.25 μg/mL), and Candida pelliculosa (4 μg/mL and 0.25 μg/mL) to categorize isolates of these species as WT and non-WT. CA between the 2 methods was 96.8% for fluconazole and 96.5% for voriconazole with less than 1% very major errors and 1.3-3.0% major errors. The Vitek 2 yeast susceptibility system

  14. Photodynamic inactivation of biofilms formed by Candida spp., Trichosporon mucoides, and Kodamaea ohmeri by cationic nanoemulsion of zinc 2,9,16,23-tetrakis(phenylthio)-29H, 31H-phthalocyanine (ZnPc).

    PubMed

    Junqueira, J C; Jorge, A O C; Barbosa, J O; Rossoni, R D; Vilela, S F G; Costa, A C B P; Primo, F L; Gonçalves, J M; Tedesco, A C; Suleiman, J M A H

    2012-11-01

    The biofilms formed by opportunistic yeasts serve as a persistent reservoir of infection and impair the treatment of fungal diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of biofilms formed by Candida spp. and the emerging pathogens Trichosporon mucoides and Kodamaea ohmeri by a cationic nanoemulsion of zinc 2,9,16,23-tetrakis(phenylthio)-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (ZnPc). Biofilms formed by yeasts after 48 h in the bottom of 96-well microtiter plates were treated with the photosensitizer (ZnPc) and a GaAlAs laser (26.3 J cm(-2)). The biofilm cells were scraped off the well wall, homogenized, and seeded onto Sabouraud dextrose agar plates that were then incubated at 37°C for 48 h. Efficient PDI of biofilms was verified by counting colony-forming units (CFU/ml), and the data were submitted to analysis of variance and the Tukey test (p < 0.05). All biofilms studied were susceptible to PDI with statistically significant differences. The strains of Candida genus were more resistant to PDI than emerging pathogens T. mucoides and K. ohmeri. A mean reduction of 0.45 log was achieved for Candida spp. biofilms, and a reduction of 0.85 and 0.84, were achieved for biofilms formed by T. mucoides and K. ohmeri, respectively. Therefore, PDI by treatment with nanostructured formulations cationic zinc 2,9,16,23- tetrakis (phenylthio)- 29H, 31H- phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and a laser reduced the number of cells in the biofilms formed by strains of C. albicans and non-Candida albicans as well the emerging pathogens T. mucoides and K. ohmeri.

  15. A prospective two-year assessment of miconazole resistance in Candida spp. With repeated treatment with 0.25% miconazole nitrate ointment in neonates and infants with moderate to severe diaper dermatitis complicated by cutaneous candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Daisy; van Rossem, Koen

    2013-01-01

    A petrolatum and zinc oxide-based ointment containing 0.25% miconazole nitrate is reported to be effective and well tolerated in the treatment of diaper dermatitis complicated by cutaneous candidiasis (DDCC). This prospective, multicenter, open-label, long-term, phase IV study investigated the potential resistance of Candida spp. to repeated topical use of 0.25% miconazole nitrate in infants age 15 months and younger with moderate to severe DDCC. For initial and recurring episodes of DDCC over the 2-year study period, subjects were treated with a 7-day course of 0.25% miconazole nitrate ointment (active components: miconazole nitrate 0.25%, zinc oxide 15%, and white petrolatum 81.35%) with a 7-day follow-up. Clinical and mycologic evaluations were conducted before treatment (day 0) and 7 days after treatment (day 14). Potential resistance to miconazole was defined using an arbitrary breakpoint of minimum inhibitory concentration of 2 μg/mL. There was no evidence of resistance to miconazole in Candida spp. after single or repeated treatment courses of 0.25% miconazole nitrate ointment. For the initial episode of DDCC, 83 of 168 subjects (49.4%) achieved a clinical cure, 77 (45.8%) achieved a mycologic cure, and 49 (29.2%) achieved an overall cure (clinical and mycologic). The overall cure rate for recurrent episodes of DDCC was similar to or numerically greater than rates observed for the initial episode. Treatment of DDCC with 0.25% miconazole nitrate ointment was effective and generally well tolerated. No evidence of the development of resistance to miconazole in Candida spp. was observed.

  16. Occurrence and diversity of Candida genus in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Chi, Zhenming; Yue, Lixi; Chi, Zhe; Zhang, Dechao

    2008-11-01

    A total of 317 yeast isolates from seawater, sediments, mud of salterns, guts of marine fishes and marine algae were obtained. The results of routine identification and molecular characterization showed that six isolates among these marine yeasts belonged to Candida genus as Candida intermedia for YA01a, Candida parapsilosis for 3eA2, Candida quercitrusa for JHSb, Candia rugosa for wl8, Candida zeylanoides for TJY13a, and Candida membranifaciens for W14-3. Isolates YA01a ( Candida intermedia), wl8 ( Candida rugosa), 3eA2 ( Candida parapsilosis), and JHSb ( Candida quercitrusa) were found producing cell-bound lipase, while isolate W14-3 ( Candida membranifaciens) producing riboflavin. These marine yeast Candida spp. seem to have wide potential applications in biotechnology.

  17. Rapid identification of Candida spp. frequently involved in invasive mycoses by using flow-through hybridization and Gene Chip (FHGC) technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Ding, Xiurong; Liu, Zhizhong; Zhu, Juanjuan

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients has increased in recent decades. Rapid and accurate identification of these pathogenic fungi is crucial for initiating a timely, safe, and effective antifungal therapy. Here we developed a microarray based on flow-through hybridization gene chip technology. The microarray was tested for its specificity using a panel of reference and blinded clinical isolates. The results proved that this microarray was highly discriminative, leading to the unequivocal identification of each species, including Candida famata and the highly related species Candida parapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis. This new system represents a reliable method that is of potential use in clinical laboratories for the simultaneous detection and identification of the most common pathogenic fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Proanthocyanidin-rich extracts from cranberry fruit (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) selectively inhibit the growth of human pathogenic fungi Candida spp. and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kunal D; Scarano, Frank J; Kondo, Miwako; Hurta, Robert A R; Neto, Catherine C

    2011-12-28

    Cranberry ( Vaccinium macrocarpon ) has been shown in clinical studies to reduce infections caused by Escherichia coli and other bacteria, and proanthocyanidins are believed to play a role. The ability of cranberry to inhibit the growth of opportunistic human fungal pathogens that cause oral, skin, respiratory, and systemic infections has not been well-studied. Fractions from whole cranberry fruit were screened for inhibition of five Candida species and Cryptococcus neoformans , a causative agent of fungal meningitis. Candida glabrata , Candida lusitaniae , Candida krusei , and Cryptococcus neoformans showed significant susceptibility to treatment with cranberry proanthocyanidin fractions in a broth microdilution assay, with minimum inhibitory concentrations as low as 1 μg/mL. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of subfractions detected epicatechin oligomers of up to 12 degrees of polymerization. Those containing larger oligomers caused the strongest inhibition. This study suggests that cranberry has potential as an antifungal agent.

  19. Usefulness of Candida ID2 agar for the presumptive identification of Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Eraso, Elena; Sahand, Ismail H; Villar-Vidal, María; Marcos, Cristina; Dolores Moragues, María; Madariaga, Lucila; Pontón, José; Quindós, Guillermo

    2006-11-01

    CHROMagar Candida and Candida ID2 are widely used for the isolation and presumptive identification of Candida spp. based on the color of the colonies on these two media. We have studied the usefulness of these chromogenic media for differentiating Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans isolates. One hundred isolates of C. dubliniensis and 100 C. albicans isolates were tested on Candida ID2, CHROMagar Candida (CHROMagar), and CHROMagar Candida reformulated by BBL. CHROMagar Candida and CHROMagar Candida BBL did not allow a clear differentiation of the two species based upon the shade of the green color of C. dubliniensis colonies. However, on Candida ID2, all C. dubliniensis isolates produced turquoise blue colonies whereas 91% of C. albicans colonies were cobalt blue. The sensitivity and the specificity for differentiating between C. dubliniensis fromC. albicans on Candida ID2 were 100% and 91%, respectively; whereas on CHROMagar Candida these values were 63% and 89% and on CHROMagar Candida BBL they were 18% and 98%. Candida ID2 agar provides a simple and accurate laboratory approach for the identification and differentiation of C. dubliniensis on the basis of the colony color.

  20. [Activity of anidulafungin against Candida biofilms].

    PubMed

    Pemán, Javier; Cantón, Emilia; Valentín, Amparo

    2008-06-01

    Currently, no standardized method to study the in vitro activity of antifungal agents on biofilms is available, thus, the comparison among different authors is difficult. The studies discussed in this review use the XTT reduction to measure the activity of antifungals on biofilms of 24 h of maturation. To date, biofilm anidulafungin MICs of 47 isolates of Candida spp. (25 Candida albicans, 16 Candida tropicalis, 5 Candida dubliniensis and 1 Candida parapsilosis) have been published. The geometric mean MIC of anidulafungin on biofilms of Candida spp. is of 1.18 microg/ml. Against isolates of species with great capacity of biofilm formation, the geometric mean MIC is 0.325 (C. albicans), 2 (C. parapsilosis) and 0.5 microg/ml (C. dubliniensis). No echinocandin has activity on C. tropicalis biofilms. In addition, anidulafungin can be used for lock therapy of catheters since it is the echinocandin with the least in vitro paradoxical effect.

  1. In vitro evaluation of the acquisition of resistance, antifungal activity and synergism of Brazilian red propolis with antifungal drugs on Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Pippi, B; Lana, A J D; Moraes, R C; Güez, C M; Machado, M; de Oliveira, L F S; Lino von Poser, G; Fuentefria, A M

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the ability of Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata to develop phenotypic resistance to a benzophenone enriched fraction obtained from Brazilian red propolis (BZP-BRP) as compared to fluconazole (FLC). To investigate possible synergy between BZP-BRP and FLC and anidulafungin (AND). To analyse the development of resistance, isolates susceptible to these antifungals were cultured in increasing concentrations of FLC and BZP-BRP. The increase in FLC minimum inhibitory concentration for all isolates was evident and the majority developed resistance, whereas none isolated became less susceptible to BZP-BRP. Synergism was investigated by checkerboard method. BZP-BRP demonstrated synergy with FLC and indifference with AND for most isolates. In conclusion, the synergism observed with FLC suggests that BZP-BRP could be a possible therapeutic strategy for the treatment of infections related to FLC-resistant Candida sp. The indiscriminate use of antifungals results in the emergence of drug-resistant strains among previously susceptible populations. BZP-BRP can become an alternative for the treatment of persistent infections caused by Candida sp. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Multitask Imidazolium Salt Additives for Innovative Poly(l-lactide) Biomaterials: Morphology Control, Candida spp. Biofilm Inhibition, Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biocompatibility, and Skin Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Schrekker, Clarissa M L; Sokolovicz, Yuri C A; Raucci, Maria G; Selukar, Balaji S; Klitzke, Joice S; Lopes, William; Leal, Claudio A M; de Souza, Igor O P; Galland, Griselda B; Dos Santos, João Henrique Z; Mauler, Raquel S; Kol, Moshe; Dagorne, Samuel; Ambrosio, Luigi; Teixeira, Mário L; Morais, Jonder; Landers, Richard; Fuentefria, Alexandre M; Schrekker, Henri S

    2016-08-24

    Candida species have great ability to colonize and form biofilms on medical devices, causing infections in human hosts. In this study, poly(l-lactide) films with different imidazolium salt (1-n-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16MImCl) and 1-n-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium methanesulfonate (C16MImMeS)) contents were prepared, using the solvent casting process. Poly(l-lactide)-imidazolium salt films were obtained with different surface morphologies (spherical and directional), and the presence of the imidazolium salt in the surface was confirmed. These films with different concentrations of the imidazolium salts C16MImCl and C16MImMeS presented antibiofilm activity against isolates of Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida albicans. The minor antibiofilm concentration assay enabled one to determine that an increasing imidazolium salt content promoted, in general, an increase in the inhibition percentage of biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs confirmed the effective prevention of biofilm formation on the imidazolium salt containing biomaterials. Lower concentrations of the imidazolium salts showed no cytotoxicity, and the poly(l-lactide)-imidazolium salt films presented good cell adhesion and proliferation percentages with human mesenchymal stem cells. Furthermore, no acute microscopic lesions were identified in the histopathological evaluation after contact between the films and pig ear skin. In combination with the good morphological, physicochemical, and mechanical properties, these poly(l-lactide)-based materials with imidazolium salt additives can be considered as promising biomaterials for use in the manufacturing of medical devices.

  3. Anti-microbial efficacy of green tea and chlorhexidine mouth rinses against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacilli spp. and Candida albicans in children with severe early childhood caries: A randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ann; Thakur, Sneha R; Shetty, Sowmya B

    2016-01-01

    Green tea is a beverage which is consumed worldwide and is reported to have anti-cariogenic effect. So, if it was as effective as chlorhexidine (CHX) mouth rinse against cariogenic microbes it could be considered a natural, economical alternative. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the anti-microbial efficacy of 0.5% green tea and 0.2% CHX mouth rinses against Streptococcus Mutans, Lactobacilli spp. and Candida Albicans. 30 children aged 4-6 years with S-ECC (based on defs score) were selected. Children were divided randomly into 2 equal groups and were asked to rinse with the prescribed mouth rinse once daily for 2 weeks after breakfast under supervision. A base-line and post rinsing non-stimulated whole salivary sample (2 ml) was collected and tested for the number of colony forming units. The data was statistically analyzed using SPSS v16.0 software with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's POSTHOC test. A statistically significant fall in colony count was found with both the mouth rinses in Streptococcus Mutans (P < 0.001, P < 0.001) and lactobacilli (P < 0.001, P < 0.001) but not against Candida albicans (P = 0.264, P = 0.264). Against Streptococcus Mutans, green tea mouth rinse was found to be significantly better than CHX mouth rinse (P = 0.005). Against lactobacilli spp, CHX mouth rinse was significantly better than green tea mouth rinse (P < 0.001). Green tea mouth rinse can be considered safe, economical and used without much concern. However, further studies are recommended.

  4. Uncommon Candida Species Fungemia among Cancer Patients, Houston, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dong Sik; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Jiang, Ying; Tarrand, Jeffrey J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2015-11-01

    Many uncommon Candida species that cause bloodstream infections (BSIs) are not well-characterized. We investigated the epidemiology, antifungal use, susceptibility patterns, and factors associated with all-cause death among cancer patients in whom uncommon Candida spp. BSIs were diagnosed at a cancer treatment center during January 1998–September 2013. Of 1,395 Candida bloodstream isolates, 79 from 68 patients were uncommon Candida spp. The incidence density of uncommon Candida spp. BSIs and their proportion to all candidemia episodes substantively increased during the study period, and the rise was associated with increasing use of echinocandin antifungal drugs. Thirty-seven patients had breakthrough infections during therapy or prophylaxis with various systemic antifungal drugs for >7 consecutive days; 21 were receiving an echinocandin. C. kefyr (82%), and C. lusitaniae (21%) isolates frequently showed caspofungin MICs above the epidemiologic cutoff values. These findings support the need for institutional surveillance for uncommon Candida spp. among cancer patients.

  5. [Comparison of broth microdilution and E-test methods for the antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida spp. strains isolated from blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Sema Keçeli; Mutlu, Birsen; Dündar, Devrim; Willke, Ayşe

    2010-04-01

    The incidence of serious fungal infections, particularly invasive Candida infections exhibit an increasing trend in the last decades since the number of patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment is increasing. This situation eventually results in an increment in resistance to antifungal agents. The aim of this study was to compare the standard broth microdilution (BMD) and E-test methods for antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida species isolated from blood cultures in our hospital, against fluconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin and amphotericin B. A total of 46 Candida strains isolated from the blood cultures by BACTEC 9000 (Becton Dickinson, USA) and identified by conventional techniques and API 20C AUX (BioMerieux, France) during January 2006-December 2007, were included into this study. The identification results of the isolates were as follows: C. albicans (23), C. parapsilosis (10), C. tropicalis (5), C. krusei (3), C. famata (2), C. glabrata (1), C. guilliermondii (1), C. kefyr (1). The antifungal susceptibilities were determined by BMD method described in Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 document and E-test. Only two isolates (C. albicans and C. globrata) were found to be resistant to fluconazole with E-test but susceptible with BMD. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of caspofungin were higher (MIC = 1-2 microg/ml) in C. parapsilosis compared to other Candida species using E-test. Only one C. albicans was resistant to voriconazole by E-test (MIC = 4 microg/ml), but it was susceptible by BMD (MIC = 0.08 microg/ml). Since definite resistance breakpoints do not yet exist for amphotericin B, MIC values were considered for amphotericin B and it was found that all strains had identical low MIC values (< 0.002-0.5). When E-test results were compared with the standard BMD results, MIC values were in agreement 80.4% for fluconazole, 84.7% for amphotericin B, 95.6% for voriconazole and 93.4% for caspofungin. These results

  6. Comparison of the Sensititre YeastOne colorimetric antifungal panel with CLSI microdilution for antifungal susceptibility testing of the echinocandins against Candida spp., using new clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Chaturvedi, V; Diekema, D J; Ghannoum, M A; Holliday, N M; Killian, S B; Knapp, C C; Messer, S A; Miskou, A; Ramani, R

    2012-08-01

    A commercially prepared dried colorimetric microdilution panel (Sensititre Yeast One, TREK Diagnostic Systems, Cleveland, OH, USA) was compared in 3 different laboratories with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference microdilution method by testing 2 quality control strains, 25 reproducibility strains, and 404 isolates of Candida spp. against anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin. Reference CLSI BMD MIC end points and YeastOne colorimetric end points were read after 24 h of incubation. Excellent (100%) essential agreement (within 2 dilutions) between the reference and colorimetric MICs was observed. Categorical agreement (CA) between the 2 methods was assessed using the new species-specific clinical breakpoints (CBPs): susceptible (S), ≤0.25 μg/mL; intermediate (I), 0.5 μg/mL; and resistant (R), ≥1 μg/mL, for C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei, and ≤2 μg/mL (S), 4 μg/mL (I), and ≥8 μg/mL (R) for C. parapsilosis and all 3 echinocandins. The new CBPs for anidulafungin and caspofungin and C. glabrata are ≤0.12 μg/mL (S), 0.25 μg/mL (I), and ≥0.5 μg/mL (R), whereas those for micafungin are ≤0.06 μg/mL (S), 0.12 μg/mL (I), and ≥0.25 μg/mL (R). Due to the lack of CBPs for any of the echinocandins and C. lusitaniae, the epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) were used for this species to categorize the isolates as wild-type (WT; MIC ≤ECV) and non-WT (MIC >ECV), respectively, for anidulafungin (≤2 μg/mL/>2 μg/mL), caspofungin (≤1 μg/mL/>1 μg/mL), and micafungin (≤0.5 μg/mL/>0.5 μg/mL). CA ranged from 93.6% (caspofungin) to 99.6% (micafungin) with less than 1% very major or major errors. The YeastOne colorimetric method remains comparable to the CLSI BMD reference method for testing the susceptibility of Candida spp. to the echinocandins when using the new (lower) CBPs and ECVs. Further study using defined fks mutant strains of Candida is warranted.

  7. Comparison of EUCAST and CLSI broth microdilution methods for the susceptibility testing of 10 systemically active antifungal agents when tested against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Castanheira, Mariana; Messer, Shawn A; Rhomberg, Paul R; Jones, Ronald N

    2014-06-01

    The antifungal broth microdilution (BMD) method of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) was compared with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) BMD method M27-A3 for amphotericin B, flucytosine, anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, fluconazole, isavuconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole susceptibility testing of 357 isolates of Candida. The isolates were selected from global surveillance collections to represent both wild-type (WT) and non-WT MIC results for the azoles (12% of fluconazole and voriconazole results were non-WT) and the echinocandins (6% of anidulafungin and micafungin results were non-WT). The study collection included 114 isolates of Candida albicans, 73 of C. glabrata, 76 of C. parapsilosis, 60 of C. tropicalis, and 34 of C. krusei. The overall essential agreement (EA) between EUCAST and CLSI results ranged from 78.9% (posaconazole) to 99.6% (flucytosine). The categorical agreement (CA) between methods and species of Candida was assessed using previously determined CLSI epidemiological cutoff values. The overall CA between methods was 95.0% with 2.5% very major (VM) and major (M) discrepancies. The CA was >93% for all antifungal agents with the exception of caspofungin (84.6%), where 10% of the results were categorized as non-WT by the EUCAST method and WT by the CLSI method. Problem areas with low EA or CA include testing of amphotericin B, anidulafungin, and isavuconazole against C. glabrata, itraconazole, and posaconazole against most species, and caspofungin against C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. We confirm high level EA and CA (>90%) between the 2 methods for testing fluconazole, voriconazole, and micafungin against all 5 species. The results indicate that the EUCAST and CLSI methods produce comparable results for testing the systemically active antifungal agents against the 5 most common species of Candida; however, there are several areas where additional

  8. Non-albicans Candida Infection: An Emerging Threat

    PubMed Central

    Deorukhkar, Sachin C.; Saini, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    The very nature of infectious diseases has undergone profound changes in the past few decades. Fungi once considered as nonpathogenic or less virulent are now recognized as a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and severely ill patients. Candida spp. are among the most common fungal pathogens. Candida albicans was the predominant cause of candidiasis. However, a shift toward non-albicans Candida species has been recently observed. These non-albicans Candida species demonstrate reduced susceptibility to commonly used antifungal drugs. In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of non-albicans Candida spp. among Candida isolates from various clinical specimens and analysed their virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility profile. A total of 523 Candida spp. were isolated from various clinical specimens. Non-albicans Candida species were the predominant pathogens isolated. Non-albicans Candida species also demonstrated the production of virulence factors once attributed to Candida albicans. Non-albicans Candida demonstrated high resistance to azole group of antifungal agents. Therefore, it can be concluded that non-albicans Candida species have emerged as an important cause of infections. Their isolation from clinical specimen can no longer be ignored as a nonpathogenic isolate nor can it be dismissed as a contaminant. PMID:25404942

  9. Candida Parapsilosis and Candida Guillermondii: Emerging Pathogens in Nail Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Fich, Felix; Abarzúa-Araya, Alvaro; Pérez, Mario; Nauhm, Yalile; León, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Onychomycosis of the fingernails and toenails is generally caused by dermatophytes and yeasts. Toenail mycoses involve mainly dermatophytes but when Candida is also involved, the strain most commonly isolated worldwide is C. albicans. Aims: To determine Candida strains prevailing in onychomycosis. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, observational and descriptive study of fungal cultures retrieved from the registry of the microbiology laboratory of the Pontificia Universidad Católica was performed. Specimens obtained from patients attending the healthcare network between December 2007 and December 2010 was analyzed. Statistical Analysis: A descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Candida was retrieved from 467 of 8443 specimens (52% fingernails and 48% toenails). Cultures were negative in 5320 specimens (63.6%). Among Candida-positive cultures, parapsilosis was the most commonly isolated strain with 202 cases (43.3%). While isolates of Candida guillermondii were 113 (24.2%), those of Candida albicans were 110 (23.6%), those of spp. were 20 (4.3%) and there were 22 cases of other isolates (4.71%). Among the 467 patients with positive cultures for Candida, 136 (29,1%) were men and 331 (70,9%) were women. All patients were older than 18 years old. Clinical files were available for only 169 of the 467 patients with positive cultures for Candida. For those, age, gender, underlying illnesses and use of immunossupresive agents during the trial was reviewed. Conclusions: The present study shows that both C. parapsilosis as well as C. guillermondii appear as emerging pathogens that would be in fact taking the place of C. albicans as the most commonly isolated pathogen in patients with Candida onychomycosis. The relative percentage of C parapsilosis increases every year. Identification of Candida strains as etiological agents of nail candidiasis becomes relevant to the management both nail as well as systemic candidiasis, in view of the

  10. Premenstrual vaginal colonization of Candida and symptoms of vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Cathy J; Grando, Danilla; Garland, Suzanne M; Myers, Stephen; Fairley, Christopher K; Pirotta, Marie

    2012-11-01

    Although premenstrual exacerbation of vulvovaginal symptoms attributed to Candida spp. is well documented, the causation of these symptoms is not well understood. This study describes the daily vaginal colonization of Candida in three women. A single pilot study was designed to test the methodology of the proposed randomized controlled trial, Garlic and Candida. This study reports the colonization of Candida spp. in three women. Ten women aged 18-50 who reported at least one episode of vulvovaginal candidiasis were recruited by the University of Melbourne. Each participant took daily vaginal swabs for 2 weeks during the luteal phase of their menstrual cycle, which were analysed for quantitative colony counts of Candida spp. Of these, three women were colonized with Candida spp. For the first time, to our knowledge, daily colonization of Candida during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle is described in three women, demonstrating an increase in the colony count preceding symptom development. This small study demonstrated the colonization of Candida spp. during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle in three women. Candida colonization is poorly understood, yet investigating the relevance of the link between symptom exacerbation and the menstrual cycle in those women who experience recurrent episodes of vulvovaginal candidiasis may influence the management of this condition.

  11. Clinical breakpoints for voriconazole and Candida spp. revisited: review of microbiologic, molecular, pharmacodynamic, and clinical data as they pertain to the development of species-specific interpretive criteria.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Andes, David; Arendrup, Maiken C; Diekema, Daniel J; Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Alexander, Barbara D; Brown, Steven D; Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Fowler, Cynthia L; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A; Johnson, Elizabeth M; Knapp, Cynthia C; Motyl, Mary R; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Walsh, Thomas J

    2011-07-01

    We reassessed the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) clinical breakpoints (CBPs) for voriconazole. We examined i) the essential (EA: ±2 dilutions) and categorical agreement between 24-h CLSI and EUCAST methods for voriconazole testing of Candida, ii) wild-type (WT) MICs and epidemiologic cutoff values (ECVs) for voriconazole by both CLSI and EUCAST methods, and iii) correlation of MICs with outcomes from previously published data using CLSI methods. We applied these findings to propose new 24-h species-specific CLSI CBPs. Adjusted 24-h CBPs for voriconazole and C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis (susceptible, ≤ 0.125 μg/mL; intermediate, 0.25-0.5 μg/mL; resistant, ≥ 1 μg/mL) should be more sensitive for detecting emerging resistance among common Candida species and provide consistency with EUCAST CBPs. In the absence of CBPs for voriconazole and C. glabrata (and less common species), we recommend that their respective ECVs be used to detect the emergence of non-WT strains.

  12. [Fungal (Candida) infections in the immunocompromised pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    Bruce Diemond, J; Lopez, C; Huerta Romano, F; Montiel Castillo, C

    2008-11-01

    Today, mycotic infections in immunocompromised patients are mainly caused by Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. The patients most sensitive to these infections are those with some kind of cell-mediated immunity quantitative or qualitative alteration (i.e., blood-related cancer, primary or secondary neutropenia, immunosuppressive disease or therapy, etc.). Candida infection in the immunosupressed patient comprises a wide range of serious diseases such as candidemia, chronic disseminated candididasis, endocarditis, meningitis and endophthalmitis. Therefore, infection by Candida spp. is considered secondary to the technological and medical advances which extend the life of patients with chronic diseases. Copyright 2008 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  13. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from urine culture.

    PubMed

    Toka Özer, Türkan; Durmaz, Süleyman; Yula, Erkan

    2016-09-01

    Candida spp. are the most common opportunistic mycosis worldwide. Although Candida albicans is the most common cause of urinary tract infections, the frequency of non-albicans Candida species is increasing with common use of antifungal in the prophylaxis and treatment. This may lead to difficulties in treatment. Antifungal tests should be applied with identification of species for effective treatment. In this study, identification of Candida species isolated from urine culture and investigation of susceptibility of these strains to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole was aimed. In this study, 58 Candida strains isolated from urine cultures at Osmaniye State Hospital between January 2012 and April 2013 were included. Urine culture and antifungal susceptibility tests were applied. Incidence rate of Candida spp. was determined as C. albicans (56.9%), Candida glabrata (20.6%), Candida tropicalis (10.3%), Candida parapsilosis (7%), Candida krusei (3.4%), Candida kefyr (1.8%). Most of the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole. Twenty three (39.7%) Candida strains were isolated from internal medical branches and Intensive Care Unit and 12 (20.6%) from the Surgical Medical Branches. C. albicans and C. glabrata species were isolated most frequently as a candiduria factor in this hospital between January 2012 and April 2013. The analysis of antifungal susceptibility profile shows no significant resistance to antifungals. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Host’s Reply to Candida Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Jeniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Candida spp. are among the most common nosocomial fungal pathogens and are notorious for their propensity toward biofilm formation. When growing on a medical device or mucosal surface, these organisms reside as communities embedded in a protective matrix, resisting host defenses. The host responds to Candida biofilm by depositing a variety of proteins that become incorporated into the biofilm matrix. Compared to free-floating Candida, leukocytes are less effective against Candida within a biofilm. This review highlights recent advances describing the host’s response to Candida biofilms using ex vivo and in vivo models of mucosal and device-associated biofilm infections. PMID:26999221

  15. Chemical composition and biological activities of Iranian Achillea wilhelmsii L. essential oil: a high effectiveness against Candida spp. and Escherichia strains.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Mohsen; Rostami, Hajar

    2015-02-01

    In the case of Achillea wilhelmsii, 30 compounds were identified representing 94.48% of the total oil with a yield of 0.82% w/w. The major constituents of the oil were described as α-thujene (6.11%), α-pinene (5.11%), sabinene (5.23%), p-cymene (7%), 1,8-cineole (6%), linalool (10%), camphor (8.43%), thymol (18.98%) and carvacrol (20.13%). A. wilhelmsii oil exhibited higher antibacterial and antifungal activities with a high effectiveness against Escherichia coli and Candida albicans with the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration/minimum fungicidal concentration value (2 ± 0.0-2 ± 0.0 g/mL, 1 ± 0.5-1 ± 0.5 g/mL), respectively. Results showed that A. wilhelmsii oil exhibits a higher activity in each antioxidant system with a special attention for β-carotene bleaching test (IC50: 19 μg/mL) and reducing power (EC50: 10 μg/mL). Antioxidant activity-guided fractionation of the oil was carried out by TLC-bioautography screening and fractionation resulted in the separation of main antioxidant compounds which were identified as thymol (65%) and carvacrol (19%). In conclusion, these results support the use of the essential oil and its main compounds for their antioxidant properties and antimicrobial activity.

  16. Recurrent episodes of Candidemia due to Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida albicans with acquired echinocandin resistance.

    PubMed

    Grosset, Marine; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Godet, Cendrine; Kauffmann-Lacroix, Catherine; Cazenave-Roblot, France

    2016-12-01

    Mixed fungal infection and acquired echinocandin resistance of Candida spp. remain infrequent. In this study we have reported the case of a patient hospitalized for tuberculosis who experienced multiple infections due to three common Candida species (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis). Furthermore, consecutive isolates from blood cultures and heart valve were found resistant to azoles (C. tropicalis) and to echinocandin with either novel (C. tropicalis) or previously described (C. albicans) missense mutations in the Fks gene.

  17. International and multicenter comparison of EUCAST and CLSI M27-A2 broth microdilution methods for testing susceptibilities of Candida spp. to fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Barchiesi, F; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Pfaller, M A; Rinaldi, M; Rodriguez-Tudela, J L; Verweij, P E

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare MICs of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole obtained by the European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and CLSI (formerly NCCLS) methods in each of six centers for 15 Candida albicans (5 fluconazole-resistant and 4 susceptible-dose-dependent [S-DD] isolates), 10 C. dubliniensis, 7 C. glabrata (2 fluconazole-resistant isolates), 5 C. guilliermondii (2 fluconazole-resistant isolates), 10 C. krusei, 9 C. lusitaniae, 10 C. parapsilosis, and 5 C. tropicalis (1 fluconazole-resistant isolate) isolates. CLSI MICs were obtained visually at 24 and 48 h and spectrophotometric EUCAST MICs at 24 h. The agreement (within a 3-dilution range) between the methods was species, drug, and incubation time dependent and due to lower EUCAST than CLSI MICs: overall, 94 to 95% with fluconazole and voriconazole and 90 to 91% with posaconazole and itraconazole when EUCAST MICs were compared against 24-h CLSI results. The agreement was lower (85 to 94%) against 48-h CLSI endpoints. The overall interlaboratory reproducibility by each method was > or =92%. When the comparison was based on CLSI breakpoint categorization, the agreement was 68 to 76% for three of the four species that included fluconazole-resistant and S-DD isolates; 9% very major discrepancies (< or =8 microg/ml versus > or =64 microg/ml) were observed among fluconazole-resistant isolates and 50% with voriconazole (< or =1 microg/ml versus > or =4 microg/ml). Similar results were observed with itraconazole for seven of the eight species evaluated (28 to 77% categorical agreement). Posaconazole EUCAST MICs were also substantially lower than CLSI MIC modes (0.008 to 1 microg/ml versus 1 to > or =8 microg/ml) for some of these isolates. Therefore, the CLSI breakpoints should not be used to interpret EUCAST MIC data.

  18. International and Multicenter Comparison of EUCAST and CLSI M27-A2 Broth Microdilution Methods for Testing Susceptibilities of Candida spp. to Fluconazole, Itraconazole, Posaconazole, and Voriconazole

    PubMed Central

    Espinel-Ingroff, A.; Barchiesi, F.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Pfaller, M. A.; Rinaldi, M.; Rodriguez-Tudela, J. L.; Verweij, P. E.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare MICs of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole obtained by the European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and CLSI (formerly NCCLS) methods in each of six centers for 15 Candida albicans (5 fluconazole-resistant and 4 susceptible-dose-dependent [S-DD] isolates), 10 C. dubliniensis, 7 C. glabrata (2 fluconazole-resistant isolates), 5 C. guilliermondii (2 fluconazole-resistant isolates), 10 C. krusei, 9 C. lusitaniae, 10 C. parapsilosis, and 5 C. tropicalis (1 fluconazole-resistant isolate) isolates. CLSI MICs were obtained visually at 24 and 48 h and spectrophotometric EUCAST MICs at 24 h. The agreement (within a 3-dilution range) between the methods was species, drug, and incubation time dependent and due to lower EUCAST than CLSI MICs: overall, 94 to 95% with fluconazole and voriconazole and 90 to 91% with posaconazole and itraconazole when EUCAST MICs were compared against 24-h CLSI results. The agreement was lower (85 to 94%) against 48-h CLSI endpoints. The overall interlaboratory reproducibility by each method was ≥92%. When the comparison was based on CLSI breakpoint categorization, the agreement was 68 to 76% for three of the four species that included fluconazole-resistant and S-DD isolates; 9% very major discrepancies (≤8 μg/ml versus ≥64 μg/ml) were observed among fluconazole-resistant isolates and 50% with voriconazole (≤1 μg/ml versus ≥4 μg/ml). Similar results were observed with itraconazole for seven of the eight species evaluated (28 to 77% categorical agreement). Posaconazole EUCAST MICs were also substantially lower than CLSI MIC modes (0.008 to 1 μg/ml versus 1 to ≥8 μg/ml) for some of these isolates. Therefore, the CLSI breakpoints should not be used to interpret EUCAST MIC data. PMID:16081926

  19. Comparison of 24-hour and 48-hour voriconazole MICs as determined by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution method (M27-A3 document) in three laboratories: results obtained with 2,162 clinical isolates of Candida spp. and other yeasts.

    PubMed

    Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Canton, E; Peman, J; Rinaldi, M G; Fothergill, A W

    2009-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of the 24-h broth microdilution voriconazole MIC by obtaining MICs for 2,162 clinical isolates of Candida spp. and other yeasts; the 24-h results were compared to 48-h reference MICs to assess essential, as well as categorical, agreement. Although the overall essential agreement was 88.6%, it ranged from 96.4 to 100% for 6 of the 11 species or groups of yeasts tested. The overall categorical agreement was 93.2%, and it was above 90% for eight species. However, unacceptable percentages of very major errors (false susceptibility) were observed for Candida albicans (2.7%), C. glabrata (4.1%), C. tropicalis (9.7%), and other less common yeast species (9.8%). Since it is essential to identify potentially resistant isolates and breakpoints are based on 48-h MICs, it appears that the 24-h MIC is not as clinically useful as the 48-h reference MIC. However, further characterization of these falsely susceptible MICs for three of the four common Candida spp. is needed to understand whether these errors are due to trailing misinterpretation or if the 48-h incubation is required to detect voriconazole resistance. Either in vivo versus in vitro correlations or the determination of resistance mechanisms should be investigated.

  20. Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans fungemia in an institutional hospital during a decade.

    PubMed

    Parmeland, Laurence; Gazon, Mathieu; Guerin, Claude; Argaud, Laurent; Lehot, Jean-Jacques; Bastien, Olivier; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Michallet, Mauricette; Picot, Stephane; Bienvenu, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    Since the outcomes of patients with candidemia is poor and Candida spp. with increased resistance to antifungal therapy may be associated with these results, the emergence of these blood infections caused by non-C. albicans Candida spp. was explored prospectively over a two-year period (2009-2010). Candidemia was defined as the recovery of Candida spp. in culture from a patient's blood sample. The in vitro susceptibility of each isolate to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole and voriconazole was determined. In addition, characteristics of patients and outcomes were investigated in real-time. The Candida distribution was compared to that observed in a similar study 10 years earlier in the same hospital. A total of 182 patients with candidemia were included in the study. While C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species (n = 102), non-C. albicans Candida spp. included; C. glabrata (n = 32), C. parapsilosis (n = 21), C. tropicalis (n = 13), C. krusei (n = 8), C. kefyr (n = 3), C. lusitaniae (n = 2), C. lipolytica (n = 2), C. famata (n = 1), C. guilliermondii (n = 1), C. inconspicua (n = 1), C. dubliniensis (n = 1), C. sake (n = 1) and C. nivariensis (n = 1). In seven patients, C. albicans was associated with another Candida spp. Surprisingly, this prospective study demonstrated that regardless of the department (intensive care unit or hematological department), Candida spp. distribution was no different from that found in the 1998-2001 survey, except for C. krusei. A reduction in the proportion of C. krusei isolates was observed from 2000-2010 (P = 0.028) as a result of its decreased recovery in the hematological department.

  1. Performance of chromogenic media for Candida in rapid presumptive identification of Candida species from clinical materials

    PubMed Central

    Pravin Charles, M. V.; Kali, Arunava; Joseph, Noyal Mariya

    2015-01-01

    Background: In perspective of the worldwide increase in a number of immunocompromised patients, the need for identification of Candida species has become a major concern. The development of chromogenic differential media, introduced recently, facilitate rapid speciation. However, it can be employed for routine mycology workup only after an exhaustive evaluation of its benefit and cost effectiveness. This study was undertaken to evaluate the benefit and cost effectiveness of chromogenic media for speciation of Candida clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: Sputum samples of 382 patients were screened for the presence of Candida spp. by Gram stain and culture on sabouraud dextrose agar. Candida species were identified using Gram stain morphology, germ tube formation, cornmeal agar with Tween-80, sugar fermentation tests and morphology on HiCrome Candida differential agar. All the Candida isolates were inoculated on HiCrome Candida agar (HiMedia, Mumbai, India). Results: The sensitivity and specificity of HiCrome agar for identification of Candida albicans were 90% and 96.42%, respectively whereas sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate fermentation test were 86.67% and 74.07%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity values of HiCrome agar for detection of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata were above 90%. Conclusions: We found HiCrome agar has high sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the conventional method. In addition, use of this differential media could significantly cut down the turnaround time as well as cost of sample processing. PMID:26109791

  2. Management of Candida biofilms: state of knowledge and new options for prevention and eradication.

    PubMed

    Bujdáková, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Candida species (spp.) on medical devices represent a potential health risk. The focus of current research is searching for new options for the treatment and prevention of biofilm-associated infections using different approaches including modern nanotechnology. This review summarizes current information concerning the most relevant resistance/tolerance mechanisms to conventional drugs and a role of additional factors contributing to these phenomena in Candida spp. (mostly Candida albicans). Additionally, it provides an information update in prevention and eradication of a Candida biofilm including experiences with 'lock' therapy, potential utilization of small molecules in biomedical applications, and perspectives of using photodynamic inactivation in the control of a Candida biofilm.

  3. Simvastatin inhibits planktonic cells and biofilms of Candida and Cryptococcus species.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Caetano, Erica Pacheco de; Oliveira, Jonathas Sales; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Souza, Elizabeth Ribeiro Yokobatake; Alencar, Lucas Pereira de; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2015-01-01

    The antifungal activity of some statins against different fungal species has been reported. Thus, at the first moment, the in vitro antifungal activity of simvastatin, atorvastatin and pravastatin was tested against Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. Then, in a second approach, considering that the best results were obtained for simvastatin, this drug was evaluated in combination with antifungal drugs against planktonic growth and tested against biofilms of Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. Drug susceptibility testing was performed using the microdilution broth method, as described by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The interaction between simvastatin and antifungals against planktonic cells was analyzed by calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration index. Regarding biofilm susceptibility, simvastatin was tested against growing biofilm and mature biofilm of one strain of each tested yeast species. Simvastatin showed inhibitory effect against Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 15.6 to 1000 mg L(-1) and from 62.5 to 1000 mg L(-1), respectively. The combination of simvastatin with itraconazole and fluconazole showed synergism against Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp., while the combination of simvastatin with amphotericin B was synergistic only against Cryptococcus spp. Concerning the biofilm assays, simvastatin was able to inhibit both growing biofilm and mature biofilm of Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The present study showed that simvastatin inhibits planktonic cells and biofilms of Candida and Cryptococcus species.

  4. Antifungal activity against Candida biofilms.

    PubMed

    Iñigo, Melania; Pemán, Javier; Del Pozo, Jose L

    2012-10-01

    Candida species have two distinct lifestyles: planktonic, and surface-attached communities called biofilms. Mature C. albicans biofilms show a complex three-dimensional architecture with extensive spatial heterogeneity, and consist of a dense network of yeast, hyphae, and pseudohyphae encased within a matrix of exopolymeric material. Several key processes are likely to play vital roles at the different stages of biofilm development, such as cell-substrate and cell-cell adherence, hyphal development, and quorum sensing. Biofilm formation is a survival strategy, since biofilm yeasts are more resistant to antifungals and environmental stress. Antifungal resistance is a multifactorial process that includes multidrug efflux pumps, target proteins of the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Most studies agree in presenting azoles as agents with poor activity against Candida spp. biofilms. However, recent studies have demonstrated that echinocandins and amphotericin B exhibit remarkable activity against C. albicans and Candida non-albicans biofilms. The association of Candida species with biofilm formation increases the therapeutic complexity of foreign body-related yeast infections. The traditional approach to the management of these infections has been to explant the affected device. There is a strong medical but also economical motivation for the development of novel anti-fungal biofilm strategies due to the constantly increasing resistance of Candida biofilms to conventional antifungals, and the high mortality caused by related infections. A better description of the extent and role of yeast in biofilms may be critical for developing novel therapeutic strategies in the clinical setting.

  5. Absence of Photoreactivating Enzyme in Candida albicans, Candida stellatoidea, and Candida tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Glendon R.; Sarachek, Alvin

    1974-01-01

    In vitro assays demonstrate photoreactivating enzyme activity in extracts of Candida pseudotropicalis but not in extracts of Candida albicans, Candida stellatoidea, or Candida tropicalis. PMID:4604052

  6. The emergence of non-albicans Candida species as causes of invasive candidiasis and candidemia.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Jack D

    2006-11-01

    The last three decades have seen an expanding pool of high-risk patients susceptible to the opportunistic pathogen Candida. Accordingly, a dramatic increase in nosocomial blood stream infections (BSIs) due to Candida spp has been reported throughout the world, starting in tertiary care centers and spreading to community hospitals. This absolute increase in Candida BSIs was accompanied by both an absolute and then a proportional increase in invasive infection caused by reduced fluconazole-susceptible non-albicans Candida spp. Currently, the incidence trend of BSI has stabilized, and Candida albicans remains the most common species causing fungal BSI. Clinicians must be aware of the importance and implications of non-albicans Candida spp when selecting antifungal drugs, although most studies have not shown significant outcome differences with use of the various antifungal classes.

  7. Characterisation of Candida within the Mycobiome/Microbiome of the Lower Respiratory Tract of ICU Patients.

    PubMed

    Krause, Robert; Halwachs, Bettina; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Klymiuk, Ingeborg; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Hoenigl, Martin; Prattes, Jürgen; Valentin, Thomas; Heidrich, Katharina; Buzina, Walter; Salzer, Helmut J F; Rabensteiner, Jasmin; Prüller, Florian; Raggam, Reinhard B; Meinitzer, Andreas; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Högenauer, Christoph; Quehenberger, Franz; Kashofer, Karl; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Whether the presence of Candida spp. in lower respiratory tract (LRT) secretions is a marker of underlying disease, intensive care unit (ICU) treatment and antibiotic therapy or contributes to poor clinical outcome is unclear. We investigated healthy controls, patients with proposed risk factors for Candida growth in LRT (antibiotic therapy, ICU treatment with and without antibiotic therapy), ICU patients with pneumonia and antibiotic therapy and candidemic patients (for comparison of truly invasive and colonizing Candida spp.). Fungal patterns were determined by conventional culture based microbiology combined with molecular approaches (next generation sequencing, multilocus sequence typing) for description of fungal and concommitant bacterial microbiota in LRT, and host and fungal biomarkes were investigated. Admission to and treatment on ICUs shifted LRT fungal microbiota to Candida spp. dominated fungal profiles but antibiotic therapy did not. Compared to controls, Candida was part of fungal microbiota in LRT of ICU patients without pneumonia with and without antibiotic therapy (63% and 50% of total fungal genera) and of ICU patients with pneumonia with antibiotic therapy (73%) (p<0.05). No case of invasive candidiasis originating from Candida in the LRT was detected. There was no common bacterial microbiota profile associated or dissociated with Candida spp. in LRT. Colonizing and invasive Candida strains (from candidemic patients) did not match to certain clades withdrawing the presence of a particular pathogenic and invasive clade. The presence of Candida spp. in the LRT rather reflected rapidly occurring LRT dysbiosis driven by ICU related factors than was associated with invasive candidiasis.

  8. Characterisation of Candida within the Mycobiome/Microbiome of the Lower Respiratory Tract of ICU Patients

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Robert; Halwachs, Bettina; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Klymiuk, Ingeborg; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Hoenigl, Martin; Prattes, Jürgen; Valentin, Thomas; Heidrich, Katharina; Buzina, Walter; Salzer, Helmut J. F.; Rabensteiner, Jasmin; Prüller, Florian; Raggam, Reinhard B.; Meinitzer, Andreas; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Högenauer, Christoph; Quehenberger, Franz; Kashofer, Karl; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Whether the presence of Candida spp. in lower respiratory tract (LRT) secretions is a marker of underlying disease, intensive care unit (ICU) treatment and antibiotic therapy or contributes to poor clinical outcome is unclear. We investigated healthy controls, patients with proposed risk factors for Candida growth in LRT (antibiotic therapy, ICU treatment with and without antibiotic therapy), ICU patients with pneumonia and antibiotic therapy and candidemic patients (for comparison of truly invasive and colonizing Candida spp.). Fungal patterns were determined by conventional culture based microbiology combined with molecular approaches (next generation sequencing, multilocus sequence typing) for description of fungal and concommitant bacterial microbiota in LRT, and host and fungal biomarkes were investigated. Admission to and treatment on ICUs shifted LRT fungal microbiota to Candida spp. dominated fungal profiles but antibiotic therapy did not. Compared to controls, Candida was part of fungal microbiota in LRT of ICU patients without pneumonia with and without antibiotic therapy (63% and 50% of total fungal genera) and of ICU patients with pneumonia with antibiotic therapy (73%) (p<0.05). No case of invasive candidiasis originating from Candida in the LRT was detected. There was no common bacterial microbiota profile associated or dissociated with Candida spp. in LRT. Colonizing and invasive Candida strains (from candidemic patients) did not match to certain clades withdrawing the presence of a particular pathogenic and invasive clade. The presence of Candida spp. in the LRT rather reflected rapidly occurring LRT dysbiosis driven by ICU related factors than was associated with invasive candidiasis. PMID:27206014

  9. Antifungal effects of phytocompounds on Candida species alone and in combination with fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mengjiao; Li, Tao; Wan, Jianjian; Li, Xiuyun; Yuan, Lei; Sun, Shujuan

    2017-02-01

    Invasive fungal infections caused by Candida spp. remain the most predominant nosocomial fungal infections. Owing to the increased use of antifungal agents, resistance of Candida spp. to antimycotics has emerged frequently, especially to fluconazole (FLC). To cope with this issue, new efforts have been dedicated to discovering novel antimycotics or new agents that can enhance the susceptibility of Candida spp. to existing antimycotics. The secondary metabolites of plants represent a large library of compounds that are important sources for new drugs or compounds suitable for further modification. Research on the anti-Candida activities of phytocompounds has been carried out in recent years and the results showed that a series of phytocompounds have anti-Candida properties, such as phenylpropanoids, flavonoids, terpenoids and alkaloids. Among these phytocompounds, some displayed potent antifungal activity, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ≤8 µg/mL, and several compounds were even more effective against drug-resistant Candida spp. than FLC or itraconazole (e.g. honokiol, magnolol and shikonin). Interestingly, quite a few phytocompounds not only displayed anti-Candida activity alone but also synergised with FLC against Candida spp., even leading to a reversal of FLC resistance. This review focuses on summarising the anti-Candida activities of phytocompounds as well as the interactions of phytocompounds with FLC. In addition, we briefly overview the synergistic mechanisms and present the structure of the antimycotic phytocompounds. Hopefully, this analysis will provide insight into antifungal agent discovery and new approaches against antifungal drug resistance.

  10. Association of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization or infection with Candida isolation and selection of non-albicans species.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Spiliopoulou, Anastasia; Fligou, Fotini; Manolopoulou, Patroula; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Vrettos, Theofanis; Dodou, Vasiliki; Filos, Kriton S; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Marangos, Markos; Christofidou, Myrto

    2014-11-01

    Clinical specimens from 565 patients hospitalized in 2 intensive care units (ICUs A and B) during a 28-month period were cultured on appropriate media for isolation of Candida. Forty-nine (9%) patients had at least a Candida spp.-positive sample. Candida albicans was the predominant species isolated from 26 (53%) patients. Seventeen patients (3%) developed candidemia. Multivariate analysis showed that obesity, female gender, hospitalization during summer months, admission at ICU B, parenteral nutrition, administration of metronidazole, transplantation, and KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) infection were independently associated with Candida spp. isolation. Candidemia was associated with cortisone administration, KPC-Kp infection, and presence of colostomy or abdominal catheter. Administration of fluconazole was a protective factor for both Candida spp. isolation and infection, leading to selection of Candida non-albicans species. Among several risk factors, KPC-Kp infection and colonization are identified as statistically significant factors associated with Candida isolation, especially of non-albicans species.

  11. Comparison of the clinical risk factors between Candida albicans and Candida non-albicans species for bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Osawa, Kayo; Jikimoto, Takumi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Hayama, Brian; Ohji, Goh; Iwata, Kentaro; Fujisawa, Masato; Arakawa, Soichi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the risk factors and susceptibilities to antifungal agents of Candida albicans and Candida non-albicans species (spp.) in candidemia cases in Kobe University Hospital. We investigated all consecutive patients with candida bloodstream infection (BSI) from 2008-2013 for whose full data were available for analyses, examining clinical factors such as gender, general complications, postoperative status or susceptibilities to antifungal agents. These factors were also compared between Candida albicans spp. and Candida non-albicans by univariate and multivariate analyses. Univariate analyses showed a significantly higher rate of Candida non-albicans species BSI patients cancer (odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI))=2.29 (1.04-5.06) and P=0.040), chemotherapy (OR=4.35 (1.11-17.1) and P=0.035), fluconazole (FLCZ) resistance (OR=77.3 (4.51-1324) and P=0.003), and itraconazole (ITCZ) resistance (OR=15.6 (5.39-45.1) and P<0.001) and lower rate of underlying cardiovascular diseases (OR=0.27 (0.09-0.80) and P=0.018) and postoperative status (OR=0.35 (0.16-0.77) and P=0.035) in than Candida albicans. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that Candida non-albicans spp. had significantly higher rate of chemotherapy (OR=4.44 (1.04-19.0) and P=0.045), FLCZ resistance (OR=5.87 (2.01-17.1) and P=0.001), and ITCZ resistance (OR=18.7(5.77-60.4) and P<0.001) and lower rate of underlying cardiovascular diseases (OR=0.25 (0.08-0.82) and P=0.022) than Candida albicans. In conclusion, this study revealed several risk factors for BSI with Candida albicans (underlying cardiovascular diseases and postoperative status) and Candida non-albicans spp. (cancer and chemotherapy), and demonstrated that Candida non-albicans spp. were more resistant to FLCZ and ITCZ than Candida albicans.

  12. A subpopulation of Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis biofilm cells are highly tolerant to chelating agents.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Joe J; Turner, Raymond J; Ceri, Howard

    2007-07-01

    Many Candida spp. produce surface-adherent biofilm populations that are resistant to antifungal compounds and other environmental stresses. Recently, certain chelating agents have been recognized as having strong antimicrobial activity against biofilms of Candida species. This study investigated and characterized the concentration- and time-dependent killing of Candida biofilms by the chelators tetrasodium EDTA and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate. Here, Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis biofilms were cultivated in the Calgary Biofilm Device and then exposed to gradient arrays of these agents. Population survival was evaluated by viable cell counting and by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in conjunction with fluorescent viability staining. At concentrations of > or =2 mM, both EDTA and diethyldithiocarbamate killed c. 90-99.5% of the biofilm cell populations. Notably, a small fraction (c. 0.5-10%) of biofilm cells were able to withstand the highest concentrations of these antifungals that were tested (16 and 32 mM for EDTA and diethyldithiocarbamate, respectively). Interestingly, CLSM revealed that these surviving cells were irregularly distributed throughout the biofilm community. These data suggest that the use of chelating agents against biofilms of Candida spp. may be limited by the refractory nature of a variant cell subpopulation in the surface-adherent community.

  13. Phospholipase and proteinase activities of Candida isolates from denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Arias, Cristina; Eraso, Elena; Madariaga, Lucila; Aguirre, Jose Manuel; Quindós, Guillermo

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterise phospholipase and proteinase activities of oral Candida isolates from 100 denture wearers and to study the relationship of these activities with denture stomatitis. Of 100 patients studied, 44 suffered from denture stomatitis. Specimens were collected by swabbing the denture and underlying mucosa. Isolates were previously identified by conventional mycological and genotypic methods. The phospholipase and proteinase activities were evaluated by agar plate methods. A total of 152 isolates were recovered from denture and underlying mucosa, including 101 Candida albicans, 18 Candida tropicalis, 14 Candida glabrata, 11 Candida guilliermondii, four Candida parapsilosis, two Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one isolate each of Candida dubliniensis and Candida krusei. Most C. albicans (97%) showed phospholipase activity; furthermore, the unique C. dubliniensis isolate showed a moderate phospholipase activity. The isolation of C. albicans (chi-square test, P = 0.0016) and phospholipase production by Candida spp. (chi-square test, P = 0.0213) was found to be significantly associated with denture stomatitis. Proteinase production was observed in <30% of isolates, and it was not related to the presence of denture stomatitis (P = 0.7675). Candida albicans isolates may produce both virulence factors, although the proteinase production was only observed in <30% of the isolates. Phospholipase production was exclusive of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis.

  14. Efficacy of micafungin in invasive candidiasis caused by common Candida species with special emphasis on non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Cornely, Oliver A; Vazquez, Jose; De Waele, Jan; Betts, Robert; Rotstein, Coleman; Nucci, Marcio; Pappas, Peter G; Ullmann, Andrew J

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of invasive candidiasis caused by non-albicans Candida (NAC) spp. is increasing. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of micafungin, caspofungin and liposomal amphotericin B in patients with invasive candidiasis and candidaemia caused by different Candida spp. This post hoc analysis used data obtained from two randomised phase III trials was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of micafungin vs. caspofungin and micafungin vs. liposomal amphotericin B. Treatment success, clinical response, mycological response and mortality were evaluated in patients infected with C. albicans and NAC spp. Treatment success rates in patients with either C. albicans or NAC infections were similar. Outcomes were similar for micafungin, caspofungin and liposomal amphotericin B. Candida albicans was the most prevalent pathogen recovered (41.0%), followed by C. tropicalis (17.9%), C. parapsilosis (14.4%), C. glabrata (10.4%), multiple Candida spp. (7.3%) and C. krusei (3.2%). Age, primary diagnosis (i.e. candidaemia or invasive candidiasis), previous corticosteroid therapy and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score were identified as potential predictors of treatment success and mortality. Micafungin, caspofungin and liposomal amphotericin B exhibit favourable treatment response rates that are comparable for patients infected with different Candida spp. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Colony morphotype on Sabouraud-triphenyltetrazolium agar: a simple and inexpensive method for Candida subspecies discrimination.

    PubMed Central

    Quindós, G; Fernández-Rodríguez, M; Burgos, A; Tellaetxe, M; Cisterna, R; Pontón, J

    1992-01-01

    A new method of Candida subspecies discrimination on Sabouraud-triphenyltetrazolium agar is reported. Five hundred sixty-two strains of Candida and Torulopsis glabrata, previously identified by conventional mycological methods, were studied. Each strain received a three-letter code and a number based on its colonial morphology. Sixteen morphotypes were found for Candida albicans, 6 were found for Candida parapsilosis, 4 were found for both Candida guilliermondii and Candida krusei, and 12 were found for Candida tropicalis. None of the 56 T. glabrata strains studied grew on this agar. A reproducibility of 95% was found for C. albicans. The simplicity and low cost could make this method useful for typing Candida spp. Images PMID:1400981

  16. In vitro activity of Caspofungin combined with Fluconazole on mixed Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pesee, Siripen; Angkananuwat, Chayanit; Tancharoensukjit, Sudarat; Muanmai, Somporn; Sirivan, Pattaraporn; Bubphawas, Manita; Tanarerkchai, Nissara

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal effect of caspofungin (CAS) combined with fluconazole (FLU) on the biofilm biomass and cultivable viability and microstructure of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata mixed biofilm in vitro.Biofilms were formed in a 96-well microtiter plate for crystal violet assay and colony forming unit (CFU) method and grown on plastic coverslip disks for scanning electron microscopy. MIC50 of CAS and FLU against single Candida spp.and mixed Candida spp.biofilms were evaluated using crystal violet assay. Additional,C. albicans and C. glabrata mixed biofilms were incubated with subinhibitory CAS concentration plus FLU and their percentages of Candida biofilm reduction were calculated. We found that percentages of biofilm reduction were significantly decreased when CAS at 0.25MIC and FLU (0.25 or 0.5MIC) were combined (P< .05) but not different when CAS at 0.5 MIC combined with FLU at 0.25 or 0.5MIC, compared to CAS treatment alone. Structural analyses revealed that CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms showed less hyphae and blastospores with some aberrant cells compared to control group. Although it was evident that a greater CFU of Candida glabrata were demonstrated in every group, the total viable cells derived from CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms at any ratio were not significantly different from positive control. Overall, CAS/FLU combinations appeared to affect the quantity and cell architecture, but number of viable cell, of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata mixed biofilm. This antifungal effect was CAS concentration dependent.

  17. Evolution and Application of Inteins in Candida species: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, José A. L.; Prandini, Tâmara H. R.; Castro, Maria da Conceiçao A.; Arantes, Thales D.; Giacobino, Juliana; Bagagli, Eduardo; Theodoro, Raquel C.

    2016-01-01

    Inteins are invasive intervening sequences that perform an autocatalytic splicing from their host proteins. Among eukaryotes, these elements are present in many fungal species, including those considered opportunistic or primary pathogens, such as Candida spp. Here we reviewed and updated the list of Candida species containing inteins in the genes VMA, THRRS and GLT1 and pointed out the importance of these elements as molecular markers for molecular epidemiological researches and species-specific diagnosis, since the presence, as well as the size of these inteins, is polymorphic among the different species. Although absent in Candida albicans, these elements are present in different sizes, in some environmental Candida spp. and also in most of the non-albicans Candida spp. considered emergent opportunistic pathogens. Besides, the possible role of these inteins in yeast physiology was also discussed in the light of the recent findings on the importance of these elements as post-translational modulators of gene expression, reinforcing their relevance as alternative therapeutic targets for the treatment of non-albicans Candida infections, because, once the splicing of an intein is inhibited, its host protein, which is usually a housekeeping protein, becomes non-functional. PMID:27777569

  18. Candida and invasive candidiasis: back to basics.

    PubMed

    Lim, C S-Y; Rosli, R; Seow, H F; Chong, P P

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous Candida spp. is an opportunistic fungal pathogen which, despite treatment with antifungal drugs, can cause fatal bloodstream infections (BSIs) in immunocompromised and immunodeficient persons. Thus far, several major C. albicans virulence factors have been relatively well studied, including morphology switching and secreted degradative enzymes. However, the exact mechanism of Candida pathogenesis and the host response to invasion are still not well elucidated. The relatively recent discovery of the quorum-sensing molecule farnesol and the existence of quorum sensing as a basic regulatory phenomenon of the C. albicans population behavior has revolutionized Candida research. Through population density regulation, the quorum-sensing mechanism also controls the cellular morphology of a C. albicans population in response to environmental factors, thereby, effectively placing morphology switching downstream of quorum sensing. Thus, the quorum-sensing phenomenon has been hailed as the 'missing piece' of the pathogenicity puzzle. Here, we review what is known about Candida spp. as the etiological agents of invasive candidiasis and address our current understanding of the quorum-sensing phenomenon in relation to virulence in the host.

  19. Candida, fluorescent stain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This microscopic film shows a fluorescent stain of Candida. Candida is a yeast (fungus) that causes mild disease, but in immunocompromised individuals it may cause life-threatening illness. (Image ...

  20. Studying the Prevalence, Species Distribution, and Detection of In vitro Production of Phospholipase from Candida Isolated from Cases of Invasive Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Yukti; Chumber, Susheel Kumar; Kaur, Mandeep

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim: Candida spp. have emerged as successful pathogens both in invasive and mucosal infections. C. albicans is the sixth cause of most common nosocomial infections according to studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A shift toward non-albicans species has been reported. There is a dearth of knowledge regarding the virulence factors of Candida, especially from this part of India. The aim was to study the prevalence of Candida, speciate, and determine antifungal sensitivity along with the detection of in vitro production of phospholipases in 100 Candida isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 Candida isolates from various clinical specimens were studied (February 1, 2015–May 31, 2015; 4 months). Speciation was done by conventional methods and antifungal drugs fluconazole and voriconazole tested. Phospholipase activity (Pz value) was determined. Results: Of the 100 Candida spp., 35% were C. albicans and 65% were nonalbicans Candida (NAC). Species spectrum was of the 100 isolates as follows: 35 were C. albicans, 17 Candida tropicalis, 6 Candida glabrata, 8 Candida guilliermondi, 1 Candida kefyr, 6 Candida krusei, 14 Candida parapsilosis, 2 Candida lusitaniae, and 1 Trichosporon and 10 Candida spp. (not speciated). Phospholipase production was seen in 81 (81%) of the total isolates. The majority (63%) of phospholipase producers were NAC. Among NAC spp., the maximum phospholipase activity was seen in C. tropicalis (30%) and C. parapsilosis (24%). Of these, 60% of Candida was from patients admitted to the hospital. Sensitivity rates of C. albicans for fluconazole and voriconazole were 89.5% and 90.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Increasing usage of devices, total parenteral nutrition, broad-spectrum antibiotics, chemotherapies, and transplantation are factors contributing to the increase of candidal infections. Recent studies underline the increasing frequency of infections by NAC. The present study showcases the increased

  1. Lack of evidence for sexual transmission of genital Candida species among women who have sex with women: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Muzny, Christina A; Rivers, Charles A; Parker, Cameron J; Mena, Leandro A; Austin, Erika L; Schwebke, Jane R

    2014-03-01

    The contribution of sexual transmission to genital Candida infection remains unclear. This study sought to investigate whether sexual behaviours were associated with the presence of genital Candida species among a cohort of women who have sex with women (WSW) in addition to determining the genetic concordance of genital Candida spp. among WSW in sexual partnerships. WSW ≥18 years of age presenting to the Mississippi State Department of Health STD Clinic during 2009-2010 completed a sexual behaviour survey. Culture of vaginal fluid was performed for Candida spp. identification; associations with participant characteristics were determined using logistic regression analysis. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR was performed on DNA extracted from yeast cultures of WSW in sexual partnerships in which both partners had isolates of Candida spp. identified and among a set of age/sexual behaviour matched controls. RAPD genetic fingerprints were evaluated by hierarchical cluster analysis for concordance. Genital Candida spp. were isolated in 105/196 (53.6%) of women: 13/105 (12.4%) had symptomatic vulvovaginal candidiasis while 92/105 (87.6%) had asymptomatic vaginal colonisation. Bisexual identity, sex with women and men during the past 12 months and numbers of male sexual partners during the past 12 months were the only significant predictors of genital Candida spp. in bivariate analysis. 13 pairs of WSW in sexual partnerships in which both partners had genital Candida spp. and 11 WSW with genital Candida spp. not in sexual partnerships were identified. Candida spp. RAPD banding patterns were discordant for all isolates among WSW within partnerships and in controls. This study found no evidence supporting sexual transmission of genital Candida spp. between women.

  2. Phylogeny and evolution of the aspartyl protease family from clinically relevant Candida species.

    PubMed

    Parra-Ortega, B; Cruz-Torres, H; Villa-Tanaca, L; Hernández-Rodríguez, C

    2009-05-01

    Aspartyl proteases are a class of enzymes that include the yeast aspartyl proteases and secreted aspartyl protease (Sap) superfamilies. Several Sap superfamily members have been demonstrated or suggested as virulence factors in opportunistic pathogens of the genus Candida. Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida dubliniensis and Candida parapsilosis harbour 10, four, eight and three SAP genes, respectively. In this work, genome mining and phylogenetic analyses revealed the presence of new members of the Sap superfamily in C. tropicalis (8), Candida guilliermondii (8), C. parapsilosis(11) and Candida lusitaniae (3). A total of 12 Sap families, containing proteins with at least 50% similarity, were discovered in opportunistic, pathogenic Candida spp. In several Sap families, at least two subfamilies or orthologous groups were identified, each defined by > 90% sequence similitude, functional similarity and synteny among its members. No new members of previously described Sap families were found in a Candida spp. clinical strain collection; however, the universality of SAPT gene distribution among C. tropicalis strains was demonstrated. In addition, several features of opportunistic pathogenic Candida species, such as gene duplications and inversions, similitude, synteny, putative transcription factor binding sites and genome traits of SAP gene superfamily were described in a molecular evolutionary context.

  3. Appearance of colonies of Prototheca on CHROMagar Candida medium.

    PubMed

    Casal, M; Linares, M J; Solís, F; Rodríguez, F C

    1997-01-01

    The microorganisms capable of producing opportunist infections include the yeast-like organisms of the genus Candida, and the unicellular algae of the genus Prototheca, which share common features and can, therefore, lead to confusion. Their colonies are almost identical and they grow in the same culture media used routinely in mycology. CHROMagar Candida is a new chromogenic differential isolation medium that facilitates the presumptive differentiation of some of the most clinically important yeast-like organisms. To our knowledge, the use of CHROMagar Candida with Prototheca spp. has not been reported in the literature. This report describes the growth of 151 strains of Prototheca on CHROMagar Candida compared to the growth of a total of 326 well-characterized yeast organisms of the genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon, Geotrichum, and Saccharomyces. It is clinically relevant to note that algae of the genus Prototheca (P. wickerhamii, P. zopfii, and P. stagnora) and of the genus Candida parapsilosis produced similar cream-colored colonies on CHROMagar Candida medium. Based on their growth on CHROMagar, a new species of Candida is described, C. zeylanoides, which has blue-green colonies. The colonies of two species of Trichosporon are also differentiated: the blue-green colonies of T. beigelii and the pink colonies of T. capitatum.

  4. Candida albicans and non-C. albicans Candida species: comparison of biofilm production and metabolic activity in biofilms, and putative virulence properties of isolates from hospital environments and infections.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A V; Prado, C G; Carvalho, R R; Dias, K S T; Dias, A L T

    2013-04-01

    Candida albicans and, more recently, non-C. albicans Candida spp. are considered the most frequent fungi in hospitals. This study analyzed Candida spp. isolates and compared the frequency of different species, that is, C. albicans and non-C. albicans Candida spp., and the origins of isolates, that is, from hospital environments or infections. Yeast virulence factors were evaluated based on biofilm production and metabolic activity. Hemolysin production and the antifungal susceptibility profiles of isolates were also evaluated. Candida spp. were highly prevalent in samples collected from hospital environments, which may provide a reservoir for continuous infections with these yeasts. There were no differences in the biofilm productivity levels and metabolic activities of the environmental and clinical isolates, although the metabolic activities of non-C. albicans Candida spp. biofilms were greater than those of the C. albicans biofilms (p < 0.05). Clinical samples had higher hemolysin production (p < 0.05) and lower susceptibility to fluconazole (p < 0.05). Non-C. albicans Candida spp. predominated in samples collected from hospital environments and infections (p < 0.05). These species had a lower susceptibility to fluconazole and amphotericin B, and their biofilms had higher metabolic activities than those produced by C. albicans, which may explain the increased incidence of fungal infections with these yeasts during recent years.

  5. Antifungal activity of extracts and isolated compounds from Buchenavia tomentosa on Candida albicans and non-albicans.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, Guilherme R; Brighenti, Fernanda L; Delbem, Alberto C Botazzo; Delbem, Ádina Cléia B; Khouri, Sonia; Gontijo, Aline Vidal L; Pascoal, Aislan Crf; Salvador, Marcos J; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Y

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the antifungal activity of Buchenavia tomentosa extract and bioactive compounds on six Candida species. The antimicrobial activity of extract was evaluated using standard strains and clinical isolates. Cytotoxicity was tested in order to evaluate cell damage caused by the extract. Extract was chemically characterized and the antifungal activity of its compounds was evaluated. Extract showed antifungal activity on Candida species. Candida non-albicans were more susceptible than Candida albicans. Low cytotoxicity for extract was observed. The isolated compounds presented antifungal activity at least against one Candida spp. and all compounds presented antifungal effect on Candida glabrata. Extracts from Buchenavia tomentosa showed promising antifungal activity on Candida species with low cytotoxicity. Gallic acid, corilagin and ellagic acid showed promising inhibitory activity on Candida glabrata.

  6. Application of CHROMagar Candida for rapid screening of clinical specimens for Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, and Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M A; Houston, A; Coffmann, S

    1996-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a new differential culture medium that allows selective isolation of yeasts and simultaneously identifies colonies of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. We evaluated the use of this medium with 316 yeast isolates including 247 isolated directly on CHROMagar from clinical material. Over 95% of stock and clinical isolates of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei were correctly identified on the basis of colony morphology and pigmentation on CHROMagar. Additionally, CHROMagar also allowed the identification of C. (Torulopsis) glabrata at a similar level of accuracy. The overall agreement between two observers in reading the CHROMagar plates was 95%. Growth of Candida sp. isolates on CHROMagar had no adverse effect on antifungal MICs or Vitek identification results. In parallel, cultures of 548 stool and rectal swab specimens set up on CHROMagar and Sabouraud glucose agar (SGA) were positive in 234 instances. CHROMagar was positive and SGA was negative for 11 specimens, and CHROMagar was negative and SGA was positive for 18 specimens. A single yeast species was isolated on both media from 162 specimens, and in 146 (90%) of these specimens the same species was detected on both CHROMagar and SGA. A total of 43 of the 234 positive cultures contained mixtures of yeast species. Twenty (47%) of these mixed cultures were detected only on CHROMagar. CHROMagar is extremely useful in making a rapid presumptive identification of common yeast species. This capability plus the ability to detect mixed cultures of Candida spp. promises to improve and streamline the work flow in the mycology and clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:8748273

  7. Stratum corneum lipid liposome-encapsulated panomycocin: preparation, characterization, and the determination of antimycotic efficacy against Candida spp. isolated from patients with vulvovaginitis in an in vitro human vaginal epithelium tissue model.

    PubMed

    İzgü, Fatih; Bayram, Günce; Tosun, Kübra; İzgü, Demet

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a liposomal lyophilized powder formulation of panomycocin was developed for therapeutic purposes against vulvovaginal candidiasis which affects 80% of women worldwide. Panomycocin is a potent antimycotic protein secreted by the yeast Wickerhamomyces anomalus NCYC 434. This study involved the preparation of panomycocin-loaded stratum corneum lipid liposomes (SCLLs), characterization of the SCLLs, and determination of antimycotic efficacy of the formulation against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata clinical vaginal isolates in a human vaginal epithelium tissue model. The encapsulation and loading efficiencies of SCLLs were 73% and 76.8%, respectively. In transmission electron microscopy images, the SCLLs appeared in the submicron size range. Dynamic light scattering analyses showed that the SCLLs had uniform size distribution. Zeta potential measurements revealed stable and positively charged SCLLs. In Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses, no irreversible interactions between the encapsulated panomycocin and the SCLLs were detected. The SCLLs retained >98% of encapsulated panomycocin in aqueous solution up to 12 hours. The formulation was fungicidal at the same minimum fungicidal concentration values for non-formulated pure panomycocin when tested on an in vitro model of vaginal candidiasis. This is the first study in which SCLLs and a protein as an active ingredient have been utilized together in a formulation. The results obtained in this study led us to conduct further preclinical trials of this formulation for the development of an effective topical anti-candidal drug with improved safety.

  8. Stratum corneum lipid liposome-encapsulated panomycocin: preparation, characterization, and the determination of antimycotic efficacy against Candida spp. isolated from patients with vulvovaginitis in an in vitro human vaginal epithelium tissue model

    PubMed Central

    İzgü, Fatih; Bayram, Günce; Tosun, Kübra; İzgü, Demet

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a liposomal lyophilized powder formulation of panomycocin was developed for therapeutic purposes against vulvovaginal candidiasis which affects 80% of women worldwide. Panomycocin is a potent antimycotic protein secreted by the yeast Wickerhamomyces anomalus NCYC 434. This study involved the preparation of panomycocin-loaded stratum corneum lipid liposomes (SCLLs), characterization of the SCLLs, and determination of antimycotic efficacy of the formulation against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata clinical vaginal isolates in a human vaginal epithelium tissue model. The encapsulation and loading efficiencies of SCLLs were 73% and 76.8%, respectively. In transmission electron microscopy images, the SCLLs appeared in the submicron size range. Dynamic light scattering analyses showed that the SCLLs had uniform size distribution. Zeta potential measurements revealed stable and positively charged SCLLs. In Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses, no irreversible interactions between the encapsulated panomycocin and the SCLLs were detected. The SCLLs retained >98% of encapsulated panomycocin in aqueous solution up to 12 hours. The formulation was fungicidal at the same minimum fungicidal concentration values for non-formulated pure panomycocin when tested on an in vitro model of vaginal candidiasis. This is the first study in which SCLLs and a protein as an active ingredient have been utilized together in a formulation. The results obtained in this study led us to conduct further preclinical trials of this formulation for the development of an effective topical anti-candidal drug with improved safety. PMID:28831255

  9. Effect of Eugenol on Cell Surface Hydrophobicity, Adhesion, and Biofilm of Candida tropicalis and Candida dubliniensis Isolated from Oral Cavity of HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Suelen Balero; Bartelli, Thais Fernanda; Di Raimo, Vanessa; Santos, Jussevania Pereira; Morey, Alexandre Tadachi; Bosini, Marina Andrea; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie

    2014-01-01

    Most Candida spp. infections are associated with biofilm formation on host surfaces. Cells within these communities display a phenotype resistant to antimicrobials and host defenses, so biofilm-associated infections are difficult to treat, representing a source of reinfections. The present study evaluated the effect of eugenol on the adherence properties and biofilm formation capacity of Candida dubliniensis and Candida tropicalis isolated from the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients. All isolates were able to form biofilms on different substrate surfaces. Eugenol showed inhibitory activity against planktonic and sessile cells of Candida spp. No metabolic activity in biofilm was detected after 24 h of treatment. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that eugenol drastically reduced the number of sessile cells on denture material surfaces. Most Candida species showed hydrophobic behavior and a significant difference in cell surface hydrophobicity was observed after exposure of planktonic cells to eugenol for 1 h. Eugenol also caused a significant reduction in adhesion of most Candida spp. to HEp-2 cells and to polystyrene. These findings corroborate the effectiveness of eugenol against Candida species other than C. albicans, reinforcing its potential as an antifungal applied to limit both the growth of planktonic cells and biofilm formation on different surfaces.

  10. Candidaemia with uncommon Candida species: predisposing factors, outcome, antifungal susceptibility, and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Chen, S C A; Marriott, D; Playford, E G; Nguyen, Q; Ellis, D; Meyer, W; Sorrell, T C; Slavin, M

    2009-07-01

    The risk factors for and clinical features of bloodstream infection with uncommon Candida spp. (species other than C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicals and C. krusei) are incompletely defined. To identify clinical variables associated with these species that might guide management, 57 cases of candidaemia resulting from uncommon Candida spp. were analysed in comparison with 517 episodes of Candida albicans candidaemia (2001-2004). Infection with uncommon Candida spp. (5.3% of candidaemia cases), as compared with C. albicans candidaemia, was significantly more likely to be outpatient-acquired than inpatient-acquired (15 of 57 vs. 65 of 517 episodes, p 0.01). Prior exposure to fluconazole was uncommon (n=1). Candida dubliniensis was the commonest species (n=22, 39%), followed by Candida guilliermondii (n=11, 19%) and Candida lusitaniae (n=7, 12%).C. dubliniensis candidaemia was independently associated with recent intravenous drug use (p 0.01) and chronic liver disease (p 0.03), and infection with species other than C. dubliniensis was independently associated with age<65 years (p 0.02), male sex (p 0.03) and human immunodeficiency virus infection (p 0.05). Presence of sepsis at diagnosis and crude 30-day mortality rates were similar for C. dubliniensis-related, non-C. dubliniensis-related and C. albicans-related candidaemia. Haematological malignancy was the commonest predisposing factor in C. guilliermondii (n=3, 27%) and C. lusitaniae (n=3, 43%) candidaemia. The 30-day mortality rate of C. lusitaniae candidaemia was higher than the overall death rate for all uncommon Candida spp. (42.9% vs. 25%, p not significant). All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, voriconazole, posaconazole, and caspofungin; five strains (9%) had fluconazole MIC values of 16-32 mg/L. Candidaemia due to uncommon Candida spp. is emerging among hospital outpatients; certain clinical variables may assist in recognition of this entity.

  11. Candida and other yeasts of clinical importance in Aseer region, southern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Mohamed E.; Assiry, Mohammed M.; Joseph, Martin R.; Haimour, Waleed O.; Abdelrahim, Ihab M.; Al-Abed, Fatin; Fadul, Abdalla N.; Al-Hakami, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To isolate, identify, and determine the prevalence of Candida and other yeasts of clinical importance in Aseer region, Saudi Arabia. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study involving retrospective analysis of 6100 samples submitted to the Microbiology Laboratory, Aseer Central Hospital, Abha, Saudi Arabia between 2011 and 2012, and prospective isolation and identification of 84 isolates recovered from various clinical specimens presented to the Microbiology Laboratory between 2012 and 2013 using the classic morphological schemes and the Vitek 2 automated system. Results: The results of the retrospective analysis (2011-2012) indicated that of the 6100 various clinical specimens submitted to the routine microbiology analysis, 143 (2.35%) revealed the presence of Candida spp. The distribution of the 143 Candida spp. according to specimens was as follows: urine 72%, sputum 10.5%, endotracheal tube 7%, blood 4.2%, catheter tip 2.1%, throat swab 2.1%, eye swab 0.7%, wound exudates 0.7%, and cerebrospinal fluid 0.7%. The results of the prospective study (2012-2013), which involved the identification of yeast recovered from 84 specimens indicated that Candida albicans 28.6% was the predominant species, followed by Candida parapsilosis 21.4%, Candida tropicalis 14.3%, and Candida lusitaniae 9.5%. Conclusions: Along with the commonly encountered Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Candida lusitaniae were detected with significant rates. Many other Candida species and some other pathogenic yeasts have been detected for the first time in the region. Urinary tract samples were the main source of Candida species. PMID:25316465

  12. The prevalence of oral Candida infections in periodontitis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Al Mubarak, Sultan; Robert, Asirvatham Alwin; Baskaradoss, Jagan Kumar; Al-Zoman, Khalid; Al Sohail, Abdulaziz; Alsuwyed, Abdulaziz; Ciancio, Sebastian

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of Candida spp. in periodontitis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This cross-sectional study included 42 diabetic patients with periodontitis (aged 21-70 years; 18 males and 24 females). Clinical measurements included probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Sub-gingival samples were collected from the mesio-buccal aspect of 3 teeth for fungal analysis. Candida species, including Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata, were identified using Gram staining, the germ tube test, CHROMagar, Staib agar and API 20C AUX. The overall prevalence of Candida in diabetic patients with periodontitis observed in our study was 52%. The most common spp. of Candida identified were C. albicans (38%), followed by C. dubliniensis (9.5%), C. tropicalis (4.7%) and C. glabrata (4.7%). Compared to females, male patients were characterized by increased levels of Candida infections. Our results also indicate that individuals over the age of 40 had increased levels of Candida infections compared to patients younger than 40. Candida infections were higher among subjects with elevated blood sugar levels (HbA1c>9) compared to individuals with well-controlled blood sugar levels (HbA1c<6). Patients with PPDs≥5 had an increased risk of Candida infection compared to patients with PPDs between 3 and 4. This study indicates that the frequency of C. albicans is higher than the frequencies of C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata in diabetic patients with periodontitis. Candida infections were observed at increased frequencies among subjects with high blood sugar levels and PPDs≥5. Copyright © 2013 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sensitive and rapid RT-qPCR quantification of pathogenic Candida species in human blood.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kiyohito; Matsuda, Kazunori; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Nomoto, Koji

    2015-10-01

    For accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of candidiasis, we developed a highly sensitive quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) system for five Candida species that have been reported to be the major causes of bloodstream fungal infection (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei), together with a system for all pathogenic Candida species. Cells of each fungal species spiked into human peripheral blood (PB) were specifically detected at a lower detection limit of 10(0) cell/1 mL PB by this system using the newly developed specific primer sets targeting 18S or 26S rRNA of the five Candida species, together with the existing group primer set. The total count of the five Candida spp. as the sum of those obtained by using the five species primer sets was equivalent to the count obtained by using the group primer set, indicating that the group set covered the major five Candida spp. in human blood with the same degree of accuracy as the species primer sets. The RT-qPCR counts of the Candida species were in good agreement with CFU counts obtained by their culture on CHROMagar™, with a lower detection limit of 10(0)cell/mL of PB. Candida rRNA molecules were stably stored for at least 7 days at 4°C by keeping the blood specimens in an RNA stabilizing reagent. These results strongly suggest that this sensitive system is useful for accurate and rapid diagnosis of Candida bloodstream infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Differentiation and characterization of yeasts pathogenic for humans (Candida albicans, Exophiala dermatitidis) and algae pathogenic for animals (Prototheca spp.) using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in comparison with conventional methods].

    PubMed

    Schmalreck, A F; Tränkle, P; Vanca, E; Blaschke-Hellmessen, R

    1998-01-01

    Due to the Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) of strain specific traits demonstrated to be a suitable and efficient method for diagnostic and epidemiological determinations for the yeasts Candida albicans, Exophiala dermatitidis and the chlorophylless algae of the genus Prototheca. FT-IR leads in a rapid and economical way to reproducible results according to the spectral differences of intact cells (IR-fingerprints). Different genera, species and sub-species respectively, different strains can be recognized and grouped into different clusters and subclusters. The FT-IR analysis of Candida albicans isolates (n = 150) of 22 newborns-at-risk of an intensive care unit showed, that 86% of the children were colonised with several (2-4) different strains in the oral cavities and faeces. Stationary cross-infections could definitely be determined. Exophiala dermatitidis isolates (n = 31), mostly isolated repetitively within a period of 3 years from sputa of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis could be characterized and grouped patient-specifically over the total sampling period. Of 6 from 8 patients (75%) their individual strains remain the same and could be tracked over the three years. Cross-infections during the stationary treatment could be clearly identified by FT-IR. The Prototheca isolate (n = 43) from live-stock and farm environment showed clear distinguishable clusters differentiating the species P. wickerhamii, P. zopfii and P. stagnora. In addition, the biotypes of P. zopfii could be distinguished, especially the subclusters of variants II and III. It could be demonstrated, that FT-IR is suitable for the routine identification and differentiation of yeasts and algae. However, in spite of the gain of knowledge by using FT-IR for the characterization of microorganisms, the conventional phenotyping and/or genetic analysis of yeast or algae strains cannot be replaced completely. For a final taxonomic classification a combination of conventional

  15. Evidence of Fluconazole-Resistant Candida Species in Tortoises and Sea Turtles.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Rodrigues, Pedro Henrique de Aragão; de Alencar, Lucas Pereira; Riello, Giovanna Barbosa; Ribeiro, Joyce Fonteles; de Oliveira, Jonathas Sales; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Monteiro, André Jalles; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. recovered from tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) and sea turtles (Chelonia mydas, Caretta caretta, Lepidochelys olivacea, Eretmochelys imbricata). For this purpose, material from the oral cavity and cloaca of 77 animals (60 tortoises and 17 sea turtles) was collected. The collected specimens were seeded on 2% Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol, and the identification was carried out by morphological and biochemical methods. Sixty-six isolates were recovered from tortoises, out of which 27 were C. tropicalis, 27 C. famata, 7 C. albicans, 4 C. guilliermondii and 1 C. intermedia, whereas 12 strains were obtained from sea turtles, which were identified as Candida parapsilosis (n = 4), Candida guilliermondii (n = 4), Candida tropicalis (n = 2), Candida albicans (n = 1) and Candida intermedia (n = 1). The minimum inhibitory concentrations for amphotericin B, itraconazole and fluconazole ranged from 0.03125 to 0.5, 0.03125 to >16 and 0.125 to >64, respectively. Overall, 19 azole-resistant strains (14 C. tropicalis and 5 C. albicans) were found. Thus, this study shows that Testudines carry azole-resistant Candida spp.

  16. Evaluation of chromogenic media and seminested PCR in the identification of Candida species

    PubMed Central

    Daef, Enas; Moharram, Ahmed; Eldin, Salwa Seif; Elsherbiny, Nahla; Mohammed, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Identification of Candida cultured from various clinical specimens to the species level is increasingly necessary for clinical laboratories. Although sn PCR identifies the species within hours but its cost-effectiveness is to be considered. So there is always a need for media which help in the isolation and identification at the species level. The study aimed to evaluate the performance of different chromogenic media and to compare the effectiveness of the traditional phenotypic methods vs. seminested polymerase chain reaction (sn PCR) for identification of Candida species. One hundred and twenty seven Candida strains isolated from various clinical specimens were identified by conventional methods, four different chromogenic media and sn PCR. HiCrome Candida Differential and CHROMagar Candida media showed comparably high sensitivities and specificities in the identification of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei. CHROMagar Candida had an extra advantage of identifying all C. parapsilosis isolates. CHROMagar-Pal’s medium identified C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei with high sensitivities and specificities, but couldn’t identify C. glabrata or C. parapsilosis. It was the only medium that identified C. dubliniensis with a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Biggy agar showed the least sensitivities and specificities. The overall concordance of the snPCR compared to the conventional tests including CHROMAgar Candida in the identification of Candida species was 97.5%. The use of CHROMAgar Candida medium is an easy and accurate method for presumptive identification of the most commonly encountered Candida spp. PMID:24948942

  17. Candida infections in newborns: a review.

    PubMed

    Khoory, B J; Vino, L; Dall'Agnola, A; Fanos, V

    1999-10-01

    Despite adequate treatment, nosocomial fungal infections have become an increasingly important cause of morbidity, extended hospitalization, and mortality in critically ill newborn babies. Furthermore, the high incidence of central nervous system involvement in septic newborns frequently results in serious neurological damage and psychomotorial sequelae. The prevention of fungal colonization in the population at risk, together with prompt diagnosis and treatment, are an efficient combination which lead to a better outcome of neonatal fungal infections. New drugs characterized by great efficacy and tolerance have recently been employed in clinical practice. This article summarizes certain aspects of Candida spp. infections in the neonatal period with regard to multisystemic presentation and involvement.

  18. Candida infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Baddley, J W; Benjamin, D K; Patel, M; Miró, J; Athan, E; Barsic, B; Bouza, E; Clara, L; Elliott, T; Kanafani, Z; Klein, J; Lerakis, S; Levine, D; Spelman, D; Rubinstein, E; Tornos, P; Morris, A J; Pappas, P; Fowler, V G; Chu, V H; Cabell, C

    2008-07-01

    Candida infective endocarditis (IE) is uncommon but often fatal. Most epidemiologic data are derived from small case series or case reports. This study was conducted to explore the epidemiology, treatment patterns, and outcomes of patients with Candida IE. We compared 33 Candida IE cases to 2,716 patients with non-fungal IE in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis-Prospective Cohort Study (ICE-PCS). Patients were enrolled and the data collected from June 2000 until August 2005. We noted that patients with Candida IE were more likely to have prosthetic valves (p < 0.001), short-term indwelling catheters (p < 0.0001), and have healthcare-associated infections (p < 0.001). The reasons for surgery differed between the two groups: myocardial abscess (46.7% vs. 22.2%, p = 0.026) and persistent positive blood cultures (33.3% vs. 9.9%, p = 0.003) were more common among those with Candida IE. Mortality at discharge was higher in patients with Candida IE (30.3%) when compared to non-fungal cases (17%, p = 0.046). Among Candida patients, mortality was similar in patients who received combination surgical and antifungal therapy versus antifungal therapy alone (33.3% vs. 27.8%, p = 0.26). New antifungal drugs, particularly echinocandins, were used frequently. These multi-center data suggest distinct epidemiologic features of Candida IE when compared to non-fungal cases. Indications for surgical intervention are different and mortality is increased. Newer antifungal treatment options are increasingly used. Large, multi-center studies are needed to help better define Candida IE.

  19. Candida Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Baddley, John W.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Patel, Mukesh; Miró, José; Athan, Eugene; Barsic, Bruno; Bouza, Emilio; Clara, Liliana; Elliott, Tom; Kanafani, Zeina; Klein, John; Lerakis, Stamatios; Levine, Donald; Spelman, Denis; Rubinstein, Ethan; Tornos, Pilar; Morris, Arthur J.; Pappas, Paul; Fowler, Vance G.; Chu, Vivian H.; Cabell, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Candida infective endocarditis (IE) is uncommon but often fatal. Most epidemiologic data are derived from small case series or case reports. This study was conducted to explore epidemiology, treatment patterns, and outcomes of patients with Candida IE. Methods We compared 33 Candida IE cases to 2716 patients with non-fungal IE in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis - Prospective Cohort Study. Patients were enrolled and data collected from June 2000 until August 2005. Results Patients with Candida IE were more likely to have prosthetic valves (p<0.001), short term indwelling catheters (p<0.0001), and have healthcare-associated infection (p<0.001). Reasons for surgery differed between the two groups: myocardial abscess (46.7% vs. 22.2% p=0.026) and persistent positive blood cultures (33.3% vs. 9.9%, p=0.003) were more common among those with Candida IE. Mortality at discharge was higher in patients with Candida IE (30.3%) when compared to non-fungal cases (17%, p=0.046). Among Candida patients, mortality was similar in patients who received combination surgical and antifungal therapy versus antifungal therapy alone (33.3% vs. 27.8%, p=0.26). New antifungal drugs, particularly echinocandins, were used frequently. Conclusions These multi-center data suggest distinct epidemiologic features of Candida IE when compared to non-fungal cases. Indications for surgical intervention are different and mortality is increased. Newer antifungal treatment options are increasingly used. Large, multi-center studies are needed to help better define Candida IE. PMID:18283504

  20. Sequence-identification of Candida species isolated from candidemia.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Naeimeh; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Ghahri, Mohammad; Sadrossadati, Seyedeh Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Candida species are the most prevalent cause of invasive fungal infections such as candidemia. Candidemia is a lethal fungal infection among immunocompromised patients worldwide. Main pathogen is Candida albicans but a global shift in epidemiology toward non-albicans species have reported. Species identification is imperative for good management of candidemia as a fatal infection. The aim of the study is to identify Candida spp. obtained from candidemia and determination of mortality rate among this population. The study was performed during February 2014 to March 2015 in Tehran, Iran. Two-hundred and four blood cultures were evaluated for fungal bloodstream infection. Identification of isolates was carried out using phenotypic tests and polymerase chain reaction sequencing technique. Twenty-two out of 204 patients (10.8%) had candidemia. Candida parapsilosis was the most prevalent species (45.4%), followed by C. albicans (31.8%) and Candida glabrata (22.7%). Male to female sex ratio was 8/14. The emergence of resistant strains of Candida species should be considered by physicians to decrease the mortality of this fatal fungal infection by appropriate treatment.

  1. Direct impression on agar surface as a diagnostic sampling procedure for candida balanitis.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Carmen; Santos, António; Azevedo, Filomena; Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Rodrigues, Acácio Gonçalves

    2010-02-01

    The diagnosis of candida balanitis should be based upon both clinical and mycological data. The procedure of material collection is a critical issue to confirm or rule out the clinical diagnosis of candida balanitis. To compare direct impression of the glans on the agar surface of solid culture media with the collection of genital exudates with cotton swab for the diagnosis of candida balanitis. A prospective cross-sectional study was carried out during a 36-month period. Sexually transmitted disease clinic attendees with balanitis and asymptomatic men were included. Specimens for yeast culture were collected from the glans penis and inner preputial layer using the direct impression on CHROMagar candida medium and by swabbing with a sterile cotton swab. Among 478 men enrolled, 189 had balanitis. The prevalence of candida balanitis was 17.8% (85/478) confirmed after culture by direct impression; the swab method detected only 54/85 (63.5%) of these men. Of the 289 asymptomatic men, 36 (12.5%) yielded Candida spp; the swab method detected only 38.9% of these men. The risk of having candida balanitis is 8.9 (IC 95% 2.48 to 32.04) whenever the number of candida colonies recovered by direct impression was greater than 10. Direct impression on CHROMagar candida medium resulted in the highest Candida spp recovery rate. More than 10 colonies yielded by impression culture were statistically associated with candida balanitis. This method shows the ideal profile for sampling the male genital area for yeasts and should be included in the management of balanitis.

  2. Candida species biofilm and Candida albicans ALS3 polymorphisms in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Bruder-Nascimento, Ariane; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Sugizaki, Maria Fátima; Sadatsune, Terue; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, there have been important changes in the epidemiology of Candida infections. In recent years, Candida species have emerged as important causes of invasive infections mainly among immunocompromised patients. This study analyzed Candida spp. isolates and compared the frequency and biofilm production of different species among the different sources of isolation: blood, urine, vulvovaginal secretions and peritoneal dialysis fluid. Biofilm production was quantified in 327 Candida isolates obtained from patients attended at a Brazilian tertiary public hospital (Botucatu, Sao Paulo). C. albicans ALS3 gene polymorphism was also evaluated by determining the number of repeated motifs in the central domain. Of the 198 total biofilm-positive isolates, 72 and 126 were considered as low and high biofilm producers, respectively. Biofilm production by C. albicans was significantly lower than that by non-albicans isolates and was most frequently observed in C. tropicalis. Biofilm production was more frequent among bloodstream isolates than other clinical sources, in urine, the isolates displayed a peculiar distribution by presenting two distinct peaks, one containing biofilm-negative isolates and the other containing isolates with intense biofilm production. The numbers of tandem-repeat copies per allele were not associated with biofilm production, suggesting the evolvement of other genetic determinants.

  3. [Candida: epidemiology and risk factors for non-albicans species].

    PubMed

    Cornistein, Wanda; Mora, Andrea; Orellana, Nora; Capparelli, Federico Javier; del Castillo, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Nosocomial fungal infections have increased significantly in the last decade. Candida detection in clinical specimens can mean either colonization or an infection which can be local (muguet) or invasive. Knowledge of the species helps in choosing the best treatment. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency and distribution of Candida species detected in clinical samples, to analyze the clinical characteristics of the involved population and to determine the risk factors for Candida non-albicans species. Retrospective, observational. 2006-2010. all isolates of Candida in clinical specimens from patients hospitalized at least 48 hours in a neurological center. We analyzed epidemiological characteristics, co morbidities, risk factors, factors associated with Candida non-albicans detection, antifungal treatment, development of adverse events and mortality. Candida spp. was isolated from 321 clinical specimens: 139 (43.3%) were C. albicans and 182 (56.7%) Candida non-albicans. The distribution of the sample was: urine 122 (Candida non-albicans 67.2%), airway 81, oropharynx 45 (C. albicans) and candidemia 40 (Candida non-albicans 75%). The most frequent co-morbidity was solid tumor (35.5%). The main risk factors were antibiotic therapy (85.5%), steroid therapy (61.7%) and in ICU at diagnosis (61.6%). The analysis of risk factors and the isolation of Candida non-albicans shows that chemotherapy, previous surgery, treatment with aminopenicillins, carbapenems and glycopeptides were statistically significant (P<.05). There is a trend in neutropenic patients (P=.055) and in ICU at diagnosis (P=.076). Overall survival was 71%. Candida species distribution varies with the type of sample analyzed. Non-albicans species make up the majority of the isolates. The identification of the species involved per sample helps to optimize treatment. The high frequency of isolation of Candida in patients on steroids and antibiotics and admitted to ICU, is worth pointing out

  4. Oral Candida Isolates Colonizing or Infecting Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected and Healthy Persons in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio; Ortiz-López, Natalia Guadalupe; Villar, María; Moragues, María Dolores; Aguirre, José Manuel; Cashat-Cruz, Miguel; Lopez-Ribot, Jose Luis; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Quindós, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    Oral yeast carriage was studied in 312 Mexican subjects. Candida albicans was the most frequent species, but other Candida spp. were isolated from 16.5 to 38.5% of patients. Colonization did not correlate with CD4+ number or viral load, but highly active antiretroviral therapy reduced the frequency of candidiasis. Most isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, but 10.8% were resistant to one or more azoles. PMID:16081965

  5. [Enzymatic activity, slime production and antifungal agent sensitivity of Candida sp].

    PubMed

    Silva, Jaqueline Otero; Ferreira, Joseane Cristina; Candido, Regina Célia

    2007-01-01

    Abilith of Candida spp to secrete extracellular enzymes and slime has been associated as pathogenicity factors. Out of a total of 37 strains of Candida sp, 100% were proteinase producers, 83.8% were phospholipase producers, 64.9% were slime producers and 100% were sensitive to fluconazole and itraconazole. Seventeen typings (enzymes/slime) were found. This methodology presented a good discrimination rate (D=0.93) and could be used for phenotypic characterization of yeasts.

  6. Oral Candida isolates colonizing or infecting human immunodeficiency virus-infected and healthy persons in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio; Ortiz-López, Natalia Guadalupe; Villar, María; Moragues, María Dolores; Aguirre, José Manuel; Cashat-Cruz, Miguel; Lopez-Ribot, Jose Luis; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Quindós, Guillermo

    2005-08-01

    Oral yeast carriage was studied in 312 Mexican subjects. Candida albicans was the most frequent species, but other Candida spp. were isolated from 16.5 to 38.5% of patients. Colonization did not correlate with CD4+ number or viral load, but highly active antiretroviral therapy reduced the frequency of candidiasis. Most isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, but 10.8% were resistant to one or more azoles.

  7. [Acinetobacter spp].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Naohisa

    2012-02-01

    Acinetobacter species are aerobic, glucose non-fermenting gram-negative rods, and ubiquitous in the environment. Acinetobacter spp. can survive for months on dry surfaces. Acinetobacter spp. have been grown from skin, pharynx, sputum, urine and feces. The most common Acinetobacter infection is pneumonia. According to Japan Nosocomial Infection Surveillance, 0.34% of the Acinetobacter spp. was multidrug-resistant in 2010. In Japan, Acinetobacter spp. whose imipenem MICs were > or = 16 microg/mL, amikacin > or = 32 microg/mL, and ciprofloxacin > or = 4 microg/mL were defined as multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter species (MDRA) in 2011 in the amended Infectious Diseases Control Law. Break-point Checkerboard Plate can help to infer an effective combination antimicrobial therapy. A selective medium for the isolation of MDRA is a great tool for active surveillance cultures. Treatment options for MDRA infections in Japan are very limited, because colistin, polymyxin B, or tigecycline is not approved. Keys to control MDRA are high levels of compliance with standard and contact precautions, appropriate cleaning and disinfection of the environment, and judicious antimicrobial use.

  8. Candida Arthritis: Analysis of 112 Pediatric and Adult Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gamaletsou, Maria N.; Rammaert, Blandine; Bueno, Marimelle A.; Sipsas, Nikolaos V.; Moriyama, Brad; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Roilides, Emmanuel; Zeller, Valerie; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J.; Miller, Andy O.; Petraitiene, Ruta; Lortholary, Olivier; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Candida arthritis is a debilitating form of deeply invasive candidiasis. However, its epidemiology, clinical manifestations, management, and outcome are not well understood. Methods. Cases of Candida arthritis were reviewed from 1967 through 2014. Variables included Candida spp in joint and/or adjacent bone, underlying conditions, clinical manifestations, inflammatory biomarkers, diagnostic imaging, management, and outcome. Results. Among 112 evaluable cases, 62% were males and 36% were pediatric. Median age was 40 years (range, <1–84 years). Most patients (65%) were not pharmacologically immunosuppressed. Polyarticular infection (≥3 joints) occurred in 31% of cases. Clinical manifestations included pain (82%), edema (71%), limited function (39%), and erythema (22%) with knees (75%) and hips (15%) most commonly infected. Median erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 62 mm/hr (10–141) and C reactive protein 26 mg/dL (0.5–95). Synovial fluid median white blood cell count was 27 500/µL (range, 100–220 000/µL) with 90% polymorphonuclear neutrophils (range, 24–98). Adjacent osteomyelitis was present in 30% of cases. Candida albicans constituted 63%, Candida tropicalis 14%, and Candida parapsilosis 11%. Most cases (66%) arose de novo, whereas 34% emerged during antifungal therapy. Osteolysis occurred in 42%, joint-effusion in 31%, and soft tissue extension in 21%. Amphotericin and fluconazole were the most commonly used agents. Surgical interventions included debridement in 25%, irrigation 10%, and drainage 12%. Complete or partial response was achieved in 96% and relapse in 16%. Conclusion. Candida arthritis mainly emerges as a de novo infection in usually non-immunosuppressed patients with hips and knees being most commonly infected. Localizing symptoms are frequent, and the most common etiologic agents are C albicans, C tropicalis, and C parapsilosis. Management of Candida arthritis remains challenging with a clear risk of relapse

  9. In vitro biofilm production of Candida bloodstream isolates: any association with clinical characteristics?

    PubMed

    Pongrácz, Júlia; Benedek, Kálmán; Juhász, Emese; Iván, Miklós; Kristóf, Katalin

    2016-04-01

    Candida spp. are a leading cause of bloodstream infection (BSI) and are associated with high mortality rates. Biofilm production is a virulence factor of Candida spp., and has been linked with poor clinical outcome. The aim of our study was to assess biofilm production of Candida bloodstream isolates at our institute, and to determine whether in vitro biofilm production is associated with any clinical characteristics of infection. During the four-year study period, 93 cases of Candida BSI were analysed. The most frequently isolated species was C. albicans (66.7 %), followed by C. glabrata (9.7 %), C. parapsilosis (9.7 %), C. tropicalis (9.7 %) and C. krusei (4.3 %). Biofilm production was more prevalent among non-albicans Candida spp. (77.4 %) than C. albicans (30.6 %) (P = 0.02). Abdominal surgery was identified as a risk factor of BSI caused by biofilm producing non-albicans Candida isolates. No risk factors predisposing to bloodstream infection caused by a biofilm producing C. albicans isolate were identified. Biofilm production was not verified as a risk factor of mortality.

  10. Itraconazole-resistant Candida auris with phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysin activity from a case of vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Banerjee, Tuhina; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Tilak, Ragini

    2015-04-15

    Since the emergence of pathogenic non-albicans Candida species, a number of new isolates have been added to the list. One such unusual species is Candida auris (C. auris), recently isolated and studied in few reports. In this study, a case of vulvovaginitis caused by Candida auris incidentally identified by molecular methods using internal transcribed spacer polymerase chain reaction (ITS PCR) is described. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed the isolate to be resistant to itraconazole (MIC ≥ 2 µg/ml) and expressed important virulence factors including phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysin activity. The patient was successfully treated with oral fluconazole and did not have any invasive fungemia. Very few cases of this emerging pathogen have been reported. However, its isolation from clinical specimens reveals the significance of non-albicans candida species over C. albicans and the diversity of Candida spp causing infections.

  11. Potent Antifungal Activity of Pure Compounds from Traditional Chinese Medicine Extracts against Six Oral Candida Species and the Synergy with Fluconazole against Azole-Resistant Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhimin; Hua, Hong; Xu, Yanying; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antifungal activities of four traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) extracts. The inhibitory effects of pseudolaric acid B, gentiopicrin, rhein, and alion were assessed using standard disk diffusion and broth microdilution assays. They were tested against six oral Candida species, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Candida dubliniensis, and Candida guilliermondii, including clinical isolates from HIV-negative, HIV-positive, and Sjögren's syndrome patients. It was found that pseudolaric acid B had the most potent antifungal effect and showed similar antifungal activity to all six Candida spp, and to isolates from HIV-negative, HIV-positive, and Sjögren's syndrome patients. The MIC values ranged from 16 to 128 μg/mL. More interestingly, a synergistic effect of pseudolaric acid B in combination with fluconazole was observed. We suggest that pseudolaric acid B might be a potential therapeutic fungicidal agent in treating oral candidiasis. PMID:22454653

  12. In vitro evaluation of vincristine and fluconazole combination against Candida.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Arif; Khurshid, Mohsin; Tawfik, A F

    2013-09-01

    Infections associated with cancer are a major scourge and cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. The aim of present study was to appraise the in vitro activity of anticancer agent vincristine and antifungal fluconazole alone and in combination against Candida spp. Results were interpreted in terms of fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI). Antifungal activity of fluconazole showed marked synergism when used in combination with vincristine, with FICI ranging from 0.25-0.5 against different Candida spp. Although, the use of vincristine with fluconazole is always disputed due to its side effects including decreased peristalsis, but the present research can help to perform suitability analysis of fluconazole use in life threatening invasive candidiasis associated with cancer patients. In addition, the synergism in antifungal activity after using with vincristine also warrants further research in the direction of minimizing adverse reaction associated with combined use of fluconazole and vincristine.

  13. Echinocandin Resistance in Candida Species Isolates from Liver Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Prigent, Gwénolé; Aït-Ammar, Nawel; Levesque, Eric; Fekkar, Arnaud; Costa, Jean-Marc; El Anbassi, Sarra; Foulet, Françoise; Duvoux, Christophe; Merle, Jean-Claude; Dannaoui, Eric; Botterel, Françoise

    2017-02-01

    Liver transplant recipients are at risk of invasive fungal infections, especially candidiasis. Echinocandin is recommended as prophylactic treatment but is increasingly associated with resistance. Our aim was to assess echinocandin drug resistance in Candida spp. isolated from liver transplant recipients treated with this antifungal class. For this, all liver-transplanted patients in a University Hospital (Créteil, France) between January and June of 2013 and 2015 were included. Susceptibilities of Candida isolates to echinocandins were tested by Etest and the EUCAST reference method. Isolates were analyzed by FKS sequencing and genotyped based on microsatellites or multilocus sequence typing (MLST) profiles. Ninety-four patients were included, and 39 patients were colonized or infected and treated with echinocandin. Echinocandin resistance appeared in 3 (8%) of the treated patients within 1 month of treatment. One patient was colonized by resistant Candida glabrata, one by resistant Candida dubliniensis, and one by resistant Candida albicans Molecular analysis found three mutations in FKS2 HS1 (F659S, S663A, and D666E) for C. glabrata and one mutation in FKS1 HS1 (S645P) for C. dubliniensis and C. albicans Susceptible and resistant isolates belonged to the same genotype. To our knowledge, this is the first study on echinocandin resistance in Candida spp. in a liver transplant population. Most resistant isolates were found around/in digestive sites, perhaps due to lower diffusion of echinocandin in these sites. This work documents the risk of emergence of resistance to echinocandin, even after short-term treatment. Copyright © 2017 Prigent et al.

  14. Echinocandin Resistance in Candida Species Isolates from Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Prigent, Gwénolé; Aït-Ammar, Nawel; Levesque, Eric; Fekkar, Arnaud; Costa, Jean-Marc; El Anbassi, Sarra; Foulet, Françoise; Duvoux, Christophe; Merle, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Liver transplant recipients are at risk of invasive fungal infections, especially candidiasis. Echinocandin is recommended as prophylactic treatment but is increasingly associated with resistance. Our aim was to assess echinocandin drug resistance in Candida spp. isolated from liver transplant recipients treated with this antifungal class. For this, all liver-transplanted patients in a University Hospital (Créteil, France) between January and June of 2013 and 2015 were included. Susceptibilities of Candida isolates to echinocandins were tested by Etest and the EUCAST reference method. Isolates were analyzed by FKS sequencing and genotyped based on microsatellites or multilocus sequence typing (MLST) profiles. Ninety-four patients were included, and 39 patients were colonized or infected and treated with echinocandin. Echinocandin resistance appeared in 3 (8%) of the treated patients within 1 month of treatment. One patient was colonized by resistant Candida glabrata, one by resistant Candida dubliniensis, and one by resistant Candida albicans. Molecular analysis found three mutations in FKS2 HS1 (F659S, S663A, and D666E) for C. glabrata and one mutation in FKS1 HS1 (S645P) for C. dubliniensis and C. albicans. Susceptible and resistant isolates belonged to the same genotype. To our knowledge, this is the first study on echinocandin resistance in Candida spp. in a liver transplant population. Most resistant isolates were found around/in digestive sites, perhaps due to lower diffusion of echinocandin in these sites. This work documents the risk of emergence of resistance to echinocandin, even after short-term treatment. PMID:27855078

  15. Production of white colonies on CHROMagar Candida BD by species in the C. glabrata clade, and other species with overlapping phenotypic traits.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chromogenic agars are important diagnostic media used in the clinical mycology laboratory. Candida spp. that produced white colonies on CHROMagar Candida (Becton Dickinson) (CAC) were found during a study designed to detect and identify C. bracarensis, a newly-described species in the C. glabrata c...

  16. Candida infection of the skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000880.htm Candida infection of the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Candida infection of the skin is a yeast infection ...

  17. The colonization with Candida species is more harmful in the second trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Iris; Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2017-04-01

    Vaginal colonization with Candida species (spp.) during pregnancy has been associated with impaired pregnancy outcomes. There is a reduction in spontaneous preterm birth among women with recurrent asymptomatic colonization of Candida who were treated with clotrimazole. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the trimester of vulvovaginal colonization with Candida species. Data from all women, who were tested positive for the vaginal colonization with Candida spp. during the first or second trimester of pregnancy, and who registered for a planned birth at our tertiary referral center between 2005 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Their preterm birth rate served as the primary outcome variable. Secondary outcome variables were neonatal birthweight and Apgar score. Overall, 1066 women were eligible for the study. In 673 women (63%), who were diagnosed with Candida spp. during the first trimester of pregnancy, the rate of preterm birth was 10% (N = 64). In 393 women (37%), who were diagnosed with candidosis during the second trimester, the preterm birth rate was 18% (N = 71; p = 0.0002). Neonates of women, who presented with vulvovaginal candidosis during the first trimester, had a mean birthweight of 3243 g, compared to 2989 g in the group with a second trimester colonization (p < 0.0001). Women who are colonized with Candida spp. during the second trimester of pregnancy have higher rates of preterm birth and lower neonatal birthweight than those who are colonized during the first trimester of their pregnancy. Screening programs for asymptomatic Candida colonization should take this information into account.

  18. Thrush and Other Candida Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Thrush and Other Candida Infections Page Content Article Body The fungus Candida is normally found on and in the body ... tract and genital area. Most of the time, Candida does not cause any symptoms. When these organisms ...

  19. Description of Groenewaldozyma gen. nov. for placement of Candida auringiensis, Candida salmanticensis and Candida tartarivorans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    DNA sequence analyses have demonstrated that species of the polyphyletic anamorphic ascomycete genus Candida may be members of described teleomorphic genera, members of the Candida tropicalis clade upon which the genus Candida is circumscribed, or members of isolated clades that represent undescribe...

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Candida albicans and Its Closely Related Yeasts Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana▿

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Orazio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We performed a molecular study to determine the occurrence of Candida albicans, Candida africana, and Candida dubliniensis in different clinical samples. The study provides new insights into the epidemiology of candidiasis in hospitalized patients in three hospitals in southern Italy. It also reports the first detailed epidemiological data concerning the occurrence of C. africana in clinical samples. PMID:18987171

  1. Performance of Candida ID, a New Chromogenic Medium for Presumptive Identification of Candida Species, in Comparison to CHROMagar Candida

    PubMed Central

    Willinger, Birgit; Hillowoth, Cornelia; Selitsch, Brigitte; Manafi, Mammad

    2001-01-01

    Candida ID agar allows identification of Candida albicans and differentiation of other Candida species. In comparison with CHROMagar Candida, we evaluated the performance of this medium directly from 596 clinical specimens. In particular, detection of C. albicans after 24 h of incubation was easier on Candida ID (sensitivity, 96.8%) than on CHROMagar (sensitivity, 49.6%). PMID:11574621

  2. Contribution of Aspartic Proteases in Candida Virulence. Protease Inhibitors against Candida Infections.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Małgorzata, Bondaryk; Zbigniew, Ochal

    2016-08-09

    Candida species are the major opportunistic human pathogens accounting for 70-90% of all invasive fungal infections. Candida spp, especially C. albicans, are able to produce and secrete hydrolytic enzymes, particularly aspartic proteases (Saps). These enzymes production is an evolutionary adaptation of pathogens to utilize nutrients and survive in host. Sap1-10 are believed to contribute to the adhesion and invasion of host tissues through the degradation of cell surface structures. Aspartic proteases control several steps in innate immune evasion and they degrade proteins related to immunological defense (antibodies, complement and cytokines), allowing the fungus to escape from the first line of host defense. The existing ways to identify potential drug targets rely on specific subset like virulence genes, transcriptional and stress response factors. Candida virulence factors like Sap isoenzymes can be pivotal targets for drug development. The identification of mechanism of a non-canonical inflammasome exerted by Saps could open novel therapeutic strategies to dampen hyperinflammatory response in candidiasis.

  3. CHROMagar Candida, a new differential isolation medium for presumptive identification of clinically important Candida species.

    PubMed Central

    Odds, F C; Bernaerts, R

    1994-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a novel, differential culture medium that is claimed to facilitate the isolation and presumptive identification of some clinically important yeast species. We evaluated the use of this medium with 726 yeast isolates, including 82 isolated directly on the medium from clinical material. After 2 days of incubation at 37 degrees C, 285 C. albicans isolates gave distinctive green colonies that were not seen with any of 441 other yeast isolates representing 21 different species. A total of 54 C. tropicalis isolates also developed distinctive dark blue-gray colonies with a halo of dark brownish purple in the surrounding agar. C. krusei isolates (n = 43) also formed highly characteristic rough, spreading colonies with pale pink centers and a white edge that was otherwise encountered only rarely with isolates of C. norvegensis. Trichosporon spp. (n = 34) formed small, pale colonies that became larger and characteristically rough with prolonged incubation. Most of the other 310 yeasts studied formed colonies with a color that ranged from white to pink to purple with a brownish tint. The only exceptions were found among isolates identified as Geotrichum sp. or Pichia sp., some of which formed colonies with a gray to blue color and which in two instances formed a green pigment or a dark halo in the agar. The specificity and sensitivity of the new medium for the presumptive identification of C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis exceeded 99% for all three species. A blinded reading test involving four personnel and 57 yeast isolates representing nine clinically important species confirmed that colonial appearance after 48 h of incubation on CHROMagar Candida afforded the correct presumptive recognition of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C, krusei, and Trichosporon spp. None of nine bacterial isolates grew on CHROMagar Candida within 72 h, and bacteria (Escherichia coli) grew from only 4 of 104 vaginal, 100 oral, and 99 anorectal swabs. The new medium

  4. Candida species from oral cavity of HIV-infected children exhibit reduced virulence factors in the HAART era.

    PubMed

    Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Lima de Amorim, Elaine; Santos, Adrielle Mangabeira; Alexandre da Rocha Curvelo, José; de Oliveira Martins, Karol; Capillé, Cauli Lima; Maria de Araújo Soares, Rosangela; Barbosa de Araújo Castro, Gloria Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess, in vitro, the biofilm viability and the phospholipase and protease production of Candida spp. from the saliva of HIV infected children and healthy controls, and to correlate the results with the use of medical data. A total of 79 isolates were analyzed: 48 Candida albicans isolates (33/15) and 20 Candida parapsilosis sensu lato complex isolates (12/8) (from HIV/control patients, respectively), and 8 Candida krusei, 1 Candida tropicalis, 1 Candida dubliniensis and 1 Candida guilliermondii from HIV patients. The XTT (2, 3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-Carboxanilide) reduction assay analyzed the biofilm viability. Phospholipase and protease assays were performed using the egg yolk and Bovine Serum Albumin agar plate methods, respectively. All isolates were able to form biofilm with cell viability. Quantitatively, Candida isolates from both groups presented a similar ability to form biofilm (p > 0.05). The biofilm viability activity was higher in C. albicans isolates than in non-albicans Candida isolates (p < 0.05) for both groups. Phospholipase activity was detected in 32 isolates (40.5%) and it was significantly higher in the HIV group (p = 0.006). Protease activity was detected in 66 isolates (84.8%) and most of them were relatively/very strong producers. No statistical association with medical data was found in the HIV group. Although Candida spp. isolates from HIV-positive children presented higher phospholipase production, in vitro they exhibited reduced virulence factors compared to isolates from healthy individuals. This finding may enlighten the role played by immunosuppression in the modulation of Candida virulence attributes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Brazilian Green Propolis Compared to Miconazole Gel in the Treatment of Candida-Associated Denture Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Capistrano, Hermínia Marques; de Assis, Eliene Magda; Leal, Rosana Maria; Alvarez-Leite, Maria Eugênia; Brener, Sylvie; Bastos, Esther Margarida Alves Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the efficacy of Brazilian green propolis in comparison to miconazole gel in the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Methods. Forty-five denture stomatitis patients, with palatal mucosa erythema levels classified according to Newtons's criteria and with positive culture to Candida spp., were randomly divided into three treatment groups: 15 received miconazole gel 2%, 15 received propolis gel 2,5%, and 15 received propolis 24% for mouthwash. After four daily use lasting two weeks, they were reexamined for the denture stomatitis degree and for a second culture of Candida. The Wilcoxon's test was applied to compare the results of clinical classification of the denture stomatitis and the Candida spp. colonies numbers, before and after each treatment. The Kruskall-Wallis's test was used to compare efficacy among the three treatment groups. Results. There were a significant reduction or complete remission of denture stomatitis (P < 0.05) and a significant decrease of Candida colonies for the three groups (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the efficacy among the treatment groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Brazilian green propolis has a similar effect as miconazole in the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis being an alternative in the therapeutics of this condition. PMID:23737855

  6. Candida/Candida biofilms. First description of dual-species Candida albicans/C. rugosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Aline Oliveira; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida Martins; Singulani, Junya de Lacorte; Abrão, Fariza; Moraes, Thais de; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2016-04-01

    Denture liners have physical properties that favour plaque accumulation and colonization by Candida species, irritating oral tissues and causing denture stomatitis. To isolate and determine the incidence of oral Candida species in dental prostheses, oral swabs were collected from the dental prostheses of 66 patients. All the strains were screened for their ability to form biofilms; both monospecies and dual-species combinations were tested. Candida albicans (63 %) was the most frequently isolated microorganism; Candida tropicalis (14 %), Candida glabrata (13 %), Candida rugosa (5 %), Candida parapsilosis (3 %), and Candida krusei (2 %) were also detected. The XTT assay showed that C. albicans SC5314 possessed a biofilm-forming ability significantly higher (p < 0.001) than non-albicans Candida strains, after 6 h 37 °C. The total C. albicans CFU from a dual-species biofilm was less than the total CFU of a monospecies C. albicans biofilm. In contrast to the profuse hyphae verified in monospecies C. albicans biofilms, micrographies showed that the C. albicans/non-albicans Candida biofilms consisted of sparse yeast forms and profuse budding yeast cells that generated a network. These results suggested that C. albicans and the tested Candida species could co-exist in biofilms displaying apparent antagonism. The study provide the first description of C. albicans/C. rugosa mixed biofilm.

  7. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida glabrata species complex, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis species complex and Candida tropicalis causing invasive candidiasis in China: 3 year national surveillance.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Fan, Xin; Chen, Sharon C-A; Wang, He; Sun, Zi-Yong; Liao, Kang; Chen, Shu-Lan; Yan, Yan; Kang, Mei; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Chu, Yun-Zhuo; Hu, Tie-Shi; Ni, Yu-Xing; Zou, Gui-Ling; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-03-01

    To define the antifungal susceptibility patterns of the most common non-albicans Candida spp. in China. We evaluated the susceptibilities to nine antifungal drugs of Candida parapsilosis species complex, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata species complex and Candida krusei isolates from patients with invasive candidiasis at 11 hospitals over 3 years. Isolates were identified by MALDI-TOF MS supplemented by DNA sequencing. MICs were determined by Sensititre YeastOne(TM) using current clinical breakpoints/epidemiological cut-off values to assign susceptibility (or WT), and by CLSI M44-A2 disc diffusion for fluconazole and voriconazole. Of 1072 isolates, 392 (36.6%) were C. parapsilosis species complex. C. tropicalis, C. glabrata species complex and C. krusei comprised 35.4%, 24.3% and 3.7% of the isolates, respectively. Over 99.3% of the isolates were of WT phenotype to amphotericin B and 5-flucytosine. Susceptibility/WT rates to azoles among C. parapsilosis species complex were ≥97.5%. However, 11.6% and 9.5% of C. tropicalis isolates were non-susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively (7.1% were resistant to both). Approximately 14.3% of C. glabrata sensu stricto isolates (n = 258) were fluconazole resistant, and 11.6% of C. glabrata sensu stricto isolates were cross-resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole. All C. krusei isolates were susceptible/WT to voriconazole, posaconazole and itraconazole. Overall, 97.7%-100% of isolates were susceptible to caspofungin, micafungin and anidulafungin, but 2.3% of C. glabrata were non-susceptible to anidulafungin. There was no azole/echinocandin co-resistance. Disc diffusion and Sensititre YeastOne(TM) methods showed >95% categorical agreement for fluconazole and voriconazole. In summary, reduced azole susceptibility was seen among C. tropicalis. Resistance to echinocandins was uncommon. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial

  8. Molecular Tools for Cryptic "Candida" Species Identification with Applications in a Clinical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamarra, Soledad; Dudiuk, Catiana; Mancilla, Estefania; Vera Garate, Maria Veronica; Guerrero, Sergio; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    "Candida" spp. includes more than 160 species but only 20 species pose clinical problems. "C. albicans" and "C. parapsilosis" account for more than 75% of all the fungemias worldwide. In 1995 and 2005, one "C. albicans" and two "C. parapsilosis"-related species were described, respectively. Using…

  9. Molecular Tools for Cryptic "Candida" Species Identification with Applications in a Clinical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamarra, Soledad; Dudiuk, Catiana; Mancilla, Estefania; Vera Garate, Maria Veronica; Guerrero, Sergio; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    "Candida" spp. includes more than 160 species but only 20 species pose clinical problems. "C. albicans" and "C. parapsilosis" account for more than 75% of all the fungemias worldwide. In 1995 and 2005, one "C. albicans" and two "C. parapsilosis"-related species were described, respectively. Using…

  10. Description of Groenewaldozyma gen. nov. for placement of Candida auringiensis, Candida salmanticensis and Candida tartarivorans.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2016-07-01

    DNA sequence analyses have demonstrated that species of the polyphyletic anamorphic ascomycete genus Candida may be members of described teleomorphic genera, members of the Candida tropicalis clade upon which the genus Candida is circumscribed, or members of isolated clades that represent undescribed genera. From phylogenetic analysis of gene sequences from nuclear large subunit rRNA, mitochondrial small subunit rRNA and cytochrome oxidase II, Candida auringiensis (NRRL Y-17674(T), CBS 6913(T)), Candida salmanticensis (NRRL Y-17090(T), CBS 5121(T)), and Candida tartarivorans (NRRL Y-27291(T), CBS 7955(T)) were shown to be members of an isolated clade and are proposed for reclassification in the genus Groenewaldozyma gen. nov. (MycoBank MB 815817). Neighbouring taxa include species of the Wickerhamiella clade and Candida blankii.

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Activity of a Novel Antifungal Small Molecule against Candida Infections

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Kwok Yong; Wang, Yu; Yang, Dan; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2014-01-01

    Candida is the most common fungal pathogen of humans worldwide and has become a major clinical problem because of the growing number of immunocompromised patients, who are susceptible to infection. Moreover, the number of available antifungals is limited, and antifungal-resistant Candida strains are emerging. New and effective antifungals are therefore urgently needed. Here, we discovered a small molecule with activity against Candida spp. both in vitro and in vivo. We screened a library of 50,240 small molecules for inhibitors of yeast-to-hypha transition, a major virulence attribute of Candida albicans. This screening identified 20 active compounds. Further examination of the in vitro antifungal and anti-biofilm properties of these compounds, using a range of Candida spp., led to the discovery of SM21, a highly potent antifungal molecule (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.2 – 1.6 µg/ml). In vitro, SM21 was toxic to fungi but not to various human cell lines or bacterial species and was active against Candida isolates that are resistant to existing antifungal agents. Moreover, SM21 was relatively more effective against biofilms of Candida spp. than the current antifungal agents. In vivo, SM21 prevented the death of mice in a systemic candidiasis model and was also more effective than the common antifungal nystatin at reducing the extent of tongue lesions in a mouse model of oral candidiasis. Propidium iodide uptake assay showed that SM21 affected the integrity of the cell membrane. Taken together, our results indicate that SM21 has the potential to be developed as a novel antifungal agent for clinical use. PMID:24465737

  12. Candida--agent of the diaper dermatitis?

    PubMed

    Dorko, E; Virágová, S; Pilipcinec, E; Tkáciková, L

    2003-01-01

    Occurrence of Candida spp. was determined in a population of 60 infants, 1-15-month-old, with diaper dermatitis, admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit in Hospital Saca (Kosice, Slovakia). Specimens were obtained from the perianal, pubic, inguinal, or gluteal areas that showed signs of secondary infection as manifested by erythema, oozing, vesiculopustular lesions, and pus formation. The most frequently isolated species was C. albicans (41), followed by C. parapsilosis (8), C. tropicalis (4), C. pulcherrima (4), C. guilliermondii (2), and C. zeylanoides (1). Other organisms present in the mixed culture from the diaper area were Staphylococcus aureus (6), Escherichia coli (3), and 2 strains of each group B and D streptococci, and Proteus mirabilis. Infants diapered exclusively in disposable diapers showed less rash than those diapered exclusively or sometimes in cloth diapers.

  13. Oral Candida colonization and its relation with predisposing factors in HIV-infected children and their uninfected siblings in Brazil: the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Daniella Ferraz; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Pomarico, Luciana; de Araújo Soares, Rosangela Maria; de Souza, Ivete Pomarico Ribeiro; Castro, Glória Fernanda

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate predisposing factors such as orofacial manifestations, immunosuppression status and antiretroviral therapy in relation to oral colonization by Candida spp. in Brazilian HIV-infected children and their uninfected siblings in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Whole stimulated saliva was collected from 65 HIV-infected children (HIV+) and 40 uninfected siblings (HIV-), followed by assessment of orofacial manifestation, caries indexes and the number of cavitated dentinal carious teeth (CDT). The salivary samples were cultured and the colonies were counted. After which they were identified by sugar assimilation and fermentation (API 20C). Data was analyzed using chi-square, Mann-Whitney, Spearman tests and logistic regression. Regarding positive growth, HIV+ presented 80% (52/65) and HIV- 57.5% (23/40) (P = 0.013). Absence of antiretroviral therapy and HAART increased the probability of Candida isolation (P < 0.05). Mean CD4%, immune-status and history of recurrent oral candidiasis (OC) had no influence on Candida isolation. Mixed Candida spp. cultures were observed in HIV+ (40%) and HIV- (52%): C. albicans was more frequently found in both groups, with a higher prevalence in HIV+ (P = 0.05); other non-albicans species were isolated in HIV+ and HIV-. Low prevalence of orofacial manifestations was observed in HIV+ (10.7% of OC). There was an association between means of CDT and Candida growth (P < 0.05) and a positive correlation between number of CDT and Candida cfu-counts in HIV+ and HIV-. Mean CD4% and immune-status had no influence on Candida isolation. Absence of antiretroviral therapy and HAART increased the probability of Candida isolation (P < 0.05). The HIV infected children had a significantly higher prevalence of oral Candida spp. compared to their uninfected siblings. Absence of HAART and presence of dentinal carious teeth increased significantly Candida spp. colonization in these children.

  14. The significance of Candida in the human respiratory tract: our evolving understanding.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Kathryn M; Huffnagle, Gary B; Dickson, Robert P

    2017-04-01

    Candida is an opportunistic pathogen and the most commonly isolated fungal genus in humans. Though Candida is often detected in respiratory specimens from humans with and without lung disease, its significance remains undetermined. While historically considered a commensal organism with low virulence potential, the status of Candida as an innocent bystander has recently been called into question by both clinical observations and animal experimentation. We here review what is currently known and yet to be determined about the clinical, microbiological and pathophysiological significance of the detection of Candida spp. in the human respiratory tract. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Candidal urinary tract infections caused by non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Dorko, E; Pilipcinec, E; Tkáciková, L

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of non-albicans Candida and non-Candida species isolated from the urine of patients admitted to various departments of the Faculty Hospital of the Medical Faculty of Safárik University in Kosice was examined. From a total of 94 samples of analyzed urine 58 strains of C. albicans and 36 strains of yeasts belonging to 6 species of non-albicans Candida and non-Candida spp. were detected: C. parapsilosis (n = 23), C. tropicalis (6), C. krusei (3), C. robusta (2), C. catenulata (1) and Cryptococcus neoformans (1). In relation to the diagnosis, the yeasts were isolated from patients suffering from a kidneys disease, epididymitis, diabetes, neoplastic diseases, urogenital anomalies, obstructive uropathy, cystitis, prostatitis, hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and others.

  16. Oral Candida albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals have similar in vitro biofilm-forming ability and pathogenicity as invasive Candida isolates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Candida can cause mucocutaneous and/or systemic infections in hospitalized and immunosuppressed patients. Most individuals are colonized by Candida spp. as part of the oral flora and the intestinal tract. We compared oral and systemic isolates for the capacity to form biofilm in an in vitro biofilm model and pathogenicity in the Galleria mellonella infection model. The oral Candida strains were isolated from the HIV patients and included species of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, C. norvegensis, and C. dubliniensis. The systemic strains were isolated from patients with invasive candidiasis and included species of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. lusitaniae, and C. kefyr. For each of the acquired strains, biofilm formation was evaluated on standardized samples of silicone pads and acrylic resin. We assessed the pathogenicity of the strains by infecting G. mellonella animals with Candida strains and observing survival. Results The biofilm formation and pathogenicity in Galleria was similar between oral and systemic isolates. The quantity of biofilm formed and the virulence in G. mellonella were different for each of the species studied. On silicone pads, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis produced more biofilm (1.12 to 6.61 mg) than the other species (0.25 to 3.66 mg). However, all Candida species produced a similar biofilm on acrylic resin, material used in dental prostheses. C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis were the most virulent species in G. mellonella with 100% of mortality, followed by C. lusitaniae (87%), C. novergensis (37%), C. krusei (25%), C. glabrata (20%), and C. kefyr (12%). Conclusions We found that on silicone pads as well as in the Galleria model, biofilm formation and virulence depends on the Candida species. Importantly, for C. albicans the pathogenicity of oral Candida isolates was similar to systemic Candida isolates, suggesting that Candida

  17. Photodynamic inactivation of oropharyngeal Candida strains.

    PubMed

    Postigo, Agustina; Bulacio, Lucía; Sortino, Maximiliano

    2014-09-25

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is an infection frequent in immunocompromised patients. Photodynamic therapy is an alternative to conventional treatments, based on the utilization of compounds that inhibit or kill microorganisms only under the effect of light, process known as Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI). In the present study, PDI of Candida spp. by the natural product α-terthienyl (α-T) was investigated following the guidelines of CLSI M27-A3, under UV-A light irradiation. The optimal values of two variables, exposure irradiation time (ET) and distance to the irradiation source (DIS) were established by employing Design Expert Software (DES). For this purpose, a panel of Candida strains isolated from OPC (C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. krusei) was employed and optimal values were 5 min (ET) and between 6.06 and 6.43 cm (DIS) with a desirability factor of 0.989. α-T plus UV-A light in the optimal conditions caused a complete reduction in viable cells in 5 min which was demonstrated by viable cells reduction assays and confocal microscopy after vital staining (propidium iodide/fluorescein diacetate). The germ tube formation of C. albicans was inhibited by α-T at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Results showed that α-T plus UV-A light could constitute an alternative for OPC treatments at the optimal conditions determined here. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. Candida Infection of the Bloodstream - Candidemia

    MedlinePlus

    Candida Infection of the Bloodstream– Candidemia Fungal Disease Series #4 Candida is the single most important cause of fungal infections worldwide. In the U.S., Candida is the 4th most common cause of bloodstream ...

  19. 21 CFR 173.160 - Candida guilliermondii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.160 Candida guilliermondii. The food additive Candida... the following conditions: (a) The food additive is the enzyme system of the viable organism Candida...

  20. 21 CFR 173.160 - Candida guilliermondii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.160 Candida guilliermondii. The food additive Candida... the following conditions: (a) The food additive is the enzyme system of the viable organism Candida...

  1. The Candida Pathogenic Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Siobhán A.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Candida species are the most common causes of fungal infection. Approximately 90% of infections are caused by five species: Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei. Three (C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis) belong to the CTG clade, in which the CTG codon is translated as serine and not leucine. C. albicans remains the most commonly isolated but is decreasing relative to the other species. The increasing incidence of C. glabrata is related to its reduced susceptibility to azole drugs. Genome analysis suggests that virulence in the CTG clade is associated with expansion of gene families, particularly of cell wall genes. Similar independent processes took place in the C. glabrata species group. Gene loss and expansion in an ancestor of C. glabrata may have resulted in preadaptations that enabled pathogenicity. PMID:25183855

  2. Synthesis and cytotoxicity of novel (thiazol-2-yl)hydrazine derivatives as promising anti-Candida agents.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Simone; Secci, Daniela; Bolasco, Adriana; Rivanera, Daniela; Mari, Emanuela; Zicari, Alessandra; Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria; Bizzarri, Bruna

    2013-07-01

    Thirty-eight new (4-(4-substituted-phenyl/2,4-disubstituted-phenyl)-thiazol-2-yl)hydrazine derivatives were synthesized in good yield and assayed for their in vitro anti-Candida activity, compared to topical and systemic antifungal drugs, against twenty-two clinical isolates of Candida spp. The concurrent presence of aliphatic chains or cycloaliphatic rings at N1-hydrazine and a 4-methyl/4-methoxyphenyl at C4 position of the thiazole nucleus exhibited an interesting anti-Candida inhibitory activity. Moreover, some of the most active compounds showed synergistic antifungal effects and lower cell toxicity when combined with clotrimazole.

  3. Retrospective analysis of mortality and Candida isolates of 75 patients with candidemia: a single hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ryuichi; Sakamoto, Yuichi; Kudo, Kumiko; Ohnishi, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    The mortality rate for candidemia is approximately 30%–60%. However, prognostic factors in patients with candidemia have not yet been elucidated in detail. The aim of the present study was to analyze prognostic factors for candidemia using the mortality rate and Candida isolates of patients with candidemia. Seventy-five patients with candidemia were analyzed between January 2007 and December 2013. The main outcome of this study was the 30-day mortality rate after the diagnosis of candidemia. The acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (APACHE II score) was measured in 34 patients (45.3%). Odds ratios (ORs) for death due to candidemia were analyzed using a multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis. Twenty (26.6%) patients died within 30 days of being diagnosed with candidemia. Non-survivors had a significantly higher APACHE II score (n=7, mean; 18.9±4.5) than that of survivors (n=27, mean; 14.0±5.0). Advanced age (OR =1.1, 95% confidence interval =1.01–1.23, P=0.04) was a significant risk factor for a high mortality rate, whereas removal of a central venous catheter (OR =0.03, 95% confidence interval =0.002–0.3, P=0.01) was associated with a lower mortality rate. Seventy-six Candida spp. were isolated from blood cultures: Candida albicans 28 (36.8%), Candida parapsilosis 23 (30.2%), Candida guilliermondii 16 (21.0%), Candida glabrata four (5.2%), Candida tropicalis two (2.6%), and Candida spp. three (3.9%) that could not be identified. C. parapsilosis was the most frequently isolated species in younger patients (<65 years), whereas C. albicans was the most frequently isolated in elderly patients (≥65 years). Physicians who treat candidemia need to consider removing the central venous catheter and pay attention to the general condition of patients, particularly that of elderly patients. PMID:26185460

  4. Voriconazole inhibits biofilm formation in different species of the genus Candida.

    PubMed

    Valentín, A; Cantón, E; Pemán, J; Martínez, J P

    2012-10-01

    To determine the ability of voriconazole to inhibit the formation of biofilms. A total of 38 blood isolates of Candida spp. (8 Candida albicans, 10 Candida tropicalis, 10 Candida glabrata, 7 Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto and 3 Candida orthopsilosis) and C. albicans ATCC 90028 and ATCC 64548 were assessed. Biofilm formation was quantified using XTT reduction assays. The inhibition of biofilm formation was determined (i) in the presence of 0.06 and 0.25 mg/L voriconazole, and (ii) on surfaces previously coated with 0.06, 0.25, 1, 4 and 16 mg/L voriconazole. Voriconazole reduced biofilm formation under both conditions, the extent depending on the species, isolate and drug concentration. In the presence of 0.25 mg/L, the highest reduction was found for C. parapsilosis (79% ± 8.6%), followed by C. albicans (64.5% ± 6.3%), C. tropicalis (53.3% ± 13.1%) and C. glabrata (23.8% ± 11.2%). This reduction was significant (P < 0.05) for all isolates tested. After coating the wells with voriconazole, biofilm formation was reduced in all Candida spp. examined, C. albicans being the species with the highest reduction (68.8% with 16 mg/L) and C. parapsilosis complex and C. glabrata the lowest. As voriconazole reduces biofilm formation it may be a good candidate for the prevention of Candida biofilm-related infections although further studies using voriconazole-impregnated catheter tubing or prostheses are required to confirm these results.

  5. Vapour and Liquid-Phase Artemisia annua Essential Oil Activities against Several Clinical Strains of Candida.

    PubMed

    Santomauro, Francesca; Donato, Rosa; Sacco, Cristiana; Pini, Gabriella; Flamini, Guido; Bilia, Anna Rita

    2016-07-01

    Candida spp. are often the cause of infection in immune-compromised individuals. They are characterized by a strong resistance to antimicrobial drugs and disinfectants. The activity of Artemisia annua essential oil against Candida spp. was determined by vapour contact and microdilution assay. The oil was characterized by the presence of oxygenated monoterpenes (more than 75 % of the constituents), mainly represented by the irregular monoterpene artemisia ketone (ca. 22 %), and the widespread monoterpenes 1,8 cineole (ca. 19 %) and camphor (ca. 17 %). Other representative constituents were artemisia alcohol (5.9 %), α-pinene (5.7 %), and pinocarvone (3.0 %). Thujone, a typical toxic constituent of the Artemisia species, was not detected. The results are reported as minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum fungicidal concentration, and diameter of inhibition zone obtained by the vapour diffusion assay. We tested 10 clinical Candida strains, coming from both clinical samples and international collections. The results show that the antifungal activity of A. annua is influenced by the type of method adopted. The inhibitory action of the essential oil was, in fact, higher in the vapour than in the liquid phase. Our results show an average minimum inhibitory concentration in the liquid phase of 11.88 µL/mL, while in the vapour phase, the growth of all Candida strains tested at a concentration of 2.13 µL/cm(3) was inhibited. A strain of Candida glabrata was found to be less susceptible to the liquid medium than the vapour assay (50 µL/mL vs. 0.64 µL/cm(3), respectively). Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis were the most susceptible to the vapour test, while Candida parapsilosis was the most resistant. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Ammonium assimilation by Candida albicans and other yeasts: evidence for activity of glutamate synthase.

    PubMed

    Holmes, A R; Collings, A; Farnden, K J; Shepherd, M G

    1989-06-01

    Activities and properties of the ammonium assimilation enzymes NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamate synthase (GOGAT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) were determined in batch and continuous cultures of Candida albicans. NADP+-dependent GDH activity showed allosteric kinetics, with an S0.5 for 2-oxoglutarate of 7.5 mM and an apparent Km for ammonium of 5.0 mM. GOGAT activity was affected by the buffer used for extraction and assay, but in phosphate buffer, kinetics were hyperbolic, yielding Km values for glutamine of 750 microM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 65 microM. The enzymes GOGAT and NADP+-dependent GDH were also assayed in batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and three other pathogenic Candida spp.: Candida tropicalis, Candida pseudotropicalis and Candida parapsilosis. Evidence is presented that GS/GOGAT is a major pathway for ammonium assimilation in Candida albicans and that this pathway is also significant in other Candida species.

  7. Clinical significance of the isolation of Candida species from hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Yankee C; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Q; Melônio, Luciane C; Ribeiro, Patrícia C S; Cosme, Lécia M; Rhoden, Cristianne R; Marques, Sirlei G

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we isolated and phenotypically identified 108 yeast strains from various clinical specimens collected from 100 hospitalized patients at three tertiary hospitals in São Luís-Maranhão, Brazil, from July to December 2010. The isolates were analyzed for their susceptibility to four of the most widely used antifungal agents in the surveyed hospitals, amphotericin B, fluconazole, 5-flucytosine and voriconazole. The species identified were Candida albicans (41.4%), Candida tropicalis (30.1%), C. glabrata (7.4%), Candida parapsilosis (5.5%), Candida krusei (4.6%), Cryptococcus neoformans (4.6%), Trichosporon spp . (3.7%), Candida norvegensis (0.9%), Rhodotorula glutinis (0.9%) and Pichia farinosa (0.9%). A higher isolation rate was observed in the following clinical specimens: urine (54 isolates; 50%), respiratory tract samples (21 isolates; 19.4%) and blood (20 isolates; 18.6%). Candida albicans isolates were 100% sensitive to all antifungal agents tested, whereas Candida krusei and Crytococcus neoformans displayed intermediate resistance to 5-flucytosine, with Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values of 8 mg/mL and 16 mg/mL, respectively. Both strains were also S-DD to fluconazole with an MIC of 16 mg/mL. C. tropicalis was resistant to 5-flucytosine with an MIC of 32 μg/mL. This study demonstrates the importance of identifying the yeast species involved in community and nosocomial infections.

  8. COMPARISON BETWEEN FOUR USUAL METHODS OF IDENTIFICATION OF Candida SPECIES

    PubMed Central

    SOUZA, Margarida Neves; ORTIZ, Stéfanie Otowicz; MELLO, Marcelo Martins; OLIVEIRA, Flávio de Mattos; SEVERO, Luiz Carlos; GOEBEL, Cristine Souza

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Infection by Candidaspp. is associated with high mortality rates, especially when treatment is not appropriate and/or not immediate. Therefore, it is necessary to correctly identify the genus and species of Candida. The aim of this study was to compare the identification of 89 samples of Candida spp. by the manual methods germ tube test, auxanogram and chromogenic medium in relation to the ID 32C automated method. The concordances between the methods in ascending order, measured by the Kappa index were: ID 32C with CHROMagar Candida(κ = 0.38), ID 32C with auxanogram (κ = 0.59) and ID 32C with germ tube (κ = 0.9). One of the species identified in this study was C. tropicalis,which demonstrated a sensitivity of 46.2%, a specificity of 95.2%, PPV of 80%, NPV of 81.1%, and an accuracy of 80.9% in tests performed with CHROMagar Candida;and a sensitivity of 76.9%, a specificity of 96.8%, PPV of 90.9%, NPV of 91%, and an accuracy of 91% in the auxanogram tests. Therefore, it is necessary to know the advantages and limitations of methods to choose the best combination between them for a fast and correct identification of Candidaspecies. PMID:26422150

  9. Growing Candida albicans Biofilms on Paper Support and Dynamic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Selow, Marcela Lima Cardoso; Rymovicz, Alinne Ulbrich Mores; Ribas, Cristina Rauen; Saad, Renata Simão; Rosa, Rosimeire Takaki; Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro

    2015-08-01

    A stainless steel paper-embedded biofilm reactor (PEBR) was developed for Candida spp. growth, permitting confluent distribution of nutrients by capillary diffusion through ordinary laboratory filter paper. Antibiogram disks were distributed along the filter paper rim, and the PEBR received 0.1 or 0.01 % crystal violet (CV) at 200 μL min(-1) and at 37 °C, for 48 h. CV was recovered from the disks and measured at 540 nm. Candida albicans SC5314 cells were applied onto antibiogram disks. The bioreactor was assembled, and YEPD broth was admitted (200 μL min(-1)) at 37 °C, for 72 h. Biofilm growth was estimated via the MTT reduction test. Controls were disks that received the same treatments, except for the fungus. The PEBR was considered high-throughput table, low-cost, and feasible to grow C. albicans biofilms.

  10. Candida species: new insights into biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; López-Romero, Everardo; Villagómez-Castro, Julio C; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2012-06-01

    Biofilms of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis are associated with high indices of hospital morbidity and mortality. Major factors involved in the formation and growth of Candida biofilms are the chemical composition of the medical implant and the cell wall adhesins responsible for mediating Candida-Candida, Candida-human host cell and Candida-medical device adhesion. Strategies for elucidating the mechanisms that regulate the formation of Candida biofilms combine tools from biology, chemistry, nanoscience, material science and physics. This review proposes the use of new technologies, such as synchrotron radiation, to study the mechanisms of biofilm formation. In the future, this information is expected to facilitate the design of new materials and antifungal compounds that can eradicate nosocomial Candida infections due to biofilm formation on medical implants. This will reduce dissemination of candidiasis and hopefully improve the quality of life of patients.

  11. The carriage of Candida species on the dorsal surface of the tongue: the correlation with the dental, periodontal and prosthetic status in elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Ohshima, Tomoko; Yasunari, Utako; Namikoshi, Satoko; Yoshihara, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Hideo; Maeda, Nobuko

    2006-09-01

    To screen the carriage status of Candida species, especially Candida albicans and its genotype in an epidemiological survey and to investigate its correlation with the dental, periodontal and prosthetic status of healthy elderly subjects. Microbiological samples were collected from the dorsum of the tongue of 366 subjects, aged 75, and cultured on CHROMagar medium. The carriage status of Candida spp. and the distribution of C. albicans genotypes by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method were analysed and compared with the dental, periodontal and prosthetic status of the subjects. A high carriage rate (68.6%) of Candida spp. and the predominant species of C. albicans (72.1%) were found in this study. The prevalence, density and multi-species of Candida spp. were significantly related to the presence of a dental prosthesis. In C. albicans, genotype A predominated (56.4%) and genotype D showed a higher prevalence (12.5%) than previous reports. When comparing Candida spp. carriage with the oral status, significant positive correlations were found with the presence of any dental prosthesis, missing teeth, the number of retained roots and the percentage of sites showing bleeding on probing (BOP), while significant negative correlations were found with the number of teeth present, sound and filled teeth. Candida carriage on the dorsum of the tongue in healthy elderly is significantly associated with the dental, periodontal and prosthetic status, especially the presence of a dental prosthesis. As the complexity of the prosthesis being worn increased, the relative risk of Candida carriage and the numbers and multi-species of Candida increased accordingly.

  12. Hand carriage of Candida occurs at lesser rates in hospital personnel who use antimicrobial hand disinfectant.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Mustafa; Sahin, Idris; Oksuz, Sukru; Sencan, Irfan; Kucukbayrak, Abdulkadir; Cakir, Selma; Ozaydin, Cigdem

    2014-09-01

    The hands of hospital personnel are considered to be important for colonization and infection of patients with Candida spp. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different hand disinfectants in reducing the carriage of Candida species on the hands of hospital personnel. A controlled study was conducted at Duzce University School of Medicine Hospital. Eighty hospital personnel were included in the trial. Subjects were divided into 4 groups according to hand hygiene procedures: group 1, hand rubbing with alcohol-based solution; group 2, hand washing with 4% chlorhexidine gluconate; group 3, hand washing with 7.5% povidone-iodine; group 4, hand washing with plain soap and water. The hands of all participants were tested by culture with the broth wash technique. Hand carriage of Candida spp. was lower in the 4% chlorhexidine gluconate group (10.5%, p = 0.006), in the 7.5% povidone-iodine group (18.7%, p = 0.043), and in the alcohol-based hand rub group (21.1%, p = 0.048) compared to the group washing hands with plain soap and water (50%). The use of hand disinfectant containing antimicrobial agents is more effective than hand washing with water and soap in reducing carriage of Candida on the hands of hospital personnel. It is recommended that hospital personnel use an antimicrobial hand disinfectant in units where there is a high risk of Candida infection.

  13. Mammary candidiasis: molecular-based detection of Candida species in human milk samples.

    PubMed

    Mutschlechner, W; Karall, D; Hartmann, C; Streiter, B; Baumgartner-Sigl, S; Orth-Höller, D; Lass-Flörl, C

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective and monocentric study, we investigated the performance of a commercialized real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test system for the specific detection of DNA from Candida albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. lusitaniae, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis in human milk samples of patients suspicious of mammary candidiasis. For this purpose, 43 breast-feeding women with characteristic symptoms of mammary candidiasis and 40 asymptomatic controls were enrolled. By culture, Candida spp. were detected in 8.8 % (4/46) and 9.3 % (4/43) of patient and control samples, respectively. Candida albicans (2/46), C. parapsilosis (1/46), and C. guilliermondii (1/46) were present in patient samples, and C. lusitaniae (3/43) and C. guilliermondii (1/43) were present in the controls. After RT-PCR was applied, Candida spp. were found to be present in 67.4 % (31/46) and 79.1 % (34/43) of patient and control samples investigated, respectively. PCR detection of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis revealed only a low sensitivity and specificity of 67.4 % and 41.9 %, respectively. Our data do not support the use of Candida RT-PCR for sensitive and specific diagnosis of mammary candidiasis.

  14. Antifungal Drug Susceptibility of Candida Species Isolated from HIV-Positive Patients Recruited at a Public Hospital in São Luís, Maranhão, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Terças, Ana L. G.; Marques, Sirlei G.; Moffa, Eduardo B.; Alves, Márcia B.; de Azevedo, Conceição M. P. S.; Siqueira, Walter L.; Monteiro, Cristina A.

    2017-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common fungal infection in hospitalized patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Its progression results in invasive infections, which are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to quickly and accurately identify Candida spp. from oral mucosa of AIDS patients recruited at Presidente Vargas Hospital, in São Luís city, Brazil and to evaluate the sensitivity profile of these fungi to antifungals by using an automated system. Isolates were collected from oropharyngeal mucosa of 52 hospitalized AIDS patients, under anti-viral and antifungal therapies. Patients were included in research if they were HIV-positive, above 18 years of age and after obtaining their written consent. CHROMagar®Candida and the automated ViteK-2®system were used to isolate and identify Candida spp., respectively. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed using the ViteK-2®system, complemented with the Etest®, using the drugs amphotericin B, fluconazole, flucytosine, and voriconazole. Oropharyngeal candidiasis had a high prevalence in these hospitalized AIDS patients (83%), and the most prevalent species was Candida albicans (56%). Antifungal susceptibility test showed that 64.7% of the Candida spp. were susceptible, 11.8% were dose-dependent sensitive, and 23.5% were resistant. All the Candida krusei and Candida famata isolates and two of Candida glabrata were resistant to fluconazole. Most of AIDS patients presented oropharyngeal candidiasis and C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species. The results showed high variability in resistance among isolated species and indicates the need to identify the Candida spp. involved in the infection and the need to test antifungal susceptibility as a guide in drug therapy in patients hospitalized with AIDS. This is the first relate about AIDS patients monitoring in a public hospital in São Luís concerning the precise identification and establishing of

  15. Echinocandin Resistance in Candida.

    PubMed

    Perlin, David S

    2015-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections are an important infection concern for patients with underlying immunosuppression. Antifungal therapy is a critical component of patient care, but therapeutic choices are limited due to few drug classes. Antifungal resistance, especially among Candida species, aggravates the problem. The echinocandin drugs (micafungin, anidulafungin, and caspofungin) are the preferred choice to treat a range of candidiasis. They target the fungal-specific enzyme glucan synthase, which is responsible for the biosynthesis of a major cell wall polymer. Therapeutic failure involves acquisition of resistance, although it is a rare event among most Candida species. However, in some settings, higher-level resistance has been reported among Candida glabrata, which is also frequently resistant to azole drugs, resulting in difficult-to-treat multidrug-resistant strains. The mechanism of echinocandin resistance involves amino acid changes in "hot spot" regions of FKS-encoded subunits of glucan synthase, which decreases the sensitivity of enzyme to drug, resulting in higher minimum inhibitory concentration values. The cellular processes promoting the formation of resistant FKS strains involve complex stress response pathways that yield a variety of adaptive compensatory genetic responses. Standardized broth microdilution techniques can be used to distinguish FKS mutant strains from wild type, but testing C. glabrata with caspofungin should be approached cautiously. Finally, clinical factors that promote echinocandin resistance include prophylaxis, host reservoirs including biofilms in the gastrointestinal tract, and intra-abdominal infections. An understanding of clinical and molecular factors that promote echinocandin resistance is critical to develop better diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies to overcome resistance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  16. 21 CFR 173.160 - Candida guilliermondii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Candida guilliermondii. 173.160 Section 173.160... CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.160 Candida guilliermondii. The food additive Candida... the following conditions: (a) The food additive is the enzyme system of the viable organism Candida...

  17. [Candida laryngitis and HIV infection: description of 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Roig, P; Carrasco, R; Salavert, M; Navarro, V; Guix, J; Nieto, A; Bernacer, B

    1992-10-01

    Candidiasic laryngitis is a very rare Candida spp infection of mucosa, appearing typically in immunosuppressed patients, mainly in patients with neoplasia, and, recently, in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (VIH) infection. We present four cases of candidiasic laryngitis and HIV infection, as well as the clinical description and evolution of said cases after treatment with fluconazole. We review, as well, the cases published on the scientific literature. We maintain that in each HIV infected patient, with or without oral candidiasis, who shows dysphonia, candidiasic laryngitis should be ruled out.

  18. Pigeons and their droppings as reservoirs of Candida and other zoonotic yeasts.

    PubMed

    Rosario Medina, Inmaculada; Román Fuentes, Lorena; Batista Arteaga, Miguel; Real Valcárcel, Fernando; Acosta Arbelo, Félix; Padilla Del Castillo, Daniel; Déniz Suárez, Soraya; Ferrer Quintana, Otilia; Vega Gutiérrez, Belinda; Silva Sergent, Freddy; Acosta-Hernández, Begoña

    2017-07-15

    The importance of pigeons as reservoirs and carriers of Cryptococcus neoformans and other species of this genus is well-known; however, less is known about their role as reservoirs and carriers of other yeasts that impact public health. The present study was performed on Gran Canaria Island to define yeasts other than Cryptococcus spp. that have been reported to impact public health and which could be carried by pigeons. Samples were obtained from 83 pigeon lofts (Columba livia); moreover, 331 crop samples, 331 cloacal samples and 174 dropping samples were collected. In addition, 17 dropping samples were taken from a total of 17 public squares. Samples were inoculated on Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol. Different yeast species, i.e. Candida guilliermondii (24.36%), Candida kefyr (1.21%), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (2.43%), and Trichosporon asahii (1.21%) were isolated for the first time from the cloaca. The most frequently isolated yeast from the crop, cloaca and dropping samples from lofts was C. guilliermondii (30.46%, 24.36% and 49.37%, respectively). In addition, for the first time, C. kefyr (3.65%), Candida pelliculosa (2.43%), Candida rugosa (1.21%), T. asahii (3.65%), Trichosporon mucoides (3.65%) and Prototheca wickerhamii (1.21%) were obtained from crop samples; Candida pelliculosa (1.20%), T. asahii (9.63%) and T. mucoides (7.22%) were isolated from dropping samples in the lofts. Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated yeast in dropping samples collected in public squares. It can be assumed that pigeons and their droppings act as carriers and reservoirs of Candida spp. and other zoonotic yeasts. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of Etest method for determining caspofungin (MK-0991) susceptibilities of 726 clinical isolates of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Messer, S A; Mills, K; Bolmström, A; Jones, R N

    2001-12-01

    The performance of the Etest for testing the susceptibilities to caspofungin (MK-0991) of 726 isolates of Candida spp. was assessed against the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) microdilution broth method. The NCCLS method employed RPMI 1640 broth medium, and MICs were read after incubation for 48 h at 35 degrees C. MICs were determined by Etest for all 726 isolates with RPMI agar containing 2% glucose (RPG) and were read after incubation for 48 h at 35 degrees C. The Candida isolates included Candida albicans (n = 486), Candida glabrata (n = 96), Candida tropicalis (n = 51), Candida parapsilosis (n = 47), Candida krusei (n = 11), Candida lusitaniae (n = 2), and Candida guilliermondii (n = 33). In addition, a subset of 314 isolates were also tested by Etest using Casitone agar (CAS) and antibiotic medium 3 agar (AM3). The Etest results obtained using RPG correlated well with reference MICs. Overall agreement was 94% with RPG, 82% with CAS, and 79% with AM3. When RPG was used, agreement ranged from 79% for C. parapsilosis to 100% for C. krusei, C. lusitaniae, and C. guilliermondii. When CAS was used, agreement ranged from 0% for C. lusitaniae to 100% for C. glabrata. With AM3, agreement ranged from 0% for C. lusitaniae to 100% for C. guilliermondii. All three media supported growth of each of the Candida species. Etest results were easy to read, with sharp zones of inhibition. In most instances (75%) where a discrepancy was observed between the Etest and the reference method, the Etest MIC was lower. The Etest method using RPG appears to be useful for determining caspofungin susceptibilities of Candida species.

  20. Yeasts from Scarlet ibises (Eudocimus ruber): A focus on monitoring the antifungal susceptibility of Candida famata and closely related species.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Silva, Aline Lobão da; Monteiro, Frederico Ozanan Barros; Guedes, Glaucia Morgana de Melo; Sales, Jamille Alencar; Oliveira, Jonathas Sales de; Maia Junior, José Erisvaldo; Miranda, Stefânia Araújo; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Alencar, Lucas Pereira de; Castelo-Branco, Débora Souza Collares Maia; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Pereira Neto, Waldemiro de Aquino; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to identify yeasts from the gastrointestinal tract of scarlet ibises (Eudocimus ruber) and from plant material collected from the environment where they live. Then, the isolates phenotypically identified as Candida famata were submitted to molecular identification of their closely related species and evaluated for their antifungal susceptibility and possible resistance mechanisms to antifungal drugs. Cloacal swabs from 20 scarlet ibises kept in captivity at Mangal das Garças Park (Brazil), pooled stool samples (n = 20) and samples of trunks and hollow of trees (n = 20) obtained from their enclosures were collected. The samples were seeded on Sabouraud agar supplemented with chloramphenicol. The 48 recovered isolates were phenotypically identified as 15 Candida famata, 13 Candida catenulata, 2 Candida intermedia, 1 Candida lusitaniae, 2 Candida guilliermondii, 1 Candida kefyr, 1 Candida amapae, 1 Candida krusei, 8 Trichosporon spp., and 4 Rhodotorula spp. The C. famata isolates were further identified as 3 C. famata, 8 Debaryomyces nepalensis, and 4 C. palmioleophila. All C. famata and C. palmioleophila were susceptible to caspofungin and itraconazole, while one D. nepalensis was resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole. This same isolate and another D. nepalensis had lower amphotericin B susceptibility. The azole resistant strain had an increased efflux of rhodamine 6G and an alteration in the membrane sterol content, demonstrating multifactorial resistance mechanism. Finally, this research shows that scarlet ibises and their environment harbor C. famata and closely related species, including antifungal resistant isolates, emphasizing the need of monitoring the antifungal susceptibility of these yeast species. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. High throughput multiplex-PCR for direct detection and diagnosis of dermatophyte species, Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis in clinical specimen.

    PubMed

    Vahidnia, Ali; Bekers, Wouter; Bliekendaal, Harry; Spaargaren, Joke

    2015-06-01

    We have developed and validated a multiplex-PCR method for detection of dermatophyte spp., Candida albicans and parapsilosis for routine diagnostics. Our m-PCR showed excellent concordance with culture results in 475 clinical samples. Through the rapid diagnosis by our m-PCR, clinicians are able to initiate adequate antimycotic therapy much earlier. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Photoinactivation of single and mixed biofilms of Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida species using Phorodithazine(®).

    PubMed

    Carmello, Juliana Cabrini; Alves, Fernanda; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Jorge, Janaina Habib; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) mediated by Photodithazine(®) (PDZ) formulated in hydrogel, in the inactivation of mono and duo-species biofilms of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis. Standardized suspensions of each strain were prepared and after biofilm formation, mono-species were treated with 150 and 175mg/L of PDZ for 20min (pre-irradiation time), and exposed to LED light at a dose of 37.5J/cm(2) (660nm). The duo-species biofilms (C. albicans+C. glabrata and C. albicans+C. tropicalis) were treated with 150mg/L of PDZ and light. Additional samples were treated with PDZ or light only, and the control did not receive any treatment. Next, microbiological evaluation was performed by spreading the cells on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar and CHROMagar Candida for colony forming units (CFU/mL). Moreover, the total biomass of biofilm was verified using the crystal violet staining assay (CV). The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc (α=0.05). The use of PDZ 150mg/L promoted a reduction of 1.0, 1.2, 1.5 log10 in the viability of C. glabrata, C. albicans and C. tropicalis, respectively. The same concentration reduced in 1.0 log10 the viability of each species grown as duo-species biofilms. The crystal violet assay showed that the use of 150mg/L reduced 24.4%, 39.2% and 43.7% of the total biomass of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata, respectively. aPDT did not reduce the total biomass to the duo-species biofilms. Thus, PDZ-mediated aPDT was more effective in the inactivation of mono-species biofilms of Candida spp. compared with duo-species biofilm.

  3. An extraction method of positive blood cultures for direct identification of Candida species by Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, Rose-Anne; Chauvin, Pamela; Valentin, Alexis; Fillaux, Judith; Roques-Malecaze, Christine; Arnaud, Sylvie; Menard, Sandie; Magnaval, Jean-François; Berry, Antoine; Cassaing, Sophie; Iriart, Xavier

    2013-08-01

    Candida spp. are an important cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Currently, complete identification of yeasts with conventional methods takes several days. We report here the first evaluation of an extraction method associated with the Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry for direct identification of Candida species from positive blood cultures. We evaluated this protocol with blood cultures that were inoculated with reference and routine isolates (eight reference strains, 30 patients isolates and six mixed cultures containing two strains of different Candida species), or from patients with candidemia (28 isolates). This method performed extremely well (97% correct identification) with blood cultures of single Candida spp. and significantly reduced the time of diagnosis. Nevertheless, subculture remains indispensable to test fungal resistance and to detect mixed infections.

  4. Association of clinical and demographic factors in invasive candidiasis caused by fluconazole-resistant Candida species: a study in 15 hospitals, Medellín, Colombia 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Natalia Andrea; Cano, Luz Elena; De Bedout, Catalina; Arbeláez, Carlos Alberto; Roncancio, Gustavo; Tabares, Angela María; Robledo, Carlos Gonzalo; Robledo, Jaime

    2014-06-01

    Candida is the most important agent of fungal infections. Several risk factors have been described associated with invasive infection by fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. A prospective cross-sectional study with case-control analysis was conducted. Case group patients with fluconazole-resistant Candida isolate were included; control group were patients with fluconazole-susceptible Candida spp. A multivariate logistic regression model was performed. Three hundred isolates of Candida spp. were analyzed. Most frequent species were Candida albicans/Candida dubliniensis (48.3%) and Candida tropicalis (22.3%). Posaconazole susceptibility was 93.7%; voriconazole, 84%; and fluconazole, 78.7%. Susceptibility to anidulafungin and caspofungin was 92.7% and 92.3%, respectively. Neutropenia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 6.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-43.1), antifungal exposure (aOR 5.1, 95% CI 2.3-11.2), and antituberculosis therapy (aOR 7.7, 95% CI 1.4-43.2) were associated to fluconazole resistance. Susceptibility results are useful to guide the selection of empiric antifungal treatment and the design of local therapeutic guidelines. Previous antifungal exposure suggests possible resistance to fluconazole, pointing towards the selection of a different class of antifungal agents.

  5. Procalcitonin as a marker of Candida species detection by blood culture and polymerase chain reaction in septic patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of our study is to test procalcitonin (PCT) as surrogate marker of identification of Candida spp. by blood culture (BC) and real-time-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), whether alone or in association with bacteria, in septic patients. Methods We performed a single-centre retrospective study. We reviewed the clinical charts of patients with a diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock treated at our general intensive care unit from March 2009 to March 2013. We analysed all diagnostic episodes consisting of BC, real-time PCR assay and dosage of PCT. We registered age, sex, white blood count, sequential organ failure assessment score and type of admission between medical or surgical. When inclusion criteria were met more than once, we registered the new diagnostic episode as subsequent diagnostic episode. The diagnostic performance of PCT to predict Candida spp. identification alone or in mixed infections by either BC or PCR was tested using the receiver-operative characteristic curve. Logistic regression was constructed using presence of Candida spp. as the dependent variable. Results A total of 260 diagnostic episodes met the inclusion criteria. According to BC results classification, a significantly lower value of PCT was observed in Candida spp. BSI (0.99 ng/ml, 0.86 - 1.34) than in BSI caused by bacteria (16.7 ng/ml, 7.65 - 50.2) or in mixed infections (4.76 ng/ml, 2.98 - 6.08). Similar findings were observed considering PCR results. A cut-off of ≤ 6.08 ng/ml for PCT yielded a sensitivity of 86.8%, a specificity of 87.4%, a positive predictive value of 63.9%, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 96.3% and an area under the curve of 0.93 for Candida spp. identification by BC. A similar high NPV for a cut-off ≤ 6.78 ng/ml was observed considering the classification of diagnostic episodes according to PCR results, with an AUC of 0.85. A subsequent diagnostic episode was independently associated with Candida spp. detection either by

  6. Candida albicans pathogenicity mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, François L.; Wilson, Duncan; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans is a member of the normal human microbiome. In most individuals, C. albicans resides as a lifelong, harmless commensal. Under certain circumstances, however, C. albicans can cause infections that range from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Several factors and activities have been identified which contribute to the pathogenic potential of this fungus. Among them are molecules which mediate adhesion to and invasion into host cells, the secretion of hydrolases, the yeast-to-hypha transition, contact sensing and thigmotropism, biofilm formation, phenotypic switching and a range of fitness attributes. Our understanding of when and how these mechanisms and factors contribute to infection has significantly increased during the last years. In addition, novel virulence mechanisms have recently been discovered. In this review we present an update on our current understanding of the pathogenicity mechanisms of this important human pathogen. PMID:23302789

  7. Yeasts isolated from Algerian infants's feces revealed a burden of Candida albicans species, non-albicans Candida species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Seddik, Hamza Ait; Ceugniez, Alexandre; Bendali, Farida; Cudennec, Benoit; Drider, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at showing the yeast diversity in feces of Algerian infants, aged between 1 and 24 months, hospitalized at Bejaia hospital (northeast side of the country). Thus, 20 colonies with yeast characteristics were isolated and identified using biochemical (ID32C Api system) and molecular (sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) methods. Almost all colonies isolated (19 strains) were identified as Candida spp., with predominance of Candida albicans species, and one strain was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Screening of strains with inhibitory activities unveiled the potential of Candida parapsilosis P48L1 and Candida albicans P51L1 to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Further studies performed with these two Candida strains revealed their susceptibility to clinically used antifungal compounds and were then characterized for their cytotoxicity and hemolytic properties. On the other hand, Saccharomyces cerevisiae P9L1 isolated as well in this study was shown to be devoid of antagonism but resulted safe and overall usable as probiotic.

  8. Performance of CHROMAGAR candida and BIGGY agar for identification of yeast species.

    PubMed

    Yücesoy, Mine; Marol, Serhat

    2003-10-29

    The importance of identifying the pathogenic fungi rapidly has encouraged the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of yeasts. In this study two differential media, CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar, were evaluated for the presumptive identification of yeast species. A total number of 270 yeast strains including 169 Candida albicans, 33 C. tropicalis, 24 C. glabrata, 18 C. parapsilosis, 12 C. krusei, 5 Trichosporon spp., 4 C. kefyr, 2 C. lusitaniae, 1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 1 Geotrichum candidum were included. The strains were first identified by germ tube test, morphological characteristics on cornmeal tween 80 agar and Vitek 32 and API 20 C AUX systems. In parallel, they were also streaked onto CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar plates. The results were read according to the color, morphology of the colonies and the existance of halo around them after 48 hours of incubation at 37 degrees C. The sensitivity and specificity values for C. albicans strains were found to be 99.4, 100% for CHROMagar Candida and 87.0, 75.2% for BiGGY agar, respectively. The sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida to identify C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei ranged between 90.9 and 100% while the specificity was 100%. The sensitivity rates for BiGGY agar were 66.6 and 100% while the specificity values were found to be 95.4 and 100% for C. tropicalis and C. krusei, respectively. It can be concluded that the use of CHROMagar Candida is an easy and reliable method for the presumptive identification of most commonly isolated Candida species especially C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei. The lower sensitivity and specificity of BiGGY agar to identify commonly isolated Candida species potentially limits the clinical usefulness of this agar.

  9. Fluconazole susceptibility and ERG11 gene expression in vaginal candida species isolated from lagos Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Pam, Victoria K; Akpan, Juliet U; Oduyebo, Oyinlola O; Nwaokorie, Francisca O; Fowora, Muinah A; Oladele, Rita O; Ogunsola, Folasade T; Smith, Stella I

    2012-01-01

    Fluconazole resistance is an important type of resistance in Candida because in most countries, fluconazole is the drug of choice for vulvovaginal candidiasis. Candida species resist fluconazole by various mechanisms but there is paucity of data on these in our environment. Such mechanisms include among others, over-expression of the ERG11 gene, which codes for synthesis of the target enzymes in the fungus. The aim of this study was to screen Candida spp. resistant to fluconazole for the expression of ERG11 gene. Fluconazole susceptibility test was performed on 28 clinical strains of Candida species previously obtained from students of a School of Nursing in Lagos, Nigeria. They were identified by API Candida, CHROMagar candida and germ tube test. Using 25 mcg discs, fluconazole susceptibility was determined by the disc diffusion method and results were interpreted in accordance with the Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) criteria; sensitive (S), resistant (R) and susceptible dose dependent (SDD). The R and SDD isolates were subsequently evaluated for the presence of ERG11 gene. Of the 28 clinical isolates, 14 were identified as C. albicans and six as C. tropicalis. The remaining isolates were identified as C. glabrata (2), C. famata (2) C. kefyr (2) one each of C. parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii respectively. In this study, 18 were susceptible (S) to fluconazole, eight were SDD and two were resistant to the antifungal agent. Out of the 14 C. albicans isolates, 12 were susceptible, one showed high level resistance and similar number showed susceptible dose dependence. ERG11 was detected in three susceptible dose dependent Candida species. This analysis demonstrates that susceptible dose dependence should not be overlooked as it may be associated with the presence of ERG11 gene and resistance to fluconazole. There is a need to consider routine antifungal susceptibility testing for Candida species causing vulvovaginitis. PMID:22493755

  10. Performance of CHROMAGAR candida and BIGGY agar for identification of yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Yücesoy, Mine; Marol, Serhat

    2003-01-01

    Background The importance of identifying the pathogenic fungi rapidly has encouraged the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of yeasts. In this study two differential media, CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar, were evaluated for the presumptive identification of yeast species. Methods A total number of 270 yeast strains including 169 Candida albicans, 33 C. tropicalis, 24 C. glabrata, 18 C. parapsilosis, 12 C. krusei, 5 Trichosporon spp., 4 C. kefyr, 2 C. lusitaniae, 1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 1 Geotrichum candidum were included. The strains were first identified by germ tube test, morphological characteristics on cornmeal tween 80 agar and Vitek 32 and API 20 C AUX systems. In parallel, they were also streaked onto CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar plates. The results were read according to the color, morphology of the colonies and the existance of halo around them after 48 hours of incubation at 37°C. Results The sensitivity and specificity values for C. albicans strains were found to be 99.4, 100% for CHROMagar Candida and 87.0, 75.2% for BiGGY agar, respectively. The sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida to identify C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei ranged between 90.9 and 100% while the specificity was 100%. The sensitivity rates for BiGGY agar were 66.6 and 100% while the specificity values were found to be 95.4 and 100% for C. tropicalis and C. krusei, respectively. Conclusions It can be concluded that the use of CHROMagar Candida is an easy and reliable method for the presumptive identification of most commonly isolated Candida species especially C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei. The lower sensitivity and specificity of BiGGY agar to identify commonly isolated Candida species potentially limits the clinical usefulness of this agar. PMID:14613587

  11. Investigating Biofilm Production, Coagulase and Hemolytic Activity in Candida Species Isolated From Denture Stomatitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Nimet; Aktas, Esin; Dagistan, Saadettin; Ayyildiz, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Oral candidiasis, in the form of Candida-associated denture stomatitis, represents a common disease in a large percentage of denture wearers, and Candida albicans remains the most commonly isolated species. In this study, we aimed to evaluate biofilm production, coagulase and hemolytic activity of Candida species isolated from denture stomatitis patients. Materials and Methods: This study included 70 patients (31 female, 39 male). Forty-eight of the patients were found to have a positive culture. A total of 48 Candida isolates representing five species, C. albicans (n=17), C. glabrata (n=10), C. krusei (n=9), C. kefyr (n=7) and C. parapsilosis (n=5), were tested. Their coagulase activities were evaluated by a classical tube coagulase test with rabbit plasma. A blood plate assay on 3% enriched sheep blood Sabouraud-dextrose agar (SDA) was used to determine their in vitro hemolytic activities. Biofilm production was determined by a visual tube method. Results: Twenty-one Candida isolates exhibited coagulase activity, and the coagulase activities of the C. albicans (64.7%) isolates were higher than other species. C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. kefyr and C. krusei species demonstrated beta hemolysis. C. parapsilosis strains failed to demonstrate any hemolytic activities. Fifteen (88.0%) of the C. albicans strains were biofilm positive. Six (35.2%) of these strains were strongly positive, 8 (47.0%) C. albicans strains were moderately positive and 1 (5.8%) C. albicans strain was weakly positive. Sixteen (51.6%) of the non-albicans Candida strains were biofilm positive while 15 (48.3%) did not produce biofilms. Conclusion: The results of this present study indicate coagulase, hemolytic activity and biofilm production by Candida spp. isolated from patients with denture stomatitis. Investigations of these virulence factors might be helpful in gaining information about the possible virulence of oral Candida species related to denture stomatitis. PMID:25610156

  12. Histone Deacetylases and Their Inhibition in Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Garnaud, Cécile; Champleboux, Morgane; Maubon, Danièle; Cornet, Muriel; Govin, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Fungi are generally benign members of the human mucosal flora or live as saprophytes in the environment. However, they can become pathogenic, leading to invasive and life threatening infections in vulnerable patients. These invasive fungal infections are regarded as a major public health problem on a similar scale to tuberculosis or malaria. Current treatment for these infections is based on only four available drug classes. This limited therapeutic arsenal and the emergence of drug-resistant strains are a matter of concern due to the growing number of patients to be treated, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Adaptation of fungi to drug pressure involves transcriptional regulation, in which chromatin dynamics and histone modifications play a major role. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) remove acetyl groups from histones and actively participate in controlling stress responses. HDAC inhibition has been shown to limit fungal development, virulence, biofilm formation, and dissemination in the infected host, while also improving the efficacy of existing antifungal drugs toward Candida spp. In this article, we review the functional roles of HDACs and the biological effects of HDAC inhibitors on Candida spp., highlighting the correlations between their pathogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. We focus on how HDAC inhibitors could be used to treat invasive candidiasis while also reviewing recent developments in their clinical evaluation. PMID:27547205

  13. Comparison Between Biofilm Production, Phospholipase and Haemolytic Activity of Different Species of Candida Isolated from Dental Caries Lesions in Children

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Neetha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction C.albicans is the most commonly isolated fungal pathogen in the oral cavity, but isolation of non-albicans Candida is increasing in recent years. We wish to demonstrate the virulence factors of Candida spp. isolated from the dental caries lesion of the children as presence of virulence factors determines the pathogenic potential of any microorganism. Aim To compare biofilm production, phospholipase and haemolytic activity of C.albicans with that of non-albicans species of Candida isolated from dental caries lesions of children to evaluate the role of non- albicans species of Candida in formation of dental caries. Materials and Methods Oral swabs were collected from caries lesion of 100 school children of age 5-10 years with dental caries. Candida isolates were tested for biofilm production, phospholipase and haemolytic activity. Statistical analysis was done by Chi-Square test and Mann-Whitney U test wherever applicable using SPSS version 11.5. Results Out of the 100 children with dental caries 37 were positive for Candida by smear or culture and 31 by culture. C.albicans was the most prevalent isolate followed by C.krusei, C.tropicalis and C.albicans. Out of 21 C.albicans isolates, 10 (47.6%) showed phospholipase activity and 18 (85.71%) produced biofilm. Of the 10 non-albicans strains, 5 (50%) showed phospholipase activity and 6 (60%) produced biofilm. All isolates of Candida produced haemolysin (100%). Conclusion There was no statistically relevant difference between the virulence factor production by C.albicans and non-albicans species of Candida. In other words, our study shows that both C.albicans and non-albicans species of Candida isolated from caries lesions of the children, produce these virulence factors. So we can say that non-albicans species of Candida also are involved in caries formation. PMID:27190803

  14. The Role of Antifungals against Candida Biofilm in Catheter-Related Candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Bouza, Emilio; Guinea, Jesús; Guembe, María

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (C-RBSI) is one of the most frequent nosocomial infections. It is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Candida spp. is the third most common cause of C-RBSI after coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus and is responsible for approximately 8% of episodes. The main cause of catheter-related candidemia is the ability of some Candida strains—mainly C. albicans and C. parapsilosis—to produce biofilms. Many in vitro and in vivo models have been designed to assess the activity of antifungal drugs against Candida biofilms. Echinocandins have proven to be the most active antifungal drugs. Potential options in situations where the catheter cannot be removed include the combination of systemic and lock antifungal therapy. However, well-designed and -executed clinical trials must be performed before firm recommendations can be issued. PMID:27025612

  15. Candida profiles and antifungal resistance evolution over a decade in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Araj, George Farah; Asmar, Rima George; Avedissian, Aline Zakaria

    2015-09-27

    Infection with and antifungal resistance of Candida species have been on the rise globally. Relevant data on these pathogens are relatively few in our region, including Lebanon, thus warranting this study. This retrospective study of Candida spp. profiles and their in vitro antifungal susceptibility was based on analysis requests for 186 Candida non-albicans and 61 C. albicans during three periods (2005-2007, 2009-2011, and 2012-2014) over the span of the last 10 years at the American University of Beirut Medical Center (AUBMC), a major tertiary care center in Lebanon. Identification of Candida was done using the API 20C AUX system, and the E-test was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antifungal agents. Among the 1,300-1,500 Candida isolates recovered yearly, C. albicans rates decreased from 86% in 2005 to around 60% in 2014. Simultaneously, the non-albicans rates increased from 14% in 2005 to around 40% in 2014, revealing 11 species, the most frequent of which were C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. All these demonstrated high resistance (35%-79%) against itraconazole, but remained uniformly susceptible (100%) to amphotericin B. Though C. albicans and the other species maintained high susceptibility against fluconazole and voriconazole, their MIC90 showed an elevated trend over time, and C. glabrata had the highest resistance rates. The observed rise in resistance among Candida spp. in Lebanon mandates the need for close surveillance and monitoring of antifungal drug resistance for both epidemiologic and treatment purposes.

  16. Inactivation of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. by Palmitic, Stearic, and Oleic Acid Sophorolipids and Thiamine Dilauryl Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuejie; Ashby, Richard; Solaiman, Daniel K. Y.; Uknalis, Joseph; Fan, Xuetong

    2016-01-01

    Food contaminated with human pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes, frequently causes outbreaks of foodborne illness. Consumer concern over the use of synthesized antimicrobials to enhance microbial food safety has led to a search of natural alternatives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of various types of sophorolipids (SLs) and thiamine dilauryl sulfate (TDS) against pathogenic Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. Both free and lactonic forms of SLs were synthesized from Candida bombicola using palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids as co-feedstocks. TDS and purified SLs were used to treat cocktails of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. Results showed that lactonic SLs had higher antimicrobial activity than the free-acid form, and Gram-positive Listeria spp. were more susceptible to SLs and TDS than Gram-negative Salmonella spp. Listeria populations were reduced from an initial concentration of 7.2 log CFU/mL to a non-detectible level within a 1 min treatment of 0.1% (w/v) lactonic SLs and TDS in the presence of 20% ethanol, which itself did not significantly reduce the populations. There were no significant differences in the antimicrobial efficacy among palmitic, stearic, and oleic acid-based SLs against Salmonella or Listeria spp. Ethanol was utilized to improve the antimicrobial activity of free-acid SLs against Gram-negative bacteria. In general, TDS was more effective than the SLs against Salmonella and Listeria spp. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that SLs and TDS damaged Listeria cell membranes and resulted in cell lysis. Overall, our results demonstrated that SLs and TDS in the presence of ethanol can be used to inactivate foodborne pathogens, especially Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:28066390

  17. Inactivation of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. by Palmitic, Stearic, and Oleic Acid Sophorolipids and Thiamine Dilauryl Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejie; Ashby, Richard; Solaiman, Daniel K Y; Uknalis, Joseph; Fan, Xuetong

    2016-01-01

    Food contaminated with human pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes, frequently causes outbreaks of foodborne illness. Consumer concern over the use of synthesized antimicrobials to enhance microbial food safety has led to a search of natural alternatives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of various types of sophorolipids (SLs) and thiamine dilauryl sulfate (TDS) against pathogenic Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. Both free and lactonic forms of SLs were synthesized from Candida bombicola using palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids as co-feedstocks. TDS and purified SLs were used to treat cocktails of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. Results showed that lactonic SLs had higher antimicrobial activity than the free-acid form, and Gram-positive Listeria spp. were more susceptible to SLs and TDS than Gram-negative Salmonella spp. Listeria populations were reduced from an initial concentration of 7.2 log CFU/mL to a non-detectible level within a 1 min treatment of 0.1% (w/v) lactonic SLs and TDS in the presence of 20% ethanol, which itself did not significantly reduce the populations. There were no significant differences in the antimicrobial efficacy among palmitic, stearic, and oleic acid-based SLs against Salmonella or Listeria spp. Ethanol was utilized to improve the antimicrobial activity of free-acid SLs against Gram-negative bacteria. In general, TDS was more effective than the SLs against Salmonella and Listeria spp. scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that SLs and TDS damaged Listeria cell membranes and resulted in cell lysis. Overall, our results demonstrated that SLs and TDS in the presence of ethanol can be used to inactivate foodborne pathogens, especially Gram-positive bacteria.

  18. Interlaboratory Comparison of Results of Susceptibility Testing with Caspofungin against Candida and Aspergillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Odds, Frank C.; Motyl, Mary; Andrade, Roberto; Bille, Jacques; Cantón, Emilia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Davidson, Amanda; Durussel, Christian; Ellis, David; Foraker, Elyse; Fothergill, Annette W.; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Giacobbe, Robert A.; Gobernado, Miguel; Handke, Rosemary; Laverdière, Michel; Lee-Yang, Wendy; Merz, William G.; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Pemán, Javier; Perea, Sophia; Perfect, John R.; Pfaller, Michael A.; Proia, Laurie; Rex, John H.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan-Luis; Schell, Wiley A.; Shields, Christine; Sutton, Deanna A.; Verweij, Paul E.; Warnock, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Seventeen laboratories participated in a study of interlaboratory reproducibility with caspofungin microdilution susceptibility testing against panels comprising 30 isolates of Candida spp. and 20 isolates of Aspergillus spp. The laboratories used materials supplied from a single source to determine the influence of growth medium (RPMI 1640 with or without glucose additions and antibiotic medium 3 [AM3]), the same incubation times (24 h and 48 h), and the same end point definition (partial or complete inhibition of growth) for the MIC of caspofungin. All tests were run in duplicate, and end points were determined both spectrophotometrically and visually. The results from almost all of the laboratories for quality control and reference Candida and Aspergillus isolates tested with fluconazole and itraconazole matched the NCCLS published values. However, considerable interlaboratory variability was seen in the results of the caspofungin tests. For Candida spp. the most consistent MIC data were generated with visual “prominent growth reduction” (MIC2) end points measured at 24 h in RPMI 1640, where 73.3% of results for the 30 isolates tested fell within a mode ± one dilution range across all 17 laboratories. MIC2 at 24 h in RPMI 1640 or AM3 also gave the best interlaboratory separation of Candida isolates of known high and low susceptibility to caspofungin. Reproducibility of MIC data was problematic for caspofungin tests with Aspergillus spp. under all conditions, but the minimal effective concentration end point, defined as the lowest caspofungin concentration yielding conspicuously aberrant hyphal growth, gave excellent reproducibility for data from 14 of the 17 participating laboratories. PMID:15297486

  19. Role of Candida species from HIV infected children in enamel caries lesions: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Charone, Senda; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Martins, Karol de Oliveira; Soares, Rosangela Maria; Castro, Gloria Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzed the capacity of Candida spp. from dental biofilm of HIV infected (HIV+) children to demineralize primary molar enamel in vitro by Transversal Microhardness (TMH), Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM) and the quantity of calcium ions (Ca2+) released from the enamel. Candida spp. samples were isolated from the supragingival biofilm of HIV+ children. A hundred and forty (140) enamel blocks were randomly assigned to six groups: biofilm formed by C. albicans (Group 1); mixed biofilm formed by C. albicans and C. tropicalis (Group 2); mixed biofilm formed by C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (Group 3); mixed biofilm formed by C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata (Group 4); biofilm formed by C. albicans ATCC (Group 5) and medium without Candida (Group 6). Enamel blocks from each group were removed on days 3, 5, 8 and 15 after biofilm formation to evaluate the TMH and images of enamel were analyzed by PLM. The quantity of Ca2+ released, from Groups 1 and 6, was determined using an Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The SPSS program was used for statistical analysis and the significance level was 5%. TMH showed a gradual reduction in enamel hardness (p<0.05) from the 1st to 15th day, but mainly five days after biofilm formation in all groups. The PLM showed superficial lesions indicating an increase in porosity. C. albicans caused the release of Ca2+ into suspension during biofilm formation. Candida species from dental biofilm of HIV+ children can cause demineralization of primary enamel in vitro.

  20. CHROMagar Candida Medium for Direct Susceptibility Testing of Yeast from Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Grace L.; Peterson, Ellena M.

    2005-01-01

    An evaluation was performed on 95 blood cultures positive for Candida spp. to determine the correlation of direct susceptibility testing of fluconazole versus both standardized disk diffusion and MIC methods. For direct testing, an aliquot taken from BD BACTEC Plus and/or BD BACTEC Lytic/10 bottles (Becton Dickinson [BD], Sparks, MD) positive by gram stain for yeast was subcultured to CHROMagar Candida (BD), and a 25-μg fluconazole disk (BD) was placed on the plate. The area of growth inhibition surrounding the disk was measured at 24 and 48 h. In addition, a subculture of the isolate was tested by a microdilution MIC using YeastOne (TREK Diagnostics Systems Inc., OH) and disk diffusion (NCCLS M44-A) using a standardized inoculum plated onto CHROMagar Candida as well as Mueller-Hinton agar to which 2% glucose and 0.5 μg/ml methylene blue dye was added (MH-GMB). The categorical interpretation derived from the MIC was used as the reference to which the disk diffusion results were compared. There were a total of 41 Candida albicans, 23 Candida glabrata, 20 Candida parapsilosis, 9 Candida tropicalis, and 1 each of Candida krusei and Candida lusitaniae tested. At 24 h there was full agreement among the methods for all C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. lusitaniae, and C. krusei isolates. For the C. parapsilosis isolates at 24 h there was one very major discrepancy using the direct CHROMagar and one major error with the standardized MH-GMB. The majority of the errors were seen at 24 h with the C. glabrata isolates. Of the 23 C. glabrata isolates at 24 h by direct CHROMagar, there were 10 minor and 1 very major error; by MH-GMB there were 12 minor and 2 very major errors; and by standardized CHROMagar Candida there were 13 minor and 2 major errors. There were no very major errors with C. glabrata when all plates were read at 48 h. At 24 h by the direct and standardized CHROMagar the majority of C. glabrata isolates were more resistant, whereas by MH-GMB they were more

  1. CHROMagar Candida medium for direct susceptibility testing of yeast from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Tan, Grace L; Peterson, Ellena M

    2005-04-01

    An evaluation was performed on 95 blood cultures positive for Candida spp. to determine the correlation of direct susceptibility testing of fluconazole versus both standardized disk diffusion and MIC methods. For direct testing, an aliquot taken from BD BACTEC Plus and/or BD BACTEC Lytic/10 bottles (Becton Dickinson [BD], Sparks, MD) positive by gram stain for yeast was subcultured to CHROMagar Candida (BD), and a 25-microg fluconazole disk (BD) was placed on the plate. The area of growth inhibition surrounding the disk was measured at 24 and 48 h. In addition, a subculture of the isolate was tested by a microdilution MIC using YeastOne (TREK Diagnostics Systems Inc., OH) and disk diffusion (NCCLS M44-A) using a standardized inoculum plated onto CHROMagar Candida as well as Mueller-Hinton agar to which 2% glucose and 0.5 microg/ml methylene blue dye was added (MH-GMB). The categorical interpretation derived from the MIC was used as the reference to which the disk diffusion results were compared. There were a total of 41 Candida albicans, 23 Candida glabrata, 20 Candida parapsilosis, 9 Candida tropicalis, and 1 each of Candida krusei and Candida lusitaniae tested. At 24 h there was full agreement among the methods for all C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. lusitaniae, and C. krusei isolates. For the C. parapsilosis isolates at 24 h there was one very major discrepancy using the direct CHROMagar and one major error with the standardized MH-GMB. The majority of the errors were seen at 24 h with the C. glabrata isolates. Of the 23 C. glabrata isolates at 24 h by direct CHROMagar, there were 10 minor and 1 very major error; by MH-GMB there were 12 minor and 2 very major errors; and by standardized CHROMagar Candida there were 13 minor and 2 major errors. There were no very major errors with C. glabrata when all plates were read at 48 h. At 24 h by the direct and standardized CHROMagar the majority of C. glabrata isolates were more resistant, whereas by MH-GMB they were more

  2. [In vitro synergistic effect of moxifloxacin and amphotericin B combination against Candida strains].

    PubMed

    Yalçin, Burçe; Kalkanci, Ayşe; Gürelik, Feryal; Fidan, Işil; Kustimur, Semra; Ozdek, Sengül

    2010-01-01

    Contradictory results such as synergy or indifferent effect, have been reported about the interactions between quinolones and antifungal drugs in different studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibilities of Candida spp. to moxifloxacin (MOX) alone and MOX + amphotericin B (AmB) combination. A total of 20 strains were included to the study, of which 19 were clinical isolates (10 Candida albicans, 4 Candida glabrata, 2 Candida parapsilosis, 1 Candida tropicalis, 1 Candida pelliculosa ve 1 Candida sake) and 1 was a standard strain (C. albicans ATCC 90028). In vitro susceptibilities of the strains to MOX with AmB were investigated by broth microdilution method according to the recommendations of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), and in vitro interaction of these drugs were determined by a chequerboard titration method. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of Candida spp. for MOX were found > or = 400 microg/ml indicating that MOX, by itself has no antifungal activity. AmB MIC values were found 1 microg/ml in 11 of the clinical isolates, and < or = 0.5 microg/ml in the other 8 clinical isolates and 1 standard strain. The inhibitor activity of AmB was slightly enhanced when combined with MOX, there being a decrease of 1-4 fold dilutions in the AmB MICs against all isolates tested. Synergistic effect between MOX and AmB, defined as a fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index as < or = 0.5, was observed in 90% (18/20; all were clinical isolates) of the strains, whereas indifferent effect (FIC = 1) was detected in 10% (2/20; 1 was clinical and 1 was standard strain) of the strains. Antagonistic effect was not observed for this combination even at 48th hours. It was concluded that these preliminary results should be confirmed by large-scaled in vitro and in vivo studies to evaluate MOX + AmB combination as a therapeutic option for the treatment of Candida infections.

  3. Supplementation of CHROMagar Candida medium with Pal's medium for rapid identification of Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Sahand, Ismail H; Moragues, María D; Eraso, Elena; Villar-Vidal, María; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2005-11-01

    CHROMagar Candida medium is used for the isolation and identification of Candida species, but it does not differentiate Candida albicans from Candida dubliniensis. This differentiation can be achieved by using Pal's agar, which cannot be used in primary isolation. We have combined both media to obtain a new medium that can be used for the isolation and identification of C. dubliniensis in primary cultures.

  4. Fungicidal activity of copper-sputtered flexible surfaces under dark and actinic light against azole-resistant Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Myriam K S; Rtimi, Sami; Kiwi, John; Pulgarin, César; Entenza, José M; Bizzini, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Candida spp. are able to survive on hospital surfaces and causes healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). Since surface cleaning and disinfecting interventions are not totally effective to eliminate Candida spp., new approaches should be devised. Copper (Cu) has widely recognized antifungal activity and the use of Cu-sputtered surfaces has recently been proposed to curb the spread of HCAIs. Moreover, the activity of Cu under the action of actinic light remains underexplored. We investigated the antifungal activity of Cu-sputtered polyester surfaces (Cu-PES) against azole-resistant Candida albicans and Candida glabrata under dark and low intensity visible light irradiation (4.65mW/cm(2)). The surface properties of Cu-PES photocatalysts were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Under dark, Cu-PES showed a fungicidal activity (≥3log10CFU reduction of the initial inoculum) against both C. albicans DSY296 and C. glabrata DSY565 leading to a reduction of the starting inoculum of 3.1 and 3.0log10CFU, respectively, within 60min of exposure. Under low intensity visible light irradiation, Cu-PES exhibited an accelerated fungicidal activity against both strains with a reduction of 3.0 and 3.4log10CFU, respectively, within 30min of exposure. This effect was likely due to the semiconductor Cu2O/CuO charge separation. The decrease in cell viability of the two Candida strains under dark and light conditions correlated with the progressive loss of membrane integrity. These results indicate that Cu-PES represent a promising strategy for decreasing the colonization of surfaces by yeasts and that actinic light can improve its self-disinfecting activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. RELATED FACTORS FOR COLONIZATION BY Candida SPECIES IN THE ORAL CAVITY OF HIV-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS

    PubMed Central

    MENEZES, Ralciane de Paula; BORGES, Aércio Sebastião; de ARAUJO, Lúcio Borges; PEDROSO, Reginaldo dos Santos; RÖDER, Denise Von Dolinger de Brito

    2015-01-01

    The colonization of the oral cavity is a prerequisite to the development of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Aims: The aims of this study were: to evaluate colonization and quantify Candida spp. in the oral cavity; to determine the predisposing factors for colonization; and to correlate the levels of CD4+ cells and viral load with the yeast count of colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) in HIV-positive individuals treated at a University Hospital. Saliva samples were collected from 147 HIV patients and were plated on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA) and chromogenic agar, and incubated at 30 ºC for 72 h. Colonies with similar morphology in both media were counted and the result expressed in CFU/mL. Results: Of the 147 HIV patients, 89 had positive cultures for Candida spp., with a total of 111 isolates, of which C. albicans was the most frequent species (67.6%), and the mean of colonies counted was 8.8 × 10³ CFU/mL. The main predisposing factors for oral colonization by Candida spp. were the use of antibiotics and oral prostheses. The use of reverse transcriptase inhibitors appears to have a greater protective effect for colonization. A low CD4+ T lymphocyte count is associated with a higher density of yeast in the saliva of HIV patients. PMID:26603229

  6. Sensitivity of clinical isolates of Candida to essential oils from Burseraceae family

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Miloš; Smiljkovic, Marija; Markovic, Tatjana; Cirica, Ana; Glamoclija, Jasmina; Markovic, Dejan; Sokovic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and antifungal activity of four commercial essential oils from the Burseraceae family - two Boswellia carterii Flueck oils, Canarium luzonicum (Blume) A. Gray oil, and Commiphora myrrha (Nees) Engl oil, against most common Candida spp. recovered from the human oral cavity. The essential oil samples were analyzed by GC-FID and GC/MS. The analysis showed that major essential oils' components were α-pinene (23.04 % and 31.84 %), limonene (45.62 %) and curzerene (34.65 %), respectively. Minimum inhibitory (MIC) and minimum fungicidal (MFC) concentrations were determined using a microdilution standardized technique. All tested Candida spp. clinical isolates and ATCC strains showed susceptibility to tested essential oils in a dose dependent manner. The strongest antifungal activity was shown by essential oil of B. carterii, sample 2; the average MIC values ranged from 1.25 to 1.34 mg/ml, and MFC values ranged from 2.50 to 3.75 mg/ml, depending on the fungus. This study supports the possible use of essential oils from the Bursecaceae family in reduction and elimination of Candida spp. populations in patients with oral cavity fungal infections. PMID:27330531

  7. Candida famata (Debaryomyces hansenii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibirny, Andriy A.; Voronovsky, Andriy Y.

    Debaryomyces hansenii (teleomorph of asporogenous strains known as Candida famata ) belongs to the group of so named ‘ flavinogenic yeasts ’ capable of riboflavin oversynthesis during starvation for iron. Some strains of C. famata belong to the most flavinogenic organisms known (accumulate 20 mg of riboflavin in 1 ml of the medium) and were used for industrial production of riboflavin in USA for long time. Many strains of D. hansenii are characterized by high salt tolerance and are used for ageing of cheeses whereas some others are able to convert xylose to xylitol, anti-caries sweetener. Transformation system has been developed for D. hansenii. It includes collection of host recipient strains, vectors with complementation and dominant markers and several transformation protocols based on protoplasting and electroporation. Besides, methods of multicopy gene insertion and insertional mutagenesis have been developed and several strong constitutive and regulatable promoters have been cloned. All structural genes of riboflavin synthesis and some regulatory genes involved in this process have been identified. Genome of D. hansenii has been sequenced in the frame of French National program ‘Genolevure’ and is opened for public access

  8. Isolation of Candida Protoplasts from a Case of Candida Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Richard

    1966-01-01

    Rosner, Richard (St. Joseph's Hospital, Paterson, N.J.). Isolation of Candida protoplasts from a case of Candida endocarditis. J. Bacteriol. 91:1320–1326. 1966.—A case of endocarditis caused by Candida tropicalis is described. Even though the patient was receiving adequate therapy, and all routine blood cultures were negative for growth, the patient continued to give clinical evidence of active, progressive endocarditis. The isolation of osmotically fragile bodies from blood cultures placed in an osmotically controlled medium is described in detail. The role of these bodies, called protoplasts, in the active disease process of this patient is discussed in relation to the criteria for the implication of protoplasts in the disease process. Several explanations as to what caused the in vivo formation of protoplasts of C. tropicalis in this patient are discussed. Images PMID:4160231

  9. [Candida biofilm-related infections].

    PubMed

    Del Pozo, José Luis; Cantón, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The number of biomedical devices (intravascular catheters, heart valves, joint replacements, etc.) that are implanted in our hospitals has increased exponentially in recent years. Candida species are pathogens which are becoming more significant in these kinds of infections. Candida has two forms of development: planktonic and in biofilms. A biofilm is a community of microorganisms which adhere to a surface and are enclosed by an extracellular matrix. This form of development confers a high resistance to the antimicrobial agents. This is the reason why antibiotic treatments usually fail and biomedical devices may have to be removed in most cases. Unspecific adhesion mechanisms, the adhesion-receptor systems, and an intercellular communication system called quorum sensing play an essential role in the development of Candida biofilms. In general, the azoles have poor activity against Candida biofilms, while echinocandins and polyenes show a greater activity. New therapeutic strategies need to be developed due to the high morbidity and mortality and high economic costs associated with these infections. Most studies to date have focused on bacterial biofilms. The knowledge of the formation of Candida biofilms and their composition is essential to develop new preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  10. Liquid and vapour-phase antifungal activities of essential oils against Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida.

    PubMed

    Mandras, Narcisa; Nostro, Antonia; Roana, Janira; Scalas, Daniela; Banche, Giuliana; Ghisetti, Valeria; Del Re, Simonetta; Fucale, Giacomo; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Tullio, Vivian

    2016-08-30

    , thymol and α-pinene against Candida spp., including fluconazole/voriconazole resistant strains. These data encourage adequately controlled and randomized clinical investigations. The use in vapour phase could have additional advantages without requiring direct contact, resulting in easy of environmental application such as in hospital, and/or in school.

  11. Effect of norfloxacin therapy for acute, uncomplicated lower urinary tract infection on vaginal Candida prevalence.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Rodrigo M; Zanni, Pâmela C M Delvas; de Souza Bonfim-Mendonça, Patrícia; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Alczuk, Silvia S Dantas; Svidzinski, Terezinha I Estivalet; Consolaro, Márcia E Lopes

    2016-05-01

    Acute uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections (UTI) and vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) both occur frequently in women. Although VVC is believed to commonly occur after antibiotic therapy, few studies have demonstrated this association. Thus, the aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of colonization by Candida spp. and VVC after norfloxacin (NOR) use for UTI and the effects on the vaginal microbiota and inflammatory process. This was a prospective cohort study of women with culture-proven UTI who were treated with NOR (antibiotic group). The control group consisted of women with noninfectious diseases or in preventive care. Candida vaginal infections were monitored both clinically and mycologically at baseline and at the follow-up evaluation. All women showed UTI remission after NOR treatment, and no woman in either group, antibiotic and control, showed symptoms of VVC. Both groups showed similar ratios of a positive Candida culture at baseline (6.7 % and 12.8 %, respectively) and at follow-up (3.3 % and 8.5 %, respectively) (p = 0.2768 and p = 0.5035, respectively). The antibiotic group showed no increased risk of Candida colonization or VVC after NOR treatment compared with the control group [odds ratio (OR) 0.556, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.2407-10.05]. NOR was effective for UTI treatment, did not increase the risk of vaginal colonization by Candida or VVC, and did not lead to major disturbances of the vaginal microbiota.

  12. Multi-probe real-time PCR identification of four common Candida species in blood culture broth.

    PubMed

    Foongladda, Suporn; Mongkol, Nanthanida; Petlum, Pornphan; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2014-06-01

    We developed a single-tube real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with multiple hybridization probes for detecting Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. Primers were designed to amplify 18S rRNA gene of the genus Candida, and DNA probes were designed to hybridize two areas of the amplicons. The amplification curves and specific melting peaks of the probes hybridized with PCR product were used for definite species identifications. The reaction specificity was 100 % when evaluating the assay using DNA samples from 21 isolates of fungal and bacterial species. The assay was further evaluated in 129 fungal blood culture broth samples which were culture positive for fungus. Of the 129 samples, 119 were positively identified as: C. albicans (39), C. tropicalis (30), C. parapsilosis (23), C. glabrata (20), Candida spp. (5), and two samples containing mixed C. glabrata/C. albicans and C. glabrata/C. tropicalis. The five Candida spp. were identified by sequencing analysis as C. krusei, C. dubliniensis, C. aquaetextoris, and two isolates of C. athensensis. Of the ten samples which showed negative PCR results, six were Cryptococcus neoformans, and the others were Trichosporon sp., Rhodotorula sp., Fusarium sp., and Penicillium marneffei. Our findings show that the assay was highly effective in identifying the four medically important Candida species. The results can be available within 3 h after positivity of a blood culture broth sample.

  13. Relevance of Candida and other mycoses for morbidity and mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock due to peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstern, Christoph; Herold, Christina; Mieth, Markus; Brenner, Thorsten; Decker, Sebastian; Busch, Cornelius J; Hofer, Stefan; Zimmermann, Stefan; Weigand, Markus A; Bernhard, Michael

    2015-07-01

    This single-centre retrospective cohort study evaluated the incidence and outcome of mycoses in critical ill patients (n = 283) with sepsis due to peritonitis. Overall mortality was 41.3%, and the 28-day mortality was 29.3%. Fungal pathogens were found in 51.9%. The common first location was the respiratory tract (66.6%), followed by the abdominal site (19.7%). Candida colonisation was found in 64.6%, and invasive Candida infection in 34.0%. Identified fungi were Candida spp. in 98.6% and Aspergillus spp. in 6.1%. Patients with fungal pathogens showed a higher rate of postoperative peritonitis, APACHE II and tracheotomy. In comparison to patients without fungal pathogens, these patients showed a longer duration on mechanical ventilation, and a higher overall mortality. Patients with Candida-positive swabs from abdominal sites had more fascia dehiscence and anastomosis leakage. Seventy-two patients (48.9%) received antifungal therapy, 26 patients were treated empirically. Antifungal therapy was not associated with a decrease in mortality. Age and renal replacement therapy were associated with mortality. In conclusion, fungi are common pathogens in critically ill patients with peritonitis, and detection of fungi is associated with an increase in overall mortality. Particularly, Candida-positive abdominal swabs are associated with an increase in morbidity. However, we were not able to demonstrate a survival benefit for antifungal therapy in peritonitis patients. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Metal resistance in Candida biofilms.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Joe J; Rabiei, Maryam; Turner, Raymond J; Badry, Erin A; Sproule, Kimberley M; Ceri, Howard

    2006-03-01

    Yeasts are often successful in metal-polluted environments; therefore, the ability of biofilm and planktonic cell Candida tropicalis to endure metal toxicity was investigated. Fifteen water-soluble metal ions, chosen to represent groups 6A to 6B of the periodic table, were tested against this organism. With in vitro exposures as long as 24 h, biofilms were up to 65 times more tolerant to killing by metals than corresponding planktonic cultures. Of the most toxic heavy metals tested, only very high concentrations of Hg2+, CrO4 (2-) or Cu2+ killed surface-adherent Candida. Metal-chelator precipitates could be formed in biofilms following exposure to the heavy metals Cu2+ and Ni2+. This suggests that Candida biofilms may adsorb metal cations from their surroundings and that sequestration in the extracellular matrix may contribute to resistance. We concluded that biofilm formation may be a strategy for metal resistance and/or tolerance in yeasts.

  15. Differentiation of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei by FT-IR and chemometrics by CHROMagar™ Candida.

    PubMed

    Wohlmeister, Denise; Vianna, Débora Renz Barreto; Helfer, Virginia Etges; Calil, Luciane Noal; Buffon, Andréia; Fuentefria, Alexandre Meneghello; Corbellini, Valeriano Antonio; Pilger, Diogo André

    2017-10-01

    Pathogenic Candida species are detected in clinical infections. CHROMagar™ is a phenotypical method used to identify Candida species, although it has limitations, which indicates the need for more sensitive and specific techniques. Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) is an analytical vibrational technique used to identify patterns of metabolic fingerprint of biological matrixes, particularly whole microbial cell systems as Candida sp. in association of classificatory chemometrics algorithms. On the other hand, Soft Independent Modeling by Class Analogy (SIMCA) is one of the typical algorithms still little employed in microbiological classification. This study demonstrates the applicability of the FT-IR-technique by specular reflectance associated with SIMCA to discriminate Candida species isolated from vaginal discharges and grown on CHROMagar™. The differences in spectra of C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei were suitable for use in the discrimination of these species, which was observed by PCA. Then, a SIMCA model was constructed with standard samples of three species and using the spectral region of 1792-1561cm(-1). All samples (n=48) were properly classified based on the chromogenic method using CHROMagar™ Candida. In total, 93.4% (n=45) of the samples were correctly and unambiguously classified (Class I). Two samples of C. albicans were classified correctly, though these could have been C. glabrata (Class II). Also, one C. glabrata sample could have been classified as C. krusei (Class II). Concerning these three samples, one triplicate of each was included in Class II and two in Class I. Therefore, FT-IR associated with SIMCA can be used to identify samples of C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. krusei grown in CHROMagar™ Candida aiming to improve clinical applications of this technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Enrichment of Multilocus Sequence Typing Clade 1 with Oral Candida albicans Isolates in Patients with Untreated Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Brenda A.; Maguire, Rory; Cashin, Phillipa J.; Claffey, Noel; Flint, Stephen; Abdulrahim, Mohammed H.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and cell density of Candida species in periodontal pockets, healthy subgingival sites, and oral rinse samples of patients with untreated periodontitis. Twenty-one periodontitis patients underwent sampling at two periodontitis sites, and 19/21 of these patients underwent sampling at one periodontally healthy site. Both paper point and curette sampling techniques were employed. The periodontitis patients and 50 healthy subjects were also sampled by oral rinse. Candida isolates were recovered on CHROMagar Candida medium, and representative isolates were identified. Candida spp. were recovered from 10/21 (46.7%) periodontitis patients and from 16/50 (32%) healthy subjects. C. albicans predominated in both groups and was recovered from all Candida-positive subjects. Candida-positive periodontitis patients yielded Candida from periodontal pockets with average densities of 3,528 and 3,910 CFU/sample from curette and paper point samples, respectively, and 1,536 CFU/ml from oral rinse samples. The majority (18/19) of the healthy sites sampled from periodontitis patients were Candida negative. The 16 Candida-positive healthy subjects yielded an average of 279 CFU/ml from oral rinse samples. C. albicans isolates were investigated by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to determine if specific clonal groups were associated with periodontitis. MLST analysis of 31 C. albicans isolates from periodontitis patients yielded 19 sequence types (STs), 13 of which were novel. Eleven STs belonged to MLST clade 1. In contrast, 16 C. albicans isolates from separate healthy subjects belonged to 16 STs, with 4 isolates belonging to clade 1. The distributions of STs between both groups were significantly different (P = 0.04) and indicated an enrichment of C. albicans isolates in periodontal pockets, which warrants a larger study. PMID:22875886

  17. Genotyping Candida albicans from Candida Leukoplakia and Non-Candida Leukoplakia Shows No Enrichment of Multilocus Sequence Typing Clades but Enrichment of ABC Genotype C in Candida Leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Stephen R.; Coleman, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Oral leukoplakias are histopathologically-diagnosed as Candida leukoplakia or non-Candida leukoplakia by the presence or absence of hyphae in the superficial epithelium. Candida leukoplakia lesions have significantly increased malignant potential. Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal species associated with oral leukoplakia and may contribute to malignant transformation of Candida leukoplakia. To date, no detailed population analysis of C. albicans isolates from oral leukoplakia patients has been undertaken. This study investigated whether specific C. albicans genotypes were associated with Candida leukoplakia and non-Candida leukoplakia in a cohort of Irish patients. Patients with histopathologically-defined Candida leukoplakia (n = 31) or non-Candida leukoplakia (n = 47) were screened for Candida species by culture of oral rinse and lesional swab samples. Selected C. albicans isolates from Candida leukoplakia patients (n = 25), non-Candida leukoplakia patients (n = 19) and oral carriage isolates from age and sex matched healthy subjects without leukoplakia (n = 34) were subjected to multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and ABC genotyping. MLST revealed that the clade distribution of C. albicans from both Candida leukoplakia and non-Candida leukoplakia lesions overlapped with the corresponding clade distributions of oral carriage isolates and global reference isolates from the MLST database indicating no enrichment of leukoplakia-associated clones. Oral leukoplakia isolates were significantly enriched with ABC genotype C (12/44, 27.3%), particularly Candida leukoplakia isolates (9/25, 36%), relative to oral carriage isolates (3/34, 8.8%). Genotype C oral leukoplakia isolates were distributed in MLST clades 1,3,4,5,8,9 and 15, whereas genotype C oral carriage isolates were distributed in MLST clades 4 and 11. PMID:24058485

  18. Genotyping Candida albicans from Candida leukoplakia and non-Candida leukoplakia shows no enrichment of multilocus sequence typing clades but enrichment of ABC genotype C in Candida leukoplakia.

    PubMed

    Abdulrahim, Mohammed H; McManus, Brenda A; Flint, Stephen R; Coleman, David C

    2013-01-01

    Oral leukoplakias are histopathologically-diagnosed as Candida leukoplakia or non-Candida leukoplakia by the presence or absence of hyphae in the superficial epithelium. Candida leukoplakia lesions have significantly increased malignant potential. Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal species associated with oral leukoplakia and may contribute to malignant transformation of Candida leukoplakia. To date, no detailed population analysis of C. albicans isolates from oral leukoplakia patients has been undertaken. This study investigated whether specific C. albicans genotypes were associated with Candida leukoplakia and non-Candida leukoplakia in a cohort of Irish patients. Patients with histopathologically-defined Candida leukoplakia (n = 31) or non-Candida leukoplakia (n = 47) were screened for Candida species by culture of oral rinse and lesional swab samples. Selected C. albicans isolates from Candida leukoplakia patients (n = 25), non-Candida leukoplakia patients (n = 19) and oral carriage isolates from age and sex matched healthy subjects without leukoplakia (n = 34) were subjected to multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and ABC genotyping. MLST revealed that the clade distribution of C. albicans from both Candida leukoplakia and non-Candida leukoplakia lesions overlapped with the corresponding clade distributions of oral carriage isolates and global reference isolates from the MLST database indicating no enrichment of leukoplakia-associated clones. Oral leukoplakia isolates were significantly enriched with ABC genotype C (12/44, 27.3%), particularly Candida leukoplakia isolates (9/25, 36%), relative to oral carriage isolates (3/34, 8.8%). Genotype C oral leukoplakia isolates were distributed in MLST clades 1,3,4,5,8,9 and 15, whereas genotype C oral carriage isolates were distributed in MLST clades 4 and 11.

  19. Pancreatic infection with Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, R; Serrano-Heranz, R

    1999-01-01

    Candida species other than C. albicans have been implicated as pathogens in intravascular (bloodstream, intravascular devices, endocarditis) and extravascular (arthritis, osteomielitis, endophtalmitis) infections. C. parapsilosis, however, is rarely implicated in intra-abdominal infections (peritonitis during peritoneal dialysis, complicating surgery or solid-organ transplantation). We describe a case of a 48-y-old male with acute pancreatitis who had a pancreatic abscess produced by primary C. parapsilosis infection. Although he received adequate treatment with antifungal medication and surgical drainage, the outcome was fatal. Because the clinical findings are indistinguishable from bacterial abscesses, Candida species should be considered in cases of complicated pancreatitis, in order to establish a prompt adequate treatment.

  20. Expansion of the Candida tanzawaensis yeast clade: 16 novel Candida species from basidiocarp-feeding beetles.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Oui; McHugh, Joseph V; Blackwell, Meredith

    2004-11-01

    A major clade of new yeast taxa from the digestive tract of basidiocarp-feeding beetles is recognized based on rRNA gene sequence analyses. Almost 30 % of 650 gut isolates formed a statistically well-supported clade that included Candida tanzawaensis. The yeasts in the clade were isolated from 11 families of beetles, of which Tenebrionidae and Erotylidae were most commonly sampled. Repeated isolation of certain yeasts from the same beetle species at different times and places indicated strong host associations. Sexual reproduction was never observed in the yeasts. Based on comparisons of small- and large-subunit rRNA gene sequences and morphological and physiological traits, the yeasts were placed in Candida ambrosiae and in 16 other undescribed taxa. In this report, the novel species in the genus Candida are described and their relationships with other taxa in the Saccharomycetes are discussed. The novel species and their type strains are as follows: Candida guaymorum (NRRL Y-27568(T)=CBS 9823(T)), Candida bokatorum (NRRL Y-27571(T)=CBS 9824(T)), Candida kunorum (NRRL Y-27580(T)=CBS 9825(T)), Candida terraborum (NRRL Y-27573(T)=CBS 9826(T)), Candida emberorum (NRRL Y-27606(T)=CBS 9827(T)), Candida wounanorum (NRRL Y-27574(T)=CBS 9828(T)), Candida yuchorum (NRRL Y-27569(T)=CBS 9829(T)), Candida chickasaworum (NRRL Y-27566(T)=CBS 9830(T)), Candida choctaworum (NRRL Y-27584(T)=CBS 9831(T)), Candida bolitotheri (NRRL Y-27587(T)=CBS 9832(T)), Candida atakaporum (NRRL Y-27570(T)=CBS 9833(T)), Candida panamericana (NRRL Y-27567(T)=CBS 9834(T)), Candida bribrorum (NRRL Y-27572(T)=CBS 9835(T)), Candida maxii (NRRL Y-27588(T)=CBS 9836(T)), Candida anneliseae (NRRL Y-27563(T)=CBS 9837(T)) and Candida taliae (NRRL Y-27589(T)=CBS 9838(T)).

  1. Antifungal activity of naphthoquinoidal compounds in vitro against fluconazole-resistant strains of different Candida species: a special emphasis on mechanisms of action on Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Neto, João B A; da Silva, Cecília R; Neta, Maria A S; Campos, Rosana S; Siebra, Janaína T; Silva, Rose A C; Gaspar, Danielle M; Magalhães, Hemerson I F; de Moraes, Manoel O; Lobo, Marina D P; Grangeiro, Thalles B; Carvalho, Tatiane S C; Diogo, Emilay B T; da Silva Júnior, Eufrânio N; Rodrigues, Felipe A R; Cavalcanti, Bruno C; Júnior, Hélio V N

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the incidence of candidemia in tertiary hospitals worldwide has substantially increased. These infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality; in addition, they prolong hospital stays and raise the costs associated with treatment. Studies have reported a significant increase in infections by non-albicans Candida species, especially C. tropicalis. The number of antifungal drugs on the market is small in comparison to the number of antibacterial agents available. The limited number of treatment options, coupled with the increasing frequency of cross-resistance, makes it necessary to develop new therapeutic strategies. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the antifungal activities of three semisynthetic naphthofuranquinone molecules against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains. These results allowed to us to evaluate the antifungal effects of three naphthofuranquinones on fluconazole-resistant C. tropicalis. The toxicity of these compounds was manifested as increased intracellular ROS, which resulted in membrane damage and changes in cell size/granularity, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and DNA damage (including oxidation and strand breakage). In conclusion, the tested naphthofuranquinones (compounds 1-3) exhibited in vitro cytotoxicity against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains.

  2. Antifungal Activity of Naphthoquinoidal Compounds In Vitro against Fluconazole-Resistant Strains of Different Candida Species: A Special Emphasis on Mechanisms of Action on Candida tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Neto, João B. A.; da Silva, Cecília R.; Neta, Maria A. S.; Campos, Rosana S.; Siebra, Janaína T.; Silva, Rose A. C.; Gaspar, Danielle M.; Magalhães, Hemerson I. F.; de Moraes, Manoel O.; Lobo, Marina D. P.; Grangeiro, Thalles B.; Carvalho, Tatiane S. C.; Diogo, Emilay B. T.; da Silva Júnior, Eufrânio N.; Rodrigues, Felipe A. R.; Cavalcanti, Bruno C.; Júnior, Hélio V. N.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the incidence of candidemia in tertiary hospitals worldwide has substantially increased. These infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality; in addition, they prolong hospital stays and raise the costs associated with treatment. Studies have reported a significant increase in infections by non-albicans Candida species, especially C. tropicalis. The number of antifungal drugs on the market is small in comparison to the number of antibacterial agents available. The limited number of treatment options, coupled with the increasing frequency of cross-resistance, makes it necessary to develop new therapeutic strategies. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the antifungal activities of three semisynthetic naphthofuranquinone molecules against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains. These results allowed to us to evaluate the antifungal effects of three naphthofuranquinones on fluconazole-resistant C. tropicalis. The toxicity of these compounds was manifested as increased intracellular ROS, which resulted in membrane damage and changes in cell size/granularity, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and DNA damage (including oxidation and strand breakage). In conclusion, the tested naphthofuranquinones (compounds 1–3) exhibited in vitro cytotoxicity against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains. PMID:24817320

  3. Emergence of non-albicans Candida among candidal vulvovaginitis cases and study of their potential virulence factors, from a tertiary care center, North India.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Varsha; Banerjee, Tuhina; Kumar, Pankaj; Pandey, Sulekha; Tilak, Ragini

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of various Candida species and study some of their virulence factors among thevulvovaginal candidiasis(VVC)patients. The study was conducted in a Tertiary Care University Hospital in North India. This study was carried out prospectively for a period of 1 year. High vaginal swabs (HVSs) were collected from women in childbearing age group attending the gynecology and obstetrics out-patient departments with the complaints suggestive of vulvovaginitis. Samples were plated on Sabouraud's dextrose agar slope. Candida spp. isolated was further speciated based on microscopy, biochemical tests and culture characteristics on special media. Virulence factors of these strains were determined by biofilm formation and phospholipase activity. A total of 464 HVS from 232 patients with the complaints of vulvovaginitis were included in this study. Following laboratory workup, 71 specimens were positive for genus Candida (30.6%). Further speciation showed 32.4% as Candida albicans, 45.07% Candida parapsilosis and 22.53% of Candida glabrata. Biofilm production was shown by 50 candidal strains (70.4%) and phospholipase activity was given by 41 candidal strains (57.74%). Our study suggests increasing prevalence of non-albicans Candida among the VVC cases along with their virulence factors. Therefore, we recommend that microbiological investigation upto species level should be mandatory to determine the emergence of non-albicans Candida as a major cause of VVC.

  4. Portrait of Candida Species Biofilm Regulatory Network Genes.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Daniela; Henriques, Mariana; Silva, Sónia

    2017-01-01

    Most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to Candida albicans, but Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis, designated as non-C. albicans Candida (NCAC), have been identified as frequent human pathogens. Moreover, Candida biofilms are an escalating clinical problem associated with significant rates of mortality. Biofilms have distinct developmental phases, including adhesion/colonisation, maturation and dispersal, controlled by complex regulatory networks. This review discusses recent advances regarding Candida species biofilm regulatory network genes, which are key components for candidiasis.

  5. Biofilm lifestyle of Candida: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, C J; Jin, L; Samaranayake, L P

    2008-10-01

    Candida is the major fungal pathogen of humans causing a variety of afflictions ranging from superficial mucosal diseases to deep seated mycoses. Biofilm formation is a major virulence factor in the pathogenicity of Candida, and Candida biofilms are difficult to eradicate especially because of their very high antifungal resistance. Consequently, research into the pathogenicity of Candida has focused on the prevention and management of biofilm development, their architecture, and antifungal resistance. Although studies have shed some light, molecular mechanisms that govern biofilm formation and pathogenicity still await full clarification. This review outlines the key features of what is currently known of Candida biofilm development, regulation and antifungal resistance and, their proteomics.

  6. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution of the three most frequent Candida species contributing to urinary tract candidiasis in different countries around the world. Material and methods For writing this review, Google Scholar –a scholarly search engine– (http://scholar.google.com/) and PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) were used. The most recently published original articles and reviews of literature relating to the first three Candida species causing urinary tract infections in different countries and the pathogenicity of Candida albicans were selected and studied. Results Although some studies show rapid changes in the uropathogenesis of Candida species causing urinary tract infections in some countries, Candida albicans is still the most important cause of candidal urinary tract infections. Conclusions Despite the ranking of Candida albicans as the dominant species for urinary tract candidiasis, specific changes have occurred in some countries. At this time, it is important to continue the surveillance related to Candida species causing urinary tract infections to prevent, control and treat urinary tract candidiasis in future. PMID:25914847

  7. Candida urinary tract infection: pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John F; Kavanagh, Kevin; Sobel, Jack D; Kauffman, Carol A; Newman, Cheryl A

    2011-05-01

    Candida species are unusual causes of urinary tract infection (UTI) in healthy individuals, but common in the hospital setting or among patients with predisposing diseases and structural abnormalities of the kidney and collecting system. The urinary tract may be invaded in either an antegrade fashion from the bloodstream or retrograde via the urethra and bladder. Candida species employ a repertoire of virulence factors, including phenotypic switching, dimorphism, galvano - and thigmotropism, and hydrolytic enzymes, to colonize and then invade the urinary tract. Antegrade infection occurs primarily among patients predisposed to candidemia. The process of adherence to and invasion of the glomerulus, renal blood vessels, and renal tubules by Candida species was elegantly described in early histopathologic studies. Armed with modern molecular biologic techniques, the various virulence factors involved in bloodborne infection of the kidney are gradually being elucidated. Disturbances of urine flow, whether congenital or acquired, instrumentation of the urinary tract, diabetes mellitus, antimicrobial therapy, and immunosuppression underlie most instances of retrograde Candida UTI. In addition, bacterial UTIs caused by Enterobacteriaceae may facilitate the initial step in the process. Ascending infections generally do not result in candidemia in the absence of obstruction.

  8. Candida osteomyelitis in a gelding

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Aimie; López, Alfonso; Pack, LeeAnn; Muckle, Anne

    2013-01-01

    A 2-year-old gelding was referred for evaluation of severe right forelimb lameness. The horse was grade 4/5 lame on the right forelimb. Clinical, laboratory, and radiographic findings were consistent with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. Due to poor prognosis the owner elected euthanasia. Histopathology confirmed chronic arthritis and osteomyelitis with intralesional yeast (Candida species). PMID:23904643

  9. Candida albicans: adapting to succeed.

    PubMed

    Kadosh, David; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2013-11-13

    In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Lu et al. (2013) report on the redundancy of signaling pathways controlling Candida albicans filamentation and pathogenicity. In the process, they provide important insight into how this normal commensal of humans adapts to different host microenvironments to become a highly successful opportunistic pathogen.

  10. New spirorotenoids from Tephrosia candida.

    PubMed

    Andrei, Cesar C; Vieira, Paulo C; Fernandes, João B; da Silva, M Fátima das G F; Rodrigues Fo, Edson

    2002-01-01

    The ethyl acetate extract of roots of Tephrosia candida afforded three new spirorotenoids belonging to a new class of spirocompounds, named tephrospirolactone, tephrospiroketone I, and tephrospiroketone II. The structures of these compounds were determined mainly based on spectral analysis. The only known spirorotenoid described in the literature is amorphispironone, isolated from Amorpha fruticosa.

  11. Sensitisation of Candida albicans to killing by low-power laser light.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M; Mia, N

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether Candida albicans, and other Candida spp. responsible for HIV-associated candidosis, could be sensitised to killing by low-power laser light. Suspensions of C. albicans were treated with a number of potential photosensitisers, exposed to laser light from a Helium/Neon (HeNe) or Gallium aluminium arsenide (GaAs) laser for 120 s and survivors enumerated. Toluidine blue O (TBO), thionin and crystal violet were able to sensitise the yeast to killing by light from the HeNe laser (energy dose = 876 mJ at a density of 66.36 J/cm2), the kills achieved being 6.8 x 10(6) cfu/ml, 3.1 x 10(6) cfu/ml and 1.3 x 10(6) cfu/ml respectively. TBO was also able to sensitise several other Candida spp. to killing by HeNe laser light. Dihaematoporphyrin ester was not an effective photosensitiser under the conditions employed. Methylene blue, but not aluminium disulphonated phthalocyanine, was able to sensitise C. albicans to killing by light from the GaAs laser (energy dose 1.32 J at a density of 2.04 J/cm2). The viability of the yeast was not affected by exposure to laser light in the absence of the photosensitisers. As killing of dye-sensitised C. albicans, and other Candida spp., could be achieved by exposure to low-power laser light for short periods of time, this approach merits further investigation as a potential therapeutic modality for HIV-associated candidosis.

  12. Bloodstream infections by Malassezia and Candida species in critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Iatta, Roberta; Cafarchia, Claudia; Cuna, Teresa; Montagna, Osvaldo; Laforgia, Nicola; Gentile, Ottavio; Rizzo, Antonino; Boekhout, Teun; Otranto, Domenico; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2014-04-01

    Despite being considered an emerging yeast related to immunocompromised individuals, severe infections by Malassezia furfur have not been evaluated. During a one-year survey on yeasts fungemia, 290 neonatal and 17 pediatric patients with intravascular catheters, lipid parenteral nutrition, prolonged ward stay, and surgery were enrolled. In addition, the origin of the infection was investigated by swabbing hand skin of patients, parents, and healthcare workers and medical devices. All biological specimens and swabs were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar and Dixon agar. The yeasts identification was based on morphological and biochemical features and by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and confirmed by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA. A higher prevalence of M. furfur (2.1%) over Candida spp. (1.4%) caused bloodstream infections (BSIs). Twelve fungemia episodes were recorded: 2 by M. furfur in a pediatric ward and 10 in a neonatal intensive care unit (6 caused by M. furfur and 4 by Candida spp.). M. furfur was also isolated from the skin of all patients with BSIs, from the hand skin of a parent, and from an incubator surface and sheet. Patients with Candida spp. and M. furfur BSIs were successfully treated with intravenous liposomal Amphotericin B. These findings highlight the need for a more accurate etiological diagnosis in high-risk patients by adding lipid-supplemented culture media for Malassezia in the current mycological routine as the clinical features, patient management, and outcomes in both Candida and Malassezia fungemia do not differ.

  13. Species Distribution and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Vulvovaginal Candida Isolates in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Dai; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Wu, Wen-Xiang; Bai, Hui-Hui; Dong, Han-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) was a common infection associated with lifelong harassment of woman's social and sexual life. The purpose of this study was to describe the species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida species (Candida spp.) isolated from patients with VVC over 8 years. Methods: Species which isolated from patients with VVC in Peking University First Hospital were identified using chromogenic culture media. Susceptibility to common antifungal agents was determined using agar diffusion method based on CLSI M44-A2 document. SPSS software (version 14.0, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was used for statistical analysis, involving statistical description and Chi-square test. Results: The most common strains were Candida (C.) albicans, 80.5% (n = 1775) followed by C. glabrata, 18.1% (n = 400). Nystatin exhibited excellent activity against all species (<4% resistant [R]). Resistance to azole drugs varied among different species. C. albicans: clotrimazole (3.1% R) < fluconazole (16.6% R) < itraconazole (51.5% R) < miconazole (54.0% R); C. glabrata: miconazole (25.6% R) < clotrimazole (50.5% R) < itraconazole (61.9% R) < fluconazole (73.3% R); Candida krusei: clotrimazole (0 R) < fluconazole (57.7% R) < miconazole (73.1% R) < itraconazole (83.3% R). The susceptibility of fluconazole was noticeably decreasing among all species in the study period. Conclusions: Nystatin was the optimal choice for the treatment of VVC at present. The species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. isolated from patients with VVC had changed over time. PMID:27174323

  14. Molecular identification of Candida species isolated from cases of neonatal candidemia using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Akeela; Bashir, Gulnaz; Wani, Tehmeena; Jan, Abiroo; Kohli, Amrish; Khan, Mosin S

    2017-01-01

    Candida spp. is an emerging cause of bloodstream infections worldwide. Delay in speciation of Candida isolates by conventional methods and resistance to antifungal drugs in various Candida species are responsible for the increase in morbidity and mortality due to candidemia. Hence, the rapid identification of Candida isolates is very important for the proper management of patients with candidemia. The aim was to re-evaluate the identification of various Candida spp. by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and to evaluate the accuracy, speed, and cost of phenotypic methodology versus PCR-RFLP. Hospital-based cross-sectional study. Ninety consecutive clinical isolates of seven Candida species, isolated from blood of neonates and identified by routine phenotypic methods, were re-evaluated using universal primers internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and ITS4 for PCR amplification and Msp I restriction enzyme for RFLP. Kappa test for agreement. The results of PCR-RFLP were 100% in agreement with those obtained using conventional phenotypic methods. Identification could be achieved within 3 work days by both the methods. Our routine methods proved to be cost effective than PCR-RFLP. We can continue with our routine phenotypic methods and PCR-RFLP can be used for periodic quality control or when conventional methods fail to identify a species.

  15. Invitro antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species to liposomal amphotericin B, determined using CLSI broth microdilution, and amphotericin B deoxycholate, measured using the Etest.

    PubMed

    Lovero, Grazia; De Giglio, Osvalda; Rutigliano, Serafina; Diella, Giusy; Caggiano, Giuseppina; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2017-03-01

    The antifungal susceptibilities of 598 isolates of Candida spp. (bloodstream and other sterile sites) to liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) versus amphotericin B (AmB) were determined. MICs were calculated using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution (M27-A3) method for L-AmB and the Etest method for AmB. The MIC50/MIC90 (µg ml-1) values for L-AmB broth microdilution and AmB Etest were 0.25/1 and 0.19/0.5, respectively. The overall essential agreement (±2 dilutions) was 91.5 %, ranging from 37.5 % (Candida lusitaniae) to 100 % (Candida glabrata and Candida krusei). Categorical agreement between the two methods was categorized based on a previously published breakpoint (susceptible/resistant MIC cut-off of 1 µg ml-1). The overall categorical agreement at the 48 h reading was 97.3 %, ranging from 72.7 % (C. krusei) to 100 % (Candida albicans). Major and very major discrepancies occurred in 2.3 and 0.3 %, respectively. Spearman's ρ was 0.48 (P<0.0001). These results demonstrate the utility of the AmB Etest as a surrogate marker to predict the sensibility and resistance of Candida spp. to L-AmB and thus to support its use in antifungal treatment.

  16. Isolation and Antimicrobial Testing of Aeromonas spp., Citrobacter spp., Cronobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., Escherichia spp., Klebsiella spp., and Trabulsiella spp. from the Gallbladder of Pigs.

    PubMed

    Evangelopoulou, Grammato; Filioussis, Georgios; Kritas, Spyridon; Kantere, Maria; Burriel, Angeliki R

    2015-01-01

    The presence of Gram-negative bacteria species, other than Salmonella spp., in the gallbladder of pigs was examined. Isolated Gram-negative bacteria were assigned to species using the Microgen™ GnA+B-ID Systems. Of the 64 isolated strains 43 were identified as Escherichia coli, seven as Enterobacter spp., three each as Klebsiella spp., Citrobacterfreundii, Aeromonas hydrophila and Cronobacter sakazakii and one each as Escherichiafergusonii and Trabulsiella guamensis. Their antibiograms showed very high resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. It was concluded that the pigs' gallbladder is a reservoir of potentially pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria for pork consumers.

  17. Calcineurin signaling: lessons from Candida species.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shang-Jie; Chang, Ya-Lin; Chen, Ying-Lien

    2015-06-01

    Human fungal infections have significantly increased in recent years due to the emergence of immunocompromised patients with AIDS and cancer. Among them, Candida species are frequently isolated and associated with high mortality if not appropriately treated. Current antifungal drugs (azoles, echinocandins and polyenes) are not sufficient to combat Candida species particularly those that are drug resistant. Calcineurin, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, is an attractive antifungal drug target, and its inhibitor (FK506 or cyclosporin A) can be combined with azoles or echinocandins for use against multidrug-resistant Candida species. The role of calcineurin in the hyphal growth of Candida albicans is controversial, but its roles in C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis and C. lusitaniae can be demonstrated. In addition, calcineurin is required for virulence of Candida species in murine systemic, ocular or urinary infection models. However, the requirement for calcineurin substrate Crz1 in these infection models varies in Candida species, suggesting that Crz1 has diverse functions in different Candida species. Besides being critical for growth in serum of Candida species, calcineurin is critical for plasma membrane integrity and growth at body temperature (37°C) uniquely in C. glabrata, suggesting that Candida calcineurin controls pathogenesis via various novel mechanisms. In this review, we summarize studies of calcineurin signaling and hyphal growth, virulence and its relationship with drug tolerance in Candida species, focusing on the divergent and conserved functions.

  18. Disk diffusion test and E-test with enriched Mueller-Hinton agar for determining susceptibility of Candida species to voriconazole and fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sai-Cheong; Lo, Hsiu-Jung; Fung, Chang-Phone; Lee, Ning; See, Lai-Chu

    2009-04-01

    A simplified antifungal disk diffusion test using Mueller-Hinton agar containing 2% glucose and methylene blue 5 microg/mL (GM-MH, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute [CLSI] M44-A) has proved to correlate well with the standard reference test. A new azole, voriconazole, has recently been approved for clinical therapy in Taiwan. This study investigated the reliability of the disk diffusion test with GM-MH agar and compared the results with those of the E-test using GM-MH agar to determine the voriconazole and fluconazole susceptibility of Candida isolates. The antimicrobial susceptibility of Candida isolates were evaluated by E-test and disk diffusion test in accordance with the guidelines of the CLSI, and compared with the reference antifungal macrodilution susceptibility test (CLSI M27-A). The antifungal disk diffusion test and the E-test using GM-MH agar plate provided a sufficiently accurate, time-efficient, and cost-effective way to determine the susceptibility of 182 Candida spp. to voriconazole and fluconazole. There was a high correlation between the test results of the E-test using the GM-MH agar plate and those obtained by the reference antifungal macrodilution susceptibility test (CLSI M27-A). The results of the E-test and those of the 1-microg voriconazole disk diffusion test on the GM-MH agar plate at 24 h had a high correlation. All the minimal inhibitory concentrations of voriconazole for all Candida spp. were <8 microg/mL. The positive predictive value of the susceptible disk test of voriconazole on the GM-MH agar plate was 100% at 24 h for C. albicans and other Candida spp. The disk diffusion test and the E-test using the GM-MH agar plate can be performed quickly, simply, and cost-effectively, and are practicable methods for the initial testing of the susceptibility of Candida spp. to voriconazole and fluconazole.

  19. Rapid characterisation of Candida albicans by pyrolysis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    White, G C; Sisson, P R; Freeman, R; Cookson, B D

    1994-08-01

    Clinical isolates (41) of Candida spp. from three possible outbreaks of nosocomially-acquired infection were compared by pyrolysis mass spectrometry (PMS) and by a combined morphotyping and resistotyping (M-R typing) method. Both systems characterised all the isolates and distinguished one isolate of C. tropicalis and another of C. glabrata from the 39 isolates of C. albicans. Results from both systems suggested that cross-infection with a single strain contributed to two of the outbreaks. In several instances, more than one strain of C. albicans was found amongst multiple isolates from the same patient. PMS is a simple, rapid and objective technique capable of characterising C. albicans isolates; discrimination was similar to M-R typing.

  20. Short peptides allowing preferential detection of Candida albicans hyphae.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Hani E J; Pölderl, Antonia; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2015-09-01

    Whereas the detection of pathogens via recognition of surface structures by specific antibodies and various types of antibody mimics is frequently described, the applicability of short linear peptides as sensor molecules or diagnostic tools is less well-known. We selected peptides which were previously reported to bind to recombinant S. cerevisiae cells, expressing members of the C. albicans Agglutinin-Like-Sequence (ALS) cell wall protein family. We slightly modified amino acid sequences to evaluate peptide sequence properties influencing binding to C. albicans cells. Among the selected peptides, decamer peptides with an "AP"-N-terminus were superior to shorter peptides. The new decamer peptide FBP4 stained viable C. albicans cells more efficiently in their mature hyphal form than in their yeast form. Moreover, it allowed distinction of C. albicans from other related Candida spp. and could thus be the basis for the development of a useful tool for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis.

  1. Antifungal Streptomyces spp. Associated with the Infructescences of Protea spp. in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Human, Zander R.; Moon, Kyuho; Bae, Munhyung; de Beer, Z. Wilhelm; Cha, Sangwon; Wingfield, Michael J.; Slippers, Bernard; Oh, Dong-Chan; Venter, Stephanus N.

    2016-01-01

    Common saprophytic fungi are seldom present in Protea infructescences, which is strange given the abundance of mainly dead plant tissue in this moist protected environment. We hypothesized that the absence of common saprophytic fungi in Protea infructescences could be due to a special symbiosis where the presence of microbes producing antifungal compounds protect the infructescence. Using a culture based survey, employing selective media and in vitro antifungal assays, we isolated antibiotic producing actinomycetes from infructescences of Protea repens and P. neriifolia from two geographically separated areas. Isolates were grouped into three different morphological groups and appeared to be common in the Protea spp. examined in this study. The three groups were supported in 16S rRNA and multi-locus gene trees and were identified as potentially novel Streptomyces spp. All of the groups had antifungal activity in vitro. Streptomyces sp. Group 1 had inhibitory activity against all tested fungi and the active compound produced by this species was identified as fungichromin. Streptomyces spp. Groups 2 and 3 had lower inhibition against all tested fungi, while Group 3 showed limited inhibition against Candida albicans and Sporothrix isolates. The active compound for Group 2 was also identified as fungichromin even though its production level was much lower than Group 1. The antifungal activity of Group 3 was linked to actiphenol. The observed antifungal activity of the isolated actinomycetes could contribute to protection of the plant material against common saprophytic fungi, as fungichromin was also detected in extracts of the infructescence. The results of this study suggest that the antifungal Streptomyces spp. could play an important role in defining the microbial population associated with Protea infructescences. PMID:27853450

  2. [Determination of Candida colonization and Candida score in patients in anesthesia intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Gökahmetoğlu, Günhan; Mutlu Sarıgüzel, Fatma; Koç, Ayşe Nedret; Behret, Orhan; Gökahmetoğlu, Selma; Atalay, Mustafa Altay; Elmalı, Ferhan; Darçın, Kamil

    2016-07-01

    The colonization rate of Candida spp. reaches up to 80% in patients who reside in intensive care units (ICUs) more than a week, and the mean rate of development of invasive disease is 10% in colonized patients. Since invasive candidiasis (IC) in ICU patients presents with septic shock and high mortality rate, rapid diagnosis and treatment are crucial. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between invasive infection and the determination of Candida colonization index (CI) and Candida score (CS) in patients admitted to ICU who are at high risk for IC and likely to benefit from early antifungal therapy. A total of 80 patients (34 female, 46 male; age range: 12-92 years, mean age: 69.57 ± 16.30) who were in ICU over seven days or longer of Anesthesia Department of Kayseri Education and Research Hospital between April, 2014 and July, 2015 were included in the study. None of the patients were neutropenic. After admission, throat, nose, skin (axillary region), urine, rectal swab and blood cultures have been collected weekly beginning from day zero. Isolation and identification of Candida strains were performed by using conventional mycological methods. CI was calculated as the ratio of the number of culture-positive distinct body sites (except blood culture) to the total number of body sites cultured. CI> 0.2 was considered as fungal colonization, while CI≥ 0.5 as intensive colonization. CS value was calculated according to the components including total parenteral nutrition (TPN) (plus 0.908 points), surgery (plus 0.907 points), colonization in multiple areas (plus 1.112) and severe sepsis (plus 2.038 points), and cut-off value for CS was accepted as >2.5. In our study, overall 1009 cultures (mean: 13 cultures per patient) were taken from 80 patients, and yeast growth was detected in 365 (36.2%) of them. Accordingly, among 68 (85%) of 80 patients included, in at least one sample, yeast growth was determined. No yeast growth was observed in the blood

  3. Biofilm inhibition by Cymbopogon citratus and Syzygium aromaticum essential oils in the strains of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohd Sajjad Ahmad; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2012-03-27

    Oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Syzygium aromaticum have been used in traditional medicine to treat fungal infections of skin, mouth, urinary and vaginal tract in Asian countries particularly India and other developing countries. To evaluate essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Syzygium aromaticum for their anti-biofilm activity against strong biofilm forming strains of Candida albicans. XTT reduction assay, Time kill assays, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to determine the effect of test oils on the Candida albicans biofilms. Most of the Candida albicans strains tested displayed formation of moderate to strong biofilms. Preformed Candida biofilms showed ≥1024 times increased resistance to antifungal drugs, 2 times to Syzygium aromaticum, but no increased tolerance for Cymbopogon citratus. Test oils were more active against preformed biofilms compared to amphotericin B and fluconazole. At 0.5× MIC, Cymbopogon citratus followed by Syzygium aromaticum were most inhibitory against biofilm formation. Light and electron microscopic studies revealed the deformity of three dimensional structures of biofilms formed in the presence of sub-MICs of Cymbopogon citratus. The cell membranes appeared to be the target site of compounds in sessile cells as displayed by SEM observations. Our data had demonstrated promising in vitro anti-biofilm activity by Cymbopogon citratus and Syzygium aromaticum and confirm the ethnopharmacological use of these oils in muco-cutaneous Candida infections. Furthermore, it suggests exploitation of these oils as new anti-biofilm products to deal with the problem of drug-resistance and recurrent infection associated with biofilm mode of growth of Candida spp. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Candida albicans Airway Colonization Facilitates Subsequent Acinetobacter baumannii Pneumonia in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaojiang; Chen, Ruilan; Zhu, Song; Wang, Huijun; Yan, Dongxing; Zhang, Xiangdong; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of Candida albicans respiratory tract colonization on Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia in a rat model. Rats were colonized with C. albicans by instillation of 3 × 10(6) CFU into their airways, while sterile saline was instilled in the control group. The colonized rats were further divided into two groups: treated with amphotericin B or not. The rats were subsequently infected with A. baumannii (10(8) CFU by tracheobronchial instillation). A. baumannii lung CFU counts, cytokine lung levels, and rates of A. baumannii pneumonia were compared between groups. In vitro expression of A. baumannii virulence genes was measured by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR after 24-hour incubation with C. albicans or with Mueller-Hinton (MH) broth alone. Rats with Candida colonization developed A. baumannii pneumonia more frequently and had higher A. baumannii CFU burdens and heavier lungs than controls. After A. baumannii infection, lung interleukin 17 (IL-17) concentrations were lower and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) concentrations were higher in Candida-colonized rats than in controls. Candida-colonized rats treated with amphotericin B had a decreased rate of A. baumannii pneumonia and lower IFN-γ levels but higher IL-17 levels than untreated rats. Expression of basC, barB, bauA, ptk, plc2, and pld2 was induced while expression of ompA and abaI was suppressed in A. baumannii cultured in the presence of C. albicans C. albicans colonization facilitated the development of A. baumannii pneumonia in a rat model. Among Candida-colonized rats, antifungal treatment lowered the incidence of A. baumannii pneumonia. These findings could be due to modification of the host immune response and/or expression of A. baumannii virulence genes by Candida spp. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Purification and characterisation of a metallopeptidase of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    el Moudni, B; Rodier, M H; Barrault, C; Ghazali, M; Jacquemin, J L

    1995-10-01

    A novel aminopeptidase was purified by high performance liquid chromatography from a cytosoluble 100,000 g extract of Candida albicans on the basis of its ability to cleave L-arginine 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin. The purification factor was 36 and the yield was 20%. The native enzyme had a mol. wt of 52 kDa as demonstrated by SDS-PAGE in the presence or absence of reducing conditions and exhibited an iso-electric point of 4.3. The aminopeptidase showed optimum activity at pH 7.2, a Michaelis constant of c. 50 microM and a Vmax at 19 mM AMC released/min/mg of protein for L-Arg-AMC. This enzyme was shown to cleave at low affinity L-leucine-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin as demonstrated by the spectrofluorimetric method. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by specific metallo-enzyme inhibitors-EDTA and o-phenanthroline. Furthermore, there is evidence that a similar or identical enzyme occurs in other C. albicans clinical isolates and other Candida spp.

  6. Rapid Development of Candida krusei Echinocandin Resistance during Caspofungin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Forastiero, A.; Garcia-Gil, V.; Rivero-Menendez, O.; Garcia-Rubio, R.; Monteiro, M. C.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Jordan, R.; Agorio, I.

    2015-01-01

    In invasive candidiasis, there has been an epidemiological shift from Candida albicans to non-albicans species infections, including infections with C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. Although the prevalence of C. krusei remains low among yeast infections, its intrinsic resistance to fluconazole raises epidemiological and therapeutic concerns. Echinocandins have in vitro activity against most Candida spp. and are the first-line agents in the treatment of candidemia. Although resistance to echinocandin drugs is still rare, individual cases of C. krusei resistance have been reported in recent years, especially with strains that have been under selective pressure. A total of 15 C. krusei strains, isolated from the blood, urine, and soft tissue of an acute lymphocytic leukemia patient, were analyzed. Strains developed echinocandin resistance during 10 days of caspofungin therapy. The molecular epidemiology of the isolates was investigated using two different typing methods: PCR-based amplification of the species-specific repetitive polymorphic CKRS-1 sequence and multilocus sequence typing. All isolates were genetically related, and the mechanism involved in decreased echinocandin susceptibility was characterized. Clinical resistance was associated with an increase in echinocandin MICs in vitro and was related to three different mutations in hot spot 1 of the target enzyme Fks1p. Molecular evidence of the rapid acquisition of resistance by different mutations in FKS1 highlights the need to monitor the development of resistance in C. krusei infections treated with echinocandin drugs. PMID:26324281

  7. Impact of the BACTEC NR system in detecting Candida fungemia.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, P; Bernaldo de Quirós, J C; Berenguer, J; Rodríguez Créixems, M; Picazo, J J; Bouza, E

    1990-01-01

    As a result of the growing importance of candidemia, various techniques for the detection of Candida spp. in blood have been designed with a view to speeding up the laboratory procedure. We have performed a retrospective comparison of the efficiencies of the conventional VACUTAINER system (Becton Dickinson Vacutainer Systems) and the BACTEC NR system (Johnston Laboratories, Inc.). During a 4-year period, 88,300 blood cultures were processed, with growth of Candida species in 552. The mean times required for the detection of growth were 7.55 days with the VACUTAINER system and 4.1 days with the BACTEC NR system (P less than 0.05). During the first week of incubation, the VACUTAINER system detected 56.1% of the candidemias and the BACTEC NR detected 93.6% (P less than 0.05). Use of the BACTEC NR therefore permits reduction of the incubation period from the previously established 4 weeks to a more convenient 7 to 14 days. PMID:2324285

  8. Factors governing adherence of Candida species to plastic surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, S A; Drutz, D J; Zajic, J E

    1985-01-01

    The ability of Candida albicans and Candida spp. to adhere to inert polymeric surfaces may allow these organisms direct ingress into the human host. Biophysical characterization of this adherence shows that the forces responsible for such adherence are attractive London-van der Waals forces (or hydrophobic forces) and electrostatic forces. The hydrophobic affinity of yeasts was determined by (i) a water-hydrocarbon two-phase assay and by (ii) measurement of the contact angle (theta) of a liquid droplet on a monolayer of yeast cells. The hydrophobicity of the yeasts correlated with the tendency of yeasts to adhere to polystyrene and was reduced in the presence of Tween 20. The adherence of yeasts to polymers of increasing hydrophobicity (determined by the contact angle method) was directly proportional to theta. Yeast surface charges were altered by selectively blocking amino and carboxyl groups. The more positively charged yeasts adhered in greater numbers. Increasing the molarity of NaCl increased yeast adherence. These forces probably contribute to the negative cooperativity (determined by Scatchard and Hill plot) that characterizes the adherence of yeasts to polymers. PMID:3899942

  9. Supplementation of CHROMagar Candida Medium with Pal's Medium for Rapid Identification of Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Sahand, Ismail H.; Moragues, María D.; Eraso, Elena; Villar-Vidal, María; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2005-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida medium is used for the isolation and identification of Candida species, but it does not differentiate Candida albicans from Candida dubliniensis. This differentiation can be achieved by using Pal's agar, which cannot be used in primary isolation. We have combined both media to obtain a new medium that can be used for the isolation and identification of C. dubliniensis in primary cultures. PMID:16272515

  10. Typing Candida Species Using Microsatellite Length Polymorphism and Multilocus Sequence Typing.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    To gain more insight into the epidemiological relationships between isolates of Candida spp. obtained from various origins, several molecular typing techniques have been developed. Two methods have emerged in the 2000s as soon as enough knowledge of the Candida spp. genomes was available to choose adequate loci and primers, namely microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). To contrast with previous PCR-based methods, specific amplifications with stringent conditions easily reproducible are the basis of MLP and MLST. MLST relies on Sanger sequencing to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms within housekeeping genes. MLP needs a first in silico step to select tandemly repeated stretches of two to five nucleotides. One of the two primers used to amplify a microsatellite locus is labeled and fragment sizing is automatically performed using high-resolution electrophoresis platforms. MLST provides results easily comparable between laboratories and active MLST schemes are publicly available for the main Candida species. For comparative studies, MLP needs standards to compensate for the electrophoretic variations depending on the platforms used. Both methods can help us gain insight into the genetic relatedness of fungal isolates, both with advantages and drawbacks, and the choice of one method rather than the other depends on the task in question.

  11. Azole resistance in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Warnock, D W; Kennedy, C T; Johnson, E M; Hopwood, V; Van Cutsem, J; Vanden Bossche, H

    1986-04-01

    An isolate of Candida albicans from a patient with chronic mucocutaneous candidosis who relapsed during ketoconazole treatment was compared with a number of other azole-sensitive and azole-resistant isolates by tests in vitro and in three animal models of vaginal or disseminated infection. In-vitro tests indicated that the isolate was cross-resistant to all imidazole and triazole antifungals tested. In the animal models, treatment with miconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole or fluconazole failed to influence the infection.

  12. Specific Human and Candida Cellular Interactions Lead to Controlled or Persistent Infection Outcomes during Granuloma-Like Formation

    PubMed Central

    Misme-Aucouturier, Barbara; Albassier, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A delayed type of multicellular process could be crucial during chronic candidiasis in determining the course of infection. This reaction, consisting of organized immune cells surrounding the pathogen, initiates an inflammatory response to avoid fungal dissemination. The goal of the present study was to examine, at an in vitro cellular scale, Candida and human immune cell interaction dynamics during a long-term period. By challenging human peripheral blood immune cells from 10 healthy donors with 32 Candida albicans and non-albicans (C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. lusitaniae, C. krusei, and C. kefyr) clinical isolates, we showed that Candida spp. induced the formation of granuloma-like structures within 6 days after challenge, but their sizes and the respective fungal burdens differed according to the Candida species. These two parameters are positively correlated. Phenotypic characteristics, such as hypha formation and higher axenic growth rate, seem to contribute to yeast persistence within granuloma-like structures. We showed an interindividual variability of the human response against Candida spp. Higher proportions of neutrophils and elevated CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratios during the first days after challenge were correlated with early production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and associated with controlled infection. In contrast, the persistence of Candida could result from upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and a poor anti-inflammatory negative feedback (IL-10). Importantly, regulatory subsets of NK cells and CD4lo CD8hi doubly positive (DP) lymphocytes at late stage infiltrate granuloma-like structures and could correlate with the IL-10 and TNF-α production. These data offer a base frame to explain cellular events that guide infection control or fungal persistence. PMID:27799331

  13. Specific Human and Candida Cellular Interactions Lead to Controlled or Persistent Infection Outcomes during Granuloma-Like Formation.

    PubMed

    Misme-Aucouturier, Barbara; Albassier, Marjorie; Alvarez-Rueda, Nidia; Le Pape, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    A delayed type of multicellular process could be crucial during chronic candidiasis in determining the course of infection. This reaction, consisting of organized immune cells surrounding the pathogen, initiates an inflammatory response to avoid fungal dissemination. The goal of the present study was to examine, at an in vitro cellular scale, Candida and human immune cell interaction dynamics during a long-term period. By challenging human peripheral blood immune cells from 10 healthy donors with 32 Candida albicans and non-albicans (C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. lusitaniae, C. krusei, and C. kefyr) clinical isolates, we showed that Candida spp. induced the formation of granuloma-like structures within 6 days after challenge, but their sizes and the respective fungal burdens differed according to the Candida species. These two parameters are positively correlated. Phenotypic characteristics, such as hypha formation and higher axenic growth rate, seem to contribute to yeast persistence within granuloma-like structures. We showed an interindividual variability of the human response against Candida spp. Higher proportions of neutrophils and elevated CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell ratios during the first days after challenge were correlated with early production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and associated with controlled infection. In contrast, the persistence of Candida could result from upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and a poor anti-inflammatory negative feedback (IL-10). Importantly, regulatory subsets of NK cells and CD4(lo) CD8(hi) doubly positive (DP) lymphocytes at late stage infiltrate granuloma-like structures and could correlate with the IL-10 and TNF-α production. These data offer a base frame to explain cellular events that guide infection control or fungal persistence. Copyright © 2016 Misme-Aucouturier et al.

  14. Medical Device-Associated Candida Infections in a Rural Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital of India.

    PubMed

    Deorukhkar, Sachin C; Saini, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Health care associated infections (HCAIs) add incrementally to the morbidity, mortality, and cost expected of the patient's underlying diseases alone. Approximately, about half all cases of HCAIs are associated with medical devices. As Candida medical device-associated infection is highly drug resistant and can lead to serious life-threatening complications, there is a need of continuous surveillance of these infections to initiate preventive and corrective measures. The present study was conducted at a rural tertiary care hospital of India with an aim to evaluate the rate of medical device-associated Candida infections. Three commonly encountered medical device-associated infections (MDAI), catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CA-UTI), intravascular catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), were targeted. The overall rate of MDAI in our hospital was 2.1 per 1000 device days. The rate of Candida related CA-UTI and CR-BSI was noted as 1.0 and 0.3, respectively. Untiring efforts taken by team members of Hospital Acquired Infection Control Committee along with maintenance of meticulous hygiene of the hospital and wards may explain the low MDAI rates in our institute. The present surveillance helped us for systematic generation of institutional data regarding MDAI with special reference to role of Candida spp.

  15. Decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines by monocytes from individuals presenting Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Pinke, Karen Henriette; Freitas, Patrícia; Viera, Narciso Almeida; Honório, Heitor Marques; Porto, Vinicius Carvalho; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2016-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis (DS) is the most frequent lesion among denture wearers, especially the elderly. DS is strongly associated with Candida albicans, as well as local and systemic factors, such as impaired immune response. Monocytes are important in the protective immune response against the fungus by the production of cytokines that recruit and activate leukocytes. There are functional changes in these cells with age, and individual alterations involving monocyte response may predispose the host to developing infections by Candida spp. In this study, our aim was to evaluate the production of TNF-α, IL-6, CXCL8, IL-1β, MCP-1 and IL-10 by monocytes from elderly denture wearers with/without DS and elderly or young non-denture wearers. We detected that monocytes from elderly denture wearers with Candida-related denture stomatitis produced lower levels of CXCL-8, IL-6 and MCP-1. This imbalance in cytokine levels was observed in spontaneous or LPS-stimulated production. Therefore, our data suggested that inherent aspects of the host, such as changes in cytokine production by monocytes, might be associated with the development and the persistence of DS irrespective of aging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. New Thiazolyl-triazole Schiff Bases: Synthesis and Evaluation of the Anti-Candida Potential.

    PubMed

    Stana, Anca; Enache, Alexandra; Vodnar, Dan Cristian; Nastasă, Cristina; Benedec, Daniela; Ionuț, Ioana; Login, Cezar; Marc, Gabriel; Oniga, Ovidiu; Tiperciuc, Brîndușa

    2016-11-22

    In the context of the dangerous phenomenon of fungal resistance to the available therapies, we present here the chemical synthesis of a new series of thiazolyl-triazole Schiff bases B1-B15, which were in vitro assessed for their anti-Candida potential. Compound B10 was found to be more potent against Candida spp. when compared with the reference drugs Fluconazole and Ketoconazole. A docking study of the newly synthesized Schiff bases was performed, and results showed good binding affinity in the active site of co-crystallized Itraconazole-lanosterol 14α-demethylase isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An in silico ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) study was done in order to predict some pharmacokinetic and pharmacotoxicological properties. The Schiff bases showed good drug-like properties. The results of in vitro anti-Candida activity, a docking study and ADMET prediction revealed that the newly synthesized compounds have potential anti-Candida activity and evidenced the most active derivative, B10, which can be further optimized as a lead compound.

  17. Biofilm formation and genetic variability of BCR1 gene in the Candida parapsilosis complex.

    PubMed

    Treviño-Rangel, Rogelio de J; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Irám P; Rosas-Taraco, Adrián G; Hernández-Bello, Romel; González, José G; González, Gloria M

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis are cryptic species that belong to the C. parapsilosis complex, which has been increasingly associated to fungemia in various geographic regions, principally due to the capability of these yeasts to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices. BCR1 is one of the most studied genes related to Candida spp. biofilms. To evaluate the biofilm forming capability of a subset of 65 clinical isolates of the C. parapsilosis complex using two conventional approaches, and to look for an association between the biofilm forming phenotype and genetic variants of a fragment of BCR1. The biofilm determination was carried out by crystal violet staining and tetrazolium reduction assay. On the other hand, a segment of BCR1 gene was sequenced by Sanger methodology. C. parapsilosis sensu stricto was statistically associated with a low biofilm production phenotype, while C. orthopsilosis was significantly associated with both phenotypes (high and low biofilm producers). According to the BCR1 sequence analysis, genetic variability was detected in C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis without a particular biofilm formation phenotype association. Under the adopted experimental design, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto was associated with the low biofilm phenotype and C. orthopsilosis with both phenotypes (high and low biofilm producers). On the other hand, an association between a biofilm forming phenotype and a particular genetic variant of the analyzed BCR1 fragment was not found. Copyright © 2014 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Micafungin: A Review in the Prophylaxis and Treatment of Invasive Candida Infections in Paediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2017-02-01

    Intravenous micafungin (Mycamine(®); Funguard(®)), an echinocandin, is approved in the EU for the treatment of invasive candidiasis in children (including neonates) and adolescents (<16 years of age) and as prophylaxis against Candida infections in patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) or who are expected to have neutropenia for ≥10 days. This narrative review focuses on the use of micafungin in paediatric indications approved in the EU, which may vary from those approved elsewhere in the world. Micafungin has a broad spectrum of in vitro activity against clinically relevant isolates of Candida spp. (including fluconazole-resistant Candida glabrata isolates), a low propensity for emergence of resistant isolates and a convenient once-daily regimen. In paediatric substudies and a small multinational, phase 3 trial in neonates with proven invasive candidiasis, intravenous micafungin was effective and generally well tolerated in the treatment of candidaemia and other types of invasive candidiasis and as prophylaxis against fungal infections in patients undergoing HSCT. Hence, micafungin remains an important option for the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive Candida infections in paediatric and adult patients.

  19. Promising results of cranberry in the prevention of oral Candida biofilms.

    PubMed

    Girardot, Marion; Guerineau, Amandine; Boudesocque, Leslie; Costa, Damien; Bazinet, Laurent; Enguehard-Gueiffier, Cécile; Imbert, Christine

    2014-04-01

    In the context of dental caries prevention by natural foodstuff sources, antifungal and antibiofilm activities of dry commercial extracts of cranberry fruit (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton) and two other red fruits (Vaccinium myrtillus L. and Malpighia punicifolia L.) were assessed on Candida albicans and Candida glabrata yeasts. When added to the culture medium, the cranberry extract displayed a significant anti-adhesion activity against Candida spp. when used at low concentrations. In addition, the pretreatment of surfaces with this extract induced an anti-adhesion activity mainly against C. glabrata yeasts and an antibiofilm activity against C. albicans. This activity was dependent on concentration, species, and strain. A phytochemical investigation bioguided by anti-adhesion tests against the two Candida species was carried out on crude cranberry juice to determine the active fractions. Three subfractions enriched in proanthocyanidins showed an anti-adhesion activity at low concentrations. This study investigated for the first time the interest of crude extracts of cranberry and cranberry juice fractions to prevent biofilms of C. glabrata. It highlighted the potency of consuming this fruit and using it as a source of anti-adhesion agents.

  20. Medical Device-Associated Candida Infections in a Rural Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital of India

    PubMed Central

    Deorukhkar, Sachin C.; Saini, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Health care associated infections (HCAIs) add incrementally to the morbidity, mortality, and cost expected of the patient's underlying diseases alone. Approximately, about half all cases of HCAIs are associated with medical devices. As Candida medical device-associated infection is highly drug resistant and can lead to serious life-threatening complications, there is a need of continuous surveillance of these infections to initiate preventive and corrective measures. The present study was conducted at a rural tertiary care hospital of India with an aim to evaluate the rate of medical device-associated Candida infections. Three commonly encountered medical device-associated infections (MDAI), catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CA-UTI), intravascular catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), were targeted. The overall rate of MDAI in our hospital was 2.1 per 1000 device days. The rate of Candida related CA-UTI and CR-BSI was noted as 1.0 and 0.3, respectively. Untiring efforts taken by team members of Hospital Acquired Infection Control Committee along with maintenance of meticulous hygiene of the hospital and wards may explain the low MDAI rates in our institute. The present surveillance helped us for systematic generation of institutional data regarding MDAI with special reference to role of Candida spp. PMID:26904115

  1. The prevalence of Candida onychomycosis in Southeastern Serbia from 2011 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Otašević, Suzana; Barac, Aleksandra; Pekmezovic, Marina; Tasic, Sinisa; Ignjatović, Aleksandra; Momčilović, Stefan; Stojanović, Predrag; Arsic Arsenijevic, Valentina; Hay, Roderick

    2016-03-01

    Despite the increasing of onychomycosis caused by Candida spp., in referent literature, there is still data insufficiency about this nail infection. The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine epidemiological characteristics of Candida onychomycosis, the antifungal susceptibility of isolated species in vitro, and to compare the results of antifungal susceptibility testing with conducted treatment in period from 2011 to the end of March 2015. Out of 761 patients who were underwent clinical and mycological examinations, 137 had Candida species isolated from nails. The dominant species was Candida albicans (C. albicans) (36.59%) followed by C. parapsilosis (23.78%), C. krusei (9.76%), and C. guilliermondii (6.71%). Antifungal susceptibility in vitro testing showed good susceptibility to antimycotics, except C. krusei, which was resistance to fluconazole (FCZ) and isolates of C. tropicalis and C. glabrata which were dose dependent to itraconazole (ITZ) and fluconazole. Evaluation of medical histories determined that combined therapy, which included pulsed systemic regimen of ITZ with topical application of clotrimazole, had better clinical outcomes regarding the proscribed only topical application of clotrimazole. Multidisciplinary approach of dermatologists and mycologists is required in solving the problem of onychomycosis, which is the dominant nail disease.

  2. Evaluation of Bichro-Dubli Fumouze to distinguish Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sahand, Ismail H; Moragues, María D; Robert, Raymond; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2006-06-01

    We have evaluated the ability of the Bichro-Dubli Fumouze (Fumouze Diagnostics, Levallois-Perret, France) latex agglutination test to identify colonies of Candida dubliniensis grown on different media. The test was positive for 103 of 106 isolates of C. dubliniensis and negative for Candida albicans and other Candida species studied. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were 97.1% and 100%, respectively. The test is very rapid, simple, and reliable giving the same results independently of whether the colonies are grown previously on Sabouraud dextrose agar, CHROMagar Candida medium, Candida ID2 medium, or CHROMagar-Pal's medium.

  3. Inhibitory effect of chromogenic culture media on the growth of Rhodotorula: relevance to the diagnosis of Rhodotorula spp. infections.

    PubMed

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Grenouillet, Frédéric; François, Nadine; Skana, Florence; Millon, Laurence

    2013-11-01

    With the increasing incidence and diverse etiologies of fungal infections, chromogenic yeast culture media are increasingly used for routine diagnosis. Rhodotorula species, which are characterized by the production of carotenoid pigments, are considered as emerging opportunistic pathogens. We recently diagnosed two fungemia due to Rhodotorula spp. and noticed that in both cases, the yeast failed to grow in subculture on the chromogenic yeast culture medium. This study was thus undertaken to investigate more thoroughly the ability (or inability) of Rhodotorula species to grow on different commercially available chromogenic media for yeast. Eighteen Rhodotorula spp. were checked for their ability to grow on four chromogenic yeast culture media: CHROMagar Candida (BD), Candi 4 Select (Biorad), Brilliance Candida (Oxoid), and Candida ID 2 (BioMerieux). All the Rhodotorula spp. strains grew on Brilliance and Candida ID 2, while only six isolates grew on Candi 4, and seven on CHROMagar. Two chromogenic yeast culture media showed a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of Rhodotorula species. As all Rhodotorula species are resistant to echinocandins and fluconazole, it is essential to isolate and identify these yeast quickly to initiate appropriate amphotericin B antifungal treatment as early as possible. The choice of media for routine use should take into account the ability of different media to allow all emerging fungal pathogens to grow. © 2013 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. In vitro activity of tea tree oil against Candida albicans mycelial conversion and other pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, F D; Laino, L; Strippoli, V; Tecca, M; Salvatore, G; Battinelli, L; Mazzanti, G

    2001-08-01

    The antifungal activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Maiden (Myrtaceae) essential oil against yeasts (Candida spp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Debaryomyces hansenii) and dermatophytes (Microsporum spp. and Tricophyton spp.) is reported. We focused on the ability of tea tree oil to inhibit Candida albicans conversion from the yeast to the pathogenic mycelial form. Moreover we carried out broth microdilution test and contact tests to evaluate the killing time. M. alternifolia essential oil inhibited the conversion of C. albicans from yeast to the mycelial form at a concentration of 0.16% (v/v). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranged from 0.12% to 0.50% (v/v) for yeasts and 0.12% to 1% (v/v) for dermatophytes; the cytocidal activity was generally expressed at the same concentration. These results, if considered along with the lipophilic nature of the oil which enables it to penetrate the skin, suggest it may be suitable for topical therapeutic use in the treatment of fungal mucosal and cutaneous infections.

  5. Patterns of Candida biofilm on intrauterine devices.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Kamal M; Agban, Michael N; Ahmed, Shaaban H; Hassan, Ehsan A; Sabet, Marwa A

    2015-04-01

    Biofilms are colonies of microbial cells encased in a self-produced organic polymeric matrix and represent a common mode of microbial growth. Microbes growing as biofilm are highly resistant to commonly used antimicrobial drugs. We aimed to screen and characterize biofilm formation by different isolates of Candida on removed intrauterine devices (IUDs), to perform experimental biofilm formation with isolated strains, and to examine biofilm by the crystal violet and XTT reduction assays and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A total of 56 IUDs were examined for biofilm formation using Sabouraud's dextrose chloramphenicol agar. Suspected colonies were identified by different methods. Antifungal susceptibility testing with fluconazole (FLU) and amphotericin B for the isolated strains and in vitro experimental biofilm formation was carried out. The biofilm was quantified by crystal violet, XTT reduction assay and SEM. Among the 56 IUDs investigated, 26 were Candida positive (46.4 %). Candida albicans was recovered from 15 isolates. The biofilm MIC of FLU was increased 64 to 1000 times compared to the MIC for planktonic cells. The XTT method results were dependent on the Candida species; biofilm formation was highest in Candida krusei and Candida glabrata strains, followed by C. albicans and Candida tropicalis. SEM of Candida biofilm revealed a heterogeneous thick biofilm with a mixture of micro-organisms. The main conclusion from this study was non-albicans Candida represents more than a half of the Candida biofilm. Better understanding of Candida biofilms may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of fungal infections, especially resistant ones among IUD users. © 2015 The Authors.

  6. [Development of a real-time polymerase chain reaction method for the identification of Candida species].

    PubMed

    Ağca, Harun; Dalyan Cilo, Burcu; Özmerdiven, Gülşah Ece; Sağlam, Sezcan; Ener, Beyza

    2015-01-01

    Candida species are one of the major causes of nosocomial infections and are the fourth most common agent involved in bloodstream infections. The impact of non-albicans Candida species is increasing, however C.albicans is still the most common species. Since the antifungal susceptibility pattern among Candida spp. may be different, rapid diagnosis and identification of non-albicans Candida spp. are important for the determination of antifungal agents that will be used for treatment. The aim of the study was to describe a real-time polymerase chain reaction (Rt-PCR) assay that rapidly detects, identifies and quantitates Candida species from blood culture samples. A total of 50 consecutive positive blood culture bottles (BACTEC, Beckton Dickinson, USA) identified at our laboratory between June-November 2013, were included in the study. Reference strains of Candida spp. (C.albicans ATCC 10231, C.glabrata ATCC 90030, C.tropicalis ATCC 1021, C.krusei ATCC 6258, C.parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and C. dubliniensis CD36) grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar were used for quality control. BACTEC bottles that were positive for Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were also studied to search the cross-reactivity. A commercial kit (Zymo Research, USA) was used for DNA extraction. Real-time PCR was performed on LightCycler 480 (Roche, Germany) with primers and probes specific for 18S rRNA of Candida species. Twenty microlitres of the reaction mix contained 2 μl of extracted DNA, 2 μl of LightCycler Fast Start DNA Master Probe (Roche Diagnostics, Germany), 2 μl of MgCl(2) (5 mmol), 2 μl of 10x PCR buffer (Roche Diagnostics, Germany), 0.5 μl of each primer (0.01 nmol/μl) and 1 μl of each probe (0.1 μmol/μl) (TibMolBiol, Germany). Amplification was performed using the following conditions; 95°C for 10 mins and 50 cycles of denaturation at 95°C for 10 secs, annealing at 62°C for 10 secs and polymerisation at 72°C for 20 secs. A melting curve was

  7. Antifungal Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains Isolated from Natural Honey against Pathogenic Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Bulgasem, Bulgasem Y.; Lani, Mohd Nizam; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Fnaish, Sumaya G.

    2016-01-01

    The role of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in honey as antifungal activity has received little attention and their mechanism of inhibitory of fungi is not fully understood. In this study, LAB were isolated from honey samples from Malaysia, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. Twenty-five isolates were confirmed LAB by catalase test and Gram staining, and were screened for antifungal activity. Four LAB showed inhibitory activity against Candida spp. using the dual agar overlay method. And they were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum HS isolated from Al-Seder honey, Lactobacillus curvatus HH isolated from Al-Hanon honey, Pediococcus acidilactici HC isolated from Tualang honey and Pediococcus pentosaceus HM isolated from Al-Maray honey by the 16S rDNA sequence. The growth of Candida glabrata ATCC 2001 was strongly inhibited (>15.0 mm) and (10~15 mm) by the isolates of L. curvatus HH and P. pentosaceus HM, respectively. The antifungal activity of the crude supernatant (cell free supernatant, CFS) was evaluated using well diffusion method. The CFS showed high antifungal activity against Candida spp. especially The CFS of L. curvatus HH was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited growth of C. glabrata ATCC 2001, C. parapsilosis ATCC 2201, and C. tropicalis ATCC 750 with inhibitory zone 22.0, 15.6, and 14.7 mm, respectively. While CFS of P. pentosaceus HM was significantly (p < 0.05) effective against C. krusei, C. glabrata, and C. albicans with inhibition zone 17.2, 16.0, and 13.3 mm, respectively. The results indicated that LAB isolated from honey produced compounds which can be used to inhibit the growth of the pathogenic Candida species. PMID:28154488

  8. Role of Candida species from HIV infected children in enamel caries lesions: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    CHARONE, Senda; PORTELA, Maristela Barbosa; MARTINS, Karol de Oliveira; SOARES, Rosangela Maria; CASTRO, Gloria Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study analyzed the capacity of Candida spp. from dental biofilm of HIV infected (HIV+) children to demineralize primary molar enamel in vitro by Transversal Microhardness (TMH), Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM) and the quantity of calcium ions (Ca2+) released from the enamel. Material and Methods Candida spp. samples were isolated from the supragingival biofilm of HIV+ children. A hundred and forty (140) enamel blocks were randomly assigned to six groups: biofilm formed by C. albicans (Group 1); mixed biofilm formed by C. albicans and C. tropicalis (Group 2); mixed biofilm formed by C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (Group 3); mixed biofilm formed by C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata (Group 4); biofilm formed by C. albicans ATCC (Group 5) and medium without Candida (Group 6). Enamel blocks from each group were removed on days 3, 5, 8 and 15 after biofilm formation to evaluate the TMH and images of enamel were analyzed by PLM. The quantity of Ca2+ released, from Groups 1 and 6, was determined using an Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The SPSS program was used for statistical analysis and the significance level was 5%. Results TMH showed a gradual reduction in enamel hardness (p<0.05) from the 1st to 15th day, but mainly five days after biofilm formation in all groups. The PLM showed superficial lesions indicating an increase in porosity. C. albicans caused the release of Ca2+ into suspension during biofilm formation. Conclusion Candida species from dental biofilm of HIV+ children can cause demineralization of primary enamel in vitro. PMID:28198976

  9. Antifungal Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains Isolated from Natural Honey against Pathogenic Candida Species.

    PubMed

    Bulgasem, Bulgasem Y; Lani, Mohd Nizam; Hassan, Zaiton; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Fnaish, Sumaya G

    2016-12-01

    The role of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in honey as antifungal activity has received little attention and their mechanism of inhibitory of fungi is not fully understood. In this study, LAB were isolated from honey samples from Malaysia, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. Twenty-five isolates were confirmed LAB by catalase test and Gram staining, and were screened for antifungal activity. Four LAB showed inhibitory activity against Candida spp. using the dual agar overlay method. And they were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum HS isolated from Al-Seder honey, Lactobacillus curvatus HH isolated from Al-Hanon honey, Pediococcus acidilactici HC isolated from Tualang honey and Pediococcus pentosaceus HM isolated from Al-Maray honey by the 16S rDNA sequence. The growth of Candida glabrata ATCC 2001 was strongly inhibited (>15.0 mm) and (10~15 mm) by the isolates of L. curvatus HH and P. pentosaceus HM, respectively. The antifungal activity of the crude supernatant (cell free supernatant, CFS) was evaluated using well diffusion method. The CFS showed high antifungal activity against Candida spp. especially The CFS of L. curvatus HH was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited growth of C. glabrata ATCC 2001, C. parapsilosis ATCC 2201, and C. tropicalis ATCC 750 with inhibitory zone 22.0, 15.6, and 14.7 mm, respectively. While CFS of P. pentosaceus HM was significantly (p < 0.05) effective against C. krusei, C. glabrata, and C. albicans with inhibition zone 17.2, 16.0, and 13.3 mm, respectively. The results indicated that LAB isolated from honey produced compounds which can be used to inhibit the growth of the pathogenic Candida species.

  10. Oral candida: is dummy carriage the culprit?

    PubMed Central

    Sio, J O; Minwalla, F K; George, R H; Booth, I W

    1987-01-01

    Oral candida in subjects who sucked dummies was almost double that of controls. Although the carriage of Candida albicans on silicone dummies was significantly reduced compared with latex dummies, oral colonisation was unaffected, suggesting that dummy carriage is not the cause of the observed increase. Images Figure PMID:3592731

  11. Candida infections in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis treated with interleukin-17 inhibitors and their practical management.

    PubMed

    Saunte, D M; Mrowietz, U; Puig, L; Zachariae, C

    2017-07-01

    The recognition of the central role of interleukin (IL)-17A in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has led to the development of several monoclonal antibodies targeting this cytokine or its receptors for therapeutic purposes. IL-17A also plays an important role in immunological protection against infections, especially those due to Candida spp., as evidenced by findings in patients with genetic defects in IL-17-related immune responses. To assess the potential of anti-IL-17 treatment to promote Candida infections, here we have systematically reviewed published clinical trials of patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Candida infections were reported in 4·0% of patients treated with brodalumab, 1·7% with secukinumab and 3·3% with ixekizumab vs. 0·3%, 2·3% and 0·8% of those assigned to placebo, ustekinumab or etanercept, respectively. Although the incidence of Candida infection was found to be increased by only a small degree during anti-IL-17 therapy, patients undergoing such treatment should be monitored for fungal infection and treated as necessary. We propose adoption of the recently updated recommendations for the practical management of Candida infection in patients administered IL-17 inhibitors. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  12. Bartonella spp. in Bats, Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ying; Kosoy, Michael; Recuenco, Sergio; Alvarez, Danilo; Moran, David; Turmelle, Amy; Ellison, James; Garcia, Daniel L; Estevez, Alejandra; Lindblade, Kim; Rupprecht, Charles

    2011-07-01

    To better understand the role of bats as reservoirs of Bartonella spp., we estimated Bartonella spp. prevalence and genetic diversity in bats in Guatemala during 2009. We found prevalence of 33% and identified 21 genetic variants of 13 phylogroups. Vampire bat-associated Bartonella spp. may cause undiagnosed illnesses in humans.

  13. Novel strategies to fight Candida species infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Silva, Sónia; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the incidence of human fungal infections. The increase in cases of infection caused by Candida species, and the consequent excessive use of antimicrobials, has favored the emergence of resistance to conventional antifungal agents over the past decades. Consequently, Candida infections morbidity and mortality are also increasing. Therefore, new approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients suffering from Candida infections, because it seems unlikely that the established standard treatments will drastically lower the morbidity of mucocutaneous Candida infections and the high mortality associated with invasive candidiasis. This review aims to present the last advances in the traditional antifungal therapy, and present an overview of novel strategies that are being explored for the treatment of Candida infections, with a special focus on combined antifungal agents, antifungal therapies with alternative compounds (plant extracts and essential oils), adjuvant immunotherapy, photodynamic therapy and laser therapy.

  14. In vitro activity of anidulafungin in combination with amphotericin B or voriconazole against biofilms of five Candida species.

    PubMed

    Valentín, A; Cantón, E; Pemán, J; Fernandez-Rivero, M E; Tormo-Mas, M A; Martínez, J P

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the in vitro activity of anidulafungin combined with amphotericin B or voriconazole against Candida spp. biofilms. Four Candida albicans, four Candida tropicalis, four Candida glabrata, two Candida parapsilosis and two Candida orthopsilosis blood isolates were tested by the microdilution chequerboard method combined with the XTT metabolic assay. Biofilm MIC was defined as the lowest concentration producing 50% metabolic inhibition with respect to control (BMIC50). Concentrations in the combinations ranged from 1/8 × BMIC50 to 4 × BMIC50 found for each antifungal tested alone. Anidulafungin plus amphotericin B acted synergistically against C. albicans and C. glabrata biofilms [fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI): 0.082-0.387], but showed no interaction against C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis (FICI: 0.516-2.099). The combination of these antifungals failed to completely remove biofilms of C. albicans and C. glabrata, decreasing the metabolic activity of the biofilms up to 80% and 95%, respectively, which did not occur when each antifungal was used alone. Anidulafungin plus voriconazole showed no interaction against all isolates. Using a less stringent criterion previously proposed to define synergism (FICI < 1) and antagonism (FICI > 1.25), antagonistic interactions were found against some isolates. Anidulafungin with amphotericin B results in a synergistic effect against C. albicans and C. glabrata biofilms at serum concentrations of the drugs, but showed no interaction against C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis complex. Anidulafungin plus voriconazole showed no interaction against the five Candida species assayed. Biofilms of C. tropicalis were found to be the most resistant towards the combinations assayed. The results presented may be of potential interest in the clinical setting. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

  15. Isolation of Vaginal Lactobacilli and Characterization of Anti-Candida Activity

    PubMed Central

    Parolin, Carola; Marangoni, Antonella; Laghi, Luca; Foschi, Claudio; Ñahui Palomino, Rogers Alberto; Calonghi, Natalia; Cevenini, Roberto; Vitali, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    Healthy vaginal microbiota is dominated by Lactobacillus spp., which form a critical line of defence against pathogens, including Candida spp. The present study aims to identify vaginal lactobacilli exerting in vitro activity against Candida spp. and to characterize their antifungal mechanisms of action. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from vaginal swabs of healthy premenopausal women. The isolates were taxonomically identified to species level (L. crispatus B1-BC8, L. gasseri BC9-BC14 and L. vaginalis BC15-BC17) by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes. All strains produced hydrogen peroxide and lactate. Fungistatic and fungicidal activities against C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. lusitaniae were evaluated by broth micro-dilution method. The broadest spectrum of activity was observed for L. crispatus BC1, BC4, BC5 and L. vaginalis BC15, demonstrating fungicidal activity against all isolates of C. albicans and C. lusitaniae. Metabolic profiles of lactobacilli supernatants were studied by 1H-NMR analysis. Metabolome was found to be correlated with both taxonomy and activity score. Exclusion, competition and displacement experiments were carried out to investigate the interference exerted by lactobacilli toward the yeast adhesion to HeLa cells. Most Lactobacillus strains significantly reduced C. albicans adhesion through all mechanisms. In particular, L. crispatus BC2, L. gasseri BC10 and L. gasseri BC11 appeared to be the most active strains in reducing pathogen adhesion, as their effects were mediated by both cells and supernatants. Inhibition of histone deacetylases was hypothesised to support the antifungal activity of vaginal lactobacilli. Our results are prerequisites for the development of new therapeutic agents based on probiotics for prophylaxis and adjuvant therapy of Candida infection. PMID:26098675

  16. Modification of adherence to plastic and to human buccal cells of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by a subinhibitory concentration of itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M T; Morales, J J; Lucio, L; Pérez-Giraldo, C; Hurtado, C; Gómez-García, A C

    2006-02-01

    Exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antifungal agents can influence the adherence of Candida spp. to the host cell. In this study the adherence of Candida albicans ATCC 10231 and Candida dubliniensis CECT 11455 to plastic and to human buccal epithelial cells was evaluated following pre-exposure to 0.5 x minimum inhibitory capacity (MIC) of itraconazole and compared with the corresponding cellular surface hydrophobicity. The yeasts were grown in Sabouraud broth or RPMI-1640 with itraconazole (0.5 x MIC) for 24-26 h at 37 degrees C and the drug was then removed. The adhesion capacity to plastic was studied by turbidimetry in a polystyrene microtiter plate. The adhesion of the yeast to buccal epithelial cells was determined using microscopy techniques. The cellular surface hydrophobicity levels were determined by the microbial adhesion hydrocarbons test. Pre-exposure to itraconazole decreased plastic adherence and cellular surface hydrophobicity in both species when grown in RPMI. When C. albicans was grown in Sabouraud broth, it was nonhydrophobic and did not adhere and therefore no change was detected with the antibiotic. Itraconazole increased adherence to buccal epithelial cells in both species and media studied, as compared to controls without antifungal agents. To study the effects of these antifungal agents on pathogenicity mechanisms, it will be necessary to standardize the methodology for evaluation to determine their in vivo therapeutic efficacy.

  17. Anti-Candida activity of Quercus infectoria gall extracts against Candida species

    PubMed Central

    Baharuddin, Nur Saeida; Abdullah, Hasmah; Abdul Wahab, Wan Nor Amilah Wan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Galls of Quercus infectoria have been traditionally used to treat common ailments, including yeast infections caused by Candida species. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro anti-Candida activity of Q. infectoria gall extracts against selected Candida species. Materials and Methods: Methanol and aqueous extracts of Q. infectoria galls were tested for anti-Candida activity against Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined using the two-fold serial dilution technique of concentrations ranging from 16 mg/ml to 0.03 mg/ml. After 24 h, the minimum fungicidal concentrations were determined by subculturing the wells, which showed no turbidity on the agar plate. Potential phytochemical group in the crude extracts was screened by phytochemical qualitative tests and subsequently subjected to the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Results: Both methanol and aqueous extracts displayed substantial anti-Candida activity and pyrogallol was the major component of both crude extracts. Conclusions: Data from current study suggested that Q. infectoria gall extracts are a potential source to be developed as anti-candidiasis. PMID:25709331

  18. Multi-species biofilm of Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans Candida species on acrylic substrate

    PubMed Central

    K PATHAK, Apurva; SHARMA, Sanjay; SHRIVASTVA, Pallavi

    2012-01-01

    Objective In polymicrobial biofilms bacteria extensively interact with Candida species, but the interaction among the different species of the Candida is yet to be completely evaluated. In the present study, the difference in biofilm formation ability of clinical isolates of four species of Candida in both single-species and multi-species combinations on the surface of dental acrylic resin strips was evaluated. Material and Methods The species of Candida, isolated from multiple species oral candidiasis of the neutropenic patients, were used for the experiment. Organisms were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose broth with 8% glucose (SDB). Biofilm production on the acrylic resins strips was determined by crystal violet assay. Student's t-test and ANOVA were used to compare in vitro biofilm formation for the individual species of Candida and its different multi-species combinations. Results In the present study, differences between the mean values of the biofilm-forming ability of individual species (C. glabrata>C. krusei>C. tropicalis>C. albicans) and in its multi-species' combinations (the highest for C. albicans with C. glabrata and the lowest for all the four species combination) were reported. Conclusions The findings of this study showed that biofilm-forming ability was found greater for non-Candida albicans Candida species (NCAC) than for C. albicans species with intra-species variation. Presence of C. albicans in multi-species biofilms increased, whereas; C. tropicalis decreased the biofilm production with all other NCAC species. PMID:22437681

  19. Frequency of the Paradoxical Effect Measured Using the EUCAST Procedure with Micafungin, Anidulafungin, and Caspofungin against Candida Species Isolates Causing Candidemia.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Zambrano, Laura Judith; Escribano, Pilar; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Bouza, Emilio; Guinea, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    We report data on the frequency of the paradoxical effect of echinocandins against Candida spp. (n = 602 incident isolates) using the EUCAST definitive document EDef 7.2 procedure. The paradoxical effect for one or more echinocandins was observed in 16% of the isolates. However, differences between species were found, and the paradoxical effect was more common in Candida tropicalis (P < 0.001). Caspofungin was the drug in which the paradoxical effect was most common, followed by anidulafungin and micafungin (P < 0.001). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Hosting infection: experimental models to assay Candida virulence.

    PubMed

    Maccallum, Donna M

    2012-01-01

    Although normally commensals in humans, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei are capable of causing opportunistic infections in individuals with altered physiological and/or immunological responses. These fungal species are linked with a variety of infections, including oral, vaginal, gastrointestinal, and systemic infections, with C. albicans the major cause of infection. To assess the ability of different Candida species and strains to cause infection and disease requires the use of experimental infection models. This paper discusses the mucosal and systemic models of infection available to assay Candida virulence and gives examples of some of the knowledge that has been gained to date from these models.

  1. Influence of Candida krusei and Candida glabrata on Candida albicans gene expression in in vitro biofilms.

    PubMed

    Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Ribeiro, Felipe Camargo; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the interactions between the species Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in monotypic and mixed biofilm models formed in vitro as well as the relative expression of the ALS1, ALS3, HWP1, BCR1, EFG1, TEC1, SAP5, PLB2 and LIP9 genes. Mixed (C. albicans/C. krusei and C. albicans/C. glabrata) and monotypic biofilms were cultured for 0, 12 and 24h. Gene expression was analyzed in the same biofilm model in which the number of CFU/mL was counted. The C. albicans CFU/mL values were lower at the 12 and 24h time points in the mixed biofilms compared with the monotypic biofilms, and decreases of 56.23% and 64.4% in C. albicans were observed when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. In the presence of C. krusei, the expression of the ALS3, HWP1, BCR1, EFG1 and TEC1 genes of C. albicans was completely inhibited, indicating both transcriptome and the phenotypic antagonism between these two species, but genes related to the secretion of enzymes were stimulated. In the presence of C. glabrata, C. albicans showed a similar gene expression profile to that obtained in association with C. krusei, though it was altered to a lesser degree. We conclude that C. krusei and C. glabrata may alter or inhibit the mechanisms involved in the in vitro adherence and formation of C. albicans biofilms, influencing the pathogenicity of this species and suggesting a competitive interaction with C. krusei and C. glabrata in biofilm formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by the fungus Arthroderma fulvum and its antifungal activity against genera of Candida, Aspergillus and Fusarium

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Baiji; He, Dan; Gao, Song; Wang, Dongyang; Yokoyama, Koji; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find one or more fungal strains that could be utilized to biosynthesize antifungal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Using morphological and molecular methods, Arthroderma fulvum was identified as the most effective fungal strain for synthesizing AgNPs. The UV–visible range showed a single peak at 420 nm, which corresponded to the surface plasmon absorbance of AgNPs. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the biosynthesized AgNPs were crystalline in nature with an average diameter of 15.5±2.5 nm. Numerous factors could potentially affect the process of biosynthesis, and the main factors are discussed here. Optimization results showed that substrate concentration of 1.5 mM, alkaline pH, reaction temperature of 55°C, and reaction time of 10 hours were the optimum conditions for AgNP biosynthesis. Biosynthesized AgNPs showed considerable activity against the tested fungal strains, including Candida spp., Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp., especially Candida spp. PMID:27217752

  3. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by the fungus Arthroderma fulvum and its antifungal activity against genera of Candida, Aspergillus and Fusarium.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baiji; He, Dan; Gao, Song; Wang, Dongyang; Yokoyama, Koji; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find one or more fungal strains that could be utilized to biosynthesize antifungal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Using morphological and molecular methods, Arthroderma fulvum was identified as the most effective fungal strain for synthesizing AgNPs. The UV-visible range showed a single peak at 420 nm, which corresponded to the surface plasmon absorbance of AgNPs. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the biosynthesized AgNPs were crystalline in nature with an average diameter of 15.5±2.5 nm. Numerous factors could potentially affect the process of biosynthesis, and the main factors are discussed here. Optimization results showed that substrate concentration of 1.5 mM, alkaline pH, reaction temperature of 55°C, and reaction time of 10 hours were the optimum conditions for AgNP biosynthesis. Biosynthesized AgNPs showed considerable activity against the tested fungal strains, including Candida spp., Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp., especially Candida spp.

  4. Microwave sterilization of Candida on underwear fabric. A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, E.G. Jr.; Phillips, L.E.

    1988-05-01

    Candida-contaminated underwear might not be sterilized by ordinary laundering. The effectiveness of microwaving against Candida albicans on fabric was therefore determined. Swatches of Candida-impregnated cotton underpants fabric were subjected to domestic microwaving at the high setting for up to 30 minutes. If the fabric was microwaved dry, the Candida organisms survived. If the fabric was moistened, sterilization occurred within five minutes. Microwaving wet, freshly laundered cotton underpants should sterilize residual Candida and reduce the risk of reinfection.

  5. Antifungal Activity of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Chrysobalanus icaco Against Oral Clinical Isolates of Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Silva, João Paulo Bastos; Peres, Ana Regina Maués Noronha; Paixão, Thiago Portal; Silva, Andressa Santa Brígida; Baetas, Ana Cristina; Barbosa, Wagner Luiz Ramos; Monteiro, Marta Chagas; Andrade, Marcieni Ataíde

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chrysobalanus icaco is a medicinal plant commonly used to treat fungal infections in Brazilian Amazonian region. Objective: This work aimed to evaluate the antifungal activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of C. icaco (HECi) against oral clinical isolates of Candida spp. and to determine the pharmacognostic parameters of the herbal drug and the phytochemical characteristics of HECi. Materials and Methods: The pharmacognostic characterization was performed using pharmacopoeial techniques. Phytochemical screening, total flavonoid content, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis were used to investigate the chemical composition of the HECi. A broth microdilution method was used to determine the antifungal activity of the extract against 11 oral clinical isolates of Candida spp. Results: Herbal drug presented parameters which were within the limits set forth in current Brazilian legislation. A high amount of flavonoid content (132,959.33 ± 12,598.23 μg quercetin equivalent/g of extract) was found in HECi. Flavonoids such as myricetin and rutin were detected in the extract by HPLC analyses. HECi showed antifungal activity against oral isolates of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis (minimum inhibitory concentrations [MIC] 3.12 and 6.25 mg/mL, respectively), and C. albicans American American Type Culture Collection (MIC <1.56 mg/mL). Conclusion: HECi was shown to possess antifungal activity against Candida species with clinical importance in the development of oral candidiasis, and these activities may be related to its chemical composition. The antifungal activity detected for C. icaco against Candida species with clinical importance in the development of oral candidiasis can be attributed to the presence of flavonoids in HECi, characterized by chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. SUMMARY Chrysobalanus icaco presents a high amount of flavonoids in its constitutionLC analysis was able to identify the flavonoids myricetin

  6. Postantifungal effect of caspofungin against the Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis clades.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    Killing and postantifungal effects could be relevant for the selection of optimal dosing schedules. This study aims to compare time-kill and postantifungal effects with caspofungin on Candida albicans (C. albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida africana) and Candida parapsilosis (C. parapsilosis, Candida metapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis) clades. In the postantifungal effect experiments, strains were exposed to caspofungin for 1 h at concentrations 0.12-8 μg/mL. Time-kill experiments were conducted at the same concentrations. Caspofungin exhibited a significant and prolonged postantifungal effect (>37 h) with 2 μg/mL against the most strains of C. albicans clade. Against the C. parapsilosis clade, the postantifungal effect was <12 h at 8 μg/mL, except for two strains. Caspofungin was fungicidal against C. albicans, C. dubliniensis and C. metapsilosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Beyond Candida albicans: Mechanisms of immunity to non-albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Whibley, Natasha; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2015-11-01

    The fungal genus Candida encompasses numerous species that inhabit a variety of hosts, either as commensal microbes and/or pathogens. Candida species are a major cause of fungal infections, yet to date there are no vaccines against Candida or indeed any other fungal pathogen. Our knowledge of immunity to Candida mainly comes from studies on Candida albicans, the most frequent species associated with disease. However, non-albicans Candida (NAC) species also cause disease and their prevalence is increasing. Although research into immunity to NAC species is still at an early stage, it is becoming apparent that immunity to C. albicans differs in important ways from non-albicans species, with important implications for treatment, therapy and predicted demographic susceptibility. This review will discuss the current understanding of immunity to NAC species in the context of immunity to C. albicans, and highlight as-yet unanswered questions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida albicans and Emerging Non-albicans Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Sarah G.; Berkow, Elizabeth L.; Rybak, Jeffrey M.; Nishimoto, Andrew T.; Barker, Katherine S.; Rogers, P. David

    2017-01-01

    Within the limited antifungal armamentarium, the azole antifungals are the most frequent class used to treat Candida infections. Azole antifungals such as fluconazole are often preferred treatment for many Candida infections as they are inexpensive, exhibit limited toxicity, and are available for oral administration. There is, however, extensive documentation of intrinsic and developed resistance to azole antifungals among several Candida species. As the frequency of azole resistant Candida isolates in the clinical setting increases, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms of such resistance in order to both preserve and improve upon the azole class of antifungals for the treatment of Candida infections. This review examines azole resistance in infections caused by C. albicans as well as the emerging non-albicans Candida species C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, and C. glabrata and in particular, describes the current understanding of molecular basis of azole resistance in these fungal species. PMID:28127295

  9. [Prevalence of oral lesions by Candida sp.: Their varieties and serotypes in a population of patients with AIDS under a highly active antiretroviral therapy.].

    PubMed

    Ceballos Salobreña, A; Gaitán Cepeda, L A; Ruesga, M T; Ceballos García, L; Quindós, G

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study has been to determine the prevalence of oral candidiasis and oral Candida carriers in an AIDS population under highly active antiretroviral therapy. Eighty-six AIDS patients treated with an antiretroviral combination (indinavir o ritonavir o saquinavir + zidovudine [AZT] + lamivudine [3TC]). Patients were grouped attending the predisposing factors for HIV infection in: intravenous drug users (IDU), heterosexuals, homosexuals, patients using hematological products or having unknown factors. Oral cavity was examined and an oral specimen was inoculated in a chromogenic culture medium (Albicans ID, bioMérieux, France). The prevalence of oral Candida lesions was 30.2% and Candida was isolated from 54.7% of patients. The predominant species was C. albicans serotype A in all the groups with the exception of homosexual patients, were C. albicans serotype B was the predominant. The IDU group showed the higher prevalence of Candida lesions and oral yeasts colonization, followed by the group of heterosexuals and homosexuals. An association was found between the presence of lesions and/or Candida spp. and the clinical stage or the viral concentration. The species Candida dubliniensis was isolated in the oral samples of two patients with candidosis and in two individuals without oral candidosis. The finding of this species in Spanish patients can be added to the data obtained in epidemiological studies in other countries.

  10. Evaluation of two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems for the identification of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, C; Gicquel, A; Sendid, B; Meyer, J; Accoceberry, I; François, N; Morio, F; Desoubeaux, G; Chandenier, J; Kauffmann-Lacroix, C; Hennequin, C; Guitard, J; Nassif, X; Bougnoux, M-E

    2014-02-01

    Candida spp. are responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised patients and those undergoing invasive procedures. The accurate identification of Candida species is important because emerging species can be associated with various antifungal susceptibility spectra. Conventional methods have been developed to identify the most common pathogens, but have often failed to identify uncommon species. Several studies have reported the efficiency of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of clinically relevant Candida species. In this study, we evaluated two commercially available MALDI-TOF systems, Andromas™ and Bruker Biotyper™, for Candida identification in routine diagnosis. For this purpose, we investigated 1383 Candida isolates prospectively collected in eight hospital laboratories during routine practice. MALDI-TOF MS results were compared with those obtained using conventional phenotypic methods. Analysis of rDNA gene sequences with internal transcribed regions or D1-D2 regions is considered the reference standard for identification. Both MALDI-TOF MS systems could accurately identify 98.3% of the isolates at the species level (1359/1383 for Andromas™; 1360/1383 for Bruker Biotyper™) vs. 96.5% for conventional techniques. Furthermore, whereas conventional methods failed to identify rare or emerging species, these were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Both MALDI-TOF MS systems are accurate and cost-effective alternatives to conventional methods for mycological identification of clinically relevant Candida species and should improve the diagnosis of fungal infections as well as patient management.

  11. Differentiation between Atypical Isolates of Candida lusitaniae and Candida pulcherrima by Determination of Mating Type

    PubMed Central

    Noël, Thierry; Favel, Anne; Michel-Nguyen, Annie; Goumar, Abdelhak; Fallague, Karim; Chastin, Christiane; Leclerc, Florence; Villard, Jean

    2005-01-01

    We report on five clinical isolates routinely identified as Candida lusitaniae that the ID 32C system was unable to discriminate from the closely related species Candida pulcherrima. When additional tests did not allow accurate identification, the less usual mating type test identified all of them as Clavispora lusitaniae. Mating type testing appears to be a valuable tool for assessing the true incidence of this emerging non-albicans Candida species. PMID:15750124

  12. Atrophic tongue associated with Candida.

    PubMed

    Terai, Haruhiko; Shimahara, Masashi

    2005-08-01

    Traditionally, total atrophic tongue has been due to nutritional deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, folic acid, or iron deficiencies, and partial atrophic tongue has been well known as median rhomboid glossitis or geographic tongue. The other cause of atrophic tongue is oral candidiasis. Forty patients with atrophic change of the tongue were examined on a relation to candidiasis. All of them complained of tongue pain on spicy or hot diet. Laboratory examinations included blood examination for diabetes and anemia, culture test and direct cytologic examination. The intensity of tongue pain was evaluated pre- and post-treatment using visual analogue scale (VAS). Twenty-four of 40 (60%) had pre-disposing factors of candidiasis including diabetes mellitus, malignancy, systemic steroid therapy, long-term antibiotic therapy and others in their medical history. Blood examinations revealed mild anemia and/or Fe deficiency in 5 (12.5%), mild diabetes in 4 (10.0%), both in two, while residual 29 patients (72.5%) were within reference levels. In the culture examination, candidal species were isolated in 72.5%, and almost all of them were candida albicans. The direct cytologic examination performed in 17 of 40 patients, witch revealed pseudohyphae of fungi in 14 patients (82.4%). After the antifungal treatment, the tongue pain disappeared or improved markedly in 80%. Simultaneously, the regenerative tendency of filifolm papilla of the tongue dorsum was observed in these patients. Atrophic tongue associated with pain at eating, even though it is mild atrophic change, has a high probability of being a candida-induced lesion. Long disease duration and no benefit by topical steroids are suggestive and diagnostic factors of this disease.

  13. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  14. Folsomia candida (Collembola): a "standard" soil arthropod.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Michelle T; Hopkin, Steve P

    2005-01-01

    Folsomia candida Willem 1902, a member of the order Collembola (colloquially called springtails), is a common and widespread arthropod that occurs in soils throughout the world. The species is parthenogenetic and is easy to maintain in the laboratory on a diet of granulated dry yeast. F. candida has been used as a "standard" test organism for more than 40 years for estimating the effects of pesticides and environmental pollutants on nontarget soil arthropods. However, it has also been employed as a model for the investigation of numerous other phenomena such as cold tolerance, quality as a prey item, and effects of microarthropod grazing on pathogenic fungi and mycorrhizae of plant roots. In this comprehensive review, aspects of the life history, ecology, and ecotoxicology of F. candida are covered. We focus on the recent literature, especially studies that have examined the effects of soil pollutants on reproduction in F. candida using the protocol published by the International Standards Organization in 1999.

  15. Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Donato, Concetta; De Carolis, Elena; Vella, Antonietta; Vaccaro, Luisa; La Greca, Antonio; Fantoni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheter-related fungemia are increasing in the last years, also due to rare fungi. We report the case of a Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection in a patient with metastatic carcinoma of the bladder and a long term totally implanted venous catheter. The diagnosis was done by paired blood cultures and differential time to positivity. The Candida species was rapidly identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The patient was successfully treated with anidulafungine. PMID:25473600

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF DIFFERENT FUSARIUM SPP. IN ALLIUM SPP. IN GERMANY.

    PubMed

    Boehnke, B; Karlovsky, P; Pfohl, K; Gamliel, A; Isack, Y; Dehne, H W

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Allium cepa bulbs from different fields in Northern and Southern Germany, seeds and sets from onion breeders were analysed for infestation with Fusarium species. The same investigation was done in 2014 with different edible Allium spp. from local markets. Different Fusarium spp. were isolated and identified by morphological characterisation. 24 different Fusarium spp. were identified. The diversity of Fusarium spp. and the intensity of infestation was higher on edible bulbs compared to the younger sets and seeds. The analysed onions and other edible Allium spp. from local markets showed also high contents of different Fusarium species. The most prevalent identified Fusarium sp. in the analysed Allium spp. in Germany was Fusarium oxysporum which can cause the Fusarium Basal Rot, followed by Fusarium solani. Fusarium proliferatum, which can cause the Fusarium Salmon Blotch in onions, could be detected in about half of the sampled onion fields and in approximately 10% of all analysed onions from fields. Also in the onion sets, on the surface of the seeds and in other edible Allium spp. F. proliferatum could be identified. Besides F. proliferatum, further mycotoxin producing Fusarium spp. like Fusarium equiseti or Fusarium tricinctum were identified. Other Fusarium spp. like Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium poae were first described in Allium sp. in this study. The two most prevalent Fusarium spp. F. oxysporum and F. solani are able to produce mycotoxins like enniatins, fumonisins, moniliformin and T-2 toxins. Fusarium sp. like F. proliferatum, F. equiseti and F. tricinctum are able to produce additional toxins like beauvericins, zearalenone and diacetoscirpenol. This high number of Fusarium spp., which are able to produce a broad spectrum of different mycotoxins, could be a potential health risk for human beings and livestock.

  17. The Candida genome database incorporates multiple Candida species: multispecies search and analysis tools with curated gene and protein information for Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Diane O; Arnaud, Martha B; Binkley, Jonathan; Shah, Prachi; Skrzypek, Marek S; Wymore, Farrell; Binkley, Gail; Miyasato, Stuart R; Simison, Matt; Sherlock, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    The Candida Genome Database (CGD, http://www.candidagenome.org/) is an internet-based resource that provides centralized access to genomic sequence data and manually curated functional information about genes and proteins of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans and other Candida species. As the scope of Candida research, and the number of sequenced strains and related species, has grown in recent years, the need for expanded genomic resources has also grown. To answer this need, CGD has expanded beyond storing data solely for C. albicans, now integrating data from multiple species. Herein we describe the incorporation of this multispecies information, which includes curated gene information and the reference sequence for C. glabrata, as well as orthology relationships that interconnect Locus Summary pages, allowing easy navigation between genes of C. albicans and C. glabrata. These orthology relationships are also used to predict GO annotations of their products. We have also added protein information pages that display domains, structural information and physicochemical properties; bibliographic pages highlighting important topic areas in Candida biology; and a laboratory strain lineage page that describes the lineage of commonly used laboratory strains. All of these data are freely available at http://www.candidagenome.org/. We welcome feedback from the research community at candida-curator@lists.stanford.edu.

  18. Effects of temperature on anti-Candida activities of antifungal antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Odds, F C

    1993-01-01

    The relative growth (percentage of growth relative to control growth) of 767 Candida isolates representing five species was measured in microcultures at 25 and 37 degrees C. In the presence of 10(-4) M flucytosine, the distribution of relative yeast growth data indicated that Candida albicans isolates were less susceptible at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C, while the opposite was found with 4 x 10(-5) M amorolfine for most of the isolates tested. Repetition of the experiments at four different temperatures with 99 C. albicans isolates and five antifungal agents confirmed a direct relationship between growth inhibition and increasing temperature from 25 to 40 degrees C with amphotericin B, flucytosine, and terconazole; a strong inverse relationship between inhibition and temperature with amorolfine; and a weak inverse relationship with terbinafine. However, these relationships were not always noted with other Candida spp.: in particular, the growth of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis isolates tended to be greater at 37 degrees C than at 25 degrees C in the presence of the azole-derivative antifungal agents itraconazole and terconazole. These findings stress the species-specific individuality of yeast susceptibility to azole antifungal agents. The results with C. albicans and amorolfine and terbinafine accord with their known in vivo efficacy in mycoses involving low-temperature superficial sites and poor activity against mycoses involving deep body sites. The data also reinforce the need for control of experimental variables such as temperature in the design of standardized yeast susceptibility tests. PMID:8494363

  19. Effects of temperature on anti-Candida activities of antifungal antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Odds, F C

    1993-04-01

    The relative growth (percentage of growth relative to control growth) of 767 Candida isolates representing five species was measured in microcultures at 25 and 37 degrees C. In the presence of 10(-4) M flucytosine, the distribution of relative yeast growth data indicated that Candida albicans isolates were less susceptible at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C, while the opposite was found with 4 x 10(-5) M amorolfine for most of the isolates tested. Repetition of the experiments at four different temperatures with 99 C. albicans isolates and five antifungal agents confirmed a direct relationship between growth inhibition and increasing temperature from 25 to 40 degrees C with amphotericin B, flucytosine, and terconazole; a strong inverse relationship between inhibition and temperature with amorolfine; and a weak inverse relationship with terbinafine. However, these relationships were not always noted with other Candida spp.: in particular, the growth of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis isolates tended to be greater at 37 degrees C than at 25 degrees C in the presence of the azole-derivative antifungal agents itraconazole and terconazole. These findings stress the species-specific individuality of yeast susceptibility to azole antifungal agents. The results with C. albicans and amorolfine and terbinafine accord with their known in vivo efficacy in mycoses involving low-temperature superficial sites and poor activity against mycoses involving deep body sites. The data also reinforce the need for control of experimental variables such as temperature in the design of standardized yeast susceptibility tests.

  20. Virulence modulation of Candida albicans biofilms by metal ions commonly released from orthodontic devices.

    PubMed

    Ronsani, Maiara Medeiros; Mores Rymovicz, Alinne Ulbrich; Meira, Thiago Martins; Trindade Grégio, Ana Maria; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Ribeiro Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio

    2011-12-01

    The installation of metal devices leads to an increase in the salivary concentration of metal ions and in the growth of salivary Candida spp. However, the relationship between released metal ions and Candida virulence has not been previously examined. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether metal ions affect fungal virulence. We prepared culture media containing Ni(2+), Fe(3+), Cr(3+), Co(2+) or a mixture of these metal ions at concentrations similar to those released in saliva of orthodontic patients. Biofilms of Candida albicans SC5314 were grown for 72 h and their biomasses were determined. The supernatants were analyzed for secretory aspartyl protease (SAP) and hemolysin activities. To verify changes in virulence following treatment with metals, proteolytic and hemolytic activities were converted into specific activities. The results revealed that all ions, except Co(2+), caused increases in biofilm biomass. In addition, Ni(2+) caused an increase in SAP activity and Fe(3+) reduced hemolytic activity. However, the SAP and hemolysin activities in the presence of the mixture of ions did not differ from those of control. These results indicate that metal ions released during the degradation of orthodontic appliances can modulate virulence factors in C. albicans biofilms.

  1. Action of Coriandrum sativum L. Essential Oil upon Oral Candida albicans Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Furletti, V F; Teixeira, I P; Obando-Pereda, G; Mardegan, R C; Sartoratto, A; Figueira, G M; Duarte, R M T; Rehder, V L G; Duarte, M C T; Höfling, J F

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of extracts and essential oils from Allium tuberosum, Coriandrum sativum, Cymbopogon martini, Cymbopogon winterianus, and Santolina chamaecyparissus was evaluated against Candida spp. isolates from the oral cavity of patients with periodontal disease. The most active oil was fractionated and tested against C. albicans biofilm formation. The oils were obtained by water-distillation and the extracts were prepared with macerated dried plant material. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration-MIC was determined by the microdilution method. Chemical characterization of oil constituents was performed using Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). C. sativum activity oil upon cell and biofilm morphology was evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The best activities against planktonic Candida spp. were observed for the essential oil and the grouped F(8-10) fractions from C. sativum. The crude oil also affected the biofilm formation in C. albicans causing a decrease in the biofilm growth. Chemical analysis of the F(8-10) fractions detected as major active compounds, 2-hexen-1-ol, 3-hexen-1-ol and cyclodecane. Standards of these compounds tested grouped provided a stronger activity than the oil suggesting a synergistic action from the major oil constituents. The activity of C. sativum oil demonstrates its potential for a new natural antifungal formulation.

  2. Action of Coriandrum sativum L. Essential Oil upon Oral Candida albicans Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Furletti, V. F.; Teixeira, I. P.; Obando-Pereda, G.; Mardegan, R. C.; Sartoratto, A.; Figueira, G. M.; Duarte, R. M. T.; Rehder, V. L. G.; Duarte, M. C. T.; Höfling, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of extracts and essential oils from Allium tuberosum, Coriandrum sativum, Cymbopogon martini, Cymbopogon winterianus, and Santolina chamaecyparissus was evaluated against Candida spp. isolates from the oral cavity of patients with periodontal disease. The most active oil was fractionated and tested against C. albicans biofilm formation. The oils were obtained by water-distillation and the extracts were prepared with macerated dried plant material. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration—MIC was determined by the microdilution method. Chemical characterization of oil constituents was performed using Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). C. sativum activity oil upon cell and biofilm morphology was evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The best activities against planktonic Candida spp. were observed for the essential oil and the grouped F8–10 fractions from C. sativum. The crude oil also affected the biofilm formation in C. albicans causing a decrease in the biofilm growth. Chemical analysis of the F8–10 fractions detected as major active compounds, 2-hexen-1-ol, 3-hexen-1-ol and cyclodecane. Standards of these compounds tested grouped provided a stronger activity than the oil suggesting a synergistic action from the major oil constituents. The activity of C. sativum oil demonstrates its potential for a new natural antifungal formulation. PMID:21660258

  3. Antifungal activity of cathelicidin peptides against planktonic and biofilm cultures of Candida species isolated from vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Scarsini, Michele; Tomasinsig, Linda; Arzese, Alessandra; D'Este, Francesca; Oro, Debora; Skerlavaj, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a frequent gynecological condition caused by Candida albicans and a few non-albicans Candida spp. It has a significant impact on the quality of life of the affected women also due to a considerable incidence of recurrent infections that are difficult to treat. The formation of fungal biofilm may contribute to the problematic management of recurrent VVC due to the intrinsic resistance of sessile cells to the currently available antifungals. Thus, alternative approaches for the prevention and control of biofilm-related infections are urgently needed. In this regard, the cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immunity are potential candidates for the development of novel antimicrobials as many of them display activity against biofilm formed by various microbial species. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antifungal activities of the cathelicidin peptides LL-37 and BMAP-28 against pathogenic Candida spp. also including C. albicans, isolated from vaginal infections, and against C. albicans SC5314 as a reference strain. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against planktonic and biofilm-grown Candida cells by using microdilution susceptibility and XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction assays and, in the case of established biofilms, also by CFU enumeration and fluorescence microscopy. BMAP-28 was effective against planktonically grown yeasts in standard medium (MIC range, 2-32μM), and against isolates of C. albicans and Candida krusei in synthetic vaginal simulated fluid (MIC range 8-32μM, depending on the pH of the medium). Established 48-h old biofilms formed by C. albicans SC5314 and C. albicans and C. krusei isolates were 70-90% inhibited within 24h incubation with 16μM BMAP-28. As shown by propidium dye uptake and CFU enumeration, BMAP-28 at 32μM killed sessile C. albicans SC5314 by membrane permeabilization with a faster killing kinetics

  4. Pre-clinical development of antifungal susceptibility test methods for the testing of the novel antifungal agent E1210 versus Candida: comparison of CLSI and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing methods.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Watanabe, Naoaki; Castanheira, Mariana; Messer, Shawn A; Jones, Ronald N

    2011-11-01

    To compare European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and CLSI broth microdilution (BMD) methods for testing the novel antifungal E1210 against a recent collection of 102 clinical isolates of Candida spp. Candida isolates (102) were tested by CLSI and EUCAST methods; 21 Candida albicans, 20 Candida glabrata, 25 Candida parapsilosis, 24 Candida tropicalis and 12 Candida krusei, including echinocandin- and azole-resistant isolates. CLSI and EUCAST MIC endpoints of 50% and 100% inhibition were determined using visual reading at 24 and 48 h of incubation and spectrophotometric reading at 24 h of incubation, respectively. E1210 CLSI MIC results ranged from ≤0.008 to only 1 mg/L (excluding C. krusei) depending on species, duration of incubation and endpoint criteria (EC). E1210 was not active against C. krusei (MIC(50) >16 mg/L). Overall essential agreement (EA; ±2 doubling dilutions) between the 24 and 48 h CLSI readings was 100% and 97.6% using the 50% and 100% inhibition EC, respectively. Slightly more trailing growth at 48 h was observed with the 100% inhibition EC. Comparison of the 50% and 100% endpoints at 24 h of incubation showed an overall EA of 100%. Comparison of CLSI and EUCAST read at 24 h of incubation and either 50% or 100% inhibition revealed an EA of 97.8% using the 50% inhibition EC and 88.9% using the 100% inhibition EC. E1210 was found to have potent in vitro activity against Candida spp. when tested by both CLSI and EUCAST BMD methods, with the highest overall EA (97.8%) obtained when E1210 MIC results were read after 24 h of incubation using a partial inhibition EC.

  5. First isolation of Mycobacterium spp. in Mullus spp. in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sevim, P; Ozer, S; Rad, F

    2015-01-01

    Ichthyozoonotic Mycobacterium spp. poses health risks both to fish and humans. In this study, the presence of ichthyozoonotic Mycobacterium spp. was investigated in red mullet (Mullus barbatus barbatus) and surmullet (Mullus surmuletus), widely caught species in the Mediterranean and the Aegean Sea. A total of 208 fish samples, provided from fishermen of Mersin province (Turkey) were studied. Using conventional methods, Mycobacterium spp. was isolated and identified at the genus level by PCR and at the species level by PCR-RFLP. Thirteen Mycobacterium spp. were detected in 13 (6.25%) fish samples. Four mycobacteria were identified as M. genavense, three as M. fortuitum, three as M. scrofulaceum, one as M. marinum, one as M. vaccae and one as M. aurum. No signs of mycobacteriosis were observed in fish samples. Findings of this study can contribute to future studies of onichthyozoonotic Mycobacterium spp. in seafood. PMID:27175166

  6. Characterization of In Vitro Resistance Development to the Novel Echinocandin CD101 in Candida Species.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jeffrey B; Almaguer, Amanda L; Zuill, Douglas E; Bartizal, Ken

    2016-10-01

    CD101 is a novel echinocandin with a long half-life undergoing clinical development for treatment of candidemia/invasive candidiasis and vulvovaginal candidiasis. The potential for and mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to CD101 in Candida species were investigated by using spontaneous resistance and serial passage selection methodologies. Four Candida spp. (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, and C. krusei) were chosen for resistance characterization with CD101, anidulafungin, and caspofungin. The frequency of spontaneous, single-step mutations conferring reduced susceptibility to CD101 at 1× the agar growth inhibition concentration was low across all species, with median frequencies ranging from 1.35 × 10(-8) to 3.86 × 10(-9), similar to ranges generated for anidulafungin and caspofungin. Serial passage of Candida spp. on agar plates containing drug gradients demonstrated a low potential for resistance development, with passage 20 CD101-selected strains possessing increases in MICs equivalent to or lower than those for the majority of strains generated under selection with anidulafungin and caspofungin. A total of 12 fks "hot spot" mutations were identified, typically in strains with the highest MIC shifts. Cross-resistance was broadly observed among the 3 echinocandins evaluated, with no CD101-selected mutants (with or without fks hot spot mutations) exhibiting reduced susceptibility to CD101 but not also to anidulafungin and/or caspofungin. Consistent with currently approved echinocandins, CD101 demonstrates a low potential for resistance development, which could be further enhanced in vivo by the high maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax)/area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) plasma drug exposure achieved with once-weekly dosing of CD101. Copyright © 2016 Locke et al.

  7. Characterization of In Vitro Resistance Development to the Novel Echinocandin CD101 in Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Almaguer, Amanda L.; Zuill, Douglas E.; Bartizal, Ken

    2016-01-01

    CD101 is a novel echinocandin with a long half-life undergoing clinical development for treatment of candidemia/invasive candidiasis and vulvovaginal candidiasis. The potential for and mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to CD101 in Candida species were investigated by using spontaneous resistance and serial passage selection methodologies. Four Candida spp. (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, and C. krusei) were chosen for resistance characterization with CD101, anidulafungin, and caspofungin. The frequency of spontaneous, single-step mutations conferring reduced susceptibility to CD101 at 1× the agar growth inhibition concentration was low across all species, with median frequencies ranging from 1.35 × 10−8 to 3.86 × 10−9, similar to ranges generated for anidulafungin and caspofungin. Serial passage of Candida spp. on agar plates containing drug gradients demonstrated a low potential for resistance development, with passage 20 CD101-selected strains possessing increases in MICs equivalent to or lower than those for the majority of strains generated under selection with anidulafungin and caspofungin. A total of 12 fks “hot spot” mutations were identified, typically in strains with the highest MIC shifts. Cross-resistance was broadly observed among the 3 echinocandins evaluated, with no CD101-selected mutants (with or without fks hot spot mutations) exhibiting reduced susceptibility to CD101 but not also to anidulafungin and/or caspofungin. Consistent with currently approved echinocandins, CD101 demonstrates a low potential for resistance development, which could be further enhanced in vivo by the high maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax)/area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) plasma drug exposure achieved with once-weekly dosing of CD101. PMID:27480852

  8. Beyond Candida albicans: Mechanisms of immunity to non-albicans Candida species

    PubMed Central

    Whibley, Natasha; Gaffen, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    The fungal genus Candida encompasses numerous species that inhabit a variety of hosts, either as commensal microbes and/or pathogens. Candida species are a major cause of fungal infections, yet to date there are no vaccines against Candida or indeed any other fungal pathogen. Our knowledge of immunity to Candida mainly comes from studies on C. albicans, the most frequent species associated with disease. However, non-albicans Candida (NAC) species also cause disease and their prevalence is increasing. Although research into immunity to NAC species is still at an early stage, it is becoming apparent that immunity to C. albicans differs in important ways from non-albicans species, with important implications for treatment, therapy and predicted demographic susceptibility. This review will discuss the current understanding of immunity to NAC species in the context of immunity to C. albicans, and highlight as-yet unanswered questions. PMID:26276374

  9. Isolation and identification of Candida species in patients with orogastric cancer: susceptibility to antifungal drugs, attributes of virulence in vitro and immune response phenotype.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Lourimar Viana Nascimento F; Santos, Vera Lúcia; de Souza Monteiro, Andrea; Dias-Souza, Marcus Vinicíus; Marques, Sirlei Garcia; de Faria, Elaine Speziali; Assunção, Elaine Alves de Oliveira; Dos Santos, Simone Gonçalves; Zonis, Juan Moises; de Alvarenga, Daniel Gomes; de Holanda, Rodrigo Assunção; de Sousa, Jaqueline Gontijo; Dos Santos, Kênia Valéria; Stoianoff, Maria Aparecida de Resende

    2016-02-23

    Because of the inherent immunosuppression of cancer patients opportunistic infections by Candida spp, occur frequently. This study aimed to identify Candida species in the oral mucosa of 59 patients with orogastric cancer (OGC) and to analyze the immunological phenotype of these patients. The yeasts were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). For all isolates, we performed phospholipases and proteinases assays, in vitro adherence to buccal epithelial cells (BEC), minimum inhibitory concentration of antifungal drugs and determined the cytokine profile by Cytometric Bead Array flow citometry assay. C. albicans was the most prevalent species in OGC patients (51.6 %) and control group (66.7 %). Candida spp. strains isolated from OGC patients exhibited better adherence to BEC (p = 0.05) than did the control group. Phospholipases production by Candida strains from OGC patients was lower (51.6 %) than in the control group (61.9 %). Proteinases were detected in 41.9 % and 4.8 % of the yeasts from OGC patients and control group, respectively. Significant differences were found in the serum of OGC patients compared to the control group for IL-2, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17. The results of this work suggest increased virulence of yeasts isolated from OGC patients and, that this may interfere with the immune phenotype.

  10. Candida alocasiicola sp. nov., Candida hainanensis sp. nov., Candida heveicola sp. nov. and Candida musiphila sp. nov., novel anamorphic, ascomycetous yeast species isolated from plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-An; Jia, Jian-Hua; Bai, Feng-Yan

    2008-08-01

    In a taxonomic study on the ascomycetous yeasts isolated from plant materials collected in tropical forests in Yunnan and Hainan Provinces, southern China, four strains isolated from tree sap (YJ2E(T)) and flowers (YF9E(T), YWZH3C(T) and YYF2A(T)) were revealed to represent four undescribed yeast species. Molecular phylogenetic analysis based on the large subunit (26S) rRNA gene D1/D2 domain sequences showed that strain YJ2E(T) was located in a clade together with Candida haemulonii and C. pseudohaemulonii. Strain YF9E(T) was most closely related to C. azyma and strain YWZH3C(T) to C. sorbophila and C. spandovensis. Strain YYF2A(T) was clustered in a clade containing small-spored Metschnikowia species and related anamorphic Candida species. The new strains differed from their closely related described species by more than 10% mismatches in the D1/D2 domain. No sexual states were observed for the four strains on various sporulation media. The new species are therefore assigned to the genus Candida and described as Candida alocasiicola sp. nov. (type strain, YF9E(T) = AS 2.3484(T) = CBS 10702(T)), Candida hainanensis sp. nov. (type strain, YYF2A(T) = AS 2.3478(T) = CBS 10696(T)), Candida heveicola sp. nov. (type strain, YJ2E(T) = AS 2.3483(T) = CBS 10701(T)) and Candida musiphila sp. nov. (type strain, YWZH3C(T) = AS 2.3479(T) = CBS 10697(T)).

  11. Selective photoinactivation of Candida albicans in the non-vertebrate host infection model Galleria mellonella

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Candida spp. are recognized as a primary agent of severe fungal infection in immunocompromised patients, and are the fourth most common cause of bloodstream infections. Our study explores treatment with photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an innovative antimicrobial technology that employs a nontoxic dye, termed a photosensitizer (PS), followed by irradiation with harmless visible light. After photoactivation, the PS produces either singlet oxygen or other reactive oxygen species (ROS) that primarily react with the pathogen cell wall, promoting permeabilization of the membrane and cell death. The emergence of antifungal-resistant Candida strains has motivated the study of antimicrobial PDT (aPDT) as an alternative treatment of these infections. We employed the invertebrate wax moth Galleria mellonella as an in vivo model to study the effects of aPDT against C. albicans infection. The effects of aPDT combined with conventional antifungal drugs were also evaluated in G. mellonella. Results We verified that methylene blue-mediated aPDT prolonged the survival of C. albicans infected G. mellonella larvae. The fungal burden of G. mellonella hemolymph was reduced after aPDT in infected larvae. A fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strain was used to test the combination of aPDT and fluconazole. Administration of fluconazole either before or after exposing the larvae to aPDT significantly prolonged the survival of the larvae compared to either treatment alone. Conclusions G. mellonella is a useful in vivo model to evaluate aPDT as a treatment regimen for Candida infections. The data suggests that combined aPDT and antifungal therapy could be an alternative approach to antifungal-resistant Candida strains. PMID:24083556

  12. SCY-078 Is Fungicidal against Candida Species in Time-Kill Studies

    PubMed Central

    Scorneaux, Bernard; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Peel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT SCY-078 is an orally bioavailable ß-1,3-glucan synthesis inhibitor (GSI) and the first-in-class of structurally novel triterpene antifungals in clinical development for treating candidemia and invasive candidiasis. In vitro susceptibilities by broth microdilution, antifungal carryover, and time-kill dynamics were determined for three reference (ATCC) strains (Candida albicans 90028, Candida parapsilosis 90018, and Candida tropicalis 750), a quality-control (QC) strain (Candida krusei 6258), and four other strains (C. albicans MYA-2732, 64124, and 76485 and Candida glabrata 90030). Caspofungin (CASP), fluconazole (FLC), and voriconazole (VRC) were comparators. For time-kill experiments, SCY-078 and CASP were evaluated at 0.25, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 times the MIC80, and FLU and VRC were evaluated at 4× MIC80. The time to reach 50%, 90%, and 99.9% reduction in the number of CFUs from the starting inoculum was determined. Net change in the number of CFU per milliliter was used to determine 50% and 90% effective concentrations and maximum effect (EC50, EC90, and Emax, respectively). The SCY-078 MIC range was between 0.0625 and 1 μg/ml and generally similar to that of CASP. Antifungal carryover was not observed for SCY-078. SCY-078 was fungicidal against seven isolates at ≥4× MIC (kill of ≥3 log10) and achieved a 1.7-log10 reduction in CFU count/milliliter against C. albicans 90028. CASP behaved similarly against each isolate and achieved a 1.5-log10 reduction in the number of CFU/milliliter against C. albicans 90028. Reductions of 50% in CFU count/milliliter were achieved rapidly (1 to 2.8 h); fungicidal endpoints were reached at 12.1 to 21.8 h at ≥4× MIC. EC90 was reached at ∼5× MIC at each time point to 24 h. The EC50 and EC90 values were generally similar (8 to 24 h). Time-kill behavior of CASP was similar to that of SCY-078. FLC and VRC were fungistatic. Overall, SCY-078 has primarily fungicidal activity against Candida spp. and behaved

  13. SCY-078 Is Fungicidal against Candida Species in Time-Kill Studies.

    PubMed

    Scorneaux, Bernard; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Peel, Michael; Wring, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    SCY-078 is an orally bioavailable ß-1,3-glucan synthesis inhibitor (GSI) and the first-in-class of structurally novel triterpene antifungals in clinical development for treating candidemia and invasive candidiasis. In vitro susceptibilities by broth microdilution, antifungal carryover, and time-kill dynamics were determined for three reference (ATCC) strains (Candida albicans 90028, Candida parapsilosis 90018, and Candida tropicalis 750), a quality-control (QC) strain (Candida krusei 6258), and four other strains (C. albicans MYA-2732, 64124, and 76485 and Candida glabrata 90030). Caspofungin (CASP), fluconazole (FLC), and voriconazole (VRC) were comparators. For time-kill experiments, SCY-078 and CASP were evaluated at 0.25, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 times the MIC80, and FLU and VRC were evaluated at 4× MIC80 The time to reach 50%, 90%, and 99.9% reduction in the number of CFUs from the starting inoculum was determined. Net change in the number of CFU per milliliter was used to determine 50% and 90% effective concentrations and maximum effect (EC50, EC90, and Emax, respectively). The SCY-078 MIC range was between 0.0625 and 1 μg/ml and generally similar to that of CASP. Antifungal carryover was not observed for SCY-078. SCY-078 was fungicidal against seven isolates at ≥4× MIC (kill of ≥3 log10) and achieved a 1.7-log10 reduction in CFU count/milliliter against C. albicans 90028. CASP behaved similarly against each isolate and achieved a 1.5-log10 reduction in the number of CFU/milliliter against C. albicans 90028. Reductions of 50% in CFU count/milliliter were achieved rapidly (1 to 2.8 h); fungicidal endpoints were reached at 12.1 to 21.8 h at ≥4× MIC. EC90 was reached at ∼5× MIC at each time point to 24 h. The EC50 and EC90 values were generally similar (8 to 24 h). Time-kill behavior of CASP was similar to that of SCY-078. FLC and VRC were fungistatic. Overall, SCY-078 has primarily fungicidal activity against Candida spp. and behaved comparably to CASP.

  14. Platelet interactions with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Skerl, K G; Calderone, R A; Sreevalsan, T

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of human platelets and Candida albicans was studied. Platelet-rich plasma was obtained from freshly drawn blood or outdated platelet concentrates. From the platelet-rich plasma, a platelet extract was derived which stimulated germ tube formation by C. albicans when incubated with yeast cells at 37 degrees C. The active component(s) was heat stable, trypsin sensitive, and ribonuclease and deoxyribonuclease insensitive, and possessed cationic properties since it readily attached to carboxymethyl-Sephadex. The active component(s) seemed to bind to heparin also, since germ tube-promoting activity was eluted from a heparin-cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B column. In addition, platelet-derived growth factor (Collaborative Research, Inc.) stimulated germination when incubated with low amounts (0.4% final concentration) of bovine calf serum. The aggregation of platelets, prepared as platelet-rich plasma by C. albicans cell wall or alkali-extracted cell wall fractions, was also studied. Aggregation of platelets was observed when cell wall or cell wall fractions were incubated with platelet-poor plasma at 37 degrees C for 20 min and then added to platelet-rich plasma. The component of platelet-poor plasma which promoted aggregation of platelets by C. albicans cell wall or alkali-extracted fractions was inactivated at 56 degrees C (30 min) and by cobra venom factor, indicating a role for the alternate complement pathway in the aggregation response. PMID:7037646

  15. Plasticity of Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Karla J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Candida albicans, the most pervasive fungal pathogen that colonizes humans, forms biofilms that are architecturally complex. They consist of a basal yeast cell polylayer and an upper region of hyphae encapsulated in extracellular matrix. However, biofilms formed in vitro vary as a result of the different conditions employed in models, the methods used to assess biofilm formation, strain differences, and, in a most dramatic fashion, the configuration of the mating type locus (MTL). Therefore, integrating data from different studies can lead to problems of interpretation if such variability is not taken into account. Here we review the conditions and factors that cause biofilm variation, with the goal of engendering awareness that more attention must be paid to the strains employed, the methods used to assess biofilm development, every aspect of the model employed, and the configuration of the MTL locus. We end by posing a set of questions that may be asked in comparing the results of different studies and developing protocols for new ones. This review should engender the notion that not all biofilms are created equal. PMID:27250770

  16. Intrauterine Candida albicans infection elicits severe inflammation in fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Matthew S.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Kannan, Paranthaman Senthamarai; Saito, Masatoshi; Miura, Yuichiro; Newnham, John P.; Stock, Sarah; Ireland, Demelza J.; Kramer, Boris W.; Jobe, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preventing preterm birth and subsequent adverse neonatal sequelae is among the greatest clinical challenges of our time. Recent studies suggest a role for Candida spp. in preterm birth and fetal injury, as a result of their colonization of either the vagina and/or the amniotic cavity. We hypothesised that intraamniotic C. albicans would cause a vigorous, acute fetal inflammatory response. Methods Sheep carrying singleton pregnancies received single intraamniotic (IA) injections of either saline (control) or 107 CFU C. albicans 1 or 2 d prior to surgical delivery and euthanasia at 124 ± 2 d gestation. Results Colonization of the amniotic cavity by C. albicans resulted in a modest inflammatory response at 1 d and florid inflammation at 2 d, characterised by fetal thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia and significant increases of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the fetal membranes skin, lung and the amniotic fluid. Conclusion Acute colonization of the amniotic cavity by C. albicans causes severe intrauterine inflammation and fetal injury. C. albicans is a potent fetal pathogen which can contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:24632681

  17. [Taxonomy and ecology of the genus Candida].

    PubMed

    Schauer, F; Hanschke, R

    1999-01-01

    Candida is a heterogeneous genus which contains about a quarter of all yeast species. It includes not only species of uncertain affiliation but also unrelated strains whose phylogenetic relationships have not been resolved. A great variety of CoQ types are present in the genus, the mol % G + C ranges from 30-63%, and species that were found to sporulate have teleomorphic counterparts in 11 different genera. Candida species are mainly associated with plants, rotting vegetation, with insects which feed on plants or with food. In line with this, 71% of Candida species utilize xylose (wood degradation), 57% of species use cellobiose (cellulose degradation), 29% oxidize aliphatic hydrocarbons (components of plant cuticula), 27% of species degrade starch as a plant storage material, and 7% utilize methanol as a possible metabolite from pectin catabolism. 85% of species require individual vitamins produced mainly in plant materials. 65% of Candida species are not able to grow at temperatures of 37 degrees C. In comparison only relatively few species occur normally in humans and other warm blooded animals. About 16% of type strains and selected strains for comparative purposes (CBS) were isolated from human specimens. Perhaps up to 10% of Candida species may be of medical importance, though this has so far only been clearly demonstrated for less than 5% of currently known species.

  18. Killer behavior within the Candida parapsilosis complex.

    PubMed

    Robledo-Leal, Efrén; Elizondo-Zertuche, Mariana; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Treviño-Rangel, Rogelio de J; García-Maldonado, Nancy; Adame-Rodríguez, Juan M; González, Gloria M

    2014-11-01

    A group of 29 isolates of Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, 29 of Candida orthopsilosis, and 4 of Candida metapsilosis were assayed for the presence of killer activity using Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 26609 as a sensitive strain. All C. metapsilosis isolates showed killer activity at 25 °C while strains of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto or C. orthopsilosis did not exhibit this activity. Sensitivity to killer toxins was evaluated using a set of previously reported killer strains of clinical origin. Only 11 isolates of the C. parapsilosis complex were inhibited by at least one killer isolate without resulting in any clear pattern, except for C. parapsilosis sensu stricto ATCC 22019, which was inhibited by every killer strain with the exception of C. parapsilosis and Candida utilis. The lack of sensitivity to killer activity among isolates of the genus Candida suggests that their toxins belong to the same killer type. Differentiation of species within the C. parapsilosis complex using the killer system may be feasible if a more taxonomically diverse panel of killer strains is employed.

  19. Prevalence of Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana in pregnant women suffering from vulvovaginal candidiasis in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mucci, María Josefina; Cuestas, María Luján; Landanburu, María Fernanda; Mujica, María Teresa

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a vulvovaginitis commonly diagnosed in gynecology care. In recent years, the taxonomy of the most important pathogenic Candida species, such as Candida albicans have undergone significant changes. This study examined the prevalence of C. albicans, Candida africana, and Candida dubliniensis in vaginal specimens from 210 pregnant women suffering from vulvovaginitis or having asymptomatic colonization. Phenotypic and molecular methods were used for the identification of the species. During the studied period, 55 isolates of Candida or other yeasts were obtained from specimens collected from 52 patients suffering from vulvovaginitis (24.8%). C. albicans was the predominant Candida species in 42 isolates (80.7%), either alone or in combination with other species of the genus (5.7%, n=3). Additionally, nine isolates of C. albicans (50%) were obtained from asymptomatic patients (n=18). C. dubliniensis was the causative agent in 2 (3.8%) cases of VVC, and was also isolated in one asymptomatic patient. Molecular assays were carried out using specific PCR to amplify the ACT1-associated intron sequence of C. dubliniensis. The amplification of the HWP1 gene also correctly identified isolates of the species C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. No C. africana was isolated in this work. Some C. albicans isolates were either homozygous or heterozygous at the HWP1 locus. The distribution of heterozygous and homozygous C. albicans isolates at the HWP1 locus was very similar among patients suffering from VVC and asymptomatic patients (p=0.897). The presence of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis, and the absence of C. africana in pregnant is noteworthy. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. [Utility of Fluoroplate Candida for the rapid identification of Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Quindós, G; San Millan, R; Bikandi, J; Pontón, J

    1996-12-01

    Candida albicans infections are frequent in immunocompromised patients and a prompt diagnosis could favor an early and proper antifungal treatment. The rapid identification of clinical yeast isolates facilitate this diagnosis. The utility of Fluoroplate Candida ready-to-use plates for Candida albicans rapid identification was evaluated with 653 clinical isolates from 23 yeast species, including 307 C. albicans plated onto Fluoroplate Candida agar (Merck, Germany). Rapid identification of C. albicans was based on the hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminide by the galactosaminidase activity of C. albicans producing white fluorescent colonies under ultraviolet light. Identification on Fluoroplate Candida was confirmed by germ tube, chlamydoconidia formation and API-ATB ID 32C assays. Three hundred and five of 306 isolates showing fluorescent colonies were C. albicans and one was Candida glabrata (false positive). The rest of the isolates showed colonies without fluorescence and with the exception of two false negatives, these isolates were identified as non-C. albicans by other methods. Fluoroplate Candida allows a rapid and excellent identification of C. albicans showing a sensitivity and specificity of 99.3 and 99.7%, respectively.

  1. Evaluation of Candida Colonization and Specific Humoral Responses against Candida albicans in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Javad, Ghaffari; Taheri Sarvtin, Mehdi; Hedayati, Mohammad Taghi; Hajheydari, Zohreh; Yazdani, Jamshid; Shokohi, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the candidal colonization and specific humoral responses against Candida albicans in patients with atopic dermatitis. One hundred patients with atopic dermatitis and 50 healthy individuals were enrolled in the study. Skin and oral specimens from all participants were cultured on CHROMagar Candida medium. Isolated yeasts were identified by using the sequence of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. ELISA was used for detection of IgM, IgA, and IgG antibodies against C. albicans in sera of participants. Candida species were isolated from the skin and oral cavity of 31% of the patients and 12% of the controls. There was no significant difference between Candida colonization in patients and controls (P>0.05). Candida albicans was isolated from the skin and oral cavity of 23% of the patients and 6% of the controls (P< 0.05). There were no significant differences between serum levels of IgM and IgA in patients and controls (P>0.05). Serum level of IgG was significantly lower in patients than in controls (P<0.05). Type of Candida colonization can change in patients with atopic dermatitis. In addition, these patients have abnormalities in the production of antibodies against Candida albicans that may have a role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. PMID:25945349

  2. [Malignant otitis externa caused by Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Elayoubi, Fahd; Lachkar, Azeddine; Aabach, Ahmed; Chouai, Mohamed; Ghailan, Mohamed Rachid

    2016-01-01

    Malignant otitis externa is also referred to as skull base osteomyelitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common offending pathogen. However, fungal origin is not uncommon. 80-year-old patient having persistent left earache since two months despite adequate treatment. Otologic examination showed signs of inflammation in the auricular pavilion, ear canal stenosis with granulomas and purulent otorrhea. CT scan showed a filled otomastoid, extensive inflammatory process affecting the pre-auricular and retro-auricular tissues and lysis of the tympanic bulla. Given the lack of improvement, mycological examination was performed which revealed the presence of Candida Albicans. Cases of malignant otitis externa caused by Candida albicans are rarely reported. Fungal origin should be suspected in patients who have negative bacteriological samples and no improvement despite adequate antibiotic treatment. It should be confirmed by sometimes multiple mycological samples. Malignant otitis externa caused by Candida albicans is a rare potentially mortal infection.

  3. How to use the Candida Genome Database

    PubMed Central

    Skrzypek, Marek S.; Binkley, Jonathan; Sherlock, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Studying Candida biology requires access to genomic sequence data in conjunction with experimental information that provides functional context to genes and proteins. The Candida Genome Database (CGD) integrates functional information about Candida genes and their products with a set of analysis tools that facilitate searching for sets of genes and exploring their biological roles. This chapter describes how the various types of information available at CGD can be searched, retrieved, and analyzed. Starting with the guided tour of the CGD Home page and Locus Summary page, this unit shows how to navigate the various assemblies of the C. albicans genome, how to use Gene Ontology tools to make sense of large-scale data, and how to access the microarray data archived at CGD. PMID:26519061

  4. Endogenous Candida endophthalmitis after induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Chen, S J; Chung, Y M; Liu, J H

    1998-06-01

    To report two young healthy women who developed endogenous Candida endophthalmitis after undergoing surgically induced abortion. Case reports. In two eyes of two patients, a diagnosis of Candida endophthalmitis was established by typical fundus appearance, positive vaginal culture, and, in one case, positive vitreous culture. After vitrectomy and intravitreal amphotericin B injection, one eye of one patient had a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/200, whereas one eye of one patient, who had systemic corticosteroid treatment before the correct diagnosis, developed recurrent retinal detachment and a best-corrected visual acuity of counting fingers. Induced abortion may cause endogenous Candida endophthalmitis in young healthy pregnant women. Systemic corticosteroid treatment may increase the risk of endophthalmitis.

  5. Caspofungin at catheter lock concentrations eradicates mature biofilms of Candida lusitaniae and Candida guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Simitsopoulou, Maria; Kyrpitzi, Daniela; Velegraki, Aristea; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2014-08-01

    The antibiofilm activities of caspofungin, anidulafungin, micafungin, and liposomal amphotericin B were studied against Candida lusitaniae, Candida guilliermondii, and a Candida albicans control strain. While anidulafungin and micafungin (0.007 to 2,048 mg/liter) showed reduced activity against biofilms of both test species, caspofungin displayed concentration-dependent antibiofilm activity, reaching complete and persistent eradication at concentrations achievable during lock therapy (512 to 2,048 mg/liter, P < 0.05). Although liposomal amphotericin B strongly inhibited mature biofilms, it possessed lower antibiofilm activity than caspofungin (P < 0.05).

  6. Identification, antifungal resistance profile, in vitro biofilm formation and ultrastructural characteristics of Candida species isolated from diabetic foot patients in Northern India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D; Banerjee, T; Chakravarty, J; Singh, S K; Dwivedi, A; Tilak, R

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are a serious cause of diagnostic and therapeutic concern. The following study was undertaken to determine the fungal causes of diabetic foot ulcers, with their phenotypic and genotypic characterisation. A total of 155 diabetic foot ulcers were studied for 1 year. Deep tissue specimen was collected from the wounds, and crushed samples were plated on Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol (0.05 g). Identification was done by growth on cornmeal agar, germ tube formation and urease test. For molecular identification, conserved portion of the 18S rDNA region, the adjacent internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and a portion of the 28S rDNA region were amplified, using the ITS1 and ITS2 primers. Antifungal susceptibility against voriconazole, fluconazole and amphotericin B was determined by standard broth microdilution method. Biofilm formation was studied in three steps. First, on the surface of wells of microtiter plates followed by quantification of growth by fungal metabolism measurement. Finally, biofilms were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fungal aetiology was found in 75 patients (48.38%). All were identified as Candida species (100%). The prevalence of different species was Candida tropicalis (34.6%), Candida albicans (29.3%), Candida krusei (16.0%), Candida parapsilosis (10.6%), Candida glabrata (9.33%). All were susceptible to amphotericin B (100%). On microtiter plate, all the isolates were viable within 48 h showing biofilms. The metabolic activity of cells in the biofilm increased with cellular mass, especially in the first 24 h. On SEM, majority showed budding yeast form. Non-albicans Candida spp. with potential biofilm forming ability are emerging as a predominant cause of diabetic foot ulcers.

  7. Evaluation of a Reformulated CHROMagar Candida

    PubMed Central

    Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Brenner, Troy M.; Romagnoli, Mark; Baqui, A. A. M. A.; Merz, William G.; Falkler, William A.; Meiller, Timothy F.

    2001-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a differential culture medium for the isolation and presumptive identification of clinically important yeasts. Recently the medium was reformulated by Becton Dickinson. This study was designed to evaluate the performance of the new formula of CHROMagar against the original CHROMagar Candida for recovery, growth, and colony color with stock cultures and with direct plating of clinical specimens. A total of 90 stock yeast isolates representing nine yeast species, including Candida dubliniensis, as well as 522 clinical specimens were included in this study. No major differences were noted in growth rate or colony size between the two media for most of the species. However, all 10 Candida albicans isolates evaluated consistently gave a lighter shade of green on the new CHROMagar formulation. In contrast, all 26 C. dubliniensis isolates gave the same typical dark green color on both media. A total of 173 of the 522 clinical specimens were positive for yeast, with eight yeast species recovered. The recovery rates for each species were equivalent on both media, with no consistent species-associated differences in colony size or color. Although both media were comparable in performance, the lighter green colonies of C. albicans isolates on the new CHROMagar made it easier to differentiate between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis isolates. In conclusion, the newly formulated Becton Dickinson CHROMagar Candida medium is as equally suited as a differential medium for the presumptive identification of yeast species and for the detection of multiple yeast species in clinical specimens as the original CHROMagar Candida medium. PMID:11326038

  8. Candida albicans isolates from a Malaysian hospital exhibit more potent phospholipase and haemolysin activities than non-albicans Candida isolates.

    PubMed

    Chin, V K; Foong, K J; Maha, A; Rusliza, B; Norhafizah, M; Ng, K P; Chong, P P

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed at determining the phospholipase and haemolysin activity of Candida isolates in Malaysia. A total of 37 Candida clinical isolates representing seven species, Candida albicans (12), Candida tropicalis (8), Candida glabrata (4), Candida parapsilosis (1), Candida krusei (4), Candida orthopsilosis (1) and Candida rugosa (7) were tested. In vitro phospholipase activity was determined by using egg yolk plate assay whereas in vitro haemolysin activity was tested by using blood plate assay on sheep blood Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA) enriched with glucose. Phospholipase activity was detected in 75% (9 out of 12) of the C. albicans isolates. Among the 25 non- C. albicans Candida isolates, phospholipase activity was detected in only 24% of these isolates. The phospholipase activity of C. albicans was significantly higher than that of the non- C. albicans Candida isolates (P=0.002). Haemolysin activity was detected in 100% of the C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis isolates while 75% of the C. krusei isolates and 12.3% of the C. rugosa isolates showed haemolysin activity. The haemolytic activity of C. albicans was significantly higher than that of the non- C. albicans Candida isolates (P=0.0001).The findings in this study indicate that C. albicans isolates in Malaysia may possess greater virulence potential than the non-albicans species.

  9. Genetic diversity of the yeast Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Stoltenburg, R; Klinner, U; Ritzerfeld, P; Zimmermann, M; Emeis, C C

    1992-12-01

    The electrophoretic karyotypes and some mtDNA restriction fragment patterns of 13 strains of Candida utilis and one strain of Hansenula jadinii were compared. PFGE separations revealed remarkable chromosome length polymorphisms between two groups of strains suggesting that perhaps they do not belong to the same species. However, all strains had the same or similar EcoRI, HindIII and BamHI mtDNA restriction patterns. The mtDNA genomes had an average size range of 55 kb. These results support the supposition that C. utilis is a yeast with a highly variable electrophoretic karyotype as already known for another imperfect yeast species, Candida albicans.

  10. Candida species distribution, genotyping and virulence factors of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity of kidney transplant recipients of two geographic regions of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a diploid yeast that in some circumstances may cause oral or oropharyngeal infections. This investigation aimed to study the prevalence of Candida spp. and to analyze the ABC genotypes of 76 clinical isolates of C. albicans obtained from the oral cavity of kidney transplant patients from two distinct geographic regions of Brazil. Methods We typed 48 strains with ABC genotyping and Microsatelitte using primer M13 and tested three virulence factors in vitro: phospholipase activity, morphogenesis and the ability to evade from polymorphonuclear neutrophils phagocytosis. Results C. albicans was the most prevalent species (86.4%), followed by C. tropicalis (4.5%). C. albicans genotype A was the most prevalent (58 isolates; 76.4%), followed by genotype C (15 isolates; 19.7%) and genotype B (3 isolates; 3.9%). When Microsatellite technique with primer M13 was applied, 80% of the isolates from the South were placed within the same cluster. The majority of Genotype C strains were grouped together within two different clusters. Genotype C was considered more resistant to PMNs attack than genotypes A and B. Strains isolated from the South of Brazil showed also better ability to combat PMNs phagocytosis. Conclusions We found a high rate of C. albicans genotype C strains isolated from the oral cavity of this group of patients. This study characterized oral C. albicans strains isolated from kidney transplant recipients and will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. PMID:24628850

  11. Propolis: a potential natural product to fight Candida species infections.

    PubMed

    Tobaldini-Valerio, Flávia K; Bonfim-Mendonça, Patricia S; Rosseto, Helen C; Bruschi, Marcos L; Henriques, Mariana; Negri, Melyssa; Silva, Sonia; Svidzinski, Terezinha Ie

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of propolis against Candida species planktonic cells and its counterpart's biofilms. The MIC values, time-kill curves and filamentation form inhibition were determined in Candida planktonic cells. The effect of propolis on Candida biofilms was assessed through quantification of CFUs. MIC values, ranging from 220 to 880 µg/ml, demonstrated higher efficiency on C. albicans and C. parapsilosis than on C. tropicalis cells. In addition, propolis was able to prevent Candida species biofilm's formation and eradicate their mature biofilms, coupled with a significant reduction on C. tropicalis and C. albicans filamentation. Propolis is an inhibitor of Candida virulence factors and represents an innovative alternative to fight candidiasis.

  12. EPA Method 1682: Salmonella spp.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Method 1682 describes procedures for analysis of solid samples (biosolids) and may be adapted for assessment of water, liquid, particulate and aerosol samples contaminated with Salmonella spp. using culture and immunoassay.

  13. Phospholipase and Aspartyl Proteinase Activities of Candida Species Causing Vulvovaginal Candidiasis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bassyouni, Rasha H; Wegdan, Ahmed Ashraf; Abdelmoneim, Abdelsamie; Said, Wessam; AboElnaga, Fatma

    2015-10-01

    Few research had investigated the secretion of phospholipase and aspartyl proteinase from Candida spp. causing infection in females with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This research aimed to investigate the prevalence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) in diabetic versus non-diabetic women and compare the ability of identified Candida isolates to secrete phospholipases and aspartyl proteinases with characterization of their genetic profile. The study included 80 females with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 100 non-diabetic females within the child-bearing period. Candida strains were isolated and identified by conventional microbiological methods and by API Candida. The isolates were screened for their extracellular phospholipase and proteinase activities by culturing them on egg yolk and bovine serum albumin media, respectively. Detection of aspartyl proteinase genes (SAP1 to SAP8) and phospholipase genes (PLB1, PLB2) were performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Our results indicated that vaginal candidiasis was significantly higher among the diabetic group versus nondiabetic group (50% versus 20%, respectively) (p = 0.004). C. albicans was the most prevalent species followed by C. glabrata in both groups. No significant association between diabetes mellitus and phospholipase activities was detected (p = 0.262), whereas high significant proteinase activities exhibited by Candida isolated from diabetic females were found (82.5%) (p = 0.000). Non-significant associations between any of the tested proteinase or phospholipase genes and diabetes mellitus were detected (p > 0.05). In conclusion, it is noticed that the incidence of C. glabrata causing VVC is increased. The higher prevalence of vaginal candidiasis among diabetics could be related to the increased aspartyl proteinase production in this group of patients.

  14. Antifungal drug resistance among Candida species: mechanisms and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2015-06-01

    The epidemiology of Candida infections has changed in recent years. Although Candida albicans is still the main cause of invasive candidiasis in most clinical settings, a substantial proportion of patients is now infected with non-albicans Candida species. The various Candida species vary in their susceptibility to the most commonly used antifungal agents, and the intrinsic resistance to antifungal therapy seen in some species, along with the development of acquired resistance during treatment in others, is becoming a major problem in the management of Candida infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms and clinical impact of antifungal drug resistance is essential for the efficient treatment of patients with Candida infection and for improving treatment outcomes. Herein, we report resistance to the azoles and echinocandins among Candida species.

  15. Comparison of the susceptibilities of clinical isolates of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to essential oils.

    PubMed

    Pozzatti, Patrícia; Loreto, Erico Silva; Lopes, Paulo Guilherme Markus; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2010-01-01

    Here, a microdilution technique based on the M27-A2 protocol (NCCLS, 2002) was employed to compare the susceptibilities of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to essential oils extracted from plants used as spices. The chemical compositions of the essential oils were defined based on the analysis of retention indices obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Taken together, the results showed that the activity of the compounds against the two species was similar.