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Sample records for candidate genetic analysis

  1. Haplotype sharing analysis with SNPs in candidate genes: the Genetic Analysis Workshop 12 example.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Christine; Beckmann, Lars; Majoram, Paul; te Meerman, Gerard; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2003-01-01

    Haplotype sharing analysis was used to investigate the association of affection status with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes within candidate gene 1 in one sample each from the isolated and the general population of Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 12 simulated data. Gene 1 has direct influence on affection and harbors more than 70 SNPs. Haplotype sharing analysis depends heavily on previous haplotype estimation. Using GENEHUNTER haplotypes, strong evidence was found for most SNPs in the isolated population sample, thus providing evidence for an involvement of this gene, but the maximum -log(10)(p) values for the haplotype sharing statistics (HSS) test statistic did not correspond to the location of the true variant in either population. In comparison, transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) analysis showed the strongest results at the disease-causing variant in both populations, and these were outstanding in the general population. In this example, TDT analysis appears to perform better than HSS in identifying the disease-causing variant, using SNPs within a candidate gene in an outbred population. Simulations showed that the performance of HSS is hampered by closely spaced SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium with the functional variant and by ambiguous haplotypes.

  2. Three autism candidate genes: a synthesis of human genetic analysis with other disciplines.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Christopher W; Gharani, Neda; Millonig, James H; Brzustowicz, Linda M

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a particularly complex disorder when considered from virtually any methodological framework, including the perspective of human genetics. We first present a review of the genetic analysis principles relevant for discussing autism genetics research. From this body of work we highlight results from three candidate genes, REELIN (RELN), SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER (5HTT), and ENGRAILED 2 (EN2) and discuss the relevant neuroscience, molecular genetics, and statistical results that suggest involvement of these genes in autism susceptibility. As will be shown, the statistical results from genetic analysis, when considered alone, are in apparent conflict across research groups. We use these three candidate genes to illustrate different problems in synthesizing results from non-overlapping research groups examining the same problem. However, when basic genetic principles and results from other scientific disciplines are incorporated into a unified theoretical framework, at least some of the difficulties with interpreting results can be understood and potentially overcome as more data becomes available to the field of autism research. Integrating results from several scientific frameworks provides new hypotheses and alternative data collection strategies for future work.

  3. Genetic analysis of dyslexia candidate genes in the European cross-linguistic NeuroDys cohort

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jessica; Czamara, Darina; Scerri, Tom S; Ramus, Franck; Csépe, Valéria; Talcott, Joel B; Stein, John; Morris, Andrew; Ludwig, Kerstin U; Hoffmann, Per; Honbolygó, Ferenc; Tóth, Dénes; Fauchereau, Fabien; Bogliotti, Caroline; Iannuzzi, Stéphanie; Chaix, Yves; Valdois, Sylviane; Billard, Catherine; George, Florence; Soares-Boucaud, Isabelle; Gérard, Christophe-Loïc; van der Mark, Sanne; Schulz, Enrico; Vaessen, Anniek; Maurer, Urs; Lohvansuu, Kaisa; Lyytinen, Heikki; Zucchelli, Marco; Brandeis, Daniel; Blomert, Leo; Leppänen, Paavo HT; Bruder, Jennifer; Monaco, Anthony P; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Kere, Juha; Landerl, Karin; Nöthen, Markus M; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Paracchini, Silvia; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Schumacher, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Dyslexia is one of the most common childhood disorders with a prevalence of around 5–10% in school-age children. Although an important genetic component is known to have a role in the aetiology of dyslexia, we are far from understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to the disorder. Several candidate genes have been implicated in dyslexia, including DYX1C1, DCDC2, KIAA0319, and the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus, each with reports of both positive and no replications. We generated a European cross-linguistic sample of school-age children – the NeuroDys cohort – that includes more than 900 individuals with dyslexia, sampled with homogenous inclusion criteria across eight European countries, and a comparable number of controls. Here, we describe association analysis of the dyslexia candidate genes/locus in the NeuroDys cohort. We performed both case–control and quantitative association analyses of single markers and haplotypes previously reported to be dyslexia-associated. Although we observed association signals in samples from single countries, we did not find any marker or haplotype that was significantly associated with either case–control status or quantitative measurements of word-reading or spelling in the meta-analysis of all eight countries combined. Like in other neurocognitive disorders, our findings underline the need for larger sample sizes to validate possibly weak genetic effects. PMID:24022301

  4. Genetic analysis of dyslexia candidate genes in the European cross-linguistic NeuroDys cohort.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jessica; Czamara, Darina; Scerri, Tom S; Ramus, Franck; Csépe, Valéria; Talcott, Joel B; Stein, John; Morris, Andrew; Ludwig, Kerstin U; Hoffmann, Per; Honbolygó, Ferenc; Tóth, Dénes; Fauchereau, Fabien; Bogliotti, Caroline; Iannuzzi, Stéphanie; Chaix, Yves; Valdois, Sylviane; Billard, Catherine; George, Florence; Soares-Boucaud, Isabelle; Gérard, Christophe-Loïc; van der Mark, Sanne; Schulz, Enrico; Vaessen, Anniek; Maurer, Urs; Lohvansuu, Kaisa; Lyytinen, Heikki; Zucchelli, Marco; Brandeis, Daniel; Blomert, Leo; Leppänen, Paavo H T; Bruder, Jennifer; Monaco, Anthony P; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Kere, Juha; Landerl, Karin; Nöthen, Markus M; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Paracchini, Silvia; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Schumacher, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    Dyslexia is one of the most common childhood disorders with a prevalence of around 5-10% in school-age children. Although an important genetic component is known to have a role in the aetiology of dyslexia, we are far from understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to the disorder. Several candidate genes have been implicated in dyslexia, including DYX1C1, DCDC2, KIAA0319, and the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus, each with reports of both positive and no replications. We generated a European cross-linguistic sample of school-age children - the NeuroDys cohort - that includes more than 900 individuals with dyslexia, sampled with homogenous inclusion criteria across eight European countries, and a comparable number of controls. Here, we describe association analysis of the dyslexia candidate genes/locus in the NeuroDys cohort. We performed both case-control and quantitative association analyses of single markers and haplotypes previously reported to be dyslexia-associated. Although we observed association signals in samples from single countries, we did not find any marker or haplotype that was significantly associated with either case-control status or quantitative measurements of word-reading or spelling in the meta-analysis of all eight countries combined. Like in other neurocognitive disorders, our findings underline the need for larger sample sizes to validate possibly weak genetic effects.

  5. A candidate gene approach for the genetic analysis of susceptibility to tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, K.; Liu, J.; Boothroyd, L.

    1994-09-01

    Tuberculosis is the most frequent and severe human disease caused by mycobacteria. In the mouse a candidate gene for innate resistance to mycobacteria (Bcg) was recently isolated and termed Nramp. We used SSCA and DNA sequencing to identify mutations in the human homologue, NRAMP, in chromosome region 2q35 in order to test if NRAMP contributes to susceptibility to tuberculosis. We have identified 16 sequence variants in or near NRAMP and defined haplotypes segregating in multiplex tuberculosis families from Canada, Columbia and Hong Kong. We defined a recessive susceptibility model for linkage analysis with four liability classes which take into account clinical status, age, exposure, and BCG vaccination. Our preliminary results support a role of NRAMP in tuberculosis susceptibility in an epidemic situation. This research was supported by grants from the Medical Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Genetic Diseases Network.

  6. Transcriptomic analysis of genetically defined autism candidate genes reveals common mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Austism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous behavioral disorder or condition characterized by severe impairment of social engagement and the presence of repetitive activities. The molecular etiology of ASD is still largely unknown despite a strong genetic component. Part of the difficulty in turning genetics into disease mechanisms and potentially new therapeutics is the sheer number and diversity of the genes that have been associated with ASD and ASD symptoms. The goal of this work is to use shRNA-generated models of genetic defects proposed as causative for ASD to identify the common pathways that might explain how they produce a core clinical disability. Methods Transcript levels of Mecp2, Mef2a, Mef2d, Fmr1, Nlgn1, Nlgn3, Pten, and Shank3 were knocked-down in mouse primary neuron cultures using shRNA constructs. Whole genome expression analysis was conducted for each of the knockdown cultures as well as a mock-transduced culture and a culture exposed to a lentivirus expressing an anti-luciferase shRNA. Gene set enrichment and a causal reasoning engine was employed to identify pathway level perturbations generated by the transcript knockdown. Results Quantification of the shRNA targets confirmed the successful knockdown at the transcript and protein levels of at least 75% for each of the genes. After subtracting out potential artifacts caused by viral infection, gene set enrichment and causal reasoning engine analysis showed that a significant number of gene expression changes mapped to pathways associated with neurogenesis, long-term potentiation, and synaptic activity. Conclusions This work demonstrates that despite the complex genetic nature of ASD, there are common molecular mechanisms that connect many of the best established autism candidate genes. By identifying the key regulatory checkpoints in the interlinking transcriptional networks underlying autism, we are better able to discover the ideal points of intervention that provide the

  7. Genetic analysis of candidate SNPs for metabolic syndrome in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)

    PubMed Central

    Grilo, Antonio; Ruiz-Granados, Elena S.; Moreno-Rey, Concha; Rivera, Jose M.; Ruiz, Agustin; Real, Luis M.; Sáez, Maria E.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by the reduction or complete cessation in airflow resulting from an obstruction of the upper airway. Several studies have observed an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among OSA patients. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors characterized by the presence of insulin resistance, is often found in patients with OSA, but the complex interplay between these two syndromes is not well understood. In this study, we present the results of a genetic association analysis of 373 candidate SNPs for MetS selected in a previous genome wide association analysis (GWAS). The 384 selected SNPs were genotyped using the Illumina VeraCode Technology in 387 subjects retrospectively assessed at the Internal Medicine Unit of the “Virgen de Valme” University Hospital (Seville, Spain). In order to increase the power of this study and to validate our findings in an independent population, we used data from the Framingham Sleep study which comprises 368 individuals. Only the rs11211631 polymorphism was associated with OSA in both populations, with an estimated OR=0.57 (0.42-0.79) in the joint analysis (p=7.21 × 10-4). This SNP was selected in the previous GWAS for MetS components using a digenic approach, but was not significant in the monogenic study. We have also identified two SNPs (rs2687855 and rs4299396) with a protective effect from OSA only in the abdominal obese subpopulation. As a whole, our study does not support that OSA and MetS share major genetic determinants, although both syndromes share common epidemiological and clinical features. PMID:23524009

  8. A Comprehensive Analysis of Common Genetic Variation Around Six Candidate Loci for Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Peter H; Wadsworth, Christopher A; Chambers, Jennifer; Donnelly, Jennifer; Cooley, Sharon; Buckley, Rebecca; Mannino, Ramona; Jarvis, Sheba; Syngelaki, Argyro; Geenes, Victoria; Paul, Priyadarshini; Sothinathan, Meera; Kubitz, Ralf; Lammert, Frank; Tribe, Rachel M; Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Glantz, Anna; Khan, Shahid A; Nicolaides, Kypros; Whittaker, John; Geary, Michael; Williamson, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) has a complex etiology with a significant genetic component. Heterozygous mutations of canalicular transporters occur in a subset of ICP cases and a population susceptibility allele (p.444A) has been identified in ABCB11. We sought to expand our knowledge of the detailed genetic contribution to ICP by investigation of common variation around candidate loci with biological plausibility for a role in ICP (ABCB4, ABCB11, ABCC2, ATP8B1, NR1H4, and FGF19). METHODS: ICP patients (n=563) of white western European origin and controls (n=642) were analyzed in a case–control design. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers (n=83) were selected from the HapMap data set (Tagger, Haploview 4.1 (build 22)). Genotyping was performed by allelic discrimination assay on a robotic platform. Following quality control, SNP data were analyzed by Armitage's trend test. RESULTS: Cochran–Armitage trend testing identified six SNPs in ABCB11 together with six SNPs in ABCB4 that showed significant evidence of association. The minimum Bonferroni corrected P value for trend testing ABCB11 was 5.81×10−4 (rs3815676) and for ABCB4 it was 4.6×10−7(rs2109505). Conditional analysis of the two clusters of association signals suggested a single signal in ABCB4 but evidence for two independent signals in ABCB11. To confirm these findings, a second study was performed in a further 227 cases, which confirmed and strengthened the original findings. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis of a large cohort of ICP cases has identified a key role for common variation around the ABCB4 and ABCB11 loci, identified the core associations, and expanded our knowledge of ICP susceptibility. PMID:24366234

  9. Genetic linkage analysis excludes HLA and several other potential candidates as being responsible for familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, J.B.; Bachinski, L.L.; Beiling, L.

    1994-09-01

    Familial dilated cardiomyopthy (FDCM), manifested by ventricular dilation and decreased systolic function, is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. We identified a family segregating DCM with 11 affected living individuals in whom the diagnosis was confirmed by echocardiography (EF <50%, left ventricular volume >80 ml/m{sup 2}). DNA was extracted and analyzed with highly polymorphmic microsatellite markers (STRs). In view of the high frequency of antibodies to specific HLA proteins in FDCM, this region was selected as a possible candidate locus. Genes whose products are sarcomeric proteins were also selected as candidates. Genetic linkage of FDCM to these candidate genes was excluded on the basis of a LOD score of <= -2. Subsequent to the candidate gene approach we pursued random mapping and completed analysis of a total of 93 chromosomal markers excluding 1000 cM.

  10. Genetic and expression analysis of cattle identifies candidate genes in pathways responding to Trypanosoma congolense infection

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Harry; Brass, Andy; Obara, Isaiah; Anderson, Susan; Archibald, Alan L.; Bradley, Dan G.; Fisher, Paul; Freeman, Abigail; Gibson, John; Gicheru, Michael; Hall, Laurence; Hanotte, Olivier; Hulme, Helen; McKeever, Declan; Murray, Caitriona; Oh, Sung Jung; Tate, Catriona; Smith, Ken; Tapio, Miika; Wambugu, John; Williams, Diana J.; Agaba, Morris; Kemp, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    African bovine trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma sp., is a major constraint on cattle productivity in sub-Saharan Africa. Some African Bos taurus breeds are highly tolerant of infection, but the potentially more productive Bos indicus zebu breeds are much more susceptible. Zebu cattle are well adapted for plowing and haulage, and increasing their tolerance of trypanosomiasis could have a major impact on crop cultivation as well as dairy and beef production. We used three strategies to obtain short lists of candidate genes within QTL that were previously shown to regulate response to infection. We analyzed the transcriptomes of trypanotolerant N'Dama and susceptible Boran cattle after infection with Trypanosoma congolense. We sequenced EST libraries from these two breeds to identify polymorphisms that might underlie previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL), and we assessed QTL regions and candidate loci for evidence of selective sweeps. The scan of the EST sequences identified a previously undescribed polymorphism in ARHGAP15 in the Bta2 trypanotolerance QTL. The polymorphism affects gene function in vitro and could contribute to the observed differences in expression of the MAPK pathway in vivo. The expression data showed that TLR and MAPK pathways responded to infection, and the former contained TICAM1, which is within a QTL on Bta7. Genetic analyses showed that selective sweeps had occurred at TICAM1 and ARHGAP15 loci in African taurine cattle, making them strong candidates for the genes underlying the QTL. Candidate QTL genes were identified in other QTL by their expression profile and the pathways in which they participate. PMID:21593421

  11. Candidate Gene Analysis Suggests Untapped Genetic Complexity in Melanin-Based Pigmentation in Birds.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Yann X C; Bertrand, Joris A M; Delahaie, Boris; Cornuault, Josselin; Duval, Thomas; Milá, Borja; Thébaud, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Studies on melanin-based color variation in a context of natural selection have provided a wealth of information on the link between phenotypic and genetic variation. Here, we evaluated associations between melanic plumage patterns and genetic polymorphism in the Réunion grey white-eye (Zosterops borbonicus), a species in which mutations on MC1R do not seem to play any role in explaining melanic variation. This species exhibits 5 plumage color variants that can be grouped into 3 color forms which occupy discrete geographic regions in the lowlands of Réunion, and a fourth high-elevation form which comprises 2 color morphs (grey and brown) and represents a true color polymorphism. We conducted a comprehensive survey of sequence variation in 96 individuals at a series of 7 candidate genes other than MC1R that have been previously shown to influence melanin-based color patterns in vertebrates, including genes that have rarely been studied in a wild bird species before: POMC, Agouti, TYR, TYRP1, DCT, Corin, and SLC24A5 Of these 7 genes, 2 (Corin and TYRP1) displayed an interesting shift in allele frequencies between lowland and highland forms and a departure from mutation-drift equilibrium consistent with balancing selection in the polymorphic highland form only. Sequence variation at Agouti, a gene frequently involved in melanin-based pigmentation patterning, was not associated with color forms or morphs. Thus, we suggest that functionally important changes in loci other than those classically studied are involved in the color polymorphism exhibited by the Réunion grey white-eye and possibly many other nonmodel species. © The American Genetic Association. 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Photoreceptor dysplasia (pd) in miniature schnauzer dogs: evaluation of candidate genes by molecular genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Baldwin, V J; Acland, G M; Parshall, C J; Haskel, J; Aguirre, G D; Ray, K

    1999-01-01

    Photoreceptor dysplasia (pd) is one of a group of at least six distinct autosomal and one X-linked retinal disorders identified in dogs which are collectively known as progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). It is an early onset retinal disease identified in miniature schnauzer dogs, and pedigree analysis and breeding studies have established autosomal recessive inheritance of the disease. Using a gene-based approach, a number of retina-expressed genes, including some members of the phototransduction pathway, have been causally implicated in retinal diseases of humans and other animals. Here we examined seven such potential candidate genes (opsin, RDS/peripherin, ROM1, rod cGMP-gated cation channel alpha-subunit, and three subunits of transducin) for their causal association with the pd locus by testing segregation of intragenic markers with the disease locus, or, in the absence of informative polymorphisms, sequencing of the coding regions of the genes. Based on these results, we have conclusively excluded four photoreceptor-specific genes as candidates for pd by linkage analysis. For three other photoreceptor-specific genes, we did not find any mutation in the coding sequences of the genes and have excluded them provisionally. Formal exclusion would require investigation of the levels of expression of the candidate genes in pd-affected dogs relative to age-matched controls. At present we are building suitable informative pedigrees for the disease locus with a sufficient number of meiosis to be useful for genomewide screening. This should identify markers linked to the disease locus and eventually permit progress toward the identification of the photoreceptor dysplasia gene and the disease-causing mutation.

  13. Genomic analysis of Meckel-Gruber syndrome in Arabs reveals marked genetic heterogeneity and novel candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Alshammari, Muneera J; Swaid, Abdulrahman; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Mardawi, Elham; Ansari, Shinu; Sogaty, Sameera; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z; AlMotairi, Muhammed I; Farra, Chantal; Kurdi, Wesam; Al-Rasheed, Shatha; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2013-07-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS, OMIM #249000) is a multiple congenital malformation syndrome that represents the severe end of the ciliopathy phenotypic spectrum. Despite the relatively common occurrence of this syndrome among Arabs, little is known about its genetic architecture in this population. This is a series of 18 Arab families with MKS, who were evaluated clinically and studied using autozygome-guided mutation analysis and exome sequencing. We show that autozygome-guided candidate gene analysis identified the underlying mutation in the majority (n=12, 71%). Exome sequencing revealed a likely pathogenic mutation in three novel candidate MKS disease genes. These include C5orf42, Ellis-van-Creveld disease gene EVC2 and SEC8 (also known as EXOC4), which encodes an exocyst protein with an established role in ciliogenesis. This is the largest and most comprehensive genomic study on MKS in Arabs and the results, in addition to revealing genetic and allelic heterogeneity, suggest that previously reported disease genes and the novel candidates uncovered by this study account for the overwhelming majority of MKS patients in our population.

  14. Genomic analysis of Meckel–Gruber syndrome in Arabs reveals marked genetic heterogeneity and novel candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Alshammari, Muneera J; Swaid, Abdulrahman; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Mardawi, Elham; Ansari, Shinu; Sogaty, Sameera; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z; AlMotairi, Muhammed I; Farra, Chantal; Kurdi, Wesam; Al-Rasheed, Shatha; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2013-01-01

    Meckel–Gruber syndrome (MKS, OMIM #249000) is a multiple congenital malformation syndrome that represents the severe end of the ciliopathy phenotypic spectrum. Despite the relatively common occurrence of this syndrome among Arabs, little is known about its genetic architecture in this population. This is a series of 18 Arab families with MKS, who were evaluated clinically and studied using autozygome-guided mutation analysis and exome sequencing. We show that autozygome-guided candidate gene analysis identified the underlying mutation in the majority (n=12, 71%). Exome sequencing revealed a likely pathogenic mutation in three novel candidate MKS disease genes. These include C5orf42, Ellis–van-Creveld disease gene EVC2 and SEC8 (also known as EXOC4), which encodes an exocyst protein with an established role in ciliogenesis. This is the largest and most comprehensive genomic study on MKS in Arabs and the results, in addition to revealing genetic and allelic heterogeneity, suggest that previously reported disease genes and the novel candidates uncovered by this study account for the overwhelming majority of MKS patients in our population. PMID:23169490

  15. Candidate genetic analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and severity of coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Suet Nee; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Todd, Josh; Lombardi, Raffaella; Willerson, James T; Gotto, Antonio M; Ballantyne, Christie M; Marian, AJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Plasma level of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), a heritable trait, is an important determinant of susceptibility to atherosclerosis. Non-synonymous and regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes implicated in HDL-C synthesis and metabolism are likely to influence plasma HDL-C, apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) levels and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Methods We genotyped 784 unrelated Caucasian individuals from two sets of populations (Lipoprotein and Coronary Atherosclerosis Study- LCAS, N = 333 and TexGen, N = 451) for 94 SNPs in 42 candidate genes by 5' nuclease assays. We tested the distribution of the phenotypes by the Shapiro-Wilk normality test. We used Box-Cox regression to analyze associations of the non-normally distributed phenotypes (plasma HDL-C and apo A-I levels) with the genotypes. We included sex, age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus (DM), and cigarette smoking as covariates. We calculated the q values as indicators of the false positive discovery rate (FDR). Results Plasma HDL-C levels were associated with sex (higher in females), BMI (inversely), smoking (lower in smokers), DM (lower in those with DM) and SNPs in APOA5, APOC2, CETP, LPL and LIPC (each q ≤0.01). Likewise, plasma apo A-I levels, available in the LCAS subset, were associated with SNPs in CETP, APOA5, and APOC2 as well as with BMI, sex and age (all q values ≤0.03). The APOA5 variant S19W was also associated with minimal lumen diameter (MLD) of coronary atherosclerotic lesions, a quantitative index of severity of coronary atherosclerosis (q = 0.018); mean number of coronary artery occlusions (p = 0.034) at the baseline and progression of coronary atherosclerosis, as indicated by the loss of MLD. Conclusion Putatively functional variants of APOA2, APOA5, APOC2, CETP, LPL, LIPC and SOAT2 are independent genetic determinants of plasma HDL-C levels. The non-synonymous S19W SNP in APOA5 is also an independent determinant of plasma

  16. Genetic analysis reveals candidate species in the Scinax catharinae clade (Amphibia: Anura) from Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Lídia; Solé, Mirco; Siqueira, Sérgio; Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes de Mello; Strüssmann, Christine; Sampaio, Iracilda

    2016-03-01

    Scinax (Anura: Hylidae) is a species-rich genus of amphibians (113 spp.), divided into five species groups by morphological features. Cladistic analyses however revealed only two monophyletic clades in these groups: Scinax catharinae and Scinax ruber. Most species from the S. catharinae clade are found in Atlantic rainforest, except for Scinax canastrensis,S. centralis, S. luizotavioi, S. machadoi,S. pombali and S. skaios. In the present work, specimens of Scinax collected in Chapada dos Guimarães, central Brazil, were morphologically compatible with species from theS. catharinae group. On the other hand, genetic analysis based on mitochondrial (16S and 12S) and nuclear (rhodopsin) sequences revealed a nucleotide divergence of 6 to 20% between Scinax sp. and other congeners from the Brazilian savannah (Cerrado). Accordingly, Bayesian inference placed Scinax sp. in the S. catharinae clade with high support values. Hence, these findings strongly indicate the presence of a new species in the S. catharinae clade from the southwestern portion of the Brazilian savannah. To be properly validated as a novel species, detailed comparative morphological and bioacustic studies with other taxa from Brazil such asS. canastrensis, S. centralis, S. luizotavioi, S. machadoi, S. pombali and S. skaios are required.

  17. Genetic analysis reveals candidate species in the Scinax catharinae clade (Amphibia: Anura) from Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lídia; Solé, Mirco; Siqueira, Sérgio; Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes de Mello; Strüssmann, Christine; Sampaio, Iracilda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Scinax (Anura: Hylidae) is a species-rich genus of amphibians (113 spp.), divided into five species groups by morphological features. Cladistic analyses however revealed only two monophyletic clades in these groups: Scinax catharinae and Scinax ruber. Most species from the S. catharinae clade are found in Atlantic rainforest, except for Scinax canastrensis,S. centralis, S. luizotavioi, S. machadoi,S. pombali and S. skaios. In the present work, specimens of Scinax collected in Chapada dos Guimarães, central Brazil, were morphologically compatible with species from theS. catharinae group. On the other hand, genetic analysis based on mitochondrial (16S and 12S) and nuclear (rhodopsin) sequences revealed a nucleotide divergence of 6 to 20% between Scinax sp. and other congeners from the Brazilian savannah (Cerrado). Accordingly, Bayesian inference placed Scinax sp. in the S. catharinae clade with high support values. Hence, these findings strongly indicate the presence of a new species in the S. catharinae clade from the southwestern portion of the Brazilian savannah. To be properly validated as a novel species, detailed comparative morphological and bioacustic studies with other taxa from Brazil such asS. canastrensis, S. centralis, S. luizotavioi, S. machadoi, S. pombali and S. skaios are required. PMID:27007898

  18. Stress-sensitive neurosignalling in depression: an integrated network biology approach to candidate gene selection for genetic association analysis.

    PubMed

    van Eekelen, J Anke M; Ellis, Justine A; Pennell, Craig E; Craig, Jeff; Saffery, Richard; Mattes, Eugen; Olsson, Craig A

    2012-07-26

    Genetic risk for depressive disorders is poorly understood despite consistent suggestions of a high heritable component. Most genetic studies have focused on risk associated with single variants, a strategy which has so far only yielded small (often non-replicable) risks for depressive disorders. In this paper we argue that more substantial risks are likely to emerge from genetic variants acting in synergy within and across larger neurobiological systems (polygenic risk factors). We show how knowledge of major integrated neurobiological systems provides a robust basis for defining and testing theoretically defensible polygenic risk factors. We do this by describing the architecture of the overall stress response. Maladaptation via impaired stress responsiveness is central to the aetiology of depression and anxiety and provides a framework for a systems biology approach to candidate gene selection. We propose principles for identifying genes and gene networks within the neurosystems involved in the stress response and for defining polygenic risk factors based on the neurobiology of stress-related behaviour. We conclude that knowledge of the neurobiology of the stress response system is likely to play a central role in future efforts to improve genetic prediction of depression and related disorders.

  19. Stress-sensitive neurosignalling in depression: an integrated network biology approach to candidate gene selection for genetic association analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Eekelen, J. Anke M.; Ellis, Justine A.; Pennell, Craig E.; Craig, Jeff; Saffery, Richard; Mattes, Eugen; Olsson, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic risk for depressive disorders is poorly understood despite consistent suggestions of a high heritable component. Most genetic studies have focused on risk associated with single variants, a strategy which has so far only yielded small (often non-replicable) risks for depressive disorders. In this paper we argue that more substantial risks are likely to emerge from genetic variants acting in synergy within and across larger neurobiological systems (polygenic risk factors). We show how knowledge of major integrated neurobiological systems provides a robust basis for defining and testing theoretically defensible polygenic risk factors. We do this by describing the architecture of the overall stress response. Maladaptation via impaired stress responsiveness is central to the aetiology of depression and anxiety and provides a framework for a systems biology approach to candidate gene selection. We propose principles for identifying genes and gene networks within the neurosystems involved in the stress response and for defining polygenic risk factors based on the neurobiology of stress-related behaviour. We conclude that knowledge of the neurobiology of the stress response system is likely to play a central role in future efforts to improve genetic prediction of depression and related disorders. PMID:25478122

  20. Genetic analysis of the calcineurin pathway identifies members of the EGR gene family, specifically EGR3, as potential susceptibility candidates in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazuo; Gerber, David J.; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Ohba, Hisako; Toyota, Tomoko; Aruga, Jun; Minabe, Yoshio; Tonegawa, Susumu; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    The calcineurin cascade is central to neuronal signal transduction, and genes in this network are intriguing candidate schizophrenia susceptibility genes. To replicate and extend our previously reported association between the PPP3CC gene, encoding the calcineurin catalytic γ-subunit, and schizophrenia, we examined 84 SNPs from 14 calcineurin-related candidate genes for genetic association by using 124 Japanese schizophrenic pedigrees. Four of these genes (PPP3CC, EGR2, EGR3, and EGR4) showed nominally significant association with schizophrenia. In a postmortem brain study, EGR1, EGR2, and EGR3 transcripts were shown to be down-regulated in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenic, but not bipolar, patients. These findings raise a potentially important role for EGR genes in schizophrenia pathogenesis. Because EGR3 is an attractive candidate gene based on its chromosomal location close to PPP3CC within 8p21.3 and its functional link to dopamine, glutamate, and neuregulin signaling, we extended our analysis by resequencing the entire EGR3 genomic interval and detected 15 SNPs. One of these, IVS1 + 607A→G SNP, displayed the strongest evidence for disease association, which was confirmed in 1,140 independent case-control samples. An in vitro promoter assay detected a possible expression-regulatory effect of this SNP. These findings support the previous genetic association of altered calcineurin signaling with schizophrenia pathogenesis and identify EGR3 as a compelling susceptibility gene. PMID:17360599

  1. Genetic analysis of candidate loci in non-syndromic cleft lip families from Antioquia-Colombia and Ohio.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lina M; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Marazita, Mary L; Krahn, Katherine; Maher, Brion S; Cooper, Margaret E; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo R; Lidral, Andrew C

    2004-03-01

    Non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a genetically complex birth defect, with a prevalence from 1/500 to 1/1,000 live births. Evidence from linkage and linkage disequilibrium studies is contradictory suggesting that heterogeneity between study populations may exist. A recent report of a genome widescan in 92 sib pairs from the United Kingdom revealed suggestive linkage to 10 loci [Prescott et al., 2000]. The purpose of this study is to replicate those results and evaluate additional candidate genes in 49 Colombian and 13 Ohio families. Genotypes were obtained for STRPs at 1p36, 2p13 (TGFA), 4p16 (MSX1), 6p23-25, 6q25-27, 8q23-24, 11p12-q13, 12q13, 14q24 (TGFB3), 16q22-24, 17q12-21 (RARA), and Xcen-q21. Linkage was performed using parametric (dominant and recessive models) and non-parametric (GenehunterNPL and SimIBD) analyses. In addition, heterogeneity was analyzed using GenehunterHLOD, and association determined by the TDT. The Colombian families showed significant SimIBD results for 11p12-q13 (P = 0.034), 12q13 (P = 0.015), 16q22-24 (0.01), and 17q12-21 (0.009), while the Ohio families showed significant SimIBD results for 1p36 (P = 0.02), TGFA (P = 0.005), 6p23 (P = 0.004), 11p12-q13 (P = 0.048) and significant NPL results for TGFA (NPL = 3.01, P = 0.009), 4p16 (MNPL = 2.07, P = 0.03) and 12q13 (SNPL = 3.55, P = 0.007). Significant association results were obtained only for the Colombian families in the regions 1p36 (P = 0.046), 6p23-25 (P = 0.020), and 12q13 (P = 0.046). In addition several families yielded LOD scores ranging from 1.09 to 1.73, for loci at 4p16, 6p23-25, 16q22-24, and 17q13. These results confirm previous reports for these loci. However, the differences between the two populations suggest that population specific locus heterogeneity exists. This article contains supplementary material, which may be viewed at the American Journal of Medical Genetics website at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0148-7299/suppmat/index.html.

  2. SNP500Cancer: a public resource for sequence validation, assay development, and frequency analysis for genetic variation in candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Packer, Bernice R; Yeager, Meredith; Burdett, Laura; Welch, Robert; Beerman, Michael; Qi, Liqun; Sicotte, Hugues; Staats, Brian; Acharya, Mekhala; Crenshaw, Andrew; Eckert, Andrew; Puri, Vinita; Gerhard, Daniela S; Chanock, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    The SNP500Cancer database provides sequence and genotype assay information for candidate SNPs useful in mapping complex diseases, such as cancer. The database is an integral component of the NCI Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (http://cgap.nci.nih.gov). SNP500Cancer reports sequence analysis of anonymized control DNA samples (n = 102 Coriell samples representing four self-described ethnic groups: African/African-American, Caucasian, Hispanic and Pacific Rim). The website is searchable by gene, chromosome, gene ontology pathway, dbSNP ID and SNP500Cancer SNP ID. As of October 2005, the database contains >13 400 SNPs, 9124 of which have been sequenced in the SNP500Cancer population. For each analysed SNP, gene location and >200 bp of surrounding annotated sequence (including nearby SNPs) are provided, with frequency information in total and per subpopulation as well as calculation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for each subpopulation. The website provides the conditions for validated sequencing and genotyping assays, as well as genotype results for the 102 samples, in both viewable and downloadable formats. A subset of sequence validated SNPs with minor allele frequency >5% are entered into a high-throughput pipeline for genotyping analysis to determine concordance for the same 102 samples. In addition, the results of genotype analysis for select validated SNP assays (defined as 100% concordance between sequence analysis and genotype results) are posted for an additional 280 samples drawn from the Human Diversity Panel (HDP). SNP500Cancer provides an invaluable resource for investigators to select SNPs for analysis, design genotyping assays using validated sequence data, choose selected assays already validated on one or more genotyping platforms, and select reference standards for genotyping assays. The SNP500Cancer database is freely accessible via the web page at http://snp500cancer.nci.nih.gov.

  3. Genetic determinants of the ankle-brachial index: A meta-analysis of a cardiovascular candidate gene 50K SNP panel in the candidate gene association resource (CARe) consortium

    PubMed Central

    Wassel, Christina L.; Lamina, Claudia; Nambi, Vijay; Coassin, Stefan; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Jacobs, David R.; Franceschini, Nora; Papanicolaou, George J.; Gibson, Quince; Yanek, Lisa R.; van der Harst, Pim; Ferguson, Jane F.; Crawford, Dana C.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Allison, Matthew A.; Criqui, Michael H.; McDermott, Mary M.; Mehra, Reena; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Redline, Susan; Kaplan, Robert C.; Heiss, Gerardo; Rotter, Jerome I.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Taylor, Herman A.; Eraso, Luis H.; Haun, Margot; Li, Mingyao; Meisinger, Christa; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Kollerits, Barbara; Rantner, Barbara; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Stadler, Marietta; Mueller, Thomas; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Klein-Weigel, Peter; Summerer, Monika; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Navis, Gerjan; Leach, Irene Mateo; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Goodloe, Robert; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Becker, Diane M.; Cooke, John P.; Absher, Devin M.; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Mohler, Emile R.; North, Kari E.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Kronenberg, Florian; Murabito, Joanne M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Candidate gene association studies for peripheral artery disease (PAD), including subclinical disease assessed with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), have been limited by the modest number of genes examined. We conducted a two stage meta-analysis of ~50,000 SNPs across ~2100 candidate genes to identify genetic variants for ABI. Methods and results We studied subjects of European ancestry from 8 studies (n = 21,547, 55% women, mean age 44–73 years) and African American ancestry from 5 studies (n = 7267, 60% women, mean age 41–73 years) involved in the candidate gene association resource (CARe) consortium. In each ethnic group, additive genetic models were used (with each additional copy of the minor allele corresponding to the given beta) to test each SNP for association with continuous ABI (excluding ABI > 1.40) and PAD (defined as ABI < 0.90) using linear or logistic regression with adjustment for known PAD risk factors and population stratification. We then conducted a fixed-effects inverse-variance weighted meta-analyses considering a p < 2 × 10−6 to denote statistical significance. Results In the European ancestry discovery meta-analyses, rs2171209 in SYTL3 (β = −0.007, p = 6.02 × 10−7) and rs290481 in TCF7L2 (β = −0.008, p = 7.01 × 10−7) were significantly associated with ABI. None of the SNP associations for PAD were significant, though a SNP in CYP2B6 (p = 4.99 × 10−5) was among the strongest associations. These 3 genes are linked to key PAD risk factors (lipoprotein(a), type 2 diabetes, and smoking behavior, respectively). We sought replication in 6 population-based and 3 clinical samples (n = 15,440) for rs290481 and rs2171209. However, in the replication stage (rs2171209, p = 0.75; rs290481, p = 0.19) and in the combined discovery and replication analysis the SNP–ABI associations were no longer significant (rs2171209, p = 1.14 × 10−3; rs290481, p = 8.88 × 10−5). In African Americans, none of the SNP associations for

  4. Genetic Analysis of Mesangial Matrix Expansion in Aging Mice and Identification of Far2 as a Candidate Gene

    PubMed Central

    Noordmans, Gerda A.; Caputo, Christina R.; Huang, Yuan; Sheehan, Susan M.; Bulthuis, Marian; Heeringa, Peter; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; van Goor, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Aging of the kidney is associated with renal damage, in particular mesangial matrix expansion (MME). Identifying the genes involved in this process will help to unravel the mechanisms of aging and aid in the design of novel therapeutic modalities aimed at prevention and regression. In this study, structural changes in glomeruli of 24 inbred mouse strains were characterized in male mice at 6, 12, and 20 months of age. Haplotype association mapping was used to determine genetic loci associated with the presence of MME at 20 months. This analysis identified a significant association with a 200-kb haplotype block on chromosome 6 containing Far2. Sequencing revealed that mouse strains with MME contain a 9-bp sequence in the 5′ untranslated region of Far2 that is absent in most of the strains without MME. Real-time PCR showed a two-fold increase in the expression of Far2 in the kidneys of strains with the insert, and subsequent experiments performed in vitro with luciferase reporter vectors showed that this sequence difference causes differential expression of Far2. Overexpression of Far2 in a mouse mesangial cell line induced upregulation of platelet activating factor and the fibrotic marker TGF-β. This upregulation of MME-promoting factors may result, in part, from the FAR2-catalyzed reduction of fatty acyl-coenzyme A to fatty alcohols, which are possible precursors of platelet activating factor. Overall, these data suggest the identification of a novel pathway involved in renal aging that may yield therapeutic targets for reducing MME. PMID:24009241

  5. Functional Mixed Effects Models for Candidate Genetic Mapping in Imaging Genetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ja-An; Zhu, Hongtu; Mihye, Ahn; Sun, Wei; Ibrahim, Joseph G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a functional mixed effects modeling (FMEM) framework for the joint analysis of high-dimensional imaging data in a large number of locations (called voxels) of a three-dimensional volume with a set of genetic markers and clinical covariates. Our FMEM is extremely useful for effciently carrying out the candidate gene approaches in imaging genetic studies. FMEM consists of two novel components including a mixed effects model for modeling nonlinear genetic effects on imaging phenotypes by introducing the genetic random effects at each voxel and a jumping surface model for modeling the variance components of the genetic random effects and fixed effects as piecewise smooth functions of the voxels. Moreover, FMEM naturally accommodates the correlation structure of genetic markers at each voxel, while the jumping surface model explicitly incorporates the intrinsically spatial smoothness of the imaging data. We propose a novel two-stage adaptive smoothing procedure to spatially estimate the piecewise smooth functions, particularly the irregular functional genetic variance components, while preserving their edges among different piecewise-smooth regions. We develop weighted likelihood ratio tests and derive their exact approximations to test the effect of the genetic markers across voxels. Simulation studies show that FMEM significantly outperforms voxel-wise approaches in terms of higher sensitivity and specificity to identify regions of interest for carrying out candidate genetic mapping in imaging genetic studies. Finally, FMEM is used to identify brain regions affected by three candidate genes including CR1, CD2AP, and PICALM, thereby hoping to shed light on the pathological interactions between these candidate genes and brain structure and function. PMID:25270690

  6. Functional-mixed effects models for candidate genetic mapping in imaging genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ja-An; Zhu, Hongtu; Mihye, Ahn; Sun, Wei; Ibrahim, Joseph G

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a functional-mixed effects modeling (FMEM) framework for the joint analysis of high-dimensional imaging data in a large number of locations (called voxels) of a three-dimensional volume with a set of genetic markers and clinical covariates. Our FMEM is extremely useful for efficiently carrying out the candidate gene approaches in imaging genetic studies. FMEM consists of two novel components including a mixed effects model for modeling nonlinear genetic effects on imaging phenotypes by introducing the genetic random effects at each voxel and a jumping surface model for modeling the variance components of the genetic random effects and fixed effects as piecewise smooth functions of the voxels. Moreover, FMEM naturally accommodates the correlation structure of the genetic markers at each voxel, while the jumping surface model explicitly incorporates the intrinsically spatial smoothness of the imaging data. We propose a novel two-stage adaptive smoothing procedure to spatially estimate the piecewise smooth functions, particularly the irregular functional genetic variance components, while preserving their edges among different piecewise-smooth regions. We develop weighted likelihood ratio tests and derive their exact approximations to test the effect of the genetic markers across voxels. Simulation studies show that FMEM significantly outperforms voxel-wise approaches in terms of higher sensitivity and specificity to identify regions of interest for carrying out candidate genetic mapping in imaging genetic studies. Finally, FMEM is used to identify brain regions affected by three candidate genes including CR1, CD2AP, and PICALM, thereby hoping to shed light on the pathological interactions between these candidate genes and brain structure and function.

  7. Class Teacher Candidates' Opinions on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ural Keles, Pinar; Aydin, Suleyman

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the Class teacher candidates' opinions on Genetically Modified Organisms. The study was carried out with 101 teacher candidates who were studying in the 3rd grade of Agri Ibrahim Çeçen University Classroom Teacher Department in 2016-2017 academic year. Of the students who participated in the survey, 56 were…

  8. Genetic influences on smoking: candidate genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rossing, M A

    1998-01-01

    Twin studies consistently indicate important genetic influences on multiple aspects of smoking behavior, including both initiation and cessation; however, knowledge regarding the role of specific genes is extremely limited. Habit-forming actions of nicotine appear to be triggered primarily at nicotinic receptors on the cell bodies of dopaminergic neurons in the mesolimbic "reward" system of the brain, a region implicated in addiction to other substances including cocaine, opiates, and alcohol. Important aspects of the dopaminergic pathway include synthesis of dopamine in dopaminergic neurons, release of dopamine by presynaptic neurons, receptor activation of postsynaptic neurons, dopamine re-uptake by presynaptic neurons, and metabolism of released dopamine. Research examining the role of allelic variation in genes involved in these functions is being actively pursued with respect to addictive behavior as well as personality traits and psycho- and neuropathologic conditions and has implications for smoking research. In addition, genetic differences in nicotinic receptors or nicotine metabolism might reasonably be hypothesized to play a role in smoking addiction. A role of dopaminergic or other genes in smoking cessation is of particular potential importance, as research in this area may lead to the identification of subgroups of individuals for whom pharmacologic cessation aids may be most effective. PMID:9647893

  9. Genetic susceptibility to renal scar formation after urinary tract infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis of candidate gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Zaffanello, Marco; Tardivo, Stefano; Cataldi, Luigi; Fanos, Vassilios; Biban, Paolo; Malerba, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Identifying patients who may develop renal scarring after urinary tract infections (UTI) remains challenging, as clinical determinants explain only a portion of individual risk. An additional factor that likely affects risk is individual genetic variability. We searched for peer-reviewed articles from 1980 to December 2009 in electronic databases that reported results showing an association between gene polymorphims and renal scaring after UTI. Two independent researchers screened articles using predetermined criteria. Studies were assessed for methodological quality using an aggregate scoring system. The 18 studies ultimately included in the review had investigated 16 polymorphisms in nine genes in association with renal scarring formation after UTI. Based on the predetermined criteria for assessing the quality of the studies, 12 studies (67%) were identified as being of poor quality design. A meta-analysis of cumulative studies showed on association between renal scarring formation after UTI and the angiotensin converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism [ACE I/D; recessive model for D allele; odds ratio (OR) 1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-2.74, P = 0.02] or transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 c.-509 T > C polymorphism (dominant model for T allele; OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.34-3.76, P = 0.002). However, heterogeneity among studies was large, indicating a strong difference that cannot only be explained by differences in study design. The studies reviewed in this article support a modest involvement of the vasomotor and inflammatory genes in the development of renal scarring after UTIs. This review also shows that only few possible candidate genes have been investigated for an association with renal scarring, raising the hypothesis that some gene polymorphisms may exert their effects through an interaction with as yet uninvestigated factors that may be related to geographic and/or socio-economic differences.

  10. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Somatic Mutations and Candidate Genetic Risk Variants

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Katie M.; Orlow, Irene; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Ballman, Karla; McCall, Linda; DeMatteo, Ronald; Engel, Lawrence S.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or “signatures” in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836) and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836). CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively). Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic origins

  11. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Katie M; Orlow, Irene; Antonescu, Cristina R; Ballman, Karla; McCall, Linda; DeMatteo, Ronald; Engel, Lawrence S

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836) and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836). CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively). Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic origins and

  12. Discovering candidate genes that regulate resin canal number in Pinus taeda stems by integrating genetic analysis across environments, ages, and populations

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, JW; Walker, AR; Neves, LG; Munoz, P; Resende, MFR; Neale, DB; Wegrzyn, JL; Huber, DA; Kirst, M; Davis, JM; Peter, GF

    2014-09-30

    Genetically improving constitutive resin canal development in Pinus stems may enhance the capacity to synthesize terpenes for bark beetle resistance, chemical feedstocks, and biofuels. To discover genes that potentially regulate axial resin canal number (RCN), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4027 genes were tested for association with RCN in two growth rings and three environments in a complex pedigree of 520 Pinus taeda individuals (CCLONES). The map locations of associated genes were compared with RCN quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in a (P.taedaxPinuselliottii)xP.elliottii pseudo-backcross of 345 full-sibs (BC1). Resin canal number was heritable (h(2)0.12-0.21) and positively genetically correlated with xylem growth (r(g)0.32-0.72) and oleoresin flow (r(g)0.15-0.51). Sixteen well-supported candidate regulators of RCN were discovered in CCLONES, including genes associated across sites and ages, unidirectionally associated with oleoresin flow and xylem growth, and mapped to RCN QTLs in BC1. Breeding is predicted to increase RCN 11% in one generation and could be accelerated with genomic selection at accuracies of 0.45-0.52 across environments. There is significant genetic variation for RCN in loblolly pine, which can be exploited in breeding for elevated terpene content.

  13. The Genetics of Reading Disabilities: From Phenotypes to Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Raskind, Wendy H.; Peter, Beate; Richards, Todd; Eckert, Mark M.; Berninger, Virginia W.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of (a) issues in definition and diagnosis of specific reading disabilities at the behavioral level that may occur in different constellations of developmental and phenotypic profiles (patterns); (b) rapidly expanding research on genetic heterogeneity and gene candidates for dyslexia and other reading disabilities; (c) emerging research on gene-brain relationships; and (d) current understanding of epigenetic mechanisms whereby environmental events may alter behavioral expression of genetic variations. A glossary of genetic terms (denoted by bold font) is provided for readers not familiar with the technical terms. PMID:23308072

  14. Examination of Candidate Genes in Language Disorder: A Model of Genetic Association for Treatment Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Jonathan; Camarata, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a model for studying genetic association of response to intervention in child language disorders. In addition to a theoretical overview and review of different approaches to studying candidate genes, a specific methodology for completing this type of analysis is presented. The goal of the analysis is to…

  15. Genetic Dissection of a Blood Pressure Quantitative Trait Locus on Rat Chromosome 1 and Gene Expression Analysis Identifies SPON1 as a Novel Candidate Hypertension Gene

    PubMed Central

    Clemitson, Jenny-Rebecca; Dixon, Richard J.; Haines, Steve; Bingham, Andrew J.; Patel, Bhakti R.; Hall, Laurence; Lo, Ming; Sassard, Jean; Charchar, Fadi J.; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2007-01-01

    A region with a major effect on blood pressure is located on rat chromosome 1. We have previously isolated this region in reciprocal congenic strains (WKY.SHR-Sa and SHR.WKY-Sa) derived from a cross of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) with the Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY) and shown that there are two distinct BP quantitative trait loci (QTLs), BP1 and BP2, in this region. Sisa1, a congenic sub-strain from the SHR.WKY-Sa animals carrying an introgressed segment of 4.3Mb, contains BP1. Here, we report further dissection of BP1 by the creation of two new mutually exclusive congenic sub-strains (Sisa1a and Sisa1b) and interrogation of candidate genes by expression profiling and targeted transcript sequencing. Only one of the sub-strains (Sisa1a) continued to demonstrate a BP difference but with a reduced introgressed segment of 3Mb. Exonic sequencing of the twenty genes located in the Sisa1a region did not identify any major differences between SHR and WKY. However, microarray expression profiling of whole kidney samples and subsequent quantitative RT-PCR identified a single gene, Spon1 that exhibited significant differential expression between the WKY and SHR genotypes at both 6 and 24 weeks of age. Western blot analysis confirmed an increased level of the Spon1 gene product in SHR kidneys. Spon1 belongs to a family of genes with anti-angiogenic properties. These findings justify further investigation of this novel positional candidate gene in BP control in hypertensive rat models and humans. PMID:17332427

  16. A candidate multimodal functional genetic network for thermal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rachana; Prajapati, Indira; Bankston, Shannon; Thompson, Aprylle; Usher, Jaytriece; Isokpehi, Raphael D.

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate ectotherms such as reptiles provide ideal organisms for the study of adaptation to environmental thermal change. Comparative genomic and exomic studies can recover markers that diverge between warm and cold adapted lineages, but the genes that are functionally related to thermal adaptation may be difficult to identify. We here used a bioinformatics genome-mining approach to predict and identify functions for suitable candidate markers for thermal adaptation in the chicken. We first established a framework of candidate functions for such markers, and then compiled the literature on genes known to adapt to the thermal environment in different lineages of vertebrates. We then identified them in the genomes of human, chicken, and the lizard Anolis carolinensis, and established a functional genetic interaction network in the chicken. Surprisingly, markers initially identified from diverse lineages of vertebrates such as human and fish were all in close functional relationship with each other and more associated than expected by chance. This indicates that the general genetic functional network for thermoregulation and/or thermal adaptation to the environment might be regulated via similar evolutionarily conserved pathways in different vertebrate lineages. We were able to identify seven functions that were statistically overrepresented in this network, corresponding to four of our originally predicted functions plus three unpredicted functions. We describe this network as multimodal: central regulator genes with the function of relaying thermal signal (1), affect genes with different cellular functions, namely (2) lipoprotein metabolism, (3) membrane channels, (4) stress response, (5) response to oxidative stress, (6) muscle contraction and relaxation, and (7) vasodilation, vasoconstriction and regulation of blood pressure. This network constitutes a novel resource for the study of thermal adaptation in the closely related nonavian reptiles and other

  17. Genetic similarity between cancers and comorbid Mendelian diseases identifies candidate driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, Rachel D.; Emmett, Kevin J.; Madubata, Chioma; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Rabadan, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Despite large-scale cancer genomics studies, key somatic mutations driving cancer, and their functional roles, remain elusive. Here we propose that analysis of comorbidities of Mendelian diseases with cancers provides a novel, systematic way to discover new cancer genes. If germline genetic variation in Mendelian loci predisposes bearers to common cancers, the same loci may harbor cancer-associated somatic variation. Compilations of clinical records spanning over 100 million patients provide an unprecedented opportunity to assess clinical associations between Mendelian diseases and cancers. We systematically compare these comorbidities against recurrent somatic mutations from more than five thousand patients across many cancers. Using multiple measures of genetic similarity, we show that a Mendelian disease and comorbid cancer indeed have genetic alterations of significant functional similarity. This result provides a basis to identify candidate drivers in cancers including melanoma and glioblastoma. Some Mendelian diseases demonstrate “pan-cancer” comorbidity and shared genetics across cancers. PMID:25926297

  18. Genetic analysis of 103 candidate genes for coronary artery disease and associated phenotypes in a founder population reveals a new association between endothelin-1 and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Pare, Guillaume; Serre, David; Brisson, Diane; Anand, Sonia S; Montpetit, Alexandre; Tremblay, Gerald; Engert, James C; Hudson, Thomas J; Gaudet, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major health concern in both developed and developing countries. With a heritability estimated at ~50%, there is a strong rationale to better define the genetic contribution to CAD. This project involves the analysis of 884 individuals from 142 families (with average sibships of 5.7) as well as 558 case and control subjects from the Saguenay Lac St-Jean region of northeastern Quebec, with the use of 1,536 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 103 candidate genes for CAD. By use of clusters of SNPs to generate multiallelic haplotypes at candidate loci for segregation studies within families, suggestive linkage for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is observed on chromosome 1p36.22. Furthermore, several associations that remain significant after Bonferroni correction are observed with lipoprotein-related traits as well as plasma concentrations of adiponectin. Of note, HDL cholesterol levels are associated with an amino acid substitution (lysine/asparagine) at codon 198 (rs5370) of endothelin-1 (EDN1) in a sex-specific manner, as well as with a SNP (rs2292318) located 7.7 kb upstream of lecithin cholesterol acyl-transferase (LCAT). Whereas the other observed associations are described in the current literature, these two are new. Using an independent validation sample of 806 individuals, we confirm the EDN1 association (P<.005), whereas the LCAT association was nonsignificant (P=.12).

  19. Direct analysis of candidate genes in impulsive behaviours.

    PubMed

    Goldman, D; Lappalainen, J; Ozaki, N

    1996-01-01

    Antisocial behaviour is both heterogeneous and the product of interacting genetic and environmental factors acting at different levels of causation. Heritability studies show that individual differences in predisposition to antisocial behaviour are transmitted vertically in families by genetic mechanisms. Owing to aetiological heterogeneity and complexity, study of a variety of other behavioural phenotypes may shed more light on the antecedents of antisocial behaviour than direct studies on antisocial behaviour. Identification of genetic vulnerability factors would clarify mechanisms of vulnerability and the role of the environment. Direct gene analysis and genetic linkage analysis have identified structural variants in genes involved in neurotransmitter function, and some progress has been made towards relating these genetic variants to antisocial personality and other behaviours. Thyroid hormone receptor variants can cause attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and a monoamine oxidase A variant leads to aggressive behaviour in one family. Direct gene analyses have revealed non-conservative amino acid substitutions and structural variants (generally rare) at DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 dopamine receptors and 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT7 serotonin receptors. The stage is set to identify the phenotypic significance of these as well as genetic variants at other loci which may be relevant as candidate genes for antisocial behaviour and related behavioural differences.

  20. Leveraging Ethnic Group Incidence Variation to Investigate Genetic Susceptibility to Glioma: A Novel Candidate SNP Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Daniel I.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John; Jenkins, Robert; Houlston, Richard S.; Bondy, Melissa; Simon, Matthias; Sanson, Marc; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Labussière, Marianne; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Moebus, Susanne; Eisele, Lewin; Dewan, Andrew T.; Dubrow, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Using a novel candidate SNP approach, we aimed to identify a possible genetic basis for the higher glioma incidence in Whites relative to East Asians and African-Americans. Methods:  We hypothesized that genetic regions containing SNPs with extreme differences in allele frequencies across ethnicities are most likely to harbor susceptibility variants. We used International HapMap Project data to identify 3,961 candidate SNPs with the largest allele frequency differences in Whites compared to East Asians and Africans and tested these SNPs for association with glioma risk in a set of White cases and controls. Top SNPs identified in the discovery dataset were tested for association with glioma in five independent replication datasets. Results: No SNP achieved statistical significance in either the discovery or replication datasets after accounting for multiple testing or conducting meta-analysis. However, the most strongly associated SNP, rs879471, was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with a previously identified risk SNP, rs6010620, in RTEL1. We estimate rs6010620 to account for a glioma incidence rate ratio of 1.34 for Whites relative to East Asians. Conclusion: We explored genetic susceptibility to glioma using a novel candidate SNP method which may be applicable to other diseases with appropriate epidemiologic patterns. PMID:23091480

  1. Immunogenicity of novel mumps vaccine candidates generated by genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pei; Chen, Zhenhai; Phan, Shannon; Pickar, Adrian; He, Biao

    2014-03-01

    Mumps is a highly contagious human disease, characterized by lateral or bilateral nonsuppurative swelling of the parotid glands and neurological complications that can result in aseptic meningitis or encephalitis. A mumps vaccination program implemented since the 1960s reduced mumps incidence by more than 99% and kept the mumps case numbers as low as hundreds of cases per year in the United States before 2006. However, a large mumps outbreak occurred in vaccinated populations in 2006 and again in 2009 in the United States, raising concerns about the efficacy of the vaccination program. Previously, we have shown that clinical isolate-based recombinant mumps viruses lacking expression of either the V protein (rMuVΔV) or the SH protein (rMuVΔSH) are attenuated in a neurovirulence test using newborn rat brains (P. Xu et al., Virology 417:126-136, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2011.05.003; P. Xu et al., J. Virol. 86:1768-1776, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.06019-11) and may be good candidates for vaccine development. In this study, we examined immunity induced by rMuVΔSH and rMuVΔV in mice. Furthermore, we generated recombinant mumps viruses lacking expression of both the V protein and the SH protein (rMuVΔSHΔV). Analysis of rMuVΔSHΔV indicated that it was stable in tissue culture cell lines. Importantly, rMuVΔSHΔV was immunogenic in mice, indicating that it is a promising candidate for mumps vaccine development.

  2. Immunogenicity of Novel Mumps Vaccine Candidates Generated by Genetic Modification

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pei; Chen, Zhenhai; Phan, Shannon; Pickar, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Mumps is a highly contagious human disease, characterized by lateral or bilateral nonsuppurative swelling of the parotid glands and neurological complications that can result in aseptic meningitis or encephalitis. A mumps vaccination program implemented since the 1960s reduced mumps incidence by more than 99% and kept the mumps case numbers as low as hundreds of cases per year in the United States before 2006. However, a large mumps outbreak occurred in vaccinated populations in 2006 and again in 2009 in the United States, raising concerns about the efficacy of the vaccination program. Previously, we have shown that clinical isolate-based recombinant mumps viruses lacking expression of either the V protein (rMuVΔV) or the SH protein (rMuVΔSH) are attenuated in a neurovirulence test using newborn rat brains (P. Xu et al., Virology 417:126–136, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2011.05.003; P. Xu et al., J. Virol. 86:1768–1776, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.06019-11) and may be good candidates for vaccine development. In this study, we examined immunity induced by rMuVΔSH and rMuVΔV in mice. Furthermore, we generated recombinant mumps viruses lacking expression of both the V protein and the SH protein (rMuVΔSHΔV). Analysis of rMuVΔSHΔV indicated that it was stable in tissue culture cell lines. Importantly, rMuVΔSHΔV was immunogenic in mice, indicating that it is a promising candidate for mumps vaccine development. PMID:24352450

  3. Analysis of reelin as a candidate gene for autism.

    PubMed

    Bonora, E; Beyer, K S; Lamb, J A; Parr, J R; Klauck, S M; Benner, A; Paolucci, M; Abbott, A; Ragoussis, I; Poustka, A; Bailey, A J; Monaco, A P

    2003-10-01

    Genetic studies indicate that chromosome 7q is likely to contain an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1). We have followed a positional candidate gene approach to identify relevant gene(s) and report here the analysis of reelin (RELN), a gene located under our peak of linkage. Screening RELN for DNA changes identified novel missense variants absent in a large control group; however, the low frequency of these mutations does not explain the relatively strong linkage results on 7q. Furthermore, analysis of a previously reported triplet repeat polymorphism and intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms, using the transmission disequilibrium test, provided no evidence for association with autism in IMGSAC and German singleton families. The analysis of RELN suggests that it probably does not play a major role in autism aetiology, although further analysis of several missense mutations is warranted in additional affected individuals.

  4. Genetic stability of genome-scale deoptimized RNA virus vaccine candidates under selective pressure

    PubMed Central

    Le Nouën, Cyril; McCarty, Thomas; Brown, Michael; Smith, Melissa Laird; Lleras, Roberto; Dolan, Michael A.; Mehedi, Masfique; Yang, Lijuan; Luongo, Cindy; Liang, Bo; Munir, Shirin; DiNapoli, Joshua M.; Mueller, Steffen; Wimmer, Eckard; Collins, Peter L.; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2017-01-01

    Recoding viral genomes by numerous synonymous but suboptimal substitutions provides live attenuated vaccine candidates. These vaccine candidates should have a low risk of deattenuation because of the many changes involved. However, their genetic stability under selective pressure is largely unknown. We evaluated phenotypic reversion of deoptimized human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine candidates in the context of strong selective pressure. Codon pair deoptimized (CPD) versions of RSV were attenuated and temperature-sensitive. During serial passage at progressively increasing temperature, a CPD RSV containing 2,692 synonymous mutations in 9 of 11 ORFs did not lose temperature sensitivity, remained genetically stable, and was restricted at temperatures of 34 °C/35 °C and above. However, a CPD RSV containing 1,378 synonymous mutations solely in the polymerase L ORF quickly lost substantial attenuation. Comprehensive sequence analysis of virus populations identified many different potentially deattenuating mutations in the L ORF as well as, surprisingly, many appearing in other ORFs. Phenotypic analysis revealed that either of two competing mutations in the virus transcription antitermination factor M2-1, outside of the CPD area, substantially reversed defective transcription of the CPD L gene and substantially restored virus fitness in vitro and in case of one of these two mutations, also in vivo. Paradoxically, the introduction into Min L of one mutation each in the M2-1, N, P, and L proteins resulted in a virus with increased attenuation in vivo but increased immunogenicity. Thus, in addition to providing insights on the adaptability of genome-scale deoptimized RNA viruses, stability studies can yield improved synthetic RNA virus vaccine candidates. PMID:28049853

  5. A candidate syntenic genetic locus is associated with voluntary exercise levels in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Kostrzewa, E; Brandys, M K; van Lith, H A; Kas, M J H

    2015-01-01

    Individual levels of physical activity, and especially of voluntary physical exercise, highly contribute to the susceptibility for developing metabolic, cardiovascular diseases, and potentially to psychiatric disorders. Here, we applied a cross-species approach to explore a candidate genetic region for voluntary exercise levels. First, a panel of mouse chromosome substitution strains was used to map a genomic region on mouse chromosome 2 that contributes to voluntary wheel running levels - a behavioral readout considered a model of voluntary exercise in humans. Subsequently, we tested the syntenic region (HSA20: 51,212,545-55,212,986) in a human sample (Saint Thomas Twin Register; n=3038) and found a significant association between voluntary exercise levels (categorized into excessive and non-excessive exercise) and an intergenic SNP rs459465 (adjusted P-value of 0.001). Taking under consideration the methodological challenges embedded in this translational approach in the research of complex phenotypes, we wanted to further test the validity of this finding. Therefore, we repeated the analysis in an independent human population (ALSPAC data set; n=2557). We found a significant association of excessive exercise with two SNPs in the same genomic region (rs6022999, adjusted P-value of P=0.011 and rs6092090, adjusted P-value of 0.012). We explored the locus for possible candidate genes by means of literature search and bioinformatics analysis of gene function and of trans-regulatory elements. We propose three potential human candidate genes for voluntary physical exercise levels (MC3R, CYP24A1, and GRM8). To conclude, the identified genetic variance in the human locus 20q13.2 may affect voluntary exercise levels.

  6. Genetically modified, live attenuated dengue virus type 3 vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Blaney, Joseph E; Hanson, Christopher T; Firestone, Cai-Yen; Hanley, Kathryn A; Murphy, Brian R; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2004-12-01

    Three novel recombinant dengue type 3 (DEN3) virus vaccine candidates have been generated from a DEN3 virus isolated from a mild outbreak of dengue fever in the Sleman area of central Java in Indonesia in 1978. Antigenic chimeric viruses were prepared by replacing the membrane precursor and envelope (ME) proteins of recombinant DEN4 (rDEN4) virus with those from DEN3 Sleman/78 in the presence (rDEN3/4Delta30(ME)) and the absence (rDEN3/4(ME)) of the Delta30 mutation, a previously described 30-nucleotide deletion in the 3' untranslated region. In addition, a full-length infectious cDNA clone was generated from the DEN3 isolate and used to produce rDEN3 virus and the vaccine candidate rDEN3Delta30. The chimeric viruses rDEN3/4(ME) and rDEN3/4Delta30(ME) appear to be acceptable vaccine candidates since they were restricted in replication in severe combined immune deficiency mice transplanted with human hepatoma cells, in rhesus monkeys, and in Aedes and Toxorynchites mosquitoes, and each was protective in rhesus monkeys against DEN3 virus challenge. The rDEN3/4(ME) and rDEN3/4Delta30(ME) viruses were comparable in all parameters evaluated, indicating that antigenic chimerization resulted in the observed high level of attenuation. Surprisingly, rDEN3Delta30 was not attenuated in any model tested when compared with wild-type rDEN3 and therefore, is not a vaccine candidate at present. Thus, the rDEN3/4(ME) and rDEN3/4Delta30(ME) antigenic chimeric viruses can be considered for evaluation in humans and for inclusion in a tetravalent dengue vaccine.

  7. Genetic heritability of ischemic stroke and the contribution of previously reported candidate gene and genomewide associations.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Steve; Traylor, Matthew; Adib-Samii, Poneh; Malik, Rainer; Paul, Nicola L M; Jackson, Caroline; Farrall, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of genetics to stroke risk, and whether this differs for different stroke subtypes, remainsuncertain. Genomewide complex trait analysis allows heritability to be assessed from genomewide association study (GWAS) data. Previous candidate gene studies have identified many associations with stoke but whether these are important requires replication in large independent data sets. GWAS data sets provide a powerful resource to perform replication studies. We applied genomewide complex trait analysis to a GWAS data set of 3752 ischemic strokes and 5972 controls and determined heritability for all ischemic stroke and the most common subtypes: large-vessel disease, small-vessel disease, and cardioembolic stroke. By systematic review we identified previous candidate gene and GWAS associations with stroke and previous GWAS associations with related cardiovascular phenotypes (myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, and carotid intima-media thickness). Fifty associations were identified. For all ischemic stroke, heritability was 37.9%. Heritability varied markedly by stroke subtype being 40.3% for large-vessel disease and 32.6% for cardioembolic but lower for small-vessel disease (16.1%). No previously reported candidate gene was significant after rigorous correction for multiple testing. In contrast, 3 loci from related cardiovascular GWAS studies were significant: PHACTR1 in large-vessel disease (P=2.63e(-6)), PITX2 in cardioembolic stroke (P=4.78e(-8)), and ZFHX3 in cardioembolic stroke (P=5.50e(-7)). There is substantial heritability for ischemic stroke, but this varies for different stroke subtypes. Previous candidate gene associations contribute little to this heritability, but GWAS studies in related cardiovascular phenotypes are identifying robust associations. The heritability data, and data from GWAS, suggest detecting additional associations will depend on careful stroke subtyping.

  8. Database of cattle candidate genes and genetic markers for milk production and mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Ogorevc, J; Kunej, T; Razpet, A; Dovc, P

    2009-01-01

    A cattle database of candidate genes and genetic markers for milk production and mastitis has been developed to provide an integrated research tool incorporating different types of information supporting a genomic approach to study lactation, udder development and health. The database contains 943 genes and genetic markers involved in mammary gland development and function, representing candidates for further functional studies. The candidate loci were drawn on a genetic map to reveal positional overlaps. For identification of candidate loci, data from seven different research approaches were exploited: (i) gene knockouts or transgenes in mice that result in specific phenotypes associated with mammary gland (143 loci); (ii) cattle QTL for milk production (344) and mastitis related traits (71); (iii) loci with sequence variations that show specific allele-phenotype interactions associated with milk production (24) or mastitis (10) in cattle; (iv) genes with expression profiles associated with milk production (207) or mastitis (107) in cattle or mouse; (v) cattle milk protein genes that exist in different genetic variants (9); (vi) miRNAs expressed in bovine mammary gland (32) and (vii) epigenetically regulated cattle genes associated with mammary gland function (1). Fourty-four genes found by multiple independent analyses were suggested as the most promising candidates and were further in silico analysed for expression levels in lactating mammary gland, genetic variability and top biological functions in functional networks. A miRNA target search for mammary gland expressed miRNAs identified 359 putative binding sites in 3′UTRs of candidate genes. PMID:19508288

  9. Osteosarcoma Genetics and Epigenetics: Emerging Biology and Candidate Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, James J.; Khanna, Chand

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone, typically presenting in the first or second decade of life. Unfortunately, clinical outcomes for osteosarcoma patients have not substantially improved in over 30 years. This stagnation in therapeutic advances is perhaps explained by the genetic, epigenetic, and biological complexities of this rare tumor. In this review we provide a general background on the biology of osteosarcoma and the clinical status quo. We go on to enumerate the genetic and epigenetic defects identified in osteosarcoma. Finally, we discuss ongoing large-scale studies in the field and potential new therapies that are currently under investigation. PMID:26349415

  10. Organ-Specific Quantitative Genetics and Candidate Genes of Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Marta; Ali, Mahmoud; Ferreres, Federico; Moreno, Diego A.; Velasco, Pablo; Soengas, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are proving to be increasingly important for human health and in crop development, defense and adaptation. In spite of the economical importance of Brassica crops in agriculture, the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds presents in these species remain unknown. The genetic and metabolic basis of phenolics accumulation was dissected through analysis of total phenolics concentration and its individual components in leaves, flower buds, and seeds of a double haploid (DH) mapping population of Brassica oleracea. The quantitative trait loci (QTL) that had an effect on phenolics concentration in each organ were integrated, resulting in 33 consensus QTLs controlling phenolics traits. Most of the studied compounds had organ-specific genomic regulation. Moreover, this information allowed us to propose candidate genes and to predict the function of genes underlying the QTL. A number of previously unknown potential regulatory regions involved in phenylpropanoid metabolism were identified and this study illustrates how plant ontogeny can affect a biochemical pathway. PMID:26858727

  11. Organ-Specific Quantitative Genetics and Candidate Genes of Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Marta; Ali, Mahmoud; Ferreres, Federico; Moreno, Diego A; Velasco, Pablo; Soengas, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are proving to be increasingly important for human health and in crop development, defense and adaptation. In spite of the economical importance of Brassica crops in agriculture, the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds presents in these species remain unknown. The genetic and metabolic basis of phenolics accumulation was dissected through analysis of total phenolics concentration and its individual components in leaves, flower buds, and seeds of a double haploid (DH) mapping population of Brassica oleracea. The quantitative trait loci (QTL) that had an effect on phenolics concentration in each organ were integrated, resulting in 33 consensus QTLs controlling phenolics traits. Most of the studied compounds had organ-specific genomic regulation. Moreover, this information allowed us to propose candidate genes and to predict the function of genes underlying the QTL. A number of previously unknown potential regulatory regions involved in phenylpropanoid metabolism were identified and this study illustrates how plant ontogeny can affect a biochemical pathway.

  12. Population, Epidemiological, and Functional Genetics of Gastric Cancer Candidate Genes in Peruvians with Predominant Amerindian Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Zamudio, Roxana; Pereira, Latife; Rocha, Carolina D; Berg, Douglas E; Muniz-Queiroz, Thaís; Sant Anna, Hanaisa P; Cabrera, Lilia; Combe, Juan M; Herrera, Phabiola; Jahuira, Martha H; Leão, Felipe B; Lyon, Fernanda; Prado, William A; Rodrigues, Maíra R; Rodrigues-Soares, Fernanda; Santolalla, Meddly L; Zolini, Camila; Silva, Aristóbolo M; Gilman, Robert H; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo; Kehdy, Fernanda S G

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is associated with chronic infection by Helicobacter pylori and with the host inflammatory response triggered by it, with substantial inter-person variation in the immune response profile due to host genetic factors. To investigate the diversity of the proinflammatory genes IL8, its receptors and PTGS2 in Amerindians; to test whether candidate SNPs in these genes are associated with gastric cancer in an admixed population with high Amerindian ancestry from Lima, Peru; and to assess whether an IL8RB promoter-derived haplotype affects gene expression. We performed a Sanger-resequencing population survey, a candidate-gene association study (220 cases, 288 controls) and meta-analyses. We also performed an in vitro validation by a reporter gene assay of IL8RB promoter. The diversity of the promoter of studied genes in Native Americans is similar to Europeans. Although an association between candidate SNPs and gastric cancer was not found in Peruvians, trend in our data is consistent with meta-analyses results that suggest PTGS2-rs689466-A is associated with H. pylori-associated gastric cancer in East Asia. IL8RB promoter-derived haplotype (rs3890158-A/rs4674258-T), common in Peruvians, was up-regulated by TNF-α unlike the ancestral haplotype (rs3890158-G/rs4674258-C). Bioinformatics analysis suggests that this effect stemmed from creation of a binding site for the FOXO3 transcription factor by rs3890158G>A. Our updated meta-analysis reinforces the role of PTGS2-rs689466-A in gastric cancer in Asians, although more studies that control for ancestry are necessary to clarify its role in Latin Americans. Finally, we suggest that IL8RB-rs3890158G>A is a cis-regulatory SNP.

  13. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  14. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  15. A Novel Candidate Region for Genetic Adaptation to High Altitude in Andean Populations

    PubMed Central

    Lippold, Sebastian; de Filippo, Cesare; Tang, Kun; López Herráez, David; Li, Jing; Stoneking, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Humans living at high altitude (≥2,500 meters above sea level) have acquired unique abilities to survive the associated extreme environmental conditions, including hypoxia, cold temperature, limited food availability and high levels of free radicals and oxidants. Long-term inhabitants of the most elevated regions of the world have undergone extensive physiological and/or genetic changes, particularly in the regulation of respiration and circulation, when compared to lowland populations. Genome scans have identified candidate genes involved in altitude adaption in the Tibetan Plateau and the Ethiopian highlands, in contrast to populations from the Andes, which have not been as intensively investigated. In the present study, we focused on three indigenous populations from Bolivia: two groups of Andean natives, Aymara and Quechua, and the low-altitude control group of Guarani from the Gran Chaco lowlands. Using pooled samples, we identified a number of SNPs exhibiting large allele frequency differences over 900,000 genotyped SNPs. A region in chromosome 10 (within the cytogenetic bands q22.3 and q23.1) was significantly differentiated between highland and lowland groups. We resequenced ~1.5 Mb surrounding the candidate region and identified strong signals of positive selection in the highland populations. A composite of multiple signals like test localized the signal to FAM213A and a related enhancer; the product of this gene acts as an antioxidant to lower oxidative stress and may help to maintain bone mass. The results suggest that positive selection on the enhancer might increase the expression of this antioxidant, and thereby prevent oxidative damage. In addition, the most significant signal in a relative extended haplotype homozygosity analysis was localized to the SFTPD gene, which encodes a surfactant pulmonary-associated protein involved in normal respiration and innate host defense. Our study thus identifies two novel candidate genes and associated pathways

  16. Transcriptomic and genetic studies identify IL-33 as a candidate gene for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Chapuis, J; Hot, D; Hansmannel, F; Kerdraon, O; Ferreira, S; Hubans, C; Maurage, CA; Huot, L; Bensemain, F; Laumet, G; Ayral, AM; Fievet, N; Hauw, JJ; DeKosky, ST; Lemoine, Y; Iwatsubo, T; Wavrant-Devrièze, F; Dartigues, JF; Tzourio, C; Buée, L; Pasquier, F; Berr, C; Mann, D; Lendon, C; Alpérovitch, A; Kamboh, MI; Amouyel, P; Lambert, JC

    2010-01-01

    The only recognised genetic determinant of the common forms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). To identify new candidate genes, we recently performed transcriptomic analysis of 2,741 genes in chromosomal regions of interest using brain tissue of AD cases and controls. From 82 differentially expressed genes, 1,156 polymorphisms were genotyped in two independent discovery sub-samples (n=945). Seventeen genes exhibited at least one polymorphism associated with AD risk and following correction for multiple testing, we retained the IL-33 gene. We first confirmed that the IL-33 expression was decreased in the brain of AD cases compared with that of controls. Further genetic analysis led us to select 3 polymorphisms within this gene, which we analysed in three independent case-control studies. These polymorphisms and a resulting protective haplotype were systematically associated with AD risk in non-APOE ε4 carriers. Using a large prospective study, these associations were also detected when analyzing the prevalent and incident AD cases together or the incident AD cases alone. These polymorphisms were also associated with less cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in the brain of non-APOE ε4 AD cases. Immunohistochemistry experiments finally indicated that the IL-33 expression was consistently restricted to vascular capillaries in the brain. Moreover, IL-33 overexpression in cellular models led to a specific decrease in secretion of the Aβ40 peptides, the main CAA component. In conclusion, our data suggest that genetic variants in IL-33 gene may be associated with a decrease in AD risk potentially in modulating CAA formation. PMID:19204726

  17. Characterising functionally important and ecologically meaningful genetic diversity using a candidate gene approach.

    PubMed

    Piertney, Stuart B; Webster, Lucy M I

    2010-04-01

    Over the past two decades the fields of molecular ecology and population genetics have been dominated by the use of putatively neutral DNA markers, primarily to resolve spatio-temporal patterns of genetic variation to inform our understanding of population structure, gene flow and pedigree. Recent emphasis in comparative functional genomics, however, has fuelled a resurgence of interest in functionally important genetic variation that underpins phenotypic traits of adaptive or ecological significance. It may prove a major challenge to transfer genomics information from classical model species to examine functional diversity in non-model species in natural populations, but already multiple gene-targeted candidate loci with major effect on phenotype and fitness have been identified. Here we briefly describe some of the research strategies used for isolating and characterising functional genetic diversity at candidate gene-targeted loci, and illustrate the efficacy of some of these approaches using our own studies on red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scoticus). We then review how candidate gene markers have been used to: (1) quantify genetic diversity among populations to identify those depauperate in genetic diversity and requiring specific management action; (2) identify the strength and mode of selection operating on individuals within natural populations; and (3) understand direct mechanistic links between allelic variation at single genes and variance in individual fitness.

  18. Genetic susceptibility to heroin addiction; a candidate-gene association study

    PubMed Central

    Levran, O.; Londono, D.; O’Hara, K.; Nielsen, D. A.; Peles, E.; Rotrosen, J.; Casadonte, P.; Linzy, S.; Randesi, M.; Ott, J.; Adelson, M.; Kreek, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a chronic complex disease with a substantial genetic contribution. This study was designed to identify genetic variants that are associated with susceptibility to develop heroin addiction, by analyzing 1350 variants in 130 candidate genes. All subjects had Caucasian ancestry. The sample consisted of 412 former severe heroin addicts in methadone treatment, and 184 healthy controls with no history of drug abuse. Nine variants, in six genes, showed the lowest nominal P values in the association tests (P < 0.01). These variants were in non-coding regions of the genes encoding the mu (OPRM1; rs510769, rs3778151), kappa (OPRK1; rs6473797), and delta opioid receptors, (OPRD1; rs2236861, rs2236857 and rs3766951), the neuropeptide galanin (GAL; rs694066), the serotonin receptor subtype 3B (HTR3B; rs3758987) and the casein kinase 1 isoform epsilon (CSNK1E; rs1534891). Several haplotypes and multi-locus genotype patterns showed nominally significant associations (e.g. OPRM1; P = 0.0006 and CSNK1E; P = 0.0007). Analysis of a combined effect of OPRM1 and OPRD1 showed that rs510769 and rs2236861 increase the risk of heroin addiction (P = 0.0005). None of these associations remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. This study suggests the involvement of several genes and variants in heroin addiction that is worthy of future study. PMID:18518925

  19. Defining a new candidate gene for amelogenesis imperfecta: from molecular genetics to biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Blanca; Ortega-Pinto, Ana; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2011-02-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic conditions that affect the structure and clinical appearance of tooth enamel. The types (hypoplastic, hypocalcified, and hypomature) are correlated with defects in different stages of the process of enamel synthesis. Autosomal dominant, recessive, and X-linked types have been previously described. These disorders are considered clinically and genetically heterogeneous in etiology, involving a variety of genes, such as AMELX, ENAM, DLX3, FAM83H, MMP-20, KLK4, and WDR72. The mutations identified within these causal genes explain less than half of all cases of amelogenesis imperfecta. Most of the candidate and causal genes currently identified encode proteins involved in enamel synthesis. We think it is necessary to refocus the search for candidate genes using biochemical processes. This review provides theoretical evidence that the human SLC4A4 gene (sodium bicarbonate cotransporter) may be a new candidate gene.

  20. Genetic Associations with Hypertension: Meta-Analyses of Six Candidate Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Lingyan; Liao, Qi; Zhang, Lina; Xu, Leiting; Chen, Cheng; Ye, Huadan; Xu, Xuting

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to perform combined analyses of six genetic variants for the risk of hypertension. Methods: After a comprehensive literature search for genetic variants involved with the association study of hypertension, we harvested a total of five genes (six variants) for the current meta-analyses. These genes consisted of CYP4A11 (T8590C), RGS2 (1891-1892del TC and G638A), HTR2A (T102C), GNAS (T393C), and HSD3B1 (T→C Leu338). Results: A total of 20 studies among 13,816 cases and 19,248 controls were retrieved for the meta-analyses of six genetic variants. It was shown that the RGS2 1891-1892del TC (OR=1.10, 95% CI=1.02–1.19, p=0.02) polymorphism and the CYP4A11 T8590C (OR=1.19, 95% CI=1.00–1.41, p=0.05) polymorphism were significantly associated with increased risk of hypertension. No association was found between the other four variants and the risk of hypertension. Conclusion: This meta-analysis revealed that the RGS2 1891-1892del TC polymorphism and CYP4A11 T8590C polymorphism were associated with hypertension risk. However, HSD3B1 T→C Leu338, HTR2A T102C, GNAS T393C, and RGS2 G638A polymorphisms were not associated with hypertension risk. PMID:23859711

  1. Mitochondrial DNA variant at HVI region as a candidate of genetic markers of type 2 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumilar, Gun Gun; Purnamasari, Yunita; Setiadi, Rahmat

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is maternally inherited. mtDNA mutations which can contribute to the excess of maternal inheritance of type 2 diabetes. Due to the high mutation rate, one of the areas in the mtDNA that is often associated with the disease is the hypervariable region I (HVI). Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the genetic variants of human mtDNA HVI that related to the type 2 diabetes in four samples that were taken from four generations in one lineage. Steps being taken include the lyses of hair follicles, amplification of mtDNA HVI fragment using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), detection of PCR products through agarose gel electrophoresis technique, the measurement of the concentration of mtDNA using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, determination of the nucleotide sequence via direct sequencing method and analysis of the sequencing results using SeqMan DNASTAR program. Based on the comparison between nucleotide sequence of samples and revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS) obtained six same mutations that these are C16147T, T16189C, C16193del, T16127C, A16235G, and A16293C. After comparing the data obtained to the secondary data from Mitomap and NCBI, it were found that two mutations, T16189C and T16217C, become candidates as genetic markers of type 2 diabetes even the mutations were found also in the generations of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The results of this study are expected to give contribution to the collection of human mtDNA database of genetic variants that associated to metabolic diseases, so that in the future it can be utilized in various fields, especially in medicine.

  2. Genetic analysis of sleep

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Amanda; Sehgal, Amita

    2010-01-01

    Almost 20 years ago, the gene underlying fatal familial insomnia was discovered, and first suggested the concept that a single gene can regulate sleep. In the two decades since, there have been many advances in the field of behavioral genetics, but it is only in the past 10 years that the genetic analysis of sleep has emerged as an important discipline. Major findings include the discovery of a single gene underlying the sleep disorder narcolepsy, and identification of loci that make quantitative contributions to sleep characteristics. The sleep field has also expanded its focus from mammalian model organisms to Drosophila, zebrafish, and worms, which is allowing the application of novel genetic approaches. Researchers have undertaken large-scale screens to identify new genes that regulate sleep, and are also probing questions of sleep circuitry and sleep function on a molecular level. As genetic tools continue to be refined in each model organism, the genes that support a specific function in sleep will become more apparent. Thus, while our understanding of sleep still remains rudimentary, rapid progress is expected from these recently initiated studies. PMID:20551171

  3. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H; Spurdle, Amanda B; Walker, Logan C; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E; Blazer, Kathleen R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth R; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Doorn, Helena C; Collée, J Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J; Lindor, Noralane M; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Friedman, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In this study, we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n = 3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. The observed P values of association ranged between 0.005 and 1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Genetic analysis of ID1-DBL2X predicts its validity as a vaccine candidate in Colombia and supports at least two independently introduced Plasmodium falciparum populations in the region.

    PubMed

    Rajwani, J; Klinger, C M; Arango, E; Arroyo, M I; Sabbagh, A; Maestre, A; Dacks, J B; Gnidehou, S; Yanow, S K

    2017-09-08

    Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) poses a threat to both the mother and fetus, increasing the risk of severe maternal anemia, fetal growth restriction and low birth weight infants. Two vaccines are currently in development to protect women from Plasmodium falciparum in pregnancy. Both vaccine constructs target the ID1-DBL2X domain of VAR2CSA, a protein expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IEs) that mediates parasite sequestration in the placenta. Although development of an effective vaccine may be hampered by ID1-DBL2X polymorphisms expressed by field isolates, a recent study showed that genetic variation of this domain in South American parasite populations is much lower than in other geographical locations. This suggests that a recombinant vaccine designed to be efficacious in Africa and Asia is likely to be efficacious in South America. However, these studies did not include Colombian parasite populations in their analyses, which are known to be genetically distinct from other South American parasite populations due to their independent introduction from Africa. Therefore, we sought to determine the genetic variation of the ID1-DBL2X domain in Colombian parasites to assess the potential efficacy of the vaccine against PAM in this region. Through sequence analysis and population genetics, we show that there is a low degree of genetic variation amongst Colombian parasite populations and that a vaccine containing conserved antigen variants for worldwide populations is likely to be protective against PAM in Colombia. Our analysis also points towards an African origin for Colombian parasite populations, and suggests that their introduction into Colombia was a recurrent process encompassing multiple introduction events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High-Throughput Transcriptome Sequencing Identifies Candidate Genetic Modifiers of Vulnerability to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Garic, Ana; Berres, Mark E.; Smith, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction FASD is a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disability. Genetic factors can modify vulnerability to FASD, but these elements are poorly characterized. Methods We performed high-throughput transcriptional profiling to identify gene candidates that could potentially modify vulnerability to ethanol’s neurotoxicity. We interrogated a unique genetic resource, neuroprogenitor cells from two closely-related Gallus gallus lines having well-characterized robust or attenuated ethanol responses with respect to intracellular calcium mobilization and CaMKII / β-catenin-dependent apoptosis. Samples were not exposed to ethanol prior to analysis. Results We identified 363 differentially expressed genes in neuroprogenitors from these two lines. KEGG analysis revealed several gene clusters having significantly differential enrichment in gene expression. The largest and most significant cluster comprised ribosomal proteins (38 genes, p = 1.85 × 10−47). Other significantly enriched gene clusters included metabolism (25 genes, p = 0.0098), oxidative phosphorylation (18 genes, p = 1.10 × 10−11), spliceosome (13 genes, p = 7.02 × 10−8) and protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum (9 genes, p = 0.0011). Inspection of GO-terms identified 24 genes involved in the calcium/β-catenin signals that mediate ethanol's neurotoxicity in this model, including β-catenin itself and both calmodulin isoforms. Conclusions Four of the identified pathways with altered transcript abundance mediate the flow of cellular information from RNA to protein. Importantly, ribosome biogenesis also senses nucleolar stress and regulates p53-mediated apoptosis in neural crest. Human ribosomopathies produce craniofacial malformations and eleven known ribosomopathy genes were differentially expressed in this model of neural crest apoptosis. Rapid changes in ribosome expression are consistently observed in ethanol-treated mouse embryo neural folds, a model that is developmentally similar

  6. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Quantitative Trait Loci and a Novel Genetic Candidate for Fear Learning.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Allison T; Halladay, Lindsay R; Holmes, Andrew J; Levitt, Pat

    2016-06-08

    Trauma- and stress-related disorders are clinically heterogeneous and associated with substantial genetic risk. Understanding the biological origins of heterogeneity of key intermediate phenotypes such as cognition and emotion can provide novel mechanistic insights into disorder pathogenesis. Performing quantitative genetics in animal models is a tractable strategy for examining both the genetic basis of intermediate phenotypes and functional testing of candidate quantitative traits genes (QTGs). Here, existing and newly collected data were used for collaborative genome-wide mapping of cued fear acquisition and expression in 65 mouse strains from the BXD genetic reference panel. For fear acquisition, we identified a significant locus on chromosome (Chr) 10 and eight suggestive loci on Chr 2, 4, 5, 11, 13, and 15. For fear expression, we identified one significant and another highly suggestive locus on Chr 13, as well as four suggestive loci on Chr 10, 11, and X. Across these loci, 60 putative QTGs were identified. The quantitative trait locus on distal Chr 13 contained a single, highly promising gene at the location of the peak likelihood ratio statistic score. The gene, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (Hcn1), regulates neuronal excitability. Validation experiments using behavioral pharmacology revealed that functional Hcn channels in the basolateral amygdala are necessary for conditioned fear acquisition and expression. Hcn1, together with the other candidate QTGs, thus provide new targets for neurobiological and treatment studies of fear learning and trauma- and stress-related disorders. There is a knowledge gap in understanding the genetic contributions to behavioral heterogeneity in typical and atypical populations. Mouse genetic reference panels (GRPs) provide one approach for identifying genetic sources of variation. Here, we identified three loci for conditioned fear acquisition and expression in a mouse GRP. Each locus

  8. Quantitative Trait Loci and a Novel Genetic Candidate for Fear Learning

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Allison T.; Halladay, Lindsay R.; Holmes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Trauma- and stress-related disorders are clinically heterogeneous and associated with substantial genetic risk. Understanding the biological origins of heterogeneity of key intermediate phenotypes such as cognition and emotion can provide novel mechanistic insights into disorder pathogenesis. Performing quantitative genetics in animal models is a tractable strategy for examining both the genetic basis of intermediate phenotypes and functional testing of candidate quantitative traits genes (QTGs). Here, existing and newly collected data were used for collaborative genome-wide mapping of cued fear acquisition and expression in 65 mouse strains from the BXD genetic reference panel. For fear acquisition, we identified a significant locus on chromosome (Chr) 10 and eight suggestive loci on Chr 2, 4, 5, 11, 13, and 15. For fear expression, we identified one significant and another highly suggestive locus on Chr 13, as well as four suggestive loci on Chr 10, 11, and X. Across these loci, 60 putative QTGs were identified. The quantitative trait locus on distal Chr 13 contained a single, highly promising gene at the location of the peak likelihood ratio statistic score. The gene, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (Hcn1), regulates neuronal excitability. Validation experiments using behavioral pharmacology revealed that functional Hcn channels in the basolateral amygdala are necessary for conditioned fear acquisition and expression. Hcn1, together with the other candidate QTGs, thus provide new targets for neurobiological and treatment studies of fear learning and trauma- and stress-related disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT There is a knowledge gap in understanding the genetic contributions to behavioral heterogeneity in typical and atypical populations. Mouse genetic reference panels (GRPs) provide one approach for identifying genetic sources of variation. Here, we identified three loci for conditioned fear acquisition and expression in a mouse

  9. The Candidate Cancer Gene Database: a database of cancer driver genes from forward genetic screens in mice.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Kenneth L; Nyre, Erik T; Abrahante, Juan; Ho, Yen-Yi; Isaksson Vogel, Rachel; Starr, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Identification of cancer driver gene mutations is crucial for advancing cancer therapeutics. Due to the overwhelming number of passenger mutations in the human tumor genome, it is difficult to pinpoint causative driver genes. Using transposon mutagenesis in mice many laboratories have conducted forward genetic screens and identified thousands of candidate driver genes that are highly relevant to human cancer. Unfortunately, this information is difficult to access and utilize because it is scattered across multiple publications using different mouse genome builds and strength metrics. To improve access to these findings and facilitate meta-analyses, we developed the Candidate Cancer Gene Database (CCGD, http://ccgd-starrlab.oit.umn.edu/). The CCGD is a manually curated database containing a unified description of all identified candidate driver genes and the genomic location of transposon common insertion sites (CISs) from all currently published transposon-based screens. To demonstrate relevance to human cancer, we performed a modified gene set enrichment analysis using KEGG pathways and show that human cancer pathways are highly enriched in the database. We also used hierarchical clustering to identify pathways enriched in blood cancers compared to solid cancers. The CCGD is a novel resource available to scientists interested in the identification of genetic drivers of cancer. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Natural Genetic Variation and Candidate Genes for Morphological Traits in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Valeria Paula; Mensch, Julián; Hasson, Esteban; Fanara, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Body size is a complex character associated to several fitness related traits that vary within and between species as a consequence of environmental and genetic factors. Latitudinal and altitudinal clines for different morphological traits have been described in several species of Drosophila and previous work identified genomic regions associated with such variation in D. melanogaster. However, the genetic factors that orchestrate morphological variation have been barely studied. Here, our main objective was to investigate genetic variation for different morphological traits associated to the second chromosome in natural populations of D. melanogaster along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in Argentina. Our results revealed weak clinal signals and a strong population effect on morphological variation. Moreover, most pairwise comparisons between populations were significant. Our study also showed important within-population genetic variation, which must be associated to the second chromosome, as the lines are otherwise genetically identical. Next, we examined the contribution of different candidate genes to natural variation for these traits. We performed quantitative complementation tests using a battery of lines bearing mutated alleles at candidate genes located in the second chromosome and six second chromosome substitution lines derived from natural populations which exhibited divergent phenotypes. Results of complementation tests revealed that natural variation at all candidate genes studied, invected, Fasciclin 3, toucan, Reticulon-like1, jing and CG14478, affects the studied characters, suggesting that they are Quantitative Trait Genes for morphological traits. Finally, the phenotypic patterns observed suggest that different alleles of each gene might contribute to natural variation for morphological traits. However, non-additive effects cannot be ruled out, as wild-derived strains differ at myriads of second chromosome loci that may interact

  11. Natural Genetic Variation and Candidate Genes for Morphological Traits in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Valeria Paula; Mensch, Julián; Hasson, Esteban; Fanara, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Body size is a complex character associated to several fitness related traits that vary within and between species as a consequence of environmental and genetic factors. Latitudinal and altitudinal clines for different morphological traits have been described in several species of Drosophila and previous work identified genomic regions associated with such variation in D. melanogaster. However, the genetic factors that orchestrate morphological variation have been barely studied. Here, our main objective was to investigate genetic variation for different morphological traits associated to the second chromosome in natural populations of D. melanogaster along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in Argentina. Our results revealed weak clinal signals and a strong population effect on morphological variation. Moreover, most pairwise comparisons between populations were significant. Our study also showed important within-population genetic variation, which must be associated to the second chromosome, as the lines are otherwise genetically identical. Next, we examined the contribution of different candidate genes to natural variation for these traits. We performed quantitative complementation tests using a battery of lines bearing mutated alleles at candidate genes located in the second chromosome and six second chromosome substitution lines derived from natural populations which exhibited divergent phenotypes. Results of complementation tests revealed that natural variation at all candidate genes studied, invected, Fasciclin 3, toucan, Reticulon-like1, jing and CG14478, affects the studied characters, suggesting that they are Quantitative Trait Genes for morphological traits. Finally, the phenotypic patterns observed suggest that different alleles of each gene might contribute to natural variation for morphological traits. However, non-additive effects cannot be ruled out, as wild-derived strains differ at myriads of second chromosome loci that may interact

  12. Genotype relative risks: Methods for design and analysis of candidate-gene association studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. )

    1993-11-01

    Design and analysis methods are presented for studying the association of a candidate gene with a disease by using parental data in place of nonrelated controls. This alternating design eliminates spurious differences in allele frequencies between cases and nonrelated controls resulting from different ethnic origins and population stratification for these two groups. The authors present analysis methods which are based on two genetic relative risks: (1) the relative risk of disease for homozygotes with two copies of the candidate gene versus homozygotes without the candidate gene and (2) the relative risk for heterozygotes with one copy of the candidate gene versus homozygotes without the candidate gene. In addition to estimating the magnitude of these relative risks, likelihood methods allow specific hypotheses to be tested, namely, a test for overall association of the candidate gene with disease, as well as specific genetic hypotheses, such as dominant or recessive inheritance. Two likelihood methods are presented: (1) a likelihood method appropriate when Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds and (2) a likelihood method in which the authors condition on parental genotype data when Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium does not hold. The results for the relative efficiency of these two methods suggest that the conditional approach may at times be preferable, even when equilibrium holds. Sample-size and power calculations are presented for a multitiered design. Tier 1 detects the presence of an abnormal sequence for a postulated candidate gene among a small group of cases. Tier 2 tests for association of the abnormal variant with disease, such as by the likelihood methods presented. Tier 3 confirms positive results from tier 2. Results indicate that required sample sizes are smaller when expression of disease is recessive, rather than dominant, and that, for recessive disease and large relative risks, necessary sample sizes may be feasible. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Identification Of Protein Vaccine Candidates Using Comprehensive Proteomic Analysis Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    133. Jefferies, J. R., A. M. Campbell, A. J. van Rossum, et al. 2001. Proteomic analysis of Fasciola hepatica excretory-secretory products...performed on other organisms prevalent in human disease, such as the analysis of excreted proteins from the human parasitic liver fluke Fasciola ... hepatica , in the search for potential vaccine candidates. 133 More recent studies have employed MudPIT analysis for the identification of potential

  14. Integrative analysis to select cancer candidate biomarkers to targeted validation.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Rebeca; Meirelles, Gabriela V; Heberle, Henry; Domingues, Romênia R; Granato, Daniela C; Yokoo, Sami; Canevarolo, Rafael R; Winck, Flavia V; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Filgueiras, Paulo R; Cruz, Karen S P; Barbuto, José Alexandre; Poppi, Ronei J; Minghim, Rosane; Telles, Guilherme P; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Fox, Jay W; Santos-Silva, Alan R; Coletta, Ricardo D; Sherman, Nicholas E; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2015-12-22

    Targeted proteomics has flourished as the method of choice for prospecting for and validating potential candidate biomarkers in many diseases. However, challenges still remain due to the lack of standardized routines that can prioritize a limited number of proteins to be further validated in human samples. To help researchers identify candidate biomarkers that best characterize their samples under study, a well-designed integrative analysis pipeline, comprising MS-based discovery, feature selection methods, clustering techniques, bioinformatic analyses and targeted approaches was performed using discovery-based proteomic data from the secretomes of three classes of human cell lines (carcinoma, melanoma and non-cancerous). Three feature selection algorithms, namely, Beta-binomial, Nearest Shrunken Centroids (NSC), and Support Vector Machine-Recursive Features Elimination (SVM-RFE), indicated a panel of 137 candidate biomarkers for carcinoma and 271 for melanoma, which were differentially abundant between the tumor classes. We further tested the strength of the pipeline in selecting candidate biomarkers by immunoblotting, human tissue microarrays, label-free targeted MS and functional experiments. In conclusion, the proposed integrative analysis was able to pre-qualify and prioritize candidate biomarkers from discovery-based proteomics to targeted MS.

  15. Integrative analysis to select cancer candidate biomarkers to targeted validation

    PubMed Central

    Heberle, Henry; Domingues, Romênia R.; Granato, Daniela C.; Yokoo, Sami; Canevarolo, Rafael R.; Winck, Flavia V.; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P.; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Filgueiras, Paulo R.; Cruz, Karen S. P.; Barbuto, José Alexandre; Poppi, Ronei J.; Minghim, Rosane; Telles, Guilherme P.; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Fox, Jay W.; Santos-Silva, Alan R.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Paes Leme, Adriana F.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted proteomics has flourished as the method of choice for prospecting for and validating potential candidate biomarkers in many diseases. However, challenges still remain due to the lack of standardized routines that can prioritize a limited number of proteins to be further validated in human samples. To help researchers identify candidate biomarkers that best characterize their samples under study, a well-designed integrative analysis pipeline, comprising MS-based discovery, feature selection methods, clustering techniques, bioinformatic analyses and targeted approaches was performed using discovery-based proteomic data from the secretomes of three classes of human cell lines (carcinoma, melanoma and non-cancerous). Three feature selection algorithms, namely, Beta-binomial, Nearest Shrunken Centroids (NSC), and Support Vector Machine-Recursive Features Elimination (SVM-RFE), indicated a panel of 137 candidate biomarkers for carcinoma and 271 for melanoma, which were differentially abundant between the tumor classes. We further tested the strength of the pipeline in selecting candidate biomarkers by immunoblotting, human tissue microarrays, label-free targeted MS and functional experiments. In conclusion, the proposed integrative analysis was able to pre-qualify and prioritize candidate biomarkers from discovery-based proteomics to targeted MS. PMID:26540631

  16. Silver-Russell syndrome: a dissection of the genetic aetiology and candidate chromosomal regions

    PubMed Central

    Hitchins, M.; Stanier, P.; Preece, M.; Moore, G.

    2001-01-01

    The main features of Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) are pre- and postnatal growth restriction and a characteristic small, triangular face. SRS is also accompanied by other dysmorphic features including fifth finger clinodactyly and skeletal asymmetry. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and various modes of inheritance and abnormalities involving chromosomes 7, 8, 15, 17, and 18 have been associated with SRS and SRS-like cases. However, only chromosomes 7 and 17 have been consistently implicated in patients with a strict clinical diagnosis of SRS. Two cases of balanced translocations with breakpoints in 17q23.3-q25 and two cases with a hemizygous deletion of the chorionic somatomammatropin gene (CSH1) on 17q24.1 have been associated with SRS, strongly implicating this region. Maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 7 (mUPD(7)) occurs in up to 10% of SRS patients, with disruption of genomic imprinting underlying the disease status in these cases. Recently, two SRS patients with a maternal duplication of 7p11.2-p13, and a single proband with segmental mUPD for the region 7q31-qter, were described. These key patients define two separate candidate regions for SRS on both the p and q arms of chromosome 7. Both the 7p11.2-p13 and 7q31-qter regions are subject to genomic imprinting and the homologous regions in the mouse are associated with imprinted growth phenotypes. This review provides an overview of the genetics of SRS, and focuses on the newly defined candidate regions on chromosome 7. The analyses of imprinted candidate genes within 7p11.2-p13 and 7q31-qter, and gene candidates on distal 17q, are discussed.


Keywords: Silver-Russell syndrome; imprinting; mUPD(7); candidates PMID:11748303

  17. A possible genetic association with chronic fatigue in primary Sjögren's syndrome: a candidate gene study.

    PubMed

    Norheim, Katrine Brække; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Nordmark, Gunnel; Harboe, Erna; Gøransson, Lasse; Brun, Johan G; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Jonsson, Roland; Omdal, Roald

    2014-02-01

    Fatigue is prevalent and disabling in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Results from studies in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) indicate that genetic variation may influence fatigue. The aim of this study was to investigate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variations in pSS patients with high and low fatigue. A panel of 85 SNPs in 12 genes was selected based on previous studies in CFS. A total of 207 pSS patients and 376 healthy controls were genotyped. One-hundred and ninety-three patients and 70 SNPs in 11 genes were available for analysis after quality control. Patients were dichotomized based on fatigue visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, with VAS <50 denominated "low fatigue" (n = 53) and VAS ≥50 denominated "high fatigue" (n = 140). We detected signals of association with pSS for one SNP in SLC25A40 (unadjusted p = 0.007) and two SNPs in PKN1 (both p = 0.03) in our pSS case versus control analysis. The association with SLC25A40 was stronger when only pSS high fatigue patients were analysed versus controls (p = 0.002). One SNP in PKN1 displayed an association in the case-only analysis of pSS high fatigue versus pSS low fatigue (p = 0.005). This candidate gene study in pSS did reveal a trend for associations between genetic variation in candidate genes and fatigue. The results will need to be replicated. More research on genetic associations with fatigue is warranted, and future trials should include larger cohorts and multicentre collaborations with sharing of genetic material to increase the statistical power.

  18. PON1 as a model for integration of genetic, epigenetic, and expression data on candidate susceptibility genes

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Karen; Yousefi, Paul; Street, Kelly; Eskenazi, Brenda; Holland, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Recent genome- and epigenome-wide studies demonstrate that the DNA methylation is controlled in part by genetics, highlighting the importance of integrating genetic and epigenetic data. To better understand molecular mechanisms affecting gene expression, we used the candidate susceptibility gene paraoxonase 1 (PON1) as a model to assess associations of PON1 genetic polymorphisms with DNA methylation and arylesterase activity, a marker of PON1 expression. PON1 has been associated with susceptibility to obesity, cardiovascular disease, and pesticide exposure. In this study, we assessed DNA methylation in 18 CpG sites located along PON1 shores, shelves, and its CpG island in blood specimens collected from newborns and 9-year-old children participating (n = 449) in the CHAMACOS birth cohort study. The promoter polymorphism, PON1−108, was strongly associated with methylation, particularly for CpG sites located near the CpG island (P << 0.0005). Among newborns, these relationships were even more pronounced after adjusting for blood cell composition. We also observed significant decreases in arylesterase activity with increased methylation at the same nine CpG sites at both ages. Using causal mediation analysis, we found statistically significant indirect effects of methylation (β(95% confidence interval): 6.9(1.5, 12.4)) providing evidence that DNA methylation mediates the relationship between PON1−108 genotype and PON1 expression. Our findings show that integration of genetic, epigenetic, and expression data can shed light on the functional mechanisms involving genetic and epigenetic regulation of candidate susceptibility genes like PON1. PMID:26913202

  19. PON1 as a model for integration of genetic, epigenetic, and expression data on candidate susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Huen, Karen; Yousefi, Paul; Street, Kelly; Eskenazi, Brenda; Holland, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome- and epigenome-wide studies demonstrate that the DNA methylation is controlled in part by genetics, highlighting the importance of integrating genetic and epigenetic data. To better understand molecular mechanisms affecting gene expression, we used the candidate susceptibility gene paraoxonase 1 (PON1) as a model to assess associations of PON1 genetic polymorphisms with DNA methylation and arylesterase activity, a marker of PON1 expression. PON1 has been associated with susceptibility to obesity, cardiovascular disease, and pesticide exposure. In this study, we assessed DNA methylation in 18 CpG sites located along PON1 shores, shelves, and its CpG island in blood specimens collected from newborns and 9-year-old children participating (n = 449) in the CHAMACOS birth cohort study. The promoter polymorphism, PON1-108 , was strongly associated with methylation, particularly for CpG sites located near the CpG island (P < 0.0005). Among newborns, these relationships were even more pronounced after adjusting for blood cell composition. We also observed significant decreases in arylesterase activity with increased methylation at the same nine CpG sites at both ages. Using causal mediation analysis, we found statistically significant indirect effects of methylation (β(95% confidence interval): 6.9(1.5, 12.4)) providing evidence that DNA methylation mediates the relationship between PON1-108 genotype and PON1 expression. Our findings show that integration of genetic, epigenetic, and expression data can shed light on the functional mechanisms involving genetic and epigenetic regulation of candidate susceptibility genes like PON1.

  20. Differing Patterns of Selection and Geospatial Genetic Diversity within Two Leading Plasmodium vivax Candidate Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Parobek, Christian M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Hathaway, Nicholas J.; Socheat, Duong; Rogers, William O.; Juliano, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Although Plasmodium vivax is a leading cause of malaria around the world, only a handful of vivax antigens are being studied for vaccine development. Here, we investigated genetic signatures of selection and geospatial genetic diversity of two leading vivax vaccine antigens – Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 (pvmsp-1) and Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite protein (pvcsp). Using scalable next-generation sequencing, we deep-sequenced amplicons of the 42 kDa region of pvmsp-1 (n = 44) and the complete gene of pvcsp (n = 47) from Cambodian isolates. These sequences were then compared with global parasite populations obtained from GenBank. Using a combination of statistical and phylogenetic methods to assess for selection and population structure, we found strong evidence of balancing selection in the 42 kDa region of pvmsp-1, which varied significantly over the length of the gene, consistent with immune-mediated selection. In pvcsp, the highly variable central repeat region also showed patterns consistent with immune selection, which were lacking outside the repeat. The patterns of selection seen in both genes differed from their P. falciparum orthologs. In addition, we found that, similar to merozoite antigens from P. falciparum malaria, genetic diversity of pvmsp-1 sequences showed no geographic clustering, while the non-merozoite antigen, pvcsp, showed strong geographic clustering. These findings suggest that while immune selection may act on both vivax vaccine candidate antigens, the geographic distribution of genetic variability differs greatly between these two genes. The selective forces driving this diversification could lead to antigen escape and vaccine failure. Better understanding the geographic distribution of genetic variability in vaccine candidate antigens will be key to designing and implementing efficacious vaccines. PMID:24743266

  1. Genetic susceptibility to chronic otitis media with effusion: candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, Carol J; Wilmot, Beth; Wang, Linda; Schuller, Michael; Lighthall, Jessyka; Trune, Dennis

    2014-05-01

    The genetic factors leading to a predisposition to otitis media are not well understood. The objective of the current study was to develop a tag-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel to determine if there is an association between candidate gene polymorphisms and the development of chronic otitis media with effusion. A 1:1 case/control design of 100 cases and 100 controls was used. The study was limited to the chronic otitis media with effusion phenotype to increase the population homogeneity. A panel of 192 tag-SNPs was selected. Saliva for DNA extraction was collected from 100 chronic otitis media with effusion cases and 100 controls. After quality control, 100 case and 79 control samples were available for hybridization. Genomic DNA from each subject was hybridized to the SNP probes, and genotypes were generated. Quality control across all samples and SNPs reduced the final SNPs used for analysis to 170. Each SNP was then analyzed for statistical association with chronic otitis media with effusion. Eight SNPs from four genes had an unadjusted P value of <.05 for association with the chronic otitis media with effusion phenotype (TLR4, MUC5B, SMAD2, SMAD4); five of these polymorphisms were in the TLR4 gene. Even though these results need to be replicated in a novel population, the presence of five SNPs in the TLR4 gene having association with chronic otitis media with effusion in our study population lends evidence for the possible role of this gene in the susceptibility to otitis media. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. The genomic architecture and association genetics of adaptive characters using a candidate SNP approach in boreal black spruce.

    PubMed

    Prunier, Julien; Pelgas, Betty; Gagnon, France; Desponts, Mireille; Isabel, Nathalie; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2013-06-01

    The genomic architecture of adaptive traits remains poorly understood in non-model plants. Various approaches can be used to bridge this gap, including the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in pedigrees, and genetic association studies in non-structured populations. Here we present results on the genomic architecture of adaptive traits in black spruce, which is a widely distributed conifer of the North American boreal forest. As an alternative to the usual candidate gene approach, a candidate SNP approach was developed for association testing. A genetic map containing 231 gene loci was used to identify QTL that were related to budset timing and to tree height assessed over multiple years and sites. Twenty-two unique genomic regions were identified, including 20 that were related to budset timing and 6 that were related to tree height. From results of outlier detection and bulk segregant analysis for adaptive traits using DNA pool sequencing of 434 genes, 52 candidate SNPs were identified and subsequently tested in genetic association studies for budset timing and tree height assessed over multiple years and sites. A total of 34 (65%) SNPs were significantly associated with budset timing, or tree height, or both. Although the percentages of explained variance (PVE) by individual SNPs were small, several significant SNPs were shared between sites and among years. The sharing of genomic regions and significant SNPs between budset timing and tree height indicates pleiotropic effects. Significant QTLs and SNPs differed quite greatly among years, suggesting that different sets of genes for the same characters are involved at different stages in the tree's life history. The functional diversity of genes carrying significant SNPs and low observed PVE further indicated that a large number of polymorphisms are involved in adaptive genetic variation. Accordingly, for undomesticated species such as black spruce with natural populations of large effective size and low

  3. The genomic architecture and association genetics of adaptive characters using a candidate SNP approach in boreal black spruce

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The genomic architecture of adaptive traits remains poorly understood in non-model plants. Various approaches can be used to bridge this gap, including the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in pedigrees, and genetic association studies in non-structured populations. Here we present results on the genomic architecture of adaptive traits in black spruce, which is a widely distributed conifer of the North American boreal forest. As an alternative to the usual candidate gene approach, a candidate SNP approach was developed for association testing. Results A genetic map containing 231 gene loci was used to identify QTL that were related to budset timing and to tree height assessed over multiple years and sites. Twenty-two unique genomic regions were identified, including 20 that were related to budset timing and 6 that were related to tree height. From results of outlier detection and bulk segregant analysis for adaptive traits using DNA pool sequencing of 434 genes, 52 candidate SNPs were identified and subsequently tested in genetic association studies for budset timing and tree height assessed over multiple years and sites. A total of 34 (65%) SNPs were significantly associated with budset timing, or tree height, or both. Although the percentages of explained variance (PVE) by individual SNPs were small, several significant SNPs were shared between sites and among years. Conclusions The sharing of genomic regions and significant SNPs between budset timing and tree height indicates pleiotropic effects. Significant QTLs and SNPs differed quite greatly among years, suggesting that different sets of genes for the same characters are involved at different stages in the tree’s life history. The functional diversity of genes carrying significant SNPs and low observed PVE further indicated that a large number of polymorphisms are involved in adaptive genetic variation. Accordingly, for undomesticated species such as black spruce with natural populations

  4. Bayesian GWAS and network analysis revealed new candidate genes for number of teats in pigs.

    PubMed

    Verardo, L L; Silva, F F; Varona, L; Resende, M D V; Bastiaansen, J W M; Lopes, P S; Guimarães, S E F

    2015-02-01

    The genetic improvement of reproductive traits such as the number of teats is essential to the success of the pig industry. As opposite to most SNP association studies that consider continuous phenotypes under Gaussian assumptions, this trait is characterized as a discrete variable, which could potentially follow other distributions, such as the Poisson. Therefore, in order to access the complexity of a counting random regression considering all SNPs simultaneously as covariate under a GWAS modeling, the Bayesian inference tools become necessary. Currently, another point that deserves to be highlighted in GWAS is the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes through candidate genes network derived from significant SNPs. We present a full Bayesian treatment of SNP association analysis for number of teats assuming alternatively Gaussian and Poisson distributions for this trait. Under this framework, significant SNP effects were identified by hypothesis tests using 95% highest posterior density intervals. These SNPs were used to construct associated candidate genes network aiming to explain the genetic mechanism behind this reproductive trait. The Bayesian model comparisons based on deviance posterior distribution indicated the superiority of Gaussian model. In general, our results suggest the presence of 19 significant SNPs, which mapped 13 genes. Besides, we predicted gene interactions through networks that are consistent with the mammals known breast biology (e.g., development of prolactin receptor signaling, and cell proliferation), captured known regulation binding sites, and provided candidate genes for that trait (e.g., TINAGL1 and ICK).

  5. No genetic association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Parkinson's disease in nine ADHD candidate SNPs.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Julia M; Romanos, Marcel; Gerlach, Manfred; Berg, Daniela; Schulte, Claudia

    2017-02-07

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) involve pathological changes in brain structures such as the basal ganglia, which are essential for the control of motor and cognitive behavior and impulsivity. The cause of ADHD and PD remains unknown, but there is increasing evidence that both seem to result from a complicated interplay of genetic and environmental factors affecting numerous cellular processes and brain regions. To explore the possibility of common genetic pathways within the respective pathophysiologies, nine ADHD candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven genes were tested for association with PD in 5333 cases and 12,019 healthy controls: one variant, respectively, in the genes coding for synaptosomal-associated protein 25 k (SNAP25), the dopamine (DA) transporter (SLC6A3; DAT1), DA receptor D4 (DRD4), serotonin receptor 1B (HTR1B), tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), the norepinephrine transporter SLC6A2 and three SNPs in cadherin 13 (CDH13). Information was extracted from a recent meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies, in which 7,689,524 SNPs in European samples were successfully imputed. No significant association was observed after correction for multiple testing. Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that candidate variants implicated in the pathogenesis of ADHD do not play a substantial role in PD.

  6. Analysis of candidate genes for macular telangiectasia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Parmalee, Nancy L.; Schubert, Carl; Merriam, Joanna E.; Allikmets, Kaija; Bird, Alan C.; Gillies, Mark C.; Peto, Tunde; Figueroa, Maria; Friedlander, Martin; Fruttiger, Marcus; Greenwood, John; Moss, Stephen E.; Smith, Lois E.H.; Toomes, Carmel; Inglehearn, Chris F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To find the gene(s) responsible for macular telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel) by a candidate-gene screening approach. Methods Candidate genes were selected based on the following criteria: those known to cause or be associated with diseases with phenotypes similar to MacTel, genes with known function in the retinal vasculature or macular pigment transport, genes that emerged from expression microarray data from mouse models designed to mimic MacTel phenotype characteristics, and genes expressed in the retina that are also related to diabetes or hypertension, which have increased prevalence in MacTel patients. Probands from eight families with at least two affected individuals were screened by direct sequencing of 27 candidate genes. Identified nonsynonymous variants were analyzed to determine whether they co-segregate with the disease in families. Allele frequencies were determined by TaqMan analysis of the large MacTel and control cohorts. Results We identified 23 nonsynonymous variants in 27 candidate genes in at least one proband. Of these, eight were known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with allele frequencies of >0.05; these variants were excluded from further analyses. Three previously unidentified missense variants, three missense variants with reported disease association, and five rare variants were analyzed for segregation and/or allele frequencies. No variant fulfilled the criteria of being causal for MacTel. A missense mutation, p.Pro33Ser in frizzled homolog (Drosophila) 4 (FZD4), previously suggested as a disease-causing variant in familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, was determined to be a rare benign polymorphism. Conclusions We have ruled out the exons and flanking intronic regions in 27 candidate genes as harboring causal mutations for MacTel. PMID:21179236

  7. Pooled ecotype sequencing reveals candidate genetic mechanisms for adaptive differentiation and reproductive isolation.

    PubMed

    Gould, Billie A; Chen, Yani; Lowry, David B

    2017-01-01

    The early stages of speciation are often characterized by the formation of partially reproductively isolated ecotypes, which evolve as a by-product of divergent selective forces that are endemic to different habitats. Identifying the genomic regions, genes and ultimately functional polymorphisms that are involved in the processes of ecotype formation is inherently challenging, as there are likely to be many different loci involved in the process. To localize candidate regions of the genome contributing to ecotype formation, we conducted whole-genome pooled sequencing (pool-seq) with 47 coastal perennial and 50 inland annual populations of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus. Coastal perennial and inland annual ecotypes of M. guttatus have previously been shown to be ecologically reproductively isolated and highly locally adapted to their respective habitats. Our pool-seq results found allelic differentiation between the ecotypes for two chromosomal inversions, suggesting that frequencies of inversion heterokaryotypes are strongly differentiated between the ecotypes. Further, there were elevated levels of nonsynonymous change across chromosomal inversions. Across the genome, we identified multiple strong candidate genes potentially driving the morphological, life history and salt tolerance differences between the ecotypes. Several candidate genes coincide with previously identified quantitative trait locus regions and also show a signature of recent natural selection. Overall, the results of our study add to growing support for a major role of chromosomal inversions in adaptation and speciation and provide new insights into the genetic mechanisms underlying classic plant ecotype adaptations to wet and dry habitats.

  8. Meta-analyses between 18 candidate genetic markers and overweight/obesity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aims The goal of our study is to investigate the associations between 18 candidate genetic markers and overweight/obesity. Methods A total of 72 eligible articles were retrieved from literature databases including PubMed, Embase, SpingerLink, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Wanfang. Meta-analyses of 18 genetic markers among 56,738 controls and 48,148 overweight/obese persons were done by Review Manager 5.0. Results Our results showed that SH2B1 rs7498665 polymorphism was significantly associated with the risk of overweight/obesity (overall odds ratio (OR) = 1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.09-1.34, P = 0.0004). Increased risk of overweight/obesity was also observed in FAIM2 rs7138803 polymorphism (overall OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01-1.22, P = 0.04). Conclusion Our meta-analyses have shown the important role of 2 polymorphisms (SH2B1 rs7498665 and FAIM2 rs7138803) in the development of overweight/obesity. This study highlighted the importance of above two candidate genes (SH2B1 and FAIM2) in the risk of overweight/obesity. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2785487401176182. PMID:24621099

  9. QTL Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis of Telomere Length Control Factors in Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Amber N.; Lauter, Nick; Vera, Daniel L.; McLaughlin-Large, Karen A.; Steele, Tace M.; Fredette, Natalie C.; Bass, Hank W.

    2011-01-01

    Telomere length is a quantitative trait important for many cellular functions. Failure to regulate telomere length contributes to genomic instability, cellular senescence, cancer, and apoptosis in humans, but the functional significance of telomere regulation in plants is much less well understood. To gain a better understanding of telomere biology in plants, we used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to identify genetic elements that control telomere length variation in maize (Zea mays L.). For this purpose, we measured the median and mean telomere lengths from 178 recombinant inbred lines of the IBM mapping population and found multiple regions that collectively accounted for 33–38% of the variation in telomere length. Two-way analysis of variance revealed interaction between the quantitative trait loci at genetic bin positions 2.09 and 5.04. Candidate genes within these and other significant QTL intervals, along with select genes known a priori to regulate telomere length, were tested for correlations between expression levels and telomere length in the IBM population and diverse inbred lines by quantitative real-time PCR. A slight but significant positive correlation between expression levels and telomere length was observed for many of the candidate genes, but Ibp2 was a notable exception, showing instead a negative correlation. A rad51-like protein (TEL-MD_5.04) was strongly supported as a candidate gene by several lines of evidence. Our results highlight the value of QTL mapping plus candidate gene expression analysis in a genetically diverse model system for telomere research. PMID:22384354

  10. First CCD UBVI photometric analysis of six open cluster candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Clariá, J. J.; Ahumada, A. V.

    2011-04-01

    We have obtained CCD UBVIKC photometry down to V ˜ 22 for the open cluster candidates Haffner 3, Haffner 5, NGC 2368, Haffner 25, Hogg 3 and Hogg 4 and their surrounding fields. None of these objects have been photometrically studied so far. Our analysis shows that these stellar groups are not genuine open clusters since no clear main sequences or other meaningful features can be seen in their colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams. We checked for possible differential reddening across the studied fields that could be hiding the characteristics of real open clusters. However, the dust in the directions to these objects appears to be uniformly distributed. Moreover, star counts carried out within and outside the open cluster candidate fields do not support the hypothesis that these objects are real open clusters or even open cluster remnants.

  11. A Systems Genetics Approach Implicates USF1, FADS3, and Other Causal Candidate Genes for Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Plaisier, Christopher L.; Horvath, Steve; Huertas-Vazquez, Adriana; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Herrera, Miguel F.; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Pajukanta, Päivi

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that a common SNP in the 3' untranslated region of the upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1), rs3737787, may affect lipid traits by influencing gene expression levels, and we investigated this possibility utilizing the Mexican population, which has a high predisposition to dyslipidemia. We first associated rs3737787 genotypes in Mexican Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia (FCHL) case/control fat biopsies, with global expression patterns. To identify sets of co-expressed genes co-regulated by similar factors such as transcription factors, genetic variants, or environmental effects, we utilized weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Through WGCNA in the Mexican FCHL fat biopsies we identified two significant Triglyceride (TG)-associated co-expression modules. One of these modules was also associated with FCHL, the other FCHL component traits, and rs3737787 genotypes. This USF1-regulated FCHL-associated (URFA) module was enriched for genes involved in lipid metabolic processes. Using systems genetics procedures we identified 18 causal candidate genes in the URFA module. The FCHL causal candidate gene fatty acid desaturase 3 (FADS3) was associated with TGs in a recent Caucasian genome-wide significant association study and we replicated this association in Mexican FCHL families. Based on a USF1-regulated FCHL-associated co-expression module and SNP rs3737787, we identify a set of causal candidate genes for FCHL-related traits. We then provide evidence from two independent datasets supporting FADS3 as a causal gene for FCHL and elevated TGs in Mexicans. PMID:19750004

  12. Prioritization and Association Analysis of Murine-Derived Candidate Genes in Anxiety-Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hettema, John M.; Webb, Bradley T.; Guo, An-Yuan; Zhao, Zhongming; Maher, Brion S.; Chen, Xiangning; An, Seon-Sook; Sun, Cuie; Aggen, Steven H.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Otowa, Takeshi; Flint, Jonathan; van den Oord, Edwin J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are common psychiatric conditions that are highly comorbid with each other and related phenotypes such as depression, likely due to a shared genetic basis. Fear-related behaviors in mice have long been investigated as potential models of anxiety disorders, making integration of information from both murine and human genetic data a powerful strategy for identifying potential susceptibility genes for these conditions. Methods We combined genome-wide association analysis of fear-related behaviours with strain distribution pattern analysis in heterogeneous stock mice to identify a preliminary list of 52 novel candidate genes. We ranked these according to three complementary sources of prior anxiety-related genetic data: (1) extant linkage and knock-out studies in mice, (2) a meta-analysis of human linkage scans, and (3) a preliminary human genomewide association study. We genotyped tagging SNPs covering the nine top-ranked regions in a two-stage association study of 1316 subjects from the Virginia Adult Twin Study of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders chosen for high or low genetic loading for anxiety-spectrum phenotypes (anxiety disorders, neuroticism, and major depression). Results Multiple SNPs in the PPARGC1A gene demonstrated association in both stages that survived gene-wise correction for multiple testing. Conclusions Integration of genetic data across human and murine studies suggests PPARGC1A as a potential susceptibility gene for anxiety-related disorders. PMID:21871609

  13. Genetic epidemiology and nonsyndromic structural birth defects: from candidate genes to epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Charlotte A; Chowdhury, Shimul; Cleves, Mario A; Erickson, Stephen; MacLeod, Stewart L; Shaw, Gary M; Shete, Sanjay; Witte, John S; Tycko, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    Birth defects are a leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The vast majority of birth defects are nonsyndromic, and although their etiologies remain mostly unknown, evidence supports the hypothesis that they result from the complex interaction of genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors. Since our last review published in 2002 describing the basic tools of genetic epidemiology used to study nonsyndromic structural birth defects, many new approaches have become available and have been used with varying success. Through rapid advances in genomic technologies, investigators are now able to investigate large portions of the genome at a fraction of previous costs. With next-generation sequencing, research has progressed from assessing a small percentage of single-nucleotide polymorphisms to assessing the entire human protein-coding repertoire (exome)-an approach that is starting to uncover rare but informative mutations associated with nonsyndromic birth defects. Herein, we report on the current state of the genetic epidemiology of birth defects and comment on future challenges and opportunities. We consider issues of study design, and we discuss common variant approaches, including candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies. We also discuss the complexities embedded in exploring interactions between genes and the environment. We complete our review by describing new and promising next-generation sequencing technologies and examining how the study of epigenetic mechanisms could become the key to unraveling the complex etiologies of nonsyndromic structural birth defects.

  14. Traditional Approaches to Molecular Genetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher J; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    Molecular studies of endometrial cancer have evolved with the tools available to researchers: the methods for measuring nucleic acids, protein expression, and combinations thereof. Today "molecular genetic analysis" implies a broad range of indirect and direct tests that yield molecular phenotypes or genotypes, immunotypes, or signatures that were not conceived of when the histologic and biologic heterogeneity was first fully acknowledged.We will provide a historical perspective on molecular genetic studies of endometrial cancers focusing on candidate genes and how early foundational research shaped both our understanding of the disease and current research directions. Examples of direct tests (mutation, DNA methylation, and/or protein expression) will be provided along with examples of indirect tests that have been and continue to be central to endometrial cancer molecular biology, such as DNA content or microsatellite instability analysis. We will highlight clinically relevant examples of molecular phenotyping and direct evaluation of candidate genes that integrate direct and indirect testing as part of routine patient care. This is not intended to be an exhaustive review but rather an overview of the progress that has been made and how early work is shaping current molecular, clinical, and biologic studies of endometrial cancer.

  15. The cognitive genetics of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): sustained attention as a candidate phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bellgrove, Mark A; Hawi, Ziarih; Gill, Michael; Robertson, Ian H

    2006-08-01

    Here we describe the application of cognitive genetics to the study of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Cognitive genetics owes much to the pioneering work of cognitive neuropsychologists such as John Marshall, whose careful observations of cognitive dissociations between brain-lesioned patients greatly advanced the theoretical understanding of normal cognitive function. These theories have in turn helped to constrain linkages between candidate genes and cognitive processes and thus help to drive the relatively new field of cognitive genetics in a hypothesis-driven fashion. We examined the relationship between sustained attention deficits in ADHD and genetic variation in a catecholamine-related gene, dopamine beta hydroxylase (DbetaH). DBH encodes the enzyme that converts dopamine to noradrenaline and is crucial to catecholamine regulation. A polymorphism with the DBH gene has been associated with ADHD. In fifty-two children with ADHD, we examined whether variation in the Taq I DBH gene polymorphism was related to sustained attention performance. Participants performed the Sustained Attention to Response Test (SART). Performance on the SART discriminates ADHD from control children, and in imaging work, is associated with right frontoparietal activation. A significant effect of DBH genotype was found on SART performance measures. Children possessing two copies of the ADHD-associated risk allele (A2) had significantly poorer sustained attention than those ADHD children who did not possess this allele or a non-genotyped control group. The DBH gene may contribute to the susceptibility for ADHD, in part because of its varying effects on the development of brain mechanisms mediating sustained attention.

  16. Identification of a strawberry flavor gene candidate using an integrated genetic-genomic-analytical chemistry approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is interest in improving the flavor of commercial strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) varieties. Fruit flavor is shaped by combinations of sugars, acids and volatile compounds. Many efforts seek to use genomics-based strategies to identify genes controlling flavor, and then designing durable molecular markers to follow these genes in breeding populations. In this report, fruit from two cultivars, varying for presence-absence of volatile compounds, along with segregating progeny, were analyzed using GC/MS and RNAseq. Expression data were bulked in silico according to presence/absence of a given volatile compound, in this case γ-decalactone, a compound conferring a peach flavor note to fruits. Results Computationally sorting reads in segregating progeny based on γ-decalactone presence eliminated transcripts not directly relevant to the volatile, revealing transcripts possibly imparting quantitative contributions. One candidate encodes an omega-6 fatty acid desaturase, an enzyme known to participate in lactone production in fungi, noted here as FaFAD1. This candidate was induced by ripening, was detected in certain harvests, and correlated with γ-decalactone presence. The FaFAD1 gene is present in every genotype where γ-decalactone has been detected, and it was invariably missing in non-producers. A functional, PCR-based molecular marker was developed that cosegregates with the phenotype in F1 and BC1 populations, as well as in many other cultivars and wild Fragaria accessions. Conclusions Genetic, genomic and analytical chemistry techniques were combined to identify FaFAD1, a gene likely controlling a key flavor volatile in strawberry. The same data may now be re-sorted based on presence/absence of any other volatile to identify other flavor-affecting candidates, leading to rapid generation of gene-specific markers. PMID:24742080

  17. Identification of a strawberry flavor gene candidate using an integrated genetic-genomic-analytical chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Alan H; Pillet, Jeremy; Plotto, Anne; Bai, Jinhe; Whitaker, Vance M; Folta, Kevin M

    2014-04-17

    There is interest in improving the flavor of commercial strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) varieties. Fruit flavor is shaped by combinations of sugars, acids and volatile compounds. Many efforts seek to use genomics-based strategies to identify genes controlling flavor, and then designing durable molecular markers to follow these genes in breeding populations. In this report, fruit from two cultivars, varying for presence-absence of volatile compounds, along with segregating progeny, were analyzed using GC/MS and RNAseq. Expression data were bulked in silico according to presence/absence of a given volatile compound, in this case γ-decalactone, a compound conferring a peach flavor note to fruits. Computationally sorting reads in segregating progeny based on γ-decalactone presence eliminated transcripts not directly relevant to the volatile, revealing transcripts possibly imparting quantitative contributions. One candidate encodes an omega-6 fatty acid desaturase, an enzyme known to participate in lactone production in fungi, noted here as FaFAD1. This candidate was induced by ripening, was detected in certain harvests, and correlated with γ-decalactone presence. The FaFAD1 gene is present in every genotype where γ-decalactone has been detected, and it was invariably missing in non-producers. A functional, PCR-based molecular marker was developed that cosegregates with the phenotype in F1 and BC1 populations, as well as in many other cultivars and wild Fragaria accessions. Genetic, genomic and analytical chemistry techniques were combined to identify FaFAD1, a gene likely controlling a key flavor volatile in strawberry. The same data may now be re-sorted based on presence/absence of any other volatile to identify other flavor-affecting candidates, leading to rapid generation of gene-specific markers.

  18. In silico identification of genetically attenuated vaccine candidate genes for Plasmodium liver stage.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hirdesh; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Mair, Gunnar R; Gomes, James

    2015-12-01

    Genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) that lack genes essential for the liver stage of the malaria parasite, and therefore cause developmental arrest, have been developed as live vaccines in rodent malaria models and recently been tested in humans. The genes targeted for deletion were often identified by trial and error. Here we present a systematic gene - protein and transcript - expression analyses of several Plasmodium species with the aim to identify candidate genes for the generation of novel GAPs. With a lack of liver stage expression data for human malaria parasites, we used data available for liver stage development of Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model, to identify proteins expressed in the liver stage but absent from blood stage parasites. An orthology-based search was then employed to identify orthologous proteins in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum resulting in a total of 310 genes expressed in the liver stage but lacking evidence of protein expression in blood stage parasites. Among these 310 possible GAP candidates, we further studied Plasmodium liver stage proteins by phyletic distribution and functional domain analyses and shortlisted twenty GAP-candidates; these are: fabB/F, fabI, arp, 3 genes encoding subunits of the PDH complex, dnaJ, urm1, rS5, ancp, mcp, arh, gk, lisp2, valS, palm, and four conserved Plasmodium proteins of unknown function. Parasites lacking one or several of these genes might yield new attenuated malaria parasites for experimental vaccination studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Key players associated with tuberization in potato: potential candidates for genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Som; Manjul, Anshul Sharma; Raigond, Pinky; Singh, Brajesh; Siddappa, Sundaresha; Bhardwaj, Vinay; Kawar, Prashant G; Patil, Virupakshagouda U; Kardile, Hemant Balasaheb

    2017-11-01

    Tuberization in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a complex biological phenomenon which is affected by several environmental cues, genetic factors and plant nutrition. Understanding the regulation of tuber induction is essential to devise strategies to improve tuber yield and quality. It is well established that short-day photoperiods promote tuberization, whereas long days and high-temperatures inhibit or delay tuberization. Worldwide research on this complex biological process has yielded information on the important bio-molecules (proteins, RNAs, plant growth regulators) associated with the tuberization process in potato. Key proteins involved in the regulation of tuberization include StSP6A, POTH1, StBEL5, StPHYB, StCONSTANS, Sucrose transporter StSUT4, StSP5G, etc. Biomolecules that become transported from "source to sink" have also been suggested to be important signaling candidates regulating the tuberization process in potatos. Four molecules, namely StSP6A protein, StBEL5 RNA, miR172 and GAs, have been found to be the main candidates acting as mobile signals for tuberization. These biomolecules can be manipulated (overexpressed/inhibited) for improving the tuberization in commercial varieties/cultivars of potato. In this review, information about the genes/proteins and their mechanism of action associated with the tuberization process is discussed.

  20. The genetic basis of quality of life in healthy Swedish women: a candidate gene approach.

    PubMed

    Schoormans, Dounya; Li, Jingmei; Darabi, Hatef; Brandberg, Yvonne; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Eriksson, Mikael; Zwinderman, Koos H; Hall, Per

    2015-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an increasingly important parameter in clinical practice as it predicts mortality and poor health outcomes. It is hypothesized that one may have a genetic predisposition for QoL. We therefore related 139 candidate genes, selected through a literature search, to QoL in healthy females. In 5,142 healthy females, background characteristics (i.e. demographic, clinical, lifestyle, and psychological factors) were assessed. QoL was measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30, which consists of 15 domains. For all women genotype information was available. For each candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified based on their functional (n = 2,663) and physical annotation (n = 10,649). SNPs were related to each QoL-domain, while controlling for background characteristics and population stratification. Finally, gene-based analyses were performed relating the combined effect of 10,649 SNPs (selected based on physical annotation) for each gene, to QoL using the statistical software package VEGAS. Overall, we found no relation between genetic variations (SNPs and genes) and 14 out of 15 QoL-domains. The strongest association was found between cognitive functioning and the top SNP rs1468951 (p = 1.21E-05) in the GSTZ1 gene. Furthermore, results of the gene-based test showed that the combined effect of 11 SNPs within the GSTZ1 gene is significantly associated with cognitive functioning (p = 2.60E-05). If validated, the involvement of GSTZ1 in cognitive functioning underscores its heritability which is likely the result of differences in the dopamine pathway, as GSTZ1 contributes to the equilibrium between dopamine and its neurotoxic metabolites via the glutathione redox cycle.

  1. The Genetic Basis of Quality of Life in Healthy Swedish Women: A Candidate Gene Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schoormans, Dounya; Li, Jingmei; Darabi, Hatef; Brandberg, Yvonne; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Eriksson, Mikael; Zwinderman, Koos H.; Hall, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) is an increasingly important parameter in clinical practice as it predicts mortality and poor health outcomes. It is hypothesized that one may have a genetic predisposition for QoL. We therefore related 139 candidate genes, selected through a literature search, to QoL in healthy females. Methods In 5,142 healthy females, background characteristics (i.e. demographic, clinical, lifestyle, and psychological factors) were assessed. QoL was measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30, which consists of 15 domains. For all women genotype information was available. For each candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified based on their functional (n = 2,663) and physical annotation (n = 10,649). SNPs were related to each QoL-domain, while controlling for background characteristics and population stratification. Finally, gene-based analyses were performed relating the combined effect of 10,649 SNPs (selected based on physical annotation) for each gene, to QoL using the statistical software package VEGAS. Results Overall, we found no relation between genetic variations (SNPs and genes) and 14 out of 15 QoL-domains. The strongest association was found between cognitive functioning and the top SNP rs1468951 (p = 1.21E-05) in the GSTZ1 gene. Furthermore, results of the gene-based test showed that the combined effect of 11 SNPs within the GSTZ1 gene is significantly associated with cognitive functioning (p = 2.60E-05). Conclusion If validated, the involvement of GSTZ1 in cognitive functioning underscores its heritability which is likely the result of differences in the dopamine pathway, as GSTZ1 contributes to the equilibrium between dopamine and its neurotoxic metabolites via the glutathione redox cycle. PMID:25675377

  2. Mapping eQTLs in the Norfolk Island Genetic Isolate Identifies Candidate Genes for CVD Risk Traits

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Miles C.; Lea, Rod A.; Macartney-Coxson, Donia; Carless, Melanie A.; Göring, Harald H.; Bellis, Claire; Hanna, Michelle; Eccles, David; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Curran, Joanne E.; Harper, Jacquie L.; Blangero, John; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) affects millions of people worldwide and is influenced by numerous factors, including lifestyle and genetics. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) influence gene expression and are good candidates for CVD risk. Founder-effect pedigrees can provide additional power to map genes associated with disease risk. Therefore, we identified eQTLs in the genetic isolate of Norfolk Island (NI) and tested for associations between these and CVD risk factors. We measured genome-wide transcript levels of blood lymphocytes in 330 individuals and used pedigree-based heritability analysis to identify heritable transcripts. eQTLs were identified by genome-wide association testing of these transcripts. Testing for association between CVD risk factors (i.e., blood lipids, blood pressure, and body fat indices) and eQTLs revealed 1,712 heritable transcripts (p < 0.05) with heritability values ranging from 0.18 to 0.84. From these, we identified 200 cis-acting and 70 trans-acting eQTLs (p < 1.84 × 10−7) An eQTL-centric analysis of CVD risk traits revealed multiple associations, including 12 previously associated with CVD-related traits. Trait versus eQTL regression modeling identified four CVD risk candidates (NAAA, PAPSS1, NME1, and PRDX1), all of which have known biological roles in disease. In addition, we implicated several genes previously associated with CVD risk traits, including MTHFR and FN3KRP. We have successfully identified a panel of eQTLs in the NI pedigree and used this to implicate several genes in CVD risk. Future studies are required for further assessing the functional importance of these eQTLs and whether the findings here also relate to outbred populations. PMID:24314549

  3. Genetic Analysis of Xenopus tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Geach, Timothy J.; Stemple, Derek L.; Zimmerman, Lyle B.

    2014-01-01

    The pipid frog Xenopus tropicalis has emerged as a powerful new model system for combining genetic and genomic analysis of tetrapod development with robust embryological, molecular and biochemical assays. Its early development closely resembles that of its well-understood relative X. laevis, from which techniques and reagents can be readily transferred. In contrast to the tetraploid X. laevis, X. tropicalis has a compact diploid genome with strong synteny to those of amniotes. Recently, advances in high-throughput sequencing together with solution-hybridization whole-exome enrichment technology offer powerful strategies for cloning novel mutations as well as reverse genetic identification of sequence lesions in specific genes of interest. Further advantages include the wide range of functional and molecular assays available, the large number of embryos/meioses produced, and the ease of haploid genetics and gynogenesis. The addition of these genetic tools to X. tropicalis provides a uniquely flexible platform for analysis of gene function in vertebrate development. PMID:22956083

  4. Evaluation of a genetically modified foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine candidate generated by reverse genetics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    . Thus, the full-length cDNA clone of FMDV can be a useful tool to develop genetically engineered FMDV vaccine candidates to help control porcinophilic FMD epidemics in China. PMID:22591597

  5. Genetic and Proteomic Interrogation of Lower Confidence Candidate Genes Reveals Signaling Networks in beta-Catenin-Active Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Genome-scale expression studies and comprehensive loss-of-function genetic screens have focused almost exclusively on the highest confidence candidate genes. Here, we describe a strategy for characterizing the lower confidence candidates identified by such approaches.

  6. SHARE: an adaptive algorithm to select the most informative set of SNPs for candidate genetic association.

    PubMed

    Dai, James Y; Leblanc, Michael; Smith, Nicholas L; Psaty, Bruce; Kooperberg, Charles

    2009-10-01

    Association studies have been widely used to identify genetic liability variants for complex diseases. While scanning the chromosomal region 1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at a time may not fully explore linkage disequilibrium, haplotype analyses tend to require a fairly large number of parameters, thus potentially losing power. Clustering algorithms, such as the cladistic approach, have been proposed to reduce the dimensionality, yet they have important limitations. We propose a SNP-Haplotype Adaptive REgression (SHARE) algorithm that seeks the most informative set of SNPs for genetic association in a targeted candidate region by growing and shrinking haplotypes with 1 more or less SNP in a stepwise fashion, and comparing prediction errors of different models via cross-validation. Depending on the evolutionary history of the disease mutations and the markers, this set may contain a single SNP or several SNPs that lay a foundation for haplotype analyses. Haplotype phase ambiguity is effectively accounted for by treating haplotype reconstruction as a part of the learning procedure. Simulations and a data application show that our method has improved power over existing methodologies and that the results are informative in the search for disease-causal loci.

  7. Candidate gene molecular markers as tools for analyzing genetic susceptibility to Morbillivirus infection in stranded Cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Stejskalova, Karla; Bayerova, Zuzana; Futas, Jan; Hrazdilova, Kristyna; Klumplerova, Marie; Oppelt, Jan; Splichalova, Petra; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Mazzariol, Sandro; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Di Francesco, Gabriella; Terracciano, Giuliana; Paiu, Romulus-Marian; Ursache, Teodor Dan; Modry, David; Horin, Petr

    2017-09-11

    Morbilliviruses, such as Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) or Phocine distemper virus (PDV), represent a growing threat for marine mammals on both hemispheres. Since free-ranging animal populations strongly rely on natural resistance mechanisms, innate immunity related genes and virus cell entry receptor genes may represent key factors involved in susceptibility to CeMV in Cetaceans. Using the next generation sequencing technology, we have sequenced eleven candidate genes in two model species, Stenella coeruleoalba and Phocoena phocoena. Suitable single nucleotide polymorphism markers of potential functional importance, located in genes coding for basigin (BSG, CD147), the signaling lymphocyte activating molecule (SLAMF1), the poliovirus related receptor-4 (NECTIN4, PVRL4), toll-like receptors 3,7,8 (TLR3, TLR7, TLR8), natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (SLC11A1) and natural cytotoxicity triggering receptor 1 (NCR1), were identified in each model species, along with MHC-DQB haplotypes unique for each species. This set of molecular markers represents a potentially useful tool for studying host genetic variation and susceptibility to Morbillivirus infection in Cetaceans as well as for studying functionally important genetic diversity of selected Cetacean populations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic Candidate Variants in Two Multigenerational Families with Childhood Apraxia of Speech.

    PubMed

    Peter, Beate; Wijsman, Ellen M; Nato, Alejandro Q; Matsushita, Mark M; Chapman, Kathy L; Stanaway, Ian B; Wolff, John; Oda, Kaori; Gabo, Virginia B; Raskind, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a severe and socially debilitating form of speech sound disorder with suspected genetic involvement, but the genetic etiology is not yet well understood. Very few known or putative causal genes have been identified to date, e.g., FOXP2 and BCL11A. Building a knowledge base of the genetic etiology of CAS will make it possible to identify infants at genetic risk and motivate the development of effective very early intervention programs. We investigated the genetic etiology of CAS in two large multigenerational families with familial CAS. Complementary genomic methods included Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis, copy-number analysis, identity-by-descent sharing, and exome sequencing with variant filtering. No overlaps in regions with positive evidence of linkage between the two families were found. In one family, linkage analysis detected two chromosomal regions of interest, 5p15.1-p14.1, and 17p13.1-q11.1, inherited separately from the two founders. Single-point linkage analysis of selected variants identified CDH18 as a primary gene of interest and additionally, MYO10, NIPBL, GLP2R, NCOR1, FLCN, SMCR8, NEK8, and ANKRD12, possibly with additive effects. Linkage analysis in the second family detected five regions with LOD scores approaching the highest values possible in the family. A gene of interest was C4orf21 (ZGRF1) on 4q25-q28.2. Evidence for previously described causal copy-number variations and validated or suspected genes was not found. Results are consistent with a heterogeneous CAS etiology, as is expected in many neurogenic disorders. Future studies will investigate genome variants in these and other families with CAS.

  9. Genetic Candidate Variants in Two Multigenerational Families with Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    PubMed Central

    Wijsman, Ellen M.; Nato, Alejandro Q.; Matsushita, Mark M.; Chapman, Kathy L.; Stanaway, Ian B.; Wolff, John; Oda, Kaori; Gabo, Virginia B.; Raskind, Wendy H.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a severe and socially debilitating form of speech sound disorder with suspected genetic involvement, but the genetic etiology is not yet well understood. Very few known or putative causal genes have been identified to date, e.g., FOXP2 and BCL11A. Building a knowledge base of the genetic etiology of CAS will make it possible to identify infants at genetic risk and motivate the development of effective very early intervention programs. We investigated the genetic etiology of CAS in two large multigenerational families with familial CAS. Complementary genomic methods included Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis, copy-number analysis, identity-by-descent sharing, and exome sequencing with variant filtering. No overlaps in regions with positive evidence of linkage between the two families were found. In one family, linkage analysis detected two chromosomal regions of interest, 5p15.1-p14.1, and 17p13.1-q11.1, inherited separately from the two founders. Single-point linkage analysis of selected variants identified CDH18 as a primary gene of interest and additionally, MYO10, NIPBL, GLP2R, NCOR1, FLCN, SMCR8, NEK8, and ANKRD12, possibly with additive effects. Linkage analysis in the second family detected five regions with LOD scores approaching the highest values possible in the family. A gene of interest was C4orf21 (ZGRF1) on 4q25-q28.2. Evidence for previously described causal copy-number variations and validated or suspected genes was not found. Results are consistent with a heterogeneous CAS etiology, as is expected in many neurogenic disorders. Future studies will investigate genome variants in these and other families with CAS. PMID:27120335

  10. Genetic variants implicated in personality: a review of the more promising candidates.

    PubMed

    Savitz, Jonathan B; Ramesar, Rajkumar S

    2004-11-15

    Alleles of the serotonin transporter gene (SERT) and the dopamine 4 receptor gene (DRD4) were first associated with anxiety-related and novelty-seeking personality traits, respectively, in 1996. These early successes precipitated a flood of research into the genetic basis of personality; a quest that has yet to yield decisive answers. Here, both the theoretical and the empirical evidence implicating specific loci-in particular SERT and DRD4-in the development of personality is evaluated. Despite a paucity of statistically significant results following post-hoc analysis, and an excess of positive results derived from studies with small sample sizes, the existence of a genuine effect is argued for: a gene-personality relationship rendered periodically latent through genetic epistasis, gene-environment interactions, variation in genetic background, and the presence of other confounding variables.

  11. PCMDI analysis of candidate atmospheric models for CCSM

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, M F; Taylor, K; Doutriaux, C; AchutaRao, K; Gleckler, P; Hnilo, J; Boyle, J

    2000-12-13

    This report is intended to give a summary analysis of the candidate model configurations under consideration by NCAR for the atmospheric component of next version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). Intercomparison results are presented for each of the models available prior to the Atmospheric Model Working Group (AMWG) meeting, December 12-14, 2000. We present four types of figures in this report. The traditional methods of viewing zonal mean surface fields, latitude-longitude maps and zonal mean latitude-height cross sections are straightforward. In each of these cases, we present DJF and JJA climatological averages and a difference from an observational or reanalysis data set. The fourth method of analyzing the candidates' model performance involves the use of ''performance portraits'' and is explained in detail on following pages. As stated by NCAR and the AMWG, the information included in this report should be considered proprietary to NCAR and is not to be cited, consistent with the disclaimer on the AMWG password protected web pages. We deliberately have deferred our conclusions in this printed report to our presentation. Rather, we encourage you to draw your own conclusions based on these figures and other information made available at the AMWG meeting.

  12. Thermal tolerance in the keystone species Daphnia magna -a candidate gene and an outlier analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Jansen, M; Geerts, A N; Rago, A; Spanier, K I; Denis, C; De Meester, L; Orsini, L

    2017-02-01

    Changes in temperature have occurred throughout Earth's history. However, current warming trends exacerbated by human activities impose severe and rapid loss of biodiversity. Although understanding the mechanisms orchestrating organismal response to climate change is important, remarkably few studies document their role in nature. This is because only few systems enable the combined analysis of genetic and plastic responses to environmental change over long time-spans. Here, we characterize genetic and plastic responses to temperature increase in the aquatic keystone grazer Daphnia magna combining a candidate gene and an outlier analysis approach. We capitalize on the short generation time of our species, facilitating experimental evolution, and the production of dormant eggs enabling the analysis of long term response to environmental change through a resurrection ecology approach. We quantify plasticity in the expression of 35 candidate genes in D. magna populations resurrected from a lake that experienced changes in average temperature over the past century and from experimental populations differing in thermal tolerance isolated from a selection experiment. By measuring expression in multiple genotypes from each of these populations in control and heat treatments we assess plastic responses to extreme temperature events. By measuring evolutionary changes in gene expression between warm and cold adapted populations we assess evolutionary response to temperature changes. Evolutionary response to temperature increase is also assessed via an outlier analysis using EST-linked microsatellite loci. This study provides the first insights into the role of plasticity and genetic adaptation in orchestrating adaptive responses to environmental change in D. magna This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic basis of qualitative and quantitative resistance to powdery mildew in wheat: from consensus regions to candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici) is one of the most damaging diseases of wheat. The objective of this study was to identify the wheat genomic regions that are involved in the control of powdery mildew resistance through a quantitative trait loci (QTL) meta-analysis approach. This meta-analysis allows the use of collected QTL data from different published studies to obtain consensus QTL across different genetic backgrounds, thus providing a better definition of the regions responsible for the trait, and the possibility to obtain molecular markers that will be suitable for marker-assisted selection. Results Five QTL for resistance to powdery mildew were identified under field conditions in the durum-wheat segregating population Creso × Pedroso. An integrated map was developed for the projection of resistance genes/ alleles and the QTL from the present study and the literature, and to investigate their distribution in the wheat genome. Molecular markers that correspond to candidate genes for plant responses to pathogens were also projected onto the map, particularly considering NBS-LRR and receptor-like protein kinases. More than 80 independent QTL and 51 resistance genes from 62 different mapping populations were projected onto the consensus map using the Biomercator statistical software. Twenty-four MQTL that comprised 2–6 initial QTL that had widely varying confidence intervals were found on 15 chromosomes. The co-location of the resistance QTL and genes was investigated. Moreover, from analysis of the sequences of DArT markers, 28 DArT clones mapped on wheat chromosomes have been shown to be associated with the NBS-LRR genes and positioned in the same regions as the MQTL for powdery mildew resistance. Conclusions The results from the present study provide a detailed analysis of the genetic basis of resistance to powdery mildew in wheat. The study of the Creso × Pedroso durum-wheat population has revealed some QTL that had

  14. Eye laterality: a comprehensive analysis in refractive surgery candidates.

    PubMed

    Linke, Stephan J; Druchkiv, Vasyl; Steinberg, Johannes; Richard, Gisbert; Katz, Toam

    2013-08-01

    To explore eye laterality (higher refractive error in one eye) and its association with refractive state, spherical/astigmatic anisometropia, age and sex in refractive surgery candidates. Medical records of 12 493 consecutive refractive surgery candidates were filtered. Refractive error (subjective and cycloplegic) was measured in each subject and correlated with eye laterality. Only subjects with corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) of >20/22 in each eye were enrolled to exclude amblyopia. Associations between eye laterality and refractive state were analysed by means of t-test, chi-squared test, Spearman's correlation and multivariate logistic regression analysis, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in spherical equivalent between right (-3.47 ± 2.76 D) and left eyes (-3.47 ± 2.76 D, p = 0.510; Pearson's r = 0.948, p < 0.001). Subgroup analysis revealed (I) right eye laterality for anisometropia >2.5 D in myopic (-5.64 ± 2.5 D versus -4.92 ± 2.6 D; p = 0.001) and in hyperopic (4.44 ± 1.69 D versus 3.04 ± 1.79 D; p = 0.025) subjects, (II) a tendency for left eye cylindrical laterality in myopic subjects, and (III) myopic male subjects had a higher prevalence of left eye laterality. (IV) Age did not show any significant impact on laterality. Over the full refractive spectrum, this study confirmed previously described strong interocular refractive correlation but revealed a statistically significant higher rate of right eye laterality for anisometropia >2.5 D. In general, our results support the use of data from one eye only in studies of ocular refraction. © 2013 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  15. Genetic subdivision and candidate genes under selection in North American grey wolves.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Rena M; vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Harrigan, Ryan; Knowles, James C; Musiani, Marco; Coltman, David; Novembre, John; Wayne, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    Previous genetic studies of the highly mobile grey wolf (Canis lupus) found population structure that coincides with habitat and phenotype differences. We hypothesized that these ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes) should exhibit signatures of selection in genes related to morphology, coat colour and metabolism. To test these predictions, we quantified population structure related to habitat using a genotyping array to assess variation in 42 036 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 111 North American grey wolves. Using these SNP data and individual-level measurements of 12 environmental variables, we identified six ecotypes: West Forest, Boreal Forest, Arctic, High Arctic, British Columbia and Atlantic Forest. Next, we explored signals of selection across these wolf ecotypes through the use of three complementary methods to detect selection: FST /haplotype homozygosity bivariate percentilae, bayescan, and environmentally correlated directional selection with bayenv. Across all methods, we found consistent signals of selection on genes related to morphology, coat coloration, metabolism, as predicted, as well as vision and hearing. In several high-ranking candidate genes, including LEPR, TYR and SLC14A2, we found variation in allele frequencies that follow environmental changes in temperature and precipitation, a result that is consistent with local adaptation rather than genetic drift. Our findings show that local adaptation can occur despite gene flow in a highly mobile species and can be detected through a moderately dense genomic scan. These patterns of local adaptation revealed by SNP genotyping likely reflect high fidelity to natal habitats of dispersing wolves, strong ecological divergence among habitats, and moderate levels of linkage in the wolf genome.

  16. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, J J; Wang, B Q; Fei, Q; Yang, Y; Li, D

    2016-12-01

    . Li, B. Q. Wang, Q. Fei, Y. Yang, D. Li. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:594-601. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.512.BJR-2016-0073.R1. © 2016 Fei et al.

  17. A Multiple Interaction Analysis Reveals ADRB3 as a Potential Candidate for Gallbladder Cancer Predisposition via a Complex Interaction with Other Candidate Gene Variations.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajani; Kim, Jong Joo; Misra, Sanjeev; Kumar, Ashok; Mittal, Balraj

    2015-11-25

    Gallbladder cancer is the most common and a highly aggressive biliary tract malignancy with a dismal outcome. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial, comprising the combined effect of multiple genetic variations of mild consequence along with numerous dietary and environmental risk factors. Previously, we demonstrated the association of several candidate gene variations with GBC risk. In this study, we aimed to identify the combination of gene variants and their possible interactions contributing towards genetic susceptibility of GBC. Here, we performed Multifactor-Dimensionality Reduction (MDR) and Classification and Regression Tree Analysis (CRT) to investigate the gene-gene interactions and the combined effect of 14 SNPs in nine genes (DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634); FAS (rs2234767); FASL (rs763110); DCC (rs2229080, rs4078288, rs7504990, rs714); PSCA (rs2294008, rs2978974); ADRA2A (rs1801253); ADRB1 (rs1800544); ADRB3 (rs4994); CYP17 (rs2486758)) involved in various signaling pathways. Genotyping was accomplished by PCR-RFLP or Taqman allelic discrimination assays. SPSS software version 16.0 and MDR software version 2.0 were used for all the statistical analysis. Single locus investigation demonstrated significant association of DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634), DCC (rs714, rs2229080, rs4078288) and ADRB3 (rs4994) polymorphisms with GBC risk. MDR analysis revealed ADRB3 (rs4994) to be crucial candidate in GBC susceptibility that may act either alone (p < 0.0001, CVC = 10/10) or in combination with DCC (rs714 and rs2229080, p < 0.0001, CVC = 9/10). Our CRT results are in agreement with the above findings. Further, in-silico results of studied SNPs advocated their role in splicing, transcriptional and/or protein coding regulation. Overall, our result suggested complex interactions amongst the studied SNPs and ADRB3 rs4994 as candidate influencing GBC susceptibility.

  18. A Multiple Interaction Analysis Reveals ADRB3 as a Potential Candidate for Gallbladder Cancer Predisposition via a Complex Interaction with Other Candidate Gene Variations

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rajani; Kim, Jong Joo; Misra, Sanjeev; Kumar, Ashok; Mittal, Balraj

    2015-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is the most common and a highly aggressive biliary tract malignancy with a dismal outcome. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial, comprising the combined effect of multiple genetic variations of mild consequence along with numerous dietary and environmental risk factors. Previously, we demonstrated the association of several candidate gene variations with GBC risk. In this study, we aimed to identify the combination of gene variants and their possible interactions contributing towards genetic susceptibility of GBC. Here, we performed Multifactor-Dimensionality Reduction (MDR) and Classification and Regression Tree Analysis (CRT) to investigate the gene–gene interactions and the combined effect of 14 SNPs in nine genes (DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634); FAS (rs2234767); FASL (rs763110); DCC (rs2229080, rs4078288, rs7504990, rs714); PSCA (rs2294008, rs2978974); ADRA2A (rs1801253); ADRB1 (rs1800544); ADRB3 (rs4994); CYP17 (rs2486758)) involved in various signaling pathways. Genotyping was accomplished by PCR-RFLP or Taqman allelic discrimination assays. SPSS software version 16.0 and MDR software version 2.0 were used for all the statistical analysis. Single locus investigation demonstrated significant association of DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634), DCC (rs714, rs2229080, rs4078288) and ADRB3 (rs4994) polymorphisms with GBC risk. MDR analysis revealed ADRB3 (rs4994) to be crucial candidate in GBC susceptibility that may act either alone (p < 0.0001, CVC = 10/10) or in combination with DCC (rs714 and rs2229080, p < 0.0001, CVC = 9/10). Our CRT results are in agreement with the above findings. Further, in-silico results of studied SNPs advocated their role in splicing, transcriptional and/or protein coding regulation. Overall, our result suggested complex interactions amongst the studied SNPs and ADRB3 rs4994 as candidate influencing GBC susceptibility. PMID:26602921

  19. Diet and colorectal cancer: analysis of a candidate pathway using SNPS, haplotypes, and multi-gene assessment.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S; Caan, Bette J; Potter, John D; Wolff, Roger K

    2011-11-01

    There is considerable biologic plausibility to the hypothesis that genetic variability in pathways involved in insulin signaling and energy homeostasis may modulate dietary risk associated with colorectal cancer. We utilized data from 2 population-based case-control studies of colon (n = 1,574 cases, 1,970 controls) and rectal (n = 791 cases, 999 controls) cancer to evaluate genetic variation in candidate SNPs identified from 9 genes in a candidate pathway: PDK1, RP6KA1, RPS6KA2, RPS6KB1, RPS6KB2, PTEN, FRAP1 (mTOR), TSC1, TSC2, Akt1, PIK3CA, and PRKAG2 with dietary intake of total energy, carbohydrates, fat, and fiber. We employed SNP, haplotype, and multiple-gene analysis to evaluate associations. PDK1 interacted with dietary fat for both colon and rectal cancer and with dietary carbohydrates for colon cancer. Statistically significant interaction with dietary carbohydrates and rectal cancer was detected by haplotype analysis of PDK1. Evaluation of dietary interactions with multiple genes in this candidate pathway showed several interactions with pairs of genes: Akt1 and PDK1, PDK1 and PTEN, PDK1 and TSC1, and PRKAG2 and PTEN. Analyses show that genetic variation influences risk of colorectal cancer associated with diet and illustrate the importance of evaluating dietary interactions beyond the level of single SNPs or haplotypes when a biologically relevant candidate pathway is examined.

  20. Category fluency, latent semantic analysis and schizophrenia: a candidate gene approach.

    PubMed

    Nicodemus, Kristin K; Elvevåg, Brita; Foltz, Peter W; Rosenstein, Mark; Diaz-Asper, Catherine; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2014-06-01

    Category fluency is a widely used task that relies on multiple neurocognitive processes and is a sensitive assay of cortical dysfunction, including in schizophrenia. The test requires naming of as many words belonging to a certain category (e.g., animals) as possible within a short period of time. The core metrics are the overall number of words produced and the number of errors, namely non-members generated for a target category. We combine a computational linguistic approach with a candidate gene approach to examine the genetic architecture of this traditional fluency measure. In addition to the standard metric of overall word count, we applied a computational approach to semantics, Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA), to analyse the clustering pattern of the categories generated, as it likely reflects the search in memory for meanings. Also, since fluency performance probably also recruits verbal learning and recall processes, we included two standard measures of this cognitive process: the Wechsler Memory Scale and California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT). To explore the genetic architecture of traditional and LSA-derived fluency measures we employed a candidate gene approach focused on SNPs with known function that were available from a recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) of schizophrenia. The selected candidate genes were associated with language and speech, verbal learning and recall processes, and processing speed. A total of 39 coding SNPs were included for analysis in 665 subjects. Given the modest sample size, the results should be regarded as exploratory and preliminary. Nevertheless, the data clearly illustrate how extracting the meaning from participants' responses, by analysing the actual content of words, generates useful and neurocognitively viable metrics. We discuss three replicated SNPs in the genes ZNF804A, DISC1 and KIAA0319, as well as the potential for computational analyses of linguistic and textual data in other genomics tasks. Copyright

  1. EST-SNP discovery and dense genetic mapping in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) enable candidate gene selection for boron tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sukhjiwan; Cogan, Noel O I; Stephens, Amber; Noy, Dianne; Butsch, Mirella; Forster, John W; Materne, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Large-scale SNP discovery and dense genetic mapping in a lentil intraspecific cross permitted identification of a single chromosomal region controlling tolerance to boron toxicity, an important breeding objective. Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a highly nutritious food legume crop that is cultivated world-wide. Until recently, lentil has been considered a genomic 'orphan' crop, limiting the feasibility of marker-assisted selection strategies in breeding programs. The present study reports on the identification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from transcriptome sequencing data, utilisation of expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) and SNP markers for construction of a gene-based genetic linkage map, and identification of markers in close linkage to major QTLs for tolerance to boron (B) toxicity. A total of 2,956 high-quality SNP markers were identified from a lentil EST database. Sub-sets of 546 SSRs and 768 SNPs were further used for genetic mapping of an intraspecific mapping population (Cassab × ILL2024) that exhibits segregation for B tolerance. Comparative analysis of the lentil linkage map with the sequenced genomes of Medicago truncatula Gaertn., soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) and Lotus japonicus L. indicated blocks of conserved macrosynteny, as well as a number of rearrangements. A single genomic region was found to be associated with variation for B tolerance in lentil, based on evaluation performed over 2 years. Comparison of flanking markers to genome sequences of model species (M. truncatula, soybean and Arabidopsis thaliana) identified candidate genes that are functionally associated with B tolerance, and could potentially be used for diagnostic marker development in lentil.

  2. A Candidate Gene Approach Identifies an IL33 Genetic Variant as a Novel Genetic Risk Factor for GCA

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana; Solans, Roser; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, Maria C.; Castañeda, Santos; Ramentol, Marc; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Narváez, Javier; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Palm, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Braun, Niko; Moosig, Frank; Witte, Torsten; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Vaglio, Augusto; Salvarani, Carlo; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Increased expression of IL-33 and its receptor ST2, encoded by the IL1RL1 gene, has been detected in the inflamed arteries of giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL33 and IL1RL1 loci on GCA predisposition. Methods A total of 1,363 biopsy-proven GCA patients and 3,908 healthy controls from four European cohorts (Spain, Italy, Germany and Norway) were combined in a meta-analysis. Six genetic variants: rs3939286, rs7025417 and rs7044343, within the IL33 gene, and rs2058660, rs2310173 and rs13015714, within the IL1RL1 gene, previously associated with immune-related diseases, were genotyped using predesigned TaqMan assays. Results A consistent association between the rs7025417 polymorphism and GCA was evident in the overall meta-analysis, under both allele (PMH = 0.041, OR = 0.88, CI 95% 0.78–0.99) and recessive (PMH = 3.40E-03, OR = 0.53, CI 95% 0.35–0.80) models. No statistically significant differences between allele or genotype frequencies for the other IL33 and IL1RL1 genetic variants were detected in this pooled analysis. Conclusions Our results clearly evidenced the implication of the IL33 rs7025417 polymorphism in the genetic network underlying GCA. PMID:25409453

  3. Root Transcriptome Analysis of Wild Peanut Reveals Candidate Genes for Nematode Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Patricia M.; Guimaraes, Larissa A.; Morgante, Carolina V.; Silva, Orzenil B.; Araujo, Ana Claudia G.; Martins, Andressa C. Q.; Saraiva, Mario A. P.; Oliveira, Thais N.; Togawa, Roberto C.; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C. M.; Bertioli, David J.; Brasileiro, Ana Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Wild peanut relatives (Arachis spp.) are genetically diverse and were adapted to a range of environments during the evolution course, constituting an important source of allele diversity for resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The wild diploid A. stenosperma harbors high levels of resistance to a variety of pathogens, including the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne arenaria, through the onset of the Hypersensitive Response (HR). In order to identify genes and regulators triggering this defense response, a comprehensive root transcriptome analysis during the first stages of this incompatible interaction was conducted using Illumina Hi-Seq. Overall, eight cDNA libraries were produced generating 28.2 GB, which were de novo assembled into 44,132 contigs and 37,882 loci. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified and clustered according to their expression profile, with the majority being downregulated at 6 DAI, which coincides with the onset of the HR. Amongst these DEGs, 27 were selected for further qRT-PCR validation allowing the identification of nematode-responsive candidate genes that are putatively related to the resistance response. Those candidates are engaged in the salycilic (NBS-LRR, lipocalins, resveratrol synthase) and jasmonic (patatin, allene oxidase cyclase) acids pathways, and also related to hormonal balance (auxin responsive protein, GH3) and cellular plasticity and signaling (tetraspanin, integrin, expansin), with some of them showing contrasting expression behavior between Arachis RKN-resistant and susceptible genotypes. As these candidate genes activate different defensive signaling systems, the genetic (HR) and the induced resistance (IR), their pyramidding in one genotype via molecular breeding or transgenic strategy might contribute to a more durable resistance, thus improving the long-term control of RKN in peanut. PMID:26488731

  4. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team identified 42 ... Distracted Driving Raises Crash Risk Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery Oxytocin Affects Facial Recognition Connect with ...

  5. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, J. J.; Wang, B. Q.; Yang, Y.; Li, D.

    2016-01-01

    bone formation. Cite this article: J. J. Li, B. Q. Wang, Q. Fei, Y. Yang, D. Li. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:594–601. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.512.BJR-2016-0073.R1. PMID:27908864

  6. Genetic Susceptibility to Cancer: the Role of Polymorphisms in Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Linda M; Potter, John D; White, Emily; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Cardon, Lon R; Peters, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    Context Continuing advances in genotyping technologies and the inclusion of DNA collection in observational studies have resulted in an increasing number of genetic association studies. Objective To evaluate the overall progress and contribution of candidate gene association studies to current understanding of the genetic susceptibility to cancer. Data Sources We systematically examined the results of meta- and pooled analyses for genetic polymorphisms and cancer risk published through March 2008. Study Selection We identified 161 meta- and pooled analyses, encompassing 18 cancer sites and 99 genes. Analyses had to meet the following criteria: 1) at least 500 cases, 2) cancer risk as outcome, 3) not focused on HLA genetic markers, and 4) published in English. Data Extraction Information on cancer site, gene name, variant, point estimate and 95% confidence interval, allelic frequency, number of studies and cases, tests of study heterogeneity and publication bias were extracted by one investigator and reviewed by other investigators. Results These 161 analyses evaluated 344 gene-variant/cancer associations and included on average 7.3 studies and 3,551 cases (range: 508–19,729 cases) per investigated association. The summary OR for 98 (28%) statistically significant associations (p-value <0.05) were further evaluated by estimating the false-positive report probability (FPRP) at a given prior probability and statistical power. At a prior probability level of 0.001 and statistical power to detect an OR of 1.5, thirteen gene-variant/cancer associations remained noteworthy (FPRP<0.2). Assuming a very low prior probability of 0.000001, similar to a probability assumed for a randomly selected SNP in a genome-wide association study, and statistical power to detect an OR of 1.5, four associations were considered noteworthy as denoted by a FPRP value < 0.2: 1) GSTM1 null and bladder cancer (OR:1.5, 95% CI: 1.3–1.6, p-value=1.9×10−14), 2) NAT2 slow acetylator and bladder

  7. Molecular Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis for Numerous Spines on the Fruit of Cucumber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengping; Liu, Shulin; Miao, Han; Wang, Min; Liu, Panna; Wehner, Todd C; Gu, Xingfang

    2016-09-01

    Number of spines on the fruit is an important quality trait in cucumber. The inheritance and identification of molecular markers for fruit spine density gene can provide a basis for breeding and lay the foundation for gene cloning. Cucumber inbred lines NCG-122 with numerous spines and NCG-121 with few spines were used for genetic analysis and gene mapping in this study. Genetic analysis showed that the numerous spines trait in NCG-122 was qualitative, and a single recessive nuclear gene (ns) controlled this trait. The few spines trait was dominant over the numerous spines trait. In the preliminary genetic mapping of the ns gene, 8 SSR markers were found to be linked to ns, which mapped to chromosome 2 (Chr.2) of cucumber. The closest flanking markers SSR22338 and SSR11596 were linked to the ns gene, with genetic distances of 10.2 and 1.7cM, respectively. One-hundred and thirty pairs of new SSR primers and 28 pairs of Indel primers were developed based on sequence information in the preliminary mapping region of ns Fifteen SSR markers and 2 Indel markers were identified to be linked to the ns gene after analysis on the F2 mapping population using the new molecular markers. The 2 closest flanking markers, SSRns-127 and SSR04219, were 0.7 and 2.4 cM from ns, respectively. The physical distance between SSRns-127 and SSR04219 was 266.1kb, containing 27 predicted genes. Csa2G285390 was speculated as the probable candidate gene for numerous spines. The accuracy of the closest linked marker to the ns gene, SSRns-127, for MAS breeding was 95.0%.

  8. Genetic and Targeted eQTL Mapping Reveals Strong Candidate Genes Modulating the Stress Response During Chicken Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Fallahsharoudi, Amir; de Kock, Neil; Johnsson, Martin; Bektic, Lejla; Ubhayasekera, S. J. Kumari A.; Bergquist, Jonas; Wright, Dominic; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    The stress response has been largely modified in all domesticated animals, offering a strong tool for genetic mapping. In chickens, ancestral Red Junglefowl react stronger both in terms of physiology and behavior to a brief restraint stress than domesticated White Leghorn, demonstrating modified functions of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying variations in stress-induced hormone levels using 232 birds from the 12th generation of an advanced intercross between White Leghorn and Red Junglefowl, genotyped for 739 genetic markers. Plasma levels of corticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and pregnenolone (PREG) were measured using LC-MS/MS in all genotyped birds. Transcription levels of the candidate genes were measured in the adrenal glands or hypothalamus of 88 out of the 232 birds used for hormone assessment. Genes were targeted for expression analysis when they were located in a hormone QTL region and were differentially expressed in the pure breed birds. One genome-wide significant QTL on chromosome 5 and two suggestive QTL together explained 20% of the variance in corticosterone response. Two significant QTL for aldosterone on chromosome 2 and 5 (explaining 19% of the variance), and one QTL for DHEA on chromosome 4 (explaining 5% of the variance), were detected. Orthologous DNA regions to the significant corticosterone QTL have been previously associated with the physiological stress response in other species but, to our knowledge, the underlying gene(s) have not been identified. SERPINA10 had an expression QTL (eQTL) colocalized with the corticosterone QTL on chromosome 5 and PDE1C had an eQTL colocalized with the aldosterone QTL on chromosome 2. Furthermore, in both cases, the expression levels of the genes were correlated with the plasma levels of the hormones. Hence, both these genes are strong putative candidates for the domestication-induced modifications of the stress response in

  9. Genetic linkage analysis of manic depression in Iceland.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, D; Sherrington, R; Brett, P; Holmes, D S; Kalsi, G; Brynjolfsson, J; Petursson, H; Rifkin, L; Murphy, P; Moloney, E

    1993-01-01

    Genetic linkage analysis has been used to study five Icelandic pedigrees multiply affected with manic depression. Genetic markers were chosen from regions which had been implicated by other studies or to which candidate genes had been localized. The transmission model used was of a dominant gene with incomplete penetrance and allowing for a large number of phenocopies, especially for unipolar rather than bipolar cases. Multipoint analysis with linked markers enabled information to be gained from regions spanning large distances. Using this approach we have excluded regions of chromosome 11p, 11q, 8q, 5q, 9q and Xq. Candidate genes excluded include those for tyrosine hydroxylase, the dopamine type 2 receptor, proenkephalin, the 5HT1A receptor and dopamine beta hydroxylase. Nevertheless, we remain optimistic that this approach will eventually identify at least some of the genes predisposing to manic depression. PMID:8105081

  10. Using a Candidate Gene-Based Genetic Linkage Map to Identify QTL for Winter Survival in Perennial Ryegrass

    PubMed Central

    Paina, Cristiana; Byrne, Stephen L.; Studer, Bruno; Rognli, Odd Arne; Asp, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Important agronomical traits in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) breeding programs such as winter survival and heading date, are quantitative traits that are generally controlled by multiple loci. Individually, these loci have relatively small effects. The aim of this study was to develop a candidate gene based Illumina GoldenGate 1,536-plex assay, containing single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed from transcripts involved in response to cold acclimation, vernalization, and induction of flowering. The assay was used to genotype a mapping population that we have also phenotyped for winter survival to complement the heading date trait previously mapped in this population. A positive correlation was observed between strong vernalization requirement and winter survival, and some QTL for winter survival and heading date overlapped on the genetic map. Candidate genes were located in clusters along the genetic map, some of which co-localized with QTL for winter survival and heading date. These clusters of candidate genes may be used in candidate gene based association studies to identify alleles associated with winter survival and heading date. PMID:27010567

  11. Using a Candidate Gene-Based Genetic Linkage Map to Identify QTL for Winter Survival in Perennial Ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Paina, Cristiana; Byrne, Stephen L; Studer, Bruno; Rognli, Odd Arne; Asp, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Important agronomical traits in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) breeding programs such as winter survival and heading date, are quantitative traits that are generally controlled by multiple loci. Individually, these loci have relatively small effects. The aim of this study was to develop a candidate gene based Illumina GoldenGate 1,536-plex assay, containing single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed from transcripts involved in response to cold acclimation, vernalization, and induction of flowering. The assay was used to genotype a mapping population that we have also phenotyped for winter survival to complement the heading date trait previously mapped in this population. A positive correlation was observed between strong vernalization requirement and winter survival, and some QTL for winter survival and heading date overlapped on the genetic map. Candidate genes were located in clusters along the genetic map, some of which co-localized with QTL for winter survival and heading date. These clusters of candidate genes may be used in candidate gene based association studies to identify alleles associated with winter survival and heading date.

  12. Association Analysis Suggests SOD2 as a Newly Identified Candidate Gene Associated With Leprosy Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Geovana Brotto; Salomão, Heloisa; Francio, Angela Schneider; Fava, Vinícius Medeiros; Werneck, Renata Iani; Mira, Marcelo Távora

    2016-08-01

    Genetic studies have identified several genes and genomic regions contributing to the control of host susceptibility to leprosy. Here, we test variants of the positional and functional candidate gene SOD2 for association with leprosy in 2 independent population samples. Family-based analysis revealed an association between leprosy and allele G of marker rs295340 (P = .042) and borderline evidence of an association between leprosy and alleles C and A of markers rs4880 (P = .077) and rs5746136 (P = .071), respectively. Findings were validated in an independent case-control sample for markers rs295340 (P = .049) and rs4880 (P = .038). These results suggest SOD2 as a newly identified gene conferring susceptibility to leprosy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Large-scale candidate gene study to identify genetic risk factors predictive of paliperidone treatment response in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dai; Fu, Dong-Jing; Wu, Xiaodong; Shapiro, Alice; Favis, Reyna; Savitz, Adam; Chung, Hedy; Alphs, Larry; Gopal, Srihari; Haas, Magali; Cohen, Nadine; Li, Qingqin

    2015-04-01

    Clinical response to antipsychotic medications can vary markedly in patients with schizophrenia. Identifying genetic variants associated with treatment response could help optimize patient care and outcome. To this end, we carried out a large-scale candidate gene study to identify genetic risk factors predictive of paliperidone efficacy. A central nervous system custom chip containing single nucleotide polymorphisms from 1204 candidate genes was utilized to genotype a discovery cohort of 684 schizophrenia patients from four clinical studies of paliperidone extended-release and paliperidone palmitate. Variants predictive of paliperidone efficacy were identified and further tested in four independent replication cohorts of schizophrenic patients (N=2856). We identified an SNP in ERBB4 that may contribute toward differential treatment response to paliperidone. The association trended in the same direction as the discovery cohort in two of the four replication cohorts, but ultimately did not survive multiple testing corrections. The association was not replicated in the other two independent cohorts. We also report several SNPs in well-known schizophrenia candidate genes that show suggestive associations with paliperidone efficacy. These preliminary findings suggest that genetic variation in the ERBB4 gene may differentially affect treatment response to paliperidone in individuals with schizophrenia. They implicate the neuregulin 1 (NRG1)-ErbB4 pathway for modulating antipsychotic response. However, these findings were not robustly reproduced in replication cohorts.

  14. Genetic and serological identification of three Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains as candidates for novel provisional O serotypes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xi; Liu, Bin; Chen, Min; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lu; Chen, Hongyou; Wang, Yao; Tu, Lihong; Zhang, Xi; Feng, Lu

    2017-03-20

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative, halophilic Vibrio that naturally inhabits marine and estuarine environments worldwide and has recently been recognized as one of the most important foodborne pathogens. To date, 13 O serotypes and 71 K serotypes of V. parahaemolyticus have been identified. However, untypeable V. parahaemolyticus strains are frequently found during routine detection, indicating that other forms of serotypes exist and suggesting the necessity for extension of the antigenic scheme. In this work, through the genetic analysis of the O serotype genetic determinants (OGDs) and the production of antisera and serological tests, we identified three novel O serotypes of V. parahaemolyticus. Further analyses showed that recombination and gene-set deletions/insertions within OGDs may play key roles in the generation of V. parahaemolyticus O serotype diversity. A PCR method was developed for the identification of these novel O serotypes, and specificity and sensitivity were evaluated. A double-blind test including 283 clinical isolates was performed, giving perfect correlation with the agglutination test results. Generally, our study expanded the O-antigenic scheme of V. parahaemolyticus from 13 to 16 and provided a tool with the potential for the detection and identification of V. parahaemolyticus strains (especially untypeable strains) isolated from both the clinic and the environment.

  15. Mosaic Zebrafish Transgenesis for Functional Genomic Analysis of Candidate Cooperative Genes in Tumor Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ung, Choong Yong; Guo, Feng; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Zhihui; Zhu, Shizhen

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive genomic analysis has uncovered surprisingly large numbers of genetic alterations in various types of cancers. To robustly and efficiently identify oncogenic “drivers” among these tumors and define their complex relationships with concurrent genetic alterations during tumor pathogenesis remains a daunting task. Recently, zebrafish have emerged as an important animal model for studying human diseases, largely because of their ease of maintenance, high fecundity, obvious advantages for in vivo imaging, high conservation of oncogenes and their molecular pathways, susceptibility to tumorigenesis and, most importantly, the availability of transgenic techniques suitable for use in the fish. Transgenic zebrafish models of cancer have been widely used to dissect oncogenic pathways in diverse tumor types. However, developing a stable transgenic fish model is both tedious and time-consuming, and it is even more difficult and more time-consuming to dissect the cooperation of multiple genes in disease pathogenesis using this approach, which requires the generation of multiple transgenic lines with overexpression of the individual genes of interest followed by complicated breeding of these stable transgenic lines. Hence, use of a mosaic transient transgenic approach in zebrafish offers unique advantages for functional genomic analysis in vivo. Briefly, candidate transgenes can be coinjected into one-cell-stage wild-type or transgenic zebrafish embryos and allowed to integrate together into each somatic cell in a mosaic pattern that leads to mixed genotypes in the same primarily injected animal. This permits one to investigate in a faster and less expensive manner whether and how the candidate genes can collaborate with each other to drive tumorigenesis. By transient overexpression of activated ALK in the transgenic fish overexpressing MYCN, we demonstrate here the cooperation of these two oncogenes in the pathogenesis of a pediatric cancer, neuroblastoma that

  16. Epidemiological survey of idiopathic scoliosis and sequence alignment analysis of multiple candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Jia, Quanzhang; Guo, Hong; Xu, Jianzhong; Bai, Yun; Yang, Kai; Luo, Fei; Zhang, Zehua; Hou, Tianyong

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the effects of genetic factors on idiopathic scoliosis (IS) and genetic modes through genetic epidemiological survey on IS in Chongqing City, China, and to determine whether SH3GL1, GADD45B, and FGF22 in the chromosome 19p13.3 are the pathogenic genes of IS through genetic sequence analysis. 214 nuclear families were investigated to analyse the age incidence, familial aggregation, and heritability. SH3GL1, GADD45B, and FGF22 were chosen as candidate genes for mutation screening in 56 IS patients of 214 families. The sequence alignment analysis was performed to determine mutations and predict the protein structure. The average age of onset of 10.8 years suggests that IS is a early onset disease. Incidences of IS in first-, second-, third-degree relatives and the overall incidence in families (5.68%) were also significantly higher than that of the general population (1.04%). The U test indicated a significant difference, suggesting that IS has a familial aggregation. The heritability of first-degree relatives (77.68 ±10.39%), second-degree relatives (69.89 ±3.14%), and third-degree relatives (62.14 ±11.92%) illustrated that genetic factors play an important role in IS pathogenesis. The incidence of first-degree relatives (10.01%), second-degree relatives (2.55%) and third-degree relatives (1.76%) illustrated that IS is not in simple accord with monogenic Mendel's law but manifests as traits of multifactorial hereditary diseases. Sequence alignment of exons of SH3GL1, GADD45B, and FGF22 showed 17 base mutations, of which 16 mutations do not induce open reading frame (ORF) shift or amino acid changes whereas one mutation (C→T)occurred in SH3GL1 results in formation of the termination codon, which induces variation of protein reading frame. Prediction analysis of protein sequence showed that the SH3GL1 mutant encoded a truncated protein, thus affecting the protein structure. IS is a multifactorial genetic disease and SH3GL1 may be one of the

  17. High volume molecular genetic identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms using Genetic Bit Analysis Application to human genetic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce-Jacino, M.T.; Reynolds, J.; Nikiforov, T.

    1994-09-01

    The most common type of genetic disease-associated mutation is the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Because most genetic diseases can be caused by multiple SNPs in the same gene, effective routine diagnosis of complex genetic diseases is dependent on a simple and reliable method of interrogating SNP sites. Molecular Tool`s solid phase assay capable of direct genotyping (single base sequencing) of SNP sites, Genetic Bit Analysis (GBA), involves hybridization-capture of a single-stranded PCR product to a sequence-specific, microtiter plate-bound oligonucleotide primer. The captured PCR product then acts as template for single-base extension of the capture primer across the polymorphic site, enabling direct determination of the base composition of the polymorphism through a simple colormetric assay. Genotyping in a high volume, semi-automated, processing system with a current capacity of 100 SNP interrogations per technician per day enables the screening of candidate mutations rapidly and cost-effectively, critically important to comprehensive genetic diagnosis. Using this gel-free technology, we have developed prototype diagnostic tests for CFTR and ApoE polymorphisms which enable direct sequencing of the polymorphic base at each site of interest. Routine clinical diagnosis of genetically complex diseases such as cystic fibrosis is dependent on this combination of robust biochemistry and simple format. Additionally, the ability to transfer the format and biochemistry to any disease gene of interest enables the broad application of this technology to clinical diagnostics, especially for genetically complex diseases.

  18. First photometric analysis of six open cluster candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Clariá, J. J.; Ahumada, A. V.

    2011-10-01

    In this study we try to clarify the nature of six catalogued open cluster (OC) candidates using CCD UBVI_{KC} photometry down to V = 22. The objects are Haffner 3, Haffner 5, NGC 2368, Haffner 25, Hogg 3 and Hogg 4. None of them was found to be a real OC.

  19. Integrative Analysis of Metabolomic, Proteomic and Genomic Data to Reveal Functional Pathways and Candidate Genes for Drip Loss in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Welzenbach, Julia; Neuhoff, Christiane; Heidt, Hanna; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Tholen, Ernst; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to integrate multi omics data to characterize underlying functional pathways and candidate genes for drip loss in pigs. The consideration of different omics levels allows elucidating the black box of phenotype expression. Metabolite and protein profiling was applied in Musculus longissimus dorsi samples of 97 Duroc × Pietrain pigs. In total, 126 and 35 annotated metabolites and proteins were quantified, respectively. In addition, all animals were genotyped with the porcine 60 k Illumina beadchip. An enrichment analysis resulted in 10 pathways, amongst others, sphingolipid metabolism and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, with significant influence on drip loss. Drip loss and 22 metabolic components were analyzed as intermediate phenotypes within a genome-wide association study (GWAS). We detected significantly associated genetic markers and candidate genes for drip loss and for most of the metabolic components. On chromosome 18, a region with promising candidate genes was identified based on SNPs associated with drip loss, the protein “phosphoglycerate mutase 2” and the metabolite glycine. We hypothesize that association studies based on intermediate phenotypes are able to provide comprehensive insights in the genetic variation of genes directly involved in the metabolism of performance traits. In this way, the analyses contribute to identify reliable candidate genes. PMID:27589727

  20. Transcriptome analysis of Brassica napus pod using RNA-Seq and identification of lipid-related candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hai-Ming; Kong, Xiang-Dong; Chen, Fei; Huang, Ji-Xiang; Lou, Xiang-Yang; Zhao, Jian-Yi

    2015-10-24

    Brassica napus is an important oilseed crop. Dissection of the genetic architecture underlying oil-related biological processes will greatly facilitates the genetic improvement of rapeseed. The differential gene expression during pod development offers a snapshot on the genes responsible for oil accumulation in. To identify candidate genes in the linkage peaks reported previously, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology to analyze the pod transcriptomes of German cultivar Sollux and Chinese inbred line Gaoyou. The RNA samples were collected for RNA-Seq at 5-7, 15-17 and 25-27 days after flowering (DAF). Bioinformatics analysis was performed to investigate differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Gene annotation analysis was integrated with QTL mapping and Brassica napus pod transcriptome profiling to detect potential candidate genes in oilseed. Four hundred sixty five and two thousand, one hundred fourteen candidate DEGs were identified, respectively, between two varieties at the same stages and across different periods of each variety. Then, 33 DEGs between Sollux and Gaoyou were identified as the candidate genes affecting seed oil content by combining those DEGs with the quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping results, of which, one was found to be homologous to Arabidopsis thaliana lipid-related genes. Intervarietal DEGs of lipid pathways in QTL regions represent important candidate genes for oil-related traits. Integrated analysis of transcriptome profiling, QTL mapping and comparative genomics with other relative species leads to efficient identification of most plausible functional genes underlying oil-content related characters, offering valuable resources for bettering breeding program of Brassica napus. This study provided a comprehensive overview on the pod transcriptomes of two varieties with different oil-contents at the three developmental stages.

  1. Transcriptomic Analysis Using Olive Varieties and Breeding Progenies Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in Plant Architecture.

    PubMed

    González-Plaza, Juan J; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; García-López, Carmen; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Luque, Francisco; Trelles, Oswaldo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; De La Rosa, Raúl; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2016-01-01

    Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2252 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species.

  2. Transcriptomic Analysis Using Olive Varieties and Breeding Progenies Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in Plant Architecture

    PubMed Central

    González-Plaza, Juan J.; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; García-López, Carmen; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F.; Luque, Francisco; Trelles, Oswaldo; Bejarano, Eduardo R.; De La Rosa, Raúl; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R.

    2016-01-01

    Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2252 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species. PMID:26973682

  3. A roadmap for the genetic analysis of renal aging.

    PubMed

    Noordmans, Gerda A; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; van Goor, Harry; Korstanje, Ron

    2015-10-01

    Several studies show evidence for the genetic basis of renal disease, which renders some individuals more prone than others to accelerated renal aging. Studying the genetics of renal aging can help us to identify genes involved in this process and to unravel the underlying pathways. First, this opinion article will give an overview of the phenotypes that can be observed in age-related kidney disease. Accurate phenotyping is essential in performing genetic analysis. For kidney aging, this could include both functional and structural changes. Subsequently, this article reviews the studies that report on candidate genes associated with renal aging in humans and mice. Several loci or candidate genes have been found associated with kidney disease, but identification of the specific genetic variants involved has proven to be difficult. CUBN, UMOD, and SHROOM3 were identified by human GWAS as being associated with albuminuria, kidney function, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). These are promising examples of genes that could be involved in renal aging, and were further mechanistically evaluated in animal models. Eventually, we will provide approaches for performing genetic analysis. We should leverage the power of mouse models, as testing in humans is limited. Mouse and other animal models can be used to explain the underlying biological mechanisms of genes and loci identified by human GWAS. Furthermore, mouse models can be used to identify genetic variants associated with age-associated histological changes, of which Far2, Wisp2, and Esrrg are examples. A new outbred mouse population with high genetic diversity will facilitate the identification of genes associated with renal aging by enabling high-resolution genetic mapping while also allowing the control of environmental factors, and by enabling access to renal tissues at specific time points for histology, proteomics, and gene expression. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John

  4. A roadmap for the genetic analysis of renal aging

    PubMed Central

    Noordmans, Gerda A; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; van Goor, Harry; Korstanje, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Several studies show evidence for the genetic basis of renal disease, which renders some individuals more prone than others to accelerated renal aging. Studying the genetics of renal aging can help us to identify genes involved in this process and to unravel the underlying pathways. First, this opinion article will give an overview of the phenotypes that can be observed in age-related kidney disease. Accurate phenotyping is essential in performing genetic analysis. For kidney aging, this could include both functional and structural changes. Subsequently, this article reviews the studies that report on candidate genes associated with renal aging in humans and mice. Several loci or candidate genes have been found associated with kidney disease, but identification of the specific genetic variants involved has proven to be difficult. CUBN, UMOD, and SHROOM3 were identified by human GWAS as being associated with albuminuria, kidney function, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). These are promising examples of genes that could be involved in renal aging, and were further mechanistically evaluated in animal models. Eventually, we will provide approaches for performing genetic analysis. We should leverage the power of mouse models, as testing in humans is limited. Mouse and other animal models can be used to explain the underlying biological mechanisms of genes and loci identified by human GWAS. Furthermore, mouse models can be used to identify genetic variants associated with age-associated histological changes, of which Far2, Wisp2, and Esrrg are examples. A new outbred mouse population with high genetic diversity will facilitate the identification of genes associated with renal aging by enabling high-resolution genetic mapping while also allowing the control of environmental factors, and by enabling access to renal tissues at specific time points for histology, proteomics, and gene expression. PMID:26219736

  5. Microsatellite data analysis for population genetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Seok; Sappington, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Theories and analytical tools of population genetics have been widely applied for addressing various questions in the fields of ecological genetics, conservation biology, and any context where the role of dispersal or gene flow is important. Underlying much of population genetics is the analysis of variation at selectively neutral marker loci, and microsatellites continue to be a popular choice of marker. In recent decades, software programs to estimate population genetics parameters have been developed at an increasing pace as computational science and theoretical knowledge advance. Numerous population genetics software programs are presently available to analyze microsatellite genotype data, but only a handful are commonly employed for calculating parameters such as genetic variation, genetic structure, patterns of spatial and temporal gene flow, population demography, individual population assignment, and genetic relationships within and between populations. In this chapter, we introduce statistical analyses and relevant population genetic software programs that are commonly employed in the field of population genetics and molecular ecology.

  6. A Genetic Predictive Model for Canine Hip Dysplasia: Integration of Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) and Candidate Gene Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomé, Nerea; Segarra, Sergi; Artieda, Marta; Francino, Olga; Sánchez, Elisenda; Szczypiorska, Magdalena; Casellas, Joaquim; Tejedor, Diego; Cerdeira, Joaquín; Martínez, Antonio; Velasco, Alfonso; Sánchez, Armand

    2015-01-01

    Canine hip dysplasia is one of the most prevalent developmental orthopedic diseases in dogs worldwide. Unfortunately, the success of eradication programs against this disease based on radiographic diagnosis is low. Adding the use of diagnostic genetic tools to the current phenotype-based approach might be beneficial. The aim of this study was to develop a genetic prognostic test for early diagnosis of hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers. To develop our DNA test, 775 Labrador Retrievers were recruited. For each dog, a blood sample and a ventrodorsal hip radiograph were taken. Dogs were divided into two groups according to their FCI hip score: control (A/B) and case (D/E). C dogs were not included in the sample. Genetic characterization combining a GWAS and a candidate gene strategy using SNPs allowed a case-control population association study. A mathematical model which included 7 SNPs was developed using logistic regression. The model showed a good accuracy (Area under the ROC curve = 0.85) and was validated in an independent population of 114 dogs. This prognostic genetic test represents a useful tool for choosing the most appropriate therapeutic approach once genetic predisposition to hip dysplasia is known. Therefore, it allows a more individualized management of the disease. It is also applicable during genetic selection processes, since breeders can benefit from the information given by this test as soon as a blood sample can be collected, and act accordingly. In the authors’ opinion, a shift towards genomic screening might importantly contribute to reducing canine hip dysplasia in the future. In conclusion, based on genetic and radiographic information from Labrador Retrievers with hip dysplasia, we developed an accurate predictive genetic test for early diagnosis of hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers. However, further research is warranted in order to evaluate the validity of this genetic test in other dog breeds. PMID:25874693

  7. A genetic predictive model for canine hip dysplasia: integration of Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) and candidate gene approaches.

    PubMed

    Bartolomé, Nerea; Segarra, Sergi; Artieda, Marta; Francino, Olga; Sánchez, Elisenda; Szczypiorska, Magdalena; Casellas, Joaquim; Tejedor, Diego; Cerdeira, Joaquín; Martínez, Antonio; Velasco, Alfonso; Sánchez, Armand

    2015-01-01

    Canine hip dysplasia is one of the most prevalent developmental orthopedic diseases in dogs worldwide. Unfortunately, the success of eradication programs against this disease based on radiographic diagnosis is low. Adding the use of diagnostic genetic tools to the current phenotype-based approach might be beneficial. The aim of this study was to develop a genetic prognostic test for early diagnosis of hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers. To develop our DNA test, 775 Labrador Retrievers were recruited. For each dog, a blood sample and a ventrodorsal hip radiograph were taken. Dogs were divided into two groups according to their FCI hip score: control (A/B) and case (D/E). C dogs were not included in the sample. Genetic characterization combining a GWAS and a candidate gene strategy using SNPs allowed a case-control population association study. A mathematical model which included 7 SNPs was developed using logistic regression. The model showed a good accuracy (Area under the ROC curve = 0.85) and was validated in an independent population of 114 dogs. This prognostic genetic test represents a useful tool for choosing the most appropriate therapeutic approach once genetic predisposition to hip dysplasia is known. Therefore, it allows a more individualized management of the disease. It is also applicable during genetic selection processes, since breeders can benefit from the information given by this test as soon as a blood sample can be collected, and act accordingly. In the authors' opinion, a shift towards genomic screening might importantly contribute to reducing canine hip dysplasia in the future. In conclusion, based on genetic and radiographic information from Labrador Retrievers with hip dysplasia, we developed an accurate predictive genetic test for early diagnosis of hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers. However, further research is warranted in order to evaluate the validity of this genetic test in other dog breeds.

  8. Association of genetic variation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure among African Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource study.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ervin R; Young, J Hunter; Li, Yali; Dreisbach, Albert W; Keating, Brendan J; Musani, Solomon K; Liu, Kiang; Morrison, Alanna C; Ganesh, Santhi; Kutlar, Abdullah; Ramachandran, Vasan S; Polak, Josef F; Fabsitz, Richard R; Dries, Daniel L; Farlow, Deborah N; Redline, Susan; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Hirschorn, Joel N; Sun, Yan V; Wyatt, Sharon B; Penman, Alan D; Palmas, Walter; Rotter, Jerome I; Townsend, Raymond R; Doumatey, Ayo P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Mosley, Thomas H; Lyon, Helen N; Kang, Sun J; Rotimi, Charles N; Cooper, Richard S; Franceschini, Nora; Curb, J David; Martin, Lisa W; Eaton, Charles B; Kardia, Sharon L R; Taylor, Herman A; Caulfield, Mark J; Ehret, Georg B; Johnson, Toby; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Levy, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in African Americans (AAs) is higher than in other US groups; yet, few have performed genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in AA. Among people of European descent, GWASs have identified genetic variants at 13 loci that are associated with blood pressure. It is unknown if these variants confer susceptibility in people of African ancestry. Here, we examined genome-wide and candidate gene associations with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium consisting of 8591 AAs. Genotypes included genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data utilizing the Affymetrix 6.0 array with imputation to 2.5 million HapMap SNPs and candidate gene SNP data utilizing a 50K cardiovascular gene-centric array (ITMAT-Broad-CARe [IBC] array). For Affymetrix data, the strongest signal for DBP was rs10474346 (P= 3.6 × 10(-8)) located near GPR98 and ARRDC3. For SBP, the strongest signal was rs2258119 in C21orf91 (P= 4.7 × 10(-8)). The top IBC association for SBP was rs2012318 (P= 6.4 × 10(-6)) near SLC25A42 and for DBP was rs2523586 (P= 1.3 × 10(-6)) near HLA-B. None of the top variants replicated in additional AA (n = 11 882) or European-American (n = 69 899) cohorts. We replicated previously reported European-American blood pressure SNPs in our AA samples (SH2B3, P= 0.009; TBX3-TBX5, P= 0.03; and CSK-ULK3, P= 0.0004). These genetic loci represent the best evidence of genetic influences on SBP and DBP in AAs to date. More broadly, this work supports that notion that blood pressure among AAs is a trait with genetic underpinnings but also with significant complexity.

  9. Association of genetic variation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure among African Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource study

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ervin R.; Young, J. Hunter; Li, Yali; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Keating, Brendan J.; Musani, Solomon K.; Liu, Kiang; Morrison, Alanna C.; Ganesh, Santhi; Kutlar, Abdullah; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Polak, Josef F.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Dries, Daniel L.; Farlow, Deborah N.; Redline, Susan; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Hirschorn, Joel N.; Sun, Yan V.; Wyatt, Sharon B.; Penman, Alan D.; Palmas, Walter; Rotter, Jerome I.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Lyon, Helen N.; Kang, Sun J.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Cooper, Richard S.; Franceschini, Nora; Curb, J. David; Martin, Lisa W.; Eaton, Charles B.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Taylor, Herman A.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Ehret, Georg B.; Johnson, Toby; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Albert V.; Tobin, Martin D.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L.; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A.; Jackson, Anne U.; Peden, John F.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H.; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N.; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C.; Kumari, Meena; JinGo, Min; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D.G.; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H.; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R.; Charlotte Onland-Moret, N.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Platou, Carl G.P.; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S.P.M.; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Arking, Dan E.; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Day, Ian N.M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Beilby, John P.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Rory; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ongen, Halit; Bis, Joshua C.; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette R.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Hoffman Bolton, Judith A.; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M.; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F.; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B.; Hunt, Steven C.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Scott, Laura J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Burton, Paul R.; SolerArtigas, Maria; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K.; Rudock, Megan E.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairajan; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; MariaCorsi, Anna; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A.; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S.; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J.; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Chris; Schwartz, Steven M.; Arfan Ikram, M.; Longstreth, Will T.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R.G.; Wain, Louise V.; Morken, Mario A.; Swift, Amy J.; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J.L.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Radha Mani, K.; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S.; Oostra, Ben A.; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G.; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würz, Peter; Twee-Hee Ong, Rick; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D.; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kranthi Kumar, M.J.; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Fowkes, Gerald R.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Bots, Michiel L.; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J.; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Casas, Juan P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Wong, Tien Y.; Shyong Tai, E.; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Harris, Tamara B.; Morris, Richard W.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G.; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn , Cornelia M.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in African Americans (AAs) is higher than in other US groups; yet, few have performed genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in AA. Among people of European descent, GWASs have identified genetic variants at 13 loci that are associated with blood pressure. It is unknown if these variants confer susceptibility in people of African ancestry. Here, we examined genome-wide and candidate gene associations with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium consisting of 8591 AAs. Genotypes included genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data utilizing the Affymetrix 6.0 array with imputation to 2.5 million HapMap SNPs and candidate gene SNP data utilizing a 50K cardiovascular gene-centric array (ITMAT-Broad-CARe [IBC] array). For Affymetrix data, the strongest signal for DBP was rs10474346 (P= 3.6 × 10−8) located near GPR98 and ARRDC3. For SBP, the strongest signal was rs2258119 in C21orf91 (P= 4.7 × 10−8). The top IBC association for SBP was rs2012318 (P= 6.4 × 10−6) near SLC25A42 and for DBP was rs2523586 (P= 1.3 × 10−6) near HLA-B. None of the top variants replicated in additional AA (n = 11 882) or European-American (n = 69 899) cohorts. We replicated previously reported European-American blood pressure SNPs in our AA samples (SH2B3, P= 0.009; TBX3-TBX5, P= 0.03; and CSK-ULK3, P= 0.0004). These genetic loci represent the best evidence of genetic influences on SBP and DBP in AAs to date. More broadly, this work supports that notion that blood pressure among AAs is a trait with genetic underpinnings but also with significant complexity. PMID:21378095

  10. Genetic and Molecular Functional Characterization of Variants within TNFSF13B, a Positional Candidate Preeclampsia Susceptibility Gene on 13q

    PubMed Central

    Roten, Linda T.; Aas, Per A.; Forsmo, Siri; Klepper, Kjetil; East, Christine E.; Abraham, Lawrence J.; Blangero, John; Brennecke, Shaun P.; Austgulen, Rigmor; Moses, Eric K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Preeclampsia is a serious pregnancy complication, demonstrating a complex pattern of inheritance. The elucidation of genetic liability to preeclampsia remains a major challenge in obstetric medicine. We have adopted a positional cloning approach to identify maternal genetic components, with linkages previously demonstrated to chromosomes 2q, 5q and 13q in an Australian/New Zealand familial cohort. The current study aimed to identify potential functional and structural variants in the positional candidate gene TNFSF13B under the 13q linkage peak and assess their association status with maternal preeclampsia genetic susceptibility. Methodology/Principal Findings The proximal promoter and coding regions of the positional candidate gene TNFSF13B residing within the 13q linkage region was sequenced using 48 proband or founder individuals from Australian/New Zealand families. Ten sequence variants (nine SNPs and one single base insertion) were identified and seven SNPs were successfully genotyped in the total Australian/New Zealand family cohort (74 families/480 individuals). Borderline association to preeclampsia (p = 0.0153) was observed for three rare SNPs (rs16972194, rs16972197 and rs56124946) in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other. Functional evaluation by electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed differential nuclear factor binding to the minor allele of the rs16972194 SNP, residing upstream of the translation start site, making this a putative functional variant. The observed genetic associations were not replicated in a Norwegian case/control cohort (The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT2), 851 preeclamptic and 1,440 non-preeclamptic women). Conclusion/Significance TNFSF13B has previously been suggested to contribute to the normal immunological adaption crucial for a successful pregnancy. Our observations support TNFSF13B as a potential novel preeclampsia susceptibility gene. We discuss a possible role for TNFSF13B in preeclampsia

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Triple Mutant Genetic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Braberg, Hannes; Alexander, Richard; Shales, Michael; Xu, Jiewei; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E.; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E.; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of genetic interactions between pairs of gene mutations has proven effective for characterizing cellular functions but can miss important interactions for functionally redundant genes. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach termed Triple Mutant Analysis (TMA). The procedure relies on a query strain that contains two deletions in a pair of redundant or otherwise related genes, that is crossed against a panel of candidate deletion strains to isolate triple mutants and measure their growth. A central feature of TMA is to interrogate mutants that are synthetically sick when two other genes are deleted but interact minimally with either single deletion. This approach has been valuable for discovering genes that restore critical functions when the principle actors are deleted. TMA has also uncovered double mutant combinations that produce severe defects because a third protein becomes deregulated and acts in a deleterious fashion, and it has revealed functional differences between proteins presumed to act together. The protocol is optimized for Singer ROTOR pinning robots, takes 3 weeks to complete, and measures interactions for up to 30 double mutants against a library of 1536 single mutants. PMID:25010907

  12. CANDID: Companion Analysis and Non-Detection in Interferometric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallenne, A.; Mérand, A.; Kervella, P.; Monnier, J. D.; Schaefer, G. H.; Baron, F.; Breitfelder, J.; Le Bouquin, J. B.; Roettenbacher, R. M.; Gieren, W.; Pietrzynski, G.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Ridgway, S.; Kraus, S.

    2015-05-01

    CANDID finds faint companion around star in interferometric data in the OIFITS format. It allows systematically searching for faint companions in OIFITS data, and if not found, estimates the detection limit. The tool is based on model fitting and Chi2 minimization, with a grid for the starting points of the companion position. It ensures all positions are explored by estimating a-posteriori if the grid is dense enough, and provides an estimate of the optimum grid density.

  13. Microsatellite data analysis for population genetics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Theories and analytical tools of population genetics have been widely applied for addressing various questions in the fields of ecological genetics, conservation biology, and any context where the role of dispersal or gene flow is important. Underlying much of population genetics is the analysis of ...

  14. Identification of candidate domestication regions in the radish genome based on high-depth resequencing analysis of 17 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namshin; Jeong, Young-Min; Jeong, Seongmun; Kim, Goon-Bo; Baek, Seunghoon; Kwon, Young-Eun; Cho, Ara; Choi, Sang-Bong; Kim, Jiwoong; Lim, Won-Jun; Kim, Kyoung Hyoun; Park, Won; Kim, Jae-Yoon; Kim, Jin-Hyun; Yim, Bomi; Lee, Young Joon; Chun, Byung-Moon; Lee, Young-Pyo; Park, Beom-Seok; Yu, Hee-Ju; Mun, Jeong-Hwan

    2016-09-01

    This study provides high-quality variation data of diverse radish genotypes. Genome-wide SNP comparison along with RNA-seq analysis identified candidate genes related to domestication that have potential as trait-related markers for genetics and breeding of radish. Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is an annual root vegetable crop that also encompasses diverse wild species. Radish has a long history of domestication, but the origins and selective sweep of cultivated radishes remain controversial. Here, we present comprehensive whole-genome resequencing analysis of radish to explore genomic variation between the radish genotypes and to identify genetic bottlenecks due to domestication in Asian cultivars. High-depth resequencing and multi-sample genotyping analysis of ten cultivated and seven wild accessions obtained 4.0 million high-quality homozygous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/insertions or deletions. Variation analysis revealed that Asian cultivated radish types are closely related to wild Asian accessions, but are distinct from European/American cultivated radishes, supporting the notion that Asian cultivars were domesticated from wild Asian genotypes. SNP comparison between Asian genotypes identified 153 candidate domestication regions (CDRs) containing 512 genes. Network analysis of the genes in CDRs functioning in plant signaling pathways and biochemical processes identified group of genes related to root architecture, cell wall, sugar metabolism, and glucosinolate biosynthesis. Expression profiling of the genes during root development suggested that domestication-related selective advantages included a main taproot with few branched lateral roots, reduced cell wall rigidity and favorable taste. Overall, this study provides evolutionary insights into domestication-related genetic selection in radish as well as identification of gene candidates with the potential to act as trait-related markers for background selection of elite lines in molecular

  15. Genetic diversity of transmission-blocking vaccine candidates Pvs25 and Pvs28 in Plasmodium vivax isolates from Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs) have been considered an important strategy for disrupting the malaria transmission cycle, especially for Plasmodium vivax malaria, which undergoes gametocytogenesis earlier during infection. Pvs25 and Pvs28 are transmission-blocking vaccine candidates for P. vivax malaria. Assessment of genetic diversity of the vaccine candidates will provide necessary information for predicting the performance of vaccines, which will guide us during the development of malaria vaccines. Results We sequenced the coding regions of pvs25 and pvs28 from 30 P. vivax isolates from Yunnan Province, identifying five amino acid haplotypes of Pvs25 and seven amino acid haplotypes of Pvs28. Among a total of four mutant residues, the predominant haplotype of Pvs25 only had the I130T substitution. For Pvs28, a total of eight amino acid substitutions were identified. The predominant haplotype of Pvs28 had two substitution at positions 52 (M52L) and 140 (T140S) with 5-6 GSGGE/D tandem repeats at the end of fourth EGF-like domain. Most amino acid substitutions were common with previous reports from South Asian isolates. Although the nucleotide diversity of pvs28 (π = 0.0034 ± 0.0012) was significantly higher than pvs25 (π = 0.0013 ± 0.0009), it was still conserved when compared with the blood stage vaccine candidates. Conclusions Genetic analysis revealed limited genetic diversity of pvs25 and pvs28, suggesting antigenic diversity may not be a particular problem for Sal I based TBVs in most P. vivax-endemic areas of China. PMID:22117620

  16. Candidate-gene studies of the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype: a sib-pair linkage analysis of DZ women twins.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, M A; Talmud, P J; Luong, L A; Haddad, L; Day, I N; Newman, B; Edwards, K L; Krauss, R M; Humphries, S E

    1998-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence supporting the roles of small, dense LDL and plasma triglyceride (TG), both features of the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype, as risk factors for coronary heart disease. Although family studies and twin studies have demonstrated genetic influences on these risk factors, the specific genes involved remain to be determined definitively. The purpose of this study was to investigate genetic linkage between LDL size, TG, and related atherogenic lipoproteins and candidate genes known to be involved in lipid metabolism. The linkage analysis was based on a sample of 126 DZ women twin pairs, which avoids the potentially confounding effects of both age and gender, by use of a quantitative sib-pair linkage-analysis approach. Eight candidate genes were examined, including those for microsomal TG-transfer protein (MTP), hepatic lipase, hormone-sensitive lipase, apolipoprotein (apo) B, apo CIII, apo E, insulin receptor, and LDL receptor. The analysis suggested genetic linkage between markers for the apo B gene and LDL size, plasma levels of TG, of HDL cholesterol, and of apo B, all features of the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype. Furthermore, evidence for linkage was maintained when the analysis was limited to women with a major LDL-subclass diameter >255 A, indicating that the apo B gene may influence LDL heterogeneity in the intermediate-to-large size range. In addition, linkage was found between the MTP gene and TG, among all the women. These findings add to the growing evidence for genetic influences on the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype and its role in genetic susceptibility to atherosclerosis. PMID:9463319

  17. Genetic mapping of thirteen drought tolerance candidate genes in wheat (T. aestivum)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drought is a severe abiotic stress that affects wheat production worldwide. In order to identify candidate genes for tolerance to water stress in wheat, sequences of 11 genes that have function of drought tolerance in other plant species were used to identify the wheat ortholog genes via homology se...

  18. Integrated analysis of genetic data with R

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Genetic data are now widely available. There is, however, an apparent lack of concerted effort to produce software systems for statistical analysis of genetic data compared with other fields of statistics. It is often a tremendous task for end-users to tailor them for particular data, especially when genetic data are analysed in conjunction with a large number of covariates. Here, R http://www.r-project.org, a free, flexible and platform-independent environment for statistical modelling and graphics is explored as an integrated system for genetic data analysis. An overview of some packages currently available for analysis of genetic data is given. This is followed by examples of package development and practical applications. With clear advantages in data management, graphics, statistical analysis, programming, internet capability and use of available codes, it is a feasible, although challenging, task to develop it into an integrated platform for genetic analysis; this will require the joint efforts of many researchers. PMID:16460651

  19. Candidate gene analysis: severe intraventricular hemorrhage in inborn preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Adén, Ulrika; Lin, Aiping; Carlo, Waldemar; Leviton, Alan; Murray, Jeffrey C; Hallman, Mikko; Lifton, Richard P; Zhang, Heping; Ment, Laura R

    2013-11-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a disorder of complex etiology. We analyzed genotypes for 7 genes from 224 inborn preterm neonates treated with antenatal steroids and grade 3-4 IVH and 389 matched controls. Only methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was more prevalent in cases of IVH, emphasizing the need for more comprehensive genetic strategies. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis for Plant Architecture Traits Using Whole Genome Re-Sequencing in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung-Hyun; Yang, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Ki-Hong; Yoo, Soo-Cheul; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2014-01-01

    Plant breeders have focused on improving plant architecture as an effective means to increase crop yield. Here, we identify the main-effect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for plant shape-related traits in rice (Oryza sativa) and find candidate genes by applying whole genome re-sequencing of two parental cultivars using next-generation sequencing. To identify QTLs influencing plant shape, we analyzed six traits: plant height, tiller number, panicle diameter, panicle length, flag leaf length, and flag leaf width. We performed QTL analysis with 178 F7 recombinant in-bred lines (RILs) from a cross of japonica rice line ‘SNUSG1’ and indica rice line ‘Milyang23’. Using 131 molecular markers, including 28 insertion/deletion markers, we identified 11 main- and 16 minor-effect QTLs for the six traits with a threshold LOD value > 2.8. Our sequence analysis identified fifty-four candidate genes for the main-effect QTLs. By further comparison of coding sequences and meta-expression profiles between japonica and indica rice varieties, we finally chose 15 strong candidate genes for the 11 main-effect QTLs. Our study shows that the whole-genome sequence data substantially enhanced the efficiency of polymorphic marker development for QTL fine-mapping and the identification of possible candidate genes. This yields useful genetic resources for breeding high-yielding rice cultivars with improved plant architecture. PMID:24599000

  1. Methods for genetic linkage analysis using trisomies

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, E.; Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.

    1994-09-01

    Certain genetic disorders (e.g. congenital cataracts, duodenal atresia) are rare in the general population, but more common in people with Down`s syndrome. We present a method for using individuals with trisomy 21 to map genes for such traits. Our methods are analogous to methods for mapping autosomal dominant traits using affected relative pairs by looking for markers with greater than expected identity-by-descent. In the trisomy case, one would take trisomic individuals and look for markers with greater than expected reduction to homozygosity in the chromosomes inherited form the non-disjoining parent. We present statistical methods for performing such a linkage analysis, including a test for linkage to a marker, a method for estimating the distance from the marker to the gene, a confidence interval for that distance, and methods for computing power and sample sizes. The methods are described in the context of gene-dosage model for the etiology of the disorder, but can be extended to other models. We also resolve some practical issues involved in implementing the methods, including how to use partially informative markers, how to test candidate genes, and how to handle the effect of reduced recombination associated with maternal meiosis I non-disjunction.

  2. Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Potential Candidate Genes in a Human Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mullegama, Saman; Wyckoff, Gerald J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find genes linked with eating disorders and associated with both metabolic and neural systems. Our operating hypothesis was that there are genetic factors underlying some eating disorders resting in both those pathways. Specifically, we are interested in disorders that may rest in both sleep and metabolic function, generally called Night Eating Syndrome (NES). A meta-analysis of the Gene Expression Omnibus targeting the mammalian nervous system, sleep, and obesity studies was performed, yielding numerous genes of interest. Through a text-based analysis of the results, a number of potential candidate genes were identified. VGF, in particular, appeared to be relevant both to obesity and, broadly, to brain or neural development. VGF is a highly connected protein that interacts with numerous targets via proteolytically digested peptides. We examined VGF from an evolutionary perspective to determine whether other available evidence supported a role for the gene in human disease. We conclude that some of the already identified variants in VGF from human polymorphism studies may contribute to eating disorders and obesity. Our data suggest that there is enough evidence to warrant eGWAS and GWAS analysis of these genes in NES patients in a case-control study. PMID:27088090

  3. Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Potential Candidate Genes in a Human Eating Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Ubadah; Mullegama, Saman; Wyckoff, Gerald J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find genes linked with eating disorders and associated with both metabolic and neural systems. Our operating hypothesis was that there are genetic factors underlying some eating disorders resting in both those pathways. Specifically, we are interested in disorders that may rest in both sleep and metabolic function, generally called Night Eating Syndrome (NES). A meta-analysis of the Gene Expression Omnibus targeting the mammalian nervous system, sleep, and obesity studies was performed, yielding numerous genes of interest. Through a text-based analysis of the results, a number of potential candidate genes were identified. VGF, in particular, appeared to be relevant both to obesity and, broadly, to brain or neural development. VGF is a highly connected protein that interacts with numerous targets via proteolytically digested peptides. We examined VGF from an evolutionary perspective to determine whether other available evidence supported a role for the gene in human disease. We conclude that some of the already identified variants in VGF from human polymorphism studies may contribute to eating disorders and obesity. Our data suggest that there is enough evidence to warrant eGWAS and GWAS analysis of these genes in NES patients in a case-control study.

  4. Comparative proteomic analysis of horseweed (Conyza canadensis) biotypes identifies candidate proteins for glyphosate resistance

    PubMed Central

    González-Torralva, Fidel; Brown, Adrian P.; Chivasa, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Emergence of glyphosate-resistant horseweed (Conyza canadensis) biotypes is an example of how unrelenting use of a single mode of action herbicide in agricultural weed control drives genetic adaptation in targeted species. While in other weeds glyphosate resistance arose from target site mutation or target gene amplification, the resistance mechanism in horseweed uses neither of these, being instead linked to reduced herbicide uptake and/or translocation. The molecular components underpinning horseweed glyphosate-resistance remain unknown. Here, we used an in vitro leaf disc system for comparative analysis of proteins extracted from control and glyphosate-treated tissues of glyphosate-resistant and glyphosate-susceptible biotypes. Analysis of shikimic acid accumulation, ABC-transporter gene expression, and cell death were used to select a suitable glyphosate concentration and sampling time for enriching proteins pivotal to glyphosate resistance. Protein gel analysis and mass spectrometry identified mainly chloroplast proteins differentially expressed between the biotypes before and after glyphosate treatment. Chloroplasts are the organelles in which the shikimate pathway, which is targeted by glyphosate, is located. Calvin cycle enzymes and proteins of unknown function were among the proteins identified. Our study provides candidate proteins that could be pivotal in engendering resistance and implicates chloroplasts as the primary sites driving glyphosate-resistance in horseweed. PMID:28198407

  5. Genetic reprogramming of human amniotic cells with episomal vectors: neural rosettes as sentinels in candidate selection for validation assays

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    The promise of genetic reprogramming has prompted initiatives to develop banks of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from diverse sources. Sentinel assays for pluripotency could maximize available resources for generating iPSCs. Neural rosettes represent a primitive neural tissue that is unique to differentiating PSCs and commonly used to identify derivative neural/stem progenitors. Here, neural rosettes were used as a sentinel assay for pluripotency in selection of candidates to advance to validation assays. Candidate iPSCs were generated from independent populations of amniotic cells with episomal vectors. Phase imaging of living back up cultures showed neural rosettes in 2 of the 5 candidate populations. Rosettes were immunopositive for the Sox1, Sox2, Pax6 and Pax7 transcription factors that govern neural development in the earliest stage of development and for the Isl1/2 and Otx2 transcription factors that are expressed in the dorsal and ventral domains, respectively, of the neural tube in vivo. Dissociation of rosettes produced cultures of differentiation competent neural/stem progenitors that generated immature neurons that were immunopositive for βIII-tubulin and glia that were immunopositive for GFAP. Subsequent validation assays of selected candidates showed induced expression of endogenous pluripotency genes, epigenetic modification of chromatin and formation of teratomas in immunodeficient mice that contained derivatives of the 3 embryonic germ layers. Validated lines were vector-free and maintained a normal karyotype for more than 60 passages. The credibility of rosette assembly as a sentinel assay for PSCs is supported by coordinate loss of nuclear-localized pluripotency factors Oct4 and Nanog in neural rosettes that emerge spontaneously in cultures of self-renewing validated lines. Taken together, these findings demonstrate value in neural rosettes as sentinels for pluripotency and selection of promising candidates for advance to validation

  6. Genetic analysis of safflower domestication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) is an oilseed crop in the Compositae (a.k.a. Asteraceae) that is valued for its oils rich in unsaturated fatty acids. Here, we present an analysis of the genetic architecture of safflower domestication and compare our findings to those from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), an independently domesticated oilseed crop within the same family. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying 24 domestication-related traits in progeny from a cross between safflower and its wild progenitor, Carthamus palaestinus Eig. Also, we compared QTL positions in safflower against those that have been previously identified in cultivated x wild sunflower crosses to identify instances of colocalization. Results We mapped 61 QTL, the vast majority of which (59) exhibited minor or moderate phenotypic effects. The two large-effect QTL corresponded to one each for flower color and leaf spininess. A total of 14 safflower QTL colocalized with previously reported sunflower QTL for the same traits. Of these, QTL for three traits (days to flower, achene length, and number of selfed seed) had cultivar alleles that conferred effects in the same direction in both species. Conclusions As has been observed in sunflower, and unlike many other crops, our results suggest that the genetics of safflower domestication is quite complex. Moreover, our comparative mapping results indicate that safflower and sunflower exhibit numerous instances of QTL colocalization, suggesting that parallel trait transitions during domestication may have been driven, at least in part, by parallel genotypic evolution at some of the same underlying genes. PMID:24502326

  7. Unravelling enzymatic discoloration in potato through a combined approach of candidate genes, QTL, and expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kloosterman, Bjorn; Celis-Gamboa, Carolina; de Vos, C. H. Ric; America, Twan; Visser, Richard G. F.; Bachem, Christian W. B.

    2007-01-01

    Enzymatic discoloration (ED) of potato tubers was investigated in an attempt to unravel the underlying genetic factors. Both enzyme and substrate concentration have been reported to influence the degree of discoloration and as such this trait can be regarded as polygenic. The diploid mapping population C × E, consisting of 249 individuals, was assayed for the degree of ED and levels of chlorogenic acid and tyrosine. Using this data, Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) analysis was performed. Three QTLs for ED have been found on parental chromosomes C3, C8, E1, and E8. For chlorogenic acid a QTL has been identified on C2 and for tyrosine levels, a QTL has been detected on C8. None of the QTLs overlap, indicating the absence of genetic correlations between these components underlying ED, in contrast to earlier reports in literature. An obvious candidate gene for the QTL for ED on Chromosome 8 is polyphenol oxidase (PPO), which was previously mapped on chromosome 8. With gene-specific primers for PPO gene POT32 a CAPS marker was developed. Three different alleles (POT32-1, -2, and -3) could be discriminated. The segregating POT32 alleles were used to map the POT32 CAPS marker and QTL analysis was redone, showing that POT32 coincides with the QTL peak. A clear correlation between allele combinations and degree of discoloration was observed. In addition, analysis of POT32 gene expression in a subset of genotypes indicated a correlation between the level of gene expression and allele composition. On average, genotypes having two copies of allele 1 had both the highest degree of discoloration as well as the highest level of POT32 gene expression. PMID:17492422

  8. Genetic Variations May Help Identify Best Candidates for Preventive Breast Cancer Drugs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Newly discovered genetic variations may help predict breast cancer risk in women who receive preventive breast cancer therapy with the selective estrogen receptor modulator drugs tamoxifen andraloxifene, a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. The study is published in the journal Cancer Discovery. "Our findings are important because we identified genetic factors that could eventually be used to select women who should be offered the drugs for prevention," said James Ingle, MD, an oncologist at Mayo Clinic. |

  9. Construction and Evaluation of a Polyvalent Genetically Engineered Vaccine Candidate for VEE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-11

    VEE vaccine strain. The very low probability of reversion at multiple sites in a single virus genome would give this vaccine strain a very stable...Our molecular approach is based on 1), a full-length cDNA clone ol the VEE genome from which infectious RNA genomes can be transcribed in vitro, (Davis...incorporation into the eventual vaccine candidate by identification of additional attenuating loci in the VEE genome . B. Optimization for attenuation and

  10. Seeking signatures of reinforcement at the genetic level: a hitchhiking mapping and candidate gene approach in the house mouse.

    PubMed

    Smadja, Carole M; Loire, Etienne; Caminade, Pierre; Thoma, Marios; Latour, Yasmin; Roux, Camille; Thoss, Michaela; Penn, Dustin J; Ganem, Guila; Boursot, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Reinforcement is the process by which prezygotic isolation is strengthened as a response to selection against hybridization. Most empirical support for reinforcement comes from the observation of its possible phenotypic signature: an accentuated degree of prezygotic isolation in the hybrid zone as compared to allopatry. Here, we implemented a novel approach to this question by seeking for the signature of reinforcement at the genetic level. In the house mouse, selection against hybrids and enhanced olfactory-based assortative mate preferences are observed in a hybrid zone between the two European subspecies Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus, suggesting a possible recent reinforcement event. To test for the genetic signature of reinforcing selection and identify genes involved in sexual isolation, we adopted a hitchhiking mapping approach targeting genomic regions containing candidate genes for assortative mating in mice. We densely scanned these genomic regions in hybrid zone and allopatric samples using a large number of fast evolving microsatellite loci that allow the detection of recent selection events. We found a handful of loci showing the expected pattern of significant reduction in variability in populations close to the hybrid zone, showing assortative odour preference in mate choice experiments as compared to populations further away and displaying no such preference. These loci lie close to genes that we pinpoint as testable candidates for further investigation.

  11. Seeking signatures of reinforcement at the genetic level: a hitchhiking mapping and candidate gene approach in the house mouse

    PubMed Central

    Caminade, Pierre; Thoma, Marios; Latour, Yasmin; Roux, Camille; Thoss, Michaela; Penn, Dustin J.; Ganem, Guila; Boursot, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Reinforcement is the process by which prezygotic isolation is strengthened as a response to selection against hybridisation. Most empirical support for reinforcement comes from the observation of its possible phenotypic signature: an accentuated degree of prezygotic isolation in the hybrid zone as compared to allopatry. Here, we implemented a novel approach to this question by seeking for the signature of reinforcement at the genetic level. In the house mouse, selection against hybrids and enhanced olfactory-based assortative mate preferences are observed in a hybrid zone between the two European subspecies Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus, suggesting a possible recent reinforcement event. To test for the genetic signature of reinforcing selection and identify genes involved in sexual isolation, we adopted a hitchhiking mapping approach targeting genomic regions containing candidate genes for assortative mating in mice. We densely scanned these genomic regions in hybrid zone and allopatric samples using a large number of fast evolving microsatellite loci that allow the detection of recent selection events. We found a handful of loci showing the expected pattern of significant reduction of variability in populations close to the hybrid zone and showing assortative odour preference in mate choice experiments as compared to populations further away and displaying no such preference. These loci lie close to genes that we pinpoint as testable candidates for further investigation. PMID:26132782

  12. Genomic analysis identifies candidate pathogenic variants in 9 of 18 patients with unexplained West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Arai-Ichinoi, Natsuko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Sato, Ryo; Suzuki, Tasuku; Kudo, Hiroki; Sato, Yuko; Nakayama, Tojo; Kakisaka, Yosuke; Kubota, Yuki; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Funayama, Ryo; Nakayama, Keiko; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Aoki, Yoko; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Kure, Shigeo

    2015-06-01

    West syndrome, which is narrowly defined as infantile spasms that occur in clusters and hypsarrhythmia on EEG, is the most common early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE). Patients with West syndrome may have clear etiologies, including perinatal events, infections, gross chromosomal abnormalities, or cases followed by other EOEEs. However, the genetic etiology of most cases of West syndrome remains unexplained. DNA from 18 patients with unexplained West syndrome was subjected to microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH), followed by trio-based whole-exome sequencing in 14 unsolved families. We identified candidate pathogenic variants in 50% of the patients (n = 9/18). The array CGH revealed candidate pathogenic copy number variations in four cases (22%, 4/18), including an Xq28 duplication, a 16p11.2 deletion, a 16p13.1 deletion and a 19p13.2 deletion disrupting CACNA1A. Whole-exome sequencing identified candidate mutations in known epilepsy genes in five cases (36%, 5/14). Three candidate de novo mutations were identified in three cases, with two mutations occurring in two new candidate genes (NR2F1 and CACNA2D1) (21%, 3/14). Hemizygous candidate mutations in ALG13 and BRWD3 were identified in the other two cases (14%, 2/14). Evaluating a panel of 67 known EOEE genes failed to identify significant mutations. Despite the heterogeneity of unexplained West syndrome, the combination of array CGH and whole-exome sequencing is an effective means of evaluating the genetic background in unexplained West syndrome. We provide additional evidence for NR2F1 as a causative gene and for CACNA2D1 and BRWD3 as candidate genes for West syndrome.

  13. Genetic Influences on Hand Osteoarthritis in Finnish Women – A Replication Study of Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hämäläinen, Satu; Solovieva, Svetlana; Vehmas, Tapio; Luoma, Katariina; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Hirvonen, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Our aims were to replicate some previously reported associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five genes (A2BP1, COG5, GDF5, HFE, ESR1) with hand osteoarthritis (OA), and to examine whether genes (BCAP29, DIO2, DUS4L, DVWA, HLA, PTGS2, PARD3B, TGFB1 and TRIB1) associated with OA at other joint sites were associated with hand OA among Finnish women. Design We examined the bilateral hand radiographs of 542 occupationally active Finnish female dentists and teachers aged 45 to 63 and classified them according to the presence of OA by using reference images. Data regarding finger joint pain and other risk factors were collected using a questionnaire. We defined two hand OA phenotypes: radiographic OA in at least three joints (ROA) and symptomatic DIP OA. The genotypes were determined by PCR-based methods. In statistical analysis, we used SNPStats software, the chi-square test and logistic regression. Results Of the SNPs, rs716508 in A2BP1 was associated with ROA (OR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.5–0.9) and rs1800470 in TGFB1 with symptomatic DIP OA (1.8, 1.2–2.9). We found an interaction between ESR1 (rs9340799) and occupation: teachers with the minor allele were at an increased risk of symptomatic DIP OA (2.8, 1.3–6.5). We saw no association among the dentists. We also found that the carriage of the COG5 rs3757713 C allele increased the risk of ROA only among women with the BCAP29 rs10953541 CC genotype (2.6; 1.1–6.1). There was also a suggestive interaction between the HFE rs179945 and the ESR1 rs9340799, and the carriage of the minor allele of either of these SNPs was associated with an increased risk of symptomatic DIP OA (2.1, 1.3–2.5). Conclusions Our results support the earlier findings of A2BP1 and TBGF1 being OA susceptibility genes and provide evidence of a possible gene-gene interaction in the genetic influence on hand OA predisposition. PMID:24825461

  14. Laser hazard analysis for various candidate diode lasers associated with the high resolution pulsed scanner.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-10-01

    A laser hazard analysis and safety assessment was performed for each various laser diode candidates associated with the High Resolution Pulse Scanner based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers. A theoretical laser hazard analysis model for this system was derived and an Excel{reg_sign} spreadsheet model was developed to answer the 'what if questions' associated with the various modes of operations for the various candidate diode lasers.

  15. QTL Analysis and Candidate Gene Mapping for the Polyphenol Content in Cider Apple

    PubMed Central

    Verdu, Cindy F.; Guyot, Sylvain; Childebrand, Nicolas; Bahut, Muriel; Celton, Jean-Marc; Gaillard, Sylvain; Lasserre-Zuber, Pauline; Troggio, Michela; Guilet, David; Laurens, François

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have favorable antioxidant potential on human health suggesting that their high content is responsible for the beneficial effects of apple consumption. They control the quality of ciders as they predominantly account for astringency, bitterness, color and aroma. In this study, we identified QTLs controlling phenolic compound concentrations and the average polymerization degree of flavanols in a cider apple progeny. Thirty-two compounds belonging to five groups of phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by reversed phase liquid chromatography on both fruit extract and juice, over three years. The average polymerization degree of flavanols was estimated in fruit by phloroglucinolysis coupled to HPLC. Parental maps were built using SSR and SNP markers and used for the QTL analysis. Sixty-nine and 72 QTLs were detected on 14 and 11 linkage groups of the female and male maps, respectively. A majority of the QTLs identified in this study are specific to this population, while others are consistent with previous studies. This study presents for the first time in apple, QTLs for the mean polymerization degree of procyanidins, for which the mechanisms involved remains unknown to this day. Identification of candidate genes underlying major QTLs was then performed in silico and permitted the identification of 18 enzymes of the polyphenol pathway and six transcription factors involved in the apple anthocyanin regulation. New markers were designed from sequences of the most interesting candidate genes in order to confirm their co-localization with underlying QTLs by genetic mapping. Finally, the potential use of these QTLs in breeding programs is discussed. PMID:25271925

  16. QTL analysis and candidate gene mapping for the polyphenol content in cider apple.

    PubMed

    Verdu, Cindy F; Guyot, Sylvain; Childebrand, Nicolas; Bahut, Muriel; Celton, Jean-Marc; Gaillard, Sylvain; Lasserre-Zuber, Pauline; Troggio, Michela; Guilet, David; Laurens, François

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have favorable antioxidant potential on human health suggesting that their high content is responsible for the beneficial effects of apple consumption. They control the quality of ciders as they predominantly account for astringency, bitterness, color and aroma. In this study, we identified QTLs controlling phenolic compound concentrations and the average polymerization degree of flavanols in a cider apple progeny. Thirty-two compounds belonging to five groups of phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by reversed phase liquid chromatography on both fruit extract and juice, over three years. The average polymerization degree of flavanols was estimated in fruit by phloroglucinolysis coupled to HPLC. Parental maps were built using SSR and SNP markers and used for the QTL analysis. Sixty-nine and 72 QTLs were detected on 14 and 11 linkage groups of the female and male maps, respectively. A majority of the QTLs identified in this study are specific to this population, while others are consistent with previous studies. This study presents for the first time in apple, QTLs for the mean polymerization degree of procyanidins, for which the mechanisms involved remains unknown to this day. Identification of candidate genes underlying major QTLs was then performed in silico and permitted the identification of 18 enzymes of the polyphenol pathway and six transcription factors involved in the apple anthocyanin regulation. New markers were designed from sequences of the most interesting candidate genes in order to confirm their co-localization with underlying QTLs by genetic mapping. Finally, the potential use of these QTLs in breeding programs is discussed.

  17. Molecular mapping and candidate gene analysis of a new epicuticular wax locus in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench).

    PubMed

    Uttam, G Anurag; Praveen, M; Rao, Y Venkateswara; Tonapi, Vilas A; Madhusudhana, R

    2017-07-12

    A new epicuticular wax (bloom) locus has been identified and fine mapped to the 207.89 kb genomic region on chromosome 1. A putative candidate gene, Sobic.001G269200, annotated as GDSL-like lipase/acylhydrolase, is proposed as the most probable candidate gene involved in bloom synthesis/deposition. Deposition of epicuticular wax on plant aerial surface is one strategy that plants adapt to reduce non-transpiration water loss. Epicuticular wax (bloom)-less mutants in sorghum with their glossy phenotypes exhibit changes in the accumulation of epicuticular wax on leaf and culm surfaces. We report molecular mapping of a new sorghum locus, bloomless mutant (bm39), involved in epicuticular wax biosynthesis in sorghum. Inheritance studies involving a profusely bloom parent (BTx623) and a spontaneous bloomless mutant (RS647) indicated that the parents differed in a single gene for bloom synthesis. Bloomless was recessive to bloom deposition. Genetic mapping involving F2 and F7 mapping populations in diverse genetic backgrounds (BTx623 × RS647; 296A × RS647 and 27A × RS647) identified and validated the map location of bm39 to a region of 207.89 kb on chromosome 1. SSR markers, Sblm13 and Sblm16, flanked the bm39 locus to a map interval of 0.3 cM on either side. Nine candidate genes were identified, of which Sobic.001G269200 annotated for GDSL-like lipase/acylhydrolase is the most likely gene associated with epicuticular wax deposition. Gene expression analysis in parents, isogenic lines and sets of near isogenic lines also confirmed the reduced expression of the putative candidate gene. The study opens possibilities for a detailed molecular analysis of the gene, its role in epicuticular wax synthesis and deposition, and may help to understand its function in moisture stress tolerance and insect and pathogen resistance in sorghum.

  18. Genetic variations related to maternal whole blood mitochondrial DNA copy number: a genome-wide and candidate gene study.

    PubMed

    Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Hevner, Karin; Gelaye, Bizu; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2017-10-01

    We conducted genome-wide (GWAS) and candidate gene association studies of maternal mitochondrial DNA copy number. Maternal peripheral blood was collected during labor and delivery admission from 471 participants of a placental abruption case-control study conducted in Lima, Peru. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-Metabo Chip. Whole blood mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number was measured using qRT-PCR techniques. We evaluated 119,629 SNPs in the GWAS and 161 SNPs (in 29 mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation genes) in the candidate association study. Top hits from GWAS and the candidate gene study were selected to compute weighted genetic risk scores (wGRS). Linear regression models were used to calculate effect size estimates and related nominal p values. The top hit in our GWAS was chr19:51063065 in FOXA3 (empirical p values = 2.20e - 6). A total of 134 SNPs had p values < 0.001 including rs17111633 in CNNM1 (p values = 6.32e - 6) and chr19:51083059 in MYPOP (p values = 3.23e - 5). In the candidate association study, several SNPs in PPARG, PRKCA, SP1 and THRB were associated with mtDNA copy number (p values < 0.05). mtDNA copy number was significantly associated with wGRS based on top GWAS hits (β = 0.49, 95% CI:0.38-0.60, p < 0.001). Variations in nuclear DNA are potentially associated with maternal mtDNA copy number.

  19. NDST4 Is a Novel Candidate Tumor Suppressor Gene at Chromosome 4q26 and Its Genetic Loss Predicts Adverse Prognosis in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Sheng-Tai; Tsai, Ming-Hong; Chen, Chi-Long; Lee, Jing-Xing; Jao, Tzu-Ming; Yu, Sung-Liang; Yen, Sou-Jhy; Yang, Ya-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Background Genomic deletion at tumor suppressor loci is a common genetic aberration in human cancers. The study aimed to explore candidate tumor suppressor genes at chromosome 4q25-q28.2 and to delineate novel prognostic biomarkers associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods Deletion mapping of chromosome 4q25-q28.2 was conducted in 114 sporadic CRC by loss of heterozygosity study with 11 microsatellite markers. A novel candidate tumor suppressor gene, namely NDST4, was identified at 4q26. Gene expression of NDST4 was investigated in 52 pairs of primary CRC tissues by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Allelic loss of NDST4 gene was further determined in 174 colorectal carcinomas by loss of heterozygosity analysis, and then was assessed for clinical relevance. Results One minimal deletion region was delineated between D4S2297 and D4S2303 loci at 4q26, where NDST4 was the only gene that had markedly been downregulated in CRC tumors. By laser capture microdissection, NDST4 RNA expression was demonstrated in colonic epithelial cells, but was undetectable in tumor cells. In total, 30 (57.7%) of 52 colorectal carcinomas showed a dramatic reduction in NDST4 gene expression compared with matched normal mucosae. The genetic loss of NDST4 was significantly associated with advanced pathological stage (P = 0.039) and poorer overall survival of patients (P = 0.036). Conclusions NDST4 gene is a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene in human cancer, and the loss of its function might be involved in CRC progression. In addition, the loss of heterozygosity assay, which was established to determine the allelic loss of NDST4 gene, could be a cost-effective tool for providing a useful biomarker of adverse prognosis in CRC. PMID:23825612

  20. The genetics of multiple sclerosis: review of current and emerging candidates.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Irizar, Haritz; Otaegui, David

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease in which environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors determine the risk of developing the disease. The human leukocyte antigen region is the strongest susceptibility locus linked to MS, but it does not explain the whole heritability of the disease. To find other non-human leukocyte antigen loci associated with the disease, high-throughput genotyping, sequencing, and gene-expression studies have been performed, producing a valuable quantity of information. An overview of the genomic and expression studies is provided in this review, as well as microRNA-expression studies, highlighting the importance of combining all the layers of information in order to elucidate the causes or pathological mechanisms occurring in the disease. Genetics in MS is a promising field that is presumably going to be very productive in the next decade understanding the cross talk between all the factors contributing to the development of MS.

  1. The genetics of multiple sclerosis: review of current and emerging candidates

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Irizar, Haritz; Otaegui, David

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease in which environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors determine the risk of developing the disease. The human leukocyte antigen region is the strongest susceptibility locus linked to MS, but it does not explain the whole heritability of the disease. To find other non-human leukocyte antigen loci associated with the disease, high-throughput genotyping, sequencing, and gene-expression studies have been performed, producing a valuable quantity of information. An overview of the genomic and expression studies is provided in this review, as well as microRNA-expression studies, highlighting the importance of combining all the layers of information in order to elucidate the causes or pathological mechanisms occurring in the disease. Genetics in MS is a promising field that is presumably going to be very productive in the next decade understanding the cross talk between all the factors contributing to the development of MS. PMID:24019748

  2. Genetic analysis of complex traits in the emerging Collaborative Cross

    PubMed Central

    Aylor, David L.; Valdar, William; Foulds-Mathes, Wendy; Buus, Ryan J.; Verdugo, Ricardo A.; Baric, Ralph S.; Ferris, Martin T.; Frelinger, Jeff A.; Heise, Mark; Frieman, Matt B.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Bell, Timothy A.; Didion, John D.; Hua, Kunjie; Nehrenberg, Derrick L.; Powell, Christine L.; Steigerwalt, Jill; Xie, Yuying; Kelada, Samir N.P.; Collins, Francis S.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.; Branstetter, Lisa A.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Miller, Darla R.; Spence, Jason; Liu, Eric Yi; McMillan, Leonard; Sarkar, Abhishek; Wang, Jeremy; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Broman, Karl W.; Korstanje, Ron; Durrant, Caroline; Mott, Richard; Iraqi, Fuad A.; Pomp, Daniel; Threadgill, David; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Churchill, Gary A.

    2011-01-01

    The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a mouse recombinant inbred strain panel that is being developed as a resource for mammalian systems genetics. Here we describe an experiment that uses partially inbred CC lines to evaluate the genetic properties and utility of this emerging resource. Genome-wide analysis of the incipient strains reveals high genetic diversity, balanced allele frequencies, and dense, evenly distributed recombination sites—all ideal qualities for a systems genetics resource. We map discrete, complex, and biomolecular traits and contrast two quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping approaches. Analysis based on inferred haplotypes improves power, reduces false discovery, and provides information to identify and prioritize candidate genes that is unique to multifounder crosses like the CC. The number of expression QTLs discovered here exceeds all previous efforts at eQTL mapping in mice, and we map local eQTL at 1-Mb resolution. We demonstrate that the genetic diversity of the CC, which derives from random mixing of eight founder strains, results in high phenotypic diversity and enhances our ability to map causative loci underlying complex disease-related traits. PMID:21406540

  3. Genetic Analysis of Plant Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Griffing, B.

    1989-01-01

    Plant mixtures are difficult to analyze genetically because of possible interactions between neighboring plants (i.e., between plants in the same biological group). However, a genetic modeling scheme has been devised which, theoretically, can accommodate such interactions. This study was an attempt to put the theoretical modeling procedure to an experimental test. To this end an experimental procedure was devised that generated biological groups from a well defined base population. A cultural system was used which permitted growing plant mixtures in controlled environmental facilities. This allowed the experiment to be conducted over a wide range of temperature and nutrient conditions. Application of the theoretical gene model to the experimental data permitted identification of those classes of gene effects that were responsible for genetic variation exhibited by the mixtures. Adequacy of the genetic modeling description was corroborated by precise prediction of an independent genetic response. The genetic analyses also identified statistically significant temperature-and nutrient-dependent forms of heterosis. It was concluded that the study demonstrated the suitability of the theoretical group gene model for describing complexities inherent in plant mixtures. PMID:17246509

  4. Analysis of genome-wide association data highlights candidates for drug repositioning in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    So, Hon-Cheong; Chau, Carlos Kwan-Long; Chiu, Wan-To; Ho, Kin-Sang; Lo, Cho-Pong; Yim, Stephanie Ho-Yue; Sham, Pak-Chung

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of psychiatric disease genetics has advanced rapidly during the past decade with the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, less progress has been made in harnessing these data to reveal new therapies. Here we propose a framework for drug repositioning by comparing transcriptomes imputed from GWAS data with drug-induced gene expression profiles from the Connectivity Map database and apply this approach to seven psychiatric disorders. We found a number of repositioning candidates, many supported by preclinical or clinical evidence. Repositioning candidates for a number of disorders were also significantly enriched for known psychiatric medications or therapies considered in clinical trials. For example, candidates for schizophrenia were enriched for antipsychotics, while those for bipolar disorder were enriched for both antipsychotics and antidepressants. These findings provide support for the usefulness of GWAS data in guiding drug discovery.

  5. Assessment of Osteoarthritis Candidate Genes in a Meta-Analysis of Nine Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Fontenla, Cristina; Calaza, Manuel; Evangelou, Evangelos; Valdes, Ana M; Arden, Nigel; Blanco, Francisco J; Carr, Andrew; Chapman, Kay; Deloukas, Panos; Doherty, Michael; Esko, Tõnu; Garcés Aletá, Carlos M; Gomez-Reino Carnota, Juan J; Helgadottir, Hafdis; Hofman, Albert; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Kerkhof, Hanneke J M; Kloppenburg, Margreet; McCaskie, Andrew; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Ollier, William E R; Oreiro, Natividad; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Ralston, Stuart H; Ramos, Yolande F; Riancho, Jose A; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Slagboom, P Eline; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tsezou, Aspasia; Uitterlinden, André G; Wallis, Gillian A; Wilkinson, J Mark; Zhai, Guangju; Zhu, Yanyan; Felson, David T; Ioannidis, John P A; Loughlin, John; Metspalu, Andres; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Stefansson, Kari; van Meurs, Joyce B; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Spector, Timothy D; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess candidate genes for association with osteoarthritis (OA) and identify promising genetic factors and, secondarily, to assess the candidate gene approach in OA. Methods A total of 199 candidate genes for association with OA were identified using Human Genome Epidemiology (HuGE) Navigator. All of their single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with an allele frequency of >5% were assessed by fixed-effects meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that included 5,636 patients with knee OA and 16,972 control subjects and 4,349 patients with hip OA and 17,836 control subjects of European ancestry. An additional 5,921 individuals were genotyped for significantly associated SNPs in the meta-analysis. After correction for the number of independent tests, P values less than 1.58 × 10−5 were considered significant. Results SNPs at only 2 of the 199 candidate genes (COL11A1 and VEGF) were associated with OA in the meta-analysis. Two SNPs in COL11A1 showed association with hip OA in the combined analysis: rs4907986 (P = 1.29 × 10−5, odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.06−1.17) and rs1241164 (P = 1.47 × 10−5, OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.74−0.89). The sex-stratified analysis also showed association of COL11A1 SNP rs4908291 in women (P = 1.29 × 10−5, OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.82−0.92); this SNP showed linkage disequilibrium with rs4907986. A single SNP of VEGF, rs833058, showed association with hip OA in men (P = 1.35 × 10−5, OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.79−0.91). After additional samples were genotyped, association at one of the COL11A1 signals was reinforced, whereas association at VEGF was slightly weakened. Conclusion Two candidate genes, COL11A1 and VEGF, were significantly associated with OA in this focused meta-analysis. The remaining candidate genes were not associated. PMID:24757145

  6. Genomewide linkage analysis in Costa Rican families implicates chromosome 15q14 as a candidate region for OCD.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jessica; Badner, Judith; Garrido, Helena; Sheppard, Brooke; Chavira, Denise A; Grados, Marco; Woo, Jonathan M; Doo, Pamela; Umaña, Paula; Fournier, Eduardo; Murray, Sarah Shaw; Mathews, Carol A

    2011-12-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) has a complex etiology that encompasses both genetic and environmental factors. However, to date, despite the identification of several promising candidate genes and linkage regions, the genetic causes of OCD are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to conduct linkage studies of childhood-onset OCD, which is thought to have the strongest genetic etiology, in several OCD-affected families from the genetically isolated population of the Central Valley of Costa Rica (CVCR). The authors used parametric and non-parametric approaches to conduct genome-wide linkage analyses using 5,786 single nucleotide repeat polymorphisms (SNPs) in three CVCR families with multiple childhood-onset OCD-affected individuals. We identified areas of suggestive linkage (LOD score ≥ 2) on chromosomes 1p21, 15q14, 16q24, and 17p12. The strongest evidence for linkage was on chromosome 15q14 (LOD = 3.13), identified using parametric linkage analysis with a recessive model, and overlapping a region identified in a prior linkage study using a Caucasian population. Each CVCR family had a haplotype that co-segregated with OCD across a ~7 Mbp interval within this region, which contains 18 identified brain expressed genes, several of which are potentially relevant to OCD. Exonic sequencing of the strongest candidate gene in this region, the ryanodine receptor 3 (RYR3), identified several genetic variants of potential interest, although none co-segregated with OCD in all three families. These findings provide evidence that chromosome 15q14 is linked to OCD in families from the CVCR, and supports previous findings to suggest that this region may contain one or more OCD susceptibility loci.

  7. Genome-wide patterns of genetic distances reveal candidate Loci contributing to human population-specific traits.

    PubMed

    de Magalhães, João Pedro; Matsuda, Alex

    2012-03-01

    Modern humans originated in Africa before migrating across the world with founder effects and adaptations to new environments contributing to their present phenotypic diversity. Determining the genetic basis of differences between populations may provide clues about our evolutionary history and may have clinical implications. Herein, we develop a method to detect genes and biological processes in which populations most differ by calculating the genetic distance between modern populations and a hypothetical ancestral population. We apply our method to large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from human populations of African, European and Asian origin. As expected, ancestral alleles were more conserved in the African populations and we found evidence of high divergence in genes previously suggested as targets of selection related to skin pigmentation, immune response, senses and dietary adaptations. Our genome-wide scan also reveals novel candidates for contributing to population-specific traits. These include genes related to neuronal development and behavior that may have been influenced by cultural processes. Moreover, in the African populations, we found a high divergence in genes related to UV protection and to the male reproductive system. Taken together, these results confirm and expand previous findings, providing new clues about the evolution and genetics of human phenotypic diversity.

  8. A Family-Based Association Analysis and Meta-Analysis of the Reading Disabilities Candidate Gene DYX1C1

    PubMed Central

    Tran, C.; Gagnon, F.; Wigg, K.G.; Feng, Y.; Gomez, L.; Cate-Carter, T.D.; Kerr, E.N.; Field, L.L.; Kaplan, B.J.; Lovett, M.W.; Barr, C.L.

    2017-01-01

    Reading disabilities (RD) have a significant genetic basis and have shown linkage to multiple regions including chromosome 15q. Dyslexia susceptibility 1 candidate gene 1 (DYX1C1) on chromosome 15q21 was originally proposed as a candidate gene with two potentially functional polymorphisms at the −3G/A and 1249G/T positions showing association with RD. However, subsequent studies have yielded mixed results. We performed a literature review and meta-analysis of the −3G/A and 1249G/T polymorphisms, including new unpublished data from two family-based samples. Ten markers in DYX1C1 were genotyped in the two independently ascertained samples. Single marker and −3G/A:1249G/T haplotype analyses were performed for RD in both samples, and quantitative trait analyses using standardized reading-related measures was performed in one of the samples. For the meta-analysis, we used a random-effects model to summarize studies that tested for association between −3G/A or 1249G/T and RD. No significant association was found between the DYX1C1 SNPs and RD or any of the reading-related measures tested after correction for the number of tests performed. The previously reported risk haplotype (−3A:1249T) was not biased in transmission. A total of 9 and 10 study samples were included in the meta-analysis of the −3G/A and 1249G/T polymorphisms, respectively. Neither polymorphism reached statistical significance, but the heterogeneity for the 1249G/T polymorphism was high. The results of this study do not provide evidence for association between the putatively functional SNPs −3G/A and 1249G/T and RD. PMID:23341075

  9. Genetic variation in vitro and in vivo of an attenuated Lassa vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Juan C; Goicochea, Marco; Nadai, Yuka; Eyzaguirre, Lindsay M; Carr, Jean K; Tallon, Luke J; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Myers, Garry; Fraser, Claire M; Su, Qi; Djavani, Mahmoud; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2014-03-01

    The attenuated Lassa vaccine candidate ML29 is a laboratory-produced reassortant between Lassa and Mopeia viruses, two Old World arenaviruses that differ by 40% in nucleic acid sequence. In our previous studies, ML29 elicited sterilizing immunity against Lassa virus challenge in guinea pigs and marmosets and virus-specific cell-mediated immunity in both simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques. Here, we show that ML29 is stable after 12 passages in vitro without losing its plaque morphology or its attenuated phenotype in suckling mice. Additionally, we used deep sequencing to characterize the viral population comprising the original stock of ML29, the stock of ML29 after 12 passages in Vero cells, and the ML29 isolates obtained from vaccinated animals. Twenty-seven isolates bore approximately 77 mutations that exceeded 20% of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) changes at any single locus. Of these 77 mutations, 5 appeared to be host specific, for example, appearing in mice but not in primates. None of these mutations were reversions of ML29 to the sequences of the parental Lassa and Mopeia viruses. The host-specific mutations indicate viral adaptations to virus-host interactions, and such interactions make reasonable targets for antiviral approaches. Variants capable of chronic infection did not emerge from any of the primate infections, even in immune-deficient animals, indicating that the ML29 reassortant is reasonably stable in vivo. In conclusion, the preclinical studies of ML29 as a Lassa virus vaccine candidate have been advanced, showing high levels of protection in nonhuman primates and acceptable stability both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Genetic epidemiology. Approaches to the genetic analysis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    John, S; Worthington, J

    2001-01-01

    The basis of susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex, comprising genetic and environmental susceptibility factors. We have reviewed the available approaches to the investigation of the genetic basis of complex diseases and how these are being applied to RA. Affected-sibling-pair methods for nonparametric linkage analysis, linkage-disequilibrium-based approaches, transmission disequilibrium testing, and disease-association studies are discussed. The pros, cons, and limitations of the approaches are considered and are illustrated by examples from the literature about rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. PLANETARY CANDIDATES OBSERVED BY KEPLER. III. ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST 16 MONTHS OF DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Barclay, Thomas; Dupree, Andrea K.; Latham, David W.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Ford, Eric B.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Isaacson, Howard; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; and others

    2013-02-15

    New transiting planet candidates are identified in 16 months (2009 May-2010 September) of data from the Kepler spacecraft. Nearly 5000 periodic transit-like signals are vetted against astrophysical and instrumental false positives yielding 1108 viable new planet candidates, bringing the total count up to over 2300. Improved vetting metrics are employed, contributing to higher catalog reliability. Most notable is the noise-weighted robust averaging of multi-quarter photo-center offsets derived from difference image analysis that identifies likely background eclipsing binaries. Twenty-two months of photometry are used for the purpose of characterizing each of the candidates. Ephemerides (transit epoch, T {sub 0}, and orbital period, P) are tabulated as well as the products of light curve modeling: reduced radius (R {sub P}/R {sub *}), reduced semimajor axis (d/R {sub *}), and impact parameter (b). The largest fractional increases are seen for the smallest planet candidates (201% for candidates smaller than 2 R {sub Circled-Plus} compared to 53% for candidates larger than 2 R {sub Circled-Plus }) and those at longer orbital periods (124% for candidates outside of 50 day orbits versus 86% for candidates inside of 50 day orbits). The gains are larger than expected from increasing the observing window from 13 months (Quarters 1-5) to 16 months (Quarters 1-6) even in regions of parameter space where one would have expected the previous catalogs to be complete. Analyses of planet frequencies based on previous catalogs will be affected by such incompleteness. The fraction of all planet candidate host stars with multiple candidates has grown from 17% to 20%, and the paucity of short-period giant planets in multiple systems is still evident. The progression toward smaller planets at longer orbital periods with each new catalog release suggests that Earth-size planets in the habitable zone are forthcoming if, indeed, such planets are abundant.

  12. Genetic Analysis of Hyperthermophilic Archaebacterial Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-28

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius . Prior studies with these organisms were limited to those that could be done in liquid culture. This was a serious limitation...techniques for the study of the extremely hypertherthophiiic archaebacteriwn, Sulfolcbus acidocaldarius . APPROACH: Develop, refine and use genetic...resulted in several major advances in the development and analysis of genetics systems in the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium, Sulfolobus a

  13. Genetic analysis of mechanisms of aging.

    PubMed

    Rose, M R; Archer, M A

    1996-06-01

    A wide range of genetic models with postponed aging are now available, from selected mice and Drosophilia to mutant Caenorhabditis elegans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These systems allow efficient testing of alternative mechanistic hypotheses for aging. Genetic analysis is forging stronger connections between particular alleles and susceptibility to particular 'diseases of aging'; for example, two different genes for Alzheimer disease have been identified.

  14. Determination of Cd and Cr in an ABS candidate reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwangwon; Kang, Namgoo; Cho, Kyunghaeng; Lee, Jounghae

    2008-12-01

    In order to practically better cope with technical barriers to trade (TBT) of a great number of resin goods, our research presents first-ever results for the determination of Cd and Cr in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) candidate reference material using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) recently recognized as a candidate primary ratio method with a particular attention to the estimation of involved measurement uncertainties.

  15. Deciphering the genetic determinism of bud phenology in apple progenies: a new insight into chilling and heat requirement effects on flowering dates and positional candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Celton, J-M; Martinez, S; Jammes, M-J; Bechti, A; Salvi, S; Legave, J-M; Costes, E

    2011-10-01

    The present study investigates the genetic determinism of bud phenological traits using two segregating F(1) apple (Malus × domestica) progenies. Phenological trait variability was dissected into genetic and climatic components using mixed linear modeling, and estimated best linear unbiased predictors were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) detection. For flowering dates, year effects were decomposed into chilling and heat requirements based on a previously developed model. QTL analysis permitted the identification of two major and population-specific genomic regions on LG08 and LG09. Both 'chilling requirement' and 'heat requirement' periods influenced flowering dates, although their relative impact was dependent on the genetic background. Using the apple genome sequence data, putative candidate genes underlying one major QTL were investigated. Numerous key genes involved in cell cycle control were identified in clusters within the confidence interval of the major QTL on LG09. Our results contribute towards a better understanding of the interaction between QTLs and climatic conditions, and provide a basis for the identification of genes involved in bud growth resumption.

  16. Planetary Candidates Observed by Kepler, III: Analysis of the First 16 Months of Data

    SciTech Connect

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Barclay, Thomas; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Brown, Timothy M.; Dupree, Andrea K.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /UC, Santa Cruz

    2012-02-01

    New transiting planet candidates are identified in sixteen months (May 2009 - September 2010) of data from the Kepler spacecraft. Nearly five thousand periodic transit-like signals are vetted against astrophysical and instrumental false positives yielding 1091 viable new planet candidates, bringing the total count up to over 2,300. Improved vetting metrics are employed, contributing to higher catalog reliability. Most notable is the noise-weighted robust averaging of multiquarter photo-center offsets derived from difference image analysis which identifies likely background eclipsing binaries. Twenty-two months of photometry are used for the purpose of characterizing each of the new candidates. Ephemerides (transit epoch, T{sub 0}, and orbital period, P) are tabulated as well as the products of light curve modeling: reduced radius (R{sub P}/R{sub {star}}), reduced semi-major axis (d/R{sub {star}}), and impact parameter (b). The largest fractional increases are seen for the smallest planet candidates (197% for candidates smaller than 2R{sub {circle_plus}} compared to 52% for candidates larger than 2R{sub {circle_plus}}) and those at longer orbital periods (123% for candidates outside of 50 day orbits versus 85% for candidates inside of 50 day orbits). The gains are larger than expected from increasing the observing window from thirteen months (Quarter 1 - Quarter 5) to sixteen months (Quarter 1 - Quarter 6). This demonstrates the benefit of continued development of pipeline analysis software. The fraction of all host stars with multiple candidates has grown from 17% to 20%, and the paucity of short-period giant planets in multiple systems is still evident. The progression toward smaller planets at longer orbital periods with each new catalog release suggests that Earth-size planets in the Habitable Zone are forthcoming if, indeed, such planets are abundant.

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated AZI1 - an attractive candidate for genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Pitzschke, Andrea; Datta, Sneha; Persak, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases and their targets have been in the limelight of plant stress research. Signaling pathways mediating the responses to multiple stresses deserve particular attention. In a recent study, we reported AZI1, a member of the lipid transfer protein family, to play a role in MPK3-mediated responses to salt stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. MPK3 controls AZI1 at the transcriptional and posttranslational level. The AZI1 protein has several properties that make it very attractive for genetic engineering. A model of multi-level control of AZI1 by MPK3 is proposed, and strategies toward optimizing AZI1 protein properties are briefly discussed.

  18. [Chromosome analysis and genetic testing].

    PubMed

    Isobe, Yasushi; Miura, Ikuo

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal and genetic tests are essential to establish correct diagnoses of the lymphoma. When the tissue examination is planned, these should be done simultaneously with the morphological and immunophenotypic evaluations. Chromosome analyses can identify the genomic alterations of tumor cells. Some chromosome abnormalities define disease subtypes. For example, recurrent 14q32 translocations involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus support the diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma, and their translocation partners identify the types. In contrast, genetic testings are performed to confirm the presence of certain abnormalities including gene rearrangements, mutations, amplifications and deletions in each case. These results provide us detailed information for diagnosis, prognosis, and choice of therapy.

  19. Gene Expression Signature Analysis Identifies Vorinostat as a Candidate Therapy for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woonyoung; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, KyoungHyun; Kim, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ju-Seog; Mills, Gordon B.; Cho, Jae Yong

    2011-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer continues to be one of the deadliest cancers in the world and therefore identification of new drugs targeting this type of cancer is thus of significant importance. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate a therapeutic agent which might improve the outcomes for gastric cancer patients in the future. Methodology/Principal Findings Using microarray technology, we generated a gene expression profile of human gastric cancer–specific genes from human gastric cancer tissue samples. We used this profile in the Broad Institute's Connectivity Map analysis to identify candidate therapeutic compounds for gastric cancer. We found the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat as the lead compound and thus a potential therapeutic drug for gastric cancer. Vorinostat induced both apoptosis and autophagy in gastric cancer cell lines. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy however, increased the therapeutic efficacy of vorinostat, indicating that a combination of vorinostat with autophagy inhibitors may therapeutically be more beneficial. Moreover, gene expression analysis of gastric cancer identified a collection of genes (ITGB5, TYMS, MYB, APOC1, CBX5, PLA2G2A, and KIF20A) whose expression was elevated in gastric tumor tissue and downregulated more than 2-fold by vorinostat treatment in gastric cancer cell lines. In contrast, SCGB2A1, TCN1, CFD, APLP1, and NQO1 manifested a reversed pattern. Conclusions/Significance We showed that analysis of gene expression signature may represent an emerging approach to discover therapeutic agents for gastric cancer, such as vorinostat. The observation of altered gene expression after vorinostat treatment may provide the clue to identify the molecular mechanism of vorinostat and those patients likely to benefit from vorinostat treatment. PMID:21931799

  20. Criteria for Identifying and Evaluating Candidate Sites for Open-Field Trials of Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David M.; Alphey, Luke S.; McKemey, Andrew; Beech, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Recent laboratory successes in the development of genetically engineered mosquitoes for controlling pathogen transmission have fostered the need for standardized procedures for advancing the technical achievements to practical tools. It is incumbent in many cases for the same scientists doing the in-laboratory discovery research to also take on the initial challenges of developing the pathway that will move the technologies to the field. One of these challenges is having a set of criteria for selecting collaborators and sites for efficacy and safety field trials that combine rigorous science with good ethical and legal practices. Specific site-selection criteria were developed in four categories—Scientific, Regulatory, Community Engagement, and Resources—in anticipation of open-field releases of a transgenic mosquito strain designed to suppress populations of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The criteria are derived from previous published material, discussions, and personal experiences with the expectation of providing guidance to laboratory scientists for addressing the conceptual and operational considerations for identifying partner researchers and countries with whom to collaborate. These criteria are not intended to be prescriptive nor can they be applied to every circumstance where genetic approaches are proposed for deployment. However, we encourage those involved in the discovery phase of research to consider each criterion during project planning activities, and where appropriate, incorporate them into a “go/no-go” decision-making process for further development and testing of the technologies. PMID:24689963

  1. Criteria for identifying and evaluating candidate sites for open-field trials of genetically engineered mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Alphey, Luke S; McKemey, Andrew; Beech, Camilla; James, Anthony A

    2014-04-01

    Recent laboratory successes in the development of genetically engineered mosquitoes for controlling pathogen transmission have fostered the need for standardized procedures for advancing the technical achievements to practical tools. It is incumbent in many cases for the same scientists doing the in-laboratory discovery research to also take on the initial challenges of developing the pathway that will move the technologies to the field. One of these challenges is having a set of criteria for selecting collaborators and sites for efficacy and safety field trials that combine rigorous science with good ethical and legal practices. Specific site-selection criteria were developed in four categories-Scientific, Regulatory, Community Engagement, and Resources-in anticipation of open-field releases of a transgenic mosquito strain designed to suppress populations of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The criteria are derived from previous published material, discussions, and personal experiences with the expectation of providing guidance to laboratory scientists for addressing the conceptual and operational considerations for identifying partner researchers and countries with whom to collaborate. These criteria are not intended to be prescriptive nor can they be applied to every circumstance where genetic approaches are proposed for deployment. However, we encourage those involved in the discovery phase of research to consider each criterion during project planning activities, and where appropriate, incorporate them into a "go/no-go" decision-making process for further development and testing of the technologies.

  2. Photometric Analysis of Two Candidate Pulsating Early Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnett, S. M.; Dukes, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    Both HD199122 and HD213617 are found to be periodic with frequencies within the characteristic range of g-mode pulsation for either the Slowly Pulsating B Stars (SPBs) or the Gamma Doradus stars. We began observing HD199122 as a SPB based on its appearance in the list of such stars found through Hipparcos data examination by Koen (MNRAS, 321, 44, 2001). However, as noted by Koen, its reported spectral type A2 is late for an SPB. Based on published photometric indices, he suggests that its spectral type is closer to B7 and thus it is likely to be a SPB. Using Stromgren uvby photometry, we have examined over 600 differential measures of this star. We find two clear frequencies of f1 = 0.80209 c/d and f2 = 0.82444 c/d, which is within the characteristic range for g-mode pulsation of hotter main sequence stars. Our data suggests the possible presence of a third frequency, but confirmation is pending more data analysis. A preliminary analysis of Hipparcos satellite data for HD 213617 proposes a frequency of 0.55672 c/d (Handler, G.MNRAS 309, L19-L23,1999). However, Castellano (private communication) has found a period closer to 0.8 c/d from his analysis of the Hipparcos data. Since this star is an early F type, confirmation of this pulsational value could classify this star as a Gamma Doradus variable. We are presently obtaining observations for both subjects and will continue analysis as data arrives. Observations of HD213617 were begun as part of a summer project as part of the NASA Academy at Ames. This work has been supported by South Carolina Space Grant and NSF grant AST-0071260 to the College of Charleston,.

  3. Application of genomic and quantitative genetic tools to identify candidate resistance genes for brown rot resistance in peach.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Pedro J; Parfitt, Dan E; Bostock, Richard M; Fresnedo-Ramírez, Jonathan; Vazquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Ogundiwin, Ebenezer A; Gradziel, Thomas M; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a complete peach genome assembly and three different peach genome sequences created by our group provide new opportunities for application of genomic data and can improve the power of the classical Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) approaches to identify candidate genes for peach disease resistance. Brown rot caused by Monilinia spp., is the most important fungal disease of stone fruits worldwide. Improved levels of peach fruit rot resistance have been identified in some cultivars and advanced selections developed in the UC Davis and USDA breeding programs. Whole genome sequencing of the Pop-DF parents lead to discovery of high-quality SNP markers for QTL genome scanning in this experimental population. Pop-DF created by crossing a brown rot moderately resistant cultivar 'Dr. Davis' and a brown rot resistant introgression line, 'F8,1-42', derived from an initial almond × peach interspecific hybrid, was evaluated for brown rot resistance in fruit of harvest maturity over three seasons. Using the SNP linkage map of Pop-DF and phenotypic data collected with inoculated fruit, a genome scan for QTL identified several SNP markers associated with brown rot resistance. Two of these QTLs were placed on linkage group 1, covering a large (physical) region on chromosome 1. The genome scan for QTL and SNP effects predicted several candidate genes associated with disease resistance responses in other host-pathogen systems. Two potential candidate genes, ppa011763m and ppa026453m, may be the genes primarily responsible for M. fructicola recognition in peach, activating both PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) responses. Our results provide a foundation for further genetic dissection, marker assisted breeding for brown rot resistance, and development of peach cultivars resistant to brown rot.

  4. A comprehensive candidate gene approach identifies genetic variation associated with osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma (OS) is a bone malignancy which occurs primarily in adolescents. Since it occurs during a period of rapid growth, genes important in bone formation and growth are plausible modifiers of risk. Genes involved in DNA repair and ribosomal function may contribute to OS pathogenesis, because they maintain the integrity of critical cellular processes. We evaluated these hypotheses in an OS association study of genes from growth/hormone, bone formation, DNA repair, and ribosomal pathways. Methods We evaluated 4836 tag-SNPs across 255 candidate genes in 96 OS cases and 1426 controls. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Twelve SNPs in growth or DNA repair genes were significantly associated with OS after Bonferroni correction. Four SNPs in the DNA repair gene FANCM (ORs 1.9-2.0, P = 0.003-0.004) and 2 SNPs downstream of the growth hormone gene GH1 (OR 1.6, P = 0.002; OR 0.5, P = 0.0009) were significantly associated with OS. One SNP in the region of each of the following genes was significant: MDM2, MPG, FGF2, FGFR3, GNRH2, and IGF1. Conclusions Our results suggest that several SNPs in biologically plausible pathways are associated with OS. Larger studies are required to confirm our findings. PMID:21619704

  5. Association of Genetic Loci with Sleep Apnea in European Americans and African-Americans: The Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sanjay R.; Goodloe, Robert; De, Gourab; Kowgier, Matthew; Weng, Jia; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Cade, Brian; Fulop, Tibor; Gharib, Sina A.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Hillman, David; Larkin, Emma K.; Lauderdale, Diane S.; Li, Li; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Palmer, Lyle; Zee, Phyllis; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Redline, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Although obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is known to have a strong familial basis, no genetic polymorphisms influencing apnea risk have been identified in cross-cohort analyses. We utilized the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) to identify sleep apnea susceptibility loci. Using a panel of 46,449 polymorphisms from roughly 2,100 candidate genes on a customized Illumina iSelect chip, we tested for association with the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) as well as moderate to severe OSA (AHI≥15) in 3,551 participants of the Cleveland Family Study and two cohorts participating in the Sleep Heart Health Study. Among 647 African-Americans, rs11126184 in the pleckstrin (PLEK) gene was associated with OSA while rs7030789 in the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPAR1) gene was associated with AHI using a chip-wide significance threshold of p-value<2×10−6. Among 2,904 individuals of European ancestry, rs1409986 in the prostaglandin E2 receptor (PTGER3) gene was significantly associated with OSA. Consistency of effects between rs7030789 and rs1409986 in LPAR1 and PTGER3 and apnea phenotypes were observed in independent clinic-based cohorts. Novel genetic loci for apnea phenotypes were identified through the use of customized gene chips and meta-analyses of cohort data with replication in clinic-based samples. The identified SNPs all lie in genes associated with inflammation suggesting inflammation may play a role in OSA pathogenesis. PMID:23155414

  6. Patterns of genetic diversity and candidate genes for ecological divergence in a homoploid hybrid sunflower, Helianthus anomalus.

    PubMed

    Sapir, Yuval; Moody, Michael L; Brouillette, Larry C; Donovan, Lisa A; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2007-12-01

    Natural hybridization accompanied by a shift in niche preference by hybrid genotypes can lead to hybrid speciation. Natural selection may cause the fixation of advantageous alleles in the ecologically diverged hybrids, and the loci experiencing selection should exhibit a reduction in allelic diversity relative to neutral loci. Here, we analyzed patterns of genetic diversity at 59 microsatellite loci associated with expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in a homoploid hybrid sunflower species, Helianthus anomalus. We used two indices, ln RV and ln RH, to compare variation and heterozygosity (respectively) at each locus between the hybrid species and its two parental species, H. annuus and H. petiolaris. Mean values of ln RV and ln RH were significantly lower than zero, which implies that H. anomalus experienced a population bottleneck during its recent evolutionary history. After correcting for the apparent bottleneck, we found six loci with a significant reduction in variation or with heterozygosity in the hybrid species, compared to one or both of the parental species. These loci should be viewed as a ranked list of candidate loci, pending further sequencing and functional analyses. Sequence data were generated for two of the candidate loci, but population genetics tests failed to detect deviations from neutral evolution at either locus. Nonetheless, a greater than eight-fold excess of nonsynonymous substitutions was found near a putative N-myristoylation motif at the second locus (HT998), and likelihood-based models indicated that the protein has been under selection in H. anomalus in the past and, perhaps, in one or both parental species. Finally, our data suggest that selective sweeps may have united populations of H. anomalus isolated by a mountain range, indicating that even low gene-flow species may be held together by the spread of advantageous alleles.

  7. A Killed, Genetically Engineered Derivative of a Wild-Type Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli strain is a Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Thomas A.; Beanan, Janet M.; Olson, Ruth; Genagon, Stacy A.; MacDonald, Ulrike; Cope, John J.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Johnston, Brian; Johnson, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Infections due to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) result in significant morbidity, mortality and increased healthcare costs. An efficacious vaccine against ExPEC would be desirable. In this report we explore the use of killed-whole E. coli as a vaccine immunogen. Given the diversity of capsule and O-antigens in ExPEC we have hypothesized that alternative targets are viable vaccine candidates. We have also hypothesized that immunization with a genetically engineered strain that is deficient in the capsule and O-antigen will generate a greater immune response against antigens other than the capsular and O-antigen epitopes than a wild-type strain. Lastly, we hypothesize that mucosal immunization with killed E. coli has the potential to generate a significant immune response. In this study we demonstrated that nasal immunization with a formalin-killed ExPEC derivative deficient in capsule and O-antigen results in a significantly greater overall humoral response compared to its wild-type derivative (which demonstrates that capsule and/or the O-antigen impede the development of an optimal humoral immune response) and a significantly greater immune response against non-capsular and O-antigen epitopes. These antibodies also bound to a subset of heterologous ExPEC strains and enhanced neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity against the homologous and a heterologous strain. Taken together these studies support the concept that formalin-killed genetically engineered ExPEC derivatives are whole cell vaccine candidates to prevent infections due to ExPEC. PMID:17306426

  8. Patterns of genetic diversity and candidate genes for ecological divergence in a homoploid hybrid sunflower, Helianthus anomalus

    PubMed Central

    SAPIR, YUVAL; MOODY, MICHAEL L.; BROUILLETTE, LARRY C.; DONOVAN, LISA A.; RIESEBERG, LOREN H.

    2008-01-01

    Natural hybridization accompanied by a shift in niche preference by hybrid genotypes can lead to hybrid speciation. Natural selection may cause the fixation of advantageous alleles in the ecologically diverged hybrids, and the loci experiencing selection should exhibit a reduction in allelic diversity relative to neutral loci. Here, we analyzed patterns of genetic diversity at 59 microsatellite loci associated with expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in a homoploid hybrid sunflower species, Helianthus anomalus. We used two indices, ln RV and ln RH, to compare variation and heterozygosity (respectively) at each locus between the hybrid species and its two parental species, H. annuus and H. petiolaris. Mean values of ln RV and ln RH were significantly lower than zero, which implies that H. anomalus experienced a population bottleneck during its recent evolutionary history. After correcting for the apparent bottleneck, we found six loci with a significant reduction in variation or with heterozygosity in the hybrid species, compared to one or both of the parental species. These loci should be viewed as a ranked list of candidate loci, pending further sequencing and functional analyses. Sequence data were generated for two of the candidate loci, but population genetics tests failed to detect deviations from neutral evolution at either locus. Nonetheless, a greater than eight-fold excess of nonsynonymous substitutions was found near a putative N-myristoylation motif at the second locus (HT998), and likelihood-based models indicated that the protein has been under selection in H. anomalus in the past and, perhaps, in one or both parental species. Finally, our data suggest that selective sweeps may have united populations of H. anomalus isolated by a mountain range, indicating that even low gene-flow species may be held together by the spread of advantageous alleles. PMID:17944850

  9. Gene-gene interactions among genetic variants from obesity candidate genes for nonobese and obese populations in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Pei, Dee; Huang, Yi-Jen; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that obesity may play a key role in modulating genetic predispositions to type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study examines the main effects of both single-locus and multilocus interactions among genetic variants in Taiwanese obese and nonobese individuals to test the hypothesis that obesity-related genes may contribute to the etiology of T2D independently and/or through such complex interactions. We genotyped 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms for 10 obesity candidate genes including adrenergic beta-2-receptor surface, adrenergic beta-3-receptor surface, angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein beta polypeptide 3 (GNB3), interleukin 6 receptor, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1), uncoupling protein 1, uncoupling protein 2, and uncoupling protein 3. There were 389 patients diagnosed with T2D and 186 age- and sex-matched controls. Single-locus analyses showed significant main effects of the GNB3 and PCSK1 genes on the risk of T2D among the nonobese group (p = 0.002 and 0.047, respectively). Further, interactions involving GNB3 and PCSK1 were suggested among the nonobese population using the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction method (p = 0.001). In addition, interactions among angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, GNB3, and uncoupling protein 3 genes were found in a significant four-locus generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction model among the obese population (p = 0.001). The results suggest that the single nucleotide polymorphisms from the obesity candidate genes may contribute to the risk of T2D independently and/or in an interactive manner according to the presence or absence of obesity.

  10. Genetic mapping of male pheromone response in the European corn borer identifies candidate genes regulating neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Teun; Heckel, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The sexual pheromone communication system of moths is a model system for studies of the evolution of reproductive isolation. Females emit a blend of volatile components that males detect at a distance. Species differences in female pheromone composition and male response directly reinforce reproductive isolation in nature, because even slight variations in the species-specific pheromone blend are usually rejected by the male. The mechanisms by which a new pheromone signal–response system could evolve are enigmatic, because any deviation from the optimally attractive blend should be selected against. Here we investigate the genetic mechanisms enabling a switch in male response. We used a quantitative trait locus-mapping approach to identify the genetic basis of male response in the two pheromone races of the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis. Male response to a 99:1 vs. a 3:97 ratio of the E and Z isomers of the female pheromone is governed by a single, sex-linked locus. We found that the chromosomal region most tightly linked to this locus contains genes involved in neurogenesis but, in accordance with an earlier study, does not contain the odorant receptors expressed in the male antenna that detect the pheromone. This finding implies that differences in the development of neuronal pathways conveying information from the antenna, not differences in pheromone detection by the odorant receptors, are primarily responsible for the behavioral response differences among the males in this system. Comparison with other moth species reveals a previously unexplored mechanism by which male pheromone response can change in evolution. PMID:27698145

  11. Genetic variation at hair length candidate genes in elephants and the extinct woolly mammoth.

    PubMed

    Roca, Alfred L; Ishida, Yasuko; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Fratpietro, Stephen; Stewardson, Kristin; Hensley, Shannon; Tisdale, Michele; Boeskorov, Gennady; Greenwood, Alex D

    2009-09-11

    Like humans, the living elephants are unusual among mammals in being sparsely covered with hair. Relative to extant elephants, the extinct woolly mammoth, Mammuthus primigenius, had a dense hair cover and extremely long hair, which likely were adaptations to its subarctic habitat. The fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF5) gene affects hair length in a diverse set of mammalian species. Mutations in FGF5 lead to recessive long hair phenotypes in mice, dogs, and cats; and the gene has been implicated in hair length variation in rabbits. Thus, FGF5 represents a leading candidate gene for the phenotypic differences in hair length notable between extant elephants and the woolly mammoth. We therefore sequenced the three exons (except for the 3' UTR) and a portion of the promoter of FGF5 from the living elephantid species (Asian, African savanna and African forest elephants) and, using protocols for ancient DNA, from a woolly mammoth. Between the extant elephants and the mammoth, two single base substitutions were observed in FGF5, neither of which alters the amino acid sequence. Modeling of the protein structure suggests that the elephantid proteins fold similarly to the human FGF5 protein. Bioinformatics analyses and DNA sequencing of another locus that has been implicated in hair cover in humans, type I hair keratin pseudogene (KRTHAP1), also yielded negative results. Interestingly, KRTHAP1 is a pseudogene in elephantids as in humans (although fully functional in non-human primates). The data suggest that the coding sequence of the FGF5 gene is not the critical determinant of hair length differences among elephantids. The results are discussed in the context of hairlessness among mammals and in terms of the potential impact of large body size, subarctic conditions, and an aquatic ancestor on hair cover in the Proboscidea.

  12. Genetic variation at hair length candidate genes in elephants and the extinct woolly mammoth

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Alfred L; Ishida, Yasuko; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Fratpietro, Stephen; Stewardson, Kristin; Hensley, Shannon; Tisdale, Michele; Boeskorov, Gennady; Greenwood, Alex D

    2009-01-01

    Background Like humans, the living elephants are unusual among mammals in being sparsely covered with hair. Relative to extant elephants, the extinct woolly mammoth, Mammuthus primigenius, had a dense hair cover and extremely long hair, which likely were adaptations to its subarctic habitat. The fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF5) gene affects hair length in a diverse set of mammalian species. Mutations in FGF5 lead to recessive long hair phenotypes in mice, dogs, and cats; and the gene has been implicated in hair length variation in rabbits. Thus, FGF5 represents a leading candidate gene for the phenotypic differences in hair length notable between extant elephants and the woolly mammoth. We therefore sequenced the three exons (except for the 3' UTR) and a portion of the promoter of FGF5 from the living elephantid species (Asian, African savanna and African forest elephants) and, using protocols for ancient DNA, from a woolly mammoth. Results Between the extant elephants and the mammoth, two single base substitutions were observed in FGF5, neither of which alters the amino acid sequence. Modeling of the protein structure suggests that the elephantid proteins fold similarly to the human FGF5 protein. Bioinformatics analyses and DNA sequencing of another locus that has been implicated in hair cover in humans, type I hair keratin pseudogene (KRTHAP1), also yielded negative results. Interestingly, KRTHAP1 is a pseudogene in elephantids as in humans (although fully functional in non-human primates). Conclusion The data suggest that the coding sequence of the FGF5 gene is not the critical determinant of hair length differences among elephantids. The results are discussed in the context of hairlessness among mammals and in terms of the potential impact of large body size, subarctic conditions, and an aquatic ancestor on hair cover in the Proboscidea. PMID:19747392

  13. CFD Analysis of Emissions for a Candidate N+3 Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajmani, Kumud

    2015-01-01

    An effort was undertaken to analyze the performance of a model Lean-Direct Injection (LDI) combustor designed to meet emissions and performance goals for NASA's N+3 program. Computational predictions of Emissions Index (EINOx) and combustor exit temperature were obtained for operation at typical power conditions expected of a small-core, high pressure-ratio (greater than 50), high T3 inlet temperature (greater than 950K) N+3 combustor. Reacting-flow computations were performed with the National Combustion Code (NCC) for a model N+3 LDI combustor, which consisted of a nine-element LDI flame-tube derived from a previous generation (N+2) thirteen-element LDI design. A consistent approach to mesh-optimization, spraymodeling and kinetics-modeling was used, in order to leverage the lessons learned from previous N+2 flame-tube analysis with the NCC. The NCC predictions for the current, non-optimized N+3 combustor operating indicated a 74% increase in NOx emissions as compared to that of the emissions-optimized, parent N+2 LDI combustor.

  14. CFD Analysis of Emissions for a Candidate N+3 Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajmani, Kumud

    2015-01-01

    An effort was undertaken to analyze the performance of a model Lean-Direct Injection (LDI) combustor designed to meet emissions and performance goals for NASA's N+3 program. Computational predictions of Emissions Index (EINOx) and combustor exit temperature were obtained for operation at typical power conditions expected of a small-core, high pressure-ratio (greater than 50), high T3 inlet temperature (greater than 950K) N+3 combustor. Reacting-flow computations were performed with the National Combustion Code (NCC) for a model N+3 LDI combustor, which consisted of a nine-element LDI flame-tube derived from a previous generation (N+2) thirteen-element LDI design. A consistent approach to mesh-optimization, spray-modeling and kinetics-modeling was used, in order to leverage the lessons learned from previous N+2 flame-tube analysis with the NCC. The NCC predictions for the current, non-optimized N+3 combustor operating indicated a 74% increase in NOx emissions as compared to that of the emissions-optimized, parent N+2 LDI combustor.

  15. Analysis of genetically modified oils.

    PubMed

    Hazebroek, J P

    2000-11-01

    Genetically modified oils with altered functional or nutritional characteristics are being introduced into the marketplace. A wide array of analytical techniques has been utilized to facilitate developing these oils. This article attempts to review the utilization of these analytical procedures for characterizing both the chemistry and some functionality of these oils. Although techniques to assess oxidative stability in frying and food applications are covered, measurement of nutritional characteristics are not.

  16. Quantitative DNA Methylation Analysis of Candidate Genes in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M.; Riggs, Bridget M.; Delmas, Amber L.; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97–1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated. PMID:25826459

  17. Electron Microscopy Abrasion Analysis of Candidate Fabrics for Planetary Space Suit Protective Overgarment Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennessy, Mary J.

    1992-01-01

    The Electron Microscopy Abrasion Analysis of Candidate Fabrics for Planetary Space Suit Protective Overgarment Application is in support of the Abrasion Resistance Materials Screening Test. The fundamental assumption made for the SEM abrasion analysis was that woven fabrics to be used as the outermost layer of the protective overgarment in the design of the future, planetary space suits perform best when new. It is the goal of this study to determine which of the candidate fabrics was abraded the least in the tumble test. The sample that was abraded the least will be identified at the end of the report as the primary candidate fabric for further investigation. In addition, this analysis will determine if the abrasion seen by the laboratory tumbled samples is representative of actual EVA Apollo abrasion.

  18. Genetic Association Analysis of Drusen Progression

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joshua D.; van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Li, Chun; Brantley, Milam; McGrath, Josephine; Agarwal, Anita; Scott, William K.; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Kovach, Jaclyn; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Sanchez, Clara I.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Age-related macular degeneration is a common form of vision loss affecting older adults. The etiology of AMD is multifactorial and is influenced by environmental and genetic risk factors. In this study, we examine how 19 common risk variants contribute to drusen progression, a hallmark of AMD pathogenesis. Methods Exome chip data was made available through the International AMD Genomics Consortium (IAMDGC). Drusen quantification was carried out with color fundus photographs using an automated drusen detection and quantification algorithm. A genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated per subject by summing risk allele counts at 19 common genetic risk variants weighted by their respective effect sizes. Pathway analysis of drusen progression was carried out with the software package Pathway Analysis by Randomization Incorporating Structure. Results We observed significant correlation with drusen baseline area and the GRS in the age-related eye disease study (AREDS) dataset (ρ = 0.175, P = 0.006). Measures of association were not statistically significant between drusen progression and the GRS (P = 0.54). Pathway analysis revealed the cell adhesion molecules pathway as the most highly significant pathway associated with drusen progression (corrected P = 0.02). Conclusions In this study, we explored the potential influence of known common AMD genetic risk factors on drusen progression. Our results from the GRS analysis showed association of increasing genetic burden (from 19 AMD associated loci) to baseline drusen load but not drusen progression in the AREDS dataset while pathway analysis suggests additional genetic contributors to AMD risk. PMID:27116550

  19. The Genetics of POAG in Black South Africans: A Candidate Gene Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Susan E. I.; Carmichael, Trevor R.; Allingham, R. Rand; Hauser, Michael; Ramsay, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Multiple loci have been associated with either primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) or heritable ocular quantitative traits associated with this condition. This study examined the association of these loci with POAG, with central corneal thickness (CCT), vertical cup-to-disc ratio (VCDR) and with diabetes mellitus in a group of black South Africans (215 POAG cases and 214 controls). The population was homogeneous and distinct from other African and European populations. Single SNPs in the MYOC, COL8A2, COL1A1 and ZNF469 gene regions showed marginal associations with POAG. No association with POAG was identified with tagging SNPs in TMCO1, CAV1/CAV2, CYP1B1, COL1A2, COL5A1, CDKN2B/CDKN2BAS-1, SIX1/SIX6 or the chromosome 2p16 regions and there were no associations with CCT or VCDR. However, SNP rs12522383 in WDR36 was associated with diabetes mellitus (p = 0.00008). This first POAG genetic association study in black South Africans has therefore identified associations that require additional investigation in this and other populations to determine their significance. This highlights the need for larger studies in this population if we are to achieve the goal of facilitating early POAG detection and ultimately preventing irreversible blindness from this condition. PMID:25669751

  20. Genetically engineered and synthetic allergen derivatives: candidates for vaccination against type I allergy.

    PubMed

    Valenta, R; Vrtala, S; Focke-Tejkl, M; Bugajska-Schretter; Ball, T; Twardosz, A; Spitzauer, S; Grönlund, H; Kraft, D

    1999-01-01

    Type I allergy, a hypersensitivity disease affecting almost 20% of the population worldwide, is based on the IgE recognition of otherwise harmless antigens (i.e., allergens). Allergen-induced crosslink of effector cell-bound IgE antibodies leads to the release of biological mediators and thus to immediate disease symptoms (allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis and asthma). Specific immunotherapy, the only causative treatment of Type I allergy, is based on the administration of increasing doses of allergens to allergic patients in order to yield allergen-specific non-responsiveness. Major disadvantages are 1. that current forms of allergen immunotherapy are performed with allergens difficult to standardize which cannot be matched to the patients reactivity profile and 2. that the administration of active allergen preparations can cause anaphylactic side effects. Through the application of molecular biological techniques many relevant environmental allergens have been produced as active recombinant proteins which allow component-resolved allergy diagnosis and thus represent the basis for patient-tailored forms of immunotherapy. Here we review molecular strategies which have been recently applied to generate genetically engineered and synthetic hypoallergenic allergen derivatives for patient-tailored and safe vaccination against Type I allergy.

  1. Genetic Prediction in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Andreas; Bohossian, Nora; Diego, Vincent P.; Yao, Chen

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing data can be used to predict phenotypes from genotypes, and this corresponds to establishing a prognostic model. In extended pedigrees the relatedness of subjects provides additional information so that genetic values, fixed or random genetic components, and heritability can be estimated. At the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 the working group on genetic prediction dealt with both establishing a prognostic model and, in one contribution, comparing standard logistic regression with robust logistic regression in a sample of unrelated affected or unaffected individuals. Results of both logistic regression approaches were similar. All other contributions to this group used extended family data, in general using the quantitative trait blood pressure. The individual contributions varied in several important aspects, such as the estimation of the kinship matrix and the estimation method. Contributors chose various approaches for model validation, including different versions of cross-validation or within-family validation. Within-family validation included model building in the upper generations and validation in later generations. The choice of the statistical model and the computational algorithm had substantial effects on computation time. If decorrelation approaches were applied, the computational burden was substantially reduced. Some software packages estimated negative eigenvalues, although eigenvalues of correlation matrices should be nonnegative. Most statistical models and software packages have been developed for experimental crosses and planned breeding programs. With their specialized pedigree structures, they are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate the variability of human pedigrees in general, and improved implementations are required. PMID:25112190

  2. Identification of novel genetic susceptibility loci in African American lupus patients in a candidate gene association study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Elena; Comeau, Mary E; Freedman, Barry I; Kelly, Jennifer A; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Langefeld, Carl D; Brown, Elizabeth E; Alarcón, Graciela S; Kimberly, Robert P; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Merrill, Joan T; Tsao, Betty P; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; James, Judith A; Vyse, Timothy J; Gaffney, Patrick M; Jacob, Chaim O; Niewold, Timothy B; Richardson, Bruce C; Harley, John B; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Sawalha, Amr H

    2011-11-01

    Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have identified several disease susceptibility loci in lupus patients. These studies have largely been performed in lupus patients who are Asian or of European ancestry. This study was undertaken to examine whether some of these same susceptibility loci increase lupus risk in African American individuals. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms tagging 15 independent lupus susceptibility loci were genotyped in a set of 1,724 lupus patients and 2,024 healthy controls of African American descent. The loci examined included PTPN22, FCGR2A, TNFSF4, STAT4, CTLA4, PDCD1, PXK, BANK1, MSH5 (HLA region), CFB (HLA region), C8orf13-BLK region, MBL2, KIAA1542, ITGAM, and MECP2/IRAK1. We found the first evidence of genetic association between lupus in African American patients and 5 susceptibility loci (C8orf13-BLK, BANK1, TNFSF4, KIAA1542, and CTLA4; P = 8.0 × 10⁻⁶, P = 1.9 × 10⁻⁵, P = 5.7 × 10⁻⁵, P = 0.00099, and P = 0.0045, respectively). Further, we confirmed the genetic association between lupus and 5 additional lupus susceptibility loci (ITGAM, MSH5, CFB, STAT4, and FCGR2A; P = 7.5 × 10⁻¹¹, P = 5.2 × 10⁻⁸, P = 8.7 × 10⁻⁷ , P = 0.0058, and P = 0.0070, respectively), and provided evidence, for the first time, of genome-wide significance for the association between lupus in African American patients and ITGAM and MSH5 (HLA region). These findings provide evidence of novel genetic susceptibility loci for lupus in African Americans and demonstrate that the majority of lupus susceptibility loci examined confer lupus risk across multiple ethnicities. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  3. A two-phase case–control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility: candidate genes from chromosomal regions 9q22 and 3q22

    PubMed Central

    Abulí, A; Fernández-Rozadilla, C; Giráldez, M D; Muñoz, J; Gonzalo, V; Bessa, X; Bujanda, L; Reñé, J M; Lanas, A; García, A M; Saló, J; Argüello, L; Vilella, À; Carreño, R; Jover, R; Xicola, R M; Llor, X; Carvajal-Carmona, L; Tomlinson, I P M; Kerr, D J; Houlston, R S; Piqué, J M; Carracedo, A; Castells, A; Andreu, M; Ruiz-Ponte, C; Castellví-Bel, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second cause of cancer-related death in the Western world. Much of the CRC genetic risk remains unidentified and may be attributable to a large number of common, low-penetrance genetic variants. Genetic linkage studies in CRC families have reported additional association with regions 9q22–31, 3q21–24, 7q31, 11q, 14q and 22q. There are several plausible candidate genes for CRC susceptibility within the aforementioned linkage regions including PTCH1, XPA and TGFBR1 in 9q22–31, and EPHB1 and MRAS in 3q21–q24. Methods: CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicentre, nationwide Spanish initiative, composed of two independent phases. Phase 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas phase 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Genotyping was performed for 172 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 84 genes located within regions 9q22–31 and 3q21–q24. Results: None of the 172 SNPs analysed in our study could be formally associated with CRC risk. However, rs1444601 (TOPBP1) and rs13088006 (CDV3) in region 3q22 showed interesting results and may have an effect on CRC risk. Conclusions: TOPBP1 and CDV3 genetic variants on region 3q22 may modulate CRC risk. Further validation and meta-analysis should be undertaken in larger CRC cohorts. PMID:21811255

  4. Integration of Sequence Data from a Consanguineous Family with Genetic Data from an Outbred Population Identifies PLB1 as a Candidate Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Gene

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothee; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Mouassess, Faten; Achkar, Walid A. L.; Fulton, Robert S.; Denny, Joshua C.; Gupta, Namrata; Mirel, Daniel; Gabriel, Stacy; Li, Gang; Kremer, Joel M.; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Carroll, Robert J.; Eyler, Anne E.; Trynka, Gosia; Stahl, Eli A.; Cui, Jing; Saxena, Richa; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Dieudé, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Barton, Anne; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João E.; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P.; Moreland, Larry W.; Bridges, S. Louis; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Choi, Hyon K.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Raj, Towfique; De Jager, Philip L.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Arayssi, Thurayya; Kazkaz, Layla A.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Integrating genetic data from families with highly penetrant forms of disease together with genetic data from outbred populations represents a promising strategy to uncover the complete frequency spectrum of risk alleles for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we demonstrate that rare, low-frequency and common alleles at one gene locus, phospholipase B1 (PLB1), might contribute to risk of RA in a 4-generation consanguineous pedigree (Middle Eastern ancestry) and also in unrelated individuals from the general population (European ancestry). Through identity-by-descent (IBD) mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a non-synonymous c.2263G>C (p.G755R) mutation at the PLB1 gene on 2q23, which significantly co-segregated with RA in family members with a dominant mode of inheritance (P = 0.009). We further evaluated PLB1 variants and risk of RA using a GWAS meta-analysis of 8,875 RA cases and 29,367 controls of European ancestry. We identified significant contributions of two independent non-coding variants near PLB1 with risk of RA (rs116018341 [MAF = 0.042] and rs116541814 [MAF = 0.021], combined P = 3.2×10−6). Finally, we performed deep exon sequencing of PLB1 in 1,088 RA cases and 1,088 controls (European ancestry), and identified suggestive dispersion of rare protein-coding variant frequencies between cases and controls (P = 0.049 for C-alpha test and P = 0.055 for SKAT). Together, these data suggest that PLB1 is a candidate risk gene for RA. Future studies to characterize the full spectrum of genetic risk in the PLB1 genetic locus are warranted. PMID:24520335

  5. Integration of sequence data from a Consanguineous family with genetic data from an outbred population identifies PLB1 as a candidate rheumatoid arthritis risk gene.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothee; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Mouassess, Faten; Achkar, Walid A L; Fulton, Robert S; Denny, Joshua C; Gupta, Namrata; Mirel, Daniel; Gabriel, Stacy; Li, Gang; Kremer, Joel M; Pappas, Dimitrios A; Carroll, Robert J; Eyler, Anne E; Trynka, Gosia; Stahl, Eli A; Cui, Jing; Saxena, Richa; Coenen, Marieke J H; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Huizinga, Tom W J; Dieudé, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Barton, Anne; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João E; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P; Moreland, Larry W; Bridges, S Louis; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Choi, Hyon K; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Raj, Towfique; De Jager, Philip L; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Gregersen, Peter K; Mardis, Elaine R; Arayssi, Thurayya; Kazkaz, Layla A; Plenge, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Integrating genetic data from families with highly penetrant forms of disease together with genetic data from outbred populations represents a promising strategy to uncover the complete frequency spectrum of risk alleles for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we demonstrate that rare, low-frequency and common alleles at one gene locus, phospholipase B1 (PLB1), might contribute to risk of RA in a 4-generation consanguineous pedigree (Middle Eastern ancestry) and also in unrelated individuals from the general population (European ancestry). Through identity-by-descent (IBD) mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a non-synonymous c.2263G>C (p.G755R) mutation at the PLB1 gene on 2q23, which significantly co-segregated with RA in family members with a dominant mode of inheritance (P = 0.009). We further evaluated PLB1 variants and risk of RA using a GWAS meta-analysis of 8,875 RA cases and 29,367 controls of European ancestry. We identified significant contributions of two independent non-coding variants near PLB1 with risk of RA (rs116018341 [MAF = 0.042] and rs116541814 [MAF = 0.021], combined P = 3.2 × 10(-6)). Finally, we performed deep exon sequencing of PLB1 in 1,088 RA cases and 1,088 controls (European ancestry), and identified suggestive dispersion of rare protein-coding variant frequencies between cases and controls (P = 0.049 for C-alpha test and P = 0.055 for SKAT). Together, these data suggest that PLB1 is a candidate risk gene for RA. Future studies to characterize the full spectrum of genetic risk in the PLB1 genetic locus are warranted.

  6. PEACE: pulsar evaluation algorithm for candidate extraction - a software package for post-analysis processing of pulsar survey candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. J.; Stovall, K.; Jenet, F. A.; Martinez, J.; Dartez, L. P.; Mata, A.; Lunsford, G.; Cohen, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Rohr, M.; Flanigan, J.; Walker, A.; Banaszak, S.; Allen, B.; Barr, E. D.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Desvignes, G.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A.; McLaughlin, M.; Ransom, S.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L.; Stairs, I.; Tan, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2013-07-01

    Modern radio pulsar surveys produce a large volume of prospective candidates, the majority of which are polluted by human-created radio frequency interference or other forms of noise. Typically, large numbers of candidates need to be visually inspected in order to determine if they are real pulsars. This process can be labour intensive. In this paper, we introduce an algorithm called Pulsar Evaluation Algorithm for Candidate Extraction (PEACE) which improves the efficiency of identifying pulsar signals. The algorithm ranks the candidates based on a score function. Unlike popular machine-learning-based algorithms, no prior training data sets are required. This algorithm has been applied to data from several large-scale radio pulsar surveys. Using the human-based ranking results generated by students in the Arecibo Remote Command Center programme, the statistical performance of PEACE was evaluated. It was found that PEACE ranked 68 per cent of the student-identified pulsars within the top 0.17 per cent of sorted candidates, 95 per cent within the top 0.34 per cent and 100 per cent within the top 3.7 per cent. This clearly demonstrates that PEACE significantly increases the pulsar identification rate by a factor of about 50 to 1000. To date, PEACE has been directly responsible for the discovery of 47 new pulsars, 5 of which are millisecond pulsars that may be useful for pulsar timing based gravitational-wave detection projects.

  7. Transcriptomic and genetic studies identify NFAT5 as a candidate gene for cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Fernàndez-Castillo, N; Cabana-Domínguez, J; Soriano, J; Sànchez-Mora, C; Roncero, C; Grau-López, L; Ros-Cucurull, E; Daigre, C; van Donkelaar, M M J; Franke, B; Casas, M; Ribasés, M; Cormand, B

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine reward and reinforcing effects are mediated mainly by dopaminergic neurotransmission. In this study, we aimed at evaluating gene expression changes induced by acute cocaine exposure on SH-SY5Y-differentiated cells, which have been widely used as a dopaminergic neuronal model. Expression changes and a concomitant increase in neuronal activity were observed after a 5 μM cocaine exposure, whereas no changes in gene expression or in neuronal activity took place at 1 μM cocaine. Changes in gene expression were identified in a total of 756 genes, mainly related to regulation of transcription and gene expression, cell cycle, adhesion and cell projection, as well as mitogen-activeated protein kinase (MAPK), CREB, neurotrophin and neuregulin signaling pathways. Some genes displaying altered expression were subsequently targeted with predicted functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a case–control association study in a sample of 806 cocaine-dependent patients and 817 controls. This study highlighted associations between cocaine dependence and five SNPs predicted to alter microRNA binding at the 3′-untranslated region of the NFAT5 gene. The association of SNP rs1437134 with cocaine dependence survived the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. A functional effect was confirmed for this variant by a luciferase reporter assay, with lower expression observed for the rs1437134G allele, which was more pronounced in the presence of hsa-miR-509. However, brain volumes in regions of relevance to addiction, as assessed with magnetic resonance imaging, did not correlate with NFAT5 variation. These results suggest that the NFAT5 gene, which is upregulated a few hours after cocaine exposure, may be involved in the genetic predisposition to cocaine dependence. PMID:26506053

  8. An integrated approach of comparative genomics and heritability analysis of pig and human on obesity trait: evidence for candidate genes on human chromosome 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaemin; Lee, Taeheon; Kim, Tae-Hun; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Kim, Heebal

    2012-12-19

    Traditional candidate gene approach has been widely used for the study of complex diseases including obesity. However, this approach is largely limited by its dependence on existing knowledge of presumed biology of the phenotype under investigation. Our combined strategy of comparative genomics and chromosomal heritability estimate analysis of obesity traits, subscapular skinfold thickness and back-fat thickness in Korean cohorts and pig (Sus scrofa), may overcome the limitations of candidate gene analysis and allow us to better understand genetic predisposition to human obesity. We found common genes including FTO, the fat mass and obesity associated gene, identified from significant SNPs by association studies of each trait. These common genes were related to blood pressure and arterial stiffness (P = 1.65E-05) and type 2 diabetes (P = 0.00578). Through the estimation of variance of genetic component (heritability) for each chromosome by SNPs, we observed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.479) between genetic contributions of human and pig to obesity traits. Furthermore, we noted that human chromosome 2 (syntenic to pig chromosomes 3 and 15) was most important in explaining the phenotypic variance for obesity. Obesity genetics still awaits further discovery. Navigating syntenic regions suggests obesity candidate genes on chromosome 2 that are previously known to be associated with obesity-related diseases: MRPL33, PARD3B, ERBB4, STK39, and ZNF385B.

  9. BAYESIAN ANALYSIS TO IDENTIFY NEW STAR CANDIDATES IN NEARBY YOUNG STELLAR KINEMATIC GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, Lison; Doyon, Rene; Lafreniere, David; Artigau, Etienne; Gagne, Jonathan; Baron, Frederique; Riedel, Adric E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: artigau@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: baron@astro.umontreal.ca

    2013-01-10

    We present a new method based on a Bayesian analysis to identify new members of nearby young kinematic groups. The analysis minimally takes into account the position, proper motion, magnitude, and color of a star, but other observables can be readily added (e.g., radial velocity, distance). We use this method to find new young low-mass stars in the {beta} Pictoris and AB Doradus moving groups and in the TW Hydrae, Tucana-Horologium, Columba, Carina, and Argus associations. Starting from a sample of 758 mid-K to mid-M (K5V-M5V) stars showing youth indicators such as H{alpha} and X-ray emission, our analysis yields 214 new highly probable low-mass members of the kinematic groups analyzed. One is in TW Hydrae, 37 in {beta} Pictoris, 17 in Tucana-Horologium, 20 in Columba, 6 in Carina, 50 in Argus, 32 in AB Doradus, and the remaining 51 candidates are likely young but have an ambiguous membership to more than one association. The false alarm rate for new candidates is estimated to be 5% for {beta} Pictoris and TW Hydrae, 10% for Tucana-Horologium, Columba, Carina, and Argus, and 14% for AB Doradus. Our analysis confirms the membership of 58 stars proposed in the literature. Firm membership confirmation of our new candidates will require measurement of their radial velocity (predicted by our analysis), parallax, and lithium 6708 A equivalent width. We have initiated these follow-up observations for a number of candidates, and we have identified two stars (2MASSJ01112542+1526214, 2MASSJ05241914-1601153) as very strong candidate members of the {beta} Pictoris moving group and one strong candidate member (2MASSJ05332558-5117131) of the Tucana-Horologium association; these three stars have radial velocity measurements confirming their membership and lithium detections consistent with young age.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Integrated genetic analysis microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagally, Eric T.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2004-12-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the ongoing DNA sequencing of the genomes of other animals, bacteria, plants and others, a wealth of new information about the genetic composition of organisms has become available. However, as the demand for sequence information grows, so does the workload required both to generate this sequence and to use it for targeted genetic analysis. Microfabricated genetic analysis systems are well poised to assist in the collection and use of these data through increased analysis speed, lower analysis cost and higher parallelism leading to increased assay throughput. In addition, such integrated microsystems may point the way to targeted genetic experiments on single cells and in other areas that are otherwise very difficult. Concomitant with these advantages, such systems, when fully integrated, should be capable of forming portable systems for high-speed in situ analyses, enabling a new standard in disciplines such as clinical chemistry, forensics, biowarfare detection and epidemiology. This review will discuss the various technologies available for genetic analysis on the microscale, and efforts to integrate them to form fully functional robust analysis devices.

  11. Analysis of Genetically Complex Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Ottman, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade, great progress has been made in the discovery of genes that influence risk for epilepsy. However, these gene discoveries have been in epilepsies with Mendelian modes of inheritance, which comprise only a tiny fraction of all epilepsy. Most people with epilepsy have no affected relatives, suggesting that the great majority of all epilepsies are genetically complex: multiple genes contribute to their etiology, none of which has a major effect on disease risk. Gene discovery in the genetically complex epilepsies is a formidable task. It is unclear which epilepsy phenotypes are most advantageous to study, and chromosomal localization and mutation detection are much more difficult than in Mendelian epilepsies. Association studies are very promising for the identification of complex epilepsy genes, but we are still in the earliest stages of their application in the epilepsies. Future studies should employ very large sample sizes to ensure adequate statistical power, clinical phenotyping methods of the highest quality, designs and analytic techniques that control for population stratification, and state-of-the-art molecular methods. Collaborative studies are essential to achieve these goals. PMID:16359464

  12. A strategy analysis for genetic association studies with known inbreeding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    disease, and also to the common asthma where we have identified candidate genes that underlie to the susceptibility of the asthma. Some of such candidate genes have been also found related to common asthma in the current literature. Conclusions The data analysis approach, based on selecting the most related cases and controls along with the Random Forest model, is a powerful tool for detecting genetic variants associated to a disease in isolated populations. Moreover, this method provides also a prediction model that has accuracy in estimating the unknown disease status and that can be generally used to build kit tests for a wide class of Mendelian diseases. PMID:21767363

  13. Association Analysis of 94 Candidate Genes and Schizophrenia-Related Endophenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Neal R.; Radant, Allen D.; Braff, David L.

    2012-01-01

    While it is clear that schizophrenia is highly heritable, the genetic basis of this heritability is complex. Human genetic, brain imaging, and model organism studies have met with only modest gains. A complementary research tactic is to evaluate the genetic substrates of quantitative endophenotypes with demonstrated deficits in schizophrenia patients. We used an Illumina custom 1,536-SNP array to interrogate 94 functionally relevant candidate genes for schizophrenia and evaluate association with both the qualitative diagnosis of schizophrenia and quantitative endophenotypes for schizophrenia. Subjects included 219 schizophrenia patients and normal comparison subjects of European ancestry and 76 schizophrenia patients and normal comparison subjects of African ancestry, all ascertained by the UCSD Schizophrenia Research Program. Six neurophysiological and neurocognitive endophenotype test paradigms were assessed: prepulse inhibition (PPI), P50 suppression, the antisaccade oculomotor task, the Letter-Number Span Test, the California Verbal Learning Test-II, and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test-64 Card Version. These endophenotype test paradigms yielded six primary endophenotypes with prior evidence of heritability and demonstrated schizophrenia-related impairments, as well as eight secondary measures investigated as candidate endophenotypes. Schizophrenia patients showed significant deficits on ten of the endophenotypic measures, replicating prior studies and facilitating genetic analyses of these phenotypes. A total of 38 genes were found to be associated with at least one endophenotypic measure or schizophrenia with an empirical p-value<0.01. Many of these genes have been shown to interact on a molecular level, and eleven genes displayed evidence for pleiotropy, revealing associations with three or more endophenotypic measures. Among these genes were ERBB4 and NRG1, providing further support for a role of these genes in schizophrenia susceptibility. The observation

  14. Association analysis of 94 candidate genes and schizophrenia-related endophenotypes.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Tiffany A; Light, Gregory A; Swerdlow, Neal R; Radant, Allen D; Braff, David L

    2012-01-01

    While it is clear that schizophrenia is highly heritable, the genetic basis of this heritability is complex. Human genetic, brain imaging, and model organism studies have met with only modest gains. A complementary research tactic is to evaluate the genetic substrates of quantitative endophenotypes with demonstrated deficits in schizophrenia patients. We used an Illumina custom 1,536-SNP array to interrogate 94 functionally relevant candidate genes for schizophrenia and evaluate association with both the qualitative diagnosis of schizophrenia and quantitative endophenotypes for schizophrenia. Subjects included 219 schizophrenia patients and normal comparison subjects of European ancestry and 76 schizophrenia patients and normal comparison subjects of African ancestry, all ascertained by the UCSD Schizophrenia Research Program. Six neurophysiological and neurocognitive endophenotype test paradigms were assessed: prepulse inhibition (PPI), P50 suppression, the antisaccade oculomotor task, the Letter-Number Span Test, the California Verbal Learning Test-II, and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test-64 Card Version. These endophenotype test paradigms yielded six primary endophenotypes with prior evidence of heritability and demonstrated schizophrenia-related impairments, as well as eight secondary measures investigated as candidate endophenotypes. Schizophrenia patients showed significant deficits on ten of the endophenotypic measures, replicating prior studies and facilitating genetic analyses of these phenotypes. A total of 38 genes were found to be associated with at least one endophenotypic measure or schizophrenia with an empirical p-value<0.01. Many of these genes have been shown to interact on a molecular level, and eleven genes displayed evidence for pleiotropy, revealing associations with three or more endophenotypic measures. Among these genes were ERBB4 and NRG1, providing further support for a role of these genes in schizophrenia susceptibility. The observation

  15. Analysis of complex repeat sequences within the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) candidate region in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, K.E.; Morrison, K.E.; Daniels, R.I.

    1994-09-01

    We previously reported that the 400 kb interval flanked the polymorphic loci D5S435 and D5S557 contains blocks of a chromosome 5 specific repeat. This interval also defines the SMA candidate region by genetic analysis of recombinant families. A YAC contig of 2-3 Mb encompassing this area has been constructed and a 5.5 kb conserved fragment, isolated from a YAC end clone within the above interval, was used to obtain cDNAs from both fetal and adult brain libraries. We describe the identification of cDNAs with stretches of high DNA sequence homology to exons of {beta} glucuronidase on human chromosome 7. The cDNAs map both to the candidate region and to an area of 5p using FISH and deletion hybrid analysis. Hybridization to bacteriophage and cosmid clones from the YACs localizes the {beta} glucuronidase related sequences within the 400 kb region of the YAC contig. The cDNAs show a polymorphic pattern on hybridization to genomic BamH1 fragments in the size range of 10-250 kb. Further analysis using YAC fragmentation vectors is being used to determine how these {beta} glucuronidase related cDNAs are distributed within 5q13. Dinucleotide repeats within the region are being investigated to determine linkage disequilibrium with the disease locus.

  16. Genome-wide association and genetic functional studies identify autism susceptibility candidate 2 gene (AUTS2) in the regulation of alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Gunter; Coin, Lachlan J.; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Charoen, Pimphen; Berger, Karen H.; Stacey, David; Desrivières, Sylvane; Aliev, Fazil A.; Khan, Anokhi A.; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Bakalkin, Georgy; Bakker, Stephan J.; Balkau, Beverley; Beulens, Joline W.; Bilbao, Ainhoa; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Beury, Delphine; Bots, Michiel L.; Breetvelt, Elemi J.; Cauchi, Stéphane; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chambers, John C.; Clarke, Toni-Kim; Dahmen, Norbert; de Geus, Eco J.; Dick, Danielle; Ducci, Francesca; Easton, Alanna; Edenberg, Howard J.; Esko, Tõnu; Fernández-Medarde, Alberto; Foroud, Tatiana; Freimer, Nelson B.; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Guarrera, Simonetta; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heath, Andrew C.; Hesselbrock, Victor; Hofman, Albert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Isohanni, Matti K.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kuehnel, Brigitte; Laitinen, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Luan, Jian'an; Mangino, Massimo; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Matullo, Giuseppe; McCarthy, Mark I.; Mueller, Christian; Navis, Gerjan; Numans, Mattijs E.; Núñez, Alejandro; Nyholt, Dale R.; Onland-Moret, Charlotte N.; Oostra, Ben A.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Palkovits, Miklos; Penninx, Brenda W.; Polidoro, Silvia; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Ricceri, Fulvio; Santos, Eugenio; Smit, Johannes H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Song, Kijoung; Sovio, Ulla; Stumvoll, Michael; Surakk, Ida; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Troakes, Claire; Tyrfingsson, Thorarinn; Tönjes, Anke; Uiterwaal, Cuno S.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Staehlin, Oliver; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Whitfield, John B.; Wichmann, Erich H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Yuan, Xin; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing H.; Zhang, Weihua; Martin, Nicholas G.; Metspalu, Andres; Doering, Angela; Scott, James; Spector, Tim D.; Loos, Ruth J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Mooser, Vincent; Peltonen, Leena; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vineis, Paolo; Sommer, Wolfgang H.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Spanagel, Rainer; Heberlein, Ulrike A.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a moderately heritable trait, but the genetic basis in humans is largely unknown, despite its clinical and societal importance. We report a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of ∼2.5 million directly genotyped or imputed SNPs with alcohol consumption (gram per day per kilogram body weight) among 12 population-based samples of European ancestry, comprising 26,316 individuals, with replication genotyping in an additional 21,185 individuals. SNP rs6943555 in autism susceptibility candidate 2 gene (AUTS2) was associated with alcohol consumption at genome-wide significance (P = 4 × 10−8 to P = 4 × 10−9). We found a genotype-specific expression of AUTS2 in 96 human prefrontal cortex samples (P = 0.026) and significant (P < 0.017) differences in expression of AUTS2 in whole-brain extracts of mice selected for differences in voluntary alcohol consumption. Down-regulation of an AUTS2 homolog caused reduced alcohol sensitivity in Drosophila (P < 0.001). Our finding of a regulator of alcohol consumption adds knowledge to our understanding of genetic mechanisms influencing alcohol drinking behavior. PMID:21471458

  17. Genetic Analysis of Inherited Leukodystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Bras, Jose; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Taipa, Ricardo; Lashley, Tammaryn; Dupuits, Céline; Gurunlian, Nicole; Mochel, Fanny; Warren, Jason D.; Hannequin, Didier; Sedel, Frédéric; Depienne, Christel; Camuzat, Agnès; Golfier, Véronique; Du Boisguéheneuc, Foucaud; Schottlaender, Lucia; Fox, Nick C.; Beck, Jonathan; Mead, Simon; Rossor, Martin N.; Hardy, John; Revesz, Tamas; Brice, Alexis; Houlden, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Importance The leukodystrophies comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of progressive hereditary neurological disorders mainly affecting the myelin in the central nervous system. Their onset is variable from childhood to adulthood and presentation can be with a variety of clinical features that include mainly for adult-onset cases cognitive decline, seizures, parkinsonism, muscle weakness, neuropathy, spastic paraplegia, personality/behavioral problems, and dystonia. Recently, Rademakers and colleagues identified mutations in the CSF1R gene as the cause of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), offering the possibility for an in-life diagnosis. The detection of mutations in this gene in cases diagnosed with different clinical entities further demonstrated the difficulties in the clinical diagnosis of HDLS. Objective To better understand the genetic role of mutations in this gene, we sequenced a large cohort of adult-onset leukodystrophy cases. Design Whole-exome sequencing and follow up-screening by Sanger sequencing. Setting Collaborative study between the Institute of Neurology, University College London and the Inserm, Paris, France. Participants A total of 114 probands, mostly European patients, with a diagnosis of adult-onset leukodystrophy or atypical cases that could fit within a picture of leukodystrophy. These included 3 extended families within the spectrum of leukodystrophy phenotype. Interventions Whole-exome sequencing in a family and Sanger sequencing of CSF1R. Main Outcomes and Measures Mutations in CSF1R. Results We identified 12 probands with mutations in CSF1R. The clinical diagnoses given to these patients included dementia with spastic paraplegia, corticobasal degeneration syndrome, and stroke disorders. Our study shows that CSF1R mutations are responsible for a significant proportion of clinically and pathologically proven HDLS. Conclusions and Relevance These results give an indication of the frequency

  18. [Primary failure of eruption (PFE). Clinical and molecular genetics analysis].

    PubMed

    Stellzig-Eisenhauer, Angelika; Decker, Eva; Meyer-Marcotty, Philipp; Rau, Christiane; Fiebig, Britta S; Kress, Wolfram; Saar, Kathrin; Rüschendorf, Franz; Hubner, Norbert; Grimm, Tiemo; Witt, Emil; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2013-09-01

    The term "primary failure of eruption" (PFE) refers to the complete or partial failure of a primary non-ankylosed tooth to erupt due to a disturbance of the eruption mechanism. Up to now, the molecular basis for this failure was unknown. Four families were studied in whom at least two members were affected by non-syndromic PFE as part of a clinical and molecular genetics study. Radiological diagnostics (OPTs) were carried out in all patients and their unaffected relatives (control group). The genetic analysis included a genomewide linkage analysis followed by direct DNA sequencing of positional candidate genes. Starting from the index patients, we were able to reconstruct pedigrees over two and/or three generations in the families that indicated an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance of non-syndromic PFE. Fifteen patients were diagnosed with PFE. Gender distribution was nearly equal (7 female, 8 male). Molecular genetic analysis of the PTHR1 gene revealed three distinct heterozygous mutations (c.1050-3C>G; c.543 + 1G>A; c.463G>T). Unaffected persons exhibited no mutations. Knowledge of the genetic causes of non-syndromic PFE can now be used for the differential diagnosis of eruption failure. It permits affected family members to be identified early and may lead to new treatment possibilities in the long term. The genetically-verified diagnosis of "primary failure of eruption" can protect patients and orthodontists from years of futile treatment, because orthodontic treatment alone does not lead to success. Moreover, it has a negative influence on unaffected teeth and areas of the jaw. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2013.

  19. "Contrasting patterns of selection at Pinus pinaster Ait. Drought stress candidate genes as revealed by genetic differentiation analyses".

    PubMed

    Eveno, Emmanuelle; Collada, Carmen; Guevara, M Angeles; Léger, Valérie; Soto, Alvaro; Díaz, Luis; Léger, Patrick; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Cervera, M Teresa; Plomion, Christophe; Garnier-Géré, Pauline H

    2008-02-01

    The importance of natural selection for shaping adaptive trait differentiation among natural populations of allogamous tree species has long been recognized. Determining the molecular basis of local adaptation remains largely unresolved, and the respective roles of selection and demography in shaping population structure are actively debated. Using a multilocus scan that aims to detect outliers from simulated neutral expectations, we analyzed patterns of nucleotide diversity and genetic differentiation at 11 polymorphic candidate genes for drought stress tolerance in phenotypically contrasted Pinus pinaster Ait. populations across its geographical range. We compared 3 coalescent-based methods: 2 frequentist-like, including 1 approach specifically developed for biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) here and 1 Bayesian. Five genes showed outlier patterns that were robust across methods at the haplotype level for 2 of them. Two genes presented higher F(ST) values than expected (PR-AGP4 and erd3), suggesting that they could have been affected by the action of diversifying selection among populations. In contrast, 3 genes presented lower F(ST) values than expected (dhn-1, dhn2, and lp3-1), which could represent signatures of homogenizing selection among populations. A smaller proportion of outliers were detected at the SNP level suggesting the potential functional significance of particular combinations of sites in drought-response candidate genes. The Bayesian method appeared robust to low sample sizes, flexible to assumptions regarding migration rates, and powerful for detecting selection at the haplotype level, but the frequentist-like method adapted to SNPs was more efficient for the identification of outlier SNPs showing low differentiation. Population-specific effects estimated in the Bayesian method also revealed populations with lower immigration rates, which could have led to favorable situations for local adaptation. Outlier patterns are discussed

  20. A Stratified Transcriptomics Analysis of Polygenic Fat and Lean Mouse Adipose Tissues Identifies Novel Candidate Obesity Genes

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Nicholas M.; Nelson, Yvonne B.; Michailidou, Zoi; Di Rollo, Emma M.; Ramage, Lynne; Hadoke, Patrick W. F.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Bunger, Lutz; Horvat, Simon; Kenyon, Christopher J.; Dunbar, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity and metabolic syndrome results from a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. In addition to brain-regulated processes, recent genome wide association studies have indicated that genes highly expressed in adipose tissue affect the distribution and function of fat and thus contribute to obesity. Using a stratified transcriptome gene enrichment approach we attempted to identify adipose tissue-specific obesity genes in the unique polygenic Fat (F) mouse strain generated by selective breeding over 60 generations for divergent adiposity from a comparator Lean (L) strain. Results To enrich for adipose tissue obesity genes a ‘snap-shot’ pooled-sample transcriptome comparison of key fat depots and non adipose tissues (muscle, liver, kidney) was performed. Known obesity quantitative trait loci (QTL) information for the model allowed us to further filter genes for increased likelihood of being causal or secondary for obesity. This successfully identified several genes previously linked to obesity (C1qr1, and Np3r) as positional QTL candidate genes elevated specifically in F line adipose tissue. A number of novel obesity candidate genes were also identified (Thbs1, Ppp1r3d, Tmepai, Trp53inp2, Ttc7b, Tuba1a, Fgf13, Fmr) that have inferred roles in fat cell function. Quantitative microarray analysis was then applied to the most phenotypically divergent adipose depot after exaggerating F and L strain differences with chronic high fat feeding which revealed a distinct gene expression profile of line, fat depot and diet-responsive inflammatory, angiogenic and metabolic pathways. Selected candidate genes Npr3 and Thbs1, as well as Gys2, a non-QTL gene that otherwise passed our enrichment criteria were characterised, revealing novel functional effects consistent with a contribution to obesity. Conclusions A focussed candidate gene enrichment strategy in the unique F and L model has identified novel adipose tissue-enriched genes

  1. Population transcriptomic characterization of the genetic and expression variation of a candidate progenitor of Miscanthus energy crops.

    PubMed

    Yan, Juan; Song, Zhihong; Xu, Qin; Kang, Lifang; Zhu, Caiyun; Xing, Shilai; Liu, Wei; Greimler, Josef; Züst, Tobias; Li, Jianqiang; Sang, Tao

    2017-08-22

    The use of transcriptome data in the study of the population genetics of a species can capture faint signals of both genetic variation and expression variation and can provide a broad picture of a species' genomic response to environmental conditions. In this study, we characterized the genetic and expression diversity of Miscanthus lutarioriparius by comparing more than 16,225 transcripts obtained from 78 individuals, belonging to 10 populations distributed across the species' entire geographic range. We only observed a low level of nucleotide diversity (π = 0.000434) among the transcriptome data of these populations, which is consistent with highly conserved sequences of functional elements and protein-coding genes captured with this method. Tests of population divergence using the transcriptome data were consistent with previous microsatellite data but proved to be more sensitive, particularly if gene expression variation was considered as well. For example, the analysis of expression data showed that genes involved in photosynthetic processes and responses to temperature or reactive oxygen species stimuli were significantly enriched in certain populations. This differential gene expression was primarily observed among populations and not within populations. Interestingly, nucleotide diversity was significantly negatively correlated with expression diversity within populations, while this correlation was positive among populations. This suggests that genetic and expression variation play separate roles in adaptation and population persistence. Combining analyses of genetic and gene expression variation represents a promising approach for studying the population genetics of wild species and may uncover both adaptive and nonadaptive processes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. High-resolution genetic mapping in the diversity outbred mouse population identifies Apobec1 as a candidate gene for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Tangi L; Gatti, Daniel M; Quizon, Pamela; Weinstock, George M; Jung, Kuo-Chen; Zhao, Liyang; Hua, Kunjie; Pomp, Daniel; Bennett, Brian J

    2014-10-23

    Inbred mice exhibit strain-specific variation in susceptibility to atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia that renders them useful in dissecting the genetic architecture of these complex diseases. Traditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping studies using inbred strains often identify large genomic regions, containing many genes, due to limited recombination and/or sample size. This hampers candidate gene identification and translation of these results into possible risk factors and therapeutic targets. An alternative approach is the use of multiparental outbred lines for genetic mapping, such as the Diversity Outbred (DO) mouse panel, which can be more informative than traditional two-parent crosses and can aid in the identification of causal genes and variants associated with QTL. We fed 292 female DO mice either a high-fat, cholesterol-containing (HFCA) diet, to induce atherosclerosis, or a low-fat, high-protein diet for 18 wk and measured plasma lipid levels before and after diet treatment. We measured markers of atherosclerosis in the mice fed the HFCA diet. The mice were genotyped on a medium-density single-nucleotide polymorphism array and founder haplotypes were reconstructed using a hidden Markov model. The reconstructed haplotypes were then used to perform linkage mapping of atherosclerotic lesion size as well as plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and glucose. Among our highly significant QTL we detected a ~100 kb QTL interval for atherosclerosis on Chromosome 6, as well as a 1.4 Mb QTL interval on Chromosome 9 for triglyceride levels at baseline and a coincident 22.2 Mb QTL interval on Chromosome 9 for total cholesterol after dietary treatment. One candidate gene within the Chromosome 6 peak region associated with atherosclerosis is Apobec1, the apolipoprotein B (ApoB) mRNA-editing enzyme, which plays a role in the regulation of ApoB, a critical component of low-density lipoprotein, by editing ApoB mRNA. This study demonstrates the value

  3. Monte Carlo methods in genetic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shili

    1996-12-31

    Many genetic analyses require computation of probabilities and likelihoods of pedigree data. With more and more genetic marker data deriving from new DNA technologies becoming available to researchers, exact computations are often formidable with standard statistical methods and computational algorithms. The desire to utilize as much available data as possible, coupled with complexities of realistic genetic models, push traditional approaches to their limits. These methods encounter severe methodological and computational challenges, even with the aid of advanced computing technology. Monte Carlo methods are therefore increasingly being explored as practical techniques for estimating these probabilities and likelihoods. This paper reviews the basic elements of the Markov chain Monte Carlo method and the method of sequential imputation, with an emphasis upon their applicability to genetic analysis. Three areas of applications are presented to demonstrate the versatility of Markov chain Monte Carlo for different types of genetic problems. A multilocus linkage analysis example is also presented to illustrate the sequential imputation method. Finally, important statistical issues of Markov chain Monte Carlo and sequential imputation, some of which are unique to genetic data, are discussed, and current solutions are outlined. 72 refs.

  4. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Chlamydia Species.

    PubMed

    Sixt, Barbara S; Valdivia, Raphael H

    2016-09-08

    Species of Chlamydia are the etiologic agent of endemic blinding trachoma, the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases, significant respiratory pathogens, and a zoonotic threat. Their dependence on an intracellular growth niche and their peculiar developmental cycle are major challenges to elucidating their biology and virulence traits. The last decade has seen tremendous advances in our ability to perform a molecular genetic analysis of Chlamydia species. Major achievements include the generation of large collections of mutant strains, now available for forward- and reverse-genetic applications, and the introduction of a system for plasmid-based transformation enabling complementation of mutations; expression of foreign, modified, or reporter genes; and even targeted gene disruptions. This review summarizes the current status of the molecular genetic toolbox for Chlamydia species and highlights new insights into their biology and new challenges in the nascent field of Chlamydia genetics.

  5. Genetic heterogeneity and HOMOG analysis in British malignant hyperthermia families.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, R; Curran, J L; Hall, W J; Halsall, P J; Hopkins, P M; Markham, A F; Stewart, A D; West, S P; Ellis, F R

    1998-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is an autosomal dominant genetic condition that presents in susceptible people undergoing general anaesthesia. The clinical disorder is a major cause of anaesthetic morbidity and mortality. The UK Malignant Hyperthermia Group has performed genetic linkage analysis on 20 large, well defined malignant hyperthermia families, using hypervariable markers on chromosome 19q13.1, including the candidate MH gene RYR1, the gene coding for the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor protein. The results were analysed using LINKAGE to perform two point and multipoint lod scores, then HOMOG to calculate levels of heterogeneity. The results clearly showed genetic heterogeneity between MH families; nine of the families gave results entirely consistent with linkage to the region around RYR1 while the same region was clearly excluded in three families. In the remaining eight MHS families there were single recombinant events between RYR1 and MH susceptibility. HOMOG analysis was of little added benefit in determining the likelihood of linkage to RYR1 in these families. This confirmation of the presence of heterogeneity in the UK MH population, along with the possibility of the presence of two MH genes in some pedigrees, indicates that it would be premature and potentially dangerous to offer diagnosis of MH by DNA based methods at this time. PMID:9541102

  6. Genetic determinants of emotionality and stress response in AcB/BcA recombinant congenic mice and in silico evidence of convergence with cardiovascular candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Thifault, Stéphane; Ondrej, Seda; Sun, Yulin; Fortin, Anny; Skamene, Emil; Lalonde, Robert; Tremblay, Johanne; Hamet, Pavel

    2008-02-01

    Genomic loci bearing stress-related phenotypes were dissected in recombinant congenic strains (RCS) of mice with C57BL/6J (B6) and A/J progenitors. Adult male mice from 14 A/J and 22 B6 background lines were evaluated for emotional reactivity in open-field (OF) and elevated plus-maze tests. Core temperature was monitored by radio telemetry during immobilization and on standard as well as salt-enriched diets. In addition, urinary electrolytes were measured. Genome-wide linkage analysis of the parameters revealed over 20 significant quantitative trait loci (QTL). The highest logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were within the previously-reported OF emotionality locus on Chr 1 (LOD = 4.6), in the dopa decarboxylase region on Chr 11 for the plus-maze (LOD = 4.7), and within a novel region of calmodulin 1 on Chr 12 for Ca++ excretion after a 24-h salt load (LOD = 4.6). RCS stress QTL overlapped with several candidate loci for cardiovascular (CV) disease. In silico evidence of functional polymorphisms by comparative sequence analysis of progenitor strains assisted to ascertain this convergence. The anxious BcA70 strain showed down regulation of Atp1a2 gene expression in the heart (P < 0.001) and brain (P < 0.05) compared with its parental B6 strain, compatible with the enhanced emotionality described in knock out animals for this gene, also involved in the salt-sensitive component of hypertension. Functional polymorphisms in regulatory elements of candidate genes of the CV/inflammatory/immune systems support the hypothesis of genetically-altered environmental susceptibility in CV disease development.

  7. Genetic basis of delay discounting in frequent gamblers: examination of a priori candidates and exploration of a panel of dopamine-related loci

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Joshua C; MacKillop, James

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delay discounting is a behavioral economic index of impulsivity that reflects preferences for small immediate rewards relative to larger delayed rewards. It has been consistently linked to pathological gambling and other forms of addictive behavior, and has been proposed to be a behavioral characteristic that may link genetic variation and risk of developing addictive disorders (i.e., an endophenotype). Studies to date have revealed significant associations with polymorphisms associated with dopamine neurotransmission. The current study examined associations between delay discounting and both previously linked variants and a novel panel of dopamine-related variants in a sample of frequent gamblers. Methods Participants were 175 weekly gamblers of European ancestry who completed the Monetary Choice Questionnaire to assess delay discounting preferences and provided a DNA via saliva. Results In a priori tests, two loci previously associated with delayed reward discounting (rs1800497 and rs4680) were not replicated, however, the long form of DRD4 VNTR was significantly associated with lower discounting of delayed rewards. Exploratory analysis of the dopamine-related panel revealed 11 additional significant associations in genes associated with dopamine synthesis, breakdown, reuptake, and receptor function (DRD3, SLC6A3, DDC, DBH, and SLC18A2). An aggregate genetic risk score from the nominally significant loci accounted for 17% of the variance in discounting. Mediational analyses largely supported the presence of indirect effects between the associated loci, delay discounting, and pathological gambling severity. Conclusions These findings do not replicate previously reported associations but identify several novel candidates and provide preliminary support for a systems biology approach to understand the genetic basis of delay discounting. PMID:25365808

  8. Microfluidics for single-cell genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A M; Paguirigan, A L; Kreutz, J E; Radich, J P; Chiu, D T

    2014-09-07

    The ability to correlate single-cell genetic information to cellular phenotypes will provide the kind of detailed insight into human physiology and disease pathways that is not possible to infer from bulk cell analysis. Microfluidic technologies are attractive for single-cell manipulation due to precise handling and low risk of contamination. Additionally, microfluidic single-cell techniques can allow for high-throughput and detailed genetic analyses that increase accuracy and decrease reagent cost compared to bulk techniques. Incorporating these microfluidic platforms into research and clinical laboratory workflows can fill an unmet need in biology, delivering the highly accurate, highly informative data necessary to develop new therapies and monitor patient outcomes. In this perspective, we describe the current and potential future uses of microfluidics at all stages of single-cell genetic analysis, including cell enrichment and capture, single-cell compartmentalization and manipulation, and detection and analyses.

  9. An integrated system for genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fiddy, Simon; Cattermole, David; Xie, Dong; Duan, Xiao Yuan; Mott, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background Large-scale genetic mapping projects require data management systems that can handle complex phenotypes and detect and correct high-throughput genotyping errors, yet are easy to use. Description We have developed an Integrated Genotyping System (IGS) to meet this need. IGS securely stores, edits and analyses genotype and phenotype data. It stores information about DNA samples, plates, primers, markers and genotypes generated by a genotyping laboratory. Data are structured so that statistical genetic analysis of both case-control and pedigree data is straightforward. Conclusion IGS can model complex phenotypes and contain genotypes from whole genome association studies. The database makes it possible to integrate genetic analysis with data curation. The IGS web site contains further information. PMID:16623936

  10. Quantitative trait locus linkage analysis in a large Amish pedigree identifies novel candidate loci for erythrocyte traits

    PubMed Central

    Hinckley, Jesse D; Abbott, Diana; Burns, Trudy L; Heiman, Meadow; Shapiro, Amy D; Wang, Kai; Di Paola, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    We characterized a large Amish pedigree and, in 384 pedigree members, analyzed the genetic variance components with covariate screen as well as genome-wide quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage analysis of red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin (HB), hematocrit (HCT), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), red cell distribution width (RDW), platelet count (PLT), and white blood cell count (WBC) using SOLAR. Age and gender were found to be significant covariates in many CBC traits. We obtained significant heritability estimates for RBC, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW, PLT, and WBC. We report four candidate loci with Logarithm of the odds (LOD) scores above 2.0: 6q25 (MCH), 9q33 (WBC), 10p12 (RDW), and 20q13 (MCV). We also report eleven candidate loci with LOD scores between 1.5 and <2.0. Bivariate linkage analysis of MCV and MCH on chromosome 20 resulted in a higher maximum LOD score of 3.14. Linkage signals on chromosomes 4q28, 6p22, 6q25, and 20q13 are concomitant with previously reported QTL. All other linkage signals reported herein represent novel evidence of candidate QTL. Interestingly rs1800562, the most common causal variant of hereditary hemochromatosis in HFE (6p22) was associated with MCH and MCHC in this family. Linkage studies like the one presented here will allow investigators to focus the search for rare variants amidst the noise encountered in the large amounts of data generated by whole-genome sequencing. PMID:24058921

  11. Novel Biomarker Candidates for Colorectal Cancer Metastasis: A Meta-analysis of In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Long, Nguyen Phuoc; Lee, Wun Jun; Huy, Nguyen Truong; Lee, Seul Ji; Park, Jeong Hill; Kwon, Sung Won

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common and lethal cancers. Although numerous studies have evaluated potential biomarkers for early diagnosis, current biomarkers have failed to reach an acceptable level of accuracy for distant metastasis. In this paper, we performed a gene set meta-analysis of in vitro microarray studies and combined the results from this study with previously published proteomic data to validate and suggest prognostic candidates for CRC metastasis. Two microarray data sets included found 21 significant genes. Of these significant genes, ALDOA, IL8 (CXCL8), and PARP4 had strong potential as prognostic candidates. LAMB2, MCM7, CXCL23A, SERPINA3, ABCA3, ALDH3A2, and POLR2I also have potential. Other candidates were more controversial, possibly because of the biologic heterogeneity of tumor cells, which is a major obstacle to predicting metastasis. In conclusion, we demonstrated a meta-analysis approach and successfully suggested ten biomarker candidates for future investigation. PMID:27688707

  12. SNP Discovery and Genetic Variation of Candidate Genes Relevant to Heat Tolerance and Agronomic Traits in Natural Populations of Sand Rice (Agriophyllum squarrosum).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengshan; Zhang, Jiwei; Qian, Chaoju; Zhou, Qin; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Guoxiong; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2017-01-01

    The extreme stress tolerance and high nutritional value of sand rice (Agriophyllum squarrosum) make it attractive for use as an alternative crop in response to concerns about ongoing climate change and future food security. However, a lack of genetic information hinders understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the morphological and physiological adaptations of sand rice. In the present study, we sequenced and analyzed the transcriptomes of two individuals representing semi-arid [Naiman (NM)] and arid [Shapotou (SPT)] sand rice genotypes. A total of 105,868 pairwise single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed in 24,712 Unigenes were identified among SPT and NM samples; the average SNP frequency was 0.3% (one SNP per 333 base pair). Characterization of gene annotation demonstrated that variations in genes involved in DNA recombination were associated with the survival of the NM population in the semi-arid environment. A set of genes predicted to be relevant to heat stress response and agronomic traits was functionally annotated using the accumulated knowledge from Arabidopsis and several crop plants, including rice, barley, maize, and sorghum. Four candidate genes related to heat tolerance (heat-shock transcription factor, HsfA1d), seed size (DA1-Related, DAR1), and flowering (early flowering 3, ELF3 and late elongated hypocotyl, LHY) were subjected to analysis of the genetic diversity in 10 natural populations, representing the core germplasm resource across the area of sand rice distribution in China. Only one SNP was detected in each of HsfA1d and DAR1, among 60 genotypes, with two in ELF3 and four in LHY. Nucleotide diversity ranged from 0.00032 to 0.00118. Haplotype analysis indicated that the NM population carried a specific allele for all four genes, suggesting that divergence has occurred between NM and other populations. These four genes could be further analyzed to determine whether they are associated with phenotype variation and identify

  13. Computational Analysis of Candidate Disease Genes and Variants for Salt-Sensitive Hypertension in Indigenous Southern Africans

    PubMed Central

    Tiffin, Nicki; Meintjes, Ayton; Ramesar, Rajkumar; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Rayner, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Multiple factors underlie susceptibility to essential hypertension, including a significant genetic and ethnic component, and environmental effects. Blood pressure response of hypertensive individuals to salt is heterogeneous, but salt sensitivity appears more prevalent in people of indigenous African origin. The underlying genetics of salt-sensitive hypertension, however, are poorly understood. In this study, computational methods including text- and data-mining have been used to select and prioritize candidate aetiological genes for salt-sensitive hypertension. Additionally, we have compared allele frequencies and copy number variation for single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes between indigenous Southern African and Caucasian populations, with the aim of identifying candidate genes with significant variability between the population groups: identifying genetic variability between population groups can exploit ethnic differences in disease prevalence to aid with prioritisation of good candidate genes. Our top-ranking candidate genes include parathyroid hormone precursor (PTH) and type-1angiotensin II receptor (AGTR1). We propose that the candidate genes identified in this study warrant further investigation as potential aetiological genes for salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:20886000

  14. A brief history of genetic variation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Afshin; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2002-05-01

    As the human genome sequence is determined, there is an emerging need for the analysis of human sequence variations as genetic markers in diagnosis, linkage and association studies, cancer research, and pharmacogenomics. There are several different techniques and approaches for detecting these genetic variations, and here we review some of these techniques and their application fields. However, all the techniques have advantages and disadvantages, andfactors such as laboratory instrumentation, personnel experience, required accuracy, required throughput, and cost often have to be taken into account before selecting a method.

  15. Landscape genomic analysis of candidate genes for climate adaptation in a California endemic oak, Quercus lobata.

    PubMed

    Sork, Victoria L; Squire, Kevin; Gugger, Paul F; Steele, Stephanie E; Levy, Eric D; Eckert, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The ability of California tree populations to survive anthropogenic climate change will be shaped by the geographic structure of adaptive genetic variation. Our goal is to test whether climate-associated candidate genes show evidence of spatially divergent selection in natural populations of valley oak, Quercus lobata, as preliminary indication of local adaptation. Using DNA from 45 individuals from 13 localities across the species' range, we sequenced portions of 40 candidate genes related to budburst/flowering, growth, osmotic stress, and temperature stress. Using 195 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we estimated genetic differentiation across populations and correlated allele frequencies with climate gradients using single-locus and multivariate models. The top 5% of FST estimates ranged from 0.25 to 0.68, yielding loci potentially under spatially divergent selection. Environmental analyses of SNP frequencies with climate gradients revealed three significantly correlated SNPs within budburst/flowering genes and two SNPs within temperature stress genes with mean annual precipitation, after controlling for multiple testing. A redundancy model showed a significant association between SNPs and climate variables and revealed a similar set of SNPs with high loadings on the first axis. In the RDA, climate accounted for 67% of the explained variation, when holding climate constant, in contrast to a putatively neutral SSR data set where climate accounted for only 33%. Population differentiation and geographic gradients of allele frequencies in climate-associated functional genes in Q. lobata provide initial evidence of adaptive genetic variation and background for predicting population response to climate change. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  16. Overview of genetic analysis of human opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Spampinato, Santi M

    2015-01-01

    The human μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), due to its genetic and structural variation, has been a target of interest in several pharmacogenetic studies. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR), encoded by OPRM1, contributes to regulate the analgesic response to pain and also controls the rewarding effects of many drugs of abuse, including opioids, nicotine, and alcohol. Genetic polymorphisms of opioid receptors are candidates for the variability of clinical opioid effects. The non-synonymous polymorphism A118G of the OPRM1 has been repeatedly associated with the efficacy of opioid treatments for pain and various types of dependence. Genetic analysis of human opioid receptors has evidenced the presence of numerous polymorphisms either in exonic or in intronic sequences as well as the presence of synonymous coding variants that may have important effects on transcription, mRNA stability, and splicing, thus affecting gene function despite not directly disrupting any specific residue. Genotyping of opioid receptors is still in its infancy and a relevant progress in this field can be achieved by using advanced gene sequencing techniques described in this review that allow the researchers to obtain vast quantities of data on human genomes and transcriptomes in a brief period of time and with affordable costs.

  17. Bayesian Analysis to Identify New Star Candidates in Nearby Young Stellar Kinematic Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malo, Lison; Doyon, René; Lafrenière, David; Artigau, Étienne; Gagné, Jonathan; Baron, Frédérique; Riedel, Adric

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method based on a Bayesian analysis to identify new members of nearby young kinematic groups. The analysis minimally takes into account the position, proper motion, magnitude, and color of a star, but other observables can be readily added (e.g., radial velocity, distance). We use this method to find new young low-mass stars in the β Pictoris and AB Doradus moving groups and in the TW Hydrae, Tucana-Horologium, Columba, Carina, and Argus associations. Starting from a sample of 758 mid-K to mid-M (K5V-M5V) stars showing youth indicators such as Hα and X-ray emission, our analysis yields 214 new highly probable low-mass members of the kinematic groups analyzed. One is in TW Hydrae, 37 in β Pictoris, 17 in Tucana-Horologium, 20 in Columba, 6 in Carina, 50 in Argus, 32 in AB Doradus, and the remaining 51 candidates are likely young but have an ambiguous membership to more than one association. The false alarm rate for new candidates is estimated to be 5% for β Pictoris and TW Hydrae, 10% for Tucana-Horologium, Columba, Carina, and Argus, and 14% for AB Doradus. Our analysis confirms the membership of 58 stars proposed in the literature. Firm membership confirmation of our new candidates will require measurement of their radial velocity (predicted by our analysis), parallax, and lithium 6708 Å equivalent width. We have initiated these follow-up observations for a number of candidates, and we have identified two stars (2MASSJ01112542+1526214, 2MASSJ05241914-1601153) as very strong candidate members of the β Pictoris moving group and one strong candidate member (2MASSJ05332558-5117131) of the Tucana-Horologium association; these three stars have radial velocity measurements confirming their membership and lithium detections consistent with young age. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre

  18. Role of salivary and candidal proteins in denture stomatitis: an exploratory proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Warren C; Schwartz-Baxter, Sarah; Carlson, Jim; Barros, Silvana; Offenbacher, Steven; Bencharit, Sompop

    2014-07-29

    Denture stomatitis, inflammation and redness beneath a denture, affects nearly half of all denture wearers. Candidal organisms, the presence of a denture, saliva, and host immunity are the key etiological factors for the condition. The role of salivary proteins in denture stomatitis is not clear. In this study 30 edentulous subjects wearing a maxillary complete denture were recruited. Unstimulated whole saliva from each subject was collected and pooled into two groups (n = 15 each), healthy and stomatitis (Newton classification II and III). Label-free multidimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) proteomics on two mass spectrometry platforms were used to determine peptide mass differences between control and stomatitis groups. Cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to determine the differential expression among the groups. The two proteomic platforms identified 97 and 176 proteins (ANOVA; p < 0.01) differentially expressed among the healthy, type 2 and 3 stomatitis groups. Three proteins including carbonic anhydrase 6, cystatin C, and cystatin SN were found to be the same as previous study. Salivary proteomic profiles of patients with denture stomatitis were found to be uniquely different from controls. Analysis of protein components suggests that certain salivary proteins may predispose some patients to denture stomatitis while others are believed to be involved in the reaction to fungal infection. Analysis of candidal proteins suggests that multiple species of candidal organisms play a role in denture stomatitis.

  19. The IL-6 -634C/G polymorphism: a candidate genetic marker for the prediction of idiopathic recurrent pregnancy loss

    PubMed Central

    Rasti, Zarnegar; Nasiri, Mahboobeh; Kohan, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) is defined as two or more miscarriages before the 20th week of gestation and its etiology is unknown in 50% of the cases. Interleukin 6 is an immune mediator, plays a regulatory role in embryo implantation and placental development. Objective: The purpose was to assess the association between IL-6 -634C/G polymorphism and, susceptibility to idiopathic RPL for the first time in Iran. Materials and Methods: In total 121 women with RPL and 121 healthy women as control group were enrolled in this case-control study. This study was performed from August 2013 to October 2014 in the Molecular Genetics Laboratory of Arsanjan University. Candidate polymorphism was evaluated by PCR-RFLP method on extracted genomic DNA. Data was analyzed using the statistical SPSS package. Results: Our results showed an increased risk of RPL in patients with GG + GC genotype (OR=5.1, 95%CI: 1.04-25.3, p=0.04) in comparison to CC genotype. The frequency of mutant allele G in patients and controls was 0.75 and 0.66 respectively. The mutant allele G predisposes women to miscarriage 1.5 times greater than controls (OR=1.5, 95%CI: 1.03-2.27, p=0.036). The mean number of live births in RPL women (1.3±2.3) was significantly lower compared to control women (4.8±2.3). Conclusion: This study indicated that the promoter polymorphism (-634C/G) of the IL-6 gene has likely influence on individual susceptibility to RPL. PMID:27200424

  20. Genetic Mapping in Mice Identifies DMBT1 as a Candidate Modifier of Mammary Tumors and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Anneke C.; Hill, Linda Z.; Roberts, Amy L.; Wang, Jun; Aud, Dee; Jung, Jimmy; Nikolcheva, Tania; Allard, John; Peltz, Gary; Otis, Christopher N.; Cao, Qing J.; Ricketts, Reva St. J.; Naber, Stephen P.; Mollenhauer, Jan; Poustka, Annemarie; Malamud, Daniel; Jerry, D. Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility alleles seem to play a significant role in breast cancer risk but are difficult to identify in human cohorts. A genetic screen of 176 N2 backcross progeny of two Trp53+/− strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, which differ in their susceptibility to mammary tumors, identified a modifier of mammary tumor susceptibility in an ∼25-Mb interval on mouse chromosome 7 (designated SuprMam1). Relative to heterozygotes, homozygosity for BALB/c alleles of SuprMam1 significantly decreased mammary tumor latency from 70.7 to 61.1 weeks and increased risk twofold (P = 0.002). Dmbt1 (deleted in malignant brain tumors 1) was identified as a candidate modifier gene within the SuprMam1 interval because it was differentially expressed in mammary tissues from BALB/c-Trp53+/− and C57BL/6-Trp53+/− mice. Dmbt1 mRNA and protein was reduced in mammary glands of the susceptible BALB/c mice. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that DMBT1 protein expression was also significantly reduced in normal breast tissue from women with breast cancer (staining score, 1.8; n = 46) compared with cancer-free controls (staining score, 3.9; n = 53; P < 0.0001). These experiments demonstrate the use of Trp53+/− mice as a sensitized background to screen for low-penetrance modifiers of cancer. The results identify a novel mammary tumor susceptibility locus in mice and support a role for DMBT1 in suppression of mammary tumors in both mice and women. PMID:17525270

  1. Physical mapping of the major early-onset familial Alzheimer`s disease locus on chromosome 14 and analysis of candidate gene sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzi, R.E.; Romano, D.M.; Crowley, A.C.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic studies of kindreds displaying evidence for familial AD (FAD) have led to the localization of gene defects responsible for this disorder on chromosomes 14, 19, and 21. A minor early-onset FAD gene on chromosome 21 has been identified to enode the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and the late-onset FAD susceptibility locus on chromosome 19 has been shown to be in linkage disequilibrium with the E4 allele of the APOE gene. Meanwhile, the locus responsible for the major form of early-onset FAD on chromosome 14q24 has not yet been identified. By recombinational analysis, we have refined the minimal candidate region containing the gene defect to approximately 3 megabases in 14q24. We will describe our laboratory`s progress on attempts to finely localize this locus, as well as test known candidate genes from this region for either inclusion in the minimal candidate region or the presence of pathogenic mutations. Candidate genes that have been tested so far include cFOS, heat shock protein 70 member (HSF2A), transforming growth factor beta (TGFB3), the trifunctional protein C1-THF synthase (MTHFD), bradykinin receptor (BR), and the E2k component of a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. HSP2A, E2k, MTHFD, and BR do not map to the current defined minimal candidate region; however, sequence analysis must be performed to confirm exclusion of these genes as true candidates. Meanwhile, no pathogenic mutations have yet been found in cFOS or TGFB3. We have also isolated a large number of novel transcribed sequences from the minimal candidate region in the form of {open_quotes}trapped exons{close_quotes} from cosmids identified by hybridization to select YAC clones; we are currently in the process of searching for pathogenic mutations in these exons in affected individuals from FAD families.

  2. Genetic Predictors of Susceptibility to Cutaneous Fungal Infections: a pilot Genome Wide Association Study to Refine a Candidate Gene Search

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan M.; Preuett, Barry L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Trichophyton tonsurans is the foremost fungal pathogen of minority children in the U.S. Despite overwhelming infection rates, it does not appear that this fungus infects children in a non-specific manner. Objective This study was designed to identify genes that may predispose or protect a child from T. tonsurans infection. Methods Children participating in an earlier longitudinal study wherein infection rates could be reliably determined were eligible for inclusion. DNA from a subset (n=40) of these children at the population extremes underwent whole genome genotyping (WGG). Allele frequencies between cases and controls were examined and significant SNPs were used to develop a candidate gene list for which the remainder of the cohort (n=115) were genotyped. Cumulative infection rate was examined by genotype and the ability of selected genotypes to predict the likelihood of infection explored by multivariable analysis. Results 23 genes with a putative mechanistic role in cutaneous infection were selected for evaluation. Of these, 21 demonstrated significant differences in infection rate between genotypes. A risk index assigned to genotypes in the 21 genes accounted for over 60% of the variability observed in infection rate (adjusted r2=0.665, p<0.001). Among these, 8 appeared to account for the majority of variability that was observed (r2=0.603, p<0.001). These included genes involved in: leukocyte activation and migration, extracellular matrix integrity and remodeling, epidermal maintenance and wound repair, and cutaneous permeability. Conclusions Applying WGG to individuals at the extremes of phenotype can help to guide the selection of candidate genes in populations of small cohorts where disease etiology is likely polygenic in nature. PMID:22704677

  3. Genetic sequence analysis of inherited bleeding diseases

    PubMed Central

    Peyvandi, Flora; Kunicki, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The genes encoding the coagulation factor proteins were among the first human genes to be characterized over 25 years ago. Since then, significant progress has been made in the translational application of this information for the 2 commonest severe inherited bleeding disorders, hemophilia A and B. For these X-linked disorders, genetic characterization of the disease-causing mutations is now incorporated into the standard of care and genetic information is used for risk stratification of treatment complications. With electronic databases detailing >2100 unique mutations for hemophilia A and >1100 mutations for hemophilia B, these diseases are among the most extensively characterized inherited diseases in humans. Experience with the genetics of the rare bleeding disorders is, as expected, less well advanced. However, here again, electronic mutation databases have been developed and provide excellent guidance for the application of genetic analysis as a confirmatory approach to diagnosis. Most recently, progress has also been made in identifying the mutant loci in a variety of inherited platelet disorders, and these findings are beginning to be applied to the genetic diagnosis of these conditions. Investigation of patients with bleeding phenotypes without a diagnosis, using genome-wide strategies, may identify novel genes not previously recognized as playing a role in hemostasis. PMID:24124085

  4. Copy number variation analysis identifies novel CAKUT candidate genes in children with a solitary functioning kidney

    PubMed Central

    Westland, Rik; Verbitsky, Miguel; Vukojevic, Katarina; Perry, Brittany J.; Fasel, David A.; Zwijnenburg, Petra J.G.; Bökenkamp, Arend; Gille, Johan J.P.; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Schreuder, Michiel F.; Gharavi, Ali G.; van Wijk, Joanna A.E.; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations associate with different developmental phenotypes and represent a major cause of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). Because rare pathogenic copy number variations are often large and contain multiple genes, identification of the underlying genetic drivers has proven to be difficult. Here we studied the role of rare copy number variations in 80 patients from the KIMONO-study cohort for which pathogenic mutations in three genes commonly implicated in CAKUT were excluded. In total, 13 known or novel genomic imbalances in 11 of 80 patients were absent or extremely rare in 23,362 population controls. To identify the most likely genetic drivers for the CAKUT phenotype underlying these rare copy number variations, we used a systematic in silico approach based on frequency in a large dataset of controls, annotation with publicly available databases for developmental diseases, tolerance and haploinsufficiency scores, and gene expression profile in the developing kidney and urinary tract. Five novel candidate genes for CAKUT were identified that showed specific expression in the human and mouse developing urinary tract. Among these genes, DLG1 and KIF12 are likely novel susceptibility genes for CAKUT in humans. Thus, there is a significant role of genomic imbalance in the determination of kidney developmental phenotypes. Additionally, we defined a systematic strategy to identify genetic drivers underlying rare copy number variations. PMID:26352300

  5. Copy number variation analysis identifies novel CAKUT candidate genes in children with a solitary functioning kidney.

    PubMed

    Westland, Rik; Verbitsky, Miguel; Vukojevic, Katarina; Perry, Brittany J; Fasel, David A; Zwijnenburg, Petra J G; Bökenkamp, Arend; Gille, Johan J P; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; D'Agati, Vivette D; Schreuder, Michiel F; Gharavi, Ali G; van Wijk, Joanna A E; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone

    2015-12-01

    Copy number variations associate with different developmental phenotypes and represent a major cause of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). Because rare pathogenic copy number variations are often large and contain multiple genes, identification of the underlying genetic drivers has proven to be difficult. Here we studied the role of rare copy number variations in 80 patients from the KIMONO study cohort for which pathogenic mutations in three genes commonly implicated in CAKUT were excluded. In total, 13 known or novel genomic imbalances in 11 of 80 patients were absent or extremely rare in 23,362 population controls. To identify the most likely genetic drivers for the CAKUT phenotype underlying these rare copy number variations, we used a systematic in silico approach based on frequency in a large data set of controls, annotation with publicly available databases for developmental diseases, tolerance and haploinsufficiency scores, and gene expression profile in the developing kidney and urinary tract. Five novel candidate genes for CAKUT were identified that showed specific expression in the human and mouse developing urinary tract. Among these genes, DLG1 and KIF12 are likely novel susceptibility genes for CAKUT in humans. Thus, there is a significant role of genomic imbalance in the determination of kidney developmental phenotypes. Additionally, we defined a systematic strategy to identify genetic drivers underlying rare copy number variations.

  6. Candidate gene association studies and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Houlston, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the contribution of candidate gene association studies to the understanding of genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies (January 1996–July 2009). Studies had to meet the following criteria: be case-control design, be studied by two or more studies, not be focused on HLA antigen genetic markers and be published in English. We identified 47 studies of polymorphic variation in 16 genes and acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. To clarify the impact of individual polymorphisms on risk, pooled analyses were performed. Of the 25 polymorphic variants studied, significant associations (P<0.05) were seen in pooled analyses for eight variants: GSTM1 (OR =1.16; 95%CI: 1.04–1.30), MTRR A66G (OR=0.73, 95%CI:0.59–0.91), SHMT1 C1420T (OR=0.79, 95%CI: 0.65–0.98), RFC1 G80A (OR=1.37, 95%CI: 1.11–1.69), CYP1A1*2A (OR=1.36, 95%CI:1.11–1.66), CYP2E1*5B (OR=1.99, 95%CI:1.32–3.00) NQO1 C609T (OR=1.24, 95%CI:1.02–1.50) and XRCC1 G28152A (OR=1.78, 95%CI:1.32–2.42). These findings should, however, be interpreted with caution as the estimated false-positive report probabilities (FPRP) for each association were not noteworthy (i.e. FPRP>0.2). While candidate gene analyses are complementary to genome-wide association studies, future analyses should be based on sample sizes commensurate with the detection of small effects and attention needs to be paid to study design. PMID:20511665

  7. Classification and analysis of candidate impact crater-hosted closed-basin lakes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudge, Timothy A.; Aureli, Kelsey L.; Head, James W.; Fassett, Caleb I.; Mustard, John F.

    2015-11-01

    We present a new catalog of 205 candidate closed-basin lakes contained within impact craters across the surface of Mars. These basins have an inlet valley that incises the crater rim and flows into the basin but no visible outlet valley, and are considered candidate closed-basin lakes; the presence of a valley flowing into a basin does not necessitate the formation of a standing body of water. The major geomorphic distinction within our catalog of candidate paleolakes is the length of the inlet valley(s), with two major classes - basins with long (>20 km) inlet valleys (30 basins), and basins with short (<20 km) inlet valleys (175 basins). We identify 55 basins that contain sedimentary fan deposits at the mouths of their inlet valleys, of which nine are fed by long inlet valleys and 46 are fed by short inlet valleys. Analysis of the mineralogy of these fan deposits suggests that they are primarily composed of detrital material. Additionally, we find no evidence for widespread evaporite deposit formation within our catalog of candidate closed-basin lakes, which we conclude is indicative of a general transience for any lakes that did form within these basins. Morphometric characteristics for our catalog indicate that as an upper limit, these basins represent a volume of water equivalent to a ∼1.2 m global equivalent layer (GEL) of water spread evenly across the martian surface; this is a small fraction of the modern water ice reservoir on Mars. Our catalog offers a broader context within which results from the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover can be interpreted, as Gale crater is a candidate closed-basin lake contained within our catalog. Gale is also one of 12 closed-basin lakes fed by both long and short inlet valleys, and so in situ analyses by Curiosity can shed light on the relative importance of these two types of inlets for any lacustrine activity within the basin.

  8. Analysis of positional candidate genes in the AAA1 susceptibility locus for abdominal aortic aneurysms on chromosome 19

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disorder with multiple genetic risk factors. Using affected relative pair linkage analysis, we previously identified an AAA susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13. This locus has been designated as the AAA1 susceptibility locus in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. Methods Nine candidate genes were selected from the AAA1 locus based on their function, as well as mRNA expression levels in the aorta. A sample of 394 cases and 419 controls was genotyped for 41 SNPs located in or around the selected nine candidate genes using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. Single marker and haplotype analyses were performed. Three genes (CEBPG, PEPD and CD22) were selected for DNA sequencing based on the association study results, and exonic regions were analyzed. Immunohistochemical staining of aortic tissue sections from AAA and control individuals was carried out for the CD22 and PEPD proteins with specific antibodies. Results Several SNPs were nominally associated with AAA (p < 0.05). The SNPs with most significant p-values were located near the CCAAT enhancer binding protein (CEBPG), peptidase D (PEPD), and CD22. Haplotype analysis found a nominally associated 5-SNP haplotype in the CEBPG/PEPD locus, as well as a nominally associated 2-SNP haplotype in the CD22 locus. DNA sequencing of the coding regions revealed no variation in CEBPG. Seven sequence variants were identified in PEPD, including three not present in the NCBI SNP (dbSNP) database. Sequencing of all 14 exons of CD22 identified 20 sequence variants, five of which were in the coding region and six were in the 3'-untranslated region. Five variants were not present in dbSNP. Immunohistochemical staining for CD22 revealed protein expression in lymphocytes present in the aneurysmal aortic wall only and no detectable expression in control aorta. PEPD protein was expressed in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the media-adventitia border in both

  9. Identification of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and analysis of Linkage Disequilibrium in sunflower elite inbred lines using the candidate gene approach

    PubMed Central

    Fusari, Corina M; Lia, Verónica V; Hopp, H Esteban; Heinz, Ruth A; Paniego, Norma B

    2008-01-01

    Background Association analysis is a powerful tool to identify gene loci that may contribute to phenotypic variation. This includes the estimation of nucleotide diversity, the assessment of linkage disequilibrium structure (LD) and the evaluation of selection processes. Trait mapping by allele association requires a high-density map, which could be obtained by the addition of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and short insertion and/or deletions (indels) to SSR and AFLP genetic maps. Nucleotide diversity analysis of randomly selected candidate regions is a promising approach for the success of association analysis and fine mapping in the sunflower genome. Moreover, knowledge of the distance over which LD persists, in agronomically meaningful sunflower accessions, is important to establish the density of markers and the experimental design for association analysis. Results A set of 28 candidate genes related to biotic and abiotic stresses were studied in 19 sunflower inbred lines. A total of 14,348 bp of sequence alignment was analyzed per individual. In average, 1 SNP was found per 69 nucleotides and 38 indels were identified in the complete data set. The mean nucleotide polymorphism was moderate (θ = 0.0056), as expected for inbred materials. The number of haplotypes per region ranged from 1 to 9 (mean = 3.54 ± 1.88). Model-based population structure analysis allowed detection of admixed individuals within the set of accessions examined. Two putative gene pools were identified (G1 and G2), with a large proportion of the inbred lines being assigned to one of them (G1). Consistent with the absence of population sub-structuring, LD for G1 decayed more rapidly (r2 = 0.48 at 643 bp; trend line, pooled data) than the LD trend line for the entire set of 19 individuals (r2 = 0.64 for the same distance). Conclusion Knowledge about the patterns of diversity and the genetic relationships between breeding materials could be an invaluable aid in crop improvement

  10. Survival analysis with incomplete genetic data.

    PubMed

    Lin, D Y

    2014-01-01

    Genetic data are now collected frequently in clinical studies and epidemiological cohort studies. For a large study, it may be prohibitively expensive to genotype all study subjects, especially with the next-generation sequencing technology. Two-phase sampling, such as case-cohort and nested case-control sampling, is cost-effective in such settings but entails considerable analysis challenges, especially if efficient estimators are desired. Another type of missing data arises when the investigators are interested in the haplotypes or the genetic markers that are not on the genotyping platform used for the current study. Valid and efficient analysis of such missing data is also interesting and challenging. This article provides an overview of these issues and outlines some directions for future research.

  11. Network-centric Analysis of Genetic Predisposition in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ntemka, A; Iliadis, F; Papanikolaou, NA; Grekas, D

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a serious, long-term complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease throughout the world. Although this disease is progressively imposing a heavier burden on the health care system, in many aspects it remains poorly understood. In addition to environmental influences, there is abundant evidence in support of genetic susceptibility to microvascular complications of nephropathy in diabetic patients. Familial clustering of phenotypes such as end-stage renal disease, albuminuria and kidney disease have been reported in large scale population studies throughout the world demonstrating strong contribution of inherited factors. Recent genome-wide linkage scans identified several chromosomal regions that are likely to contain diabetic nephropathy susceptibility genes, and association analyses have evaluated positional candidate genes under linkage peaks. In this review we have extracted from the literature the most promising candidate genes thought to confer susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy and mapped them to affected pathways by using network-centric analysis. Several of the top susceptibility genes have been identified as network hubs and bottlenecks suggesting that they might be important agents in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22435020

  12. An analysis of the attrition of drug candidates from four major pharmaceutical companies.

    PubMed

    Waring, Michael J; Arrowsmith, John; Leach, Andrew R; Leeson, Paul D; Mandrell, Sam; Owen, Robert M; Pairaudeau, Garry; Pennie, William D; Pickett, Stephen D; Wang, Jibo; Wallace, Owen; Weir, Alex

    2015-07-01

    The pharmaceutical industry remains under huge pressure to address the high attrition rates in drug development. Attempts to reduce the number of efficacy- and safety-related failures by analysing possible links to the physicochemical properties of small-molecule drug candidates have been inconclusive because of the limited size of data sets from individual companies. Here, we describe the compilation and analysis of combined data on the attrition of drug candidates from AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly and Company, GlaxoSmithKline and Pfizer. The analysis reaffirms that control of physicochemical properties during compound optimization is beneficial in identifying compounds of candidate drug quality and indicates for the first time a link between the physicochemical properties of compounds and clinical failure due to safety issues. The results also suggest that further control of physicochemical properties is unlikely to have a significant effect on attrition rates and that additional work is required to address safety-related failures. Further cross-company collaborations will be crucial to future progress in this area.

  13. Genetic analysis of cancer in families.

    PubMed

    King, M C

    1990-01-01

    Cancer is genetic, in the sense that it is caused by DNA alterations at the cellular level. On the other hand, the most important risk factors for the common cancers are environmental: cigarette smoking, environmental pollution, occupational exposures, poor diet, and so on. These two observations are not in conflict: the DNA alterations that lead to cancer are very likely to be caused by environmental mutagens. It would be valuable to know exactly what genes are altered to cause a specific cancer, because the effects of these alterations might then be reversible before cancer has a chance to develop. A key to identifying these cancer genes may lie with rare families at extremely high risk of a specific cancer. Unlike most cancer patients, members of these families may inherit an alteration that confers increased susceptibility to cancer. In these rare instances, cancer is a genetic disease at the level of the family, as well as at the level of the cell. Therefore, in these families, genes predisposing to cancer can be mapped in the same way as genes for purely genetic diseases like sickle cell anaemia, cystic fibrosis, and Huntington's disease. The hypothesis that underlies the mapping of cancer genes in families is that the genes inherited in altered form in these rare families are the same genes that are altered in somatic cells of individuals without a remarkable family history of cancer. This hypothesis has proved correct for retinoblastoma. Genes responsible for other rare cancers have been mapped in families as well: neurofibromatosis, multiple endocrine neoplasia, Wilms' tumour, and colon cancer following familial adenomatous polyps, among others. Genes responsible for common cancers are also being defined by genetic analysis, most notably breast cancer and colon cancer. This review summarizes why, how, and what genetic analysis of families can reveal about human cancers.

  14. Association analysis of GWAS and candidate gene loci in a Pakistani population with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Munir, Saeeda; ber Rahman, Simeen; Rehman, Sadia; Saba, Nusrat; Ahmad, Wasim; Nilsson, Staffan; Mazhar, Kehkashan; Naluai, Åsa Torinsson

    2015-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory and hyper proliferative condition of the skin and a serious chronic systemic autoimmune disease. We undertook an association study to investigate the genetic etiology of psoriasis in a Pakistani population by genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported to be associated in genome-wide association (GWAS) or in candidate gene studies of psoriasis. Fifty seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 42 loci were genotyped in 533 psoriasis patients and 373 controls. Our results showed genome wide significant association of the MHC region (rs1265181 being the most significant from five SNPs used with overall OR=3.38; p=2.97E-18), as well as nominally significant associations at ten other loci (p<0.05) in the Pakistani population (LCE3B, REL, IL13/IL4, TNIP1, IL12B, TRAF3IP2, ZC3H12C, NOS2 and RNF114 from GWAS and PRR9 from a previous candidate gene study). Overall, only nine SNPs out of the 42 GWAS loci, displayed an odds ratio in the opposite allelic direction and only three did not reach similar odds ratio within 95% confidence interval as previously reported (SLC45A1/TNFRSF9, ELMO1 and IL28RA). This indicates similar genetic risk factors and molecular mechanisms behind disease in Pakistani psoriasis patients as in other populations. In addition, we show that the MHC and TNIP1 regions are significantly different in patients with psoriasis onset before the age of 40 (type I) compared to after 40 years of age (type II). MHC being associated mainly with type I while TNIP1 with type II patients.

  15. Expression QTL analysis of top loci from GWAS meta-analysis highlights additional schizophrenia candidate genes.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Simone; van Eijk, Kristel R; Zeegers, Dave W L H; Strengman, Eric; Janson, Esther; Veldink, Jan H; van den Berg, Leonard H; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Boks, Marco P M; Ophoff, Roel A

    2012-09-01

    There is genetic evidence that schizophrenia is a polygenic disorder with a large number of loci of small effect on disease susceptibility. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia have had limited success, with the best finding at the MHC locus at chromosome 6p. A recent effort of the Psychiatric GWAS consortium (PGC) yielded five novel loci for schizophrenia. In this study, we aim to highlight additional schizophrenia susceptibility loci from the PGC study by combining the top association findings from the discovery stage (9394 schizophrenia cases and 12 462 controls) with expression QTLs (eQTLs) and differential gene expression in whole blood of schizophrenia patients and controls. We examined the 6192 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with significance threshold at P<0.001. eQTLs were calculated for these SNPs in a sample of healthy controls (n=437). The transcripts significantly regulated by the top SNPs from the GWAS meta-analysis were subsequently tested for differential expression in an independent set of schizophrenia cases and controls (n=202). After correction for multiple testing, the eQTL analysis yielded 40 significant cis-acting effects of the SNPs. Seven of these transcripts show differential expression between cases and controls. Of these, the effect of three genes (RNF5, TRIM26 and HLA-DRB3) coincided with the direction expected from meta-analysis findings and were all located within the MHC region. Our results identify new genes of interest and highlight again the involvement of the MHC region in schizophrenia susceptibility.

  16. QTL Mapping by SLAF-seq and Expression Analysis of Candidate Genes for Aphid Resistance in Cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Danna; Chen, Minyang; Qi, Xiaohua; Xu, Qiang; Zhou, Fucai; Chen, Xuehao

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber, a very important vegetable crop worldwide, is easily damaged by pests. Aphid is one of the most serious cucumber pests and frequently cause severe damage to commercially produced crops. Understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying pest resistance is important for aphid-resistant cucumber varieties breeding. In this study, two parental cucumber lines, JY30 (aphid susceptible) and EP6392 (aphid resistant), and pools of resistant and susceptible (n = 50 each) plants from 1000 F2 individuals derived from crossing JY30 with EP6392, were used to detect genomic regions associated with aphid resistance in cucumbers. The analysis was performed using specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq), bulked segregant analysis (BSA), and single nucleotide polymorphism index (SNP-index) methods. A main effect QTL (quantitative trait locus) of 0.31 Mb on Chr5, including 43 genes, was identified by association analysis. Sixteen of the 43 genes were identified as potentially associated with aphid resistance through gene annotation analysis. The effect of aphid infestation on the expression of these candidate genes screened by SLAF-seq was investigated in EP6392 plants by qRT-PCR. The results indicated that seven genes including encoding transcription factor MYB59-like (Csa5M641610.1), auxin transport protein BIG-like (Csa5M642140.1), F-box/kelch-repeat protein At5g15710-like (Csa5M642160.1), transcription factor HBP-1a-like (Csa5M642710.1), beta-glucan-binding protein (Csa5M643380.1), endo-1,3(4)-beta-glucanase 1-like (Csa5M643880.1), and proline-rich receptor-like protein kinase PERK10-like (Csa5M643900.1), out of the 16 genes were down regulated after aphid infestation, whereas 5 genes including encoding probable leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor-like serine/threonine-protein kinase At5g15730-like (Csa5M642150.1), Stress-induced protein KIN2 (Csa5M643240.1 and Csa5M643260.1), F-box family protein (Csa5M643280.1), F-box/kelch-repeat protein (Csa5M643290

  17. Exclusion of linkage between hypokalemic periodic paralysis and a candidate region in 1q31-32 suggests genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Sillen, A.; Wadelius, C.; Gustabson, K.H.

    1994-09-01

    Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP) is an autosomal dominant disease with attacks of paralysis of varying severity. The attacks occur at intervals of days to years in otherwise healthy people combined with hypokalemia during attacks. The paralysis attacks are precipitated by a number of different factors, like carbohydrate-rich meals, cold, exercise and mental stress. Recently linkage for HOKPP was shown for chromosome 1q31-32 and the disease was mapped between D1S413 and D1S249. The gene for the calcium channel alfa1-subunit (CACNL 1A3) maps to this interval and in two families no recombination was found between a polymorphism in the CACNL 1A3 gene and the disease. This gene is therefore considered to be a candidate for HOKPP. The analysis of a large Danish family excludes linkage to this region and to the CACNL 1A3 gene. In each direction from D1S413, 18.8 cM could be excluded and for D1S249, 14.9 cM. The present study clearly excludes the possibility that the gene causing HOKPP in a large Danish family is located in the region 1q31-32. This result shows that HOKPP is a heterogenous disease, with only one mapped gene so far.

  18. Molecular genetic analysis of two families with keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans: refinement of gene localization and evidence for genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, J C; Richard, G; van der Wielen, M J; van de Vosse, E; Harth, W; Sandkuijl, L A; Bakker, E; van Ommen, G J

    1997-10-01

    X-linked keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is a rare disorder affecting both skin and eyes. In the two extended KFSD families analysed to date, the gene was mapped to Xp22.13-p22.2. By analyzing several new markers in this region, we were able to narrow the candidate region to a 1-Mb interval between DXS7161 and (DXS7593, DXS7105) in the large Dutch pedigree. In addition, we analyzed 23 markers in Xp21.2-p22.2 in a German family with KFSD. Haplotype and recombination analysis positioned the KFSD gene in this family most likely outside the candidate region on Xp22.13-p22.2. This finding is suggestive for genetic heterogeneity: in this pedigree there is either another locus on the X-chromosome, or KFSD is transmitted here as an autosomal dominant trait with variable expression.

  19. Transcript co-variance with Nestin in two mouse genetic reference populations identifies Lef1 as a novel candidate regulator of neural precursor cell proliferation in the adult hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Delprato, Anna; Grellmann, Claudia; Klein, Marieke; Wetzel, Richard; Overall, Rupert W.; Badea, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the lifelong production of new neurons in the adult brain, is under complex genetic control but many of the genes involved remain to be identified. In this study, we have integrated publicly available gene expression data from the BXD and CXB recombinant inbred mouse lines to discover genes co-expressed in the adult hippocampus with Nestin, a common marker of the neural precursor cell population. In addition, we incorporated spatial expression information to restrict candidates to genes with high differential gene expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Incorporating data from curated protein-protein interaction databases revealed interactions between our candidate genes and those already known to be involved in adult neurogenesis. Enrichment analysis suggested a link to the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, known to be involved in adult neurogenesis. In particular, our candidates were enriched in targets of Lef1, a modulator of the Wnt pathway. In conclusion, our combination of bioinformatics approaches identified six novel candidate genes involved in adult neurogenesis; Amer3, Eya3, Mtdh, Nr4a3, Polr2a, and Tbkbp1. Further, we propose a role for Lef1 transcriptional control in the regulation of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation. PMID:25565948

  20. Genome-wide linkage and positional candidate gene study of blood pressure response to dietary potassium intervention: the genetic epidemiology network of salt sensitivity study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Tanika N; Hixson, James E; Rao, Dabeeru C; Mei, Hao; Rice, Treva K; Jaquish, Cashell E; Shimmin, Lawrence C; Schwander, Karen; Chen, Chung-Shuian; Liu, Depei; Chen, Jichun; Bormans, Concetta; Shukla, Pramila; Farhana, Naveed; Stuart, Colin; Whelton, Paul K; He, Jiang; Gu, Dongfeng

    2010-12-01

    Genetic determinants of blood pressure (BP) response to potassium, or potassium sensitivity, are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide linkage scan and positional candidate gene analysis to identify genetic determinants of potassium sensitivity. A total of 1906 Han Chinese participants took part in a 7-day high-sodium diet followed by a 7-day high-sodium plus potassium dietary intervention. BP measurements were obtained at baseline and after each intervention using a random-zero sphygmomanometer. Significant linkage signals (logarithm of odds [LOD] score, >3) for BP responses to potassium were detected at chromosomal regions 3q24-q26.1, 3q28, and 11q22.3-q24.3. Maximum multipoint LOD scores of 3.09 at 3q25.2 and 3.41 at 11q23.3 were observed for absolute diastolic BP (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses, respectively. Linkage peaks of 3.56 at 3q25.1 and 3.01 at 11q23.3 for percent DBP response and 3.22 at 3q25.2, 3.01 at 3q28, and 4.48 at 11q23.3 for percent MAP response also were identified. Angiotensin II receptor, type 1 (AGTR1), single-nucleotide polymorphism rs16860760 in the 3q24-q26.1 region was significantly associated with absolute and percent systolic BP responses to potassium (P=0.0008 and P=0.0006, respectively). Absolute (95% CI) systolic BP responses for genotypes C/C, C/T, and T/T were -3.71 (-4.02 to -3.40), -2.62 (-3.38 to -1.85), and 1.03 (-3.73 to 5.79) mm Hg, respectively, and percent responses (95% CI) were -3.07 (-3.33 to -2.80), -2.07 (-2.74 to -1.41), and 0.90 (-3.20 to 4.99), respectively. Similar trends were observed for DBP and MAP responses. Genetic regions on chromosomes 3 and 11 may harbor important susceptibility loci for potassium sensitivity. Furthermore, the AGTR1 gene was a significant predictor of BP responses to potassium intake.

  1. ANALYSIS OF THE PICO DOS DIAS SURVEY HERBIG Ae/Be CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, Marilia J.; Rodrigues, Claudia V.; Batalha, Celso

    2010-01-15

    A large sample of Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) candidates, distributed in different Galactic regions south to declination +30 deg., were identified by the Pico dos Dias Survey (a search for young stellar objects based on IRAS colors). Most of the candidates are nearby or associated with star-forming clouds, but several others are considered isolated objects. Aiming to verify the young nature of 93 HAeBe candidates, we searched for additional information that could be useful to confirm if they are pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars or evolved objects, which coincidentally show similar IRAS colors. By adopting a spectral index that is related to the amount of infrared excess and the shape of the spectral energy distribution, we have classified the sample according to three groups, which are analyzed on the basis of (1) circumstellar luminosity; (2) spatial distribution; (3) optical polarization; (4) near-infrared colors; (5) stellar parameters (mass, age, effective temperature); and (5) intensity of emission lines. Our analysis indicates that only 76% of the studied sample, mainly the group with intermediate to low levels of circumstellar emission, can be more confidently considered PMS stars. The nature of the remaining stars, which are in the other group that contains the highest levels of infrared excess, remains to be confirmed. They share the same characteristics of evolved objects, requiring complementary studies in order to correctly classify them. At least seven objects show characteristics typical of post-asymptotic giant branch or proto-planetary nebulae.

  2. Multidimensional integrative analysis uncovers driver candidates and biomarkers in penile carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Fabio Albuquerque; Martins, David Correa; Barros-Filho, Mateus Camargo; Kuasne, Hellen; Busso Lopes, Ariane Fidelis; Brentani, Helena; Trindade Filho, Jose Carlos Souza; Guimarães, Gustavo Cardoso; Faria, Eliney F; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Lopes, Ademar; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2017-07-27

    Molecular data generation and their combination in penile carcinomas (PeCa), a significant public health problem in poor and underdeveloped countries, remain virtually unexplored. An integrativemethodology combin ing genome-wide copy number alteration, DNA methylation, miRNA and mRNA expression analysis was performed in a set of 20 usual PeCa. The well-ranked 16 driver candidates harboring genomic alterations and regulated by a set of miRNAs, including hsa-miR-31, hsa-miR-34a and hsa-miR-130b, were significantly associated with over-represented pathways in cancer, such as immune-inflammatory system, apoptosis and cell cycle. Modules of co-expressed genes generated from expression matrix were associated with driver candidates and classified according to the over-representation of passengers, thus suggesting an alteration of the pathway dynamics during the carcinogenesis. This association resulted in 10 top driver candidates (AR, BIRC5, DNMT3B, ERBB4, FGFR1, PML, PPARG, RB1, TNFSF10 and STAT1) selected and confirmed as altered in an independent set of 33 PeCa samples. In addition to the potential driver genes herein described, shorter overall survival was associated with BIRC5 and DNMT3B overexpression (log-rank test, P = 0.026 and P = 0.002, respectively) highlighting its potential as novel prognostic marker for penile cancer.

  3. Role of Salivary and Candidal Proteins in Denture Stomatitis; an exploratory proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Warren C.; Schwartz-Baxter, Sarah; Carlson, Jim; Barros, Silvana; Offenbacher, Steven; Bencharit, Sompop

    2014-01-01

    Denture stomatitis, inflammation and redness beneath a denture, affects nearly half of all denture wearers. Candida organism, the presence of a denture, saliva, and host immunity are the key etiological factors for the condition. The role of salivary proteins in denture stomatitis is not clear. In this study 30 edentulous subjects wearing a maxillary complete denture were recruited. Unstimulated whole saliva from each subject was collected and pooled into two groups (n=15 each); healthy and stomatitis (Newton classification II and III). Label-free multidimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) proteomics on two mass spectrometry platforms were used to determine peptide mass differences between control and stomatitis groups. Cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to determine differential expression among the groups. The two proteomic platforms identified 97 and 176 proteins (ANOVA; p<0.01) differentially expressed among the healthy, type 2 and 3 stomatitis groups. Three proteins including carbonic anhydrase 6, cystatin C, and cystatin SN were found to be the same as previous study. Salivary proteomic profiles of patients with denture stomatitis were found to be uniquely different from controls. Analysis of protein components suggests that certain salivary proteins may predispose some patients to denture stomatitis while others are believed to be involved in the reaction to fungal infection. Analysis of candidal proteins suggest that multiple species of candidal organisms play a role in denture stomatitis. PMID:24947908

  4. Candidate gene analysis and exome sequencing confirm LBX1 as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Grauers, Anna; Wang, Jingwen; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Simony, Ane; Danielsson, Aina; Åkesson, Kristina; Ohlin, Acke; Halldin, Klas; Grabowski, Pawel; Tenne, Max; Laivuori, Hannele; Dahlman, Ingrid; Andersen, Mikkel; Christensen, Steen Bach; Karlsson, Magnus K; Jiao, Hong; Kere, Juha; Gerdhem, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis is a spinal deformity affecting approximately 3% of otherwise healthy children or adolescents. The etiology is still largely unknown but has an important genetic component. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of common genetic variants that are significantly associated with idiopathic scoliosis in Asian and Caucasian populations, rs11190870 close to the LBX1 gene being the most replicated finding. The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetics of idiopathic scoliosis in a Scandinavian cohort by performing a candidate gene study of four variants previously shown to be associated with idiopathic scoliosis and exome sequencing of idiopathic scoliosis patients with a severe phenotype to identify possible novel scoliosis risk variants. This was a case control study. A total of 1,739 patients with idiopathic scoliosis and 1,812 controls were included. The outcome measure was idiopathic scoliosis. The variants rs10510181, rs11190870, rs12946942, and rs6570507 were genotyped in 1,739 patients with idiopathic scoliosis and 1,812 controls. Exome sequencing was performed on pooled samples from 100 surgically treated idiopathic scoliosis patients. Novel or rare missense, nonsense, or splice site variants were selected for individual genotyping in the 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls. In addition, the 5'UTR, noncoding exon and promoter regions of LBX1, not covered by exome sequencing, were Sanger sequenced in the 100 pooled samples. Of the four candidate genes, an intergenic variant, rs11190870, downstream of the LBX1 gene, showed a highly significant association to idiopathic scoliosis in 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls (p=7.0×10(-18)). We identified 20 novel variants by exome sequencing after filtration and an initial genotyping validation. However, we could not verify any association to idiopathic scoliosis in the large cohort of 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls. We did not find any variants in the 5'UTR, noncoding exon and

  5. Cost/benefit analysis of advanced materials technology candidates for the 1980's, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, R. E.; Maertins, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    Cost/benefit analyses to evaluate advanced material technologies projects considered for general aviation and turboprop commuter aircraft through estimated life-cycle costs, direct operating costs, and development costs are discussed. Specifically addressed is the selection of technologies to be evaluated; development of property goals; assessment of candidate technologies on typical engines and aircraft; sensitivity analysis of the changes in property goals on performance and economics, cost, and risk analysis for each technology; and ranking of each technology by relative value. The cost/benefit analysis was applied to a domestic, nonrevenue producing, business-type jet aircraft configured with two TFE731-3 turbofan engines, and to a domestic, nonrevenue producing, business type turboprop aircraft configured with two TPE331-10 turboprop engines. In addition, a cost/benefit analysis was applied to a commercial turboprop aircraft configured with a growth version of the TPE331-10.

  6. Genetic analysis for early diagnosis of otorhinolaryngeal diseases.

    PubMed

    Propping, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Familiarity with the concepts and methods of human genetics is important in order to be able to perform genetic analysis. The grade of predictability of a genetic disease is partly given by formal genetics but also depends on the importance of the mutated gene for the phenotype.Possibilities for genetic analysis range from differential diagnosis to predictive diagnosis to prenatal diagnosis. After initial consultation in which the physician fully explains the procedure to the patient, it is mandatory that the patient give his full consent.This article summarises and evaluates current knowledge about genetic analysis of important otorhinolaryngeal diseases, including hereditary hearing disabilities, olfactory malfunction, hereditary tumorous diseases, hereditary syndromes and dysplasias. In addition, this article discusses genetic diseases that affect voice and speech, highlights the relevance of human genetic consultation and discusses the importance of embedding genetic analysis in medicine in general.

  7. Genetic analysis for early diagnosis of otorhinolaryngeal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Propping, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Familiarity with the concepts and methods of human genetics is important in order to be able to perform genetic analysis. The grade of predictability of a genetic disease is partly given by formal genetics but also depends on the importance of the mutated gene for the phenotype. Possibilities for genetic analysis range from differential diagnosis to predictive diagnosis to prenatal diagnosis. After initial consultation in which the physician fully explains the procedure to the patient, it is mandatory that the patient give his full consent. This article summarises and evaluates current knowledge about genetic analysis of important otorhinolaryngeal diseases, including hereditary hearing disabilities, olfactory malfunction, hereditary tumorous diseases, hereditary syndromes and dysplasias. In addition, this article discusses genetic diseases that affect voice and speech, highlights the relevance of human genetic consultation and discusses the importance of embedding genetic analysis in medicine in general. PMID:22073089

  8. Comparative gene expression analysis of avian embryonic facial structures reveals new candidates for human craniofacial disorders.

    PubMed

    Brugmann, S A; Powder, K E; Young, N M; Goodnough, L H; Hahn, S M; James, A W; Helms, J A; Lovett, M

    2010-03-01

    Mammals and birds have common embryological facial structures, and appear to employ the same molecular genetic developmental toolkit. We utilized natural variation found in bird beaks to investigate what genes drive vertebrate facial morphogenesis. We employed cross-species microarrays to describe the molecular genetic signatures, developmental signaling pathways and the spectrum of transcription factor (TF) gene expression changes that differ between cranial neural crest cells in the developing beaks of ducks, quails and chickens. Surprisingly, we observed that the neural crest cells established a species-specific TF gene expression profile that predates morphological differences between the species. A total of 232 genes were differentially expressed between the three species. Twenty-two of these genes, including Fgfr2, Jagged2, Msx2, Satb2 and Tgfb3, have been previously implicated in a variety of mammalian craniofacial defects. Seventy-two of the differentially expressed genes overlap with un-cloned loci for human craniofacial disorders, suggesting that our data will provide a valuable candidate gene resource for human craniofacial genetics. The most dramatic changes between species were in the Wnt signaling pathway, including a 20-fold up-regulation of Dkk2, Fzd1 and Wnt1 in the duck compared with the other two species. We functionally validated these changes by demonstrating that spatial domains of Wnt activity differ in avian beaks, and that Wnt signals regulate Bmp pathway activity and promote regional growth in facial prominences. This study is the first of its kind, extending on previous work in Darwin's finches and provides the first large-scale insights into cross-species facial morphogenesis.

  9. Candidate pathway based analysis for cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Xiao; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo

    2012-01-06

    The objective of this research was to identify potential biological pathways associated with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P), and to explore the potential biological mechanisms underlying these associated pathways on risk of NSCL/P. This project was based on the dataset of a previously published genome-wide association (GWA) study on NSCL/P (Beaty et al. 2010). Case-parent trios used here originated from an international consortium (The Gene, Environment Association Studies consortium, GENEVA) formed in 2007. A total of 5,742 individuals from 1,908 CL/P case-parents trios (1,591 complete trios and 317 incomplete trios where one parent was missing) were collected and genotyped using the Illumina Human610-Quad array. Candidate pathways were selected using a list of 356 genes that may be related to oral clefts. In total, 42 candidate pathways, which included 1,564 genes and 40,208 SNPs were tested. Using a pathway-based analysis approach proposed by Wang et al (2007), we conducted a permutation-based test to assess the statistical significance of the nominal p-values of 42 candidate pathways. The analysis revealed several pathways yielding nominally significant p-values. However, controlling for the family wise error rate, none of these pathways could retain statistical significance. Nominal p-values of these pathways were concentrated at the lower tail of the distribution, with more than expected low p-values. A permutation based test for examining this type of distribution pattern yielded an overall p-value of 0.029. Thus, while this pathway-based analysis did not yield a clear significant result for any particular pathway, we conclude that one or more of the genes and pathways considered here likely do play a role in oral clefting.

  10. Fine Mapping of a Dravet Syndrome Modifier Locus on Mouse Chromosome 5 and Candidate Gene Analysis by RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Nicole A.; Zachwieja, Nicole J.; Miller, Alison R.; Anderson, Lyndsey L.; Kearney, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    A substantial number of mutations have been identified in voltage-gated sodium channel genes that result in various forms of human epilepsy. SCN1A mutations result in a spectrum of severity ranging from mild febrile seizures to Dravet syndrome, an infant-onset epileptic encephalopathy. Dravet syndrome patients experience multiple seizures types that are often refractory to treatment, developmental delays, and elevated risk for SUDEP. The same sodium channel mutation can produce epilepsy phenotypes of varying clinical severity. This suggests that other factors, including genetic, modify the primary mutation and change disease severity. Mouse models provide a useful tool in studying the genetic basis of epilepsy. The mouse strain background can alter phenotype severity, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn1a+/- mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Scn1a+/- mice on the 129S6/SvEvTac (129) strain have a normal phenotype and lifespan, while [129xC57BL/6J]F1-Scn1a+/- mice experience spontaneous seizures, hyperthermia-induced seizures and high rates of premature death. We hypothesize the phenotypic differences are due to strain-specific genetic modifiers that influence expressivity of the Scn1a+/- phenotype. Low resolution mapping of Scn1a+/- identified several Dravet syndrome modifier (Dsm) loci responsible for the strain-dependent difference in survival. One locus of interest, Dsm1 located on chromosome 5, was fine mapped to a 9 Mb region using interval specific congenics. RNA-Seq was then utilized to identify candidate modifier genes within this narrowed region. Three genes with significant total gene expression differences between 129S6/SvEvTac and [129xC57BL/6J]F1 were identified, including the GABAA receptor subunit, Gabra2. Further analysis of Gabra2 demonstrated allele-specific expression. Pharmological manipulation by clobazam, a common anticonvulsant with preferential affinity for the GABRA2 receptor, revealed

  11. Fine Mapping of a Dravet Syndrome Modifier Locus on Mouse Chromosome 5 and Candidate Gene Analysis by RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Nicole A; Zachwieja, Nicole J; Miller, Alison R; Anderson, Lyndsey L; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-10-01

    A substantial number of mutations have been identified in voltage-gated sodium channel genes that result in various forms of human epilepsy. SCN1A mutations result in a spectrum of severity ranging from mild febrile seizures to Dravet syndrome, an infant-onset epileptic encephalopathy. Dravet syndrome patients experience multiple seizures types that are often refractory to treatment, developmental delays, and elevated risk for SUDEP. The same sodium channel mutation can produce epilepsy phenotypes of varying clinical severity. This suggests that other factors, including genetic, modify the primary mutation and change disease severity. Mouse models provide a useful tool in studying the genetic basis of epilepsy. The mouse strain background can alter phenotype severity, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn1a+/- mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Scn1a+/- mice on the 129S6/SvEvTac (129) strain have a normal phenotype and lifespan, while [129xC57BL/6J]F1-Scn1a+/- mice experience spontaneous seizures, hyperthermia-induced seizures and high rates of premature death. We hypothesize the phenotypic differences are due to strain-specific genetic modifiers that influence expressivity of the Scn1a+/- phenotype. Low resolution mapping of Scn1a+/- identified several Dravet syndrome modifier (Dsm) loci responsible for the strain-dependent difference in survival. One locus of interest, Dsm1 located on chromosome 5, was fine mapped to a 9 Mb region using interval specific congenics. RNA-Seq was then utilized to identify candidate modifier genes within this narrowed region. Three genes with significant total gene expression differences between 129S6/SvEvTac and [129xC57BL/6J]F1 were identified, including the GABAA receptor subunit, Gabra2. Further analysis of Gabra2 demonstrated allele-specific expression. Pharmological manipulation by clobazam, a common anticonvulsant with preferential affinity for the GABRA2 receptor, revealed

  12. A comprehensive genetic study on left atrium size in Caribbean Hispanics identifies candidate genes in 17p10

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyong; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Beecham, Ashley; Slifer, Susan; Rundek, Tatjana; Homma, Shunichi; Blanton, Susan H.; Sacco, Ralph L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Left atrial enlargement is associated with cardiovascular disease. Genetic factors contributing to the left atrium (LA) dimension are poorly understood. We sought to map susceptibility genes for LA size in a large Dominican family dataset and an independent population-based cohort from the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS). Methods and Results 100 Dominican families consisting of 1350 individuals were used to estimate heritability and map quantitative trait loci for LA size using variance components analysis. LA dimension was measured by transthoracic echocardiography. A polygenic covariate screening was used to identify significant covariates. LA size had a moderate estimate of heritability (h2=0.42), after adjusting for significant covariates. Linkage analysis of 405 microsatellite markers revealed suggestive evidence on chromosome 10p19 (D10S1423, MLOD=2.00) and 17p10 (D17S974, MLOD=2.05). Ordered subset analysis found significantly enhanced (p<0.05 for increase of LOD score) evidence for linkage at 17p10 (MLOD=2.9) in families with lower LDL level. 2233 single nucleotide polymophisms (SNPs) were used to perform a peak-wide association mapping across 17p10 in 825 NOMAS individuals. Strong evidence for association were found in NTN1, MYH10, COX10, and MYOCD genes (p=0.00005 to 0.005). Conclusions Using non-biased genome-wide linkage followed by peak-wide association analysis, we identified several possible susceptibility genes affecting LA size. Among them, MYOCD has been shown to serve as a key transducer of hypertrophic signals in cardiomyocytes in vitro. Evidence from our linkage and association study, together with the known function, strongly suggests that polymorphisms in MYOCD gene modify LA size. PMID:20562446

  13. Analysis of Lunar Surface Charging for a Candidate Spacecraft Using NASCAP-2K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda; Minow, Joseph; Blackwell, William, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The characterization of the electromagnetic interaction for a spacecraft in the lunar environment, and identification of viable charging mitigation strategies, is a critical lunar mission design task, as spacecraft charging has important implications both for science applications and for astronaut safety. To that end, we have performed surface charging calculations of a candidate lunar spacecraft for lunar orbiting and lunar landing missions. We construct a model of the spacecraft with candidate materials having appropriate electrical properties using Object Toolkit and perform the spacecraft charging analysis using Nascap-2k, the NASA/AFRL sponsored spacecraft charging analysis tool. We use nominal and atypical lunar environments appropriate for lunar orbiting and lunar landing missions to establish current collection of lunar ions and electrons. In addition, we include a geostationary orbit case to demonstrate a bounding example of extreme (negative) charging of a lunar spacecraft in the geostationary orbit environment. Results from the charging analysis demonstrate that minimal differential potentials (and resulting threat of electrostatic discharge) occur when the spacecraft is constructed entirely of conducting materials, as expected. We compare charging results to data taken during previous lunar orbiting or lunar flyby spacecraft missions.

  14. Analysis of Surface Charging for a Candidate Solar Sail Mission Using Nascap-2k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neergaard, Linda F.; Davis, Victoria A.; Gardner, Barbara; Mandell, Myron; Minow, Joseph I.

    2004-01-01

    The characterization of the electromagnetic interaction for a solar sail in the solar wind environment, and identification of viable charging mitigation strategies, is a critical solar sail mission design task, as spacecraft charging has important implications both for science applications and for sail lifetime. To that end, we have pexformed some preliminary surface charging calculations of a candidate 150 meter class solar sail spacecraft for the 0.5 AU solar polar orbit and a 1.0 AU L1 orbit. We construct a model of the spacecraft with candidate materials having appropriate electrical properties using Object Toolkit and perform the spacecraft charging analysis using Nascap-2k, the NASA/AFRL sponsored spacecraft charging analysis tool. We use mean and extreme solar wind environments appropriate for the 0.5 AU and 1.0 AU missions to establish current collection of solar wind ions and electrons. In addition, we include a geostationary orbit case to demonstrate a bounding example of extreme (negative) charging of a solar sail spacecraft in the geostationary orbit environment. Results from the charging analysis demonstrate that minimal differential potentials (and resulting threat of electrostatic discharge) occur when the spacecraft is constructed entirely of conducting materials, as expected. Examples with dielectric materials exposed to the space environment exhibit differential potentials ranging from a few volts to extreme potentials in the kilovolt range. Recommendations for further analyses include calculations of wake effects, surface current densities, and environments effects on conductivities.

  15. Analysis of Surface Charging for a Candidate Solar Sail Mission Using NASCAP-2K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard; Minow, Joseph I.; Davis, V. A.; Gardner, Barbara; Mandell, Myron

    2004-01-01

    The characterization of the electromagnetic interaction for a solar sail in the solar wind environment, and identification of viable charging mitigation strategies, is a critical solar sail mission design task, as spacecraft charging has important implications both for science applications and for sail lifetime. To that end, we have performed surface charging calculations of a candidate 150-meter-class solar sail spacecraft for the 0.5 AU solar polar orbit and a 1.0 AU L1 orbit. We construct a model of the spacecraft with candidate materials having appropriate electrical properties using Object Toolkit and perform the spacecraft charging analysis using NASCAP-2k, the NASA/AFRL sponsored spacecraft charging analysis tool. We use nominal and atypical solar wind environments appropriate for the 0.5 AU and 1.0 AU missions to establish current collection of solar wind ions and electrons. In addition, we include a geostationary orbit case to demonstrate a bounding example of extreme (negative) charging of a solar sail spacecraft in the geostationary orbit environment. Results from the charging analysis demonstrate that minimal differential potentials (and resulting threat of electrostatic discharge) occur when the spacecraft is constructed entirely of conducting materials, as expected. Examples with dielectric materials exposed to the space environment exhibit differential potentials ranging from a few volts to extreme potentials in the kilovolt range.

  16. Candidate genes for the progression of malignant gliomas identified by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Bozinov, Oliver; Köhler, Sylvia; Samans, Birgit; Benes, Ludwig; Miller, Dorothea; Ritter, Markus; Sure, Ulrich; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Malignant astrocytomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grade III or IV have a reduced median survival time, and possible pathways have been described for the progression of anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastomas, but the molecular basis of malignant astrocytoma progression is still poorly understood. Microarray analysis provides the chance to accelerate studies by comparison of the expression of thousands of genes in these tumours and consequently identify targeting genes. We compared the transcriptional profile of 4,608 genes in tumours of 15 patients including 6 anaplastic astrocytomas (WHO grade III) and 9 glioblastomas (WHO grade IV) using microarray analysis. The microarray data were corroborated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of two selected genes. We identified 166 gene alterations with a fold change of 2 and higher whose mRNA levels differed (absolute value of the t statistic of 1.96) between the two malignant glioma groups. Further analyses confirmed same transcription directions for Olig2 and IL-13Ralpha2 in anaplastic astrocytomas as compared to glioblastomas. Microarray analyses with a close binary question reveal numerous interesting candidate genes, which need further histochemical testing after selection for confirmation. IL-13Ralpha2 and Olig2 have been identified and confirmed to be interesting candidate genes whose differential expression likely plays a role in malignant progression of astrocytomas.

  17. Analysis Of Surface Charging For A Candidate Solar Sail Mission Using Nascap-2k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph; Parker, Linda Neergaard; Davis, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    The characterization of the electromagnetic interaction for a solar sail in the solar wind environment, and identification of viable charging mitigation strategies, is a critical solar sail mission design task, as spacecraft charging has important implications both for science applications and for sail lifetime. To that end, we have performed surface charging calculations of a candidate 150-meter-class solar sail spacecraft for the 0.5 solar polar orbit and a 1.0 AU L1 orbit. We construct a model of the spacecraft with candidate materials having appropriate electrical properties using Object Toolkit and perform the spacecraft charging analysis using NASCAP-2k, the NASA/AFRL sponsored spacecraft charging analysis tool. We use nominal and atypical solar wind environments appropriate for the 0.5 AU and 1.0 AU missions to establish current collection of solar wind ions and electrons. In addition, we include a geostationary orbit case to demonstrate a bounding example of extreme (negative) charging of a solar sail spacecraft in the geostationary orbit environment. Results form the charging analysis demonstrate that minimal differential potentials (and resulting threat of electrostatic discharge) occur when the spacecraft is constructed entirely of conducting materials, as expected. Examples with dielectric materials exposed to the space environment exhibit differential potentials ranging from a few volts to extreme potentials in the kilovolt range.

  18. Effects of GWAS-Associated Genetic Variants on lncRNAs within IBD and T1D Candidate Loci

    PubMed Central

    Brorsson, Caroline A.; Pociot, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs are a new class of non-coding RNAs that are at the crosshairs in many human diseases such as cancers, cardiovascular disorders, inflammatory and autoimmune disease like Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). Nearly 90% of the phenotype-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) lie outside of the protein coding regions, and map to the non-coding intervals. However, the relationship between phenotype-associated loci and the non-coding regions including the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is poorly understood. Here, we systemically identified all annotated IBD and T1D loci-associated lncRNAs, and mapped nominally significant GWAS/ImmunoChip SNPs for IBD and T1D within these lncRNAs. Additionally, we identified tissue-specific cis-eQTLs, and strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) signals associated with these SNPs. We explored sequence and structure based attributes of these lncRNAs, and also predicted the structural effects of mapped SNPs within them. We also identified lncRNAs in IBD and T1D that are under recent positive selection. Our analysis identified putative lncRNA secondary structure-disruptive SNPs within and in close proximity (+/−5 kb flanking regions) of IBD and T1D loci-associated candidate genes, suggesting that these RNA conformation-altering polymorphisms might be associated with diseased-phenotype. Disruption of lncRNA secondary structure due to presence of GWAS SNPs provides valuable information that could be potentially useful for future structure-function studies on lncRNAs. PMID:25144376

  19. A Genetic Analysis of Mortality in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Varona, Luis; Sorensen, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of mortality is undertaken in two breeds of pigs: Danish Landrace and Yorkshire. Zero-inflated and standard versions of hierarchical Poisson, binomial, and negative binomial Bayesian models were fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). The objectives of the study were to investigate whether there is support for genetic variation for mortality and to study the quality of fit and predictive properties of the various models. In both breeds, the model that provided the best fit to the data was the standard binomial hierarchical model. The model that performed best in terms of the ability to predict the distribution of stillbirths was the hierarchical zero-inflated negative binomial model. The best fit of the binomial hierarchical model and of the zero-inflated hierarchical negative binomial model was obtained when genetic variation was included as a parameter. For the hierarchical binomial model, the estimate of the posterior mean of the additive genetic variance (posterior standard deviation in brackets) at the level of the logit of the probability of a stillbirth was 0.173(0.039) in Landrace and 0.202(0.048) in Yorkshire. The implications of these results from a breeding perspective are briefly discussed. PMID:19901070

  20. A genetic analysis of neural progenitor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Geschwind, D H; Ou, J; Easterday, M C; Dougherty, J D; Jackson, R L; Chen, Z; Antoine, H; Terskikh, A; Weissman, I L; Nelson, S F; Kornblum, H I

    2001-02-01

    Genetic mechanisms regulating CNS progenitor function and differentiation are not well understood. We have used microarrays derived from a representational difference analysis (RDA) subtraction in a heterogeneous stem cell culture system to systematically study the gene expression patterns of CNS progenitors. This analysis identified both known and novel genes enriched in progenitor cultures. In situ hybridization in a subset of clones demonstrated that many of these genes were expressed preferentially in germinal zones, some showing distinct ventricular or subventricular zone labeling. Several genes were also enriched in hematopoietic stem cells, suggesting an overlap of gene expression in neural and hematopoietic progenitors. This combination of methods demonstrates the power of using custom microarrays derived from RDA-subtracted libraries for both gene discovery and gene expression analysis in the central nervous system.

  1. RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes for Ontogenic Resistance in Malus-Venturia Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Gusberti, Michele; Gessler, Cesare; Broggini, Giovanni A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Ontogenic scab resistance in apple leaves and fruits is a horizontal resistance against the plant pathogen Venturia inaequalis and is expressed as a decrease in disease symptoms and incidence with the ageing of the leaves. Several studies at the biochemical level tried to unveil the nature of this resistance; however, no conclusive results were reported. We decided therefore to investigate the genetic origin of this phenomenon by performing a full quantitative transcriptome sequencing and comparison of young (susceptible) and old (ontogenic resistant) leaves, infected or not with the pathogen. Two time points at 72 and 96 hours post-inoculation were chosen for RNA sampling and sequencing. Comparison between the different conditions (young and old leaves, inoculated or not) should allow the identification of differentially expressed genes which may represent different induced plant defence reactions leading to ontogenic resistance or may be the cause of a constitutive (uninoculated with the pathogen) shift toward resistance in old leaves. Differentially expressed genes were then characterised for their function by homology to A. thaliana and other plant genes, particularly looking for genes involved in pathways already suspected of appertaining to ontogenic resistance in apple or other hosts, or to plant defence mechanisms in general. In this work, five candidate genes putatively involved in the ontogenic resistance of apple were identified: a gene encoding an “enhanced disease susceptibility 1 protein” was found to be down-regulated in both uninoculated and inoculated old leaves at 96 hpi, while the other four genes encoding proteins (metallothionein3-like protein, lipoxygenase, lipid transfer protein, and a peroxidase 3) were found to be constitutively up-regulated in inoculated and uninoculated old leaves. The modulation of the five candidate genes has been validated using the real-time quantitative PCR. Thus, ontogenic resistance may be the result of the

  2. Analysis of Genetic Mosaics of the Nematode CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Robert K.

    1984-01-01

    A new method for producing genetic mosaics, which involves the spontaneous somatic loss of free chromosome fragments, is demonstrated. Four genes that affect the behavior of C. elegans were studied in mosaic animals. The analysis was greatly aided by the fact that the complete cell lineage of wild-type animals is known. Two of the mutant genes affect certain sensory responses and prevent uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) by certain sensory neurons. Mosaic analysis indicated that one of these mutant genes is cell autonomous with respect to its effect on FITC uptake and the other is cell nonautonomous. In the latter case, the genotype of a non-neuronal supporting cell that surrounds the processes of the neurons that normally take up FITC probably is critical. The other two mutant genes affect animal movement. Mosaic analysis indicated that the expression of one of these genes is specific to certain neurons (motor neurons of the ventral and dorsal nerve cords are prime candidates) and the expression of the other gene is specific to muscle cells. PMID:6434374

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis in cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas identifies new candidate genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, Cristina L; Leich, Ellen; Sbiera, Silviu; Weismann, Dirk; Rosenwald, Andreas; Allolio, Bruno; Fassnacht, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The genetic mechanisms underlying adrenocortical tumor development are still largely unknown. We used high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (Affymetrix SNP 6.0) to detect copy number alterations (CNAs) and copy-neutral losses of heterozygosity (cnLOH) in 15 cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas with matched blood samples. We focused on microalterations aiming to discover new candidate genes involved in early tumorigenesis and/or autonomous cortisol secretion. We identified 962 CNAs with a median of 18 CNAs per sample. Half of them involved noncoding regions, 89% were less than 100 kb, and 28% were found in at least two samples. The most frequently gained regions were 5p15.33, 6q16.1, 7p22.3-22.2, 8q24.3, 9q34.2-34.3, 11p15.5, 11q11, 12q12, 16q24.3, 20p11.1-20q21.11, and Xq28 (≥20% of cases), most of them being identified in the same three adenomas. These regions contained among others genes like NOTCH1, CYP11B2, HRAS, and IGF2. Recurrent losses were less common and smaller than gains, being mostly localized at 1p, 6q, and 11q. Pathway analysis revealed that Notch signaling was the most frequently altered. We identified 46 recurrent CNAs that each affected a single gene (31 gains and 15 losses), including genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11B1) or tumorigenesis (CTNNB1, EPHA7, SGK1, STIL, FHIT). Finally, 20 small cnLOH in four cases affecting 15 known genes were found. Our findings provide the first high-resolution genome-wide view of chromosomal changes in cortisol-secreting adenomas and identify novel candidate genes, such as HRAS, EPHA7, and SGK1. Furthermore, they implicate that the Notch1 signaling pathway might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors.

  4. A 45-year followup study of breast and other cancers in kindred 107 and linkage analysis of candidate loci

    SciTech Connect

    Goldgar, D.E.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ward, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    One of the earliest large kindreds with inherited susceptibility to breast cancer was reported by Gardner and Stephens in 1950. This family, denoted K107, was ascertained in 1947 by a genetics student with two great aunts who died of breast cancer in their 40`s. Subsequent clinical and genealogical follow-up identified 7 additional cases of early-onset breast cancer. The family was updated several times, most notably in 1980. For the present study K107 was recently reinvestigated and over 75 blood samples gathered for genotyping. The kindred now contains 38 cases of female breast cancer, 3 cases of male breast cancer, and 6 cases of ovarian cancer, 18 of which have been identified since the 1980 report. Examination of the obligate carriers demonstrates that that gene responsible for the breast and ovarian cancer in K107 is highly penetrant. Other cancers appear to be associated with expression of this gene, most notably prostate cancer, melanoma, and uterine cancer. Linkage to the BRCA1 region in K107 was excluded based upon the analysis of genotypings at four loci covering the BRCA1 gene on chromosome 17q has been excluded in this family, using four highly polymorphic markers in the BRCA1 region (multipoint LOD score -3.27). Eight other candidate breast cancer susceptibility genes and candidate regions, including p53 and ESR have also been tested for linkage and excluded. Studies to formally re-estimate penetrance and test for excesses of all cancer sites and a genomic search in this family are in progress.

  5. CHARACTERISTICS OF PLANETARY CANDIDATES OBSERVED BY KEPLER. II. ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST FOUR MONTHS OF DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas; DeVore, Edna; Jenkins, Jon M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Cochran, William D.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Geary, John C.; Latham, David W.; Gilliland, Ronald; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B. E-mail: Martin.Still@nasa.gov

    2011-07-20

    On 2011 February 1 the Kepler mission released data for 156,453 stars observed from the beginning of the science observations on 2009 May 2 through September 16. There are 1235 planetary candidates with transit-like signatures detected in this period. These are associated with 997 host stars. Distributions of the characteristics of the planetary candidates are separated into five class sizes: 68 candidates of approximately Earth-size (R{sub p} < 1.25 R{sub +}), 288 super-Earth-size (1.25 R{sub +} {<=} R{sub p} < 2 R{sub +}), 662 Neptune-size (2 R{sub +} {<=} R{sub p} < 6 R{sub +}), 165 Jupiter-size (6 R{sub +} {<=} R{sub p} < 15 R{sub +}), and 19 up to twice the size of Jupiter (15 R{sub +} {<=} R{sub p} < 22 R{sub +}). In the temperature range appropriate for the habitable zone, 54 candidates are found with sizes ranging from Earth-size to larger than that of Jupiter. Six are less than twice the size of the Earth. Over 74% of the planetary candidates are smaller than Neptune. The observed number versus size distribution of planetary candidates increases to a peak at two to three times the Earth-size and then declines inversely proportional to the area of the candidate. Our current best estimates of the intrinsic frequencies of planetary candidates, after correcting for geometric and sensitivity biases, are 5% for Earth-size candidates, 8% for super-Earth-size candidates, 18% for Neptune-size candidates, 2% for Jupiter-size candidates, and 0.1% for very large candidates; a total of 0.34 candidates per star. Multi-candidate, transiting systems are frequent; 17% of the host stars have multi-candidate systems, and 34% of all the candidates are part of multi-candidate systems.

  6. Transcriptome analysis reveals candidate genes involved in luciferin metabolism in Luciola aquatilis (Coleoptera: Lampyridae)

    PubMed Central

    Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Chumnanpuen, Pramote

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence, which living organisms such as fireflies emit light, has been studied extensively for over half a century. This intriguing reaction, having its origins in nature where glowing insects can signal things such as attraction or defense, is now widely used in biotechnology with applications of bioluminescence and chemiluminescence. Luciferase, a key enzyme in this reaction, has been well characterized; however, the enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of its substrate, luciferin, remains unsolved at present. To elucidate the luciferin metabolism, we performed a de novo transcriptome analysis using larvae of the firefly species, Luciola aquatilis. Here, a comparative analysis is performed with the model coleopteran insect Tribolium casteneum to elucidate the metabolic pathways in L. aquatilis. Based on a template luciferin biosynthetic pathway, combined with a range of protein and pathway databases, and various prediction tools for functional annotation, the candidate genes, enzymes, and biochemical reactions involved in luciferin metabolism are proposed for L. aquatilis. The candidate gene expression is validated in the adult L. aquatilis using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). This study provides useful information on the bio-production of luciferin in the firefly and will benefit to future applications of the valuable firefly bioluminescence system. PMID:27761329

  7. Analysis of Surface Charging for a Candidate Solar Sail Mission Using Nascap-2k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard; Minow, Joseph I.; Davis, Victoria; Mandell, Myron; Gardner, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The characterization of the electromagnetic interaction for a solar sail in the solar wind environment and identification of viable charging mitigation strategies are critical solar sail mission design task. Spacecraft charging has important implications both for science applications and for lifetime and reliability issues of sail propulsion systems. To that end, surface charging calculations of a candidate 150-meter-class solar sail spacecraft for the 0.5 AU solar polar and 1.0 AU L1 solar wind environments are performed. A model of the spacecraft with candidate materials having appropriate electrical properties is constructed using Object Toolkit. The spacecraft charging analysis is performed using Nascap-2k, the NASA/AFRL sponsored spacecraft charging analysis tool. Nominal and atypical solar wind environments appropriate for the 0.5 AU and 1.0 AU missions are used to establish current collection of solar wind ions and electrons. Finally, a geostationary orbit environment case is included to demonstrate a bounding example of extreme (negative) charging of a solar sail spacecraft. Results from the charging analyses demonstrate that minimal differential potentials (and resulting threat of electrostatic discharge) occur when the spacecraft is constructed entirely of conducting materials, as anticipated from standard guidelines for mitigation of spacecraft charging issues. Examples with dielectric materials exposed to the space environment exhibit differential potentials ranging from a few volts to extreme potentials in the kilovolt range.

  8. Analysis of Surface Charging for a Candidate Solar Sail Mission Using NASCAP-2K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard; Minow, Joseph L.; Davis, V. A.; Mandell, Myron; Gardner, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The characterization of the electromagnetic interaction for a solar sail in the solar wind environment and identification of viable charging mitigation strategies are critical solar sail mission design tasks. Spacecraft charging has important implications both for science applications and for lifetime and reliability issues of sail propulsion systems. To that end, surface charging calculations of a candidate 150-meter-class solar sail spacecraft for the 0.5 AU solar polar and 1.9 AU LI solar wind environments are performed. A model of the spacecraft with candidate materials having appropriate electrical properties is constructed using Object Toolkit. The spacecraft charging analysis is performed using Nascap-2k. the NASA/AFRL sponsored spacecraft charging analysis tool. Nominal and atypical solar wind environments appropriate for the 0.5 AU and 1.0 AU missions are used to establish current collection of solar wind ions and electrons. Finally, a geostationary orbit environment case is included to demonstrate a bounding example of extreme (negative) charging of a solar sail spacecraft. Results from the charging analyses demonstrate that minimal differential potentials (and resulting threat of electrostatic discharge) occur when the spacecraft is constructed entirely of conducting materials, as anticipated from standard guidelines for mitigation of spacecraft charging issues. Examples with dielectric materials exposed to the space environment exhibit differential potentials ranging from a few volts to extreme potentials in the kilovolt range.

  9. Moving toward System Genetics through Multiple Trait Analysis in Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shriner, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Association studies are a staple of genotype–phenotype mapping studies, whether they are based on single markers, haplotypes, candidate genes, genome-wide genotypes, or whole genome sequences. Although genetic epidemiological studies typically contain data collected on multiple traits which themselves are often correlated, most analyses have been performed on single traits. Here, I review several methods that have been developed to perform multiple trait analysis. These methods range from traditional multivariate models for systems of equations to recently developed graphical approaches based on network theory. The application of network theory to genetics is termed systems genetics and has the potential to address long-standing questions in genetics about complex processes such as coordinate regulation, homeostasis, and pleiotropy. PMID:22303408

  10. Candidate Gene Association Analysis of Neuroblastoma in Chinese Children Strengthens the Role of LMO1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanmin; Jin, Yaqiong; Han, Shujing; Han, Wei; Tai, Jun; Guo, Yongli; Ni, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in children and the most frequently diagnosed cancer in the first year of life. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of Caucasian and African populations have shown that common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in several genes are associated with the risk of developing NB, while few studies have been performed on Chinese children. Herein, we examined the association between the genetic polymorphisms in candidate genes and the risk of NB in Chinese children. In total, 127 SNPs in nine target genes, revealed by GWAS studies of other ethnic groups and four related lincRNAs, were genotyped in 549 samples (244 NB patients and 305 healthy controls). After adjustment for gender and age, there were 21 SNPs associated with NB risk at the two-sided P < 0.05 level, 11 of which were located in LMO1. After correction for multiple comparisons, only rs204926 in LMO1 remained significantly different between cases and controls (OR = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.31–0.65, adjusted P = 0.003). In addition, 16 haplotypes in four separate genes were significantly different between case and control groups at an unadjusted P value < 0.05, 11 of which were located in LMO1. A major haplotype, ATC, containing rs204926, rs110420, and rs110419, conferred a significant increase in risk for NB (OR = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.41–2.36, adjusted P < 0.001). The major finding of our study was obtained for risk alleles within the LMO1 gene. Our data suggest that genetic variants in LMO1 are associated with increased NB risk in Chinese children. PMID:26030754

  11. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Mycobacterium ulcerans for the Identification of Putative Essential Genes and Therapeutic Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Shifa; Tong, Yigang

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, is the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. The present treatment options are limited and emergence of treatment resistant isolates represents a serious concern and a need for better therapeutics. Conventional drug discovery methods are time consuming and labor-intensive. Unfortunately, the slow growing nature of M. ulcerans in experimental conditions is also a barrier for drug discovery and development. In contrast, recent advancements in complete genome sequencing, in combination with cheminformatics and computational biology, represent an attractive alternative approach for the identification of therapeutic candidates worthy of experimental research. A computational, comparative genomics workflow was defined for the identification of novel therapeutic candidates against M. ulcerans, with the aim that a selected target should be essential to the pathogen, and have no homology in the human host. Initially, a total of 424 genes were predicted as essential from the M. ulcerans genome, via homology searching of essential genome content from 20 different bacteria. Metabolic pathway analysis showed that the most essential genes are associated with carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Among these, 236 proteins were identified as non-host and essential, and could serve as potential drug and vaccine candidates. Several drug target prioritization parameters including druggability were also calculated. Enzymes from several pathways are discussed as potential drug targets, including those from cell wall synthesis, thiamine biosynthesis, protein biosynthesis, and histidine biosynthesis. It is expected that our data will facilitate selection of M. ulcerans proteins for successful entry into drug design pipelines. PMID:22912793

  12. Multiplexed Genetic Analysis Using an Expanded Genetic Alphabet

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Scott C.; Marshall, David J.; Harms, Gerda; Miller, Christie M.; Sherrill, Christopher B.; Beaty, Edward L.; Lederer, Scott A.; Roesch, Eric B.; Madsen, Gary; Hoffman, Gary L.; Laessig, Ronald H.; Kopish, Greg J.; Baker, Mei Wang; Benner, Steven A.; Farrell, Philip M.; Prudent, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Background All states require some kind of testing for newborns, but the policies are far from standardized. In some states, newborn screening may include genetic tests for a wide range of targets, but the costs and complexities of the newer genetic tests inhibit expansion of newborn screening. We describe the development and technical evaluation of a multiplex platform that may foster increased newborn genetic screening. Methods MultiCode® PLx involves three major steps: PCR, target-specific extension, and liquid chip decoding. Each step is performed in the same reaction vessel, and the test is completed in ~3 h. For site-specific labeling and room-temperature decoding, we use an additional base pair constructed from isoguanosine and isocytidine. We used the method to test for mutations within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The developed test was performed manually and by automated liquid handling. Initially, 225 samples with a range of genotypes were tested retrospectively with the method. A prospective study used samples from >400 newborns. Results In the retrospective study, 99.1% of samples were correctly genotyped with no incorrect calls made. In the perspective study, 95% of the samples were correctly genotyped for all targets, and there were no incorrect calls. Conclusions The unique genetic multiplexing platform was successfully able to test for 31 targets within the CFTR gene and provides accurate genotype assignments in a clinical setting. PMID:15319316

  13. Genetic variation and effects of candidate-gene polymorphisms on coagulation properties, curd firmness modeling and acidity in milk from Brown Swiss cows.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, A; Chessa, S; Ribeca, C; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Bobbo, T; Casellas, J; Bittante, G

    2015-07-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate the genetic variation of traditional milk coagulation properties (MCPs), milk acidity, curd firmness (CF) modeled on time t (CF(t) ; comprising: RCT(eq), rennet coagulation time estimated from the equation; CF(P), the asymptotic potential curd firmness; k(CF), the curd firming instant rate constant; and k(SR), the syneresis instant rate constant) and maximum CF traits (MCF; comprising CF(max), the maximum CF value; and tmax, the time of attainment). Furthermore, we investigated 96 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 54 candidate genes, testing their associations with the above-listed traits. Milk and blood samples were collected from 1271 cows (each sampled once) from 85 herds. Genotyping was performed using a custom Illumina VeraCode GoldenGate approach. A Bayesian linear animal model (including the effects of herd, days in milk, parity and additive polygenic effects) was used to estimate the genetic parameters of the studied traits. The same model with the addition of the SNP genotype effect was used for our association analysis. The heritability estimates of CF t and the MCF traits (RCT(eq)=0.258; k(CF)=0.230; CF(max)=0.191; t(max)=0.278) were similar to those obtained using traditional MCPs (0.187 to 0.267), except for the lower estimates for CF(P) (0.064) and k(SR) (0.077). A total of 13 of the 51 tested SNPs had relevant additive effects on at least one trait. We observed associations between MCPs and SNPs in the genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2), chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), growth hormone 1 (GH1), prolactin (PRL) and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Whereas, CF(t) and the MCF traits were associated with polymorphisms in the α-s1-casein (CSN1S1), β-casein (CSN2), GH1, oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1), phospholipase C β1 (PLCB1), PRL and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A (STAT5A) genes.

  14. Fine mapping and candidate gene analysis of the floury endosperm gene, FLO(a), in rice.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yongli; Lee, Song-I; Piao, Rihua; Jiang, Wenzhu; Ham, Tae-Ho; Chin, Joong-Hyoun; Piao, Zhongze; Han, Longzhi; Kang, Si-Yong; Koh, Hee-Jong

    2010-02-28

    In addition to its role as an energy source for plants, animals and humans, starch is also an environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels. In rice, the eating and cooking quality of the grain is determined by its starch properties. The floury endosperm of rice has been explored as an agronomical trait in breeding and genetics studies. In the present study, we characterized a floury endosperm mutant, flo(a), derived from treatment of Oryza sativa ssp. japonica cultivar Hwacheong with MNU. The innermost endosperm of the flo(a) mutant exhibited floury characteristics while the outer layer of the endosperm appeared normal. Starch granules in the flo(a) mutant formed a loosely-packed crystalline structure and X-ray diffraction revealed that the overall crystallinity of the starch was decreased compared to wild-type. The FLO(a) gene was isolated via a map-based cloning approach and predicted to encode the tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein, OsTPR. Three mutant alleles contain a nucleotide substitution that generated one stop codon or one splice site, respectively, which presumably disrupts the interaction of the functionally conserved TPR motifs. Taken together, our map-based cloning approach pinpointed an OsTPR as a strong candidate of FLO(a), and the proteins that contain TPR motifs might play a significant role in rice starch biosynthetic pathways.

  15. An Analysis of the Candidate Teachers' Beliefs Related to Knowledge, Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Erdal; Vural, Ömer Faruk; Demir, Servet; Bagceci, Birsen

    2015-01-01

    Candidate teachers have several beliefs related to their knowledge, learning and teaching. The purpose of this study is to analyze the beliefs of candidate teachers about knowledge, learning and teaching. Candidate teachers were assigned a scale and from the answers "belief points" were obtained based on their attitudes about these three…

  16. Quantitative analysis of triple-mutant genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Braberg, Hannes; Alexander, Richard; Shales, Michael; Xu, Jiewei; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E; Krogan, Nevan J

    2014-08-01

    The quantitative analysis of genetic interactions between pairs of gene mutations has proven to be effective for characterizing cellular functions, but it can miss important interactions for functionally redundant genes. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach termed triple-mutant analysis (TMA). The procedure relies on a query strain that contains two deletions in a pair of redundant or otherwise related genes, which is crossed against a panel of candidate deletion strains to isolate triple mutants and measure their growth. A central feature of TMA is to interrogate mutants that are synthetically sick when two other genes are deleted but interact minimally with either single deletion. This approach has been valuable for discovering genes that restore critical functions when the principal actors are deleted. TMA has also uncovered double-mutant combinations that produce severe defects because a third protein becomes deregulated and acts in a deleterious fashion, and it has revealed functional differences between proteins presumed to act together. The protocol is optimized for Singer ROTOR pinning robots, takes 3 weeks to complete and measures interactions for up to 30 double mutants against a library of 1,536 single mutants.

  17. Genetic analysis of Xenopus transcription factor IIIA.

    PubMed

    Bumbulis, M J; Wroblewski, G; McKean, D; Setzer, D R

    1998-12-18

    We describe a method for the genetic analysis of the DNA-binding properties of Xenopus transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA). In this approach, a transcriptional activator with the DNA-binding specificity of Xenopus TFIIIA is expressed in yeast cells, where it specifically activates expression of a beta-galactosidase reporter gene containing one or more Xenopus 5 S rRNA genes that function as upstream activator sequences. This transcription-promoting activity was used as the basis for a genetic assay of Xenopus TFIIIA's DNA-binding function in yeast, an assay that we show can be calibrated quantitatively to allow the affinity of the Xenopus TFIIIA-5 S rRNA gene interaction to be deduced from measurements of beta-galactosidase activity. We have combined this genetic assay with a simple and efficient method of mutagenesis that makes use of error-prone PCR and homologous recombination to generate and screen large numbers of TFIIIA mutants for those with altered 5 S rRNA gene-binding affinity. Over 30 such mutants have been identified and partially characterized. The mutants we have obtained provide strong support for the application to intact TFIIIA of recent structural models of the N-terminal zinc fingers of the protein bound to fragments of the 5 S rRNA gene. Other mutants permit identification of important residues in more C-terminal zinc fingers of TFIIIA for which high-resolution structural information is not currently available. Finally, our results have interesting implications with respect to the mechanism of activation of transcription by RNA polymerase II in yeast. Copyright 1998 Academic Press

  18. Comprehensive Association Analysis of Candidate Genes for Generalized Vitiligo Supports XBP1, FOXP3, and TSLP

    PubMed Central

    Birlea, Stanca A.; Jin, Ying; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Herbstman, Deborah M.; Wallace, Margaret R.; McCormack, Wayne T.; Kemp, E. Helen; Gawkrodger, David J.; Weetman, Anthony P.; Picardo, Mauro; Leone, Giovanni; Taïeb, Alain; Jouary, Thomas; Ezzedine, Khaled; van Geel, Nanja; Lambert, Jo; Overbeck, Andreas; Fain, Pamela R.; Spritz, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    We previously carried out a genome-wide association study of generalized vitiligo (GV) in non-Hispanic whites, identifying 13 confirmed susceptibility loci. In this study, we re-analyzed the genome-wide data set (comprising 1,392 cases and 2,629 controls) to specifically test association of all 33 GV candidate genes that have previously been suggested for GV, followed by meta-analysis incorporating both current and previously published data. We detected association of three of the candidate genes tested: TSLP (rs764916, P = 3.0E-04, odds ratio (OR)= 1.60; meta-P for rs3806933= 3.1E-03), XBP1 (rs6005863, P = 3.6E-04, OR= 1.17; meta-P for rs2269577= 9.5E-09), and FOXP3 (rs11798415, P = 5.8E-04, OR= 1.19). Association of GV with CTLA4 (rs12992492, P = 5.9E-05, OR= 1.20; meta-P for rs231775= 1.0E-04) seems to be secondary to epidemiological association with other concomitant autoimmune diseases. Within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), at 6p21.33, association with TAP1-PSMB8 (rs3819721, P = 5.2E-06) seems to derive from linkage disequilibrium with major primary signals in the MHC class I and class II regions. PMID:21085187

  19. Early developability screen of therapeutic antibody candidates using Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Lavoisier, Alexandra; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies represent one of the fastest growing segments in the pharmaceutical market. They are used in a broad range of disease fields, such as autoimmune diseases, cancer, inflammation and infectious diseases. The growth of the segment has necessitated development of new analytical platforms for faster and better antibody selection and characterization. Early quality control and risk assessment of biophysical parameters help prevent failure in later stages of antibody development, and thus can reduce costs and save time. Critical parameters such as aggregation, conformational stability, colloidal stability and hydrophilicity, are measured during the early phase of antibody generation and guide the selection process of the best lead candidates in terms of technical developability. We report on the use of a novel instrument (ActiPix/Viscosizer) for measuring both the hydrodynamic radius and the absolute viscosity of antibodies based on Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging. The looped microcapillary-based method combines low sample consumption, fast throughput and high precision compared to other conventional methods. From a random panel of 130 antibodies in the early selection process, we identified some with large hydrodynamic radius outside the normal distribution and others with non-Gaussian Taylor dispersion profiles. The antibodies with such abnormal properties were confirmed later in the selection process to show poor developability profiles. Moreover, combining these results with those of the viscosity measurements at high antibody concentrations allows screening, with limited amounts of materials, candidates with potential issues in pre-formulation development.

  20. Early developability screen of therapeutic antibody candidates using Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging detection

    PubMed Central

    Lavoisier, Alexandra; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies represent one of the fastest growing segments in the pharmaceutical market. They are used in a broad range of disease fields, such as autoimmune diseases, cancer, inflammation and infectious diseases. The growth of the segment has necessitated development of new analytical platforms for faster and better antibody selection and characterization. Early quality control and risk assessment of biophysical parameters help prevent failure in later stages of antibody development, and thus can reduce costs and save time. Critical parameters such as aggregation, conformational stability, colloidal stability and hydrophilicity, are measured during the early phase of antibody generation and guide the selection process of the best lead candidates in terms of technical developability. We report on the use of a novel instrument (ActiPix/Viscosizer) for measuring both the hydrodynamic radius and the absolute viscosity of antibodies based on Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging. The looped microcapillary-based method combines low sample consumption, fast throughput and high precision compared to other conventional methods. From a random panel of 130 antibodies in the early selection process, we identified some with large hydrodynamic radius outside the normal distribution and others with non-Gaussian Taylor dispersion profiles. The antibodies with such abnormal properties were confirmed later in the selection process to show poor developability profiles. Moreover, combining these results with those of the viscosity measurements at high antibody concentrations allows screening, with limited amounts of materials, candidates with potential issues in pre-formulation development. PMID:25514497

  1. An analysis of candidates for addition to the Clean Air Act list of hazardous air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Lunder, Sonya; Woodruff, Tracey J; Axelrad, Daniel A

    2004-02-01

    There are 188 air toxics listed as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in the Clean Air Act (CAA), based on their potential to adversely impact public health. This paper presents several analyses performed to screen potential candidates for addition to the HAPs list. We analyzed 1086 HAPs and potential HAPs, including chemicals regulated by the state of California or with emissions reported to the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI). HAPs and potential HAPs were ranked by their emissions to air, and by toxicity-weighted (tox-wtd) emissions for cancer and noncancer, using emissions information from the TRI and toxicity information from state and federal agencies. Separate consideration was given for persistent, bioaccumulative toxins (PBTs), reproductive or developmental toxins, and chemicals under evaluation for regulation as toxic air contaminants in California. Forty-four pollutants were identified as candidate HAPs based on three ranking analyses and whether they were a PBT or a reproductive or developmental toxin. Of these, nine qualified in two or three different rankings (ammonia [NH3], copper [Cu], Cu compounds, nitric acid [HNO3], N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, sulfuric acid [H2SO4], vanadium [V] compounds, zinc [Zn], and Zn compounds). This analysis suggests further evaluation of several pollutants for possible addition to the CAA list of HAPs.

  2. Cloned cDNA of A/swine/Iowa/15/1930 internal genes as a candidate backbone for reverse genetics vaccine against influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Petcharat, Nantawan; Lekcharoensuk, Chalermpol; Auewarakul, Prasert; Richt, Juergen A

    2012-02-14

    Reverse genetics viruses for influenza vaccine production usually utilize the internal genes of the egg-adapted A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) strain. This egg-adapted strain provides high production yield in embryonated eggs but does not necessarily give the best yield in mammalian cell culture. In order to generate a reverse genetics viral backbone that is well-adapted to high growth in mammalian cell culture, a swine influenza isolate A/swine/Iowa/15/30 (H1N1) (rg1930) that was shown to give high yield in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells was used as the internal gene donor for reverse genetics plasmids. In this report, the internal genes from rg1930 were used for construction of reverse genetics viruses carrying a cleavage site-modified hemagglutinin (HA) gene and neuraminidase (NA) gene from a highly pathogenic H5N1 virus. The resulting virus (rg1930H5N1) was low pathogenic in vivo. Inactivated rg1930H5N1 vaccine completely protected chickens from morbidity and mortality after challenge with highly pathogenic H5N1. Protective immunity was obtained when chickens were immunized with an inactivated vaccine consisting of at least 2(9) HA units of the rg1930H5N1 virus. In comparison to the PR8-based reverse genetics viruses carrying the same HA and NA genes from an H5N1 virus, rg1930 based viruses yielded higher viral titers in MDCK and Vero cells. In addition, the reverse genetics derived H3N2 and H5N2 viruses with the rg1930 backbone replicated in MDCK cells better than the cognate viruses with the rgPR8 backbone. It is concluded that this newly established reverse genetics backbone system could serve as a candidate for a master donor strain for development of inactivated influenza vaccines in cell-based systems.

  3. Cloned cDNA of A/swine/Iowa/15/1930 internal genes as a candidate backbone for reverse genetics vaccine against influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Petcharat, Nuntawan; Lekcharoensuk, Chalermpol; Auewarakul, Prasert; Richt, Juergen A

    2012-01-01

    Reverse genetics viruses for influenza vaccine production usually utilize the internal genes of the egg-adapted A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) strain. This egg-adapted strain provides high production yield in embryonated eggs but does not necessarily give the best yield in mammalian cell culture. In order to generate a reverse genetics viral backbone that is well-adapted to high growth in mammalian cell culture, a swine influenza isolate (A/swine/Iowa/15/30 (H1N1) (rg1930) that was shown to give high yield in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells was used as the internal gene donor for reverse genetics plasmids. In this report, the internal genes from rg1930 were used for construction of reverse genetics viruses carrying a cleavage site-modified hemagglutinin (HA) gene and neuraminidase (NA) gene from a highly pathogenic H5N1 virus. The resulting virus (rg1930H5N1) was low pathogenic in vivo. Inactivated rg1930H5N1 vaccine completely protected chickens from morbidity and mortality after challenge with highly pathogenic H5N1. Protective immunity was obtained when chickens were immunized with an inactivated vaccine consisting of at least 29 HA units of the rg1930H5N1 virus. In comparison to the PR8-based reverse genetics viruses carrying the same HA and NA genes from an H5N1 virus, rg1930 based viruses yielded higher viral titers in MDCK and Vero cells. In addition, the reverse genetics derived H3N2 and H5N2 viruses with the rg1930 backbone replicated in MDCK cells better than the cognate viruses with the rgPR8 backbone. It is concluded that this newly established reverse genetics backbone system could serve as a candidate for a master donor strain for development of inactivated influenza vaccines in cell-based systems. PMID:22230579

  4. Gene expression profile analysis of testis and ovary of oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, reveals candidate reproduction-related genes.

    PubMed

    Qiao, H; Xiong, Y W; Jiang, S F; Fu, H T; Sun, S M; Jin, S B; Gong, Y S; Zhang, W Y

    2015-03-20

    This study utilized high-throughput RNA sequencing technology to identify reproduction- and development-related genes of Macrobrachium nipponense by analyzing gene expression profiles of testis and ovary. More than 20 million 1 x 51-bp reads were obtained by Illumina sequencing, generating more than 7.7 and 11.7 million clean reads in the testis and ovary library, respectively. As a result, 10,018 unitags were supposed to be differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between ovary and testis. Compared to the ovary library, 4563 (45.5%) of these DEGs exhibited at least 6-fold upregulated expression, while 5455 (54.5%) DEGs exhibited at least 2-fold downregulated expression in the testis. The Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis showed that 113 GO terms had potential molecular functions in reproduction. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes results revealed that the most important pathways may be relevant to reproduction and included 7 pathways. Forty-two genes were identified as reproduction-, development-, and sex-related genes based on GO classification and sequence comparison with other publications, including male reproductive-related LIM protein, spermatogenesis-associated protein, gametocyte-specific factor 1, VASA-like protein, vitellogenin, sex-determining protein fem-1, and other potential candidates. These results will advance research in the field of molecular genetics in M. nipponense and offer a valuable resource for further research related to reproduction in crustaceans.

  5. Comprehensive analysis of schizophrenia-associated loci highlights ion channel pathways and biologically plausible candidate causal genes

    PubMed Central

    Pers, Tune H.; Timshel, Pascal; Ripke, Stephan; Lent, Samantha; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Franke, Lude; Hirschhorn, Joel N.

    2016-01-01

    Over 100 associated genetic loci have been robustly associated with schizophrenia. Gene prioritization and pathway analysis have focused on a priori hypotheses and thus may have been unduly influenced by prior assumptions and missed important causal genes and pathways. Using a data-driven approach, we show that genes in associated loci: (1) are highly expressed in cortical brain areas; (2) are enriched for ion channel pathways (false discovery rates <0.05); and (3) contain 62 genes that are functionally related to each other and hence represent promising candidates for experimental follow up. We validate the relevance of the prioritized genes by showing that they are enriched for rare disruptive variants and de novo variants from schizophrenia sequencing studies (odds ratio 1.67, P = 0.039), and are enriched for genes encoding members of mouse and human postsynaptic density proteomes (odds ratio 4.56, P = 5.00 × 10−4; odds ratio 2.60, P = 0.049).The authors wish it to be known that, in their opinion, the first 2 authors should be regarded as joint First Author. PMID:26755824

  6. Comprehensive analysis of schizophrenia-associated loci highlights ion channel pathways and biologically plausible candidate causal genes.

    PubMed

    Pers, Tune H; Timshel, Pascal; Ripke, Stephan; Lent, Samantha; Sullivan, Patrick F; O'Donovan, Michael C; Franke, Lude; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2016-03-15

    Over 100 associated genetic loci have been robustly associated with schizophrenia. Gene prioritization and pathway analysis have focused on a priori hypotheses and thus may have been unduly influenced by prior assumptions and missed important causal genes and pathways. Using a data-driven approach, we show that genes in associated loci: (1) are highly expressed in cortical brain areas; (2) are enriched for ion channel pathways (false discovery rates <0.05); and (3) contain 62 genes that are functionally related to each other and hence represent promising candidates for experimental follow up. We validate the relevance of the prioritized genes by showing that they are enriched for rare disruptive variants and de novo variants from schizophrenia sequencing studies (odds ratio 1.67, P = 0.039), and are enriched for genes encoding members of mouse and human postsynaptic density proteomes (odds ratio 4.56, P = 5.00 × 10(-4); odds ratio 2.60, P = 0.049).The authors wish it to be known that, in their opinion, the first 2 authors should be regarded as joint First Author.

  7. Basic principles and laboratory analysis of genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Chanock, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    With the draft of the human genome and advances in technology, the approach toward mapping complex diseases and traits has changed. Human genetics has evolved into the study of the genome as a complex structure harbouring clues for multifaceted disease risk with the majority still unknown. The discovery of new candidate regions by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has changed strategies for the study of genetic predisposition. More genome-wide, "agnostic" approaches, with increasing numbers of participants from high-quality epidemiological studies are for the first time replicating results in different settings. However, new-found regions (which become the new candidate "genes") require extensive follow-up and investigation of their functional significance. Understanding the true effect of genetic variability on the risk of complex diseases is paramount. The importance of designing high-quality studies to assess environmental contributions, as well as the interactions between genes and exposures, cannot be stressed enough. This chapter will address the basic issues of genetic variation, including population genetics, as well as analytical platforms and tools needed to investigate the contribution of genetics to human diseases and traits.

  8. Integrated analysis of gene expression and methylation profiles of 48 candidate genes in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Zibo; Heng, Jianfu; Yan, Jinhua; Guo, Xinwu; Tang, Lili; Chen, Ming; Peng, Limin; Wu, Yepeng; Wang, Shouman; Xiao, Zhi; Deng, Zhongping; Dai, Lizhong; Wang, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Gene-specific methylation and expression have shown biological and clinical importance for breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Integrated analysis of gene methylation and gene expression may identify genes associated with biology mechanism and clinical outcome of breast cancer and aid in clinical management. Using high-throughput microfluidic quantitative PCR, we analyzed the expression profiles of 48 candidate genes in 96 Chinese breast cancer patients and investigated their correlation with gene methylation and associations with breast cancer clinical parameters. Breast cancer-specific gene expression alternation was found in 25 genes with significant expression difference between paired tumor and normal tissues. A total of 9 genes (CCND2, EGFR, GSTP1, PGR, PTGS2, RECK, SOX17, TNFRSF10D, and WIF1) showed significant negative correlation between methylation and gene expression, which were validated in the TCGA database. Total 23 genes (ACADL, APC, BRCA2, CADM1, CAV1, CCND2, CST6, EGFR, ESR2, GSTP1, ICAM5, NPY, PGR, PTGS2, RECK, RUNX3, SFRP1, SOX17, SYK, TGFBR2, TNFRSF10D, WIF1, and WRN) annotated with potential TFBSs in the promoter regions showed negative correlation between methylation and expression. In logistics regression analysis, 31 of the 48 genes showed improved performance in disease prediction with combination of methylation and expression coefficient. Our results demonstrated the complex correlation and the possible regulatory mechanisms between DNA methylation and gene expression. Integration analysis of methylation and expression of candidate genes could improve performance in breast cancer prediction. These findings would contribute to molecular characterization and identification of biomarkers for potential clinical applications.

  9. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q.

    PubMed

    Bonora, Elena; Lamb, Janine A; Barnby, Gabrielle; Sykes, Nuala; Moberly, Thomas; Beyer, Kim S; Klauck, Sabine M; Poustka, Firtz; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Maestrini, Elena; Battaglia, Agatino; Haracopos, Demetrios; Pedersen, Lennart; Isager, Torben; Eriksen, Gunna; Viskum, Birgitte; Sorensen, Ester-Ulsted; Brondum-Nielsen, Karen; Cotterill, Rodney; Engeland, Herman von; Jonge, Maretha de; Kemner, Chantal; Steggehuis, Karlijn; Scherpenisse, Margret; Rutter, Michael; Bolton, Patrick F; Parr, Jeremy R; Poustka, Annemarie; Bailey, Anthony J; Monaco, Anthony P

    2005-02-01

    Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants in the genes CUTL1, LAMB1 and PTPRZ1. Analysis of genetic variants provided evidence for association with autism for one of the new missense changes identified in LAMB1; this effect was stronger in a subgroup of affected male sibling pair families, implying a possible specific sex-related effect for this variant. Association was also detected for several polymorphisms in the promoter and untranslated region of NRCAM, suggesting that alterations in expression of this gene may be linked to autism susceptibility.

  10. Genome-wide association study and gene set analysis for understanding candidate genes involved in salt tolerance at the rice seedling stage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Zao, Weiguo; He, Qiang; Kim, Tae-Sung; Park, Yong-Jin

    2017-08-18

    Salt is the major factor limiting crop productivity in saline soils and is controlled by various genes. The development of salt-tolerant rice through molecular breeding methods is important to meet the needs of rice breeding. We used 295 accessions to perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of salt tolerance-related phenotypes in rice at the seedling stage and obtained 93 candidate genes with high association peaks across six phenotypes. We constructed a protein interaction network using the candidate genes identified here, and 33 genes were associated. Based on the expression patterns, we found that most of these genes showed a different expression level under control and salt stress conditions. In addition, haplotype network and sequence analysis of one 'key' gene, a transcription factor (Os12g0176700) encoding a SWIRM domain-containing protein, in the interaction network was investigated to explore its possible role in the network. Our study revealed candidate salt tolerance-related genes in rice at the seedling stage, and demonstrated the feasibility of using GWAS to identify genetic architecture underlying salt tolerance. The data generated here may provide resources for molecular breeding and functional analysis of salt tolerance in rice seedlings.

  11. Efficient genetic analysis of fungal samples.

    PubMed

    de los Ríos, A; Deutsch, G; Grube, M

    2000-05-01

    We present a method for rapid genetic analysis of small amounts of fungal material. Sterile glass slides, sufficiently small to fit in a standard PCR tube, were placed on agar inside a Petri dish. After a few days, fungal cultures start to overgrow the glass slides. Glass slides with attached mycelium were harvested, analysed microscopically, and placed into a standard PCR tube. Conserved primers flanking the ITS regions of rDNA repeat were used in a direct PCR with the fungal material. Sequence data were generated to be included in phylogenetic analyses to investigate the relationships of the studied mycorrhizal fungi from orchids. The mycelium attached to glass slides was also used for an in situ hybridization experiment using fluorescent labelled oligonucleotides as probes. Fluorescent signal was found throughout the cytoplasm when a probe specific to a site in the nuclear small subunit rRNA is used.

  12. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Parasite Survival in P. falciparum Malaria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-08

    AD-A279 410 GRANT NO: DAMN17-89-Z-9003 TITLE: MOLECULAR GENETIC ANALYSIS OF PARASITE SURVIVAL IN R. E&LEZjpAIM MALARIA PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR... Analysis of Parasite Survival Grant No. in P. Falciparum Malaria DAMDi 7-89- Z-9003 -6. AUTHOR(S) Jeffrey V. Ravetch, M.D., Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING...consequences of genetic variation for parasite survival. Genetic polymorphisms in PRfalciparum were initially detected by pulsed-field gel analysis of intact

  13. Accelerator-Based PIXE and STIM Analysis of Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerman, W.A.; Stanaland, T.L.; Boudreaux, P.; Elberson, L.; Fontenot, J.; Gates, E.; Greco, R.; McBride, M.; Woodward, A.; Edwards, D.

    2003-08-26

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. A totally reflective sail experiences a pressure of 9.1 {mu}Pa at a distance of 1 AU from the Sun. Since sails are not limited by reaction mass, they provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Practical solar sails can expand the number of possible missions, enabling new concepts that are difficult by conventional means. One of the current challenges is to develop strong, lightweight, and radiation resistant sail materials. This paper will discuss initial results from a Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) analysis of candidate solar sail materials.

  14. Inbreeding and genetic diversity in dogs: results from DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Wade, Claire M

    2011-08-01

    This review assesses evidence from DNA analysis to determine whether there is sufficient genetic diversity within breeds to ensure that populations are sustainable in the absence of cross breeding and to determine whether genetic diversity is declining. On average, dog breeds currently retain approximately 87% of the available domestic canine genetic diversity. Requirements that breeding stock must be 'clear' for all genetic disorders may firstly place undue genetic pressure on animals tested as being 'clear' of known genetic disorders, secondly may contribute to loss of diversity and thirdly may result in the dissemination of new recessive disorders for which no genetic tests are available. Global exchange of genetic material may hasten the loss of alleles and this practice should be discussed in relation to the current effective population size of a breed and its expected future popularity. Genomic data do not always support the results from pedigree analysis and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  15. Fine Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis of the Tiller Suppression Gene ts1 in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Meng, Fen; He, Yonggang; Zhu, Menghao; Shen, Yanhao; Zhang, Zhihong

    2017-01-01

    Tiller number is one of the key factors that influences rice plant type and yield components. In this study, an EMS-induced rice tiller suppression mutant ts1 was characterized. Morphological and histological observations revealed that, in the ts1 plants, the tiller buds were abnormally formed and therefore cannot outgrow into tillers. With an F2 population derived from a cross between ts1 and an indica cultivar Wushansimiao, a major gene, tiller suppression 1 (ts1) was fine-mapped to a 108.5 kb genomic region between markers ID8378 and SSR6884 on the short arm of rice chromosome 2. Candidate gene analysis identified nineteen putative genes. Among them, ORF4 (LOC_Os02g01610) is a PPR gene which harbored a point mutation c.+733/C→T in ts1 mutant plants. A co-dominant SNP marker cd-733C/T was subsequently developed and the SNP assay demonstrated that the point mutation co-segregated with tiller suppression phenotype. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression level of ORF4 in ts1 plants was significantly lower than that in their wild plants, and the expression of rice tillering regulators MOC1 and HTD1 was also significantly decreased in ts1 plants. Our data indicated that ORF4 was a strong candidate gene for ts1 and ts1 might play a role in regulating rice tillering through MOC1 and HTD1 associated pathway. The results above provide a basis for further functional characterization of ts1 and will shed light on molecular mechanism of rice tillering. The informative SNP marker cd-733C/T will facilitate marker-assisted selection of ts1 in rice plant type breeding. PMID:28107441

  16. Quantifying the astrocytoma cell response to candidate pharmaceutical from F-ACTIN image analysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chi; JaJa, Joseph; Turbyville, Thomas; Beutler, John; Gudla, Prabhakar; Nandy, Kaustav; Lockett, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The distribution, directionality and motility of the actin fibers control cell shape, affect cell function and are different in cancer versus normal cells. Quantification of actin structural changes is important for further understanding differences between cell types and for elucidation of the effects and dynamics of drug interactions. We have developed an image analysis framework for quantifying F-actin organization patterns in confocal microscope images in response to different candidate pharmaceutical treatments. The main problem solved was to determine which quantitative features to compute from the images that both capture the visually-observed F-actin patterns and correlate with predicted biological outcomes. The resultant numerical features were effective to quantitatively profile the changes in the spatial distribution of F-actin and facilitate the comparison of different pharmaceuticals. The validation for the segmentation was done through visual inspection and correlation to expected biological outcomes. This is the first study quantifying different structural formations of the same protein in intact cells. Preliminary results show uniquely significant increases in cortical F-actin to stress fiber ratio for increasing doses of OSW-1 and Schweinfurthin A(SA) and a less marked increase for cephalostatin 1 derivative (ceph). This increase was not observed for the actin inhibitors: cytochalasin B (cytoB) and Y-27632 (Y). Ongoing studies are further validating the algorithms, elucidating the underlying molecular pathways and will utilize the algorithms for understanding the kinetics of the F-actin changes. Since many anti-cancer drugs target the cytoskeleton, we believe that the quantitative image analysis method reported here will have broad applications to understanding the mechanisms of action of candidate pharmaceuticals.

  17. Genetic variants determining survival and fertility in an adverse African environment: a population-based large-scale candidate gene association study

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Jacob J.E.; Pijpe, Jeroen; Böhringer, Stefan; van Bodegom, David; Eriksson, Ulrika K.; Sanchez-Faddeev, Hernando; Ziem, Juventus B.; Zwaan, Bas; Slagboom, P. Eline; de Knijff, Peter; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Human survival probability and fertility decline strongly with age. These life history traits have been shaped by evolution. However, research has failed to uncover a consistent genetic determination of variation in survival and fertility. As an explanation, such genetic determinants have been selected in adverse environments, in which humans have lived during most of their history, but are almost exclusively studied in populations in modern affluent environments. Here, we present a large-scale candidate gene association study in a rural African population living in an adverse environment. In 4387 individuals, we studied 4052 SNPs in 148 genes that have previously been identified as possible determinants of survival or fertility in animals or humans. We studied their associations with survival comparing newborns, middle-age adults, and old individuals. In women, we assessed their associations with reported and observed numbers of children. We found no statistically significant associations of these SNPs with survival between the three age groups nor with women's reported and observed fertility. Population stratification was unlikely to explain these results. Apart from a lack of power, we hypothesise that genetic heterogeneity of complex phenotypes and gene-environment interactions prevent the identification of genetic variants explaining variation in survival and fertility in humans. PMID:27356285

  18. Homogeneity study of a corn flour laboratory reference material candidate for inorganic analysis.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Ana Maria Pinto; Dos Santos, Liz Oliveira; Brandao, Geovani Cardoso; Leao, Danilo Junqueira; Bernedo, Alfredo Victor Bellido; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Lemos, Valfredo Azevedo

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a homogeneity study of a corn flour reference material candidate for inorganic analysis is presented. Seven kilograms of corn flour were used to prepare the material, which was distributed among 100 bottles. The elements Ca, K, Mg, P, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn and Mo were quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) after acid digestion procedure. The method accuracy was confirmed by analyzing the rice flour certified reference material, NIST 1568a. All results were evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and principal component analysis (PCA). In the study, a sample mass of 400mg was established as the minimum mass required for analysis, according to the PCA. The between-bottle test was performed by analyzing 9 bottles of the material. Subsamples of a single bottle were analyzed for the within-bottle test. No significant differences were observed for the results obtained through the application of both statistical methods. This fact demonstrates that the material is homogeneous for use as a laboratory reference material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene expression analysis of endometrium reveals progesterone resistance and candidate susceptibility genes in women with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Burney, Richard O; Talbi, Said; Hamilton, Amy E; Vo, Kim Chi; Nyegaard, Mette; Nezhat, Camran R; Lessey, Bruce A; Giudice, Linda C

    2007-08-01

    The identification of molecular differences in the endometrium of women with endometriosis is an important step toward understanding the pathogenesis of this condition and toward developing novel strategies for the treatment of associated infertility and pain. In this study, we conducted global gene expression analysis of endometrium from women with and without moderate/severe stage endometriosis and compared the gene expression signatures across various phases of the menstrual cycle. The transcriptome analysis revealed molecular dysregulation of the proliferative-to-secretory transition in endometrium of women with endometriosis. Paralleled gene expression analysis of endometrial specimens obtained during the early secretory phase demonstrated a signature of enhanced cellular survival and persistent expression of genes involved in DNA synthesis and cellular mitosis in the setting of endometriosis. Comparative gene expression analysis of progesterone-regulated genes in secretory phase endometrium confirmed the observation of attenuated progesterone response. Additionally, interesting candidate susceptibility genes were identified that may be associated with this disorder, including FOXO1A, MIG6, and CYP26A1. Collectively these findings provide a framework for further investigations on causality and mechanisms underlying attenuated progesterone response in endometrium of women with endometriosis.

  20. Antimicrobial Protein Candidates from the Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1: Production, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalili, Rawana N.; Bernfur, Katja; Dishisha, Tarek; Mamo, Gashaw; Schelin, Jenny; Canbäck, Björn; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2016-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterial strain, Geobacillus sp. ZGt-1, isolated from Zara hot spring in Jordan, was capable of inhibiting the growth of the thermophilic G. stearothermophilus and the mesophilic Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhimurium on a solid cultivation medium. Antibacterial activity was not observed when ZGt-1 was cultivated in a liquid medium; however, immobilization of the cells in agar beads that were subjected to sequential batch cultivation in the liquid medium at 60 °C showed increasing antibacterial activity up to 14 cycles. The antibacterial activity was lost on protease treatment of the culture supernatant. Concentration of the protein fraction by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation and analysis of the gel for antibacterial activity against G. stearothermophilus showed a distinct inhibition zone in 15–20 kDa range, suggesting that the active molecule(s) are resistant to denaturation by SDS. Mass spectrometric analysis of the protein bands around the active region resulted in identification of 22 proteins with molecular weight in the range of interest, three of which were new and are here proposed as potential antimicrobial protein candidates by in silico analysis of their amino acid sequences. Mass spectrometric analysis also indicated the presence of partial sequences of antimicrobial enzymes, amidase and dd-carboxypeptidase. PMID:27548162

  1. Genetic analysis of glutamatergic function in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, B.A.; Kankel, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential for communication between neurons and hence are vital in the overall integrative functioning of the nervous system. Previous work on acetylcholine metabolism in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has also raised the possibility that transmitter metabolism may play a prominent role in either the achievement or maintenance of the normal structure of the central nervous system in this species. Unfortunately, acetylcholine is rather poorly characterized as a neurotransmitter in Drosophila; consequently, we have begun an analysis of the role of glutamate (probably the best characterized transmitter in this organism) in the formation and/or maintenance of nervous system structure. We present here the results of a series of preliminary analyses. To suggest where glutamatergic function may be localized, an examination of the spatial distribution of high affinity (/sup 3/H)-glutamate binding sites are presented. We present the results of an analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of enzymatic activities thought to be important in the regulation of transmitter-glutamate pools (i.e., glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenase). To begin to examine whether mutations in any of these functions are capable of affecting glutamatergic activity, we present the results of an initial genetic analysis of one enzymatic function, glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), chosen because of its differential distribution within the adult central nervous system and musculature.

  2. A storied-identity analysis approach to teacher candidates learning to teach in an urban setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibourk, Amal

    highlighted his struggle with navigating talkativeness in the class, but also his struggle being an authority figure in his classroom. At present, only Becky and Ashley pursued teaching in a high needs setting. A storied identity analysis provided as well an insight into their storied strategies, or the teaching strategies shaped by the stories the interns told about how they made sense of the challenges they faced in their teaching practice. There were five teaching strategies the interns named that were important in supporting their learning to teach were (1) building relationships with their students, (2) being resourceful and creative when faced with limited lab materials, (3) making science relevant to their students, (4) scaffolding their students in their learning, and (5) having a network of people as resources in helping them be better teachers and helping their students learn. Out of these five teaching strategies, I called those they named and highlighted as helping them teach in ways they valued and that connected back to their storied identity of science learning their storied strategies. Implications for further pushing storied identities as a tool for teacher educators to help pinpoint priorities that surface in teacher candidates' practice are discussed. An insight into the priorities that teacher candidates highlight in their practice as well as the storied strategies they name and use to deal with challenges that surface in their practice has potential in better helping teacher candidates navigate their developing practice.

  3. Genetic Etiology of Renal Agenesis: Fine Mapping of Renag1 and Identification of Kit as the Candidate Functional Gene

    PubMed Central

    Samanas, Nyssa Becker; Commers, Tessa W.; Dennison, Kirsten L.; Harenda, Quincy Eckert; Kurz, Scott G.; Lachel, Cynthia M.; Wavrin, Kristen Leland; Bowler, Michael; Nijman, Isaac J.; Guryev, Victor; Cuppen, Edwin; Hubner, Norbert; Sullivan, Ruth; Vezina, Chad M.; Shull, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urogenital tract (CAKUT) occur in approximately 0.5% of live births and represent the most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease in neonates and children. The genetic basis of CAKUT is not well defined. To understand more fully the genetic basis of one type of CAKUT, unilateral renal agenesis (URA), we are studying inbred ACI rats, which spontaneously exhibit URA and associated urogenital anomalies at an incidence of approximately 10%. URA is inherited as an incompletely dominant trait with incomplete penetrance in crosses between ACI and Brown Norway (BN) rats and a single responsible genetic locus, designated Renag1, was previously mapped to rat chromosome 14 (RNO14). The goals of this study were to fine map Renag1, identify the causal genetic variant responsible for URA, confirm that the Renag1 variant is the sole determinant of URA in the ACI rat, and define the embryologic basis of URA in this rat model. Data presented herein localize Renag1 to a 379 kilobase (kb) interval that contains a single protein coding gene, Kit (v-kit Hardy-Zukerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog); identify an endogenous retrovirus-derived long terminal repeat located within Kit intron 1 as the probable causal variant; demonstrate aberrant development of the nephric duct in the anticipated number of ACI rat embryos; and demonstrate expression of Kit and Kit ligand (Kitlg) in the nephric duct. Congenic rats that harbor ACI alleles at Renag1 on the BN genetic background exhibit the same spectrum of urogenital anomalies as ACI rats, indicating that Renag1 is necessary and sufficient to elicit URA and associated urogenital anomalies. These data reveal the first genetic link between Kit and URA and illustrate the value of the ACI rat as a model for defining the mechanisms and cell types in which Kit functions during urogenital development. PMID:25693193

  4. Fine resolution genetic mapping of galamin-GMAP (GALN) excludes a candidate gene for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)

    SciTech Connect

    fGuida, L.C.; Kerr, L.; Schwartz, S.

    1994-09-01

    Galamin is a 30 amino acid peptide in the human that has been suggested to potentiate the release of growth hormone; inhibit insulin secretion; play a role in gonadotropin modulation, in neuronal regeneration, and in the control of satiety; may mediate estrogen`s mitogenic role in development of prolactinomas; and may be associated with the development of pituitary hyperplasia in hGHRH transgenic mice. The preprogalanin gene, GALN, is predominantly expressed in the pituitary, hypothalamus, duodenum and pancreas. A second peptide, GMAP, is produced by proteolysis of preprogalanin, but is of unknown function. We previously isolated a 200 kb YAC containing the human galanin gene and localized it to chromosome 11q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene has also been assigned to 11q13. Tumors in MEN1 develop in the anterior pituitary, parathroid glands, neuroendocrine pancreas and the duodenum, which is similar to the expression specificity of GALN. Based on the similar gene localization and expression, we tested GALN as a candidate gene for MEN1. Studies of chromosome 11q13 have defined a genetic map, cen-D11S480-PYGM-MEN1-D11S146-INT2-tel. Whereas PCR analysis of a panel of radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrids from 11q13 mapped GALN distal to PYGM, and within the 1NT2 segregation group, the use of two-color FISH suggested a localization of GALN proximal to 1NT2. Subsequently, TaqI and SinI RFLPs in the GALN gene were identified and genotyped in a 228 member Venezuelan reference pedigree. Multipoint analysis suggested the order; cen-D11S480-[FAEES-III, GALN]-INT2-D11S527, with this order having 100:1 odds vs. placement of GALN distal to INT2. Since other studies place FAEES-III distal of MEN1, our studies exclude the GALN gene from having a role in MEN1.

  5. Candidate genetic pathways for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show association to hyperactive/impulsive symptoms in children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Bralten, Janita; Franke, Barbara; Waldman, Irwin; Rommelse, Nanda; Hartman, Catharina; Asherson, Philip; Banaschewski, Tobias; Ebstein, Richard P; Gill, Michael; Miranda, Ana; Oades, Robert D; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Sergeant, Joseph A; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V; Buitelaar, Jan K; Arias-Vásquez, Alejandro

    2013-11-01

    Because multiple genes with small effect sizes are assumed to play a role in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) etiology, considering multiple variants within the same analysis likely increases the total explained phenotypic variance, thereby boosting the power of genetic studies. This study investigated whether pathway-based analysis could bring scientists closer to unraveling the biology of ADHD. The pathway was described as a predefined gene selection based on a well-established database or literature data. Common genetic variants in pathways involved in dopamine/norepinephrine and serotonin neurotransmission and genes involved in neuritic outgrowth were investigated in cases from the International Multicentre ADHD Genetics (IMAGE) study. Multivariable analysis was performed to combine the effects of single genetic variants within the pathway genes. Phenotypes were DSM-IV symptom counts for inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity (n = 871) and symptom severity measured with the Conners Parent (n = 930) and Teacher (n = 916) Rating Scales. Summing genetic effects of common genetic variants within the pathways showed a significant association with hyperactive/impulsive symptoms ((p)empirical = .007) but not with inattentive symptoms ((p)empirical = .73). Analysis of parent-rated Conners hyperactive/impulsive symptom scores validated this result ((p)empirical = .0018). Teacher-rated Conners scores were not associated. Post hoc analyses showed a significant contribution of all pathways to the hyperactive/impulsive symptom domain (dopamine/norepinephrine, (p)empirical = .0004; serotonin, (p)empirical = .0149; neuritic outgrowth, (p)empirical = .0452). The present analysis shows an association between common variants in 3 genetic pathways and the hyperactive/impulsive component of ADHD. This study demonstrates that pathway-based association analyses, using quantitative measurements of ADHD symptom domains, can increase the power of genetic analyses to

  6. PLANET HUNTERS: NEW KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES FROM ANALYSIS OF QUARTER 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lintott, Chris J.; Schwamb, Megan E.; Schwainski, Kevin; and others

    2013-06-15

    We present new planet candidates identified in NASA Kepler Quarter 2 public release data by volunteers engaged in the Planet Hunters citizen science project. The two candidates presented here survive checks for false positives, including examination of the pixel offset to constrain the possibility of a background eclipsing binary. The orbital periods of the planet candidates are 97.46 days (KIC 4552729) and 284.03 (KIC 10005758) days and the modeled planet radii are 5.3 and 3.8 R{sub Circled-Plus }. The latter star has an additional known planet candidate with a radius of 5.05 R{sub Circled-Plus} and a period of 134.49 days, which was detected by the Kepler pipeline. The discovery of these candidates illustrates the value of massively distributed volunteer review of the Kepler database to recover candidates which were otherwise uncataloged.

  7. Planet Hunters: New Kepler Planet Candidates from Analysis of Quarter 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintott, Chris J.; Schwamb, Megan E.; Barclay, Thomas; Sharzer, Charlie; Fischer, Debra A.; Brewer, John; Giguere, Matthew; Lynn, Stuart; Parrish, Michael; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F.; Schwainski, Kevin; Gagliano, Robert; Gilardi, Joe; Jek, Kian J.; Pääkkönen, Jari-Pekka; Smits, Tjapko

    2013-06-01

    We present new planet candidates identified in NASA Kepler Quarter 2 public release data by volunteers engaged in the Planet Hunters citizen science project. The two candidates presented here survive checks for false positives, including examination of the pixel offset to constrain the possibility of a background eclipsing binary. The orbital periods of the planet candidates are 97.46 days (KIC 4552729) and 284.03 (KIC 10005758) days and the modeled planet radii are 5.3 and 3.8 R ⊕. The latter star has an additional known planet candidate with a radius of 5.05 R ⊕ and a period of 134.49 days, which was detected by the Kepler pipeline. The discovery of these candidates illustrates the value of massively distributed volunteer review of the Kepler database to recover candidates which were otherwise uncataloged. .

  8. The Image of the Candidates: A Communication Analysis of the Ford/Carter Debates I, II, and III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhaber, Gerald M.; And Others

    After 750 combined hours of analysis, the authors discovered major verbal and nonverbal communication differences between the candidates in the three Ford/Carter debates. The research was based on an analysis of 7,378 specific nonverbal behaviors and on 955 verbal references found in the 30,852 word transcripts. The researchers found differences…

  9. Genetic analysis of albuminuria in collaborative cross and multiple mouse intercross populations

    PubMed Central

    Thaisz, Jill; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Feng, Minjie; Philip, Vivek M.; Zhang, Yunyu; Yanas, Liane; Sheehan, Susan; Xu, Lingfei; Miller, Darla R.; Paigen, Beverly; Chesler, Elissa J.; Churchill, Gary A.

    2012-01-01

    Albuminuria is an important marker of nephropathy that increases the risk of progressive renal and chronic cardiovascular diseases. The genetic basis of kidney disease is well-established in humans and rodent models, but the causal genes remain to be identified. We applied several genetic strategies to map and refine genetic loci affecting albuminuria in mice and translated the findings to human kidney disease. First, we measured albuminuria in mice from 33 inbred strains, used the data for haplotype association mapping (HAM), and detected 10 genomic regions associated with albuminuria. Second, we performed eight F2 intercrosses between genetically diverse strains to identify six loci underlying albuminuria, each of which was concordant to kidney disease loci in humans. Third, we used the Oak Ridge National Laboratory incipient Collaborative Cross subpopulation to detect an additional novel quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying albuminuria. We also performed a ninth intercross, between genetically similar strains, that substantially narrowed an albuminuria QTL on Chromosome 17 to a region containing four known genes. Finally, we measured renal gene expression in inbred mice to detect pathways highly correlated with albuminuria. Expression analysis also identified Glcci1, a gene known to affect podocyte structure and function in zebrafish, as a strong candidate gene for the albuminuria QTL on Chromosome 6. Overall, these findings greatly enhance our understanding of the genetic basis of albuminuria in mice and may guide future studies into the genetic basis of kidney disease in humans. PMID:22859403

  10. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF ABSCISIC ACID BIOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    MCCARTY D R

    2012-01-10

    The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCD) catalyze synthesis of a variety of apo-carotenoid secondary metabolites in plants, animals and bacteria. In plants, the reaction catalyzed by the 11, 12, 9-cis-epoxy carotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is the first committed and key regulated step in synthesis of the plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is a key regulator of plant stress responses and has critical functions in normal root and seed development. The molecular mechanisms responsible for developmental control of ABA synthesis in plant tissues are poorly understood. Five of the nine CCD genes present in the Arabidopsis genome encode NCED's involved in control of ABA synthesis in the plant. This project is focused on functional analysis of these five AtNCED genes as a key to understanding developmental regulation of ABA synthesis and dissecting the role of ABA in plant development. For this purpose, the project developed a comprehensive set of gene knockouts in the AtNCED genes that facilitate genetic dissection of ABA synthesis. These mutants were used in combination with key molecular tools to address the following specific objectives: (1) the role of ABA synthesis in root development; (2) developmental control of ABA synthesis in seeds; (3) analysis of ATNCED over-expressers; (4) preliminary crystallography of the maize VP14 protein.

  11. Worldwide Genetic Analysis of the CFTR Region

    PubMed Central

    Mateu, Eva; Calafell, Francesc; Lao, Oscar; Bonné-Tamir, Batsheva; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Bertranpetit, Jaume

    2001-01-01

    Mutations at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) cause cystic fibrosis, the most prevalent severe genetic disorder in individuals of European descent. We have analyzed normal allele and haplotype variation at four short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) and two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CFTR in 18 worldwide population samples, comprising a total of 1,944 chromosomes. The rooted phylogeny of the SNP haplotypes was established by typing ape samples. STRP variation within SNP haplotype backgrounds was highest in most ancestral haplotypes—although, when STRP allele sizes were taken into account, differences among haplotypes became smaller. Haplotype background determines STRP diversity to a greater extent than populations do, which indicates that haplotype backgrounds are older than populations. Heterogeneity among STRPs can be understood as the outcome of differences in mutation rate and pattern. STRP sites had higher heterozygosities in Africans, although, when whole haplotypes were considered, no significant differences remained. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) shows a complex pattern not easily related to physical distance. The analysis of the fraction of possible different haplotypes not found may circumvent some of the methodological difficulties of LD measure. LD analysis showed a positive correlation with locus polymorphism, which could partly explain the unusual pattern of similar LD between Africans and non-Africans. The low values found in non-Africans may imply that the size of the modern human population that emerged “Out of Africa” may be larger than what previous LD studies suggested. PMID:11104661

  12. Candidate Gene Analysis Using Imputed Genotypes: Cell Cycle SNPs and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anderson, Stephanie; Rider, David N.; White, Kristin L.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Song, Honglin; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Whittemore, Alice S.; DiCioccio, Richard; Ramus, Susan J.; Gayther, Simon A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Pharaoh, Paul P.D.; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes critical to cell cycle control are outstanding candidates for association with ovarian cancer risk; numerous genes have been interrogated by multiple research groups using differing tagging SNP sets. In order to maximize information gleaned from existing genotype data, we conducted a combined analysis of five independent studies of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. Up to 2,120 cases and 3,382 controls were genotyped in the course of two collaborations at a variety of SNPs in 11 cell cycle genes (CDKN2C, CDKN1A, CCND3, CCND1, CCND2, CDKN1B, CDK2, CDK4, RB1, CDKN2D, CCNE1) and one gene region (CDKN2A-CDKN2B). Because of the semi-overlapping nature of the 123 assayed tagging SNPs, we performed multiple imputation based on fastPHASE using data from White non-Hispanic study participants and participants in the international HapMap Consortium and NIEHS SNPs Program. Logistic regression assuming a log-additive model was performed on combined and imputed data. We observed strengthened signals in imputation-based analyses at several SNPs, particularly CDKN2A-CDKN2B rs3731239, CCND1 rs602652, rs3212879, rs649392, and rs3212891, CDK2 rs2069391, rs2069414, and rs17528736, and CCNE1 rs3218036. These results lend evidence to a role of cell cycle genes in ovarian cancer etiology, suggest a reduced set of SNPs to target in additional cases and controls, and exemplify the utility of imputation in candidate gene studies. PMID:19258477

  13. Candidate gene analysis using imputed genotypes: cell cycle single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A; Cunningham, Julie M; Phelan, Catherine M; Anderson, Stephanie; Rider, David N; White, Kristin L; Pankratz, V Shane; Song, Honglin; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K; Whittemore, Alice S; DiCioccio, Richard; Ramus, Susan J; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Pharaoh, Paul P D; Sellers, Thomas A

    2009-03-01

    Polymorphisms in genes critical to cell cycle control are outstanding candidates for association with ovarian cancer risk; numerous genes have been interrogated by multiple research groups using differing tagging single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sets. To maximize information gleaned from existing genotype data, we conducted a combined analysis of five independent studies of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. Up to 2,120 cases and 3,382 controls were genotyped in the course of two collaborations at a variety of SNPs in 11 cell cycle genes (CDKN2C, CDKN1A, CCND3, CCND1, CCND2, CDKN1B, CDK2, CDK4, RB1, CDKN2D, and CCNE1) and one gene region (CDKN2A-CDKN2B). Because of the semi-overlapping nature of the 123 assayed tagging SNPs, we performed multiple imputation based on fastPHASE using data from White non-Hispanic study participants and participants in the international HapMap Consortium and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences SNPs Program. Logistic regression assuming a log-additive model was done on combined and imputed data. We observed strengthened signals in imputation-based analyses at several SNPs, particularly CDKN2A-CDKN2B rs3731239; CCND1 rs602652, rs3212879, rs649392, and rs3212891; CDK2 rs2069391, rs2069414, and rs17528736; and CCNE1 rs3218036. These results exemplify the utility of imputation in candidate gene studies and lend evidence to a role of cell cycle genes in ovarian cancer etiology, suggest a reduced set of SNPs to target in additional cases and controls.

  14. Comparison of variants of canonical correlation analysis and partial least squares for combined analysis of MRI and genetic data.

    PubMed

    Grellmann, Claudia; Bitzer, Sebastian; Neumann, Jane; Westlye, Lars T; Andreassen, Ole A; Villringer, Arno; Horstmann, Annette

    2015-02-15

    The standard analysis approach in neuroimaging genetics studies is the mass-univariate linear modeling (MULM) approach. From a statistical view, however, this approach is disadvantageous, as it is computationally intensive, cannot account for complex multivariate relationships, and has to be corrected for multiple testing. In contrast, multivariate methods offer the opportunity to include combined information from multiple variants to discover meaningful associations between genetic and brain imaging data. We assessed three multivariate techniques, partial least squares correlation (PLSC), sparse canonical correlation analysis (sparse CCA) and Bayesian inter-battery factor analysis (Bayesian IBFA), with respect to their ability to detect multivariate genotype-phenotype associations. Our goal was to systematically compare these three approaches with respect to their performance and to assess their suitability for high-dimensional and multi-collinearly dependent data as is the case in neuroimaging genetics studies. In a series of simulations using both linearly independent and multi-collinear data, we show that sparse CCA and PLSC are suitable even for very high-dimensional collinear imaging data sets. Among those two, the predictive power was higher for sparse CCA when voxel numbers were below 400 times sample size and candidate SNPs were considered. Accordingly, we recommend Sparse CCA for candidate phenotype, candidate SNP studies. When voxel numbers exceeded 500 times sample size, the predictive power was the highest for PLSC. Therefore, PLSC can be considered a promising technique for multivariate modeling of high-dimensional brain-SNP-associations. In contrast, Bayesian IBFA cannot be recommended, since additional post-processing steps were necessary to detect causal relations. To verify the applicability of sparse CCA and PLSC, we applied them to an experimental imaging genetics data set provided for us. Most importantly, application of both methods replicated

  15. Exome sequence analysis suggests genetic burden contributes to phenotypic variability and complex neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Harel, Tamar; Gambin, Tomasz; Kousi, Maria; Griffin, Laurie B.; Francescatto, Ludmila; Ozes, Burcak; Karaca, Ender; Jhangiani, Shalini; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Lawson, Kim S.; Pehlivan, Davut; Okamoto, Yuji; Withers, Marjorie; Mancias, Pedro; Slavotinek, Anne; Reitnauer, Pamela J; Goksungur, Meryem T.; Shy, Michael; Crawford, Thomas O.; Koenig, Michel; Willer, Jason; Flores, Brittany N.; Pediaditrakis, Igor; Us, Onder; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Parman, Yesim; Antonellis, Anthony; Muzny, Donna M.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Battaloglu, Esra; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous distal symmetric polyneuropathy. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 40 individuals from 37 unrelated families with CMT-like peripheral neuropathy refractory to molecular diagnosis identified apparent causal mutations in ~45% (17/37) of families. Three candidate disease genes are proposed, supported by a combination of genetic and in vivo studies. Aggregate analysis of mutation data revealed a significantly increased number of rare variants across 58 neuropathy associated genes in subjects versus controls; confirmed in a second ethnically discrete neuropathy cohort, suggesting mutation burden potentially contributes to phenotypic variability. Neuropathy genes shown to have highly penetrant Mendelizing variants (HMPVs) and implicated by burden in families were shown to interact genetically in a zebrafish assay exacerbating the phenotype established by the suppression of single genes. Our findings suggest that the combinatorial effect of rare variants contributes to disease burden and variable expressivity. PMID:26257172

  16. Identification of Candidate Adherent-Invasive E. coli Signature Transcripts by Genomic/Transcriptomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanhao; Rowehl, Leahana; Krumsiek, Julia M; Orner, Erika P; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Tarr, Phillip I; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M; Boedeker, Edgar C; Xiong, Xuejian; Parkinson, John; Frank, Daniel N; Li, Ellen; Gathungu, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains are detected more frequently within mucosal lesions of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). The AIEC phenotype consists of adherence and invasion of intestinal epithelial cells and survival within macrophages of these bacteria in vitro. Our aim was to identify candidate transcripts that distinguish AIEC from non-invasive E. coli (NIEC) strains and might be useful for rapid and accurate identification of AIEC by culture-independent technology. We performed comparative RNA-Sequence (RNASeq) analysis using AIEC strain LF82 and NIEC strain HS during exponential and stationary growth. Differential expression analysis of coding sequences (CDS) homologous to both strains demonstrated 224 and 241 genes with increased and decreased expression, respectively, in LF82 relative to HS. Transition metal transport and siderophore metabolism related pathway genes were up-regulated, while glycogen metabolic and oxidation-reduction related pathway genes were down-regulated, in LF82. Chemotaxis related transcripts were up-regulated in LF82 during the exponential phase, but flagellum-dependent motility pathway genes were down-regulated in LF82 during the stationary phase. CDS that mapped only to the LF82 genome accounted for 747 genes. We applied an in silico subtractive genomics approach to identify CDS specific to AIEC by incorporating the genomes of 10 other previously phenotyped NIEC. From this analysis, 166 CDS mapped to the LF82 genome and lacked homology to any of the 11 human NIEC strains. We compared these CDS across 13 AIEC, but none were homologous in each. Four LF82 gene loci belonging to clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats region (CRISPR)--CRISPR-associated (Cas) genes were identified in 4 to 6 AIEC and absent from all non-pathogenic bacteria. As previously reported, AIEC strains were enriched for pdu operon genes. One CDS, encoding an excisionase, was shared by 9 AIEC strains. Reverse transcription

  17. Identification of Candidate Adherent-Invasive E. coli Signature Transcripts by Genomic/Transcriptomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanhao; Rowehl, Leahana; Krumsiek, Julia M.; Orner, Erika P.; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Tarr, Phillip I.; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M.; Boedeker, Edgar C.; Xiong, Xuejian; Parkinson, John; Frank, Daniel N.; Li, Ellen; Gathungu, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains are detected more frequently within mucosal lesions of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). The AIEC phenotype consists of adherence and invasion of intestinal epithelial cells and survival within macrophages of these bacteria in vitro. Our aim was to identify candidate transcripts that distinguish AIEC from non-invasive E. coli (NIEC) strains and might be useful for rapid and accurate identification of AIEC by culture-independent technology. We performed comparative RNA-Sequence (RNASeq) analysis using AIEC strain LF82 and NIEC strain HS during exponential and stationary growth. Differential expression analysis of coding sequences (CDS) homologous to both strains demonstrated 224 and 241 genes with increased and decreased expression, respectively, in LF82 relative to HS. Transition metal transport and siderophore metabolism related pathway genes were up-regulated, while glycogen metabolic and oxidation-reduction related pathway genes were down-regulated, in LF82. Chemotaxis related transcripts were up-regulated in LF82 during the exponential phase, but flagellum-dependent motility pathway genes were down-regulated in LF82 during the stationary phase. CDS that mapped only to the LF82 genome accounted for 747 genes. We applied an in silico subtractive genomics approach to identify CDS specific to AIEC by incorporating the genomes of 10 other previously phenotyped NIEC. From this analysis, 166 CDS mapped to the LF82 genome and lacked homology to any of the 11 human NIEC strains. We compared these CDS across 13 AIEC, but none were homologous in each. Four LF82 gene loci belonging to clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats region (CRISPR)—CRISPR-associated (Cas) genes were identified in 4 to 6 AIEC and absent from all non-pathogenic bacteria. As previously reported, AIEC strains were enriched for pdu operon genes. One CDS, encoding an excisionase, was shared by 9 AIEC strains. Reverse transcription

  18. The complex genetics of gait speed: genome-wide meta-analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Eicher, John D.; Vered, Rotem; Deelen, Joris; Arnold, Alice M.; Buchman, Aron S.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Faul, Jessica D.; Nethander, Maria; Fornage, Myriam; Adams, Hieab H.; Matteini, Amy M.; Callisaya, Michele L.; Smith, Albert V.; Yu, Lei; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Pattie, Alison; Corley, Janie; Launer, Lenore J.; Knopman, Davis S.; Parimi, Neeta; Turner, Stephen T.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beekman, Marian; Gutman, Danielle; Sharvit, Lital; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Liewald, David C.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Ohlsson, Claes; Moed, Matthijs; Verlinden, Vincent J.; Mellström, Dan; van der Geest, Jos N.; Karlsson, Magnus; Hernandez, Dena; McWhirter, Rebekah; Liu, Yongmei; Thomson, Russell; Tranah, Gregory J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Weir, David R.; Zhao, Wei; Starr, John M.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Bennett, David A.; Cummings, Steven R.; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Srikanth, Velandai K.; Windham, Beverly G.; Newman, Ann B.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Davies, Gail; Evans, Daniel S.; Slagboom, Eline P.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kiel, Douglas P.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Atzmon, Gil

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the basis for variation in late-life mobility is attributable, in part, to genetic factors, which may become increasingly important with age. Our objective was to systematically assess the contribution of genetic variation to gait speed in older individuals. We conducted a meta-analysis of gait speed GWASs in 31,478 older adults from 17 cohorts of the CHARGE consortium, and validated our results in 2,588 older adults from 4 independent studies. We followed our initial discoveries with network and eQTL analysis of candidate signals in tissues. The meta-analysis resulted in a list of 536 suggestive genome wide significant SNPs in or near 69 genes. Further interrogation with Pathway Analysis placed gait speed as a polygenic complex trait in five major networks. Subsequent eQTL analysis revealed several SNPs significantly associated with the expression of PRSS16, WDSUB1 and PTPRT, which in addition to the meta-analysis and pathway suggested that genetic effects on gait speed may occur through synaptic function and neuronal development pathways. No genome-wide significant signals for gait speed were identified from this moderately large sample of older adults, suggesting that more refined physical function phenotypes will be needed to identify the genetic basis of gait speed in aging. PMID:28077804

  19. Genetic Risk Score Modelling for Disease Progression in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Patients: Increased Genetic Load of Islet-Expressed and Cytokine-Regulated Candidate Genes Predicts Poorer Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Brorsson, Caroline A.; Nielsen, Lotte B.; Andersen, Marie Louise; Kaur, Simranjeet; Bergholdt, Regine; Hansen, Lars; Mortensen, Henrik B.; Pociot, Flemming; Størling, Joachim; Hvidoere Study Group on Childhood Diabetes

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 40 type 1 diabetes risk loci. The clinical impact of these loci on β-cell function during disease progression is unknown. We aimed at testing whether a genetic risk score could predict glycemic control and residual β-cell function in type 1 diabetes (T1D). As gene expression may represent an intermediate phenotype between genetic variation and disease, we hypothesized that genes within T1D loci which are expressed in islets and transcriptionally regulated by proinflammatory cytokines would be the best predictors of disease progression. Two-thirds of 46 GWAS candidate genes examined were expressed in human islets, and 11 of these significantly changed expression levels following exposure to proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β + IFNγ + TNFα) for 48 h. Using the GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from each locus, we constructed a genetic risk score based on the cumulative number of risk alleles carried in children with newly diagnosed T1D. With each additional risk allele carried, HbA1c levels increased significantly within first year after diagnosis. Network and gene ontology (GO) analyses revealed that several of the 11 candidate genes have overlapping biological functions and interact in a common network. Our results may help predict disease progression in newly diagnosed children with T1D which can be exploited for optimizing treatment. PMID:26904692

  20. Genetic analysis of captive proboscis monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Mitsuaki; Seino, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Information on the genetic relationships of captive founders is important for captive population management. In this study, we investigated DNA polymorphisms of four microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region sequence of five proboscis monkeys residing in a Japanese zoo as captive founders, to clarify their genetic relationship. We found that two of the five monkeys appeared to be genetically related. Furthermore, the haplotypes of the mitochondrial control region of the five monkeys were well differentiated from the haplotypes previously reported from wild populations from the northern area of Borneo, indicating a greater amount of genetic diversity in proboscis monkeys than previously reported.

  1. RNA-seq analysis reveals new candidate genes for drip loss in a Pietrain × Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire population.

    PubMed

    Li, Bojiang; Liu, Kaiqing; Weng, Qiannan; Li, Pinghua; Wei, Wei; Li, Qifa; Chen, Jie; Huang, Ruihua; Wu, Wangjun; Liu, Honglin

    2016-04-01

    Drip loss, one of the most important meat quality traits, is characterized by low heritability. To date, the genetic factors affecting the drip loss trait have not been clearly elucidated. The objective of this study was to identify critical candidate genes affecting drip loss. First, we generated a Pietrain × Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire commercial pig population and obtained phenotypic values for the drip loss trait. Furthermore, we constructed two RNA libraries from pooled samples of longissimus dorsi muscles with the highest (H group) and lowest (L group) drip loss and identified the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between these extreme phenotypes using RNA-seq technology. In total, 25 883 genes were detected in the H and L group libraries, and none was specifically expressed in only one library. Comparative analysis of gene expression levels found that 150 genes were differentially expressed, of which 127 were upregulated and 23 were downregulated in the H group relative to the L group. In addition, 68 drip loss quantitative trait loci (QTL) overlapping with 63 DEGs were identified, and these QTL were distributed mainly on chromosomes 1, 2, 5 and 6. Interestingly, the triadin (TRDN) gene, which is involved in muscle contraction and fat deposition, and the myostatin (MSTN) gene, which has a role in muscle growth, were localized to more than two drip loss QTL, suggesting that both are critical candidate genes responsible for drip loss. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  2. Automated analysis of immunohistochemistry images identifies candidate location biomarkers for cancers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aparna; Rao, Arvind; Bhavani, Santosh; Newberg, Justin Y; Murphy, Robert F

    2014-12-23

    Molecular biomarkers are changes measured in biological samples that reflect disease states. Such markers can help clinicians identify types of cancer or stages of progression, and they can guide in tailoring specific therapies. Many efforts to identify biomarkers consider genes that mutate between normal and cancerous tissues or changes in protein or RNA expression levels. Here we define location biomarkers, proteins that undergo changes in subcellular location that are indicative of disease. To discover such biomarkers, we have developed an automated pipeline to compare the subcellular location of proteins between two sets of immunohistochemistry images. We used the pipeline to compare images of healthy and tumor tissue from the Human Protein Atlas, ranking hundreds of proteins in breast, liver, prostate, and bladder based on how much their location was estimated to have changed. The performance of the system was evaluated by determining whether proteins previously known to change location in tumors were ranked highly. We present a number of candidate location biomarkers for each tissue, and identify biochemical pathways that are enriched in proteins that change location. The analysis technology is anticipated to be useful not only for discovering new location biomarkers but also for enabling automated analysis of biomarker distributions as an aid to determining diagnosis.

  3. Physics Structure Analysis of Parallel Waves Concept of Physics Teacher Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwi, S.; Supardi, K. I.; Linuwih, S.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this research was to find a parallel structure concept of wave physics and the factors that influence on the formation of parallel conceptions of physics teacher candidates. The method used qualitative research which types of cross-sectional design. These subjects were five of the third semester of basic physics and six of the fifth semester of wave course students. Data collection techniques used think aloud and written tests. Quantitative data were analysed with descriptive technique-percentage. The data analysis technique for belief and be aware of answers uses an explanatory analysis. Results of the research include: 1) the structure of the concept can be displayed through the illustration of a map containing the theoretical core, supplements the theory and phenomena that occur daily; 2) the trend of parallel conception of wave physics have been identified on the stationary waves, resonance of the sound and the propagation of transverse electromagnetic waves; 3) the influence on the parallel conception that reading textbooks less comprehensive and knowledge is partial understanding as forming the structure of the theory.

  4. Cloning and sequence analysis of candidate human natural killer-enhancing factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Shau, H.; Butterfield, L.H.; Chiu, R.; Kim, A.

    1994-12-31

    A cytosol factor from human red blood cells enhances natural killer (NK) activity. This factor, termed NK-enhancing factor (NKEF), is a protein of 44000 M{sub r} consisting of two subunits of equal size linked by disulfide bonds. NKEF is expressed in the NK-sensitive erythroleukemic cell line K562. Using an antibody specific for NKEF as a probe for immunoblot screening, we isolated several clones from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library of K562. Additional subcloning and sequencing revealed that the candidate NKEF cDNAs fell into one of two categories of closely related but non-identical genes, referred to as NKEF A and B. They are 88% identical in amino acid sequence and 71% identical in nucleotide sequence. Southern blot analysis suggests that there are two to three NKEF family members in the genome. Analysis of predicted amino acid sequences indicates that both NKEF A and B are cytosol proteins with several phosphorylation sites each, but that they have no glycosylation sites. They are significantly homologous to several other proteins from a wide variety of organisms ranging from prokaryotes to mammals, especially with regard to several well-conserved motifs within the amino acid sequences. The biological functions of these proteins in other species are mostly unknown, but some of them were reported to be induced by oxidative stress. Therefore, as well as for immunoregulation of NK activity, NKEF may be important for cells in coping with oxidative insults. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  5. The CarbonSat Earth Explorer 8 candidate mission: Error analysis for carbon dioxide and methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwitz, Michael; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Reuter, Maximilian; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Meijer, Yasjka; Sierk, Bernd; Caron, Jerome; Loescher, Armin; Ingmann, Paul; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    CarbonSat is one of two candidate missions for ESA's Earth Explorer 8 (EE8) satellite to be launched around 2022. The main goal of CarbonSat is to advance our knowledge on the natural and man-made sources and sinks of the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) on various temporal and spatial scales (e.g., regional, city and point source scale), as well as related climate feedbacks. CarbonSat will be the first satellite mission optimised to detect emission hot spots of CO2 (e.g., cities, industrialised areas, power plants) and CH4 (e.g., oil and gas fields) and to quantify their emissions. Furthermore, CarbonSat will deliver a number of important by-products such as Vegetation Chlorophyll Fluorescence (VCF, also called Solar Induced Fluorescence (SIF)) at 755 nm. These applications require appropriate retrieval algorithms which are currently being optimized and used for error analysis. The status of this error analysis will be presented based on the latest version of the CO2 and CH4 retrieval algorithm and taking the current instrument specification into account. An overview will be presented focusing on nadir observations over land. Focus will be on specific issues such as errors of the CO2 and CH4 products due to residual polarization related errors and errors related to inhomogeneous ground scenes.

  6. Automated analysis of immunohistochemistry images identifies candidate location biomarkers for cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Aparna; Rao, Arvind; Bhavani, Santosh; Newberg, Justin Y.; Murphy, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular biomarkers are changes measured in biological samples that reflect disease states. Such markers can help clinicians identify types of cancer or stages of progression, and they can guide in tailoring specific therapies. Many efforts to identify biomarkers consider genes that mutate between normal and cancerous tissues or changes in protein or RNA expression levels. Here we define location biomarkers, proteins that undergo changes in subcellular location that are indicative of disease. To discover such biomarkers, we have developed an automated pipeline to compare the subcellular location of proteins between two sets of immunohistochemistry images. We used the pipeline to compare images of healthy and tumor tissue from the Human Protein Atlas, ranking hundreds of proteins in breast, liver, prostate, and bladder based on how much their location was estimated to have changed. The performance of the system was evaluated by determining whether proteins previously known to change location in tumors were ranked highly. We present a number of candidate location biomarkers for each tissue, and identify biochemical pathways that are enriched in proteins that change location. The analysis technology is anticipated to be useful not only for discovering new location biomarkers but also for enabling automated analysis of biomarker distributions as an aid to determining diagnosis. PMID:25489103

  7. Single exon-resolution targeted chromosomal microarray analysis of known and candidate intellectual disability genes

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Tracy; Zahir, Farah R; Griffith, Malachi; Delaney, Allen; Chai, David; Tsang, Erica; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Marra, Marco; Eydoux, Patrice; Langlois, Sylvie; Hamdan, Fadi F; Michaud, Jacques L; Friedman, Jan M

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability affects about 3% of individuals globally, with∼50% idiopathic. We designed an exonic-resolution array targeting all known submicroscopic chromosomal intellectual disability syndrome loci, causative genes for intellectual disability, and potential candidate genes, all genes encoding glutamate receptors and epigenetic regulators. Using this platform, we performed chromosomal microarray analysis on 165 intellectual disability trios (affected child and both normal parents). We identified and independently validated 36 de novo copy-number changes in 32 trios. In all, 67% of the validated events were intragenic, involving only exon 1 (which includes the promoter sequence according to our design), exon 1 and adjacent exons, or one or more exons excluding exon 1. Seventeen of the 36 copy-number variants involve genes known to cause intellectual disability. Eleven of these, including seven intragenic variants, are clearly pathogenic (involving STXBP1, SHANK3 (3 patients), IL1RAPL1, UBE2A, NRXN1, MEF2C, CHD7, 15q24 and 9p24 microdeletion), two are likely pathogenic (PI4KA, DCX), two are unlikely to be pathogenic (GRIK2, FREM2), and two are unclear (ARID1B, 15q22 microdeletion). Twelve individuals with genomic imbalances identified by our array were tested with a clinical microarray, and six had a normal result. We identified de novo copy-number variants within genes not previously implicated in intellectual disability and uncovered pathogenic variation of known intellectual disability genes below the detection limit of standard clinical diagnostic chromosomal microarray analysis. PMID:24253858

  8. Single exon-resolution targeted chromosomal microarray analysis of known and candidate intellectual disability genes.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Tracy; Zahir, Farah R; Griffith, Malachi; Delaney, Allen; Chai, David; Tsang, Erica; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Marra, Marco; Eydoux, Patrice; Langlois, Sylvie; Hamdan, Fadi F; Michaud, Jacques L; Friedman, Jan M

    2014-06-01

    Intellectual disability affects about 3% of individuals globally, with∼50% idiopathic. We designed an exonic-resolution array targeting all known submicroscopic chromosomal intellectual disability syndrome loci, causative genes for intellectual disability, and potential candidate genes, all genes encoding glutamate receptors and epigenetic regulators. Using this platform, we performed chromosomal microarray analysis on 165 intellectual disability trios (affected child and both normal parents). We identified and independently validated 36 de novo copy-number changes in 32 trios. In all, 67% of the validated events were intragenic, involving only exon 1 (which includes the promoter sequence according to our design), exon 1 and adjacent exons, or one or more exons excluding exon 1. Seventeen of the 36 copy-number variants involve genes known to cause intellectual disability. Eleven of these, including seven intragenic variants, are clearly pathogenic (involving STXBP1, SHANK3 (3 patients), IL1RAPL1, UBE2A, NRXN1, MEF2C, CHD7, 15q24 and 9p24 microdeletion), two are likely pathogenic (PI4KA, DCX), two are unlikely to be pathogenic (GRIK2, FREM2), and two are unclear (ARID1B, 15q22 microdeletion). Twelve individuals with genomic imbalances identified by our array were tested with a clinical microarray, and six had a normal result. We identified de novo copy-number variants within genes not previously implicated in intellectual disability and uncovered pathogenic variation of known intellectual disability genes below the detection limit of standard clinical diagnostic chromosomal microarray analysis.

  9. An Analysis of Teacher Candidate Success as Measured by Admission Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas, Araceli Garza; Mundy, Marie-Anne; Varela, Daniella; Ybarra, Anissa; Yuma, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    There has been little to no data indicating that candidate scores on the Nelson Denny Reading Assessment, entrance GPA, and basic skills were effective measures for success in educator preparation programs. This study contributed to the body of knowledge by evaluating whether candidate scores on the Nelson Denny Reading Assessment, entrance GPA,…

  10. Preparing Teachers for Assessment within Diverse Classrooms: An Analysis of Teacher Candidates' Conceptualizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Christopher; Lam, Chi Yan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose in this article was to examine teacher candidates' conceptualizations of the intersection between assessment and diversity at the end of their initial teacher education program. At the onset of this study, it was expected that teacher candidates would be able to articulate a professional stance toward each of these core-teaching…

  11. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of candidate genes for reliable identification of alleles by capillary array electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, David N; Borrone, James; Meerow, Alan W; Motamayor, Juan C; Brown, J Steven; Schnell, Raymond J

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the reliability of capillary array electrophoresis-single strand conformation polymorphism (CAE-SSCP) to determine if it can be used to identify novel alleles of candidate genes in a germplasm collection. Both strands of three different size fragments (160, 245 and 437 bp) that differed by one or more nucleotides in sequence were analyzed at four different temperatures (18 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 30 degrees C, and 35 degrees C). Mixtures of amplified fragments of either the intron interrupting the C-terminal WRKY domain of the Tc10 locus or the NBS domain of the TcRGH1 locus of Theobroma cacao were electroinjected into all 16 capillaries of an ABI 3100 Genetic Analyzer and analyzed three times at each temperature. Multiplexing of samples of different size range is possible, as intermediate and large fragments were analyzed simultaneously in these experiments. A statistical analysis of the means of the fragment mobilities demonstrated that single-stranded conformers of the fragments could be reliably identified by their mobility at all temperatures and size classes. The order of elution of fragments was not consistent over strands or temperatures for the intermediate and large fragments. If samples are only run once at a single temperature, small fragments could be identified from a single strand at a single temperature. A combination of data from both strands of a single run was needed to identify correctly all four of the intermediate fragments and no combination of data from strands or temperatures would allow the correct identification of two large fragments that differed by only a single single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) from a single run. Thus, to adequately assess alleles at a candidate gene locus using SSCP on a capillary array, fragments should be < or =250 bp, samples should be analyzed at two different temperatures between 18 degrees C and 30 degrees C to reduce the variability introduced by the capillaries, data should be combined

  12. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray Analysis in Cortisol-Secreting Adrenocortical Adenomas Identifies New Candidate Genes and Pathways1 2

    PubMed Central

    Ronchi, Cristina L; Leich, Ellen; Sbiera, Silviu; Weismann, Dirk; Rosenwald, Andreas; Allolio, Bruno; Fassnacht, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The genetic mechanisms underlying adrenocortical tumor development are still largely unknown. We used high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (Affymetrix SNP 6.0) to detect copy number alterations (CNAs) and copy-neutral losses of heterozygosity (cnLOH) in 15 cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas with matched blood samples. We focused on microalterations aiming to discover new candidate genes involved in early tumorigenesis and/or autonomous cortisol secretion. We identified 962 CNAs with a median of 18 CNAs per sample. Half of them involved noncoding regions, 89% were less than 100 kb, and 28% were found in at least two samples. The most frequently gained regions were 5p15.33, 6q16.1, 7p22.3-22.2, 8q24.3, 9q34.2-34.3, 11p15.5, 11q11, 12q12, 16q24.3, 20p11.1-20q21.11, and Xq28 (≥20% of cases), most of them being identified in the same three adenomas. These regions contained among others genes like NOTCH1, CYP11B2, HRAS, and IGF2. Recurrent losses were less common and smaller than gains, being mostly localized at 1p, 6q, and 11q. Pathway analysis revealed that Notch signaling was the most frequently altered. We identified 46 recurrent CNAs that each affected a single gene (31 gains and 15 losses), including genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11B1) or tumorigenesis (CTNNB1, EPHA7, SGK1, STIL, FHIT). Finally, 20 small cnLOH in four cases affecting 15 known genes were found. Our findings provide the first high-resolution genome-wide view of chromosomal changes in cortisol-secreting adenomas and identify novel candidate genes, such as HRAS, EPHA7, and SGK1. Furthermore, they implicate that the Notch1 signaling pathway might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. PMID:22496620

  13. Genes for human general transcription initiation factors TFIIIB, TFIIIB-associated proteins, TFIIIC2 and PTF/SNAPC: functional and positional candidates for tumour predisposition or inherited genetic diseases?

    PubMed

    Purrello, M; Di Pietro, C; Rapisarda, A; Amico, V; Giunta, V; Engel, H; Stevens, S; Hsieh, Y; Teichman, M; Wang, Z; Sichel, G; Roeder, R; Grzeschik, K H

    2001-08-09

    TFIIIB, TFIIIC2, and PTF/SNAPC are heteromultimeric general transcription factors (GTFs) needed for expression of genes encoding small cytoplasmic (scRNAs) and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Their activity is stimulated by viral oncogenes, such as SV40 large T antigen and Adenovirus E1A, and is repressed by specific transcription factors (STFs) acting as anti-oncogenes, such as p53 and pRb. GTFs role as final targets of critical signal transduction pathways, that control cell proliferation and differentiation, and their involvement in gene expression regulation suggest that the genes encoding them are potential proto-oncogenes or anti-oncogenes or may be otherwise involved in the pathogenesis of inherited genetic diseases. To test our hypothesis through the positional candidate gene approach, we have determined the physical localization in the human genome of the 11 genes, encoding the subunits of these GTFs, and of three genes for proteins associated with TFIIIB (GTF3BAPs). Our data, obtained by chromosomal in situ hybridization, radiation hybrids and somatic cell hybrids analysis, demonstrate that these genes are present in the human genome as single copy sequences and that some cluster to the same cytogenetic band, alone or in combination with class II GTFs. Intriguingly, some of them are localized within chromosomal regions where recurrent, cytogenetically detectable mutations are seen in specific neoplasias, such as neuroblastoma, uterine leyomioma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the salivary glands and hemangiopericytoma, or where mutations causing inherited genetic diseases map, such as Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Their molecular function and genomic position make these GTF genes interesting candidates for causal involvement in oncogenesis or in the pathogenesis of inherited genetic diseases.

  14. De novo Transcriptome Analysis of Miscanthus lutarioriparius Identifies Candidate Genes in Rhizome Development

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ruibo; Yu, Changjiang; Wang, Xiaoyu; Jia, Chunlin; Pei, Shengqiang; He, Kang; He, Guo; Kong, Yingzhen; Zhou, Gongke

    2017-01-01

    HIGHLIGHT De novo transcriptome profiling of five tissues reveals candidate genes putatively involved in rhizome development in M. lutarioriparius. Miscanthus lutarioriparius is a promising lignocellulosic feedstock for second-generation bioethanol production. However, the genomic resource for this species is relatively limited thus hampers our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying many important biological processes. In this study, we performed the first de novo transcriptome analysis of five tissues (leaf, stem, root, lateral bud and rhizome bud) of M. lutarioriparius with an emphasis to identify putative genes involved in rhizome development. Approximately 66 gigabase (GB) paired-end clean reads were obtained and assembled into 169,064 unigenes with an average length of 759 bp. Among these unigenes, 103,899 (61.5%) were annotated in seven public protein databases. Differential gene expression profiling analysis revealed that 4,609, 3,188, 1,679, 1,218, and 1,077 genes were predominantly expressed in root, leaf, stem, lateral bud, and rhizome bud, respectively. Their expression patterns were further classified into 12 distinct clusters. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed that genes predominantly expressed in rhizome bud were mainly involved in primary metabolism and hormone signaling and transduction pathways. Noteworthy, 19 transcription factors (TFs) and 16 hormone signaling pathway-related genes were identified to be predominantly expressed in rhizome bud compared with the other tissues, suggesting putative roles in rhizome formation and development. In addition, a predictive regulatory network was constructed between four TFs and six auxin and abscisic acid (ABA) -related genes. Furthermore, the expression of 24 rhizome-specific genes was further validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. Taken together, this study provide a global portrait of gene expression across five different tissues and reveal preliminary insights

  15. Analysis of Mlsc genetics. A novel instance of genetic redundancy.

    PubMed

    Abe, R; Foo-Phillips, M; Hodes, R J

    1989-10-01

    The identity of the self determinants involved in the selection of the T cell repertoire has been a matter of considerable interest. In addition to the apparent critical role of MHC gene products, accumulated experimental results indicate the importance of non-MHC gene products in T cell repertoire selection. In particular, murine Mlsa and Mlsc determinants have been shown to be highly stimulatory to allogeneic T cells and to be involved in the negative selection (elimination) of self-reactive T cells expressing selected TCR V beta segments. In this work, a unique phenomenon of genetic redundancy is described in the control of Mlsc expression: Mlsc appears to be controlled by at least two unlinked loci, and the product of either one of these loci is sufficient to evoke Mlsc-specific T cell response and to act as a ligand in the deletion of self Mlsc-reactive V beta 3+ T cells. Based on these findings, we propose a possible explanation for the fact that Mls-like genes or gene products have not been identified in other species such as man.

  16. Analysis of Mlsc genetics. A novel instance of genetic redundancy

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The identity of the self determinants involved in the selection of the T cell repertoire has been a matter of considerable interest. In addition to the apparent critical role of MHC gene products, accumulated experimental results indicate the importance of non-MHC gene products in T cell repertoire selection. In particular, murine Mlsa and Mlsc determinants have been shown to be highly stimulatory to allogeneic T cells and to be involved in the negative selection (elimination) of self-reactive T cells expressing selected TCR V beta segments. In this work, a unique phenomenon of genetic redundancy is described in the control of Mlsc expression: Mlsc appears to be controlled by at least two unlinked loci, and the product of either one of these loci is sufficient to evoke Mlsc-specific T cell response and to act as a ligand in the deletion of self Mlsc-reactive V beta 3+ T cells. Based on these findings, we propose a possible explanation for the fact that Mls-like genes or gene products have not been identified in other species such as man. PMID:2477483

  17. Computational analysis of TRAPPC9: candidate gene for autosomal recessive non-syndromic mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Khattak, Naureen Aslam; Mir, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Mental retardation (MR)/ intellectual disability (ID) is a neuro-developmental disorder characterized by a low intellectual quotient (IQ) and deficits in adaptive behavior related to everyday life tasks such as delayed language acquisition, social skills or self-help skills with onset before age 18. To date, a few genes (PRSS12, CRBN, CC2D1A, GRIK2, TUSC3, TRAPPC9, TECR, ST3GAL3, MED23, MAN1B1, NSUN1) for autosomal-recessive forms of non syndromic MR (NS-ARMR) have been identified and established in various families with ID. The recently reported candidate gene TRAPPC9 was selected for computational analysis to explore its potentially important role in pathology as it is the only gene for ID reported in more than five different familial cases worldwide. YASARA (12.4.1) was utilized to generate three dimensional structures of the candidate gene TRAPPC9. Hybrid structure prediction was employed. Crystal Structure of a Conserved Metalloprotein From Bacillus Cereus (3D19-C) was selected as best suitable template using position-specific iteration-BLAST. Template (3D19-C) parameters were based on E-value, Z-score and resolution and quality score of 0.32, -1.152, 2.30°A and 0.684 respectively. Model reliability showed 93.1% residues placed in the most favored region with 96.684 quality factor, and overall 0.20 G-factor (dihedrals 0.06 and covalent 0.39 respectively). Protein-Protein docking analysis demonstrated that TRAPPC9 showed strong interactions of the amino acid residues S(253), S(251), Y(256), G(243), D(131) with R(105), Q(425), W(226), N(255), S(233), its functional partner 1KBKB. Protein-protein interacting residues could facilitate the exploration of structural and functional outcomes of wild type and mutated TRAPCC9 protein. Actively involved residues can be used to elucidate the binding properties of the protein, and to develop drug therapy for NS-ARMR patients.

  18. role of seed analysis in genetic conservation

    Treesearch

    V.G. Vankus; R.P. Karrfalt

    2017-01-01

    Long term storage of seeds at freezing temperatures is one strategy for genetic conservation of tree species. It can be used to preserve species that produce seeds that remain viable after drying to a low seed moisture content. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USDA FS) National Seed Laboratory (NSL) began long term seed storage for genetic...

  19. Longitudinal Genetic Analysis of Anxiety Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavos, Helena M. S.; Gregory, Alice M.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity is associated with both anxiety and depression and has been shown to be heritable. Little, however, is known about the role of genetic influence on continuity and change of symptoms over time. The authors' aim was to examine the stability of anxiety sensitivity during adolescence. By using a genetically sensitive design, the…

  20. Genetic Analysis of Termite Colonies in Wisconsin

    Treesearch

    R.A. Arango; D.A. Marschalek; F. Green III; K.F. Raffa; M.E. Berres

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document current areas of subterranean termite activity in Wisconsin and to evaluate genetic characteristics of these northern, peripheral colonies. Here, amplified fragment-length polymorphism was used to characterize levels of inbreeding, expected heterozygosity, and percent polymorphism within colonies as well as genetic structure...

  1. Longitudinal Genetic Analysis of Anxiety Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavos, Helena M. S.; Gregory, Alice M.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity is associated with both anxiety and depression and has been shown to be heritable. Little, however, is known about the role of genetic influence on continuity and change of symptoms over time. The authors' aim was to examine the stability of anxiety sensitivity during adolescence. By using a genetically sensitive design, the…

  2. Genome analysis and genetic enhancement of tomato.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vikrant; Mathur, Saloni; Solanke, Amolkumar U; Sharma, Manoj K; Kumar, Rahul; Vyas, Shailendra; Khurana, Paramjit; Khurana, Jitendra P; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Sharma, Arun K

    2009-01-01

    The Solanaceae is an important family of vegetable crops, ornamentals and medicinal plants. Tomato has served as a model member of this family largely because of its enriched cytogenetic, genetic, as well as physical, maps. Mapping has helped in cloning several genes of importance such as Pto, responsible for resistance against bacterial speck disease, Mi-1.2 for resistance against nematodes, and fw2.2 QTL for fruit weight. A high-throughput genome-sequencing program has been initiated by an international consortium of 10 countries. Since heterochromatin has been found to be concentrated near centromeres, the consortium is focusing on sequencing only the gene-rich euchromatic region. Genomes of the members of Solanaceae show a significant degree of synteny, suggesting that the tomato genome sequence would help in the cloning of genes for important traits from other Solanaceae members as well. ESTs from a large number of cDNA libraries have been sequenced, and microarray chips, in conjunction with wide array of ripening mutants, have contributed immensely to the understanding of the fruit-ripening phenomenon. Work on the analysis of the tomato proteome has also been initiated. Transgenic tomato plants with improved abiotic stress tolerance, disease resistance and insect resistance, have been developed. Attempts have also been made to develop tomato as a bioreactor for various pharmaceutical proteins. However, control of fruit quality and ripening remains an active and challenging area of research. Such efforts should pave the way to improve not only tomato, but also other solanaceous crops.

  3. Genetic analysis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus intestinal colonization

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Troy P.; Chao, Michael C.; Abel, Sören; Blondel, Carlos J.; Abel zur Wiesch, Pia; Zhou, Xiaohui; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide and a blight on global aquaculture. This organism requires a horizontally acquired type III secretion system (T3SS2) to infect the small intestine, but knowledge of additional factors that underlie V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity is limited. We used transposon-insertion sequencing to screen for genes that contribute to viability of V. parahaemolyticus in vitro and in the mammalian intestine. Our analysis enumerated and controlled for the host infection bottleneck, enabling robust assessment of genetic contributions to in vivo fitness. We identified genes that contribute to V. parahaemolyticus colonization of the intestine independent of known virulence mechanisms in addition to uncharacterized components of T3SS2. Our study revealed that toxR, an ancestral locus in Vibrio species, is required for V. parahaemolyticus fitness in vivo and for induction of T3SS2 gene expression. The regulatory mechanism by which V. parahaemolyticus ToxR activates expression of T3SS2 resembles Vibrio cholerae ToxR regulation of distinct virulence elements acquired via lateral gene transfer. Thus, disparate horizontally acquired virulence systems have been placed under the control of this ancestral transcription factor across independently evolved human pathogens. PMID:27185914

  4. Genetic analysis of embryo dormancy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Galau, G.

    1998-09-01

    Primary dormancy is the inability of mature seed to immediately germinate until specific environmental stimuli are perceived that predict that future conditions will support plant growth and seed set. The analysis of abscisic acid deficient and insensitive mutants, in particular in Arabidopsis, suggests that embryo abscisic acid may be directly involved in the development of primary dormancy. Other studies implicate the continued accumulation of LEA proteins as inhibiting germination in dormant embryos. The results of these physiological, molecular and genetic approaches are complex and equivocal. There is a real need for approaches that test the separate nature of vivipary inhibition and primary dormancy and deliberately seed to decouple and dissect them. These approaches should be of help in understanding both late embryo development and primary dormancy. The approach taken here is to directly isolate mutants of Arabidopsis that appear to be deficient only in primary dormancy, that is fresh seed that germinate rapidly without the normally-required cold-stratification. The authors have isolated at least 8 independent, rapidly germinating RGM mutants of Arabidopsis. All others aspects of plant growth and development appear normal in these lines, suggesting that the rgm mutants are defective only in the establishment or maintenance of primary dormancy. At least one of these may be tagged with T-DNA. In addition, about 50 RGM isolates have been recovered from EMS-treated seed.

  5. Linkage and candidate gene analysis of X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Shastry, B.S.; Hartzer, M.K.; Hejtmancik, J.F.

    1995-05-20

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is a hereditary eye disorder characterized by avascularity of the peripheral retina, retinal exudates, tractional detachment, and retinal folds. The disorder is most commonly transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, but X-linked transmission also occurs. To initiate the process of identifying the gene responsible for the X-linked disorder, linkage analysis has been performed with three previously unreported three- or four-generation families. Two-point analysis showed linkage to MAOA (Z{sub max} = 2.1, {theta}{sub max} = 0) and DXS228 (Z{sub max} = 0.5, {theta}{sub max} = 0.11), and this was further confirmed by multipoint analysis with these same markers (Z{sub max} = 2.81 at MAOA), which both lie near the gene causing Norrie disease. Molecular genetic analysis further reveals a missense mutation (R121W) in the third exon of the Norrie`s disease gene that perfectly cosegregates with the disease through three generations in one family. This mutation was not detected in the unaffected family members and six normal unrelated controls, suggesting that it is likely to be the pathogenic mutation. Additionally, a polymorphic missense mutation (H127R) was detected in a severely affected patient. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Candidate-Gene Screening and Association Analysis at the Autism-Susceptibility Locus on Chromosome 16p: Evidence of Association at GRIN2A and ABAT

    PubMed Central

    Barnby, Gabrielle; Abbott, Aaron; Sykes, Nuala; Morris, Andrew; Weeks, Daniel E.; Mott, Richard; Lamb, Janine; Bailey, Anthony J.; Monaco, Anthony P.

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder whose underlying genetic causes have yet to be identified. To date, there have been eight genome screens for autism, two of which identified a putative susceptibility locus on chromosome 16p. In the present study, 10 positional candidate genes that map to 16p11-13 were examined for coding variants: A2BP1, ABAT, BFAR, CREBBP, EMP2, GRIN2A, MRTF-B, SSTR5, TBX6, and UBN1. Screening of all coding and regulatory regions by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography identified seven nonsynonymous changes. Five of these mutations were found to cosegregate with autism, but the mutations are not predicted to have deleterious effects on protein structure and are unlikely to represent significant etiological variants. Selected variants from candidate genes were genotyped in the entire International Molecular Genetics Study of Autism Consortium collection of 239 multiplex families and were tested for association with autism by use of the pedigree disequilibrium test. Additionally, genotype frequencies were compared between 239 unrelated affected individuals and 192 controls. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium were investigated, and the transmission of haplotypes across candidate genes was tested for association. Evidence of single-marker association was found for variants in ABAT, CREBBP, and GRIN2A. Within these genes, 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were subsequently genotyped in 91 autism trios (one affected individual and two unaffected parents), and the association was replicated within GRIN2A (Fisher's exact test, P<.0001). Logistic regression analysis of SNP data across GRIN2A and ABAT showed a trend toward haplotypic differences between cases and controls. PMID:15830322

  7. Candidate gene association analysis for milk yield, composition, urea nitrogen and somatic cell scores in Brown Swiss cows.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, A; Ribeca, C; Chessa, S; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Maretto, F; Casellas, J; Bittante, G

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate 96 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 54 candidate genes, and test the associations of the polymorphic SNPs with milk yield, composition, milk urea nitrogen (MUN) content and somatic cell score (SCS) in individual milk samples from Italian Brown Swiss cows. Milk and blood samples were collected from 1271 cows sampled once from 85 herds. Milk production, quality traits (i.e. protein, casein, fat and lactose percentages), MUN and SCS were measured for each milk sample. Genotyping was performed using a custom Illumina VeraCode GoldenGate approach. A Bayesian linear animal model that considered the effects of herd, days in milk, parity, SNP genotype and additive polygenic effect was used for the association analysis. Our results showed that 14 of the 51 polymorphic SNPs had relevant additive effects on at least one of the aforementioned traits. Polymorphisms in the glucocorticoid receptor DNA-binding factor 1 (GRLF1), prolactin receptor (PRLR) and chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) were associated with milk yield; an SNP in the stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD-1) was related to fat content; SNPs in the caspase recruitment domain 15 protein (CARD15) and lipin 1 (LPIN1) affected the protein and casein contents; SNPs in growth hormone 1 (GH1), lactotransferrin (LTF) and SCD-1 were relevant for casein number; variants in beta casein (CSN2), GH1, GRLF1 and LTF affected lactose content; SNPs in beta-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2), serpin peptidase inhibitor (PI) and SCD-1 were associated with MUN; and SNPs in acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (ACACA) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A (STAT5A) were relevant in explaining the variation of SCS. Although further research is needed to validate these SNPs in other populations and breeds, the association between these markers and milk yield, composition, MUN and SCS could be exploited in gene-assisted selection programs for genetic improvement purposes.

  8. Refining the locus for Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and mutation analysis of the candidate gene ROM1

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, B.E.; Stone, E.M.; Sheffield, V.C. ); McInnes, R.; Bascom, R. ); Litt, M. )

    1994-01-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease) is an autosomal dominant macular dystrophy which shares important clinical features with age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of legal blindness in the elderly. Unfortunately, understanding and treatment for this common age-related disorder is limited. Discovery of the gene which causes Best disease has the potential to increase the understanding of the pathogenesis of all types of macular degeneration, including the common age-related form. Best disease has recently been mapped to chromosome 11q13. The photoreceptor-specific protein ROM1 has also been recently mapped to this location, and the ROM1 gene is a candidate gene for Best disease. Using highly polymorphic markers, the authors have narrowed the genetic region which contains the Best disease gene to the 10-cM region between markers D11S871 and PYGM. Marker D11S956 demonstrated no recombinants with Best disease in three large families and resulted in a lod score of 18.2. In addition, a polymorphism within the ROM1 gene also demonstrated no recombinants and resulted in a lod score of 10.0 in these same three families. The authors used a combination of SSCP analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing to screen the entire coding region of the ROM1 gene in 11 different unrelated patients affected with Best disease. No nucleotide changes were found in the coding sequence of any affected patient, indicating that mutations within the coding sequence are unlikely to cause Best disease. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L.; Bernales, Cecily Q.; Ross, Jay P.; Forwell, Amanda L.; Yee, Irene M.; Guillot-Noel, Lena; Fontaine, Bertrand; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Hilven, Kelly; Dubois, Bénédicte; Goris, An; Astobiza, Ianire; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Akkad, Denis A.; Aktas, Orhan; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Epplen, Joerg T.; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Lohse, Peter; Rieckmann, Peter; Zettl, Uwe K.; Zipp, Frauke; Bertram, Lars; Lill, Christina M; Fernandez, Oscar; Urbaneja, Patricia; Leyva, Laura; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Arroyo, Rafael; Garagorri, Aroa M.; García-Martínez, Angel; Villar, Luisa M.; Urcelay, Elena; Malhotra, Sunny; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel; Berger, Thomas; Fazekas, Franz; Reindl, Markus; Schmied, Mascha C.; Zimprich, Alexander; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D) in plasminogen (PLG) as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351) in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117), despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93–1.87). To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility. PMID:27194806

  10. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Sadovnick, A Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L; Bernales, Cecily Q; Ross, Jay P; Forwell, Amanda L; Yee, Irene M; Guillot-Noel, Lena; Fontaine, Bertrand; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Hilven, Kelly; Dubois, Bénédicte; Goris, An; Astobiza, Ianire; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Akkad, Denis A; Aktas, Orhan; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Epplen, Joerg T; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Lohse, Peter; Rieckmann, Peter; Zettl, Uwe K; Zipp, Frauke; Bertram, Lars; Lill, Christina M; Fernandez, Oscar; Urbaneja, Patricia; Leyva, Laura; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Arroyo, Rafael; Garagorri, Aroa M; García-Martínez, Angel; Villar, Luisa M; Urcelay, Elena; Malhotra, Sunny; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel; Berger, Thomas; Fazekas, Franz; Reindl, Markus; Schmied, Mascha C; Zimprich, Alexander; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-07-07

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D) in plasminogen (PLG) as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351) in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117), despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93-1.87). To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility. Copyright © 2016 Sadovnick et al.

  11. Analysis of microsatellite markers and single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes for susceptibility to bipolar affective disorder in the chromosome 12Q24.31 region.

    PubMed

    Shink, Eric; Harvey, Mario; Tremblay, Monique; Gagné, Bernard; Belleau, Pascal; Raymond, Catherine; Labbé, Michel; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Lafrenière, Ronald G; Barden, Nicholas

    2005-05-05

    Previous results from our genetic analyses using pedigrees from a French Canadian population suggested that the interval delimited by markers D12S86 and D12S378 on chromosome 12 was the most probable genomic region to contain a susceptibility gene for affective disorders. Here we present a more detailed genetic analysis of a 7.7 Mb genomic region located on 12q24.31. This region was saturated with 20 microsatellite markers to refine the candidate region and linkage analysis performed in 41 families from the Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean (SLSJ) region of Quebec. The results of two point parametric analysis using MFLINK supported the presence of a susceptibility locus on chromosome 12q24.31. Association studies with microsatellite markers using a case/control sample from the same population (n = 401) and analyzed with CLUMP revealed significant allelic associations between the bipolar phenotype and markers NBG6 (P = 0.008) and NBG12 (P < 10(-3)). According to these results, we investigated candidate genes in the NBG12 area. We analyzed 32 genes for the presence of polymorphisms in coding sequences and intron/exon junctions and genotyped 22 non-synonymous SNPs in the SLSJ case/control sample. Two uncommon polymorphisms (minor allele frequency < or = 0.03) found in KIAA1595 and FLJ22471 genes, gave P-values below 0.05 with the T1 statistic. Moreover, using haplotype analysis, a nearly significant haplotypic association was observed at the HM74 gene. These results do not give strong support for a role in the susceptibility to bipolar disorder of any of these genes analyzed. However, the significance of rare polymorphisms should be explored by further analyses. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Prioritizing disease candidate proteins in cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks based on "guilt by association" analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wan; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming; Li, Weiguo; Qu, Xiaoli; Liang, Binhua; Gao, Qianping; Feng, Chenchen; Jia, Xu; Lv, Yana; Zhang, Siya; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    The cardiomyopathies are a group of heart muscle diseases which can be inherited (familial). Identifying potential disease-related proteins is important to understand mechanisms of cardiomyopathies. Experimental identification of cardiomyophthies is costly and labour-intensive. In contrast, bioinformatics approach has a competitive advantage over experimental method. Based on "guilt by association" analysis, we prioritized candidate proteins involving in human cardiomyopathies. We first built weighted human cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks for three subtypes of cardiomyopathies using the known disease proteins from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man as seeds. We then developed a method in prioritizing disease candidate proteins to rank candidate proteins in the network based on "guilt by association" analysis. It was found that most candidate proteins with high scores shared disease-related pathways with disease seed proteins. These top ranked candidate proteins were related with the corresponding disease subtypes, and were potential disease-related proteins. Cross-validation and comparison with other methods indicated that our approach could be used for the identification of potentially novel disease proteins, which may provide insights into cardiomyopathy-related mechanisms in a more comprehensive and integrated way.

  13. Genetic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)

    SciTech Connect

    St. Jean, P.L.; Hart, B.K.; Zhang, X.C.

    1994-09-01

    The association between AAA and gender, smoking (SM), hypertension (HTN) and inguinal herniation (IH) was examined in 141 AAA probands and 139 of their 1st degree relatives with aortic exam (36 affected, 103 unaffected). There was no significant difference between age at diagnosis of affecteds and age at exam of unaffecteds. Of 181 males, 142 had AAA; of 99 females, 35 had AAA. Using log-linear modeling AAA was significantly associated at the 5% level with gender, SM and HTN but not IH. The association of AAA with SM and HTN held when males and females were analyzed separately. HTN was -1.5 times more common in both affected males and females, while SM was 1.5 and 2 times more common in affected males and females, respectively. Tests of association and linkage analyses were performed with relevant candidate genes: 3 COL3A1 polymorphisms (C/T, ALA/THR, AvaII), 2 ELN polymorphisms (SER/GLY, (CA)n), FBN1(TAAA)n, 2 APOB polymorphisms (Xbal,Ins/Del), CLB4B (CA)n, PI and markers D1S243 (CA)n, HPR (CA)n and MFD23(CA)n. The loci were genotyped in > 100 AAA probands and > 95 normal controls. No statistically significant evidence of association at the 5% level was obtained for any of the loci using chi-square test of association. 28 families with 2 or more affecteds were analyzed using the affected pedigree member method (APM) and lod-score analyses. There was no evidence for linkage with any loci using APM. Lod-score analysis under an autosomal recessive model resulted in excluding linkage (lod score < -2) of all loci to AAA at {theta}=0.0. Under an autosomal dominant model, linkage was excluded at {theta}=0.0 to ELN, APOB, CLG4B, D1S243, HPR and MFD23. The various genes previously proposed in AAA pathogenesis are neither associated nor casually related in our study population.

  14. [Genetic background in common forms of obesity - from studies on identical twins to candidate genes of obesity].

    PubMed

    Bendlová, Běla; Lukášová, Petra; Vaňková, Markéta; Vejražková, Daniela; Bradnová, Olga; Včelák, Josef; Stanická, Soňa; Zamrazilová, Hana; Aldhoon-Hainerová, Irena; Dušátková, Lenka; Kunešová, Marie; Hainer, Vojtěch

    2014-01-01

    Common obesity is a result of interaction between genes and environmental/lifestyle factors, with heritability estimates 40-70%. Not only the susceptibility to obesity but also the success of weight management depends on the genetic background of each individual. This paper summarizes the up-to-date knowledge on genetic causes of common obesities. Introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to an identification of a total of 32 variants associated with obesity/BMI and 14 with body fat distribution. Further, a great progress in revealing the mechanisms regulating the energy balance was also noted. However, the proportion of explained variance for BMI is still low, suggesting other mechanisms such as gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, rare gene variants, copy number variants polymorphisms, or epigenetic modifications and microRNAs regulating gene transcription. In summary, we present results of our studies on obesity risk variants in Czech adults, children and adolescents including those evaluating the influence of selected gene variants on the outcomes of weight management.

  15. SNP-set analysis replicates acute lung injury genetic risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We used a gene – based replication strategy to test the reproducibility of prior acute lung injury (ALI) candidate gene associations. Methods We phenotyped 474 patients from a prospective severe trauma cohort study for ALI. Genomic DNA from subjects’ blood was genotyped using the IBC chip, a multiplex single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Results were filtered for 25 candidate genes selected using prespecified literature search criteria and present on the IBC platform. For each gene, we grouped SNPs according to haplotype blocks and tested the joint effect of all SNPs on susceptibility to ALI using the SNP-set kernel association test. Results were compared to single SNP analysis of the candidate SNPs. Analyses were separate for genetically determined ancestry (African or European). Results We identified 4 genes in African ancestry and 2 in European ancestry trauma subjects which replicated their associations with ALI. Ours is the first replication of IL6, IL10, IRAK3, and VEGFA associations in non-European populations with ALI. Only one gene – VEGFA – demonstrated association with ALI in both ancestries, with distinct haplotype blocks in each ancestry driving the association. We also report the association between trauma-associated ALI and NFKBIA in European ancestry subjects. Conclusions Prior ALI genetic associations are reproducible and replicate in a trauma cohort. Kernel - based SNP-set analysis is a more powerful method to detect ALI association than single SNP analysis, and thus may be more useful for replication testing. Further, gene-based replication can extend candidate gene associations to diverse ethnicities. PMID:22742663

  16. Identification of candidate prostate cancer biomarkers in prostate needle biopsy specimens using proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-Feng; Xu, Jun; Tian, Hong-Yu; Gao, Xia; Chen, Qing-Xi; Gu, Qi; Xu, Gen-Jun; Song, Jian-da; Zhao, Fu-Kun

    2007-12-15

    Although serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a well-established diagnostic tool for prostate cancer (PCa) detection, the definitive diagnosis of PCa is based on the information contained in prostate needle biopsy (PNBX) specimens. To define the proteomic features of PNBX specimens to identify candidate biomarkers for PCa, PNBX specimens from patients with PCa or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were subjected to comparative proteomic analysis. 2-DE revealed that 52 protein spots exhibited statistically significantly changes among PCa and BPH groups. Interesting spots were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS. The 2 most notable groups of proteins identified included latent androgen receptor coregulators [FLNA(7-15) and FKBP4] and enzymes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation (DCI and ECHS1). An imbalance in the expression of peroxiredoxin subtypes was noted in PCa specimens. Furthermore, different post-translationally modified isoforms of HSP27 and HSP70.1 were identified. Importantly, changes in FLNA(7-15), FKBP4, and PRDX4 expression were confirmed by immunoblot analyses. Our results suggest that a proteomics-based approach is useful for developing a more complete picture of the protein profile of PNBX specimen. The proteins identified by this approach may be useful molecular targets for PCa diagnostics and therapeutics. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Identification and immunoprotective analysis of a Streptococcus iniae subunit vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuang; Hu, Yong-hua; Jiao, Xu-dong; Sun, Li

    2010-03-19

    Streptococcus iniae is a Gram-positive bacterium and a severe aquaculture pathogen that can infect a wide range of farmed fish species. In the summer of 2006, an epidemic broke out in a fish farm in north China, and examination of moribund fish (Japanese flounder) identified the possible etiological agent of the outbreak as a strain named SF1, which exhibited apparent virulence in a Japanese flounder infection model and conforms to the description of S. iniae by 16S rRNA sequence analysis and API 20 Strep test. Biochemical and random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses indicated that SF1 is of the serotype I. A putative iron-binding protein, Sip11, was identified from SF1 using a previously established molecular trap that selects exported proteins. Recombinant Sip11 was purified from Escherichia coli and found to be protective against SF1 infection when used as an injection vaccine administered intraperitoneally into Japanese flounder. To improve the vaccine potential of Sip11, an E. coli strain was constructed, which expresses and secrets recombinant Sip11 covalently linked to a carrier protein in the form of a chimera. Vaccination of Japanese flounder with live Sip11-secreting E. coli afforded complete protection upon the fish following lethal SF1 challenge. These results indicate that Sip11, especially when delivered by a live bacterial carrier, is an effective vaccine candidate against SF1 infection.

  18. Identification of candidate genes associated with porcine meat color traits by genome-wide transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bojiang; Dong, Chao; Li, Pinghua; Ren, Zhuqing; Wang, Han; Yu, Fengxiang; Ning, Caibo; Liu, Kaiqing; Wei, Wei; Huang, Ruihua; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wangjun; Liu, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    Meat color is considered to be the most important indicator of meat quality, however, the molecular mechanisms underlying traits related to meat color remain mostly unknown. In this study, to elucidate the molecular basis of meat color, we constructed six cDNA libraries from biceps femoris (Bf) and soleus (Sol), which exhibit obvious differences in meat color, and analyzed the whole-transcriptome differences between Bf (white muscle) and Sol (red muscle) using high-throughput sequencing technology. Using DEseq2 method, we identified 138 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between Bf and Sol. Using DEGseq method, we identified 770, 810, and 476 DEGs in comparisons between Bf and Sol in three separate animals. Of these DEGs, 52 were overlapping DEGs. Using these data, we determined the enriched GO terms, metabolic pathways and candidate genes associated with meat color traits. Additionally, we mapped 114 non-redundant DEGs to the meat color QTLs via a comparative analysis with the porcine quantitative trait loci (QTL) database. Overall, our data serve as a valuable resource for identifying genes whose functions are critical for meat color traits and can accelerate studies of the molecular mechanisms of meat color formation. PMID:27748458

  19. DNA microarray analysis on gene candidates possibly related to tetrodotoxin accumulation in pufferfish.

    PubMed

    Feroudj, Holger; Matsumoto, Takuya; Kurosu, Yohei; Kaneko, Gen; Ushio, Hideki; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Nagashima, Yuji; Akimoto, Seiji; Usui, Kazushige; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Asakawa, Shuichi; Kodama, Masaaki; Watabe, Shugo

    2014-01-01

    Pufferfish accumulate tetrodotoxin (TTX) at high levels in liver and ovary through the food chain. However, the mechanisms underlying TTX toxification in pufferfish have been poorly understood. In order to search gene candidates involved in TTX accumulation in the torafugu pufferfish Takifugu rubripes, a custom 4x44k oligonucleotide microarray slide was designed by the Agilent eArray program using oligonucleotide probes of 60 bp in length referring to 42,724 predicted transcripts in the publicly available Fugu genome database. DNA microarray analysis was performed with total RNA samples from the livers of two toxic wild specimens in comparison with those from a nontoxic wild specimen and two nontoxic cultured specimens. The mRNA levels of 1108 transcripts were more than 2-fold higher in the toxic specimens than in the nontoxic specimens. The levels of 613 transcripts were remarkably high, and 16 transcripts encoded by 9 genes were up-regulated more than 10-fold. These genes included those encoding forming structural filaments (keratins) and those related to vitamin D metabolism and immunity. It was also noted that the levels of the transcripts encoding serpin peptidase inhibitor clade C member 1, coagulation factor X precursor, complement C2, C3, C5, C8 precursors, and interleukin-6 receptor were high in the toxic liver samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic analysis of the Venezuelan Criollo horse.

    PubMed

    Cothran, E G; Canelon, J L; Luis, C; Conant, E; Juras, R

    2011-10-07

    Various horse populations in the Americas have an origin in Spain; they are remnants of the first livestock introduced to the continent early in the colonial period (16th and 17th centuries). We evaluated genetic variability within the Venezuelan Criollo horse and its relationship with other horse breeds. We observed high levels of genetic diversity within the Criollo breed. Significant population differentiation was observed between all South American breeds. The Venezuelan Criollo horse showed high levels of genetic diversity, and from a conservation standpoint, there is no immediate danger of losing variation unless there is a large drop in population size.

  1. Evolutionary analysis suggests that AMTN is enamel-specific and a candidate for AI.

    PubMed

    Gasse, B; Silvent, J; Sire, J-Y

    2012-11-01

    Molecular evolutionary analysis is an efficient method to predict and/or validate amino acid substitutions that could lead to a genetic disease and to highlight residues and motifs that could play an important role in the protein structure and/or function. We have applied such analysis to amelotin (AMTN), a recently identified enamel protein in the rat, mouse, and humans. An in silico search for AMTN provided 42 new mammalian sequences that were added to the 3 published sequences with which we performed the analysis using a dataset representative of all lineages (circa 220 million years of evolution), including 2 enamel-less species, sloth and armadillo. During evolution, of the 209 residues of human AMTN, 17 were unchanged and 34 had conserved their chemical properties. Substituting these important residues could lead to amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Also, AMTN possesses a well-conserved signal peptide, 2 conserved motifs whose function is certainly important but unknown, and a putative phosphorylation site (SXE). In addition, the sequences of the 2 enamel-less species display mutations revealing that AMTN underwent pseudogenization, which suggests that AMTN is an enamel-specific protein.

  2. Identifying candidates with favorable prognosis following liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma: Data mining analysis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Lilly, Leslie B; Izumi, Namiki; Sherman, Morris

    2015-07-01

    The optimal cutoff of each value in configuring selection criteria for pre-transplant assessment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains uncertain. To build a predictive model for recurrent HCC, we performed data mining analysis on patients who underwent LT for HCC at University Health Network (n = 246). The model was externally validated using a cohort from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) database (n = 9,769). Among 246 patients, 14.6% (n = 36) experienced recurrent HCC within 2.5 years post-LT. The risk prediction model for recurrent HCC identified two subgroups with low-risk (total tumor diameter [TTD] <4 cm and serum alpha-fetoprotein [AFP] <73 ng/ml, n = 135) and with high-risk (TTD >4 cm and/or AFP >73 ng/ml, n = 111). The reproducibility of the model was validated through the SRTR database; overall patient survival rate was significantly better in low-risk group than high-risk group (P < 0.0001). Using Cox regression model, this yardstick, not Milan criteria, was revealed to efficiently predict post-transplant survival independent of underlying characteristics (P < 0.0001). Grouping LT candidates with pre-LT HCC by the cutoffs of TTD 4 cm and AFP 73 ng/ml which were unearthed by data mining analysis efficiently classify patients according by the post-transplant prognosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Transcriptome Analysis of Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) Anthers Reveals Candidate Genes for Tapetum and Pollen Wall Development

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Lin; Twell, David; Kuang, Yanfeng; Liao, Jingping; Zhou, Xianqiang

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the anther transcriptome on non-model plants without a known genome are surprisingly scarce. RNA-Seq and digital gene expression (DGE) profiling provides a comprehensive approach to identify candidate genes contributing to developmental processes in non-model species. Here we built a transcriptome library of developing anthers of Hamelia patens and analyzed DGE profiles from each stage to identify genes that regulate tapetum and pollen development. In total 7,720 putative differentially expressed genes across four anther stages were identified. The number of putative stage-specific genes was: 776 at microspore mother cell stage, 807 at tetrad stage, 322 at uninucleate microspore stage, and the highest number (1,864) at bicellular pollen stage. GO enrichment analysis revealed 243 differentially expressed and 108 stage-specific genes that are potentially related to tapetum development, sporopollenin synthesis, and pollen wall. The number of expressed genes, their function and expression profiles were all significantly correlated with anther developmental processes. Overall comparisons of anther and pollen transcriptomes with those of rice and Arabidopsis together with the expression profiles of homologs of known anther-expressed genes, revealed conserved patterns and also divergence. The divergence may reflect taxon-specific differences in gene expression, the use RNA-seq as a more sensitive methodology, variation in tissue composition and sampling strategies. Given the lack of genomic sequence, this study succeeded in assigning putative identity to a significant proportion of anther-expressed genes and genes relevant to tapetum and pollen development in H. patens. The anther transcriptome revealed a molecular distinction between developmental stages, serving as a resource to unravel the functions of genes involved in anther development in H. patens and informing the analysis of other members of the Rubiaceae. PMID:28119704

  4. Microarray analysis identifies candidate genes for key roles in coral development.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Lauretta C; Maindonald, John; Rudd, Stephen; Hayward, David C; Saint, Robert; Miller, David J; Ball, Eldon E

    2008-11-14

    Anthozoan cnidarians are amongst the simplest animals at the tissue level of organization, but are surprisingly complex and vertebrate-like in terms of gene repertoire. As major components of tropical reef ecosystems, the stony corals are anthozoans of particular ecological significance. To better understand the molecular bases of both cnidarian development in general and coral-specific processes such as skeletogenesis and symbiont acquisition, microarray analysis was carried out through the period of early development - when skeletogenesis is initiated, and symbionts are first acquired. Of 5081 unique peptide coding genes, 1084 were differentially expressed (P candidate genes for key roles in many aspects of coral biology, including calcification, metamorphosis and symbiont uptake. One surprising finding is that some of these genes have clear counterparts in higher animals but are not present in the closely-related sea anemone Nematostella. Secondly, coral-specific processes (i.e. traits which distinguish corals from their close relatives) may be analogous to similar processes in distantly related organisms. This first large-scale application of microarray analysis demonstrates the potential of this approach for investigating many aspects of coral biology, including the effects of stress and disease.

  5. Screening of candidate key genes associated with human osteosarcoma using bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kefeng; Gao, Jianwen; Ni, Yong

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the key genes associated with osteosarcoma (OS) using a bioinformatics approach. Microarray data (GSE36004) was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, including 19 OS cell lines and 6 normal controls. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the OS cell lines were identified using the Limma package, and differentially methylated regions were screened with methyAnalysis in R. Copy number analysis was performed and genes with copy number gains/losses were further screened using DNAcopy and cghMCR packages. Functional enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery online tool, and protein-protein interactions were identified based on information obtained from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes database. A total of 47 downregulated genes were screened in hyper-methylated regions, including the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of immunoglobulin E, high affinity I, receptor for; γ polypeptide (FCER1G), leptin (LEP) and feline Gardner-Rasheed sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FGR). In addition, a total of 17 upregulated genes, including the TPase family, AAA domain containing 2 (ATAD2) and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), exhibited copy number gains, while 5 downregulated genes, including Rho GTPase activating protein 9 (ARHGAP9) and major histocompatibility complex, class II, DO α (HLA-DOA), exhibited copy number losses. These results indicate that hyper-methylation of FCER1G, LEP, and FGR may serve a crucial function in the development of OS. In addition, copy number alterations of these DEGs, including ATAD2, CDK4, ARHGAP9 and HLA-DOA, may also contribute to OS progression. These DEGs may be candidate targets for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

  6. The kynurenine pathway in major depression: haplotype analysis of three related functional candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Claes, Stephan; Myint, Aye-Mu; Domschke, Katharina; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Entrich, Kathrin; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter; Mueller, Norbert; Baune, Bernhard; Rothermundt, Matthias

    2011-08-15

    A consistent finding in major depressive disorder (MDD) research is dysfunction of the immune system. One of the relevant metabolic pathways in this regard is the kynurenine pathway. In patients with major depression, an imbalance between neuroprotective and neurotoxic arms of the pathway with lower plasma kynurenic acid concentration was demonstrated. Therefore, we investigated Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) and haplotype association of three candidate genes of the three enzymes involved in this metabolism. The three genes, namely, tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), kynurenine 3 monooxygenase (KMO) and kynurenine amino transferase 3 (KAT III) SNPs and haplotype association analysis was performed in 338 (266 major depression and 72 bipolar depression) unrelated Caucasian patients with major depressive episodes and 310 age, gender and ethnicity matched controls. In sliding window analyses using PLINK of the haplotypes of KAT III, all windows which include the first SNP (rs12729558), the overall haplotype distribution (OMNIBUS) was significantly different between patients with a major depressive episode and control for all windows, with p-values ranging between 1.75 × 10=5 and 0.006. This is due to the haplotype CGCTCT (referring to 6 SNP window analysis), which is found in about 5.7% of patients and 1.9% of healthy controls. It was due to CGCTCT haplotype and the frequencies of this haplotype in both bipolar patients and patients with major depression showed significantly higher than the control population (p<0.001). This haplotype of KAT III gene CGCTCT may have effect on the function of this enzyme in formation of kynurenic acid in some patients with major depressive episodes. 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identifying candidate oocyte reprogramming factors using cross-species global transcriptional analysis.

    PubMed

    Awe, Jason P; Byrne, James A

    2013-04-01

    There is mounting evidence to suggest that the epigenetic reprogramming capacity of the oocyte is superior to that of the current factor-based reprogramming approaches and that some factor-reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) retain a degree of epigenetic memory that can influence differentiation capacity and may be linked to the observed expression of immunogenicity genes in iPSC derivatives. One hypothesis for this differential reprogramming capacity is the "chromatin loosening/enhanced reprogramming" concept, as previously described by John Gurdon and Ian Wilmut, as well as others, which postulates that the oocyte possesses factors that loosen the somatic cell chromatin structure, providing the epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory factors more ready access to repressed genes and thereby significantly increasing epigenetic reprogramming. However, to empirically test this hypothesis a list of candidate oocyte reprogramming factors (CORFs) must be ascertained that are significantly expressed in metaphase II oocytes. Previous studies have focused on intraspecies or cross-species transcriptional analysis of up to two different species of oocytes. In this study, we have identified eight CORFs (ARID2, ASF1A, ASF1B, DPPA3, ING3, MSL3, H1FOO, and KDM6B) based on unbiased global transcriptional analysis of oocytes from three different species (human, rhesus monkey, and mouse) that both demonstrate significant (p<0.05, FC>3) expression in oocytes of all three species and have well-established roles in loosening/opening up chromatin structure. We also identified an additional 15 CORFs that fit within our proposed "chromatin opening/fate transformative" (COFT) model. These CORFs may be able to augment Shinya Yamanaka's previously identified reprogramming factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC) and potentially facilitate the removal of epigenetic memory in iPSCs and/or reduce the expression of immunogenicity genes in iPSC derivatives, and may have

  8. Microarray analysis identifies candidate genes for key roles in coral development

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Lauretta C; Maindonald, John; Rudd, Stephen; Hayward, David C; Saint, Robert; Miller, David J; Ball, Eldon E

    2008-01-01

    Background Anthozoan cnidarians are amongst the simplest animals at the tissue level of organization, but are surprisingly complex and vertebrate-like in terms of gene repertoire. As major components of tropical reef ecosystems, the stony corals are anthozoans of particular ecological significance. To better understand the molecular bases of both cnidarian development in general and coral-specific processes such as skeletogenesis and symbiont acquisition, microarray analysis was carried out through the period of early development – when skeletogenesis is initiated, and symbionts are first acquired. Results Of 5081 unique peptide coding genes, 1084 were differentially expressed (P ≤ 0.05) in comparisons between four different stages of coral development, spanning key developmental transitions. Genes of likely relevance to the processes of settlement, metamorphosis, calcification and interaction with symbionts were characterised further and their spatial expression patterns investigated using whole-mount in situ hybridization. Conclusion This study is the first large-scale investigation of developmental gene expression for any cnidarian, and has provided candidate genes for key roles in many aspects of coral biology, including calcification, metamorphosis and symbiont uptake. One surprising finding is that some of these genes have clear counterparts in higher animals but are not present in the closely-related sea anemone Nematostella. Secondly, coral-specific processes (i.e. traits which distinguish corals from their close relatives) may be analogous to similar processes in distantly related organisms. This first large-scale application of microarray analysis demonstrates the potential of this approach for investigating many aspects of coral biology, including the effects of stress and disease. PMID:19014561

  9. [Cost-analysis of viscosupplementation treatment with hyaluronic acid in candidate knee replacement patients with osteoarhritis].

    PubMed

    Mar, J; Romero Jurado, M; Arrospide, A; Enrique Fidalgo, A; Soler López, B

    2013-01-01

    A high percentage of knee osteoarthritis finally need a knee replacement. Previous treatments used including viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid can delay the knee replacement. The objective of this study was to estimate the economic impact in the short, medium and long term of the knee replacement delay, by conducting a budget impact analysis of the incorporation of viscosupplementation to the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. From the data of patients treated at a specialized Knee Osteoarthritis Unit we built a discrete event simulation model that reproduced the progress of patients, as it could represent changes in the health status of an individual and their interaction with the system. The model allowed the number of prostheses and replacements performed each year to be calculated in a population including 1,000 patients each year according to the use of viscosupplementation. The budget impact analysis was estimated for 10 years by adding the cost of each treatment. A total of 224 patient candidates to receive a knee replacement were studied. The viscosupplementation use delayed the need to perform the knee replacement by 2.67 years The budgetary impact would lead to net savings during the 10 years. However, it is much greater in the earlier years. The sum of the savings in the first three years would be 36 million euros. The study concludes that the use of viscosupplementation reduced the economic burden of knee osteoarthritis in the health system as a result of delayed knee replacement. The simulation model enabled the economic impact in both the short and long term to be analysed.

  10. Genetic association analysis identifies variants associated with disease progression in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Rudi; de Vries, Elisabeth M G; Goode, Elizabeth C; Jiang, Xiaojun; Sampaziotis, Fotis; Rombouts, Krista; Böttcher, Katrin; Folseraas, Trine; Weismüller, Tobias J; Mason, Andrew L; Wang, Weiwei; Alexander, Graeme; Alvaro, Domenico; Bergquist, Annika; Björkström, Niklas K; Beuers, Ulrich; Björnsson, Einar; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Bowlus, Christopher L; Bragazzi, Maria C; Carbone, Marco; Chazouillères, Olivier; Cheung, Angela; Dalekos, Georgios; Eaton, John; Eksteen, Bertus; Ellinghaus, David; Färkkilä, Martti; Festen, Eleonora A M; Floreani, Annarosa; Franceschet, Irene; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Hoek, Bart van; Holm, Kristian; Hohenester, Simon; Hov, Johannes Roksund; Imhann, Floris; Invernizzi, Pietro; Juran, Brian D; Lenzen, Henrike; Lieb, Wolfgang; Liu, Jimmy Z; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Marzioni, Marco; Melum, Espen; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Müller, Tobias; Pares, Albert; Rupp, Christian; Rust, Christian; Sandford, Richard N; Schramm, Christoph; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrumpf, Erik; Silverberg, Mark S; Srivastava, Brijesh; Sterneck, Martina; Teufel, Andreas; Vallier, Ludovic; Verheij, Joanne; Vila, Arnau Vich; Vries, Boudewijn de; Zachou, Kalliopi; Chapman, Roger W; Manns, Michael P; Pinzani, Massimo; Rushbrook, Simon M; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Franke, Andre; Anderson, Carl A; Karlsen, Tom H; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; Weersma, Rinse K

    2017-08-04

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a genetically complex, inflammatory bile duct disease of large