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Sample records for candidate antiviral compounds

  1. Antiviral Screening of Multiple Compounds against Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dowall, Stuart D.; Bewley, Kevin; Watson, Robert J.; Vasan, Seshadri S.; Ghosh, Chandradhish; Konai, Mohini M.; Gausdal, Gro; Lorens, James B.; Long, Jason; Barclay, Wendy; Garcia-Dorival, Isabel; Hiscox, Julian; Bosworth, Andrew; Taylor, Irene; Easterbrook, Linda; Pitman, James; Summers, Sian; Chan-Pensley, Jenny; Funnell, Simon; Vipond, Julia; Charlton, Sue; Haldar, Jayanta; Hewson, Roger; Carroll, Miles W.

    2016-01-01

    In light of the recent outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV) disease in West Africa, there have been renewed efforts to search for effective antiviral countermeasures. A range of compounds currently available with broad antimicrobial activity have been tested for activity against EBOV. Using live EBOV, eighteen candidate compounds were screened for antiviral activity in vitro. The compounds were selected on a rational basis because their mechanisms of action suggested that they had the potential to disrupt EBOV entry, replication or exit from cells or because they had displayed some antiviral activity against EBOV in previous tests. Nine compounds caused no reduction in viral replication despite cells remaining healthy, so they were excluded from further analysis (zidovudine; didanosine; stavudine; abacavir sulphate; entecavir; JB1a; Aimspro; celgosivir; and castanospermine). A second screen of the remaining compounds and the feasibility of appropriateness for in vivo testing removed six further compounds (ouabain; omeprazole; esomeprazole; Gleevec; D-LANA-14; and Tasigna). The three most promising compounds (17-DMAG; BGB324; and NCK-8) were further screened for in vivo activity in the guinea pig model of EBOV disease. Two of the compounds, BGB324 and NCK-8, showed some effect against lethal infection in vivo at the concentrations tested, which warrants further investigation. Further, these data add to the body of knowledge on the antiviral activities of multiple compounds against EBOV and indicate that the scientific community should invest more effort into the development of novel and specific antiviral compounds to treat Ebola virus disease. PMID:27801778

  2. Antiviral Screening of Multiple Compounds against Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Dowall, Stuart D; Bewley, Kevin; Watson, Robert J; Vasan, Seshadri S; Ghosh, Chandradhish; Konai, Mohini M; Gausdal, Gro; Lorens, James B; Long, Jason; Barclay, Wendy; Garcia-Dorival, Isabel; Hiscox, Julian; Bosworth, Andrew; Taylor, Irene; Easterbrook, Linda; Pitman, James; Summers, Sian; Chan-Pensley, Jenny; Funnell, Simon; Vipond, Julia; Charlton, Sue; Haldar, Jayanta; Hewson, Roger; Carroll, Miles W

    2016-10-27

    In light of the recent outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV) disease in West Africa, there have been renewed efforts to search for effective antiviral countermeasures. A range of compounds currently available with broad antimicrobial activity have been tested for activity against EBOV. Using live EBOV, eighteen candidate compounds were screened for antiviral activity in vitro. The compounds were selected on a rational basis because their mechanisms of action suggested that they had the potential to disrupt EBOV entry, replication or exit from cells or because they had displayed some antiviral activity against EBOV in previous tests. Nine compounds caused no reduction in viral replication despite cells remaining healthy, so they were excluded from further analysis (zidovudine; didanosine; stavudine; abacavir sulphate; entecavir; JB1a; Aimspro; celgosivir; and castanospermine). A second screen of the remaining compounds and the feasibility of appropriateness for in vivo testing removed six further compounds (ouabain; omeprazole; esomeprazole; Gleevec; D-LANA-14; and Tasigna). The three most promising compounds (17-DMAG; BGB324; and NCK-8) were further screened for in vivo activity in the guinea pig model of EBOV disease. Two of the compounds, BGB324 and NCK-8, showed some effect against lethal infection in vivo at the concentrations tested, which warrants further investigation. Further, these data add to the body of knowledge on the antiviral activities of multiple compounds against EBOV and indicate that the scientific community should invest more effort into the development of novel and specific antiviral compounds to treat Ebola virus disease.

  3. Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Minneman, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. PMID:21116410

  4. Antiviral potential of a diterpenoid compound sugiol from Metasequoia glyptostroboides.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Vivek K; Kim, Na-Hyung; Kim, Kangmin; Kang, Sun Chul

    2016-05-01

    This research reports first time antiviral activity of sugiol, a diterpenoid isolated from Metasequoia glyptostroboides in terms of its ability to inhibit in vitro growth of H1N1 influenza virus. Antiviral potential of sugiol was evaluated through hcytopathogenic reduction assay using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line. Sugiol (500 μg/ml) was found to exhibit considerable anti-cytopathic effect on MDCK cell line confirming its antiviral efficacy against H1N1 influenza virus. These findings strongly reinforce the suggestion that sugiol could be a candidate of choice in combinational regimen with potential antiviral efficacy.

  5. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60–80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40–98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV. PMID:20008902

  6. Screening for antiviral activities of isolated compounds from essential oils.

    PubMed

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60-80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40-98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV.

  7. Synthesis and antiviral evaluation of bisnoradamantane sulfites and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Elena; Torres, Eva; Guardiola, Salvador; Naesens, Lieve; Vázquez, Santiago

    2011-03-01

    The reaction of a series of 1,2-diols with thionyl chloride led to bisnoradamantane sulfites in very good yields. The reaction has also been applied to related polycyclic scaffolds. The compounds have been tested for antiviral activity but none of them showed to be active. Several attempts to generate and trap SO from these polycyclic sulfites have been unsuccessful.

  8. In Vitro Efficacy of Antiviral Compounds against Enterovirus D68

    PubMed Central

    Rhoden, Eric; Zhang, Mingyu; Nix, W. Allan

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the United States experienced a large outbreak of severe respiratory illness associated with enterovirus D68 (EV-D68). We used a homogeneous, cell-based assay to assess the antiviral activity of compounds developed for EV/rhinovirus infection or other indications. Three of 15 compounds were highly active against all four strains tested (the prototype and three 2014 strains), with 50% effective concentrations of 0.0012 to 0.027 μM. Additional studies are needed to assess their in vivo efficacy against EV-D68. PMID:26149998

  9. Hepatitis C Virus and Natural Compounds: a New Antiviral Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Calland, Noémie; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouillé, Yves; Séron, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a major global health burden with an estimated 160 million infected individuals worldwide. This long-term disease evolves slowly, often leading to chronicity and potentially to liver failure. There is no anti-HCV vaccine, and, until recently, the only treatment available, based on pegylated interferon and ribavirin, was partially effective, and had considerable side effects. With recent advances in the understanding of the HCV life cycle, the development of promising direct acting antivirals (DAAs) has been achieved. Their use in combination with the current treatment has led to encouraging results for HCV genotype 1 patients. However, this therapy is quite expensive and will probably not be accessible for all patients worldwide. For this reason, constant efforts are being made to identify new antiviral molecules. Recent reports about natural compounds highlight their antiviral activity against HCV. Here, we aim to review the natural molecules that interfere with the HCV life cycle and discuss their potential use in HCV therapy. PMID:23202460

  10. An evolutionary screen highlights canonical and noncanonical candidate antiviral genes within the primate TRIM gene family.

    PubMed

    Malfavon-Borja, Ray; Sawyer, Sara L; Wu, Lily I; Emerman, Michael; Malik, Harmit S

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent viral pressure has acted on host-encoded antiviral genes during primate and mammalian evolution. This selective pressure has resulted in dramatic episodes of adaptation in host antiviral genes, often detected via positive selection. These evolutionary signatures of adaptation have the potential to highlight previously unrecognized antiviral genes (also called restriction factors). Although the TRIM multigene family is recognized for encoding several bona fide restriction factors (e.g., TRIM5alpha), most members of this expansive gene family remain uncharacterized. Here, we investigated the TRIM multigene family for signatures of positive selection to identify novel candidate antiviral genes. Our analysis reveals previously undocumented signatures of positive selection in 17 TRIM genes, 10 of which represent novel candidate restriction factors. These include the unusual TRIM52 gene, which has evolved under strong positive selection despite its encoded protein lacking a putative viral recognition (B30.2) domain. We show that TRIM52 arose via gene duplication from the TRIM41 gene. Both TRIM52 and TRIM41 have dramatically expanded RING domains compared with the rest of the TRIM multigene family, yet this domain has evolved under positive selection only in primate TRIM52, suggesting that it represents a novel host-virus interaction interface. Our evolutionary-based screen not only documents positive selection in known TRIM restriction factors but also highlights candidate novel restriction factors, providing insight into the interfaces of host-pathogen interactions mediated by the TRIM multigene family.

  11. Antiviral Compounds Discovered by Virtual Screening of Small–Molecule Libraries against Dengue Virus E Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhigang; Khaliq, Mansoora; Suk, Jae-Eun; Patkar, Chinmay; Li, Long; Kuhn, Richard J.; Post, Carol Beth

    2009-01-01

    Infection by the mosquito-borne dengue virus causes dengue fever and the sometimes fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever. The increasing number of dengue infections per year suggests that the virus is becoming more virulent and its transmission is expanding. Nevertheless, no effective treatment for dengue infection currently exists. In a search for antiviral agents effective against dengue virus, we investigated the potential of targeting a structural protein site rather than an enzymatic one. Using this approach, we now report the discovery of a small molecule ligand that inhibits viral growth. Our results also provide the first evidence that the binding site, a pocket located at the hinge between domains 1 and 2 of the envelope protein (E protein) on the virus surface, is a valid target for antiviral therapy. Ligand candidates were identified from libraries of ∼142,000 compounds using a computational high-throughput screening protocol targeting this pocket of the E protein. Cell-based assays were conducted on 23 top-ranked compounds. Among four with good antiviral activity profiles, the compound P02 was found to inhibit viral reproduction at micromolar concentrations. Using saturation transfer difference NMR spectroscopy, we also show that the compound binds virus and competes for binding E protein with the known ligand N-octyl-β-d-glucoside. Together, the results are consistent with an inhibition mechanism against maturation or host-cell entry mediated by ligand binding to the E-protein pocket. P02 is a promising lead compound for future development of an effective treatment against dengue virus and related flaviviruses. PMID:19053243

  12. Identification and Analysis of Antiviral Compounds Against Poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Leyssen, Pieter; Franco, David; Tijsma, Aloys; Lacroix, Céline; De Palma, Armando; Neyts, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative, launched in 1988, had as its goal the eradication of polio worldwide by the year 2000 through large-scale vaccinations campaigns with the live attenuated oral PV vaccine (OPV) (Griffiths et al., Biologicals 34:73-74, 2006). Despite substantial progress, polio remains endemic in several countries and new imported cases are reported on a regular basis ( http://www.polioeradication.org/casecount.asp ).It was recognized by the poliovirus research community that developing antivirals against poliovirus would be invaluable in the post-OPV era. Here, we describe three methods essential for the identification of selective inhibitors of poliovirus replication and for determining their mode of action by time-of-drug-addition studies as well as by the isolation of compound-resistant poliovirus variants.

  13. AVCpred: an integrated web server for prediction and design of antiviral compounds.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Abid; Kaur, Gazaldeep; Kumar, Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Viral infections constantly jeopardize the global public health due to lack of effective antiviral therapeutics. Therefore, there is an imperative need to speed up the drug discovery process to identify novel and efficient drug candidates. In this study, we have developed quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR)-based models for predicting antiviral compounds (AVCs) against deadly viruses like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), human herpesvirus (HHV) and 26 others using publicly available experimental data from the ChEMBL bioactivity database. Support vector machine (SVM) models achieved a maximum Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.72, 0.74, 0.66, 0.68, and 0.71 in regression mode and a maximum Matthew's correlation coefficient 0.91, 0.93, 0.70, 0.89, and 0.71, respectively, in classification mode during 10-fold cross-validation. Furthermore, similar performance was observed on the independent validation sets. We have integrated these models in the AVCpred web server, freely available at http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/avcpred. In addition, the datasets are provided in a searchable format. We hope this web server will assist researchers in the identification of potential antiviral agents. It would also save time and cost by prioritizing new drugs against viruses before their synthesis and experimental testing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Evaluation of Lassa antiviral compound ST-193 in a guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kathleen A; Smith, Mark A; Twenhafel, Nancy A; Larson, Ryan A; Jones, Kevin F; Allen, Robert D; Dai, Dongcheng; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Bolken, Tove' C; Hruby, Dennis E; Amberg, Sean M; Hensley, Lisa E; Guttieri, Mary C

    2011-04-01

    Lassa virus (LASV), a member of the Arenaviridae family, causes a viral hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, where as many as 300,000 infections occur per year. Presently, there are no FDA-approved LASV-specific vaccines or antiviral agents, although the antiviral drug ribavirin has shown some efficacy. A recently identified small-molecule inhibitor of arenavirus entry, ST-193, exhibits submicromolar antiviral activity in vitro. To determine the antiviral utility of ST-193 in vivo, we tested the efficacy of this compound in the LASV guinea pig model. Four groups of strain 13 guinea pigs were administered 25 or 80 mg/kg ST-193, 25 mg/kg of ribavirin, or the vehicle by the intraperitoneal (i.p.) route before infection with a lethal dose of LASV, strain Josiah, and continuing once daily for 14 days. Control animals exhibited severe disease, becoming moribund between days 10 and 15 postinfection. ST-193-treated animals exhibited fewer signs of disease and enhanced survival when compared to the ribavirin or vehicle groups. Body temperatures in all groups were elevated by day 9, but returned to normal by day 19 postinfection in the majority of ST-193-treated animals. ST-193 treatment mediated a 2-3-log reduction in viremia relative to vehicle-treated controls. The overall survival rate for the ST-193-treated guinea pigs was 62.5% (10/16) compared with 0% in the ribavirin (0/8) and vehicle (0/7) groups. These data suggest that ST-193 may serve as an improved candidate for the treatment of Lassa fever.

  15. Modeling interactions between C₆₀ antiviral compounds and HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Al Garalleh, Hakim; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Cox, Barry J; Hill, James M

    2015-01-01

    Fullerenes have generated a great deal of interest in recent years, due to their properties and potential applications in many fields, including medicine. In this paper, we study an antiviral fullerene compound which may be used to treat the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We formulate a mathematical model which can describe the interaction energy between the C[Formula: see text] antiviral compounds and the HIV. In particular, this paper predicts the energy and force arising from the interaction between HIV active region and the antiviral molecule which is attached to the external surface of a fullerene C[Formula: see text]. These interactions are calculated based on the structure of the antiviral molecules. Our results show that the binding of fullerene C[Formula: see text] to the antiviral molecules increases the efficiency of the compound to prohibit the activity of HIV.

  16. Chemical Space Mapping and Structure-Activity Analysis of the ChEMBL Antiviral Compound Set.

    PubMed

    Klimenko, Kyrylo; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Varnek, Alexandre

    2016-08-22

    Curation, standardization and data fusion of the antiviral information present in the ChEMBL public database led to the definition of a robust data set, providing an association of antiviral compounds to seven broadly defined antiviral activity classes. Generative topographic mapping (GTM) subjected to evolutionary tuning was then used to produce maps of the antiviral chemical space, providing an optimal separation of compound families associated with the different antiviral classes. The ability to pinpoint the specific spots occupied (responsibility patterns) on a map by various classes of antiviral compounds opened the way for a GTM-supported search for privileged structural motifs, typical for each antiviral class. The privileged locations of antiviral classes were analyzed in order to highlight underlying privileged common structural motifs. Unlike in classical medicinal chemistry, where privileged structures are, almost always, predefined scaffolds, privileged structural motif detection based on GTM responsibility patterns has the decisive advantage of being able to automatically capture the nature ("resolution detail"-scaffold, detailed substructure, pharmacophore pattern, etc.) of the relevant structural motifs. Responsibility patterns were found to represent underlying structural motifs of various natures-from very fuzzy (groups of various "interchangeable" similar scaffolds), to the classical scenario in medicinal chemistry (underlying motif actually being the scaffold), to very precisely defined motifs (specifically substituted scaffolds).

  17. Discovery of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Compound That Inhibits Pyrimidine Biosynthesis and Establishes a Type 1 Interferon-Independent Antiviral State.

    PubMed

    Chung, Dong-Hoon; Golden, Jennifer E; Adcock, Robert S; Schroeder, Chad E; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Sotsky, Julie B; Cramer, Daniel E; Chilton, Paula M; Song, Chisu; Anantpadma, Manu; Davey, Robert A; Prodhan, Aminul I; Yin, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Viral emergence and reemergence underscore the importance of developing efficacious, broad-spectrum antivirals. Here, we report the discovery of tetrahydrobenzothiazole-based compound 1, a novel, broad-spectrum antiviral lead that was optimized from a hit compound derived from a cytopathic effect (CPE)-based antiviral screen using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Compound 1 showed antiviral activity against a broad range of RNA viruses, including alphaviruses, flaviviruses, influenza virus, and ebolavirus. Mechanism-of-action studies with metabolomics and molecular approaches revealed that the compound inhibits host pyrimidine synthesis and establishes an antiviral state by inducing a variety of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Notably, the induction of the ISGs by compound 1 was independent of the production of type 1 interferons. The antiviral activity of compound 1 was cell type dependent with a robust effect observed in human cell lines and no observed antiviral effect in mouse cell lines. Herein, we disclose tetrahydrobenzothiazole compound 1 as a novel lead for the development of a broad-spectrum, antiviral therapeutic and as a molecular probe to study the mechanism of the induction of ISGs that are independent of type 1 interferons.

  18. Discovery of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Compound That Inhibits Pyrimidine Biosynthesis and Establishes a Type 1 Interferon-Independent Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, Robert S.; Schroeder, Chad E.; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Sotsky, Julie B.; Cramer, Daniel E.; Chilton, Paula M.; Song, Chisu; Anantpadma, Manu; Davey, Robert A.; Prodhan, Aminul I.; Yin, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Viral emergence and reemergence underscore the importance of developing efficacious, broad-spectrum antivirals. Here, we report the discovery of tetrahydrobenzothiazole-based compound 1, a novel, broad-spectrum antiviral lead that was optimized from a hit compound derived from a cytopathic effect (CPE)-based antiviral screen using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Compound 1 showed antiviral activity against a broad range of RNA viruses, including alphaviruses, flaviviruses, influenza virus, and ebolavirus. Mechanism-of-action studies with metabolomics and molecular approaches revealed that the compound inhibits host pyrimidine synthesis and establishes an antiviral state by inducing a variety of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Notably, the induction of the ISGs by compound 1 was independent of the production of type 1 interferons. The antiviral activity of compound 1 was cell type dependent with a robust effect observed in human cell lines and no observed antiviral effect in mouse cell lines. Herein, we disclose tetrahydrobenzothiazole compound 1 as a novel lead for the development of a broad-spectrum, antiviral therapeutic and as a molecular probe to study the mechanism of the induction of ISGs that are independent of type 1 interferons. PMID:27185801

  19. Discovery of a new class of antiviral compounds: camphor imine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Anastasiya S; Yarovaya, Olga I; Shernyukov, Andrey V; Gatilov, Yuriy V; Razumova, Yuliya V; Zarubaev, Vladimir V; Tretiak, Tatiana S; Pokrovsky, Andrey G; Kiselev, Oleg I; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F

    2015-11-13

    A new class of compounds featuring a camphor moiety has been discovered that exhibits potent inhibitory activity against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H5N1) viruses. The synthesized compounds were characterized by spectroscopic analysis; in addition the structures of compound 2 and 14 were elucidated by the X-ray diffraction technique. Structure-activity relationship studies have been conducted to identify the 1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptanes2-ylidene group as the key functional group responsible for the observed antiviral activity. The most potent antiviral compound is imine 2 with therapeutic index more than 500.

  20. Phenolic Compounds from the Flowers of Bombax malabaricum and Their Antioxidant and Antiviral Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Bo; Wu, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Xia, Chao; Li, Guo-Qiang; Ye, Wen-Cai; Wang, Guo-Cai; Li, Yao-Lan

    2015-11-05

    Three new phenolic compounds 1-3 and twenty known ones 4-23 were isolated from the flowers of Bombax malabaricum. Their chemical structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses (IR, ESI-MS, HR-ESI-MS, 1D- and 2D-NMR) and chemical reactions. The antioxidant capacities of the isolated compounds were tested using FRAP and DPPH radical-scavenging assays, and compounds 4, 6, 8, 12, as well as the new compound 2, exhibited stronger antioxidant activities than ascorbic acid. Furthermore, all of compounds were tested for their antiviral activities against RSV by the CPE reduction assay and plaque reduction assay. Compounds 4, 10, 12 possess in vitro antiviral activities, and compound 10 exhibits potent anti-RSV effects, comparable to the positive control ribavirin.

  1. Antiviral effect of compounds derived from Angelica archangelica L. on Herpes simplex virus-1 and Coxsackievirus B3 infections.

    PubMed

    Rajtar, Barbara; Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Świątek, Łukasz; Stec, Agnieszka; Boguszewska, Anastazja; Polz-Dacewicz, Małgorzata

    2017-05-06

    The dichloromethane extract from fruits of Angelica archangelica L. was separated by the modern high-performance countercurrent chromatography (HPCCC). The extract and five pure compounds: xanthotoxin, bergapten, imperatorin, phellopterin and isoimperatorin, and the mixture of imperatorin and phellopterin, have been studied as the potential antiviral agents against Herpes simplex virus type l and Coxsackievirus B3. The cytotoxicity was measured using the MTT method. Compounds were tested for the in vitro antiviral activity using the cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibitory assay and by the virus titre reduction assay. Real-time PCR was used to quantify the relative inhibition of the HSV-1 replication. The results indicate that the highest activity was demonstrated by the extract, imperatorin, phellopterin and the mixture of imperatorin and phellopterin, reducing the HSV-1 replication by 5.61 log, 4.7 log, 3.01 log and 3.73 log, respectively. The influence of isolated compounds on the CVB3 replication was not significant. Only the extract caused the decrease in the titre of virus in relation to the virus control. Our results show that coumarins of A. archangelica L. might be a potential candidate for the development of the alternative natural anti- HSV-1 compound. Moreover, the presence of isopentenyloxy moiety at C-8 position significantly improves their activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical Preparation Laboratory for IND Candidate Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-08

    CLASSIFICATION lb. RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS Unclassified 2a. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY 3 . DISTRIBUTION /AVAILABILITY OF REPORT 2b. DECLASSIFICATION... 3 III. Cumulative list of Compounds Delivered to U.S. Army Medical Research and Development (USAMRIID) from January 17, 1989 to...AVS 52) ............................................ 7 2. Selenazole (AVS 253) ............................................... 9 3 . Methyl-l,2,4

  3. Chemical Preparation Laboratory for IND Candidate Compounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-30

    carboxamide; 4H-r,lH-trans,2H-cis,lObH-trans,l-(2’-tetrahydro- pyranyloxy)-2-hydroxy-8,9- methylenedioxy -1,2,4a,l0b-tetrahydro6(5H)phenan. thridone...4aH-r,lH-trans,2H-cis,lObH-trans-1,2-Dihydroxy-8,9- methylenedioxy - 1,2 ,4a, lOb-tetrahydro-6(5H)phenanthridone. Three compounds remain under...28 K. 4H-r,lH-trans,2H-cis,lObH-trans,l-(2’-Tetrahydro- pyranyloxy)-2-hydroxy-8 9- methylenedioxy -1,2,4a,10b

  4. Chemical Preparation Laboratory for IND Candidate Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-10

    Dihydroxy-8 ,9 - methylenedioxy -1 ,2- 4a,l0b-tetrahydro-6(5H)phenanthridone 2.5 g 1986, p.3 1 5 SYN. REFERENCE* I.D. NO. COMPOUND AMOUNT (ANN. CONT. RPT...AVS 360 HP 4H-r,lH-trans,2H-cis,lObH-trans-1- (2’ ,Tetrahydropyranyloxy) -2-hydroxy- 8, 9- methylenedioxy -l, 2,4a, l0b-tetra- hydro-6(5H...Trihydroxy-2 acetoxy-8 ,9- methylenedioxy -I ,3,4, 4a, lOb-hexahydro-6(5H)phenanthridone 1.23 g 1988, p. 16 AVS 360 OH 4aH-r,1H-trans,2H-cis,3H--trans

  5. The in vitro antiviral activity of an aliphatic nitro compound from Heteropteris aphrodisiaca.

    PubMed

    Melo, Fernando L; Benati, Fabricio J; Roman, Walter Antonio; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Nozawa, Carlos; Linhares, Rosa Elisa Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the antiviral activity of an aliphatic nitro compound (NC) isolated from Heteropteris aphrodisiaca O. Mach. (Malpighiaceae), a Brazilian medicinal plant. The NC was tested for its antiviral activity against poliovirus type 1 (PV-1) and bovine herpes virus type 1 (BHV-1) by plaque reduction assay in cell culture. The NC showed a moderate antiviral activity against PV-1 and BHV-1 in HEp-2 cells, and the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) were 22.01 microg/ml (selectivity index (SI)=2.83) and 21.10 microg/ml (SI=2.95), respectively. At the highest concentration of the drug (40 microg/ml) a reduction of approximately 80% in plaque assay was observed for both viruses. The treatment of cells or virus prior to infection did not inhibit the replication of virus strains.

  6. Antiviral activity and mode of action of propolis extracts and selected compounds.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Paul; Neuner, Annett; Nolkemper, Silke; Zundel, Christine; Nowack, Hans; Sensch, Karl Heinz; Reichling, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanol extracts of propolis were analysed phytochemically and examined for their antiviral activity in vitro. Different polyphenols, flavonoids and phenylcarboxylic acids were identified as major constituents. The antiviral effect of propolis extracts and selected constituents, e.g. caffeic acid (1), p-coumaric acid (2), benzoic acid (3), galangin (4), pinocembrin (5) and chrysin (6) against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was analysed in cell culture. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of aqueous and ethanol propolis extracts for HSV-1 plaque formation was determined at 0.0004% and 0.000035%, respectively. Both propolis extracts exhibited high levels of antiviral activity against HSV-1 in viral suspension tests, plaque formation was significantly reduced by >98%. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action of propolis, the extracts were added at different times during the viral infection cycle. Both propolis extracts exhibited high anti-HSV-1 activity when the viruses were pretreated with these drugs prior to infection. Among the analysed compounds, only galangin and chrysin displayed some antiviral activity. However, the extracts containing many different components exhibited significantly higher antiherpetic effects as well as higher selectivity indices than single isolated constituents. Propolis extracts might be suitable for topical application against herpes infection.

  7. Chemical composition and antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities of Gallesia gorazema (Phytolaccaceae), a potential candidate for novel anti-herpetic phytomedicines.

    PubMed

    Silva Júnior, Ademir de Jesus; de Campos-Buzzi, Fátima; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela; Wagner, Theodoro Marcel; Guimarães, Antônio Fernando de Paula Costa; Filho, Valdir Cechinel; Batista, Ronan

    2013-11-25

    In traditional medicine, teas made from leaves and bark of Gallesia gorazema are used as antispasmodic, anthelmintic, antihemorrhagic and febrifuge agents. Crude leaves of this plant are also employed as a remedy in the treatment of abscesses, orchitis, gonorrhea and for rheumatic pain relief. this study investigates the presumed antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of leaves and roots Gallesia gorazema (Phytolaccaceae) extracts. The most active extract and its isolated compound, a new natural product, are also evaluated against viruses HSV-1 and HSV-2. In vivo experiments with mice were used to assess the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Gallesia gorazema extracts. Antiviral activity of extracts and the new natural product was investigated by in vitro experiments. Results show that dichloromethanic root (DRE) and ethanolic leaf (ELE) extracts displayed significant antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in in vivo experiments with mice. Both extracts were also assayed against the herpes simplex viruses HSV-1 and HSV-2, but only DRE was highly active, showing a selective antiviral effect against HSV-1. Phytochemical fractionation of DRE led to the isolation of 28-hydroxyoctacosyl ferulate, a novel natural product, which displayed strong antiviral activity against HSV-1 (EC₅₀=21.6 μg/mL) with a selective index above 9, justifying, at least in part, the high selective antiviral activity observed for DRE. These results suggest that the plant Gallesia gorazema is a potential candidate for the development of novel anti-herpetic phytomedicines. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of antiviral activity of compounds isolated from Ranunculus sieboldii and Ranunculus sceleratus.

    PubMed

    Li, Haibo; Zhou, Changxin; Pan, Yunxue; Gao, Xiaozhong; Wu, Xiumei; Bai, Hua; Zhou, Linfu; Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Shuili; Shi, Shuyun; Luo, Jiali; Xu, Juanhua; Chen, Liurong; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yu

    2005-12-01

    Nineteen compounds isolated from Ranunculus sieboldii and Ranunculus sceleratus were tested for inhibitory effects on hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1). The results showed that apigenin 4'- O- alpha-rhamnopyranoside, apigenin 7- O- beta-glucopyranosyl-4'- O- alpha-rhamnopyranoside, tricin 7- O- beta-glucopyranoside, tricin, and isoscopoletin possessed inhibitory activity against HBV replication. Protocatechuyl aldehyde exhibited an inhibiting activity on HSV-1 replication. It is therefore suggested that further investigations on these bioactive compounds might be needed to discover and develop new antiviral agents.

  9. A review of antiviral drugs and other compounds with activity against feline herpesvirus-1

    PubMed Central

    Thomasy, S. M.; Maggs, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) is a common and important cause of ocular surface disease, dermatitis, respiratory disease, and potentially intraocular disease in cats. However, many antiviral drugs developed for the treatment of humans infected with herpesviruses have been used to treat cats infected with FHV-1. Translational use of drugs in this manner ideally requires methodical investigation of their in vitro efficacy against FHV-1 followed by pharmacokinetic and safety trials in normal cats. Subsequently, placebo-controlled efficacy studies in experimentally-inoculated animals should be performed followed, finally, by carefully designed and monitored clinical trials in client-owned animals. This review is intended to provide a concise review of the available literature regarding the efficacy of antiviral drugs and other compounds with proven or putative activity against FHV-1, as well as a discussion of their safety in cats. PMID:27091747

  10. Computer-aided identification, design and synthesis of a novel series of compounds with selective antiviral activity against chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Bassetto, Marcella; De Burghgraeve, Tine; Delang, Leen; Massarotti, Alberto; Coluccia, Antonio; Zonta, Nicola; Gatti, Valerio; Colombano, Giampiero; Sorba, Giovanni; Silvestri, Romano; Tron, Gian Cesare; Neyts, Johan; Leyssen, Pieter; Brancale, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an Arbovirus that is transmitted to humans primarily by the mosquito species Aedes aegypti. Infection with this pathogen is often associated with fever, rash and arthralgia. Neither a vaccine nor an antiviral drug is available for the prevention or treatment of this disease. Albeit considered a tropical pathogen, adaptation of the virus to the mosquito species Aedes albopictus, which is also very common in temperate zones, has resulted in recent outbreaks in Europe and the US. In the present study, we report on the discovery of a novel series of compounds that inhibit CHIKV replication in the low μM range. In particular, we initially performed a virtual screening simulation of ∼5 million compounds on the CHIKV nsP2, the viral protease, after which we investigated and explored the Structure-Activity Relationships of the hit identified in silico. Overall, a series of 26 compounds, including the original hit, was evaluated in a virus-cell-based CPE reduction assay. The study of such selective inhibitors will contribute to a better understanding of the CHIKV replication cycle and may represents a first step towards the development of a clinical candidate drug for the treatment of this disease.

  11. Drug candidates and model systems in respiratory syncytial virus antiviral drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Neyts, Johan; Jochmans, Dirk

    2017-03-01

    The development of antiviral strategies to prevent or treat respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections is of great importance, especially considering the fact that RSV is one of the most important causes of pediatric respiratory infections. However, despite intense efforts, there is no antiviral or vaccine approved for the prevention or treatment of RSV infections. Several inhibitors, targeting different RSV proteins have been discovered over the past decade. We here review the most important chemical series as well as recent developments in understanding which viral proteins and/or host cell factors are good targets for inhibition of viral replication. In addition, we highlight the current in vitro and in vivo model systems of the disease. A number of molecules are currently in (advanced) preclinical or clinical development. Significant breakthroughs in the field may be expected in the upcoming years.

  12. Novel Indole-2-Carboxamide Compounds Are Potent Broad-Spectrum Antivirals Active against Western Equine Encephalitis Virus In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Delekta, Phillip C.; Dobry, Craig J.; Sindac, Janice A.; Barraza, Scott J.; Blakely, Pennelope K.; Xiang, Jianming; Kirchhoff, Paul D.; Keep, Richard F.; Irani, David N.; Larsen, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurotropic alphaviruses, including western, eastern, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses, cause serious and potentially fatal central nervous system infections in humans for which no currently approved therapies exist. We previously identified a series of thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole derivatives as novel inhibitors of neurotropic alphavirus replication, using a cell-based phenotypic assay (W. Peng et al., J. Infect. Dis. 199:950–957, 2009, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/597275), and subsequently developed second- and third-generation indole-2-carboxamide derivatives with improved potency, solubility, and metabolic stability (J. A. Sindac et al., J. Med. Chem. 55:3535–3545, 2012, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm300214e; J. A. Sindac et al., J. Med. Chem. 56:9222–9241, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm401330r). In this report, we describe the antiviral activity of the most promising third-generation lead compound, CCG205432, and closely related analogs CCG206381 and CCG209023. These compounds have half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of ∼1 μM and selectivity indices of >100 in cell-based assays using western equine encephalitis virus replicons. Furthermore, CCG205432 retains similar potency against fully infectious virus in cultured human neuronal cells. These compounds show broad inhibitory activity against a range of RNA viruses in culture, including members of the Togaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Although their exact molecular target remains unknown, mechanism-of-action studies reveal that these novel indole-based compounds target a host factor that modulates cap-dependent translation. Finally, we demonstrate that both CCG205432 and CCG209023 dampen clinical disease severity and enhance survival of mice given a lethal western equine encephalitis virus challenge. These studies demonstrate that indole-2-carboxamide compounds are viable candidates for continued preclinical development as inhibitors of

  13. Novel indole-2-carboxamide compounds are potent broad-spectrum antivirals active against western equine encephalitis virus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Delekta, Phillip C; Dobry, Craig J; Sindac, Janice A; Barraza, Scott J; Blakely, Pennelope K; Xiang, Jianming; Kirchhoff, Paul D; Keep, Richard F; Irani, David N; Larsen, Scott D; Miller, David J

    2014-10-01

    Neurotropic alphaviruses, including western, eastern, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses, cause serious and potentially fatal central nervous system infections in humans for which no currently approved therapies exist. We previously identified a series of thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole derivatives as novel inhibitors of neurotropic alphavirus replication, using a cell-based phenotypic assay (W. Peng et al., J. Infect. Dis. 199:950-957, 2009, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/597275), and subsequently developed second- and third-generation indole-2-carboxamide derivatives with improved potency, solubility, and metabolic stability (J. A. Sindac et al., J. Med. Chem. 55:3535-3545, 2012, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm300214e; J. A. Sindac et al., J. Med. Chem. 56:9222-9241, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm401330r). In this report, we describe the antiviral activity of the most promising third-generation lead compound, CCG205432, and closely related analogs CCG206381 and CCG209023. These compounds have half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of ∼1 μM and selectivity indices of >100 in cell-based assays using western equine encephalitis virus replicons. Furthermore, CCG205432 retains similar potency against fully infectious virus in cultured human neuronal cells. These compounds show broad inhibitory activity against a range of RNA viruses in culture, including members of the Togaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Although their exact molecular target remains unknown, mechanism-of-action studies reveal that these novel indole-based compounds target a host factor that modulates cap-dependent translation. Finally, we demonstrate that both CCG205432 and CCG209023 dampen clinical disease severity and enhance survival of mice given a lethal western equine encephalitis virus challenge. These studies demonstrate that indole-2-carboxamide compounds are viable candidates for continued preclinical development as inhibitors of neurotropic

  14. Characterization of bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates resistant to a novel antiviral compound obtained from persistently infected calves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this research was to characterize isolates resistant to a novel antiviral compound (DB772) isolated from persistently infected (PI) calves treated with the compound. Viral isolates were obtained from four Angus-cross beef calves (A,B,C,D) persistently infected with BVDV type 1 or 2 ...

  15. An antiviral disulfide compound blocks interaction between arenavirus Z protein and cellular promyelocytic leukemia protein

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C.C.; Topisirovic, I.; Djavani, M.; Borden, K.L.B.; Damonte, E.B.; Salvato, M.S.

    2010-03-19

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) forms nuclear bodies (NB) that can be redistributed by virus infection. In particular, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) influences disruption of PML NB through the interaction of PML with the arenaviral Z protein. In a previous report, we have shown that the disulfide compound NSC20625 has antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses, inducing unfolding and oligomerization of Z without affecting cellular RING-containing proteins such as the PML. Here, we further studied the effect of the zinc-finger-reactive disulfide NSC20625 on PML-Z interaction. In HepG2 cells infected with LCMV or transiently transfected with Z protein constructs, treatment with NSC20625 restored PML distribution from a diffuse-cytoplasmic pattern to punctate, discrete NB which appeared identical to NB found in control, uninfected cells. Similar results were obtained in cells transfected with a construct expressing a Z mutant in zinc-binding site 2 of the RING domain, confirming that this Z-PML interaction requires the integrity of only one zinc-binding site. Altogether, these results show that the compound NSC20625 suppressed Z-mediated PML NB disruption and may be used as a tool for designing novel antiviral strategies against arenavirus infection.

  16. Antiviral effects of black raspberry (Rubus coreanus) seed extract and its polyphenolic compounds on norovirus surrogates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Bae, Sun Young; Oh, Mi; Seok, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Sella; Chung, Yeon Bin; Gowda K, Giri; Mun, Ji Young; Chung, Mi Sook; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Black raspberry seeds, a byproduct of wine and juice production, contain large quantities of polyphenolic compounds. The antiviral effects of black raspberry seed extract (RCS) and its fraction with molecular weight less than 1 kDa (RCS-F1) were examined against food-borne viral surrogates, murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) and feline calicivirus-F9 (FCV-F9). The maximal antiviral effect was achieved when RCS or RCS-F1 was added simultaneously to cells with MNV-1 or FCV-F9, reaching complete inhibition at 0.1-1 mg/mL. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed enlarged viral capsids or disruption (from 35 nm to up to 100 nm) by RCS-F1. Our results thus suggest that RCS-F1 can interfere with the attachment of viral surface protein to host cells. Further, two polyphenolic compounds derived from RCS-F1, cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G) and gallic acid, identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, showed inhibitory effects against the viruses. C3G was suggested to bind to MNV-1 RNA polymerase and to enlarge viral capsids using differential scanning fluorimetry and TEM, respectively.

  17. Screening and identification of compounds with antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus using a safe compound library and novel real-time immune-absorbance PCR-based high throughput system

    PubMed Central

    Lamontagne, Jason; Mills, Courtney; Mao, Richeng; Goddard, Cally; Cai, Dawei; Guo, Haitao; Cuconati, Andy; Block, Timothy; Lu, Xuanyong

    2013-01-01

    There are now 7 nucleoside/tide analogues, along with interferon-α, that are approved by the FDA for the management of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, a disease affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. These medications, however, are limited in usefulness, and significant side effects and the emergence of viral escape mutants make the development of novel and updated therapeutics a pressing need in the treatment of HBV. With this in mind, a library containing 2,000 compounds already known to be safe in both humans and mice with known mechanisms of action in mammalian cells were tested for the possibility of either antiviral activity against HBV or selective toxicity in HBV producing cell lines. A modified real-time immune-absorbance-polymerase chain reaction (IA-PCR) assay was developed for this screen, utilizing cells that produce and secrete intact HBV virions. In this procedure, viral particles are first captured by an anti-HBs antibody immobilized on a plate. The viral load is subsequently assessed by real-time PCR directly on captured particles. Using this assay, eight compounds were shown to consistently reduce the amount of secreted HBV viral particles in the culture medium under conditions that had no detectable impact on cell viability. Two compounds, proparacaine and chlorophyllide, were shown to reduce HBV levels 4- to 6-fold with an IC50 of 1 and 1.5μM respectively, and were selected for further study. The identification of these compounds as promising antiviral drug candidates against HBV, despite a lack of previous recognition of HBV antiviral activity, supports the validity and utility of testing known compounds for “off- pathogen target” activity against HBV, and also validates this IA-PCR assay as an important tool for the detection of anti-viral activity against enveloped viruses. PMID:23415884

  18. Screening and identification of compounds with antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus using a safe compound library and novel real-time immune-absorbance PCR-based high throughput system.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Jason; Mills, Courtney; Mao, Richeng; Goddard, Cally; Cai, Dawei; Guo, Haitao; Cuconati, Andy; Block, Timothy; Lu, Xuanyong

    2013-04-01

    There are now seven nucleoside/tide analogues, along with interferon-α, that are approved by the FDA for the management of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, a disease affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. These medications, however, are limited in usefulness, and significant side effects and the emergence of viral escape mutants make the development of novel and updated therapeutics a pressing need in the treatment of HBV. With this in mind, a library containing 2000 compounds already known to be safe in both humans and mice with known mechanisms of action in mammalian cells were tested for the possibility of either antiviral activity against HBV or selective toxicity in HBV producing cell lines. A modified real-time immune-absorbance-polymerase chain reaction (IA-PCR) assay was developed for this screen, utilizing cells that produce and secrete intact HBV virions. In this procedure, viral particles are first captured by an anti-HBs antibody immobilized on a plate. The viral load is subsequently assessed by real-time PCR directly on captured particles. Using this assay, eight compounds were shown to consistently reduce the amount of secreted HBV viral particles in the culture medium under conditions that had no detectable impact on cell viability. Two compounds, proparacaine and chlorophyllide, were shown to reduce HBV levels 4- to 6-fold with an IC₅₀ of 1 and 1.5 μM, respectively, and were selected for further study. The identification of these compounds as promising antiviral drug candidates against HBV, despite a lack of previous recognition of HBV antiviral activity, supports the validity and utility of testing known compounds for "off-pathogen target" activity against HBV, and also validates this IA-PCR assay as an important tool for the detection of anti-viral activity against enveloped viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of the antiviral effect of solid-state copper and silver compounds.

    PubMed

    Minoshima, Masafumi; Lu, Yue; Kimura, Takuto; Nakano, Ryuichi; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Sunada, Kayano

    2016-07-15

    Antiviral activities of insoluble solid-state and soluble ionic copper and silver compounds were evaluated against influenza A virus (A/PR8/H1N1) possessing a viral envelope and bacteriophage Qβ lacking an envelope. The viral solutions were exposed on glass samples uniformly loaded with copper and silver compounds. Exposure to solid-state cuprous oxide (Cu2O) efficiently inactivated both influenza A virus and bacteriophage Qβ, whereas solid-state cupric oxide (CuO) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) showed little antiviral activity. Copper ions from copper chloride (CuCl2) had little effect on the activity of bacteriophage Qβ in spite of the fact that copper ions strongly inactivate influenza A in previous studies. Silver ions from silver nitrate (AgNO3) and silver(I) oxide (Ag2O) in solution showed strong inactivation of influenza A and weak inactivation of bacteriophage Qβ. We also investigated the influence of the compounds on the function of two influenza viral proteins, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Silver ions from AgNO3 and Ag2O remarkably decreased enzymatic activity of neuraminidase through the breakage of disulfide (SS) bonds, corresponding to the selective inactivation of influenza A virus. By contrast, exposure to Cu2O markedly reduced the activity of hemagglutinin rather than neuraminidase. These findings suggest that solid-state Cu2O disrupts host cell recognition by denaturing protein structures on viral surfaces, leading to the inactivation of viruses regardless of the presence of a viral envelope.

  20. Efficacy of an antiviral compound to inhibit replication of multiple pestivirus species.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Marley, M Shonda; Ridpath, Julia F; Neill, John D; Boykin, David W; Kumar, Arvind; Givens, M Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Pestiviruses are economically important pathogens of livestock. An aromatic cationic compound (DB772) has previously been shown to inhibit bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 1 in vitro at concentrations lacking cytotoxic side effects. The aim of this study was to determine the scope of antiviral activity of DB772 among diverse pestiviruses. Isolates of BVDV 2, border disease virus (BDV), HoBi virus, pronghorn virus and Bungowannah virus were tested for in vitro susceptibility to DB772 by incubating infected cells in medium containing 0, 0.006, 0.01, 0.02, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.39, 0.78, 1.56, 3.125, 6.25, 12.5 or 25μM DB772. The samples were assayed for the presence of virus by virus isolation and titration (BDV and BVDV 2) or PCR (HoBi, pronghorn and Bungowannah viruses). Cytotoxicity of the compound was assayed for each cell type. Complete inhibition of BVDV 2, BDV, and Pronghorn virus was detected when DB772 was included in the culture media at concentrations of 0.20μM and higher. In two of three tests, a concentration of 0.05μM DB772 was sufficient to completely inhibit HoBi virus replication. Bungowannah virus was completely inhibited at a concentration of 0.01μM DB772. Thus, DB772 effectively inhibits all pestiviruses studied at concentrations >0.20μM. As cytotoxicity is not evident at these concentrations, this antiviral compound potentially represents an effective preventative or therapeutic for diverse pestiviruses.

  1. Characterization of Poliovirus Variants Selected for Resistance to the Antiviral Compound V-073

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Mei; Roberts, Jason A.; Moore, Deborah; Anderson, Barbara; Pallansch, Mark A.; Pevear, Daniel C.; Collett, Marc S.

    2012-01-01

    V-073, a small-molecule capsid inhibitor originally developed for nonpolio enterovirus indications is considerably more potent against polioviruses. All poliovirus isolates tested to date (n = 45), including wild, vaccine, vaccine-derived, and laboratory strains, are susceptible to the antiviral capsid inhibitor V-073. We grew poliovirus in the presence of V-073 to allow for the identification of variants with reduced susceptibility to the drug. Sequence analysis of 160 independent resistant variants (80 isolates of poliovirus type 1, 40 isolates each of types 2 and 3) established that V-073 resistance involved a single amino acid change in either of two virus capsid proteins, VP1 (67 of 160 [42%]) or VP3 (93 of 160 [58%]). In resistant variants with a VP1 change, the majority (53 of 67 [79%]) exhibited a substitution of isoleucine at position 194 (equivalent position 192 in type 3) with either methionine or phenylalanine. Of those with a VP3 change, alanine at position 24 was replaced with valine in all variants (n = 93). The resistance phenotype was relatively stable upon passage of viruses in cell culture in the absence of drug. Single-step growth studies showed no substantial differences between drug-resistant variants and the virus stocks from which they were derived, while the resistant viruses were generally more thermally labile than the corresponding drug-susceptible parental viruses. These studies provide a foundation from which to build a greater understanding of resistance to antiviral compound V-073. PMID:22890765

  2. Highly efficient antiviral and antibacterial activities of solid-state cuprous compounds.

    PubMed

    Sunada, Kayano; Minoshima, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2012-10-15

    We found that several solid-state cuprous compounds, including cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O), sulfide (Cu(2)S), iodide (CuI), and chloride (CuCl), have highly efficient antiviral activities, whereas those of solid-state silver and cupric compounds are markedly lower. On a Cu(2)O-loaded glass substrate, for example, the infectious activity of bacteriophages was reduced by 5-orders of magnitude within 30 min and by 3-orders of magnitude within 1h for bacteria. In contrast, the infectious activities of both phages and bacteria were not markedly reduced on CuO-loaded substrates within a similar time frame. To determine the origin of this inhibitory activity, we investigated the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leached copper ions, and the solid-state compound itself against bacteriophages, and concluded that infectious activity is lost following direct contact with the solid-state surface of cuprous compounds, but not ROS or copper ions. Furthermore, we found that Cu(2)O adsorbed and denatured more proteins than CuO, which suggests the difference of the inhibitory activity between Cu(2)O and CuO.

  3. Antiviral activities of compounds from aerial parts of Salvia plebeia R. Br.

    PubMed

    Bang, Sunghee; Quy Ha, Thi Kim; Lee, Changyeol; Li, Wei; Oh, Won-Keun; Shim, Sang Hee

    2016-11-04

    Salvia plebeia R. Br. is an edible plant widely spread in many countries. It has been used as a traditional medicine to treat common cold, flu, cough, hepatitis, hemorrhoids, etc. The purpose of the study is to explicate antiviral compounds responsible for its traditional use for the common cold or flu. The methanolic extract of the aerial parts of S. plebeia was extracted with CHCl3, EtOAc, and n-BuOH, successively. The EtOAc and CHCl3 fractions were subjected to a successive of chromatographic method, which led to the isolation of fourteen compounds. Inhibition activities of the isolated compounds were evaluated against influenza A (H1N1) neuraminidase. Chemical investigation of the methanolic extracts of S. plebeia resulted in the isolation of two novel benzoylated monoterpene glycosides, named as plebeiosides A (1) and B (2), together with twelve known compounds including four flavonoids (4-5, 7, 10), two sesquiterpenoids (8, 12), four phenolics (9-10, 13-14), a steroid (6), and a triterpenoid (3). Their chemical structures were elucidated based on spectroscopic data and absolute stereochemistries of 1 and 2 were determined by comparison of optical rotations of their hydrolysates with literature values. Compounds 5, 7, 9, and 11 exhibited potent enzymatic inhibition against H1N1 neuraminidase (IC50 values ranging from 11.18±1.73 to 19.83±2.28μM). Furthermore, two flavonoids (5 and 7) and one rosmarinic acid methyl ester (9) reduced cytopathic effects of the H1N1 virus during replication. The antiviral activities of the flavonoids and phenolics isolated from the extracts of S. plebeia supported the traditional application of this medicine on common cold or flu. In this study, benzoylated monoterpene glycosides were first found to exist in this species. Moreover, the present study suggested potential of three compounds (5, 7, and 9) to be new lead structures for the development of new neuraminidase inhibitors in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland

  4. [A comparative study of the antiviral activity of chemical compounds concerning the orthopoxviruses experiments in vivo].

    PubMed

    Kabanov, A S; Sergeev, Al A; Shishkina, L N; Bulychev, L E; Skarnovich, M O; Sergeev, Ar A; Bormotov, N I; P'iankov, O V; Serova, O A; Bodnev, S A; Selivanov, B A; Tikhonov, A Ia; Agafonov, A P; Sergeev, A N

    2013-01-01

    In the experiments using intranasal (i/n) infection of mice with the ectromelia virus (EV) in a dose 10 LD50/head (10 x 50% lethal doselhead) or with the monkaypox virus (MPXV) in a dose 10 ID50/head (10 x 50% infective dose/ head) it was demonstrated that the antiviral efficiency of chemical compounds - the condensed derivatives of pyrrolidin-2,5-dion, as well as their predecessors and the nearest analogues, synthesized in Novosibirsk Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (NIOCH SB RAS) was observed. As a positive control we used the antipoxvirus chemical preparation ST-246 available from SIGA Technologies Inc. (USA), synthesized in NIOCH SB RAS by the technique suggested by the authors. It was demonstrated that the compound NIOCH-14 (7-[N'-(4-Trifluoromethylbenzoil)-hydrazidecarbonil]-tricyclo[3.2.2.02,4]non-8-en-6-carbonic acid) possessed comparable with ST-246 antiviral activity concerning EV and MPXV on all indicators used. Therefore, at infection of mice with EV (strain K-1) and peroral administration of NIOCH-14 and ST-246 in a dose 50 mkg/g of mouse weight (12-14 g) within 10 days the survival rate and average life expectancy of mice authentically exceeded the control levels. EV titers in lungs through 6 days after infection in the same groups were lower than in the control. In addition to that, after 7 days of infection of mice with MPXV (strain V79-1-005) and daily peroral administration of NIOCH-14 and ST-246 in a dose 60 mkg/g of mouse weight (9-11 g) authentic decrease in a part of infected animals and MPXV titers in lungs was observed.

  5. Antiviral effect of compounds derived from the seeds of Mammea americana and Tabernaemontana cymosa on Dengue and Chikungunya virus infections.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Calderón, Cecilia; Mesa-Castro, Carol; Robledo, Sara; Gómez, Sergio; Bolivar-Avila, Santiago; Diaz-Castillo, Fredyc; Martínez-Gutierrez, Marlen

    2017-01-18

    The transmission of Dengue virus (DENV) and Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has increased worldwide, due in part to the lack of a specific antiviral treatment. For this reason, the search for compounds with antiviral potential, either as licensed drugs or in natural products, is a research priority. The objective of this study was to identify some of the compounds that are present in Mammea americana (M. americana) and Tabernaemontana cymosa (T. cymosa) plants and, subsequently, to evaluate their cytotoxicity in VERO cells and their potential antiviral effects on DENV and CHIKV infections in those same cells. Dry ethanolic extracts of M. americana and T. cymosa seeds were subjected to open column chromatographic fractionation, leading to the identification of four compounds: two coumarins, derived from M. americana; and lupeol acetate and voacangine derived from T. cymosa.. The cytotoxicity of each compound was subsequently assessed by the MTT method (at concentrations from 400 to 6.25 μg/mL). Pre- and post-treatment antiviral assays were performed at non-toxic concentrations; the resulting DENV inhibition was evaluated by Real-Time PCR, and the CHIKV inhibition was tested by the plating method. The results were analyzed by means of statistical analysis. The compounds showed low toxicity at concentrations ≤ 200 μg/mL. The compounds coumarin A and coumarin B, which are derived from the M. americana plant, significantly inhibited infection with both viruses during the implementation of the two experimental strategies employed here (post-treatment with inhibition percentages greater than 50%, p < 0.01; and pre-treatment with percentages of inhibition greater than 40%, p < 0.01). However, the lupeol acetate and voacangine compounds, which were derived from the T. cymosa plant, only significantly inhibited the DENV infection during the post-treatment strategy (at inhibition percentages greater than 70%, p < 0.01). In vitro, the coumarins are capable of

  6. Novel thioglycosyl analogs of glycosyltransferase substrates as antiviral compounds against classical swine fever virus and hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Pastuch-Gawolek, Gabriela; Chaubey, Binay; Szewczyk, Boguslaw; Krol, Ewelina

    2017-09-08

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and classical swine fever virus (CSFV) are important pathogens for which new therapeutic approaches are in high demand. Herein, we report the synthesis of newly designed thioglycosyl analogs of glycosyltransferase substrates which were evaluated using cell-based assays for cytotoxicity and antiviral activity against both viruses. The antiviral activity of synthesized compounds against CSFV and HCV was confirmed using pseudo-plaque reduction assays where a significant arrest of viral growth was observed in the presence of selected compounds. We showed that compounds 13 and 14 exerted the most significant inhibitory effect on in vitro CSFV and HCV infections in the series. Glycoconjugates 13 and 14 not only inhibited both viral propagation with IC50 values in low micromolar range, but efficiently suppressed the production of viral proteins in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, studies using in vitro HCV infection and replication models have shown that both compounds are able to significantly reduce viral genomic replication. We demonstrated that compounds 13 and 14 showed a strong inhibition, up to 90% of replication which inscribe them in the promising alternative approach for the development of new anti-CSFV and anti-HCV drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Full Length Single Chain Fc Protein (FLSC IgG1) as a Potent Antiviral Therapy Candidate: Implications for In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Latinovic, Olga S.; Medina-Moreno, Sandra; Schneider, Kate; Gohain, Neelakshi; Zapata, Juan; Pazgier, Marzena; Reitz, Marvin; Bryant, Joseph; Redfield, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that FLSC, a chimeric protein containing HIV-1BAL gp120 and the D1 and D2 domains of human CD4, blocks the binding and entry of HIV-1 into target cells by occluding CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor. In an effort to improve the antiviral potential of FLSC, we fused it with the hinge-CH2-CH3 region of human IgG1. The IgG moiety should increase both the affinity and stability in vivo of FLSC, due to the resultant bivalency and an extended serum half-life, thereby increasing its antiviral potency. We previously showed that (FLSC) IgG1 indeed had greater antiviral activity against T cell infections. Here we extend these results to macrophages, for which (FLSC) IgG1 has a more potent antiviral activity than FLSC alone, due in part to its higher binding affinity for CCR5. We also test both compounds in a relevant humanized mouse model and show that, as anticipated, the IgG1 moiety confers a greatly extended half-life. These data, taken together with previous results, suggest potential clinical utility for (FLSC) IgG1 and support further developmental work toward eventual clinical trials. PMID:26059995

  8. The effect of urine storage on antiviral and antibiotic compounds in the liquid phase of source-separated urine.

    PubMed

    Jaatinen, Sanna T; Palmroth, Marja R T; Rintala, Jukka A; Tuhkanen, Tuula A

    2016-09-01

    The behaviour of pharmaceuticals related to the human immunodeficiency virus treatment was studied in the liquid phase of source-separated urine during six-month storage at 20°C. Six months is the recommended time for hygienization and use of urine as fertilizer. Compounds were spiked in urine as concentrations calculated to appear in urine. Assays were performed with separate compounds and as therapeutic groups of antivirals, antibiotics and anti-tuberculotics. In addition, urine was amended either with faeces or urease inhibitor. The pharmaceutical concentrations were monitored from filtered samples with solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography. The concentration reductions of the studied compounds as such or with amendments ranged from less than 1% to more than 99% after six-month storage. The reductions without amendments were 41.9-99% for anti-tuberculotics; <52% for antivirals (except with 3TC 75.6%) and <50% for antibiotics. In assays with amendments, the reductions were all <50%. Faeces amendment resulted in similar or lower reduction than without it even though bacterial activity should have increased. The urease inhibitor prevented ureolysis and pH rise but did not affect pharmaceutical removal. In conclusion, removal during storage might not be enough to reduce risks associated with the studied pharmaceuticals, in which case other feasible treatment practises or urine utilization means should be considered.

  9. In Vivo Screening of Candidate Pretreatment Compounds Against Cyanide Using Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-13

    efficacious in preventing lethality than is a negative control substance (candidate compound vehicle). Since 1988, approximately 250 candidate...effective in preventing or reversing the effects of cyanide intoxication. Battelle’s MREF, as part of its tasking to evaluate efficacy of candidate...concentrations tested, or at either pretreatment time, it is statistically more efficacious in preventing lethality than is the negative control substance

  10. Development of a FACS-based assay for evaluating antiviral potency of compound in dengue infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yilong; Chen, Yen-Liang; Herve, Maxime; Gu, Feng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Blasco, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arthropod-transmitted viral disease affecting humans. It is a blood-borne disease characterized by persistent fever and joint pain. In the blood, primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), in particular monocytes, are the main target of the dengue virus (DENV). These cells are poorly permissive for in vitro dengue virus infection and their infectivity varies from donor to donor. To overcome this barrier, an anti-dengue antibody was used to improve the infectivity of DENV-2 clinical isolates to PBMCs, the monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1 and the granulocyte cell line, KU812. A higher throughput 96-well-format assay based on a fluorescent-activated cell sorter could potentially be developed to evaluate the antiviral potency of compounds in DENV-infected PBMCs in vitro. The results correlate well with data obtained by a standard plaque assay. Altogether, an assay has been developed that enables evaluation of the antiviral activity of test compounds in a physiologically-relevant cell system (PBMCs). These screening processes are urgently needed for dengue drug discovery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Arenavirus Z protein as an antiviral target: virus inactivation and protein oligomerization by zinc finger-reactive compounds

    PubMed Central

    García, Cybele C.; Djavani, Mahmoud; Topisirovic, Ivan; Borden, Katherine L. B.; Salvato, María S.; Damonte, Elsa B.

    2008-01-01

    Several disulfide-based and azoic compounds have shown antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses in virus yield-inhibition and inactivation assays, respectively. The most effective virucidal agent, the aromatic disulfide NSC20625, was able to inactivate two strains of the prototype arenavirus species Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Inactivated viral particles retained the biological functions of the virion envelope glycoproteins in virus binding and uptake, but were unable to perform viral RNA replication. Furthermore, in inactivated virions, the electrophoretic profile of the Z protein was altered when analysed under non-reducing conditions, whereas the patterns of the proteins NP and GP1 remained unaffected. Treatment of a recombinant LCMV Z protein with the virucidal agents induced unfolding and oligomerization of Z to high-molecular-mass aggregates, probably due to metal-ion ejection and the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds through the cysteine residues of the Z RING finger. NSC20625 also exhibited antiviral properties in LCMV-infected cells without affecting other cellular RING-motif proteins, such as the promyelocytic leukaemia protein PML. Altogether, the investigations described here illustrate the potential of the Z protein as a promising target for therapy and the prospects of the Z-reactive compounds to prevent arenavirus dissemination. PMID:16603524

  12. Arenavirus Z protein as an antiviral target: virus inactivation and protein oligomerization by zinc finger-reactive compounds.

    PubMed

    García, Cybele C; Djavani, Mahmoud; Topisirovic, Ivan; Borden, Katherine L B; Salvato, María S; Damonte, Elsa B

    2006-05-01

    Several disulfide-based and azoic compounds have shown antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses in virus yield-inhibition and inactivation assays, respectively. The most effective virucidal agent, the aromatic disulfide NSC20625, was able to inactivate two strains of the prototype arenavirus species Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Inactivated viral particles retained the biological functions of the virion envelope glycoproteins in virus binding and uptake, but were unable to perform viral RNA replication. Furthermore, in inactivated virions, the electrophoretic profile of the Z protein was altered when analysed under non-reducing conditions, whereas the patterns of the proteins NP and GP1 remained unaffected. Treatment of a recombinant LCMV Z protein with the virucidal agents induced unfolding and oligomerization of Z to high-molecular-mass aggregates, probably due to metal-ion ejection and the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds through the cysteine residues of the Z RING finger. NSC20625 also exhibited antiviral properties in LCMV-infected cells without affecting other cellular RING-motif proteins, such as the promyelocytic leukaemia protein PML. Altogether, the investigations described here illustrate the potential of the Z protein as a promising target for therapy and the prospects of the Z-reactive compounds to prevent arenavirus dissemination.

  13. Molybdenum Metallopharmaceuticals Candidate Compounds - The "Renaissance" of Molybdenum Metallodrugs?

    PubMed

    Jurowska, Anna; Jurowski, Kamil; Szklarzewicz, Janusz; Buszewski, Boguslaw; Kalenik, Tatiana; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Metal-based drugs, also called "metallopharmaceuticals" or "metallodrugs", are examples of sophisticated compounds that have been used in inorganic medicinal chemistry as therapeutic agents for a long time. Few of them have shown substantially promising results and many of them have been used in different phases of clinical trials. The Mo-based metallodrugs were successfully applied in the past for treating conditions such as anemia or Wilson's disease. Moreover, Mo complexes are supposed to exert their effect by intercalation/ cleavage of DNA/RNA, arrest of the cell cycle, and alteration of cell membrane functions. However, in the current literature, there are no reliable and in-depth reviews about the hypothetical therapeutic applications of all of the known molybdenum complexes as metallopharmaceuticals/ metallodrugs. The main emphasis was on the in-depth review of the potential applications of Mo-based complexes in medicinal chemistry as metallopharmaceuticals in treating diseases such as cancer and tumors, Wilson's disease, diabetes mellitus, Huntington's disease, atherosclerosis, and anemia. It must be emphasized that today the development of innovative and new Mo-based metalo-pharmaceuticals is not rapid, and hence the aim of this paper was also to inspire colleagues working in the field of Mo compounds who are trying to find "signpost" for research. The authors hope that this article will increase interest and initiate the Renaissance of Mo-compounds among medicinal inorganic chemists. This paper is the first review article in the literature that refers to and emphasizes many different and complex aspects of possible applications and capabilities of Mo-based metallodrugs.

  14. The SARS-coronavirus papain-like protease: structure, function and inhibition by designed antiviral compounds.

    PubMed

    Báez-Santos, Yahira M; St John, Sarah E; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2015-03-01

    Over 10 years have passed since the deadly human coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) emerged from the Guangdong Province of China. Despite the fact that the SARS-CoV pandemic infected over 8500 individuals, claimed over 800 lives and cost billions of dollars in economic loss worldwide, there still are no clinically approved antiviral drugs, vaccines or monoclonal antibody therapies to treat SARS-CoV infections. The recent emergence of the deadly human coronavirus that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV) is a sobering reminder that new and deadly coronaviruses can emerge at any time with the potential to become pandemics. Therefore, the continued development of therapeutic and prophylactic countermeasures to potentially deadly coronaviruses is warranted. The coronaviral proteases, papain-like protease (PLpro) and 3C-like protease (3CLpro), are attractive antiviral drug targets because they are essential for coronaviral replication. Although the primary function of PLpro and 3CLpro are to process the viral polyprotein in a coordinated manner, PLpro has the additional function of stripping ubiquitin and ISG15 from host-cell proteins to aid coronaviruses in their evasion of the host innate immune responses. Therefore, targeting PLpro with antiviral drugs may have an advantage in not only inhibiting viral replication but also inhibiting the dysregulation of signaling cascades in infected cells that may lead to cell death in surrounding, uninfected cells. This review provides an up-to-date discussion on the SARS-CoV papain-like protease including a brief overview of the SARS-CoV genome and replication followed by a more in-depth discussion on the structure and catalytic mechanism of SARS-CoV PLpro, the multiple cellular functions of SARS-CoV PLpro, the inhibition of SARS-CoV PLpro by small molecule inhibitors, and the prospect of inhibiting papain-like protease from other coronaviruses. This paper forms part of a series of

  15. Antiviral activities of purified compounds from Youngia japonica (L.) DC (Asteraceae, Compositae).

    PubMed

    Ooi, Linda S M; Wang, Hua; He, Zhendan; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2006-06-30

    The ethanol extract of a biannual medicinal herb, Youngia japonica (commonly known as Oriental hawk's beard) was reported previously to have potent antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) cultured in HEp-2 cells. Three anti-microbial agents, namely 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and luteolin-7-O-glucoside were subsequently purified and chemically characterized from the ethanol extract of Youngia japonica. The two dicaffeoylquinic acids exhibited prominent anti-RSV with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.5 microg/ml in vitro. Luteolin-7-O-glucoside together with the two dicaffeoylquinic acids were also manifested to have some antibacterial activity towards the causal agents of food-borne disease, namely Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus at the concentration of 2mg/ml. Bacillus cereus was sensitive to 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid only, but not to luteolin-7-O-glucoside.

  16. Simultaneous detection of three antiviral and four antibiotic compounds in source-separated urine with liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pynnönen, Sanna T; Tuhkanen, Tuula A

    2014-02-01

    An analytical method for the simultaneous screening of three antiviral agents (nevirapine, zidovudine, lamivudine), four antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin) and one reference compound (carbamazepine) in human urine was developed. Separation was achieved with a Kinetex XB-C18 (75 × 4.6 mm, 2.6 μm) column after the extraction of pharmaceuticals from urine with SPE. Gradient elution with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 10 mM KH2 PO4 (pH 2.5), and diode array detection with monitoring at 210 and 264 nm was applied. The developed method was validated in terms of selectivity, linearity, stability and sensitivity. Repeatability (n = 3) and between-day precision (n = 3) revealed RSD <5%. The detection limits were estimated as 0.02-0.54 g/L (depending on compound). The method was validated for human urine and successfully applied to the simultaneous quantification of selected compounds. Strata-X cartridges provided good recoveries ranging from 81 to 109%. The limits of detection for urine varied between 0.04 and 1.61 g/L. The method is suitable for the fast determination of selected pharmaceuticals from source-separated urine samples for further environmental risk assessment and degradation potential evaluation. It provides a way to enhance safe nutrient recycling from wastewater streams and promotes the safe use of urine as fertiliser. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Identification of a novel compound with antiviral activity against influenza A virus depending on PA subunit of viral RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazunori; Koyama, Hiroko; Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ueda, Atsushi; Sasaki, Yutaka; Kanesashi, Shin-Nosuke; Ueno, Ryuki; Nakamura, Hironori K; Kuwata, Kazuo; Shimizu, Kazufumi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Aida, Yoko

    2012-08-01

    Influenza viruses have developed resistance to current drugs, creating a need for new antiviral targets and new drugs to treat influenza virus infections. In this study, computational and experimental screening of an extensive compound library identified THC19, which was able to suppress influenza virus replication. This compound had no cytotoxic effects and did not disrupt cell cycle progression or induce apoptosis in MDCK cells as confirmed by WST-1 assays, flow cytometry analysis, and caspase-3 assays. Time-of-addition experiments showed that THC19 acts at a relatively early stage of the viral lifecycle. Subsequent mini-genome assays revealed that THC19 inhibited viral genome replication and/or transcription, suggesting that it interferes with one or more of the viral components that form the ribonucleoprotein complexes, namely polymerase basic 2 (PB2), polymerase basic 1 (PB1), polymerase acidic (PA), nucleoprotein (NP) and viral RNA. Finally, mini-genome assays where PB2, PB1, PA or NP from A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus were replaced with those from A/Udorn/307/1972 (H3N2) virus effectively demonstrated that THC19 inhibited viral multiplication in a manner dependent upon the PA subunit. Taken together, these results suggest that influenza virus PA protein is a potential target for, and may aid the development of, novel compounds that inhibit influenza A virus replication. Copyright © 2012 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Strategies in the designing of prodrugs, taking into account the antiviral and anticancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Lesniewska-Kowiel, Monika A; Muszalska, Izabela

    2017-03-31

    Prodrugs are a wide group of substances of low or no pharmacological activity. The search for prodrugs is aimed at obtaining drugs characterized by better pharmacokinetic properties, pharmaceutical availability and selective activity of the active substance. Prodrug strategies involve chemical modifications and syntheses of new structures as well as the establishment of systems that deliver active substances for therapeutic aims that is prodrug-based treatments. The paper describes decisive factors in prodrug designing, such as enzymes participating in their activation, concepts of chemical modifications in the group of antiviral drugs and new anticancer treatments based on prodrugs (ADEPT, GDEPT, LEAPT). Prodrugs are seen as a possibility to design medicines which are selective for their therapeutic aim, for example a tumorous cell or a microorganism. Such an approach is possible thanks to the knowledge on: pathogenesis of diseases at molecular level, metabolism of healthy and affected cells as well as metabolism of microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, protozoa, etc.). Many drugs which have been used for years are still studied in relation to their metabolism and their molecular mechanism of operation, providing new knowledge on active substances. Many of them meet the criteria of being a prodrug. The paper indicates methods of discovering new structures or modifications of known structures and their synthesis as well as new therapeutic strategies using prodrugs, which are expected to be successful and to broaden the knowledge on what is happening to the drug in the body, in addition to providing a molecular explanation of xenobiotics activity.

  19. Biosynthesis of an antiviral compound using a stabilized phosphopentomutase by multipoint covalent immobilization.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Cintia W; De Benedetti, Eliana C; Gallego, Fernando López; Pessela, Benevides C; Guisán, José M; Trelles, Jorge A

    2017-03-24

    Ribavirin is a synthetic guanosine analogue with a broad-spectrum of antiviral activity. It is clinically effective against several viruses, such as respiratory syncytial virus, several hemorrhagic fever viruses and HCV when combined with pegylated interferon-α. Phosphopentomutase (PPM) catalyzes the transfer of intramolecular phosphate (from C1 to C5) on ribose, and is involved in pentose phosphate pathway and in purine metabolism. Reactions catalyzed by this enzyme are useful for nucleoside analogues production. However, out of its natural environment PPM is unstable and its stability is affected by parameters such as pH and temperature. Therefore, to irreversibly immobilize this enzyme, it needs to be stabilized. In this work, PPM from Escherichia coli ATCC 4157 was overexpressed, purified, stabilized at alkaline pH and immobilized on several supports. The activity of different additives as stabilizing agents was evaluated, and the best result was found using 10% (v/v) glycerol. Under this condition, PPM maintained 86% of its initial activity at pH 10 after 18h incubation, which allowed further covalent immobilization of this enzyme on glyoxyl-agarose with a high yield. This is the first time that PPM has been immobilized by multipoint covalent attachment on glyoxyl support, this derivative being able to biosynthesize ribavirin from α-D-ribose-5-phosphate.

  20. Rat and human STINGs profile similarly towards anticancer/antiviral compounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng; Han, Min-Jie; Tao, Jianli; Ye, Zhao-Yang; Du, Xiao-Xia; Deng, Ming-Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Lan-Fen; Jiang, Zheng-Fan; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs) and antitumor/antiviral agents (DMXAA and CMA) trigger STING-dependent innate immunity activation. Accumulative evidences have showed that DMXAA and CMA selectively activate mouse, but not human STING signaling. The mechanism underlying this species selectivity remains poorly understood. In this report, we have shown that human and rat STINGs display more similar signaling profiles toward DMXAA and CMA than that of human and mouse STINGs, suggesting that rat is more suitable for preclinical testing of STING-targeted drugs. We have also determined the crystal structures of both apo rat STING and its complex with cyclic GMP-AMP with 2′5′ and 3′5′ phosphodiester linkage (2′3′-cGAMP), a human endogenous CDN. Structure-guided biochemical analysis also revealed the functional importance of the connecting loop (A140-N152) between membrane and cytosolic domains in STING activation. Taken together, these findings reveal that rat STING is more closely related to human STING in terms of substrate preference, serving as a foundation for the development of STING-targeted drugs. PMID:26669264

  1. Zika virus: a race in search for antivirals.

    PubMed

    Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2017-03-27

    Zika virus (ZIKV), a flavivirus transmitted by mosquitoes, was an almost neglected pathogen until its introduction in the Americas in 2015, and its subsequent explosive spread throughout the continent, where it has infected millions of people. The virus has caused social and sanitary alarm, mainly due to its association with severe neurological disorders (Guillain-Barré syndrome, and microcephaly in fetus and newborns). Nowadays, no specific antiviral therapy is available against ZIKV. However, during the past months, a great effort has been made in search for antiviral candidates by using different approaches and methodologies, from testing specific compounds with known antiviral activity to screenings of libraries with hundreds of bioactive molecules. The identified antiviral candidates include drugs targeting viral components, as well as cellular ones. Here, an updated review of what has been done in this line is presented.

  2. USE OF QSPRS IN IMPROVING CARBON ADSORPTION MODELING OF EPA CONTAMINANT CANDIDATE COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activated carbon adsorption of EPA contaminant candidate list (CCL) compounds is under investigation as a treatment technology for contaminated drinking water. Historically, EPA, in support of drinking water regulations, has used a number of techniques to calculate field-scale c...

  3. USE OF QSPRS IN IMPROVING CARBON ADSORPTION MODELING OF EPA CONTAMINANT CANDIDATE COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activated carbon adsorption of EPA contaminant candidate list (CCL) compounds is under investigation as a treatment technology for contaminated drinking water. Historically, EPA, in support of drinking water regulations, has used a number of techniques to calculate field-scale c...

  4. Antiviral Activity of a Novel Compound CW-33 against Japanese Encephalitis Virus through Inhibiting Intracellular Calcium Overload

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Su-Hua; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Chen, Chao-Jung; Liu, Yu-Ching; Wang, Ching-Ying; Ping, Chia-Fong; Lin, Yu-Fong; Huang, An-Cheng; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, has five genotypes (I, II, III, IV, and V). JEV genotype I circulates widely in some Asian countries. However, current JEV vaccines based on genotype III strains show low neutralizing capacities against genotype I variants. In addition, JE has no specific treatment, except a few supportive treatments. Compound CW-33, an intermediate synthesized derivative of furoquinolines, was investigated for its antiviral activities against JEV in this study. CW-33 exhibited the less cytotoxicity to Syrian baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) and human medulloblastoma (TE761) cells. CW-33 dose-dependently reduced the cytopathic effect and apoptosis of JEV-infected cells. Supernatant virus yield assay pinpointed CW-33 as having potential anti-JEV activity with IC50 values ranging from 12.7 to 38.5 μM. Time-of-addition assay with CW-33 indicated that simultaneous and post-treatment had no plaque reduction activity, but continuous and simultaneous treatments proved to have highly effective antiviral activity, with IC50 values of 32.7 and 48.5 μM, respectively. CW-33 significantly moderated JEV-triggered Ca2+ overload, which correlated with the recovery of mitochondria membrane potential as well as the activation of Akt/mTOR and Jak/STAT1 signals in treated infected cells. Phosphopeptide profiling by LC-MS/MS revealed that CW-33 upregulated proteins from the enzyme modulator category, such as protein phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2), Rho GTPase-activating protein 35, ARF GTPase-activating protein GIT2, and putative 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 2. These enzyme modulators identified were associated with the activation of Akt/mTOR and Jak/STAT1 signals. Meanwhile, I-2 treatment substantially inhibited the apoptosis of JEV-infected cells. The results demonstrated that CW-33 exhibited a significant potential in the development of anti-JEV agents. PMID:27563890

  5. Efficacy of a novel antiviral compound to inhibit replication of multiple pestivirus species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pestiviruses are economically important pathogens of livestock. An aromatic cationic compound (DB772) has previously been shown to inhibit bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 1 in vitro at concentrations lacking cytotoxic side effects. The aim of this study was to determine the scope of anti...

  6. Isolation and identification of compounds from Kalanchoe pinnata having human alphaherpesvirus and vaccinia virus antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Cryer, Matthew; Lane, Kyle; Greer, Mary; Cates, Rex; Burt, Scott; Andrus, Merritt; Zou, Jiping; Rogers, Paul; Hansen, Marc D H; Burgado, Jillybeth; Panayampalli, Subbian Satheshkumar; Day, Craig W; Smee, Donald F; Johnson, Brent F

    2017-12-01

    Kalanchoe pinnata (Lam.) Pers. (Crassulaceae) is a succulent plant that is known for its traditional antivirus and antibacterial usage. This work examines two compounds identified from the K. pinnata plant for their antivirus activity against human alphaherpesvirus (HHV) 1 and 2 and vaccinia virus (VACV). Compounds KPB-100 and KPB-200 were isolated using HPLC and were identified using NMR and MS. Both compounds were tested in plaque reduction assay of HHV-2 wild type (WT) and VACV. Both compounds were then tested in virus spread inhibition and virus yield reduction (VYR) assays of VACV. KPB-100 was further tested in viral cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibition assay of HHV-2 TK-mutant and VYR assay of HHV-1 WT. KPB-100 and KPB-200 inhibited HHV-2 at IC50 values of 2.5 and 2.9 μg/mL, respectively, and VACV at IC50 values of 3.1 and 7.4 μg/mL, respectively, in plaque reduction assays. In virus spread inhibition assay of VACV KPB-100 and KPB-200 yielded IC50 values of 1.63 and 13.2 μg/mL, respectively, and KPB-100 showed a nearly 2-log reduction in virus in VYR assay of VACV at 20 μg/mL. Finally, KPB-100 inhibited HHV-2 TK- at an IC50 value of 4.5 μg/mL in CPE inhibition assay and HHV-1 at an IC90 of 3.0 μg/mL in VYR assay. Both compounds are promising targets for synthetic optimization and in vivo study. KPB-100 in particular showed strong inhibition of all viruses tested.

  7. Development and Validation of a High Throughput Screen for Compounds with Antiviral Activity Against Encephalitic Alphaviruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-15

    determined the compounds as cytotoxic if the viability is less than 85% in the screening. 1. Single dose study A. Small library screening We have...run on two independent days and the results are shown below (Table 8). The assay metrics meet the requirement for a successful HTS assay for a library ... screening . The assay performance was ascertained by testing plate-to-plate variation (data not shown). Table 8. Assay performance of the assay

  8. Antivirals against animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Villa, T G; Feijoo-Siota, L; Rama, J L R; Ageitos, J M

    2016-09-30

    Antivirals are compounds used since the 1960s that can interfere with viral development. Some of these antivirals can be isolated from a variety of sources, such as animals, plants, bacteria or fungi, while others must be obtained by chemical synthesis, either designed or random. Antivirals display a variety of mechanisms of action, and while some of them enhance the animal immune system, others block a specific enzyme or a particular step in the viral replication cycle. As viruses are mandatory intracellular parasites that use the host's cellular machinery to survive and multiply, it is essential that antivirals do not harm the host. In addition, viruses are continually developing new antiviral resistant strains, due to their high mutation rate, which makes it mandatory to continually search for, or develop, new antiviral compounds. This review describes natural and synthetic antivirals in chronological order, with an emphasis on natural compounds, even when their mechanisms of action are not completely understood, that could serve as the basis for future development of novel and/or complementary antiviral treatments.

  9. Thiosemicarbazones and Phthalyl-Thiazoles compounds exert antiviral activity against yellow fever virus and Saint Louis encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Pacca, Carolina Colombelli; Marques, Rafael Elias; Espindola, José Wanderlan P; Filho, Gevânio B O Oliveira; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Nogueira, Mauricio L

    2017-03-01

    Arboviruses, arthropod-borneviruses, are frequency associated to human outbreak and represent a serious health problem. The genus Flavivirus, such as Yellow Fever Virus (YFV) and Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus (SLEV), are important pathogens with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. In Brazil, YFV is maintained in sylvatic cycle, but many cases are notified annually, despite the efficiency of vaccine. SLEV causes an acute encephalitis and is widely distributed in the Americas. There is no specific antiviral drugs for these viruses, only supporting treatment that can alleviate symptoms and prevent complications. Here, we evaluated the potential anti-YFV and SLEV activity of a series of thiosemicarbazones and phthalyl-thiazoles. Plaque reduction assay, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and cellular viability were used to test the compounds in vitro. Treated cells showed efficient inhibition of the viral replication at concentrations that presented minimal toxicity to cells. The assays showed that phthalyl-thiazole and phenoxymethyl-thiosemicarbazone reduced 60% of YFV replication and 75% of SLEV replication.

  10. Exploring the in vitro potential of celecoxib derivative AR-12 as an effective antiviral compound against four dengue virus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Hassandarvish, Pouya; Oo, Adrian; Jokar, Amin; Zukiwski, Alexander; Proniuk, Stefan; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2017-09-01

    With no clinically effective antiviral options available, infections and fatalities associated with dengue virus (DENV) have reached an alarming level worldwide. We have designed this study to evaluate the efficacy of the celecoxib derivative AR-12 against the in vitro replication of all four DENV serotypes. Each 24-well plate of Vero cells infected with all four DENV serotypes, singly, was subjected to treatments with various doses of AR-12. Following 48 h of incubation, inhibitory efficacies of AR-12 against the different DENV serotypes were evaluated by conducting a virus yield reduction assay whereby DENV RNA copy numbers present in the collected supernatant were quantified using qRT-PCR. The underlying mechanism(s) possibly involved in the compound's inhibitory activities were then investigated by performing molecular docking on several potential target human and DENV protein domains. The qRT-PCR data demonstrated that DENV-3 was most potently inhibited by AR-12, followed by DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-4. Our molecular docking findings suggested that AR-12 possibly exerted its inhibitory effects by interfering with the chaperone activities of heat shock proteins. These results serve as vital information for the design of future studies involving in vitro mechanistic studies and animal models, aiming to decipher the potential of AR-12 as a potential therapeutic option for DENV infection.

  11. Natural products from plants as drug candidates and lead compounds against leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Salem, Manar M; Werbovetz, Karl A

    2006-01-01

    Millions of people in the developing world are affected by diseases caused by the kinetoplastid parasites: the leishmaniases, African trypanosomiasis, and Chagas disease. In many cases the drugs employed for treatment are toxic, marginally effective, given by injection, and/or compromised by the development of resistance. Since safe, effective, and affordable chemotherapeutic agents for leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are clearly needed, the identification of new antikinetoplastid drug candidates should be an urgent priority. Numerous plant-derived natural products from different structural classes have been investigated as antileishmanial and antitrypanosomal candidates, including various alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, and quinonoids. This review outlines the antikinetoplastid activities of plant-derived natural products reported in the literature and also provides an overview of mechanistic studies that have been conducted with these compounds. Given the activities of these agents and their diverse range of effects on parasite biology, natural products are a potentially rich source of drug candidates and leads against leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis.

  12. Historical perspectives in the development of antiviral agents against poxviruses.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-06-01

    The poxvirus vaccinia virus (VV) served as the model virus for which the first antivirals, the thiosemicarbazones, were identified. This dates back to 1950; and, although there is at present no single antiviral drug specifically licensed for the chemotherapy or -prophylaxis of poxvirus infections, numerous candidate compounds have been described over the past 50 years. These compounds include interferon and inducers thereof (i.e., polyacrylic acid), 5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridines (i.e., idoxuridine), IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors, acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (such as cidofovir) and alkoxyalkyl prodrugs thereof (such as CMX001), viral egress inhibitors (such as tecovirimat), and cellular kinase inhibitors (such as imatinib).

  13. In vivo screening of candidate pretreatment compounds against cyanide using mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, R.C.; Olson, C.T.; Menton, R.G.; Hobson, D.W.; Moore, D.M.

    1993-05-13

    An in vivo screening procedure was established at Battelle's Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) to evaluate the efficacy of candidate pretreatment compounds in mice challenged with the blood agent, sodium cyanide (NaCN). Male albino mice of ICR outbred stock weighing between 22.5 and 27.5 g are challenged by intramuscular (i.m.) injection, at a volume of 0.5 mL/kg, of a dose of NaCN twice the LD50 of untreated mice as determined on that day of testing. Candidate drugs are tested at fractions of their LD50 or their limit of solubility in the most optimum vehicle and given intraperitoneally (i.p.) to separate groups of mice at either 60 or 15 min prior to NaCN challenge. Sodium thiosulfate (1000 mg/kg)/sodium nitrite (100 mg/kg) controls are injected i.p. only at 60 min prior to challenge. A test compound is deemed effective if, at any of three concentrations tested, or at either pretreatment time, it is statistically more efficacious in preventing lethality than is a negative control substance (candidate compound vehicle).

  14. Synthesis and antiviral activity of a series of novel N-phenylbenzamide and N-phenylacetophenone compounds as anti-HCV and anti-EV71 agents.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi; Wang, Huiqiang; Li, Yanping; Peng, Zonggen; Li, Yuhuan; Li, Zhuorong

    2015-05-01

    A series of novel N-phenylbenzamide and N-phenylacetophenone compounds were synthesized and evaluated for their antiviral activity against HCV and EV71 (strain SZ-98). The biological results showed that three compounds (23, 25 and 41) exhibited considerable anti-HCV activity (IC50=0.57-7.12 μmol/L) and several compounds (23, 28, 29, 30, 31 and 42) displayed potent activity against EV71 with the IC50 values lower than 5.00 μmol/L. The potency of compound 23 (IC50=0.57 μmol/L) was superior to that of reported compounds IMB-1f (IC50=1.90 μmol/L) and IMB-1g (IC50=1.00 μmol/L) as anti-HCV agents, and compound 29 possessed the highest anti-EV71 activity, comparable to the comparator drug pirodavir. The efficacy in vivo and antiviral mechanism of these compounds warrant further investigations.

  15. Antiviral Potential of a Novel Compound CW-33 against Enterovirus A71 via Inhibition of Viral 2A Protease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Ying; Huang, An-Cheng; Hour, Mann-Jen; Huang, Su-Hua; Kung, Szu-Hao; Chen, Chao-Hsien; Chen, I-Chieh; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) in the Picornaviridae family causes hand-foot-and-mouth disease, aseptic meningitis, severe central nervous system disease, even death. EV-A71 2A protease cleaves Type I interferon (IFN)-α/β receptor 1 (IFNAR1) to block IFN-induced Jak/STAT signaling. This study investigated anti-EV-A7l activity and synergistic mechanism(s) of a novel furoquinoline alkaloid compound CW-33 alone and in combination with IFN-β. Anti-EV-A71 activities of CW-33 alone and in combination with IFN-β were evaluated by inhibitory assays of virus-induced apoptosis, plaque formation, and virus yield. CW-33 showed antiviral activities with an IC50 of near 200 μM in EV-A71 plaque reduction and virus yield inhibition assays. While, anti-EV-A71 activities of CW-33 combined with 100 U/mL IFN-β exhibited a synergistic potency with an IC50 of approximate 1 μM in plaque reduction and virus yield inhibition assays. Molecular docking revealed CW-33 binding to EV-A71 2A protease active sites, correlating with an inhibitory effect of CW33 on in vitro enzymatic activity of recombinant 2A protease (IC50 = 53.1 μM). Western blotting demonstrated CW-33 specifically inhibiting 2A protease-mediated cleavage of IFNAR1. CW-33 also recovered Type I IFN-induced Tyk2 and STAT1 phosphorylation as well as 2′,5′-OAS upregulation in EV-A71 infected cells. The results demonstrated CW-33 inhibiting viral 2A protease activity to reduce Type I IFN antagonism of EV-A71. Therefore, CW-33 combined with a low-dose of Type I IFN could be applied in developing alternative approaches to treat EV-A71 infection. PMID:26090728

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment in Hepatitis C-Infected Liver Transplant Candidates With Compensated Cirrhosis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salazar, James; Saxena, Varun; Kahn, James G; Roberts, John P; Mehta, Neil; Volk, Michael; Lai, Jennifer C

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)(+) donors represent an effective strategy to increase liver donor availability to HCV-infected recipients. However, many HCV(+) transplant candidates are now receiving treatment with direct-acting anti-viral (DAA) agents that lower the risk of posttransplant HCV recurrence but could make the patient ineligible for HCV(+) livers. We compared pretransplant DAA treatment versus deferred DAA treatment using a cost-effectiveness decision analysis model to estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (cost per quality-adjusted life year gained) from the societal perspective across a range of HCV(+) liver availability rates. For practical considerations, the population modeled was restricted to well-compensated HCV(+) cirrhotics listed for liver transplantation with hepatocellular carcinoma MELD exception points. Under base case conditions, the deferred DAA treatment strategy was found to be the "dominant" strategy. That is, it provided superior health outcomes at cost savings compared to the pretransplant DAA treatment strategy. The pretransplant DAA treatment strategy trended towards cost-effectiveness as HCV(+) donor liver availability declined. However, only in 1 scenario that was highly optimized for favorable outcomes in the pretransplant DAA treatment arm (low availability of HCV(+) organs, low cost of DAA treatment, high cost of HCV recurrence) was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio associated with HCV DAA treatment before transplant less than US $150 000/quality-adjusted life-year gained. Deferring HCV treatment until after liver transplant and maintaining access to the expanded pool of HCV(+) donors appears to be the most cost-effective strategy for well-compensated HCV-infected cirrhotics listed for liver transplantation with hepatocellular carcinoma, even in geographic areas of relatively low HCV(+) donor availability.

  17. Candidate pheromone receptors provide the basis for the response of distinct antennal neurons to pheromonal compounds.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Gohl, Thomas; Bouché, Elisabeth; Breer, Heinz; Krieger, Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    Males of the moth species Heliothis virescens are able to detect the female-released pheromone with remarkable sensitivity and specificity, distinguishing between highly related pheromonal compounds. In the past, electrophysiological studies succeeded in assigning sensory hairs to identified compounds revealing three functional types of long sensilla trichodea housing neurons specifically responding to distinct semiochemicals. The specific responsiveness implies that the sensory neurons express different receptor types tuned to pheromone components. In this study we demonstrate that heterologously expressed candidate pheromone receptors from Heliothis responded to several pheromonal compounds, including the major sex-pheromone component Z-11-hexadecenal indicating a limited specificity of each receptor type. Nonetheless, based on functional analysis and in situ hybridization studies the analysed receptor types could tentatively be assigned to types of long sensilla trichodea, containing the pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) HvirPBP1 and HvirPBP2 in the sensillum lymph. Substituting organic solvent with PBPs to solubilize the hydrophobic pheromone compounds in functional assays revealed an increase in sensitivity and especially specificity. It was found that in the presence of HvirPBP2, cells expressing the receptor type HR13 specifically responded to the main component of the sex pheromone blend only. The data provide further evidence that a combination of a distinct receptor type and binding protein underlie the specific response observed in the detection of a pheromone component in vivo.

  18. Identification of drug candidates and repurposing opportunities through compound-target interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Cichonska, Anna; Rousu, Juho; Aittokallio, Tero

    2015-12-01

    System-wide identification of both on- and off-targets of chemical probes provides improved understanding of their therapeutic potential and possible adverse effects, thereby accelerating and de-risking drug discovery process. Given the high costs of experimental profiling of the complete target space of drug-like compounds, computational models offer systematic means for guiding these mapping efforts. These models suggest the most potent interactions for further experimental or pre-clinical evaluation both in cell line models and in patient-derived material. The authors focus here on network-based machine learning models and their use in the prediction of novel compound-target interactions both in target-based and phenotype-based drug discovery applications. While currently being used mainly in complementing the experimentally mapped compound-target networks for drug repurposing applications, such as extending the target space of already approved drugs, these network pharmacology approaches may also suggest completely unexpected and novel investigational probes for drug development. Although the studies reviewed here have already demonstrated that network-centric modeling approaches have the potential to identify candidate compounds and selective targets in disease networks, many challenges still remain. In particular, these challenges include how to incorporate the cellular context and genetic background into the disease networks to enable more stratified and selective target predictions, as well as how to make the prediction models more realistic for the practical drug discovery and therapeutic applications.

  19. Broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun-Da; Meng, Wen; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Wang, Hwa-Chain R.

    2015-01-01

    Development of highly effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the major objective shared by the fields of virology and pharmaceutics. Antiviral drug development has focused on targeting viral entry and replication, as well as modulating cellular defense system. High throughput screening of molecules, genetic engineering of peptides, and functional screening of agents have identified promising candidates for development of optimal broad-spectrum antiviral agents to intervene in viral infection and control viral epidemics. This review discusses current knowledge, prospective applications, opportunities, and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:26052325

  20. Environmentally Friendly Procedure Based on Supercritical Fluid Chromatography and Tandem Mass Spectrometry Molecular Networking for the Discovery of Potent Antiviral Compounds from Euphorbia semiperfoliata.

    PubMed

    Nothias, Louis-Félix; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Cachet, Xavier; De La Torre, Erick; Laboureur, Laurent; Gallard, Jean-François; Retailleau, Pascal; Brunelle, Alain; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Costa, Jean; Bedoya, Luis M; Roussi, Fanny; Leyssen, Pieter; Alcami, José; Paolini, Julien; Litaudon, Marc; Touboul, David

    2017-09-19

    A supercritical fluid chromatography-based targeted purification procedure using tandem mass spectrometry and molecular networking was developed to analyze, annotate, and isolate secondary metabolites from complex plant extract mixture. This approach was applied for the targeted isolation of new antiviral diterpene esters from Euphorbia semiperfoliata whole plant extract. The analysis of bioactive fractions revealed that unknown diterpene esters, including jatrophane esters and phorbol esters, were present in the samples. The purification procedure using semipreparative supercritical fluid chromatography led to the isolation and identification of two new jatrophane esters (13 and 14) and one known (15) and three new 4-deoxyphorbol esters (16-18). The structure and absolute configuration of compound 16 were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. This compound was found to display antiviral activity against Chikungunya virus (EC50 = 0.45 μM), while compound 15 proved to be a potent and selective inhibitor of HIV-1 replication in a recombinant virus assay (EC50 = 13 nM). This study showed that a supercritical fluid chromatography-based protocol and molecular networking can facilitate and accelerate the discovery of bioactive small molecules by targeting molecules of interest, while minimizing the use of toxic solvents.

  1. Evaluation of anti-Zika virus activities of broad-spectrum antivirals and NIH clinical collection compounds using a cell-based, high-throughput screen assay.

    PubMed

    Adcock, Robert S; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Golden, Jennifer E; Chung, Dong-Hoon

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have clearly underscored the association between Zika virus (ZIKV) and severe neurological diseases such as microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Given the historical complacency surrounding this virus, however, no significant antiviral screenings have been performed to specifically target ZIKV. As a result, there is an urgent need for a validated screening method and strategy that is focused on highlighting potential anti-ZIKV inhibitors that can be further advanced via rigorous validation and optimization. To address this critical gap, we sought to test whether a cell-based assay that measures protection from the ZIKV-induced cytopathic effect could serve as a high-throughput screen assay for discovering novel anti-ZIKV inhibitors. Employing this approach, we tested the anti-ZIKV activity of previously known broad-spectrum antiviral compounds and discovered several compounds (e.g., NITD008, SaliPhe, and CID 91632869) with anti-ZIKV activity. Interestingly, while GTP synthesis inhibitors (e.g., ribavirin or mycophenolic acid) were too toxic or showed no anti-ZIKV activity (EC50 > 50 μM), ZIKV was highly susceptible to pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors (e.g., brequinar) in the assay. We amended the assay into a high-throughput screen (HTS)-compatible 384-well format and then screened the NIH Clinical Compound Collection library, which includes a total of 727 compounds organized, using an 8-point dose response format with two Zika virus strains (MR766 and PRVABC59, a recent human isolate). The screen discovered 6-azauridine and finasteride as potential anti-ZIKV inhibitors with EC50 levels of 3.18 and 9.85 μM for MR766, respectively. We further characterized the anti-ZIKV activity of 6-azauridine and several pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors such as brequinar in various secondary assays including an antiviral spectrum test within flaviviruses and alphaviruses, Western blot (protein), real-time PCR (RNA), and plaque reduction assays (progeny

  2. Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Hans

    1977-01-01

    The current status of antiviral therapy is reviewed, including discussion of older approaches together with more recently developed chemotherapy. Following the introduction dealing with pathophysiological aspects of virus disease, the different approaches to antiviral therapy are presented. The reasons for the slow progress in antiviral therapy are discussed. These include: 1. the necessity of intracellular penetration of drugs acting on viral replication; 2. the severe toxicity of most antiviral drugs; 3. the narrow antiviral spectrum of most of these agents; 4. the difficulty of making a rapid etiological diagnosis in view of the necessity of starting (specific?) treatment early in the course of the disease; 5. the difficult evaluation of beneficial as compared with deleterious effects of antiviral therapy. After a detailed review of clinically tested substances, including immunoglobulins, synthetic antiviral drugs (amantadine, nucleoside analogs, thiosemicarbazones and photodynamic dyes) and interferon, a guide concerning indications and application of specific antiviral therapy is presented. Although at present there are few indications, clinicians should be aware of the (present and future) possibilities of antiviral therapy. PMID:341538

  3. Antiviral activity of the Lippia graveolens (Mexican oregano) essential oil and its main compound carvacrol against human and animal viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pilau, Marciele Ribas; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Weiblen, Rudi; Arenhart, Sandra; Cueto, Ana Paula; Lovato, Luciane Teresinha

    2011-01-01

    Mexican oregano (Lippia graveolens) is a plant found in Mexico and Central America that is traditionally used as a medicinal herb. In the present study, we investigated the antiviral activity of the essential oil of Mexican oregano and its major component, carvacrol, against different human and animal viruses. The MTT test (3–4,5-dimethythiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) was conducted to determine the selectivity index (SI) of the essential oil, which was equal to 13.1, 7.4, 10.8, 9.7, and 7.2 for acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 (ACVR-HHV-1), acyclovir-sensitive HHV-1, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV), bovine herpesvirus type 2 (BoHV-2), and bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), respectively. The human rotavirus (RV) and BoHV-1 and 5 were not inhibited by the essential oil. Carvacrol alone exhibited high antiviral activity against RV with a SI of 33, but it was less efficient than the oil for the other viruses. Thus, Mexican oregano oil and its main component, carvacrol, are able to inhibit different human and animal viruses in vitro. Specifically, the antiviral effects of Mexican oregano oil on ACVR-HHV-1 and HRSV and of carvacrol on RV justify more detailed studies. PMID:24031796

  4. Antiviral activity of the Lippia graveolens (Mexican oregano) essential oil and its main compound carvacrol against human and animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Pilau, Marciele Ribas; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Weiblen, Rudi; Arenhart, Sandra; Cueto, Ana Paula; Lovato, Luciane Teresinha

    2011-10-01

    Mexican oregano (Lippia graveolens) is a plant found in Mexico and Central America that is traditionally used as a medicinal herb. In the present study, we investigated the antiviral activity of the essential oil of Mexican oregano and its major component, carvacrol, against different human and animal viruses. The MTT test (3-4,5-dimethythiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) was conducted to determine the selectivity index (SI) of the essential oil, which was equal to 13.1, 7.4, 10.8, 9.7, and 7.2 for acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 (ACVR-HHV-1), acyclovir-sensitive HHV-1, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV), bovine herpesvirus type 2 (BoHV-2), and bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), respectively. The human rotavirus (RV) and BoHV-1 and 5 were not inhibited by the essential oil. Carvacrol alone exhibited high antiviral activity against RV with a SI of 33, but it was less efficient than the oil for the other viruses. Thus, Mexican oregano oil and its main component, carvacrol, are able to inhibit different human and animal viruses in vitro. Specifically, the antiviral effects of Mexican oregano oil on ACVR-HHV-1 and HRSV and of carvacrol on RV justify more detailed studies.

  5. The yjdF riboswitch candidate regulates gene expression by binding diverse azaaromatic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sanshu; Hwang, Xue Ying; Stav, Shira; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2016-01-01

    The yjdF motif RNA is an orphan riboswitch candidate that almost exclusively associates with the yjdF protein-coding gene in many bacteria. The function of the YjdF protein is unknown, which has made speculation regarding the natural ligand for this putative riboswitch unusually challenging. By using a structure-probing assay for ligand binding, we found that a surprisingly broad diversity of nitrogen-containing aromatic heterocycles, or “azaaromatics,” trigger near-identical changes in the structures adopted by representative yjdF motif RNAs. Regions of the RNA that undergo ligand-induced structural modulation reside primarily in portions of the putative aptamer region that are highly conserved in nucleotide sequence, as is typical for riboswitches. Some azaaromatic molecules are bound by the RNA with nanomolar dissociation constants, and a subset of these ligands activate riboswitch-mediated gene expression in cells. Furthermore, genetic elements most commonly adjacent to the yjdF motif RNA or to the yjdF protein-coding region are homologous to protein regulators implicated in mitigating the toxic effects of diverse phenolic acids or polycyclic compounds. Although the precise type of natural ligand sensed by yjdF motif RNAs remains unknown, our findings suggest that this riboswitch class might serve as part of a genetic response system to toxic or signaling compounds with chemical structures similar to azaaromatics. PMID:26843526

  6. Influenza A virus encoding secreted Gaussia luciferase as useful tool to analyze viral replication and its inhibition by antiviral compounds and cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Nadine; Wrensch, Florian; Gärtner, Sabine; Palanisamy, Navaneethan; Goedecke, Ulrike; Jäger, Nils; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Winkler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Reporter genes inserted into viral genomes enable the easy and rapid quantification of virus replication, which is instrumental to efficient in vitro screening of antiviral compounds or in vivo analysis of viral spread and pathogenesis. Based on a published design, we have generated several replication competent influenza A viruses carrying either fluorescent proteins or Gaussia luciferase. Reporter activity could be readily quantified in infected cultures, but the virus encoding Gaussia luciferase was more stable than viruses bearing fluorescent proteins and was therefore analyzed in detail. Quantification of Gaussia luciferase activity in the supernatants of infected culture allowed the convenient and highly sensitive detection of viral spread, and enzymatic activity correlated with the number of infectious particles released from infected cells. Furthermore, the Gaussia luciferase encoding virus allowed the sensitive quantification of the antiviral activity of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) zanamivir and the host cell interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) proteins 1-3, which are known to inhibit influenza virus entry. Finally, the virus was used to demonstrate that influenza A virus infection is sensitive to a modulator of endosomal cholesterol, in keeping with the concept that IFITMs inhibit viral entry by altering cholesterol levels in the endosomal membrane. In sum, we report the characterization of a novel influenza A reporter virus, which allows fast and sensitive detection of viral spread and its inhibition, and we show that influenza A virus entry is sensitive to alterations of endosomal cholesterol levels.

  7. Antiviral activities of photoactive perylenequinones.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J B; Imperial, V; Haugland, R P; Diwu, Z

    1997-02-01

    Nine perylenequinones (PQ), including some familiar naturally occurring pigments, were compared for their light-mediated antiviral efficacies. Calphostin C was the most active compound against the two target viruses, herpes simplex virus type 1 and Sindbis virus. Hypocrellins A and B were also very active. However, three cercosporin-like PQ were substantially less active in spite of their high quantum yields of singlet oxygen, whereas phleichrome, another efficient singlet oxygen producer, showed no detectable antiviral activity. One other PQ, which was a very weak singlet oxygen producer, also showed no antiviral activity. None of the active compounds showed significant antiviral activity in the dark. Thus, for some groups of PQ there was correlation between quantum yield of singlet oxygen (1O2) and antiviral efficacy, but there are evidently other structural features of PQ that influence activity.

  8. The broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 restricts chlamydial inclusion development and bacterial growth and localizes to host cell lipid droplets within treated cells.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Valiant, William G; Eriksen, Steven G; Hruby, Dennis E; Allen, Robert D; Rockey, Daniel D

    2014-07-01

    Novel broad-spectrum antimicrobials are a critical component of a strategy for combating antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In this study, we explored the activity of the broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 for activity against different intracellular bacteria and began a characterization of its mechanism of antimicrobial action. ST-669 inhibits the growth of three different species of chlamydia and the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii in Vero and HeLa cells but not in McCoy (murine) cells. The antichlamydial and anti-C. burnetii activity spectrum was consistent with those observed for tested viruses, suggesting a common mechanism of action. Cycloheximide treatment in the presence of ST-669 abrogated the inhibitory effect, demonstrating that eukaryotic protein synthesis is required for tested activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that different chlamydiae grow atypically in the presence of ST-669, in a manner that suggests the compound affects inclusion formation and organization. Microscopic analysis of cells treated with a fluorescent derivative of ST-669 demonstrated that the compound localized to host cell lipid droplets but not to other organelles or the host cytosol. These results demonstrate that ST-669 affects intracellular growth in a host-cell-dependent manner and interrupts proper development of chlamydial inclusions, possibly through a lipid droplet-dependent process.

  9. Identification of candidate anti-cancer molecular mechanisms of Compound Kushen Injection using functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhipeng; Aung, Thazin Nwe; Feng, Qianjin; Raison, Joy M.; Kortschak, Robert Daniel; Adelson, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Compound Kushen Injection (CKI) has been clinically used in China for over 15 years to treat various types of solid tumours. However, because such Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) preparations are complex mixtures of plant secondary metabolites, it is essential to explore their underlying molecular mechanisms in a systematic fashion. We have used the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line as an initial in vitro model to identify CKI induced changes in gene expression. Cells were treated with CKI for 24 and 48 hours at two concentrations (1 and 2 mg/mL total alkaloids), and the effect of CKI on cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured using XTT and Annexin V/Propidium Iodide staining assays respectively. Transcriptome data of cells treated with CKI or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) for 24 and 48 hours were subsequently acquired using high-throughput Illumina RNA-seq technology. In this report we show that CKI inhibited MCF-7 cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent fashion. We integrated and applied a series of transcriptome analysis methods, including gene differential expression analysis, pathway over-representation analysis, de novo identification of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) as well as co-expression network reconstruction, to identify candidate anti-cancer molecular mechanisms of CKI. Multiple pathways were perturbed and the cell cycle was identified as the potential primary target pathway of CKI in MCF-7 cells. CKI may also induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells via a p53 independent mechanism. In addition, we identified novel lncRNAs and showed that many of them might be expressed as a response to CKI treatment. PMID:27602759

  10. Antiviral Potential of Algae Polysaccharides Isolated from Marine Sources: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Azin; Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    From food to fertilizer, algal derived products are largely employed in assorted industries, including agricultural, biomedical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. Among different chemical compositions isolated from algae, polysaccharides are the most well-established compounds, which were subjected to a variety of studies due to extensive bioactivities. Over the past few decades, the promising results for antiviral potential of algae-derived polysaccharides have advocated them as inordinate candidates for pharmaceutical research. Numerous studies have isolated various algal polysaccharides possessing antiviral activities, including carrageenan, alginate, fucan, laminaran, and naviculan. In addition, different mechanisms of action have been reported for these polysaccharides, such as inhibiting the binding or internalization of virus into the host cells or suppressing DNA replication and protein synthesis. This review strives for compiling previous antiviral studies of algae-derived polysaccharides and their mechanism of action towards their development as natural antiviral agents for future investigations. PMID:26484353

  11. Antiviral Potential of Algae Polysaccharides Isolated from Marine Sources: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Azin; Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    From food to fertilizer, algal derived products are largely employed in assorted industries, including agricultural, biomedical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. Among different chemical compositions isolated from algae, polysaccharides are the most well-established compounds, which were subjected to a variety of studies due to extensive bioactivities. Over the past few decades, the promising results for antiviral potential of algae-derived polysaccharides have advocated them as inordinate candidates for pharmaceutical research. Numerous studies have isolated various algal polysaccharides possessing antiviral activities, including carrageenan, alginate, fucan, laminaran, and naviculan. In addition, different mechanisms of action have been reported for these polysaccharides, such as inhibiting the binding or internalization of virus into the host cells or suppressing DNA replication and protein synthesis. This review strives for compiling previous antiviral studies of algae-derived polysaccharides and their mechanism of action towards their development as natural antiviral agents for future investigations.

  12. Historical Perspectives in the Development of Antiviral Agents Against Poxviruses

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-01-01

    The poxvirus vaccinia virus (VV) served as the model virus for which the first antivirals, the thiosemicarbazones, were identified. This dates back to 1950; and, although there is at present no single antiviral drug specifically licensed for the chemotherapy or -prophylaxis of poxvirus infections, numerous candidate compounds have been described over the past 50 years. These compounds include interferon and inducers thereof (i.e., polyacrylic acid), 5-substituted 2’-deoxyuridines (i.e., idoxuridine), IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors, acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (such as cidofovir) and alkoxyalkyl prodrugs thereof (such as CMX001), viral egress inhibitors (such as tecovirimat), and cellular kinase inhibitors (such as imatinib). PMID:21994682

  13. The effect of blood on the antiviral activity of sodium hypochlorite, a phenolic, and a quaternary ammonium compound.

    PubMed

    Weber, D J; Barbee, S L; Sobsey, M D; Rutala, W A

    1999-12-01

    To assess the virucidal activity of three disinfectants (sodium hypochlorite, a phenolic, and a quaternary ammonium compound) in the presence and absence of blood. Disinfectants at varying concentrations (hypochlorite: 5,000, 500, or 50 ppm; phenolic: 1:10 or 1:128 dilution; quaternary ammonium compound: 1:10 or 1:128 dilution) were added to either saline or whole blood (final concentration, 80% or 20% blood) and mixed. Test organisms included an attenuated vaccine strain of poliovirus type 1 (prototype for relatively resistant hydrophilic viruses) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (prototype for relatively susceptible lipophilic viruses). Virus was added to create a viral-blood suspension. Viral survival was tested at room temperature at the following times: 0, 15 seconds, 30 seconds, 1 minute, 2 minutes, 5 minutes, and 10 minutes. A neutralizer stopped the reaction, and virus was assayed using a plaque technique. In the absence of blood, complete inactivation of HSV was achieved within 30 seconds with 5,000 (1:10 dilution of bleach) and 500 (1:100 dilution of bleach) ppm chlorine, 1:10 and 1:128 diluted phenolic (use dilution), and 1:10 and 1:128 diluted quaternary ammonium compound (use dilution). In the presence of 80% blood, only 5,000 ppm hypochlorite, 1:10 phenolic, and 1:10 or 1:128 quaternary ammonium compound were effective. In the absence of blood, complete inactivation of polio was achieved within 30 seconds by 5,000 and 500 ppm chlorine and 1:10 quaternary ammonium compound. In the presence of 80% blood, no solution tested was capable of completely inactivating poliovirus within 10 minutes. Our data suggest that, in the absence of visible blood, environmental surfaces may be disinfected with a diluted hypochlorite solution (1:10 or 1:100), a phenolic, or a quaternary ammonium compound. Based on our studies using HSV, which has similar susceptibilities to disinfectants as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), phenolics at their use dilution and 1

  14. Smallpox Antiviral Drug

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    structural model of the vaccinia virus (VV) I7L proteinase was developed at Transtech Pharma. A unique chemical library of ~ 51,000 compounds was...model of the I7L active site based on the Ulp1 cysteine proteinase (PDB: 1euv). Commercially available small molecule libraries that total...Smallpox, cysteine proteinase , antiviral drug, HTS-screening, rational drug design 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18

  15. Isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid of drug candidate VX-787: Effect of charge on antiviral potency and kinase activity of azaindole-based influenza PB2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Michael J; Bandarage, Upul K; Bennett, Hamilton; Byrn, Randal R; Davies, Ioana; Gu, Wenxin; Jacobs, Marc; Ledeboer, Mark W; Ledford, Brian; Leeman, Joshua R; Perola, Emanuele; Wang, Tiansheng; Bennani, Youssef; Clark, Michael P; Charifson, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    VX-787 is a first in class, orally bioavailable compound that offers unparalleled potential for the treatment of pandemic and seasonal influenza. As a part of our routine SAR exploration, carboxylic acid isosteres of VX-787 were prepared and tested against influenza A. It was found that the negative charge is important for maintaining potency and selectivity relative to kinase targets. Neutral carboxylic acid replacements generally resulted in compounds that were significantly less potent and less selective relative to the charged species.

  16. Exoproteome and Secretome Derived Broad Spectrum Novel Drug and Vaccine Candidates in Vibrio cholerae Targeted by Piper betel Derived Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Barh, Debmalya; Barve, Neha; Gupta, Krishnakant; Chandra, Sudha; Jain, Neha; Tiwari, Sandeep; Leon-Sicairos, Nidia; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian; Rodrigues dos Santos, Anderson; Hassan, Syed Shah; Almeida, Síntia; Thiago Jucá Ramos, Rommel; Augusto Carvalho de Abreu, Vinicius; Ribeiro Carneiro, Adriana; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Luiz de Paula Castro, Thiago; Miyoshi, Anderson; Silva, Artur; Kumar, Anil; Narayan Misra, Amarendra; Blum, Kenneth; Braverman, Eric R.; Azevedo, Vasco

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causal organism of the cholera epidemic, which is mostly prevalent in developing and underdeveloped countries. However, incidences of cholera in developed countries are also alarming. Because of the emergence of new drug-resistant strains, even though several generic drugs and vaccines have been developed over time, Vibrio infections remain a global health problem that appeals for the development of novel drugs and vaccines against the pathogen. Here, applying comparative proteomic and reverse vaccinology approaches to the exoproteome and secretome of the pathogen, we have identified three candidate targets (ompU, uppP and yajC) for most of the pathogenic Vibrio strains. Two targets (uppP and yajC) are novel to Vibrio, and two targets (uppP and ompU) can be used to develop both drugs and vaccines (dual targets) against broad spectrum Vibrio serotypes. Using our novel computational approach, we have identified three peptide vaccine candidates that have high potential to induce both B- and T-cell-mediated immune responses from our identified two dual targets. These two targets were modeled and subjected to virtual screening against natural compounds derived from Piper betel. Seven compounds were identified first time from Piper betel to be highly effective to render the function of these targets to identify them as emerging potential drugs against Vibrio. Our preliminary validation suggests that these identified peptide vaccines and betel compounds are highly effective against Vibrio cholerae. Currently we are exhaustively validating these targets, candidate peptide vaccines, and betel derived lead compounds against a number of Vibrio species. PMID:23382822

  17. Exoproteome and secretome derived broad spectrum novel drug and vaccine candidates in Vibrio cholerae targeted by Piper betel derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Barh, Debmalya; Barve, Neha; Gupta, Krishnakant; Chandra, Sudha; Jain, Neha; Tiwari, Sandeep; Leon-Sicairos, Nidia; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian; dos Santos, Anderson Rodrigues; Hassan, Syed Shah; Almeida, Síntia; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; de Abreu, Vinicius Augusto Carvalho; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Soares, Siomar de Castro; Castro, Thiago Luiz de Paula; Miyoshi, Anderson; Silva, Artur; Kumar, Anil; Misra, Amarendra Narayan; Blum, Kenneth; Braverman, Eric R; Azevedo, Vasco

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causal organism of the cholera epidemic, which is mostly prevalent in developing and underdeveloped countries. However, incidences of cholera in developed countries are also alarming. Because of the emergence of new drug-resistant strains, even though several generic drugs and vaccines have been developed over time, Vibrio infections remain a global health problem that appeals for the development of novel drugs and vaccines against the pathogen. Here, applying comparative proteomic and reverse vaccinology approaches to the exoproteome and secretome of the pathogen, we have identified three candidate targets (ompU, uppP and yajC) for most of the pathogenic Vibrio strains. Two targets (uppP and yajC) are novel to Vibrio, and two targets (uppP and ompU) can be used to develop both drugs and vaccines (dual targets) against broad spectrum Vibrio serotypes. Using our novel computational approach, we have identified three peptide vaccine candidates that have high potential to induce both B- and T-cell-mediated immune responses from our identified two dual targets. These two targets were modeled and subjected to virtual screening against natural compounds derived from Piper betel. Seven compounds were identified first time from Piper betel to be highly effective to render the function of these targets to identify them as emerging potential drugs against Vibrio. Our preliminary validation suggests that these identified peptide vaccines and betel compounds are highly effective against Vibrio cholerae. Currently we are exhaustively validating these targets, candidate peptide vaccines, and betel derived lead compounds against a number of Vibrio species.

  18. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES IN THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINANT CANDIDATE LIST (CCL) COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current (2nd) Contaminant Candidate List was completed in 2005 by the United States EPA as an update to the Safe Drinking Water Act. The list of 42 chemical contaminants spans a wide array of classes, from pesticides to pharmaceuticals to elements, all of which are anticipate...

  19. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES IN THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINANT CANDIDATE LIST (CCL) COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current (2nd) Contaminant Candidate List was completed in 2005 by the United States EPA as an update to the Safe Drinking Water Act. The list of 42 chemical contaminants spans a wide array of classes, from pesticides to pharmaceuticals to elements, all of which are anticipate...

  20. Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-Mediated Silencing of Nicotiana benthamiana ARGONAUTES (NbAGOs) Reveals New Antiviral Candidates and Dominant Effects of TRV-NbAGO1.

    PubMed

    Odokonyero, Denis; Mendoza, Maria R; Moffett, Peter; Scholthof, Herman B

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of different ARGONAUTE proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana (NbAGOs) to the defense against silencing sensitive GFP-expressing viral constructs based on Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) (Tombusvirus), Sunn-hemp mosaic virus (Tobamovirus), and Foxtail mosaic virus (Potexvirus). Upon Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated down-regulation of NbAGO1, 4, 5, or 6, no effects were noted on susceptibility to any virus construct, whereas knockdown of NbAGO2 specifically prevented silencing of P19-defective TBSV (TGdP19). Down-regulation of a new gene referred to as NbAGO5L showed some reduced silencing for TGdP19 but not for the other two virus constructs, whereas silencing of NbAGO7 gave rise to a subtle increase in susceptibility to all three viruses. Co-infiltrating different TRV-NbAGO constructs simultaneously did not enhance virus susceptibility. However, an unexpected finding was that whenever the TRV-NbAGO1 construct was present, this compromised silencing of genes targeted by co-infiltrated constructs, as shown upon co-infiltration of TRV-NbAGO1 with either TRV-NbAGO2 or TRV-Sul (targeting Magnesium chelatase I). Only after a prolonged period (approximately 2 months) did TRV-Sul-mediated systemic bleaching occur in these co-infected plants, suggesting that TRV-NbAGO1 hinders the silencing ability of other TRV-NbAGO constructs. In conclusion, this study revealed new antiviral NbAGOs and dominant effects of silencing NbAGO1.

  1. Technical description of candidate fluorescence compounds and radioisotopes for a nuclear smuggling deterrence tag (IL500E)

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenstein, S.D.; Aryaeinejad, R.

    1996-03-01

    This report summarizes the efforts completed in identifying candidate fluorescence compounds and radioisotopes for a developing tagging system. The tagging system is being developed as a deterrent to nuclear smuggling, by providing a means of: (1) tracing materials and pilferers to the facility of origin for any recovered special nuclear materials; (2) inventory control of long-term stored items containing special nuclear materials; and (3) tracking materials transferred between facilities. The tagging system uses four types of tagging materials to cover a range of applications intended to prevent the pilfering of special nuclear materials. One material, fluorescent compounds which are invisible without ultraviolet or near-infrared detection systems, is marked on controlled items with a tracking pattern that corresponds to a specified item in a specified location in the data control system. The tagging system uses an invisible, fluorescent dusting powder to mark equipment and personnel who inappropriately handle the tagged material. The tagging system also uses unique combinations of radionuclides to identify the facility of origin for any special nuclear material. Currently, 18 long-lived radioisotopes, 38 short-live radioisotopes and 10 fluorescent compounds have been selected as candidate materials for the tagging system.

  2. Cross-study and cross-omics comparisons of three nephrotoxic compounds reveal mechanistic insights and new candidate biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Matheis, Katja A.; Com, Emmanuelle; Gautier, Jean-Charles; Guerreiro, Nelson; Brandenburg, Arnd; Gmuender, Hans; Sposny, Alexandra; Hewitt, Philip; Amberg, Alexander; Boernsen, Olaf; Riefke, Bjoern; Hoffmann, Dana; Mally, Angela; Kalkuhl, Arno; Suter, Laura; Dieterle, Frank; Staedtler, Frank

    2011-04-15

    The European InnoMed-PredTox project was a collaborative effort between 15 pharmaceutical companies, 2 small and mid-sized enterprises, and 3 universities with the goal of delivering deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms of kidney and liver toxicity and to identify mechanism-linked diagnostic or prognostic safety biomarker candidates by combining conventional toxicological parameters with 'omics' data. Mechanistic toxicity studies with 16 different compounds, 2 dose levels, and 3 time points were performed in male Crl: WI(Han) rats. Three of the 16 investigated compounds, BI-3 (FP007SE), Gentamicin (FP009SF), and IMM125 (FP013NO), induced kidney proximal tubule damage (PTD). In addition to histopathology and clinical chemistry, transcriptomics microarray and proteomics 2D-DIGE analysis were performed. Data from the three PTD studies were combined for a cross-study and cross-omics meta-analysis of the target organ. The mechanistic interpretation of kidney PTD-associated deregulated transcripts revealed, in addition to previously described kidney damage transcript biomarkers such as KIM-1, CLU and TIMP-1, a number of additional deregulated pathways congruent with histopathology observations on a single animal basis, including a specific effect on the complement system. The identification of new, more specific biomarker candidates for PTD was most successful when transcriptomics data were used. Combining transcriptomics data with proteomics data added extra value.

  3. Marine Pharmacology in 2012–2013: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Antidiabetic, Antifungal, Anti-Inflammatory, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Immune and Nervous Systems, and Other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action †

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Rodríguez, Abimael D.; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature from 2012 to 2013 was systematically reviewed, consistent with the 1998–2011 reviews of this series. Marine pharmacology research from 2012 to 2013, conducted by scientists from 42 countries in addition to the United States, reported findings on the preclinical pharmacology of 257 marine compounds. The preclinical pharmacology of compounds isolated from marine organisms revealed antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, antiviral and anthelmitic pharmacological activities for 113 marine natural products. In addition, 75 marine compounds were reported to have antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory activities and affect the immune and nervous system. Finally, 69 marine compounds were shown to display miscellaneous mechanisms of action which could contribute to novel pharmacological classes. Thus, in 2012–2013, the preclinical marine natural product pharmacology pipeline provided novel pharmacology and lead compounds to the clinical marine pharmaceutical pipeline, and contributed significantly to potentially novel therapeutic approaches to several global disease categories. PMID:28850074

  4. Marine Pharmacology in 2012-2013: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Antidiabetic, Antifungal, Anti-Inflammatory, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Immune and Nervous Systems, and Other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Alejandro M S; Rodríguez, Abimael D; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2017-08-29

    The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature from 2012 to 2013 was systematically reviewed, consistent with the 1998-2011 reviews of this series. Marine pharmacology research from 2012 to 2013, conducted by scientists from 42 countries in addition to the United States, reported findings on the preclinical pharmacology of 257 marine compounds. The preclinical pharmacology of compounds isolated from marine organisms revealed antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, antiviral and anthelmitic pharmacological activities for 113 marine natural products. In addition, 75 marine compounds were reported to have antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory activities and affect the immune and nervous system. Finally, 69 marine compounds were shown to display miscellaneous mechanisms of action which could contribute to novel pharmacological classes. Thus, in 2012-2013, the preclinical marine natural product pharmacology pipeline provided novel pharmacology and lead compounds to the clinical marine pharmaceutical pipeline, and contributed significantly to potentially novel therapeutic approaches to several global disease categories.

  5. Design and development of antivirals and intervention strategies against human herpesviruses using high-throughput approach.

    PubMed

    Hornig, Julia; McGregor, Alistair

    2014-08-01

    Although a number of antiviral agents are licensed for treatment of some human herpesvirus (HHV) infections, effective antiviral therapy is not available for all HHVs. Additional complications are associated with approved drugs, such as toxicity and side effects, and rise in drug-resistant strains is a driving force for new drug development. Success in HHV vaccine development is limited with only vaccines against varicella-zoster virus currently in use in the clinic. In vitro, in vivo and in silico high-throughput (HTP) approaches and innovative microfluidic systems will provide novel technologies to efficiently identify and evaluate new targets and antiherpetic compounds. Coupled with HTP strategies for manipulation of herpesvirus viral genomes, these strategies will greatly accelerate the development of future antivirals as well as candidate vaccine intervention strategies. The authors provide a brief overview of the herpesvirus family and associated diseases. Further, the authors discuss the approved and investigational antiherpetic drugs in the context of current HTP technologies. HTP technology such as microfluidic systems is crucial for the identification and validation of novel drug targets and next-generation antivirals. Current drug development is limited by the unavailability of HTP preclinical model systems. Specific advancement in the development of HTP animal-specific technology, applied in parallel, allows a more rapid evaluation of drugs at the preclinical stage. The advancement of HTP combinatorial drug therapy, especially 'Organ-on-a-Chip' approaches, will aid in the evaluation of future antiviral compounds and intervention strategies.

  6. Antiviral activity of lanatoside C against dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yan Yi; Chen, Karen Caiyun; Chen, Huixin; Seng, Eng Khuan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-11-01

    Dengue infection poses a serious threat globally due to its recent rapid spread and rise in incidence. Currently, there is no approved vaccine or effective antiviral drug for dengue virus infection. In response to the urgent need for the development of an effective antiviral for dengue virus, the US Drug Collection library was screened in this study to identify compounds with anti-dengue activities. Lanatoside C, an FDA approved cardiac glycoside was identified as a candidate anti-dengue compound. Our data revealed that lanatoside C has an IC50 of 0.19μM for dengue virus infection in HuH-7 cells. Dose-dependent reduction in dengue viral RNA and viral proteins synthesis were also observed upon treatment with increasing concentrations of lanatoside C. Time of addition study indicated that lanatoside C inhibits the early processes of the dengue virus replication cycle. Furthermore, lanatoside C can effectively inhibit all four serotypes of dengue virus, flavivirus Kunjin, alphavirus Chikungunya and Sindbis virus as well as the human enterovirus 71. These findings suggest that lanatoside C possesses broad spectrum antiviral activity against several groups of positive-sense RNA viruses.

  7. In vitro inhibition of canine distemper virus by flavonoids and phenolic acids: implications of structural differences for antiviral design.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, O V; Botelho, C V; Ferreira, C G T; Ferreira, H C C; Santos, M R; Diaz, M A N; Oliveira, T T; Soares-Martins, J A P; Almeida, M R; Silva, A

    2013-10-01

    Infection caused by canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious disease with high incidence and lethality in the canine population. Antiviral activity of flavonoids quercetin, morin, rutin and hesperidin, and phenolic cinnamic, trans-cinnamic and ferulic acids were evaluated in vitro against the CDV using the time of addition assay to determine which step of the viral replicative cycle was affected. All flavonoids displayed great viral inhibition when they were added at the times 0 (adsorption) and 1h (penetration) of the viral replicative cycle. Both quercetin and hesperidin presented antiviral activity at the time 2h (intracellular). In the other hand, cinnamic acid showed antiviral activity at the times 0 and 2h while trans-cinnamic acid showed antiviral effect at the times -1h (pre-treatment) and 0 h. Ferulic acid inhibited CDV replicative cycle at the times 0 and 1h. Our study revealed promising candidates to be considered in the treatment of CDV. Structural differences among compounds and correlation to their antiviral activity were also explored. Our analysis suggest that these compounds could be useful in order to design new antiviral drugs against CDV as well as other viruses of great meaning in veterinary medicine.

  8. Replication-Competent Influenza Virus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Luciferase Reporter Strains Engineered for Co-Infections Identify Antiviral Compounds in Combination Screens

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dan; Weisshaar, Marco; Lamb, Kristen; Chung, Hokyung K; Lin, Michael Z; Plemper, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Myxoviruses such as influenza A virus (IAV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are major human pathogens, mandating the development of novel therapeutics. To establish a high-throughput screening protocol for the simultaneous identification of pathogen- and host-targeted hit candidates against either or both pathogens, we have attempted coinfection of cells with IAV and RSV. However, viral replication kinetics were incompatible, RSV signal window was low, and an IAV-driven minireplicon reporter assay used in initial screens narrowed the host cell range and restricted to single-cycle infections. To overcome these limitations, we developed an RSV strain carrying firefly luciferase fused to an innovative universal small-molecule assisted shut-off domain, which boosted assay signal window, and a hyperactive fusion protein that synchronized IAV and RSV reporter expression kinetics and suppresses the identification of RSV entry inhibitors sensitive to a recently reported RSV pan-resistance mechanism. Combined with a replication-competent recombinant IAV strain harboring nano-luciferase, the assay performed well on a human respiratory cell line and supports multi-cycle infections. Miniaturized to 384-well format, the protocol was validated through screening of a set of the NIH Clinical Collection (NCC) in quadruplicate. These test screens demonstrated favorable assay parameters and reproducibility. Application to a LOPAC library of bioactive compounds in a proof-of-concept campaign detected licensed anti-myxovirus therapeutics, ribavirin and the neuraminidase inhibitor zanamivir, and identified two unexpected RSV-specific hit candidates, Fenretinide and the opioid receptor antagonist BNTX-7. Hits were evaluated in direct and orthogonal dose-response counterscreens using a standard recRSV reporter strain expressing renilla luciferase. PMID:26307636

  9. Improving drug candidates by design: a focus on physicochemical properties as a means of improving compound disposition and safety.

    PubMed

    Meanwell, Nicholas A

    2011-09-19

    The development of small molecule drug candidates from the discovery phase to a marketed product continues to be a challenging enterprise with very low success rates that have fostered the perception of poor productivity by the pharmaceutical industry. Although there have been significant advances in preclinical profiling that have improved compound triaging and altered the underlying reasons for compound attrition, the failure rates have not appreciably changed. As part of an effort to more deeply understand the reasons for candidate failure, there has been considerable interest in analyzing the physicochemical properties of marketed drugs for the purpose of comparing with drugs in discovery and development as a means capturing recent trends in drug design. The scenario that has emerged is one in which contemporary drug discovery is thought to be focused too heavily on advancing candidates with profiles that are most easily satisfied by molecules with increased molecular weight and higher overall lipophilicity. The preponderance of molecules expressing these properties is frequently a function of increased aromatic ring count when compared with that of the drugs launched in the latter half of the 20th century and may reflect a preoccupation with maximizing target affinity rather than taking a more holistic approach to drug design. These attributes not only present challenges for formulation and absorption but also may influence the manifestation of toxicity during development. By providing some definition around the optimal physicochemical properties associated with marketed drugs, guidelines for drug design have been developed that are based largely on calculated parameters and which may readily be applied by medicinal chemists as an aid to understanding candidate quality. The physicochemical properties of a molecule that are consistent with the potential for good oral absorption were initially defined by Lipinski, with additional insights allowing further

  10. Antiviral agents derived from novel 1-adamantyl singlet nitrenes.

    PubMed

    Kesel, Andreas J; Weiss, Hans-Christoph; Schönleber, Andreas; Day, Craig W; Barnard, Dale L; Detorio, Mervi A; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2012-12-07

    Amantadine constitutes an interesting, diamond crystal lattice-shaped, antivirally active amine with an inhibitory effect on influenza A viruses causing common 'flu' in humans. Unfortunately, amantadine forfeited most of its therapeutic potential because of resistance development in recent influenza A virus isolates. The antiviral efficacy of amantadine congeners can be chemically modified, resulting in re-constitution, improvement and/or extension of antiviral activities mediated by amino-adamantyls. Newly synthesized compounds were evaluated towards HIV type-1 (HIV-1) replication in primary human lymphocytes. One N-phenacyl amantadine derivative was investigated for inhibiting the in vitro replication of respiratory viruses (influenza A viruses, influenza B virus, human parainfluenza virus type 3 and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus). Two ketone-stabilized 1-adamantyl singlet nitrenes were discovered serendipitously. To our best knowledge these are the first persistently stable nitrenes to be reported. Their structure was proved by determining the X-ray single crystal structure of one hydrolytic elaboration product. This salt adduct revealed an incommensurately modulated crystal structure, which was solved by extensive computational refinement. We could show that ketone-stabilized 1-adamantyl singlet nitrenes are versatile synthons for the synthesis of antiviral drug candidates. An amantadine-folate conjugate was inhibitory on HIV-1 replication in primary human lymphocytes, and one N-phenacyl amantadine derivative was inhibitory towards low pathogenic avian influenza A virus (H5N1) replication in vitro. These results indicate that the aromatic-aliphatic ketone-stabilized 1-adamantyl singlet nitrenes, beyond being of fundamental interest in organic chemistry, represent versatile synthons for the synthesis of new amantadine-related potentially antiviral drugs.

  11. The role of the anaesthetised guinea-pig in the preclinical cardiac safety evaluation of drug candidate compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Louise; Borland, Samantha; Philp, Karen; Ewart, Lorna; Lainée, Pierre; Skinner, Matthew; Kirk, Sarah; Valentin, Jean-Pierre

    2012-09-01

    Despite rigorous preclinical and clinical safety evaluation, adverse cardiac effects remain a leading cause of drug attrition and post-approval drug withdrawal. A number of cardiovascular screens exist within preclinical development. These screens do not, however, provide a thorough cardiac liability profile and, in many cases, are not preventing the progression of high risk compounds. We evaluated the suitability of the anaesthetised guinea-pig for the assessment of drug-induced changes in cardiovascular parameters. Sodium pentobarbitone anaesthetised male guinea-pigs received three 15 minute intravenous infusions of ascending doses of amoxicillin, atenolol, clonidine, dobutamine, dofetilide, flecainide, isoprenaline, levosimendan, milrinone, moxifloxacin, nifedipine, paracetamol, verapamil or vehicle, followed by a 30 minute washout. Dose levels were targeted to cover clinical exposure and above, with plasma samples obtained to evaluate effect/exposure relationships. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, contractility function (left ventricular dP/dt{sub max} and QA interval) and lead II electrocardiogram were recorded throughout. In general, the expected reference compound induced effects on haemodynamic, contractility and electrocardiographic parameters were detected confirming that all three endpoints can be measured accurately and simultaneously in one small animal. Plasma exposures obtained were within, or close to the expected clinical range of therapeutic plasma levels. Concentration–effect curves were produced which allowed a more complete understanding of the margins for effects at different plasma exposures. This single in vivo screen provides a significant amount of information pertaining to the cardiovascular risk of drug candidates, ultimately strengthening strategies addressing cardiovascular-mediated compound attrition and drug withdrawal. -- Highlights: ► Evaluation of the anaesthetised guinea-pig to determine cardiac liability.

  12. The role of the anaesthetised guinea-pig in the preclinical cardiac safety evaluation of drug candidate compounds.

    PubMed

    Marks, Louise; Borland, Samantha; Philp, Karen; Ewart, Lorna; Lainée, Pierre; Skinner, Matthew; Kirk, Sarah; Valentin, Jean-Pierre

    2012-09-01

    Despite rigorous preclinical and clinical safety evaluation, adverse cardiac effects remain a leading cause of drug attrition and post-approval drug withdrawal. A number of cardiovascular screens exist within preclinical development. These screens do not, however, provide a thorough cardiac liability profile and, in many cases, are not preventing the progression of high risk compounds. We evaluated the suitability of the anaesthetised guinea-pig for the assessment of drug-induced changes in cardiovascular parameters. Sodium pentobarbitone anaesthetised male guinea-pigs received three 15 minute intravenous infusions of ascending doses of amoxicillin, atenolol, clonidine, dobutamine, dofetilide, flecainide, isoprenaline, levosimendan, milrinone, moxifloxacin, nifedipine, paracetamol, verapamil or vehicle, followed by a 30 minute washout. Dose levels were targeted to cover clinical exposure and above, with plasma samples obtained to evaluate effect/exposure relationships. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, contractility function (left ventricular dP/dt(max) and QA interval) and lead II electrocardiogram were recorded throughout. In general, the expected reference compound induced effects on haemodynamic, contractility and electrocardiographic parameters were detected confirming that all three endpoints can be measured accurately and simultaneously in one small animal. Plasma exposures obtained were within, or close to the expected clinical range of therapeutic plasma levels. Concentration-effect curves were produced which allowed a more complete understanding of the margins for effects at different plasma exposures. This single in vivo screen provides a significant amount of information pertaining to the cardiovascular risk of drug candidates, ultimately strengthening strategies addressing cardiovascular-mediated compound attrition and drug withdrawal.

  13. Naphthyridines with Antiviral Activity - A Review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Inder P; Kumar, Sanjay; Gupta, Shiv

    2017-01-01

    Naphthyridine scaffold is an important pharmacophore in compounds which have shown various biological activities like antiviral, antimicrobial, anticancer, antiinflammatory and analgesic. This scaffold is also reported to exhibit activity against HIV, HCMV, HSV, HPV and HCV. Antiviral activity displayed by many naphthyridine analogs is in nM range. Only few review articles are available in literature which describe about various biological activities of naphthyridines, but there is no comprehensive compilation particularly for antiviral activities. The objective of this review is to compile the literature on anti-viral activities of naphthyridine analogs. SciFinder, Google Scholar and PubMed database were searched with keyword "naphthyridine" and the references obtained were further sorted using keywords "antihiv", "antiviral" and "virus", separately. References obtained were considered to review the antiviral literature of naphthyridines. Literature search using SciFinder database with different keywords gave several references. Only references of antiviral activities of naphthyridine compounds were reviewed. References to in-silico studies alone or on formulation development or on patents were excluded. This review will be helpful for future researches to design and synthesize naphthyridine analogs with improved antiviral activities. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. The combined use of alphavirus replicons and pseudoinfectious particles for the discovery of antivirals derived from natural products.

    PubMed

    Delekta, Phillip C; Raveh, Avi; Larsen, Martha J; Schultz, Pamela J; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H; Miller, David J

    2015-06-01

    Alphaviruses are a prominent class of reemergent pathogens due to their globally expanding ranges, potential for lethality, and possible use as bioweapons. The absence of effective treatments for alphaviruses highlights the need for innovative strategies to identify antiviral agents. Primary screens that use noninfectious self-replicating RNAs, termed replicons, have been used to identify potential antiviral compounds for alphaviruses. Only inhibitors of viral genome replication, however, will be identified using replicons, which excludes many other druggable steps in the viral life cycle. To address this limitation, we developed a western equine encephalitis virus pseudoinfectious particle system that reproduces several crucial viral life cycle steps in addition to genome replication. We used this system to screen a library containing ~26,000 extracts derived from marine microbes, and we identified multiple bacterial strains that produce compounds with potential antiviral activity. We subsequently used pseudoinfectious particle and replicon assays in parallel to counterscreen candidate extracts, and followed antiviral activity during biochemical fractionation and purification to differentiate between inhibitors of viral entry and genome replication. This novel process led to the isolation of a known alphavirus entry inhibitor, bafilomycin, thereby validating the approach for the screening and identification of potential antiviral compounds.

  15. Hydrogen bonds and antiviral activity of benzaldehyde derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    We have obtained the Fourier transform IR spectra of solutions of benzaldehyde derivatives having different antiviral activities against a herpes virus. We observe a correlation between the presence of hydrogen bonds in the benzaldehyde molecules and the appearance of antiviral properties in the compounds. For compounds having antiviral activity, we have obtained spectral data suggesting the existence of hydrogen bonds of the type C=OṡṡṡH-O and O-HṡṡṡO in the molecules. When the hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl groups are replaced by a methyl group, no intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed and the compounds lose their antiviral activity.

  16. Effects of a candidate antifouling compound (medetomidine) on pheromone induced mate search in the amphipod Corophium volutator.

    PubMed

    Krång, Anna-Sara; Dahlström, Mia

    2006-12-01

    Environmental hazards associated with traditional, toxic antifouling coatings based on heavy metals calls for the development of alternative, environmentally acceptable antifouling compounds. Medetomidine ((+/-)-4-[1-(2,3-dimethylphenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole) is a candidate antifouling biocide which impedes settlement of barnacles in the nanomolar range. Prior to introducing novel biocides it is of great importance to consider potential effects on non-target organisms. This study is the first to investigate the effects of medetomidine on the amphipod Corophium volutator, specifically effects on male mate search behaviour. In a laboratory, Y-maze bioassay, C. volutator males were allowed to follow female pheromones after 24 h exposure to 0 (control), 0.01 and 0.1 microg mL(-1) medetomidine. We found that exposure to medetomidine at both concentrations significantly reduced pheromone induced mate search (by 42-71%), with fewer males crawling towards female odour. The results obtained indicate that medetomidine may impair the reproductive fitness of non-target crustaceans, an aspect that needs to be considered before further commercialisation.

  17. Antiviral prodrugs - the development of successful prodrug strategies for antiviral chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik; Field, Hugh J

    2006-01-01

    Following the discovery of the first effective antiviral compound (idoxuridine) in 1959, nucleoside analogues, especially acyclovir (ACV) for the treatment of herpesvirus infections, have dominated antiviral therapy for several decades. However, ACV and similar acyclic nucleosides suffer from low aqueous solubility and low bioavailability following oral administration. Derivatives of acyclic nucleosides, typically esters, were developed to overcome this problem and valaciclovir, the valine ester of ACV, was among the first of a new series of compounds that were readily metabolized upon oral administration to produce the antiviral nucleoside in vivo, thus increasing the bioavailility by several fold. Concurrently, famciclovir was developed as an oral formulation of penciclovir. These antiviral 'prodrugs' thus established a principle that has led to many successful drugs including both nucleoside and nucleotide analogues for the control of several virus infections, notably those caused by herpes-, retro- and hepatitisviruses. This review will chart the origins and development of the most important of the antiviral prodrugs to date.

  18. Tannins from Hamamelis virginiana bark extract: characterization and improvement of the antiviral efficacy against influenza A virus and human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Theisen, Linda L; Erdelmeier, Clemens A J; Spoden, Gilles A; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Sausy, Aurélie; Florin, Luise; Muller, Claude P

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral activity has been demonstrated for different tannin-rich plant extracts. Since tannins of different classes and molecular weights are often found together in plant extracts and may differ in their antiviral activity, we have compared the effect against influenza A virus (IAV) of Hamamelis virginiana L. bark extract, fractions enriched in tannins of different molecular weights and individual tannins of defined structures, including pseudotannins. We demonstrate antiviral activity of the bark extract against different IAV strains, including the recently emerged H7N9, and show for the first time that a tannin-rich extract inhibits human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 infection. As the best performing antiviral candidate, we identified a highly potent fraction against both IAV and HPV, enriched in high molecular weight condensed tannins by ultrafiltration, a simple, reproducible and easily upscalable method. This ultrafiltration concentrate and the bark extract inhibited early and, to a minor extent, later steps in the IAV life cycle and tannin-dependently inhibited HPV attachment. We observed interesting mechanistic differences between tannin structures: High molecular weight tannin containing extracts and tannic acid (1702 g/mol) inhibited both IAV receptor binding and neuraminidase activity. In contrast, low molecular weight compounds (<500 g/mol) such as gallic acid, epigallocatechin gallate or hamamelitannin inhibited neuraminidase but not hemagglutination. Average molecular weight of the compounds seemed to positively correlate with receptor binding (but not neuraminidase) inhibition. In general, neuraminidase inhibition seemed to contribute little to the antiviral activity. Importantly, antiviral use of the ultrafiltration fraction enriched in high molecular weight condensed tannins and, to a lesser extent, the unfractionated bark extract was preferable over individual isolated compounds. These results are of interest for developing and improving plant

  19. Tannins from Hamamelis virginiana Bark Extract: Characterization and Improvement of the Antiviral Efficacy against Influenza A Virus and Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Theisen, Linda L.; Erdelmeier, Clemens A. J.; Spoden, Gilles A.; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Sausy, Aurélie; Florin, Luise; Muller, Claude P.

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral activity has been demonstrated for different tannin-rich plant extracts. Since tannins of different classes and molecular weights are often found together in plant extracts and may differ in their antiviral activity, we have compared the effect against influenza A virus (IAV) of Hamamelis virginiana L. bark extract, fractions enriched in tannins of different molecular weights and individual tannins of defined structures, including pseudotannins. We demonstrate antiviral activity of the bark extract against different IAV strains, including the recently emerged H7N9, and show for the first time that a tannin-rich extract inhibits human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 infection. As the best performing antiviral candidate, we identified a highly potent fraction against both IAV and HPV, enriched in high molecular weight condensed tannins by ultrafiltration, a simple, reproducible and easily upscalable method. This ultrafiltration concentrate and the bark extract inhibited early and, to a minor extent, later steps in the IAV life cycle and tannin-dependently inhibited HPV attachment. We observed interesting mechanistic differences between tannin structures: High molecular weight tannin containing extracts and tannic acid (1702 g/mol) inhibited both IAV receptor binding and neuraminidase activity. In contrast, low molecular weight compounds (<500 g/mol) such as gallic acid, epigallocatechin gallate or hamamelitannin inhibited neuraminidase but not hemagglutination. Average molecular weight of the compounds seemed to positively correlate with receptor binding (but not neuraminidase) inhibition. In general, neuraminidase inhibition seemed to contribute little to the antiviral activity. Importantly, antiviral use of the ultrafiltration fraction enriched in high molecular weight condensed tannins and, to a lesser extent, the unfractionated bark extract was preferable over individual isolated compounds. These results are of interest for developing and improving plant

  20. Antiviral Activity of Baicalein and Quercetin against the Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Johari, Jefree; Kianmehr, Aynaz; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE), a mosquito-borne viral disease, is endemic to the entire east and southeast Asia, and some other parts of the world. Currently, there is no effective therapeutic available for JE; therefore, finding the effective antiviral agent against JEV replication is crucial. In the present study, the in vitro antiviral activity of baicalein and quercetin, two purportedly antiviral bioflavonoids, was evaluated against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) replication in Vero cells. Anti-JEV activities of these compounds were examined on different stages of JEV replication cycle. The effects of the compounds on virus replication were determined by foci forming unit reduction assay (FFURA) and quantitative RT-PCR. Baicalein showed potent antiviral activity with IC50 = 14.28 μg/mL when it was introduced to the Vero cells after adsorption of JEV. Quercetin exhibited weak anti-JEV effects with IC50 = 212.1 μg/mL when the JEV infected cells were treated with the compound after virus adsorption. However, baicalein exhibited significant effect against JEV adsorption with IC50 = 7.27 μg/mL while quercetin did not show any anti-adsorption activity. Baicalein also exhibited direct extracellular virucidal activity on JEV with IC50 = 3.44 μg/mL. However, results of quantitative RT-PCR experiments confirmed the findings from FFURA. This study demonstrated that baicalein should be considered as an appropriate candidate for further investigations, such as the study of molecular and cellular mechanism(s) of action and in vivo evaluation for the development of an effective antiviral compound against Japanese encephalitis virus. PMID:23222683

  1. The synthesis and antiviral properties of acyclic nucleoside analogues with a phosphonomethoxy fragment in the side chain.

    PubMed

    Khandazhinskaya, A; Yasko, M; Shirokova, E

    2006-01-01

    Acyclic nucleoside analogues bearing phosphonomethoxy residues in the side chain (ANP) attract much attention due to a very beneficial combination of biological properties. Intensive work of organic chemists during the last two decades resulted in a large panel of new compounds that were evaluated as potential antiviral drugs. Herein, we present an overview of major chemical structures within the group of acyclic nucleoside analogues containing phosphonomethoxy side fragments and describe main aspects of their synthesis and antiviral potential. We also describe progress in "prodrug" approaches applied to this chemical group to improve pharmacokinetic profiles of the potential candidates. Chemical modifications in the molecule of parental ANP aimed at blocking of phosphonate charges resulted in a set of promising derivatives, two of which have been recently approved for treatment of hepatits B (Hepsera) and HIV (Viread). The preparation, antiviral properties and some aspects of metabolic transformations and pharmacokinetics of ANP prodrugs are discussed.

  2. Electronic structure of Ba3CuSb2O9: A candidate quantum spin liquid compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanavas, K. V.; Popović, Z. S.; Satpathy, S.

    2014-02-01

    Using density-functional methods, we study the electronic structure of Ba3CuSb2O9, a candidate material for the quantum spin liquid behavior. We study both the triangular lattice as well as the recently proposed hexagonal lattice structures with flipped Cu-Sb dumbbells. The band structure near the Fermi energy is described very well by a tight-binding Hamiltonian involving the Cu (eg) orbitals, confirming their central role in the physics of the problem. A minimal tight-binding Hamiltonian for the triangular structure is presented. The Cu (d9) ions (a single eg hole in the band structure) present in the compound are expected to be Jahn-Teller centers, while the nature of the Jahn-Teller distortions in this material is still under debate. Solving a simple model by exact diagonalization, we show that electronic correlation effects in general enhance the tendency towards a Jahn-Teller distortion by reducing the kinetic energy due to correlation effects. Our density-functional calculations do indeed show a significant Jahn-Teller distortion of the CuO6 octahedra when we include the correlation effects within the Coulomb-corrected GGA+U method, so that the Jahn-Teller effect is correlation driven. We argue for the presence of a random static Jahn-Teller distortion in the hexagonal structure rather than a dynamical one because of the broken octahedral symmetry around the CuO6 octahedra and the potential fluctuations inherently present in the system caused by a significant disorder, which is believed to be present, in particular, due to the flipped Cu-Sb dumbbells.

  3. Antivirals for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, T O; Tyrrell, D

    2001-01-01

    The common cold is a ubiquitous short and usually mild illness for which preventive and treatment interventions have been under development since the mid-40s. As our understanding of the disease has increased, more experimental antivirals have been developed. This review attempts to draw together experimental evidence of the effects of these compounds. To identify, assemble, evaluate and (if possible) synthesise the results of published and unpublished randomised controlled trials of the effects of antivirals to prevent or minimise the impact of the common cold. We searched electronic databases, corresponded with researchers and handsearched the archives of the MRC's Common Cold Unit (CCU). We included original reports of randomised and quasi-randomised trials assessing the effects of antivirals on volunteers artificially infected and in individuals exposed to colds in the community. We included 241 studies assessing the effects of Interferons, interferon-inducers and other antivirals on experimental and naturally occurring common colds, contained in 230 reports. We structured our comparisons by experimental or community setting. Although intranasal interferons have high preventive efficacy against experimental colds (protective efficacy 46%, 37% to 54%) and to a lesser extent against natural colds (protective efficacy 24%, 21% to 27%) and are also significantly more effective than placebo in attenuating the course of experimental colds (WMD 15.90, 13.42 to 18.38), their safety profile makes compliance with their use difficult. For example, prolonged prevention of community colds with interferons causes blood-tinged nasal discharge (OR 4.52, 3.78 to 5.41). Dipyridamole (protective efficacy against natural colds 49%, 30% to 62%), ICI 130, 685 (protective efficacy against experimental colds 58%, 35% to 74% ), Impulsin (palmitate) (protective efficacy against natural colds 44%, CI 35% to 52% ) and Pleconaril (protective efficacy against experimental colds 71%, 15% to

  4. Antiviral activity of silymarin against chikungunya virus

    PubMed Central

    Lani, Rafidah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Chiam, Chun Wei; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Rausalu, Kai; Merits, Andres; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes chikungunya fever, with clinical presentations such as severe back and small joint pain, and debilitating arthritis associated with crippling pains that persist for weeks and even years. Although there are several studies to evaluate the efficacy of drugs against CHIKV, the treatment for chikungunya fever is mainly symptom-based and no effective licensed vaccine or antiviral are available. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of three types of flavonoids against CHIKV in vitro replication. Three compounds: silymarin, quercetin and kaempferol were evaluated for their in vitro antiviral activities against CHIKV using a CHIKV replicon cell line and clinical isolate of CHIKV of Central/East African genotype. A cytopathic effect inhibition assay was used to determine their activities on CHIKV viral replication and quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to calculate virus yield. Antiviral activity of effective compound was further investigated by evaluation of CHIKV protein expression using western blotting for CHIKV nsP1, nsP3, and E2E1 proteins. Briefly, silymarin exhibited significant antiviral activity against CHIKV, reducing both CHIKV replication efficiency and down-regulating production of viral proteins involved in replication. This study may have important consequence for broaden the chance of getting the effective antiviral for CHIKV infection. PMID:26078201

  5. Developing Novel Antimicrobial and Antiviral Textile Products.

    PubMed

    Iyigundogdu, Zeynep Ustaoglu; Demir, Okan; Asutay, Ayla Burcin; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2017-03-01

    In conjunction with an increasing public awareness of infectious diseases, the textile industry and scientists are developing hygienic fabrics by the addition of various antimicrobial and antiviral compounds. In the current study, sodium pentaborate pentahydrate and triclosan are applied to cotton fabrics in order to gain antimicrobial and antiviral properties for the first time. The antimicrobial activity of textiles treated with 3 % sodium pentaborate pentahydrate, 0.03 % triclosan, and 7 % Glucapon has been investigated against a broad range of microorganisms including bacteria, yeast, and fungi. Moreover, modified cotton fabrics were tested against adenovirus type 5 and poliovirus type 1. According to the test results, the modified textile goods attained very good antimicrobial and antiviral properties. Thus, the results of the present study clearly suggest that sodium pentaborate pentahydrate and triclosan solution-treated textiles can be considered in the development of antimicrobial and antiviral textile finishes.

  6. Determining Mechanism of Action of Antivirals for Respiratory Illness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Irma; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Viral infections in the respiratory tract are common in humans and can cause serious illness and death. Drug treatment is the principal line of protection against many of these illnesses and many compounds are tested as antivirals. Often the efficacy of these antivirals are determined before a mechanism of action is understood. We use mathematical models to represent the evolution of these diseases and establish which experiments can help determine the mechanism of action of antivirals.

  7. Marine pharmacology in 2007-8: Marine compounds with antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral activities; affecting the immune and nervous system, and other miscellaneous mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Alejandro M S; Rodríguez, Abimael D; Berlinck, Roberto G S; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2011-03-01

    The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature in 2007-8 is covered in this review, which follows a similar format to the previous 1998-2006 reviews of this series. The preclinical pharmacology of structurally characterized marine compounds isolated from marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria is discussed in a comprehensive manner. Antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis and antiviral activities were reported for 74 marine natural products. Additionally, 59 marine compounds were reported to affect the cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems as well as to possess anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 65 marine metabolites were shown to bind to a variety of receptors and miscellaneous molecular targets, and thus upon further completion of mechanism of action studies, will contribute to several pharmacological classes. Marine pharmacology research during 2007-8 remained a global enterprise, with researchers from 26 countries, and the United States, contributing to the preclinical pharmacology of 197 marine compounds which are part of the preclinical marine pharmaceuticals pipeline. Sustained preclinical research with marine natural products demonstrating novel pharmacological activities, will probably result in the expansion of the current marine pharmaceutical clinical pipeline, which currently consists of 13 marine natural products, analogs or derivatives targeting a limited number of disease categories.

  8. Marine Pharmacology in 2009–2011: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Antidiabetic, Antifungal, Anti-Inflammatory, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Immune and Nervous Systems, and other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action †

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Rodríguez, Abimael D.; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature from 2009 to 2011 is presented in this review, following the format used in the 1998–2008 reviews of this series. The pharmacology of structurally-characterized compounds isolated from marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria is discussed in a comprehensive manner. Antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral pharmacological activities were reported for 102 marine natural products. Additionally, 60 marine compounds were observed to affect the immune and nervous system as well as possess antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 68 marine metabolites were shown to interact with a variety of receptors and molecular targets, and thus will probably contribute to multiple pharmacological classes upon further mechanism of action studies. Marine pharmacology during 2009–2011 remained a global enterprise, with researchers from 35 countries, and the United States, contributing to the preclinical pharmacology of 262 marine compounds which are part of the preclinical pharmaceutical pipeline. Continued pharmacological research with marine natural products will contribute to enhance the marine pharmaceutical clinical pipeline, which in 2013 consisted of 17 marine natural products, analogs or derivatives targeting a limited number of disease categories. PMID:23880931

  9. Marine pharmacology in 2005–6: Marine Compounds with Anthelmintic, Antibacterial, Anticoagulant, Antifungal, Anti-inflammatory, Antimalarial, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; affecting the Cardiovascular, Immune and Nervous Systems, and other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Rodriguez, Abimael D.; Berlinck, Roberto G. S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The review presents the 2005–2006 peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature, and follows a similar format to the authors’ 1998–2004 reviews. The preclinical pharmacology of chemically characterized marine compounds isolated from marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria is systematically presented. RESULTS Anthelminthic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis and antiviral activities were reported for 78 marine chemicals. Additionally 47 marine compounds were reported to affect the cardiovascular, immune and nervous system as well as possess anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 58 marine compounds were shown to bind to a variety of molecular targets, and thus could potentially contribute to several pharmacological classes. CONCLUSIONS Marine pharmacology research during 2005–2006 was truly global in nature, involving investigators from 32 countries, and the United States, and contributed 183 marine chemical leads to the research pipeline aimed at the discovery of novel therapeutic agents. SIGNIFICANCE Continued preclinical and clinical research with marine natural products demonstrating a broad spectrum of pharmacological activity and will probably result in novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of multiple disease categories. PMID:19303911

  10. Marine pharmacology in 2009-2011: marine compounds with antibacterial, antidiabetic, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral activities; affecting the immune and nervous systems, and other miscellaneous mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Alejandro M S; Rodríguez, Abimael D; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2013-07-16

    The peer-reviewed marine pharmacology literature from 2009 to 2011 is presented in this review, following the format used in the 1998-2008 reviews of this series. The pharmacology of structurally-characterized compounds isolated from marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria is discussed in a comprehensive manner. Antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral pharmacological activities were reported for 102 marine natural products. Additionally, 60 marine compounds were observed to affect the immune and nervous system as well as possess antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 68 marine metabolites were shown to interact with a variety of receptors and molecular targets, and thus will probably contribute to multiple pharmacological classes upon further mechanism of action studies. Marine pharmacology during 2009-2011 remained a global enterprise, with researchers from 35 countries, and the United States, contributing to the preclinical pharmacology of 262 marine compounds which are part of the preclinical pharmaceutical pipeline. Continued pharmacological research with marine natural products will contribute to enhance the marine pharmaceutical clinical pipeline, which in 2013 consisted of 17 marine natural products, analogs or derivatives targeting a limited number of disease categories.

  11. Characterization of DNA polymerase-associated acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1: mutations, sensitivity to antiviral compounds, neurovirulence, and in-vivo sensitivity to treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Xin; Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Kinoshita-Yamaguchi, Hitomi; Kakiuchi, Satsuki; Suzutani, Tatsuo; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Lim, Chang-Kweng; Kurane, Ichiro; Saijo, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Acyclovir (ACV)-resistant (ACV(r)) mutants were generated from plaque-purified ACV-sensitive herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) by culturing the virus in Vero cells in the presence of 2-amino-7-(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl) purine (S2242). Three DNA polymerase (DNApol)-associated ACV(r) HSV-1 generated under ACV selection in a previous study (Suzutani, T., Ishioka, K., De Clercq, E., et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother., 47, 1707-1713, 2003) were also included. The sensitivity of the mutants to other antivirals and their neurovirulence were determined. The treatment efficacy of ACV and ganciclovir (GCV) against ACV(r) HSV-1 infections was evaluated in mice. Amino acid substitutions were demonstrated in conserved regions II and III in DNApol in 5 of the 6 mutants, while the other substitution was located in non-conserved regions. DNApol-associated ACV(r) clones showed cross-resistance to foscarnet, penciclovir, and vidarabine but were sensitive or hypersensitive to GCV, brivudin, sorivudine, and spongothymidine. The ACV(r) clone with an N815S mutation in DNApol showed similar neurovirulence to that of the parent virus; however, those with other mutations showed attenuation. GCV was effective in the treatment of the ACV(r) clone with similar virulence to that of parent HSV-1, while ACV was less effective in mice. These results indicate the importance of the characterization of HSV-1 isolates for the proper treatment of HSV-1 infections exhibiting ACV-resistance.

  12. Photoinduced antiviral carbon nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyako, Eijiro; Nagata, Hideya; Hirano, Ken; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Makita, Yoji; Nakayama, Ken-ichi; Hirotsu, Takahiro

    2008-02-01

    Nanocarbons, such as carbon nanohorns (CNH) and carbon nanotubes, are materials of interest in many fields of science and technology because of their remarkable physical properties. We report here a novel approach for using NIR laser-driven CNH as an antiviral agent. NIR laser-driven functional CNH complexes could open the way to a new range of antiviral materials.

  13. Antiviral effect of theaflavins against caliciviruses.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Mai; Oka, Tomoichiro; Ando, Takayuki; Arahata, Saori; Ikegaya, Asaka; Takagi, Hirotaka; Ogo, Naohisa; Zhu, Chelsea; Owada, Kazuhiro; Kawamori, Fumihiko; Wang, Qiuhong; Saif, Linda J; Asai, Akira

    2017-04-01

    Caliciviruses are contagious pathogens of humans and various animals. They are the most common cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans, and can cause lethal diseases in domestic animals such as cats, rabbits and immunocompromised mice. In this study, we conducted cytopathic effect-based screening of 2080 selected compounds from our in-house library to find antiviral compounds against three culturable caliciviruses: feline calicivirus, murine norovirus (MNV) and porcine sapovirus (PoSaV). We identified active six compounds, of which two compounds, both related to theaflavins, showed broad antiviral activities against all three caliciviruses; three compounds (abamectin, a mixture of avermectin B1a and B1b; avermectin B1a; and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate hydrate) were effective against PoSaV only; and a heterocyclic carboxamide derivative (BFTC) specifically inhibited MNV infectivity in cell cultures. Further studies of the antiviral mechanism and structure-activity relationship of theaflavins suggested the following: (1) theaflavins worked before the viral entry step; (2) the effect of theaflavins was time- and concentration-dependent; and (3) the hydroxyl groups of the benzocycloheptenone ring were probably important for the anti-calicivirus activity of theaflavins. Theaflavins could be used for the calicivirus research, and as potential disinfectants and antiviral reagents to prevent and control calicivirus infections in animals and humans.

  14. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Nikzad, Sonia; Kadir, Habsah Abdul; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-07-22

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity.

  15. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Nikzad, Sonia; Abdul Kadir, Habsah; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity. PMID:26204947

  16. Is Atyaephyra desmarestii a useful candidate for lethal and sub-lethal toxicity tests on pharmaceutical compounds?

    PubMed

    Nieto, Elena; Blasco, Julián; González-Ortegón, Enrique; Drake, Pilar; Hampel, Miriam

    2013-12-15

    Single and mixture toxicity tests on three pharmaceutical compounds, Diclofenac (DF), Ibuprofen (IB) and Carbamazepine (CBZ), were carried out with the freshwater shrimp Atyaephyra desmarestii. Lethal and sublethal responses were analyzed for single compounds. Lethal concentrations (LC50) obtained for each individual compound, after 96 h of exposure, were 6.3 mg L(-1) for DF, 13.3 mg L(-1) for IB and 94.3 mg L(-1) for CBZ. The selected sublethal endpoints of food ingestion, osmoregulatory capacity and respiration rates were not affected by the exposures to environmentally-relevant concentrations. Based on mortality data obtained, the predictive no effect concentration (PNEC) was calculated for each of the compounds, and compared with predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) reported in surface waters. The environmental risk of each compound was estimated as the ratio between PEC/PNEC, and indicated that IB could represent a medium risk in freshwater environments. Additionally, binary and ternary mixture toxicity assays of the selected compounds were carried out. The data obtained was applied to two predictive toxicity models: Concentration Addition (CA) and Independent Action (IA). Finally, risk assessment was estimated using risk quotients (RQ) for the compound mixtures based on EC50 and LC50 values.

  17. Marine pharmacology in 2003-4: Marine Compounds with Anthelminthic, Antibacterial, Anticoagulant, Antifungal, Anti-inflammatory, Antimalarial, Antiplatelet, Antiprotozoal, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; affecting the Cardiovascular, Immune and Nervous Systems, and other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M.S.; Rodriguez, Abimael D.; Berlinck, Roberto G.S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2007-01-01

    The current marine pharmacology review that covers the peer-reviewed literature during 2003 and 2004 is a sequel to the authors' 1998-2002 reviews, and highlights the preclinical pharmacology of 166 marine chemicals derived from a diverse group of marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria. Anthelminthic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis or antiviral activities were reported for 67 marine chemicals. Additionally 45 marine compounds were shown to have significant effects on the cardiovascular, immune and nervous system as well as possessing anti-inflammatory effects. Finally, 54 marine compounds were reported to act on a variety of molecular targets and thus may potentially contribute to several pharmacological classes. Thus, during 2003-2004, research on the pharmacology of marine natural products which involved investigators from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Belgium, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Morocco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, the Philippines, Portugal, Russia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, United Kingdom, and the United States, contributed numerous chemical leads for the continued global search for novel therapeutic agents with broad spectrum activity. PMID:17392033

  18. Marine pharmacology in 2001–2002: Marine compounds with anthelmintic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antidiabetic, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis, and antiviral activities; affecting the cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems and other miscellaneous mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M.S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    During 2001–2002, research on the pharmacology of marine chemicals continued to be global in nature involving investigators from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, United Kingdom, and the United States. This current article, a sequel to the authors’ 1998, 1999 and 2000 marine pharmacology reviews, classifies 106 marine chemicals derived from a diverse group of marine animals, algae, fungi and bacteria, on the basis of peer-reviewed preclinical pharmacology. Anthelmintic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antiprotozoal, antituberculosis or antiviral activities were reported for 56 marine chemicals. An additional 19 marine compounds were shown to have significant effects on the cardiovascular, immune and nervous system as well as to possess anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic effects. Finally, 31 marine compounds were reported to act on a variety of molecular targets and thus may potentially contribute to several pharmacological classes. Thus, during 2001–2002 pharmacological research with marine chemicals continued to contribute potentially novel chemical leads for the ongoing global search for therapeutic agents for the treatment of multiple disease categories. PMID:15919242

  19. Marine Pharmacology in 2000: Marine Compounds with Antibacterial, Anticoagulant, Antifungal, Anti-inflammatory, Antimalarial, Antiplatelet, Antituberculosis, and Antiviral Activities; Affecting the Cardiovascular, Immune, and Nervous Systems and Other Miscellaneous Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    During 2000 research on the pharmacology of marine chemicals involved investigators from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Phillipines, Singapore, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States. This current review, a sequel to the authors’ 1998 and 1999 reviews, classifies 68 peer-reviewed articles on the basis of the reported preclinical pharmacologic properties of marine chemicals derived from a diverse group of marine animals, algae, fungi, and bacteria. Antibacterial, anticoagulant, antifungal, antimalarial, antiplatelet, antituberculosis, or antiviral activity was reported for 35 marine chemicals. An additional 20 marine compounds were shown to have significant effects on the cardiovascular and nervous system, and to possess anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressant properties. Finally, 23 marine compounds were reported to act on a variety of molecular targets and thus could potentially contribute to several pharmacologic classes. Thus, as in 1998 and 1999, during 2000 pharmacologic research with marine chemicals continued to contribute potentially novel chemical leads to the ongoing global search for therapeutic agents in the treatment of multiple disease categories. PMID:14583811

  20. Exchange-spring like magnetic behavior of the tetragonal Heusler compound Mn2FeGa as a candidate for spin-transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasi, Teuta; Nayak, Ajaya K.; Winterlik, Jürgen; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Adler, Peter; Nicklas, Michael; Felser, Claudia

    2013-05-01

    We report structural, magnetic, and Mössbauer studies of the Heusler compound Mn2FeGa. Theoretical calculations predict that a tetragonal phase in Mn2FeGa could be an interesting candidate for spin torque transfer applications due to the presence of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Experimentally, we found that Mn2FeGa crystallizes in a tetragonal structure after annealing at low temperatures (≤400 °C), whereas, it becomes pseudocubic for higher annealing temperatures. The sample annealed at 400 °C shows a high Curie temperature of 650 K and a hard-magnetic behavior. We observed a nonsaturating and exchange-spring type of hysteresis loops, which indicates that the sample contains two different magnetic states. The Mössbauer measurements clearly support the structural and magnetic data. All these properties make the material a potential candidate for spintronic devices, especially in thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  1. In Vitro Evaluation of Candidate Pretreatment and Treatment Compounds Against sulfur Mustard (HD) -Induced Human Mononuclear Leukocyte Toxicity Using a Dye Exclusion Cell Viability Assay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-13

    concentration of candidate compound required to provide 50 percent protection against the fixed HD concentration) for niacinamide (NM). Various...mustard, HD) is a powerful alkylating agent that causes incapacitating injuries to the eyes, respiratory tract and skin . HD is known to irreversibly...FIGURE 3. CONTROL CHARTING OF NIACINAMIDE EC5 0 ESTIMATES 100’ gSo- 8 0- o70- S60- SSo- a÷ oC 40- X 30- .~20- 04/06/92 05 /26 /9’ 07/1𔃿/02 09 / 10~A

  2. Synthesis and antiviral activity of 2,4-diamino-5-cyano-6-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethoxy]pyrimidine and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Hocková, Dana; Holý, Antonín; Masojídková, Milena; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan

    2004-06-15

    Synthesis of 2,4-diamino-5-cyano-6-[[(diisopropoxyphosphoryl)methoxy]ethoxy]pyrimidine was based on the formation of the pyrimidine ring by cyclization followed by modification of the side chain by alkylation. The 5-cyano group was also transformed to a 5-formyl and 5-hydroxymethyl group by reduction. As a side product an unexpected dimer was formed. Resulting compounds were converted to the free phosphonic acids by treatment with bromotrimethylsilane followed by hydrolysis. The 5-cyano and 5-formyl derivatives showed pronounced antiretroviral activity, comparable to that of the reference drugs adefovir and tenofovir.

  3. Antiviral effects of Glycyrrhiza species.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cristina; Eisenhut, Michael; Krausse, Rea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Pellati, Donatella; Armanini, Decio; Bielenberg, Jens

    2008-02-01

    Historical sources for the use of Glycyrrhiza species include ancient manuscripts from China, India and Greece. They all mention its use for symptoms of viral respiratory tract infections and hepatitis. Randomized controlled trials confirmed that the Glycyrrhiza glabra derived compound glycyrrhizin and its derivatives reduced hepatocellular damage in chronic hepatitis B and C. In hepatitis C virus-induced cirrhosis the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was reduced. Animal studies demonstrated a reduction of mortality and viral activity in herpes simplex virus encephalitis and influenza A virus pneumonia. In vitro studies revealed antiviral activity against HIV-1, SARS related coronavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, arboviruses, vaccinia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. Mechanisms for antiviral activity of Glycyrrhiza spp. include reduced transport to the membrane and sialylation of hepatitis B virus surface antigen, reduction of membrane fluidity leading to inhibition of fusion of the viral membrane of HIV-1 with the cell, induction of interferon gamma in T-cells, inhibition of phosphorylating enzymes in vesicular stomatitis virus infection and reduction of viral latency. Future research needs to explore the potency of compounds derived from licorice in prevention and treatment of influenza A virus pneumonia and as an adjuvant treatment in patients infected with HIV resistant to antiretroviral drugs.

  4. Assessment of chimeric mice with humanized livers in new drug development: generation of pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity data for selecting the final candidate compound.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    1. Chimeric mice with humanized livers are expected to be a novel tool for new drug development. This review discusses four applications where these animals can be used efficiently to collect supportive data for selecting the best compound in the final stage of drug discovery. 2. The first application is selection of the final compound based on estimated pharmacokinetic parameters in humans. Since chimeric mouse livers are highly repopulated with human hepatocytes, hepatic clearance values in vivo could be used preferentially to estimate pharmacokinetic profiles for humans. 3. The second is prediction of human-specific or disproportionate metabolites. Chimeric mice reproduce human-specific metabolites of drugs under development to conform to ICH guidance M3(R2), except for compounds that were extensively eliminated by co-existing mouse hepatocytes. 4. The third is identifying metabolites with distinct pharmacokinetic profiles in humans. Slow metabolite elimination specifically in humans increases its exposure level, but if its elimination is faster in laboratory animals, the animal exposure level might not satisfy ICH guidance M3(R2). 5. Finally, two examples of reproducing acute liver toxicity in chimeric mice are introduced. Integrated pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity information are expected to assist pharmaceutical scientists in selecting the best candidate compound in new drug development.

  5. Interferon-mediated antiviral activities of Angelica tenuissima Nakai and its active components.

    PubMed

    Weeratunga, Prasanna; Uddin, Md Bashir; Kim, Myun Soo; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Yoon, Ji-Eun; Ma, Jin Yeul; Kim, Hongik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Angelica tenuissima Nakai is a widely used commodity in traditional medicine. Nevertheless, no study has been conducted on the antiviral and immune-modulatory properties of an aqueous extract of Angelica tenuissima Nakai. In the present study, we evaluated the antiviral activities and the mechanism of action of an aqueous extract of Angelica tenuissima Nakai both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, an effective dose of Angelica tenuissima Nakai markedly inhibited the replication of Influenza A virus (PR8), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), Herpes simplex virus (HSV), Coxsackie virus, and Enterovirus (EV-71) on epithelial (HEK293T/HeLa) and immune (RAW264.7) cells. Such inhibition can be described by the induction of the antiviral state in cells by antiviral, IFNrelated gene induction and secretion of IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In vivo, Angelica tenuissima Nakai treated BALB/c mice displayed higher survivability and lower lung viral titers when challenged with lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3, and H9N2). We also found that Angelica tenuissima Nakai can induce the secretion of IL-6, IFN-λ, and local IgA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of Angelica tenuissima Nakai treated mice, which correlating with the observed prophylactic effects. In HPLC analysis, we found the presence of several compounds in the aqueous fraction and among them; we evaluated antiviral properties of ferulic acid. Therefore, an extract of Angelica tenuissima Nakai and its components, including ferulic acid, play roles as immunomodulators and may be potential candidates for novel anti-viral/anti-influenza agents.

  6. Norovirus genetic diversity and evolution: implications for antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Joana; Van Dycke, Jana; Neyts, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Human noroviruses are the leading cause of foodborne illness causing both acute and chronic gastroenteritis. In recent years, a number of vaccine candidates entered (pre-) clinical development and the first efforts to develop antiviral therapy have been made. We here discuss aspects of norovirus genetic evolution, persistence in immunocompromised patients as well as the risk and potential consequences of resistance development toward future antiviral drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants of Laos toward the discovery of bioactive compounds as potential candidates for pharmaceutical development

    PubMed Central

    Soejarto, D.D.; Gyllenhaal, C.; Kadushin, M.R.; Southavong, B.; Sydara, K.; Bouamanivong, S.; Xaiveu, M.; Zhang, H.-J.; Franzblau, S.G.; Tan, Ghee T.; Pezzuto, J.M.; Riley, M.C.; Elkington, B.G.; Waller, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    Context An ethnobotany-based approach in the selection of raw plant materials to study was implemented. Objective To acquire raw plant materials using ethnobotanical field interviews as starting point to discover new bioactive compounds from medicinal plants of the Lao People’s Democratic Republic. Methods Using semi-structured field interviews with healers in the Lao PDR, plant samples were collected, extracted, and bio-assayed to detect bioactivity against cancer, HIV/AIDS, TB, malaria. Plant species demonstrating activity were recollected and the extracts subjected to a bioassay-guided isolation protocol to isolate and identify the active compounds. Results Field interviews with 118 healers in 15 of 17 provinces of Lao PDR yielded 753 collections (573 species) with 955 plant samples. Of these 955, 50 extracts demonstrated activity in the anticancer, 10 in the anti-HIV, 30 in the anti-TB, and 52 in the antimalarial assay. Recollection of actives followed by bioassay-guided isolation processes yielded a series of new and known in vitro-active anticancer and antimalarial compounds from 5 species. Discussion Laos has a rich biodiversity, harboring an estimated 8000–11,000 species of plants. In a country highly dependent on traditional medicine for its primary health care, this rich plant diversity serves as a major source of their medication. Conclusions Ethnobotanical survey has demonstrated the richness of plant-based traditional medicine of Lao PDR, taxonomically and therapeutically. Biological assays of extracts of half of the 955 samples followed by in-depth studies of a number of actives have yielded a series of new bioactive compounds against the diseases of cancer and malaria. PMID:22136442

  8. Antiviral, anti-parasitic, and cytotoxic effects of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI), a reactive compound generated by phenoloxidase during insect immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Picheng; Lu, Zhiqiang; Strand, Michael R; Jiang, Haobo

    2011-09-01

    Phenoloxidase (PO) and its activation system are implicated in several defense responses of insects. Upon wounding or infection, inactive prophenoloxidase (proPO) is converted to active PO through a cascade of serine proteases and their homologs. PO generates reactive compounds such as 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI), which have a broad-spectrum antibacterial and antifungal activity. Here we report that DHI and its spontaneous oxidation products are also active against viruses and parasitic wasps. Preincubation of a baculovirus stock with 1.25 mM DHI for 3 h near fully disabled recombinant protein production. The LC₅₀ for lambda bacteriophage and eggs of the wasp Microplitis demolitor were 5.6 ± 2.2 and 111.0 ± 1.6 μM, respectively. The toxicity of DHI and related compounds also extended to cells derived from insects that serve as hosts for several of the aforementioned pathogens. Pretreatment of Sf9 cells with 1.0 mM DHI for 4 h resulted in 97% mortality, and LC₅₀ values of 20.3 ± 1.2 μM in buffer and 131.8 ± 1.1 μM in a culture medium. Symptoms of DHI toxicity in Sf9 cells included DNA polymerization, protein crosslinking, and lysis. Taken together, these data showed that proPO activation and DHI production is strongly toxic against various pathogens but can also damage host tissues and cells if not properly controlled. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential applications for antiviral therapy and prophylaxis in bovine medicine.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Viral disease is one of the major causes of financial loss and animal suffering in today's cattle industry. Increases in global commerce and average herd size, urbanization, vertical integration within the industry and alterations in global climate patterns have allowed the spread of pathogenic viruses, or the introduction of new viral species, into regions previously free of such pathogens, creating the potential for widespread morbidity and mortality in naïve cattle populations. Despite this, no antiviral products are currently commercially licensed for use in bovine medicine, although significant progress has been made in the development of antivirals for use against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) and bovine herpesvirus (BHV). BVDV is extensively studied as a model virus for human antiviral studies. Consequently, many compounds with efficacy have been identified and a few have been successfully used to prevent infection in vivo although commercial development is still lacking. FMDV is also the subject of extensive antiviral testing due to the importance of outbreak containment for maintenance of export markets. Thirdly, BHV presents an attractive target for antiviral development due to its worldwide presence. Antiviral studies for other bovine viral pathogens are largely limited to preliminary studies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of antiviral compounds against several key bovine pathogens and the potential for commercial antiviral applications in the prevention and control of several selected bovine diseases.

  10. An antiviral furanoquinone from Paulownia tomentosa Steud.

    PubMed

    Kang, K H; Huh, H; Kim, B K; Lee, C K

    1999-11-01

    A methanol extract of the stem bark of Paulownia tomentosa showed antiviral activity against poliovirus types 1 and 3. Sequential liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane, chloroform and water, and a silicagel column chromatography resulted in the purification of a compound. The compound was identified as methyl-5-hydroxy-dinaphthol[1,2-2',3']furan-7,12-dione-6-carbox yla te on the basis of spectroscopic data. The component caused a significant reduction of viral cytopathic effect when it was subjected to a standard antiviral assay by using HeLa cells. The EC(50) of the compound against poliovirus type 1 strain Brunhilde, and type 3 strain Leon were 0.3 microg/mL and 0.6 microg/mL, respectively.

  11. From protein domains to drug candidates-natural products as guiding principles in the design and synthesis of compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Breinbauer, Rolf; Vetter, Ingrid R; Waldmann, Herbert

    2002-08-16

    In the continuing effort to find small molecules that alter protein function and ultimately might lead to new drugs, combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a very powerful tool. Contrary to original expectations that large libraries would result in the discovery of many hit and lead structures, it has been recognized that the biological relevance, design, and diversity of the library are more important. As the universe of conceivable compounds is almost infinite, the question arises: where is a biologically validated starting point from which to build a combinatorial library? Nature itself might provide an answer: natural products have been evolved to bind to proteins. Recent results in structural biology and bioinformatics indicate that the number of distinct protein families and folds is fairly limited. Often the same structural domain is used by many proteins in a more or less modified form created by divergent evolution. Recent progress in solid-phase organic synthesis has enabled the synthesis of combinatorial libraries based on the structure of complex natural products. It can be envisioned that natural-product-based combinatorial synthesis may permit hit or lead compounds to be found with enhanced probability and quality.

  12. Identification of bioactive candidate compounds responsible for oxidative challenge from hydro-ethanolic extract of Moringa oleifera leaves.

    PubMed

    Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Tangestani Fard, Masoumeh; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Abas, Faridah; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2013-09-01

    Free radicals trigger chain reaction and inflict damage to the cells and its components, which in turn ultimately interrupts their biological activities. To prevent free radical damage, together with an endogenous antioxidant system, an exogenous supply of antioxidant components to the body in the form of functional food or nutritional diet helps undeniably. Research conducted by the Natl. Inst. of Health claimed that Moringa oleifera Lam possess the highest antioxidant content among various natural food sources based on an oxygen radical absorbent capacity assay. In this study, a 90% (ethanol:distilled water--90:10) gradient solvent was identified as one of the best gradient solvents for the effectual extraction of bioactive components from M. oleifera leaves. This finding was confirmed by various antioxidant assays, including radical scavenging activity (that is, 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, H(2)O(2), and NO radical scavenging assay) and total antioxidant capacity (that is, ferric reducing antioxidant power and molybdenum assay). High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprints of the 90% gradient extract visually showed few specific peaks, which on further analysis, using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS, were identified as flavonoids and their derivatives. Despite commonly reported flavonoids, that is, kaempferol and quercetin, we report here for the 1st time the presence of multiflorin-B and apigenin in M. oleifera leaves. These findings might help researchers to further scrutinize this high activity exhibiting gradient extract and its bio-active candidates for fruitful clinical/translational investigations.

  13. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Tajima, Shigeru; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko; Aida, Yoko

    2014-07-18

    Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC50 values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  14. Cyclopalladated Compound 7a Induces Apoptosis- and Autophagy-Like Mechanisms in Paracoccidioides and Is a Candidate for Paracoccidioidomycosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Denise C.; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Silva, Luiz S.; Real, Fernando; Leitão, Natanael P.; Pires, Jhon H. S.; Caires, Antonio Carlos F.; Garcia, Daniel M.; Cunha, Fernanda F. M.; Longo, Larissa V. G.

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by Paracoccidioides species, is the main cause of death due to systemic mycoses in Brazil and other Latin American countries. Therapeutic options for PCM and other systemic mycoses are limited and time-consuming, and there are high rates of noncompliance, relapses, toxic side effects, and sequelae. Previous work has shown that the cyclopalladated 7a compound is effective in treating several kinds of cancer and parasitic Chagas disease without significant toxicity in animals. Here we show that cyclopalladated 7a inhibited the in vitro growth of Paracoccidioides lutzii Pb01 and P. brasiliensis isolates Pb18 (highly virulent), Pb2, Pb3, and Pb4 (less virulent) in a dose-response manner. Pb18 was the most resistant. Opportunistic Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans were also sensitive. BALB/c mice showed significantly lighter lung fungal burdens when treated twice a day for 20 days with a low cyclopalladated 7a dose of 30 μg/ml/day for 30 days after intratracheal infection with Pb18. Electron microscopy images suggested that apoptosis- and autophagy-like mechanisms are involved in the fungal killing mechanism of cyclopalladated 7a. Pb18 yeast cells incubated with the 7a compound showed remarkable chromatin condensation, DNA degradation, superoxide anion production, and increased metacaspase activity suggestive of apoptosis. Autophagy-related killing mechanisms were suggested by increased autophagic vacuole numbers and acidification, as indicated by an increase in LysoTracker and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining in cyclopalladated 7a-treated Pb18 yeast cells. Considering that cyclopalladated 7a is highly tolerated in vivo and affects yeast fungal growth through general apoptosis- and autophagy-like mechanisms, it is a novel promising drug for the treatment of PCM and other mycoses. PMID:26349827

  15. Cyclopalladated Compound 7a Induces Apoptosis- and Autophagy-Like Mechanisms in Paracoccidioides and Is a Candidate for Paracoccidioidomycosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Denise C; Matsuo, Alisson L; Silva, Luiz S; Real, Fernando; Leitão, Natanael P; Pires, Jhon H S; Caires, Antonio Carlos F; Garcia, Daniel M; Cunha, Fernanda F M; Puccia, Rosana; Longo, Larissa V G

    2015-12-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by Paracoccidioides species, is the main cause of death due to systemic mycoses in Brazil and other Latin American countries. Therapeutic options for PCM and other systemic mycoses are limited and time-consuming, and there are high rates of noncompliance, relapses, toxic side effects, and sequelae. Previous work has shown that the cyclopalladated 7a compound is effective in treating several kinds of cancer and parasitic Chagas disease without significant toxicity in animals. Here we show that cyclopalladated 7a inhibited the in vitro growth of Paracoccidioides lutzii Pb01 and P. brasiliensis isolates Pb18 (highly virulent), Pb2, Pb3, and Pb4 (less virulent) in a dose-response manner. Pb18 was the most resistant. Opportunistic Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans were also sensitive. BALB/c mice showed significantly lighter lung fungal burdens when treated twice a day for 20 days with a low cyclopalladated 7a dose of 30 μg/ml/day for 30 days after intratracheal infection with Pb18. Electron microscopy images suggested that apoptosis- and autophagy-like mechanisms are involved in the fungal killing mechanism of cyclopalladated 7a. Pb18 yeast cells incubated with the 7a compound showed remarkable chromatin condensation, DNA degradation, superoxide anion production, and increased metacaspase activity suggestive of apoptosis. Autophagy-related killing mechanisms were suggested by increased autophagic vacuole numbers and acidification, as indicated by an increase in LysoTracker and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining in cyclopalladated 7a-treated Pb18 yeast cells. Considering that cyclopalladated 7a is highly tolerated in vivo and affects yeast fungal growth through general apoptosis- and autophagy-like mechanisms, it is a novel promising drug for the treatment of PCM and other mycoses.

  16. Antiviral immunity in crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haipeng; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul

    2009-08-01

    Viral diseases of shrimp have caused negative effects on the economy in several countries in Asia, South America and America, where they have numerous shrimp culture industries. The studies on the immunity of shrimp and other crustaceans have mainly focused on general aspects of immunity and as a consequence little is known about the antiviral responses in crustaceans. The aim of this review is to update recent knowledge of innate immunity against viral infections in crustaceans. Several antiviral molecules have been isolated and characterized recently from decapods. Characterization and identification of these molecules might provide a promising strategy for protection and treatment of these viral diseases. In addition dsRNA-induced antiviral immunity is also included.

  17. Protein kinase C and the antiviral effect of human interferon.

    PubMed

    Cernescu, C; Constantinescu, S N; Baltă, F; Popescu, L M; Cajal, N

    1989-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors: Hidaka's compounds H-7 (10 microM) and H-8 (20 microM), palmitoyl-carnitine (10 microM) and phloretin (50 microM), did not modify the antiviral effect of human natural or recombinant interferon alpha and of natural interferon beta. The tumor promoter 12-o-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (200 nM), known as activator of PKC induced an antiviral state when tested on human embryo fibroblasts challenged with the vesicular stomatitis virus. The battery of PKC inhibitors used inhibited the antiviral effect induced by TPA. Palmitoyl-carnitine (10 microM) exerted a toxic effect that was reversed by interferon treatment (2,000 IU/ml interferon alpha). These results suggest that PKC, possibly activated by interferon-receptor interaction, is not essential for inducing the antiviral effect of interferon, but, probably, mediates the antiviral effect of TPA.

  18. Novel cycloalkylthiophene-imine derivatives bearing benzothiazole scaffold: synthesis, characterization and antiviral activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ke, Shaoyong; Wei, Yanhong; Yang, Ziwen; Wang, Kaimei; Liang, Ying; Shi, Liqiao

    2013-09-15

    A series of novel cycloalkylthiophene-imine derivatives containing benzothiazole unit were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anti-viral activities. The bio-evaluation results indicated that some of the target compounds (such as 5g, 5i, 5u) exhibited good to moderate antiviral effect on CVB5, ADV7 and EV71 viruses, however, these compounds did not have inhibition activity against H1N1 virus. Especially, the compounds 4c and 4d also exhibited high antiviral activities, which provide a new and efficient approach to evolve novel multi-functional antiviral agents by rational integration of active pharmacophores.

  19. Oligonucleotide-based antiviral strategies.

    PubMed

    Schubert, S; Kurreck, J

    2006-01-01

    In the age of extensive global traffic systems, the close neighborhood of man and livestock in some regions of the world, as well as inadequate prevention measures and medical care in poorer countries, greatly facilitates the emergence and dissemination of new virus strains. The appearance of avian influenza viruses that can infect humans, the spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus, and the unprecedented raging of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) illustrate the threat of a global virus pandemic. In addition, viruses like hepatitis B and C claim more than one million lives every year for want of efficient therapy. Thus, new approaches to prevent virus propagation are urgently needed. Antisense strategies are considered a very attractive means of inhibiting viral replication, as oligonucleotides can be designed to interact with any viral RNA, provided its sequence is known. The ensuing targeted destruction of viral RNA should interfere with viral replication without entailing negative effects on ongoing cellular processes. In this review, we will give some examples of the employment of antisense oligonucleotides, ribozymes, and RNA interference strategies for antiviral purposes. Currently, in spite of encouraging results in preclinical studies, only a few antisense oligonucleotides and ribozymes have turned out to be efficient antiviral compounds in clinical trials. The advent of RNA interference now seems to be refueling hopes for decisive progress in the field of therapeutic employment of antisense strategies.

  20. Deep sequencing of the Camellia sinensis transcriptome revealed candidate genes for major metabolic pathways of tea-specific compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, CY; Yang, H; Wei, CL; Yu, O; Zhang, ZZ; Sun, J; Wan, XC

    2011-01-01

    Tea is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages worldwide. However, the tea plant, Camellia sinensis, is difficult to culture in vitro, to transform, and has a large genome, rendering little genomic information available. Recent advances in large-scale RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provide a fast, cost-effective, and reliable approach to generate large expression datasets for functional genomic analysis, which is especially suitable for non-model species with un-sequenced genomes. Using high-throughput Illumina RNA-seq, the transcriptome from poly (A){sup +} RNA of C. sinensis was analyzed at an unprecedented depth (2.59 gigabase pairs). Approximate 34.5 million reads were obtained, trimmed, and assembled into 127,094 unigenes, with an average length of 355 bp and an N50 of 506 bp, which consisted of 788 contig clusters and 126,306 singletons. This number of unigenes was 10-fold higher than existing C. sinensis sequences deposited in GenBank (as of August 2010). Sequence similarity analyses against six public databases (Uniprot, NR and COGs at NCBI, Pfam, InterPro and KEGG) found 55,088 unigenes that could be annotated with gene descriptions, conserved protein domains, or gene ontology terms. Some of the unigenes were assigned to putative metabolic pathways. Targeted searches using these annotations identified the majority of genes associated with several primary metabolic pathways and natural product pathways that are important to tea quality, such as flavonoid, theanine and caffeine biosynthesis pathways. Novel candidate genes of these secondary pathways were discovered. Comparisons with four previously prepared cDNA libraries revealed that this transcriptome dataset has both a high degree of consistency with previous EST data and an approximate 20 times increase in coverage. Thirteen unigenes related to theanine and flavonoid synthesis were validated. Their expression patterns in different organs of the tea plant were analyzed by RT-PCR and quantitative real

  1. Novel microencapsulation of potential drugs with low molecular weight and high hydrophilicity: hydrogen peroxide as a candidate compound.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sing-Muk; Choi, Jeong-Yeon; Han, Hyung-Soo; Huh, Jeung-Soo; Lim, Jeong Ok

    2010-01-15

    Microencapsulation of drugs into solid biodegradable polymeric microspheres via solvent evaporation technique remains challenging especially with those having low molecular weight and high hydrophilicity nature. This paper presents an efficient encapsulation protocol for this group of drugs, demonstrated using hydrogen peroxide as a model compound that is encapsulated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres. Hydrogen peroxide can be employed as antiseptic agent or its decomposed form into oxygen can be useful in various pharmaceutical applications. The new encapsulation technique was developed based on the modification of conventional double emulsion and solvent evaporation protocol with a backward concentration gradient of hydrogen peroxide. This was achieved by adding and controlling the concentration of hydrogen peroxide at the continuous phase during the solidification stage of the microspheres. Parameters involved in the production and the formulation aspect were optimized to achieve the best protocol having controlled efficiency of encapsulation that is simple, safe, practical, and economical. Evaluation on the encapsulation efficiency and the release profile has been made indirectly by monitoring the dissolved oxygen level of the solution where the microspheres were incubated. Morphology of the microspheres was investigated using scanning electron microscopy. This proposed method has successfully used to prepare batches of microspheres having different encapsulation efficiencies and its potential applications have been demonstrated accordingly.

  2. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Tajima, Shigeru; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko; Aida, Yoko

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Screening of 50,000 compounds and subsequent lead optimization identified WV970. • WV970 has antiviral effects against influenza A, B and highly pathogenic viral strains. • WV970 inhibits viral genome replication and transcription. • A target database search suggests that WV970 may bind to a number of kinases. • KINOMEscan screening revealed that WV970 has inhibitory effects on 15 kinases. - Abstract: Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC{sub 50} values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  3. An M2-V27A channel blocker demonstrates potent in vitro and in vivo antiviral activities against amantadine-sensitive and -resistant influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanmei; Musharrafieh, Rami; Ma, Chunlong; Zhang, Jiantao; Smee, Donald F; DeGrado, William F; Wang, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Adamantanes such as amantadine (1) and rimantadine (2) are FDA-approved anti-influenza drugs that act by inhibiting the wild-type M2 proton channel from influenza A viruses, thereby inhibiting the uncoating of the virus. Although adamantanes have been successfully used for more than four decades, their efficacy was curtailed by emerging drug resistance. Among the limited number of M2 mutants that confer amantadine resistance, the M2-V27A mutant was found to be the predominant mutant under drug selection pressure, thereby representing a high profile antiviral drug target. Guided by molecular dynamics simulations, we previously designed first-in-class M2-V27A inhibitors. One of the potent lead compounds, spiroadamantane amine (3), inhibits both the M2-WT and M2-V27A mutant with IC50 values of 18.7 and 0.3 μM, respectively, in in vitro electrophysiological assays. Encouraged by these findings, in this study we further examine the in vitro and in vivo antiviral activity of compound 3 in inhibiting both amantadine-sensitive and -resistant influenza A viruses. Compound 3 not only had single to sub-micromolar EC50 values against M2-WT- and M2-V27A-containing influenza A viruses in antiviral assays, but also rescued mice from lethal viral infection by either M2-WT- or M2-V27A-containing influenza A viruses. In addition, we report the design of two analogs of compound 3, and one was found to have improved in vitro antiviral activity over compound 3. Collectively, this study represents the first report demonstrating the in vivo antiviral efficacy of inhibitors targeting M2 mutants. The results suggest that inhibitors targeting drug-resistant M2 mutants are promising antiviral drug candidates worthy of further development.

  4. Identification of Antiviral Agents Targeting Hepatitis B Virus Promoter from Extracts of Indonesian Marine Organisms by a Novel Cell-Based Screening Assay

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Atsuya; Fujimoto, Yuusuke; Tamaki, Mayumi; Setiawan, Andi; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Toyama, Masaaki; Baba, Masanori; de Voogd, Nicole J.; Maekawa, Shinya; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Junichi; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    The current treatments of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) face a limited choice of vaccine, antibody and antiviral agents. The development of additional antiviral agents is still needed for improvement of CHB therapy. In this study, we established a screening system in order to identify compounds inhibiting the core promoter activity of hepatitis B virus (HBV). We prepared 80 extracts of marine organisms from the coral reefs of Indonesia and screened them by using this system. Eventually, two extracts showed high inhibitory activity (>95%) and low cytotoxicity (66% to 77%). Solvent fractionation, column chromatography and NMR analysis revealed that 3,5-dibromo-2-(2,4-dibromophenoxy)-phenol (compound 1) and 3,4,5-tribromo-2-(2,4-dibromophenoxy)-phenol (compound 2), which are classified as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), were identified as anti-HBV agents in the extracts. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited HBV core promoter activity as well as HBV production from HepG2.2.15.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The EC50 values of compounds 1 and 2 were 0.23 and 0.80 µM, respectively, while selectivity indexes of compound 1 and 2 were 18.2 and 12.8, respectively. These results suggest that our cell-based HBV core promoter assay system is useful to determine anti-HBV compounds, and that two PBDE compounds are expected to be candidates of lead compounds for the development of anti-HBV drugs. PMID:26561821

  5. Identification of Antiviral Agents Targeting Hepatitis B Virus Promoter from Extracts of Indonesian Marine Organisms by a Novel Cell-Based Screening Assay.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Atsuya; Fujimoto, Yuusuke; Tamaki, Mayumi; Setiawan, Andi; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Toyama, Masaaki; Baba, Masanori; de Voogd, Nicole J; Maekawa, Shinya; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Junichi; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-11-06

    The current treatments of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) face a limited choice of vaccine, antibody and antiviral agents. The development of additional antiviral agents is still needed for improvement of CHB therapy. In this study, we established a screening system in order to identify compounds inhibiting the core promoter activity of hepatitis B virus (HBV). We prepared 80 extracts of marine organisms from the coral reefs of Indonesia and screened them by using this system. Eventually, two extracts showed high inhibitory activity (>95%) and low cytotoxicity (66% to 77%). Solvent fractionation, column chromatography and NMR analysis revealed that 3,5-dibromo-2-(2,4-dibromophenoxy)-phenol (compound 1) and 3,4,5-tribromo-2-(2,4-dibromophenoxy)-phenol (compound 2), which are classified as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), were identified as anti-HBV agents in the extracts. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited HBV core promoter activity as well as HBV production from HepG2.2.15.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The EC50 values of compounds 1 and 2 were 0.23 and 0.80 µM, respectively, while selectivity indexes of compound 1 and 2 were 18.2 and 12.8, respectively. These results suggest that our cell-based HBV core promoter assay system is useful to determine anti-HBV compounds, and that two PBDE compounds are expected to be candidates of lead compounds for the development of anti-HBV drugs.

  6. Antiviral properties of quinolone-based drugs.

    PubMed

    Richter, Sara; Parolin, Cristina; Palumbo, Manlio; Palù, Giorgio

    2004-06-01

    Quinolones represent an important class of broad-spectrum antibacterials, the main structural features of which are a 1,4 dihydro-4-oxo-quinolinyl moiety bearing an essential carboxyl group at position 3. Quinolones inhibit prokaryotic type II topoisomerases, namely DNA gyrase and, in a few cases, topoisomerase IV, through direct binding to the bacterial chromosome. Based on the hypothesis that these drugs could also bind to the viral nucleic acids or nucleoprotein-complexes, several quinolone derivatives were tested for their antiviral activity. Indeed, antibacterial fluoroquinolones were shown to be effective against vaccinia virus and papovaviruses; these preliminary results prompted the synthesis of modified quinolones to optimize antiviral action and improve selectivity index. The introduction of an aryl group at the piperazine moiety of the fluoroquinolone shifted the activity from antibacterial to antiviral, with a specific action against HIV. The antiviral activity seemed to be related to an inhibitory effect at the transcriptional level, and further evidence suggested a mechanism of action mediated by inhibition of Tat functions. Substitution of the fluorine at position 6 with an amine group to give aryl-piperazinyl-6-amino-quinolones improved the activity and selectivity against HIV-1: the most potent compound of this series was shown to inhibit virus replication through interference with Tat-TAR interaction. A comprehensive SAR investigation was performed based on additional chemical intervention to the quinolone template moiety, such as the introduction of nucleoside derivative functions. The information gained so far will be useful for future rational drug design aimed at developing new compounds with optimized antiviral activity.

  7. Glycodendritic structures: promising new antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2004-09-01

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed by dendritic cells, is able to recognize high mannosylated glycoproteins at the surface of a broad range of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. For at least some of these agents this interaction appears to be an important part of the infection process. Therefore, this lectin might be considered in the design of new antiviral drugs. In this manner, multivalent carbohydrate systems based on dendrimers and dendritic polymers are promising candidates as antiviral drugs. Boltorn hyperbranched dendritic polymers functionalized with mannose have been used to inhibit DC-SIGN-mediated infection in an Ebola-pseudotyped viral model. Their physiological solubility, lack of toxicity and especially their low price suggest the application of these glycodendritic polymers for possible formulation as microbicides.

  8. Transformation of Contaminant Candidate List (CCL3) compounds during ozonation and advanced oxidation processes in drinking water: Assessment of biological effects.

    PubMed

    Mestankova, Hana; Parker, Austa M; Bramaz, Nadine; Canonica, Silvio; Schirmer, Kristin; von Gunten, Urs; Linden, Karl G

    2016-04-15

    The removal of emerging contaminants during water treatment is a current issue and various technologies are being explored. These include UV- and ozone-based advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In this study, AOPs were explored for their degradation capabilities of 25 chemical contaminants on the US Environmental Protection Agency's Contaminant Candidate List 3 (CCL3) in drinking water. Twenty-three of these were found to be amenable to hydroxyl radical-based treatment, with second-order rate constants for their reactions with hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the range of 3-8 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The development of biological activity of the contaminants, focusing on mutagenicity and estrogenicity, was followed in parallel with their degradation using the Ames and YES bioassays to detect potential changes in biological effects during oxidative treatment. The majority of treatment cases resulted in a loss of biological activity upon oxidation of the parent compounds without generation of any form of estrogenicity or mutagenicity. However, an increase in mutagenic activity was detected by oxidative transformation of the following CCL3 parent compounds: nitrobenzene (OH, UV photolysis), quinoline (OH, ozone), methamidophos (OH), N-nitrosopyrolidine (OH), N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine (OH), aniline (UV photolysis), and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (UV photolysis). Only one case of formation of estrogenic activity was observed, namely, for the oxidation of quinoline by OH. Overall, this study provides fundamental and practical information on AOP-based treatment of specific compounds of concern and represents a framework for evaluating the performance of transformation-based treatment processes.

  9. Novel antiviral activity of bromocriptine against dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Kato, Fumihiro; Ishida, Yuki; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Watanabe, Satoru; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Tajima, Shigeru; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Youichi; Ichiyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yoshii, Kentaro; Takashima, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Miura, Tomoyuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infectious disease is a major public health problem worldwide; however, licensed vaccines or specific antiviral drugs against this infection are not available. To identify novel anti-DENV compounds, we screened 1280 pharmacologically active compounds using focus reduction assay. Bromocriptine (BRC) was found to have potent anti-DENV activity and low cytotoxicity (half maximal effective concentration [EC50], 0.8-1.6 μM; and half maximal cytotoxicity concentration [CC50], 53.6 μM). Time-of-drug-addition and time-of-drug-elimination assays suggested that BRC inhibits translation and/or replication steps in the DENV life cycle. A subgenomic replicon system was used to verify that BRC restricts RNA replication step. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution (N374H) was detected in the NS3 protein that conferred resistance to BRC. In summary, BRC was found to be a novel DENV inhibitor and a potential candidate for the treatment of DENV infectious disease. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis and Antiviral Activity of Substituted Quercetins

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Mahendra; Kim, Yunjeong; Desper, John; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Hua, Duy H.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza viruses are important pathogens that cause respiratory infections in humans and animals. In addition to vaccination, antiviral drugs against influenza virus play a significant role in controlling viral infections by reducing disease progression and virus transmission. Plant derived polyphenols are associated with antioxidant activity, anti-carcinogenic, and cardio- and neuro-protective actions. Some polyphenols, such as resveratrol and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), showed significant anti-influenza activity in vitro and/or in vivo. Recently we showed that quercetin and isoquercetin (quercetin-3-β-D-glucoside), a glucoside form of quercetin, significantly reduced the replication of influenza viruses in vitro and in vivo (isoquercetin). The antiviral effects of isoquercetin were greater than that of quercetin with lower IC50 values and higher in vitro therapeutic index. Thus, we investigated the synthesis and antiviral activities of various quercetin derivatives with substitution of C3, C3’, and C5 hydroxyl functions with various phenolic ester, alkoxy, and aminoalkoxy moieties. Among newly synthesized compounds, quercetin-3-gallate which is structurally related to EGCG showed comparable antiviral activity against influenza virus (porcine H1N1 strain) to that of EGCG with improved in vitro therapeutic index. PMID:22115591

  11. Synthesis and antiviral activity of substituted quercetins.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Mahendra; Kim, Yunjeong; Desper, John; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Hua, Duy H

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses are important pathogens that cause respiratory infections in humans and animals. In addition to vaccination, antiviral drugs against influenza virus play a significant role in controlling viral infections by reducing disease progression and virus transmission. Plant derived polyphenols are associated with antioxidant activity, anti-carcinogenic, and cardio- and neuro-protective actions. Some polyphenols, such as resveratrol and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), showed significant anti-influenza activity in vitro and/or in vivo. Recently we showed that quercetin and isoquercetin (quercetin-3-β-d-glucoside), a glucoside form of quercetin, significantly reduced the replication of influenza viruses in vitro and in vivo (isoquercetin). The antiviral effects of isoquercetin were greater than that of quercetin with lower IC(50) values and higher in vitro therapeutic index. Thus, we investigated the synthesis and antiviral activities of various quercetin derivatives with substitution of C3, C3', and C5 hydroxyl functions with various phenolic ester, alkoxy, and aminoalkoxy moieties. Among newly synthesized compounds, quercetin-3-gallate which is structurally related to EGCG showed comparable antiviral activity against influenza virus (porcine H1N1 strain) to that of EGCG with improved in vitro therapeutic index. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. WITHDRAWN: Antivirals for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, T O; Tyrrell, D

    2007-07-18

    The common cold is a ubiquitous short and usually mild illness for which preventive and treatment interventions have been under development since the mid-40s. As our understanding of the disease has increased, more experimental antivirals have been developed. This review attempts to draw together experimental evidence of the effects of these compounds. To identify, assemble, evaluate and (if possible) synthesise the results of published and unpublished randomised controlled trials of the effects of antivirals to prevent or minimise the impact of the common cold. We searched electronic databases, corresponded with researchers and handsearched the archives of the MRC's Common Cold Unit (CCU). We included original reports of randomised and quasi-randomised trials assessing the effects of antivirals on volunteers artificially infected and in individuals exposed to colds in the community. We included 241 studies assessing the effects of Interferons, interferon-inducers and other antivirals on experimental and naturally occurring common colds, contained in 230 reports. We structured our comparisons by experimental or community setting. Although intranasal interferons have high preventive efficacy against experimental colds (protective efficacy 46%, 37% to 54%) and to a lesser extent against natural colds (protective efficacy 24%, 21% to 27%) and are also significantly more effective than placebo in attenuating the course of experimental colds (WMD 15.90, 13.42 to 18.38), their safety profile makes compliance with their use difficult. For example, prolonged prevention of community colds with interferons causes blood-tinged nasal discharge (OR 4.52, 3.78 to 5.41). Dipyridamole (protective efficacy against natural colds 49%, 30% to 62%), ICI 130, 685 (protective efficacy against experimental colds 58%, 35% to 74% ), Impulsin (palmitate) (protective efficacy against natural colds 44%, CI 35% to 52% ) and Pleconaril (protective efficacy against experimental colds 71%, 15% to

  13. Smallpox Antiviral Drug

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Nevirapine 1996 HIV Delavirdine 1997 HIV Abacavir 1998 HIV Efavirenz 1998 HIV Tenofovir 2001 HIV Adefovirn dipivoxil 2002 HBV Emtricitabine 2003 HIV Acyclovir...toxicity, hair loss, and skin changes [De Benedittis et al., 2004]. The other approach to orthopoxvirus antiviral drug discovery is to screen new...Rouzioux C. 2004. Penetration of enfuvirtide, tenofovir, efavirenz , and protease inhibitors in the genital tract of HIV-1-infected men. Aids 18:1958

  14. Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzumura, Akitoshi; Watanabe, Masaki; Nagasako, Naoyuki; Asahi, Ryoji

    2014-06-01

    Recently, Cu-based chalcogenides such as Cu3SbSe4, Cu2Se, and Cu2SnSe3 have attracted much attention because of their high thermoelectric performance and their common feature of very low thermal conductivity. However, for practical use, materials without toxic elements such as selenium are preferable. In this paper, we report Se-free Cu3SbS4 thermoelectric material and improvement of its figure of merit ( ZT) by chemical substitutions. Substitutions of 3 at.% Ag for Cu and 2 at.% Ge for Sb lead to significant reductions in the thermal conductivity by 37% and 22%, respectively. These substitutions do not sacrifice the power factor, thus resulting in enhancement of the ZT value. The sensitivity of the thermal conductivity to chemical substitutions in these compounds is discussed in terms of the calculated phonon dispersion and previously proposed models for Cu-based chalcogenides. To improve the power factor, we optimize the hole carrier concentration by substitution of Ge for Sb, achieving a power factor of 16 μW/cm K2 at 573 K, which is better than the best reported for Se-based Cu3SbSe4 compounds.

  15. Pharmacokinetics in melanoma-bearing mice of 5-dihydroxyboryl-6-propyl-2-thiouracil (BPTU), a candidate compound for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Verrijk, R; Smolders, I J; Huiskamp, R; Gavin, P R; Philipp, K H; Begg, A C

    1994-04-01

    Blood pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of 5-dihydroxyboryl-6-propyl-2-thiouracil (BPTU), a boron carrier with postulated melanin-seeking properties for boron neutron capture therapy, were determined in C57/BL mice with subcutaneous pigmented or non-pigmented B16 melanomas. Borocaptate sodium (BSH) was used as a boron compound without melanin-seeking properties in a comparative biodistribution study in the same animal tumour models. Administration of single doses showed that BPTU was retained better in the pigmented B16 tumour than in the non-pigmented variant. BPTU was found in large concentrations in kidney and liver. Brain boron was approximately 10-fold lower than tumour boron. On a molar basis, BPTU demonstrated higher affinity for B16 tumours than BSH. Owing to solubility limits, tumour boron concentrations in this mouse study were too low for effective application of BNCT. However, the high tumour-to-blood and tumour-to-normal tissues ratios indicate that, with appropriate formulation, BPTU could be a promising candidate for clinical BNCT.

  16. Antiviral properties of deazaadenine nucleoside derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vittori, S; Dal Ben, D; Lambertucci, C; Marucci, G; Volpini, R; Cristalli, G

    2006-01-01

    Viral infections have menaced human beings since time immemorial, and even today new viral strains that cause lethal diseases are being discovered with alarming frequency. One major example is HIV, the etiological agent of AIDS, which spread up in the last two decades. Very recently, other virus based diseases such as avian flu have spread fear around the world, and hemorrhagic fevers from central Africa serious threaten human health because of their very deadly effects. New antiviral agents are still greatly needed to counter these menaces. Many scientists are involved in this field of research, and many of the recently discovered effective antiviral compounds are nucleoside analogues. Among those derivatives, deazapurine nucleoside analogues have demonstrated potent inhibitory effect of viral replication. This review reports on recently generated data from preparing and testing deazapurine nucleoside derivatives as inhibitors in virus replication systems. Although most of the reported data have been produced in antiHIV, antiHCMV, and antiHSV biological testing, very recently other new important fields of application have been discovered, all in topical subjects of strong interest. In fact, deazapurine nucleosides have been found to be active as chemotherapeutics for some veterinary systemic viral infections, for which no antiviral drugs are licensed yet. Furthermore, they demonstrated efficacy in the inhibition of Hepatitis C virus replication. Finally, these compounds showed high potency as virucides against Ebola Virus, curing Ebola infected mice with a single dose administration.

  17. International society for antiviral research - 23rd international conference.

    PubMed

    Mason, Vicki L

    2010-06-01

    The 23rd International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR), organized by the International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR) and held in San Francisco, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of antivirals. This conference report highlights selected presentations on CD4-BFFI (Roche Holding AG), a CD4 mAb-based bifunctional HIV entry inhibitor; a CLDC-HBsAg vaccine (Juvaris BioTherapeutics Inc/China National Biotec Group) against HBV; ODE-(S)-MPMPA (University of California San Diego), a potent anti-HCV compound; the anti-human CMV activity exhibited by tricin; the protective activity of Ingavirin against influenza A; and Prosetta Bioconformatics's approach to identifying small-molecule antivirals.

  18. Dengue Virus Entry as Target for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Marijke M. F.; Schols, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infections are expanding worldwide and, because of the lack of a vaccine, the search for antiviral products is imperative. Four serotypes of DENV are described and they all cause a similar disease outcome. It would be interesting to develop an antiviral product that can interact with all four serotypes, prevent host cell infection and subsequent immune activation. DENV entry is thus an interesting target for antiviral therapy. DENV enters the host cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several cellular receptors have been proposed, and DC-SIGN, present on dendritic cells, is considered as the most important DENV receptor until now. Because DENV entry is a target for antiviral therapy, various classes of compounds have been investigated to inhibit this process. In this paper, an overview is given of all the putative DENV receptors, and the most promising DENV entry inhibitors are discussed. PMID:22529868

  19. Antiviral agents against equid alphaherpesviruses: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vissani, María A; Thiry, Etienne; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Barrandeguy, María

    2016-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus infections cause respiratory, neurological and reproductive syndromes. Despite preventive and control measures and the availability of vaccines and immunostimulants, herpesvirus infections still constitute a major threat to equine health and for the equine industry worldwide. Antiviral drugs, particularly nucleoside analogues and foscarnet, are successfully used for the treatment of human alphaherpesvirus infections. In equine medicine, the use of antiviral medications in alphaherpesvirus infections would decrease the excretion of virus and diminish the risk of contagion and the convalescent time in affected horses, and would also improve the clinical outcome of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy. The combined use of antiviral compounds, along with vaccines, immune modulators, and effective preventive and control measures, might be beneficial in diminishing the negative impact of alphaherpesvirus infections in horses. The purpose of this review is to analyse the available information regarding the use of antiviral agents against alphaherpesviruses, with particular emphasis on equine alphaherpesvirus infections.

  20. Chlorogenic Compounds from Coffee Beans Exert Activity against Respiratory Viruses.

    PubMed

    Sinisi, Valentina; Stevaert, Annelies; Berti, Federico; Forzato, Cristina; Benedetti, Fabio; Navarini, Luciano; Camps, Anita; Persoons, Leentje; Vermeire, Kurt

    2017-05-01

    Chlorogenic acids are secondary metabolites in diverse plants. Some chlorogenic acids extracted from traditional medicinal plants are known for their healing properties, e.g., against viral infections. Also, green coffee beans are a rich source of chlorogenic acids, with 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid being the most abundant chlorogenic acid in coffee. We previously reported the synthesis of the regioisomers of lactones, bearing different substituents on the quinidic core. Here, 3,4-O-dicaffeoyl-1,5-γ-quinide and three dimethoxycinnamoyl-γ-quinides were investigated for in vitro antiviral activities against a panel of 14 human viruses. Whereas the dimethoxycinnamoyl-γ-quinides did not show any antiviral potency in cytopathogenic effect reduction assays, 3,4-O-dicaffeoyl-1,5-γ-quinide exerted mild antiviral activity against herpes simplex viruses, adenovirus, and influenza virus. Interestingly, when the compounds were evaluated against respiratory syncytial virus, a potent antiviral effect of 3,4-O-dicaffeoyl-1,5-γ-quinide was observed against both subtypes of respiratory syncytial virus, with EC50 values in the submicromolar range. Time-of-addition experiments revealed that this compound acts on an intracellular post-entry replication step. Our data show that 3,4-O-dicaffeoyl-1,5-γ-quinide is a relevant candidate for lead optimization and further mechanistic studies, and warrants clinical development as a potential anti-respiratory syncytial virus drug. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Antiviral Activity of Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid and Its Derivative Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid against West Nile Virus and Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Jiménez de Oya, Nereida; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2017-08-01

    Flaviviruses are positive-strand RNA viruses distributed all over the world that infect millions of people every year and for which no specific antiviral agents have been approved. These viruses include the mosquito-borne West Nile virus (WNV), which is responsible for outbreaks of meningitis and encephalitis. Considering that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) has been previously shown to inhibit the multiplication of the related dengue virus and hepatitis C virus, we have evaluated the effect of NDGA, and its methylated derivative tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N), on the infection of WNV. Both compounds inhibited the infection of WNV, likely by impairing viral replication. Since flavivirus multiplication is highly dependent on host cell lipid metabolism, the antiviral effect of NDGA has been previously related to its ability to disturb the lipid metabolism, probably by interfering with the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP) pathway. Remarkably, we observed that other structurally unrelated inhibitors of the SREBP pathway, such as PF-429242 and fatostatin, also reduced WNV multiplication, supporting that the SREBP pathway may constitute a druggable target suitable for antiviral intervention against flavivirus infection. Moreover, treatment with NDGA, M4N, PF-429242, and fatostatin also inhibited the multiplication of the mosquito-borne flavivirus Zika virus (ZIKV), which has been recently associated with birth defects (microcephaly) and neurological disorders. Our results point to SREBP inhibitors, such as NDGA and M4N, as potential candidates for further antiviral development against medically relevant flaviviruses. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) and studies supporting the Medical Chemical Defense Program on Task 89-01: Screening of candidate pretreatment and therapeutic compounds in in vivo models. Final report Jul 89-Sep 91

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.T.; Kiser, R.C.; Dill, G.S.

    1992-02-01

    This task was a continuation of Task 86-29 initiated for Contract D. It provided in vivo screens for evaluating the efficacy of candidate pretreatment and treatment compounds submitted by the Drug Assessment Division of U.S. Army Medical Research of Chemical Defense against soman, tabun, and/or cyanide. A total of 578 compounds were received for testing and their maximum solubility in-vehicles comparable with in vivo testing in mice was determined. Range-finding and median lethal dose determinations following IM and/or oral administrations were conducted for 436 compounds submitted for nerve agent screening and range finding and median lethal dose determinations following IP administration were conducted for up to 142 compounds submitted for cyanide screening. Of 332 compounds evaluated, 154 passed the GD treatment efficacy evaluation, and 90 of 156 compounds submitted passed the GA treatment efficacy evaluation. For pretreatment studies against a GD challenge, 224 of 379 compounds submitted passed the IM efficacy evaluation and 96 of 143 compounds submitted passed the oral efficacy evaluation. Only 12 of 133 compounds evaluated as cyanide pretreatment compounds passed the efficacy evaluations. The mission of Task 89-01 was combined under Task 91-20 for the duration of Contract DAMD17-89-C-9050.

  3. A candidate anti-HIV reservoir compound, auranofin, exerts a selective 'anti-memory' effect by exploiting the baseline oxidative status of lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Chirullo, B; Sgarbanti, R; Limongi, D; Shytaj, I L; Alvarez, D; Das, B; Boe, A; DaFonseca, S; Chomont, N; Liotta, L; Petricoin, E Iii; Norelli, S; Pelosi, E; Garaci, E; Savarino, A; Palamara, A T

    2013-12-05

    Central memory (T(CM)) and transitional memory (T(TM)) CD4(+) T cells are known to be the major cellular reservoirs for HIV, as these cells can harbor a transcriptionally silent form of viral DNA that is not targeted by either the immune system or current antiretroviral drug regimens. In the present study, we explored the molecular bases of the anti-HIV reservoir effects of auranofin (AF), a pro-oxidant gold-based drug and a candidate compound for a cure of AIDS. We here show that T(CM) and T(TM) lymphocytes have lower baseline antioxidant defenses as compared with their naive counterpart. These differences are mirrored by the effects exerted by AF on T-lymphocytes: AF was able to exert a pro-differentiating and pro-apoptotic effect, which was more pronounced in the memory subsets. AF induced an early activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) followed by mitochondrial depolarization and a final burst in intracellular peroxides. The pro-differentiating effect was characterized by a downregulation of the CD27 marker expression. Interestingly, AF-induced apoptosis was inhibited by pyruvate, a well-known peroxide scavenger, but pyruvate did not inhibit the pro-differentiating effect of AF, indicating that the pro-apoptotic and pro-differentiating effects involve different pathways. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that AF selectively targets the T(CM)/T(TM) lymphocyte subsets, which encompass the HIV reservoir, by affecting redox-sensitive cell death pathways.

  4. [Antiviral therapy in herpetic keratitis].

    PubMed

    Popa, D P; Ivaşcu, M; Ristea, L

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of ocular herpes has increased in the last time. The pathogenic mechanisms of herpetic ocular inflammation consist in cells degeneration produced by intracell virus accumulation, and immunopathological processes. It is presented the antiviral treatment in ocular herpes and antiviral efficacity of acyclovir, in comparison with other chemotherapeutics.

  5. Progress in the development of poliovirus antiviral agents and their essential role in reducing risks that threaten eradication.

    PubMed

    McKinlay, Mark A; Collett, Marc S; Hincks, Jeffrey R; Oberste, M Steven; Pallansch, Mark A; Okayasu, Hiromasa; Sutter, Roland W; Modlin, John F; Dowdle, Walter R

    2014-11-01

    Chronic prolonged excretion of vaccine-derived polioviruses by immunodeficient persons (iVDPV) presents a personal risk of poliomyelitis to the patient as well as a programmatic risk of delayed global eradication. Poliovirus antiviral drugs offer the only mitigation of these risks. Antiviral agents may also have a potential role in the management of accidental exposures and in certain outbreak scenarios. Efforts to discover and develop poliovirus antiviral agents have been ongoing in earnest since the formation in 2007 of the Poliovirus Antivirals Initiative. The most advanced antiviral, pocapavir (V-073), is a capsid inhibitor that has recently demonstrated activity in an oral poliovirus vaccine human challenge model. Additional antiviral candidates with differing mechanisms of action continue to be profiled and evaluated preclinically with the goal of having 2 antivirals available for use in combination to treat iVDPV excreters.

  6. Antiviral Actions of Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Charles E.

    2001-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of the antiviral actions of interferons (IFNs), as well as strategies evolved by viruses to antagonize the actions of IFNs. Furthermore, advances made while elucidating the IFN system have contributed significantly to our understanding in multiple areas of virology and molecular cell biology, ranging from pathways of signal transduction to the biochemical mechanisms of transcriptional and translational control to the molecular basis of viral pathogenesis. IFNs are approved therapeutics and have moved from the basic research laboratory to the clinic. Among the IFN-induced proteins important in the antiviral actions of IFNs are the RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) and RNase L, and the Mx protein GTPases. Double-stranded RNA plays a central role in modulating protein phosphorylation and RNA degradation catalyzed by the IFN-inducible PKR kinase and the 2′-5′-oligoadenylate-dependent RNase L, respectively, and also in RNA editing by the IFN-inducible RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (ADAR1). IFN also induces a form of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS2) and the major histocompatibility complex class I and II proteins, all of which play important roles in immune response to infections. Several additional genes whose expression profiles are altered in response to IFN treatment and virus infection have been identified by microarray analyses. The availability of cDNA and genomic clones for many of the components of the IFN system, including IFN-α, IFN-β, and IFN-γ, their receptors, Jak and Stat and IRF signal transduction components, and proteins such as PKR, 2′,5′-OAS, Mx, and ADAR, whose expression is regulated by IFNs, has permitted the generation of mutant proteins, cells that overexpress different forms of the proteins, and animals in which their expression has been disrupted by targeted gene disruption. The use of these IFN system

  7. A comprehensive procedure for antiviral inhibitor discovery using EV71 as an example.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lin; Zhu, Shouhai; Wang, Yaxin; Lou, Zhiyong; Sun, Yuna

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic viral infectious diseases, the emergence and re-emergence of new viral infections, and in particular, resistance to currently used antiviral drugs have led to increased demand for new antiviral strategies and reagents. Increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms of viral infection has provided great potential for the discovery of new antiviral agents that target viral proteins or host factors. In this work, we introduce a comprehensive system using enteroviruses 71 (EV71) as an example for leading compound discovery to develop new antiviral.

  8. Zika antiviral chemotherapy: identification of drugs and promising starting points for drug discovery from an FDA-approved library

    PubMed Central

    Pascoalino, Bruno S.; Courtemanche, Gilles; Cordeiro, Marli T.; Gil, Laura H. V. G.; Freitas-Junior, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Background The recent epidemics of Zika virus (ZIKV) implicated it as the cause of serious and potentially lethal congenital conditions such microcephaly and other central nervous system defects, as well as the development of the Guillain-Barré syndrome in otherwise healthy patients. Recent findings showed that anti-Dengue antibodies are capable of amplifying ZIKV infection by a mechanism similar to antibody-dependent enhancement, increasing the severity of the disease. This scenario becomes potentially catastrophic when the global burden of Dengue and the advent of the newly approved anti-Dengue vaccines in the near future are taken into account. Thus, antiviral chemotherapy should be pursued as a priority strategy to control the spread of the virus and prevent the complications associated with Zika. Methods Here we describe a fast and reliable cell-based, high-content screening assay for discovery of anti-ZIKV compounds. This methodology has been used to screen the National Institute of Health Clinical Collection compound library, a small collection of FDA-approved drugs. Results and conclusion From 725 FDA-approved compounds triaged, 29 (4%) were found to have anti-Zika virus activity, of which 22 had confirmed (76% of confirmation) by dose-response curves. Five candidates presented selective activity against ZIKV infection and replication in a human cell line. These hits have abroad spectrum of chemotypes and therapeutic uses, offering valuable opportunities for selection of leads for antiviral drug discovery. PMID:27909576

  9. Antiviral immunity in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangchun; Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Although a variety of virus species can infect amphibians, diseases caused by ranaviruses ([RVs]; Iridoviridae) have become prominent, and are a major concern for biodiversity, agriculture and international trade. The relatively recent and rapid increase in prevalence of RV infections, the wide range of host species infected by RVs, the variability in host resistance among population of the same species and among different developmental stages, all suggest an important involvement of the amphibian immune system. Nevertheless, the roles of the immune system in the etiology of viral diseases in amphibians are still poorly investigated. We review here the current knowledge of antiviral immunity in amphibians, focusing on model species such as the frog Xenopus and the salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and on recent progress in generating tools to better understand how host immune defenses control RV infections, pathogenicity, and transmission.

  10. Recent developments in antiviral agents against enterovirus 71 infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Recent EV-71 outbreaks in Asia-Pacific were not limited to mild HFMD, but were associated with severe neurological complications such as aseptic meningitis and brainstem encephalitis, which may lead to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The absence of licensed therapeutics for clinical use has intensified research into anti-EV-71 development. This review highlights the potential antiviral agents targeting EV-71 attachment, entry, uncoating, translation, polyprotein processing, virus-induced formation of membranous RNA replication complexes, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The strategies for antiviral development include target-based synthetic compounds, anti-rhinovirus and poliovirus libraries screening, and natural compound libraries screening. Growing knowledge of the EV-71 life cycle will lead to successful development of antivirals. The continued effort to develop antiviral agents for treatment is crucial in the absence of a vaccine. The coupling of antivirals with an effective vaccine will accelerate eradication of the disease. PMID:24521134

  11. [Use of Getah virus for antiviral assay of human interferon].

    PubMed

    Ogiso, Subaru; Shirai, Junsuke; Tuchiya, Yoshinori; Honda, Eiichi

    2005-12-01

    Antiviral assay is used routinely for measuring the biological activity of interferon (IFN). However, the challenge viruses used in these assays are considered dangerous to the animal industry and pose a risk of human infection. For example, the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an important exotic disease agent in domestic animals, and the sindbis virus provokes rash, arthralgia, and fever in humans. Therefore, biosafety needs to be considered when antiviral assays are performed. We chose Getah virus as a candidate challenge virus because it is less hazardous to animals and humans. Crystal violet staining 50% CPE inhibition antiviral assay of human IFN using Getah virus was studied. Antiviral assay using Getah virus and FL cells gave a higher titer of human IFN than did assay using VSV. The titer of human IFN alpha was almost the same as that given by standardized control samples. The titer of human IFN by antiviral assay using Getah virus on the sheet method (IFN reacted the sheeted FL cells) was higher than those of the simultaneous reaction method (IFN reacted the suspending FL cells before sheeted). We therefore consider the sheet method useful for detection of small amounts of IFN. Antiviral assay using Getah virus on MDBK cells gave a lower titer of human IFN alpha than did assay using VSV. However, the adjusting the number of MDBK cells and the titer of Getah virus to get the best condition for CPE appearance, gave similar results in the assays using Getah virus and VSV. We consider that Getah virus is a potentially useful challenge virus for antiviral assay of human IFN.

  12. Antiviral Activity of Sulfated Polysaccharide of Adenanthera pavonina against Poliovirus in HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Godoi, Ananda Marques; Faccin-Galhardi, Lígia Carla; Lopes, Nayara; de Almeida, Raimundo Rafael; Ricardo, Nágila Maria Pontes Silva; Nozawa, Carlos; Linhares, Rosa Elisa Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Adenanthera pavonina, popularly known as red-bead tree, carolina, pigeon's eye, and dragon's eye, is a plant traditionally used in Brazil for the treatment of several diseases. The present study aimed at evaluating the activity of sulfated polysaccharide from the Adenanthera pavonina (SPLSAp) seeds against poliovirus type 1 (PV-1) in HEp-2 cell cultures. The SPLSAp presented a cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of 500 μg/mL in HEp-2 cell cultures, evaluated by the dimethylthiazolyl-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method (MTT). The SPLSAp exhibited a significant antiviral activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.18 µg/mL, determined by plaque reduction assay and a high selectivity index (SI) of 423. The maximum inhibition (100%) of PV replication was found when the SPLSAp treatment was concomitant with viral infection (time 0 h), at all tested concentrations. The maximal inhibition was also found when the SPLSAp was used 1 h and 2 h postinfection, albeit at 50 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL. Therefore, we demonstrated that the SPLSAp inhibited PV growth. We also suggested that SPLSAp inhibited PV in more than one step of the replication, as the mechanism of antiviral action. We, therefore, selected the compound as a potential candidate for further development towards the control of the infection. PMID:25221609

  13. Cytomegalovirus Antivirals and Development of Improved Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Alistair; Choi, K. Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that establishes a life long asymptomatic infection in healthy individuals. Infection of immunesuppressed individuals causes serious illness. Transplant and AIDS patients are highly susceptible to CMV leading to life threatening end organ disease. Another vulnerable population is the developing fetus in utero, where congenital infection can result in surviving newborns with long term developmental problems. There is no vaccine licensed for CMV and current antivirals suffer from complications associated with prolonged treatment. These include drug toxicity and emergence of resistant strains. There is an obvious need for new antivirals. Candidate intervention strategies are tested in controlled pre-clinical animal models but species specificity of HCMV precludes the direct study of the virus in an animal model. Areas covered This review explores the current status of CMV antivirals and development of new drugs. This includes the use of animal models and the development of new improved models such as humanized animal CMV and bioluminescent imaging of virus in animals in real time. Expert Opinion Various new CMV antivirals are in development, some with greater spectrum of activity against other viruses. Although the greatest need is in the setting of transplant patients there remains an unmet need for a safe antiviral strategy against congenital CMV. This is especially important since an effective CMV vaccine remains an elusive goal. In this capacity greater emphasis should be placed on suitable pre-clinical animal models and greater collaboration between industry and academia. PMID:21883024

  14. Structure-based discovery of two antiviral inhibitors targeting the NS3 helicase of Japanese encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jin’e; Li, Huan; Kong, Dexin; Cao, Shengbo; Peng, Guiqing; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Huanchun; Song, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a flavivirus that threatens more than half of the world’s population. Vaccination can prevent the disease, but no specific antiviral drug is yet available for clinical therapy, and the death rate caused by JEV can reach as high as 60%. The C-terminus of non-structural protein 3 (NS3) of flavivirus encodes helicase and has been identified as a potential drug target. In this study, high throughput molecular docking was employed to identify candidate JEV NS3 helicase inhibitors in a commercial library containing 250,000 compounds. Forty-one compounds were then tested for their ability to inhibit NS3 activity. Two compounds inhibited unwinding activity strongly but had no effect on the ATPase activity of the protein. Western blots, IFA, and plaque reduction assays demonstrated that both compounds inhibited the virus in cell culture. The EC50s of the two compounds were 25.67 and 23.50 μM, respectively. Using simulated docking, the two compounds were shown to bind and block the NS3 RNA unwinding channel, consistent with the results of the enzyme inhibition tests. The atoms participating in intramolecular interaction were identified to facilitate future compound optimization. PMID:27679979

  15. Utility of humanized BLT mice for analysis of dengue virus infection and antiviral drug testing.

    PubMed

    Frias-Staheli, Natalia; Dorner, Marcus; Marukian, Svetlana; Billerbeck, Eva; Labitt, Rachael N; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the cause of a potentially life-threatening disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The lack of a small animal model that mimics the symptoms of DENV infection in humans has slowed the understanding of viral pathogenesis and the development of therapies and vaccines. Here, we investigated the use of humanized "bone marrow liver thymus" (BLT) mice as a model for immunological studies and assayed their applicability for preclinical testing of antiviral compounds. Human immune system (HIS) BLT-NOD/SCID mice were inoculated intravenously with a low-passage, clinical isolate of DENV-2, and this resulted in sustained viremia and infection of leukocytes in lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. In addition, DENV infection increased serum cytokine levels and elicited DENV-2-neutralizing human IgM antibodies. Following restimulation with DENV-infected dendritic cells, in vivo-primed T cells became activated and acquired effector function. An adenosine nucleoside inhibitor of DENV decreased the circulating viral RNA when administered simultaneously or 2 days postinfection, simulating a potential treatment protocol for DENV infection in humans. In summary, we demonstrate that BLT mice are susceptible to infection with clinical DENV isolates, mount virus-specific adaptive immune responses, and respond to antiviral drug treatment. Although additional refinements to the model are required, BLT mice are a suitable platform to study aspects of DENV infection and pathogenesis and for preclinical testing of drug and vaccine candidates. IMPORTANCE Infection with dengue virus remains a major medical problem. Progress in our understanding of the disease and development of therapeutics has been hampered by the scarcity of small animal models. Here, we show that humanized mice, i.e., animals engrafted with components of a human immune system, that were infected with a patient-derived dengue virus strain developed clinical symptoms of the disease and mounted

  16. Further iinvestigations on the antiviral activities of medicinal plants of togo.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J B; Anani, K; Lee, M K; de Souza, C; Arnason, J T; Gbeassor, M

    2000-01-01

    Further studies were done on the antiviral activities of 10 species of Togolese medicinal plants, previously shown to possess activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV). The dominant activity in all cases was virucidal (direct inactivation of virus particles), although Adansonia digitata extracts also appeared to have intracellular antiviral activities as well, which could indicate the presence of multiple antiviral compounds, or a single compound with multiple actions. In the seven most active extracts, the anti-HSV activity was considerably enhanced by light, especially UVA (long wavelength UV), although they all showed "dark" antiviral activity as well. Thus, all the extracts contained antiviral photosensitizers. In all tests, the root-bark and leaf extracts of A. digitata were the most potent.

  17. Online solid phase extraction liquid chromatography using bonded zwitterionic stationary phases and tandem mass spectrometry for rapid environmental trace analysis of highly polar hydrophilic compounds - Application for the antiviral drug Zanamivir.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Richard H; Fedorova, Ganna; Blum, Kristin M; Pulit-Prociak, Jolanta; Gillman, Anna; Järhult, Josef; Appelblad, Patrik; Söderström, Hanna

    2015-08-15

    Zanamivir (Za) is a highly polar and hydrophilic antiviral drug used for the treatment of influenza A viruses. Za has been detected in rivers of Japan and it's environmental occurrence has the risk of inducing antiviral resistant avian influenza viruses. In this study, a rapid automated online solid phase extraction liquid chromatography method using bonded zwitterionic stationary phases and tandem mass spectrometry (SPE/LC-MS/MS) for trace analysis of Za was developed. Furthermore, an internal standard (IS) calibration method capable of quantifying Za in Milli-Q, surface water, sewage effluent and sewage influent was evaluated. Optimum pre-extraction sample composition was found to be 95/5 v/v acetonitrile/water sample and 1% formic acid. The developed method showed acceptable linearities (r(2)≥0.994), filtration recovery (≥91%), and intra-day precisions (RSD≤16%), and acceptable and environmentally relevant LOQs (≤20ngL(-1)). Storage tests showed no significant losses of Za during 20 days and +4/-20°C (≤12%) with the exception of influent samples, which should be kept at -20°C to avoid significant Za losses. The applicability of the method was demonstrated in a study on phototransformation of Za in unfiltered and filtered surface water during 28 days of artificial UV irradiation exposure. No significant (≤12%) phototransformation was found in surface water after 28 days suggesting a relatively high photostability of Za and that Za should be of environmental concern.

  18. Macromolecular Antiviral Agents against Zika, Ebola, SARS, and Other Pathogenic Viruses.

    PubMed

    Schandock, Franziska; Riber, Camilla Frich; Röcker, Annika; Müller, Janis A; Harms, Mirja; Gajda, Paulina; Zuwala, Kaja; Andersen, Anna H F; Løvschall, Kaja Borup; Tolstrup, Martin; Kreppel, Florian; Münch, Jan; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2017-09-25

    Viral pathogens continue to constitute a heavy burden on healthcare and socioeconomic systems. Efforts to create antiviral drugs repeatedly lag behind the advent of pathogens and growing understanding is that broad-spectrum antiviral agents will make strongest impact in future antiviral efforts. This work performs selection of synthetic polymers as novel broadly active agents and demonstrates activity of these polymers against Zika, Ebola, Lassa, Lyssa, Rabies, Marburg, Ebola, influenza, herpes simplex, and human immunodeficiency viruses. Results presented herein offer structure-activity relationships for these pathogens in terms of their susceptibility to inhibition by polymers, and for polymers in terms of their anionic charge and hydrophobicity that make up broad-spectrum antiviral agents. The identified leads cannot be predicted based on prior data on polymer-based antivirals and represent promising candidates for further development as preventive microbicides. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Quasispecies, error catastrophe, and the antiviral activity of ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Graci, Jason D; Cameron, Craig E

    2002-07-05

    Ribavirin is the first synthetic, broad-spectrum antiviral nucleoside. Despite its more than 30 year history, the mechanism of action of this compound remains unclear and somewhat controversial. Recent data suggest the possibility that the activity of ribavirin against RNA viruses is a reflection of incorporation of ribavirin into the viral genome. Because ribavirin incorporation is not specific, this event leads to lethal mutagenesis of the virus population. The data supporting this new proposal for the mechanism of action of ribavirin are reviewed herein. In addition, we discuss briefly the challenges that remain for development of lethal mutagenesis as an effective antiviral strategy.

  20. Antiviral evaluation of plants from Brazilian Atlantic Tropical Forest.

    PubMed

    Andrighetti-Fröhner, C R; Sincero, T C M; da Silva, A C; Savi, L A; Gaido, C M; Bettega, J M R; Mancini, M; de Almeida, M T R; Barbosa, R A; Farias, M R; Barardi, C R M; Simões, C M O

    2005-06-01

    The antiviral activity of six medicinal plants from Brazilian Atlantic Tropical Forest was investigated against two viruses: herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and poliovirus type 2 (PV-2). Cuphea carthagenensis and Tillandsia usneoides extracts showed the best antiherpes activity. T. usneoides dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts, and Lippia alba n-butanol extract showed inhibition of HSV-1, strain 29R/acyclovir resistant. In addition, only L. alba ethyl acetate extract showed antipoliovirus activity. These results corroborate that medicinal plants can be a rich source of potential antiviral compounds.

  1. Chemical analysis and antiviral activity evaluation of Baccharis anomala.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Caroline Rita; Bordignon, Srgio Augusto De Loreto; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Montanha, Jarbas Alves; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Gosmann, Grace

    2017-07-19

    The chemical composition and antiviral activity of aqueous extract from Baccharis anomala was studied by bioactivity-guided fractionation. Ethanol precipitation and fractionation by molecular permeation allowed the separation of the anti-herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) active fraction from aqueous extract (Fraction B). Natural Product Reagent A, FeCl3 and thin-layer chromatography indicated the presence of phenolic compounds in the aqueous extract. Fraction B showed pronounced antiviral activity when tested with HSV-1 strains VR733/ATCC and Acyclovir-resistant 29-R, displaying virucidal but not virustatic activity.

  2. Emerging antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2008-09-01

    Foremost among the newly described antiviral agents that may be developed into drugs are, for the treatment of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections, cPrPMEDAP; for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, BAY 57-1293; for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections, FV-100 (prodrug of Cf 1743); for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, maribavir; for the treatment of poxvirus infections, ST-246; for the treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) (which in the meantime has already been approved in the EU); for the treatment of various DNA virus infections, the hexadecyloxypropyl (HDP) and octadecyloxyethyl (ODE) prodrugs of cidofovir; for the treatment of orthomyxovirus infections (i.e., influenza), peramivir; for the treatment of hepacivirus infections (i.e., hepatitis C), the protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir, the nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NRRIs) PSI-6130 and R1479, and various non-nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NNRRIs); for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, integrase inhibitors (INIs) such as elvitegravir, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) such as apricitabine, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) such as rilpivirine and dapivirine; and for the treatment of both HCV and HIV infections, cyclosporin A derivatives such as the non-immunosuppressive Debio-025.

  3. Novel antiviral activity of baicalein against dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is a serious arboviral disease currently with no effective antiviral therapy or approved vaccine available. Therefore, finding the effective compound against dengue virus (DENV) replication is very important. Among the natural compounds, bioflavonoids derived mainly from plants are of interest because of their biological and medicinal benefits. Methods In the present study, antiviral activity of a bioflavonoid, baicalein, was evaluated against different stages of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) replication in Vero cells using focus forming unit reduction assay and quantitative RT-PCR. Results Baicalein inhibited DENV-2 replication in Vero cells with IC50= 6.46 μg/mL and SI= 17.8 when added after adsorption to the cells. The IC50 against DENV-2 was 5.39 μg/mL and SI= 21.3 when cells were treated 5 hours before virus infection and continuously up to 4 days post infection. Baicalein exhibited direct virucidal effect against DENV-2 with IC 50= 1.55 μg/mL and showed anti-adsorption effect with IC50 = 7.14 μg/mL. Conclusions Findings presented here suggest that baicalein exerts potent antiviral activity against DENV. Baicalein possesses direct virucidal activity against DENV besides its effects against dengue virus adsorption and intracellular replication of DENV-2. Baicalein, hence, should be considered for in vivo evaluation in the development of an effective antiviral compound against DENV. PMID:23140177

  4. Gene Expression Profiling of Human Vaginal Cells In Vitro Discriminates Compounds with Pro-Inflammatory and Mucosa-Altering Properties: Novel Biomarkers for Preclinical Testing of HIV Microbicide Candidates.

    PubMed

    Zalenskaya, Irina A; Joseph, Theresa; Bavarva, Jasmin; Yousefieh, Nazita; Jackson, Suzanne S; Fashemi, Titilayo; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Settlage, Robert; Fichorova, Raina N; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and immune activation of the cervicovaginal mucosa are considered factors that increase susceptibility to HIV infection. Therefore, it is essential to screen candidate anti-HIV microbicides for potential mucosal immunomodulatory/inflammatory effects prior to further clinical development. The goal of this study was to develop an in vitro method for preclinical evaluation of the inflammatory potential of new candidate microbicides using a microarray gene expression profiling strategy. To this end, we compared transcriptomes of human vaginal cells (Vk2/E6E7) treated with well-characterized pro-inflammatory (PIC) and non-inflammatory (NIC) compounds. PICs included compounds with different mechanisms of action. Gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2 arrays. Data processing was performed using GeneSpring 11.5 (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA). Microarraray comparative analysis allowed us to generate a panel of 20 genes that were consistently deregulated by PICs compared to NICs, thus distinguishing between these two groups. Functional analysis mapped 14 of these genes to immune and inflammatory responses. This was confirmed by the fact that PICs induced NFkB pathway activation in Vk2 cells. By testing microbicide candidates previously characterized in clinical trials we demonstrated that the selected PIC-associated genes properly identified compounds with mucosa-altering effects. The discriminatory power of these genes was further demonstrated after culturing vaginal cells with vaginal bacteria. Prevotella bivia, prevalent bacteria in the disturbed microbiota of bacterial vaginosis, induced strong upregulation of seven selected PIC-associated genes, while a commensal Lactobacillus gasseri associated to vaginal health did not cause any changes. In vitro evaluation of the immunoinflammatory potential of microbicides using the PIC-associated genes defined in this study could help in the initial screening of candidates prior to entering

  5. Antifungal and antiviral products of marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Pan, Wen Liang; Chan, Yau Sang; Yin, Cui Ming; Dan, Xiu Li; Wang, He Xiang; Fang, Evandro Fei; Lam, Sze Kwan; Ngai, Patrick Hung Kui; Xia, Li Xin; Liu, Fang; Ye, Xiu Yun; Zhang, Guo Qing; Liu, Qing Hong; Sha, Ou; Lin, Peng; Ki, Chan; Bekhit, Adnan A; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Wan, David Chi Cheong

    2017-01-01

    Marine organisms including bacteria, fungi, algae, sponges, echinoderms, mollusks, and cephalochordates produce a variety of products with antifungal activity including bacterial chitinases, lipopeptides, and lactones; fungal (−)-sclerotiorin and peptaibols, purpurides B and C, berkedrimane B and purpuride; algal gambieric acids A and B, phlorotannins; 3,5-dibromo-2-(3,5-dibromo-2-methoxyphenoxy)phenol, spongistatin 1, eurysterols A and B, nortetillapyrone, bromotyrosine alkaloids, bis-indole alkaloid, ageloxime B and (−)-ageloxime D, haliscosamine, hamigeran G, hippolachnin A from sponges; echinoderm triterpene glycosides and alkene sulfates; molluscan kahalalide F and a 1485-Da peptide with a sequence SRSELIVHQR; and cepalochordate chitotriosidase and a 5026.9-Da antifungal peptide. The antiviral compounds from marine organisms include bacterial polysaccharide and furan-2-yl acetate; fungal macrolide, purpurester A, purpurquinone B, isoindolone derivatives, alterporriol Q, tetrahydroaltersolanol C and asperterrestide A, algal diterpenes, xylogalactofucan, alginic acid, glycolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, sulfated polysaccharide p-KG03, meroditerpenoids, methyl ester derivative of vatomaric acid, lectins, polysaccharides, tannins, cnidarian zoanthoxanthin alkaloids, norditerpenoid and capilloquinol; crustacean antilipopolysaccharide factors, molluscan hemocyanin; echinoderm triterpenoid glycosides; tunicate didemnin B, tamandarins A and B and; tilapia hepcidin 1–5 (TH 1–5), seabream SauMx1, SauMx2, and SauMx3, and orange-spotted grouper β-defensin. Although the mechanisms of antifungal and antiviral activities of only some of the afore-mentioned compounds have been elucidated, the possibility to use those known to have distinctly different mechanisms, good bioavailability, and minimal toxicity in combination therapy remains to be investigated. It is also worthwhile to test the marine antimicrobials for possible synergism with existing drugs. The

  6. A quantitative infection assay for human type I, II, and III interferon antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Upon virus infection, cells secrete a diverse group of antiviral molecules that signal proximal cells to enter into an antiviral state, slowing or preventing viral spread. These paracrine signaling molecules can work synergistically, so measurement of any one antiviral molecule does not reflect the total antiviral activity of the system. Results We have developed an antiviral assay based on replication inhibition of an engineered fluorescent vesicular stomatitis virus reporter strain on A549 human lung epithelial cells. Our assay provides a quantitative functional readout of human type I, II, and III interferon activities, and it provides better sensitivity, intra-, and inter-assay reproducibility than the traditional crystal violet based assay. Further, it eliminates cell fixation, rinsing, and staining steps, and is inexpensive to implement. Conclusions A dsRed2-strain of vesicular stomatitis virus that is sensitive to type I, II, and III interferons was used to develop a convenient and sensitive assay for interferon antiviral activity. We demonstrate use of the assay to quantify the kinetics of paracrine antiviral signaling from human prostate cancer (PC3) cells in response to viral infection. The assay is applicable to high-throughput screening for anti-viral compounds as well as basic studies of cellular antiviral signaling. PMID:23829314

  7. Antiviral properties from plants of the Mediterranean flora.

    PubMed

    Sanna, G; Farci, P; Busonera, B; Murgia, G; La Colla, P; Giliberti, G

    2015-01-01

    Natural products are a successful source in drug discovery, playing a significant role in maintaining human health. We investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of extracts from 18 traditionally used Mediterranean plants. Noteworthy antiviral activity was found in the extract obtained from the branches of Daphne gnidium L. against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (EC50 = 0.08 μg/mL) and coxsackievirus B5 (EC50 = 0.10 μg/mL). Other relevant activities were found against BVDV, YFV, Sb-1, RSV and HSV-1. Interestingly, extracts from Artemisia arborescens L. and Rubus ulmifolius Schott, as well as those from D. gnidium L., showed activities against two different viruses. This extensive antiviral screening allowed us to identify attractive activities, offering opportunities to develop lead compounds with a great pharmaceutical potential.

  8. The Antiviral Effect of Baicalin on Enterovirus 71 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Tingting; Jin, Yue; Cheng, Jianpin; Wan, Changbiao; Qian, Weihe; Xing, Fei; Shi, Weifeng

    2015-01-01

    Baicalin is a flavonoid compound extracted from Scutellaria roots that has been reported to possess antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral activities. However, the antiviral effect of baicalin on enterovirus 71 (EV71) is still unknown. In this study, we found that baicalin showed inhibitory activity on EV71 infection and was independent of direct virucidal or prophylactic effect and inhibitory viral absorption. The expressions of EV71/3D mRNA and polymerase were significantly blocked by baicalin treatment at early stages of EV71 infection. In addition, baicalin could decrease the expressions of FasL and caspase-3, as well as inhibit the apoptosis of EV71-infected human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells. Altogether, these results indicate that baicalin exhibits potent antiviral effect on EV71 infection, probably through inhibiting EV71/3D polymerase expression and Fas/FasL signaling pathways. PMID:26295407

  9. Cationic phenylene ethynylene polymers and oligomers exhibit efficient antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Canady, Taylor D; Zhou, Zhijun; Tang, Yanli; Price, Dominique N; Bear, David G; Chi, Eva Y; Schanze, Kirk S; Whitten, David G

    2011-07-01

    The antiviral activities of poly(phenylene ethynylene) (PPE)-based cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPE) and oligo-phenylene ethynylenes (OPE) were investigated using two model viruses, the T4 and MS2 bacteriophages. Under UV/visible light irradiation, significant antiviral activity was observed for all of the CPEs and OPEs; without irradiation, most of these compounds exhibited high inactivation activity against the MS2 phage and moderate inactivation ability against the T4 phage. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) reveal that the CPEs and OPEs exert their antiviral activity by partial disassembly of the phage particle structure in the dark and photochemical damage of the phage capsid protein under UV/visible light irradiation.

  10. Host cell factors as antiviral targets in arenavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Linero, Florencia N; Sepúlveda, Claudia S; Giovannoni, Federico; Castilla, Viviana; García, Cybele C; Scolaro, Luis A; Damonte, Elsa B

    2012-09-01

    Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Lassa virus and Junin virus generate periodic annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF) in endemic areas of West Africa and Argentina, respectively. Given the human health threat that arenaviruses represent and the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. Since diverse host cell pathways and enzymes are used by RNA viruses to fulfill their replicative cycle, the targeting of a host process has turned an attractive antiviral approach in the last years for many unrelated virus types. This strategy has the additional benefit to reduce the serious challenge for therapy of RNA viruses to escape from drug effects through selection of resistant variants triggered by their high mutation rate. This article focuses on novel strategies to identify inhibitors for arenavirus therapy, analyzing the potential for antiviral developments of diverse host factors essential for virus infection.

  11. Phytochemistry, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of Eleusine indica (sambau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iberahim, Rashidah; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    Goose grass also known as Eleusine indica (EI) is a local medicinal plant that displays antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. The present study is to determine the phytochemical constituents, cytotoxicity and antiviral activities for both crude extract and fraction obtained from the plant. The crude extract contained more secondary metabolites compared to the hexane fraction as gauged using standard phytochemical tests. Cytotoxicity screening against Vero cells using MTT assay showed that the CC50 values for crude extract and hexane fraction were 2.07 and 5.62 mg/ml respectively. The antiviral activity towards Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) was determined using plaque reduction assay. The selective indices (SI = CC50 / EC50) for both methanol extract and hexane fraction were 12.2 and 6.2 respectively. These results demonstrate that the extract prepared from E. indica possesses phytochemical compound that was non cytotoxic to the cell with potential antiviral activity.

  12. Sulfated polysaccharides extracted from sea algae as potential antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Witvrouw, M; De Clercq, E

    1997-10-01

    The inhibitory effects of polyanionic substances on the replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and other viruses were reported almost four decades ago. However, these observations did not generate much interest, because the antiviral action of the compounds was considered to be largely nonspecific. Shortly after the identification of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the causative agent of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in 1984, heparin and other sulfated polysaccharides were found to be potent and selective inhibitors of HIV-1 replication in cell culture. Since 1988, the activity spectrum of the sulfated polysaccharides has been shown to extend to various enveloped viruses, including viruses that emerge as opportunistic pathogens (e.g., herpes simplex virus [HSV] and cytomegalovirus [CMV]) in immunosuppressed (e.g., AIDS) patients. As potential anti-HIV drug candidates, sulfated polysaccharides offer a number of promising features. They are able to block HIV replication in cell culture at concentrations as low as 0.1 to 0.01 microgram ml-1 without toxicity to the host cells at concentrations up to 2.5 mg ml-1. We noted that some polysulfates show a differential inhibitory activity against different HIV strains, suggesting that marked differences exist in the target molecules with which polysulfates interact. They not only inhibit the cytopathic effect of HIV, but also prevent HIV-induced syncytium (giant cell) formation. Furthermore, experiments carried out with dextran sulfate samples of increasing molecular weight and with sulfated cyclodextrins of different degrees of sulfation have shown that antiviral activity increases with increasing molecular weight and degree of sulfation. A sugar backbone is not strictly needed for the anti-HIV activity of polysulfates because sulfated polymers composed of a carbon-carbon backbone have also proved to be highly efficient anti-HIV agents in vitro. Other, yet to be defined, structural features may

  13. Discovery of potent broad spectrum antivirals derived from marine actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C; Dobry, Craig J; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J; Blakely, Pennelope K; Tai, Andrew W; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N; Sherman, David H; Miller, David J

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the

  14. Discovery of Potent Broad Spectrum Antivirals Derived from Marine Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C.; Dobry, Craig J.; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J.; Blakely, Pennelope K.; Tai, Andrew W.; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N.; Sherman, David H.; Miller, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the

  15. Escape Mutations in NS4B Render Dengue Virus Insensitive to the Antiviral Activity of the Paracetamol Metabolite AM404.

    PubMed

    van Cleef, Koen W R; Overheul, Gijs J; Thomassen, Michael C; Marjakangas, Jenni M; van Rij, Ronald P

    2016-04-01

    Despite the enormous disease burden associated with dengue virus infections, a licensed antiviral drug is lacking. Here, we show that the paracetamol (acetaminophen) metabolite AM404 inhibits dengue virus replication. Moreover, we find that mutations in NS4B that were previously found to confer resistance to the antiviral compounds NITD-618 and SDM25N also render dengue virus insensitive to AM404. Our work provides further support for NS4B as a direct or indirect target for antiviral drug development.

  16. Analysis of human skin emanations by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. 2. Identification of volatile compounds that are candidate attractants for the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Bernier, U R; Kline, D L; Barnard, D R; Schreck, C E; Yost, R A

    2000-02-15

    Volatile compounds emanated from human skin were studied by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The purpose of this study was to identify compounds that may be human-produced kairomones which are used for host location by the mosquito, Aedes aegypti (L.). The procedure used to collect volatiles was chosen because of prior knowledge that attractive substances can be transferred from skin to glass by handling. Laboratory bioassays have shown that the residuum on the glass remains attractive to mosquitoes until the compounds of importance evaporate. The sampling and analytical procedures modeled the above-cited process as closely as possible except that the evaporation of compounds from the glass surface was accomplished by thermal desorption from glass beads in a heated GC injection port. This made possible the solventless injection of volatiles onto the column. The compounds were cryofocused on the head of the column with liquid nitrogen prior to GC separation. A single stage of mass spectrometry on a triple quadrupole instrument was used for mass analysis. A combination of electron ionization and pulsed positive ion/negative ion chemical ionization modes on two different GC columns (one polar, one relatively nonpolar) was used to identify most of the 346 compound peaks detected by this technique.

  17. Antiviral therapy: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi Bonjar, Amir Hashem

    2016-01-01

    sufficient research has yielded positive results in animal models, EVAC could be used as a supportive treatment in humans along with conventional antiviral therapies. EVAC would not be suitable for all viral infections, but could be expected to decrease the casualties resulting from blood-borne viral infections. The EVAC approach would be efficient in terms of time, effort, and expenditure in the research and treatment of blood-borne viral infections. PMID:26893542

  18. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus.

  19. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus

    PubMed Central

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus. PMID:25713700

  20. Antiviral effect of mefloquine on feline calicivirus in vitro.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Phillip; Sheehy, Paul A; Fawcett, Anne; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2015-04-17

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is an important viral pathogen of domestic cats causing clinical signs ranging from mild to severe oral ulceration or upper respiratory tract disease through to a severe fatal systemic disease. Current therapeutic options are limited, with no direct acting antivirals available for treatment. This study screened a panel of 19 compounds for potential antiviral activity against FCV strain F9 and recent field isolates in vitro. Using a resazurin-based cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibition assay, mefloquine demonstrated a marked inhibitory effect on FCV induced CPE, albeit with a relatively low selectivity index. Orthogonal assays confirmed inhibition of CPE was associated with a significant reduction in viral replication. Mefloquine exhibited a strong inhibitory effect against a panel of seven recent FCV isolates from Australia, with calculated IC50 values for the field isolates approximately 50% lower than against the reference strain FCV F9. In vitro combination therapy with recombinant feline interferon-ω, a biological response modifier currently registered for the treatment of FCV, demonstrated additive effects with a concurrent reduction in the IC50 of mefloquine. These results are the first report of antiviral effects of mefloquine against a calicivirus and support further in vitro and in vivo evaluation of this compound as an antiviral therapeutic for FCV.

  1. Discovery of antiviral molecules for dengue: In silico search and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cabarcas-Montalvo, Maria; Maldonado-Rojas, Wilson; Montes-Grajales, Diana; Bertel-Sevilla, Angela; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Sztajer, Helena; Reck, Michael; Flechas-Alarcon, Maria; Ocazionez, Raquel; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2016-03-03

    Dengue disease is a global disease that has no effective treatment. The dengue virus (DENV) NS2B/NS3 protease complex is a target for designing specific antivirals due to its importance in viral replication and its high degree of conservation. NS2B/NS3 protease complex structural information was employed to find small molecules that are capable of inhibiting the activity of the enzyme complex. This inhibitory activity was probed with in vitro assays using a fluorescent substrate and the complex NS2B/NS3 obtained by recombinant DNA techniques. HepG2 cells infected with dengue virus serotype 2 were used to test the activity against dengue virus replication. A total of 210,903 small molecules from PubChem were docked in silico to the NS2B/NS3 structure (PDB: 2FOM) to find molecules that were capable of inhibiting this protein complex. Five of the best 500 leading compounds, according to their affinity values (-11.6 and -13.5 kcal/mol), were purchased. The inhibitory protease activity on the recombinant protein and antiviral assays was tested. Chemicals CID 54681617, CID 54692801 and CID 54715399 were strong inhibitors of NS2B/NS3, with IC50 values (μM) and percentages of viral titer reductions of 19.9, 79.9%; 17.5, 69.8%; and 9.1, 73.9%, respectively. Multivariate methods applied to the molecular descriptors showed two compounds that were structurally different from other DENV inhibitors. This discovery opens new possibilities for obtaining drug candidates against Dengue virus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Luis P.

    2011-01-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  3. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  4. Antivirals in the transplant setting.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul D

    2006-09-01

    Over the past quarter of a century, antiviral drugs have moved from an experimental adventure in transplant patients to a situation where they are used routinely to prevent diseases caused by several viruses. Furthermore, they have significantly reduced several medical complications of transplantation, such as graft rejection, thereby implicating viruses as components of their pathogenesis. By controlling these major complication, the development of these antiviral drugs and their prodrugs, has therefore greatly facilitated the clinical expansion of transplantation, allowing life saving procedures to be offered to more patients who could potentially benefit. This article will briefly summaries which viruses are important following transplantation and outline the evidence-base from randomized controlled clinical trails for the deployment of antiviral drugs to prevent viral diseases.

  5. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  6. RNA-Seq analysis and annotation of a draft blueberry genome assembly identifies candidate genes involved in fruit ripening, biosynthesis of bioactive compounds, and stage-specific alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vikas; Estrada, April D; Blakley, Ivory; Reid, Rob; Patel, Ketan; Meyer, Mason D; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj; Brown, Allan F; Lila, Mary Ann; Loraine, Ann E

    2015-01-01

    Blueberries are a rich source of antioxidants and other beneficial compounds that can protect against disease. Identifying genes involved in synthesis of bioactive compounds could enable the breeding of berry varieties with enhanced health benefits. Toward this end, we annotated a previously sequenced draft blueberry genome assembly using RNA-Seq data from five stages of berry fruit development and ripening. Genome-guided assembly of RNA-Seq read alignments combined with output from ab initio gene finders produced around 60,000 gene models, of which more than half were similar to proteins from other species, typically the grape Vitis vinifera. Comparison of gene models to the PlantCyc database of metabolic pathway enzymes identified candidate genes involved in synthesis of bioactive compounds, including bixin, an apocarotenoid with potential disease-fighting properties, and defense-related cyanogenic glycosides, which are toxic. Cyanogenic glycoside (CG) biosynthetic enzymes were highly expressed in green fruit, and a candidate CG detoxification enzyme was up-regulated during fruit ripening. Candidate genes for ethylene, anthocyanin, and 400 other biosynthetic pathways were also identified. Homology-based annotation using Blast2GO and InterPro assigned Gene Ontology terms to around 15,000 genes. RNA-Seq expression profiling showed that blueberry growth, maturation, and ripening involve dynamic gene expression changes, including coordinated up- and down-regulation of metabolic pathway enzymes and transcriptional regulators. Analysis of RNA-seq alignments identified developmentally regulated alternative splicing, promoter use, and 3' end formation. We report genome sequence, gene models, functional annotations, and RNA-Seq expression data that provide an important new resource enabling high throughput studies in blueberry.

  7. Synthesis and Antiviral Evaluation of Octadecyloxyethyl Benzyl 9-[(2-Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]guanine (ODE-Bn-PMEG), a Potent Inhibitor of Transient HPV DNA Amplification.

    PubMed

    Beadle, James R; Valiaeva, Nadejda; Yang, Guang; Yu, Jei-Hwa; Broker, Thomas R; Aldern, Kathy A; Harden, Emma A; Keith, Kathy A; Prichard, Mark N; Hartman, Tracy; Buckheit, Robert W; Chow, Louise T; Hostetler, Karl Y

    2016-12-08

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) high-risk genotypes such as HPV-16 and HPV-18 cause the majority of anogenital tract carcinomas, including cervical cancer, the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Currently there are no approved antiviral agents that reduce or eliminate HPV and reverse virus-associated pathology. We synthesized and evaluated several alkoxyalkyl acyclic nucleoside phosphonate diesters and identified octadecyloxyethyl benzyl 9-[(2-phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]guanine (ODE-Bn-PMEG) as an active compound which strongly inhibited transient amplification of HPV-11, -16, and -18 origin-containing plasmid DNA in transfected cells at concentrations well below its cytotoxic concentrations. ODE-Bn-PMEG demonstrated increased uptake in human foreskin fibroblast cells and was readily converted in vitro to the active antiviral metabolite, PMEG diphosphate. The P-chiral enantiomers of ODE-Bn-PMEG were obtained and appeared to have equivalent antiviral activities against HPV. ODE-Bn-PMEG is a promising candidate for the local treatment of HPV-16 and HPV-18 and other high-risk types, an important unmet medical need.

  8. Antiviral and antimicrobial assessment of some selected flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Ozçelik, Berrin; Orhan, Ilkay; Toker, Gülnur

    2006-01-01

    In the current study, the results of antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activity tests of four flavonoid derivatives, scandenone (1), tiliroside (2), quercetin-3,7-O-alpha-L-dirhamnoside (3), and kaempferol-3,7-O-alpha-L-dirhamnoside (4), are presented. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of these compounds were tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Enterococcus faecalis, as well as the fungus Candida albicans by a micro-dilution method. On the other hand, both DNA virus Herpes simplex (HSV) and RNA virus Parainfluenza-3 (PI-3) were employed for antiviral assessment of the compounds using Madin-Darby bovine kidney and Vero cell lines. According to our data, all of the compounds tested were found to be quite active against S. aureus and E. faecalis with MIC values of 0.5 microg/ml, followed by E. coli (2 microg/ml), K. pneumoniae (4 microg/ml), A. baumannii (8 micro/g/ml), and B. subtilis (8 microg/ml), while they inhibited C. albicans at 1 microg/ml as potent as ketoconazole. However, only compound 3 displayed an antiviral effect towards PI-3 in the range of 8-32 microg/ml of inhibitory concentration for cytopathogenic effect (CPE).

  9. Section candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eos has carried biographies and photographs of candidates for President-Elect of the Union and for President-Elect and Secretary of each section. In addition, statements by the candidates for Union and Section President-Elect have appeared. T h e material for the petition candidate for President-Elect of the Solar-Planetary Relationships Section and a correction to the biography of one candidate for President-Elect of t h e Geodesy Section appear below. The material for the original slate for Solar-Planetary Relationships appeared in the August 6 issue, that for the Seismology Section in the August 13 issue, that for the Geodesy Section in the August 20 issue, that for the Atmospheric Sciences Section in the August 27 issue, that for the Hydrology Section in the September 3 issue, that for the Tectonophysics Section in the September 10 issue, that for the Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology Section in the September 17 issue, that for the Planetology Section in the September 24 issue, that for the Ocean Sciences Section in the October 1 issue, that for the Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism Section in the October 8 issue, and that for Union President-Elect in the October 15 issue. T h e slate of candidates for all offices was carried in the July 2 issue.

  10. Epimedium koreanum Nakai Displays Broad Spectrum of Antiviral Activity in Vitro and in Vivo by Inducing Cellular Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Park, Jun-Seol; Kim, Chul-Joong; Ma, Jin Yeul; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Epimedium koreanum Nakai has been extensively used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the plant’s known immune modulatory potential and chemical make-up, scientific information on its antiviral properties and mode of action have not been completely investigated. In this study, the broad antiviral spectrum and mode of action of an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai was evaluated in vitro, and moreover, the protective effect against divergent influenza A subtypes was determined in BALB/c mice. An effective dose of Epimedium koreanum Nakaimarkedly reduced the replication of Influenza A Virus (PR8), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in RAW264.7 and HEK293T cells. Mechanically, we found that an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai induced the secretion of type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent stimulation of the antiviral state in cells. Among various components present in the extract, quercetin was confirmed to have striking antiviral properties. The oral administration of Epimedium koreanum Nakai exhibited preventive effects on BALB/c mice against lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2). Therefore, an extract of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and its components play roles as immunomodulators in the innate immune response, and may be potential candidates for prophylactic or therapeutic treatments against diverse viruses in animal and humans. PMID:25609307

  11. Antiviral activity of extracts from Morinda citrifolia leaves and chlorophyll catabolites, pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a, against hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Ratnoglik, Suratno Lulut; Aoki, Chie; Sudarmono, Pratiwi; Komoto, Mari; Deng, Lin; Shoji, Ikuo; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Hotta, Hak

    2014-03-01

    The development of complementary and/or alternative drugs for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is still needed. Antiviral compounds in medicinal plants are potentially good targets to study. Morinda citrifolia is a common plant distributed widely in Indo-Pacific region; its fruits and leaves are food sources and are also used as a treatment in traditional medicine. In this study, using a HCV cell culture system, it was demonstrated that a methanol extract, its n-hexane, and ethyl acetate fractions from M. citrifolia leaves possess anti-HCV activities with 50%-inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of 20.6, 6.1, and 6.6 μg/mL, respectively. Bioactivity-guided purification and structural analysis led to isolation and identification of pheophorbide a, the major catabolite of chlorophyll a, as an anti-HCV compound present in the extracts (IC(50) = 0.3 μg/mL). It was also found that pyropheophorbide a possesses anti-HCV activity (IC(50) = 0.2 μg/mL). The 50%-cytotoxic concentrations (CC(50)) of pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a were 10.0 and 7.2 μg/mL, respectively, their selectivity indexes being 33 and 36, respectively. On the other hand, chlorophyll a, sodium copper chlorophyllin, and pheophytin a barely, or only marginally, exhibited anti-HCV activities. Time-of-addition analysis revealed that pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a act at both entry and the post-entry steps. The present results suggest that pheophorbide a and its related compounds would be good candidates for seed compounds for developing antivirals against HCV. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Progress in RNAi-based antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to the conserved sequence-specific degradation of message RNA mediated by small interfering (si)RNA duplexes 21-25 nucleotides in length. Given the ability to specifically silence any gene of interest, siRNAs offers several advantages over conventional drugs as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of human maladies including cancers, genetic disorders, and infectious diseases. Antiviral RNAi strategies have received much attention and several compounds are currently being tested in clinical trials. In particular, the development of siRNA-based HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) therapeutics has progressed rapidly and many recent studies have shown that the use of RNAi could inhibit HIV-1 replication by targeting a number of viral or cellular genes. Therefore, the present chapter mainly focuses on the recent progress of RNAi-based anti-HIV gene therapeutics, with particular attention to molecular targets and delivery strategies of the siRNAs.

  13. Interchromosomal huddle kickstarts antiviral defense.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Fraser, Peter

    2008-07-11

    Long-distance chromosomal interactions are emerging as a potential mechanism of gene expression control. In this issue, Apostolou and Thanos (2008) describe how viral infection elicits interchromosomal associations between the interferon-beta (IFN-beta) gene enhancer and DNA binding sites of the transcription factor NF-kappaB, resulting in the initiation of transcription and an antiviral response.

  14. Novel antiviral activity of chemokines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Takashi; Shirane, Jumi; Hieshima, Kunio; Shibano, Michiko; Watanabe, Masayasu; Jin, Zhe; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Saito, Takuya; Shimomura, Yoshikazu; Yoshie, Osamu . E-mail: o.yoshie@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2006-07-05

    Antimicrobial peptides are a diverse family of small, mostly cationic polypeptides that kill bacteria, fungi and even some enveloped viruses, while chemokines are a group of mostly cationic small proteins that induce directed migration of leukocytes through interactions with a group of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. Recent studies have shown that antimicrobial peptides and chemokines have substantially overlapping functions. Thus, while some antimicrobial peptides are chemotactic for leukocytes, some chemokines can kill a wide range of bacteria and fungi. Here, we examined a possible direct antiviral activity of chemokines against an enveloped virus HSV-1. Among 22 human chemokines examined, chemokines such as MIP-1{alpha}/CCL3, MIP-1{beta}/CCL4 and RANTES/CCL5 showed a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1. It is intriguing that these chemokines are mostly known to be highly expressed by effector CD8{sup +} T cells. The chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity commonly bound to HSV-1 virions via envelope glycoprotein gB. Electron microscopy revealed that the chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity were commonly capable of generating pores in the envelope of HSV-1. Thus, some chemokines have a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1 in vitro and may have a potential role in host defense against HSV-1 as a direct antiviral agent.

  15. Antiviral Activity of Resveratrol against Human and Animal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Abba, Yusuf; Hassim, Hasliza; Hamzah, Hazilawati; Noordin, Mohamed Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a potent polyphenolic compound that is being extensively studied in the amelioration of viral infections both in vitro and in vivo. Its antioxidant effect is mainly elicited through inhibition of important gene pathways like the NF-κβ pathway, while its antiviral effects are associated with inhibitions of viral replication, protein synthesis, gene expression, and nucleic acid synthesis. Although the beneficial roles of resveratrol in several viral diseases have been well documented, a few adverse effects have been reported as well. This review highlights the antiviral mechanisms of resveratrol in human and animal viral infections and how some of these effects are associated with the antioxidant properties of the compound. PMID:26693226

  16. Virtual screening, synthesis and biological evaluation of DNA intercalating antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Klimenko, Kyrylo; Lyakhov, Sergey; Shibinskaya, Marina; Karpenko, Alexander; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Zenkova, Marina; Goncharova, Elena; Amirkhanov, Rinat; Krysko, Andrei; Andronati, Sergei; Levandovskiy, Igor; Polishchuk, Pavel; Kuz'min, Victor; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-08-15

    This paper describes computer-aided design of new anti-viral agents against Vaccinia virus (VACV) potentially acting as nucleic acid intercalators. Earlier obtained experimental data for DNA intercalation affinities and activities against Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) have been used to build, respectively, pharmacophore and QSAR models. These models were used for virtual screening of a database of 245 molecules generated around typical scaffolds of known DNA intercalators. This resulted in 12 hits which then were synthesized and tested for antiviral activity against VaV together with 43 compounds earlier studied against VSV. Two compounds displaying high antiviral activity against VaV and low cytotoxicity were selected for further antiviral activity investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Gene Expression Profiling of Human Vaginal Cells In Vitro Discriminates Compounds with Pro-Inflammatory and Mucosa-Altering Properties: Novel Biomarkers for Preclinical Testing of HIV Microbicide Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Zalenskaya, Irina A.; Joseph, Theresa; Bavarva, Jasmin; Yousefieh, Nazita; Jackson, Suzanne S.; Fashemi, Titilayo; Yamamoto, Hidemi S.; Settlage, Robert; Fichorova, Raina N.; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and immune activation of the cervicovaginal mucosa are considered factors that increase susceptibility to HIV infection. Therefore, it is essential to screen candidate anti-HIV microbicides for potential mucosal immunomodulatory/inflammatory effects prior to further clinical development. The goal of this study was to develop an in vitro method for preclinical evaluation of the inflammatory potential of new candidate microbicides using a microarray gene expression profiling strategy. Methods To this end, we compared transcriptomes of human vaginal cells (Vk2/E6E7) treated with well-characterized pro-inflammatory (PIC) and non-inflammatory (NIC) compounds. PICs included compounds with different mechanisms of action. Gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2 arrays. Data processing was performed using GeneSpring 11.5 (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA). Results Microarraray comparative analysis allowed us to generate a panel of 20 genes that were consistently deregulated by PICs compared to NICs, thus distinguishing between these two groups. Functional analysis mapped 14 of these genes to immune and inflammatory responses. This was confirmed by the fact that PICs induced NFkB pathway activation in Vk2 cells. By testing microbicide candidates previously characterized in clinical trials we demonstrated that the selected PIC-associated genes properly identified compounds with mucosa-altering effects. The discriminatory power of these genes was further demonstrated after culturing vaginal cells with vaginal bacteria. Prevotella bivia, prevalent bacteria in the disturbed microbiota of bacterial vaginosis, induced strong upregulation of seven selected PIC-associated genes, while a commensal Lactobacillus gasseri associated to vaginal health did not cause any changes. Conclusions In vitro evaluation of the immunoinflammatory potential of microbicides using the PIC-associated genes defined in this study could help in the initial

  18. Topical Hazard Evaluation Program of Candidate Insect Repellents AI3-33663a and AI3-35580a, US Department of Agriculture Proprietary Compounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-23

    to the intact skin of six tation in humans. rabbits. Five minutes after applicaton, the rabbits were exposed to UV light (365 nm) for 30 minutes at a...distance of 10-15 cm. Control Following UV exposures of Positive control appli- the rabbits, 0.05 mL of cation and irradiation test compound, positive...caused greater irritant control and diluent were effects than in unirra- applied to additional diated skin areas. skin areas to serve as uni rradiated

  19. Preliminary study of FMO1, FMO5, CYP21, ESR1, PLIN2 and SULT2A1 as candidate gene for compounds related to boar taint.

    PubMed

    Neuhoff, Christiane; Gunawan, Asep; Farooq, Malik Omar; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Sahadevan, Sudeep; Frieden, Luc; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim

    2015-10-01

    An association study between polymorphisms of six genes and boar taint related compounds androstenone, skatole and indole was performed in a boar population (n=370). Significant association (P<0.05) was detected for SNP of FMO5 (g.494A>G) with all boar taint compounds, SNP of CYP21 (g.3911T>C) with skatole and indole, and SNP of ESR1 (g.672C>T) with androstenone and indole. mRNA expression of CYP21 and ESR1 was higher in CAB (castrated boar) compared to non-castrated boars; whereas, the expression of FMO5 and ESR1 was higher in LBT (low boar taint) compared to HBT (high boar taint) in liver tissue. FMO5, CYP21 and ESR1 proteins were less detectable in HBT compared with LBT and CAB in liver tissues. These findings suggest that FMO5, CYP21 and ESR1 gene variants might have effects on the boar taint compounds.

  20. A Mechanistic Paradigm for Broad-Spectrum Antivirals that Target Virus-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hollmann, Axel; Tanner, Lukas B.; Akyol Ataman, Zeynep; Yun, Tatyana; Shui, Guanghou; Aguilar, Hector C.; Zhang, Dong; Meriwether, David; Roman-Sosa, Gleyder; Robinson, Lindsey R.; Juelich, Terry L.; Buczkowski, Hubert; Chou, Sunwen; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Wolf, Mike C.; Smith, Jennifer K.; Banyard, Ashley; Kielian, Margaret; Reddy, Srinivasa; Wenk, Markus R.; Selke, Matthias; Santos, Nuno C.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Jung, Michael E.; Lee, Benhur

    2013-01-01

    LJ001 is a lipophilic thiazolidine derivative that inhibits the entry of numerous enveloped viruses at non-cytotoxic concentrations (IC50≤0.5 µM), and was posited to exploit the physiological difference between static viral membranes and biogenic cellular membranes. We now report on the molecular mechanism that results in LJ001's specific inhibition of virus-cell fusion. The antiviral activity of LJ001 was light-dependent, required the presence of molecular oxygen, and was reversed by singlet oxygen (1O2) quenchers, qualifying LJ001 as a type II photosensitizer. Unsaturated phospholipids were the main target modified by LJ001-generated 1O2. Hydroxylated fatty acid species were detected in model and viral membranes treated with LJ001, but not its inactive molecular analog, LJ025. 1O2-mediated allylic hydroxylation of unsaturated phospholipids leads to a trans-isomerization of the double bond and concurrent formation of a hydroxyl group in the middle of the hydrophobic lipid bilayer. LJ001-induced 1O2-mediated lipid oxidation negatively impacts on the biophysical properties of viral membranes (membrane curvature and fluidity) critical for productive virus-cell membrane fusion. LJ001 did not mediate any apparent damage on biogenic cellular membranes, likely due to multiple endogenous cytoprotection mechanisms against phospholipid hydroperoxides. Based on our understanding of LJ001's mechanism of action, we designed a new class of membrane-intercalating photosensitizers to overcome LJ001's limitations for use as an in vivo antiviral agent. Structure activity relationship (SAR) studies led to a novel class of compounds (oxazolidine-2,4-dithiones) with (1) 100-fold improved in vitro potency (IC50<10 nM), (2) red-shifted absorption spectra (for better tissue penetration), (3) increased quantum yield (efficiency of 1O2 generation), and (4) 10–100-fold improved bioavailability. Candidate compounds in our new series moderately but significantly (p≤0.01) delayed the

  1. Antiviral activity of ancient system of ayurvedic medicinal plant Cissus quadrangularis L. (Vitaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, P.; Jayalakshmi, K.; Vidhya, N.; Prasad, R.; Sheriff, A. Khaleefathullah; Kathiravan, G.; Rajagopal, K.; Sureban, Sripathi M.

    2009-01-01

    Partially purified methanolic extract of Cissus quadrangularis (belonging to Vitaceae member, South Indian medicinal plant) have been explored for antiviral activity and their phytochemical characterisation. In vitro antiviral activity against HSV type1 and 2, and Vero cells at non-cytotoxic concentration were determined. HSV1 and HSV2 showed more sensitivity against the partially purified compound. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of the Steroids and Terpenoids. PMID:25206252

  2. Antiviral activity of ancient system of ayurvedic medicinal plant Cissus quadrangularis L. (Vitaceae).

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, P; Jayalakshmi, K; Vidhya, N; Prasad, R; Sheriff, A Khaleefathullah; Kathiravan, G; Rajagopal, K; Sureban, Sripathi M

    2009-12-01

    Partially purified methanolic extract of Cissus quadrangularis (belonging to Vitaceae member, South Indian medicinal plant) have been explored for antiviral activity and their phytochemical characterisation. In vitro antiviral activity against HSV type1 and 2, and Vero cells at non-cytotoxic concentration were determined. HSV1 and HSV2 showed more sensitivity against the partially purified compound. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of the Steroids and Terpenoids.

  3. New era for management of chronic hepatitis C virus using direct antiviral agents: A review

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz, Tamer; El-Kassas, Mohamed; Esmat, Gamal

    2014-01-01

    The pegylated interferon regimen has long been the lone effective management of chronic hepatitis C with modest response. The first appearance of protease inhibitors included boceprevir and telaprevir. However, their efficacy was limited to genotype 1. Recently, direct antiviral agents opened the gate for a real effective management of HCV, certainly after FDA approval of some compounds that further paved the way for the appearance of enormous potent direct antiviral agents that may achieve successful eradication of HCV. PMID:26257927

  4. Abalone Hemocyanin Blocks the Entry of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 into Cells: a Potential New Antiviral Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Talaei Zanjani, Negar; Miranda-Saksena, Monica; Valtchev, Peter; Hueston, Linda; Diefenbach, Eve; Sairi, Fareed; Gomes, Vincent G.

    2015-01-01

    A marine-derived compound, abalone hemocyanin, from Haliotis rubra was shown to have a unique mechanism of antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections. In vitro assays demonstrated the dose-dependent and inhibitory effect of purified hemocyanin against HSV-1 infection in Vero cells with a 50% effective dose (ED50) of 40 to 50 nM and no significant toxicity. In addition, hemocyanin specifically inhibited viral attachment and entry by binding selectively to the viral surface glycoproteins gD, gB, and gC, probably by mimicking their receptors. However, hemocyanin had no effect on postentry events and did not block infection by binding to cellular receptors for HSV. By the use of different mutants of gD and gB and a competitive heparin binding assay, both protein charge and conformation were shown to be the driving forces of the interaction between hemocyanin and viral glycoproteins. These findings also suggested that hemocyanin may have different motifs for binding to each of the viral glycoproteins B and D. The dimer subunit of hemocyanin with a 10-fold-smaller molecular mass exhibited similar binding to viral surface glycoproteins, showing that the observed inhibition did not require the entire multimer. Therefore, a small hemocyanin analogue could serve as a new antiviral candidate for HSV infections. PMID:26643336

  5. Synthesis, antiviral and antitumor activity of 2-substituted-5-amidino-benzimidazoles.

    PubMed

    Starcević, Kristina; Kralj, Marijeta; Ester, Katja; Sabol, Ivan; Grce, Magdalena; Pavelić, Kresimir; Karminski-Zamola, Grace

    2007-07-01

    We have prepared a set of heterocyclic benzimidazole derivatives bearing amidino substituents at C-5 of benzimidazole ring, by introducing various heterocyclic nuclei (pyridine, N-methyl-pyrrole or imidazole) at C-2, and evaluated their antitumor and antiviral activities. The most pronounced antiproliferative activity was shown with compounds 6 and 9, having imidazolinylamidino-substituent. Interestingly, all compounds show noticeable selectivity toward breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The most distinct and selective antiviral activity toward coxsackieviruses and echoviruses was observed with compounds having pyridine ring at C-2. Especially interesting was fairly strong activity of 4 and 8 toward adenoviruses, which could be considered as leads against adenoviral replication.

  6. A direct quantitative PCR-based measurement of herpes simplex virus susceptibility to antiviral drugs and neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Virók, Dezső P; Eszik, Ildikó; Mosolygó, Tímea; Önder, Kamil; Endrész, Valéria; Burián, Katalin

    2017-04-01

    the method, we applied the direct qPCR for antiviral inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) measurements of known and novel antiviral compounds. The measured IC50 of acyclovir was ∼0.28μg/ml, similar to the previously published IC50 value. The IC50 of novel antiviral candidates was between 1.6-3.1μg/ml. The direct qPCR-based neutralization titres of HSV positive sera were 1:32-1:64, identical to the neutralization titres determined using a traditional neutralization assay. The negative sera did not inhibit the HSV-2 replication in either of the tests. Our direct qPCR method for the HSV-2 growth determination of antiviral IC50 and neutralization titre is less time-consuming, less subjective and a more accurate alternative to the traditional plaque titration and growth reduction assays.

  7. Platinum(II)-Acyclovir Complexes: Synthesis, Antiviral and Antitumour Activity

    PubMed Central

    Coluccia, M.; Boccarelli, A.; Cermelli, C.; Portolani, M.; Natile, G.

    1995-01-01

    A platinum(II) complex with the antiviral drug acyclovir was synthesized and its antiviral and anticancer properties were investigated in comparison to those of acyclovir and cisplatin. The platinum-acyclovir complex maintained the antiviral activity of the parent drug acyclovir, though showing a minor efficacy on a molar basis (ID50  =   7.85 and 1.02 μΜ for platinum-acyclovir and cisplatin, respectively). As anticancer agent, the platinum-acyclovir complex was markedly less potent than cisplatin on a mole-equivalent basis, but it was as effective as cisplatin when equitoxic dosages were administered in vivo to P388 leukaemia-bearing mice (%T/C = 209 and 211 for platinum-acyclovir and cisplatin, respectively). The platinum-acyclovir complex was also active against a cisplatin-resistant subline of the P388 leukaemia (%T/C = 140), thus suggesting a different mechanism of action. The DNA interaction properties (sequence specificity and interstrand cross-linking ability) of platinum-acyclovir were also investigated in comparison to those of cisplatin and [Pt(dien)Cl]+, an antitumour-inactive platinum-triamine compound. The results of this study point to a potential new drug endowed, at the same time, with antiviral and anticancer activity and characterized by DNA interaction properties different from those of cisplatin. PMID:18472776

  8. Cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of methanol extract from Polygonum minus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Noor Zarina Abd; Bunawan, Hamidun; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    A study was carried out to test the cytotoxicity and antiviral effects of methanolic extracts from the leaves and stem of Polygonum minus or kesum. Cytotoxicity tests were performed on Vero cells indicates the LC50 value for leaf extract towards the Vero cells was 875 mg/L and the LC50 value for stem extract was 95 mg/L. The LC50 values indidcate the non-cytotoxic effect of the extracts and worth for further testing. Antiviral test were carried out towards herpes simplex virus infected Vero cells using three concentration of extract which were equivalent to 1.0 LC50, 0.1 LC50 and 0.01 LC50. Three different treatments to detect antiviral activity were used. Mild antiviral activity of the stem extract was detected when cells were treated for 24 hours with plant extract before viral infection. This demonstrates the capability of the test compound to protect the cells from viral attachment and of the possible prophylactic effect of the P. minus stem methanol extract.

  9. Antiviral activity of hop constituents against a series of DNA and RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Buckwold, Victor E; Wilson, Richard J H; Nalca, Aysegul; Beer, Brigitte B; Voss, Thomas G; Turpin, Jim A; Buckheit, Robert W; Wei, Jiayi; Wenzel-Mathers, Michelle; Walton, Eve M; Smith, Robert J; Pallansch, Melanie; Ward, Priscilla; Wells, Jay; Chuvala, Lara; Sloane, Sandra; Paulman, Robin; Russell, Julie; Hartman, Tracy; Ptak, Roger

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether crude hop extracts and purified hop components representing every major chemical class of hop compound have antiviral activity. These hop constituents were tested for antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) as a surrogate model of hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), influenza A virus (FLU-A), influenza B virus (FLU-B), rhinovirus (Rhino), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), yellow fever virus (YFV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2). The extracts all failed to prevent the replication of HIV, FLU-A, FLU-B, RSV and YFV. A xanthohumol-enriched hop extract displayed a weak to moderate antiviral activity against BVDV (therapeutic index (TI)=6.0), HSV-2 (TI=>5.3), Rhino (TI=4.0) and HSV-1 (TI=>1.9) with IC(50) values in the low microg/ml range. Pure iso-alpha-acids demonstrated low to moderate antiviral activity against both BVDV (TI=9.1) and CMV (TI=4.2) with IC(50) values in the low microg/ml range. No antiviral activity was detected using beta-acids or a hop oil extract. Ultra-pure preparations (>99% pure) were used to show that xanthohumol accounted for the antiviral activity observed in the xanthohumol-enriched hop extract against BVDV, HSV-1 and HSV-2. Xanthohumol was found to be a more potent antiviral agent against these viruses than the isomer iso-xanthohumol. With Rhino, the opposite trend was observed with iso-xanthohumol showing superior antiviral activity to that observed with xanthohumol. Xanthohumol also showed antiviral activity against CMV, suggesting that it might have a generalized anti-herpesvirus antiviral activity. Again, superior antiviral activity was observed with the xanthohumol isomer against CMV. In summary, iso-alpha-acids and xanthohumol were shown to have a low-to-moderate antiviral activity against several viruses. These hop constituents might serve as interesting lead compounds from which more

  10. Henipavirus pathogenesis and antiviral approaches.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Horvat, Branka

    2015-03-01

    Hendra virus and Nipah virus are closely related, recently emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses, belonging to the Henipavirus genus. Both viruses induce generalized vasculitis affecting particularly the respiratory tract and CNS. The exceptionally broad species tropism of Henipavirus, the high case fatality rate and person-to-person transmission associated with Nipah virus outbreaks emphasize the necessity of effective antiviral strategies for these intriguing threatening pathogens. Current therapeutic approaches, validated in animal models, target early steps in viral infection; they include the use of neutralizing virus-specific antibodies and blocking membrane fusion with peptides that bind the viral fusion protein. A better understanding of Henipavirus pathogenesis is critical for the further advancement of antiviral treatment, and we summarize here the recent progress in the field.

  11. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride.

    PubMed

    Cernescu, C; Popescu, L; Constantinescu, S; Cernescu, S

    1988-01-01

    Studies in human embryo fibroblasts infected with measles or herpes simplex virus showed a reduction in virus yield when cultures were pretreated with 1-10 mM lithium chloride doses. Maximum effect was obtained by a 1 h treatment with 10 mM lithium chloride, preceding viral infection by 19-24 hours. A specific antiviral effect against measles virus was manifest immediately after culture pretreatment. Intermittent treatment with 10 mM lithium chloride of cultures persistently infected with measles or herpes virus obtained from human myeloid K-562 cell line shows a reduction in the extracellular virus yield. In the K-562/herpes virus system, the culture treatment with lithium chloride and acyclovir (10 microM) has an additive inhibitory effect on virus production. The paper is focused on the mechanism of lithium chloride antiviral action and the expediency of lithium therapy in SSPE (subacute sclerosing panencephalitis).

  12. High content screening of a kinase-focused library reveals compounds broadly-active against dengue viruses.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Deu John M; Koishi, Andrea Cristine; Taniguchi, Juliana Bosso; Li, Xiaolan; Milan Bonotto, Rafaela; No, Joo Hwan; Kim, Keum Hyun; Baek, Sungmin; Kim, Hee Young; Windisch, Marc Peter; Pamplona Mosimann, Ana Luiza; de Borba, Luana; Liuzzi, Michel; Hansen, Michael Adsetts Edberg; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia Nunes; Freitas-Junior, Lucio Holanda

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that has a large impact in global health. It is considered as one of the medically important arboviruses, and developing a preventive or therapeutic solution remains a top priority in the medical and scientific community. Drug discovery programs for potential dengue antivirals have increased dramatically over the last decade, largely in part to the introduction of high-throughput assays. In this study, we have developed an image-based dengue high-throughput/high-content assay (HT/HCA) using an innovative computer vision approach to screen a kinase-focused library for anti-dengue compounds. Using this dengue HT/HCA, we identified a group of compounds with a 4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-methylthiazol-2-amine as a common core structure that inhibits dengue viral infection in a human liver-derived cell line (Huh-7.5 cells). Compounds CND1201, CND1203 and CND1243 exhibited strong antiviral activities against all four dengue serotypes. Plaque reduction and time-of-addition assays suggests that these compounds interfere with the late stage of viral infection cycle. These findings demonstrate that our image-based dengue HT/HCA is a reliable tool that can be used to screen various chemical libraries for potential dengue antiviral candidates.

  13. [Mechanisms of imiquimod indirect antiviral activity].

    PubMed

    Hober, D; Ajram, L; Chehadeh, W; Lazrek, M; Goffard, A; Dewilde, A; Wattré, P

    2005-01-01

    The potential role of an immune response in HPV-related anogenital disorders had already been anticipated by clinicians. Indeed the lesions efflorescence and the relapsing HPV infection in HIV positive patients as well as the lack of recurrence in patients with spontaneous cure, provided relevant clues for a likely immune mechanism. At present time, the role of the immune system in the development of HPV-related anogenital disorders is well established : HPV induce a humoral and cell mediated immune response. This response is mainly exerted towards infected cells; it is also exerted at the systemic level, through antibodies synthesis, but this pathway remains a secondary one. Due to the limits of the present therapies (either purely destructive and characterized by the rate of recurrences, or antiviral, but difficult to use), it was necessary to find a new treatment type which enhances the local immune response, results in the disappearance of lesions and allows for a decrease in the risk of recurrences. The original mechanism of action of the first cell-mediated immune response modifier: imiquimod, for local use (Aldara 5 % cream) is an answer to this need. The first positive results observed in vitro and in animals were confirmed in patients with HPV anogenital warts in a double blind placebo-controlled study: imiquimod inhibits HPV replication and results in the condyloma regression. Its action is based on the combined activation of the natural local immunity, by stimulating interferon alpha; and of the acquired immunity, by stimulating a T-cell mediated immune response. Thus imiquimod appears to be an original antiviral compound, because it does not act directly on the virus itself.

  14. Can Antiviral Drugs Contain Pandemic Influenza Transmission?

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Niels G.; Wang, Dingcheng

    2011-01-01

    Antiviral drugs dispensed during the 2009 influenza pandemic generally failed to contain transmission. This poses the question of whether preparedness for a future pandemic should include plans to use antiviral drugs to mitigate transmission. Simulations using a standard transmission model that allows for infected arrivals and delayed vaccination show that attempts to contain transmission require relatively few antiviral doses. In contrast, persistent use of antiviral drugs when the reproduction number remains above 1 use very many doses and are unlikely to reduce the eventual attack rate appreciably unless the stockpile is very large. A second model, in which the community has a household structure, shows that the effectiveness of a strategy of dispensing antiviral drugs to infected households decreases rapidly with time delays in dispensing the antivirals. Using characteristics of past pandemics it is estimated that at least 80% of primary household cases must present upon show of symptoms to have a chance of containing transmission by dispensing antiviral drugs to households. To determine data needs, household outbreaks were simulated with 50% receiving antiviral drugs early and 50% receiving antiviral drugs late. A test to compare the size of household outbreaks indicates that at least 100–200 household outbreaks need to be monitored to find evidence that antiviral drugs can mitigate transmission of the newly emerged virus. Use of antiviral drugs in an early attempt to contain transmission should be part of preparedness plans for a future influenza pandemic. Data on the incidence of the first 350 cases and the eventual attack rates of the first 200 hundred household outbreaks should be used to estimate the initial reproduction number R and the effectiveness of antiviral drugs to mitigate transmission. Use of antiviral drugs to mitigate general transmission should cease if these estimates indicate that containment of transmission is unlikely. PMID:21464934

  15. Synthesis and hepatitis C antiviral activity of 1-aminobenzyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide analogues.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing-Jing; Ji, Fei-Hong; He, Pei-Lan; Yang, Ya-xi; Tang, Wei; Zuo, Jian-Ping; Li, Yuan-Chao

    2013-05-01

    FIGHTING HCV: Two potent antiviral analogues were developed from a previously identified lead as novel agents against hepatitis C virus. Their potency and selectivity (5 n: IC50 =0.013 μM and EC50 =0.018 μM; 5 t: IC50 =0.007 μM and EC50 =0.024 μM) make them good candidates for further development as antiviral agents.

  16. Antiviral triterpenoids from the medicinal plant Schefflera heptaphylla.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaolan; Jiang, Renwang; Ooi, Linda S M; But, Paul P H; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2007-05-01

    Schefflera heptaphylla (L.) Frodin is a principal ingredient of an herbal tea formulation widely used for the treatment of common cold in southern China. An extract of the long leafstalk of the compound leaf of S. heptaphylla exhibited the most potent antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Further antiviral-guided fractionation and isolation of the leafstalk extract of S. heptaphylla led to obtain two highly active pure triterpenoids, namely 3alpha-hydroxylup-20(29)-ene-23,28-dioic acid and 3-epi-betulinic acid 3-O-sulfate, together with an inactive saponin, 3alpha-hydroxylup-20(29)-ene-23,28-dioic acid 28-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-d-glucopyranoside. An antiviral assay using a cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction method showed that the two triterpenoids possessed broader antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) with a similar 50% inhibition concentration (IC(50)) value of 6.25 microg/mL, influenza A (H1N1) virus with IC(50) values of 25 and 31.3 microg/mL, Coxsackie B3 (Cox B3) virus with IC(50) values of 12.5 and 20 microg/mL and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) with IC(50) values of 18.8 and 25 microg/mL, respectively, whereas the saponin did not have antiviral activity against these four viruses at a concentration of 100 microg/mL. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Antiviral activity of natural products extracted from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Uzair, Bushra; Mahmood, Zahra; Tabassum, Sobia

    2011-01-01

    Many epidemics have broken out over the centuries. Hundreds and thousands of humans have died over a disease. Available treatments for infectious diseases have always been limited. Some infections are more deadly than the others, especially viral pathogens. These pathogens have continuously resisted all kinds of medical treatment, due to a need for new treatments to be developed. Drugs are present in nature and are also synthesized in vitro and they help in combating diseases and restoring health. Synthesizing drugs is a hard and time consuming task, which requires a lot of man power and financial aid. However, the natural compounds are just lying around on the earth, may it be land or water. Over a thousand novel compounds isolated from marine organisms are used as antiviral agents. Others are being pharmacologically tested. Today, over forty antiviral compounds are present in the pharmacological market. Some of these compounds are undergoing clinical and preclinical stages. Marine compounds are paving the way for a new trend in modern medicine.

  18. Viral infectious disease and natural products with antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Kitazato, K; Wang, Y; Kobayashi, N

    2007-08-01

    Viral diseases, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), respiratory diseases, and hepatitis, are the leading causes of death in humans worldwide, despite the tremendous progress in human medicine. The lack of effective therapies and/or vaccines for several viral infections, and the rapid emergence of new drug-resistant viruses have urged a growing need for developing new and effective chemotherapeutic agents to treat viral diseases. Recent advances in the understanding of both the cellular and molecular mechanisms of virus replication have provided the basis for novel therapeutic strategies. Several hundred natural products have been isolated for screening and identifying antiviral activity, and some have been shown to have great medicinal value in preventing and/or ameliorating viral diseases in preclinical and clinical trials. There are innumerable potentially useful medicinal plants and herbs waiting to be evaluated and exploited for therapeutic applications against genetically and functionally diverse virus families. This review focuses on several selected pathogenic viruses, including the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), influenza virus, hepatitis B and C viruses and herpes viruses, and antiviral natural compounds from medicinal plants (herbs), while paying particular attention to promising compounds in preclinical and clinical trials. We also focused our attention on the need to develop effective screening systems for antiviral activity.

  19. Antiviral flavans from the leaves of Pithecellobium clypearia.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaolan; Leung, Kam-Tong; Yao, Fenghe; Ooi, Linda S M; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2006-05-01

    Two new antiviral flavan derivatives were isolated from a methanol extract of leaves of Pithecellobium clypearia as guided by antiviral assays. The structures were characterized, by spectroscopic analyses, as 7-O-galloyltricetifavan (1) and 7,4'-di-O-galloyltricetifavan (2). Cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction assay showed that both compounds 1 and 2 possess antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), with 50% inhibition concentration (IC(50)) values of 5 and 10 microg/mL, respectively; influenza A (H1N1) virus, with IC(50) values of 15.7 and 30 microg/mL; Coxsackie B3 (Cox B3) virus, with IC(50) values of 12.5 and 25 microg/mL, respectively; and Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) with IC(50) values of 30 and 20 microg/mL, respectively. Cytotoxicity evaluation using the MTT assay showed that both compounds 1 and 2 were also moderately toxic to several cultured cell lines.

  20. Design, synthesis and antiviral activity of novel quinazolinones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziwen; Wang, Mingxiao; Yao, Xue; Li, Yue; Tan, Juan; Wang, Lizhong; Qiao, Wentao; Geng, Yunqi; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Qingmin

    2012-07-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a validated therapeutic target for antiviral drug design. However, the emergence of viral strains resistant to clinically studied IN inhibitors demands the discovery of novel inhibitors that are structurally as well as mechanistically different. Herein, a series of quinazolinones were designed and synthesized as novel HIV-1 inhibitors. The new synthetic route provides a practical method for the preparation of 5-hydroxy quinazolinones. Primary bioassay results indicated that most of the quinazolinones possess anti-HIV activity, especially for compound 11b with 77.5% inhibition rate at 10 μM emerged as a new active lead. Most of the synthesized compounds were also found to exhibit good anti-TMV activity, of which compo und 9a showed similar in vivo anti-TMV activity to commercial plant virucide Ribavirin. This work provides a new and efficient approach to evolve novel multi-functional antiviral agents by rational integration and optimization of previously reported antiviral agents.

  1. Antiviral activity of lactoferrin towards naked viruses.

    PubMed

    Seganti, Lucilla; Di Biase, Assunta Maria; Marchetti, Magda; Pietrantoni, Agostina; Tinari, Antonella; Superti, Fabiana

    2004-06-01

    It is well known that lactoferrin (Lf) is a potent inhibitor towards several enveloped and naked viruses, such as rotavirus, enterovirus and adenovirus. Lf is resistant to tryptic digestion and breast-fed infants excrete high levels of faecal Lf, so that its effect on viruses replicating in the gastrointestinal tract is of great interest. In this report, we analysed the mechanism of the antiviral action of this protein in three viral models which, despite representing different genoma and replication strategies, share the ability to infect the gut. Concerning the mechanism of action against rotavirus, Lf from bovine milk (BLf) possesses a dual role, preventing virus attachment to intestinal cells by binding to viral particles, and inhibiting a post adsorption step. The BLf effect towards poliovirus is due to the interference with an early infection step but, when the BLf molecule is saturated with Zn+2 ions, it is also capable of inhibiting viral replication after the viral adsorption phase. The anti-adenovirus action of BLf takes place on virus attachment to cell membranes through competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors and a specific interaction with viral structural polypeptides. Taken together, these findings provide further evidence that Lf is an excellent candidate in the search of natural agents against viral enteric diseases, as it mainly acts by hindering adsorption and internalisation into cells through specific binding to cell receptors and/or viral particles.

  2. Human enterovirus 71 protein interaction network prompts antiviral drug repositioning.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Li, Kang; Jin, Chaozhi; Wang, Jian; Li, Qingjun; Zhang, Qiling; Cheng, Qiyue; Yang, Jing; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2017-02-21

    As a predominant cause of human hand, foot, and mouth disease, enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection may lead to serious diseases and result in severe consequences that threaten public health and cause widespread panic. Although the systematic identification of physical interactions between viral proteins and host proteins provides initial information for the recognition of the cellular mechanism involved in viral infection and the development of new therapies, EV71-host protein interactions have not been explored. Here, we identified interactions between EV71 proteins and host cellular proteins and confirmed the functional relationships of EV71-interacting proteins (EIPs) with virus proliferation and infection by integrating a human protein interaction network and by functional annotation. We found that most EIPs had known interactions with other viruses. We also predicted ATP6V0C as a broad-spectrum essential host factor and validated its essentiality for EV71 infection in vitro. EIPs and their interacting proteins were more likely to be targets of anti-inflammatory and neurological drugs, indicating their potential to serve as host-oriented antiviral targets. Thus, we used a connectivity map to find drugs that inhibited EIP expression. We predicted tanespimycin as a candidate and demonstrated its antiviral efficiency in vitro. These findings provide the first systematic identification of EV71-host protein interactions, an analysis of EIP protein characteristics and a demonstration of their value in developing host-oriented antiviral therapies.

  3. Human enterovirus 71 protein interaction network prompts antiviral drug repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lu; Li, Kang; Jin, Chaozhi; Wang, Jian; Li, Qingjun; Zhang, Qiling; Cheng, Qiyue; Yang, Jing; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2017-01-01

    As a predominant cause of human hand, foot, and mouth disease, enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection may lead to serious diseases and result in severe consequences that threaten public health and cause widespread panic. Although the systematic identification of physical interactions between viral proteins and host proteins provides initial information for the recognition of the cellular mechanism involved in viral infection and the development of new therapies, EV71-host protein interactions have not been explored. Here, we identified interactions between EV71 proteins and host cellular proteins and confirmed the functional relationships of EV71-interacting proteins (EIPs) with virus proliferation and infection by integrating a human protein interaction network and by functional annotation. We found that most EIPs had known interactions with other viruses. We also predicted ATP6V0C as a broad-spectrum essential host factor and validated its essentiality for EV71 infection in vitro. EIPs and their interacting proteins were more likely to be targets of anti-inflammatory and neurological drugs, indicating their potential to serve as host-oriented antiviral targets. Thus, we used a connectivity map to find drugs that inhibited EIP expression. We predicted tanespimycin as a candidate and demonstrated its antiviral efficiency in vitro. These findings provide the first systematic identification of EV71-host protein interactions, an analysis of EIP protein characteristics and a demonstration of their value in developing host-oriented antiviral therapies. PMID:28220872

  4. Mechanisms of antiviral action of plant antimicrobials against murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gilling, Damian H; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R; Bright, Kelly R

    2014-08-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤ 35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Mechanisms of Antiviral Action of Plant Antimicrobials against Murine Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gilling, Damian H.; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses. PMID:24907316

  6. Pungent and bitter, cytotoxic and antiviral terpenoids from some bryophytes and inedible fungi.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yoshinori; Nagashima, Fumihiro; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Toyota, Masao; Ludwiczuk, Agnieszka; Komala, Ismiarni; Ito, Takuya; Yagi, Yasuyuki

    2014-03-01

    Most liverworts elaborate characteristic odiferous, pungent and bitter tasting compounds many of which show antimicrobial, antifungal, antiviral, allergenic contact dermatitis, cytotoxic, insecticidal, anti-HIV, superoxide anion radical release, plant growth regulatory, neurotrophic, NO production inhibitory, muscle relaxant, antiobesity, piscicidal and nematocidal activities. Several inedible mushrooms produce female spider pheromones, strong antioxidant, and cytotoxic compounds. The present paper is concerned with the extraction and isolation of terpenoids from some bryophytes and inedible fungi and their pungent and bitter taste, and cytotoxic and antiviral activity.

  7. Broad-spectrum antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rider, Todd H; Zook, Christina E; Boettcher, Tara L; Wick, Scott T; Pancoast, Jennifer S; Zusman, Benjamin D

    2011-01-01

    Currently there are relatively few antiviral therapeutics, and most which do exist are highly pathogen-specific or have other disadvantages. We have developed a new broad-spectrum antiviral approach, dubbed Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) Activated Caspase Oligomerizer (DRACO) that selectively induces apoptosis in cells containing viral dsRNA, rapidly killing infected cells without harming uninfected cells. We have created DRACOs and shown that they are nontoxic in 11 mammalian cell types and effective against 15 different viruses, including dengue flavivirus, Amapari and Tacaribe arenaviruses, Guama bunyavirus, and H1N1 influenza. We have also demonstrated that DRACOs can rescue mice challenged with H1N1 influenza. DRACOs have the potential to be effective therapeutics or prophylactics for numerous clinical and priority viruses, due to the broad-spectrum sensitivity of the dsRNA detection domain, the potent activity of the apoptosis induction domain, and the novel direct linkage between the two which viruses have never encountered.

  8. The antiviral drug acyclovir is a slow-binding inhibitor of (D)-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Katane, Masumi; Matsuda, Satsuki; Saitoh, Yasuaki; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Nakagome, Izumi; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Hirono, Shuichi; Homma, Hiroshi

    2013-08-20

    d-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a degradative enzyme that is stereospecific for d-amino acids, including d-serine and d-alanine, which are believed to be coagonists of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. To identify a new class of DAO inhibitor(s) that can be used to elucidate the molecular details of the active site environment of DAO, manifold biologically active compounds of microbial origin and pre-existing drugs were screened for their ability to inhibit DAO activity, and several compounds were identified as candidates. One of these compounds, acyclovir (ACV), a well-known antiviral drug used for the treatment of herpesvirus infections, was characterized and evaluated as a novel DAO inhibitor in vitro. Analysis showed that ACV acts on DAO as a reversible slow-binding inhibitor, and interestingly, the time required to achieve equilibrium between DAO, ACV, and the DAO/ACV complex was highly dependent on temperature. The binding mechanism of ACV to DAO was investigated in detail by several approaches, including kinetic analysis, structural modeling of DAO complexed with ACV, and site-specific mutagenesis of an active site residue postulated to be involved in the binding of ACV. The results confirm that ACV is a novel, active site-directed inhibitor of DAO that can be a valuable tool for investigating the structure-function relationships of DAO, including the molecular details of the active site environment of DAO. In particular, it appears that ACV can serve as an active site probe to study the structural basis of temperature-induced conformational changes of DAO.

  9. Antiviral activity of medicinal plants of Nilgiris.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, P; Raghu, C; Ashok, G; Dhanaraj, S A; Suresh, B

    2004-07-01

    Medicinal plants have been traditionally used for different kinds of ailments including infectious diseases. There is an increasing need for substances with antiviral activity since the treatment of viral infections with the available antiviral drugs often leads to the problem of viral resistance. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes a variety of life threatening diseases. Since the chemotherapeutic agents available for HSV infections are either low in quality or limited in efficiency, there is a need to search for new and more effective antiviral agents for HSV infections. Therefore in the present study 18 plants with ethnomedical background from different families were screened for antiviral activity against HSV-1. Different parts of the plants collected from in and around Ootacamund, Tamil Nadu were extracted with different solvents to obtain crude extracts. These extracts were screened for their cytotoxicity against Vero cell line by assay microculture tetrazolium (MTT) trypan blue dye exclusion, proteins estimation and 3H labeling. Antiviral properties of the plant extracts were determined by cytopathic effect inhibition assay and virus yield reduction assay. Three plant extracts Hypericum mysorense, Hypericum hookerianum and Usnea complanta exhibited significant antiviral activity at a concentration non toxic to the cell line used. The extracts of Melia dubia, Cryptostegia grandiflora and essential oil of Rosmarinus officinalis showed partial activity at higher concentrations. Some of the medicinal plants have shown antiviral activity. Further research is needed to elucidate the active constituents of these plants which may be useful in the development of new and effective antiviral agents.

  10. Broad-spectrum antivirals against viral fusion

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Santos, Nuno C.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    Effective antivirals have been developed against specific viruses, such as HIV, Hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This ‘one bug–one drug’ approach to antiviral drug development can be successful, but it may be inadequate for responding to an increasing diversity of viruses that cause significant diseases in humans. The majority of viral pathogens that cause emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases are membrane-enveloped viruses, which require the fusion of viral and cell membranes for virus entry. Therefore, antivirals that target the membrane fusion process represent new paradigms for broad-spectrum antiviral discovery. In this Review, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the fusion between virus and cell membranes and explore how broad-spectrum antivirals target this process to prevent virus entry. PMID:26075364

  11. Hepatitis C Virus and Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungtaek; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been intensively investigated to understand its biology and develop effective antiviral therapies. The efforts of the previous 25 years have resulted in a better understanding of the virus, and this was facilitated by the development of in vitro cell culture systems for HCV replication. Antiviral treatments and sustained virological responses have also improved from the early interferon monotherapy to the current all-oral regimens using direct-acting antivirals. However, antiviral resistance has become a critical issue in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, similar to other chronic viral infections, and retreatment options following treatment failure have become important questions. Despite the clinical challenges in the management of chronic hepatitis C, substantial progress has been made in understanding HCV, which may facilitate the investigation of other closely related flaviviruses and lead to the development of antiviral agents against these human pathogens. PMID:27784846

  12. Viral respiratory diseases: vaccines and antivirals*

    PubMed Central

    Lennette, Edwin H.

    1981-01-01

    Acute respiratory diseases, most of which are generally attributed to viruses, account for about 6% of all deaths and for about 60% of the deaths associated with all respiratory disease. The huge cost attributable to viral respiratory infections as a result of absenteeism and the disruption of business and the burden of medical care makes control of these diseases an important objective. The viruses that infect the respiratory tract fall taxonomically into five viral families. Although immunoprophylaxis would appear to be the logical approach, the development of suitable vaccines has been confronted with numerous obstacles, including antigenic drift and shift in the influenzaviruses, the large number of antigenically distinct immunotypes among rhinoviruses, the occurrence after immunization of rare cases of a severe form of the disease following subsequent natural infection with respiratory syncytial virus, and the risk of oncogenicity of adenoviruses for man. Considerable expenditure on the development of new antiviral drugs has so far resulted in only three compounds that are at present officially approved and licensed for use in the USA. Efforts to improve the tools available for control should continue and imaginative and inventive approaches are called for. However, creativity and ingenuity must operate within the constraints imposed by economic, political, ethical, and legal considerations. PMID:6976841

  13. Viral respiratory diseases: vaccines and antivirals.

    PubMed

    Lennette, E H

    1981-01-01

    Acute respiratory diseases, most of which are generally attributed to viruses, account for about 6% of all deaths and for about 60% of the deaths associated with all respiratory disease. The huge cost attributable to viral respiratory infections as a result of absenteeism and the disruption of business and the burden of medical care makes control of these diseases an important objective. The viruses that infect the respiratory tract fall taxonomically into five viral families. Although immunoprophylaxis would appear to be the logical approach, the development of suitable vaccines has been confronted with numerous obstacles, including antigenic drift and shift in the influenzaviruses, the large number of antigenically distinct immunotypes among rhinoviruses, the occurrence after immunization of rare cases of a severe form of the disease following subsequent natural infection with respiratory syncytial virus, and the risk of oncogenicity of adenoviruses for man. Considerable expenditure on the development of new antiviral drugs has so far resulted in only three compounds that are at present officially approved and licensed for use in the USA. Efforts to improve the tools available for control should continue and imaginative and inventive approaches are called for. However, creativity and ingenuity must operate within the constraints imposed by economic, political, ethical, and legal considerations.

  14. Antiviral activity of some South American medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Abad, M J; Bermejo, P; Sanchez Palomino, S; Chiriboga, X; Carrasco, L

    1999-03-01

    Folk medicinal plants are potential sources of useful therapeutic compounds including some with antiviral activities. Extracts prepared from 10 South American medicinal plants (Baccharis trinervis, Baccharis teindalensis, Eupatorium articulatum, Eupatorium glutinosum, Tagetes pusilla, Neurolaena lobata, Conyza floribunda, Phytolacca bogotensis, Phytolacca rivinoides and Heisteria acuminata) were screened for in vitro antiviral activity against herpes simplex type I (HSV-1), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and poliovirus type 1. The most potent inhibition was observed with an aqueous extract of B. trinervis, which inhibited HSV-1 replication by 100% at 50-200 micrograms/mL, without showing cytotoxic effects. Good activities were also found with the ethanol extract of H. acuminata and the aqueous extract of E. articulatum, which exhibited antiviral effects against both DNA and RNA viruses (HSV-1 and VSV, respectively) at 125-250 micrograms/mL. The aqueous extracts of T. pusilla (100-250 micrograms/mL), B. teindalensis (50-125 micrograms/mL) and E. glutinosum (50-125 micrograms/mL) also inhibited the replication of VSV, but none of the extracts tested had any effect on poliovirus replication.

  15. In vitro antiviral effect of germacrone on feline calicivirus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongxia; Liu, Yongxiang; Zu, Shaopo; Sun, Xue; Liu, Chunguo; Liu, Dafei; Zhang, Xiaozhan; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2016-06-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) often causes respiratory tract and oral disease in cats and is a highly contagious virus. Widespread vaccination does not prevent the spread of FCV. Furthermore, the low fidelity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of FCV leads to the emergence of new variants, some of which show increased virulence. Currently, few effective anti-FCV drugs are available. Here, we found that germacrone, one of the main constituents of volatile oil from rhizoma curcuma, was able to effectively reduce the growth of FCV strain F9 in vitro. This compound exhibited a strong anti-FCV effect mainly in the early phase of the viral life cycle. The antiviral effect depended on the concentration of the drug. In addition, germacrone treatment had a significant inhibitory effect against two other reference strains, 2280 and Bolin, and resulted in a significant reduction in the replication of strains WZ-1 and HRB-SS, which were recently isolated in China. This is the first report of antiviral effects of germacrone against a calicivirus, and extensive in vivo research is needed to evaluate this drug as an antiviral therapeutic agent for FCV.

  16. Immunoenhancing properties and antiviral activity of 7-deazaguanosine in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Smee, D F; Alaghamandan, H A; Gilbert, J; Burger, R A; Jin, A; Sharma, B S; Ramasamy, K; Revankar, G R; Cottam, H B; Jolley, W B

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide analog 7-deazaguanosine has not previously been reported to possess biological (antiviral or antitumor) properties in cell culture or in vivo. Up to 10(5) U of interferon per ml was detected in mouse sera 1 to 4 h following oral (200-mg/kg of body weight) and intraperitoneal (50-mg/kg) doses of the compound. 7-Deazaguanosine also caused significant activation of natural killer and phagocytic cells but did not augment T- and B-cell blastogenesis. Intraperitoneal treatments of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day administered 24 and 18 h before virus inoculation were highly protective in mice inoculated with lethal doses of Semliki Forest or San Angelo viruses. Less but still significant survivor increases were evident in treated mice infected with banzi or encephalomyocarditis viruses. In most cases, the degree of antiviral activity was similar to that exhibited by the biological response modifier 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine. 7-Thia-8-oxoguanosine was more potent than 7-deazaguanosine against encephalomyocarditis virus in mice, however. Oral efficacy was achieved with 7-deazaguanosine treatments of greater than or equal to 100 mg/kg against all virus infections, whereas 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine is reported to be devoid of oral activity in rodents. Thus, 7-deazaguanosine represents the first reported orally active nucleoside biological response modifier exhibiting broad-spectrum antiviral activity against particular types of RNA viruses. PMID:1707603

  17. Antiviral activity of lauryl gallate against animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Carolina; Bustos, Maria Jose; Sabina, Prado; Nogal, Maria Luisa; Granja, Aitor G; González, Maria Eugenia; Gónzalez-Porqué, Pedro; Revilla, Yolanda; Carrascosa, Angel L

    2008-01-01

    Antiviral compounds are needed in the control of many animal and human diseases. We analysed the effect of the antitumoural drug lauryl gallate on the infectivity of the African swine fever virus among other DNA (herpes simplex and vaccinia) and RNA (influenza, porcine transmissible gastroenteritis and Sindbis) viruses, paying attention to its effect on the viability of the corresponding host cells. Viral production was strongly inhibited in different cell lines at non-toxic concentrations of the drug (1-10 microM), reducing the titres 3->5 log units depending on the multiplicity of infection. In our model system (African swine fever virus in Vero cells), the addition of the drug 1 h before virus adsorption completely abolished virus productivity in a one-step growth virus cycle. Interestingly, no inhibitory effect was observed when lauryl gallate was added after 5-8 h post-infection. Both cellular and viral DNA synthesis and late viral transcription were inhibited by the drug; however, the early viral protein synthesis and the virus-mediated increase of p53 remained unaffected. Activation of the apoptotic effector caspase-3 was not detected after lauryl gallate treatment of Vero cells. Furthermore, the presence of the drug abrogated the activation of this protease induced by the virus infection. Lauryl gallate is a powerful antiviral agent against several pathogens of clinical and veterinary importance. The overall results indicate that a cellular factor or function might be the target of the antiviral action of alkyl gallates.

  18. Lipophilic prodrugs of nucleoside triphosphates as biochemical probes and potential antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Gollnest, Tristan; de Oliveira, Thiago Dinis; Schols, Dominique; Balzarini, Jan; Meier, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The antiviral activity of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors is often limited by ineffective phosphorylation. We report on a nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) prodrug approach in which the γ-phosphate of NTPs is bioreversibly modified. A series of TriPPPro-compounds bearing two lipophilic masking units at the γ-phosphate and d4T as a nucleoside analogue are synthesized. Successful delivery of d4TTP is demonstrated in human CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell extracts by an enzyme-triggered mechanism with high selectivity. In antiviral assays, the compounds are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 and HIV-2 in CD4+ T-cell (CEM) cultures. Highly lipophilic acyl residues lead to higher membrane permeability that results in intracellular delivery of phosphorylated metabolites in thymidine kinase-deficient CEM/TK− cells with higher antiviral activity than the parent nucleoside. PMID:26503889

  19. Antiviral interactions of combinations of highly potent 2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione congeners and other anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Tracy L; Yang, Lu; Buckheit, Robert W

    2011-12-01

    Structure-activity relationship evaluation of seventy-four 2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione derivatives identified seven lead compounds based on anti-HIV-1 potency, extended range of action to include HIV-2, virus entry inhibition, reverse transcriptase inhibition, and lack of cytotoxicity to human cells. The selected pyrimidinedione congeners are highly active inhibitors of HIV-1 with EC(50) values ranging from 0.6 to 2 nM in CEM-SS cells infected with laboratory derived viruses, 11-20 nM in fresh human PBMCs infected with subtype B (HT/92/599) virus, and 2-7 nM in PBMCs infected with the clinical subtype C (ZA/97/003) virus. Combination antiviral assays were performed using the laboratory adapted RF strain of HIV-1 in CEM-SS cells and with a clade B and C low passage clinical isolate in fresh human peripheral mononuclear cells and the compound interactions were analyzed using MacSynergy II. The seven pyrimidinedione compounds resulted in additive to synergistic interactions in combination with entry and fusion inhibitors, nonnucleoside and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and the protease inhibitors. No evidence of antagonistic antiviral activity or synergistic cytotoxicity was detected with the combinations of compounds tested. The dual mechanism of action of the pyrimidinediones resulting in inhibition of both virus entry and reverse transcription suggests excellent potential of these lead pyrimidinediones as candidates for combination therapy with other approved HIV inhibitors of varying mechanism of action. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. New Class of Orthopoxvirus Antiviral Drugs That Block Viral Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Chelsea M.; Bolken, Tove' C.; Mjalli, Adnan M.; Arimilli, Murty N.; Andrews, Robert C.; Rothlein, Robert; Andrea, Tariq; Rao, Mohan; Owens, Katrina L.; Hruby, Dennis E.

    2004-01-01

    By using a homology-based bioinformatics approach, a structural model of the vaccinia virus (VV) I7L proteinase was developed. A unique chemical library of ∼51,000 compounds was computationally queried to identify potential active site inhibitors. The resulting biased subset of compounds was assayed for both toxicity and the ability to inhibit the growth of VV in tissue culture cells. A family of chemotypically related compounds was found which exhibits selective activity against orthopoxviruses, inhibiting VV with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 3 to 12 μM. These compounds exhibited no significant cytotoxicity in the four cell lines tested and did not inhibit the growth of other organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, adenovirus, or encephalomyocarditis virus. Phenotypic analyses of virus-infected cells were conducted in the presence of active compounds to verify that the correct biochemical step (I7L-mediated core protein processing) was being inhibited. Electron microscopy of compound-treated VV-infected cells indicated a block in morphogenesis. Compound-resistant viruses were generated and resistance was mapped to the I7L open reading frame. Transient expression with the mutant I7L gene rescued the ability of wild-type virus to replicate in the presence of compound, indicating that this is the only gene necessary for resistance. This novel class of inhibitors has potential for development as an efficient antiviral drug against pathogenic orthopoxviruses, including smallpox. PMID:15507601

  1. Enterovirus infection in Korean children and anti-enteroviral potential candidate agents

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwi Sung; Choi, Young Jin

    2012-01-01

    Although most enterovirus infections are not serious enough to be life threatening, several enteroviruses such as enterovirus 71 are responsible for severe, potentially life-threatening disease. The epidemic patterns of enteroviruses occur regularly during the year, but they may change due to environmental shifts induced by climate change due to global warming. Therefore, enterovirus epidemiological studies should be performed continuously as a basis for anti-viral studies. A great number of synthesized antiviral compounds that work against enteroviruses have been developed but only a few have demonstrated effectiveness in vivo. No proven effective antiviral agents are available for enterovirus disease therapy. The development of a new antiviral drug is a difficult task due to poor selective toxicity and cost. To overcome these limitations, one approach is to accelerate the availability of other existing antiviral drugs approved for antiviral effect against enteroviruses, and the other way is to screen traditional medicinal plants. PMID:23133481

  2. In vitro antiviral activity of plant extracts from Asteraceae medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Visintini Jaime, María F; Redko, Flavia; Muschietti, Liliana V; Campos, Rodolfo H; Martino, Virginia S; Cavallaro, Lucia V

    2013-07-27

    Due to the high prevalence of viral infections having no specific treatment and the constant appearance of resistant viral strains, the development of novel antiviral agents is essential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), poliovirus type 2 (PV-2) and vesicular stomatitis virus of organic (OE) and aqueous extracts (AE) from: Baccharis gaudichaudiana, B. spicata, Bidens subalternans, Pluchea sagittalis, Tagetes minuta and Tessaria absinthioides. A characterization of the antiviral activity of B. gaudichaudiana OE and AE and the bioassay-guided fractionation of the former and isolation of one active compound is also reported. The antiviral activity of the OE and AE of the selected plants was evaluated by reduction of the viral cytopathic effect. Active extracts were then assessed by plaque reduction assays. The antiviral activity of the most active extracts was characterized by evaluating their effect on the pretreatment, the virucidal activity and the effect on the adsorption or post-adsorption period of the viral cycle. The bioassay-guided fractionation of B. gaudichaudiana OE was carried out by column chromatography followed by semipreparative high performance liquid chromatography fractionation of the most active fraction and isolation of an active compound. The antiviral activity of this compound was also evaluated by plaque assay. B. gaudichaudiana and B. spicata OE were active against PV-2 and VSV. T. absinthioides OE was only active against PV-2. The corresponding three AE were active against HSV-1. B. gaudichaudiana extracts (OE and AE) were the most selective ones with selectivity index (SI) values of 10.9 (PV-2) and > 117 (HSV-1). For this reason, both extracts of B. gaudichaudiana were selected to characterize their antiviral effects. Further bioassay-guided fractionation of B. gaudichaudiana OE led to an active fraction, FC (EC50 = 3.1 μg/ml; SI = 37

  3. In vitro antiviral activity of plant extracts from Asteraceae medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the high prevalence of viral infections having no specific treatment and the constant appearance of resistant viral strains, the development of novel antiviral agents is essential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), poliovirus type 2 (PV-2) and vesicular stomatitis virus of organic (OE) and aqueous extracts (AE) from: Baccharis gaudichaudiana, B. spicata, Bidens subalternans, Pluchea sagittalis, Tagetes minuta and Tessaria absinthioides. A characterization of the antiviral activity of B. gaudichaudiana OE and AE and the bioassay-guided fractionation of the former and isolation of one active compound is also reported. Methods The antiviral activity of the OE and AE of the selected plants was evaluated by reduction of the viral cytopathic effect. Active extracts were then assessed by plaque reduction assays. The antiviral activity of the most active extracts was characterized by evaluating their effect on the pretreatment, the virucidal activity and the effect on the adsorption or post-adsorption period of the viral cycle. The bioassay-guided fractionation of B. gaudichaudiana OE was carried out by column chromatography followed by semipreparative high performance liquid chromatography fractionation of the most active fraction and isolation of an active compound. The antiviral activity of this compound was also evaluated by plaque assay. Results B. gaudichaudiana and B. spicata OE were active against PV-2 and VSV. T. absinthioides OE was only active against PV-2. The corresponding three AE were active against HSV-1. B. gaudichaudiana extracts (OE and AE) were the most selective ones with selectivity index (SI) values of 10.9 (PV-2) and >117 (HSV-1). For this reason, both extracts of B. gaudichaudiana were selected to characterize their antiviral effects. Further bioassay-guided fractionation of B. gaudichaudiana OE led to an active fraction, FC (EC50

  4. Chemical Preparation Laboratory IND Candidate Compounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-21

    carboxamide (Ribavirin) (8)10: Methanol (42 L) was placed in a stainless steel reactor and cooled to -10° by circulating alcohol at -40 through the reactor ...was dissolved in anhydrous methanol (200 mL) and the pH of the solution was adjusted to -9-10 by adding sodium methoxide solution. The reaction...mixture was stirred at room temperature for 4 hours, neutralized with Amberlite IR-120 H+ resin and filtered. The resin was washed with methanol (4 x 30

  5. Chemical Preparation Laboratory for IND Candidate Compounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-05

    29 J. Thiazofurin-nitrile, AVS TFN....................................... 32 K. 4aH-r,lH-trans,l-Hydroxy-8,9- methylenedioxy - l,4,4a...Hydroxy, 2,3,4-triacetoxy-8,9- methylenedioxy -1,2,3,4,4a,10b- hexahydro-6(5H)phenanthridone, AVS 360 OH .......................... 38 d ion M. 4aH-r,lH...trans,2H-cis,3H-trans,4H-trans,l,3,4-Trihydroxy- 2-acetoxy-8,9- methylenedioxy -1,2,3,4,4a,10b-hexahydro- 6(5H)phenanthridone, AVS 360 MA

  6. Chemical Preparation Laboratory for IND Candidate Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-31

    AVS 360MA) ..................... 16 6. 1-Hydroxy-8,9- methylenedioxy -1,4,4a,106-tetrahydro-6(5H)phenan- thridone (Intermediate II...carboxylic acid (AVS RCOOH); Lycoricidine triacetate (AVS 360); l-Hydroxy-2-acetoxy-lycoricidine (AVS 360MA); 1- Hydroxy-8,9- methylenedioxy -l,4,4a,106... methylenedioxy -l.2.3.4.4a.l0b-hexahydro- 6(5H)Dhenanthridone (U5): To a mixture of N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (5.5 g, 47 mmol) in t-butanol (30 mL

  7. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  8. Antiviral Perspectives for Chikungunya Virus

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen that has a major health impact in humans and causes acute febrile illness in humans accompanied by joint pains and, in many cases, persistent arthralgia lasting for weeks to years. CHIKV reemerged in 2005-2006 in several parts of the Indian Ocean islands and India after a gap of 32 years, causing millions of cases. The re-emergence of CHIKV has also resulted in numerous outbreaks in several countries in the eastern hemisphere, with a threat to further expand in the near future. However, there is no vaccine against CHIKV infection licensed for human use, and therapy for CHIKV infection is still mainly limited to supportive care as antiviral agents are yet in different stages of testing or development. In this review we explore the different perspectives for chikungunya treatment and the effectiveness of these treatment regimens and discuss the scope for future directions. PMID:24955364

  9. Norovirus: targets and tools in antiviral drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Joana; Neyts, Johan; Jochmans, Dirk

    2014-09-01

    The development of antiviral strategies to treat or prevent norovirus infections is a pressing matter. Noroviruses are the number 1 cause of acute gastroenteritis, of foodborne illness, of sporadic gastroenteritis in all age groups and of severe acute gastroenteritis in children less than 5 years old seeking medical assistance [USA/CDC]. In developing countries, noroviruses are linked to significant mortality (~200,000 children <5 years old). Noroviruses are a major culprit for the closure of hospital wards, and associated with increased hospitalization and mortality among the elderly. Transplant patients have significant risk of acquiring persistent norovirus gastroenteritis. Control and prevention strategies are limited to the use of disinfectants and hand sanitizers, whose efficacy is frequently insufficient. Hence, there is an ample need for antiviral treatment and prophylaxis of norovirus infections. The fact that only a handful of inhibitors of norovirus replication have been reported can largely be attributable to the hampering inability to cultivate human noroviruses in cell culture. The Norwalk replicon-bearing cells and the murine norovirus-infected cell lines are the available models to assess in vitro antiviral activity of compounds. Human noroviruses have been shown to replicate (to some extent) in mice, calves, gnotobiotic pigs, and chimpanzees. Infection of interferon-deficient mice with the murine norovirus results in virus-induced diarrhea. Here we review recent developments in understanding which norovirus proteins or host cell factors may serve as targets for inhibition of viral replication. Given the recent advances, significant progress in the search for antiviral strategies against norovirus infections is expected in the upcoming years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis and antiviral activity of azoles obtained from carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Barradas, José Sebastián; Errea, María Inés; D'Accorso, Norma B; Sepúlveda, Claudia S; Talarico, Laura B; Damonte, Elsa B

    2008-09-22

    Herein we describe the synthesis of 1,2,4-triazolyl-3-thione;1,3,4-oxadiazole, and imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole derivatives from carbohydrates. The antiviral activity of these compounds was tested against Dengue and Junin virus (the etiological agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever). The 3-(p-bromobenzoyl)-5-(1,2-O-isopropylidene-3-O-methyl-alpha-d-xylofuranos-5-ulos-5-yl)imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole was able to inhibit the replication of both viruses in Vero cells at concentration significantly lower than the CC(50).

  11. Escape Mutations in NS4B Render Dengue Virus Insensitive to the Antiviral Activity of the Paracetamol Metabolite AM404

    PubMed Central

    van Cleef, Koen W. R.; Overheul, Gijs J.; Thomassen, Michael C.; Marjakangas, Jenni M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the enormous disease burden associated with dengue virus infections, a licensed antiviral drug is lacking. Here, we show that the paracetamol (acetaminophen) metabolite AM404 inhibits dengue virus replication. Moreover, we find that mutations in NS4B that were previously found to confer resistance to the antiviral compounds NITD-618 and SDM25N also render dengue virus insensitive to AM404. Our work provides further support for NS4B as a direct or indirect target for antiviral drug development. PMID:26856827

  12. Antiviral effect of ranpirnase against Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Thomas; Draper, Ken; Brasel, Trevor; Freiberg, Alexander; Squiquera, Luis; Sidransky, David; Sulley, Jamie; Taxman, Debra J

    2016-08-01

    The recent epidemic of Ebola has intensified the need for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics that prolong and improve survival against deadly viral diseases. We sought to determine whether ranpirnase, an endoribonuclease from Rana pipiens with a demonstrated human safety profile in phase III oncology trials, can reduce titers of Ebola virus (EBOV) in infected cells, protect mice against mouse-adapted EBOV challenge, and reduce virus levels in infected mice. Our results demonstrate that 0.50 μg/ml ranpirnase is potently effective at reducing EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection in cultured Vero E6 cells (Selectivity Index 47.8-70.2). In a prophylactic study, a single intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase protected 70% of mice from progressive infection. Additionally, in a post-exposure prophylactic study, 100% of female mice survived infection after intraperitoneal administration of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase for ten days beginning 1 h post challenge. Most of the male counterparts were sacrificed due to weight loss by Study Day 8 or 9; however, the Clinical Activity/Behavior scores of these mice remained low and no significant microscopic pathologies could be detected in the kidneys, livers or spleens. Furthermore, live virus could not be detected in the sera of ranpirnase-treated mice by Study Day 8 or in the kidneys, livers or spleens by Study Day 12, and viral RNA levels declined exponentially by Study Day 12. Because ranpirnase is exceptionally stable and has a long track record of safe intravenous administration to humans, this drug provides a promising new candidate for clinical consideration in the treatment of Ebola virus disease alone or in combination with other therapeutics.

  13. Antiviral Activity of Hederasaponin B from Hedera helix against Enterovirus 71 Subgenotypes C3 and C4a

    PubMed Central

    Song, JaeHyoung; Yeo, Sang-Gu; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Bo-Ra; Kim, Jin-Won; Kim, JeongHoon; Jeong, HyeonGun; Kwon, YongSoo; Kim, HyunPyo; Lee, SangWon; Park, Jae-Hak; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the predominant cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). The antiviral activity of hederasaponin B from Hedera helix against EV71 subgenotypes C3 and C4a was evaluated in vero cells. In the current study, the antiviral activity of hederasaponin B against EV71 C3 and C4a was determined by cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction method and western blot assay. Our results demonstrated that hederasaponin B and 30% ethanol extract of Hedera helix containing hederasaponin B showed significant antiviral activity against EV71 subgenotypes C3 and C4a by reducing the formation of a visible CPE. Hederasaponin B also inhibited the viral VP2 protein expression, suggesting the inhibition of viral capsid protein synthesis.These results suggest that hederasaponin B and Hedera helix extract containing hederasaponin B can be novel drug candidates with broad-spectrum antiviral activity against various subgenotypes of EV71. PMID:24596620

  14. Cytotoxic, Virucidal, and Antiviral Activity of South American Plant and Algae Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Faral-Tello, Paula; Mirazo, Santiago; Dutra, Carmelo; Pérez, Andrés; Geis-Asteggiante, Lucía; Frabasile, Sandra; Koncke, Elina; Davyt, Danilo; Cavallaro, Lucía; Heinzen, Horacio; Arbiza, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection has a prevalence of 70% in the human population. Treatment is based on acyclovir, valacyclovir, and foscarnet, three drugs that share the same mechanism of action and of which resistant strains have been isolated from patients. In this aspect, innovative drug therapies are required. Natural products offer unlimited opportunities for the discovery of antiviral compounds. In this study, 28 extracts corresponding to 24 plant species and 4 alga species were assayed in vitro to detect antiviral activity against HSV-1. Six of the methanolic extracts inactivated viral particles by direct interaction and 14 presented antiviral activity when incubated with cells already infected. Most interesting antiviral activity values obtained are those of Limonium brasiliense, Psidium guajava, and Phyllanthus niruri, which inhibit HSV-1 replication in vitro with 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of 185, 118, and 60 μg/mL, respectively. For these extracts toxicity values were calculated and therefore selectivity indexes (SI) obtained. Further characterization of the bioactive components of antiviral plants will pave the way for the discovery of new compounds against HSV-1. PMID:22619617

  15. Cytotoxicity, antiviral and antimicrobial activities of alkaloids, flavonoids, and phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Ozçelik, Berrin; Kartal, Murat; Orhan, Ilkay

    2011-04-01

    Some natural products consisting of the alkaloids yohimbine and vincamine (indole-type), scopolamine and atropine (tropane-type), colchicine (tropolone-type), allantoin (imidazolidine-type), trigonelline (pyridine-type) as well as octopamine, synephrine, and capsaicin (exocyclic amine-type); the flavonoid derivatives quercetin, apigenin, genistein, naringin, silymarin, and silibinin; and the phenolic acids namely gallic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, and quinic acid, were tested for their in vitro antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal activities and cytotoxicity. Antiviral activity of the compounds was tested against DNA virus herpes simplex type 1 and RNA virus parainfluenza (type-3). Cytotoxicity of the compounds was determined using Madin-Darby bovine kidney and Vero cell lines, and their cytopathogenic effects were expressed as maximum non-toxic concentration. Antibacterial activity was assayed against following bacteria and their isolated strains: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacillus subtilis, although they were screened by microdilution method against two fungi: Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis. Atropine and gallic acid showed potent antiviral effect at the therapeutic range of 0.8-0.05 µg ml(-1), whilst all of the compounds exerted robust antibacterial effect. Antiviral and antimicrobial effects of the compounds tested herein may constitute a preliminary step for further relevant studies to identify the mechanism of action.

  16. Marine Snails and Slugs: a Great Place To Look for Antiviral Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Vinh T.; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Green, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Molluscs, comprising one of the most successful phyla, lack clear evidence of adaptive immunity and yet thrive in the oceans, which are rich in viruses. There are thought to be nearly 120,000 species of Mollusca, most living in marine habitats. Despite the extraordinary abundance of viruses in oceans, molluscs often have very long life spans (10 to 100 years). Thus, their innate immunity must be highly effective at countering viral infections. Antiviral compounds are a crucial component of molluscan defenses against viruses and have diverse mechanisms of action against a wide variety of viruses, including many that are human pathogens. Antiviral compounds found in abalone, oyster, mussels, and other cultured molluscs are available in large supply, providing good opportunities for future research and development. However, most members of the phylum Mollusca have not been examined for the presence of antiviral compounds. The enormous diversity and adaptations of molluscs imply a potential source of novel antiviral compounds for future drug discovery. PMID:26063420

  17. Synthesis and antiviral evaluation of new N-acylhydrazones containing glycine residue.

    PubMed

    Tian, Baohe; He, Meizi; Tan, Zhiwu; Tang, Shixing; Hewlett, Indira; Chen, Shuguang; Jin, Yinxue; Yang, Ming

    2011-03-01

    N-acylhydrazones containing glycine residue 3a-j and 8a-h were synthesized as HIV-1 capsid protein assembly inhibitors. The structures of the novel N-acylhydrazone derivatives were characterized using different spectroscopic methods. Antiviral activity demonstrated that compound 8c bearing 4-methylphenyl moiety was the most active with low cytotoxicity.

  18. Marine Snails and Slugs: a Great Place To Look for Antiviral Drugs.

    PubMed

    Dang, Vinh T; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Green, Tim; Speck, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Molluscs, comprising one of the most successful phyla, lack clear evidence of adaptive immunity and yet thrive in the oceans, which are rich in viruses. There are thought to be nearly 120,000 species of Mollusca, most living in marine habitats. Despite the extraordinary abundance of viruses in oceans, molluscs often have very long life spans (10 to 100 years). Thus, their innate immunity must be highly effective at countering viral infections. Antiviral compounds are a crucial component of molluscan defenses against viruses and have diverse mechanisms of action against a wide variety of viruses, including many that are human pathogens. Antiviral compounds found in abalone, oyster, mussels, and other cultured molluscs are available in large supply, providing good opportunities for future research and development. However, most members of the phylum Mollusca have not been examined for the presence of antiviral compounds. The enormous diversity and adaptations of molluscs imply a potential source of novel antiviral compounds for future drug discovery. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. An integrated approach of network-based systems biology, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics approach to unravel the role of existing antiviral molecules against AIDS-associated cancer.

    PubMed

    Omer, Ankur; Singh, Poonam

    2017-05-01

    A serious challenge in cancer treatment is to reposition the activity of various already known drug candidates against cancer. There is a need to rewrite and systematically analyze the detailed mechanistic aspect of cellular networks to gain insight into the novel role played by various molecules. Most Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection-associated cancers are caused by oncogenic viruses like Human Papilloma Viruses and Epstein-Bar Virus. As the onset of AIDS-associated cancers marks the severity of AIDS, there might be possible interconnections between the targets and mechanism of both the diseases. We have explored the possibility of certain antiviral compounds to act against major AIDS-associated cancers: Kaposi's Sarcoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, and Cervical Cancer with the help of systems pharmacology approach that includes screening for targets and molecules through the construction of a series of drug-target and drug-target-diseases network. Two molecules (Calanolide A and Chaetochromin B) and the target "HRAS" were finally screened with the help of molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. The results provide novel antiviral molecules against HRAS target to treat AIDS defining cancers and an insight for understanding the pharmacological, therapeutic aspects of similar unexplored molecules against various cancers.

  20. Antiviral Triterpenes from the Twigs and Leaves of Lyonia ovalifolia.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiao-Jing; Li, Yong; Ma, Shuang-Gang; Qu, Jing; Liu, Yun-Bao; Li, Yu-Huan; Zhang, Dan; Li, Li; Yu, Shi-Shan

    2016-11-23

    Eleven new 9,10-seco-cycloartan triterpene glycosides (1-11), seven new lanostane triterpene glycosides (12-18), and two new ursane triterpenoids (19-20) were isolated from the twigs and leaves of Lyonia ovalifolia. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive MS and NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of compound 1a (the aglycone of 1) was established by X-ray crystallography, and that of C-24 in compounds 2, 7, and 12 was established by Mo2(OAc)4-induced electronic circular dichroism experiments. All compounds were evaluated for their antiviral [herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), influenza A/95-359 (A/95-359), and Coxsackie B3 (CVB3)] activity. Compounds 1, 1a, 2a, 12a, 13, and 16 exhibited potent activity against HSV-1, with IC50 values from 2.1 to 14.3 μM, while compounds 1a, 2a, 12a, 13, and 12-2a exhibited potent activity against A/95-359, with IC50 values from 2.1 to 11.1 μM. In turn, compounds 1, 1a, 2a, 12a, and 13 exhibited potent activity against CVB3, with IC50 values from 2.1 to 11.1 μM.

  1. Antiviral activity of gliotoxin, gentian violet and brilliant green against Nipah and Hendra virus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Using a recently described monolayer assay amenable to high throughput screening format for the identification of potential Nipah virus and Hendra virus antivirals, we have partially screened a low molecular weight compound library (>8,000 compounds) directly against live virus infection and identified twenty eight promising lead molecules. Initial single blind screens were conducted with 10 μM compound in triplicate with a minimum efficacy of 90% required for lead selection. Lead compounds were then further characterised to determine the median efficacy (IC50), cytotoxicity (CC50) and the in vitro therapeutic index in live virus and pseudotype assay formats. Results While a number of leads were identified, the current work describes three commercially available compounds: brilliant green, gentian violet and gliotoxin, identified as having potent antiviral activity against Nipah and Hendra virus. Similar efficacy was observed against pseudotyped Nipah and Hendra virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type 3 while only gliotoxin inhibited an influenza A virus suggesting a non-specific, broad spectrum activity for this compound. Conclusion All three of these compounds have been used previously for various aspects of anti-bacterial and anti-fungal therapy and the current results suggest that while unsuitable for internal administration, they may be amenable to topical antiviral applications, or as disinfectants and provide excellent positive controls for future studies. PMID:19889218

  2. Antiviral Action of Synthetic Stigmasterol Derivatives on Herpes Simplex Virus Replication in Nervous Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Petrera, Erina; Níttolo, Analía G.; Alché, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Polyfunctionalized stigmasterol derivatives, (22S,23S)-22,23-dihydroxystigmast-4-en-3-one (compound 1) and (22S,23S)-3β-bromo-5α,22,23-trihydroxystigmastan-6-one (compound 2), inhibit herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) replication and spreading in human epithelial cells derived from ocular tissues. Both compounds reduce the incidence and severity of lesions in a murine model of herpetic stromal keratitis when administered in different treatment modalities. Since encephalitis caused by HSV-1 is another immunopathology of viral origin, we evaluate here the antiviral effect of both compounds on HSV-1 infected nervous cell lines as well as their anti-inflammatory action. We found that both stigmasterol derivatives presented low cytotoxicity in the three nervous cell lines assayed. Regarding the antiviral activity, in all cases both compounds prevented HSV-1 multiplication when added after infection, as well as virus propagation. Additionally, both compounds were able to hinder interleukin-6 and Interferon-gamma secretion induced by HSV-1 infection in Neuro-2a cells. We conclude that compounds 1 and 2 have exerted a dual antiviral and anti-inflammatory effect in HSV-1 infected nervous cell lines, which makes them interesting molecules to be further studied. PMID:25147828

  3. Antiviral activity of gliotoxin, gentian violet and brilliant green against Nipah and Hendra virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aljofan, Mohamad; Sganga, Michael L; Lo, Michael K; Rootes, Christina L; Porotto, Matteo; Meyer, Adam G; Saubern, Simon; Moscona, Anne; Mungall, Bruce A

    2009-11-04

    Using a recently described monolayer assay amenable to high throughput screening format for the identification of potential Nipah virus and Hendra virus antivirals, we have partially screened a low molecular weight compound library (>8,000 compounds) directly against live virus infection and identified twenty eight promising lead molecules. Initial single blind screens were conducted with 10 microM compound in triplicate with a minimum efficacy of 90% required for lead selection. Lead compounds were then further characterised to determine the median efficacy (IC50), cytotoxicity (CC50) and the in vitro therapeutic index in live virus and pseudotype assay formats. While a number of leads were identified, the current work describes three commercially available compounds: brilliant green, gentian violet and gliotoxin, identified as having potent antiviral activity against Nipah and Hendra virus. Similar efficacy was observed against pseudotyped Nipah and Hendra virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type 3 while only gliotoxin inhibited an influenza A virus suggesting a non-specific, broad spectrum activity for this compound. All three of these compounds have been used previously for various aspects of anti-bacterial and anti-fungal therapy and the current results suggest that while unsuitable for internal administration, they may be amenable to topical antiviral applications, or as disinfectants and provide excellent positive controls for future studies.

  4. Antiviral Natural Products and Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Hsu, Wen-Chan; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections play an important role in human diseases, and recent outbreaks in the advent of globalization and ease of travel have underscored their prevention as a critical issue in safeguarding public health. Despite the progress made in immunization and drug development, many viruses lack preventive vaccines and efficient antiviral therapies, which are often beset by the generation of viral escape mutants. Thus, identifying novel antiviral drugs is of critical importance and natural products are an excellent source for such discoveries. In this mini-review, we summarize the antiviral effects reported for several natural products and herbal medicines. PMID:24872930

  5. Antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Zoulim, Fabien

    2006-09-01

    Treatment of chronic hepatitis B remains a clinical challenge. Long-term viral suppression is a major goal of antiviral therapy to improve the clinical outcome of the patients. Antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis B relies currently on immune modulators such as interferon alpha and its pegylated form, and viral polymerase inhibitors. Because of the slow kinetics of viral clearance and the spontaneous viral genome variability, viral mutants resistant to nucleoside analogs may be selected. However, the development of new antiviral agents is rapidly improving the offing of therapy of chronic hepatitis B. These new therapeutic advances are reviewed in this manuscript.

  6. Characterization of an Antiviral Compound Effective Against Several Pestiviruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Pestivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family consists of four separate species: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 1 and type 2, classical swine fever virus, and border disease virus (BDV). Classification of several other viral isolates as pestiviruses has been proposed due to their genetic ...

  7. Pharmacokinetics of antiviral polyoxometalates in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, L; Boudinot, F D; Boudinot, S G; Henson, G W; Bossard, G E; Martellucci, S A; Ash, P W; Fricker, S P; Darkes, M C; Theobald, B R

    1994-01-01

    Polyoxometalates are soluble mineral compounds formed principally of oxide anions and early transition metal cations. The polyoxometalates K12H2[P2W12O48].24H2O (JM 1591), K10[P2W18Zn4(H2O)2O68].20H2O (JM 1596), and [(CH3)3NH]8[Si2W18Nb6O77] (JM 2820) demonstrate potent antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus in vitro. The preclinical pharmacokinetics of these three compounds were characterized after single-dose intravenous administration of 50 mg/kg to rats. Plasma, urine, and feces were collected for 168 h, and polyoxometalate concentrations were determined by atomic emission. Serum protein binding was measured by equilibrium dialysis. All three compounds were highly bound to serum proteins in a concentration-dependent manner. Total and unbound concentrations of the three compounds in plasma declined in a triexponential manner with terminal half-lives of 246.0 +/- 127.0, 438.4 +/- 129.4, and 32.2 +/- 5.37 h (mean +/- standard deviation) for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. Systemic clearances based on total concentrations in plasma were low, averaging 0.016 +/- 0.002, 0.015 +/- 0.002, and 0.018 +/- 0.003 liter/h/kg for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. The clearances of unbound compounds from plasma averaged 0.966 +/- 0.136, 0.050 +/- 0.005, and 0.901 +/- 0.165 liter/h/kg for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. For JM 1596, the clearance of unbound compound from the kidneys was lower than the glomerular filtration rate (0.086 liter/h/kg), suggesting this polyoxometalate underwent renal tubular reabsorption. However, JM 1591 and JM 2820 appeared to undergo tubular secretion. The fraction of the dose recovered in urine was 11.5, 46.8, and 10.6% for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. Approximately 5% of the dose of each polyoxometalate was recovered in feces. The steady-state volume of distribution based on total concentrations averaged 1.44 liters

  8. Pentagalloylglucose, a highly bioavailable polyphenolic compound present in Cortex moutan, efficiently blocks hepatitis C virus entry.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Patrick; Perin, Paula; Menzel, Nicolas; Banda, Dominic; Pfaender, Stephanie; Alves, Marco P; Thiel, Volker; Meulemann, Phillip; Colpitts, Che C; Schang, Luis M; Vondran, Florian W R; Anggakusuma; Manns, Michael P; Steinmann, Eike; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2017-09-18

    Approximately 142 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Although potent direct acting antivirals are available, high costs limit access to treatment. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection remains a major cause of orthotopic liver transplantation. Moreover, re-infection of the graft occurs regularly. Antivirals derived from natural sources might be an alternative and cost-effective option to complement therapy regimens for global control of hepatitis C virus infection. We tested the antiviral properties of a mixture of different Chinese herbs/roots named Zhi Bai Di Huang Wan (ZBDHW) and its individual components on HCV. One of the ZBDHW components, Penta-O-Galloyl-Glucose (PGG), was further analyzed for its mode of action in vitro, its antiviral activity in primary human hepatocytes as well as for its bioavailability and hepatotoxicity in mice. ZBDHW, its component Cortex Moutan and the compound PGG efficiently block entry of HCV of all major genotypes and also of the related flavivirus Zika virus. PGG does not disrupt HCV virion integrity and acts primarily during virus attachment. PGG shows an additive effect when combined with the well characterized HCV inhibitor Daclatasvir. Analysis of bioavailability in mice revealed plasma levels above tissue culture IC50 after a single intraperitoneal injection. In conclusion, PGG is a pangenotypic HCV entry inhibitor with high bioavailability. The low cost and wide availability of this compound make it a promising candidate for HCV combination therapies, and also emerging human pathogenic flaviviruses like ZIKV. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Chemical Derivatives of a Small Molecule Deubiquitinase Inhibitor Have Antiviral Activity against Several RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J.; Pal, Anupama; Gyan, Kofi E.; Charbonneau, Marie-Eve; Showalter, Hollis D.; Donato, Nicholas J.; O'Riordan, Mary; Wobus, Christiane E.

    2014-01-01

    Most antiviral treatment options target the invading pathogen and unavoidably encounter loss of efficacy as the pathogen mutates to overcome replication restrictions. A good strategy for circumventing drug resistance, or for pathogens without treatment options, is to target host cell proteins that are utilized by viruses during infection. The small molecule WP1130 is a selective deubiquitinase inhibitor shown previously to successfully reduce replication of noroviruses and some other RNA viruses. In this study, we screened a library of 31 small molecule derivatives of WP1130 to identify compounds that retained the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of the parent compound in vitro but exhibited improved drug-like properties, particularly increased aqueous solubility. Seventeen compounds significantly reduced murine norovirus infection in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, with four causing decreases in viral titers that were similar or slightly better than WP1130 (1.9 to 2.6 log scale). Antiviral activity was observed following pre-treatment and up to 1 hour postinfection in RAW 264.7 cells as well as in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages. Treatment of the human norovirus replicon system cell line with the same four compounds also decreased levels of Norwalk virus RNA. No significant cytotoxicity was observed at the working concentration of 5 µM for all compounds tested. In addition, the WP1130 derivatives maintained their broad-spectrum antiviral activity against other RNA viruses, Sindbis virus, LaCrosse virus, encephalomyocarditis virus, and Tulane virus. Thus, altering structural characteristics of WP1130 can maintain effective broad-spectrum antiviral activity while increasing aqueous solubility. PMID:24722666

  10. Chemical derivatives of a small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor have antiviral activity against several RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J; Pal, Anupama; Gyan, Kofi E; Charbonneau, Marie-Eve; Showalter, Hollis D; Donato, Nicholas J; O'Riordan, Mary; Wobus, Christiane E

    2014-01-01

    Most antiviral treatment options target the invading pathogen and unavoidably encounter loss of efficacy as the pathogen mutates to overcome replication restrictions. A good strategy for circumventing drug resistance, or for pathogens without treatment options, is to target host cell proteins that are utilized by viruses during infection. The small molecule WP1130 is a selective deubiquitinase inhibitor shown previously to successfully reduce replication of noroviruses and some other RNA viruses. In this study, we screened a library of 31 small molecule derivatives of WP1130 to identify compounds that retained the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of the parent compound in vitro but exhibited improved drug-like properties, particularly increased aqueous solubility. Seventeen compounds significantly reduced murine norovirus infection in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, with four causing decreases in viral titers that were similar or slightly better than WP1130 (1.9 to 2.6 log scale). Antiviral activity was observed following pre-treatment and up to 1 hour postinfection in RAW 264.7 cells as well as in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages. Treatment of the human norovirus replicon system cell line with the same four compounds also decreased levels of Norwalk virus RNA. No significant cytotoxicity was observed at the working concentration of 5 µM for all compounds tested. In addition, the WP1130 derivatives maintained their broad-spectrum antiviral activity against other RNA viruses, Sindbis virus, LaCrosse virus, encephalomyocarditis virus, and Tulane virus. Thus, altering structural characteristics of WP1130 can maintain effective broad-spectrum antiviral activity while increasing aqueous solubility.

  11. Antiviral treatment of influenza in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choe, Young June; Lee, Hyunju; Lee, Hoan Jong; Choi, Eun Hwa

    2015-06-01

    Antiviral therapy has an important role in the treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza. At present, two classes of antiviral agents, adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors, are available for the treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza in Korea. Because of the widespread resistance against adamantanes, neuraminidase inhibitors are mainly used. Because each country has a unique epidemiology of influenza, the proper use of antiviral agents should be determined based on local data. Decisions on the clinical practice in the treatment of influenza in South Korea are guided by the local surveillance data, practice guidelines, health insurance system and the resistance patterns of the circulating influenza viruses. This review highlights the role of antiviral agents in the treatment and outcome of influenza in Korea by providing comprehensive information of their clinical usage in Korea.

  12. Antiviral activity in Argentine medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Kott, V; Barbini, L; Cruañes, M; Muñoz, J D; Vivot, E; Cruañes, J; Martino, V; Ferraro, G; Cavallaro, L; Campos, R

    1999-01-01

    In an ethnopharmacological screening of selected medicinal plants used in Argentina for the treatment of infectious diseases, aqueous extracts of five species were assayed in vitro to detect antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenovirus serotype 7 (ADV-7). Polygonum punctatum, Lithraea molleoides, Sebastiania brasiliensis and Sebastiania klotzschiana but not Myrcianthes cisplatensis showed in vitro antiherpetic activity with 50% effective dose (ED50) ranging from 39 to 169 microg/ml. P. punctatum, L. molleoides and M. cisplatensis showed antiviral activity against RSV with ED50 ranging from 78 to 120 microg/ml. None of the extracts had antiviral activity against ADV-7. The differences between their maximal non cytotoxic concentration and their antiviral activity values were high enough to justify further analysis.

  13. Viruses and Antiviral Immunity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Cherry, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Viral pathogens present many challenges to organisms, driving the evolution of a myriad of antiviral strategies to combat infections. A wide variety of viruses infect invertebrates, including both natural pathogens that are insect-restricted, and viruses that are transmitted to vertebrates. Studies using the powerful tools available in the model organism Drosophila have expanded our understanding of antiviral defenses against diverse viruses. In this review, we will cover three major areas. First, we will describe the tools used to study viruses in Drosophila. Second, we will survey the major viruses that have been studied in Drosophila. And lastly, we will discuss the well-characterized mechanisms that are active against these diverse pathogens, focusing on non-RNAi mediated antiviral mechanisms. Antiviral RNAi is discussed in another paper in this issue. PMID:23680639

  14. Fluorinated nucleosides as antiviral and antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wei-Dong; Qing, Feng-Ling

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis of nucleosides and analogues with fluoride modifications on the surgar moiety are reviewed, and their biological activities as potential antiviral and anti-tumor agents are also discussed.

  15. 3C Protease of Enterovirus 68: Structure-Based Design of Michael Acceptor Inhibitors and Their Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Effects against Picornaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jinzhi; George, Shyla; Kusov, Yuri; Perbandt, Markus; Anemüller, Stefan; Mesters, Jeroen R.; Norder, Helene; Coutard, Bruno; Lacroix, Céline; Leyssen, Pieter; Neyts, Johan

    2013-01-01

    We have determined the cleavage specificity and the crystal structure of the 3C protease of enterovirus 68 (EV68 3Cpro). The protease exhibits a typical chymotrypsin fold with a Cys...His...Glu catalytic triad; its three-dimensional structure is closely related to that of the 3Cpro of rhinovirus 2, as well as to that of poliovirus. The phylogenetic position of the EV68 3Cpro between the corresponding enzymes of rhinoviruses on the one hand and classical enteroviruses on the other prompted us to use the crystal structure for the design of irreversible inhibitors, with the goal of discovering broad-spectrum antiviral compounds. We synthesized a series of peptidic α,β-unsaturated ethyl esters of increasing length and for each inhibitor candidate, we determined a crystal structure of its complex with the EV68 3Cpro, which served as the basis for the next design round. To exhibit inhibitory activity, compounds must span at least P3 to P1′; the most potent inhibitors comprise P4 to P1′. Inhibitory activities were found against the purified 3C protease of EV68, as well as with replicons for poliovirus and EV71 (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.5 μM for the best compound). Antiviral activities were determined using cell cultures infected with EV71, poliovirus, echovirus 11, and various rhinovirus serotypes. The most potent inhibitor, SG85, exhibited activity with EC50s of ≈180 nM against EV71 and ≈60 nM against human rhinovirus 14 in a live virus–cell-based assay. Even the shorter SG75, spanning only P3 to P1′, displayed significant activity (EC50 = 2 to 5 μM) against various rhinoviruses. PMID:23388726

  16. An interferon-beta promoter reporter assay for high throughput identification of compounds against multiple RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Zhao, Xuesen; Gill, Tina; Zhou, Yan; Campagna, Matthew; Wang, Lijuan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Pinghu; DiPaolo, Laura; Du, Yanming; Xu, Xiaodong; Jiang, Dong; Wei, Lai; Cuconati, Andrea; Block, Timothy M; Guo, Ju-Tao; Chang, Jinhong

    2014-07-01

    Virus infection of host cells is sensed by innate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and induces production of type I interferons (IFNs) and other inflammatory cytokines. These cytokines orchestrate the elimination of the viruses but are occasionally detrimental to the hosts. The outcomes and pathogenesis of viral infection are largely determined by the specific interaction between the viruses and their host cells. Therefore, compounds that either inhibit viral infection or modulate virus-induced cytokine response should be considered as candidates for managing virus infection. The aim of the study was to identify compounds in both categories, using a single cell-based assay. Our screening platform is a HEK293 cell-based reporter assay where the expression of a firefly luciferase is under the control of a human IFN-β promoter. We have demonstrated that infection of the reporter cell line with a panel of RNA viruses activated the reporter gene expression that correlates quantitatively with the levels of virus replication and progeny virus production, and could be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by known antiviral compound or inhibitors of PRR signal transduction pathways. Using Dengue virus as an example, a pilot screening of a small molecule library consisting of 26,900 compounds proved the concept that the IFN-β promoter reporter assay can serve as a convenient high throughput screening platform for simultaneous discovery of antiviral and innate immune response modulating compounds. A representative antiviral compound from the pilot screening, 1-(6-ethoxybenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-3-(3-methoxyphenyl) urea, was demonstrated to specifically inhibit several viruses belonging to the family of flaviviridae.

  17. Determining the Virus Life-Cycle Stage Blocked by an Antiviral.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Claudia S; García, Cybele C; Damonte, Elsa B

    2018-01-01

    Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Junín virus and Lassa virus represent important human health threats generating annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF) in endemic areas of Argentina and Western Africa, respectively. Given the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. During the last two decades, academic research studies originated important results identifying novel molecules to be considered for further in vivo characterization. This chapter summarizes experimental in vitro approaches used to determine the possible mechanism of action of these antiviral agents.

  18. Advances Toward a Norovirus Antiviral: From Classical Inhibitors to Lethal Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Lucy; Arias, Armando; Goodfellow, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide, yet there are no licensed antivirals. There is an urgent need for norovirus therapeutics, particularly for chronic infections in immunocompromised individuals, but also a potential need for prophylactic use in epidemics. Continued research has led to the identification of compounds that inhibit norovirus replication in vitro and, at least in some cases, are also effective in vivo against murine norovirus. Progress has included classical approaches targeting viral proteins and harnessing the antiviral action of interferon, strategies targeting essential host cell factors, and novel strategies exploiting the high mutation rate of noroviruses. PMID:26744429

  19. Advances Toward a Norovirus Antiviral: From Classical Inhibitors to Lethal Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Lucy; Arias, Armando; Goodfellow, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Human noroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide, yet there are no licensed antivirals. There is an urgent need for norovirus therapeutics, particularly for chronic infections in immunocompromised individuals, but also a potential need for prophylactic use in epidemics. Continued research has led to the identification of compounds that inhibit norovirus replication in vitro and, at least in some cases, are also effective in vivo against murine norovirus. Progress has included classical approaches targeting viral proteins and harnessing the antiviral action of interferon, strategies targeting essential host cell factors, and novel strategies exploiting the high mutation rate of noroviruses.

  20. Targeting Innate Immunity for Antiviral Therapy through Small Molecule Agonists of the RLR Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pattabhi, Sowmya; Wilkins, Courtney R.; Dong, Ran; Knoll, Megan L.; Posakony, Jeffrey; Kaiser, Shari; Mire, Chad E.; Wang, Myra L.; Ireton, Renee C.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Bedard, Kristin M.; Iadonato, Shawn P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cellular response to virus infection is initiated when pathogen recognition receptors (PRR) engage viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). This process results in induction of downstream signaling pathways that activate the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). IRF3 plays a critical role in antiviral immunity to drive the expression of innate immune response genes, including those encoding antiviral factors, type 1 interferon, and immune modulatory cytokines, that act in concert to restrict virus replication. Thus, small molecule agonists that can promote IRF3 activation and induce innate immune gene expression could serve as antivirals to induce tissue-wide innate immunity for effective control of virus infection. We identified small molecule compounds that activate IRF3 to differentially induce discrete subsets of antiviral genes. We tested a lead compound and derivatives for the ability to suppress infections caused by a broad range of RNA viruses. Compound administration significantly decreased the viral RNA load in cultured cells that were infected with viruses of the family Flaviviridae, including West Nile virus, dengue virus, and hepatitis C virus, as well as viruses of the families Filoviridae (Ebola virus), Orthomyxoviridae (influenza A virus), Arenaviridae (Lassa virus), and Paramyxoviridae (respiratory syncytial virus, Nipah virus) to suppress infectious virus production. Knockdown studies mapped this response to the RIG-I-like receptor pathway. This work identifies a novel class of host-directed immune modulatory molecules that activate IRF3 to promote host antiviral responses to broadly suppress infections caused by RNA viruses of distinct genera. IMPORTANCE Incidences of emerging and reemerging RNA viruses highlight a desperate need for broad-spectrum antiviral agents that can effectively control infections caused by viruses of distinct genera. We identified small molecule compounds that can

  1. SnapShot: antiviral restriction factors.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Silvia F; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2015-10-22

    Restriction factors are cellular proteins that inhibit viruses at different steps of their replication cycle and represent an important first line of defense against viral pathogens. This SnapShot provides an overview of cell-intrinsic antiviral factors, describes their properties, and illustrates the striking variety of antiviral mechanisms as well the sophisticated viral countermeasures. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chickenpox pneumonia: experience with antiviral treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, R N; Lynn, W; Savage, P; Wansbrough-Jones, M H

    1988-01-01

    Of 13 patients with chickenpox pneumonia (12 of them adults) treated during 1979-87, 10 received antiviral drugs--nine acyclovir and one vidarabine. Three died despite intensive treatment. Serious secondary infections occurred in six cases. There were no clear indications that antiviral treatment altered the natural history of the condition. Acyclovir may at present be used too late in the course of chickenpox pneumonia to alter its outcome. Images PMID:3175975

  3. Antiviral Drugs: Molecular Modeling and QSAR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-10

    questions related to drug design and our areas of expertise; (3) provide general education to USAMRII)D personnel in our methods and capabilities. In...terms of drug design effort, the antiviral drug development effortat US AMRIrID is in its infancy. Little is known of the structure or biology of the...because of the dearth of information about the viruses, for the antiviral work this approach to drug design is currently unavailable to USAMRIID and to

  4. Antiviral symposium and workshop--eighth international meeting.

    PubMed

    Schang, L

    2001-02-01

    The invited speakers for this exciting meeting could be loosely classified into three categories: (i) pre-eminent academic researchers on antivirals; (ii) academic researchers working on basic aspects of virology but whose work may lead to the development of novel antivirals; and, (iii) academic clinicians working with experimental antivirals or with diseases that require new antivirals. As expected from this selection, this meeting explored the future of antivirals, while still paying attention to the development of improved derivatives of currently available drugs.

  5. In-vitro antiviral efficacy of ribavirin and interferon-alpha against canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Otávio V; Saraiva, Giuliana L; Ferreira, Caroline G T; Felix, Daniele M; Fietto, Juliana L R; Bressan, Gustavo C; Almeida, Márcia R; Silva Júnior, Abelardo

    2014-10-01

    Canine distemper is a highly contagious disease with high incidence and lethality in the canine population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of antiviral action with ribavirin (RBV), interferon-alpha (IFNα), and combinations of RBV and IFNα against canine distemper virus (CDV). Vero cells inoculated with CDV were treated with RBV, IFNα, and combinations of these drugs. The efficacy to inhibit viral replication was evaluated by adding the compounds at different times to determine which step of the viral replicative process was affected. Both drugs were effective against CDV in vitro. The IFNα was the most active compound, with an average IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) value lower than the IC50 of the RBV. Ribavirin (RBV) was more selective than IFNα, however, and neither drug showed extracellular antiviral activity. The combination of RBV and IFNα exhibited antiviral activity for the intra- and extracellular stages of the replicative cycle of CDV, although the intracellular viral inhibition was higher. Both RBV and IFNα showed high antiviral efficacy against CDV, and furthermore, RBV + IFNα combinations have shown greater interference range in viral infectivity. These compounds could potentially be used to treat clinical disease associated with CDV infection.

  6. Ontogeny and water temperature influences the antiviral response of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Montagnani, Caroline; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Robinson, Nick; Speck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Disease is caused by a complex interaction between the pathogen, environment, and the physiological status of the host. Determining how host ontogeny interacts with water temperature to influence the antiviral response of the Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, is a major goal in understanding why juvenile Pacific oysters are dying during summer as a result of the global emergence of a new genotype of the Ostreid herpesvirus, termed OsHV-1 μvar. We measured the effect of temperature (12 vs 22 °C) on the antiviral response of adult and juvenile C. gigas injected with poly I:C. Poly I:C up-regulated the expression of numerous immune genes, including TLR, MyD88, IκB-1, Rel, IRF, MDA5, STING, SOC, PKR, Viperin and Mpeg1. At 22 °C, these immune genes showed significant up-regulation in juvenile and adult oysters, but the majority of these genes were up-regulated 12 h post-injection for juveniles compared to 26 h for adults. At 12 °C, the response of these genes was completely inhibited in juveniles and delayed in adults. Temperature and age had no effect on hemolymph antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV-1). These results suggest that oysters rely on a cellular response to minimise viral replication, involving recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns to induce host cells into an antiviral state, as opposed to producing broad-spectrum antiviral compounds. This cellular response, measured by antiviral gene expression of circulating hemocytes, was influenced by temperature and oyster age. We speculate whether the vigorous antiviral response of juveniles at 22 °C results in an immune-mediated disorder causing mortality.

  7. Antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activity of propolis of different geographic origin.

    PubMed

    Kujumgiev, A; Tsvetkova, I; Serkedjieva, Y; Bankova, V; Christov, R; Popov, S

    1999-03-01

    Propolis samples from different geographic origins were investigated for their antibacterial (against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli), antifungal (against Candida albicans) and antiviral (against Avian influenza virus) activities. All samples were active against the fungal and Gram-positive bacterial test strains, and most showed antiviral activity. The activities of all samples were similar in spite of the differences in their chemical composition. In samples from the temperate zone, flavonoids and esters of phenolic acids are known to be responsible for the above mentioned activities of bee glue; tropical samples did not contain such substances but showed similar activities. Obviously, in different samples, different substance combinations are essential for the biological activity of the bee glue. It seems that propolis has general pharmacological value as a natural mixture and not as a source of new powerful antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral compounds.

  8. Potent In Vivo Antiviral Activity of the Herpes Simplex Virus Primase-Helicase Inhibitor BAY 57-1293

    PubMed Central

    Betz, Ulrich A. K.; Fischer, Rüdiger; Kleymann, Gerald; Hendrix, Martin; Rübsamen-Waigmann, Helga

    2002-01-01

    BAY 57-1293 belongs to a new class of antiviral compounds and inhibits replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and type 2 in the nanomolar range in vitro by abrogating the enzymatic activity of the viral primase-helicase complex. In various rodent models of HSV infection the antiviral activity of BAY 57-1293 in vivo was found to be superior compared to all compounds currently used to treat HSV infections. The compound shows profound antiviral activity in murine and rat lethal challenge models of disseminated herpes, in a murine zosteriform spread model of cutaneous disease, and in a murine ocular herpes model. It is active in parenteral, oral, and topical formulations. BAY 57-1293 continued to demonstrate efficacy when the onset of treatment was initiated after symptoms of herpetic disease were already apparent. PMID:12019088

  9. Advances in Antiviral vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Barney S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Antiviral vaccines have been the most successful biomedical intervention for preventing epidemic viral disease. Vaccination for smallpox in humans and rinderpest in cattle was the basis for disease eradication, and recent progress in polio eradication is promising. While early vaccines were developed empirically by passage in live animals or eggs, more recent vaccines have been developed because of the advent of new technologies, particularly cell culture and molecular biology. Recent technological advances in gene delivery and expression, nanoparticles, protein manufacturing, and adjuvants have created the potential for new vaccine platforms that may provide solutions for vaccines against viral pathogens for which no interventions currently exist. In addition, the technological convergence of human monoclonal antibody isolation, structural biology, and high throughput sequencing is providing new opportunities for atomic-level immunogen design. Selection of human monoclonal antibodies can identify immunodominant antigenic sites associated with neutralization and provide reagents for stabilizing and solving the structure of viral surface proteins. Understanding the structural basis for neutralization can guide selection of vaccine targets. Deep sequencing of the antibody repertoire and defining the ontogeny of the desired antibody responses can reveal the junctional recombination and somatic mutation requirements for B-cell recognition and affinity maturation. Collectively, this information will provide new strategic approaches for selecting vaccine antigens, formulations, and regimens. Moreover, it creates the potential for rational vaccine design and establishing a catalogue of vaccine technology platforms that would be effective against any given family or class of viral pathogens and improve our readiness to address new emerging viral threats. PMID:23947359

  10. Advances in antiviral vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Graham, Barney S

    2013-09-01

    Antiviral vaccines have been the most successful biomedical intervention for preventing epidemic viral disease. Vaccination for smallpox in humans and rinderpest in cattle was the basis for disease eradication, and recent progress in polio eradication is promising. Although early vaccines were developed empirically by passage in live animals or eggs, more recent vaccines have been developed because of the advent of new technologies, particularly cell culture and molecular biology. Recent technological advances in gene delivery and expression, nanoparticles, protein manufacturing, and adjuvants have created the potential for new vaccine platforms that may provide solutions for vaccines against viral pathogens for which no interventions currently exist. In addition, the technological convergence of human monoclonal antibody isolation, structural biology, and high-throughput sequencing is providing new opportunities for atomic-level immunogen design. Selection of human monoclonal antibodies can identify immunodominant antigenic sites associated with neutralization and provide reagents for stabilizing and solving the structure of viral surface proteins. Understanding the structural basis for neutralization can guide selection of vaccine targets. Deep sequencing of the antibody repertoire and defining the ontogeny of the desired antibody responses can reveal the junctional recombination and somatic mutation requirements for B-cell recognition and affinity maturation. Collectively, this information will provide new strategic approaches for selecting vaccine antigens, formulations, and regimens. Moreover, it creates the potential for rational vaccine design and establishing a catalogue of vaccine technology platforms that would be effective against any given family or class of viral pathogens and improve our readiness to address new emerging viral threats. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. In vitro antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus in the abalone Haliotis laevigata.

    PubMed

    Dang, Vinh T; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Speck, Peter

    2011-03-01

    As viruses are extremely abundant in oceans, marine organisms may have evolved novel metabolites to protect themselves from viral infection. This research examined a well-known commercial gastropod, abalone (Haliotidae), which in Australia have recently experienced disease due to a neurotropic infection, abalone viral ganglioneuritis, caused by an abalone herpesvirus (AbHV). Due to the lack of molluscan cell lines for culturing AbHV, the antiviral activity of the abalone Haliotis laevigata was assessed against another neurotropic herpesvirus, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), using a plaque assay. The concentration range at which abalone extract was used for antiviral testing caused minimal (<10 %) mortality in Vero cells. Haemolymph (20 %, v/v) and lipophilic extract of the digestive gland (3000 μg ml(-1)) both substantially decreased the number and size of plaques. By adding haemolymph or lipophilic extract at different times during the plaque assay, it was shown that haemolymph inhibited viral infection at an early stage. In contrast, the antiviral effect of the lipophilic extract was greatest when added 1 h after infection, suggesting that it may act at an intracellular stage of infection. These results suggest that abalone have at least two antiviral compounds with different modes of action against viral infection, and provide a novel lead for marine antiviral drug discovery.

  12. Antiviral Activities of Several Oral Traditional Chinese Medicines against Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin-Lin; Ge, Miao; Wang, Hui-Qiang; Yin, Jin-Qiu; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Li, Yu-Huan

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is still a serious threat to human health with significant morbidity and mortality. The emergence of drug-resistant influenza viruses poses a great challenge to existing antiviral drugs. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) may be an alternative to overcome the challenge. Here, 10 oral proprietary Chinese medicines were selected to evaluate their anti-influenza activities. These drugs exhibit potent inhibitory effects against influenza A H1N1, influenza A H3N2, and influenza B virus. Importantly, they demonstrate potent antiviral activities against drug-resistant strains. In the study of mechanisms, we found that Xiaoqinglong mixture could increase antiviral interferon production by activating p38 MAPK, JNK/SAPK pathway, and relative nuclear transcription factors. Lastly, our studies also indicate that some of these medicines show inhibitory activities against EV71 and CVB strains. In conclusion, the 10 traditional Chinese medicines, as kind of compound combination medicines, show broad-spectrum antiviral activities, possibly also including inhibitory activities against strains resistant to available antiviral drugs. PMID:26557857

  13. High content image-based screening of a protease inhibitor library reveals compounds broadly active against Rift Valley fever virus and other highly pathogenic RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Mudhasani, Rajini; Kota, Krishna P; Retterer, Cary; Tran, Julie P; Whitehouse, Chris A; Bavari, Sina

    2014-08-01

    High content image-based screening was developed as an approach to test a protease inhibitor small molecule library for antiviral activity against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and to determine their mechanism of action. RVFV is the causative agent of severe disease of humans and animals throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Of the 849 compounds screened, 34 compounds exhibited ≥ 50% inhibition against RVFV. All of the hit compounds could be classified into 4 distinct groups based on their unique chemical backbone. Some of the compounds also showed broad antiviral activity against several highly pathogenic RNA viruses including Ebola, Marburg, Venezuela equine encephalitis, and Lassa viruses. Four hit compounds (C795-0925, D011-2120, F694-1532 and G202-0362), which were most active against RVFV and showed broad-spectrum antiviral activity, were selected for further evaluation for their cytotoxicity, dose response profile, and mode of action using classical virological methods and high-content imaging analysis. Time-of-addition assays in RVFV infections suggested that D011-2120 and G202-0362 targeted virus egress, while C795-0925 and F694-1532 inhibited virus replication. We showed that D011-2120 exhibited its antiviral effects by blocking microtubule polymerization, thereby disrupting the Golgi complex and inhibiting viral trafficking to the plasma membrane during virus egress. While G202-0362 also affected virus egress, it appears to do so by a different mechanism, namely by blocking virus budding from the trans Golgi. F694-1532 inhibited viral replication, but also appeared to inhibit overall cellular gene expression. However, G202-0362 and C795-0925 did not alter any of the morphological features that we examined and thus may prove to be good candidates for antiviral drug development. Overall this work demonstrates that high-content image analysis can be used to screen chemical libraries for new antivirals and to determine their mechanism of action and

  14. Antiviral effect of flavonol glycosides isolated from the leaf of Zanthoxylum piperitum on influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Ha, Song-Yi; Youn, Hana; Song, Chang-Seon; Kang, Se Chan; Bae, Jong Jin; Kim, Hee Tae; Lee, Kwang Min; Eom, Tae Hoon; Kim, In Su; Kwak, Jong Hwan

    2014-04-01

    The ethanol extract of Zanthoxylum piperitum (L.) DC. showed in vitro antiviral activity against influenza A virus. Three flavonol glycosides were isolated from the EtOAc fraction of Z. piperitum leaf by means of activity-guided chromatographic separation. Structures of isolated compounds were identified as quercetin 3-O-β-D-galactopyranoside (1), quercetin 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (2), kaempferol 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (3) by comparing their spectral data with literature values. The anti-influenza viral activity of isolates was evaluated using a plaque reduction assay against influenza A/NWS/33 (H1N1) virus. The compounds also were subjected to neuraminidase inhibition assay in influenza A/NWS/33 virus. Compounds 1-3 exhibited antiviral activity against an influenza A virus in vitro, and inhibited the neuraminidase activity at relatively high concentrations.

  15. Synthesis of camphecene derivatives using click chemistry methodology and study of their antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Artyushin, Oleg I; Sharova, Elena V; Vinogradova, Natalya M; Genkina, Galina K; Moiseeva, Aleksandra A; Klemenkova, Zinaida S; Orshanskaya, Iana R; Shtro, Anna A; Kadyrova, Renata A; Zarubaev, Vladimir V; Yarovaya, Olga I; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F; Brel, Valery K

    2017-03-22

    A series of seventeen tetrazole derivatives of 1,7,7-trimethyl-[2.2.1]bicycloheptane were synthesized using click chemistry methodology and characterized by spectral data. Studies of cytotoxicity and in vitro antiviral activity against influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) in MDCK cells of the compounds obtained were performed. The structure-activity relationship analysis suggests that to possess virus-inhibiting activity, the compounds of this group should bear oxygen atom with a short linker (C2-C4), either as a hydroxyl group (18, 19, 29), keto-group (21) or as a part of a heterocycle (24). These compounds demonstrated low cytotoxicity along with high anti-viral activity.

  16. Gene Expression Signature-Based Screening Identifies New Broadly Effective Influenza A Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Josset, Laurence; Textoris, Julien; Loriod, Béatrice; Ferraris, Olivier; Moules, Vincent; Lina, Bruno; N'Guyen, Catherine; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Classical antiviral therapies target viral proteins and are consequently subject to resistance. To counteract this limitation, alternative strategies have been developed that target cellular factors. We hypothesized that such an approach could also be useful to identify broad-spectrum antivirals. The influenza A virus was used as a model for its viral diversity and because of the need to develop therapies against unpredictable viruses as recently underlined by the H1N1 pandemic. We proposed to identify a gene-expression signature associated with infection by different influenza A virus subtypes which would allow the identification of potential antiviral drugs with a broad anti-influenza spectrum of activity. We analyzed the cellular gene expression response to infection with five different human and avian influenza A virus strains and identified 300 genes as differentially expressed between infected and non-infected samples. The most 20 dysregulated genes were used to screen the connectivity map, a database of drug-associated gene expression profiles. Candidate antivirals were then identified by their inverse correlation to the query signature. We hypothesized that such molecules would induce an unfavorable cellular environment for influenza virus replication. Eight potential antivirals including ribavirin were identified and their effects were tested in vitro on five influenza A strains. Six of the molecules inhibited influenza viral growth. The new pandemic H1N1 virus, which was not used to define the gene expression signature of infection, was inhibited by five out of the eight identified molecules, demonstrating that this strategy could contribute to identifying new broad anti-influenza agents acting on cellular gene expression. The identified infection signature genes, the expression of which are modified upon infection, could encode cellular proteins involved in the viral life cycle. This is the first study showing that gene expression-based screening can be

  17. Synthesis and characteristics of (Hydrogenated) ferulic acid derivatives as potential antiviral agents with insecticidal activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant viruses cause many serious plant diseases and are currently suppressed with the simultaneous use of virucides and insecticides. The use of such materials, however, increases the amounts of pollutants in the environment. To reduce environmental contaminants, virucides with insecticidal activity is an attractive option. Results A series of substituted ferulic acid amide derivatives 7 and the corresponding hydrogenated ferulic acid amide derivatives 13 were synthesized and evaluated for their antiviral and insecticidal activities. The majority of the synthesized compounds exhibited good levels of antiviral activity against the tobacco mosaic virus (TMW), with compounds 7a, 7b and 7d in particular providing higher levels of protective and curative activities against TMV at 500 μg/mL than the control compound ribavirin. Furthermore, these compounds displayed good insecticidal activities against insects with piercing-sucking mouthparts, which can spread plant viruses between and within crops. Conclusions Two series of ferulic acid derivatives have been synthesized efficiently. The bioassay showed title compounds not only inhibit the plant viral infection, but also prevented the spread of plant virus by insect vectors. These findings therefore demonstrate that the ferulic acid amides represent a new template for future antiviral studies. PMID:23409923

  18. Design, synthesis, and antiviral, fungicidal, and insecticidal activities of tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carbohydrazide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongxian; Song, Hongjian; Huang, Yuanqiong; Li, Jiarui; Zhao, Sheng; Song, Yuchuan; Yang, Peiwen; Xiao, Zhixin; Liu, Yuxiu; Li, Yongqiang; Shang, Hui; Wang, Qingmin

    2014-10-15

    According to our previous research on the antiviral activity of β-carboline and tetrahydro-β-carboline derivatives, using (1S,3S)-1-methyl-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole-3-carbohydrazide (1) as a lead compound, series of novel tetrahydro-β-carboline derivatives containing acylhydrazone moiety were designed, synthesized, and first evaluated for their biological activities. Most of these compounds exhibited excellent antiviral activity both in vitro and in vivo. The in vivo inactivation, curative, and protection activities of compounds 8, 9, 12, 16, 28, 29, and 30 were much higher than that of ribavirin (37.6%, 39.4%, and 37.9% at 500 μg/mL) and the lead compound (40.0%, 42.3%, and 39.6% at 500 μg/mL). Especially, the in vitro and in vivo activities of compound 16 (36.9%, 33.6%, 30.2%, and 35.8%) at 100 μg/mL, which were very close to that of ribavirin (40.0% for in vitro activity) at 500 μg/mL. Compounds 9 and 29 were chosen for the field trials of antiviral efficacy against TMV (tobacco mosaic virus); the results exhibited that both compounds, especially compound 29, showed better activities than control plant virus inhibitors. At the same time, the fungicidal results showed that compounds 6, 9, and 11 exhibited good fungicidal activities against 14 kinds of phytopathogens. Additionally, compounds 3 and 23 exhibited moderate insecticidal activity against the four tested species of insects.

  19. Optimization of antiviral potency and lipophilicity of halogenated 2,6-diarylpyridinamines (DAPAs) as a novel class of HIV-1 NNRTIs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Na; Qin, Bingjie; Huang, Li; Yu, Fei; Qian, Keduo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Jiang, Shibo; Chen, Chin Ho; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Xie, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Nineteen new halogenated diarylpyridinamine (DAPA) analogues (6a-n and 8a-e) modified on the phenoxy C-ring were synthesized and evaluated for anti-HIV activity and certain drug-like properties. Ten compounds showed high anti-HIV activity (EC50 < 10 nM). Particularly, (E)-6-(2”-bromo-4”-cyanovinyl-6“-methoxy)phenoxy-N2-(4′-cyanophenyl)pyridin-2,3-diamine (8c) displayed low nanomolar antiviral potency (3–7 nM) against wild-type and resistant viral strains with E138K or K101E mutation, associated with resistance to rilvipirine (1b). Compound 8c exhibited much lower resistance fold changes (RFC 1.1–2.1) than 1b (RFC 11.8–13.0). Compound 8c also exhibited better metabolic stability (in vitro half-life) than 1b in human liver microsomes (HLM), possessed low lipophilicity (clog D: 3.29; measured log P: 3.31), and had desirable lipophilic efficiency indices (LE > 0.3, LLE >5, LELP <10). With balanced potency and drug-like properties, 8c merits further development as an anti-HIV drug candidate. PMID:24895029

  20. 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, William M

    2005-08-01

    The 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held at the Princess Sofia Hotel in Barcelona, Spain, from 11th-14th April, 2005. This is a yearly international meeting sponsored by the International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR). The current president of ISAR is John A Secrest 3rd of the Southern Research Institute. The scientific programme committee was chaired by John C Drach from the University of Michigan. ISAR was founded in 1987 to exchange prepublication basic, applied and clinical information on the development of antiviral, chemical and biological agents as well as to promote collaborative research. The ISAR has had a major role in the significant advances of the past decade in the reduction of the societal burdens of viral diseases by the focus of ICAR on the discovery and clinical application of antiviral agents. The 18th ICAR was organised as a series of focus presentations on specific viral groups consisting of oral and poster presentations of original research findings. In addition, the conference included plenary speakers, award presentations, a minisymposium on bioterrorism, and a satellite symposium on clinical antiviral drug developments. The size of the conference (> 50 oral and 250 poster presentations) necessitates limitation to the most noteworthy in the judgment of this reviewer. The current membership of the ISAR is approximately 700 with approximately 50% the membership in attendance.

  1. Antiviral activities of heated dolomite powder.

    PubMed

    Motoike, Koichi; Hirano, Shozo; Yamana, Hideaki; Onda, Tetsuhiko; Maeda, Takayoshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Hayakawa, Motozo

    2008-12-01

    The effect of the heating conditions of dolomite powder on its antiviral activity was studied against the H5N3 avian influenza virus. Calcium oxide (CaO) and magnesium oxide (MgO), obtained by the thermal decomposition of dolomite above 800 degrees C, were shown to have strong antiviral activity, but the effect was lessened when the heating temperature exceeded 1400 degrees C. Simultaneous measurement of the crystallite size suggested that the weakening of the activity was due to the considerable grain growth of the oxides. It was found that the presence of Mg in dolomite contributed to the deterrence of grain growth of the oxides during the heating process. Although both CaO and MgO exhibited strong antiviral activity, CaO had the stronger activity but quickly hydrated in the presence of water. On the other hand, the hydration of MgO took place gradually under the same conditions. Separate measurements using MgO and Mg(OH)2 revealed that MgO had a higher antiviral effect than Mg(OH)2. From the overall experiments, it was suggested that the strong antiviral activity of dolomite was related to the hydration reaction of CaO.

  2. In vitro antiviral activity of dermaseptin S(4) and derivatives from amphibian skin against herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Bergaoui, Ines; Zairi, Amira; Tangy, Frédéric; Aouni, Mahjoub; Selmi, Boulbaba; Hani, Khaled

    2013-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections have become a public health problem worldwide. The emergence of acyclovir-resistant viral strains and the failure of vaccination to prevent herpetic infections have prompted the search for new antiviral drugs. Accordingly, the present study was undertaken to synthesize chemically and evaluate Dermaseptin S(4) (S(4)), an anti-microbial peptide derived from amphibian skin, and its derivatives in terms of anti-herpetic activity. The effects of biochemical modifications on their antimicrobial potential were also investigated. The peptides were incubated together with HSV-2 on target cells under various conditions, and the antiviral effects were examined via a cell metabolic labeling method. The findings revealed that DS(4) derivatives elicited concentration-dependent antiviral activity at micromole concentrations. The biochemical modifications of S(4) allowed for the reduction of peptide cytotoxicity without altering antiviral activity. Dermaseptins were added at different times during the viral cycle to investigate the mode of antiviral action. At the highest non-cytotoxic concentrations, most of the tested derivatives were noted to exhibit high antiviral activity particularly when pre-incubated with free herpes viruses prior to infection. Among these peptides, K(4)K(20)S(4) exhibited the highest antiviral activity against HSV-2 sensitive and resistant strains. Interestingly, the antiviral activity of K(4)K(20)S(4) was effective on both acyclovir-resistant and -sensitive viruses. The findings indicate that K(4)K(20)S(4) can be considered a promising candidate for future application as a therapeutic virucidal agent for the treatment of herpes viruses.

  3. Curious discoveries in antiviral drug development: the role of serendipity.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Antiviral drug development has often followed a curious meandrous route, guided by serendipity rather than rationality. This will be illustrated by ten examples. The polyanionic compounds (i) polyethylene alanine (PEA) and (ii) suramin were designed as an antiviral agent (PEA) or known as an antitrypanosomal agent (suramin), before they emerged as, respectively, a depilatory agent, or reverse transcriptase inhibitor. The 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides (ddNs analogues) (iii) have been (and are still) used in the "Sanger" DNA sequencing technique, although they are now commercialized as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in the treatment of HIV infections. (E)-5-(2-Bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (iv) was discovered as a selective anti-herpes simplex virus compound and is now primarily used for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus infections. The prototype of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs), (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA], (v) was never commercialized, although it gave rise to several marketed products (cidofovir, adefovir, and tenofovir). 1-[2-(Hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (vi) and TIBO (tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4-benzodiazepin-2(1H)]-one and -thione) (vii) paved the way to a number of compounds (i.e., nevirapine, delavirdine, etravirine, and rilpivirine), which are now collectively called non-NRTIs. The bicyclam AMD3100 (viii) was originally described as an anti-HIV agent before it became later marketed as a stem cell mobilizer. The S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors (ix), while active against a broad range of (-)RNA viruses and poxviruses may be particularly effective against Ebola virus, and for (x) the O-ANP derivatives, the potential application range encompasses virtually all DNA viruses.

  4. Recent researches in triazole compounds as medicinal drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, C-H; Wang, Y

    2012-01-01

    Triazole compounds containing three nitrogen atoms in the five-membered aromatic azole ring are readily able to bind with a variety of enzymes and receptors in biological system via diverse non-covalent interactions, and thus display versatile biological activities. The related researches in triazole-based derivatives as medicinal drugs have been an extremely active topic, and numerous excellent achievements have been acquired. Noticeably, a large number of triazole compounds as clinical drugs or candidates have been frequently employed for the treatment of various types of diseases, which have shown their large development value and wide potential as medicinal agents. This work systematically reviewed the recent researches and developments of the whole range of triazole compounds as medicinal drugs, including antifungal, anticancer, antibacterial, antitubercular, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and analgesic, anticonvulsant, antiparasitic, antidiabetic, anti-obesitic, antihistaminic, anti-neuropathic, antihypertensive as well as other biological activities. The perspectives of the foreseeable future in the research and development of triazole-based compounds as medicinal drugs are also presented. It is hoped that this review will serve as a stimulant for new thoughts in the quest for rational designs of more active and less toxic triazole medicinal drugs.

  5. Antiviral Defense Mechanisms in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees are significant pollinators of agricultural crops and other important plant species. High annual losses of honey bee colonies in North America and in some parts of Europe have profound ecological and economic implications. Colony losses have been attributed to multiple factors including RNA viruses, thus understanding bee antiviral defense mechanisms may result in the development of strategies that mitigate colony losses. Honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms include RNA-interference, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered signal transduction cascades, and reactive oxygen species generation. However, the relative importance of these and other pathways is largely uncharacterized. Herein we review the current understanding of honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms and suggest important avenues for future investigation. PMID:26273564

  6. Current Landscape of Antiviral Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Wade; Cox, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Continued discovery and development of new antiviral medications are paramount for global human health, particularly as new pathogens emerge and old ones evolve to evade current therapeutic agents. Great success has been achieved in developing effective therapies to suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV); however, the therapies are not curative and therefore current efforts in HIV and HBV drug discovery are directed toward longer-acting therapies and/or developing new mechanisms of action that could potentially lead to cure, or eradication, of the virus. Recently, exciting early clinical data have been reported for novel antivirals targeting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza (flu). Preclinical data suggest that these new approaches may be effective in treating high-risk patients afflicted with serious RSV or flu infections. In this review, we highlight new directions in antiviral approaches for HIV, HBV, and acute respiratory virus infections. PMID:26962437

  7. Extracellular 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase stimulates RNase L-independent antiviral activity: a novel mechanism of virus-induced innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Helle; Scherer, Christina A; McVean, Maralee; Iadonato, Shawn P; Vends, Susanne; Thavachelvam, Karthiga; Steffensen, Thomas B; Horan, Kristy A; Kuri, Thomas; Weber, Friedemann; Paludan, Søren R; Hartmann, Rune

    2010-11-01

    The 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) proteins are traditionally considered intracellular antiviral proteins. However, several studies demonstrate a correlation between the concentration of freely circulating OAS protein in sera from hepatitis C patients and their clinical prognosis. Here we demonstrate that extracellular OAS1 enters into cells and possesses a strong antiviral activity, both in vitro and in vivo, which is independent of RNase L. The OAS protein directly inhibits viral proliferation and does not require the activation of known antiviral signaling pathways. We propose that OAS produced by cells infected with viruses is released to the extracellular space, where it acts as a paracrine antiviral agent. Thus, the OAS protein represents the first direct antiviral compound released by virus-infected cells.

  8. Meeting report: 26th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Vere Hodge, R Anthony

    2013-10-01

    The 26th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in San Francisco, California from May 11 to 15, 2013. This article summarizes the principal invited lectures at the meeting. The opening symposium on the legacy of the late Antonín Holý included presentations on his pioneering work with nucleotide analogs, which led to the development of several antiviral drugs including tenofovir. This drug has transformed the treatment of HIV infection and has recently become the first-line therapy for chronic hepatitis B. The Gertrude Elion Award lecturer described the anti-HIV activities of the CCR5 inhibitor cenicriviroc and the reverse transcriptase inhibitor festinavir®, and also reviewed the evaluation of biodegradable nanoparticles with adjuvant activity. The William Prusoff Award winner reported on the creation of NAOMI, a computer model with 21 enzymes to predict the activity of nucleoside analogs against hepatitis C virus (HCV). Other invited lecturers discussed the development of countermeasures against severe dengue and the potential of RNA virus capping and repair enzymes as drug targets. Topics in the clinical symposium included the current status of the anti-HCV compounds sovaprevir, ACH-3102, miravirsen and ALS-2200; the evaluation of single-tablet regimens for HIV infection; and the investigation of cytomegalovirus resistance to CMX001. Two chemistry minisymposia examined strategies and tactics in drug design and the use of in drug discovery. Copyright © 2013 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antiviral Effects of Pyrrolidine Dithiocarbamate on Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gaudernak, Elisabeth; Seipelt, Joachim; Triendl, Andrea; Grassauer, Andreas; Kuechler, Ernst

    2002-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are the predominant cause of the common cold. The frequency of HRV infections in industrial countries and the lack of effective therapeutical treatment underline the importance of research for new antiviral substances. As viral infections are often accompanied by the generation of oxidative stress inside the infected cells, several redox-active substances were tested as potential antivirals. In the course of these studies it was discovered that pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) is an extremely potent compound against HRV and poliovirus infection in cell culture. Besides the ability to dramatically reduce HRV production by interfering with viral protein expression, PDTC promotes cell survival and abolishes cytopathic effects in infected cells. PDTC also protects cells against poliovirus infection. These effects were highly specific, as several other antioxidants (vitamin C, Trolox, 2-mercaptoethanol, and N-acetyl-l-cysteine) are inactive against HRV infection. Synthesis of HRV proteins and cleavage of eucaryotic initiation factor 4G responsible for host cell shutoff of cellular protein synthesis are severely inhibited in the presence of PDTC. PMID:12021333

  10. In vitro characterization of the antiviral activity of fucoidan from Cladosiphon okamuranus against Newcastle Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Elizondo-Gonzalez, Regina; Cruz-Suarez, L Elizabeth; Ricque-Marie, Denis; Mendoza-Gamboa, Edgar; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina; Trejo-Avila, Laura M

    2012-12-12

    Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) causes a serious infectious disease in birds that results in severe losses in the worldwide poultry industry. Despite vaccination, NDV outbreaks have increased the necessity of alternative prevention and control measures. Several recent studies focused on antiviral compounds obtained from natural resources. Many extracts from marine organisms have been isolated and tested for pharmacological purposes, and their antiviral activity has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Fucoidan is a sulfated polysaccharide present in the cell wall matrix of brown algae that has been demonstrated to inhibit certain enveloped viruses with low toxicity. This study evaluated the potential antiviral activity and the mechanism of action of fucoidan from Cladosiphon okamuranus against NDV in the Vero cell line. The cytotoxicity of fucoidan was determined by the MTT assay. To study its antiviral activity, fusion and plaque-forming unit (PFU) inhibition assays were conducted. The mechanism of action was determined by time of addition, fusion inhibition, and penetration assays. The NDV vaccine strain (La Sota) was used in the fusion inhibition assays. PFU and Western blot experiments were performed using a wild-type lentogenic NDV strain. Fucoidan exhibited antiviral activity against NDV La Sota, with an obtained IS50 >2000. In time of addition studies, we observed viral inhibition in the early stages of infection (0-60 min post-infection). The inhibition of viral penetration experiments with a wild-type NDV strain supported this result, as these experiments demonstrated a 48% decrease in viral infection as well as reduced HN protein expression. Ribavirin, which was used as an antiviral control, exhibited lower antiviral activity than fucoidan and high toxicity at active doses. In the fusion assays, the number of syncytia was significantly reduced (70% inhibition) when fucoidan was added before cleavage of the fusion protein, perhaps indicating a specific

  11. Tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles show antiviral activity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Gniadek, Marianna; Baska, Piotr; Nowakowska, Julita; Sokolowska, Justyna; Nowak, Zuzanna; Donten, Mikolaj; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jaroslaw; Krzyzowska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between silver nanoparticles and herpesviruses is attracting great interest due to their antiviral activity and possibility to use as microbicides for oral and anogenital herpes. In this work, we demonstrate that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles sized 13 nm, 33 nm and 46 nm are capable of reducing HSV-2 infectivity both in vitro and in vivo. The antiviral activity of tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles was size-related, required direct interaction and blocked virus attachment, penetration and further spread. All tested tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles reduced both infection and inflammatory reaction in the mouse model of HSV-2 infection when used at infection or for a post-infection treatment. Smaller-sized nanoparticles induced production of cytokines and chemokines important for anti-viral response. The corresponding control buffers with tannic acid showed inferior antiviral effects in vitro and were ineffective in blocking in vivo infection. Our results show that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles are good candidates for microbicides used in treatment of herpesvirus infections.

  12. Tannic Acid Modified Silver Nanoparticles Show Antiviral Activity in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Gniadek, Marianna; Baska, Piotr; Nowakowska, Julita; Sokolowska, Justyna; Nowak, Zuzanna; Donten, Mikolaj; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jaroslaw; Krzyzowska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between silver nanoparticles and herpesviruses is attracting great interest due to their antiviral activity and possibility to use as microbicides for oral and anogenital herpes. In this work, we demonstrate that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles sized 13 nm, 33 nm and 46 nm are capable of reducing HSV-2 infectivity both in vitro and in vivo. The antiviral activity of tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles was size-related, required direct interaction and blocked virus attachment, penetration and further spread. All tested tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles reduced both infection and inflammatory reaction in the mouse model of HSV-2 infection when used at infection or for a post-infection treatment. Smaller-sized nanoparticles induced production of cytokines and chemokines important for anti-viral response. The corresponding control buffers with tannic acid showed inferior antiviral effects in vitro and were ineffective in blocking in vivo infection. Our results show that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles are good candidates for microbicides used in treatment of herpesvirus infections. PMID:25117537

  13. Antiviral activities of Nepalese medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R S; Manandhar, N P; Hudson, J B; Towers, G H

    1996-07-05

    In a screening of plants used traditionally in Nepal to treat diseases that could be caused by viruses, methanol extracts from 21 species were assayed for activity against three mammalian viruses: herpes simplex virus, Sindbis virus and poliovirus. Assays were performed in UV-A or visible light, as well as dark. Individual species of Hypericum, Lygodium, and Maesa exhibited impressive antiviral activities, although their selective effects on the three viruses suggested that the antiviral ingredients were different in each extract. In addition, many of the other extracts showed partial inactivation of one or more test viruses.

  14. Antiviral lectins as potential HIV microbicides.

    PubMed

    Koharudin, Leonardus M I; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2014-08-01

    A growing class of potential antivirals encompasses carbohydrate-binding proteins, such as antibodies and lectins. They block virus entry into host target cells and halt virus transmission from virus-infected cells to non-infected cells, thereby preventing infection. Here, we review the structural basis for the anti-HIV activity of various lectins, describing their structures and determinants of high-affinity oligosaccharide binding. The mechanism of glycan recognition on the gp120 envelope protein by these antiviral lectins may therefore be exploited for developing agents and alternative strategies to prevent HIV transmission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Syntheses of isoxazoline-carbocyclic nucleosides and their antiviral evaluation: a standard protocol.

    PubMed

    Quadrelli, Paolo; Vazquez Martinez, Naiara; Scrocchi, Roberto; Corsaro, Antonino; Pistarà, Venerando

    2014-01-01

    The current synthesis of racemic purine and pyrimidine isoxazoline-carbocyclic nucleosides is reported, detailing the key-steps for standard and reliable preparations. Improved yields were obtained by the proper tuning of the single synthetic steps, opening the way for the preparation of a variety of novel compounds. Some of the obtained compounds were also evaluated against a wide variety of DNA and RNA viruses including HIV. No specific antiviral activity was observed in the cases at hand. Novel compounds were prepared for future biological tests.

  16. Syntheses of Isoxazoline-Carbocyclic Nucleosides and Their Antiviral Evaluation: A Standard Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Quadrelli, Paolo; Vazquez Martinez, Naiara; Scrocchi, Roberto; Corsaro, Antonino; Pistarà, Venerando

    2014-01-01

    The current synthesis of racemic purine and pyrimidine isoxazoline-carbocyclic nucleosides is reported, detailing the key-steps for standard and reliable preparations. Improved yields were obtained by the proper tuning of the single synthetic steps, opening the way for the preparation of a variety of novel compounds. Some of the obtained compounds were also evaluated against a wide variety of DNA and RNA viruses including HIV. No specific antiviral activity was observed in the cases at hand. Novel compounds were prepared for future biological tests. PMID:25544956

  17. Assay development and high throughput antiviral drug screening against Bluetongue virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianjun; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Hobrath, Judith V.; White, Lucile E.

    2009-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) infection is one of the most important diseases of domestic livestock. There are no antivirals available against BTV disease. In this paper, we present the development, optimization and validation of an in vitro cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay using the luminescent-based CellTiter-Glo reagent to identify novel antivirals against BTV. Conditions of the cytopathic effect (CPE)-based assay were optimized at cell density of 5 000 cells/well in medium containing 1% FBS and a multiplicity of infection at 0.01 in 384-well plate, with Z'-values ≥ 0.70, Coefficient of Variations ≥ 5.68 and signal-to-background ratio ≥ 7.10. This assay was further validated using a 9 532 compound library. The fully validated assay was then used to screen the 194 950 compound collection, which identified 693 compounds with > 30% CPE inhibition. The ten-concentration dose response assay identified 185 structures with IC50 ≤ 100 μM, out of which 42 compounds were grouped into six analog series corresponding to six scaffolds enriched within the active set compared to their distribution in the library. The CPE-based assay development demonstrated its robustness and reliability, and its application in the HTS campaign will make significant contribution to the antiviral drug discovery against BTV disease. PMID:19559054

  18. Actinobacteria from Termite Mounds Show Antiviral Activity against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model for Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Marina Aiello; Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre Ferreira; Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Martini, Matheus Cavalheiro; Barnabé, Ana Caroline de Souza; Kohn, Luciana Konecny; Uetanabaro, Ana Paula Trovatti; Bomfim, Getúlio Freitas; Afonso, Rafael Sanches; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2015-01-01

    Extracts from termite-associated bacteria were evaluated for in vitro antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Two bacterial strains were identified as active, with percentages of inhibition (IP) equal to 98%. Both strains were subjected to functional analysis via the addition of virus and extract at different time points in cell culture; the results showed that they were effective as posttreatments. Moreover, we performed MTT colorimetric assays to identify the CC50, IC50, and SI values of these strains, and strain CDPA27 was considered the most promising. In parallel, the isolates were identified as Streptomyces through 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Specifically, CDPA27 was identified as S. chartreusis. The CDPA27 extract was fractionated on a C18-E SPE cartridge, and the fractions were reevaluated. A 100% methanol fraction was identified to contain the compound(s) responsible for antiviral activity, which had an SI of 262.41. GC-MS analysis showed that this activity was likely associated with the compound(s) that had a peak retention time of 5 min. Taken together, the results of the present study provide new information for antiviral research using natural sources, demonstrate the antiviral potential of Streptomyces chartreusis compounds isolated from termite mounds against BVDV, and lay the foundation for further studies on the treatment of HCV infection.

  19. Actinobacteria from Termite Mounds Show Antiviral Activity against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model for Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Marina Aiello; Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre Ferreira; Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Martini, Matheus Cavalheiro; Barnabé, Ana Caroline de Souza; Kohn, Luciana Konecny; Uetanabaro, Ana Paula Trovatti; Bomfim, Getúlio Freitas; Afonso, Rafael Sanches; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2015-01-01

    Extracts from termite-associated bacteria were evaluated for in vitro antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Two bacterial strains were identified as active, with percentages of inhibition (IP) equal to 98%. Both strains were subjected to functional analysis via the addition of virus and extract at different time points in cell culture; the results showed that they were effective as posttreatments. Moreover, we performed MTT colorimetric assays to identify the CC50, IC50, and SI values of these strains, and strain CDPA27 was considered the most promising. In parallel, the isolates were identified as Streptomyces through 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Specifically, CDPA27 was identified as S. chartreusis. The CDPA27 extract was fractionated on a C18-E SPE cartridge, and the fractions were reevaluated. A 100% methanol fraction was identified to contain the compound(s) responsible for antiviral activity, which had an SI of 262.41. GC-MS analysis showed that this activity was likely associated with the compound(s) that had a peak retention time of 5 min. Taken together, the results of the present study provide new information for antiviral research using natural sources, demonstrate the antiviral potential of Streptomyces chartreusis compounds isolated from termite mounds against BVDV, and lay the foundation for further studies on the treatment of HCV infection. PMID:26579205

  20. Streptovirudins -- new antibiotics with antiviral activity. The antiviral spectrum and inhibition of Newcastle disease virus in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Tonew, E; Tonew, M; Eckardt, K; Thrum, H; Gumpert, B

    1975-07-01

    Streptovirudins are new antibiotics isolated as a mixture of several structurally related compounds from fermentations of Streptomyces griseoflavus (Krainsky) Waksman et Henrici var. thuringensis JA 10124. They possess antiviral activity against RNA and DNA viruses cultivated in chick embryo cells, namely Sindbis, fowl plague, Newcastle disease (NDV), pseudorabies, vaccinia and sheep abortion viruses. The naturally formed streptovirudin complex, in concentrations of 20-2.5 mug/ml inhibited the viral cytopathic effect and caused 100 percent plaque reduction. Mengo, Coxsackie B1-B5, ECHO 30 and 33, and polio (wild and attenuated types 1, 2, and 3) viruses grown in FL cells were not sensitive in the agar-diffusion plaque-inhibition test. The antibiotics failed to show a direct virucidal effect on the NDV virion itself or to influence virus adsorption and penetration processes. Addition of streptovirudin complex during a one-step growth cycle of NDV from 0-4 hours after virus adsorption resulted in complete suppression of virus yield. The antibiotic complex consists of two main groups: I - A1, B1, C1, D1, E1 and II - A2, B2, C2, D2, E2, each of which possess antiviral activity.

  1. [Study of cytotoxic and antiviral effects of some eye drops].

    PubMed

    Dediulescu, Lucreţia; Dediulescu, Daniela Florentina

    2008-01-01

    The study of the cytotoxic and antiviral effect of six commercial mixtures, eye drops type, underlined the advantages of using eye drops with Indomethacin for Herpetic Keratitis, due to the antiviral effect and also for the lack of cytotoxicity.

  2. First discovery and stucture-activity relationship study of phenanthroquinolizidines as novel antiviral agents against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziwen; Feng, Anzheng; Cui, Mingbo; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Qingmin

    2012-01-01

    A series of phenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids 1-24 were prepared and first evaluated for their antiviral activity against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). The bioassay results showed that most of these compounds exhibited good to excellent in vivo anti-TMV activity, of which compounds 1, 2, 15 and 16 displayed significantly higher activity than (R)-antofine and commercial Ningnanmycin at the same test condition. The substituents on the phenanthrene moiety play an important role for maintaining high in vivo antiviral activity. The introduction of 6-hydroxyl, which is proposed to interact with TMV RNA, did increased anti-TMV activity. The 14aR-configuration was confirmed to be the preferred antiviral configuration for phenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids. Introduction of hydroxy group at 15-position of phenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids increased activity for S-configuration but decreased activity for R-configuration. Present study provides fundamental support for development and optimization of phenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids as potential inhibitors of plant virus.

  3. Detection and management of antiviral resistance for influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Guy

    2013-11-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) are first-line agents for the treatment and prevention of influenza virus infections. As for other antivirals, the development of resistance to NAIs has become an important concern particularly in the case of A(H1N1) viruses and oseltamivir. The most frequently reported change conferring oseltamivir resistance in that viral context is the H275Y neuraminidase mutation (N1 numbering). Recent studies have shown that, in the presence of the appropriate permissive mutations, the H275Y variant can retain virulence and transmissibility in some viral backgrounds. Most oseltamivir-resistant influenza A virus infections can be managed with the use of inhaled or intravenous zanamivir, another NAI. New NAI compounds and non-neuraminidase agents as well as combination therapies are currently in clinical evaluation for the treatment for severe influenza infections. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Antiviral Effects of Amphotericin B Methyl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, George W.; Seet, Elizabeth C.

    1978-01-01

    The methyl ester of amphotericin B (AME) is water soluble, retains antifungal activity, and is significantly less toxic in mammals than amphotericin B. In contrast to amphotericin B, which is not water soluble, AME exhibits antiviral effects against vesicular stomatitis virus, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, Sindbis virus, and vaccinia virus in a plaque reduction assay. No antiviral effects could be demonstrated against the unenveloped adenovirus type 4 or echovirus type 11. The extent of virus inactivation was found to be dependent upon the AME concentration, contact time, and temperature. No consistent effect of the virus concentration on the probability of plaque-forming unit inactivation could be determined. The antiviral effects of AME were partially antagonized by the presence of serum. Binding of AME to vesicular stomatitis virus was demonstrated by the comigration of drug and virus in linear sucrose gradients. AME represents a new class of antiviral agents with activity at concentrations relevant to therapeutics. Sterol components of the host cell membrane that become incorporated into the viral envelope are postulated as the site of reaction with AME. PMID:206201

  5. Antiviral therapy: current concepts and practices.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, B

    1992-01-01

    Drugs capable of inhibiting viruses in vitro were described in the 1950s, but real progress was not made until the 1970s, when agents capable of inhibiting virus-specific enzymes were first identified. The last decade has seen rapid progress in both our understanding of antiviral therapy and the number of antiviral agents on the market. Amantadine and ribavirin are available for treatment of viral respiratory infections. Vidarabine, acyclovir, ganciclovir, and foscarnet are used for systemic treatment of herpesvirus infections, while ophthalmic preparations of idoxuridine, trifluorothymidine, and vidarabine are available for herpes keratitis. For treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infections, zidovudine and didanosine are used. Immunomodulators, such as interferons and colony-stimulating factors, and immunoglobulins are being used increasingly for viral illnesses. While resistance to antiviral drugs has been seen, especially among AIDS patients, it has not become widespread and is being intensely studied. Increasingly, combinations of agents are being used: to achieve synergistic inhibition of viruses, to delay or prevent resistance, and to decrease dosages of toxic drugs. New approaches, such as liposomes carrying antiviral drugs and computer-aided drug design, are exciting and promising prospects for the future. PMID:1576586

  6. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  7. Discovery of Topsentin Alkaloids and Their Derivatives as Novel Antiviral and Anti-phytopathogenic Fungus Agents.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofei; Wang, Ziwen; Dong, Ji; Liu, Yuxiu; Lu, Aidang; Wang, Qingmin

    2016-12-07

    Topsentin alkaloids and their derivatives were designed, synthesized, and characterized on the basis of NMR and mass spectroscopy. The antiviral activities against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and anti-phytopathogenic fungus activities of these alkaloids were evaluated for the first time. Alkaloids 1c, 1e, 2b, and 2d displayed significantly higher antiviral activities against TMV than Ribavirin, emerging as new lead compounds for anti-TMV research. Further fungicidal activity tests against 14 kinds of phytopathogenic fungi revealed that these alkaloids displayed broad-spectrum fungicidal activities. Topsentin derivative 2d with 4-5 mg/kg EC50 values against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.), Rhizoctonia solani (Kuhn), and Botrytis cinerea (Pers.) emerged as a new lead compound for fungicidal research. Current studies provide support for the application of topsentin alkaloids as novel agrochemicals.

  8. Glycyrrhizin as antiviral agent against Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus is a major cause of chronic liver diseases which can lead to permanent liver damage, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. The presently available treatment with interferon plus ribavirin, has limited benefits due to adverse side effects such as anemia, depression, fatigue, and "flu-like" symptoms. Herbal plants have been used for centuries against different diseases including viral diseases and have become a major source of new compounds to treat bacterial and viral diseases. Material The present study was design to study the antiviral effect of Glycyrrhizin (GL) against HCV. For this purpose, HCV infected liver cells were treated with GL at non toxic doses and HCV titer was measured by Quantitative real time RT-PCR. Results and Discussion Our results demonstrated that GL inhibit HCV titer in a dose dependent manner and resulted in 50% reduction of HCV at a concentration of 14 ± 2 μg. Comparative studies were made with interferon alpha to investigate synergistic effects, if any, between antiviral compound and interferon alpha 2a. Our data showed that GL exhibited synergistic effect when combined with interferon. Moreover, these results were verified by transiently transfecting the liver cells with HCV 3a core plasmid. The results proved that GL dose dependently inhibit the expression of HCV 3a core gene both at mRNA and protein levels while the GAPDH remained constant. Conclusion Our results suggest that GL inhibit HCV full length viral particles and HCV core gene expression or function in a dose dependent manner and had synergistic effect with interferon. In future, GL along with interferon will be better option to treat HCV infection. PMID:21762538

  9. Design, synthesis, and antiviral activity of novel rutin derivatives containing 1, 4-pentadien-3-one moiety.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu; Ding, Yan; Xie, Dandan; Hu, Deyu; Li, Pei; Li, Xiangyang; Xue, Wei; Jin, Linhong; Song, Baoan

    2015-03-06

    Rutin (compound 5) and some compounds (compounds 1-4 and 6) were isolated from Artemisia princeps Pamp (A. princeps Pamp.) and a series of novel rutin derivatives containing 1,4-pentadien-3-one moiety were designed and synthesized. The target compounds were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR), carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((13)C NMR), and ESI-MS. Bioassay results indicated that some of the compounds showed good to excellent antiviral activities against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) at 500 μg/mL in vivo. The 50% effective concentrations (EC50) of the compound 7r against CMV was 394.78 μg/mL, which was better than that of Ningnanmycin (432.22 μg/mL). These results indicated that novel rutin derivatives containing 1,4-pentadien-3-one moiety can effectively control CMV.

  10. Antiviral activity of borage (Echium amoenum).

    PubMed

    Abolhassani, Mohsen

    2010-06-30

    Borage (Echium amoenum) is a large annual plant of the Boraginaceae family that grows in most parts of Europe and in northern parts of Iran. The flower of borage is used as a medicinal herb in various countries as an antifebrile and antidepressant, for treatment of stress, circulatory heart diseases and pulmonary complaints, as a poultice for inflammatory swellings, as a diuretic, laxative, emollient and demulcent, and recently as a possible cancer protective factor. The Iranian borage is used in traditional medicine for infectious diseases and influenza and as an antifebrile. In this report, an aqueous extract of dried borage (Echium amoenum) flowers was tested in vitro for its antiviral activity. Bacteriophage 3C and its specific host, Staphylococcus aureus 8327 were used Aqueous extract of E. amoenum dried flower was prepared and anti-viral activity was determined by agar overlay method and the burst size was determined by one-step growth experiment. Antibacterial activity was determined by disc diffusion, agar-well diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration methods. The extract showed concentration-dependent antiviral activity against free bacteriophage 3C and reduced the yield of phage from the host Staphylococcus aureus 8327. Antiviral activity of the extract is heat resistant. Autoclaving the extract at 110°C for 1 h did not eliminate its antiviral activity and the effect was similar to the extract that was filter sterilized. However, the activity of the freeze-dried extract was diminished during 90 days of storage at 4°C and the activity of the working solution was diminished in a one-week period at 4°C. These results may provide a justification for the traditional use of the Iranian borage flower for infectious diseases and antifebrile activity.

  11. Antiviral activity of borage (Echium amoenum)

    PubMed Central

    Abolhassani, Mohsen

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Borage (Echium amoenum) is a large annual plant of the Boraginaceae family that grows in most parts of Europe and in northern parts of Iran. The flower of borage is used as a medicinal herb in various countries as an antifebrile and antidepressant, for treatment of stress, circulatory heart diseases and pulmonary complaints, as a poultice for inflammatory swellings, as a diuretic, laxative, emollient and demulcent, and recently as a possible cancer protective factor. The Iranian borage is used in traditional medicine for infectious diseases and influenza and as an antifebrile. In this report, an aqueous extract of dried borage (Echium amoenum) flowers was tested in vitro for its antiviral activity. Material and methods Bacteriophage 3C and its specific host, Staphylococcus aureus 8327 were used Aqueous extract of E. amoenum dried flower was prepared and anti-viral activity was determined by agar overlay method and the burst size was determined by one-step growth experiment. Antibacterial activity was determined by disc diffusion, agar-well diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration methods. Results The extract showed concentration-dependent antiviral activity against free bacteriophage 3C and reduced the yield of phage from the host Staphylococcus aureus 8327. Antiviral activity of the extract is heat resistant. Autoclaving the extract at 110°C for 1 h did not eliminate its antiviral activity and the effect was similar to the extract that was filter sterilized. However, the activity of the freeze-dried extract was diminished during 90 days of storage at 4°C and the activity of the working solution was diminished in a one-week period at 4°C. Conclusions These results may provide a justification for the traditional use of the Iranian borage flower for infectious diseases and antifebrile activity. PMID:22371772

  12. TRIM25 Enhances the Antiviral Action of Zinc-Finger Antiviral Protein (ZAP)

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Zerlina; Cheung, Pamela; Schneider, William M.; Bozzacco, Leonia; Buehler, Eugen; Takaoka, Akinori; Rice, Charles M.; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; MacDonald, Margaret R.

    2017-01-01

    The host factor and interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) product, zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP), inhibits a number of diverse viruses by usurping and intersecting with multiple cellular pathways. To elucidate its antiviral mechanism, we perform a loss-of-function genome-wide RNAi screen to identify cellular cofactors required for ZAP antiviral activity against the prototype alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV). In order to exclude off-target effects, we carry out stringent confirmatory assays to verify the top hits. Important ZAP-liaising partners identified include proteins involved in membrane ion permeability, type I IFN signaling, and post-translational protein modification. The factor contributing most to the antiviral function of ZAP is TRIM25, an E3 ubiquitin and ISG15 ligase. We demonstrate here that TRIM25 interacts with ZAP through the SPRY domain, and TRIM25 mutants lacking the RING or coiled coil domain fail to stimulate ZAP’s antiviral activity, suggesting that both TRIM25 ligase activity and its ability to form oligomers are critical for its cofactor function. TRIM25 increases the modification of both the short and long ZAP isoforms by K48- and K63-linked polyubiquitin, although ubiquitination of ZAP does not directly affect its antiviral activity. However, TRIM25 is critical for ZAP’s ability to inhibit translation of the incoming SINV genome. Taken together, these data uncover TRIM25 as a bona fide ZAP cofactor that leads to increased ZAP modification enhancing its translational inhibition activity. PMID:28060952

  13. Evasion of the interferon-mediated antiviral response by filoviruses.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Washington B

    2010-01-01

    The members of the filoviruses are recognized as some of the most lethal viruses affecting human and non-human primates. The only two genera of the Filoviridae family, Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus (EBOV), comprise the main etiologic agents of severe hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in central Africa, with case fatality rates ranging from 25 to 90%. Fatal outcomes have been associated with a late and dysregulated immune response to infection, very likely due to the virus targeting key host immune cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) that are necessary to mediate effective innate and adaptive immune responses. Despite major progress in the development of vaccine candidates for filovirus infections, a licensed vaccine or therapy for human use is still not available. During the last ten years, important progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of filovirus pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence implicate the impairment of the host interferon (IFN) antiviral innate immune response by MARV or EBOV as an important determinant of virulence. In vitro and in vivo experimental infections with recombinant Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV), the best characterized filovirus, demonstrated that the viral protein VP35 plays a key role in inhibiting the production of IFN-α/β. Further, the action of VP35 is synergized by the inhibition of cellular responses to IFN-α/β by the minor matrix viral protein VP24. The dual action of these viral proteins may contribute to an efficient initial virus replication and dissemination in the host. Noticeably, the analogous function of these viral proteins in MARV has not been reported. Because the IFN response is a major component of the innate immune response to virus infection, this chapter reviews recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of IFN-mediated antiviral evasion by filovirus infection.

  14. Evasion of the Interferon-Mediated Antiviral Response by Filoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Washington B.

    2010-01-01

    The members of the filoviruses are recognized as some of the most lethal viruses affecting human and non-human primates. The only two genera of the Filoviridae family, Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus (EBOV), comprise the main etiologic agents of severe hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in central Africa, with case fatality rates ranging from 25 to 90%. Fatal outcomes have been associated with a late and dysregulated immune response to infection, very likely due to the virus targeting key host immune cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) that are necessary to mediate effective innate and adaptive immune responses. Despite major progress in the development of vaccine candidates for filovirus infections, a licensed vaccine or therapy for human use is still not available. During the last ten years, important progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of filovirus pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence implicate the impairment of the host interferon (IFN) antiviral innate immune response by MARV or EBOV as an important determinant of virulence. In vitro and in vivo experimental infections with recombinant Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV), the best characterized filovirus, demonstrated that the viral protein VP35 plays a key role in inhibiting the production of IFN-α/β. Further, the action of VP35 is synergized by the inhibition of cellular responses to IFN-α/β by the minor matrix viral protein VP24. The dual action of these viral proteins may contribute to an efficient initial virus replication and dissemination in the host. Noticeably, the analogous function of these viral proteins in MARV has not been reported. Because the IFN response is a major component of the innate immune response to virus infection, this chapter reviews recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of IFN-mediated antiviral evasion by filovirus infection. PMID:21994610

  15. Antiviral properties against HIV of water soluble copper carbosilane dendrimers and their EPR characterization.

    PubMed

    Galan, M; Sanchez-Rodriguez, J; Cangiotti, M; Garcia-Gallego, S; Jimenez, J L; Gomez, R; Ottaviani, M F; Munoz-Fernandez, M A; de la Mata, F J

    2012-01-01

    We describe here the use of anionic carbosilane dendrimers to obtain new copper complexes. UV-Vis and a computer aided analysis of the EPR spectra provided information about the coordination modes of copper depending on the nature of the dendrimer and about the geometry and structure of the complexes in solution. Some of these metallo-dendrimers have been tested "in vitro" as antiviral compounds in the inhibition of HIV infection in pre and post-infection treatment.

  16. Antiviral activity of salivary microRNAs for ophthalmic herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Irmak, M Kemal; Erdem, Uzeyir; Kubar, Ayhan

    2012-06-07

    Ophthalmic herpes zoster is a common ocular infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Viral mRNA transcripts play a major role in the replicative cycle of the virus and current antiviral agents have little effect in preventing and treating the complications. Therapeutic use of saliva for certain painful ocular diseases such as ophthalmic herpes zoster is a well-known public practice in our region. We thought that antiviral activity of saliva may stem from salivary microvesicles and we aimed to look for molecules with antiviral activity in these vesicles. As a possible candidate for antiviral activity, salivary microvesicles contain at least 20 microRNAs (miRNAs), small noncoding RNAs, which suppress the translation of target mRNAs. miRNAs not only participate in maintenance of normal cell functions, but are also involved in host-virus interactions and limit the replication of certain virus types. Thus, miRNA gene therapy by targeting mRNAs required for VZV survival may find a niche in the treatment of ophthalmic herpes zoster. But, how could salivary microvesicles reach into the corneal cells to demonstrate their antiviral activity. We suggest that human salivary microvesicles can be effective carriers of miRNA for corneal cells, because they contain a molecular machinery for vesicle trafficking and fusion allowing them to be endocytosed by target cells. After binding to the plasma membrane, microvesicles seem to enter into the corneal cells through the clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In the cytosol, human salivary miRNAs base-pair with specific viral mRNAs and inhibit their translation, thus limiting the replication of the virus.

  17. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Phosphorylated Abacavir Derivatives as Antiviral Agents Against Newcastle Disease Virus Infection in Chicken.

    PubMed

    K A, Suresh; Venkata Subbaiah, Kadiam C; Lavanya, Rayapu; Chandrasekhar, Kuruva; Chamarti, Naga Raju; Kumar, M Suresh; Wudayagiri, Rajendra; Valluru, Lokanatha

    2016-09-01

    Newcastle disease virus is the most devastating virus in poultry industry. It can eradicate the entire poultry flocks once infected. This study is aimed to investigate the antiviral efficacy of novel phosphorylated analogues of the drug abacavir (ABC) against Newcastle disease virus (NDV). About 16 analogues of ABC were designed and docking was performed against fusion protein of NDV. Three compounds were identified and selected for synthesis and biological evaluation based on binding affinity and docking scores. The compounds were synthesized and characterized by IR, (1)H, (13)C, (31)P and CHN analysis and mass spectra. These compounds were tested for antiviral efficacy against NDV-infected DF-1 cells. Compound ABC-1 had shown potent antiviral activity as evidenced by significant reduction in plaque units and cytopathic effect. Therefore, ABC-1 was selected to test for NDV-infected chicken survival rate. Effective dose50 concentrations were determined for ABC-1. Antioxidant enzyme levels in brain, liver and lung tissues were estimated. Superoxide dismutase and catalase were significantly raised and lipid peroxidation and HA titer levels were decreased upon treatment with 2 mg/kg body weight ABC-1. Histopathological modifications were also restored in the ABC-1-treated group. These findings demonstrated ABC-1 as a potential antiviral agent against NDV in chicken.

  18. Cloning and expression of small cDNA fragment encoding strong antiviral peptide from Celosia cristata in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, A; Kohnehrouz, B Baghban; Santha, I M; Lodha, M L; Kapoor, H C

    2005-09-01

    A small cDNA fragment containing a ribosome-inactivating site was isolated from the leaf cDNA population of Celosia cristata by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR was conducted linearly using a degenerate primer designed from the partially conserved peptide of ribosome-inactivating/antiviral proteins. Sequence analysis showed that it is 150 bp in length. The cDNA fragment was then cloned in a bacterial expression vector and expressed in Escherichia coli as a ~57 kD fused protein, and its presence was further confirmed by Western blot analysis. The recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography. The purified product showed strong antiviral activity towards tobacco mosaic virus on host plant leaves, Nicotiana glutinosa, indicating the presence of a putative antiviral determinant in the isolated cDNA product. It is speculated that antiviral site is at, or is separate but very close to, the ribosome-inactivating site. We nominate this short cDNA fragment reported here as a good candidate to investigate further the location of the antiviral determinants. The isolated cDNA sequence was submitted to EMBL databases under accession number of AJ535714.

  19. Determination and Confirmation of the Antiviral Drug Amantadine and Its Analogues in Chicken Jerky Pet Treats.

    PubMed

    Turnipseed, Sherri B; Storey, Joseph M; Andersen, Wendy C; Filigenzi, Michael S; Heise, Andrea S; Lohne, Jack J; Madson, Mark R; Ceric, Olgica; Reimschuessel, Renate

    2015-08-12

    In this study, we investigated two methods for the detection of antiviral compounds in chicken jerky pet treats. Initially, a screening method developed to detect many different chemical contaminants indicated the presence of amantadine, 1, in some pet treats analyzed. A second antiviral-specific method was then developed for amantadine and its analogues, rimantadine, 2, and memantine, 3. Both methods used an acidic water/acetonitrile extraction. The antiviral-specific method also included a dispersive sorbent cleanup. Analytes were detected and identified by LC-MS (ion trap and Orbitrap) instruments. The antiviral-specific method was validated by analyzing matrix blanks and fortified samples (2.5-50 μg/kg levels). Average recoveries for amantadine (using a deuterated internal standard) in fortified samples ranged from 76 to 123% with relative standard deviations of ≤12%. Amantadine was detected and identified in suspect chicken jerky pet treat samples at levels ranging from <2.5 μg/kg to over 600 μg/kg. Rimantadine and memantine were not detected in any samples.

  20. Egyptian propolis: 2. Chemical composition, antiviral and antimicrobial activities of East Nile Delta propolis.

    PubMed

    Abd El Hady, Faten K; Hegazi, Ahmed G

    2002-01-01

    Three propolis samples from East Nile Delta, Egypt were collected. Propolis samples were investigated by GC/MS,103 compounds were identified, 20 being new for propolis. Dakahlia propolis was a typical poplar propolis but it contained two new caffeate esters and two new triterpenoids. Ismailia propolis was characterized by the presence of new triterpenic acid methyl esters and it did not contain any aromatic acids, esters and flavonoids. Sharkia propolis was characterized by the presence of caffeate esters only, some di- and triterpenoids. The antiviral (Infectious Bursal Disease Virus and Reo-Virus) and antimicrobial (Staphylococcus aureus; Escherichia coli and Candida albicans) activities of propolis samples were investigated. Dakahlia propolis showed the highest antiviral activity against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) and the highest antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and the highest antifungal activity against Candida albicans. While Ismailia propolis had the highest antiviral activity against Reo-virus. Sharkia propolis showed the highest antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and moderate antiviral activity against infectious bursal disease virus and reovirus.

  1. HIV-1 Gag as an Antiviral Target: Development of Assembly and Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Gag is the master orchestrator of particle assembly. The central role of Gag at multiple stages of the HIV lifecycle has led to efforts to develop drugs that directly target Gag and prevent the formation and release of infectious particles. Until recently, however, only the catalytic site protease inhibitors have been available to inhibit late stages of HIV replication. This review summarizes the current state of development of antivirals that target Gag or disrupt late events in the retrovirus lifecycle such as maturation of the viral capsid. Maturation inhibitors represent an exciting new series of antiviral compounds, including those that specifically target CA-SP1 cleavage and the allosteric integrase inhibitors that inhibit maturation by a completely different mechanism. Numerous small molecules and peptides targeting CA have been studied in attempts to disrupt steps in assembly. Efforts to target CA have recently gained have considerable momentum from the development of small molecules that bind CA and alter capsid stability at the post-entry stage of the lifecycle. Efforts to develop antivirals that inhibit incorporation of genomic RNA or to inhibit late budding events remain in preliminary stages of development. Overall, the development of novel antivirals targeting Gag and the late stages in HIV replication appears much closer to success than ever, with the new maturation inhibitors leading the way. PMID:26329615

  2. Filovirus proteins for antiviral drug discovery: Structure/function bases of the replication cycle.

    PubMed

    Martin, Baptiste; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne

    2017-05-01

    Filoviruses are important pathogens that cause severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans, for which no approved vaccines and antiviral treatments are yet available. In an earlier article (Martin et al., Antiviral Research, 2016), we reviewed the role of the filovirus surface glycoprotein in replication and as a target for drugs and vaccines. In this review, we focus on recent findings on the filovirus replication machinery and how they could be used for the identification of new therapeutic targets and the development of new antiviral compounds. First, we summarize the recent structural and functional advances on the molecules involved in filovirus replication/transcription cycle, particularly the NP, VP30, VP35 proteins, and the "large" protein L, which harbors the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and mRNA capping activities. These proteins are essential for viral mRNA synthesis and genome replication, and consequently they constitute attractive targets for drug design. We then describe how these insights into filovirus replication mechanisms and the structure/function characterization of the involved proteins have led to the development of new and innovative antiviral strategies that may help reduce the filovirus disease case fatality rate through post-exposure or prophylactic treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antiviral effect of cimicifugin from Cimicifuga foetida against human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuo-Chih; Chang, Jung-San; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Chiang, Lien-Chai; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes serious infection of the lower respiratory tract in children and an effective antiviral therapy against the viral pathogen remains unavailable. We previously demonstrated that the oriental medicinal plant, Cimicifuga foetida L. (C. foetida), possessed inhibitory activity against RSV. Since cimicifugin is a major constituent of C. foetida, we sought to examine in this study its anti-RSV effect on both the human upper (HEp-2) and lower (A549) respiratory tract cell lines. Results revealed that cimicifugin dose-dependently inhibited RSV-induced plaque formation in both HEp-2 and A549 cells (p < 0.0001), with a superior effect in the latter cell type (p < 0.0001). The antiviral activity of cimicifugin was time-dependent (p < 0.0001) and was most effective when cells were treated with the compound before viral inoculation. Additional experiments demonstrated that cimicifugin could inhibit viral attachment (p < 0.0001) and viral internalization (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the drug could potentiate heparin's effect against attachment of RSV, particularly in A549 cells. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis of antiviral cytokines induction revealed that cimicifugin could also stimulate epithelial cells to secrete IFN-β to counteract viral infection. Taken together, these results indicate that cimicifugin is an efficient antiviral agent against RSV infection. We suggest that cimicifugin might be useful for the management of RSV pathogenesis.

  4. Antiviral potential of lactic acid bacteria and their bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Al Kassaa, I; Hober, D; Hamze, M; Chihib, N E; Drider, D

    2014-12-01

    Emerging resistance to antiviral agents is a growing public health concern worldwide as it was reported for respiratory, sexually transmitted and enteric viruses. Therefore, there is a growing demand for new, unconventional antiviral agents which may serve as an alternative to the currently used drugs. Meanwhile, published literature continues shedding the light on the potency of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their bacteriocins as antiviral agents. Health-promoting LAB probiotics may exert their antiviral activity by (1) direct probiotic-virus interaction; (2) production of antiviral inhibitory metabolites; and/or (3) via stimulation of the immune system. The aim of this review was to highlight the antiviral activity of LAB and substances they produce with antiviral activity.

  5. Antiviral activity of the zinc ionophores pyrithione and hinokitiol against picornavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Krenn, B M; Gaudernak, E; Holzer, B; Lanke, K; Van Kuppeveld, F J M; Seipelt, J

    2009-01-01

    We have discovered two metal ion binding compounds, pyrithione (PT) and hinokitiol (HK), that efficiently inhibit human rhinovirus, coxsackievirus, and mengovirus multiplication. Early stages of virus infection are unaffected by these compounds. However, the cleavage of the cellular eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4GI by the rhinoviral 2A protease was abolished in the presence of PT and HK. We further show that these compounds inhibit picornavirus replication by interfering with proper processing of the viral polyprotein. In addition, we provide evidence that these structurally unrelated compounds lead to a rapid import of extracellular zinc ions into cells. Imported Zn(2+) was found to be localized in punctate structures, as well as in mitochondria. The observed elevated level of zinc ions was reversible when the compounds were removed. As the antiviral activity of these compounds requires the continuous presence of the zinc ionophore PT, HK, or pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate, the requirement for zinc ions for the antiviral activity is further substantiated. Therefore, an increase in intracellular zinc levels provides the basis for a new antipicornavirus mechanism.

  6. Off Label Antiviral Therapeutics for Henipaviruses: New Light Through Old Windows.

    PubMed

    Aljofan, Mohamad; Lo, Michael K; Rota, Paul A; Michalski, Wojtek P; Mungall, Bruce A

    2010-01-01

    Hendra and Nipah viruses are recently emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses for which there is no vaccine or protective therapy available. While a number of experimental therapeutics and vaccines have recently been reported, all of these will require lengthy approval processes, limiting their usefulness in the short term. To address the urgent need for henipavirus therapeutics, a number of currently licensed pharmaceuticals have been evaluated for off label efficacy against henipavirus replication in vitro. Initially it was observed that compounds which released intracellular calcium stores induced a potent inhibition of henipaviruses replication, prompting the evaluation of known drugs with a similar effect on calcium mobilisation. Of the eight compounds randomly selected based on existing literature, seven inhibited virus replication in the micromolar range while the remaining compound also inhibited virus replication but only at millimolar concentrations. Pretreatment experiments with various calcium chelators, channel antagonists or endoplasmic reticulum release inhibitors supported a calcium mediated mechanism of action for five of these compounds. The mechanism of antiviral action for the remaining three compounds is currently unknown. Additionally, a number of other modulators of calcium flux, including calcium channel and calmodulin antagonists also exhibited potent antiviral activity in vitro providing a broad range of potential therapeutic options for the treatment of henipavirus infections. Importantly, as many of these compounds are currently licensed drugs, regulatory approval should be a much more streamlined process, with the caveat that appropriate in vivo efficacy can be demonstrated in animal models.

  7. High Throughput Screening for Small Molecule Enhancers of the Interferon Signaling Pathway to Drive Next-Generation Antiviral Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dhara A.; Patel, Anand C.; Nolan, William C.; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Most of current strategies for antiviral therapeutics target the virus specifically and directly, but an alternative approach to drug discovery might be to enhance the immune response to a broad range of viruses. Based on clinical observation in humans and successful genetic strategies in experimental models, we reasoned that an improved interferon (IFN) signaling system might better protect against viral infection. Here we aimed to identify small molecular weight compounds that might mimic this beneficial effect and improve antiviral defense. Accordingly, we developed a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify small molecules that enhance the IFN signaling pathway components. The assay is based on a phenotypic screen for increased IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity in a fully automated and robust format (Z′>0.7). Application of this assay system to a library of 2240 compounds (including 2160 already approved or approvable drugs) led to the identification of 64 compounds with significant ISRE activity. From these, we chose the anthracycline antibiotic, idarubicin, for further validation and mechanism based on activity in the sub-µM range. We found that idarubicin action to increase ISRE activity was manifest by other members of this drug class and was independent of cytotoxic or topoisomerase inhibitory effects as well as endogenous IFN signaling or production. We also observed that this compound conferred a consequent increase in IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression and a significant antiviral effect using a similar dose-range in a cell-culture system inoculated with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). The antiviral effect was also found at compound concentrations below the ones observed for cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results provide proof of concept for using activators of components of the IFN signaling pathway to improve IFN efficacy and antiviral immune defense as well as a validated HTS approach to identify small

  8. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  9. Antiviral action of the tumor suppressor ARF

    PubMed Central

    García, María A; Collado, Manuel; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Matheu, Ander; Marcos-Villar, Laura; Arroyo, Javier; Esteban, Mariano; Serrano, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Oncogenic viruses frequently target the pathways controlled by tumor suppressor genes, suggesting an extra function for these proteins as antiviral factors. The control exerted by the tumor suppressor Arf on cellular proliferation is crucial to restrict tumor development; however, a potential contribution of Arf to prevent viral infectivity has remained unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the consequences of loss or increased expression of Arf on viral infection. Our results reveal that ARF expression is induced by interferon and after viral infection. Furthermore, we show that ARF protects against viral infection in a gene dosage-dependent manner, and that this antiviral action is mediated in part by PKR through a mechanism that involves ARF-induced release of PKR from nucleophosmin complexes. Finally, Arf-null mice were hypersensitive to viral infection compared to wild-type mice. Together, our results reveal a novel and unexpected role for the tumor suppressor ARF in viral infection surveillance. PMID:16957780

  10. Antiviral and antiretroviral use in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Money, Deborah M

    2003-12-01

    The history of antiviral and antiretroviral therapy is recent compared with many other medical therapies, including traditional antibiotics in pregnancy. There are few long-term data on which to base decisions of management in pregnancy. Accessing up-to-date information is critical to optimizing the safety of care for mothers and their infants. Exposure to medications in pregnancy can be toxic to a fetus in a gestational age-dependent manner. Determination of safe medications for pregnancy must take into consideration the need for certain medications and the possibility of inadvertent exposure in early pregnancy because of unplanned pregnancies. This article reviews the most commonly used antiviral and antiretroviral agents and places emphasis on the issues regarding use in pregnancy.

  11. Antiviral herbs--present and future.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Su, Dan; Feng, Yulin; Liu, Kuangyi; Song, Yonggui

    2014-01-01

    Viral disease is a calamity which absolutely can not be ignored for human health. The emergence of drug resistance and spread of new virus will be the new challenge against viral disease. To find and develop new antivirus agents with properties of safety, significant effect and low toxicity is the pressing question facing humans today. Because of its advantages, including rich resources, low price, less adverse effect, Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) have become the research focus in antiviral treatment. In recent years, there are numerous articles about the studies from separation of active ingredients to the antiviral mechanism. In this paper, the progress in experimental study was illustrated on the basis of active ingredients, species of virus, mechanism, clinical application. Obviously, TCM have obvious advantages in the treatment of virus infectious disease and has a broad prospect of application.

  12. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Li, Timothy C. M.; Chan, Martin C. W.; Lee, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir), M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine), and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir). In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:26389935

  13. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza.

    PubMed

    Li, Timothy C M; Chan, Martin C W; Lee, Nelson

    2015-09-14

    Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir), M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine), and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir). In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed.

  14. Ester groups as carriers of antivirally active tricyclic analogue of acyclovir in prodrugs designing: synthesis, lipophilicity--comparative statistical study of the chromatographic and theoretical methods, validation of the HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Lesniewska, Monika A; Ostrowski, Tomasz; Zeidler, Joanna; Muszalska, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the lipophilicity of candidate compounds for prodrugs may predict their predetermined course/effect in the body. Acyclovir (ACV) belongs to a class of drugs with low bioavailability. Its tricyclic analogues, the derivatives of 3,9-dihydro-3-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-9-oxo-5H-imidazo[1,2-a]purine (TACV) exhibit similar antiviral activities and are more lipophilic as compared with acyclovir itself. In the search for new antiviral prodrugs 6-(4- methoxyphenyl) tricyclic compound (6-(4-MeOPh)-TACV) was modified by esterification of a hydroxyl group in the aliphatic chain. Selected esters (acetyl, isobutyryl, pivaloyl, ethoxycarbonyl and nicotinoyl) were synthesized and their lipophilicity was determined by the HPLC-RP method. The study compared the log kw calculated from the linear and quadratic equations and proved the correctness of the application of the linear relationship log k as a function of the concentration of ACN in the mobile phase (30-60%). Statistical analyses of the comparative values of log kw and clogP were carried out using computational methods. It was proved that the AC logP algorithm can be useful for the analysis of these compounds, which can have a statistically justified application in the assessment of the quantitative structure- activity relationship (QSAR). The lipophilicity determined by the HPLC method appears as follows: 6-(4-MeOPh)-TACV < Ac- < Nic- < Etc- < iBut- < Piv- (log kw = 0.65-2.26). Finally, the HPLC-RP method was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of synthesized esters.

  15. Optimization of Influenza Antiviral Response in Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    defined as having a chronic condition such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, coronary 31 heart disease , angina, heart attack, diabetes...States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention down to state and local regions, are prepared to respond to potential influenza. pandetnics with...decision makers at the Texas Department of State Health Services. We input the antiviral release schedule into an independent disease -spread simulation

  16. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents Eddie L. Chang 1,*, Christa Simmers 2 and D. Andrew Knight 2,* 1 Center for Bio/Molecular Science and...April 2010; in revised form: 04 May 2010 / Accepted: 14 May 2010 / Published: 26 May 2010 Abstract: Metal ion complexes are playing an increasing...role in the development of antimicrobials. We review here the antimicrobial properties of cobalt coordination complexes in oxidation state 3+. In

  17. Synthesis and Antiviral Activity Evaluation of 2',5',5'-Trifluoro-Apiosyl Nucleoside Phosphonic Acid Analogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunae; Hong, Joon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Racemic synthesis of novel 2',5',5'-trifluoro-apiose nucleoside phosphonic acid analogs were performed as potent antiviral agents. Phosphonation was performed by direct displacement of triflate intermediate with diethyl (lithiodifluoromethyl) phosphonate to give the corresponding (α,α-difluoroalkyl) phosphonate. Condensation successfully proceeded from a glycosyl donor with persilylated bases to yield the nucleoside phosphonate analogs. Deprotection of diethyl phosphonates provided the target nucleoside analogs. An antiviral evaluation of the synthesized compounds against various viruses such as HIV, HSV-1, HSV-2, and HCMV revealed that the pyrimidine analogues have significant anti-HCMV activity.

  18. Antiviral activities of atractylon from Atractylodis Rhizoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Mai, Jing-Yin; Hou, Tian-Lu; Ping, Jian; Chen, Jian-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Atractylodis Rhizoma is a traditional medicinal herb, which has antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic, anticancer, gastroprotective and neuroprotective activities. It is widely used for treating fever, cold, phlegm, edema and arthralgia syndrome in South-East Asian nations. In this study, 6 chemical compositions of Atractylodis Rhizoma were characterized by spectral analysis and their antiviral activities were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Among them, atractylon showed most significant antiviral activities. Atractylon treatment at doses of 10–40 mg/kg for 5 days attenuated influenza A virus (IAV)-induced pulmonary injury and decreased the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1β, but increased interferon-β (IFN-β) levels. Atractylon treatment upregulated the expression of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), MyD88, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 and IFN-β mRNA but downregulated nuclear factor-κB p65 protein expression in the lung tissues of IAV-infected mice. These results demonstrated that atractylon significantly alleviated IAV-induced lung injury via regulating the TLR7 signaling pathway, and may warrant further evaluation as a possible agent for IAV treatment. PMID:27600871

  19. CRM1 Inhibitors for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Cynthia; Ghildyal, Reena

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diseases are a major global concern and despite major advancements in medical research, still cause significant morbidity and mortality. Progress in antiviral therapy is particularly hindered by appearance of mutants capable of overcoming the effects of drugs targeting viral components. Alternatively, development of drugs targeting host proteins essential for completion of viral lifecycle holds potential as a viable strategy for antiviral therapy. Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways in particular are involved in several pathological conditions including cancer and viral infections, where hijacking or alteration of function of key transporter proteins, such as Chromosome Region Maintenance1 (CRM1) is observed. Overexpression of CRM1-mediated nuclear export is evident in several solid and hematological malignancies. Interestingly, CRM1-mediated nuclear export of viral components is crucial in various stages of the viral lifecycle and assembly. This review summarizes the role of CRM1 in cancer and selected viruses. Leptomycin B (LMB) is the prototypical inhibitor of CRM1 potent against various cancer cell lines overexpressing CRM1 and in limiting viral infections at nanomolar concentrations in vitro. However, the irreversible shutdown of nuclear export results in high cytotoxicity and limited efficacy in vivo. This has prompted search for synthetic and natural CRM1 inhibitors that can potentially be developed as broadly active antivirals, some of which are summarized in this review. PMID:28702009

  20. Cycluridine: A novel antiviral effective against flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Galabov, Angel S; Mukova, Lucia; Abashev, Yuriy P; Wassilewa, Lilia; Tzvetkov, Petko; Minkov, Vassil; Barinskiy, Igor F; Rice, Charles M; Ouzounov, Sergey; Sidzhakova, Dorotea

    2017-08-01

    This review describes the contemporary state of research for antivirals effective against flaviviruses, especially focusing on inhibitors of the pestivirus causative agent of bovine viral diarrhoea virus. We highlight cycluridine, an originally synthesized Mannich's base [a tetrahydro-2(1H)-pyrimidinones derivative], as a highly effective antiviral possessing a strong inhibitory effect on bovine viral diarrhoea virus replication. Cycluridine was active against replication of a wide variety of bovine viral diarrhoea virus strains in cell cultures. The drug-sensitive period in the bovine viral diarrhoea virus replication cycle included the latent period and the exponential phase; a 90-min delay in the peak of viral RNA synthesis was observed. Cycluridine administered orally manifested a pronounced protective effect in calves with natural mucosal disease/viral diarrhoea and calves experimentally infected with bovine viral diarrhoea virus. Its magnitude of activity and selectivity places cycluridine in the lead among all known substances with anti- bovine viral diarrhoea virus activity. Additionally, cycluridine applied subcutaneously showed anti-tick-born encephalitis virus activity, manifesting a marked protective effect in mice infected with tick-born encephalitis virus. Cycluridine could be a prospective antiviral in veterinary and medical practice for the treatment of bovine viral diarrhoea virus and other flavivirus infections.

  1. ANTIVIRAL ACTIVITY OF GENETICIN AGAINST DENGUE VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianchao G.; Mason, Peter W.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Xu, Xiaodong; Bourne, Nigel; Renshaw, Randall W.; Block, Timothy M.; Birk, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    The aminoglycoside, geneticin (G418), was recently shown to have antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Since BVDV, dengue virus (DENV) and yellow fever virus (YFV) all belong to the Flaviviridae family, it seemed possible that a common step in their life cycle might be affected by this aminoglycoside. Here it is shown that geneticin prevented the cytopathic effect (CPE) resulting from DENV-2 infection of BHK cells, in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 3±0.4 μg/ml. Geneticin had no detectable effect on CPE caused byYFV in BHK cells. Geneticin also inhibited DENV-2 viral yield with an EC50 value of 2±0.1 μg/ml and an EC90 value of 20±2 μg/ml. With a CC50 value of 165±5 μg/ml, the selectivity indexof anti-DENV activity of geneticin in BHK cells was established to be 66. Furthermore, 25 μg/ml of geneticin nearly completely blocked plaque formation induced by DENV-2, but not YFV. In addition, geneticin, inhibited DENV-2 viral RNA replication and viral translation. Gentamicin, kanamycin, and the guanidinylated geneticin showed no anti-DENV activity. Neomycin and Paromomycin demonstrated weak antiviral activity at high concentrations. Finally, aminoglycoside-3′-phosphotransferase activity of neomycin-resistant gene abolished antiviral activity of geneticin. PMID:19501253

  2. Potential Antivirals: Natural Products Targeting Replication Enzymes of Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana Flávia Costa da Silveira; Teixeira, Róbson Ricardo; Oliveira, André Silva de; Souza, Ana Paula Martins de; Silva, Milene Lopes da; Paula, Sérgio Oliveira de

    2017-03-22

    Dengue virus (DENV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV) are reemergent arboviruses that are transmitted by mosquitoes of the Aedes genus. During the last several decades, these viruses have been responsible for millions of cases of infection and thousands of deaths worldwide. Therefore, several investigations were conducted over the past few years to find antiviral compounds for the treatment of DENV and CHIKV infections. One attractive strategy is the screening of compounds that target enzymes involved in the replication of both DENV and CHIKV. In this review, we describe advances in the evaluation of natural products targeting the enzymes involved in the replication of these viruses.

  3. Triterpenes as potentially cytotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Chudzik, Malwina; Korzonek-Szlacheta, Ilona; Król, Wojciech

    2015-01-19

    Triterpenes are compounds of natural origin, which have numerously biological activities: anti-cancer properties, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-fungal. These substances can be isolated from plants, animals or fungi. Nowadays, when neoplasms are main cause of death, triterpenes can become an alternative method for treating cancer because of their cytotoxic properties and chemopreventive activities.

  4. A case for developing antiviral drugs against polio.

    PubMed

    Collett, Marc S; Neyts, Johan; Modlin, John F

    2008-09-01

    Polio eradication is within sight. In bringing the world close to this ultimate goal, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has relied exclusively on the live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). However, as eradication nears, continued OPV use becomes less tenable due to the incidence of vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) in vaccine recipients and disease caused by circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) in contacts. Once wild poliovirus transmission has been interrupted globally, OPV use will stop. This will leave the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) as the only weapon to defend a polio-free world. Outbreaks caused by cVDPVs are expected post-OPV cessation, and accidental or deliberate releases of virus could also occur. There are serious doubts regarding the ability of IPV alone to control outbreaks. Here, we argue that antiviral drugs against poliovirus be added to the arsenal. Anti-poliovirus drugs could be used to treat the infected and protect the exposed, acting rapidly on their own to contain an outbreak and used as a complement to IPV. While there are no polio antiviral drugs today, the technological feasibility of developing such drugs and their probability of clinical success have been established by over three decades of drug development targeting the related rhinoviruses and non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs). Because of this history, there are known compounds with anti-poliovirus activity in vitro that represent excellent starting points for polio drug development. Stakeholders must come to understand the potential public health benefits of polio drugs, the feasibility of their development, and the relatively modest costs involved. Given the timelines for eradication and those for drug development, the time for action is now.

  5. Antiviral Natural Products Against Chronic Hepatitis B: Recent Developments.

    PubMed

    Parvez, Mohammad K; Arbab, Ahmed H; Al-Dosari, Mohammed S; Al-Rehaily, Adnan J

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is inherently a hepatotropic virus that causes acute and chronic hepatitis in about one-third of world population. Of the estimated 360 million chronically infected individuals, more than one million die of liver cirrhosis, fulminant liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) every year. Though there is an effective vaccine available, failure to protection because of vaccine-escape viral mutants in some population is also reported. Moreover, all the currently approved antiviral drugs have their limitations, too. Interferon (IFN-α) has limited efficacy and a high incidence of adverse side-effects in a proportion of chronic patients. Nucleos(t)ide analogs like, lamivudine, adefovir, tenofovir and entecavir are very effective in treating chronic hepatitis B (CHB), but long-term therapy eventually leads to drug-resistance. As an alternative approach, natural or plant products have provided promising therapeutics in modern pharma industry. Owing to their characteristics of high chemical diversity and biochemical specificity, natural products offer great promises as potentially effective antiviral drugs. A broad spectrum of phytochemicals including flavonoids (e.g., Vogonin), terpenes (e.g., Artemisinin), alkaloids (e.g., Oxymatrine), polyphenolics (e.g., geraniin), saponins (e.g., Astragaloside IV) and lignans (e.g., Helioxanthin) has been isolated and investigated for anti-HBV activities in vitro as well as in vivo. Nevertheless, these promising compounds have different and overlapping mechanisms of action by either inhibiting viral antigens secretion or suppression of DNA replication. The present article reviews the recent developments in anti-HBV natural products.

  6. Sensitive radioimmunoassay for the broad-spectrum antiviral agent ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Austin, R K; Trefts, P E; Hintz, M; Connor, J D; Kagnoff, M F

    1983-11-01

    Ribavirin, 1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxyamide (Virazole; Viratek, Inc., Covina, Calif.), has a broad spectrum of antiviral activity. However, the study of the absorption, metabolism, and excretion of this compound has been limited by the lack of an appropriate assay for ribavirin and its metabolites. Since ribavirin has definite potential for therapeutic use, we developed a radioimmunoassay to measure ribavirin levels in clinical specimens. To prepare an effective immunogen, ribavirin was monosuccinylated and coupled to ovalbumin. The competitive binding radioimmunoassay, in which tritium-labeled ribavirin and rabbit antiribavirin serum were used, was quantitative for ribavirin at concentrations of 1 pmol/100 microliter in urine or plasma samples. The rabbit antibody cross-reacted with the major metabolite of ribavirin, 1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide, at a low level (2 to 5%) which did not interfere with ribavirin binding until concentrations of 1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide 10- to 100-fold higher than ribavirin were present in mock samples, a condition not present in biological specimens. We used the ribavirin radioimmunoassay to determine the ribavirin concentration in mouse plasma after intraperitoneal administration, in the sera of adults from Sierra Leone after oral or intravenous administration for treatment of suspected Lassa fever, and in the sera of children in the United States after small-particle aerosol administration. Our experience with the radioimmunoassay indicates that it is sensitive, accurate, and reproducible. The assay will permit studies leading to a better understanding of the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of this potentially useful antiviral drug.

  7. Steroid plus antiviral treatment for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Kang, H M; Jung, S Y; Byun, J Y; Park, M S; Yeo, S G

    2015-05-01

    The effectiveness of antiviral agents for the treatment of Bell's palsy is uncertain. We evaluated whether a steroid with an antiviral agent (S + A group) provided better recovery outcomes than a steroid alone (S group) in patients with Bell's palsy. A total of 1342 patients diagnosed with Bell's palsy who visited the Kyung Hee Medical Center in Seoul, Korea, from 2002 to 2012 were included in this study. Patients in the S + A group were treated with prednisolone and antiviral agents (n = 569) and those in the S group with prednisolone alone (n = 773). Outcomes were measured using the House-Brackmann (HB) scale according to age, initial disease severity, electroneurography (ENoG) findings and underlying comorbidities. The rate of recovery (HB grades I and II) with initially severe Bell's palsy (HB grades V and VI) was higher in the S + A than in the S group (P = 0.001). However, the rates of recovery were similar with initially moderate palsy (HB grades II-IV) (P = 0.502). In patients classified according to age and ENoG-determined severity of palsy, the overall recovery rate was higher in the S + A than in the S group, but the differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05 for both). The recovery rate without diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) was higher in the S + A group than in the S group (P = 0.031). But in the patients with HTN and DM, the difference in recovery rates between the S + A and S groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.805). Treatment with a steroid plus antiviral agent resulted in significantly higher recovery rates than steroid therapy alone in patients with initially severe Bell's palsy and without either HTN or DM, and a nonsignificant trend towards higher recovery rates in all patients with Bell's palsy in this study. Antiviral agents may therefore help in the treatment of Bell's palsy. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  8. Molecular Sleds and More: Novel Antiviral Agents via Single-Molecule Biology (441st Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Mangel, Wally

    2008-10-15

    Vaccines are effective against viruses such as polio and measles, but vaccines against other important viruses, such as HIV and flu viruses, may be impossible to obtain. These viruses change their genetic makeup each time they replicate so that the immune system cannot recognize all their variations. Hence it is important to develop new antiviral agents that inhibit virus replication. During this lecture, Dr. Mangel will discuss his group's work with a model system, the human adenovirus, which causes, among other ailments, pink eye, blindness and obesity. Mangel's team has developed a promising drug candidate that works by inihibiting adenovirus proteinase, an enzyme necessary for viral replication.

  9. Antiviral Activity of Diterpene Esters on Chikungunya Virus and HIV Replication.

    PubMed

    Nothias-Scaglia, Louis-Félix; Pannecouque, Christophe; Renucci, Franck; Delang, Leen; Neyts, Johan; Roussi, Fanny; Costa, Jean; Leyssen, Pieter; Litaudon, Marc; Paolini, Julien

    2015-06-26

    Recently, new daphnane, tigliane, and jatrophane diterpenoids have been isolated from various Euphorbiaceae species, of which some have been shown to be potent inhibitors of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) replication. To further explore this type of compound, the antiviral activity of a series of 29 commercially available natural diterpenoids was evaluated. Phorbol-12,13-didecanoate (11) proved to be the most potent inhibitor, with an EC50 value of 6.0 ± 0.9 nM and a selectivity index (SI) of 686, which is in line with the previously reported anti-CHIKV potency for the structurally related 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (13). Most of the other compounds exhibited low to moderate activity, including an ingenane-type diterpene ester, compound 28, with an EC50 value of 1.2 ± 0.1 μM and SI = 6.4. Diterpene compounds are known also to inhibit HIV replication, so the antiviral activities of compounds 1-29 were evaluated also against HIV-1 and HIV-2. Tigliane- (4β-hydroxyphorbol analogues 10, 11, 13, 15, 16, and 18) and ingenane-type (27 and 28) diterpene esters were shown to inhibit HIV replication in vitro at the nanomolar level. A Pearson analysis performed with the anti-CHIKV and anti-HIV data sets demonstrated a linear relationship, which supported the hypothesis made that PKC may be an important target in CHIKV replication.

  10. Dominant drug targets suppress the emergence of antiviral resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Elizabeth J; Liu, Hong-mei; Oberste, M Steven; Pallansch, Mark; Collett, Marc S; Kirkegaard, Karla

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance can defeat the successful treatment of pathogens that display high mutation rates, as exemplified by RNA viruses. Here we detail a new paradigm in which a single compound directed against a ‘dominant drug target’ suppresses the emergence of naturally occurring drug-resistant variants in mice and cultured cells. All new drug-resistant viruses arise during intracellular replication and initially express their phenotypes in the presence of drug-susceptible genomes. For the targets of most anti-viral compounds, the presence of these drug-susceptible viral genomes does not prevent the selection of drug resistance. Here we show that, for an inhibitor of the function of oligomeric capsid proteins of poliovirus, the expression of drug-susceptible genomes causes chimeric oligomers to form, thus rendering the drug-susceptible genomes dominant. The use of dominant drug targets should suppress drug resistance whenever multiple genomes arise in the same cell and express products in a common milieu. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03830.001 PMID:25365453

  11. Chemokine receptors as new molecular targets for antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Santoro, F; Vassena, L; Lusso, P

    2004-04-01

    Extraordinary advancements have been made over the past decade in our understanding of the molecular mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry into cells. The external HIV envelope glycoprotein, gp120, sequentially interacts with two cellular receptor molecules, the CD4 glycoprotein and a chemokine receptor, such as CCR5 or CXCR4, leading to the activation of the fusogenic domain of the transmembrane viral glycoprotein, gp41, which changes its conformation to create a hairpin structure that eventually triggers fusion between the viral and cellular membranes. Each of these discrete steps in the viral entry process represents a potential target for new antiviral agents. Current efforts to develop safe and effective HlV entry inhibitors are focused on naturally occurring proteins (e.g., chemokines, antibodies), engineered or modified derivatives of natural proteins (e.g., multimerized soluble CD4, gp41--or chemokine--derived synthetic peptides), as well as small synthetic compounds obtained either by high-throughput screening of large compound libraries or by structure-guided rational design. The recent introduction in therapy of the first fusion inhibitor, the gp41-derived synthetic peptide T20, heralds a new era in the treatment of AIDS, which will hopefully lead to more effective multi-drug regimens with reduced adverse effects for the patients.

  12. Chemical diversity and antiviral potential in the pantropical Diospyros genus.

    PubMed

    Peyrat, Laure-Anne; Eparvier, Véronique; Eydoux, Cécilia; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Stien, Didier; Litaudon, Marc

    2016-07-01

    A screening using a dengue replicon virus-cell-based assay was performed on 3563 ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extracts from different parts of 1500 plants. The screening led to the selection of species from the genus Diospyros (Ebenaceae), among which 25 species distributed in tropical areas showed significant inhibitory activity on dengue virus replication. A metabolic analysis was conducted from the UPLC-HRMS profiles of 33 biologically active and inactive plant extracts, and their metabolic proximity is presented in the form of a dendrogram. The results of the study showed that chemical similarity is not related to plant species or organ. Overall, metabolomic profiling allowed us to define large groups of extracts, comprising both active and inactive ones. Closely related profiles from active extracts might indicate that the common major components of these extracts were responsible for the antiviral activity, while the comparison of chemically similar active and inactive extracts, will permit to find compounds of interest. Eventually, the phytochemical investigation of Diospyros glans bark EtOAc extract afforded usnic acid and 7 known ursane- and lupane-type triterpenoids, among which 5 were found significantly active against dengue virus replication. The inhibitory potency of these compounds was also evaluated on a DENV-NS5 RNA-dependant RNA polymerase assay.

  13. Antiviral activity of natural and synthetic β-carbolines against dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Verónica M; Piccini, Luana E; Panozzo Zénere, Juan D; Damonte, Elsa B; Ponce, María A; Castilla, Viviana

    2016-10-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most prevalent mosquito borne viral pathogen worldwide. In this work we first evaluated the antiviral activity of natural and synthetic β-carbolines against DENV-2 multiplication in cell cultures. We determined that the natural β-carboline harmol and a synthetic harmine derivative, 9N-methylharmine, exhibit inhibitory effect on DENV-2 production without virucidal activity. The active compounds were inhibitory of all DENV serotypes, being DENV-2 the more susceptible to their antiviral action. The mode of action of 9N-methylharmine against DENV-2 was further explored. We determined that the derivative neither affects viral adsorption-internalization events nor viral RNA synthesis. The quantification of intracellular and extracellular viral genomes and infectious virus particles indicated that 9N-methylharmine would impair the maturation and release of virus particles to the extracellular medium affecting the spreading of the infection. Furthermore, we also determined that 9N-methylharmine antiviral activity is not related to the ability of the compound to downregulate p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Antiviral activity of Thiosemicarbazones derived from α-amino acids against Dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Padmapriya; Khaleefathullah, Sheriff; Kaveri, Krishansamy; Palani, Gunasekaran; Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Thennarasu, Sathiah; Tirichurapalli Sivagnanam, Uma

    2017-03-01

    The endemicity and seasonal outbreaks of Dengue disease in most tropical and subtropical countries underscores an urgent need to develop effective prevention and control measures. Development of a Dengue vaccine, which is complicated by the Antibody Dependent Enhancement effect (ADE), a viral inhibitor, seems prudent as it would inhibit the spread of the virus. In vitro methods such as MTT assay and plaque formation unit reduction assays were employed for screening the viral inhibitory property of α-amino acid based Thiosemicarbazides. The results elicits that at concentrations not exceeding the maximum non cytotoxic concentration (MNCC), these compounds completely prevented Dengue virus infection in vero cells as indicated by the absence of cytopathic effects in a dose-dependent manner. The high potency of Bz-Trp-TSC against all four types of Dengue virus infection elevates Thiosemicarbazide as a lead antiviral agent for Dengue disease. Screening small molecules for antiviral activity against the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease is being explored by several research groups. Our findings would help to augment the efforts to identify the lead compounds for antiviral therapy to combat the Dengue disease. J. Med. Virol. 89:546-552, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. In vitro evaluation of the synergistic antiviral effects of acemannan in combination with azidothymidine and acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Kahlon, J B; Kemp, M C; Yawei, N; Carpenter, R H; Shannon, W M; McAnalley, B H

    1991-12-01

    The antiviral effects of selected combinations between acemannan (ACE-M), a long-chained, polydispersed, beta-(1,4)-acetylated mannan, were tested in combination with azidothymidine (AZT) and acyclovir (ACY) in vitro. The rationale for such combinations was based on the antiviral and immunomodulatory properties exhibited by ACE-M. In addition, the observed antiviral effects of ACE-M against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other enveloped viruses appear to be related to modification of the glycosylation of viral glycoproteins. Therefore, the inhibitory effect of ACE-M does not overlap with that of AZT or ACY. The studies presented herein show that ACE-M combined with suboptimal noncytotoxic concentrations of AZT or ACY act synergistically to inhibit the replication of HIV-1 and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), respectively. The median effect method was not applicable for analysis because the test compounds show mutually nonexclusive drug effects. For a meaningful evaluation and interpretation of the effects of drug combinations, the biological significance of combinations must be considered, that is, the protective effect of the combination, the noncytotoxicity of the combination, the mechanism(s) of action of the individual compounds comprising the combination, and so forth. With respect to effects on U1 cells latently infected with HIV-1, treatment with combinations of AZT and ACE-M does not potentiate virus replication.

  16. Update On Emerging Antivirals For The Management Of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections: A Patenting Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D.; Vadlapatla, Ramya K.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, some drugs are associated with dose-limiting toxicities which limit their further utility. Therefore, there is a need to develop new antiherpetic compounds with different mechanisms of action which will be safe and effective against emerging drug resistant viral isolates. Significant advances have been made towards the design and development of novel antiviral therapeutics during the last decade. As evident by their excellent antiviral activities, pharmaceutical companies are moving forward with several new compounds into various phases of clinical trials. This review provides an overview of structure and life cycle of HSV, progress in the development of new therapies, update on the advances in emerging therapeutics under clinical development and related recent patents for the treatment of Herpes simplex virus infections. PMID:23331181

  17. Update on emerging antivirals for the management of herpes simplex virus infections: a patenting perspective.

    PubMed

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D; Vadlapatla, Ramya K; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, some drugs are associated with dose-limiting toxicities which limit their further utility. Therefore, there is a need to develop new antiherpetic compounds with different mechanisms of action which will be safe and effective against emerging drug resistant viral isolates. Significant advances have been made towards the design and development of novel antiviral therapeutics during the last decade. As evident by their excellent antiviral activities, pharmaceutical companies are moving forward with several new compounds into various phases of clinical trials. This review provides an overview of structure and life cycle of HSV, progress in the development of new therapies, update on the advances in emerging therapeutics under clinical development and related recent patents for the treatment of Herpes simplex virus infections.

  18. Neuraminidase inhibition of Dietary chlorogenic acids and derivatives - potential antivirals from dietary sources.

    PubMed

    Gamaleldin Elsadig Karar, Mohamed; Matei, Marius-Febi; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Illenberger, Susanne; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    Plants rich in chlorogenic acids (CGAs), caffeic acids and their derivatives have been found to exert antiviral effects against influenza virus neuroaminidase. In this study several dietary naturally occurring chlorogenic acids, phenolic acids and derivatives were screened for their inhibitory activity against neuroaminidases (NAs) from C. perfringens, H5N1 and recombinant H5N1 (N-His)-Tag using a fluorometric assay. There was no significant difference in inhibition between the different NA enzymes. The enzyme inhibition results indicated that chlorogenic acids and selected derivatives, exhibited high activities against NAs. It seems that the catechol group from caffeic acid was important for the activity. Dietary CGA therefore show promise as potential antiviral agents. However, caffeoyl quinic acids show low bioavailibility and are intensly metabolized by the gut micro flora, only low nM concentrations are observed in plasma and urine, therefore a systemic antiviral effect of these compounds is unlikely. Nevertheless, gut floral metabolites with a catechol moiety or structurally related dietary phenolics with a catechol moiety might serve as interesting compounds for future investigations.

  19. HIV/HCV Antiviral Drug Interactions in the Era of Direct-acting Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Donald P.; Faragon, John J.; Banks, Sarah; Chirch, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and chronic hepatitis C has evolved over the past decade, resulting in better control of infection and clinical outcomes; however, drug-drug interactions remain a significant hazard. Joint recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Infectious Diseases Society of America regarding drug-drug interactions between HIV antiretroviral agents and direct-acting antiviral agents for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are reviewed here. This review is oriented to facilitate appropriate selection of an antiviral therapy regimen for HCV infection based on the choice of antiretroviral therapy being administered and, if necessary, switching antiretroviral regimens. PMID:27777891

  20. Chromosome Conformation Capture for Research on Innate Antiviral Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Jung; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology has revolutionized our knowledge on chromatin folding and nuclear organization. This cis-loop detection approach can be used to identify candidate regulatory elements interacting with target gene of interest. This chapter introduces the application of 3C technique to investigate a dynamic alteration in the chromosome folding structure or genomic architecture resulting from interaction changes between the enhancer and its target gene. Innate antiviral immunity is one of the well-known gene induction systems, involving rapid first-line response to virus or pathogen to trigger gene expression changes in order to protect cells and to limit further infection. Thus, the 3C technique can be a powerful tool for exploring how enhancers control expression of immunity genes during virus infection. 3C assay consists of four major steps: Cross-linking with formaldehyde, restriction enzyme digestion, ligation of cross-linked DNA fragments, and quantitative data analysis. Here, we discuss in detail the design, application, and data analysis of a 3C experiment.

  1. The Antimicrobial and Antiviral Applications of Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Pärn, Kalle; Eriste, Elo; Langel, Ülo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have become increasingly popular both in research and in application. There have been numerous studies on the physiochemical characteristics and behavior of CPPs in various environments; likewise, the mechanisms of entry and delivery capabilities of these peptides have also been extensively researched. Besides the fundamental issues, there is an enormous interest in the delivery capabilities of the peptides as the family of CPPs is a promising and mostly non-toxic delivery vector candidate for numerous medical applications such as gene silencing, transgene delivery, and splice correction. Lately, however, there has been an emerging field of study besides the high-profile gene therapy applications-the use of peptides and CPPs to combat various infections caused by harmful bacteria, fungi, and viruses.In this chapter, we aim to provide a short overview of the history and properties of CPPs which is followed by more thorough descriptions of antimicrobial and antiviral peptides. To achieve this, we analyze the origin of such peptides, give an overview of the mechanisms of action and discuss the various practical applications which are ongoing or have been suggested based on research.

  2. Liver-targeted antiviral peptide nanocomplexes as potential anti-HCV therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinjin; Garrison, Jered C.; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Osna, Natalia A.

    2015-01-01

    Great success in HCV therapy was achieved by the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAA). However, the unsolved issues such as high cost and genotype dependency drive us to pursue additional therapeutic agents to be used instead or in combination with DAA. The cationic peptide p41 is one of such candidates displaying submicromolar anti-HCV potency. By electrostatic coupling of p41 with anionic poly(amino acid)-based block copolymers, antiviral peptide nanocomplexes (APN) platform was developed to improve peptide stability and to reduce cytotoxicity associated with positive charge. Herein, we developed a facile method to prepare galactosylated Gal-APN and tested their feasibility as liver-specific delivery system. In vitro, Gal-APN displayed specific internalization in hepatoma cell lines. Even though liver-targeted and non-targeted APN displayed comparable antiviral activity, Gal-APN offered prominent advantages to prevent HCV association with lipid droplets and suppress intracellular expression of HCV proteins. Moreover, in vivo preferential liver accumulation of Gal-APN was revealed in the biodistribution study. Altogether, this work illustrates the potential of Gal-APN as a novel liver-targeted therapy against HCV. PMID:26298393

  3. Kaempferol derivatives as antiviral drugs against the 3a channel protein of coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Silvia; Sauter, Daniel; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Ronghua; Sun, Bing; Karioti, Anastasia; Bilia, Anna Rita; Efferth, Thomas; Schwarz, Wolfgang

    2014-02-01

    The protein coded by the open-reading-frame 3a of SARS coronavirus has been demonstrated to form a cation-selective channel that may become expressed in the infected cell. The activity of the channel is involved in the mechanism of virus release. Drugs that inhibit the ion channel can, therefore, inhibit virus release, and they could be a source for development of novel therapeutic antiviral agents. Various drugs found in Chinese herbs that are well known as anticancer agents also have an antiviral potency. Here we tested the flavonols kaempferol, kaempferol glycosides, and acylated kaempferol glucoside derivatives with respect to their potency to block the 3a channel. We used the Xenopus oocyte with a heterologously expressed 3a protein as a model system to test the efficacy of the flavonols. Some of these drugs turned out to be potent inhibitors of the 3a channel. The most effective one was the glycoside juglanin (carrying an arabinose residue) with an IC50 value of 2.3 µM for inhibition of the 3a-mediated current. Kaempferol derivatives with rhamnose residue also seem to be quite effective. We suggest that viral ion channels, in general, may be a good target for the development of antiviral agents, and that, in particular, kaempferol glycosides are good candidates for 3a channel proteins of coronaviruses. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. A recombinant, infectious human parainfluenza virus type 3 expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein for use in high-throughput antiviral assays

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Jason P.; Li, Joseph K.-K.; Smee, Donald F.; Morrey, John D.; Barnard, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to rescue an infectious, recombinant, negative-stranded, RNA virus from a cDNA clone, has led to new opportunities for measuring viral replication from a viral expressed reporter gene. In this study, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene was inserted into the human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV-3) antigenome and a recombinant, infectious virus was rescued. Maximum EGFP expression levels, measured by fluorescence, were seen at day 3. Comparison of a three-day, viral expressed EGFP fluorescence assay to a seven-day, neutral red assay, based on complete cell destruction in virus infected MA-104 cells, yielded Z′-factor values of 0.83 and 0.70, respectively. A three-day, endpoint EGFP-based antiviral assay and a seven-day, endpoint neutral red based antiviral assay were run in parallel to establish antiviral sensitivity profiles of 23 compounds based on selective index (SI) values. Using an SI threshold of 10, the EGFP-based antiviral assay had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 54%. Thus, the use of an EGFP-based antiviral assay for testing potential antiviral compounds against HPIV-3 in a high-throughput format may be justified. PMID:19189850

  5. Antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Calvin Q; Lee, Hannah M

    2013-05-01

    The management of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) during pregnancy remains a challenge and involves various aspects of maternal-fetal care. Despite the standard immunoprophylaxis, a significant portion of infants born to highly viremic mothers remain infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Emerging data suggest that antiviral therapy in the third trimester can prevent immunoprophylaxis failure. To minimize fetal exposure to antiviral agents, antiviral therapy during pregnancy should be reserved for mothers with advanced disease or who are at risk for hepatic decompensation. Current safety data suggest that lamivudine, telbivudine, or tenofovir may be used during pregnancy. However, the timing in initiating antiviral therapy requires careful assessment of risks and benefit. The authors provide a systematic review of the features of HBV during pregnancy, risk factors for vertical transmission, and evidence-based data on antiviral use during pregnancy. They propose an algorithm to assess the need of antiviral treatment and monitor mothers with CHB.

  6. Potent in vitro antiviral activity of Cistus incanus extract against HIV and Filoviruses targets viral envelope proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rebensburg, Stephanie; Helfer, Markus; Schneider, Martha; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Eberle, Josef; Schindler, Michael; Gürtler, Lutz; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Novel therapeutic options are urgently needed to improve global treatment of virus infections. Herbal products with confirmed clinical safety features are attractive starting material for the identification of new antiviral activities. Here we demonstrate that Cistus incanus (Ci) herbal products inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in vitro. Ci extract inhibited clinical HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates, and, importantly, a virus isolate with multiple drug resistances, confirming broad anti-HIV activity. Antiviral activity was highly selective for virus particles, preventing primary attachment of the virus to the cell surface and viral envelope proteins from binding to heparin. Bioassay-guided fractionation indicated that Ci extract contains numerous antiviral compounds and therefore has favorably low propensity to induce virus resistance. Indeed, no resistant viruses emerged during 24 weeks of continuous propagation of the virus in the presence of Ci extracts. Finally, Ci extracts also inhibited infection by virus particles pseudotyped with Ebola and Marburg virus envelope proteins, indicating that antiviral activity of Ci extract extends to emerging viral pathogens. These results demonstrate that Ci extracts show potent and broad in vitro antiviral activity against viruses that cause life-threatening diseases in humans and are promising sources of agents that target virus particles. PMID:26833261

  7. Autophagy is involved in anti-viral activity of pentagalloylglucose (PGG) against Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Ying; Chen, Zhen-Ping; Ju, Huai-Qiang; Komatsu, Masaaki; Ji, Yu-hua; Liu, Ge; Guo, Chao-wan; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Yang, Chong-Ren; Wang, Yi-Fei; Kitazato, Kaio

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} We showed PGG has anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and can induce autophgy. {yields} Autophagy may be a novel and important mechanism mediating PGG anti-viral activities. {yields} Inhibition of mTOR pathway is an important mechanism of induction of autophagy by PGG. -- Abstract: Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with broad-spectrum anti-viral activity, however, the mechanisms underlying anti-viral activity remain undefined. In this study, we investigated the effects of PGG on anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) associated with autophagy. We found that the PGG anti-HSV-1 activity was impaired significantly in MEF-atg7{sup -/-} cells (autophagy-defective cells) derived from an atg7{sup -/-} knockout mouse. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that PGG-induced autophagosomes engulfed HSV-1 virions. The mTOR signaling pathway, an essential pathway for the regulation of autophagy, was found to be suppressed following PGG treatment. Data presented in this report demonstrated for the first time that autophagy induced following PGG treatment contributed to its anti-HSV activity in vitro.

  8. Potent in vitro antiviral activity of Cistus incanus extract against HIV and Filoviruses targets viral envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Rebensburg, Stephanie; Helfer, Markus; Schneider, Martha; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Eberle, Josef; Schindler, Michael; Gürtler, Lutz; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2016-02-02

    Novel therapeutic options are urgently needed to improve global treatment of virus infections. Herbal products with confirmed clinical safety features are attractive starting material for the identification of new antiviral activities. Here we demonstrate that Cistus incanus (Ci) herbal products inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in vitro. Ci extract inhibited clinical HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates, and, importantly, a virus isolate with multiple drug resistances, confirming broad anti-HIV activity. Antiviral activity was highly selective for virus particles, preventing primary attachment of the virus to the cell surface and viral envelope proteins from binding to heparin. Bioassay-guided fractionation indicated that Ci extract contains numerous antiviral compounds and therefore has favorably low propensity to induce virus resistance. Indeed, no resistant viruses emerged during 24 weeks of continuous propagation of the virus in the presence of Ci extracts. Finally, Ci extracts also inhibited infection by virus particles pseudotyped with Ebola and Marburg virus envelope proteins, indicating that antiviral activity of Ci extract extends to emerging viral pathogens. These results demonstrate that Ci extracts show potent and broad in vitro antiviral activity against viruses that cause life-threatening diseases in humans and are promising sources of agents that target virus particles.

  9. Antimicrobial, antiviral and antioxidant activities of "água-mel" from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Maria G; Faleiro, Leonor; Antunes, Maria D; Aazza, Smail; Duarte, Joana; Silvério, Ana R

    2013-06-01

    "Água-mel" is a honey-based product produced in Portugal for ancient times. Several attributes have been reported to "água-mel" particularly in the alleviation of simple symptoms of upper respiratory tract. Samples of "água-mel" from diverse beekeepers from different regions of Portugal were studied in what concerns antimicrobial, antioxidant and antiviral properties. The amounts of phenol and brown pigment were also evaluated and correlated with the antioxidant activities. A great variability on the levels of these compounds was found among samples which were responsible for the variability detected also on the antioxidant activities, independent on the method used. Generally, antioxidant activity correlated better with brown pigments' amount than with phenols' content. The antimicrobial activity found for "água-mel" samples confirm the virtues reported by popular findings. In addition, this work also reveals the antiviral properties of "água-mel" evidenced by a decrease on the infectivity of the Qβ bacteriophage.

  10. Anti-Viral Evaluation of Sesquiterpene Coumarins from Ferula assa-foetida against HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Ghannadi, Alireza; Fattahian, Khadijeh; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Behbahani, Mandana; Shahnoush, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Several complications attributed with Herpes virus related infections and the emergence of drug resistant viruses prompt scientists to search for new drugs. Several terpenoids and coumarins have shown anti HSV effects while no sesquiterpene coumarins have been previously tested for HSV treatment. Three sesquiterpene coumarins badrakemin acetate (1), kellerin (2) and samarcandin diastereomer (3) were isolated from the gum resin of Ferula assa-foetida, a herbal medicine with antimicrobial, antiprotozoal and antiviral effects. Compounds were identified by 1D and 2D- NMR spectroscopies and comparison with literature data. A comparative evaluation of cytotoxicity and antiviral activity showed that kellerin (2) could significantly inhibit the cytopathic effects and reduce the viral titre of the herpes virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA viral strain KOS at concentrations of 10, 5 and 2.5 µg/mL.

  11. Anti-Viral Evaluation of Sesquiterpene Coumarins from Ferula assa-foetida against HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Ghannadi, Alireza; Fattahian, Khadijeh; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Behbahani, Mandana; Shahnoush, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Several complications attributed with Herpes virus related infections and the emergence of drug resistant viruses prompt scientists to search for new drugs. Several terpenoids and coumarins have shown anti HSV effects while no sesquiterpene coumarins have been previously tested for HSV treatment. Three sesquiterpene coumarins badrakemin acetate (1), kellerin (2) and samarcandin diastereomer (3) were isolated from the gum resin of Ferula assa-foetida, a herbal medicine with antimicrobial, antiprotozoal and antiviral effects. Compounds were identified by 1D and 2D- NMR spectroscopies and comparison with literature data. A comparative evaluation of cytotoxicity and antiviral activity showed that kellerin (2) could significantly inhibit the cytopathic effects and reduce the viral titre of the herpes virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA viral strain KOS at concentrations of 10, 5 and 2.5 µg/mL. PMID:25237347

  12. An Image-Based Genetic Assay Identifies Genes in T1D Susceptibility Loci Controlling Cellular Antiviral Immunity in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Juan; Jijon, Humberto B.; Kim, Ira R.; Goel, Gautam; Doan, Aivi; Sokol, Harry; Bauer, Hermann; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Lassen, Kara G.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of complex diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D), derives from interactions between host genetics and environmental factors. Previous studies have suggested that viral infection plays a significant role in initiation of T1D in genetically predisposed individuals. T1D susceptibility loci may therefore be enriched in previously uncharacterized genes functioning in antiviral defense pathways. To identify genes involved in antiviral immunity, we performed an image-based high-throughput genetic screen using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against 161 genes within T1D susceptibility loci. RAW 264.7 cells transduced with shRNAs were infected with GFP-expressing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and fluorescent microscopy was performed to assess the viral infectivity by fluorescence reporter activity. Of the 14 candidates identified with high confidence, two candidates were selected for further investigation, Il27 and Tagap. Administration of recombinant IL-27 during viral infection was found to act synergistically with interferon gamma (IFN-γ) to activate expression of type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines, and to enhance the activities of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Consistent with a role in antiviral immunity, Tagap-deficient macrophages demonstrated increased viral replication, reduced expression of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and decreased production of IFN-β. Taken together, our unbiased loss-of-function genetic screen identifies genes that play a role in host antiviral immunity and delineates roles for IL-27 and Tagap in the production of antiviral cytokines. PMID:25268627

  13. Contribution of Toll-like receptors to the control of hepatitis B virus infection by initiating antiviral innate responses and promoting specific adaptive immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ejuan; Yang, Dongliang; Lu, Mengji

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that adaptive immunity plays a key role in the control of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In contrast, the contribution of innate immunity has only received attention in recent years. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) sense pathogen-associated molecule patterns and activate antiviral mechanisms, including intracellular antiviral pathways and the production of antiviral effector interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Experimental results from in vitro and in vivo models have demonstrated that TLRs mediate the activation of cellular signaling pathways and the production of antiviral cytokines, resulting in a suppression of HBV replication. However, HBV infection is associated with downregulation of TLR expression on host cells and blockade of the activation of downstream signaling pathways. In primary HBV infection, TLRs may slow down HBV infection, but contribute only indirectly to viral clearance. Importantly, TLRs may modulate HBV-specific T- and B-cell responses in vivo, which are essential for the termination of HBV infection. Thus, TLR agonists are promising candidates to act as immunomodulators for the treatment of chronic HBV infection. Antiviral treatment may recover TLR expression and function in chronic HBV infection and may increase the efficacy of therapeutic approaches based on TLR activation. A combined therapeutic strategy with antiviral treatment and TLR activation could facilitate the restoration of HBV-specific immune responses and thereby, achieve viral clearance in chronically infected HBV patients. PMID:25418467

  14. Mouse lung slices: An ex vivo model for the evaluation of antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; An, Liwei; Liu, Ge; Li, Xiaoyu; Tang, Wei; Chen, Xulin

    2015-08-01

    The influenza A virus is notoriously known for its ability to cause recurrent epidemics and global pandemics. Antiviral therapy is effective when treatment is initiated within 48h of symptom onset, and delaying treatment beyond this time frame is associated with decreased efficacy. Research on anti-inflammatory therapy to ameliorate influenza-induced inflammation is currently underway and seems important to the impact on the clinical outcome. Both antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently needed. Current methods for evaluating the efficacy of anti-influenza drugs rely mostly on transformed cells and animals. Transformed cell models are distantly related to physiological and pathological conditions. Although animals are the best choices for preclinical drug testing, they are not time- or cost-efficient. In this study, we established an ex vivo model using mouse lung slices to evaluate both antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza virus infection. Both influenza virus PR8 (H1N1) and A/Human/Hubei/3/2005 (H3N2) can replicate efficiently in mouse lung slices and trigger significant cytokine and chemokine responses. The induction of selected cytokines and chemokines were found to have a positive correlation between ex vivo and in vivo experiments, suggesting that the ex vivo cultured lung slices may closely resemble the lung functionally in an in vivo configuration when challenged by influenza virus. Furthermore, a set of agents with known antiviral and/or anti-inflammatory activities were tested to validate the ex vivo model. Our results suggested that mouse lung slices provide a robust, convenient and cost-efficient model for the assessment of both antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents against influenza virus infection in one assay. This ex vivo model may predict the efficacy of drug candidates' antiviral and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo.

  15. NICTABA and UDA, two GlcNAc-binding lectins with unique antiviral activity profiles.

    PubMed

    Gordts, Stephanie C; Renders, Marleen; Férir, Geoffrey; Huskens, Dana; Van Damme, Els J M; Peumans, Willy; Balzarini, Jan; Schols, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the antiviral properties of a unique lectin (NICTABA) produced by the tobacco plant, Nicotiana tabacum. Cellular assays were used to investigate the antiviral activity of NICTABA and Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies were performed to study the sugar specificity and the interactions of both lectins with the envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1. The N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc)-binding lectins exhibited broad-spectrum activity against several families of enveloped viruses including influenza A/B, Dengue virus type 2, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and HIV-1/2. The IC50 of NICTABA for various HIV-1 strains, clinical isolates and HIV-2 assessed in PBMCs ranged from 5 to 30 nM. Furthermore, NICTABA inhibited syncytium formation between persistently HIV-1-infected T cells and uninfected CD4+ T lymphocytes and prevented DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ target T lymphocytes. However, unlike many other antiviral carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) described so far, NICTABA did not block HIV-1 capture to DC-SIGN+ cells and it did not interfere with the binding of the human monoclonal antibody 2G12 to gp120. SPR studies with HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins showed that the affinity of NICTABA for gp120 and gp41 was in the low nanomolar range. The specific binding of NICTABA to gp120 could be prevented in the presence of a GlcNAc trimer, but not in the presence of mannose trimers. NICTABA displayed no antiviral activity against non-enveloped viruses. Since CBAs possess a high genetic barrier for the development of viral resistance and NICTABA shows a broad antiviral activity profile, this CBA may qualify as a potential antiviral candidate with a pleiotropic mode of action aimed at targeting the entry of enveloped viruses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Ester prodrugs of acyclic nucleoside thiophosphonates compared to phosphonates: synthesis, antiviral activity and decomposition study.

    PubMed

    Roux, Loïc; Priet, Stéphane; Payrot, Nadine; Weck, Clément; Fournier, Maëlenn; Zoulim, Fabien; Balzarini, Jan; Canard, Bruno; Alvarez, Karine

    2013-05-01

    9-[2-(Thiophosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine [S-PMEA, 8] and (R)-9-[2-(Thiophosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine [S-PMPA, 9] are acyclic nucleoside thiophosphonates we described recently that display the same antiviral spectrum (DNA viruses) as approved and potent phosphonates PMEA and (R)-PMPA. Here, we describe the synthesis, antiviral activities in infected cell cultures and decomposition study of bis(pivaloyloxymethoxy)-S-PMEA [Bis-POM-S-PMEA, 13] and bis(isopropyloxymethylcarbonyl)-S-PMPA [Bis-POC-S-PMPA, 14] as orally bioavailable prodrugs of the S-PMEA 8 and S-PMPA 9, in comparison to the equivalent "non-thio" derivatives [Bis-POM-PMEA, 11] and [Bis-POC-PMPA, 12]. Compounds 11, 12, 13 and 14 were evaluated for their in vitro antiviral activity against HIV-1-, HIV-2-, HBV- and a broad panel of DNA viruses, and found to exhibit moderate to potent antiviral activity. In order to determine the decomposition pathway of the prodrugs 11, 12, 13 and 14 into parent compounds PMEA, PMPA, 8 and 9, kinetic data and decomposition pathways in several media are presented. As expected, bis-POM-S-PMEA 13 and bis-POC-S-PMPA 14 behaved as prodrugs of S-PMEA 8 and S-PMPA 9. However, thiophosphonates 8 and 9 were released very smoothly in cell extracts, in contrast to the release of PMEA and PMPA from "non-thio" prodrugs 11 and 12. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Timing of Antiviral Therapy in Candidates for Liver Transplant for Hepatitis C and Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saab, Sammy; Jimenez, Melissa; Fong, Tiffany; Wu, Crystal; El Kabany, Mohamed; Tong, Myron J

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection is the most common underlying reason for hepatocellular carcinoma and indication for liver transplant. The increased availability of non-interferon-based therapy has expanded the number of treatment-eligible patients. We used a decision analysis model to compare 2 strategies of treating hepatitis C virus. Included patients were followed for 1 year after liver transplant. The probabilities and costs were obtained from a literature review, an expert panel, and our institution's experience. Sensitivity analyses were performed on all variables. Our model demonstrated that it would be less costly to treat patients after liver transplant than to treat patients while they wait for transplant. When we compared baseline values, the cost difference between the 2 strategies was $25,011 per patient and $41,535 per sustained viral response. Overall survival was 60.1% for both strategies. Our model was robust across most of the variables tested in the sensitivity analysis. Our results indicated that there is no substantial pharmacoeconomic or survival advantage of treating hepatitis C virus in patients with compensated cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma before liver transplant versus after transplant.

  18. Antiviral treatment of Argentine hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Enria, D A; Maiztegui, J I

    1994-01-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever is a systemic viral disease caused by Junin virus, with a mortality of 15-30% in untreated individuals. Current specific therapy is highly effective in reducing mortality, and consists of the early administration of immune plasma in defined doses of specific neutralizing antibodies per kg of body weight. However, several reasons suggest the need to investigate alternative therapies. Ribavirin, a broad spectrum antiviral agent, is effective in the treatment of other viral hemorrhagic fevers, and the studies done with Junin virus infections to date indicate that this drug may also have a beneficial effect in Argentine hemorrhagic fever.

  19. AN ANTIVIRAL SUBSTANCE FROM PENICILLIUM FUNICULOSUM

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1966-01-01

    Helenine, NDV, and statolon, all known inducers of interferon in mice, all exerted a marked antiviral effect against Semliki Forest virus. This AV effect was, so far as can be demonstrated, mediated through, the induced interferon. The same three materials also exerted a marked antipassive immunity effect. All the evidence that can be brought to bear indicates that this API effect like the AV effect is mediated through interferon known to be induced by the three materials. If the API effect does indeed have interferon as its basis, this represents a new and totally unsuspected action of interferon. PMID:5926302

  20. Anopheles gambiae Antiviral Immune Response to Systemic O'nyong-nyong Infection

    PubMed Central

    Waldock, Joanna; Olson, Kenneth E.; Christophides, George K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mosquito-borne viral diseases cause significant burden in much of the developing world. Although host-virus interactions have been studied extensively in the vertebrate host, little is known about mosquito responses to viral infection. In contrast to mosquitoes of the Aedes and Culex genera, Anopheles gambiae, the principal vector of human malaria, naturally transmits very few arboviruses, the most important of which is O'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV). Here we have investigated the A. gambiae immune response to systemic ONNV infection using forward and reverse genetic approaches. Methodology/Principal Findings We have used DNA microarrays to profile the transcriptional response of A. gambiae inoculated with ONNV and investigate the antiviral function of candidate genes through RNAi gene silencing assays. Our results demonstrate that A. gambiae responses to systemic viral infection involve genes covering all aspects of innate immunity including pathogen recognition, modulation of immune signalling, complement-mediated lysis/opsonisation and other immune effector mechanisms. Patterns of transcriptional regulation and co-infections of A. gambiae with ONNV and the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei suggest that hemolymph immune responses to viral infection are diverted away from melanisation. We show that four viral responsive genes encoding two putative recognition receptors, a galectin and an MD2-like receptor, and two effector lysozymes, function in limiting viral load. Conclusions/Significance This study is the first step in elucidating the antiviral mechanisms of A. gambiae mosquitoes, and has revealed interesting differences between A. gambiae and other invertebrates. Our data suggest that mechanisms employed by A. gambiae are distinct from described invertebrate antiviral immunity to date, and involve the complement-like branch of the humoral immune response, supressing the melanisation response that is prominent in anti-parasitic immunity. The

  1. Synthesis, cytotoxicity and antiviral evaluation of new series of imidazo[4,5-g]quinoline and pyrido[2,3-g]quinoxalinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Briguglio, Irene; Loddo, Roberta; Laurini, Erik; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Piras, Sandra; Corona, Paola; Giunchedi, Paolo; Gavini, Elisabetta; Sanna, Giuseppina; Giliberti, Gabriele; Ibba, Cristina; Farci, Pamela; La Colla, Paolo; Pricl, Sabrina; Carta, Antonio

    2015-11-13

    Linear aromatic N-tricyclic compounds with promising antiviral activity and minimal cytotoxicity were prepared and analyzed in the last years. Specifically, the pyrido[2,3-g]quinoxalinone nucleus was found endowed with high potency against several pathogenic RNA viruses as etiological agents of important veterinary and human pathologies. Following our research program on new antiviral agents we have designed, synthesized and assayed new series of imidazo[4,5-g]quinoline and pyrido[2,3-g]quinoxalinone derivatives. Lead compounds 1-4 were further modified to enhance their antiviral activity and reduce their cytotoxicity. Thus, different substituents were introduced on N atom at position 1 or the O atom at position 2 of the leads; contextually, several groups were inserted on the nitrogen atom at position 7 of diaminoquinoline intermediates. Title compounds were tested in cell-based assays for cytotoxicity and antiviral activity against RNA virus families containing single-stranded (either positive-sense (ssRNA+) or negative-sense (ssRNA-)), and double-stranded genomes (dsRNA), and against two representatives of DNA virus families. Some derivatives emerged as potential leads for further development as antiviral agents against some viruses of public health significance, such as RSV, Reo, BVDV and HCV. Particularly, compounds 4, 11b, 11c, 13c, 15a, 18 and 21 resulted active against BVDV at concentrations ranging from 1.3 to 5 μM. Compound 21 was also evaluated for its activity on the BVDV RdRp. Compound 4 was also tested as potential anti-HCV compound in a subgenomic replication assay. Molecular simulation results provided a molecular rationale for the anti-BVDV activity of these compounds.

  2. Candidate CDTI procedures study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ace, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A concept with potential for increasing airspace capacity by involving the pilot in the separation control loop is discussed. Some candidate options are presented. Both enroute and terminal area procedures are considered and, in many cases, a technologically advanced Air Traffic Control structure is assumed. Minimum display characteristics recommended for each of the described procedures are presented. Recommended sequencing of the operational testing of each of the candidate procedures is presented.

  3. Inflammatory monocytes hinder antiviral B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Kuka, Mirela; Di Lucia, Pietro; de Oya, Nereida Jimenez; De Giovanni, Marco; Fioravanti, Jessica; Cristofani, Claudia; Maganuco, Carmela G.; Fallet, Benedict; Ganzer, Lucia; Sironi, Laura; Mainetti, Marta; Ostuni, Renato; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Philip D.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Guidotti, Luca G.; Iannacone, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are critical for protection against viral infections. However, several viruses, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), avoid the induction of early protective antibody responses by poorly understood mechanisms. Here we analyzed the spatiotemporal dynamics of B cell activation to show that, upon subcutaneous infection, LCMV-specific B cells readily relocate to the interfollicular and T cell areas of the draining lymph node where they extensively interact with CD11b+Ly6Chi inflammatory monocytes. These myeloid cells were recruited to lymph nodes draining LCMV infection sites in a type I interferon-, CCR2-dependent fashion and they suppressed antiviral B cell responses by virtue of their ability to produce nitric oxide. Depletion of inflammatory monocytes, inhibition of their lymph node recruitment or impairment of their nitric oxide-producing ability enhanced LCMV-specific B cell survival and led to robust neutralizing antibody production. In conclusion, our results identify inflammatory monocytes as critical gatekeepers that prevent antiviral B cell responses and suggest that certain viruses take advantage of these cells to prolong their persistence within the host. PMID:27868108

  4. Cell senescence is an antiviral defense mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Baz-Martínez, Maite; Da Silva-Álvarez, Sabela; Rodríguez, Estefanía; Guerra, Jorge; El Motiam, Ahmed; Vidal, Anxo; García-Caballero, Tomás; González-Barcia, Miguel; Sánchez, Laura; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Collado, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is often considered a protection mechanism triggered by conditions that impose cellular stress. Continuous proliferation, DNA damaging agents or activated oncogenes are well-known activators of cell senescence. Apart from a characteristic stable cell cycle arrest, this response also involves a proinflammatory phenotype known as senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). This, together with the widely known interference with senescence pathways by some oncoviruses, had led to the hypothesis that senescence may also be part of the host cell response to fight virus. Here, we evaluate this hypothesis using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a model. Our results show that VSV replication is significantly impaired in both primary and tumor senescent cells in comparison with non-senescent cells, and independently of the stimulus used to trigger senescence. Importantly, we also demonstrate a protective effect of senescence against VSV in vivo. Finally, our results identify the SASP as the major contributor to the antiviral defense exerted by cell senescence in vitro, and points to a role activating and recruiting the immune system to clear out the infection. Thus, our study indicates that cell senescence has also a role as a natural antiviral defense mechanism. PMID:27849057

  5. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of IFNs have been genetically characterized in most avian species with available annotated genomes. Intriguingly, chickens are capable of mounting potent innate immune responses upon various stimuli in the absence of essential components of IFN pathways including retinoic acid-inducible gene I, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and possibility IRF9. Understanding these unique properties of the chicken IFN system would propose valuable targets for the development of potential therapeutics for a broader range of viruses of both veterinary and zoonotic importance. This review outlines recent developments in the roles of avian IFNs and ISGs against viruses and highlights important areas of research toward our understanding of the antiviral functions of IFN effectors against viral infections in birds. PMID:28197148

  6. Cell senescence is an antiviral defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Baz-Martínez, Maite; Da Silva-Álvarez, Sabela; Rodríguez, Estefanía; Guerra, Jorge; El Motiam, Ahmed; Vidal, Anxo; García-Caballero, Tomás; González-Barcia, Miguel; Sánchez, Laura; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Collado, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen

    2016-11-16

    Cellular senescence is often considered a protection mechanism triggered by conditions that impose cellular stress. Continuous proliferation, DNA damaging agents or activated oncogenes are well-known activators of cell senescence. Apart from a characteristic stable cell cycle arrest, this response also involves a proinflammatory phenotype known as senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). This, together with the widely known interference with senescence pathways by some oncoviruses, had led to the hypothesis that senescence may also be part of the host cell response to fight virus. Here, we evaluate this hypothesis using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a model. Our results show that VSV replication is significantly impaired in both primary and tumor senescent cells in comparison with non-senescent cells, and independently of the stimulus used to trigger senescence. Importantly, we also demonstrate a protective effect of senescence against VSV in vivo. Finally, our results identify the SASP as the major contributor to the antiviral defense exerted by cell senescence in vitro, and points to a role activating and recruiting the immune system to clear out the infection. Thus, our study indicates that cell senescence has also a role as a natural antiviral defense mechanism.

  7. Antiviral Defenses in Plants through Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Romay, Gustavo; Bragard, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Plant–virus interactions based-studies have contributed to increase our understanding on plant resistance mechanisms, providing new tools for crop improvement. In the last two decades, RNA interference, a post-transcriptional gene silencing approach, has been used to induce antiviral defenses in plants with the help of genetic engineering technologies. More recently, the new genome editing systems (GES) are revolutionizing the scope of tools available to confer virus resistance in plants. The most explored GES are zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 endonuclease. GES are engineered to target and introduce mutations, which can be deleterious, via double-strand breaks at specific DNA sequences by the error-prone non-homologous recombination end-joining pathway. Although GES have been engineered to target DNA, recent discoveries of GES targeting ssRNA molecules, including virus genomes, pave the way for further studies programming plant defense against RNA viruses. Most of plant virus species have an RNA genome and at least 784 species have positive ssRNA. Here, we provide a summary of the latest progress in plant antiviral defenses mediated by GES. In addition, we also discuss briefly the GES perspectives in light of the rebooted debate on genetic modified organisms (GMOs) and the current regulatory frame for agricultural products involving the use of such engineering technologies. PMID:28167937

  8. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of IFNs have been genetically characterized in most avian species with available annotated genomes. Intriguingly, chickens are capable of mounting potent innate immune responses upon various stimuli in the absence of essential components of IFN pathways including retinoic acid-inducible gene I, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and possibility IRF9. Understanding these unique properties of the chicken IFN system would propose valuable targets for the development of potential therapeutics for a broader range of viruses of both veterinary and zoonotic importance. This review outlines recent developments in the roles of avian IFNs and ISGs against viruses and highlights important areas of research toward our understanding of the antiviral functions of IFN effectors against viral infections in birds.

  9. In vitro antiviral activity of red alga, Polysiphonia morrowii extract and its bromophenols against fish pathogenic infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Yeun; Kim, Seok Ryel; Oh, Myung-Joo; Jung, Sung-Ju; Kang, So Young

    2011-02-01

    Our previous investigation revealed that 80% methanolic extract of the red alga Polysiphonia morrowii has significant antiviral activities against fish pathogenic viruses, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). The present study was conducted to identify compounds attributed for its antiviral activities and investigate their antiviral activities against IHNV and IPNV. Activity-guided fractionation for 80% methanolic extract of Polysiphonia morrowii using a cell-based assay measuring virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) on cells yielded a 90% methanolic fraction, which showed the highest antiviral activity against both viruses among fractions yielded from the extract. From the fraction, two bromophenols were isolated and identified as 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl methyl ether (1) and 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (2) based on spectroscopic analyses. For both compounds, the concentrations to inhibit 50% of flounder spleen cell (FSP cell) proliferation (CC(50)) and each viral replication (EC(50)) were measured. In the pretreatment test, 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl methyl ether (1) and 3-bromo-4,5-dihy-droxybenzaldehyde (2) exhibited significant antiviral activities showing selective index values (SI = CC(50)/EC(50)) of 20 to 42 against both IHNV and IPNV. In direct virucidal test, 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl methyl ether (1) showed significant antiviral activités against both viruses while 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (2) was significantly effective against only IHNV. Although antiviral efficacies of both compounds against IHNV and IPNV were lower than those of ribavirin used as a positive control, our findings suggested that the red alga Polysiphonia morrowii and isolated two bromophenols may have potential as a therapeutic agent against fish viral diseases.

  10. Marine bacterial sources of bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Jaiganesh, R; Sampath Kumar, N S

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of novel compounds have been isolated from various marine bacteria and tested for pharmacological properties, many of which are commercially available. Many more are being tested as potential bioactive compound at the preclinical and clinical stages. The growing interest in marine-derived antiviral compounds, along with the development of new technology in marine cultures and extraction, will significantly expedite the current exploration of the marine environment for compounds with significant pharmacological applications, which will continue to be a promising strategy and new trend for modern medicine. Marine actinomycetes and cyanobacteria are a prolific but underexploited source for the discovery of novel secondary metabolites.

  11. Antimicrobial Action of Compounds from Marine Seaweed.

    PubMed

    Pérez, María José; Falqué, Elena; Domínguez, Herminia

    2016-03-09

    Seaweed produces metabolites aiding in the protection against different environmental stresses. These compounds show antiviral, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and antibacterial properties. Macroalgae can be cultured in high volumes and would represent an attractive source of potential compounds useful for unconventional drugs able to control new diseases or multiresistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms. The substances isolated from green, brown and red algae showing potent antimicrobial activity belong to polysaccharides, fatty acids, phlorotannins, pigments, lectins, alkaloids, terpenoids and halogenated compounds. This review presents the major compounds found in macroalga showing antimicrobial activities and their most promising applications.

  12. Antimicrobial Action of Compounds from Marine Seaweed

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, María José; Falqué, Elena; Domínguez, Herminia

    2016-01-01

    Seaweed produces metabolites aiding in the protection against different environmental stresses. These compounds show antiviral, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and antibacterial properties. Macroalgae can be cultured in high volumes and would represent an attractive source of potential compounds useful for unconventional drugs able to control new diseases or multiresistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms. The substances isolated from green, brown and red algae showing potent antimicrobial activity belong to polysaccharides, fatty acids, phlorotannins, pigments, lectins, alkaloids, terpenoids and halogenated compounds. This review presents the major compounds found in macroalga showing antimicrobial activities and their most promising applications. PMID:27005637

  13. Determining anti-betanodavirus compounds through a GF-1 cell-based screening platform.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Cheng; Han, Yu-San

    2014-05-01

    Betanodavirus is a highly contagious pathogen, responsible for severe losses incurred in the aquaculture industry. Currently, there are no commercially available antivirals against the virulence observed during very early stages of fish larvae development. Therefore, we developed a novel GF-1 (grouper fin cell) cell viability-based screening assay to facilitate the discovery of an anti-betanodavirus agent. The assay conditions were optimized and the robustness of the assay was confirmed by a Z' factor value ranging from 0.7 to 0.94. After screening a library of 2000 small molecule compounds, 43 compounds with a virus inhibition capacity of ⩾55% were identified. A cytochrome P450 inhibitor, proadifen hydrochloride, was validated with an EC50 value of 6.48μM and a CC50 value of 20.63μM. This compound inhibited the amplification of viral RNA by 99.68% 5days post-infection. Surprisingly, we found that 18 of 43 compounds act as neurotransmitter agents. These findings indicate a novel way of investigating the infection mechanism of betanodavirus, and suggest potential candidates for an anti-betanodavirus drug. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. D and E rings may not be indispensable for antofine: discovery of phenanthrene and alkylamine chain containing antofine derivatives as novel antiviral agents against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) based on interaction of antofine and TMV RNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziwen; Wei, Peng; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Qingmin

    2014-10-29

    On the basis of the interaction of antofine and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA, a series of phenanthrene and alkylamine chain containing antofine derivatives 1-41 were designed, synthesized, and systematically evaluated for their antiviral activity against TMV. The results showed that most of these compounds exhibited good to excellent anti-TMV activity, which indicated that the D and E rings of antofine may not be indispensable. Phenanthrene is important for these compounds, but not the more the better. Phenanthrene, benzene rings, and alkylamine chain containing compounds exhibited good antiviral activity. The optimum compounds, 10, 18, and 19, displayed higher activity than precursor antofine and commercial ribavirin, thus emerging as new lead compounds. The novel concise structure provides another new template for antiviral studies.

  15. Antiviral treatment among pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F; Murphy, Trudy V

    2014-01-01

    To describe the antiviral treatment patterns for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) among pregnant and nonpregnant women. Using 2011 MarketScan claims, we calculated the rates of antiviral treatment among women (aged 10-50 years) with CHB. We described the pattern of antiviral treatment during pregnancy and ≥1 month after delivery. We identified 6274 women with CHB during 2011. Among these, 64 of 507 (12.6%) pregnant women and 1151 of 5767 (20.0%) nonpregnant women received antiviral treatment (P < 0.01). Pregnant women were most commonly prescribed tenofovir (73.4%) and lamivudine (21.9%); nonpregnant women were most commonly prescribed tenofovir (50.2%) and entecavir (41.3%) (P < 0.01). Among 48 treated pregnant women with an identifiable delivery date, 16 (33.3%) were prescribed an antiviral before pregnancy and continued treatment for at least one month after delivery; 14 (29.2%) started treatment during the third trimester and continued at least one month after delivery. Among this insured population, pregnant women with CHB received an antiviral significantly less often than nonpregnant women. The most common antiviral prescribed for pregnant women was tenofovir. These data provide a baseline for assessing changes in treatment patterns with anticipated increased use of antivirals to prevent breakthrough perinatal hepatitis B virus infection.

  16. Antiviral Treatment among Pregnant Women with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F.; Murphy, Trudy V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the antiviral treatment patterns for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) among pregnant and nonpregnant women. Methods. Using 2011 MarketScan claims, we calculated the rates of antiviral treatment among women (aged 10–50 years) with CHB. We described the pattern of antiviral treatment during pregnancy and ≥1 month after delivery. Results. We identified 6274 women with CHB during 2011. Among these, 64 of 507 (12.6%) pregnant women and 1151 of 5767 (20.0%) nonpregnant women received antiviral treatment (P < 0.01). Pregnant women were most commonly prescribed tenofovir (73.4%) and lamivudine (21.9%); nonpregnant women were most commonly prescribed tenofovir (50.2%) and entecavir (41.3%) (P < 0.01). Among 48 treated pregnant women with an identifiable delivery date, 16 (33.3%) were prescribed an antiviral before pregnancy and continued treatment for at least one month after delivery; 14 (29.2%) started treatment during the third trimester and continued at least one month after delivery. Conclusion. Among this insured population, pregnant women with CHB received an antiviral significantly less often than nonpregnant women. The most common antiviral prescribed for pregnant women was tenofovir. These data provide a baseline for assessing changes in treatment patterns with anticipated increased use of antivirals to prevent breakthrough perinatal hepatitis B virus infection. PMID:25548510

  17. The Antiviral Activities and Mechanisms of Marine Polysaccharides: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shi-Xin; Guan, Hua-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the studies on the antiviral activities of marine natural products, especially marine polysaccharides, are attracting more and more attention all over the world. Marine-derived polysaccharides and their lower molecular weight oligosaccharide derivatives have been shown to possess a variety of antiviral activities. This paper will review the recent progress in research on the antiviral activities and the mechanisms of these polysaccharides obtained from marine organisms. In particular, it will provide an update on the antiviral actions of the sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine algae including carrageenans, alginates, and fucans, relating to their structure features and the structure–activity relationships. In addition, the recent findings on the different mechanisms of antiviral actions of marine polysaccharides and their potential for therapeutic application will also be summarized in detail. PMID:23235364

  18. Anti-hepatitis C virus compounds obtained from Glycyrrhiza uralensis and other Glycyrrhiza species.

    PubMed

    Adianti, Myrna; Aoki, Chie; Komoto, Mari; Deng, Lin; Shoji, Ikuo; Wahyuni, Tutik Sri; Lusida, Maria Inge; Soetjipto; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Hotta, Hak

    2014-03-01

    Development of complementary and/or alternative drugs for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is still much needed from clinical and economic points of view. Antiviral substances obtained from medicinal plants are potentially good targets to study. Glycyrrhiza uralensis and G. glabra have been commonly used in both traditional and modern medicine. In this study, extracts of G. uralensis roots and their components were examined for anti-HCV activity using an HCV cell culture system. It was found that a methanol extract of G. uralensis roots and its chloroform fraction possess anti-HCV activity with 50%-inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of 20.0 and 8.0 μg/mL, respectively. Through bioactivity-guided purification and structural analysis, glycycoumarin, glycyrin, glycyrol and liquiritigenin were isolated and identified as anti-HCV compounds, their IC(50) being 8.8, 7.2, 4.6 and 16.4 μg/mL, respectively. However, glycyrrhizin, the major constituent of G. uralensis, and its monoammonium salt, showed only marginal anti-HCV activity. It was also found that licochalcone A and glabridin, known to be exclusive constituents of G. inflata and G. glabra, respectively, did have anti-HCV activity, their IC(50) being 2.5 and 6.2 μg/mL, respectively. Another chalcone, isoliquiritigenin, also showed anti-HCV activity, with an IC(50) of 3.7 μg/mL. Time-of-addition analysis revealed that all Glycyrrhiza-derived anti-HCV compounds tested in this study act at the post-entry step. In conclusion, the present results suggest that glycycoumarin, glycyrin, glycyrol and liquiritigenin isolated from G. uralensis, as well as isoliquiritigenin, licochalcone A and glabridin, would be good candidates for seed compounds to develop antivirals against HCV.

  19. Antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities of some flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Didem Deliorman; Ozçelik, Berrin; Ozgen, Selda; Ergun, Fatma

    2010-08-20

    Antibacterial and antifungal activities of six plant-derived flavonoids representing two different structural groups were evaluated against standard strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis and their drug-resistant isolates, as well as fungi (Candida albicans, C. krusei) using the microdilution broth method. Herpes simplex virus Type-1 and Parainfluenza-3 virus were employed for antiviral assessment of the flavonoids using Madin-Darby bovine kidney and Vero cell lines. Ampicillin, gentamycin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, fluconazole, ketoconazole, acyclovir, and oseltamivir were used as the control agents. All tested compounds (32-128 microg/ml) showed strong antimicrobial and antifungal activities against isolated strains of P. aeruginosa, A. baumanni, S. aureus, and C. krusei. Rutin, 5,7-dimethoxyflavanone-4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside and 5,7,3'-trihydroxy-flavanone-4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (0.2-0.05 microg/ml) were active against PI-3, while 5,7-dimethoxyflavanone-4'-O-[2''-O-(5'''-O-trans-cinnamoyl)-beta-D-apiofuranosyl]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (0.16-0.2 microg/ml) inhibited potently HSV-1. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. The antiviral activity of tetrazole phosphonic acids and their analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, D W; Naylor, M

    1985-01-01

    5-(Phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and a number of related tetrazoles have been prepared and their effects on the replication of Herpes Simplex Viruses-1 and -2 have been investigated as well as their abilities to inhibit the DNA polymerases induced by these viruses and the RNA transcriptase activity of influenza virus A. Contrary to an earlier report, 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole was not an efficient inhibitor of the replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in tissue culture. Analogues of 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole were also devoid of significant antiviral activity. Only 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and 5-(thiophosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole inhibited the influenza virus transcriptase, and both were more effective as inhibitors than phosphonoacetic acid under the same conditions. The DNA polymerases induced by HSV-1 and HSV-2 were inhibited slightly by 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and to a lesser extent by its N-ethyl analogue and 3-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole. None of these compounds were as effective as phosphonoacetic acid. 5-(Thiophosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole was a better inhibitor of the DNA polymerase induced by HSV-1 than 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole. PMID:2417198

  1. Antiviral mechanism of polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers against HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Vacas-Córdoba, Enrique; Maly, Marek; De la Mata, Francisco J; Gómez, Rafael; Pion, Marjorie; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology-derived platforms, such as dendrimers, are very attractive in several biological applications. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers have shown great potential as antiviral agents in the development of novel microbicides to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1. In this work, we studied the mechanism of two sulfated and naphthylsulfonated functionalized carbosilane dendrimers, G3-S16 and G2-NF16. They are able to inhibit viral infection at fusion and thus at the entry step. Both compounds impede the binding of viral particles to target cell surface and membrane fusion through the blockage of gp120–CD4 interaction. In addition, and for the first time, we demonstrate that dendrimers can inhibit cell-to-cell HIV transmission and difficult infectious synapse formation. Thus, carbosilane dendrimers’ mode of action is a multifactorial process targeting several proteins from viral envelope and from host cells that could block HIV infection at different stages during the first step of infection. PMID:27103798

  2. Antiviral activity of a Bacillus sp. P34 peptide against pathogenic viruses of domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Scopel e Silva, Débora; de Castro, Clarissa Caetano; da Silva e Silva, Fábio; Sant'anna, Voltaire; Vargas, Gilberto D'Avila; de Lima, Marcelo; Fischer, Geferson; Brandelli, Adriano; da Motta, Amanda de Souza; Hübner, Silvia de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    P34 is an antimicrobial peptide produced by a Bacillus sp. strain isolated from the intestinal contents of a fish in the Brazilian Amazon basin with reported antibacterial activity. The aim of this work was to evaluate the peptide P34 for its in vitro antiviral properties against canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine coronavirus (CCoV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), equine arteritis virus (EAV), equine influenza virus (EIV), feline calicivirus (FCV) and feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1). The results showed that the peptide P34 exhibited antiviral activity against EAV and FHV-1. The peptide P34 inhibited the replication of EAV by 99.9% and FHV-1 by 94.4%. Virucidal activity was detected only against EAV. When P34 and EAV were incubated for 6 h at 37 °C the viral titer reduced from 10(4.5) TCID50 to 10(2.75) TCID50, showing a percent of inhibition of 98.6%. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that P34 inhibited EAV and FHV-1 replication in infected cell cultures and it showed virucidal activity against EAV. Since there is documented resistance to the current drugs used against herpesviruses and there is no treatment for equine viral arteritis, it is advisable to search for new antiviral compounds to overcome these infections.

  3. Identification of Inonotus obliquus polysaccharide with broad-spectrum antiviral activity against multi-feline viruses.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jin; Hu, Xiaoliang; Liu, Dafei; Wu, Hongxia; Qu, Liandong

    2017-02-01

    Inonotus obliquus polysaccharides (IOPs) are a potential drug for the prevention and treatment of cancer, cardiopathy, diabetes, AIDs, pancreatitis and other diseases. In this study, we found that IOP can act as a broad-spectrum antiviral drug against feline viruses in the in vitro experiment. Using cell models of feline calicivirus (FCV), we demonstrated that IOP treatment was capable of exhibiting anti-FCV strain F9 activity in cell-based assays and also showed low cytotoxicity. Investigation of the mechanism of action of the compound revealed that IOP treatment induces its inhibitory actions directly on virus particles through blocking viral binding/absorpting. The inhibitory activity against other FCV isolates from China was also identified. More importantly, we found that IOP exhibited broad-spectrum antiviral activity against the feline herpesvirus 1, feline influenza virus H3N2 and H5N6, feline panleukopenia virus and feline infectious peritonitis virus that can contribute to respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases in cats. These findings suggest that IOP may be a potential broad-spectrum antiviral drug against feline viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Docking Studies of Pakistani HCV NS3 Helicase: A Possible Antiviral Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Kaneez; Mathew, Shilu; Suhail, Mohd; Ali, Ashraf; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Azhar, Esam; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2014-01-01

    The nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) helicase is believed to be essential for viral replication and has become an attractive target for the development of antiviral drugs. The study of helicase is useful for elucidating its involvement in positive sense single-stranded RNA virus replication and to serve as templates for the design of novel antiviral drugs. In recent years, several models have been proposed on the conformational change leading to protein movement and RNA unwinding. Some compounds have been recently reported to inhibit the helicase and these include small molecules, RNA aptamers and antibodies. The current study is designed to help gain insights for the consideration of potential inhibitors for Pakistani HCV NS3 helicase protein. We have cloned, expressed and purified HCV NS3 helicase from Pakistani HCV serum samples and determined its 3D structure and employed it further in computational docking analysis to identify inhibitors against HCV genotype 3a (GT3a),including six antiviral key molecules such as quercetin, beta-carotene, resveratrol, catechins, lycopene and lutein. The conformation obtained after docking showed good hydrogen bond (HBond) interactions with best docking energy for quercetin and catechins followed by resveratrol and lutein. These anti-helicase key molecules will offer an alternative attraction to target the viral helicase, due to the current limitation with the interferon resistance treatment and presences of high rate of resistance in anti-protease inhibitor classes. PMID:25188400

  5. The anti-obesity drug orlistat reveals anti-viral activity.

    PubMed

    Ammer, Elisabeth; Nietzsche, Sandor; Rien, Christian; Kühnl, Alexander; Mader, Theresa; Heller, Regine; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Henke, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The administration of drugs to inhibit metabolic pathways not only reduces the risk of obesity-induced diseases in humans but may also hamper the replication of different viral pathogens. In order to investigate the value of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-obesity drug orlistat in view of its anti-viral activity against different human-pathogenic viruses, several anti-viral studies, electron microscopy analyses as well as fatty acid uptake experiments were performed. The results indicate that administrations of non-cytotoxic concentrations of orlistat reduced the replication of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) in different cell types significantly. Moreover, orlistat revealed cell protective effects and modified the formation of multi-layered structures in CVB3-infected cells, which are necessary for viral replication. Lowering fatty acid uptake from the extracellular environment by phloretin administrations had only marginal impact on CVB3 replication. Finally, orlistat reduced also the replication of varicella-zoster virus moderately but had no significant influence on the replication of influenza A viruses. The data support further experiments into the value of orlistat as an inhibitor of the fatty acid synthase to develop new anti-viral compounds, which are based on the modulation of cellular metabolic pathways.

  6. Antiviral activity of some Tunisian medicinal plants against Herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Sassi, A Ben; Harzallah-Skhiri, F; Bourgougnon, N; Aouni, M

    2008-01-10

    Fifteen species of Tunisian traditional medicinal plants, belonging to 10 families, were selected for this study. They were Inula viscosa (L.) Ait and Reichardia tingitana (L.) Roth ssp. discolor (Pom.) Batt. (Asteraceae), Mesembryanthemum cristallinum L. and M. nodiflorum L. (Aizoaceae), Arthrocnemum indicum (Willd.) Moq., Atriplex inflata Muell., A. parvifolia Lowe var. ifiniensis (Caball) Maire, and Salicornia fruticosa L. (Chenopodiaceae), Cistus monspeliensis L. (Cistaceae), Juniperus phoenicea L. (Cupressaceae), Erica multiflora L. (Ericaceae), Frankenia pulverulenta L. (Frankeniaceae), Hypericum crispum L. (Hypericaceae), Plantago coronopus L. ssp. eu-coronopus Pilger var. vulgaris G.G. (Plantaginaceae) and Zygophyllum album L. (Zygophyllaceae). Fifty extracts prepared from those plants were screened in order to assay their antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), using neutral red incorporation. Extracts from eight plants among these 15 showed some degree of antiviral activity, while the methanolic extract of E. multiflora was highly active with EC(50) of 132.6 microg mL(-1). These results corroborate that medicinal plants from Tunisia can be a rich source of potential antiviral compounds.

  7. Antiviral activities of some Ethiopian medicinal plants used for the treatment of dermatological disorders.

    PubMed

    Gebre-Mariam, T; Neubert, R; Schmidt, P C; Wutzler, P; Schmidtke, M

    2006-03-08

    Acokanthera schimperi (Apocynaceae), Euclea schimperi (Ebenaceae), Inula confertiflora (Asteraceae), Melilotus elegans (Leguminosae), and Plumbago zeylanica (Plumbaginaceae), are some of the medicinal plants used in Ethiopia for treatment of various skin disorders. In this study, the antiviral activities of the 80% methanolic extracts of these plants have been examined against coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), influenza A virus and herpes simplex virus type1 Kupka (HSV-1) using cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibitory assays in HeLa, MDCK, and GMK cells, respectively. In parallel, the cytotoxicity was quantified using a crystal violet uptake assay. The antiviral activity of the most active compound was confirmed with plaque reduction assays. The results revealed that the extracts of Acokanthera schimperi and Euclea schimperi showed antiviral activity against all three tested viruses albeit with unequal efficacy. Whereas the Acokanthera schimperi extract exhibited the strongest activity against CVB3, the extract of Euclea schimperi inhibited influenzavirus A replication most effectively. A weak anti-influenzavirus A activity was also exhibited by the other plant extracts tested. In addition, CVB3 was inhibited by the extracts of Plumbago zeylanica and HSV-1 by Inula confertiflora. Thus, the extracts of these plants, particularly those of Acokanthera schimperi, Euclea schimperi and Inula confertiflora which showed activity against CVB3 and HSV-1 support their traditional use in the treatment of skin diseases of viral origin.

  8. Dextrans produced by lactic acid bacteria exhibit antiviral and immunomodulatory activity against salmonid viruses.

    PubMed

    Nácher-Vázquez, Montserrat; Ballesteros, Natalia; Canales, Ángeles; Rodríguez Saint-Jean, Sylvia; Pérez-Prieto, Sara Isabel; Prieto, Alicia; Aznar, Rosa; López, Paloma

    2015-06-25

    Viral infections in the aquaculture of salmonids can lead to high mortality and substantial economic losses. Thus, there is industrial interest in new molecules active against these viruses. Here we describe the production, purification, and the physicochemical and structural characterization of high molecular weight dextrans synthesized by Lactobacillus sakei MN1 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides RTF10. The purified dextrans, and commercial dextrans with molecular weights ranging from 10 to 2000kDa, were assayed in infected BF-2 and EPC fish cell-line monolayers for antiviral activity. Only T2000 and dextrans from MN1 and RTF10 had significant antiviral activity. This was similar to results obtained against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus. However the dextran from MN1 showed ten-fold higher activity against hematopoietic necrosis virus than T2000. In vivo assays using the MN1 polymer confirmed the in vitro results and revealed immunomodulatory activity. These results together with the high levels of dextran production (2gL(-1)) by Lb. sakei MN1, indicate the compounds potential utility as an antiviral agent in aquaculture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Treatment of norovirus infections: Moving antivirals from the bench to the bedside

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Stuart S.; Green, Kim Y.; Korba, Brent E.

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses (NV) are the most common cause of acute gastrointestinal illness in the United States and worldwide. The development of specific antiviral countermeasures has lagged behind that of other viral pathogens, primarily because norovirus disease has been perceived as brief and self-limiting and robust assays suitable for drug discovery have been lacking. The increasing recognition that NV illness can be life-threatening, especially in immunocompromised patients who often require prolonged hospitalization and intensive supportive care, has stimulated new research to develop an effective antiviral therapy. Here, we propose a path forward for evaluating drug therapy in norovirus-infected immunocompromised individuals, a population at high risk for serious and prolonged illness. The clinical and laboratory features of norovirus illness in immunocompromised patients are reviewed, and potential markers of drug efficacy are defined. We discuss the potential design of clinical trials in these patients and how an anti-viral therapy that proves effective in immunocompromised patients might also be used in the setting of acute outbreaks, especially in confined settings such as nursing homes, to block the spread of infection and reduce the severity of illness. We conclude by reviewing the current status of approved and experimental compounds that might be evaluated in a hospital setting. PMID:24583027

  10. Antiviral activity of a Bacillus sp. P34 peptide against pathogenic viruses of domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Débora Scopel e; de Castro, Clarissa Caetano; Silva, Fábio da Silva e; Sant’anna, Voltaire; Vargas, Gilberto D’Avila; de Lima, Marcelo; Fischer, Geferson; Brandelli, Adriano; da Motta, Amanda de Souza; Hübner, Silvia de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    P34 is an antimicrobial peptide produced by a Bacillus sp. strain isolated from the intestinal contents of a fish in the Brazilian Amazon basin with reported antibacterial activity. The aim of this work was to evaluate the peptide P34 for its in vitro antiviral properties against canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine coronavirus (CCoV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), equine arteritis virus (EAV), equine influenza virus (EIV), feline calicivirus (FCV) and feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1). The results showed that the peptide P34 exhibited antiviral activity against EAV and FHV-1. The peptide P34 inhibited the replication of EAV by 99.9% and FHV-1 by 94.4%. Virucidal activity was detected only against EAV. When P34 and EAV were incubated for 6 h at 37 °C the viral titer reduced from 104.5 TCID50 to 102.75 TCID50, showing a percent of inhibition of 98.6%. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that P34 inhibited EAV and FHV-1 replication in infected cell cultures and it showed virucidal activity against EAV. Since there is documented resistance to the current drugs used against herpesviruses and there is no treatment for equine viral arteritis, it is advisable to search for new antiviral compounds to overcome these infections. PMID:25477947

  11. The antiviral activity of arctigenin in traditional Chinese medicine on porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Li, Wentao; Jin, Erguang; He, Qigai; Yan, Weidong; Yang, Hanchun; Gong, Shiyu; Guo, Yi; Fu, Shulin; Chen, Xiabing; Ye, Shengqiang; Qian, Yunguo

    2016-06-01

    Arctigenin (ACT) is a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan extracted from the traditional herb Arctium lappa L. (Compositae) with anti-viral and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of ACT found in traditional Chinese medicine on porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that dosing of 15.6-62.5μg/mL ACT could significantly inhibit the PCV2 proliferation in PK-15 cells (P<0.01). Dosing of 62.5μg/mL ACT 0, 4 or 8h after challenge inoculation significantly inhibited the proliferation of 1MOI and 10MOI in PK-15 cells (P<0.01), and the inhibitory effect of ACT dosing 4h or 8h post-inoculation was greater than 0h after dosing (P<0.01). In vivo test with mice challenge against PCV2 infection demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection of 200μg/kg ACT significantly inhibited PCV2 proliferation in the lungs, spleens and inguinal lymph nodes, with an effect similar to ribavirin, demonstrating the effectiveness of ACT as an antiviral agent against PCV2 in vitro and in vivo. This compound, therefore, may have the potential to serve as a drug for protection of pigs against the infection of PCV2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative study to evaluate the anti-viral efficacy of Glycyrrhiza glabra extract and ribavirin against the Newcastle disease virus

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Muhammad Ovais; AlMalki, Waleed Hassan; Shahid, Imran; Khuram, Shahzada; Altaf, Imran; Imran, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Newcastle disease represents as one of the most infectious viral disease, which afflicts almost every species of the birds. The causative agent of the disease is a single-stranded RNA virus with rapid replication capability. Objective: This study was performed to evaluate the comparative anti-viral efficacy and toxicity of Glycyrrhiza glabra aqueous extract and ribavirin against the Newcastle disease virus. Materials and Methods: The embryonated eggs were divided into six groups (A, B, C, D, E and F). Groups A, B, C, and D were further subdivided into three subgroups. The virus was identified by hemagglutination inhibition test. Spot hemagglutination test and viability of embryos were also evaluated. Three different concentrations i-e., 30 mg/100 ml, 60 mg/100 ml, and 120 mg/100 ml of the Glycyrrhiza aqueous extract and 10 μg/ml, 20 μg/ml, and 40 μg/ml ribavirin in deionized water were evaluated for their toxicity and anti-viral activity in the embryonated eggs. Results: 60 mg/100 ml concentration of Glycyrrhiza extract did not produce any toxicity in the embryonated eggs and showed anti-viral activity against the virus. Similarly, 20 μg/ml ribavirin was non-toxic in the embryonated eggs and contained anti-viral activity. Conclusion: It may conclude from the presented study that 60 mg/100 ml Glycyrrhiza extract inhibits replication of Newcastle disease virus and is non-toxic in the embryonated eggs. So, Glycyrrhiza glabra extract may be further evaluated in future to determine the potentially active compounds for their anti-viral activity against Newcastle disease virus. Furthermore, the mechanism of action of these active phytochemicals as an antiviral agent would be helpful to elucidate the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24497736

  13. Comparative study to evaluate the anti-viral efficacy of Glycyrrhiza glabra extract and ribavirin against the Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Omer, Muhammad Ovais; Almalki, Waleed Hassan; Shahid, Imran; Khuram, Shahzada; Altaf, Imran; Imran, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle disease represents as one of the most infectious viral disease, which afflicts almost every species of the birds. The causative agent of the disease is a single-stranded RNA virus with rapid replication capability. This study was performed to evaluate the comparative anti-viral efficacy and toxicity of Glycyrrhiza glabra aqueous extract and ribavirin against the Newcastle disease virus. The embryonated eggs were divided into six groups (A, B, C, D, E and F). Groups A, B, C, and D were further subdivided into three subgroups. The virus was identified by hemagglutination inhibition test. Spot hemagglutination test and viability of embryos were also evaluated. Three different concentrations i-e., 30 mg/100 ml, 60 mg/100 ml, and 120 mg/100 ml of the Glycyrrhiza aqueous extract and 10 μg/ml, 20 μg/ml, and 40 μg/ml ribavirin in deionized water were evaluated for their toxicity and anti-viral activity in the embryonated eggs. 60 mg/100 ml concentration of Glycyrrhiza extract did not produce any toxicity in the embryonated eggs and showed anti-viral activity against the virus. Similarly, 20 μg/ml ribavirin was non-toxic in the embryonated eggs and contained anti-viral activity. It may conclude from the presented study that 60 mg/100 ml Glycyrrhiza extract inhibits replication of Newcastle disease virus and is non-toxic in the embryonated eggs. So, Glycyrrhiza glabra extract may be further evaluated in future to determine the potentially active compounds for their anti-viral activity against Newcastle disease virus. Furthermore, the mechanism of action of these active phytochemicals as an antiviral agent would be helpful to elucidate the pathogenesis of the disease.

  14. The in vitro antiviral property of Azadirachta indica polysaccharides for poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Faccin-Galhardi, Ligia Carla; Yamamoto, Kristie Aimi; Ray, Sayani; Ray, Bimalendu; Carvalho Linhares, Rosa Elisa; Nozawa, Carlos

    2012-06-26

    Azadirachta indica A. Juss, popularly known as neem, has been extensively used in Ayurvedic medicine by Indian population for over 2000 years. It is used traditionally for the healing of various diseases. Natural products and their derivatives provide an excellent source for new anti-viral drugs. The present study aims at evaluating the activity of two polysaccharides (P1 and P2) isolated from the leaves of Azadirachta indica and their chemical sulfated derivatives (P1S and P2S) against poliovirus type 1 (PV-1). The cytotoxicity of the compounds was analyzed by MTT and the antiviral effect was determined by plaque reduction assay in different protocols. The polysaccharides did not show any cytotoxic effects on HEp-2 cells at the highest tested concentration (200 μg/ml) and exhibited significant antiviral activity with inhibitory concentrations (IC₅₀) of 80 μg/ml, 37.5 μg/ml, 77.5 μg/ml, and 12.1 μg/ml for P1, P1S, P2 and P2S, respectively, and the selectivity indexes (SI) ranged from 18 to 131.9. The compounds demonstrated better inhibitory effect when added concomitantly with the virus infection with a dose-dependent curve inhibition. Lesser effect was observed when the compounds were added after viral infection and the least effect at pre-treatment. We suggested that the polysaccharides obtained from Azadirachta indica act against PV-1 by inhibiting the initial stage of viral replication. Importantly, original polysaccharides showed better virucidal effect than their sulfated derivatives at all tested concentrations. This study provides a scientific basis for the past and present ethnomedical uses of this plant.

  15. Polyhydroxylated sulfated steroids derived from 5α-cholestanes as antiviral agents against herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Carlos A; Sepúlveda, Claudia S; Richmond, Victoria; Maier, Marta S; Damonte, Elsa B

    2016-07-01

    Twelve polyhydroxylated sulfated steroids synthesized from a 5α-cholestane skeleton with different substitutions in C-2, C-3 and C-6 were evaluated for cytotoxicity and antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV) by a virus plaque reduction assay. Four compounds elicited a selective inhibitory effect against HSV. The disodium salt of 2β,3α-dihydroxy-6E-hydroximine-5α-cholestane-2,3-disulfate, named compound 7, was the most effective inhibitor of HSV-1, HSV-2 and pseudorabies virus (PrV) strains, including acyclovir-resistant variants, in human and monkey cell lines. Preliminary mechanistic studies demonstrated that compound 7 did not affect the initial steps of virus entry but inhibited a subsequent event in the infection process of HSV.

  16. RNA degradation in antiviral immunity and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Rachel E.; Rehwinkel, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control determines the fate of cellular RNA molecules. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) provides quality control of mRNA, targeting faulty cellular transcripts for degradation by multiple nucleases including the RNA exosome. Recent findings have revealed a role for NMD in targeting viral RNA molecules, thereby restricting virus infection. Interestingly, NMD is also linked to immune responses at another level: mutations affecting the NMD or RNA exosome machineries cause chronic activation of defence programmes, resulting in autoimmune phenotypes. Here we place these observations in the context of other links between innate antiviral immunity and type I interferon mediated disease and examine two models: one in which expression or function of pathogen sensors is perturbed and one wherein host-derived RNA molecules with a propensity to activate such sensors accumulate. PMID:25709093

  17. Cytoplasmic nucleic acid sensors in antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Priya; Bowzard, J Bradford; Schwerzmann, Joy W; Jeisy-Scott, Victoria; Fujita, Takashi; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2009-08-01

    The innate immune system uses pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to sense invading microbes and initiate a rapid protective response. PRRs bind and are activated by structural motifs, such as nucleic acids or bacterial and fungal cell wall components, collectively known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. PRRs that recognize pathogen-derived nucleic acids are present in vesicular compartments and in the cytosol of most cell types. Here, we review recent studies of these cytosolic sensors, focusing on the nature of the ligands for DNA-dependent activator of interferon (DAI)-regulatory factors, absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2), and the retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like helicase (RLH) family of receptors, the basis of ligand recognition and the signaling pathways triggered by the activation of these receptors. An increased understanding of these molecular aspects of innate immunity will guide the development of novel antiviral therapeutics.

  18. RNAi: antiviral therapy against dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Sobia; Ashfaq, Usman A

    2013-03-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of siRNA in inhibiting dengue virus replication. This review summarizes siRNAs as a therapeutic approach against dengue virus serotypes and concludes that siRNAs against virus and host genes can be next generation treatment of dengue virus infection.

  19. Contribution of autophagy to antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Riedel, Claudia A; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-11-14

    Although identified in the 1960's, interest in autophagy has significantly increased in the past decade with notable research efforts oriented at understanding as to how this multi-protein complex operates and is regulated. Autophagy is commonly defined as a "self-eating" process evolved by eukaryotic cells to recycle senescent organelles and expired proteins, which is significantly increased during cellular stress responses. In addition, autophagy can also play important roles during human diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative and autoimmune disorders. Furthermore, novel findings suggest that autophagy contributes to the host defense against microbial infections. In this article, we review the role of macroautophagy in antiviral immune responses and discuss m