Science.gov

Sample records for candidate structural material

  1. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-12-01

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400{degrees}C, corrosion rates are {approx}4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400{degrees}C are {ge}88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400{degrees}C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized.

  2. Candidate Structural Materials for In-Core VHTR Application

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai; Windes, Will; Smit, Kobus

    2008-01-01

    Graphite moderated gas cooled reactors led the way into the nuclear age with the Chicago Pile-1 reactor, which provided the first sustained critical reaction in December, 1942. The first commercial nuclear plant, Calder Hall in the UK, went critical in 1956 with an outlet gas temperature of {approx}345 C. As depicted in Fig. 1, in five decades since Calder Hall, outlet temperature increased rapidly, reaching a plateau of {approx}950 C. This apparent ceiling is in large part due to limitations in the structural materials utilized within the core (e.g. control systems) and primary loop (hot duct, heat-exchangers etc.) Simply, the operating temperatures of Generation III (HTGR's) are very near performance limits of the structural alloys used, both in terms of elevated temperature and as-irradiated properties. This limitation remains today and is the reason the outlet temperature of the Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) continues to be revised downward from the original optimistic goal of {approx}1200 C, to it's current target outlet temperature of {approx}950 C, a temperature consistent with the previous generation of HTGR's. An example of the challenges facing Generation IV VHTR is found by considering the control rods. For the Fort St. Vrain Reactor the control system consisted of thirty tubes each containing B4C control material. Alloy 800, originally developed by Inco in the 1950's under the trade-name Incoloy 800 and 800H had found widespread application is steam generators, turbines and was selected for this control rod application. These materials are included for Class 1 Nuclear Component by ASME section III. In addition to Ft. St Vrain, alloy 800H has found control rod application in the German HTR and Japanese HTTR reactors and is the primary choice Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (a HTGR) reactivity control system. Figure 2 gives the ASME allowed stress for Alloy 800H. Due to the loss in creep rupture strength, the allowed design stress for

  3. Fracture toughness of irradiated candidate materials for ITER first wall/blanket structures: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1996-04-01

    Disk compact specimens of candidate materials for first wall/blanket structures in ITER have been irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 250{degrees}C. These specimens have been tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250{degrees}C to determine J-integral values and tearing moduli. The results show that irradiation at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness of austenic stainless steels, but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the temperature increases. Irradiation at 250{degrees}C is more damaging that at 90{degrees}C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. The ferritic-martensitic steels HT-9 and F82H show significantly greater reductions in fracture toughness that the austenitic stainless steels.

  4. Carrier multiplication in semiconductor nanocrystals: theoretical screening of candidate materials based on band-structure effects.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun-Wei; Franceschetti, Alberto; Zunger, Alex

    2008-10-01

    Direct carrier multiplication (DCM) occurs when a highly excited electron-hole pair decays by transferring its excess energy to the electrons rather than to the lattice, possibly exciting additional electron-hole pairs. Atomistic electronic structure calculations have shown that DCM can be induced by electron-hole Coulomb interactions, in an impact-ionization-like process whose rate is proportional to the density of biexciton states rho XX. Here we introduce a DCM "figure of merit" R2(E) which is proportional to the ratio between the biexciton density of states rhoXX and the single-exciton density of states rhoX, restricted to single-exciton and biexciton states that are coupled by Coulomb interactions. Using R2(E), we consider GaAs, InAs, InP, GaSb, InSb, CdSe, Ge, Si, and PbSe nanocrystals of different sizes. Although DCM can be affected by both quantum-confinement effects (reflecting the underly electronic structure of the confined dot-interior states) and surface effects, here we are interested to isolate the former. To this end the nanocrystal energy levels are obtained from the corresponding bulk band structure via the truncated crystal approximation. We find that PbSe, Si, GaAs, CdSe, and InP nanocrystals have larger DCM figure of merit than the other nanocrystals. Our calculations suggest that high DCM efficiency requires high degeneracy of the corresponding bulk band-edge states. Interestingly, by considering band structure effects we find that as the dot size increases the DCM critical energy E0 (the energy at which R2(E) becomes >or=1) is reduced, suggesting improved DCM. However, whether the normalized E0/epsilong increases or decreases as the dot size increases depends on dot material.

  5. Effects of surface condition on the corrosion of candidate structural materials in a simulated HTGR-GT environment

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.D.

    1980-02-01

    A simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) helium environment was used to study the effects of surface finish conditions on the subsequent elevated-temperature corrosion behavior of key candidate structural materials. The environment contained helium with 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2//50 ..mu..atm CO/50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4//<0.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O at 900/sup 0/C with total test exposure durations of 3000 hours. Specimens with lapped, grit-blasted, pickled, and preoxidized surface conditions were studied. Materials tested included two cast superalloys, IN 100 and IN 713LC; one centrifugally cast high-temperature alloy, HK 40 one oxice-dispersion-strengthened alloy, Inconel MA 754; and three wrought high-temperature alloys, Hastelloy Alloy X, Inconel Alloy 617, and Alloy 800H.

  6. Influence of operation conditions on structure and properties of 12% Cr steels as candidate structural materials for fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioltukhovsky, A. G.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M. V.; Kazennov, Y. I.; Medvedeva, E. A.; Tselishchev, A. V.; Shamardin, V. K.; Povstyanko, A. V.; Ostrovsky, S. E.; Dvoryashin, A. M.; Porollo, S. I.; Vorobyev, A. N.; Khabarov, V. S.

    1998-10-01

    The Russian experience in the development and operation of the nuclear core components in fast reactors with a sodium coolant demonstrates that 12% Cr steels may be successfully used at temperatures of 270-650°C and at high neutron damage dose (up to 100 dpa and above). The priority of the temperature but not of dose of the irradiation is noted for the steels at 270-350°C. In addition, the following may take place: a sharp decrease in the ductility of material, a change in the mechanism of fracture with which the ductile-brittle-transition-temperature (DBTT) shift is associated. With an increase in irradiation temperature to 350-500°C and the irradiation dose (up to 100 dpa) chromium steels are observed to strengthen; their ductility increased monotonously, and embrittlement does not show up. With the irradiation temperature increased above 500°C (up to 650-690°C), the material becomes plastic and some of its strength properties are decreased. The high level of the irradiation resistance of 12% Cr steels is a result of their structure and phase transformations. The properties of the welded joints of 12% Cr steels under the conditions of the neutron irradiation are slightly inferior to the properties of the base metal.

  7. Biological and structural characterization of a naturally inspired material engineered from elastin as a candidate for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Vassalli, Massimo; Sbrana, Francesca; Laurita, Alessandro; Papi, Massimiliano; Bloise, Nora; Visai, Livia; Bochicchio, Brigida

    2013-12-23

    The adoption of a biomimetic approach in the design and fabrication of innovative materials for biomedical applications is encountering a growing interest. In particular, new molecules are being engineered on the basis of proteins present in the extracellular matrix, such as fibronectin, collagen, or elastin. Following this approach scientists expect to be able not only to obtain materials with tailored mechanical properties but also to elicit specific biological responses inherited by the mimicked tissue. In the present work, a novel peptide, engineered starting from the sequence encoded by exon 28 of human tropoelastin, was characterized from a chemical, physical, and biological point of view. The obtained molecule was observed to aggregate at high temperatures, forming a material able to induce a biological effect similar to what elastin does in the physiological context. This material seems to be a good candidate to play a relevant role in future biomedical applications with special reference to vascular surgery.

  8. An evaluation of candidate oxidation resistant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon; Banks, Bruce; Mirtich, Michael; Difilippo, Frank; Hotes, Deborah; Labed, Richard; Dever, Terese; Kussmaul, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Ground based testing of materials considered for Kapton solar array blanket protection, graphite epoxy structural member protection, and high temperature radiators was performed in an RF plasma asher. Ashing rates for Kapton were correlated with rates measured on STS-8 to determine the exposure time equivalent to one year in low Earth orbit (LEO) at a constant density space station orbital flux. Protective coatings on Kapton from Tekmat, Andus Corporation, and LeRC were evaluated in the plasma asher and mass loss rates per unit area were measured for each sample. All samples evaluated provided some protection to the underlying surface but ion beam sputter deposited samples of SiO2 and SiO2 with 8% polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) showed no evidence of degradation after 47 hours of exposure. Mica paint was evaluated as a protective coating for graphite epoxy structural members. Mica appears to be resistant to attack by atomic oxygen but only offers some limited protection as a paint because the paint vehicles evaluated to date were not resistant to atomic oxygen. Four materials were selected for evaluation as candidate radiator materials: stainless steel, copper, niobium-1% zirconium, and titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium. These materials were surface textured by various means to improve their emittance. Emittances as high as 0.93 at 2.5 microns for stainless steel and 0.89 at 2.5 microns for Nb-1 Zr were obtained from surface texturing. There were no significant changes in emittance after asher exposure.

  9. Updated candidate list for engineered barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes candidate materials to be evaluated over the next several years during advanced design phases for the waste package to be used for the underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes at the Yucca Mountain facility.

  10. Thermal Diffusivity of Carbon Materials as Candidate Reference Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akoshima, M.; Abe, H.; Baba, T.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal-diffusivity measurements using the laser-flash method have been investigated in order to establish a thermal diffusivity standard. In many cases, thermal-conductivity values of bulk materials are calculated from the thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, and bulk density. The thermal diffusivity is one of the transport properties. It depends on the material and is sensitive to the structure. So, it is important to measure the thermal diffusivity of each material. The laser-flash method is one of the most popular methods for thermal-diffusivity measurements of bulk materials above room temperature. Because the method realizes a short-time method and is a non-contact method, it is very suitable for practical use. And it is known as a highly reliable measurement since one-dimensional heat diffusion phenomena observed in these measurements are simple. On the other hand, more reliable values measured by the method are important in the view of thermal design. According to the background, there is a need of a standard for thermal-diffusivity measurements using the laser-flash method to obtain reliable thermal diffusivities. The National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) in AIST has established reference materials for the laser-flash method and is supplying them. However, they are not sufficient to cover the whole range of thermal-diffusivity measurements. Thus, some candidate materials have been investigated to establish another reference material. Carbon materials are considered since it is preferable for the laser-flash method that the material is optically nontransparent and dark colored (ideally black). In this study, the thermal diffusivity of a pyrolytic graphite that is expected to be a candidate reference material for the laser-flash method is investigated. It was found that the intrinsic thermal diffusivities can be determined along the in-plane and cross-plane directions. The high thermal diffusivity of the in-plane direction, 1.19 × 10^{-3} m2

  11. Surface segregation in binary alloy first wall candidate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, D. M.; Krauss, A. R.; Mendelsohn, M. H.; Susman, S.

    1982-12-01

    We have been studying the conditions necessary to produce a self-sustaining stable lithium monolayer on a metal substrate as a means of creating a low-Z film which sputters primarily as secondary ions. It is expected that because of the toroidal field, secondary ions originating at the first wall will be returned and contribute little to the plasma impurity influx [1,2]. Aluminum and copper have, because of their high thermal conductivity and low induced radioactivity, been proposed [3-5] as first wall candidate materials. The mechanical properties of the pure metals are very poorly suited to structural applications and an alloy must be used to obtain adequate hardness and tensile strength. In the case of aluminum, mechanical properties suitable for aircraft manufacture are obtained by the addition of a few at% Li. In order to investigate alloys of a similar nature as candidate structural materials for fusion machines we have prepared samples of Li-doped aluminum using both a pyro-metallurgical and a vapor-diffusion technique. The sputtering properties and surface composition have been studied as a function of sample temperature and heating time, and ion beam mass. The erosion rate and secondary ion yield of both the sputtered Al and Li have been raonitored by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Auger analysis providing information on surface segregation, depth composition profiles, and diffusion rates. The surface composition and lithium depth profiles are compared with previously obtained computational results based on a regular solution model of segregation, while the partial sputtering yields of Al and Li are compared with results obtained with a modified version of the TRIM computer program.

  12. A New Tribological Test for Candidate Brush Seal Materials Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellenstein, James A.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700 C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  13. A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fellenstein, J.A.; DellaCorte, C.

    1994-10-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  14. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR A CANDIDATE BUILDING MATERIALS RADIUM STANDARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the technical basis for a candidate building materials radium standard. It contains the standard and a summary of the technical basis for the standard. (NOTE: The Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP), sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency and the...

  15. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR A CANDIDATE BUILDING MATERIALS RADIUM STANDARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the technical basis for a candidate building materials radium standard. It contains the standard and a summary of the technical basis for the standard. (NOTE: The Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP), sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency and the...

  16. Production and characterization of a bovine liver candidate reference material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, S. R.; Peixoto, A. M. J.; Souza, G. B.; Tullio, R. R.; Nogueira, A. R. A.

    2016-07-01

    The preparation of a bovine liver candidate reference material and the steps are taken to confirm its homogeneity, long and short term stabilities, and consensus values are described. Details of the sample preparation and the final collaborative exercise are presented. The material elemental composition was characterized by 17 elements (As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mo, Mn, Na, P, Pb, Se, Sr, V, and Zn) of nutritional and toxicological significance.

  17. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons and methods for making such materials. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  18. Candidate materials for advanced fire-resistant photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimura, R. S.; Otth, D. H.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Arnett, J. C.; Samuelson, G.

    1985-01-01

    A cooperative, cost-sharing research effort to develop a technology base required to construct fire-ratable photovoltaic modules has resulted in the identification of several high-temperature, back-surface candidate materials capable of raising the fire-resistance of modules using hydrocarbon encapsulants to Class A and B levels. Advanced experimental module configurations have been developed using back surfaces consisting of Kapton, Tedlar laminates, metal-foils, and fiberglass materials with high-temperature coatings. Test results (October 1984; March 1985; May 1985; and October 1985) indicate that several of these advanced module configurations are capable of achieving Class B fire-resistance levels, while a few configurations can achieve Class A levels. The paper summarizes activities to date, discussing flammability failure mechanisms, time-temperature profiles, and results of Block V environmental exposure tests of a candidate material suitable for both Class B and Class A fire-resistance levels.

  19. Electron Radiation Effects on Candidate Solar Sail Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Hollerman, William A.; Hubbs, Whitney S.; Gray, Perry A.; Wertz, George E.; Hoppe, David T.; Nehls, Mary K.; Semmel, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Solar sails are not limited by reaction mass and provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Once thought to be difficult or impossible, solar sailing has come out of science fiction and into the realm of possibility. Any spacecraft using this propulsion method would need to deploy a thin sail that could be as large as many kilometers in extent. The availability of strong, ultra lightweight, and radiation resistant materials will determine the future of solar sailing. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate solar sail material to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to space environmental effects. This paper will describe the irradiation of candidate solar sail materials to energetic electrons, in vacuum, to determine the hardness of several candidate sail materials.

  20. Cryogenic Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Candidate Materials for Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, JIm; Canavan, Ed; Jahromi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Spacecraft and instruments on space missions are built using a wide variety of carefully-chosen materials. In addition to having mechanical properties appropriate for surviving the launch environment, these materials generally must have thermal conductivity values which meet specific requirements in their operating temperature ranges. Space missions commonly propose to include materials for which the thermal conductivity is not well known at cryogenic temperatures. We developed a test facility in 2004 at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center to measure material thermal conductivity at temperatures between 4 and 300 Kelvin, and we have characterized many candidate materials since then. The measurement technique is not extremely complex, but proper care to details of the setup, data acquisition and data reduction is necessary for high precision and accuracy. We describe the thermal conductivity measurement process and present results for several materials.

  1. Characterization of Space Environmental Effects on Candidate Solar Sail Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David; Hubbs, Whitney; Stanaland, Tesia; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted to a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two if the sunfacing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. The Space Environmental Effects Team, at MSFC, is actively characterizing candidate solar sail material to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to radiation environments simulating orbital environments. This paper describes the results of three candidate materials after exposure to a simulated Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO). This is the first known characterization of solar sail material exposed to space simulated radiation environments. The technique of radiation dose versus material depth profiling was used to determine the orbital equivalent exposure doses. The solar sail exposure procedures and results of the material characterization will be discussed.

  2. Degradation mode surveys of high performance candidate container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1990-12-01

    Corrosion resistant materials are being considered for the metallic barrier of the Yucca Mountain Project`s high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. Nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys and titanium alloys have good corrosion resistance properties and are considered good candidates for the metallic barrier. The localized corrosion phenomena, pitting and crevice corrosion, are considered as potentially limiting for the barrier lifetime. An understanding of the mechanisms of localized corrosion and of how various parameters affect it will be necessary for adequate performance assessment of candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns involving localized corrosion are discussed. The effects of various parameters, such as temperature and concentration of halide species, on localized corrosion are given. In addition, concerns about aging of the protective oxide layer in the expected service temperature range (50 to 250{degree}C) are presented. Also some mechanistic considerations of localized corrosion are given. 45 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Oxygen-Diffused Titanium as a Candidate Brake Rotor Material

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Jolly, Brian C

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are one of several candidate materials for the next generation of truck disk brake rotors. Despite their advantages of lightweight relative to cast iron and good strength and corrosion resistance, titanium alloys are unlikely to be satisfactory brake rotor materials unless their friction and wear behavior can be significantly improved. In this study, a surface engineering process oxygen diffusion was applied to titanium rotors and has shown very encouraging results. The oxygen diffused Ti-6Al-4V (OD-Ti) was tested on a sub-scale brake tester against a flat block of commercial brake lining material and benchmarked against several other Ti-based materials, including untreated Ti-6Al-4V, ceramic particle-reinforced Ti composites (MMCs), and a thermal-spray-coated Ti alloy. With respect to friction, the OD-Ti outperformed all other candidate materials under the imposed test conditions with the friction coefficient remaining within a desirable range of 0.35-0.50, even under the harshest conditions when the disk surface temperature reached nearly 600 C. In addition, the OD-Ti showed significantly improved wear-resistance over the non-treated one and was even better than the Ti-based composite materials.

  4. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  5. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  6. Lightweight Materials & Structures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Lightweight Materials and Structures (LMS) project will mature high-payoff structures and materials technologies that have direct application to NASA’s future space exploration needs.One of the...

  7. Explosive Train Scale Safety Testing of Candidate Booster Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoodley, Andrew; Wright, Mark; Flegg, Gareth; Vine, Tracey

    2009-06-01

    A concern for initiation train design is that the use of relatively sensitive explosives to initiate an IHE could degrade its inherent safety properties. In order to understand the effect of a more sensitive explosive on an IHE, it is important to characterise the candidate explosive train materials as they would be utilised. To support the safety assessment of candidate booster explosives, a collaboration was established to evaluate the response of various formulations of interest (UF-TATB, LLM- 105, FOX-7, HMX and TATB) in the Explosive Train Scale Safety tests developed by QinetiQ. This report describes the three experimental configurations (slow and fast cook-off and shock sensitivity) and the results for the aforementioned materials. All of the materials displayed good safety characteristics in the fast cook-off, resulting in low order deflagrations. The TATB based, LLM-105 and most of the HMX based materials also displayed a similar response in the slow cook-off tests, yielding a low order event. The shock sensitivity experiments ranked the materials in the expected order, with UF-TATB yielding the least sensitive result recorded in the XTSS tests to date.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Park, J.Y.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.

    1990-11-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS), Type 316L SS, Incology 825, P-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7% Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks, and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in simulated Well J-13 water which is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site has been completed, and crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests are also being conducted under the same environmental conditions. 13 refs., 60 figs., 22 tabs.

  9. 77 FR 20886 - Proposed Information Collection (Advertising, Sales, and Enrollment Materials, and Candidate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Advertising, Sales, and Enrollment Materials, and Candidate... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Advertising, Sales, and Enrollment... advertising, sales materials, enrollment materials, or candidate handbooks that educational institutions...

  10. Space Environmental Effects on Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Nehls, Mary; Semmel, Charles; Hovater, Mary; Gray, Perry; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted ot a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two, if the sun-facing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. Near term solar sail propelled science missions are targeting the Lagrange point 1 (L1) as well as locations sunward of L1 as destinations. These near term missions include the Solar Polar Imager and the L1 Diamond. The Environmental Effects Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues to actively characterize solar sail material in preparation for these near term solar sail missions. Previous investigations indicated that space environmental effects on sail material thermo-optical properties were minimal and would not significantly affect the propulsion efficiency of the sail. These investigations also indicated that the sail material mechanical stability degrades with increasing radiation exposure. This paper will further quantify the effect of space environmental exposure on the mechanical properties of candidate sail materials. Candidate sail materials for these missions include Aluminum coated Mylar, Teonex, and CP1 (Colorless Polyimide). These materials were subjected to uniform radiation doses of electrons and protons in individual exposures sequences. Dose values ranged from 100 Mrads to over 5 Grads. The engineering performance property responses of thermo-optical and mechanical properties were characterized

  11. Space Environmental Effects on Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Nehls, Mary; Semmel, Charles; Hovater, Mary; Gray, Perry; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted ot a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two, if the sun-facing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. Near term solar sail propelled science missions are targeting the Lagrange point 1 (L1) as well as locations sunward of L1 as destinations. These near term missions include the Solar Polar Imager and the L1 Diamond. The Environmental Effects Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues to actively characterize solar sail material in preparation for these near term solar sail missions. Previous investigations indicated that space environmental effects on sail material thermo-optical properties were minimal and would not significantly affect the propulsion efficiency of the sail. These investigations also indicated that the sail material mechanical stability degrades with increasing radiation exposure. This paper will further quantify the effect of space environmental exposure on the mechanical properties of candidate sail materials. Candidate sail materials for these missions include Aluminum coated Mylar, Teonex, and CP1 (Colorless Polyimide). These materials were subjected to uniform radiation doses of electrons and protons in individual exposures sequences. Dose values ranged from 100 Mrads to over 5 Grads. The engineering performance property responses of thermo-optical and mechanical properties were characterized

  12. Relative sliding durability of candidate high temperature fiber seal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1992-01-01

    The relative sliding durability behavior of six candidate ceramic fibers for high temperature sliding seal applications is reviewed and compared. Pin on disk tests were used to evaluate potential seal materials by sliding a tow or bundle of the candidate ceramic fiber against a superalloy test disk. Tests were conducted in air under a 2.65 N load, at a sliding velocity of 0.025 m/sec and at temperatures from 25 to 900 C. Friction was measured during the tests and fiber wear, indicated by the extent of fibers broken in the tow or bundle, was measured at the end of each test. For most of the fibers, friction and wear increase with test temperature. The relative fiber durability ranking correlates with tensile strength, indicating that tensile data, which is more readily available than sliding durability data, may be useful in predicting fiber wear behavior under various conditions. A dimensional analysis of the wear data shows that the fiber durability is related to a dimensionless durability ratio which represents the ratio of the fiber strength to the fiber stresses imposed by sliding. The analysis is applicable to fibers with similar diameters and elastic moduli. Based upon the results of the research program, three fiber candidates are recommended for further study as potential seal materials. They are a silicon based complex carbide-oxide fiber, an alumina-boria-silica and an aluminosilicate fiber.

  13. Materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, Theodore T.; Langenbeck, Sharon L.; Al-Jamily, Ghanim; Arnold, Joe; Barbee, Troy; Coulter, Dan; Dolgin, Ben; Fichter, Buck; George, Patricia; Gorenstein, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Materials and structures technology covers a wide range of technical areas. Some of the most pertinent issues for the Astrotech 21 missions include dimensionally stable structural materials, advanced composites, dielectric coatings, optical metallic coatings for low scattered light applications, low scattered light surfaces, deployable and inflatable structures (including optical), support structures in 0-g and 1-g environments, cryogenic optics, optical blacks, contamination hardened surfaces, radiation hardened glasses and crystals, mono-metallic telescopes and instruments, and materials characterization. Some specific examples include low coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) structures (0.01 ppm/K), lightweight thermally stable mirror materials, thermally stable optical assemblies, high reliability/accuracy (1 micron) deployable structures, and characterization of nanometer level behavior of materials/structures for interferometry concepts. Large filled-aperture concepts will require materials with CTE's of 10(exp 9) at 80 K, anti-contamination coatings, deployable and erectable structures, composite materials with CTE's less than 0.01 ppm/K and thermal hysteresis, 0.001 ppm/K. Gravitational detection systems such as LAGOS will require rigid/deployable structures, dimensionally stable components, lightweight materials with low conductivity, and high stability optics. The Materials and Structures panel addressed these issues and the relevance of the Astrotech 21 mission requirements by dividing materials and structures technology into five categories. These categories, the necessary development, and applicable mission/program development phasing are summarized. For each of these areas, technology assessments were made and development plans were defined.

  14. LEO effects on candidate solar cell cover materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.

    1993-01-01

    In 1984, the LDEF (Long Duration Exposure Facility) was placed in LEO (Low Earth Orbit) for a mission planned to last approximately one year. Due to a number of factors, retrieval was delayed until 1990. An experiment, prepared under the direction of JPL, consisted of a test plate with thirty (30) individual thin silicon solar cell/cover samples. The covers consisted of conventional cerium doped microsheet platelets and potential candidate materials, such as FEP Teflon, silicon RTV's, glass resins, polyimides, and a silicone-polyimide copolymer encapsulant. The effects of the LDEF mission environment (micrometeorite/debris impacts, atomic oxygen, UV, and particulate radiation) on the samples are discussed.

  15. Material Properties of Three Candidate Elastomers for Space Seals Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastrzyk, Marta B.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Oswald, Jay J.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    A next-generation docking system is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to support Constellation Space Exploration Missions to low Earth orbit (LEO), to the Moon, and to Mars. A number of investigations were carried out to quantify the properties of candidate elastomer materials for use in the main interface seal of the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). This seal forms the gas pressure seal between two mating spacecraft. Three candidate silicone elastomer compounds were examined: Esterline ELA-SA-401, Parker Hannifin S0383-70, and Parker Hannifin S0899-50. All three materials were characterized as low-outgassing compounds, per ASTM E595, so as to minimize the contamination of optical and solar array systems. Important seal properties such as outgas levels, durometer, tensile strength, elongation to failure, glass transition temperature, permeability, compression set, Yeoh strain energy coefficients, coefficients of friction, coefficients of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and diffusivity were measured and are reported herein.

  16. Characterization of Space Environmental Effects on Candidate Solar Sail Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David; Hubbs, Whitney; Stanaland, Tesia; Altstatt, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure and provide a source of spacecraft propulsion. The pressure can be increased, by a factor of two if the sun-facing surface is perfectly reflective. Solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic front layer, a thin polymeric substrate, and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate solar sail materials to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to a simulated Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) radiation environment. The technique of radiation dose verses material depth profiling was used to determine the orbital equivalent exposure doses. The solar sail exposure procedures and results of the material characterization will be discussed.

  17. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Various topics relating to composite structural materials for use in aircraft structures are discussed. The mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers, carbon fiber-epoxy interface bonds, composite fractures, residual stress in high modulus and high strength carbon fibers, fatigue in composite materials, and the mechanical properties of polymeric matrix composite laminates are among the topics discussed.

  18. Bioinspired structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegst, Ulrike G. K.; Bai, Hao; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    Natural structural materials are built at ambient temperature from a fairly limited selection of components. They usually comprise hard and soft phases arranged in complex hierarchical architectures, with characteristic dimensions spanning from the nanoscale to the macroscale. The resulting materials are lightweight and often display unique combinations of strength and toughness, but have proven difficult to mimic synthetically. Here, we review the common design motifs of a range of natural structural materials, and discuss the difficulties associated with the design and fabrication of synthetic structures that mimic the structural and mechanical characteristics of their natural counterparts.

  19. Bioinspired structural materials.

    PubMed

    Wegst, Ulrike G K; Bai, Hao; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P; Ritchie, Robert O

    2015-01-01

    Natural structural materials are built at ambient temperature from a fairly limited selection of components. They usually comprise hard and soft phases arranged in complex hierarchical architectures, with characteristic dimensions spanning from the nanoscale to the macroscale. The resulting materials are lightweight and often display unique combinations of strength and toughness, but have proven difficult to mimic synthetically. Here, we review the common design motifs of a range of natural structural materials, and discuss the difficulties associated with the design and fabrication of synthetic structures that mimic the structural and mechanical characteristics of their natural counterparts.

  20. Corrosion of candidate container materials by Yucca Mountain bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J; Jones, D; Lian, T; Martin, S; Rivera, A

    1999-12-10

    Several candidate container materials have been studied in modified Yucca Mountain (YM) ground water in the presence or absence of YM bacteria. YM bacteria increased corrosion rates by 5-6 fold in UNS G10200 carbon steel, and nearly 100-fold in UNS NO4400 Ni-Cu alloy. YM bacteria caused microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) through de-alloying or Ni-depletion of Ni-Cu alloy as evidenced by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) analysis. MIC rates of more corrosion-resistant alloys such as UNS NO6022 Ni-Cr- MO-W alloy, UN's NO6625 Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, and UNS S30400 stainless steel were measured below 0.05 umyr, however YM bacteria affected depletion of Cr and Fe relative to Ni in these materials. The chemical change on the metal surface caused by depletion was characterized in anodic polarization behavior. The anodic polarization behavior of depleted Ni-based alloys was similar to that of pure Ni. Key words: MIC, container materials, YM bacteria, de-alloying, Ni-depletion, Cr-depletion, polarization resistance, anodic polarization,

  1. Composite structural materials. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of filamentary composite materials in the design and construction of primary aircraft structures is considered with emphasis on efforts to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, and reliability and life prediction. The redesign of a main spar/rib region on the Boeing 727 elevator near its actuator attachment point is discussed. A composite fabrication and test facility is described as well as the use of minicomputers for computer aided design. Other topics covered include (1) advanced structural analysis methids for composites; (2) ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite structures; (3) optimum combination of hardeners in the cure of epoxy; (4) fatigue in composite materials; (5) resin matrix characterization and properties; (6) postbuckling analysis of curved laminate composite panels; and (7) acoustic emission testing of composite tensile specimens.

  2. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Overall emphasis is on basic long-term research in the following categories: constituent materials, composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology; and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Research in basic composition, characteristics, and processing science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to present and future problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of this comprehensive program are presented.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.Y.; Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1992-06-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS). Type 316L SS, Incoloy 825, phosphorus-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks. and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC)- A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) and fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests was performed at 93{degree}C and 1 atm of pressure in simulated J-13 well water. This water is representative, prior to the widespread availability of unsaturated-zone water, of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. Slow-strain-rate tests were conducted on 6.35-mm-diameter cylindrical specimens at strain rates of 10-{sup {minus}7} and 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1} under crevice and noncrevice conditions. All tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strain of 1--4%. Scanning electron microscopy revealed some crack initiation in virtually all the materials, as well as weldments made from these materials. A stress- or strain-ratio cracking index ranks these materials, in order of increasing resistance to SCC, as follows: Type 304 SS < Type 316L SS < Incoloy 825 < Cu-30%Ni < Cu and Cu-7%Al. Fracture-mechanics CGR tests were conducted on 25.4-mm-thick compact tension specimens of Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS) and Incoloy 825. Crack-growth rates were measured under various load conditions: load ratios M of 0.5--1.0, frequencies of 10{sup {minus}3}-1 Hz, rise nines of 1--1000s, and peak stress intensities of 25--40 MPa{center_dot}m {sup l/2}.

  4. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the RPI composites program is to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability and life prediction. Concommitant goals are to educate engineers to design and use composite materials as normal or conventional materials. A multifaceted program was instituted to achieve these objectives.

  5. Laboratory Reference Spectroscopy of Icy Satellite Candidate Surface Materials (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, J. B.; Jamieson, C. S.; Shirley, J. H.; Pitman, K. M.; Kariya, M.; Crandall, P.

    2013-12-01

    The bulk of our knowledge of icy satellite composition continues to be derived from ultraviolet, visible and infrared remote sensing observations. Interpretation of remote sensing observations relies on availability of laboratory reference spectra of candidate surface materials. These are compared directly to observations, or incorporated into models to generate synthetic spectra representing mixtures of the candidate materials. Spectral measurements for the study of icy satellites must be taken under appropriate conditions (cf. Dalton, 2010; also http://mos.seti.org/icyworldspectra.html for a database of compounds) of temperature (typically 50 to 150 K), pressure (from 10-9 to 10-3 Torr), viewing geometry, (i.e., reflectance), and optical depth (must manifest near infrared bands but avoid saturation in the mid-infrared fundamentals). The Planetary Ice Characterization Laboratory (PICL) is being developed at JPL to provide robust reference spectra for icy satellite surface materials. These include sulfate hydrates, hydrated and hydroxylated minerals, and both organic and inorganic volatile ices. Spectral measurements are performed using an Analytical Spectral Devices FR3 portable grating spectrometer from .35 to 2.5 microns, and a Thermo-Nicolet 6500 Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometer from 1.25 to 20 microns. These are interfaced with the Basic Extraterrestrial Environment Simulation Testbed (BEEST), a vacuum chamber capable of pressures below 10-9 Torr with a closed loop liquid helium cryostat with custom heating element capable of temperatures from 30-800 Kelvins. To generate optical constants (real and imaginary index of refraction) for use in nonlinear mixing models (i.e., Hapke, 1981 and Shkuratov, 1999), samples are ground and sieved to six different size fractions or deposited at varying rates to provide a range of grain sizes for optical constants calculations based on subtractive Kramers-Kronig combined with Hapke forward modeling (Dalton and

  6. Humid air corrosion of YMP waste package candidate material

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is evaluating candidate materials for high level nuclear waste containers (Waste Packages) for a potential deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The potential repository is located above the water table in the unsaturated zone. The rock contains nominally 10% by volume water and gas pressure in the emplacement drifts of the repository is expected to remain near the ambient atmospheric pressure. The heat generated by the radioactive decay of the waste will raise the temperature of the waste packages and the surrounding rock. Waste Package temperatures above the ambient boiling point of water are anticipated for the waste emplacement scenarios. Because the repository emplacement drifts are expected to remain at the ambient atmospheric pressure, the maximum relative humidity obtainable decreases above the boiling point of water. Temperatures of the Waste Packages and the surrounding rock are expected to reach maximum temperature within 100`s of years and then gradually decrease with time. Episodic liquid water contact with the WPs is also expected; this will result in the deposition of salts and mineral scale.

  7. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in studies of constituent materials composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology, and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Topics discussed include: mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; fatigue in composite materials; experimental and theoretical studies of moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates and neat resins; numerical investigations of the micromechanics of composite fracture; delamination failures of composite laminates; effect of notch size on composite laminates; improved beam theory for anisotropic materials; variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; numerical analysis composite processing; heat treatment of metal matrix composites, and the RP-1 and RP2 gliders of the sailplane project.

  8. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of filamentary composite materials, whose development may be considered as entering its second generation, continues to generate intense interest and applications activity. Fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been achieved since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. Rather limited applications to primary aircraft structure have been made, however, mainly in a material-substitution mode on military aircraft, except for a few experiments currently underway on large passenger airplanes in commercial operation. To fulfill the promise of composite materials completely requires a strong technology base. NASA and AFOSR recognize the present state of the art to be such that to fully exploit composites in sophisticated aerospace structures, the technology base must be improved. This, in turn, calls for expanding fundamental knowledge and the means by which it can be successfully applied in design and manufacture.

  9. Structural Materials: 95. Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power plant concrete structures and their materials of construction are described, and their operating experience noted. Aging and environmental factors that can affect the durability of the concrete structures are identified. Basic components of a program to manage aging of these structures are identified and described. Application of structural reliability theory to devise uniform risk-based criteria by which existing facilities can be evaluated to achieve a desired performance level when subjected to uncertain demands and to quantify the effects of degradation is outlined. Finally, several areas are identified where additional research is desired.

  10. Composite Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development and application of filamentary composite materials, is considered. Such interest is based on the possibility of using relatively brittle materials with high modulus, high strength, but low density in composites with good durability and high tolerance to damage. Fiber reinforced composite materials of this kind offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been made since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. There were only limited applied to the primary structure of operational vehicles, mainly as aircrafts.

  11. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    A multifaceted program is described in which aeronautical, mechanical, and materials engineers interact to develop composite aircraft structures. Topics covered include: (1) the design of an advanced composite elevator and a proposed spar and rib assembly; (2) optimizing fiber orientation in the vicinity of heavily loaded joints; (3) failure mechanisms and delamination; (4) the construction of an ultralight sailplane; (5) computer-aided design; finite element analysis programs, preprocessor development, and array preprocessor for SPAR; (6) advanced analysis methods for composite structures; (7) ultrasonic nondestructive testing; (8) physical properties of epoxy resins and composites; (9) fatigue in composite materials, and (10) transverse thermal expansion of carbon/epoxy composites.

  12. Evaluation of C/C-SiC Composites as Potential Candidate Materials for High Performance Braking Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saptono Duryat, Rahmat

    2016-05-01

    This paper is aimed at evaluating the characteristic and performance of C/C-SiC composites as potential candidate materials for high performance braking system. A set of material specifications had been derived from specific engineering design requirements. Analysis was performed by formulating the function(s), constraint(s), and objective(s) of design and materials selection. Function of a friction material is chiefly to provide friction, absorb and dissipate energy. It is done while withstanding load and maintaining the structural adequacy and characteristic of tribology at high temperature. Objective of the material selection and design is to maximize the absorption and dissipation of energy and to minimize weight and cost. Candidate materials were evaluated based on their friction and wear, thermal capacity and conductivity, structural properties, manufacturing properties, and densities. The present paper provides a state of the art example on how materials - function - geometry - design, are all interrelated.

  13. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research in the basic composition, characteristics, and processng science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of his program are presented.

  14. Materials and structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Glasgow, T. K.; Halford, G. R.; Levine, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    Materials and structures performance limitations, particularly for the hot section of the engine in which these limitations limit the life of components, are considered. Failure modes for components such as blades, vanes, and combustors and how they are affected by the environment for such components are discussed. Methods used to improve the materials used for such components are: (1) application of directional structures to turbine components for high strength at high temperatures; (2) improved coatings to increase oxidation and corrosion resistance; (3) increase strength and stiffness with reduced weight by applying higher specific properties of composite materials; and (4) cost effective processing such as near net shape powder methods applied to disks. Life prediction techniques developed to predict component life accurately in advance of service and progress in improving the intermediate and cold section components of turbine engines are covered.

  15. 11 CFR 109.23 - Dissemination, distribution, or republication of candidate campaign materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... in part, of any broadcast or any written, graphic, or other form of campaign materials prepared by... materials that demonstrate a candidate's position as part of a person's expression of its own views; or...

  16. Si-compatible candidates for high-K dielectrics with the Pbnm perovskite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Coh, Sinisa; Heeg, Tassilo; Haeni, Jeffery; Biegalski, Michael D; Letteri, James; Bernhagen, M; Reiche, Paul; O'brien, Kevin; Uecker, Rinhold; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Schlom, Darrell; Vanderbilt, David

    2010-01-01

    We analyze both experimentally (where possible) and theoretically from first-principles the dielectric tensor components and crystal structure of five classes of Pbnm perovskites. All of these materials are believed to be stable on silicon and are therefore promising candidates for high-K dielectrics. We also analyze the structure of these materials with various simple models, decompose the lattice contribution to the dielectric tensor into force constant matrix eigenmode contributions, explore a peculiar correlation between structural and dielectric anisotropies in these compounds and give phonon frequencies and infrared activities of those modes that are infrared-active. We find that CaZrO3, SrZrO3, LaHoO3, and LaYO3 are among the most promising candidates for high-K dielectrics among the compounds we considered.

  17. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of composite materials to aerospace vehicle structures which began in the mid 1960's has now progressed to the point where what can be considered entire airframes are being designed and built using composites. Issues related to the fabrication of non-resin matrix composites and the micro, mezzo and macromechanics of thermoplastic and metal matrix composites are emphasized. Several research efforts are presented. They are entitled: (1) The effects of chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatments on the properties of pitch-based carbon fiber; (2) Inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; (3) Analysis of fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; (4) Delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; (5) Numerical investigation of the microhardness of composite fracture; and (6) General beam theory for composite structures.

  18. Artificially structured magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Falco, C.M.

    1990-09-28

    This document reports the progress made during the first six months of the current three-year DOE grant on Artificially Structured Magnetic Materials.'' However, because some of the results of our previous three-year DOE grant on Artificially Structured Superconductors'' continue to emerge, both topics are addressed in this Progress Report. This report describes progress with DOE funding during the current calendar year; description of the research to be conducted during the remaining six months of the current grant year; a description of the status of the graduate students working on this research; lists of the invited talks, seminars and colloquia, of other recognition of our research, and of the publications crediting DOE sponsorship; and a summary of current and pending federal support. Since the research proposed to be conducted during the next 2 1/2 years is described in detail in our DOE proposal, it is only briefly reviewed here.

  19. Permeability of Candidate Stirling Heater Head Materials Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Marc R.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are evaluating high-temperature materials for Stirling heater heads for second- and third-generation Stirling radioisotope power systems that would help to increase the system efficiency to 30 to 35 percent and the system specific power to 8 to 10+ W/kg. Ceramic materials could make it possible for the convertor hot-end temperature to be increased to 1050 to 1200 C, in comparison to the current 650 C with an Inconel 718 heater head. A hermetically sealed Stirling heater head must retain a constant internal pressure of nearly 400-psi helium (He) throughout its useful life (120,000 hr) at the design operating temperature. Therefore, He permeability was measured for eight potential materials and compared with the permeability of the current heater head material, Inconel 718. The eight materials included silicon nitride (Si3N4), silicon dioxide (SiO2), both sintered and chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC), alumina (Al2O3), two types of melt-infiltrated (MI) SiC/SiC composites, and a carbon/SiC composite (C/SiC). Glenn submitted samples of each material to Porous Materials, Inc., Ithaca, New York, for permeability analysis. At room temperature and 30-psi He, four materials--Si3N4, Al2O3, SiO2, and sintered SiC--demonstrated lower permeability than Inconel 718. The CVD SiC and all the composite materials were significantly more permeable to He than the baseline material.

  20. Characterization of Candidate Materials for Remote Recession Measurements of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Bradley D.; Winter, Michael; Panerai, Francesco; Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Stackpoole, Margaret; Danehy, Paul M.; Splinter, Scott

    2016-01-01

    A method of remotely measuring surface recession of a material sample in a plasma flow through emission spectroscopy of the post shock layer was characterized through experiments in the NASA Langley HYMETS arc jet facility. Different methods for delivering the seed products into the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) material samples were investigated. Three samples were produced by seeding the PICA material with combinations of Al, Si, HfO2, VB2, Al2O3, SiO2, TiC, HfC, NaCl, and MgCl2 through infusing seed materials into a core of PICA, or through encapsulating seed material in an epoxy disk, mechanically bonding the disk to a PICA sample. The PICA samples seeded with the candidate tracers were then tested at surface temperatures near 2400 K under low pressure air plasma. The emission of Al, Ti, V, Na, and Mg in the post-shock layer was observed in the UV with a high resolution imaging spectrometer viewing the whole stagnation line from the side, and from UV to NIR with a fiber-coupled miniaturized spectrometer observing the sample surface in the wavelength range from 200 nm to 1,100 nm from the front through a collimator. Al, Na, and Mg were found to be emitting in the post-shock spectra even before the recession reached the seeding depth - therefore possibly characterizing the pyrolysis process rather than the recession itself. The appearance of Ti and V emission in the spectra was well correlated with the actual recession which was monitored through a video of the front surface of the sample. The applicability of a seed material as an indicator for recession appears to be related to the melting temperature of the seed material. Future parametric studies will be carried out in low power plasma facilities at the University of Kentucky.

  1. Candidate ice-rich material within equatorial craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shean, David E.

    2010-12-01

    The floors and walls of many mid-latitude (˜30-60°) craters on Mars appear to be mantled by relatively young material(s) with distinct morphology and erosional properties. Collectively, this material (“fill”) is often interpreted as ice-rich, with emplacement and modification related to climatological processes. Here, I document material and associated landforms within 38 craters between 4-13°S in the Sinus Sabaeus region that appear morphologically similar to material and landforms within mid-latitude craters. These equatorial/mid-latitude materials may also share a common composition and emplacement mechanism. Near-surface ice is unstable at equatorial latitudes under present conditions, suggesting that emplacement could have occurred under different climate conditions in the past. High-obliquity (35-45°) general circulation model (GCM) simulations show surface ice accumulation in Sinus Sabaeus and Tharsis, where similar material and landforms have been documented. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that past obliquity-driven climate change resulted in equatorward volatile migration on Mars.

  2. Candidate ice-rich material within equatorial craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shean, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    The floors and walls of many mid-latitude (~30-60°) craters on Mars appear to be mantled by relatively young material(s) with distinct morphology and erosional properties [1,2]. Collectively, this material (“fill”) is often interpreted as ice-rich, with emplacement and modification related to climatically controlled/induced processes [1,3]. Here, I document material and associated landforms within 38 craters between ~4-12°S and ~335-355°W in the Sinus Sabaeus region (south of Schiaparelli Crater) that appear morphologically similar to material and landforms within mid-latitude craters. The morphological similarities between the equatorial and mid-latitude fill material suggest that they potentially share a similar composition, are subjected to similar erosional processes, and share a similar emplacement mechanism. Nearly all craters containing fill material in Sinus Sabaeus are ~2.0-9.0 km in diameter (median 5.3 km) and they tend to be relatively young with steep interior wall slopes of ~15-30°. At least 30 additional craters in the region display evidence suggestive of past fill presence. A survey of available Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Context Camera (CTX) data at equatorial latitudes did not identify this material or evidence for its former presence within any other equatorial craters. Near-surface ice is unstable at equatorial latitudes under present conditions, suggesting that emplacement could have occurred under different climate conditions in the past. High-obliquity (35-45°) general circulation model simulations [4] show surface ice accumulation in Sinus Sabaeus and Tharsis, where similar material and landforms have been documented within steep-walled depressions and troughs [5]. The documentation of this material in Sinus Sabaeus is consistent with the hypothesis that past obliquity-driven climate change resulted in equatorward volatile migration on Mars. This fill material is >80-100 m thick in some craters. It is unclear from available data

  3. Evaluation and ranking of candidate ceramic wafer engine seal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    Modern engineered ceramics offer high temperature capabilities not found in even the best superalloy metals. The high temperature properties of several selected ceramics including aluminum oxide, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride are reviewed as they apply to hypersonic engine seal design. A ranking procedure is employed to objectively differentiate among four different monolithic ceramic materials considered, including: a cold-pressed and sintered aluminum oxide; a sintered alpha-phase silicon carbide; a hot-isostatically pressed silicon nitride; and a cold-pressed and sintered silicon nitride. This procedure is used to narrow the wide range of potential ceramics considered to an acceptable number for future detailed and costly analyses and tests. The materials are numerically scored according to their high temperature flexural strength; high temperature thermal conductivity; resistance to crack growth; resistance to high heating rates; fracture toughness; Weibull modulus; and finally according to their resistance to leakage flow, where materials having coefficients of thermal expansion closely matching the engine panel material resist leakage flow best. The cold-pressed and sintered material (Kyocera SN-251) ranked the highest in the overall ranking especially when implemented in engine panels made of low expansion rate materials being considered for the engine, including Incoloy and titanium alloys.

  4. Complex Permittivities of Candidate Radome Materials at W-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of w-band complex permittivity measurements performed in NASA Langley's Electromagnetics Research Branch. The test articles included in the permittivity study were flat panels of materials which are under consideration for use in a radome for the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) flight experiment. This experiment is scheduled to fly on the Air Force's 'Speckled Trout' aircraft in late 1997. The radome design is very important because the PMMWC can tolerate only a small amount of electromagnetic loss through the radome. A free space measurement system was used to obtain complex reflection and transmission coefficients of the samples. The frequency of interest was 89 GHz, so measurements were performed over a range of 79 to 99 GHz. The transmission and reflection coefficients were used, along with the measured sample thickness, to calculate complex permittivity over the frequency range. The material samples measured in this study can be divided into four categories: skin materials, core materials, coating materials, and layered samples.

  5. Material candidates for optical frequency comb generation in microspheres.

    PubMed

    Riesen, Nicolas; Afshar V, Shahraam; François, Alexandre; Monro, Tanya M

    2015-06-01

    This paper evaluates the opportunities for using materials other than silica for optical frequency comb generation in whispering gallery mode microsphere resonators. Different materials are shown to satisfy the requirement of dispersion compensation in interesting spectral regions such as the visible or mid-infrared and for smaller microspheres. This paper also analyses the prospects of comb generation in microspheres within aqueous solution for potential use in applications such as biosensing. It is predicted that to achieve comb generation with microspheres in aqueous solution the visible low-loss wavelength window of water needs to be exploited. This is because efficient comb generation necessitates ultra-high Q-factors, which are only possible for cavities with low absorption of the evanescent field outside the cavity. This paper explores the figure of merit for nonlinear interaction efficiency and the potential for dispersion compensation at unique wavelengths for a host of microsphere materials and dimensions and in different surroundings.

  6. 11 CFR 109.23 - Dissemination, distribution, or republication of candidate campaign materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... materials that demonstrate a candidate's position as part of a person's expression of its own views; or (5) A national political party committee or a State or subordinate political party committee pays for...

  7. Sound absorption of low-temperature reusable surface insulation candidate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Sound absorption data from tests of four candidate low-temperature reusable surface insulation materials are presented. Limitations on the use of the data are discussed, conclusions concerning the effective absorption of the materials are drawn, and the relative significance to Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility test planning of the absorption of each material is assessed.

  8. Investigation of structural behavior of candidate Space Station structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.; Miller, Richard K.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative evaluations of the structural loads, stiffness and deflections of an example Space Station truss due to a variety of influences, including manufacturing tolerances, assembly operations, and operational loading are reported. The example truss is a dual-keel design composed of 5-meter-cube modules. The truss is 21 modules high and 9 modules wide, with a transverse beam 15 modules long. One problem of concern is the amount of mismatch which will be expected when the truss is being erected on orbit. Worst-case thermal loading results in less than 0.5 inch of mismatch. The stiffness of the interface is shown to be less than 100 pounds per inch. Thus, only moderate loads will be required to overcome the mismatch. The problem of manufacturing imperfections is analyzed by the Monte Carlo approach. Deformations and internal loads are obtained for ensembles of 100 example trusses. All analyses are performed on a personal computer. The necessary routines required to supplement commercially available programs are described.

  9. Corrosion susceptibility study of candidate pin materials for ALTC (Active Lithium/Thionyl Chloride) batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovard, Francine S.; Cieslak, Wendy R.

    1987-09-01

    The corrosion susceptibilities of eight alternate battery pin material candidates for ALTC (Active Lithium/Thionyl Chloride) batteries in 1.5M LiAlCl4/SOCl2 electrolyte have been investigated using ampule exposure and electrochemical tests. The thermal expansion coefficients of these candidate materials are expected to match Sandia-developed Li-corrosion resistant glasses. The corrosion resistances of the candidate materials, which included three stainless steels (15-5 PH, 17-4 PH, and 446), three Fe-Ni glass sealing alloys (Kovar, Alloy 52, and Niromet 426), a Ni-based alloy (Hastelloy B-2) and a zirconium-based alloy (Zircaloy), were compared to the reference materials Ni and 316L SS. All of the candidate materials showed some evidence of corrosion and, therefore, did not perform as well as the reference materials. The Hastelloy B-2 and Zircaloy are clearly unacceptable materials for this application. Of the remaining alternate materials, the 446 SS and Alloy 52 are the most promising candidates.

  10. Intelligent materials and structures revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    1996-02-01

    Presented are new definitions and interpretations for smartness and intelligence associated with materials, structures, and material systems (MS & MS). These newly proposed definitions complement and augment the present notion of smart and/or intelligent materials, structures and material systems, as accepted by our scientific community. These new definitions numerically quantify the concepts of smartness and intelligence for materials, structures and material systems. In this context amino acid sequences and structures such as proteins are proposed to be the smartest material family and are given an MSQ of 1000. Correspondingly, ribonucleic acid sequences such as RNA and DNA macromolecular assemblies and structures are proposed to be the most intelligent material family and are given an MIQ of 1000. In the same category the proteins are given an MIQ of about 700. Ionic polymeric gels, shape memory alloys, electromagnetic (electrostrictive, piezoelectric, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic) materials, electrorheological fluids and magnetorheological fluids are then categorized under this hierarchy of smart/intelligent materials with MSQs and MIQs of smaller values. A similar classification is also applied to smart/intelligent structures with reference to simple cells such as bacteria and viruses such as T4 Bacteriophages. A number of examples are presented and the corresponding MSQs and MIQs are estimated to show that materials, structure and material systems can truly be numerically categorized in connection with their smartness and intelligence and thus be compared with biological and botanical structures and material systems.

  11. Smart materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert S.; Heyman, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Embedded optical fibers allow not only the cure-monitoring and in-service lifetime measurements of composite materials, but the NDE of material damage and degradation with aging. The capabilities of such damage-detection systems have been extended to allow the quantitative determination of 2D strain in materials by several different methods, including the interferometric and the numerical. It remains to be seen, what effect the embedded fibers have on the strength of the 'smart' materials created through their incorporation.

  12. Smart materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert S.; Heyman, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Embedded optical fibers allow not only the cure-monitoring and in-service lifetime measurements of composite materials, but the NDE of material damage and degradation with aging. The capabilities of such damage-detection systems have been extended to allow the quantitative determination of 2D strain in materials by several different methods, including the interferometric and the numerical. It remains to be seen, what effect the embedded fibers have on the strength of the 'smart' materials created through their incorporation.

  13. Simulated Space Environment Effects on a Candidate Solar Sail Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Bryant, Robert G.; Wilkie, W. Keats; Wadsworth, Heather M.; Craven, Paul D.; Nehls, Mary K.; Vaughn, Jason A.

    2017-01-01

    For long duration missions of solar sails, the sail material needs to survive harsh space environments and the degradation of the sail material controls operational lifetime. Therefore, understanding the effects of the space environment on the sail membrane is essential for mission success. In this study, we investigated the effect of simulated space environment effects of ionizing radiation, thermal aging and simulated potential damage on mechanical, thermal and optical properties of a commercial off the shelf (COTS) polyester solar sail membrane to assess the degradation mechanisms on a feasible solar sail. The solar sail membrane was exposed to high energy electrons (about 70 keV and 10 nA/cm2), and the physical properties were characterized. After about 8.3 Grad dose, the tensile modulus, tensile strength and failure strain of the sail membrane decreased by about 20 95%. The aluminum reflective layer was damaged and partially delaminated but it did not show any significant change in solar absorbance or thermal emittance. The effect on mechanical properties of a pre-cracked sample, simulating potential impact damage of the sail membrane, as well as thermal aging effects on metallized PEN (polyethylene naphthalate) film will be discussed.

  14. Simulated Space Environment Effects on a Candidate Solar Sail Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Bryant, Robert G.; Wilkie, W. Keats; Wadsworth, Heather M.; Craven, Paul D.; Nehls, Mary K.; Vaughn, Jason A.

    2017-01-01

    For long duration missions of solar sail vehicles, the sail material needs to survive the harsh space environment as the degradation of the sail material determines its operational lifetime. Therefore, understanding the effects of the space environment on the sail membrane is essential for mission success. In this study, the effect of simulated space environments of ionizing radiation and thermal aging were investigated. In order to assess some of the potential damage effects on the mechanical, thermal and optical properties of a commercial off the shelf (COTS) polyester solar sail membrane. The solar sail membrane was exposed to high energy electrons [about 70 keV and 10 nA/cm(exp. 2)], and the physical properties were characterized. After about 8.3 Grad dose, the tensile modulus, tensile strength and failure strain of the sail membrane decreased by 20 to 95%. The aluminum reflective layer was damaged and partially delaminated but it did not show any significant change in solar absorbance or thermal emittance. The mechanical properties of a precracked sample, simulating potential impact damage of the sail membrane, as well as thermal aging effects on metallized PEN (polyethylene naphthalate) film, will be discussed.

  15. Sample - Based Material Structure Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingchen

    The paradigm of Sample-based Material Structure Modeling is proposed to facilitate the design and manufacturing of material structures towards desired mechanical properties. By modeling material structure samples via a Markov random field, the proposed paradigm views material structure as a collection of neighborhoods. The abstraction facilitates the reconstruction of both periodic and stochastic material structures and extends to the reconstruction and design of spatially varying material structures, a principal mechanism for creating and controlling spatially varying material properties in nature and engineering. The spatially varying material properties are represented and controlled using the notion of material descriptors which include common geometric, statistical, and topological measures such as correlation functions and Minkowski functionals. The proposed method is of particular advantage in preserving the microscopic geometry and related properties of the material structure sample while achieving target macroscopic property distributions during the design of material structures. For material structures that exhibit anisotropy, properly oriented neighborhoods could greatly enhance the efficiency of the material. The expansion of the design space to include the rotation of neighborhoods is appropriate when the properties that need to be preserved can be safely regarded as rotation invariant. With the assumption of orthotropic symmetry, an automatic way to determine the principal axes of neighborhoods for material structure samples with stochastic orientations is proposed. A Green's function based homogenization method is investigated for the efficient evaluation of the mechanical properties of neighborhoods. The formulated integral equation is converted into a system of linear equations which is shown to be symmetric and positive definite with the appropriate reference material properties and can be solved efficiently using the conjugate gradient method

  16. Graphene oxide as an optimal candidate material for methane storage.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Rajiv K; Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2015-07-28

    Methane, the primary constituent of natural gas, binds too weakly to nanostructured carbons to meet the targets set for on-board vehicular storage to be viable. We show, using density functional theory calculations, that replacing graphene by graphene oxide increases the adsorption energy of methane by 50%. This enhancement is sufficient to achieve the optimal binding strength. In order to gain insight into the sources of this increased binding, that could also be used to formulate design principles for novel storage materials, we consider a sequence of model systems that progressively take us from graphene to graphene oxide. A careful analysis of the various contributions to the weak binding between the methane molecule and the graphene oxide shows that the enhancement has important contributions from London dispersion interactions as well as electrostatic interactions such as Debye interactions, aided by geometric curvature induced primarily by the presence of epoxy groups.

  17. Graphene oxide as an optimal candidate material for methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Rajiv K.; Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2015-07-01

    Methane, the primary constituent of natural gas, binds too weakly to nanostructured carbons to meet the targets set for on-board vehicular storage to be viable. We show, using density functional theory calculations, that replacing graphene by graphene oxide increases the adsorption energy of methane by 50%. This enhancement is sufficient to achieve the optimal binding strength. In order to gain insight into the sources of this increased binding, that could also be used to formulate design principles for novel storage materials, we consider a sequence of model systems that progressively take us from graphene to graphene oxide. A careful analysis of the various contributions to the weak binding between the methane molecule and the graphene oxide shows that the enhancement has important contributions from London dispersion interactions as well as electrostatic interactions such as Debye interactions, aided by geometric curvature induced primarily by the presence of epoxy groups.

  18. Irradiation creep of candidate materials for advanced nuclear plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Jung, P.; Hoffelner, W.

    2013-10-01

    In the present paper, irradiation creep results of an intermetallic TiAl alloy and two ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are summarized. In situ irradiation creep measurements were performed using homogeneous implantation with α- and p-particles to maximum doses of 0.8 dpa at displacement damage rates of 2-8 × 10-6 dpa/s. The strains of miniaturized flat dog-bone specimens were monitored under uniaxial tensile stresses ranging from 20 to 400 MPa at temperatures of 573, 673 and 773 K, respectively. The effects of material composition, ODS particle size, and bombarding particle on the irradiation creep compliance was studied and results are compared to literature data. Evolution of microstructure during helium implantation was investigated in detail by TEM and is discussed with respect to irradiation creep models.

  19. Tensile and fatigue properties of two titanium alloys as candidate materials for fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmy, P.; Leguey, T.; Belianov, I.; Victoria, M.

    2000-12-01

    Titanium alloys have been identified as candidate structural materials for the first wall, the blanket and the magnetic coil structures of fusion reactors. Titanium alloys are interesting materials because of their high specific strength and low elastic modulus, their low swelling tendency and their fast induced radioactivity decay. Other attractive properties are an excellent resistance to corrosion and good weldability, even in thick sections. Furthermore titanium alloys are suitable for components exposed to heat loads since they have a low thermal stress parameter. Titanium alloys with an α structure are believed to have a good resistance against radiation embrittlement and α+β alloys should possess the best tolerance to hydrogen embrittlement. Two classical industrially available alloys in the two families, the Ti5Al2.4Sn and the Ti6Al4V alloys have been used in this study. The tensile properties between room temperature and 450°C are reported. A low cycle fatigue analysis has been performed under strain control at total strain ranges between 0.8% and 2% and at a temperature of 350°C. The microstructure of both alloys was investigated before and after both types of deformation. Both alloys exhibit excellent mechanical properties comparable to or better than those of ferritic martensitic steels.

  20. Initial Estimates of Optical Constants of Mars Candidate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousch, Ted L.; Brown, Adrian Jon; Bishop, Janice L.; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Data obtained at visible and near-infrared wavelengths by OMEGA on Mars Express and CRISM on MRO provide definitive evidence for the presence of phyllosilicates and other hydrated phases on Mars. A diverse range of both Fe/Mg-OH and Al- OH-bearing phyllosilicates were identified including the smectites, nontronite, saponite, and montmorillonite. To constrain the abundances of these phyllosilicates, spectral analyses of mixtures are needed. We report on our effort to enable the quantitative evaluation of the abundance of hydrated-hydroxylated silicates when they are contained in mixtures. We include two component mixtures of hydrated/ hydroxylated silicates with each other and with two analogs for other Martian materials; pyroxene (enstatite) and palagonitic soil (an alteration product of basaltic glass, hereafter referred to as palagonite). For the hydrated-hydroxylated silicates we include saponite and montmorillonite (Mg- and Al-rich smectites). We prepared three size separates of each end-member for study: 20-45, 63-90, and 125-150 micron.

  1. Fire resistivity and toxicity studies of candidate aircraft passenger seat materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.; Trabold, E. L.; Spieth, H.

    1978-01-01

    Fire resistivity studies were conducted on a wide range of candidate nonmetallic materials being considered for the construction of improved fire resistant aircraft passenger seats. These materials were evaluated on the basis of FAA airworthiness burn and smoke generation tests, colorfastness, limiting oxygen index, and animal toxicity tests. Physical, mechanical, and aesthetic properties were also assessed. Candidate seat materials that have significantly improved thermal response to various thermal loads corresponding to reasonable fire threats as they relate to in-flight fire situations, are identified.

  2. L-Argininium phosphite - a new candidate for NLO materials.

    PubMed

    Ghazaryan, Vahram V; Zakharov, Boris A; Petrosyan, Aram M; Boldyreva, Elena V

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the possibility of salt formation in the L-Arg-H3PO3-H2O system, single crystals of L-argininium phosphite, C6H15N4O2(+)·H2PO3(-), were prepared by evaporation of an aqueous solution containing equimolar quantities of L-arginine and phosphorous acid. The asymmetric unit contains one L-argininium(+) cation and one phosphite [HPO2(OH)](-) anion. The phosphite anions form chains parallel to [010] by O-H...O hydrogen bonding, with an O...O distance of 2.630 (3) Å. The protonated amine and guanidyl groups of the L-argininium(+) cations form N-H...O hydrogen bonds with the carboxylate groups and anions. The IR and Raman spectra are discussed in relation to the crystal structure. The salt displays nonlinear optical (NLO) properties. Another salt was obtained from a solution with a 1:2 molar ratio of components, but was characterized by vibrational spectra only.

  3. a Study of Behavior of Inert Gases in Some Candidate Materials for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. H.; Chen, K. Q.; Wang, Y. S.; Sun, J. G.; Hu, B. F.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2003-06-01

    This paper gives a review of our study of inert gases (helium, argon) in several materials candidate to future fusion reactors. The study is focused on the agglomeration of gas atoms and formation of nanoscale cavities in several materials including stainless steels and silicon carbide under irradiation with ions with energy ranging from 10 keV to 100 MeV.

  4. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program: Topical report I, selection of candidate alloys. Volume 3. Selection of surface coating/substrate systems for screening creep and structural stability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-20

    Considering the high temperature, low O/sub 2/, high C environment of operation in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Systems, the utilization of coatings is envisaged to hold potential for extending component lifetimes through the formation of stable and continuous oxide films with enhanced resistance to C diffusion. A survey of the current state of technology for high temperature coatings has been performed. The usefulness of these coatings on the Mo, Ni, and Fe base alloys is discussed. Specifically, no coating substitute was identified for TZM other than the well known W-3 (pack silicide) and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ forming coatings were recommended for the Fe and Ni base structural materials. Recommendations as to coating types and processng have been made based on the predicted VHTR component size, shape, base metal and operational environment. Four tests designed to evaluate the effects of selected combinations of coatings and substrate matrices are recommended for consideration.

  5. Determination of Cd and Cr in an ABS candidate reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwangwon; Kang, Namgoo; Cho, Kyunghaeng; Lee, Jounghae

    2008-12-01

    In order to practically better cope with technical barriers to trade (TBT) of a great number of resin goods, our research presents first-ever results for the determination of Cd and Cr in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) candidate reference material using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) recently recognized as a candidate primary ratio method with a particular attention to the estimation of involved measurement uncertainties.

  6. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology utilization of fiber reinforced composite materials is discussed in the areas of physical properties, and life prediction. Programs related to the Composite Aircraft Program are described in detail.

  7. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse properties of fiber constituents in composites, fatigue in composite materials, matrix dominated properties of high performance composites, numerical investigation of moisture effects, numerical investigation of the micromechanics of composite fracture, advanced analysis methods, compact lug design, and the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes projects are discussed.

  8. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The composite aircraft program component (CAPCOMP) is a graduate level project conducted in parallel with a composite structures program. The composite aircraft program glider (CAPGLIDE) is an undergraduate demonstration project which has as its objectives the design, fabrication, and testing of a foot launched ultralight glider using composite structures. The objective of the computer aided design (COMPAD) portion of the composites project is to provide computer tools for the analysis and design of composite structures. The major thrust of COMPAD is in the finite element area with effort directed at implementing finite element analysis capabilities and developing interactive graphics preprocessing and postprocessing capabilities. The criteria for selecting research projects to be conducted under the innovative and supporting research (INSURE) program are described.

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Progress and plans are reported for investigations of: (1) the mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; (2) fatigue in composite materials; (3) moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates; (4) the theory of inhomogeneous swelling in epoxy resin; (5) numerical studies of the micromechanics of composite fracture; (6) free edge failures of composite laminates; (7) analysis of unbalanced laminates; (8) compact lug design; (9) quantification of Saint-Venant's principles for a general prismatic member; (10) variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; and (11) the wing fuselage ensemble of the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes.

  10. LTA structures and materials technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1975-01-01

    The state-of-the-art concerning structures and materials technology is reviewed. It is shown that many present materials developments resulting from balloon and aircraft research programs can be applied to new concepts in LTA vehicles. Both buoyant and semi-buoyant vehicles utilize similar approaches to solving structural problems and could involve pressurized non-rigid and unpressurized rigid structures. System designs common to both and vital to structural integrity include much of the past technology as well. Further research is needed in determination of structural loads, especially in future design concepts.

  11. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    A decade long program to develop critical advanced composite technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concept and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life predictions is reviewed. Specific goals are discussed. The status of the chemical vapor deposition effects on carbon fiber properties; inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; and numerical analysis of composite micromechanical behavior are presented.

  12. Multifunctional Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments...Power F Affordability Ø Proposed Solution – “ LIVE ” Ship Concept F Lightweight, High Performance Multifunctional Composite Structure F Desired...www.onr.navy.mil/sci_tech/grandc.htm F Navy DD(X) Program 1 July 2003© 2003 University of Delaware All rights reservedYarlagadda ONR Review - 4 “ LIVE ” Ship

  13. Hypersonic Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are required for a range of hypersonic vehicles ranging from ballistic reentry to hypersonic cruise vehicles, both within Earth's atmosphere and non-Earth atmospheres. The focus of this presentation is on air breathing hypersonic vehicles in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes single-stage to orbit (SSTO), two-stage to orbit (TSTO) accelerators, access to space vehicles, and hypersonic cruise vehicles. This paper will start out with a brief discussion of aerodynamic heating and thermal management techniques to address the high heating, followed by an overview of TPS for rocket-launched and air-breathing vehicles. The argument is presented that as we move from rocket-based vehicles to air-breathing vehicles, we need to move away from the insulated airplane approach used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter to a wide range of TPS and hot structure approaches. The primary portion of the paper will discuss issues and design options for CMC TPS and hot structure components, including leading edges, acreage TPS, and control surfaces. The current state-of-the-art will be briefly discussed for some of the components.

  14. Investigation of thorium salts as candidate materials for direct observation of the (229m)Th nuclear transition.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jason K; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Martin, Richard L

    2014-07-07

    Recent efforts to measure the (229m)Th → (229g)Th nuclear transition sparked interest in understanding the electronic structure of wide-gap thorium salts. Such materials could be used to measure this nuclear transition using optical spectroscopy in solid-state devices. Here, we present screened hybrid density functional theory and many-body G0W0 calculations of two candidate materials, namely, Na2ThF6 and ThF4, for such a measurement. Our results show an electronic gap larger than 10 eV for both materials, suggesting that the internal conversion nuclear de-excitation channel would be suppressed in these materials. We also present results for ThX4 (X = Cl, Br, I), materials with smaller gaps significantly easier to access experimentally.

  15. Optical Properties of a Quantum Spin Liquid Candidate Material, κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Ag2(CN)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuto; Hiramatsu, Takaaki; Yoshida, Yukihiro; Saito, Gunzi; Kishida, Hideo

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the electronic states of a quantum spin liquid candidate material, κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Ag2(CN)3, using optical methods. In reflectivity measurements, we observed the polarization dependence of electronic transitions, which reflects the crystal structure and anisotropic charge excitation. Raman scattering measurements revealed that the broad magnetic excitation mode is located below 600 cm-1. This spectral feature indicates the spin-liquid nature of the candidate material. The charge-sensitive molecular-vibrational modes observed in infrared and Raman spectra are broader than those of typical BEDT-TTF compounds, which indicate a possibility of dynamic charge fluctuation. By comparing the optical spectra of κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Ag2(CN)3 with a well-investigated spin-liquid candidate κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu2(CN)3, we found common optical properties of BEDT-TTF-based spin-liquid candidates. The dynamic fluctuations of charge on a BEDT-TTF dimer are independent of the arrangement of BEDT-TTF molecules and anion layers.

  16. Investigation of Teacher Candidates' Opinions about Instructional Technologies and Material Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orhan-Karsak, Hanife Gülhan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the awareness of teacher candidates about instructional technologies and materials and the ways of giving place in instruction by integrating them with different activities, to reveal opinions about their usage. Seventeen female and eight male, in total twenty five participants are sampling. The ages of…

  17. Corrosion test on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curtis, P.G.

    1996-01-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials in order to assist in selecting materials for package design and to help in designing longer-term corrosion tests. The corrosion solution was buffered near pH4, was in contact with air, and contained chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron absorber elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron absorber elements were studied.

  18. Structural materials for high-heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rybin, V.V.; Smith, D.L.

    1991-12-31

    The structural materials for the ITER, (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) divertor must perform reliably under complex and diverse operating requirements. Only a limited number of materials offer a potential for meeting these requirements for the wide temperature range of interest. The candidate materials considered in the ITER design activity include copper, molybdenum, niobium alloys. Molybdenum alloys being considered include dilute alloys of the TZM type and the Mo-Re system. Niobium alloys under consideration include Nb-V-Zr and Nb-Zr systems. Copper alloys being considered include precipitation strengthened alloys of the Glidcop and MAGT type, alloys of Cu-Mo system and dispersion hardened bronzes. The projected operating conditions for the ITER divertor and the criteria for evaluating the candidate materials are reviewed. This paper summarizes the data base and presents recent experimental results on these candidate divertor structural alloys.

  19. Structural materials for high-heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rybin, V.V. ); Smith, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The structural materials for the ITER, (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) divertor must perform reliably under complex and diverse operating requirements. Only a limited number of materials offer a potential for meeting these requirements for the wide temperature range of interest. The candidate materials considered in the ITER design activity include copper, molybdenum, niobium alloys. Molybdenum alloys being considered include dilute alloys of the TZM type and the Mo-Re system. Niobium alloys under consideration include Nb-V-Zr and Nb-Zr systems. Copper alloys being considered include precipitation strengthened alloys of the Glidcop and MAGT type, alloys of Cu-Mo system and dispersion hardened bronzes. The projected operating conditions for the ITER divertor and the criteria for evaluating the candidate materials are reviewed. This paper summarizes the data base and presents recent experimental results on these candidate divertor structural alloys.

  20. Fusible heat sink materials - An identification of alternate candidates. [for astronaut thermoregulation in EVA portable life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna; Lomax, Curtis

    1991-01-01

    Fusible heat sinks are a possible source for thermal regulation of space suited astronauts. An extensive database search was undertaken to identify candidate materials with liquid solid transformations over the temperature range of -18 C to 5 C; and 1215 candidates were identified. Based on available data, 59 candidate materials with thermal storage capability, DeltaH values higher than that of water were identified. This paper presents the methodology utilized in the study, including the decision process used for materials selection.

  1. Communication Skills in Candidates for Accreditation in Rheumatology Are Correlated With Candidate's Performance in the Objective Structured Clinical Examination.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Flores-Alvarado, Diana Elsa; Portela-Hernández, Margarita; Maldonado-Velázquez, María Del Rocío; Amezcua-Guerra, Luis Manuel; López-Zepeda, Judith; Álvarez, Everardo; Rubio, Nadina; Lastra, Olga Vera; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Arce-Salinas, César Alejandro

    2017-07-26

    The Mexican Accreditation Council for Rheumatology annually certifies trainees in Rheumatology using a multiple-choice test and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Since 2015, candidate's communication skills (CS) have been rated by both patients and by physician examiners and correlated with results on the OSCE. This study compared the CS from candidates to annual accreditation in Rheumatology as rated by patients and by physician examiners, and assessed whether these correlated with candidate's performance in the OSCE. From 2015 to 2017, 8areas of CS were evaluated using a Likert scale, in each OSCE station that involved a patient. Both patient and physician evaluators were trained annually and their evaluations were performed blindly. The associations were calculated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. In general, candidates were given high CS scores; the scores from patients of the candidate's CS were better than those of physician examiners; within the majority of the stations, both scores were found to correlate moderately. In addition, the scoring of CS correlated with trainee performance at the corresponding OSCE station. Interestingly, better correlations were found when the skills were rated by the patients compared to physician scores. The average CS score was correlated with the overall OSCE performance for each trainee, but not with the multiple-choice test, except in the 2017 accreditation process, when a weak correlation was found. CS assessed during a national accreditation process correlated with the candidate's performance at the station level and with the overall OSCE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  2. Fire retardancy with structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    Impregnating wood with chemicals to reduce or prevent combustion is discussed. Basic types of materials for fireproofing purposes and methods of applications are described. It is concluded that effective fireproofing materials have been developed and their application to wooden structures represents acceptable safety management procedures.

  3. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    DOE PAGES

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describingmore » the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.« less

  4. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describing the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.

  5. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describing the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.

  6. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-11-01

    This work describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describing the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.

  7. Analytical ultrasonics for structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupperman, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The application of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements to characterize the microstructure of structural materials is discussed. Velocity measurements in cast stainless steel are correlated with microstructural variations ranging from equiaxed (elastically isotropic) to columnar (elastically anisotropic) grain structure. The effect of the anisotropic grain structure on the deviation of ultrasonic waves in cast stainless steel is also reported. Field-implementable techniques for distinguishing equiaxed from columnar grain structures in cast strainless steel structural members are presented. The application of ultrasonic velocity measurements to characterize structural ceramics in the green state is also discussed.

  8. The role of microbial biofilms in deterioration of space station candidate materials.

    PubMed

    Gu, J D; Roman, M; Esselman, T; Mitchell, R

    1998-01-01

    Formation of microbial biofilms on surfaces of a wide range of materials being considered as candidates for use on the International Space Station was investigated. The materials included a fibre-reinforced polymeric composite, an adhesive sealant, a polyimide insulation foam, teflon cable insulation, titanium, and an aliphatic polyurethane coating. They were exposed to a natural mixed population of bacteria under controlled conditions of temperature and relative humidity (RH). Biofilms formed on the surfaces of the materials at a wide range of temperatures and RHs. The biofilm population was dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Alcaligenes denitrificans, Xanthomonas maltophila, and Vibrio harveyi. The biocide, diiodomethyl-p-tolyl sulfone, impregnated in the polyurethane coating, was ineffective against microbial colonization and growth. Degradation of the polyurethane coatings was monitored with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The impedance spectra indicated that microbial degradation of the coating occurred in several stages. The initial decreases in impedance were due to the transport of water and solutes into the polymeric matrices. Further decreases were a result of polymer degradation by microorganisms. Our data showed that these candidate materials for space application are susceptible to biofilm formation and subsequent degradation. Our study suggests that candidate materials for use in space missions need to be carefully evaluated for their susceptibility to microbial biofilm formation and biodegradation.

  9. Intercomparison of techniques available at INETI in the analysis of two IAEA candidate research materials.

    PubMed

    Freitas, M C; Afonso, M H; Almeida, C; Alves, L C; Araújo, M F; Barreiros, M A; Seabra e Barros, J; Costa, M B; Gouveia, M A; Reis, M A

    1994-01-01

    Under contract with the IAEA, the epiphytic lichen Evernia prunastri was collected to prepare a multielement lichen reference material for quality assurance of environmental studies. An intercomparison run on trace and minor elements in this candidate research material (IAEA-336) was organized in which six analytical groups of the National Institute of Engineering and Industrial Technology (INETI) took part. INAA, PIXE, XRF, AAS, and ICP-ES were applied. The results obtained by different methods are compared, and their complementarity is discussed. As a quality control, the IAEA cabbage research material (IAEA-359) was analyzed. The results agree quite well with the estimated values given by the IAEA.

  10. Preliminary cleaning tests on candidate materials for APS beamline and front end UHV components

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, R.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-05-12

    Comparative cleaning tests have been done on four candidate materials for use in APS beamline and front-end vacuum components. These materials are 304 SS, 304L SS, OFHC copper, and Glidcop* (Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})- Samples of each material were prepared and cleaned using two different methods. After cleaning, the sample surfaces were analyzed using ESCA (Electron Spectography for Chemical Analysis). Uncleaned samples were used as a reference. The cleaning methods and surface analysis results are further discussed.

  11. Evaluation of Candidate Materials for a High-Temperature Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Randy; Ritzert, Frank; Freedman, Marc

    2003-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA have identified Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRG) as a candidate power system for use on long-duration, deep-space science missions and Mars rovers. One of the developments planned for an upgraded version of the current SRG design is to achieve higher efficiency by increasing the overall operating temperature of the system. Currently, the SRG operates with a heater head temperature of 650 C and is fabricated from the nickel base superalloy 718. This temperature is at the limit of Alloy 718's capability, and any planned increase in temperature will be contingent on identifying a more capable material from which to fabricate the heater head. To this end, an assessment of material candidates was performed assuming a range of heater head temperatures. The chosen alternative material candidates will be discussed, along with the development efforts needed to ensure that these materials can meet the demanding system requirements of long-duration operation in hostile environments.

  12. Application of a passive electrochemical noise technique to localized corrosion of candidate radioactive waste container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Korzan, M.A.

    1994-05-01

    One of the key engineered barriers in the design of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is the waste canister that encapsulates the spent fuel elements. Current candidate metals for the canisters to be emplaced at Yucca Mountain include cast iron, carbon steel, Incoloy 825 and titanium code-12. This project was designed to evaluate passive electrochemical noise techniques for measuring pitting and corrosion characteristics of candidate materials under prototypical repository conditions. Experimental techniques were also developed and optimized for measurements in a radiation environment. These techniques provide a new method for understanding material response to environmental effects (i.e., gamma radiation, temperature, solution chemistry) through the measurement of electrochemical noise generated during the corrosion of the metal surface. In addition, because of the passive nature of the measurement the technique could offer a means of in-situ monitoring of barrier performance.

  13. Fusible heat sink materials - Evaluation of alternate candidates. [for PLSS cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna S.; Lomax, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    Fusible heat sinks are a possible source for thermal regulation of space suited astronauts. Materials with greater thermal storage capability than water could enable both an extension of time between recharging and/or a reduction in size and/or mass. An extensive literature search identified 1,215 candidates with a solid-liquid transformation within the temperature range of -13 C to 5 C. Based on data available in the literature, several candidates with a cooling capacity significantly greater than water were identified. Measurements of the transformation temperature and enthalpy of transformation were then undertaken with a differential scanning calorimeter in order to confirm the accuracy of the literature. Laboratory measurements have thus far not been able to corroborate the extremely high values found from the literature. This paper presents the approach for materials selection utilized in this study, the experimental procedure, and the results of the measurements thus far undertaken.

  14. A structural classification of candidate oscillatory and multistationary biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Blanchini, Franco; Franco, Elisa; Giordano, Giulia

    2014-10-01

    Molecular systems are uncertain: The variability of reaction parameters and the presence of unknown interactions can weaken the predictive capacity of solid mathematical models. However, strong conclusions on the admissible dynamic behaviors of a model can often be achieved without detailed knowledge of its specific parameters. In systems with a sign-definite Jacobian, for instance, cycle-based criteria related to the famous Thomas' conjectures have been largely used to characterize oscillatory and multistationary dynamic outcomes. We build on the rich literature focused on the identification of potential oscillatory and multistationary behaviors using parameter-free criteria. We propose a classification for sign-definite non-autocatalytic biochemical networks, which summarizes several existing results in the literature. We call weak (strong) candidate oscillators systems which can possibly (exclusively) transition to instability due to the presence of a complex pair of eigenvalues, while we call weak (strong) candidate multistationary systems those which can possibly (exclusively) transition to instability due to the presence of a real eigenvalue. For each category, we provide a characterization based on the exclusive or simultaneous presence of positive and negative cycles in the associated sign graph. Most realistic examples of biochemical networks fall in the gray area of systems in which both positive and negative cycles are present: Therefore, both oscillatory and bistable behaviors are in principle possible. However, many canonical example circuits exhibiting oscillations or bistability fall in the categories of strong candidate oscillators/multistationary systems, in agreement with our results.

  15. Characterization of Candidate Solar Sail Material Exposed to Space Environmental Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David; Hovater, Mary; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George; Hollerman, William; Gray, Perry

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Solar sails are not limited by reaction mass and provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Once thought to be difficult or impossible, solar sailing has come out of science fiction and into the realm of possibility. Any spacecraft using this method would need to deploy a thin sail that could be as large as many kilometers in extent. The availability of strong, ultra lightweight, and radiation resistant materials will determine the future of solar sailing. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate solar sail material to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to space environmental effects. This paper will describe the exposure of candidate solar sail materials to emulated space environmental effects including energetic electrons, combined electrons and Ultraviolet radiation, and hypervelocity impact of irradiated solar sail material. This paper will describe the testing procedure and the material characterization results of this investigation.

  16. Characterization of Candidate Solar Sail Material Exposed to Space Environmental Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David; Hovater, Mary; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George; Hollerman, William; Gray, Perry

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Solar sails are not limited by reaction mass and provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Once thought to be difficult or impossible, solar sailing has come out of science fiction and into the realm of possibility. Any spacecraft using this method would need to deploy a thin sail that could be as large as many kilometers in extent. The availability of strong, ultra lightweight, and radiation resistant materials will determine the future of solar sailing. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate solar sail material to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to space environmental effects. This paper will describe the exposure of candidate solar sail materials to emulated space environmental effects including energetic electrons, combined electrons and Ultraviolet radiation, and hypervelocity impact of irradiated solar sail material. This paper will describe the testing procedure and the material characterization results of this investigation.

  17. Development of potential candidate reference materials for drugs in bottom sediment, cod and herring tissues.

    PubMed

    Baranowska, Irena; Buszewski, Bogusław; Namieśnik, Jacek; Konieczka, Piotr; Magiera, Sylwia; Polkowska-Motrenko, Halina; Kościelniak, Paweł; Gadzała-Kopciuch, Renata; Woźniakiewicz, Aneta; Samczyński, Zbigniew; Kochańska, Kinga; Rutkowska, Małgorzata

    2017-02-01

    Regular use of a reference material and participation in a proficiency testing program can improve the reliability of analytical data. This paper presents the preparation of candidate reference materials for the drugs metoprolol, propranolol, carbamazepine, naproxen, and acenocoumarol in freshwater bottom sediment and cod and herring tissues. These reference materials are not available commercially. Drugs (between 7 ng/g and 32 ng/g) were added to the samples, and the spiked samples were freeze-dried, pulverized, sieved, homogenized, bottled, and sterilized by γ-irradiation to prepare the candidate materials. Procedures for extraction and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry were developed to determine the drugs of interest in the studied material. Each target drug was quantified using two analytical procedures, and the results obtained from these two procedures were in good agreement with each other. Stability and homogeneity assessments were performed, and the relative uncertainties due to instability (for an expiration date of 12 months) and inhomogeneity were 10-25% and 4.0-6.8%, respectively. These procedures will be useful in the future production of reference materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Study of Candidate Replacement Materials for DOP (Dioctyl Phthalate) in Filter-Testing Penetrometer Machines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    candidate materials. A standard sample required 100 days to absorb 10 ml of oxygen at 600C, while under the same conditions commercial oleic acid required...Explosivess The phthalate esters may form highly oxygenated compounds with metal nitrates that are more unstable than the original explosive. They...populations degrade phthalate esters via enzymatic hydrolysis. The reaction rate varies with factors such as temperature, pH1, the presence of oxygen , the

  19. Static and Dynamic Friction Behavior of Candidate High Temperature Airframe Seal Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Lukaszewicz, V.; Morris, D. E.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1994-01-01

    The following report describes a series of research tests to evaluate candidate high temperature materials for static to moderately dynamic hypersonic airframe seals. Pin-on-disk reciprocating sliding tests were conducted from 25 to 843 C in air and hydrogen containing inert atmospheres. Friction, both dynamic and static, was monitored and serves as the primary test measurement. In general, soft coatings lead to excessive static friction and temperature affected friction in air environments only.

  20. High-Temperature Phase Change Materials (PCM) Candidates for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    It is clearly understood that lower overall costs are a key factor to make renewable energy technologies competitive with traditional energy sources. Energy storage technology is one path to increase the value and reduce the cost of all renewable energy supplies. Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies have the ability to dispatch electrical output to match peak demand periods by employing thermal energy storage (TES). Energy storage technologies require efficient materials with high energy density. Latent heat TES systems using phase change material (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation like melting-solidification. PCM technology relies on the energy absorption/liberation of the latent heat during a physical transformation. The main objective of this report is to provide an assessment of molten salts and metallic alloys proposed as candidate PCMs for TES applications, particularly in solar parabolic trough electrical power plants at a temperature range from 300..deg..C to 500..deg.. C. The physical properties most relevant for PCMs service were reviewed from the candidate selection list. Some of the PCM candidates were characterized for: chemical stability with some container materials; phase change transformation temperatures; and latent heats.

  1. Round-robin measurements of two candidate materials for a Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowhorn, N. D.; Wong-Ng, W.; Zhang, W.; Lu, Z. Q.; Otani, M.; Thomas, E.; Green, M.; Tran, T. N.; Dilley, N.; Ghamaty, S.; Elsner, N.; Hogan, T.; Downey, A. D.; Jie, Q.; Li, Q.; Obara, H.; Sharp, J.; Caylor, C.; Venkatasubramanian, R.; Willigan, R.; Yang, J.; Martin, J.; Nolas, G.; Edwards, B.; Tritt, T.

    2009-02-01

    A Standard Reference Material (SRM™) for the Seebeck coefficient is critical for inter-laboratory data comparison and for instrument calibration. To develop this SRM™, we have conducted an international round-robin measurement survey of two candidate materials—undoped Bi2Te3 and constantan (55% Cu and 45% Ni alloy). Measurements were performed in two rounds by twelve laboratories involved in active thermoelectric research using a number of commercial and custom-built measurement systems and techniques. We report the results of these measurements and the statistical analysis performed. Based on this extensive study, we have selected Bi2Te3 as the prototype standard material.

  2. Smart materials and aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1999-11-01

    Starting from the very definition of smart structures and smart materials, this paper addresses the fundamental mechanism of operation of some well known smart materials like piezoelectric ceramic/polymer, electrostrictive ceramic, magnetostrictive alloy, shape memory alloy, electroheological fluid, magnetoheological fluid, optical fibers and so on. It also describes briefly the working principles of the actuators and sensor based upon these materials. In addition to that an overview of the various applications and research dealing with the application of these smart materials in aerospace structures mainly in the context of vibration suppression, shape control and adaptive structures for their efficient functioning has been presented. On the whole the presentation stresses on actuators. Since it is the actuator not the sensor that is often the limiting factor in smart structure used for active control. Numerous investigations have been made and are on the way to improve upon the piezoelectric and electrostrictive actuator for greater generating force and larger stroke, as well as shape memory alloy actuator for fast response. Development of multilayer piezoelectric and electrostrictive actuator and discovery of precompressed piezoelectric element and actuator is a forward leap in that direction.

  3. Composite structural materials. [aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of composite materials for aircraft applications is addressed with specific consideration of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life prediction. The design and flight testing of composite ultralight gliders is documented. Advances in computer aided design and methods for nondestructive testing are also discussed.

  4. Potential Biogenic Corrosion of Alloy 22, A Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Materials, Under Simulated Repository Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J.M.; Martin, S.I.; Rivera, A.J.; Bedrossian, P.J.; Lian, T.

    2000-01-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy has been charged with assessing the suitability of a geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), NV. Microorganisms, both those endogenous to the repository site and those introduced as a result of construction and operational activities, may contribute to the corrosion of metal nuclear waste packaging and thereby decrease their useful lifetime as barrier materials. Evaluation of potential Microbiological Influenced Corrosion (MIC) on candidate waste package materials was undertaken reactor systems incorporating the primary elements of the repository: YM rock (either non-sterile or presterilized), material coupons, and a continual feed of simulated YM groundwater. Periodically, both aqueous reactor efflux and material coupons were analyzed for chemical and surfacial characterization. Alloy 22 coupons exposed for a year at room temperature in reactors containing non-sterile YM rock demonstrated accretion of chromium oxide and silaceous scales, with what appear to be underlying areas of corrosion.

  5. A feasibility study for producing an egg matrix candidate reference material for the polyether ionophore salinomycin.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rosana Gomes; Monteiro, Mychelle Alves; Pereira, Mararlene Ulberg; da Costa, Rafaela Pinto; Spisso, Bernardete Ferraz; Calado, Veronica

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of producing an egg matrix candidate reference material for salinomycin. Preservation techniques investigated were freeze-drying and spray drying dehydration. Homogeneity and stability studies of the produced batches were conducted according to ISO Guides 34 and 35. The results showed that all produced batches were homogeneous and both freeze-drying and spray drying techniques were suitable for matrix dehydrating, ensuring the material stability. In order to preserve the material integrity, it must be transported within the temperature range of -20 up to 25°C. The results constitute an important step towards the development of an egg matrix reference material for salinomycin is possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Spent fuel canister for geological repository: Inner material requirements and candidates evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, Francesc; Dies, Javier; Pablo, Joan de; Martínez-Esparza, Aurora

    2008-05-01

    One of the key aspects in designing Spanish spent nuclear fuel canister for geological repository is selecting the inner material to be placed between the steel walls and the fuel assemblies. This material has to primarily avoid the possibility of a criticality event once the canister gets breached by corrosion and flooded by groundwater. A detailed set of requirements for a material to fulfil this role in that environment have been devised and presented in this paper. With these requirements in view, eight potentially interesting candidates were evaluated: cast iron or steel, borosilicate glass, spinel, depleted uranium, dehydrated zeolites, haematite, phosphates, and olivine. Among these, the first four materials or their families are found promising for this application.

  7. B4CN3 and B3CN4 monolayers as the promising candidates for metal-free spintronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hongzhe; Sun, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Yongping; Tang, Nujiang; Du, Youwei

    2016-09-01

    The search for candidates of spintronic materials, especially among the two-dimensional (2D) materials, has attracted tremendous attentions over the past decades. By using a particle swarm optimization structure searching method combined with density functional calculations, two kinds of boron carbonitride monolayer structures (B4CN3 and B3CN4) are proposed and confirmed to be dynamically and kinetically stable. Intriguingly, we demonstrate that the magnetic ground states of the two B x C y N z systems are ferromagnetic ordering with a high Curie temperature of respectively 337 K for B4CN3 and 309 K for B3CN4. Furthermore, based on their respective band structures, the B4CN3 is found to be a bipolar magnetic semiconductor (BMS), while the B3CN4 is identified to be a type of spin gapless semiconductor (SGS), both of which are potential spintronic materials. In particular, carrier doping in the B4CN3 can induce a transition from BMS to half-metal, and its spin polarization direction is switchable depending on the doped carrier type. The BMS property of B4CN3 is very robust under an external strain or even a strong electric field. By contrast, as a SGS, the electronic structure of B3CN4 is relatively sensitive to external influences. Our findings successfully disclose two promising materials toward 2D metal-free spintronic applications.

  8. Bone as a Structural Material.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Ritchie, Robert O

    2015-06-24

    As one of the most important natural materials, cortical bone is a composite material comprising assemblies of tropocollagen molecules and nanoscale hydroxyapatite mineral crystals, forming an extremely tough, yet lightweight, adaptive and multi-functional material. Bone has evolved to provide structural support to organisms, and therefore its mechanical properties are vital physiologically. Like many mineralized tissues, bone can resist deformation and fracture from the nature of its hierarchical structure, which spans molecular to macroscopic length-scales. In fact, bone derives its fracture resistance with a multitude of deformation and toughening mechanisms that are active at most of these dimensions. It is shown that bone's strength and ductility originate primarily at the scale of the nano to submicrometer structure of its mineralized collagen fibrils and fibers, whereas bone toughness is additionally generated at much larger, micro- to near-millimeter, scales from crack-tip shielding associated with interactions between the crack path and the microstructure. It is further shown how the effectiveness with which bone's structural features can resist fracture at small to large length-scales can become degraded by biological factors such as aging and disease, which affect such features as the collagen cross-linking environment, the homogeneity of mineralization, and the density of the osteonal structures.

  9. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Bullen, D.B.; Gdowski, G.E. ); Weiss, H. )

    1988-06-01

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are being considered along with three austenitic candidates as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level reprocessing wastes in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain mechanical integrity for 50 yr after emplacement to allow for retrieval of waste during the preclosure phase of repository operation. Containment is required to be substantially complete for up to 300 to 1000 yr. During the early period, the containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. The final closure joint will be critical to the integrity of the containers. This volume surveys the available data on the metallurgy of the copper-based candidate alloys and the welding techniques employed to join these materials. The focus of this volume is on the methods applicable to remote-handling procedures in a hot-cell environment with limited possibility of postweld heat treatment. The three copper-based candidates are ranked on the basis of the various closure techniques. On the basis of considerations regarding welding, the following ranking is proposed for the copper-based alloys: CDA 715 (best) > CDA 102 > CDA 613 (worst). 49 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  10. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  11. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-06

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  12. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  13. Development of candidate reference materials for the measurement of lead in bone

    PubMed Central

    Hetter, Katherine M.; Bellis, David J.; Geraghty, Ciaran; Todd, Andrew C.; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    The production of modest quantities of candidate bone lead (Pb) reference materials is described, and an optimized production procedure is presented. The reference materials were developed to enable an assessment of the interlaboratory agreement of laboratories measuring Pb in bone; method validation; and for calibration of solid sampling techniques such as laser ablation ICP-MS. Long bones obtained from Pb-dosed and undosed animals were selected to produce four different pools of a candidate powdered bone reference material. The Pb concentrations of these pools reflect both environmental and occupational exposure levels in humans. The animal bones were harvested post mortem, cleaned, defatted, and broken into pieces using the brittle fracture technique at liquid nitrogen temperature. The bone pieces were then ground in a knife mill to produce fragments of 2-mm size. These were further ground in an ultra-centrifugal mill, resulting in finely powdered bone material that was homogenized and then sampled-scooped into vials. Testing for contamination and homogeneity was performed via instrumental methods of analysis. PMID:18421443

  14. Structural evaluation of candidate space shuttle thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics and development of a lightweight reusable thermal protection system for the space shuttle are discussed. The test articles consisted of metallic substrates with upper surfaces covered with all-silica, reusable, surface insulation material. The material is processed in the form of tiles. The external surfaces of the tiles are provided with a coating system which consists of a borosilicate coating with a silicon carbide emittance agent and impregnation with a hydrophobic agent. The finished tiles are attached to the metal substrate by adhesive bonding. Charts and graphs of the properties of the material are provided.

  15. Biologically-Induced Micropitting of Alloy 22, a Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Material

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S; Carrillo, C; Horn, J

    2003-11-03

    The effects of potential microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) on candidate packaging materials for nuclear waste containment are being assessed. Coupons of Alloy 22, the outer barrier candidate for waste packaging, were exposed to a simulated, saturated repository environment (or microcosm) consisting of crushed rock (tuff) from the Yucca Mountain repository site and a continual flow of simulated groundwater for periods up to five years at room temperature and 30 C. Coupons were incubated with YM tuff under both sterile and non-sterile conditions. Surfacial analysis by scanning electron microscopy of the biotically-incubated coupons show development of both submicron-sized pinholes and pores; these features were not present on either sterile or untreated control coupons. Room temperature, biotically-incubated coupons show a wide distribution of pores covering the coupon surface, while coupons incubated at 30 C show the pores restricted to polishing ridges.

  16. Fissile material disposition program: Screening of alternate immobilization candidates for disposition of surplus fissile materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.W.

    1996-01-08

    With the end of the Cold War, the world faces for the first time the need to dismantle vast numbers of ``excess`` nuclear weapons and dispose of the fissile materials they contain, together with fissile residues in the weapons production complex left over from the production of these weapons. If recently agreed US and Russian reductions are fully implemented, tens of thousands of nuclear weapons, containing a hundred tons or more of plutonium and hundreds of tonnes* of highly enriched uranium (HEU), will no longer be needed worldwide for military purposes. These two materials are the essential ingredients of nuclear weapons, and limits on access to them are the primary technical barrier to prospective proliferants who might desire to acquire a nuclear weapons capability. Theoretically, several kilograms of plutonium, or several times that amount of HEU, is sufficient to make a nuclear explosive device. Therefore, these materials will continue to be a potential threat to humanity for as long as they exist.

  17. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D. ); Bullen, D.B. )

    1988-04-01

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste containers. Waste will include fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass forms, and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides in the repository will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluences of gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including atmospheric oxidation; uniform aqueous phase corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; sensitization and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This report is an analysis of data relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the three austenitic candidate alloys. The candidates are compared in terms of their susceptibilities to these forms of corrosion. Although all three candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these types of localized corrosion (LC); such resistance is important because pits can penetrate the metal and serve as crack initiation sites. Both Types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented in Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma radiation has been found to enhance SCC in Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while the effects of microbiologically induced corrosion have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. 211 refs., 49 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Structural materials challenges for advanced reactor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvon, P.; Carré, F.

    2009-03-01

    Key technologies for advanced nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant core materials, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes, etc.). The main requirements for the materials to be used in these reactor systems are dimensional stability under irradiation, whether under stress (irradiation creep or relaxation) or without stress (swelling, growth), an acceptable evolution under ageing of the mechanical properties (tensile strength, ductility, creep resistance, fracture toughness, resilience) and a good behavior in corrosive environments (reactor coolant or process fluid). Other criteria for the materials are their cost to fabricate and to assemble, and their composition could be optimized in order for instance to present low-activation (or rapid desactivation) features which facilitate maintenance and disposal. These requirements have to be met under normal operating conditions, as well as in incidental and accidental conditions. These challenging requirements imply that in most cases, the use of conventional nuclear materials is excluded, even after optimization and a new range of materials has to be developed and qualified for nuclear use. This paper gives a brief overview of various materials that are essential to establish advanced systems feasibility and performance for in pile and out of pile applications, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617, etc.), oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics (SiC, TiC, etc.). This article gives also an insight into the various natures of R&D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, lab-scale tests to characterize candidate materials

  19. Statistical Analysis of a Round-Robin Measurement Survey of Two Candidate Materials for a Seebeck Coefficient Standard Reference Material.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z Q J; Lowhorn, N D; Wong-Ng, W; Zhang, W; Thomas, E L; Otani, M; Green, M L; Tran, T N; Caylor, C; Dilley, N R; Downey, A; Edwards, B; Elsner, N; Ghamaty, S; Hogan, T; Jie, Q; Li, Q; Martin, J; Nolas, G; Obara, H; Sharp, J; Venkatasubramanian, R; Willigan, R; Yang, J; Tritt, T

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to develop a Standard Reference Material (SRM™) for Seebeck coefficient, we have conducted a round-robin measurement survey of two candidate materials-undoped Bi2Te3 and Constantan (55 % Cu and 45 % Ni alloy). Measurements were performed in two rounds by twelve laboratories involved in active thermoelectric research using a number of different commercial and custom-built measurement systems and techniques. In this paper we report the detailed statistical analyses on the interlaboratory measurement results and the statistical methodology for analysis of irregularly sampled measurement curves in the interlaboratory study setting. Based on these results, we have selected Bi2Te3 as the prototype standard material. Once available, this SRM will be useful for future interlaboratory data comparison and instrument calibrations.

  20. Screening of candidate corrosion resistant materials for coal combustion environments -- Volume 4. Final report, January 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a silicon carbide heat exchanger is a critical step in the development of the Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) power system. SiC is the only material that provides the necessary combination of resistance to creep, thermal shock, and oxidation. While the SiC structural materials provide the thermomechanical and thermophysical properties needed for an efficient system, the mechanical properties of the SiC tubes are severely degraded through corrosion by the coal combustion products. To obtain the necessary service life of thousands of hours at temperature, a protective coating is needed that is stable with both the SiC tube and the coal combustion products, resists erosion from the particle laden gas stream, is thermal-shock resistant, adheres to SiC during repeated thermal shocks (start-up, process upsets, shut-down), and allows the EFCC system to be cost competitive. The candidate protective materials identified in a previous effort were screened for their stability to the EFCC combustion environment. Bulk samples of each of the eleven candidate materials were prepared, and exposed to coal slag for 100 hours at 1,370 C under flowing air. After exposure the samples were mounted, polished, and examined via x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. In general, the alumina-based materials behaved well, with comparable corrosion depths in all five samples. Magnesium chromite formed a series of reaction products with the slag, which included an alumina-rich region. These reaction products may act as a diffusion barrier to slow further reaction between the magnesium chromite and the slag and prove to be a protective coating. As for the other materials; calcium titanate failed catastrophically, the CS-50 exhibited extension microstructural and compositional changes, and zirconium titanate, barium zironate, and yttrium chromite all showed evidence of dissolution with the slag.

  1. Alkali metal compatibility testing of candidate heater head materials for a Stirling engine heat transport system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Jack E.; Hickman, Gary L.; Grobstein, Toni

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe work performed as part of the 25-kWe advanced Stirling conversion system project. Liquid alkali metal compatibility is being assessed in an ongoing test program to evaluate candidate heater head materials and fabrication processes at the temperatures and operating conditions required for Stirling engines. Specific materials under evaluation are alloy 713LC, alloy 713LC coated with nickel aluminide, and Udimet 720, each in combination with Waspaloy. The tests were run at a constant 700 C. A eutectic alloy of sodium and potassium (NaK) was the working fluid. Titanium sheet in the system was shown to be an effective oxygen getter. Metallographic and microchemical examination of material surfaces, joints, and their interfaces revealed little or no corrosion after 1000 h. Tests are in progress, with up to 10,000 h exposure.

  2. Post-Irradiation Properties of Candidate Materials for High-Power Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, H.G.; Ludewig, H.; Mausner, L.F.; Simos, N.; Thieberger, P.; Hayato, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; McDonald, K.T.; Sheppard, J.; Trung, L.P.; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2006-03-15

    The desire of the high-energy-physics community for more intense secondary particle beams motivates the development of multi-megawatt, pulsed proton sources. The targets needed to produce these secondary particle beams must be sufficiently robust to withstand the intense pressure waves arising from the high peak-energy deposition which an intense pulsed beam will deliver. In addition, the materials used for the targets must continue to perform in a severe radiation environment. The effect of the beam induced pressure waves can be mitigated by use of target materials with high-yield strength and/or low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). We report here first results of an expanded study of the effects of irradiation on several additional candidate materials with high strength (AlBeMet, beryllium, Ti-V6-Al4) or low CTE (a carbon-carbon composite, a new Toyota ''gum'' metal alloy, Super-Invar).

  3. Alkali metal compatibility testing of candidate heater head materials for a Stirling engine heat transport system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Jack E.; Hickman, Gary L.; Grobstein, Toni

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe work performed as part of the 25-kWe advanced Stirling conversion system project. Liquid alkali metal compatibility is being assessed in an ongoing test program to evaluate candidate heater head materials and fabrication processes at the temperatures and operating conditions required for Stirling engines. Specific materials under evaluation are alloy 713LC, alloy 713LC coated with nickel aluminide, and Udimet 720, each in combination with Waspaloy. The tests were run at a constant 700 C. A eutectic alloy of sodium and potassium (NaK) was the working fluid. Titanium sheet in the system was shown to be an effective oxygen getter. Metallographic and microchemical examination of material surfaces, joints, and their interfaces revealed little or no corrosion after 1000 h. Tests are in progress, with up to 10,000 h exposure.

  4. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Curtis, P.G.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility.

  5. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curits, P.C.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90{degrees}C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron- absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. the stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on it chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high- chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. the results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility.

  6. Candidate Materials Evaluated for a High-Temperature Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Randy R.; Ritzert, Frank J.

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Energy and NASA have identified Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRGs) as a candidate power system for use on long-duration, deep-space science missions and Mars rovers. One of the developments planned for an upgraded version of the current SRG design is to achieve higher efficiency by increasing the overall operating temperature of the system. Currently, the SRG operates with a heater head temperature of 650 C and is fabricated from the nickel-base superalloy 718. The current operating temperature is at the limit of alloy 718 s capability, and any planned increase in temperature will be contingent on identifying a more capable material from which to fabricate the heater head. To this end, personnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center are evaluating advanced materials for a high-temperature heater head to allow a higher convertor temperature ratio and, thus, increase the system efficiency. A generic list of properties that were used to screen the candidate materials follows: (1) creep, (2) fabricability, (3) helium gas containment, (4) long-term stability and compatibility, (5) ability to form a hermetical closeout seal, and (6) ductility and toughness.

  7. Quantitative assessment of microbiological contributions to corrosion of candidate nuclear waste-package materials

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J.; Jones, D.; Lian, T.; Martin, S.

    1998-10-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy is contributing to the design of a potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A system to predict the contribution of Yucca Mountain (YM) bacteria to overall corrosion rates of candidate waste-package (WP) materials was designed and implemented. DC linear polarization resistance techniques were applied to candidate material coupons that had been inoculated with a mixture of YM-derived bacteria with potentially corrosive activities or left sterile. Inoculated bacteria caused a 5- to 6-fold increase in corrosion rate of carbon steel C1020 (to approximately 7Ð8mm/yr) and an almost 100-fold increase in corrosion rate of Alloy 400 (to approximately 1mm/yr). Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) rates on more resistant materials (CRMs: Alloy 625, Type 304 Stainless Steel, and Alloy C22) were on the order of hundredths of micrometers per year (mm/yr). Bulk chemical and surfacial end-point analyses of spent media and coupon surfaces showed preferential dissolution of nickel from Alloy 400 coupons and depletion of chromium from CRMs after incubation with YM bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed greater damage to the Alloy 400 surface than that indicated by electrochemical detection methods.

  8. Potentiodynamic polarization studies of candidate container materials in simulated tuff repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.; Harper, W.V.

    1990-12-31

    Cortest Columbus is investigating the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level waste packages as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. In one task of the program, a cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique was used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the candidate container materials. In order to evaluate the expected range of environmental variables, a statistical experimental design approach was used. A Resolution 4 experimental design for 15 variables was selected. The variables included temperature, pH, species present in the groundwater, and those generated by radiolysis. Complete matrices of CPP tests, which consist of tests in 33 environments, were performed on two candidate container materials; Type 304L Stainless Steel and Incoloy Alloy 825. In these tests, both alloys exhibited a wide range of behavior; including passive behavior, pitting and active corrosion. For each alloy, the environmental variables that affected corrosion behavior were identified.

  9. Sliding durability of candidate seal fiber materials in hydrogen from 25 to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1992-01-01

    Sliding durability studies of candidate ceramic fibers were conducted in hydrogen to support the high temperature seal development program at NASA LeRC. Pin-on-disk tests were used to measure the friction and durability of a tow or bundle of ceramic fibers in sliding against a superalloy disk. This procedure was used previously to test candidate fibers in an air environment. The fibers based upon mullite (Al2O3-SiO2) chemistry (Nextel 550, 440, and 312) exhibited better durability in hydrogen than in air. HPZ, a complex silicon carboxynitride fiber which showed good durabilty in air, however, showed a significant loss of durability in hot hydrogen. These results are consistent with recent thermodynamic and experimental studies of ceramic compatibility with hydrogen at elevated temperatures. These research results indicate that only oxide fibers display good durability in both air and hydrogen environments. Also, simple, low cost testing in air can provide an adequate data base for initial seal material screening and selection, especially for oxide fiber candidates. The findings of this research provide critical input to the seal design team.

  10. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY15 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    In the previous report of this series, a literature review was performed to assess the potential for substantial corrosion issues associated with the proposed SHINE process conditions to produce 99Mo. Following the initial review, substantial laboratory corrosion testing was performed emphasizing immersion and vapor-phase exposure of candidate alloys in a wide variety of solution chemistries and temperatures representative of potential exposure conditions. Stress corrosion cracking was not identified in any of the exposures up to 10 days at 80°C and 10 additional days at 93°C. Mechanical properties and specimen fracture face features resulting from slow-strain rate tests further supported a lack of sensitivity of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking. Fluid velocity was found not to be an important variable (0 to ~3 m/s) in the corrosion of candidate alloys at room temperature and 50°C. Uranium in solution was not found to adversely influence potential erosion-corrosion. Potentially intense radiolysis conditions slightly accelerated the general corrosion of candidate alloys, but no materials were observed to exhibit an annualized rate above 10 μm/y.

  11. Superconducting Gamma/Neutron Spectrometer Task 1 Completion Report Evaluation of Candidate Neutron-Sensitive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Lamberti, V.E.

    2002-06-20

    A review of the scientific literature regarding boron- and lithium-containing compounds was completed. Information such as Debye temperature, heat capacity, superconductivity properties, physical and chemical characteristics, commercial availability, and recipes for synthesis was accumulated and evaluated to develop a list of neutron-sensitive materials likely to perform properly in the spectrometer. The best candidate borides appear to be MgB{sub 2} (a superconductor with T{sub c} = 39 K), B{sub 6}Si, B{sub 4}C, and elemental boron; all are commercially available. Among the lithium compounds are LiH, LiAl, Li{sub 12}Si{sub 7}, and Li{sub 7}Sn{sub 2}. These materials have or are expected to have high Debye temperatures and sufficiently low heat capacities at 100 mK to produce a useful signal. The responses of {sup 10}B and {sup 6}Li to a fission neutron spectrum were also estimated. These demonstrated that the contribution of scattering events is no more than 3% in a boron-based system and 1.5% in a lithium-based system. This project is concerned with the development of materials for use in a cryogenic neutron spectrometer and is complementary to work in progress by Labov at LLNL to develop a cryogenic gamma ray spectrometer. Refrigeration to 100 mK lowers the heat capacity of these materials to the point that the energy of absorbed gamma and x rays, nuclei scattered by fast neutrons, and ions from (n, {alpha}) reactions produce a measurable heat pulse, from which the energy of the incident radiation may be deduced. The objective of this project is the discovery, fabrication, and testing of candidate materials with which a cryogenic neutron spectrometer may be realized.

  12. Homogeneity study of a corn flour laboratory reference material candidate for inorganic analysis.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Ana Maria Pinto; Dos Santos, Liz Oliveira; Brandao, Geovani Cardoso; Leao, Danilo Junqueira; Bernedo, Alfredo Victor Bellido; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Lemos, Valfredo Azevedo

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a homogeneity study of a corn flour reference material candidate for inorganic analysis is presented. Seven kilograms of corn flour were used to prepare the material, which was distributed among 100 bottles. The elements Ca, K, Mg, P, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn and Mo were quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) after acid digestion procedure. The method accuracy was confirmed by analyzing the rice flour certified reference material, NIST 1568a. All results were evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and principal component analysis (PCA). In the study, a sample mass of 400mg was established as the minimum mass required for analysis, according to the PCA. The between-bottle test was performed by analyzing 9 bottles of the material. Subsamples of a single bottle were analyzed for the within-bottle test. No significant differences were observed for the results obtained through the application of both statistical methods. This fact demonstrates that the material is homogeneous for use as a laboratory reference material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermocyclic stability of candidate Seebeck coefficient standard reference materials at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua; Wong-Ng, Winnie; Caillat, Thierry; Yonenaga, I.; Green, Martin L.

    2014-05-01

    The Seebeck coefficient is the most widely measured property specific to thermoelectric materials. There is currently no consensus on measurement protocols, and researchers employ a variety of techniques to measure the Seebeck coefficient. The implementation of standardized measurement protocols and the use of reliable Seebeck Coefficient Standard Reference Materials (SRMs®) will allow the accurate interlaboratory comparison and validation of materials data, thereby accelerating the development and commercialization of more efficient thermoelectric materials and devices. To enable members of the thermoelectric materials community the means to calibrate Seebeck coefficient measurement equipment, NIST certified SRM® 3451 "Low Temperature Seebeck Coefficient Standard (10 K to 390 K)". Due to different practical requirements in instrumentation, sample contact methodology, and thermal stability, a complementary SRM® is required for the high temperature regime (300 K to 900 K). The principal requirement of a SRM® for the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature is thermocyclic stability. We therefore characterized the thermocyclic behavior of the Seebeck coefficient for a series of candidate materials: constantan, p-type single crystal SiGe, and p-type polycrystalline SiGe, by measuring the temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of 10 sequential thermal cycles, between 300 K and 900 K. We employed multiple regression analysis to interpolate and analyze the thermocyclic variability in the measurement curves.

  14. CRISPR/Cas9 Technology-Based Xenograft Tumors as Candidate Reference Materials for Multiple EML4-ALK Rearrangements Testing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rongxue; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Guigao; Yang, Xin; Li, Ziyang; Zhang, Kuo; Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Jinming

    2017-09-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase (EML4-ALK) rearrangement is an important biomarker that plays a pivotal role in therapeutic decision making for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Ensuring accuracy and reproducibility of EML4-ALK testing by fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and next-generation sequencing requires reliable reference materials for monitoring assay sensitivity and specificity. Herein, we developed novel reference materials for various kinds of EML4-ALK testing. CRISPR/Cas9 was used to edit various NSCLC cell lines containing EML4-ALK rearrangement variants 1, 2, and 3a/b. After s.c. inoculation, the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples from xenografts were prepared and tested for suitability as candidate reference materials by fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and next-generation sequencing. Sample validation and commutability assessments showed that all types of FFPE samples derived from xenograft tumors have typical histological structures, and EML4-ALK testing results were similar to the clinical ALK-positive NSCLC specimens. Among the four methods for EML4-ALK detection, the validation test showed 100% concordance. Furthermore, these novel FFPE reference materials showed good stability and homogeneity. Without limitations on variant types and production, our novel FFPE samples based on CRISPR/Cas9 editing and xenografts are suitable as candidate reference materials for the validation, verification, internal quality control, and proficiency testing of EML4-ALK detection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Determining the Cognitive Structures of Geography Teacher Candidates on "Earthquake"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Bastürk; Aladag, Caner

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the cognitive structures of the students of geography teaching department by identifying their conceptual frameworks about the concept of earthquake. A case study design from qualitative research approaches was used in this research. Sample group of the study constitutes 155 students from the Department…

  16. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D. ); Gdowski, G.E. )

    1988-06-01

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free, high-purity copper), CDA 613 (aluminum bronze), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are candidates for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. Waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as borosilicate glass, and will be sent to the prospective repository site at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluxes of gamma radiation outside the containers. In this environment, container materials might degrade by atmospheric oxidation, general aqueous phase corrosion, localized corrosion (LC), and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This volume is a critical survey of available data on pitting and crevice corrosion of the copper-based candidates. Pitting and crevice corrosion are two of the most common forms of LC of these materials. Data on the SCC of these alloys is surveyed in Volume 4. Pitting usually occurs in water that contains low concentrations of bicarbonate and chloride anions, such as water from Well J-13 at the Nevada Test Site. Consequently, this mode of degradation might occur in the repository environment. Though few quantitative data on LC were found, a tentative ranking based on pitting corrosion, local dealloying, crevice corrosion, and biofouling is presented. CDA 102 performs well in the categories of pitting corrosion, local dealloying, and biofouling, but susceptibility to crevice corrosion diminishes its attractiveness as a candidate. The cupronickel alloy, CDA 715, probably has the best overall resistance to such localized forms of attack. 123 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Composite Based Chitosan/Zinc-Doped HA as a Candidate Material for Bone Substitute Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicaksono, S. T.; Rasyida, A.; Purnomo, A.; Pradita, N. N.; Ardhyananta, H.; Hidayat, M. I. P.

    2017-05-01

    The composite based Zinc-doped in Chitosan/Hydroxyapatite was successfully prepared by wet mixing method through the addition of 10, 15, and 20wt% of chitosan. The addition of Chitosan increased the compressive strength and the modulus elasticity. However, it decreased the density and the surface hardness of HA-Zn. Mechanical characterization revealed that these composites are suitable as a candidate of a cancellous bone substitute. Composite with 10% chitosan has compressive strength and modulus elasticity of 57.03 MPa and 0.15 GPa, respectively. Hence, it has the physical and mechanical properties that meet the standards as a cancellous bone substitute material. Also, in vitro biocompatibility test against BHK-21 cells exhibited non-toxic materials.

  18. Accelerator-Based PIXE and STIM Analysis of Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerman, W.A.; Stanaland, T.L.; Boudreaux, P.; Elberson, L.; Fontenot, J.; Gates, E.; Greco, R.; McBride, M.; Woodward, A.; Edwards, D.

    2003-08-26

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. A totally reflective sail experiences a pressure of 9.1 {mu}Pa at a distance of 1 AU from the Sun. Since sails are not limited by reaction mass, they provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Practical solar sails can expand the number of possible missions, enabling new concepts that are difficult by conventional means. One of the current challenges is to develop strong, lightweight, and radiation resistant sail materials. This paper will discuss initial results from a Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) analysis of candidate solar sail materials.

  19. Candidate materials for high-strength fastener applications in both the aerospace and automotive industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, J. G.

    2005-12-01

    There are many commercially available titanium alloys that have exhibited the capability of achieving high strength. Many of these alloys have not been seriously considered for fastener applications due to their cost or availability as coil or bar product. However, because new designs, increased material requirements, and larger aircraft are being built, the need to reduce weight and improve performance continues to be a major issue. The possibility of reducing weight by replacing currently used steel or Ni-based fasteners in various sizes is a great incentive. Over the past few years, many of these titanium alloys have been processed to bar and coil products to evaluate their capabilities as potential fastener materials. This article will review and summarize the mechanical properties, tensile, shear, notch tensile, and available fatigue, as well as the microstructure of these candidate alloys.

  20. Erosion Studies of EUVL Candidate Collector Mirror Materials in the Impact Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rokusek, D.L.; Allain, J.P.; Hassanein, A.; Nieto, M.

    2005-01-01

    The IMPACT (Interaction of Materials with charged Particles And Components Testing) experiment at Argonne National Laboratory was used to expose Pd, Ru, and Re-capped Ru candidate EUV light collector mirror materials to conditions similar to extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography source devices, in particular high-energy singly-charged Xe ions. Experiments measured both the time-dependent atomic surface concentration evolution of candidate single-layer mirror (SLM) samples and the Xe+-induced sputtering yield. Elemental surface information was acquired using low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy (LEISS) and sputtering yields were acquired using an in-situ quartz crystal microbalance. Sputtering results show large erosion rates between 0.5 and up to 7.0 for Pd and Ru SLM samples for energies between 500 and 1000 eV of Xe+ irradiation at grazing incidence. Re-capped Ru SLM samples also demonstrated very high sputter yields. Time-dependent erosion rate measurements used with LEISS resulted in a high depth-resolution profile and led to the discovery of ion-induced recoil implantation of oxygen atoms to the Ru mirror surface. High concentration of oxygen throughout the Ru SLM may be detrimental to the reflectivity response of the collector mirror.

  1. Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, D.W.; Nutt, W.M.; Bullen, D.B.

    1995-06-01

    Oxidation and atmospheric corrosion data suggest that addition of Cr provides the greatest improvement in oxidation resistance. Cr-bearing cast irons are resistant to chloride environments and solutions containing strongly oxidizing constituents. Weathering steels, including high content and at least 0.04% Cu, appear to provide adequate resistance to oxidation under temperate conditions. However, data from long-term, high-temperature oxidation studies on weathering steels were not available. From the literature, it appears that the low alloy steels, plain carbon steels, cast steels, and cast irons con-ode at similar rates in an aqueous environment. Alloys containing more than 12% Cr or 36% Ni corrode at a lower rate than plain carbon steels, but pitting may be worse. Short term tests indicate that an alloy of 9Cr-1Mo may result in increased corrosion resistance, however long term data are not available. Austenitic cast irons show the best corrosion resistance. A ranking of total corrosion performance of the materials from most corrosion resistant to least corrosion resistant is: Austenitic Cast Iron; 12% Cr = 36% Ni = 9Cr-1Mo; Carbon Steel = Low Alloy Steels; and Cast Iron. Since the materials to be employed in the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) waste package are considered to be corrosion allowance materials, the austenitic cast irons, high Cr steels, high Ni steels and the high Cr-Mo steels should not be considered as candidates for the outer containment barrier. Based upon the oxidation and corrosion data available for carbon steels, low alloy steels, and cast irons, a suitable list of candidate materials for a corrosion allowance outer barrier for an ACD waste package could include, A516, 2.25%Cr -- 1%Mo Steel, and A27.

  2. Layered materials for structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, J.J.; Ward, C.H.; Jackson, M.R.; Hunt, W.H. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The symposium, Layered Materials for Structural Applications, was held April 8--11, 1996, in San Francisco, California. This Materials Research Society symposium was supported by contributions from The Air Force Office of Scientific Research and Office of Naval Research. The meeting began with overviews on structural applications of layered systems and highlighted applications such as thermal barrier coatings, aircraft structural components, and wear-resistant coatings for a variety of applications. Processing techniques such as EB deposition processing, reactive sputter deposition, sedimentation processing, pressureless co-sintering, and rapid prototyping via laminated object manufacturing were subsequently covered in a following session. Microstructural stability issues were additionally covered and highlighted as a critical area requiring further investigation. The largest number of papers presented focused on the mechanical behavior and modeling of layered systems and revealed significant effects of layer thickness, spacing, and constituent properties on the fracture and fatigue behavior of such systems. While considerable work has investigated the issues of strength and toughness, less effort has been focused on the behavior of such systems under either cyclic loading or high-temperature conditions. Forty papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  3. Selection and evaluation of inner material candidates for Spanish high level radioactive waste canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Puig, Francesc; Dies, Javier; Sevilla, Manuel; Pablo, Joan de; Pueyo, Juan Jose; Miralles, Lourdes; Martinez-Esparza, Aurora

    2007-07-01

    This paper summarizes the work carried out to analyse different alternatives related to the inner material selection of the Spanish high level waste canister for long term storage. The preliminary repository design considers granitic or clay formations, compacted bentonite sealing, corrosion allowing steel canisters and glass bead filling between the fuel assemblies and canister walls. This filling material will have the primary role of avoiding the possibility of a criticality event, which becomes an issue of major importance once the container is finally breached by corrosion and flooded by groundwater. In the first place, a complete set of requirements have been devised as evaluation criteria for candidate materials examination and selection; resulting in a compilation of demands significantly deeper and more exhaustive than any other similar work found in literature, including over 20 requirements and some other general aspects that could involve improvements in repository performance. Secondly, eight materials or material families (cast iron or steel, borosilicate glass, spinel, depleted uranium, dehydrated zeolites, hematite, phosphates and olivine) have been chosen and examined in detail, extracting some relevant conclusions. Either cast iron, borosilicate glass, spinel or depleted uranium are considered to look quite promising for the mentioned purpose. (authors)

  4. Application of Negligible Creep Criteria to Candidate Materials for HTGR Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Jetter, Robert I; Sham, Sam; Swindeman, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Two of the proposed High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) under consideration for a demonstration plant have the design object of avoiding creep effects in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during normal operation. This work addresses the criteria for negligible creep in Subsection NH, Division 1 of the ASME B&PV (Boiler and Pressure Vessel) Code, Section III, other international design codes and some currently suggested criteria modifications and their impact on permissible operating temperatures for various reactor pressure vessel materials. The goal of negligible creep could have different interpretations depending upon what failure modes are considered and associated criteria for avoiding the effects of creep. It is shown that for the materials of this study, consideration of localized damage due to cycling of peak stresses results in a lower temperature for negligible creep than consideration of the temperature at which the allowable stress is governed by creep properties. In assessing the effect of localized cyclic stresses it is also shown that consideration of cyclic softening is an important effect that results in a higher estimated temperature for the onset of significant creep effects than would be the case if the material were cyclically hardening. There are other considerations for the selection of vessel material besides avoiding creep effects. Of interest for this review are (1) the material s allowable stress level and impact on wall thickness (the goal being to minimize required wall thickness) and (2) ASME Code approval (inclusion as a permitted material in the relevant Section and Subsection of interest) to expedite regulatory review and approval. The application of negligible creep criteria to two of the candidate materials, SA533 and Mod 9Cr-1Mo (also referred to as Grade 91), and to a potential alternate, normalized and tempered 2 Cr-1Mo, is illustrated and the relative advantages and disadvantages of the materials are discussed.

  5. Structural materials for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.

    1989-01-01

    The long-term performance of structural materials in the space environment is a key research activity within NASA. The primary concerns for materials in low Earth orbit (LEO) are atomic oxygen erosion and space debris impact. Atomic oxygen studies have included both laboratory exposures in atomic oxygen facilities and flight exposures using the Shuttle. Characterization of atomic oxygen interaction with materials has included surface recession rates, residual mechanical properties, optical property measurements, and surface analyses to establish chemical changes. The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is scheduled to be retrieved in 1989 and is expected to provide a wealth of data on atomic oxygen erosion in space. Hypervelocity impact studies have been conducted to establish damage mechanisms and changes in mechanical properties. Samples from LDEF will be analyzed to determine the severity of space debris impact on coatings, films, and composites. Spacecraft placed in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) will be subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation which for long term exposures will exceed the damage threshold of many polymeric materials. Radiation interaction with polymers can result in chain scission and/or cross-linking. The formation of low molecular weight products in the epoxy plasticize the matrix at elevated temperatures and embrittle the matrix at low temperatures. This affects both the matrix-dominated mechanical properties and the dimensional stability of the composite. Embrittlement of the matrix at low temperatures results in enhanced matrix microcracking during thermal cycling. Matrix microcracking changes the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of composite laminates and produces permanent length changes. Residual stress calculations were performed to estimate the conditions necessary for microcrack development in unirradiated and irradiated composites. The effects of UV and electron exposure on the optical properties of transparent

  6. Explosive scabbling of structural materials

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Bonzon, Lloyd L.

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to scabbling of surfaces of structural materials is disclosed. A layer of mildly energetic explosive composition is applied to the surface to be scabbled. The explosive composition is then detonated, rubbleizing the surface. Explosive compositions used must sustain a detonation front along the surface to which it is applied and conform closely to the surface being scabbled. Suitable explosive compositions exist which are stable under handling, easy to apply, easy to transport, have limited toxicity, and can be reliably detonated using conventional techniques.

  7. Method of binding structural material

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Antink, Allison L.

    2007-12-25

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic. The ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  8. A natural matrix (pureed tomato) candidate reference material containing residue concentrations of pesticide chemicals.

    PubMed

    Armishaw, P; Millar, R

    2001-06-01

    NARL (the Australian National Analytical Reference Laboratory) is preparing a pureed tomato reference material spiked with residue concentrations of a range of pesticide chemicals relevant to the Australian horticultural industry. Traceable certified pesticide concentration values will be established using both isotope dilution mass spectrometry primary methods (developed within NARL) and measurements carried out by a number of experienced laboratories. As far as we are aware, there is no other similar CRM available anywhere in the world. The need for such a material is evident from the results of interlaboratory proficiency studies conducted by NARL among Australian and Asia-Pacific residue testing laboratories. Many participants are experiencing difficulties with the analysis of pesticide residues in fruit and vegetables at concentrations of regulatory significance. Chemicals such as methamidophos (an organophosphorus pesticide widely used on tomato crops) are causing particular problems. In a pilot study, a number of units of control (unspiked tomato) and the candidate reference material were prepared and packaged into lacquered steel cans which were sealed and sterilised by immersion in boiling water. Accelerated stability testing of the packaged material was conducted using isochronous measurement. All of the pesticides showed some degree of degradation after 4 weeks of storage at 50 degrees C, and after 168 days of storage at room temperature. However, all appeared to be stable after 168 days of freezer storage. Homogeneity testing involved duplicate test portions taken from every 50th unit of reference material. An experimental protocol was devised with the aim of minimising the analytical variability and assuring the quality of the data generated. There is some degree of inhomogeneity in the prepared material and a small fill trend is also indicated. Potential improvements to the spiking and preparation procedure have been identified and it is planned to

  9. A simplified in vivo approach for evaluating the bioabsorbable behavior of candidate stent materials.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Daniel; Edick, Jacob; Tauscher, Aaron; Pokorney, Ellen; Bowen, Patrick; Gelbaugh, Jesse; Stinson, Jon; Getty, Heather; Lee, Chee Huei; Drelich, Jaroslaw; Goldman, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Metal stents are commonly used to revascularize occluded arteries. A bioabsorbable metal stent that harmlessly erodes away over time may minimize the normal chronic risks associated with permanent implants. However, there is no simple, low-cost method of introducing candidate materials into the arterial environment. Here, we developed a novel experimental model where a biomaterial wire is implanted into a rat artery lumen (simulating bioabsorbable stent blood contact) or artery wall (simulating bioabsorbable stent matrix contact). We use this model to clarify the corrosion mechanism of iron (≥99.5 wt %), which is a candidate bioabsorbable stent material due to its biocompatibility and mechanical strength. We found that iron wire encapsulation within the arterial wall extracellular matrix resulted in substantial biocorrosion by 22 days, with a voluminous corrosion product retained within the vessel wall at 9 months. In contrast, the blood-contacting luminal implant experienced minimal biocorrosion at 9 months. The importance of arterial blood versus arterial wall contact for regulating biocorrosion was confirmed with magnesium wires. We found that magnesium was highly corroded when placed in the arterial wall but was not corroded when exposed to blood in the arterial lumen for 3 weeks. The results demonstrate the capability of the vascular implantation model to conduct rapid in vivo assessments of vascular biomaterial corrosion behavior and to predict long-term biocorrosion behavior from material analyses. The results also highlight the critical role of the arterial environment (blood vs. matrix contact) in directing the corrosion behavior of biodegradable metals. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The Probabilistic Nature of Environmental Cracking in Candidate Waste Package Materials

    SciTech Connect

    G.M. Gordon; P.L. Andresen; L.M. Young

    2001-07-10

    The objective of this research is to determine the effects of material condition and applied stress on environmental cracking in candidate waste package materials for the Yucca Mountain Project. Time-to-failure experiments were performed on smooth bar tensile specimens in a hot, concentrated, mixed-salt solution chosen to simulate concentrated Yucca Mountain water. Smooth tensile specimens were individually loaded by the internal pressure of a 55-liter autoclave, where the applied stress varied with the individual specimen gauge cross section. The effects of material, applied stress, welding, surface finish, shot peening, cold work, crevicing, and aging treatment were investigated for Alloy 22, Titanium Grade 7, and 316NG stainless steel. Testing of multiple specimens allowed statistical differences among material conditions to be determined. Sensitized 304SS specimens were included in the test matrix to provide benchmark data. Microstructural effects on time-to-failure were studied for Alloy 22, where heat treatments designed to produce topologically close-packed phases (TCP) and long-range ordering (LRO) were investigated. This research complements high-resolution crack-growth-rate experiments performed in a parallel research project.

  11. The rheology of structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning

    2000-10-01

    In this work, the rheological properties of structured materials are studied via both theoretical (continuum mechanics and molecular theory) and experimental approaches. Through continuum mechanics, a structural model, involving shear-induced structural breakdown and buildup, is extended to model biofluids. In particular, we study the cases of steady shear flow, hysteresis, yield stress, small amplitude oscillatory flow as well as non-linear viscoelasticity. Model predictions are successfully compared with experimental data on complex materials such as blood and a penicillin suspension. Next, modifications are introduced into the network model. A new formulation involving non-affine motion is proposed and its applications are presented. The major improvement is that a finite elongational viscosity is predicted for finite elongational rate, contrary to infinite elongational viscosities existing at some elongational rates predicted by most previous network models. Comparisons with experimental data on shear viscosity, primary normal stress coefficient and elongational viscosity are given, in terms of the same set of model parameters. Model predictions for the stress growth are also shown. The model is successfully tested with data on a polyisobutylene solution (S1), on a polystyrene solution and on a poly-alpha-methylstyrene solution. A further extension of the network model is related to the prediction of the stress jump phenomenon which is defined as the instantaneous gain or loss of stress on startup or cessation of a deformation. It is not predicted by most existing models. In this work, the internal viscosity idea used in the dumbbell model is incorporated into the transient network model. Via appropriate approximations, a closed form constitutive equation, which predicts a stress jump, is obtained. Successful comparisons with the available stress jump measurements are given. In addition, the model yields good quantitative predictions of the standard steady

  12. Evaluations of Structural Failure Probabilities and Candidate Inservice Inspection Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Simonen, Fredric A.

    2009-05-01

    The work described in this report applies probabilistic structural mechanics models to predict the reliability of nuclear pressure boundary components. These same models are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative programs for inservice inspection to reduce these failure probabilities. Results of the calculations support the development and implementation of risk-informed inservice inspection of piping and vessels. Studies have specifically addressed the potential benefits of ultrasonic inspections to reduce failure probabilities associated with fatigue crack growth and stress-corrosion cracking. Parametric calculations were performed with the computer code pc-PRAISE to generate an extensive set of plots to cover a wide range of pipe wall thicknesses, cyclic operating stresses, and inspection strategies. The studies have also addressed critical inputs to fracture mechanics calculations such as the parameters that characterize the number and sizes of fabrication flaws in piping welds. Other calculations quantify uncertainties associated with the inputs calculations, the uncertainties in the fracture mechanics models, and the uncertainties in the resulting calculated failure probabilities. A final set of calculations address the effects of flaw sizing errors on the effectiveness of inservice inspection programs.

  13. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Gdowski, G.E.; Bullen, D.B. )

    1988-08-01

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, they must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after the containers are emplaced in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of the high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on oxidation and corrosion of the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) and the copper-based alloy materials (CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni)), which are the present candidates for fabrication of the containers. Studies that provided a large amount of data are highlighted, and those areas in which little data exists are identified. Examples of successful applications of these materials are given. On the basis of resistance to oxidation and general corrosion, the austenitic materials are ranked as follows: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is as follows: CDA 715 and CDA 613 (both best), and CDA 102 (worst). 110 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs.

  14. Effect of temperature and gap opening rate on the resiliency of candidate solid rocket booster O-ring materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lach, Cynthia L.

    1992-01-01

    In the redesign of the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor following the Challenger accident, the field and nozzle-to-case joints were designed to minimize gap opening caused by internal motor pressurization during ignition. The O-ring seals and glands for these joints were designed both to accommodate structural deflections and to promote pressure assisted sealing. The resiliency behavior of several candidate O-ring materials was evaluated for the effects of temperature and gap opening rates. The performance of three of the elastomeric materials was tested under the specific redesign gap opening requirement. Dynamic flexure conditions unique to launch produce low frequency vibrations in the gap opening. The effect of these vibrations on the ability of the O-ring to maintain contact with the sealing surface was addressed. The resiliency of the O-ring materials was found to be extremely sensitive to variations in temperature and gap opening rate. The top three elastomeric materials tracked the simulated solid rocket booster (SRB) field joint deflection at 75 and 120 F. The external tank/SRB attach strut load vibrations had a negligible effect on the ability of the O-ring to track the simulated SRB field joint deflection.

  15. Applicants regard structured interviews as a fair method of selection: an audit of candidates

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Mark A; Nunn, Laurence M; Redpath, Calum; Mills, Peter; Crake, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective To discover whether applicants regard structures interviews as a fair method of selection for jobs. Design Audit study of short-listed candidates for postgraduate specialty training programmes in the London Deanery. Setting Postgraduate applications for the London Deanery. Main outcome measures Satisfaction or otherwise with the application and selection process for postgraduate specialty training programmes amongst short-listed candidates in the London Deanery. Questions were asked under five categories: the applicant, the advertisement, the application form, the short-listing process, and the interview. Results 89 of 118 forms were completed and analysed. Candidates thought the advertisement was clear on who to contact (97%), when short-listed candidates would be notified of their interview (66%) and when interviews would occur (93%). The design of the application form and the short-listing process both scored a median of 1 or 2 (strongly agree or agree) on all points. The interview process itself also scored well, with most candidates scoring broadly positively. Conclusions As in the previous study, the overall response was broadly a positive one from the candidates' perspective, with the majority of candidates finding the system fair and objective. PMID:18463281

  16. Characterization of cellulose structure of Populus plants modified in candidate cellulose biosynthesis genes

    DOE PAGES

    Bali, Garima; Khunsupat, Ratayakorn; Akinosho, Hannah; ...

    2016-09-10

    Here, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass is a combined effect of several factors such as high crystallinity and high degree of polymerization of cellulose, lignin content and structure, and the available surface area for enzymatic degradation (i.e., accessibility). Genetic improvement of feedstock cell wall properties is a path to reducing recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass and improving conversion to various biofuels. An advanced understanding of the cellulose biosynthesis pathway is essential to precisely modify cellulose properties of plant cell walls. Here we report on the impact of modified expression of candidate cellulose biosynthesis pathway genes on the ultra-structure of cellulose,more » a key carbohydrate polymer of Populus cell wall using advanced nuclear magnetic resonance approaches. Noteworthy changes were observed in the cell wall characteristics of downregulated KORRIGAN 1 (KOR) and KOR 2 transgenic plants in comparison to the wild-type control. It was observed that all of the transgenic lines showed variation in cellulose ultrastructure, increase in cellulose crystallinity and decrease in the cellulose degree of polymerization. Additionally, the properties of cellulose allomorph abundance and accessibility were found to be variable. Application of such cellulose characterization techniques beyond the traditional measurement of cellulose abundance to comprehensive studies of cellulose properties in larger transgenic and naturally variable populations is expected to provide deeper insights into the complex nature of lignocellulosic material, which can significantly contribute to the development of precisely tailored plants for enhanced biofuels production.« less

  17. Characterization of cellulose structure of Populus plants modified in candidate cellulose biosynthesis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, Garima; Khunsupat, Ratayakorn; Akinosho, Hannah; Payyavula, Raja S.; Samuel, Reichel; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-09-10

    Here, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass is a combined effect of several factors such as high crystallinity and high degree of polymerization of cellulose, lignin content and structure, and the available surface area for enzymatic degradation (i.e., accessibility). Genetic improvement of feedstock cell wall properties is a path to reducing recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass and improving conversion to various biofuels. An advanced understanding of the cellulose biosynthesis pathway is essential to precisely modify cellulose properties of plant cell walls. Here we report on the impact of modified expression of candidate cellulose biosynthesis pathway genes on the ultra-structure of cellulose, a key carbohydrate polymer of Populus cell wall using advanced nuclear magnetic resonance approaches. Noteworthy changes were observed in the cell wall characteristics of downregulated KORRIGAN 1 (KOR) and KOR 2 transgenic plants in comparison to the wild-type control. It was observed that all of the transgenic lines showed variation in cellulose ultrastructure, increase in cellulose crystallinity and decrease in the cellulose degree of polymerization. Additionally, the properties of cellulose allomorph abundance and accessibility were found to be variable. Application of such cellulose characterization techniques beyond the traditional measurement of cellulose abundance to comprehensive studies of cellulose properties in larger transgenic and naturally variable populations is expected to provide deeper insights into the complex nature of lignocellulosic material, which can significantly contribute to the development of precisely tailored plants for enhanced biofuels production.

  18. Characterization of cellulose structure of Populus plants modified in candidate cellulose biosynthesis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, Garima; Khunsupat, Ratayakorn; Akinosho, Hannah; Payyavula, Raja S.; Samuel, Reichel; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-09-10

    Here, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass is a combined effect of several factors such as high crystallinity and high degree of polymerization of cellulose, lignin content and structure, and the available surface area for enzymatic degradation (i.e., accessibility). Genetic improvement of feedstock cell wall properties is a path to reducing recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass and improving conversion to various biofuels. An advanced understanding of the cellulose biosynthesis pathway is essential to precisely modify cellulose properties of plant cell walls. Here we report on the impact of modified expression of candidate cellulose biosynthesis pathway genes on the ultra-structure of cellulose, a key carbohydrate polymer of Populus cell wall using advanced nuclear magnetic resonance approaches. Noteworthy changes were observed in the cell wall characteristics of downregulated KORRIGAN 1 (KOR) and KOR 2 transgenic plants in comparison to the wild-type control. It was observed that all of the transgenic lines showed variation in cellulose ultrastructure, increase in cellulose crystallinity and decrease in the cellulose degree of polymerization. Additionally, the properties of cellulose allomorph abundance and accessibility were found to be variable. Application of such cellulose characterization techniques beyond the traditional measurement of cellulose abundance to comprehensive studies of cellulose properties in larger transgenic and naturally variable populations is expected to provide deeper insights into the complex nature of lignocellulosic material, which can significantly contribute to the development of precisely tailored plants for enhanced biofuels production.

  19. Thermo-Optical and Mechanical Property Testing of Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollerman, WIlliam A.; Stanaland, T. L.; Womack, F.; Edwards, David; Hubbs, Whitney; Semmel, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Since sails are not limited by reaction mass, they provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Practical solar sails can expand the number of possible missions, enabling new concepts that are difficult by conventional means. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra-lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. Solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic front layer, a thin polymeric substrate, and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate sails to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to electrons. This poster will discuss the preliminary results of this research.

  20. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.; Weiss, H.; Farmer, J.C. ); Bullen, D.B. )

    1988-06-01

    This volume surveys the effects of welding on the degradation modes of three austenitic alloys: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. These materials are candidates for the fabrication of containers for the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste. The metallurgical characteristics of fusion welds are reviewed here and related to potential degradation modes of the containers. Three specific areas are discussed in depth: (1) decreased resistance to corrosion in the forms of preferential corrosion, sensitization, and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking, (2) hot cracking in the heat-affected zone and the weld zone, and (3) formation of intermetallic phases. The austenitic alloys are ranked as follows in terms of overall weldability: Alloy 825 (best) > Type 316L stainless steel > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 108 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Cost/benefit analysis of advanced materials technology candidates for the 1980's, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, R. E.; Maertins, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    Cost/benefit analyses to evaluate advanced material technologies projects considered for general aviation and turboprop commuter aircraft through estimated life-cycle costs, direct operating costs, and development costs are discussed. Specifically addressed is the selection of technologies to be evaluated; development of property goals; assessment of candidate technologies on typical engines and aircraft; sensitivity analysis of the changes in property goals on performance and economics, cost, and risk analysis for each technology; and ranking of each technology by relative value. The cost/benefit analysis was applied to a domestic, nonrevenue producing, business-type jet aircraft configured with two TFE731-3 turbofan engines, and to a domestic, nonrevenue producing, business type turboprop aircraft configured with two TPE331-10 turboprop engines. In addition, a cost/benefit analysis was applied to a commercial turboprop aircraft configured with a growth version of the TPE331-10.

  2. Preliminary Investigation of Candidate Materials for Use in Accident Resistant Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Lessing; Blair H. Park; Jakeob Maupin

    2013-09-01

    As part of a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with industry, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating several options for accident resistant uranium compounds including silicides, and nitrides for use in future light water reactor (LWR) fuels. This work is part of a larger effort to create accident tolerant fuel forms where changes to the fuel pellets, cladding, and cladding treatment are considered. The goal fuel form should have a resistance to water corrosion comparable to UO2, have an equal to or larger thermal conductivity than uranium dioxide, a melting temperature that allows the material to stay solid under power reactor conditions, and a uranium loading that maintains or improves current LWR power densities. During the course of this research, fuel fabricated at INL will be characterized, irradiated at the INL Advanced Test Reactor, and examined after irradiation at INL facilities to help inform industrial partners on candidate technologies.

  3. Assessment of candidates for target window material in accelerator-driven molybdenum-99 production

    SciTech Connect

    Strons, Philip; Bailey, James; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Chemerisov, Sergey; Gromov, Roman; Vandegrift, George

    2016-10-01

    NorthStar Medical Technologies is pursuing production of an important medical isotope, Mo-99, through a photo-nuclear reaction of a Mo-100 target using a high-power electron accelerator. The current target utilizes an Inconel 718 window. The purpose of this study was to evaluate other candidate materials for the target window, which separates the high-pressure helium gas inside the target from the vacuum inside the accelerator beamline and is subjected to significant stress. Our initial analysis assessed the properties (density, thermal conductivity, maximum stress, minimum window thickness, maximum temperature, and figure of merit) for a range of materials, from which the three most promising were chosen: Inconel 718, 250 maraging steel, and standard-grade beryllium. These materials were subjected to further analysis to determine the effects of thermal and mechanical strain versus beam power at varying thicknesses. Both beryllium and the maraging steel were calculated to withstand more than twice as high beam power than Inconel 718.

  4. Emissivity of Candidate Materials for VHTR Applicationbs: Role of Oxidation and Surface Modification Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Anderson, Mark; Cao, Guoping; Kulcinski, Gerald

    2011-07-25

    The Generation IV (GEN IV) Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative was instituted by the Department of Energy (DOE) with the goal of researching and developing technologies and materials necessary for various types of future reactors. These GEN IV reactors will employ advanced fuel cycles, passive safety systems, and other innovative systems, leading to significant differences between these future reactors and current water-cooled reactors. The leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to be built at Idaho National Lab (INL) in the United States is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Due to the high operating temperatures of the VHTR, the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) will partially rely on heat transfer by radiation for cooling. Heat expulsion by radiation will become all the more important during high temperature excursions during off-normal accident scenarios. Radiant power is dictated by emissivity, a material property. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program Plan [1] has identified emissivity and the effects of high temperature oxide formation on emissivity as an area of research towards the development of the VHTR.

  5. Method and structure for passivating semiconductor material

    DOEpatents

    Pankove, Jacques I.

    1981-01-01

    A structure for passivating semiconductor material comprises a substrate of crystalline semiconductor material, a relatively thin film of carbon disposed on a surface of the crystalline material, and a layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited on the carbon film.

  6. Carbon structural materials for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Virgiliev, Yu.S.; Kurolenkin, E.I.

    1993-12-31

    This report describes properties of several structural carbon materials being investigated as materials for fusion reactors. Materials include: graphite, graphite doped with boron and titanium; and C-C composites. Radiation effects and additive effects are described.

  7. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Bullen, D.B.; Gdowski, G.E. )

    1988-08-01

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The copper-based alloy materials are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The austenitic materials are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. The waste-package containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr, and they must be retrievable from the disposal site during the first 50 yr after emplacement. The containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on the phase stability of both groups of candidate alloys. The austenitic alloys are reviewed in terms of the physical metallurgy of the iron-chromium-nickel system, martensite transformations, carbide formation, and intermetallic-phase precipitation. The copper-based alloys are reviewed in terms of their phase equilibria and the possibility of precipitation of the minor alloying constituents. For the austenitic materials, the ranking based on phase stability is: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is: CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper) (best), and then both CDA 715 and CDA 613. 75 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Comparative genomics reveals 104 candidate structured RNAs from bacteria, archaea, and their metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Structured noncoding RNAs perform many functions that are essential for protein synthesis, RNA processing, and gene regulation. Structured RNAs can be detected by comparative genomics, in which homologous sequences are identified and inspected for mutations that conserve RNA secondary structure. Results By applying a comparative genomics-based approach to genome and metagenome sequences from bacteria and archaea, we identified 104 candidate structured RNAs and inferred putative functions for many of these. Twelve candidate metabolite-binding RNAs were identified, three of which were validated, including one reported herein that binds the coenzyme S-adenosylmethionine. Newly identified cis-regulatory RNAs are implicated in photosynthesis or nitrogen regulation in cyanobacteria, purine and one-carbon metabolism, stomach infection by Helicobacter, and many other physiological processes. A candidate riboswitch termed crcB is represented in both bacteria and archaea. Another RNA motif may control gene expression from 3'-untranslated regions of mRNAs, which is unusual for bacteria. Many noncoding RNAs that likely act in trans are also revealed, and several of the noncoding RNA candidates are found mostly or exclusively in metagenome DNA sequences. Conclusions This work greatly expands the variety of highly structured noncoding RNAs known to exist in bacteria and archaea and provides a starting point for biochemical and genetic studies needed to validate their biologic functions. Given the sustained rate of RNA discovery over several similar projects, we expect that far more structured RNAs remain to be discovered from bacterial and archaeal organisms. PMID:20230605

  9. Physical oceanographic processes at candidate dredged-material disposal sites B1B and 1M offshore San Francisco

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, C.R.; Denbo, D.W.; Downing, J.P. ); Coats, D.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, has identified two candidate sites for ocean disposal of material from several dredging projects in San Francisco Bay. The disposal site is to be designated under Section 103 of the Ocean Dumping Act. One of the specific criteria in the Ocean Dumping Act is that the physical environments of the candidate sites be considered. Toward this goal, the USACE requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conduct a study of physical oceanographic and sediment transport processes at the candidate sites, B1B and 1M. The results of that study are presented in this report. 40 refs., 27 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Assessment of commutability for candidate certified reference material ERM-BB130 "chloramphenicol in pork".

    PubMed

    Zeleny, Reinhard; Emteborg, Håkan; Schimmel, Heinz

    2010-10-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP), an effective antibiotic against many microorganisms, is meanwhile banned in the EU for treatment of food-producing animals due to adverse health effects. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) is currently developing a certified reference material (CRM) for CAP in pork, intended for validation and method performance verifications of analytical methods. The material will be certified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods and has a target CAP level around the minimum required performance limit (MRPL) of 0.3 microg/kg. To prove that the material can be applied as a quality control tool for screening methods, a commutability study was conducted, involving five commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits and one biosensor assay (BiaCore kit). Meat homogenates (cryo-milled wet tissue) with CAP concentrations around the MRPL and the candidate CRM (lyophilised powder) were measured by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS as well as the six screening methods. Pairwise method comparisons of results obtained for the two sample types showed that the CRM can successfully be applied as quality control (QC) sample to all six screening methods. The study suggests that ERM-BB130 is sufficiently commutable with the investigated assays and that laboratories applying one of the investigated kits therefore benefit from using ERM-BB130 to demonstrate the correctness of their results. However, differences among the assays were observed, either in the abundance of bias between screening and confirmatory LC and GC methods, the repeatability of test results, or goodness of fit between the methods.

  11. Transient Scuffing of Candidate Diesel Engine Materials at Temperatures up to 600oC

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.

    2003-06-20

    This milestone report summarizes the general characteristics of scuffing damage to solid surfaces, then describes transient effects on scuffing observed during oscillating sliding wear tests of candidate material pairs for high-temperature diesel engine applications, like waste-gate bushings in exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) systems. It is shown that oxidation and the formation of wear particle layers influence the friction of such components. In the case of metallic materials in cylindrical contacts where there is a generous clearance, debris layers can form which reduce the torque over time. For ceramic combinations, the opposite effect is observed. Here, the accumulation of wear debris leads to an increase in the turning torque. High-temperature transient scuffing behavior is considered in terms of a series of stages in which the composition and morphology of the contact is changing. These changes are used to explain the behavior of 11 material pairs consisting of stainless steels, Ni-based alloys, Co-based alloys, and structural ceramics.

  12. Material Properties Analysis of Structural Members in Pumpkin Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The efficient design, service-life qualification, and reliability predictions for lightweight aerospace structures require careful mechanical properties analysis of candidate structural materials. The demand for high-quality laboratory data is particularly acute when the candidate material or the structural design has little history. The pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloon presents both challenges. Its design utilizes load members (tendons) extending from apex to base around the gas envelope to achieve a lightweight structure. The candidate tendon material is highly weight-efficient braided HM cord. Previous mechanical properties studies of Zylon have focused on fiber and yarn, and industrial use of the material in tensile applications is limited. For high-performance polymers, a carefully plamed and executed properties analysis scheme is required to ensure the data are relevant to the desired application. Because no directly-applicable testing standard was available, a protocol was developed based on guidelines fiom professional and industry organizations. Due to the liquid-crystalline nature of the polymer, the cord is very stiff, creeps very little, and does not yield. Therefore, the key material property for this application is the breaking strength. The pretension load and gauge length were found to have negligible effect on the measured breaking strength over the ranges investigated. Strain rate was found to have no effect on breaking strength, within the range of rates suggested by the standards organizations. However, at the lower rate more similar to ULDB operations, the strength was reduced. The breaking strength increased when the experiment temperature was decreased from ambient to 183K which is the lowest temperature ULDB is expected to experience. The measured strength under all test conditions was well below that resulting from direct scale-up of fiber strength based on the manufacturers data. This expected result is due to the effects of the

  13. A Damage Resistance Comparison Between Candidate Polymer Matrix Composite Feedline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T

    2000-01-01

    As part of NASAs focused technology programs for future reusable launch vehicles, a task is underway to study the feasibility of using the polymer matrix composite feedlines instead of metal ones on propulsion systems. This is desirable to reduce weight and manufacturing costs. The task consists of comparing several prototype composite feedlines made by various methods. These methods are electron-beam curing, standard hand lay-up and autoclave cure, solvent assisted resin transfer molding, and thermoplastic tape laying. One of the critical technology drivers for composite components is resistance to foreign objects damage. This paper presents results of an experimental study of the damage resistance of the candidate materials that the prototype feedlines are manufactured from. The materials examined all have a 5-harness weave of IM7 as the fiber constituent (except for the thermoplastic, which is unidirectional tape laid up in a bidirectional configuration). The resin tested were 977-6, PR 520, SE-SA-1, RS-E3 (e-beam curable), Cycom 823 and PEEK. The results showed that the 977-6 and PEEK were the most damage resistant in all tested cases.

  14. Development of a matrix-based candidate reference material of total homocysteine in human serum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Song, Dewei; Xu, Bei; Li, Hongmei; Dai, Xinhua; Chen, Baorong

    2017-03-07

    We developed and evaluated a candidate serum reference material to help improve clinical routine measurement, and to provide traceability of the measurement results. D8-Homocystine, dithiothreitol, and acetonitrile were used as an internal standard, the reducing agent, and the protein precipitating agent, respectively. A triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization source was used for monitoring the transitions (m/z 140.0 → 94.0, 136.0 → 90.0) in multiple-reaction-monitoring mode. We used a calibration model relying on bracketing and gravimetric measurements to give SI-traceability and higher accuracy to serum value assignments. The method was evaluated for accuracy using NIST Standard Reference Material SRM1955. The results of the three concentrations (1, 2, and 3) of total homocysteine in human serum samples were determined by an isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method; tHcy 1 is 28.8 ± 1.1 μmol/L, tHcy 2 is 17.93 ± 0.57 μmol/L, and tHcy 3 is 14.38 ± 0.46 μmol/L. Graphical abstract The workflow diagram.

  15. Evaluations of candidate encapsulation designs and materials for low-cost silicon photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.; Sliemers, F. A.; Brockway, M. C.; Bunk, A. R.; Nance, G. P.

    1978-01-01

    Three encapsulation designs for silicon photovoltaic arrays based on cells with silk-screened Ag metallization have been evaluated: transparent polymeric coatings over cells laminated between two films or sheets of polymeric materials; cells adhesively bonded to a glass cover with a polymer pottant and a glass or other substrate component. Silicone and acrylic coatings were assessed, together with acrylic sheet, 0.635 mm fiberglass-reinforced polyester sheet, 0.102 mm polycarbonate/acrylic dual-layer film, 0.127 mm fluorocarbon film, soda-lime glass, borosilicate glass, low-iron glass, and several adhesives. The encapsulation materials were characterized by light transmittance measurements, determination of moisture barrier properties and bond strengths, and by the performance of cells before and after encapsulation. Silicon and acrylic coatings provided inadequate protection. Acrylic and fluorocarbon films displayed good weatherability and acceptable optical transmittance. Borosilicate, low-iron and soda-lime-float glasses were found to be acceptable candidate encapsulants for most environments.

  16. Justification of the new approach to the testing of the candidate ITER materials in fission reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaenko, V. A.; Karpukhin, V. I.; Krasikov, E. A.; Kuznetsov, V. N.

    Routine approaches to the candidate ITER materials reactor testing have to be modified by taking into account the large, difference between fusion and fission reactor gamma-quanta fluxes. Recent analyses have shown clear evidence of the relationship between the steel ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift and the gamma-quanta flux during the reactor irradiation. For example, if during the reactor irradiation of the 25Cr3NiMo type steel gamma-quanta the flux increases from 5 × 10 11 to 5 × 10 12 sm -2 s -1 to obtain the DBTT=160°C, it is necessary to increase the neutron fluence by one order of magnitude. Simultaneous neutron and gamma irradiation is characterized by an Irradiation Composition Factor (ICF) - neutron flux/gamma-quanta flux. For example, for a fast neutron fluence ( E > 0.5 MeV) of 2.4 × 10 19 cm -2 and 1.6 × 10 19 cm -2 and corresponding values of ICF of 0.4 and 2.1, the DBTT shift is greater for the smaller neutron fluence. Hence, the smaller is the ICF the greater is the gamma-quanta of the nescient defects restoring (annealing) action. For the ITER first wall the ICF is 4, whereas for a nuclear reactor it is only 0.1-0.3. Therefore the new approach to the experimental procedure of the experimental procedure of the canditate ITER materials testing in a fission reactor is justified.

  17. Reversible Hydrogen Storage MaterialsStructure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  18. Radiation effects on structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoniem, N.M.

    1991-06-28

    This report discusses the following topics on the effect radiation has on thermonuclear reactor materials: Atomic Displacements; Microstructure Evolution; Materials Engineering, Mechanics, and Design; Research on Low-Activation Steels; and Research Motivated by Grant Support.

  19. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  20. A three-dimensional measurement method based on mesh candidates assisted with structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Zhang, Wenming; Li, Haibin; Liu, Bin

    2009-07-01

    Rendering three-dimensional information of a scene from optical measurement is very important for a wide variety of applications such as robot navigation, rapid prototyping, medical imaging, industrial inspection, etc. In this paper, a new 3D measurement method based on mesh candidate with structured light illuminating is proposed. The vision sensor consists of two CCD cameras and a DLP projector. The measurement system combines the technology of binocular stereo vision and structured light, so as to simplify the process of acquiring depth information using mesh candidates. The measurement method is based on mesh candidates which represent the potential depth in the three dimensional scene. First the mesh grid was created along the direction of axes in world coordinate system, and the nodes were considered as depth candidates on the surface of object. Then each group of the mesh nodes varying along z axis were mapped to the captured image planes of both cameras. At last, according to the similarity measure of the corresponding pixel pairs, the depth of the object surface can be obtained. The matching process is between the pixels in both camera planes corresponding to the spatial mesh candidates. Aided by the structured light pattern, the accuracy of measurement system improved. Appending the periodic sawtooth pattern on the scene by structured light made measurement easier, while the computational cost did not increased since the projector had no need to be calibrated. The 3DS MAX and Matlab software were used to simulate measurement system and reconstruct the surface of the object. After the positioned cameras have been calibrated using Matlab calibration toolbox, the projector is used to project structured light pattern on the scene. Indicated by experimental results, the mesh-candidate-based method is obviously superior in computation and accuracy. Compared with traditional methods based on image matching, our method has several advantages: (1) the complex

  1. NASICON-Structured Materials for Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zelang; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Ji, Xiulei; Chen, Wen

    2017-02-21

    The demand for electrical energy storage (EES) is ever increasing, which calls for better batteries. NASICON-structured materials represent a family of important electrodes due to its superior ionic conductivity and stable structures. A wide range of materials have been considered, where both vanadium-based and titanium-based materials are recommended as being of great interest. NASICON-structured materials are suitable for both the cathode and the anode, where the operation potential can be easily tuned by the choice of transition metal and/or polyanion group in the structure. NASICON-structured materials also represent a class of solid electrolytes, which are widely employed in all-solid-state ion batteries, all-solid-state air batteries, and hybrid batteries. NASICON-structured materials are reviewed with a focus on both electrode materials and solid-state electrolytes.

  2. Bio-inspired variable structural color materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Xie, Zhuoying; Gu, Hongcheng; Zhu, Cun; Gu, Zhongze

    2012-04-21

    Natural structural color materials, especially those that can undergo reversible changes, are attracting increasing interest in a wide variety of research fields. Inspired by the natural creatures, many elaborately nanostructured photonic materials with variable structural colors were developed. These materials have found important applications in switches, display devices, sensors, and so on. In this critical review, we will provide up-to-date research concerning the natural and bio-inspired photonic materials with variable structural colors. After introducing the variable structural colors in natural creatures, we will focus on the studies of artificial variable structural color photonic materials, including their bio-inspired designs, fabrications and applications. The prospects for the future development of these fantastic variable structural color materials will also be presented. We believe this review will promote the communications among biology, bionics, chemistry, optical physics, and material science (196 references).

  3. Chapter 7: Materials for Launch Vehicle Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henson, Grant; Jone, Clyde S. III

    2017-01-01

    This chapter concerns materials for expendable and reusable launch vehicle (LV) structures. An emphasis is placed on applications and design requirements, and how these requirements are met by the optimum choice of materials. Structural analysis and qualification strategies, which cannot be separated from the materials selection process, are described.

  4. Composite Materials for Structural Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    Conditioning of Cross-Ply Graphite/Epoxy Laminates." In Advances in Composite Materials (Proceedings of 3rd International Con- ference on Composite Materials...Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. L. Bradley An epoxy resin commonly used in advanced composite materials for aerospace application was tested...34, Vought Corp. Advanced Technology Center Final Report, Aug. 1978. Contract No. N00019-77-C-0369 with the Department of the Navy. 2. Williams, M.L., et al

  5. Friction and Wear Characteristics of Candidate Foil Bearing Materials from 25 C to 800 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Laskowski, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    The friction and wear behavior of unlubricated metal/metal sliding couples was investigated to screen potential candidates for high temperature foil bearings. The tribo-tests were run in an induction-heated high temperature pin-on-disk tribometer in an air atmosphere at a load of 4.9 N and at a sliding velocity of 1 m/s. The friction and wear properties of several nickel based alloys (Rene'41, Inconel X-750, Inconel 713C), iron based alloys (MA956 and Inconel 909) and a ceramic (Al2O3) were tested at 25, 500, and 800 C. In general, at elevated temperatures the alloys oxidized and formed a tenacious and lubricous oxide surface film or layer. At 800 C, Inconel X-750 versus Rene'41 had the lowest friction coefficient (0.27) and at 500 C, Inconel X-750 versus Inconel 909 the lowest pin wear (2.84 x 10(exp -6)cu mm/N-m). Gouging and severe wear of the softer material occurred whenever a significant difference in hardness existed between the pin and disk specimens.

  6. Relative sliding durability of two candidate high temperature oxide fiber seal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    A test program to determine the relative sliding durability of two candidate ceramic fibers for high temperature sliding seal applications is described. Pin on disk tests were used to evaluate potential seal materials. Friction during the tests and fiber wear, indicated by the extent of fibers broken in a test bundle or yarn, was measured at the end of a test. In general, friction and wear increase with test temperature. This may be due to a reduction in fiber strength, a change in the surface chemistry at the fiber/counterface interface due to oxidation, adsorption and/or desorption of surface species and, to a lesser extent, an increase in counterface surface roughness due to oxidation at elevated temperatures. The relative fiber durability correlates with tensile strength indicating that tensile data, which is more readily available than sliding durability data, may be useful in predicting fiber wear behavior under various conditions. A simple model developed using dimensional analysis shows that the fiber durability is related to a dimensionless parameter which represents the ratio of the fiber strength to the fiber stresses imposed by sliding.

  7. High temperature oxidation of fuel cladding candidate materials in steam-hydrogen environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pint, B. A.; Terrani, K. A.; Brady, M. P.; Cheng, T.; Keiser, J. R.

    2013-09-01

    Alternative fuel cladding materials to Zr alloys are being investigated for enhanced accident tolerance, which specifically involves oxidation resistance to steam or steam-H2 environments at ⩾1200 °C for short times. Based on a comparison of a range of commercial and model alloys, conventional austenitic steels do not have sufficient oxidation resistance with only ˜18Cr-10Ni. Higher alloyed type 310 stainless steel is protective but Ni is not a desirable alloy addition for this application. Results at 1350 °C indicated that FeCrAl alloys and CVD SiC remain oxidation resistant in steam. At 1200 °C, high (⩾25% Cr) ferritic alloys appear to be good candidates for this application. Higher pressures (up to 20.7 bar) and H2 additions appeared to have a limited effect on the oxidation behavior of the most oxidation resistant alloys, but higher pressures accelerated the maximum metal loss for less oxidation resistant steels and less metal loss was observed for type 317 L tubing in a H2-50%H2O environment at 10.3 bar compared to 100% H2O.

  8. Damage parameter comparison for candidate intense neutron test facilities for fusion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, D.G.; Greenwood, L.R. ); Mann, F.M. )

    1990-07-31

    It is recognized worldwide that an intense source of fusion energy neutrons is needed to evaluate candidate fusion materials. At an International Energy Agency (IEA) workshop held in San Diego in February 1989, an Evaluation Panel recommended that three neutron source concepts be developed further. The panel also recommended that further comparisons were needed of their irradiation environments. In this paper, a comparison is made of damage parameters for beryllium, carbon, silicon, vanadium, iron, copper, molybdenum, and tungsten irradiated in spectra characteristic of di-Li, spallation, and beam-plasma (d-t) neutron sources and in a reference DEMO first wall spectrum. The treatment of neutron-induced displacement reactions is confined to the region below 20 MeV and transmutation reactions to below 50 MeV by the limited availability of calculational tools. The spallation spectrum is relatively soft; less than 2% of the neutrons are above 50 MeV. The transmutation results emphasize the need to define the neutron spectra at low, as well as high, energies; only the DEMO spectrum is adequate in this respect. Recommendations are given for further work to be performed under an international working group. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Tribological Evaluation of Candidate Gear Materials Operating Under Light Loads in Highly Humid Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Thomas, Fransua; Leak, Olivia Ann

    2015-01-01

    A series of pin-on-disk sliding wear tests were undertaken to identify candidate materials for a pair of lightly loaded timing gears operating under highly humid conditions. The target application involves water purification and thus precludes the use of oil, grease and potentially toxic solid lubricants. The baseline sliding pair is austenitic stainless steel operating against a carbon filled polyimide. The test load and sliding speed (4.9N, 2.7ms) were chosen to represent average contact conditions of the meshing gear teeth. In addition to the baseline materials, the hard superelastic NiTiNOL 60 (60NiTi) was slid against itself, against the baseline polyimide, and against 60NiTi onto which a commercially deposited dry film lubricant (DFL) was applied. The alternate materials were evaluated as potential replacements to achieve a longer wear life and improved dimensional stability for the timing gear application. An attempt was also made to provide solid lubrication to self-mated 60NiTi by rubbing the polyimide against the disk wear track outside the primary 60NiTi-60NiTi contact, a method named stick or transfer-film lubrication. The selected test conditions gave repeatable friction and wear data and smooth sliding surfaces for the baseline materials similar to those in the target application. Friction and wear for self-mated stainless steel were high and erratic. Self-mated 60NiTi gave acceptably low friction (0.2) and modest wear but the sliding surfaces were rough and potentially unsuitable for the gear application. Tests in which 60NiTi pins were slid against DFL coated 60NiTi and DFL coated stainless steel gave low friction and long wear life. The use of stick lubrication via a secondary polyimide pin provided effective transfer film lubrication to self-mated 60NiTi tribological specimens. Using this approach, friction levels were equal or lower than the baseline polyimide-stainless combination and wear was higher but within data scatter observed in these

  10. Tribological Evaluation of Candidate Gear Materials Operating Under Light Loads in Highly Humid Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Thomas, Fransua; Leak, Olivia Ann

    2015-01-01

    A series of pin-on-disk sliding wear tests were undertaken to identify candidate materials for a pair of lightly loaded timing gears operating under highly humid conditions. The target application involves water purification and thus precludes the use of oil, grease and potentially toxic solid lubricants. The baseline sliding pair is austenitic stainless steel operating against a carbon filled polyimide. The test load and sliding speed (4.9 N, 2.7 m/s) were chosen to represent average contact conditions of the meshing gear teeth. In addition to the baseline materials, the hard superelastic NiTiNOL 60 (60NiTi) was slid against itself, against the baseline polyimide, and against 60NiTi onto which a commercially deposited dry film lubricant (DFL) was applied. The alternate materials were evaluated as potential replacements to achieve a longer wear life and improved dimensional stability for the timing gear application. An attempt was also made to provide solid lubrication to self-mated 60NiTi by rubbing the polyimide against the disk wear track outside the primary 60NiTi-60NiTi contact, a method named stick or transfer-film lubrication. The selected test conditions gave repeatable friction and wear data and smooth sliding surfaces for the baseline materials similar to those in the target application. Friction and wear for self-mated stainless steel were high and erratic. Self-mated 60NiTi gave acceptably low friction (approx. 0.2) and modest wear but the sliding surfaces were rough and potentially unsuitable for the gear application. Tests in which 60NiTi pins were slid against DFL coated 60NiTi and DFL coated stainless steel gave low friction and long wear life. The use of stick lubrication via the secondary polyimide pin provided effective transfer film lubrication to self-mated 60NiTi tribological specimens. Using this approach, friction levels were equal or lower than the baseline polyimide-stainless combination and wear was higher but within data scatter observed

  11. Interaction of candidate plasma facing materials with tokamak plasma in COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matějíček, Jiří; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Havránek, Vladimír; Naydenkova, Diana; Klevarová, Veronika; Petersson, Per; Gasior, Pawel; Hakola, Antti; Rubel, Marek; Fortuna, Elzbieta; Kolehmainen, Jukka; Tervakangas, Sanna

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of tokamak plasma with several materials considered for the plasma facing components of future fusion devices was studied in a small-size COMPASS tokamak. These included mainly tungsten as the prime candidate and chromium steel as an alternative whose suitability was to be assessed. For the experiments, thin coatings of tungsten, P92 steel and nickel on graphite substrates were prepared by arc-discharge sputtering. The samples were exposed to hydrogen and deuterium plasma discharges in the COMPASS tokamak in two modes: a) short exposure (several discharges) on a manipulator in the proximity of the separatrix, close to the central column, and b) long exposure (several months) at the central column, aligned with the other graphite tiles. During the discharges, standard plasma diagnostics were used and a local emission of spectral lines in the visible near ultraviolet regions, corresponding to the material erosion, was monitored. Before and after the plasma exposures, the sample surfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy, the coatings thickness was measured using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and the concentration profiles of hydrogen and deuterium were measured by elastic recoil detection analysis. The uniformity of the coatings and their thickness was verified before the exposure. After the exposure, no reduction of the thickness was observed, indicating the absence of 'global' erosion. Erosion was observed only in isolated spots, and attributed to unipolar arcing. Slightly larger erosion was found on the steel coatings compared to the tungsten ones. Incorporation of deuterium in a thin surface layer was observed, in dependence on the exposure mode. Additionally, boron enrichment of the long-exposure samples was observed, as a result of the tokamak chamber boronization.

  12. Structural Integrity of Intelligent Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    Laminates," International Journal for Numerical Methods and Engineering (in press). 3. "Coupled Thermomechanical Simulation of Shape Memory Alloys...interpolation polynomials," AIAA Journal , 30, No 11, Nov. 1992. 5. Chang, Fu-Kuo, Perez, J.L., and Chang, K.Y., "Analysis of thick laminated composites...34 Journals of Composite Materials, 24, 801-822, August 1990. 6. Christensen, R.M., Mechanics of Composite Materials, John Wiley & Sons, NY 1979. 7

  13. Identification of 22 candidate structured RNAs in bacteria using the CMfinder comparative genomics pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Zasha; Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Yao, Zizhen; Roth, Adam; Kim, Jane N.; Gore, Jeremy; Wang, Joy Xin; Lee, Elaine R.; Block, Kirsten F.; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Neph, Shane; Tompa, Martin; Ruzzo, Walter L.

    2007-01-01

    We applied a computational pipeline based on comparative genomics to bacteria, and identified 22 novel candidate RNA motifs. We predicted six to be riboswitches, which are mRNA elements that regulate gene expression on binding a specific metabolite. In separate studies, we confirmed that two of these are novel riboswitches. Three other riboswitch candidates are upstream of either a putative transporter gene in the order Lactobacillales, citric acid cycle genes in Burkholderiales or molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis genes in several phyla. The remaining riboswitch candidate, the widespread Genes for the Environment, for Membranes and for Motility (GEMM) motif, is associated with genes important for natural competence in Vibrio cholerae and the use of metal ions as electron acceptors in Geobacter sulfurreducens. Among the other motifs, one has a genetic distribution similar to a previously published candidate riboswitch, ykkC/yxkD, but has a different structure. We identified possible non-coding RNAs in five phyla, and several additional cis-regulatory RNAs, including one in ε-proteobacteria (upstream of purD, involved in purine biosynthesis), and one in Cyanobacteria (within an ATP synthase operon). These candidate RNAs add to the growing list of RNA motifs involved in multiple cellular processes, and suggest that many additional RNAs remain to be discovered. PMID:17621584

  14. Structural material irradiations in FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA); instrumentation and control system; MOTA neutronic data; pressurized tube specimens; stress-rupture measurements for reactor materials; miniature specimen design; the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell at the FFTF; support services; and general information concerning the FFTF.

  15. The Effect of Instructional Technology and Material Design Course to Teacher Candidates' Gaining of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tozkoparam, Süleyman Burak; Kiliç, Muhammet Emre; Usta, Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) Competencies of teacher candidates in Turkish Teaching department of Mevlana (Rumi) University and the effect of Instructional Technology and Material Design (ITMD) Course on TPACK. The study is a study of quantitative type and single-group pretest-posttest…

  16. High Temperature Steam Oxidation Testing of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A.; Terrani, Kurt A; Nelson, Andrew; Parker, Scott; Parkison, Adam

    2013-12-23

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign has initiated a multifold effort aimed at facilitating development of accident tolerant fuels in order to overcome the inherent shortcomings of light water reactor (LWR) fuels when exposed to beyond design basis accident conditions. The campaign has invested in development of experimental infrastructure within the Department of Energy complex capable of chronicling the performance of a wide range of concepts under prototypic accident conditions. This report summarizes progress made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in FY13 toward these goals. Alternative fuel cladding materials to Zircaloy for accident tolerance and a significantly extended safety margin requires oxidation resistance to steam or steam-H2 environments at ≥1200°C for short times. At ORNL, prior work focused attention on SiC, FeCr and FeCrAl as the most promising candidates for further development. Also, it was observed that elevated pressure and H2 additions had minor effects on alloy steam oxidation resistance, thus, 1 bar steam was adequate for screening potential candidates. Commercial Fe-20Cr-5Al alloys remain protective up to 1475°C in steam and CVD SiC up to 1700°C in steam. Alloy development has focused on Fe-Cr-Mn-Si-Y and Fe-Cr-Al-Y alloys with the aluminaforming alloys showing more promise. At 1200°C, ferritic binary Fe-Cr alloys required ≥25% Cr to be protective for this application. With minor alloy additions to Fe-Cr, more than 20%Cr was still required, which makes the alloy susceptible to α’ embrittlement. Based on current results, a Fe-15Cr-5Al-Y composition was selected for initial tube fabrication and welding for irradiation experiments in FY14. Evaluations of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were conducted up to 1700°C in steam. The reaction of H2O with the alumina reaction tube at 1700°C resulted in Al(OH)3

  17. Electrorheological Material Based Smart Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    based in-situ structural vibration monitoring, and real-time neural network based vibration control. In order to facilitate the basic science...structural vibration model was developed and tested with corresponding experimentation. Novel fiber-optic sensors and neural network controllers were also

  18. Structure-power multifunctional materials for UAV's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, James; Qidwai, Muhammad A.; Matic, Peter; Everett, Richard; Gozdz, Antoni S.; Keennon, Matt; Grasmeyer, Joel

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents multifunctional structure-plus-power developments being pursued under DARPA sponsorship with the focus on structure-battery components for unmanned air vehicles (UAV). New design strategies, analysis methods, performance indices, and prototypes for multifunctional structure-battery materials are described along with the development of two UAV prototypes with structure-battery implementation.

  19. Materials and structures/ACEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Light weight composites made from graphite fibers, glass, or man made materials held in an epoxy matrix, and their application to airframe design are reviewed. The Aircraft Energy Efficiency program is discussed. Characteristics of composites, acceptable risks, building parts and confidence, and aeroelastic tailoring are considered.

  20. A New Light Weight Structural Material for Nuclear Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2016-01-14

    Radiation shielding materials are commonly used in nuclear facilities to attenuate the background ionization radiations to a minimum level for creating a safer workplace, meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining high quality performance. The conventional radiation shielding materials have a number of drawbacks: heavy concrete contains a high amount of elements that are not desirable for an effective shielding such as oxygen, silicon, and calcium; a well known limitation of lead is its low machinability and toxicity, which is causing a major environmental concern. Therefore, an effective and environmentally friendly shielding material with increased attenuation and low mass density is desirable. Close-cell composite metal foams (CMFs) and open-cell Al foam with fillers are light-weight candidate materials that we have studied in this project. Close-cell CMFs possess several suitable properties that are unattainable by conventional radiation shielding materials such as low density and high strength for structural applications, high surface area to volume ratio for excellent thermal isolation with an extraordinary energy absorption capability. Open-cell foam is made up of a network of interconnected solid struts, which allows gas or fluid media to pass through it. This unique structure provided a further motive to investigate its application as radiation shields by infiltrating original empty pores with high hydrogen or boron compounds, which are well known for their excellent neutron shielding capability. The resulting open-cell foam with fillers will not only exhibit light weight and high specific surface area, but also possess excellent radiation shielding capability and good processability. In this study, all the foams were investigated for their radiation shielding efficiency in terms of X-ray, gamma ray and neutron. X-ray transmission measurements were carried out on a high-resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) system. Gamma-emitting sources: 3.0m

  1. Durability of Composite Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-02

    Michigan State University Composite Materials and Structures Center 2100 Engineering Building , East Lansing, MI 48824-1226 6.1 Objectives The...DATES COVERED (From - To) February 7, 2005 - January 31. 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES 5a...Manager: Dr. Yapa D.S. Rajapakse Office of Naval Research 875 N. Randolph Street Arlington, VA 22203-1995 DURABILITY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND

  2. Intrinsically Survivable Structural Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-01

    Coefficient 14 2.2.2 Low-Temperature Precure Treatment (LTPT) 16 2.2.3 Investigation of Several Commercially Available Organoclays 18 2.2.4 High-Shear...of material. Additional commercially available organoclay samples all flocculated to a greater extent than the original S30A. Other attempts to...nanocomposites. A series of epoxy-organosilicate nanocomposites have been successfully prepared with the nanosheets of the nano- organoclay uniformly and

  3. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Byun, Thak Sang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maloy, Stuart A.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-11-01

    The high resistance of cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure is one of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate such deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisted of a high-resolution video camera, light filtering unit, and monochromatic light sources, and the in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. In this study eleven (11) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., 6 FeCrAl alloys and 5 nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800°C while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys and/or for relatively thick wall specimens.

  4. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    DOE PAGES

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maloy, Stuart A.; ...

    2015-08-25

    Here, one of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is high resistance of the cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure, since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and the process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate the deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisting of a high-resolution video camera, a light filteringmore » unit, and monochromatic light sources. The in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. As the first application, ten (10) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., five FeCrAl alloys and five nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800 °C, while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys.« less

  5. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maloy, Stuart A.; Gussev, M. N.; Terrani, K. A.

    2015-08-25

    Here, one of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is high resistance of the cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure, since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and the process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate the deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisting of a high-resolution video camera, a light filtering unit, and monochromatic light sources. The in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. As the first application, ten (10) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., five FeCrAl alloys and five nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800 °C, while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys.

  6. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gussev, M. N.; Byun, T. S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Maloy, S. A.; Terrani, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is high resistance of the cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure, since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and the process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate the deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisting of a high-resolution video camera, a light filtering unit, and monochromatic light sources. The in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. As the first application, ten (10) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., five FeCrAl alloys and five nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800 °C, while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys.

  7. Structures and materials technology for hypersonic aerospacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, Harvey G., Jr.; Murrow, Harold N.; Card, Michael F.

    1990-01-01

    Major considerations in structural design of a transatmospheric aerospacecraft are discussed. The general direction of progress in structures and materials technology is indicated, and technical areas in structures and materials where further research and development is necessary are indicated. Various structural concepts under study and materials which appear to be most applicable are discussed. Structural design criteria are discussed with particular attention to the factor-of-safety approach and the probabilistic approach. Structural certification requirements for the aerospacecraft are discussed. The kinds of analyses and tests which would be required to certify the structural integrity, safety, and durability of the aerospacecraft are discussed, and the type of test facility needed to perform structural certification tests is identified.

  8. Structural Integrity of Intelligent Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-17

    Memory Actuators ," J. Sound and Vibr., Vol. 140, pp. 437-456, 1990.I 7. Jackson, C.M. et al., ൿ- Nitinol - The Alloy with a Memory:3 Its Physical...55W0 Standard Foam 298 (Rev 2869) P..*Cb.d by ANSI S.13 239- 290,102 -- 2Q-•.m* 4 0388; IMSNVV, INC. Approved f or publ iC rel685O 3 P.O. Box 865...Douglas Aircraft, Grumman, and other companies have resulted in the development of shape memory actuators for the3 control of space structures, the

  9. Recent global trends in structural materials research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hideyuki; Ohmura, Takahito; Nishimura, Toshiyuki

    2013-02-01

    Structural materials support the basis of global society, such as infrastructure and transportation facilities, and are therefore essential for everyday life. The optimization of such materials allows people to overcome environmental, energy and resource depletion issues on a global scale. The creation and manufacture of structural materials make a large contribution to economies around the world every year. The use of strong, resistant materials can also have profound social effects, providing a better quality of life at both local and national levels. The Great East Japan Earthquake of 11 March 2011 caused significant structural damage in the Tohoku and Kanto regions of Japan. On a global scale, accidents caused by the ageing and failure of structural materials occur on a daily basis. Therefore, the provision and inspection of structural reliability, safety of nuclear power facilities and construction of a secure and safe society hold primary importance for researchers and engineers across the world. Clearly, structural materials need to evolve further to address both existing problems and prepare for new challenges that may be faced in the future. With this in mind, the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) organized the 'NIMS Conference 2012' to host an extensive discussion on a variety of global issues related to the future development of structural materials. Ranging from reconstruction following natural disasters, verification of structural reliability, energy-saving materials to fundamental problems accompanying the development of materials for high safety standards, the conference covered many key issues in the materials industry today. All the above topics are reflected in this focus issue of STAM, which introduces recent global trends in structural materials research with contributions from world-leading researchers in this field. This issue covers the development of novel alloys, current methodologies in the characterization of structural

  10. Composite materials for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Sykes, G. F.; Bowles, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The use of advanced composites for space structures is reviewed. Barriers likely to limit further applications of composites are discussed and highlights of research to improve composites are presented. Developments in composites technology which could impact spacecraft systems are reviewed to identify technology needs and opportunities.

  11. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers; Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.; Kass, J.N.

    1988-06-01

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys and three copper-based alloys are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The austenitic alloys are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and the high-nickel material Alloy 825. The copper-based alloys are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). Waste in the forms of both spent fuel assemblies from reactors and borosilicate glass will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including undesirable phase transformations due to a lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking; and transgranular stress corrosion cracking. Problems specific to welds, such as hot cracking, may also occur. A survey of the literature has been prepared as part of the process of selecting, from among the candidates, a material that is adequate for repository conditions. The modes of degradation are discussed in detail in the survey to determine which apply to the candidate alloys and the extent to which they may actually occur. The eight volumes of the survey are summarized in Sections 1 through 8 of this overview. The conclusions drawn from the survey are also given in this overview.

  12. Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An J.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Hunter, Hamilton T.; Singleterry, Robert C. Jr.

    2002-07-01

    Research is being conducted to develop an integrated technology for the prediction of aging behavior for space structural materials during service. This research will utilize state-of-the-art radiation experimental apparatus and analysis, updated codes and databases, and integrated mechanical and radiation testing techniques to investigate the suitability of numerous current and potential spacecraft structural materials. Also included are the effects on structural materials in surface modules and planetary landing craft, with or without fission power supplies. Spacecraft structural materials would also be in hostile radiation environments on the surface of the moon and planets without appreciable atmospheres and moons around planets with large intense magnetic and radiation fields (such as the Jovian moons). The effects of extreme temperature cycles in such locations compounds the effects of radiation on structural materials. This paper describes the integrated methodology in detail and shows that it will provide a significant technological advance for designing advanced spacecraft. This methodology will also allow for the development of advanced spacecraft materials through the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of material degradation in the space radiation environment. Thus, this technology holds a promise for revolutionary advances in material damage prediction and protection of space structural components as, for example, in the development of guidelines for managing surveillance programs regarding the integrity of spacecraft components, and the safety of the aging spacecraft. (authors)

  13. Biomimetic photonic materials with tunable structural colors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Guo, Zhiguang

    2013-09-15

    Nature is a huge gallery of art involving nearly perfect structures and forms over the millions of years developing. Inspiration from natural structures exhibiting structural colors is first discussed. We give some examples of natural one-, two-, and three-dimensional photonic structures. This review article presents a brief summary of recent progress on bio-inspired photonic materials with variable structural colors, including the different facile and efficient routes to construct the nano-architectures, and the development of the artificial variable structural color photonic materials. Besides the superior optical properties, the excellent functions such as robust mechanical strength, good wettability are also mentioned, as well as the technical importance in various applications. This review will provide significant insight into the fabrication, design and application of the structural color materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. LTA structures and materials technology. [airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1975-01-01

    The state-of-the-art concerning structures and materials technology is reviewed. It is shown that many present materials developments resulting from balloon and aircraft research programs can be applied to new concepts in LTA vehicles. Both buoyant and semi-buoyant vehicles will utilize similar approaches to solving structural problems and could involve pressurized non-rigid and unpressurized rigid structures. System designs common to both and vital to structural integrity will include much of the past technology as well. Further research is needed in determination of structural loads, especially in future design concepts.

  15. Moisture-cured silicone-urethanes-candidate materials for tissue engineering: a biocompatibility study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mrówka, P; Kozakiewicz, J; Jurkowska, A; Sienkiewicz, E; Przybylski, J; Lewandowski, Z; Przybylski, J; Lewandowska-Szumieł, M

    2010-07-01

    This study was performed to verify the response of human bone-derived cells (HBDCs) to moisture-cured silicone-urethanes (mcSUUs) in vitro, as the first step toward using them as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Good surgical handling, tissue cavity filling, stable mechanical properties, and potentially improved oxygen supply to cells after implantation justify the investigation of these nondegradable elastomers. A set of various mcSUUs were obtained by moisture-curing NCO-terminated prepolymers, synthesized from oligomeric siloxane diols of two different oligosiloxane chain lengths, and two different diisocyanates (MDI and IPDI), using two different NCO/OH molar ratios. Dibutyltindilaurate (DBTL) or N-dimethylethanolamine (N-met) served as catalysts. After 7 days of culture, cell number, viability, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were determined, and after 21 days, cell viability and collagen production were determined. Material characteristics significantly influenced the cell response. The mcSUUs prepared with DBTL (widely used in the syntheses of biomaterials) were cytotoxic. The MDI-based mcSUUs were significantly more favored by HBDCs than the IPDI-based ones in all performed tests. MDI-based material with low 2/1 NCO/OH and short chain length was the best support for cells, comparable with tissue-culture polystyrene (with ALP activity even higher). HBDCs cultured on porous scaffolds from this mcSUU produced a tissue-like structure in culture. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2010.

  16. Detection, identification, and quantification of selenoproteins in a candidate human plasma standard reference material.

    PubMed

    Ballihaut, Guillaume; Kilpatrick, Lisa E; Davis, W Clay

    2011-11-15

    To understand the effect of Se supplementation on health, it is critical to accurately assess the Se status in the human body by measuring reliable biomarkers. The preferred biomarkers of the Se status are selenoprotein P (SelP) and glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) along with selenoalbumin (SeAlb), but there is still a real need for reference methods and reference materials to validate their measurements. Therefore, this work presents a systematic approach to provide quality control data in selenoprotein measurements. This approach combines online isotope dilution affinity liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), laser ablation ICPMS, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to identify and quantify SelP, GPx3, and SeAlb in a human plasma reference material SRM 1950. Quantitative determinations of SelP, GPx3, and SeAlb were 50.2 ± 4.3, 23.6 ± 1.3, and 28.2 ± 2.6 ng g(-1) as Se, respectively. The subsequent identification of the selenoproteins included nine SelP peptides, including two selenopeptides and nine GPx3 peptides, while albumin was identified with a protein coverage factor >95%. The structural elucidation of selenoproteins in the target Se affinity fractions in SRM 1950 provides information needed for method validation and quality control measurements of selenoproteins and therefore the selenium status in human plasma.

  17. Effects of thermal cycling on composite materials for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of thermal cycling on the thermal and mechanical properties of composite materials that are candidates for space structures are briefly described. The results from a thermal analysis of the orbiting Space Station Freedom is used to define a typical thermal environment and the parameters that cause changes in the thermal history. The interactions of this environment with composite materials are shown and described. The effects of this interaction on the integrity as well as the properties of GR/thermoset, Gr/thermoplastic, Gr/metal and Gr/glass composite materials are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the interaction that are critical to precision spacecraft. Finally, ground test methodology are briefly discussed.

  18. Space structures concepts and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowitzky, A. M.; Supan, E. C.

    1988-01-01

    An extension is preseted of the evaluation of graphite/aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC) for space structures application. A tubular DWG graphite/aluminum truss assembly was fabricated having the structural integrity and thermal stability needed for space application. DWG is a proprietary thin ply continuous graphite reinforced aluminum composite. The truss end fittings were constructed using the discontinuous ceramic particulate reinforced MMC DWAl 20 (trademark). Thermal stability was incorporated in the truss by utilizing high stiffness, negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) P100 graphite fibers in a 6061 aluminum matrix, crossplied to provide minimized CTE in the assembled truss. Tube CTE was designed to be slightly negative to offset the effects of the end fitting and sleeve, CTE values of which are approx. 1/2 that of aluminum. In the design of the truss configuration, the CTE contribution of each component was evaluated to establish the component dimension and layup configuration required to provide a net zero CTE in the subassemblies which would then translate to a zero CTE for the entire truss bay produced.

  19. Evaluation of candidate oxidation resistant materials for space applications in LEO

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, S.; Banks, B.; Difilippo, F.; Brady, J.; Dever, T.; Hotes, D.

    1986-01-01

    Ground based testing of materials considered for polyimide (Kapton) solar array blanket protection and graphite-epoxy stroctural member protection was performed in an RF plasma asher. Protective coatings on Kapton from various commercial sources and from NASA Lewis Research Center were exposed to the air plasma; and mass loss per unit area was measured for each sample. All samples evaluated provided some protection to the underlying surface, but metal-oxide-fluoropolymer coatings provided the best protection by exhibiting very little degradation after 47 hr of asher exposure. Mica paint was evaluated as a protective coating for graphite-epoxy structural members. Mica appeared to be resistant to attack by atomic oxygen, but only offered limited protection as a paint. this is believed to be due to the paint vehicle ashing underneath the mica leaving unattached mica flakes lying on the surface. The protective coatings on Kapton evaluated so far are promising but further research on protection of graphite-epoxy support structures is needed.

  20. An evaluation of candidate oxidation resistant materials for space applications in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon; Banks, Bruce; Difilippo, Frank; Brady, Joyce; Dever, Therese; Hotes, Deborah

    1986-01-01

    Ground based testing of materials considered for polyimide (Kapton) solar array blanket protection and graphite-epoxy stroctural member protection was performed in an RF plasma asher. Protective coatings on Kapton from various commercial sources and from NASA Lewis Research Center were exposed to the air plasma; and mass loss per unit area was measured for each sample. All samples evaluated provided some protection to the underlying surface, but metal-oxide-fluoropolymer coatings provided the best protection by exhibiting very little degradation after 47 hr of asher exposure. Mica paint was evaluated as a protective coating for graphite-epoxy structural members. Mica appeared to be resistant to attack by atomic oxygen, but only offered limited protection as a paint. this is believed to be due to the paint vehicle ashing underneath the mica leaving unattached mica flakes lying on the surface. The protective coatings on Kapton evaluated so far are promising but further research on protection of graphite-epoxy support structures is needed.

  1. Surface Catalytic Efficiency of Advanced Carbon Carbon Candidate Thermal Protection Materials for SSTO Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic efficiency (atom recombination coefficients) for advanced ceramic thermal protection systems was calculated using arc-jet data. Coefficients for both oxygen and nitrogen atom recombination on the surfaces of these systems were obtained to temperatures of 1650 K. Optical and chemical stability of the candidate systems to the high energy hypersonic flow was also demonstrated during these tests.

  2. Revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study

    SciTech Connect

    Schweiger, F.A.

    1987-02-01

    The revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study was performed to provide Government and Industry focus for advanced materials technology. Both subsonic and supersonic engine studies and aircraft fuel burn and DOC evaluation are examined. Year 2010 goal materials were used in the advanced engine studies. These goal materials and improved component aero yielded subsonic fuel burn and DOC improvements of 13.4 percent and 5 percent, respectively and supersonic fuel burn and DOC improvements of 21.5 percent and 18 percent, respectively. Conclusions are that the supersonic study engine yielded fuel burn and DOC improvements well beyond the program goals; therefore, it is appropriate that advanced material programs be considered.

  3. Revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweiger, F. A.

    1987-01-01

    The revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study was performed to provide Government and Industry focus for advanced materials technology. Both subsonic and supersonic engine studies and aircraft fuel burn and DOC evaluation are examined. Year 2010 goal materials were used in the advanced engine studies. These goal materials and improved component aero yielded subsonic fuel burn and DOC improvements of 13.4 percent and 5 percent, respectively and supersonic fuel burn and DOC improvements of 21.5 percent and 18 percent, respectively. Conclusions are that the supersonic study engine yielded fuel burn and DOC improvements well beyond the program goals; therefore, it is appropriate that advanced material programs be considered.

  4. Plastics as structural materials for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, G M

    1937-01-01

    The purpose here is to consider the mechanical characteristics of reinforced phenol-formaldehyde resin as related to its use as structural material for aircraft. Data and graphs that have appeared in the literature are reproduced to illustrate the comparative behavior of plastics and materials commonly used in aircraft construction. Materials are characterized as to density, static strength, modulus of elasticity, resistance to long-time loading, strength under repeated impact, energy absorption, corrosion resistance, and ease of fabrication.

  5. Development of the Structural Materials Information Center

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a Structural Aging Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to identify potential structural safety issues related to continued service of nuclear power plants and to establish criteria for evaluating and resolving these issues. One of the tasks in this program focuses on the establishment of a Structural Materials Information Center where data and information on the time variation of concrete and other structural material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors are being collected and assembled into a data base. This data base will be used to assist in the prediction of potential long-term deterioration of critical structural components in nuclear power plants and to establish limits on hostile environmental exposure for these structures and materials. Two complementary data base formats have been developed. The Structural Materials Handbook is an expandable, hard-copy reference document that contains complete sets of data and information for selected portland cement concrete, metallic reinforcement, prestressing tendon, and structural steel materials. Baseline data, reference properties and environmental information are presented in the handbook as tables, notes and graphs. The handbook, which will be published in four volumes, serves as the information source for the electronic data base. The Structural Materials Electronic Data Base is accessible by an IBM-compatible personal computer and provides an efficient means for searching the various data base files to locate materials with similar properties. Properties will be reported in the International System of Units (SI) and in customary units whenever possible. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Identification of candidate structured RNAs in the marine organism 'Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique'

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michelle M; Ames, Tyler D; Smith, Daniel P; Weinberg, Zasha; Schwalbach, Michael S; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Breaker, Ronald R

    2009-01-01

    Background Metagenomic sequence data are proving to be a vast resource for the discovery of biological components. Yet analysis of this data to identify functional RNAs lags behind efforts to characterize protein diversity. The genome of 'Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique' HTCC 1062 is the closest match for approximately 20% of marine metagenomic sequence reads. It is also small, contains little non-coding DNA, and has strikingly low GC content. Results To aid the discovery of RNA motifs within the marine metagenome we exploited the genomic properties of 'Cand. P. ubique' by targeting our search to long intergenic regions (IGRs) with relatively high GC content. Analysis of known RNAs (rRNA, tRNA, riboswitches etc.) shows that structured RNAs are significantly enriched in such IGRs. To identify additional candidate structured RNAs, we examined other IGRs with similar characteristics from 'Cand. P. ubique' using comparative genomics approaches in conjunction with marine metagenomic data. Employing this strategy, we discovered four candidate structured RNAs including a new riboswitch class as well as three additional likely cis-regulatory elements that precede genes encoding ribosomal proteins S2 and S12, and the cytoplasmic protein component of the signal recognition particle. We also describe four additional potential RNA motifs with few or no examples occurring outside the metagenomic data. Conclusion This work begins the process of identifying functional RNA motifs present in the metagenomic data and illustrates how existing completed genomes may be used to aid in this task. PMID:19531245

  7. Theoretical investigations of candidate crystal structures for β-carbonic acid.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sandeep Kumar; Kulkarni, Chidambar H; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2011-03-28

    Using multiple computational tools, we examine five candidate crystal structures for β-carbonic acid, a molecular crystal of environmental and astrophysical significance. These crystals comprise of hydrogen bonded molecules in either sheetlike or chainlike topologies. Gas phase quantum calculations, empirical force field based crystal structure search, and periodic density functional theory based calculations and finite temperature simulations of these crystals have been carried out. The infrared spectrum calculated from density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations compares well with experimental data. Results suggest crystals with one-dimensional hydrogen bonding topologies (chainlike) to be more stable than those with two-dimensional (sheetlike) hydrogen bonding networks. We predict that these structures can be distinguished on the basis of their far infrared spectra.

  8. Physical oceanographic processes at candidate dredged-material disposal sites B1B and 1M offshore San Francisco

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, C.R.; Denbo, D.W.; Downing, J.P. ); Coats, D.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, has identified two candidate sites for ocean disposal of material from several dredging projects in San Francisco Bay. The disposal site is to be designated under Section 103 of the Ocean Dumping Act. One of the specific criteria in the Ocean Dumping Act is that the physical environments of the candidate sites be considered. Toward this goal, the USACE requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conduct studies of physical oceanographic and sediment transport processes at the candidate sites. Details of the methods and complete listing or graphical representation of the results are contained in this second volume of the two-volume report. Appendix A describes the methods and results of a pre-disposal bathymetric survey of Site B1B, and provides an analysis of the accuracy and precision of the survey. Appendix B describes the moorings and instruments used to obtain physical oceanographic data at the candidate sites, and also discussed other sources of data used in the analyses. Techniques used to analyze the formation, processed data, and complete results of various analyses are provided in tabular and graphical form. Appendix C provides details of the sediment transport calculations. Appendix D describes the format of the archived current meter data, which is available through the National Oceanographic Data Center. 43 refs., 54 figs., 58 tabs.

  9. Total hemispherical emissivity of very high temperature reactor (VHTR) candidate materials: Hastelloy X, Haynes 230, and Alloy 617

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Raymond K.

    An experimental system was constructed in accordance with the standard ASTM C835-06 to measure the total hemispherical emissivity of structural materials of interest in Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) systems. The system was tested with304 stainless steel as well as for oxidized and un-oxidized nickel, and good reproducibility and agreement with the literature data was found. Emissivity of Hastelloy X was measured under different conditions that included: (i) "as received" (original sample) from the supplier; (ii) with increased surface roughness; (iii) oxidized, and; (iv) graphite coated. Measurements were made over a wide range of temperatures. Hastelloy X, as received from the supplier, was cleaned before additional roughening of the surface and coating with graphite. The emissivity of the original samples (cleaned after received) varied from around 0.18 to 0.28 in the temperature range of 473 K to 1498 K. The apparent emissivity increased only slightly as the roughness of the surface increased (without corrections for the increased surface area due to the increased surface roughness). When Hastelloy X was coated with graphite or oxidized however, its emissivity was observed to increase substantially. With a deposited graphite layer on the Hastelloy, emissivity increased from 0.2 to 0.53 at 473 K and from 0.25 to 0.6 at 1473 K; a finding that has strong favorable safety implications in terms of decay heat removal in post-accident VHTR environments. Although initial oxidation of Hastelloy X increased the emissivity prolonged oxidation did not significantly increase emissivity. However as there is some oxidation of Hastelloy X used in the construction of VHTRs, this represents an essentially neutral finding in terms of the safety implications in post-accident VHTR environments. The total hemispherical emissivity of Haynes 230 alloy, which is regarded as a leading candidate material for heat exchangers in VHTR systems, was measured under various surface

  10. Smart materials and structures: what are they?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillman, W. B., Jr.; Sirkis, J. S.; Gardiner, P. T.

    1996-06-01

    There has been considerable discussion in the technical community on a number of questions concerned with smart materials and structures, such as what they are, whether smart materials can be considered a subset of smart structures, whether a smart structure and an intelligent structure are the same thing, etc. This discussion is both fueled and confused by the technical community due to the truly multidisciplinary nature of this new field. Smart materials and structures research involves so many technically diverse fields that it is quite common for one field to completely misunderstand the terminology and start of the art in other fields. In order to ascertain whether a consensus is emerging on a number of questions, the technical community was surveyed in a variety of ways including via the internet and by direct contact. The purpose of this survey was to better define the smart materials and structures field, its current status and its potential benefits. Results of the survey are presented and discussed. Finally, a formal definition of the field of smart materials and structures is proposed.

  11. The M 101 group complex: new dwarf galaxy candidates and spatial structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Oliver; Scalera, Roberto; Binggeli, Bruno; Jerjen, Helmut

    2017-06-01

    Context. The fine details of the large-scale structure in the local Universe provide important empirical benchmarks for testing cosmological models of structure formation. Dwarf galaxies are key object for such studies. Aims: Our aim was to enlarge the sample of known dwarf galaxies in the local Universe. We performed a search for faint unresolved low-surface-brightness dwarf galaxies in the M 101 group complex, including the region around the major spiral galaxies M 101, M 51, and M 63 lying at a distance of 7.0, 8.6, and 9.0 Mpc, respectively. The new dwarf galaxy sample can be used in a first step to test for significant substructure in the 2D distribution and in a second step to study the spatial distribution of the galaxy complex. Methods: Using filtering algorithms we surveyed 330 square degrees of imaging data obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The images were visually inspected. The spatial distribution of known galaxies and candidates was analyzed and the system transformed into a M 101 eigenframe using the geometrical alignment of the group. Results: We discovered 15 new dwarf galaxies and carried out surface photometry in the g and r bands. The similarity of the photometric properties of these dwarfs to those of Local Group dwarfs suggest membership to the M 101 group complex. The sky distribution of the candidates follows the thin planar structure outlined by the known members of the three subgroups. The 3 Mpc long filamentary structure has a rms thickness of 67 kpc. The planar structure of the embedded M 101 subgroup is even thinner, with rms = 46 kpc. The formation of this structure might be due to the expansion of the bordering Local Void. Other implications are discussed as well. Conclusions: We show the viability of SDSS data to extend the sample of dwarfs in the local Universe and test cosmological models on small scales.

  12. Determination of Fundamental Thermodynamic Properties of Constituent Materials and Performance Screening of Candidate Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    Experimental Apparatus 4.2.1.1 HARC Carbon Dioxide Laser Test Resource. For the experiments conducted during this program, only a part of the HARC CO Laser Test...ites. The experimental techniques employed were laser probe spectroscopy and high temperature mass spectrometrr. Representative candidate constituents...the laser spectroscopic measurement would be useful and the mass spectrometric techique would benefit from extended pressure sampling capability and

  13. Functional materials discovery using energy-structure-function maps.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Angeles; Chen, Linjiang; Kaczorowski, Tomasz; Holden, Daniel; Little, Marc A; Chong, Samantha Y; Slater, Benjamin J; McMahon, David P; Bonillo, Baltasar; Stackhouse, Chloe J; Stephenson, Andrew; Kane, Christopher M; Clowes, Rob; Hasell, Tom; Cooper, Andrew I; Day, Graeme M

    2017-03-30

    Molecular crystals cannot be designed in the same manner as macroscopic objects, because they do not assemble according to simple, intuitive rules. Their structures result from the balance of many weak interactions, rather than from the strong and predictable bonding patterns found in metal-organic frameworks and covalent organic frameworks. Hence, design strategies that assume a topology or other structural blueprint will often fail. Here we combine computational crystal structure prediction and property prediction to build energy-structure-function maps that describe the possible structures and properties that are available to a candidate molecule. Using these maps, we identify a highly porous solid, which has the lowest density reported for a molecular crystal so far. Both the structure of the crystal and its physical properties, such as methane storage capacity and guest-molecule selectivity, are predicted using the molecular structure as the only input. More generally, energy-structure-function maps could be used to guide the experimental discovery of materials with any target function that can be calculated from predicted crystal structures, such as electronic structure or mechanical properties.

  14. Functional materials discovery using energy-structure-function maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido, Angeles; Chen, Linjiang; Kaczorowski, Tomasz; Holden, Daniel; Little, Marc A.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Slater, Benjamin J.; McMahon, David P.; Bonillo, Baltasar; Stackhouse, Chloe J.; Stephenson, Andrew; Kane, Christopher M.; Clowes, Rob; Hasell, Tom; Cooper, Andrew I.; Day, Graeme M.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular crystals cannot be designed in the same manner as macroscopic objects, because they do not assemble according to simple, intuitive rules. Their structures result from the balance of many weak interactions, rather than from the strong and predictable bonding patterns found in metal-organic frameworks and covalent organic frameworks. Hence, design strategies that assume a topology or other structural blueprint will often fail. Here we combine computational crystal structure prediction and property prediction to build energy-structure-function maps that describe the possible structures and properties that are available to a candidate molecule. Using these maps, we identify a highly porous solid, which has the lowest density reported for a molecular crystal so far. Both the structure of the crystal and its physical properties, such as methane storage capacity and guest-molecule selectivity, are predicted using the molecular structure as the only input. More generally, energy-structure-function maps could be used to guide the experimental discovery of materials with any target function that can be calculated from predicted crystal structures, such as electronic structure or mechanical properties.

  15. The Opinions of Primary School Teachers' Candidates towards Material Preparation and Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    Instruction materials help students to acquire more memorable information. Instruction materials have an important effect on providing more permanent and simple way of learning in every step of education. Instruction materials are the most frequently used by primary school teachers. Primary school teachers should support their lectures with…

  16. Adaptable Holders for Arc-Jet Screening Candidate Thermal Protection System Repair Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccio, Joe; Milhoan, Jim D.

    2010-01-01

    Reusable holders have been devised for evaluating high-temperature, plasma-resistant re-entry materials, especially fabrics. Typical material samples tested support thermal-protection-system damage repair requiring evaluation prior to re-entry into terrestrial atmosphere. These tests allow evaluation of each material to withstand the most severe predicted re-entry conditions.

  17. Rapid discovery of peptide capture candidates with demonstrated specificity for structurally similar toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrell, Mikella E.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    Peptides have emerged as viable alternatives to antibodies for molecular-based sensing due to their similarity in recognition ability despite their relative structural simplicity. Various methods for peptide capture reagent discovery exist, including phage display, yeast display, and bacterial display. One of the primary advantages of peptide discovery by bacterial display technology is the speed to candidate peptide capture agent, due to both rapid growth of bacteria and direct utilization of the sorted cells displaying each individual peptide for the subsequent round of biopanning. We have previously isolated peptide affinity reagents towards protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis using a commercially available automated magnetic sorting platform with improved enrichment as compared to manual magnetic sorting. In this work, we focus on adapting our automated biopanning method to a more challenging sort, to demonstrate the specificity possible with peptide capture agents. This was achieved using non-toxic, recombinant variants of ricin and abrin, RiVax and abrax, respectively, which are structurally similar Type II ribosomal inactivating proteins with significant sequence homology. After only two rounds of biopanning, enrichment of peptide capture candidates binding abrax but not RiVax was achieved as demonstrated by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) studies. Further sorting optimization included negative sorting against RiVax, proper selection of autoMACS programs for specific sorting rounds, and using freshly made buffer and freshly thawed protein target for each round of biopanning for continued enrichment over all four rounds. Most of the resulting candidates from biopanning for abrax binding peptides were able to bind abrax but not RiVax, demonstrating that short peptide sequences can be highly specific even at this early discovery stage.

  18. Integrated design of structures, controls, and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    In this talk we shall discuss algorithms and CAD tools for the design and analysis of structures for high performance applications using advanced composite materials. An extensive mathematical theory for optimal structural (e.g., shape) design was developed over the past thirty years. Aspects of this theory have been used in the design of components for hypersonic vehicles and thermal diffusion systems based on homogeneous materials. Enhancement of the design methods to include optimization of the microstructure of the component is a significant innovation which can lead to major enhancements in component performance. Our work is focused on the adaptation of existing theories of optimal structural design (e.g., optimal shape design) to treat the design of structures using advanced composite materials (e.g., fiber reinforced, resin matrix materials). In this talk we shall discuss models and algorithms for the design of simple structures from composite materials, focussing on a problem in thermal management. We shall also discuss methods for the integration of active structural controls into the design process.

  19. Electronic structure of Ba3CuSb2O9: A candidate quantum spin liquid compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanavas, K. V.; Popović, Z. S.; Satpathy, S.

    2014-02-01

    Using density-functional methods, we study the electronic structure of Ba3CuSb2O9, a candidate material for the quantum spin liquid behavior. We study both the triangular lattice as well as the recently proposed hexagonal lattice structures with flipped Cu-Sb dumbbells. The band structure near the Fermi energy is described very well by a tight-binding Hamiltonian involving the Cu (eg) orbitals, confirming their central role in the physics of the problem. A minimal tight-binding Hamiltonian for the triangular structure is presented. The Cu (d9) ions (a single eg hole in the band structure) present in the compound are expected to be Jahn-Teller centers, while the nature of the Jahn-Teller distortions in this material is still under debate. Solving a simple model by exact diagonalization, we show that electronic correlation effects in general enhance the tendency towards a Jahn-Teller distortion by reducing the kinetic energy due to correlation effects. Our density-functional calculations do indeed show a significant Jahn-Teller distortion of the CuO6 octahedra when we include the correlation effects within the Coulomb-corrected GGA+U method, so that the Jahn-Teller effect is correlation driven. We argue for the presence of a random static Jahn-Teller distortion in the hexagonal structure rather than a dynamical one because of the broken octahedral symmetry around the CuO6 octahedra and the potential fluctuations inherently present in the system caused by a significant disorder, which is believed to be present, in particular, due to the flipped Cu-Sb dumbbells.

  20. Freeze Casting for Assembling Bioinspired Structural Materials.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qunfeng; Huang, Chuanjin; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2017-08-23

    Nature is very successful in designing strong and tough, lightweight materials. Examples include seashells, bone, teeth, fish scales, wood, bamboo, silk, and many others. A distinctive feature of all these materials is that their properties are far superior to those of their constituent phases. Many of these natural materials are lamellar or layered in nature. With its "brick and mortar" structure, nacre is an example of a layered material that exhibits extraordinary physical properties. Finding inspiration in living organisms to create bioinspired materials is the subject of intensive research. Several processing techniques have been proposed to design materials mimicking natural materials, such as layer-by-layer deposition, self-assembly, electrophoretic deposition, hydrogel casting, doctor blading, and many others. Freeze casting, also known as ice-templating, is a technique that has received considerable attention in recent years to produce bioinspired bulk materials. Here, recent advances in the freeze-casting technique are reviewed for fabricating lamellar scaffolds by assembling different dimensional building blocks, including nanoparticles, polymer chains, nanofibers, and nanosheets. These lamellar scaffolds are often infiltrated by a second phase, typically a soft polymer matrix, a hard ceramic matrix, or a metal matrix. The unique architecture of the resultant bioinspired structural materials displays excellent mechanical properties. The challenges of the current research in using the freeze-casting technique to create materials large enough to be useful are also discussed, and the technique's promise for fabricating high-performance nacre-inspired structural materials in the future is reviewed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Simulated Solar Flare X-Ray and Thermal Cycling Durability Evaluation of Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Control Candidate Replacement Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Scheiman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) second servicing mission (SM2), astronauts noticed that the multilayer insulation (MLI) covering the telescope was damaged. Large pieces of the outer layer of MLI (aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP)) were torn in several locations around the telescope. A piece of curled up Al-FEP was retrieved by the astronauts and was found to be severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) organized a HST MLI Failure Review Board (FRB) to determine the damage mechanism of FEP in the HST environment, and to recommend replacement insulation material to be installed on HST during the third servicing mission (SM3) in 1999. Candidate thermal control replacement materials were chosen by the FRB and tested for environmental durability under various exposures and durations. This paper describes durability testing of candidate materials which were exposed to charged particle radiation, simulated solar flare x-ray radiation and thermal cycling under load. Samples were evaluated for changes in solar absorptance and tear resistance. Descriptions of environmental exposures and durability evaluations of these materials are presented.

  2. Homogeneity and stability of a candidate certified reference material for the determination of methamphetamine and amphetamine in hair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sooyeun; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Han, Eunyoung; Kim, Eunmi; Park, Yonghoon; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2010-12-01

    In the preparation of a reference material (RM) for quality assurance, both homogeneity and stability studies are integral parts. In the present study, both homogeneity and stability of a candidate RM for the determination of methamphetamine and amphetamine in hair were examined by an isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method, which is not only one of the analytical methods validated in our previous study but also one of the primary methods for the preparation of a certified reference material (CRM). Additionally, homogeneity was monitored using a different method: micropulverized extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), which was fully validated in the previous study. In order to demonstrate the suitability of the method as an isotope dilution with mass spectrometry (IDMS), the extraction efficiency was also determined according to time. Our results showed that the current method, i.e., agitating hair with isotope internal standards in the extraction solvent for 20 h followed by GC-MS, was accepted as an IDMS. No significant difference was observed between bottles of the candidate CRM. The statistical results also showed no significant trends in stability for 92 days at room temperature and 4 degrees C. An inter-laboratory quality assurance program was also performed successfully using this material. The candidate CRM developed in the present study demonstrated its suitability for quality assurance in hair drug analysis. Even though a RM is necessity as a quality control tool, it is not always easy to have an authentic RM containing target drugs and metabolites. Even when an in-house quality control material is used, both homogeneity and stability should be investigated. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal Analysis and Testing of Candidate Materials for PAIDAE Inflatable Aeroshell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelCorso, Joseph A.; Bruce, Walter E., III; Liles, Kaitlin A.; Hughes, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    The Program to Advance Inflatable-Decelerators for Atmospheric Entry (PAIDAE) is a NASA project tasked with developing and evaluating viable inflatable-decelerator aeroshell geometries and materials. Thermal analysis of material layups supporting an inflatable aeroshell was completed in order to identify expected material response, failure times, and to establish an experimental test matrix to keep barrier layer materials from reaching critical temperature limits during thermal soak. Material layups were then tested in the 8- foot High Temperature Tunnel (8'HTT), where they were subjected to hypersonic aerothermal heating conditions, similar to those expected for a Mars entry. This paper presents a broad overview of the thermal analysis supporting multiple materials, and layup configurations tested in the 8'HTT at flight conditions similar to those that would be experienced during Mars entry trajectories. Direct comparison of TPS samples tested in the 8'HTT verify that the thermal model accurately predicted temperature profiles when there are up to four materials in the test layup. As the number of material layers in each test layup increase (greater than 4), the accuracy of the prediction decreases significantly. The inaccuracy of the model predictions for layups with more than four material layers is believed to be a result of the contact resistance values used throughout the model being inaccurate. In addition, the harsh environment of the 8'HTT, including hot gas penetrating through the material layers, could also be a contributing factor.

  4. Search for circum-planetary material and orbital period variations of short-period Kepler exoplanet candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Z.; Zhou, G.; Budaj, J.; Stellingwerf, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    A unique short-period ({P = 0.65356(1)} d) Mercury-size Kepler exoplanet candidate KIC012557548b has been discovered recently by {Rappaport et al. (2012)}. This object is a transiting disintegrating exoplanet with a circum-planetary material-comet-like tail. Close-in exoplanets, like KIC012557548b, are subjected to the greatest planet-star interactions. This interaction may have various forms. In certain cases it may cause formation of the comet-like tail. Strong interaction with the host star, and/or presence of an additional planet may lead to variations in the orbital period of the planet. Our main aim is to search for comet-like tails similar to KIC012557548b and for long-term orbital period variations. We are curious about frequency of comet-like tail formation among short-period Kepler exoplanet candidates. We concentrate on a sample of 20 close-in candidates with a period similar to KIC012557548b from the Kepler mission. We first improved the preliminary orbital periods and obtained the transit light curves. Subsequently we searched for the signatures of a circum-planetary material in these light curves. For this purpose the final transit light curve of each planet was fitted with a theoretical light curve, and the residuals were examined for abnormalities. We then searched for possible long-term changes of the orbital periods using the method of phase dispersion minimization. In 8 cases out of 20 we found some interesting peculiarities, but none of the exoplanet candidates showed signs of a comet-like tail. It seems that the frequency of comet-like tail formation among short-period Kepler exoplanet candidates is very low. We searched for comet-like tails based on the period criterion. Based on our results we can conclude that the short-period criterion is not enough to cause comet-like tail formation. This result is in agreement with the theory of the thermal wind and planet evaporation (Perez-Becker & Chiang 2013). We also found 3 cases of candidates which

  5. Structural evaluation of candidate designs for the large space telescope primary mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soosaar, K.; Grin, R.; Furey, M.; Hamilton, J.

    1975-01-01

    Structural performance analyses were conducted on two candidate designs (Itek and Perkin-Elmer designs) for the large space telescope three-meter mirror. The mirror designs and the finite-element models used in the analyses evaluation are described. The results of the structural analyses for several different types of loading are presented in tabular and graphic forms. Several additional analyses are also reported: the evaluation of a mirror design concept proposed by the Boeing Co., a study of the global effects of local cell plate deflections, and an investigation of the fracture mechanics problems likely to occur with Cervit and ULE. Flexibility matrices were obtained for the Itek and Perkin-Elmer mirrors to be used in active figure control studies. Summary, conclusions, and recommendations are included.

  6. Structural identifiability analyses of candidate models for in vitro Pitavastatin hepatic uptake.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Michael J; Yates, James W T; Evans, Neil D

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a review of the application of four different techniques (a version of the similarity transformation approach for autonomous uncontrolled systems, a non-differential input/output observable normal form approach, the characteristic set differential algebra and a recent algebraic input/output relationship approach) to determine the structural identifiability of certain in vitro nonlinear pharmacokinetic models is provided. The Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) substrate, Pitavastatin, is used as a probe on freshly isolated animal and human hepatocytes. Candidate pharmacokinetic non-linear compartmental models have been derived to characterise the uptake process of Pitavastatin. As a prerequisite to parameter estimation, structural identifiability analyses are performed to establish that all unknown parameters can be identified from the experimental observations available.

  7. Structural Materials and Fuels for Space Power Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl; Busby, Jeremy; Porter, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    A fission reactor combined with Stirling convertor power generation is one promising candidate in on-going Fission Surface Power (FSP) studies for future lunar and Martian bases. There are many challenges for designing and qualifying space-rated nuclear power plants. In order to have an affordable and sustainable program, NASA and DOE designers want to build upon the extensive foundation in nuclear fuels and structural materials. This talk will outline the current Fission Surface Power program and outline baseline design options for a lunar power plant with an emphasis on materials challenges. NASA first organized an Affordable Fission Surface Power System Study Team to establish a reference design that could be scrutinized for technical and fiscal feasibility. Previous papers and presentations have discussed this study process in detail. Considerations for the reference design included that no significant nuclear technology, fuels, or material development were required for near term use. The desire was to build upon terrestrial-derived reactor technology including conventional fuels and materials. Here we will present an overview of the reference design, Figure 1, and examine the materials choices. The system definition included analysis and recommendations for power level and life, plant configuration, shielding approach, reactor type, and power conversion type. It is important to note that this is just one concept undergoing refinement. The design team, however, understands that materials selection and improvement must be an integral part of the system development.

  8. Haplotype structure enables prioritization of common markers and candidate genes in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Vardarajan, B N; Eran, A; Jung, J-Y; Kunkel, L M; Wall, D P

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition that results in behavioral, social and communication impairments. ASD has a substantial genetic component, with 88–95% trait concordance among monozygotic twins. Efforts to elucidate the causes of ASD have uncovered hundreds of susceptibility loci and candidate genes. However, owing to its polygenic nature and clinical heterogeneity, only a few of these markers represent clear targets for further analyses. In the present study, we used the linkage structure associated with published genetic markers of ASD to simultaneously improve candidate gene detection while providing a means of prioritizing markers of common genetic variation in ASD. We first mined the literature for linkage and association studies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, copy-number variations and multi-allelic markers in Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) families. From markers that reached genome-wide significance, we calculated male-specific genetic distances, in light of the observed strong male bias in ASD. Four of 67 autism-implicated regions, 3p26.1, 3p26.3, 3q25-27 and 5p15, were enriched with differentially expressed genes in blood and brain from individuals with ASD. Of 30 genes differentially expressed across multiple expression data sets, 21 were within 10 cM of an autism-implicated locus. Among them, CNTN4, CADPS2, SUMF1, SLC9A9, NTRK3 have been previously implicated in autism, whereas others have been implicated in neurological disorders comorbid with ASD. This work leverages the rich multimodal genomic information collected on AGRE families to present an efficient integrative strategy for prioritizing autism candidates and improving our understanding of the relationships among the vast collection of past genetic studies. PMID:23715297

  9. Search for improved-performance scintillator candidates among the electronic structures of mixed halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Williams, Richard T.; Burger, Arnold; Adhikari, Rajendra; Biswas, Koushik

    2014-09-01

    The application of advanced theory and modeling techniques has become an essential component to understand material properties and hasten the design and discovery of new ones. This is true for diverse applications. Therefore, current efforts aimed towards finding new scintillator materials are also aligned with this general predictive approach. The need for large scale deployment of efficient radiation detectors requires discovery and development of high-performance, yet low-cost, scintillators. While Tl-doped NaI and CsI are still some of the widely used scintillators, there are promising new developments, for example, Eu-doped SrI2 and Ce-doped LaBr3. The newer candidates have excellent light yield and good energy resolution, but challenges persist in the growth of large single crystals. We will discuss a theoretical basis for anticipating improved proportionality as well as light yield in solid solutions of certain systems, particularly alkali iodides, based on considerations of hot-electron group velocity and thermalization. Solid solutions based on NaI and similar alkali halides are attractive to consider in more detail because the end point compositions are inexpensive and easy to grow. If some of this quality can be preserved while reaping improved light yield and possibly improved proportionality of the mixture, the goal of better performance at the low price of NaI:Tl might be attainable by such a route. Within this context, we will discuss a density functional theory (DFT) based study of two prototype systems: mixed anion NaIxBr1-x and mixed cation NaxK1-xI. Results obtained from these two prototype candidates will lead to further targeted theoretical and experimental search and discovery of new scintillator hosts.

  10. 11 CFR 109.23 - Dissemination, distribution, or republication of candidate campaign materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in part, of any broadcast or any written, graphic, or other form of campaign materials prepared by..., distribution, or republication of campaign materials is a coordinated communication under 11 CFR 109.21 or a party coordinated communication under 11 CFR 109.37. (b) Exceptions. The following uses of campaign...

  11. Thermal characteristics of non-edible oils as phase change materials candidate to application of air conditioning chilled water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsyad, M.; Indartono, Y. S.; Suwono, A.; Pasek, A. D.

    2015-09-01

    The addition of phase change material in the secondary refrigerant has been able to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioning systems in chilled water system. This material has a high thermal density because its energy is stored as latent heat. Based on material melting and freezing point, there are several non-edible oils that can be studied as a phase change material candidate for the application of chilled water systems. Forests and plantations in Indonesia have great potential to produce non-edible oil derived from the seeds of the plant, such as; Calophyllum inophyllum, Jatropha curcas L, and Hevea braziliensis. Based on the melting temperature, these oils can further studied to be used as material mixing in the secondary refrigerant. Thermal characteristics are obtained from the testing of T-history, Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC) and thermal conductivity materials. Test results showed an increase in the value of the latent heat when mixed with water with the addition of surfactant. Thermal characteristics of each material of the test results are shown completely in discussion section of this article.

  12. Integrated Corrosion Facility for long-term testing of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste containment

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J.C.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    A long-term-testing facility, the Integrated Corrosion Facility (I.C.F.), is being developed to investigate the corrosion behavior of candidate construction materials for high-level-radioactive waste packages for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Corrosion phenomena will be characterized in environments considered possible under various scenarios of water contact with the waste packages. The testing of the materials will be conducted both in the liquid and high humidity vapor phases at 60 and 90{degrees}C. Three classes of materials with different degrees of corrosion resistance will be investigated in order to encompass the various design configurations of waste packages. The facility is expected to be in operation for a minimum of five years, and operation could be extended to longer times if warranted. A sufficient number of specimens will be emplaced in the test environments so that some can be removed and characterized periodically. The corrosion phenomena to be characterized are general, localized, galvanic, and stress corrosion cracking. The long-term data obtained from this study will be used in corrosion mechanism modeling, performance assessment, and waste package design. Three classes of materials are under consideration. The corrosion resistant materials are high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys; the corrosion allowance materials are low-alloy and carbon steels; and the intermediate corrosion resistant materials are copper-nickel alloys.

  13. In situ corrosion studies on candidate container materials for the underground disposal of high level radioactive waste in Boom Clay

    SciTech Connect

    Kursten, B.; Iseghem, P. Van

    1999-07-01

    SCK{center{underscore}dot}CEN has developed in the early 1980's, with the support of NIRAS/ONDRAF and EC, an extensive in situ corrosion program to evaluate the long-term corrosion behavior of various candidate container materials for the disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. The in situ corrosion experiments were performed in the underground research facility, HADES, situated in the Boom Clay formation at a depth of 225 meters below ground level. These experiments place the samples either in direct contact with clay (type I), in a humid clay atmosphere (type 2), or in a concrete saturated clay atmosphere (type 3). During the period 1985--1994, twelve in situ corrosion experiments were installed in the underground laboratory. The exploitation of these experiments ended in 1996. All samples were recuperated and analyzed. The purpose of this paper is to summarize and discuss the results from the type 1 corrosion experiments (samples in direct contact with Boom Clay). Surface analyses tend to indicate that the so-called corrosion-resistant materials, e.g. stainless steels, Ni- and Ti-alloys, remain intact after exposure to Boom Clay between 16 and 170 C, whereas carbon steel presents significant pitting corrosion. Carbon steel seems to be unsuitable for the Belgian repository concept (pits up to 240{micro}m deep are detected after direct exposure to the argillaceous environment for 2 years at 90 C). The stainless steels look very promising candidate container materials.

  14. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY14 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J.

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory corrosion testing of candidate alloys—including Zr-4 and Zr-2.5Nb representing the target solution vessel, and 316L, 2304, 304L, and 17-4 PH stainless steels representing process piping and balance-of-plant components—was performed in support of the proposed SHINE process to produce 99Mo from low-enriched uranium. The test solutions used depleted uranyl sulfate in various concentrations and incorporated a range of temperatures, excess sulfuric acid concentrations, nitric acid additions (to simulate radiolysis product generation), and iodine additions. Testing involved static immersion of coupons in solution and in the vapor above the solution, and was extended to include planned-interval tests to examine details associated with stainless steel corrosion in environments containing iodine species. A large number of galvanic tests featuring couples between a stainless steel and a zirconium-based alloy were performed, and limited vibratory horn testing was incorporated to explore potential erosion/corrosion features of compatibility. In all cases, corrosion of the zirconium alloys was observed to be minimal, with corrosion rates based on weight loss calculated to be less than 0.1 mil/year with no change in surface roughness. The resulting passive film appeared to be ZrO2 with variations in thickness that influence apparent coloration (toward light brown for thicker films). Galvanic coupling with various stainless steels in selected exposures had no discernable effect on appearance, surface roughness, or corrosion rate. Erosion/corrosion behavior was the same for zirconium alloys in uranyl sulfate solutions and in sodium sulfate solutions adjusted to a similar pH, suggesting there was no negative effect of uranium resulting from fluid dynamic conditions aggressive to the passive film. Corrosion of the candidate stainless steels was similarly modest across the entire range of exposures. However, some sensitivity to corrosion of the stainless steels was

  15. Psychopathology in Bariatric Surgery Candidates: A Review of Studies Using Structured Diagnostic Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sarah; Mitchell, James E.; Engel, Scott; Crosby, Ross; Wonderlich, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are not uncommon among severely obese patients who present for bariatric surgery. This paper (1) reviews the results of the published studies using the structured interviews to assess psychopathology in bariatric surgery candidates; (2) compares the prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders across these studies with the data from other population samples; and (3) assesses whether sociodemographic variables appear to affect these prevalence rates. We searched online resources, PubMed, PsychINFO and reference lists of all the relevant articles to provide an overview of evidence so far and highlight some details in the assessment and comparisons of different samples in different countries. The prevalence estimates in the non- treatment obese group did not appear to differ substantially from the general population group in the US or the Italian population samples, although they were relatively higher for the German population. However, the rates of psychopathology in the bariatric surgery candidates were considerably higher than the other two population groups in all the samples. Overall, the most common category of lifetime Axis I disorders in all the studies was affective disorders, with anxiety disorders being the most common category of current Axis I disorders. Certain demographic characteristics are also associated with higher rates of psychopathology, such as, female gender, low socioeconomic status, higher BMI. Overall, methodological and sociodemographic differences make these studies difficult to compare and these differences should be taken into account when interpreting the results. PMID:24290079

  16. Dynamic and structural control utilizing smart materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of several novel 'smart material' structural control concepts that are currently under development. The thrust of these investigations is the evolution of intelligent materials and structures superceding the recently defined variable-geometry trusses and shape memory alloy-reinforced composites; the substances envisioned will be able to autonomously evaluate emergent environmental conditions and adapt to them, and even change their operational objectives. While until now the primary objective of the developmental efforts presently discussed has been materials that mimic biological functions, entirely novel concepts may be formulated in due course.

  17. Dynamic and structural control utilizing smart materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of several novel 'smart material' structural control concepts that are currently under development. The thrust of these investigations is the evolution of intelligent materials and structures superceding the recently defined variable-geometry trusses and shape memory alloy-reinforced composites; the substances envisioned will be able to autonomously evaluate emergent environmental conditions and adapt to them, and even change their operational objectives. While until now the primary objective of the developmental efforts presently discussed has been materials that mimic biological functions, entirely novel concepts may be formulated in due course.

  18. Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials FY 2013 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Xie, YuLong; Wu, Dangxin; Prange, Micah P.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Campbell, Luke W.; Wang, Zhiguo

    2013-10-01

    This annual report presents work carried out during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials” (Project number: PL13-SciDriScintMat-PD05) and led by Dr. Fei Gao. This project is divided into three tasks, namely (1) Ab initio calculations of electronic properties, electronic response functions and secondary particle spectra; (2) Intrinsic response properties, theoretical light yield, and microscopic description of ionization tracks; and (3) Kinetics and efficiency of scintillation: nonlinearity, intrinsic energy resolution, and pulse shape discrimination. Detailed information on the findings and insights obtained in each of these three tasks are provided in this report. Additionally, papers published this fiscal year or currently in review are included in Appendix together with presentations given this fiscal year.

  19. Status of candidate materials for full-scale tests in the 737 fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Supkis, D.

    1979-01-01

    The test program has the objectives to: (1) increase passenger evacuation time to a minimum of five minutes from commercial aircraft in case of a fire; (2) prevent an external fire from entering closed cabins for five minutes by using fire barrier materials in the exterior wall; (3) demonstrate that a closed cabin will not reach 400 F; and (4) prove that a fire near a cabin opening will not propagate through the cabin for a minimum of five minutes. The materials status is outlined for seat cushions, upholstery and associated seat materials, wall and ceiling panels, floor panels, carpet and carpet underlay, windows, cargo bay liners, insulation bagging, and thermal acoustical insulation.

  20. Electrochemical Characterization of Semiconductor Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    For a period covering October 1, 1995 through August 12, 1996, the research group at CSU has conducted theoretical and experimental research on "Electrochemical Characterization of Semiconductor Materials and Structures. " The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the applicability of electrochemical techniques for characterization of complex device structures based on InP and GaAs, Ge, InGaAs, InSb, InAs and InSb, including: (1) accurate EC-V net majority carrier concentration depth profiling, and (2) surface and bulk structural and electrical type defect densities. Our motivation for this R&D effort was as follows: "Advanced space solar cells and ThermoPhotoVoltaic (TPV) cells are fabricated using a large variety of III-V materials based on InP and GaAs for solar cells and low bandgap materials such as Ge, InGaAs, InAs and InSb for TPV applications. At the present time for complex device structures using these materials, however, there is no simple way to assess the quality of these structures prior to device fabrication. Therefore, process optimization is a very time consuming and a costly endeavor". Completion of this R&D effort would have had unquestionable benefits for space solar cell and TPV cells, since electrochemical characterization of the above cell structures, if properly designed can provide many useful structural and electrical material information virtually at any depth inside various layers and at the interfaces. This, could have been applied for step-by-step process optimization, which could have been used for fabrication of new generation high efficiency, low cost space PV and TPV cells.

  1. The electrical conductivities of candidate beam-waveguide antenna shroud materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Franco, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    The shroud on the beam-waveguide (BWG) antenna at DSS 13 is made from highly magnetic American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) A36 steel. Measurements at 8.42 GHz showed that this material (with paint) has a very poor electrical conductivity that is 600 times worse than aluminum. In cases where the BWG mirrors might be slightly misaligned, unintentional illumination and poor electrical conductivity of the shroud walls can cause system noise temperature to be increased significantly. This potential increase of noise temperature contribution can be reduced through the use of better conductivity materials for the shroud walls. An alternative is to attempt to improve the conductivity of the currently used ASTM A36 steel by means of some type of plating, surface treatment, or high-conductivity paints. This article presents the results of a study made to find improved materials for future shrouds and mirror supports.

  2. Zeolitic materials with hierarchical porous structures.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Orozco, Sofia; Inayat, Amer; Schwab, Andreas; Selvam, Thangaraj; Schwieger, Wilhelm

    2011-06-17

    During the past several years, different kinds of hierarchical structured zeolitic materials have been synthesized due to their highly attractive properties, such as superior mass/heat transfer characteristics, lower restriction of the diffusion of reactants in the mesopores, and low pressure drop. Our contribution provides general information regarding types and preparation methods of hierarchical zeolitic materials and their relative advantages and disadvantages. Thereafter, recent advances in the preparation and characterization of hierarchical zeolitic structures within the crystallites by post-synthetic treatment methods, such as dealumination or desilication; and structured devices by in situ and ex situ zeolite coatings on open-cellular ceramic foams as (non-reactive as well as reactive) supports are highlighted. Specific advantages of using hierarchical zeolitic catalysts/structures in selected catalytic reactions, such as benzene to phenol (BTOP) and methanol to olefins (MTO) are presented.

  3. Report on Reactor Physics Assessment of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Jeffrey J.; George, Nathan; Maldonado, G. Ivan; Worrall, Andrew

    2015-08-28

    This work focuses on ATF concepts being researched at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), expanding on previous studies of using alternate cladding materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The neutronic performance of two leading alternate cladding materials were assessed in boiling water reactors (BWRs): iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based composite cladding. This report fulfills ORNL Milestone M3FT-15OR0202332 within the fiscal year 2015 (FY15)

  4. The challenge of developing structural materials for fusion power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Everett E.

    1998-10-01

    Nuclear fusion can be one of the most attractive sources of energy from the viewpoint of safety and minimal environmental impact. Central in the goal of designing a safe, environmentally benign, and economically competitive fusion power system is the requirement for high performance, low activation materials. The general performance requirements for such materials have been defined and it is clear that materials developed for other applications (e.g. aerospace, nuclear fission, fossil energy systems) will not fully meet the needs of fusion. Advanced materials, with composition and microstructure tailored to yield properties that will satisfy the specific requirements of fusion must be developed. The international fusion programs have made significant progress towards this goal. Compositional requirements for low activation lead to a focus of development efforts on silicon carbide composites, vanadium alloys, and advanced martensitic steels as candidate structural material systems. Control of impurities will be critically important in actually achieving low activation but this appears possible. Neutron irradiation produces significant changes in the mechanical and physical properties of each of these material systems raising feasibility questions and design limitations. A focus of the research and development effort is to understand these effects, and through the development of specific compositions and microstructures, produce materials with improved and adequate performance. Other areas of research that are synergistic with the development of radiation resistant materials include fabrication, joining technology, chemical compatibility with coolants and tritium breeders and specific questions relating to the unique characteristics of a given material (e.g. coatings to reduce gas permeation in SiC composites) or design concept (e.g. electrical insulator coatings for liquid metal concepts).

  5. Crevice Corrosion Behavior of Candidate Nuclear Waste Container Materials in Repository Environment

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua; J. Sarver; W. Mohn

    2001-11-08

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) and Ti Grade 7 (UNS R52400) have been proposed as the corrosion resistant materials for fabricating the waste package outer barrier and the drip shield, respectively for the proposed nuclear waste repository Yucca Mountain Project. In this work, the susceptibility of welded and annealed Alloy 22 (N06022) and Ti Grade 7 (UNS R52400) to crevice corrosion was studied by the Multiple Crevice Assembly (ASTM G78) method combined with surface morphological observation after four and eight weeks of exposure to the Basic Saturated Water (BSW-12) in a temperature range from 60 to 105 C. The susceptibility of the materials to crevice corrosion was evaluated based on the appearance of crevice attack underneath the crevice formers and the weight loss data. The results showed that, after exposed to BSW-12 for four and eight weeks, no obvious crevice attack was observed on these materials. The descaled weight loss increased with the increase in temperature for all materials. The weight loss, however, is believed to be caused by general corrosion, rather than crevice corrosion. There was no significant difference between the annealed and welded materials either. On the other hand, to conclude that these materials are immune to crevice corrosion in BSW-12 will require longer term testing.

  6. Corrosion of structural materials by lead-based reactor coolants.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.; Leibowitz, L.; Maroni, V. A.; McDeavitt, S. M.; Raraz, A. G.

    2000-11-16

    Advanced nuclear reactor design has, in recent years, focused increasingly on the use of heavy-liquid-metal coolants, such as lead and lead-bismuth eutectic. Similarly, programs on accelerator-based transmutation systems have also considered the use of such coolants. Russian experience with heavy-metal coolants for nuclear reactors has lent credence to the validity of this approach. Of significant concern is the compatibility of structural materials with these coolants. We have used a thermal convection-based test method to allow exposure of candidate materials to molten lead and lead-bismuth flowing under a temperature gradient. The gradient was deemed essential in evaluating the behavior of the test materials in that should preferential dissolution of components of the test material occur we would expect dissolution in the hotter regions and deposition in the colder regions, thus promoting material transport. Results from the interactions of a Si-rich mild steel alloy, AISI S5, and a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel, HT-9, with the molten lead-bismuth are presented.

  7. Section candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eos has carried biographies and photographs of candidates for President-Elect of the Union and for President-Elect and Secretary of each section. In addition, statements by the candidates for Union and Section President-Elect have appeared. T h e material for the petition candidate for President-Elect of the Solar-Planetary Relationships Section and a correction to the biography of one candidate for President-Elect of t h e Geodesy Section appear below. The material for the original slate for Solar-Planetary Relationships appeared in the August 6 issue, that for the Seismology Section in the August 13 issue, that for the Geodesy Section in the August 20 issue, that for the Atmospheric Sciences Section in the August 27 issue, that for the Hydrology Section in the September 3 issue, that for the Tectonophysics Section in the September 10 issue, that for the Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology Section in the September 17 issue, that for the Planetology Section in the September 24 issue, that for the Ocean Sciences Section in the October 1 issue, that for the Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism Section in the October 8 issue, and that for Union President-Elect in the October 15 issue. T h e slate of candidates for all offices was carried in the July 2 issue.

  8. Extension of nuclear structure data base searches for gamma-ray laser candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Madland, D.G.; George, D.C.

    1987-12-01

    Results from a data base search of computerized nuclear structure libraries have been extended and augmented so as to expand the information available for nuclei suitable as gamma-ray laser candidates. The spectrum of nuclear levels occurring in deformed rotational nuclei have been calculated and have been used in conjunction with isomeric state data for odd-A systems. The results of this augmentation effort are presented with particular emphasis on results obtained for /sup 177/Lu, /sup 177/Hf, and /sup 179/Hf. For these cases some possibly interesting cases were identified that met energy spacing criteria. However, significant hindrance factors exist for them which negate their interest for gamma-ray laser applications. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Advanced materials for ultralightweight stable structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Rudolf; Deyerler, Michael; Helwig, Gunter

    1999-08-01

    Optical Instruments require high precision structures, under varying and often severe environmental conditions. If such instruments are movable, or carried on spacecraft or aircraft platforms, low mass is essential. Stabilization requirements and flight environment demand high dynamic stability, usually specified as high vibration frequency. Those 3 qualities - dimensional stability, high stiffness, low mass - present severe problems to the designer, if he is constrained by the use of conventional materials. Advanced ceramic material like SiC offers great potential, due to its extremely high stiffness, at very reasonably low mass, and thermal expansion. But technologies are not yet available to manufacture parts of 1 m dimensions or above. A special C/SiC material developed by Dornier Satellitensysteme GmbH and partners allows just that, today only limited to 3 m sizes by existing facilities. Mechanical properties are comparable to SiC, and the manufacturing process is far more economical. Advanced composites, in particular ultra-high-modulus carbon fiber materials, offer dimensional stability commensurate with Zerodur, at significantly lower mass. Those fibers exhibit ultra-high stiffness at negative thermal expansion and very low mass. THe paper presents an introduction into material properties and manufacturing processes of those two materials, and high-lights the design approach for a number of high performance structures for satellite borne optical instruments.

  10. Hierarchically structured materials for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2013-10-25

    The lithium-ion battery (LIB) is one of the most promising power sources to be deployed in electric vehicles, including solely battery powered vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and hybrid electric vehicles. With the increasing demand for devices of high-energy densities (>500 Wh kg(-1)), new energy storage systems, such as lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries and other emerging systems beyond the conventional LIB, have attracted worldwide interest for both transportation and grid energy storage applications in recent years. It is well known that the electrochemical performance of these energy storage systems depends not only on the composition of the materials, but also on the structure of the electrode materials used in the batteries. Although the desired performance characteristics of batteries often have conflicting requirements with the micro/nano-structure of electrodes, hierarchically designed electrodes can be tailored to satisfy these conflicting requirements. This work will review hierarchically structured materials that have been successfully used in LIB and Li-O2 batteries. Our goal is to elucidate (1) how to realize the full potential of energy materials through the manipulation of morphologies, and (2) how the hierarchical structure benefits the charge transport, promotes the interfacial properties and prolongs the electrode stability and battery lifetime.

  11. Hierarchically Structured Materials for Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-09-25

    Lithium-ion battery (LIB) is one of the most promising power sources to be deployed in electric vehicles (EV), including solely battery powered vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and hybrid electrical vehicles. With the increasing demand on devices of high energy densities (>500 Wh/kg) , new energy storage systems, such as lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries and other emerging systems beyond the conventional LIB also attracted worldwide interest for both transportation and grid energy storage applications in recent years. It is well known that the electrochemical performances of these energy storage systems depend not only on the composition of the materials, but also on the structure of electrode materials used in the batteries. Although the desired performances characteristics of batteries often have conflict requirements on the micro/nano-structure of electrodes, hierarchically designed electrodes can be tailored to satisfy these conflict requirements. This work will review hierarchically structured materials that have been successfully used in LIB and Li-O2 batteries. Our goal is to elucidate 1) how to realize the full potential of energy materials through the manipulation of morphologies, and 2) how the hierarchical structure benefits the charge transport, promotes the interfacial properties, prolongs the electrode stability and battery lifetime.

  12. Failure Analysis of Composite Structure Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    8MATERIAL STRUCTURES DISCONTINUITY T•R PLY DROPOFF i 7ARC LAP/GAP . PRPAATION A, ,OM LY , 1e, ’ •INS ERVICE MAINTENANCE DAMAGE SVv , S IMPACT \\\\ CHESIE ...composite joints such as box beam members, for example, are difficult to inspect by ultrasonic techniques, and the X-ray attenuation coefficients of

  13. Hierarchically structured materials for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2013-10-01

    The lithium-ion battery (LIB) is one of the most promising power sources to be deployed in electric vehicles, including solely battery powered vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and hybrid electric vehicles. With the increasing demand for devices of high-energy densities (>500 Wh kg-1), new energy storage systems, such as lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries and other emerging systems beyond the conventional LIB, have attracted worldwide interest for both transportation and grid energy storage applications in recent years. It is well known that the electrochemical performance of these energy storage systems depends not only on the composition of the materials, but also on the structure of the electrode materials used in the batteries. Although the desired performance characteristics of batteries often have conflicting requirements with the micro/nano-structure of electrodes, hierarchically designed electrodes can be tailored to satisfy these conflicting requirements. This work will review hierarchically structured materials that have been successfully used in LIB and Li-O2 batteries. Our goal is to elucidate (1) how to realize the full potential of energy materials through the manipulation of morphologies, and (2) how the hierarchical structure benefits the charge transport, promotes the interfacial properties and prolongs the electrode stability and battery lifetime.

  14. Evaluation of some candidate materials for automobile thermal reactors in engine-dynamometer screening tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    Fourteen materials were evaluated in engine screening tests on full-size thermal reactors for automobile engine pollution control systems. Cyclic test-stand engine operation provided 2 hours at 1040 C and a 20-minute air-cool to 70 C each test cycle. Each reactor material was exposed to 83 cycles in 200 hours of engine testing. On the basis of resistance to oxidation and distortion, the best materials included two ferritic iron alloys (Ge 1541 and Armco 18S/R), several commercial oxidation-resistant coatings on AlSl 651 (19-9 DL), and possibly uncoated AISI 310. The best commercial coatings were Cr-Al, Ni-Cr, and a glass ceramic.

  15. Fe-Au and Fe-Ag composites as candidates for biodegradable stent materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Cheng, Jian; Bian, Dong; Zheng, Yufeng

    2016-02-01

    In this study, Fe-Ag and Fe-Au composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy using spark plasma sintering. Their microstructures, mechanical properties, and biocorrosion behavior were investigated by using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, environment scanning electronic microscopy, compressive test, electrochemical measurements, and immersion tests. Microstructure characterization indicated that the as-sintered iron-based materials obtained much finer grains than that of as-cast pure iron. Phase analysis showed that the Fe-Ag composites were composed of α-Fe and pure Ag phases, and Fe-Au composites consisted of α-Fe and Au phases. Compressive test showed that the improved mechanical strengths were obtained in as-sintered iron-based materials, among which the Fe-5 wt %Ag exhibited the best mechanical properties. The electrochemical and immersion tests revealed that the addition of Ag and Au could increase the corrosion rate of the iron matrix and change the corrosion mode into more uniform one. Based on the results of cytotoxicity evaluation, it was found that all the experimental material extracts performed no significant toxicity on the L-929 cells and EA. hy-926 cells, whereas a considerable inhibition on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells was observed. The hemocompatibility tests showed that the hemolysis of all the experimental materials was within the range of 5%, which is the criteria value of biomaterials with good hemocomaptibility. The amount of platelet adhered on the surface of as-sintered iron-based materials was lower than that of as-cast pure iron, and the morphology of platelets kept smoothly spherical on the surface of all the experimental materials.

  16. Mechanical properties testing of candidate polymer matrix materials for use in high performance composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, R. S.; Adams, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanical properties of four candidate neat resin systems for use in graphite/epoxy composites are characterized. This includes tensile and shear stiffnesses and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests are conducted on specimens in the dry state and moisture-saturated, at temperatures of 23C, 82C and 121C. The neat resins tested are Hexcel HX-1504, Narmco 5245-C, American Cyanamid CYCOM 907, and Union Carbide ERX-4901A (MDA). Results are compared with those obtained for four other epoxy resins tested in a prior program, i.e., Hercules 3502, 2220-1, and 2220-3, and Ciba-Geigy Fibredux 914, as well as with available Hercules 3501-6 data. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces is performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions. A finite element micromechanics analysis is used to predict unidirectional composite response under various test conditions, using the measured neat resin properties as input data.

  17. Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials: FY 2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Wu, Dangxin; Prange, Micah P.

    2014-10-01

    This annual reports presents work carried out during Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials” (Project number: PL13-SciDriScintMat-PD05) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project is divided into three tasks: 1) Ab initio calculations of electronic properties, electronic response functions and secondary particle spectra; 2) Intrinsic response properties, theoretical light yield, and microscopic description of ionization tracks; and 3) Kinetics and efficiency of scintillation: nonproportionality, intrinsic energy resolution, and pulse shape discrimination. Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the three tasks is provided in this Annual Report. Furthermore, peer-reviewed articles published this FY or currently under review and presentations given this FY are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  18. Physics Structure Analysis of Parallel Waves Concept of Physics Teacher Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwi, S.; Supardi, K. I.; Linuwih, S.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this research was to find a parallel structure concept of wave physics and the factors that influence on the formation of parallel conceptions of physics teacher candidates. The method used qualitative research which types of cross-sectional design. These subjects were five of the third semester of basic physics and six of the fifth semester of wave course students. Data collection techniques used think aloud and written tests. Quantitative data were analysed with descriptive technique-percentage. The data analysis technique for belief and be aware of answers uses an explanatory analysis. Results of the research include: 1) the structure of the concept can be displayed through the illustration of a map containing the theoretical core, supplements the theory and phenomena that occur daily; 2) the trend of parallel conception of wave physics have been identified on the stationary waves, resonance of the sound and the propagation of transverse electromagnetic waves; 3) the influence on the parallel conception that reading textbooks less comprehensive and knowledge is partial understanding as forming the structure of the theory.

  19. Functional evaluation of candidate ice structuring proteins using cell-free expression systems.

    PubMed

    Brödel, A K; Raymond, J A; Duman, J G; Bier, F F; Kubick, S

    2013-02-10

    Ice structuring proteins (ISPs) protect organisms from damage or death by freezing. They depress the non-equilibrium freezing point of water and prevent recrystallization, probably by binding to the surface of ice crystals. Many ISPs have been described and it is likely that many more exist in nature that have not yet been identified. ISPs come in many forms and thus cannot be reliably identified by their structure or consensus ice-binding motifs. Recombinant protein expression is the gold standard for proving the activity of a candidate ISP. Among existing expression systems, cell-free protein expression is the simplest and gives the fastest access to the protein of interest, but selection of the appropriate cell-free expression system is crucial for functionality. Here we describe cell-free expression methods for three ISPs that differ widely in structure and glycosylation status from three organisms: a fish (Macrozoarces americanus), an insect (Dendroides canadensis) and an alga (Chlamydomonas sp. CCMP681). We use both prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems for the production of ISPs. An ice recrystallization inhibition assay is used to test functionality. The techniques described here should improve the success of cell-free expression of ISPs in future applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Global Patterns of Abundance, Diversity and Community Structure of the Aminicenantes (Candidate Phylum OP8)

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Ibrahim F.; Davis, James P.; Youssef, Noha H.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the global patterns of abundance, diversity, and community structure of members of the Aminicenantes (candidate phylum OP8). Our aim was to identify the putative ecological role(s) played by members of this poorly characterized bacterial lineages in various ecosystems. Analysis of near full-length 16S rRNA genes identified four classes and eight orders within the Aminicenantes. Within 3,134 datasets comprising ∼1.8 billion high throughput-generated partial 16S rRNA genes, 47,351 Aminicenantes-affiliated sequences were identified in 913 datasets. The Aminicenantes exhibited the highest relative abundance in hydrocarbon-impacted environments, followed by marine habitats (especially hydrothermal vents and coral-associated microbiome samples), and aquatic, non-marine habitats (especially in terrestrial springs and groundwater samples). While the overall abundance of the Aminicenantes was higher in low oxygen tension as well as non-saline and low salinity habitats, it was encountered in a wide range of oxygen tension, salinities, and temperatures. Analysis of the community structure of the Aminicenantes showed distinct patterns across various datasets that appear to be, mostly, driven by habitat variations rather than prevalent environmental parameters. We argue that the detection of the Aminicenantes across environmental extremes and the observed distinct community structure patterns reflect a high level of intraphylum metabolic diversity and adaptive capabilities that enable its survival and growth in a wide range of habitats and environmental conditions. PMID:24637619

  1. Probabilistic analysis of a materially nonlinear structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H. R.; Wu, Y.-T.; Fossum, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element program is used to perform probabilistic analysis of a materially nonlinear structure. The program used in this study is NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structure Under Stress), under development at Southwest Research Institute. The cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the radial stress of a thick-walled cylinder under internal pressure is computed and compared with the analytical solution. In addition, sensitivity factors showing the relative importance of the input random variables are calculated. Significant plasticity is present in this problem and has a pronounced effect on the probabilistic results. The random input variables are the material yield stress and internal pressure with Weibull and normal distributions, respectively. The results verify the ability of NESSUS to compute the CDF and sensitivity factors of a materially nonlinear structure. In addition, the ability of the Advanced Mean Value (AMV) procedure to assess the probabilistic behavior of structures which exhibit a highly nonlinear response is shown. Thus, the AMV procedure can be applied with confidence to other structures which exhibit nonlinear behavior.

  2. Engineered materials characterization report for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Volume 1, Introduction, history, and current candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D.; Roy, A.K.; Jones, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is to evaluate Yucca Mountain for its suitability as a potential site for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository. As part of this effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been occupied for a number of years with developing and evaluating the performance of waste packages for the potential repository. In recent years this work has been carried out under the guidance of and in collaboration with the Management and Operating contractor for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc., which in turn reports to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes the history of the selection and characterization of materials to be used in the engineered barrier system for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, describes the current candidate materials, presents a compilation of their properties, and summarizes available corrosion data and modeling. The term ``engineered materials`` is intended to distinguish those materials that are used as part of the engineered barrier system from the natural, geologic materials of the site.

  3. Preparation and evaluation of candidate certified reference materials (CRMs) for nutrients in seawater.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kerry M; Wells, David E

    2007-07-01

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) are an essential part of the quality assurance (QA) necessary for the reliable analytical measurement of nutrients in seawater. The CRMs currently available for these analyses are not matrix matched to marine samples. QUASIMEME routinely produces test materials for the nutrients in seawater and nutrients in estuarine water and low-salinity open water Laboratory Performance Studies (LPS) that are both homogeneous and stable. QUASIMEME, in conjunction with Eurofins Scientific, Denmark have produced two reference materials (RMs). The homogeneity testing and preliminary stability studies were carried out by QUASIMEME, and the results are presented in this article. Participants of the QUASIMEME LPS who demonstrated satisfactory long-term performance for the analysis of nutrients in seawater and nutrients in estuarine water and low-salinity open water were invited to take part in the certification exercise. Twenty laboratories returned data, a summary of which is also presented. The certification and long-term stability testing and additional data analysis were carried out by Eurofins Scientific, Denmark, and are outwith the scope of this article and not reported here. Eurofins Scientific, Denmark have marketed these RMs as part of their range of VKI Reference Materials (further information is available from eurofins@eurofins.dk).

  4. Some Candidate Replacement Materials for Dioctyl Phthalate in ’Hot Smoke’ Aerosol Penetrometer Machines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    test machines, identified relatively innocuous, inexpensive replacement materials for DOP. One of these, a synthetic hydrocarbon (poly- alpha olefin ...smoke testing applications. 14. SUBJECT TERMS IS. NUMBER OF PAGES Dioctyl phthalate (DOP) Filters (particulate) 20 TDA-100 machines Poly- alpha olefins ...simulate aerosol behavior in thetic hydrocarbon (poly- alpha olefin (PAOI), can be nondestructive gas mask and filter serviceability test- used to

  5. Focus issue introduction: synergy of structured light and structured materials.

    PubMed

    Omatsu, Takashige; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Brasselet, Etienne; Morita, Ryuji; Wang, Jian

    2017-07-10

    Structured light beams, such as optical vortices, vector beams, and non-diffracting beams, have been recently studied in a variety of fields, such as optical manipulations, optical telecommunications, nonlinear interactions, quantum physics, and 'super resolution' microscopy.. Their unique physical properties, such as annular intensity profile, helical wavefront and orbital angular momentum, give rise to a plethora of new, fundamental light-matter interactions and device applications. Recent progress in nanostructured materials, including metamaterials and metasurfaces, opened new opportunities for structured light generation on the microscale that exceed the capabilities of bulk-optics approaches such as computer generated holography and diffractive optics. Furthermore, structured optical fields may interact with matters on the subwavelength scale to yield new physical effects, such as spin-orbital momentum coupling. This special issue of Optics Express focuses on the state-of-the-art fundamental research and emerging technologies and applications enabled by the interplay of "structured light" and "structured materials".

  6. Acrylamide Polymer Double-Network Hydrogels: Candidate Cartilage Repair Materials with Cartilage-Like Dynamic Stiffness and Attractive Surgery-Related Attachment Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Markus P; Daniels, Alma U; Ronken, Sarah; García, Helena Ardura; Friederich, Niklaus F; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian P; Wirz, Dieter

    2011-10-01

    In focal repair of joint cartilage and meniscus, initial stiffness and strength of repairs are generally much less than surrounding tissue. This increases early failure potential. Secure primary fixation of the repair material is also a problem. Acrylamide polymer double-network (DN) hydrogels are candidate-improved repair materials. DN gels have exceptional strength and toughness compared to ordinary gels. This stems from the double-network structure in which there is a high molar ratio of the second network to the first network, with the first network highly crosslinked and the second loosely crosslinked. Previous studies of acrylic PAMPS/PDMAAm and PAMPS/PAAm DN gels demonstrated physicochemical stability and tissue compatibility as well as the ability to foster cartilage formation. Mechanical properties related to surgical use were tested in 2 types of DN gels. Remarkably, these >90%-water DN gels exhibited dynamic impact stiffness (E*) values (~1.1 and ~1.5 MPa) approaching swine meniscus (~2.9 MPa). Dynamic impact energy-absorbing capability was much lower (median loss angles of ~2°) than swine meniscus (>10°), but it is intriguing that >90%-water materials can efficiently store energy. Also, fine 4/0 suture tear-out strength approached cartilage (~2.1 and ~7.1 N v. ~13.5 N). Initial strength of attachment of DN gels to cartilage with acrylic tissue adhesive was also high (~0.20 and ~0.15 N/mm(2)). DN gel strength and toughness properties stem from optimized entanglement of the 2 network components. DN gels thus have obvious structural parallels with cartilaginous tissues, and their surgical handling properties make them ideal candidates for clinical use.

  7. Structure of SALO, a leishmaniasis vaccine candidate from the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    PubMed

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Kelleher, Alan; Liu, Zhuyun; Pollet, Jeroen; Hudspeth, Elissa M; Rezende, Wanderson C; Groen, Mallory Jo; Seid, Christopher A; Abdeladhim, Maha; Townsend, Shannon; de Castro, Waldione; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Zhan, Bin; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2017-03-01

    Immunity to the sand fly salivary protein SALO (Salivary Anticomplement of Lutzomyia longipalpis) protected hamsters against Leishmania infantum and L. braziliensis infection and, more recently, a vaccine combination of a genetically modified Leishmania with SALO conferred strong protection against L. donovani infection. Because of the importance of SALO as a potential component of a leishmaniasis vaccine, a plan to produce this recombinant protein for future scale manufacturing as well as knowledge of its structural characteristics are needed to move SALO forward for the clinical path. Recombinant SALO was expressed as a soluble secreted protein using Pichia pastoris, rSALO(P), with yields of 1g/L and >99% purity as assessed by SEC-MALS and SDS-PAGE. Unlike its native counterpart, rSALO(P) does not inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, antibodies to rSALO(P) inhibit the anti-complement activity of sand fly salivary gland homogenate. Immunization with rSALO(P) produces a delayed type hypersensitivity response in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting rSALO(P) lacked anti-complement activity but retained its immunogenicity. The structure of rSALO(P) was solved by S-SAD at Cu-Kalpha to 1.94 Å and refined to Rfactor 17%. SALO is ~80% helical, has no appreciable structural similarities to any human protein, and has limited structural similarity in the C-terminus to members of insect odorant binding proteins. SALO has three predicted human CD4+ T cell epitopes on surface exposed helices. The results indicate that SALO as expressed and purified from P. pastoris is suitable for further scale-up, manufacturing, and testing. SALO has a novel structure, is not similar to any human proteins, is immunogenic in rodents, and does not have the anti-complement activity observed in the native salivary protein which are all important attributes to move this vaccine candidate forward to the clinical path.

  8. Postirradiation thermocyclic loading of ferritic-martensitic structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, L.; Orychtchenko, A.; Petersen, C.; Rybin, V.

    Thermonuclear fusion reactors of the Tokamak-type will be unique power engineering plants to operate in thermocyclic mode only. Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels are prime candidate structural materials for test blankets of the ITER fusion reactor. Beyond the radiation damage, thermomechanical cyclic loading is considered as the most detrimental lifetime limiting phenomenon for the above structure. With a Russian and a German facility for thermal fatigue testing of neutron irradiated materials a cooperation has been undertaken. Ampule devices to irradiate specimens for postirradiation thermal fatigue tests have been developed by the Russian partner. The irradiation of these ampule devices loaded with specimens of ferritic-martensitic steels, like the European MANET-II, the Russian 05K12N2M and the Japanese Low Activation Material F82H-mod, in a WWR-M-type reactor just started. A description of the irradiation facility, the qualification of the ampule device and the modification of the German thermal fatigue facility will be presented.

  9. Identification of Crystalline Material in Two Interstellar Dust Candidates from the Stardust Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gainsforth, Zack; Simionovici, Alexandra; Brenker, Frank E.; Schmitz, Sylvia; Burghammer, Manfred; Cloetens, Peter; Lemelle, Laurence; San Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Schoonjans, Tom; Silversmit, Geert; hide

    2012-01-01

    NASA's interstellar collector from the Stardust mission captured several particles that are now thought to be of interstellar origin. We analyzed two of these via nanodiffraction at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and found them to contain crystalline components. The unit cell of the crystalline material is determined from the diffraction patterns and the most likely mineral components are identified as olivine and spinel.

  10. Systematic Study of Trace Radioactive Impurities in Candidate Construction Materials for EXO-200

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, D.S.; Grinberg, P.; Weber, P.; Baussan, E.; Djurcic, Z.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Vuilleumier, J.-M.; Akimov, D.; Bellerive, A.; Bowcock, M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Conley, R.; Craddock, W.; Danilov, M.; DeVoe, R.; Dixit, M.; Dolgolenko, A.; /Alabama U. /NRC-INMS /Neuchatel U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Maryland U. /UC, Irvine

    2007-10-24

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) will search for double beta decays of 136Xe. We report the results of a systematic study of trace concentrations of radioactive impurities in a wide range of raw materials and finished parts considered for use in the construction of EXO-200, the first stage of the EXO experimental program. Analysis techniques employed, and described here, include direct gamma counting, alpha counting, neutron activation analysis, and high-sensitivity mass spectrometry.

  11. Challenges in the size analysis of a silica nanoparticle mixture as candidate certified reference material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kestens, Vikram; Roebben, Gert; Herrmann, Jan; Jämting, Åsa; Coleman, Victoria; Minelli, Caterina; Clifford, Charles; De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Mast, Jan; Junjie, Liu; Babick, Frank; Cölfen, Helmut; Emons, Hendrik

    2016-06-01

    A new certified reference material for quality control of nanoparticle size analysis methods has been developed and produced by the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre. The material, ERM-FD102, consists of an aqueous suspension of a mixture of silica nanoparticle populations of distinct particle size and origin. The characterisation relied on an interlaboratory comparison study in which 30 laboratories of demonstrated competence participated with a variety of techniques for particle size analysis. After scrutinising the received datasets, certified and indicative values for different method-defined equivalent diameters that are specific for dynamic light scattering (DLS), centrifugal liquid sedimentation (CLS), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), particle tracking analysis (PTA) and asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) were assigned. The value assignment was a particular challenge because metrological concepts were not always interpreted uniformly across all participating laboratories. This paper presents the main elements and results of the ERM-FD102 characterisation study and discusses in particular the key issues of measurand definition and the estimation of measurement uncertainty.

  12. Retention, isotope exchange, and thermal release of hydrogen in candidate materials for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W. R.; Doyle, B. L.; Brice, D. K.; Picraux, S. T.

    1980-08-01

    The materials studied included TiC, TiB/sub 2/, VB/sub 2/, B/sub 4/C, B, Si, graphite, and the metals Ti, V, and 304L stainless steel. The TiC and TiB/sub 2/ were formed by chemical vapor deposition on a graphite substrate. The C/Ti ratio of the TiC was measured to be 1.0 +- .05 by ion backscattering analysis. The Ti and V were explosively bonded to copper substrates, and the VB/sub 2/ was made by borodizing vanadium. Carbon (compression annealed pyrolytic graphite from Union Carbide and Papyex graphite ribbon from Le Carbone) and single crystal silicon samples were included in the study as reference materials. The hydrogen retention and isotope exchange behavior for these materials were studied by measuring the amount of H or D retained as a function of incident fluence using the D(/sup 3/He,P)/sup 4/He nuclear reaction analysis techniques for D and H(/sup 15/N,..cap alpha gamma..) profiling for H.

  13. Challenges in the size analysis of a silica nanoparticle mixture as candidate certified reference material.

    PubMed

    Kestens, Vikram; Roebben, Gert; Herrmann, Jan; Jämting, Åsa; Coleman, Victoria; Minelli, Caterina; Clifford, Charles; De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Mast, Jan; Junjie, Liu; Babick, Frank; Cölfen, Helmut; Emons, Hendrik

    A new certified reference material for quality control of nanoparticle size analysis methods has been developed and produced by the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre. The material, ERM-FD102, consists of an aqueous suspension of a mixture of silica nanoparticle populations of distinct particle size and origin. The characterisation relied on an interlaboratory comparison study in which 30 laboratories of demonstrated competence participated with a variety of techniques for particle size analysis. After scrutinising the received datasets, certified and indicative values for different method-defined equivalent diameters that are specific for dynamic light scattering (DLS), centrifugal liquid sedimentation (CLS), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), particle tracking analysis (PTA) and asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) were assigned. The value assignment was a particular challenge because metrological concepts were not always interpreted uniformly across all participating laboratories. This paper presents the main elements and results of the ERM-FD102 characterisation study and discusses in particular the key issues of measurand definition and the estimation of measurement uncertainty.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Acrylic-Based Photopolymer as a Candidate for Denture Base Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicaksono, S. T.; Rasyida; Ardhyananta, H.

    2017-05-01

    Denture base is a denture part that rests on the soft tissue covering the jawbone and becomes an anchor of a denture. The material that commonly used for this purpose is poly (methyl methacrylate). However, it lacks in mechanical properties due to high water absorption. The aim of this research was to improve the physical and mechanical properties of poly (methyl methacrylate) by making a copolymer with styrene via photopolymerization process. In this method was used the addition of styrene monomer at 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 wt% into the acrylic resin to form copolymer materials via photopolymerization process. The amount of 1.5 wt% Irgacure 784’s photoinitiator was added as a photoinitiator. The results showed that the addition of 40% by weight of styrene copolymer is the best performance compare to the addition styrene of 10, 20, 30, and 50%. The samples with an addition styrene of 40 wt% showed excellent properties such as high water absorption value of 2.405 μg/mm3, the solubility of 0.434 μg/mm3, the flexural strength of 69.336 MPa, a flexural modulus of 1.236 GPa, and a hardness value of 82.583 HD. Poly (methyl methacrylate-co-styrene) copolymer with the addition of styrene 40 wt% has the closest value to the requirements for a denture base material.

  15. Rheology, microrheology and structure of soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppong, Felix K.

    We study the relationship between the bulk rheological properties and the micron-scale structure and rheology of different types of soft materials. The materials studied are Laponite, a colloidal clay suspension; Carbopol, a dispersion of microgel particles; hydroxyethyl cellulose, a linear polymer solution; and hydrophobically modified hydroxyethyl cellulose, an associative polymer. Bulk properties are measured using conventional shear rheometry. The micron-scale measurements are performed using techniques based on multiple particle tracking and dynamic light scattering. From the thermal motion of suspended tracer particles, we obtain information about the local structure and viscoelastic properties of the materials. We investigate the evolution of Laponite from a liquid to a gel and find that the process is length-scale dependent. We study the properties of Carbopol as a function of microgel concentration and find that as concentration increases, a jamming transition occurs which is related to the onset of yield stress on the bulk scale. We compare the viscoelastic properties of hydroxyethylcellulose and its associative derivative and observe that the hydrophobic interactions in the latter lead to much slower dynamics than in the unmodified polymer. A study of the stress relaxation in hydroxyethylcellulose showed that it depended on both the wait time after the application and removal of a large strain and on the type and magnitude of the deformation applied. Our work exploits the unique ability of microrheological techniques to probe both the rheology and structure of soft materials on the microscopic scale, which enables a better understanding of the relationship between bulk scale properties and microscopic structure in these systems. Keywords. Rheology, microrheology, soft materials, particle tracking, dynamic light scattering, viscoelasticity, yield stress, gelation, polymers.

  16. Materials and structures for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Lisagor, W. B.; Dixon, S. C.

    1988-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles are envisioned to require, in addition to carbon-carbon and ceramic-matrix composites for leading edges heated to above 2000 F, such 600-1800 F operating temperature materials as advanced Ti alloys, nickel aluminides, and metal-matrix composites; these possess the necessary low density and high strength and stiffness. The primary design drivers are maximum vehicle heating rate, total heat load, flight envelope, propulsion system type, mission life requirements, and liquid hydrogen containment system. Attention is presently given to aspects of these materials and structures requiring more intensive development.

  17. Structural adhesives for missile external protection material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, F. L.; Garzolini, J. A.

    1981-07-01

    Two basic rubber materials are examined as possible external substrate protection materials (EPM) for missiles. The analysis provided a data base for selection of the optimum adhesives which are compatible with the substrate, loads applied and predicted bondline temperatures. Under the test conditions, EA934/NA was found to be the optimum adhesive to bond VAMAC 2273 and/or NBR/EPDM 9969A to aluminum substrate. The optimum adhesive for composite structures was EA956. Both of these adhesives are two-part epoxy systems with a pot life of approximately two hours. Further research is suggested on field repair criteria, nuclear hardness and survivability effects on bondline, and ageing effects.

  18. Materials and structures for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Darrel R.; Lisagor, W. Barry; Dixon, Sidney C.

    1988-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles are envisioned to require, in addition to carbon-carbon and ceramic-matrix composities for leading edges heated to above 2000 F, such 600 to 1800 F operating temperature materials as advanced Ti alloys, nickel aluminides, and metal-matrix composited; These possess the necessary low density and high strength and stiffness. The primary design drivers are maximum vehicle heating rate, total heat load, flight envelope, propulsion system type, mission life requirements and liquid hydrogen containment systems. Attention is presently given to aspects of these materials and structures requiring more intensive development.

  19. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2010-01-05

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  20. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2012-10-09

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  1. Structural materials: understanding atomic scale microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, E A; Miller, Michael K; Blavette, D; Ringer, S. P.; Sudbrack, C; Smith, G.D.W.

    2009-01-01

    With the ability to locate and identify atoms in three dimensions, atom-probe tomography (APT) has revolutionized our understanding of structure-property relationships in materials used for structural applications. The atomic-scale details of clusters, second phases, and microstructural defects that control alloy properties have been investigated, providing an unprecedented level of detail on the origins of aging behavior, strength, creep, fracture toughness, corrosion, and irradiation resistance. Moreover, atomic-scale microscopy combined with atomistic simulation and theoretical modeling of material behavior can guide new alloy design. In this article, selected examples highlight how APT has led to a deeper understanding of materials structures and therefore properties, starting with the phase transformations controlling the aging and strengthening behavior of complex Al-, Fe-, and Ni-based alloys systems. The chemistry of interfaces and structural defects that play a crucial role in high-temperature strengthening, fracture, and corrosion resistance are also discussed, with particular reference to Zr- and Al-alloys and FeAl intermetallics.

  2. Genetic epidemiology and nonsyndromic structural birth defects: from candidate genes to epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Charlotte A; Chowdhury, Shimul; Cleves, Mario A; Erickson, Stephen; MacLeod, Stewart L; Shaw, Gary M; Shete, Sanjay; Witte, John S; Tycko, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    Birth defects are a leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The vast majority of birth defects are nonsyndromic, and although their etiologies remain mostly unknown, evidence supports the hypothesis that they result from the complex interaction of genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors. Since our last review published in 2002 describing the basic tools of genetic epidemiology used to study nonsyndromic structural birth defects, many new approaches have become available and have been used with varying success. Through rapid advances in genomic technologies, investigators are now able to investigate large portions of the genome at a fraction of previous costs. With next-generation sequencing, research has progressed from assessing a small percentage of single-nucleotide polymorphisms to assessing the entire human protein-coding repertoire (exome)-an approach that is starting to uncover rare but informative mutations associated with nonsyndromic birth defects. Herein, we report on the current state of the genetic epidemiology of birth defects and comment on future challenges and opportunities. We consider issues of study design, and we discuss common variant approaches, including candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies. We also discuss the complexities embedded in exploring interactions between genes and the environment. We complete our review by describing new and promising next-generation sequencing technologies and examining how the study of epigenetic mechanisms could become the key to unraveling the complex etiologies of nonsyndromic structural birth defects.

  3. Systematic structural characterization of metabolites in Arabidopsis via candidate substrate-product pair networks.

    PubMed

    Morreel, Kris; Saeys, Yvan; Dima, Oana; Lu, Fachuang; Van de Peer, Yves; Vanholme, Ruben; Ralph, John; Vanholme, Bartel; Boerjan, Wout

    2014-03-01

    Plant metabolomics is increasingly used for pathway discovery and to elucidate gene function. However, the main bottleneck is the identification of the detected compounds. This is more pronounced for secondary metabolites as many of their pathways are still underexplored. Here, an algorithm is presented in which liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry profiles are searched for pairs of peaks that have mass and retention time differences corresponding with those of substrates and products from well-known enzymatic reactions. Concatenating the latter peak pairs, called candidate substrate-product pairs (CSPP), into a network displays tentative (bio)synthetic routes. Starting from known peaks, propagating the network along these routes allows the characterization of adjacent peaks leading to their structure prediction. As a proof-of-principle, this high-throughput cheminformatics procedure was applied to the Arabidopsis thaliana leaf metabolome where it allowed the characterization of the structures of 60% of the profiled compounds. Moreover, based on searches in the Chemical Abstract Service database, the algorithm led to the characterization of 61 compounds that had never been described in plants before. The CSPP-based annotation was confirmed by independent MS(n) experiments. In addition to being high throughput, this method allows the annotation of low-abundance compounds that are otherwise not amenable to isolation and purification. This method will greatly advance the value of metabolomics in systems biology.

  4. Factor structure of the functional movement screen in marine officer candidates.

    PubMed

    Kazman, Josh B; Galecki, Jeffrey M; Lisman, Peter; Deuster, Patricia A; OʼConnor, Francis G

    2014-03-01

    Functional movement screening (FMS) is a musculoskeletal assessment that is intended to fill a gap between preparticipation examinations and performance tests. Functional movement screening consists of 7 standardized movements involving multiple muscle groups that are rated 0-3 during performance; scores are combined into a final score, which is intended to predict injury risk. This use of a sum-score in this manner assumes that the items are unidimensional and scores are internally consistent, which are measures of internal reliability. Despite research into the FMS' predictive value and interrater reliability, research has not assessed its psychometric properties. The present study is a standard psychometric analysis of the FMS and is the first to assess the internal consistency and factor structure of the FMS, using Cronbach's alpha and exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Using a cohort of 877 male and 57 female Marine officer candidates who performed the FMS, EFA of polychoric correlations with varimax rotation was conducted to explore the structure of the FMS. Tests were repeated on the original scores, which integrated feelings of pain during movement (0-3), and then on scores discounting the pain instruction and based only on the performance (1-3), to determine whether pain ratings affected the factor structure. The average FMS score was 16.7 ± 1.8. Cronbach's alpha was 0.39. Exploratory factor analysis availed 2 components accounting for 21 and 17% and consisting of separate individual movements (shoulder mobility and deep squat, respectively). Analysis on scores discounting pain showed similar results. The factor structures were not interpretable, and the low Cronbach's alpha suggests a lack of internal consistency in FMS sum scores. Results do not offer support for validity of the FMS sum score as a unidimensional construct. In the absence of additional psychometric research, caution is warranted when using the FMS sum score.

  5. Optimization on electrochemical synthesis of HKUST-1 as candidate catalytic material for Green diesel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, W. W.; Nugraha, R. E.; Winarni, I. D.; Adreane, M.; Rahmawati, F.

    2016-04-01

    In the effort to support the discovery of new renewable energy sources in Indonesia, biofuel is one of promising options. The conversion of vegetable oil into ready-biofuel, especially green diesel, needs several steps, one of which is a hydrogenation or hydro-deoxygenation reaction. In this case, the catalyst plays a very important role regarding to its activity and selectivity, and Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) becoming a new generation of heterogeneous catalyst in this area. In this research, a preliminary study to optimize electrochemical synthesis of the catalytic material based on MOFs, namely HKUST-1 [Cu3(BTC)2], has been conducted. Some electrochemical reaction parameters were tested, for example by modifying the electrochemical synthetic conditions, i.e. by performing variation of voltages (12, 13, 14, and 15 Volt), temperatures (RT, 40, 60, and 80 °C) and solvents (ethanol, water, methanol and dimethyl-formamide (DMF)). Material characterization was carried out by XRD, SEM, FTIR, DTA/TG and SAA. The results showed that the optimum synthetic conditions of HKUST-1 are performed at room temperature in a solvent combination of water: ethanol (1: 1) and a voltage of 15 Volt for 2 hours. The XRD-analysis revealed that the resulted peaks are identical to the simulated powder pattern generated from single crystal data and comparable to the peaks of solvothermal method. However, the porosity of the resulting material through electrochemical method is still in the range of micro-pore according to IUPAC and 50% smaller than the porosity resulted from solvothermal synthesis. The corresponding compounds are thermally stable until 300 °C according to TG/DTA.

  6. Angular Scattering Reflectance and Polarization Measurements of Candidate Regolith Materials Measured in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Boryta, Mark D.; Hapke, Bruce W.; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Vandervoort, Kurt; Vides, Christina L.

    2016-10-01

    The reflectance and polarization of light reflected from a solar system object indicates the chemical and textural state of the regolith. Remote sensing data are compared to laboratory angular scattering measurements and surface properties are determined.We use a Goniometric Photopolarimeter (GPP) to make angular reflectance and polarization measurements of particulate materials that simulate planetary regoliths. The GPP employs the Helmholtz Reciprocity Principle ( 2, 1) - the incident light is linearly polarized - the intensity of the reflected component is measured. The light encounters fewer optical surfaces improving signal to noise. The lab data are physically equivalent to the astronomical data.Our reflectance and polarization phase curves of highly reflective, fine grained, media simulate the regolith of Jupiter's satellite Europa. Our lab data exhibit polarization phase curves that are very similar to reports by experienced astronomers (4). Our previous reflectance phase curve data of the same materials agree with the same astronomical observers (5). We find these materials exhibit an increase in circular polarization ratio with decreasing phase angle (3). This suggests coherent backscattering (CB) of photons in the regolith (3). Shkuratov et al.(3) report that the polarization properties of these particulate media are also consistent with the CB enhancement process (5). Our results replicate the astronomical data indicating Europa's regolith is fine-grained, high porous with void space exceeding 90%.1. Hapke, B. W. (2012). ISBN 978-0-521-88349-82. Minnaert, M. (1941).Asrophys. J., 93, 403-410.3. Nelson, R. M. et al. (1998). Icarus, 131, 223-230.4. Rosenbush, V. et al. (2015). ISBN 978-1-107-04390-9, pp 340-359.5. Shkuratov, Yu. et al. (2002) Icarus 159, 396-416.

  7. Oxidation of fuel cladding candidate materials in steam environments at high temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ting; Keiser, James R.; Brady, Michael P.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2012-08-01

    Under certain severe accident conditions, the fuel rods of nuclear power plants are exposed to high temperature/pressure steam environments in which the Zr alloy cladding is rapidly oxidized. As alternative claddings, the oxidation resistances of SiC-based materials and stainless steels with high Cr and/or Al additions have been examined from 800-1200 °C in high-pressure steam environments. Very low reaction kinetics were observed with alumina-forming FeCrAl alloys at 1200 °C while Fe-Cr alloys with only 15-20% Cr were rapidly attacked.

  8. Nonlinearity in structural and electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.; Beardmore, K.M.; Ben-Naim, E.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project strengthens a nonlinear technology base relevant to a variety of problems arising in condensed matter and materials science, and applies this technology to those problems. In this way the controlled synthesis of, and experiments on, novel electronic and structural materials provide an important focus for nonlinear science, while nonlinear techniques help advance the understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of microstructure and dynamics in complex materials. This research is primarily focused on four topics: (1) materials microstructure: growth and evolution, and porous media; (2) textures in elastic/martensitic materials; (3) electro- and photo-active polymers; and (4) ultrafast photophysics in complex electronic materials. Accomplishments included the following: organization of a ``Nonlinear Materials`` seminar series and international conferences including ``Fracture, Friction and Deformation,`` ``Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions,`` and ``Landscape Paradigms in Physics and Biology``; invited talks at international conference on ``Synthetic Metals,`` ``Quantum Phase Transitions,`` ``1996 CECAM Euroconference,`` and the 1995 Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society; large-scale simulations and microscopic modeling of nonlinear coherent energy storage at crack tips and sliding interfaces; large-scale simulation and microscopic elasticity theory for precursor microstructure and dynamics at solid-solid diffusionless phase transformations; large-scale simulation of self-assembling organic thin films on inorganic substrates; analysis and simulation of smoothing of rough atomic surfaces; and modeling and analysis of flux pattern formation in equilibrium and nonequilibrium Josephson junction arrays and layered superconductors.

  9. On Structure and Properties of Amorphous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Stachurski, Zbigniew H.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical, optical, magnetic and electronic properties of amorphous materials hold great promise towards current and emergent technologies. We distinguish at least four categories of amorphous (glassy) materials: (i) metallic; (ii) thin films; (iii) organic and inorganic thermoplastics; and (iv) amorphous permanent networks. Some fundamental questions about the atomic arrangements remain unresolved. This paper focuses on the models of atomic arrangements in amorphous materials. The earliest ideas of Bernal on the structure of liquids were followed by experiments and computer models for the packing of spheres. Modern approach is to carry out computer simulations with prediction that can be tested by experiments. A geometrical concept of an ideal amorphous solid is presented as a novel contribution to the understanding of atomic arrangements in amorphous solids. PMID:28824158

  10. Critical parameters of superconducting materials and structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Dykes, J.W.; Mosley, W.D.; Chaiken, A.; Ralls, K.; Radousky, H.

    1995-02-01

    We report here the completion of a one year project to investigate the synthesis, electronic structure, defect structure, and physical transport properties of high temperature superconducting oxide materials. During the course of this project we produced some of the finest samples of single crystal detwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and stoichiometrically perfect (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3}. We deduced the Fermi surface of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, (La,Sr){sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, and (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3} through the recording of the electron momentum density in these materials as measured by positron annihilation spectroscopy and angle resolved photoemission. We also performed extensive studies on Pr substituted (Y,Pr)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} so as to further understand the origin of the electron pairing leading to superconductivity.

  11. Materials for Adaptive Structural Acoustic Controls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-31

    stannate -11M I f-I ic cmoiin MATERIALS FOR ADAPTIVE STRUCTURAL ACOUSTIC CONTROLS Period February 1, 1993 to January 31, 1994 Annual Report VOLUME I OFFICE... ics 139, 25- 49(1993). 14. Jiang, Q., W. Cao, and L. E. Cross. Electrical Fatigue in Lead Zirconate Titanate Ceramics. J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 77(1), 211...Ceramic Composte Transducer-The Moonie. Ferroelecuics: IM , Gaithersburg, Maryland (August 1993). 21. Tressler, J. F., Q. C. Xu, S. Yoshikawa, K. Uchino

  12. Innovative Optoelectronic Materials and Structures Using OMVPE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-19

    facilities which supports compound semiconductor research activities at Cornell. Finally, key research activities which focus on quantum well laser materials...the fabrication of Optoelectronic Integrated Circuits (OEICs). The ability to intermix quantum well heterostructures opens the possibility to the...non-resonant spectra of single quantum well GRIN-SCH structures were reported at the end of 1989. A continued investigation of other laser designs

  13. Structures and Materials Working Group report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torczyner, Robert; Hanks, Brantley R.

    1986-01-01

    The appropriateness of the selection of four issues (advanced materials development, analysis/design methods, tests of large flexible structures, and structural concepts) was evaluated. A cross-check of the issues and their relationship to the technology drivers is presented. Although all of the issues addressed numerous drivers, the advanced materials development issue impacts six out of the seven drivers and is considered to be the most crucial. The advanced materials technology development and the advanced design/analysis methods development were determined to be enabling technologies with the testing issues and development of structural concepts considered to be of great importance, although not enabling technologies. In addition, and of more general interest and criticality, the need for a Government/Industry commitment which does not now exist, was established. This commitment would call for the establishment of the required infrastructure to facilitate the development of the capabilities highlighted through the availability of resources and testbed facilities, including a national testbed in space to be in place in ten years.

  14. Fretting of Secondary-Seal-Ring Candidate Materials in Air at Temperatures to 816 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Superalloys containing chromium showed decreasing fretting damage with increasing temperature of 816 C. This trend was related to the ability of the alloys to generate self-protecting oxide films. The damage at 816 C was one-third to one-tenth of that at 23 C. Osmium, chromium, and chromium carbide platings were fretted at 23 and 450 C. Osmium was extremely protective at 23 C but oxidized excessively at 450 C. Chromium and chromium carbide gave about the same protection at 450 C as the oxide films that formed on the superalloys. High graphite and low graphite carbons were fretted at 23 and 327 C. High graphite carbon was superior at 327 C, but low graphite carbon was the best material examined at 23 C.

  15. Graphene oxide as a candidate material for natural gas storage: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Rajiv Kumar; Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2015-03-01

    Alternative sources of clean energy will be much in demand in the coming days. To store methane (CH4) in sorbent materials at ambient conditions for on-board vehicular usage, minimum adsorption energy of 18.8 KJ/mol is desirable. In this work, we have investigated methane adsorption on graphene oxide using first principles calculations. To accurately capture the weak interactions between CH4 and the substrate we have included van der Waals interactions in our calculations. We show that the adsorption energy falls within the target range. Careful analysis of the various contributions to the binding shows that the enhancement in adsorption energy on going from graphene to graphene oxide arises from a subtle synergy between various effects. Funding agencies CSIR, India, DST Nanomission and JNCASR. Computational facilities provided by TUE-CMS, JNCASR.

  16. Research in Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M. (Compiler); Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and Materials (SDM) Conference was held on April 2 to 4, 1990 in Long Beach, California. This publication is a compilation of presentations of the work-in-progress sessions and does not contain papers from the regular sessions since those papers are published by AIAA in the conference proceedings.

  17. Oral hepatitis B vaccine candidates produced and delivered in plant material.

    PubMed

    Streatfield, Stephen J

    2005-06-01

    Hepatitis B is a major global health problem; approximately two billion people are infected with the virus worldwide, despite the fact that safe and efficacious vaccines have been developed and used for nearly 20 years. Prohibitive costs for vaccine purchase and administration restrict uptake in many developing nations. Agencies such as the Global Alliance for Vaccination and Immunization are helping to make current vaccines more available, but reduced costs would greatly aid this effort. Oral delivery is an option to reduce the expense of administering hepatitis B vaccines. It may also improve compliance, and orally delivered vaccines may be more efficacious among poor responders to current vaccines. However, to induce protective efficacy, oral administration may require encapsulation of antigen and delivery of large doses. Plant-based expression systems offer an oral delivery alternative with low production costs, and they also encapsulate the antigen. Some plant-based systems also stabilize antigen and therefore reduce storage and distribution costs. The hepatitis B major surface antigen has been expressed in several plant systems. A variety of regulatory sequences and subcellular targets have been used to achieve expression suitable for early stage clinical trials. However, further increase in expression will be necessary for practical and efficacious products. Appropriate processing can yield palatable products with uniform antigen concentration. The antigen expressed in plant systems shows extensive disulphide cross-linking and oligomerization and forms virus-like particles. Oral delivery of the antigen in plant material can induce a serum antibody response, prime the immune system for a subsequent injection of antigen and give a boosted response to a prior injection. Small scale clinical trials in which the antigen has been delivered orally in edible plant material indicate safety and immunogenicity.

  18. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  19. Tungsten - Yttrium Based Nuclear Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Chessa, Jack; Martinenz, Gustavo

    2013-04-01

    The challenging problem currently facing the nuclear science community in this 21st century is design and development of novel structural materials, which will have an impact on the next-generation nuclear reactors. The materials available at present include reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, dispersion strengthened reduced activation ferritic steels, and vanadium- or tungsten-based alloys. These materials exhibit one or more specific problems, which are either intrinsic or caused by reactors. This work is focussed towards tungsten-yttrium (W-Y) based alloys and oxide ceramics, which can be utilized in nuclear applications. The goal is to derive a fundamental scientific understanding of W-Y-based materials. In collaboration with University of Califonia -- Davis, the project is designated to demonstrate the W-Y based alloys, ceramics and composites with enhanced physical, mechanical, thermo-chemical properties and higher radiation resistance. Efforts are focussed on understanding the microstructure, manipulating materials behavior under charged-particle and neutron irradiation, and create a knowledge database of defects, elemental diffusion/segregation, and defect trapping along grain boundaries and interfaces. Preliminary results will be discussed.

  20. Engineering aspects of the application of structural materials in the 5 MW-ESS-mercury-target

    SciTech Connect

    Guttek, B.

    1996-06-01

    A main problem of the ESS-Hg-target development and the design of the components of its primary Hg-circuit is the choice of structural materials. As designing, calculations and experiments with elected materials take time and are very costy, a preview on their successful application has to be done before as detailed as possible. One aspect on this is to have the knowledge of characteristics values of the structural material candidates under the occuring mechanical and thermal loads, irradiation, corrosion and erosion. Another point is the technology of engineering concerning the manufacturing, welding, surface treatment, and quality control of such parts and components under the demand to reach maximum lifetime.

  1. Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal: a new candidate host material for the ytterbium ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yeqing; You, Zhenyu; Zhu, Zhaojie; Xu, Jinlong; Li, Jianfu; Wang, Yan; Wang, Hongyan; Tu, Chaoyang

    2013-10-01

    A disordered laser crystal Yb3+-doped Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal was grown by the Czochralski technique. The characterized room temperature polarized spectra, re-absorption possibility and laser performance showed that this crystal should be a promising gain material, not only suitable for diode pumping, but also a good candidate for the generation of tunable and short pulse lasers. End pumped by a diode laser at 976 nm in plano-concave and plano-plano cavity, a 3.65 W output power with a slope efficiency of 65% was achieved by using a c-cut Yb3+:Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal. The output laser wavelength shifted from 1042 to 1062 nm.

  2. Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1998-04-01

    In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 20 mass % Na{sub 2}O, 10 mass % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 8 mass % B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 1.5 mass % K{sub 2}O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired.

  3. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Bismuth Chalcohalides: Candidate Photovoltaic Materials with Easily, Continuously Controllable Band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunioku, Hironobu; Higashi, Masanobu; Abe, Ryu

    2016-09-01

    Although bismuth chalcohalides, such as BiSI and BiSeI, have been recently attracting considerable attention as photovoltaic materials, the methods available to synthesize them are quite limited thus far. In this study, a novel, facile method to synthesize these chalcohalides, including BiSBr1‑xIx solid solutions, at low temperatures was developed via the substitution of anions from O2‑ to S2‑ (or Se2‑) using bismuth oxyhalide precursors. Complete phase transition was readily observed upon treatment of BiOI particles with H2S or H2Se at surprisingly low temperatures of less than 150 °C and short reaction times of less than 1 h, producing BiSI and BiSeI particles, respectively. This method was also applied for synthesizing BiSBr1‑xIx, where continuous changes in their band gaps were observed depending on the ratio between iodine and bromine. The composition of all elements (except oxygen) in the chalcohalides thus produced was almost identical to that of the oxyhalide precursors, attributed to the suppressed volatilization of halogens at such low temperatures. All chalcohalides loaded on FTO clearly exhibited an anodic photocurrent in an acetonitrile solution containing I‑, attributed to their n-type nature, e.g., the BiSI electrode exhibited high IPCE (64% at 700 nm, +0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl).

  4. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Bismuth Chalcohalides: Candidate Photovoltaic Materials with Easily, Continuously Controllable Band gap

    PubMed Central

    Kunioku, Hironobu; Higashi, Masanobu; Abe, Ryu

    2016-01-01

    Although bismuth chalcohalides, such as BiSI and BiSeI, have been recently attracting considerable attention as photovoltaic materials, the methods available to synthesize them are quite limited thus far. In this study, a novel, facile method to synthesize these chalcohalides, including BiSBr1−xIx solid solutions, at low temperatures was developed via the substitution of anions from O2− to S2− (or Se2−) using bismuth oxyhalide precursors. Complete phase transition was readily observed upon treatment of BiOI particles with H2S or H2Se at surprisingly low temperatures of less than 150 °C and short reaction times of less than 1 h, producing BiSI and BiSeI particles, respectively. This method was also applied for synthesizing BiSBr1−xIx, where continuous changes in their band gaps were observed depending on the ratio between iodine and bromine. The composition of all elements (except oxygen) in the chalcohalides thus produced was almost identical to that of the oxyhalide precursors, attributed to the suppressed volatilization of halogens at such low temperatures. All chalcohalides loaded on FTO clearly exhibited an anodic photocurrent in an acetonitrile solution containing I−, attributed to their n-type nature, e.g., the BiSI electrode exhibited high IPCE (64% at 700 nm, +0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl). PMID:27600662

  5. Thermophysical and heat transfer properties of phase change material candidate for waste heat transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaizawa, Akihide; Maruoka, Nobuhiro; Kawai, Atsushi; Kamano, Hiroomi; Jozuka, Tetsuji; Senda, Takeshi; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2008-05-01

    A waste heat transportation system trans-heat (TH) system is quite attractive that uses the latent heat of a phase change material (PCM). The purpose of this paper is to study the thermophysical properties of various sugars and sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) as PCMs for a practical TH system and the heat transfer property between PCM selected and heat transfer oil, by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and a heat storage tube. As a result, erythritol, with a large latent heat of 344 kJ/kg at melting point of 117°C, high decomposition point of 160°C and excellent chemical stability under repeated phase change cycles was found to be the best PCM among them for the practical TH system. In the heat release experiments between liquid erythritol and flowing cold oil, we observed foaming phenomena of encapsulated oil, in which oil droplet was coated by solidification of PCM.

  6. Candidate solar cell materials for photovoltaic conversion in a solar power satellite /SPS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, P. E.; Almgren, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    In recognition of the obstacles to solar-generated baseload power on earth, proposals have been made to locate solar power satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO), where solar energy would be available 24 hours a day during most of the time of the year. In an SPS, the electricity produced by solar energy conversion will be fed to microwave generators forming part of a planar phase-array transmitting antenna. The antenna is designed to precisely direct a microwave beam of very low intensity to one or more receiving antennas at desired locations on earth. At the receiving antenna, the microwave energy will be safely and efficiently reconverted to electricity and then be transmitted to consumers. An SPS system will include a number of satellites in GEO. Attention is given to the photovoltaic option for solar energy conversion in GEO, solar cell requirements, the availability of materials, the implication of large production volumes, requirements for high-volume manufacture of solar cell arrays, and the effects of concentration ratio on solar cell array area.

  7. Optical Constants of Mars Candidate Materials used to Model Laboratory Reflectance Spectra of Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Brown, Adrian Jon; Blake, D.; Bristow, T.

    2014-01-01

    Data obtained at visible and nearinfrared wavelengths by OMEGA on MarsExpress and CRISM on MRO provide definitive evidence for the presence of phyllosilicates and other hydrated phases on Mars. A diverse range of both Fe/Mg-OH and Al- OH-bearing phyllosilicates were identified including the smectites nontronite, saponite, and montmorillonite. To constrain the abundances of these phyllosilicates, spectral analyses of mixtures are needed. We report on our effort to enable the quantitative evaluation of the abundance of hydrated-hydroxylated silicates when they are contained in mixtures. Here we focus on two component mixtures of the hydrated/ hydroxylated silicates, saponite and montmorillonite (Mg- and Al-rich smectites) with each other and with two analogs for other Martian materials; pyroxene (enstatite) and palagonitic soil (an alteration product of basaltic glass, hereafter referred to as palagonite). We prepared three size separates of each end-member for study: 20-45, 63-90, and 125-150 micron. Here we focus upon mixtures of the 63-90 m size fractions.

  8. Tellurite glass as a waste form for a simulated mixed chloride waste stream: Candidate materials selection and initial testing

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Rieck, Bennett T.; McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Vienna, John D.

    2012-02-02

    Tellurite glasses have been researched widely for the last 60 years since they were first introduced by Stanworth. These glasses have been primarily used in research applications as glass host materials for lasers and as non-linear optical materials, though many other uses exist in the literature. Tellurite glasses have long since been used as hosts for various, and even sometimes mixed, halogens (i.e., multiple chlorides or even chlorides and iodides). Thus, it was reasonable to expect that these types of glasses could be used as a waste form to immobilize a combination of mixed chlorides present in the electrochemical separations process involved with fuel separations and processing from nuclear reactors. Many of the properties related to waste forms (e.g., chemical durability, maximum chloride loading) for these materials are unknown and thus, in this study, several different types of tellurite glasses were made and their properties studied to determine if such a candidate waste form could be fabricated with these glasses. One of the formulations studied was a lead tellurite glass, which had a low sodium release and is on-par with high-level waste silicate glass waste forms.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamics of Structures with Material Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, P.; Wagg, D. J.; Pinna, C.; Whear, R.; Briody, C.

    2016-09-01

    Structures usually experience deterioration during their working life. Oxidation, corrosion, UV exposure, and thermo-mechanical fatigue are some of the most well-known mechanisms that cause degradation. The phenomenon gradually changes structural properties and dynamic behaviour over their lifetime, and can be more problematic and challenging in the presence of nonlinearity. In this paper, we study how the dynamic behaviour of a nonlinear system changes as the thermal environment causes certain parameters to vary. To this end, a nonlinear lumped mass modal model is considered and defined under harmonic external force. Temperature dependent material functions, formulated from empirical test data, are added into the model. Using these functions, bifurcation parameters are defined and the corresponding nonlinear responses are observed by numerical continuation. A comparison between the results gives a preliminary insight into how temperature induced properties affects the dynamic response and highlights changes in stability conditions of the structure.

  10. Structure of SALO, a leishmaniasis vaccine candidate from the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis

    PubMed Central

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Kelleher, Alan; Liu, Zhuyun; Pollet, Jeroen; Hudspeth, Elissa M.; Rezende, Wanderson C.; Groen, Mallory Jo; Seid, Christopher A.; Abdeladhim, Maha; Townsend, Shannon; de Castro, Waldione; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J.; Zhan, Bin; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Immunity to the sand fly salivary protein SALO (Salivary Anticomplement of Lutzomyia longipalpis) protected hamsters against Leishmania infantum and L. braziliensis infection and, more recently, a vaccine combination of a genetically modified Leishmania with SALO conferred strong protection against L. donovani infection. Because of the importance of SALO as a potential component of a leishmaniasis vaccine, a plan to produce this recombinant protein for future scale manufacturing as well as knowledge of its structural characteristics are needed to move SALO forward for the clinical path. Methodology/Principal findings Recombinant SALO was expressed as a soluble secreted protein using Pichia pastoris, rSALO(P), with yields of 1g/L and >99% purity as assessed by SEC-MALS and SDS-PAGE. Unlike its native counterpart, rSALO(P) does not inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, antibodies to rSALO(P) inhibit the anti-complement activity of sand fly salivary gland homogenate. Immunization with rSALO(P) produces a delayed type hypersensitivity response in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting rSALO(P) lacked anti-complement activity but retained its immunogenicity. The structure of rSALO(P) was solved by S-SAD at Cu-Kalpha to 1.94 Å and refined to Rfactor 17%. SALO is ~80% helical, has no appreciable structural similarities to any human protein, and has limited structural similarity in the C-terminus to members of insect odorant binding proteins. SALO has three predicted human CD4+ T cell epitopes on surface exposed helices. Conclusions/Significance The results indicate that SALO as expressed and purified from P. pastoris is suitable for further scale-up, manufacturing, and testing. SALO has a novel structure, is not similar to any human proteins, is immunogenic in rodents, and does not have the anti-complement activity observed in the native salivary protein which are all important attributes to move this vaccine candidate forward to the clinical path. PMID

  11. Toward standardization of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) measurements: II. Performance of a laboratory network running the HPLC candidate reference measurement procedure and evaluation of a candidate reference material.

    PubMed

    Helander, Anders; Wielders, Jos P M; Jeppsson, Jan-Olof; Weykamp, Cas; Siebelder, Carla; Anton, Raymond F; Schellenberg, François; Whitfield, John B

    2010-11-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a descriptive term used for a temporary change in the transferrin glycosylation profile caused by alcohol, and used as a biomarker of chronic high alcohol consumption. The use of an array of methods for measurement of CDT in various absolute or relative amounts, and sometimes covering different transferrin glycoforms, has complicated the comparability of results and caused confusion among medical staff. This situation prompted initiation of an IFCC Working Group on CDT standardization. This second publication of the WG-CDT covers the establishment of a network of reference laboratories running a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) candidate reference measurement procedure, and evaluation of candidate secondary reference materials. The network laboratories demonstrated good and reproducible performance and thus can be used to assign target values for calibrators and controls. A candidate secondary reference material based on native human serum lyophilized with a cryo-/lyoprotectant to prevent protein denaturation was found to be commutable and stable during storage. A proposed strategy for calibration of different CDT methods is also presented. In an external quality assurance study involving 66 laboratories and covering the current routine CDT assays (HPLC, capillary electrophoresis and immunoassay), recalculation of observed results based on the nominal values for the candidate calibrator reduced the overall coefficient of variation from 18.9% to 5.5%. The logistics for distribution of reference materials and review of results were found to be functional, indicating that a full reference system for CDT may soon be available.

  12. Experience on fuel and structural materials development in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Laidler, J.J.; Last, G.A.

    1985-06-01

    The United States has conducted extensive LMFBR fuel and structural materials development programs since the mid-1960's. Fuels and materials irradiation tests conducted in EBR-II formed the basis for evaluating the expected performance of FFTF fuel and identified candidate fuels and materials for further full-scale testing in FFTF. The performance of FFTF fuel through the first three years of reactor operation (700 EFPD) has been outstanding. Peak fuel burnup has been limited by swelling of the cold worked AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel ducts rather than by fuel pin behavior. Standard FFTF driver fuel is currently being irradiated routinely to a peak burnup of approximately 100,000 MWd/MTM. Fuel assemblies fabricated with Alloy D9 (titanium modified austenitic stainless steel) cladding and ducts will complete irradiation to an exposure of 155,000 MWd/MTM by the end of 1985, and a large-scale FFTF test program to demonstrate the extended performance capability of fuel assemblies fabricated with the ferritic/martensitic stainless steel alloy HT9 is in progress. Current information indicates that mixed oxide fuel clad with alloy HT9, a modified D9 alloy or dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel, enclosed in an HT9 alloy duct, can be expected to achieve the extended burnup goals set for the US program. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Topological Kondo Insulator (TKI) and related candidate materials: High-resolution ARPES studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. Zahid

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, I plan to present ARPES (synchrotron and laser-based) studies of several mix valence and Kondo insulator phenomena in some of the rare earth heavy fermion compounds in connection to their non-trivial topology of band structures. Focus will be on SmB6 which has been predicted to be a TKI recently. By combining low-temperature and high energy-momentum resolution of the laser-based ARPES technique, for the first time, we accessed the surface electronic structure of the anomalous conductivity regime. At low T, we observe in-gap states within a 4 meV energy window of the Fermi level, which lie clearly within the bulk insulating gap. The in-gap states are found to be suppressed and eventually disappear, as the temperature is raised in approaching the coherent Kondo lattice hybridization (30 K), which proves that the in-gap states strongly depend on the existence of Kondo lattice hybridization and the effective Kondo gap, in agreement with their theoretical predicted origin of topological surface states within the Kondo insulating gap . Our Fermi mapping at the energy corresponding to these in-gap states shows distinct Fermi pockets that enclose the three Kramers' points the surface Brillouin zone, which are remarkably consistent with the theoretically predicted topological surface Fermi surface in the topological Kondo insulating phase within the level of energy resolution. The observed Fermi surface topology of the in-gap states, their temperature dependence across the transport anomaly and Kondo lattice hybridization temperatures, as well as their robustness against repeated thermal recycling, collectively not only provide a unique insight illuminating the nature of the residual conductivity anomaly but also serve as a strong experimental evidence to the predicted topological Kondo insulator phase. I also plan to present results on YbB6 and YbB12 both of which are mix valence compounds. This work is in collaboration with Madhab Neupane, N. Alidoust, S

  14. Study of Co/Pd multilayers as a candidate material for next generation magnetic media

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Bing; Amos, Nissim; Tian Yuan; Butler, John; Khizroev, Sakhrat; Litvinov, Dmitri

    2011-02-01

    We report a combinatorial synthesis study on the magnetic properties of sputter-deposited Co/Pd multilayers with high perpendicular anisotropy and high remnant squareness for magnetic media applications such as magnetic logic systems, bit patterned media, magneto-optical recording, and multilevel three-dimensional (3D) magnetic media. The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the multilayers originates from the interfacial anisotropy of the alloylike structure. The deposition conditions and subsequent microstructures of the multilayers are critical factors to determine the magnetic properties of the media. We investigated the dependence of the magnetic properties on the thickness of Co and Pd layers the number of Co/Pd bilayers. For instance, we found that a 0.26-nm-thick layer of Co would produce the highest coercivity value if paired with a 0.55-nm-thick Pd layer. Our results revealed that an Ar{sup +} milling could significantly increase the coercivity of the multilayer media. Further, we discovered that we could control the deposition pressure to achieve either granular or continuous media morphologies corresponding to exchange-coupled or decoupled grains, respectively. Finally, we used the combinatorial synthesis to tailor multilayers' properties to engineer a eight-level three-layer 3D media.

  15. Optical waveguide materials, structures, and dispersion modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jiaming; Lin, Jian; Li, Wenxiu; Xue, Xia; Huang, Anping; Xiao, Zhisong

    2016-11-01

    Optical waveguide is used in most integrated optic devices to confine and guide light in higher refractive index channels. The structures and materials of slot waveguides are reviewed in this paper. Coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROWs) can be used for a rotation sensor with compact size, low power consumption and low cost. The loss determines the ultimate sensitivity of CROW gyros. Resonator-based optical gyroscope's sensitivity for measuring rotation is enhanced via using the anomalous dispersion characteristic of superluminal light propagation, which can be also generated by using passive optical resonators.

  16. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  17. Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, D.W.; Bullen, D.B.

    1995-09-22

    One of the most significant factors impacting the performance of waste package container materials under repository relevant conditions is the thermal environment. This environment will be affected by the areal power density of the repository, which is dictated by facility design, and the dominant heat transfer mechanism at the site. The near-field environment will evolve as radioactive decay decreases the thermal output of each waste package. Recent calculations (Buscheck and Nitao, 1994) have addressed the importance of thermal loading conditions on waste package performance at the Yucca Mountain site. If a relatively low repository thermal loading design is employed, the temperature and relative humidity near the waste package may significantly affect the degradation of corrosion allowance barriers due to moist air oxidation and radiolytically enhanced corrosion. The purpose this report is to present a literature review of the potential degradation modes for moderately corrosion resistant nickel copper and nickel based candidate materials that may be applicable as alternate barriers for the ACD systems in the Yucca Mountain environment. This report presents a review of the corrosion of nickel-copper alloys, summaries of experimental evaluations of oxidation and atmospheric corrosion in nickel-copper alloys, views of experimental studies of aqueous corrosion in nickel copper alloys, a brief review of galvanic corrosion effects and a summary of stress corrosion cracking in these alloys.

  18. Structure Determination of Novel Polydiacetylene Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Mrinal Kanti

    The major objective of this work has been to synthesize and characterize some novel diacetylene polymers. Monomers of the general type HC(TBOND)C-(CH(,2))(,n)-C(TBOND)CH were oxidatively coupled (Glaser coupling) to synthesize polymers of the form ( (CH(,2))(,n)-C(TBOND)C-C(TBOND)C )(,x). These polymers (n = 5, 6, 8), termed macromonomers, were subsequently exposed to CO('60)-(gamma) radiation to effect the diacetylene polymerization. The resulting materials, called crosspolymerized macromonomers, were composed of regular two-dimensional networks of polydiacetylene and hydrocarbon chains. Crystal structures of macromonomers before and after crosspolymerization were determined essentially by electron diffraction analysis, with supporting information from x-ray fiber diffraction. A detailed investigation of the crosspolymerization reaction was made by C-13 NMR in solid state. A very special type of diacetylene monomer was synthesized by dimerizing 1,11-dodecadiyne through a controlled oxidative coupling. Preliminary characterization of these dimers was accomplished by using GPC, DSC and electron diffraction. Macroscopic single crystals of polymerized dimer were obtained by radiation ((gamma)-radiation) induced polymerization and simultaneous crystallization from solution. X -ray diffraction analysis was employed for the crystal structure determination of this material. The structure was found to be composed of sheets of alternating polydiacetylene and polyacetylene chains. The nearest neighbor distance between a polydiacetylene and a polyacetylene chain was approximately 4(ANGSTROM). The electrical conductivity of this undoped material was measured and found to be reasonably high ((TURN)10('-2) (OMEGA)('-1)cm('-1)). A (pi)-electron band structure calculation indicated that such high conductivity resulted because of significant interchain interaction within the unit cell. A detailed investigation of the consequences of anharmonic interaction on diffraction intensities

  19. Comparative gene expression analysis of avian embryonic facial structures reveals new candidates for human craniofacial disorders.

    PubMed

    Brugmann, S A; Powder, K E; Young, N M; Goodnough, L H; Hahn, S M; James, A W; Helms, J A; Lovett, M

    2010-03-01

    Mammals and birds have common embryological facial structures, and appear to employ the same molecular genetic developmental toolkit. We utilized natural variation found in bird beaks to investigate what genes drive vertebrate facial morphogenesis. We employed cross-species microarrays to describe the molecular genetic signatures, developmental signaling pathways and the spectrum of transcription factor (TF) gene expression changes that differ between cranial neural crest cells in the developing beaks of ducks, quails and chickens. Surprisingly, we observed that the neural crest cells established a species-specific TF gene expression profile that predates morphological differences between the species. A total of 232 genes were differentially expressed between the three species. Twenty-two of these genes, including Fgfr2, Jagged2, Msx2, Satb2 and Tgfb3, have been previously implicated in a variety of mammalian craniofacial defects. Seventy-two of the differentially expressed genes overlap with un-cloned loci for human craniofacial disorders, suggesting that our data will provide a valuable candidate gene resource for human craniofacial genetics. The most dramatic changes between species were in the Wnt signaling pathway, including a 20-fold up-regulation of Dkk2, Fzd1 and Wnt1 in the duck compared with the other two species. We functionally validated these changes by demonstrating that spatial domains of Wnt activity differ in avian beaks, and that Wnt signals regulate Bmp pathway activity and promote regional growth in facial prominences. This study is the first of its kind, extending on previous work in Darwin's finches and provides the first large-scale insights into cross-species facial morphogenesis.

  20. MATERIALS WITH COMPLEX ELECTRONIC/ATOMIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. PARKIN; L. CHEN; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    We explored both experimentally and theoretically the behavior of materials at stresses close to their theoretical strength. This involves the preparation of ultra fine scale structures by a variety of fabrication methods. In the past year work has concentrated on wire drawing of in situ composites such as Cu-Ag and Cu-Nb. Materials were also fabricated by melting alloys in glass and drawing them into filaments at high temperatures by a method known as Taylor wire technique. Cu-Ag microwires have been drawn by this technique to produce wires 10 {micro}m in diameter that consist of nanoscale grains of supersaturated solid solution. Organogels formed from novel organic gelators containing cholesterol tethered to squaraine dyes or trans-stilbene derivatives have been studied from several different perspectives. The two types of molecules are active toward several organic liquids, gelling in some cases at w/w percentages as low as 0.1. While relatively robust, acroscopically dry gels are formed in several cases, studies with a variety of probes indicate that much of the solvent may exist in domains that are essentially liquid-like in terms of their microenvironment. The gels have been imaged by atomic force microscopy and conventional and fluorescence microscopy, monitoring both the gelator fluorescence in the case of the stilbene-cholesterol gels and, the fluorescence of solutes dissolved in the solvent. Remarkably, our findings show that several of the gels are composed of similarly appearing fibrous structures visible at the nano-, micro-, and macroscale.

  1. Solubility of Structurally Complicated Materials: II. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Ari L.

    2006-12-01

    Bone is a structurally complex material, formed of both organic and inorganic chemicals. The organic compounds constitute mostly collagen and other proteins. The inorganic or bone mineral components constitute predominantly calcium, phosphate, carbonate, and a host of minor ingredients. The mineralized bone is composed of crystals which are closely associated with a protein of which collagen is an acidic polysaccharide material. This association is very close and the protein integrates into the crystalline structure. The mineralization involves the deposition of relatively insoluble crystals on an organic framework. The solubility process takes place when the outermost ions in the crystal lattice breakaway from the surface and become separated from the crystal. This is characteristic for ions dissolving in water or aqueous solutions at the specified temperature. The magnitude of solubility is temperature and pH dependent. Bone is sparingly soluble in most solvents. Enamel is less soluble than bone and fluoroapatite is the least soluble of all apatites in acid buffers. Collagen is less soluble in neutral salt solution than in dilute acid solutions at ambient temperatures. The solubility of collagens in solvents gradually decreases with increasing age of the bone samples.

  2. Thermal-Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teate, Anthony A.

    1997-01-01

    Since its inception and successful implementation in 1997 at James Madison University, the Thermal Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory (T-SaMTL) funded by the NASA Langley Research Center is evolving into one of the University's premier and exemplary efforts to increase minority representation in the sciences and mathematics. Serving ten (10) students and faculty directly and almost fifty (50) students indirectly, T-SAMTL, through its recruitment efforts, workshops, mentoring program, tutorial services and its research and computational laboratories has marked the completion of the first year with support from NASA totaling $ 100,000. Beginning as an innovative academic research and mentoring program for underrepresented minority science and mathematics students, the program now boasts a constituency which consists of 50% graduating seniors in the spring of 1998 with 50% planning to go to graduate school. The program's intent is to increase the number of underrepresented minorities who receive doctoral degrees in the sciences by initiating an academically enriched research program aimed at strengthening the academic and self actualization skills of undergraduate students with the potential to pursue doctoral study in the sciences. The program provides financial assistance, academic enrichment, and professional and personal development support for minority students who demonstrate the potential and strong desire to pursue careers in the sciences and mathematics. James Madison University was awarded the first $100,000, in April 1997, by The NASA Langley Research Center for establishment and support of its Thermal Structures and Materials Testing

  3. Thermal-Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teate, Anthony A.

    1997-01-01

    Since its inception and successful implementation in 1997 at James Madison University, the Thermal Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory (T-SaMTL) funded by the NASA Langley Research Center is evolving into one of the University's premier and exemplary efforts to increase minority representation in the sciences and mathematics. Serving ten (10) students and faculty directly and almost fifty (50) students indirectly, T-SAMTL, through its recruitment efforts, workshops, mentoring program, tutorial services and its research and computational laboratories has marked the completion of the first year with support from NASA totaling $ 100,000. Beginning as an innovative academic research and mentoring program for underrepresented minority science and mathematics students, the program now boasts a constituency which consists of 50% graduating seniors in the spring of 1998 with 50% planning to go to graduate school. The program's intent is to increase the number of underrepresented minorities who receive doctoral degrees in the sciences by initiating an academically enriched research program aimed at strengthening the academic and self actualization skills of undergraduate students with the potential to pursue doctoral study in the sciences. The program provides financial assistance, academic enrichment, and professional and personal development support for minority students who demonstrate the potential and strong desire to pursue careers in the sciences and mathematics. James Madison University was awarded the first $100,000, in April 1997, by The NASA Langley Research Center for establishment and support of its Thermal Structures and Materials Testing

  4. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, Harry W; Petkovic, Lucia M; Ginosar, Daniel M

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  5. Producing and optimizing novel materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, Mahdi

    2011-12-01

    A series of detailed experimental and finite element investigations were carried out to study the response of selected objects which are currently utilized for load carrying. These investigations were later applied to optimize the mechanical performance of the studied structures and materials. First, a number of experiments and detailed finite element simulations were carried out to study the response and failure of single lap joints with non-flat interface under uniaxial tension. The adherents were made from fiber reinforced epoxy composite and the custom-made mold allowed the fibers to follow the profile of the bonded joint interface. The experiments showed that the interface shape has significant effect on the mechanical behavior and strength of the bonded joints. Finite element simulations were performed to estimate the distribution of shear and peeling stresses along the bonded joints and the results were linked to the experimental investigations. Additional parametric calculations were also carried out to highlight the role of interface shape on the distribution of stresses, and inherently the overall strength and behavior of the bonded joints. In addition, the role of a central void on the distribution of the stresses in a bonded joint with flat and non-flat sinusoidal interfaces was investigated. The second topic concerns Wood Plastic Composites (WPC) which are widely used in the industry due to its durability, low cost, and anti-moisture properties in comparison with the natural wood. In this research, we have produced flout shaped WPC samples using African black wood powder and Phenolic resin in a hot compression molding set-up. Initial WPC composites were produced by systematically changing the wood volume fraction. Based on these results the optimum temperature, pressure and wood volume fraction for developing WPC in a form of a flute is developed. A series of experimental procedures were performed to improve mechanical properties of WPC samples by

  6. Fusion materials: Technical evaluation of the technology of vandium alloys for use as blanket structural materials in fusion power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-04

    The Committee`s evaluation of vanadium alloys as a structural material for fusion reactors was constrained by limited data and time. The design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor is still in the concept stage, so meaningful design requirements were not available. The data on the effect of environment and irradiation on vanadium alloys were sparse, and interpolation of these data were made to select the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. With an aggressive, fully funded program it is possible to qualify a vanadium alloy as the principal structural material for the ITER blanket in the available 5 to 8-year window. However, the data base for V-5Cr-5Ti is United and will require an extensive development and test program. Because of the chemical reactivity of vanadium the alloy will be less tolerant of system failures, accidents, and off-normal events than most other candidate blanket structural materials and will require more careful handling during fabrication of hardware. Because of the cost of the material more stringent requirements on processes, and minimal historical worlding experience, it will cost an order of magnitude to qualify a vanadium alloy for ITER blanket structures than other candidate materials. The use of vanadium is difficult and uncertain; therefore, other options should be explored more thoroughly before a final selection of vanadium is confirmed. The Committee views the risk as being too high to rely solely on vanadium alloys. In viewing the state and nature of the design of the ITER blanket as presented to the Committee, h is obvious that there is a need to move toward integrating fabrication, welding, and materials engineers into the ITER design team. If the vanadium allay option is to be pursued, a large program needs to be started immediately. The commitment of funding and other resources needs to be firm and consistent with a realistic program plan.

  7. Genetic variation in the rhythmonome: ethnic variation and haplotype structure in candidate genes for arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Bush, William S; Crawford, Dana C; Alexander, Charles; George, Alfred L; Roden, Dan M; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2009-01-01

    Aims The ‘rhythmonome’ is the term we have adopted to describe the set of genes that determine the normal coordinated electrical activity in the heart. Elements of this set include pore-forming ion channels, function-modifying proteins and intracellular calcium control elements. Rare mutations in many of these genes are known to cause unusual congenital monogenic arrhythmia syndromes, and single common variants have been reported to modify arrhythmia phenotypes. Here, we report an evaluation of the variation and haplotype structure in six key components of the rhythmonome. Materials & methods SNPs were typed using DNA extracted from Coriell cell lines to survey allele frequencies and haplotype structure in six genes (ANK2, SCN5A, KCNE1 and 2 gene cluster, KCNQ1, KCNH2 and RYR2) across four human populations (African—American, European American, Han Chinese and Mexican American). Results A total of 307 SNPs were analyzed across the six genes, revealing significant allele-frequency differences between populations and clear differences in haplotype structure. Conclusions The pattern of variation we report is an important step towards incorporating common variation across the rhythmonome in studies of arrhythmia susceptibility. PMID:19530973

  8. Recent progress in R&D on tungsten alloys for divertor structural and plasma facing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wurster, S.; Baluc, N.; Battabyal, M.; Crosby, T.; Du, J.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Hasegawa, Akira; Hoffmann, A.; Kimura, A.; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Kurtz, Richard J.; Li, H.; Noh, S.; Reiser, J.; Riesch, J.; Rieth, Michael; Setyawan, Wahyu; Walter, M.; You, J. H.; Pippan, R.

    2013-03-13

    Tungsten materials are candidates for plasma facing components for ITER and DEMO because of their superior thermophysical properties. Knowledge and strategies to improve properties of tungsten-based materials are still under development, as they are not a common structural material such as steel. Consequently, several activities have started in Europe, Japan, USA and China. Research is directed towards manufacturing of new materials based on alloying, microstructure stabilizing and composite formation involving improved processing steps. Beside experimental analyses, work also focuses on computational treatment of open questions, supporting the development of better tungsten materials. Assuming the availability of an ideal material that is ready to use, there remain the questions of inherent safety, the joining of tungsten to steel and the influence of radiation damage. These are topics of increasing interest when the material comes to application.

  9. A method for finding candidate conformations for molecular replacement using relative rotation between domains of a known structure.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jay I; Lattman, Eaton E; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a methodology to obtain candidate conformations of multidomain proteins for use in molecular replacement. For each separate domain, the orientational relationship between the template and the target structure is obtained using standard molecular replacement. The orientational relationships of the domains are then used to calculate the relative rotation between the domains in the target conformation by using pose-estimation techniques from the field of robotics and computer vision. With the angle of relative rotation between the domains as a cost function, iterative normal-mode analysis is used to drive the template structure to a candidate conformation that matches the X-ray crystallographic data obtained for the target conformation. The selection of the correct intra-protein domain orientations from among the many spurious maxima in the rotation function (including orientations obtained from domains in symmetry mates rather than within the same copy of the protein) presents a challenge. This problem is resolved by checking R factors of each domain, measuring the absolute value of relative rotation between domains, and evaluating the cost value after each candidate conformation is driven to convergence with iterative NMA. As a validation, the proposed method is applied to three test proteins: ribose-binding protein, lactoferrin and calcium ATPase. In each test case, the orientation and translation of the final candidate conformation in the unit cell are generated correctly from the suggested procedure. The results show that the proposed method can yield viable candidate conformations for use in molecular replacement and can reveal the structural details and pose of the target conformation in the crystallographic unit cell.

  10. Abrasive wear of advanced structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gun-Young

    Wear of advanced structural materials, namely composites and ceramics, in abrasion has been examined in the present study. A simple physically-based model for the abrasive wear of composite materials is presented based on the mechanics and mechanisms associated with sliding wear in soft (ductile) matrix composites containing hard (brittle) reinforcement particles. The model is based on the assumption that any portion of the reinforcement that is removed as wear debris cannot contribute to the wear resistance of the matrix material. The size of this non-contributing portion of reinforcement is estimated by modeling three primary wear mechanisms, specifically plowing, cracking at the matrix/reinforcement interface or in the reinforcement, and particle removal. Critical variables describing the role of the reinforcement, such as the relative size, fracture toughness, and the nature of the matrix/reinforcement interface, are characterized by a single contribution coefficient, C. Predictions are compared with the results of experimental two-body (pin-on-drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy-matrix composite material. In addition, the effects of post heat-treatment on the wear behavior of toughened silicon carbide (ABC-SiC) are investigated by characterizing the role of the microstructures introduced during the post annealing processes. When the annealing temperature is above 1300°C, an aluminum rich secondary phase (nano-precipitate) forms and grows inside the SiC grains. This toughened silicon carbide (ABC-SiC), annealed at temperatures ranging from 0 to 1600°C, is subjected to two- and three-body abrasions with different sizes of abrasives (3˜70 mum). The test results exhibit that the effect of nano-precipitates on wear resistance of post-annealed ABC-SiC is restricted to the abrasion with fine abrasives (3 mum), since nano-precipitates, in the range from 4 nm at 1300°C to 25 nm at 1600°C, are comparable in dimension

  11. The LDCE Particle Impact Experiment as flown on STS-46. [limited duration space environment candidate materials exposure (LDCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, Carl R.; Tanner, William G.; Borg, Janet; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Alexander, W. Merle; Maag, Andrew J.

    1992-01-01

    Many materials and techniques have been developed by the authors to sample the flux of particles in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Though regular in-site sampling of the flux in LEO the materials and techniques have produced data which compliment the data now being amassed by the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) research activities. Orbital debris models have not been able to describe the flux of particles with d sub p less than or = 0.05 cm, because of the lack of data. Even though LDEF will provide a much needed baseline flux measurement, the continuous monitoring of micron and sub-micron size particles must be carried out. A flight experiment was conducted on the Space Shuttle as part of the LDCE payload to develop an understanding of the Spatial Density (concentration) as a function of size (mass) for particle sizes 1 x 10(exp 6) cm and larger. In addition to the enumeration of particle impacts, it is the intent of the experiment that hypervelocity particles be captured and returned intact. Measurements will be performed post flight to determine the flux density, diameters, and subsequent effects on various optical, thermal control and structural materials. In addition to these principal measurements, the Particle Impact Experiment (PIE) also provides a structure and sample holders for the exposure of passive material samples to the space environment, e.g., thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen, etc. The experiment will measure the optical property changes of mirrors and will provide the fluence of the ambient atomic oxygen environment to other payload experimenters. In order to augment the amount of material returned in a form which can be analyzed, the survivability of the experiment as well as the captured particles will be assessed. Using Sandia National Laboratory's hydrodynamic computer code CTH, hypervelocity impacts on the materials which comprise the experiments have been investigated and the progress of these studies are reported.

  12. HCV infection through perforating and cutting material among candidates for blood donation in Belém, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Valois, Rubenilson Caldas; Maradei-Pereira, Luciana Maria Cunha; Crescente, José Ângelo Barletta; Oliveira-Filho, Aldemir Branco de; Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated epidemiological factors for HCV infection associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments among candidates for blood donation (CBD) in the city of Belém, Pará, Brazilian Amazon. Two definitions of HCV infection cases were used: anti-HCV positivity shown by EIA, and HCV-RNA detection by PCR. Infected and uninfected CBD completed a questionnaire about possible risk factors associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments. The information was evaluated using simple and multiple logistic regressions. Between May and November 2010, 146 (1.1%) persons with anti-HCV antibodies and 106 (0.8%) with HCV-RNA were detected among 13,772 CBD in Belém. Risk factors associated with HCV infection based on the EIA (model 1) and PCR (model 2) results were: use of needles and syringes sterilized at home; shared use of razors at home, sharing of disposable razors in barbershops, beauty salons etc.; and sharing manicure and pedicure material. The models of HCV infection associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments should be taken into account by local and regional health authorities and by those of other countries with similar cultural practices, in order to provide useful information to guide political and public strategies to control HCV transmission.

  13. Impact of phase stability on the corrosion behavior of the austenitic candidate materials for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bullen, D.B.; Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1987-10-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is responsible for the development of the waste package design to meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing requirements for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. The metallic container component of the waste package is required to assist in providing substantially complete containment of the waste for a period of up to 1000 years. Long term phase stability of the austenitic candidate materials (304L and 316L stainless steels and alloy 825) over this time period at moderate temperatures (100-250{sup 0}C) can impact the mechanical and corrosion behavior of the metal barrier. A review of the technical literature with respect to phase stability of 304L, 316L and 825 is presented. The impact of martensitic transformations, carbide precipitation and intermediate ({sigma}, chi, and eta) phase formation on the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of these alloys at repository relevant conditions is discussed. The effect of sensitization on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of each alloy is also addressed. A summary of the impact of phase stability on the degradation of each alloy in the proposed repository environment is included. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Computational Modeling in Structural Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    High temperature materials such as silicon carbide, a variety of nitrides, and ceramic matrix composites find use in aerospace, automotive, machine tool industries and in high speed civil transport applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used in processing such structural materials. Variations of CVD include deposition on substrates, coating of fibers, inside cavities and on complex objects, and infiltration within preforms called chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Our current knowledge of the process mechanisms, ability to optimize processes, and scale-up for large scale manufacturing is limited. In this regard, computational modeling of the processes is valuable since a validated model can be used as a design tool. The effort is similar to traditional chemically reacting flow modeling with emphasis on multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, large sets of homogeneous reactions, and surface chemistry. In the case of CVI, models for pore infiltration are needed. In the present talk, examples of SiC nitride, and Boron deposition from the author's past work will be used to illustrate the utility of computational process modeling.

  15. Computational Modeling in Structural Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    High temperature materials such as silicon carbide, a variety of nitrides, and ceramic matrix composites find use in aerospace, automotive, machine tool industries and in high speed civil transport applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used in processing such structural materials. Variations of CVD include deposition on substrates, coating of fibers, inside cavities and on complex objects, and infiltration within preforms called chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Our current knowledge of the process mechanisms, ability to optimize processes, and scale-up for large scale manufacturing is limited. In this regard, computational modeling of the processes is valuable since a validated model can be used as a design tool. The effort is similar to traditional chemically reacting flow modeling with emphasis on multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, large sets of homogeneous reactions, and surface chemistry. In the case of CVI, models for pore infiltration are needed. In the present talk, examples of SiC nitride, and Boron deposition from the author's past work will be used to illustrate the utility of computational process modeling.

  16. Testing of candidate materials for their resistance to alkali-vapor adsorption in PFBC and gasification environments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Natesan, K.; Swift, W.M.

    1995-08-01

    Laboratory-scale studies were performed to identify metallic material(s) having no, or limited, affinity for alkali vapors in an environment of either the off-gas from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) or the fuel gas from coal gasification. Such materials would be potential candidates for use as components in advanced coal-utilization systems. The following materials were tested for adsorption of NaCl vapor at 870--875 C and atmospheric pressure in a simulated PFBC off-gas (oxidizing) doped with 80 ppmW NaCl vapor: iron-based Type 304 stainless steel (304 SS), nickel-based Hastelloy C-276 and Hastelloy X alloys, cobalt-based Haynes No. 188 alloy, noble-metal-coated 304 SS, aluminized 304 SS, and ZrO{sub 2}-coated 304 SS. The Haynes No. 188 alloy and the aluminized 304 SS were also tested for their NaCl-vapor adsorption in a simulated gasification fuel gas (reducing) under the same test conditions as in the PFBC off-gas test. After 100 h of testing, the specimens were analyzed with a SEM equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer, and by an AES. The aluminized 304 SS had the least tendency to adsorb NaCl vapor, as well as an excellent resistance to corrosion as a result of the formation of a protective layer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on its surface. In the reducing environment, however, the aluminized 304 SS was badly corroded by H{sub 2}S attack. The Haynes No. 188 showed virtually no NaCl-vapor adsorption and only limited H{sub 2}S attack. The authors recommend further long-term parametric studies to quantitate alkali-vapor adsorption as a function of operating variables for (1) the aluminized 304 SS in the PFBC off-gas environment and (2) the Haynes No. 188 in the gasification fuel gas environment.

  17. The influence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enzyme ratio on preparation virgin coconut oil for candidate in-house reference materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohyami, Yuli; Anjani, Rafika Debby; Purwanti, Napthalina Putri

    2017-03-01

    Virgin coconut oil is an excellent product which has result of oil processing business opportunities in the international market. Standardization of virgin coconut oil necessary to satisfy the requirements industry needs. This research is expected as procedure preparation of reference materials. Preparation of virgin coconut oil by Sacharomycescerevisiaeenzyme. Based on the results of this study concluded that the ratio of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can affect the yield of virgin coconut oil produced. The preparation of virgin coconut oil enzymatically using a variety of mass ratio of 0.001 to 0.006% is obtained yield average of 12.40%. The optimum separation of virgin coconut oil on the use of enzymes with a mass ratio of 0.002%. The average water content at a ratio of 0.002% is 0.04 % with a value of uncertainty is 0.005%. The average iodine number in virgin coconut oil produced is 2.4403 ± 0,1974 grams of iodine per 100 grams of oil and optimum iodine number is obtained from the manufacturing process virgin coconut oil with a ratio of 0.006% Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sacharomycescerevisiae with a ratio of 0.002% results virgin coconut oil with acid number 0.3068 ± 0.1098%. The peroxide value of virgin coconut oil between 0.0108 ± 0.009 to 0.0114 ± 0015milli-equivalent per kilograms. Organoleptic test results and test chemical parameters can be used as the test data that can be developed in prototype preparation of candidate in-house reference material in the testing standards of quality virgin coconut oil.

  18. Structural Composite Construction Materials Manufactured from Municipal Solid Waste

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-20

    in Table 1. Candidate matrix materials included polystyrene (PS) or expanded polystyrene (EPS), high density polyethylene (HDPE), and polyethylene...companies make a variety of expanded polystyrene insulation panels that arc used in insulation and roofing systems.46 Thermoplastics are seeing

  19. Exploring Writing Circles as Innovative, Collaborative Writing Structures with Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth; Blanch, Norine; Gurjar, Nandita

    2017-01-01

    Writing circles are "small groups... meeting regularly to share drafts, choose common writing topics, practice positive response, and in general, help each other become better writers" (Vopat, 2009, p. 6). In this exploratory study, writing circles were employed with elementary teacher candidates in hopes of enhancing their perceptions…

  20. HITEMP Material and Structural Optimization Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Craig S.; Arnold, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of adding viscoelasticity and the Generalized Method of Cells (GMC) for micromechanical viscoelastic behavior into the commercial HyperSizer structural analysis and optimization code was investigated. The viscoelasticity methodology was developed in four steps. First, a simplified algorithm was devised to test the iterative time stepping method for simple one-dimensional multiple ply structures. Second, GMC code was made into a callable subroutine and incorporated into the one-dimensional code to test the accuracy and usability of the code. Third, the viscoelastic time-stepping and iterative scheme was incorporated into HyperSizer for homogeneous, isotropic viscoelastic materials. Finally, the GMC was included in a version of HyperSizer. MS Windows executable files implementing each of these steps is delivered with this report, as well as source code. The findings of this research are that both viscoelasticity and GMC are feasible and valuable additions to HyperSizer and that the door is open for more advanced nonlinear capability, such as viscoplasticity.

  1. Structures and Crystal Chemistry of Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Daniel Edward

    The crystal chemistry of several layered materials has been explored using a variety of methods, with an emphasis on their structural aspects. In the second part of this work, the structure of several copper oxides that are of significance to the study of superconductors are described. The crystal structures of MgCl_2 and CdCl_2 have been refined using powder X-ray diffraction data. They have the space group Roverline{3}m. For magnesium chloride the unit cell constants are a = 3.6363(1) A, c = 17.6663(5) A. For cadmium chloride they are a = 3.8459(1) A, c = 17.4931(4) A. The structures and their relationship to that of fluorite are discussed within the framework of a Born-Mayer model. The crystal structure of Mg(OD)_2 has been refined from time-of flight (TOF) neutron diffraction data and found to be trigonal, Poverline {3}m1, a = 3.1455(1) A, c = 4.7646(3) A. The data were collected at 305 K. The O-D bond length is 0.937 (1) A (corrected for "riding" motion 0.948 A). An infrared/Raman study of Mg(OH)_2 was conducted in a diamond anvil cell in the pressure range from room pressure up to 7 Gpa. For layered crystals, it was found that as the internally fixed layers are moved apart the Madelung energy of the system becomes constant after a very short distance, although not necessarily that of the given crystal's energy at ambient conditions. The crystal structure of Sr(OD)_2 has been refined from time-of-flight neutron diffraction data and the deuterium positions found. Strontium deuteroxide crystallizes in the space group Pnma, with the unit cell constants of a = 9.8269(5) A, b = 3.9051(2) A, and c = 6.0733(3) A. The crystal structures of SrCuO_2 and Sr_2CuO_3 have been refined by time-of-flight neutron diffraction. For SrCuO_2 the space group is Cmcm, a = 3.57002(2), b = 16.32268(8), c = 3.91100(2); for Sr _2CuO_3 the space group is Immm, a = 3.49900(5), b = 12.7009(2), c = 3.91120(5). In both structures the strontium atoms are coordinated by seven oxygen atoms

  2. Dark matter candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    One of the simplest, yet most profound, questions we can ask about the Universe is, how much stuff is in it, and further what is that stuff composed of. Needless to say, the answer to this question has very important implications for the evolution of the Universe, determining both the ultimate fate and the course of structure formation. Remarkably, at this late date in the history of the Universe we still do not have a definitive answer to this simplest of questions---although we have some very intriguing clues. It is known with certainty that most of the material in the Universe is dark, and we have the strong suspicion that the dominant component of material in the Cosmos is not baryons, but rather is exotic relic elementary particles left over from the earliest, very hot epoch of the Universe. If true, the Dark Matter question is a most fundamental one facing both particle physics and cosmology. The leading particle dark matter candidates are: the axion, the neutralino, and a light neutrino species. All three candidates are accessible to experimental tests, and experiments are now in progress. In addition, there are several dark horse, long shot, candidates, including the superheavy magnetic monopole and soliton stars. 13 refs.

  3. Characterization of candidate reference materials for bone lead via interlaboratory study and double isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, David J.; Hetter, Katherine M.; Verostek, Mary Frances; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Four candidate ground bone reference materials (NYS RMs 05-01 through 04), were produced from lead-dosed bovine and caprine sources, and characterized by interlaboratory study. The consensus value ( X ) and expanded standard uncertainty (UX ) were determined from the robust average and standard deviation of the participants’ data for each NYS RM 05-01 through 04. The values were 1.08 ±0.04, 15.3 ±0.5, 12.4 ±0.5, and 29.9 ±1.1 μg g−1 Pb, respectively. Youden plots of z-scores showed a statistically significant correlation between the results for pairs of NYS RM 05-02 through 04, indicating common sources of between-laboratory variation affecting reproducibility. NYS RM 05-01 exhibited more random variability affecting repeatability at low concentration. Some participants using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) exhibited a negative bias compared to the all-method consensus value. Other methods used included inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), isotope dilution (ID-) ICP-MS, and ICP atomic (optical) emission spectroscopy (-OES). The NYS RMs 05-01 through 04 were subsequently re-analyzed in house using double ID-ICP-MS to assign certified reference values (C ) and expanded uncertainty (UC ) of 1.09 ± 0.03, 16.1 ± 0.3, 13.2 ± 0.3 and 31.5 ± 0.7, respectively, indicating a low bias in the interlaboratory data. SRM 1486 Bone Meal was analyzed for measurement quality assessment obtaining results in agreement with the certified values within the stated uncertainty. Analysis using a primary reference method based on ID-ICP-MS with full quantification of uncertainty calculated according to ISO guidelines provided traceability to SI units. PMID:23087531

  4. Macroporous structures based on biodegradable polymers--candidates for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Simionescu, Bogdan C; Neamtu, Andrei; Balhui, Ciprian; Danciu, Mihai; Ivanov, Daniela; David, Geta

    2013-09-01

    New hybrid cryogels comprising natural polymers (free atelocollagen or atelocollagen mixed with a hyaluronic acid derivative) and a synthetic polyester--poly(ε-caprolactone)--were successfully developed by a cryogenic treatment and a subsequent freeze-drying step. Systematic studies on the effect of preparation conditions (reaction mixture composition, total concentration of the feed dispersion, and freezing regime) on cryogelation efficiency were conducted. The degree of cross-linking and the morphology of the obtained materials were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and (environmental) scanning electron microscopy (ESEM/SEM) techniques. Considering their possible biomedical application, the developed macroporous hydrogels were also investigated in terms of swelling behavior and hemo/biocompatibility. The produced hydrogels had an uniform interconnected open porous structure with a porosity of up to 95% and pores size in the range of 83-260 μm. All obtained cryogels were elastic, mechanically stable, with a superfast swelling kinetics. In vitro hemocompatibility assay gave hemolysis ratios (HRs) lower than 0.5%, which is below the permissible limit of 5%. The in vivo tolerance tests performed by implantation of cryogel specimens into Wistar rats proved their biocompatibility. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Laser Materials Processing for NASA's Aerospace Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagarathnam, Karthik; Hunyady, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Lasers are useful for performing operations such as joining, machining, built-up freeform fabrication, and surface treatment. Due to the multifunctional nature of a single tool and the variety of materials that can be processed, these attributes are attractive in order to support long-term missions in space. However, current laser technology also has drawbacks for space-based applications. Specifically, size, power efficiency, lack of robustness, and problems processing highly reflective materials are all concerns. With the advent of recent breakthroughs in solidstate laser (e.g., diode-pumped lasers) and fiber optic technologies, the potential to perform multiple processing techniques in space has increased significantly. A review of the historical development of lasers from their infancy to the present will be used to show how these issues may be addressed. The review will also indicate where further development is necessary to realize a laser-based materials processing capability in space. The broad utility of laser beams in synthesizing various classes of engineering materials will be illustrated using state-of-the art processing maps for select lightweight alloys typically found on spacecraft. Both short- and long-term space missions will benefit from the development of a universal laser-based tool with low power consumption, improved process flexibility, compactness (e.g., miniaturization), robustness, and automation for maximum utility with a minimum of human interaction. The potential advantages of using lasers with suitable wavelength and beam properties for future space missions to the moon, Mars and beyond will be discussed. The laser processing experiments in the present report were performed using a diode pumped, pulsed/continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (50 W max average laser power), with a 1064 nm wavelength. The processed materials included Ti-6AI-4V, Al-2219 and Al-2090. For Phase I of this project, the laser process conditions were varied and optimized

  6. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, John J.; Buksa, John J.

    1995-09-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment. Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  7. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Buksa, J.J.

    1994-08-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  8. Method for making field-structured memory materials

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Anderson, Robert A.; Tigges, Chris P.

    2002-01-01

    A method of forming a dual-level memory material using field structured materials. The field structured materials are formed from a dispersion of ferromagnetic particles in a polymerizable liquid medium, such as a urethane acrylate-based photopolymer, which are applied as a film to a support and then exposed in selected portions of the film to an applied magnetic or electric field. The field can be applied either uniaxially or biaxially at field strengths up to 150 G or higher to form the field structured materials. After polymerizing the field-structure materials, a magnetic field can be applied to selected portions of the polymerized field-structured material to yield a dual-level memory material on the support, wherein the dual-level memory material supports read-and-write binary data memory and write once, read many memory.

  9. Materials Cartography: Representing and Mining Material Space Using Structural and Electronic Fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oses, Corey; Isayev, Olexandr; Fourches, Denis; Muratov, Eugene; Rasch, Kevin; Tropsha, Alexander; Curtarolo, Stefano; CenterMaterials Genomics, Duke University Collaboration; LaboratoryMolecular Modeling, UNC Chapel Hill Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    As the proliferation of high-throughput approaches in materials science is increasing the wealth of data in the field, the gap between accumulated-information and derived-knowledge widens. We address the issue of scientific discovery in materials databases by introducing novel analytical approaches based on structural and electronic materials fingerprints. The framework is employed to (i) query large databases of materials using similarity concepts, (ii) map the connectivity of the materials space (i.e., as a materials cartogram) for rapidly identifying regions with unique organizations/properties, and (iii) develop predictive Quantitative Materials Structure-Property Relationships (QMSPR) models for guiding materials design. In this study, we test these fingerprints by seeking target material properties. As a quantitative example, we model the critical temperatures of known superconductors. Our novel materials fingerprinting and materials cartography approaches contribute to the emerging field of materials informatics by enabling effective computational tools to analyze, visualize, model, and design new materials.

  10. 3D polypyrrole structures as a sensing material for glucose detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cysewska, Karolina; Szymańska, Magdalena; Jasiński, Piotr

    2016-11-01

    In this work, 3D polypyrrole (PPy) structures as material for glucose detection is proposed. Polypyrrole was electrochemically polymerized on platinum screen-printed electrode from an aqueous solution of lithium perchlorate and pyrrole. The growth mechanism of such PPy structures was studied by ex-situ scanning electron microscopy. Preliminary studies show that studied here PPy film is a good candidate as a sensing material for glucose biosensor. It exhibits very high sensitivity (28.5 mA·mM-1·cm-2) and can work without any additional dopants, mediators or enzymes. It was also shown that glucose detection depends on the PPy morphology. The same PPy material was immobilized with the glucose oxidase enzyme. Such material exhibited higher signal response, however it lost its stability very fast.

  11. Evaluation of Method-Specific Extraction Variability for the Measurement of Fatty Acids in a Candidate Infant/Adult Nutritional Formula Reference Material.

    PubMed

    Place, Benjamin J

    2017-05-01

    To address community needs, the National Institute of Standards and Technology has developed a candidate Standard Reference Material (SRM) for infant/adult nutritional formula based on milk and whey protein concentrates with isolated soy protein called SRM 1869 Infant/Adult Nutritional Formula. One major component of this candidate SRM is the fatty acid content. In this study, multiple extraction techniques were evaluated to quantify the fatty acids in this new material. Extraction methods that were based on lipid extraction followed by transesterification resulted in lower mass fraction values for all fatty acids than the values measured by methods utilizing in situ transesterification followed by fatty acid methyl ester extraction (ISTE). An ISTE method, based on the identified optimal parameters, was used to determine the fatty acid content of the new infant/adult nutritional formula reference material.

  12. A non-element-enriched, non-lyophilized candidate rat serum reference material prepared for once use in determination of inorganic elements by ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Yun; Lian, Hong-Zhen; Mao, Li; Chen, Yi-Jun; Hu, Xin; Qiao, Jun-qin; Sheng, Dong

    2009-06-15

    A practice about preparing a once-used native state candidate rat serum reference material has been described for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-MS) determination of inorganic elements in biological matrices, which is independently packed, easy to use, non-lyophilized, without element-spiking, and with stable quality. Various dispersing and storing factors influencing the serum quality have been investigated including container material, sampling volume, packing mode and storage time. The contents of twelve main elements in the rat serum have been not only evaluated by ICP-MS but also verified by other analytical techniques. The probation of this unconventional candidate serum reference material by different laboratories has given very similar contents of 12 main trace elements in the serum, and proven its applicability to support quality assurance of biological sample analyses.

  13. Effect of Eu magnetism on the electronic properties of the candidate Dirac material EuMnBi2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Andrew F.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sales, Brian C.

    2014-08-01

    The crystal structure and physical properties of the layered material EuMnBi2 have been characterized by measurements on single crystals. EuMnBi2 is isostructural with the Dirac material SrMnBi2 based on single-crystal x-ray diffraction, crystallizing in the I4/mmm space group (No. 139). Magnetic susceptibility measurements suggest antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering of moments on divalent Eu ions near TN=22 K. For low fields, the ordered Eu moments are aligned along the c axis, and a spin flop is observed near 5.4 T at 5 K. The moment is not saturated in an applied field of 13 T at 5 K, which is uncommon for compounds containing Eu2+. The magnetic behavior suggests an anisotropy enhancement via interaction between Eu and the Mn moments that appear to be ordered antiferromagnetically below ≈310 K. A large increase in the magnetoresistance is observed across the spin flop, with absolute magnetoresistance reaching ≈650% at 5 K and 12 T. Hall effect measurements reveal a decrease in the carrier density below TN, which implies a manipulation of the Fermi surface by magnetism on the sites surrounding the Bi square nets that lead to Dirac cones in this family of materials.

  14. Field-structured material media and methods for synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Hughes, Robert C.; Anderson, Robert A.

    2001-09-18

    The present application is directed to a new class of composite materials, called field-structured composite (FSC) materials, which comprise a oriented aggregate structure made of magnetic particles suspended in a nonmagnetic medium, and to a new class of processes for their manufacture. FSC materials have much potential for application, including use in chemical, optical, environmental, and mechanical sensors.

  15. Direct optical imaging of structural inhomogeneities in crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Grigorev, A M

    2016-05-10

    A method for optical imaging of structural inhomogeneities in crystalline materials is proposed, based on the differences in the optical properties of the structural inhomogeneity and the homogeneous material near the fundamental absorption edge of the crystalline material. The method can be used to detect defects in both semiconductors and insulators.

  16. A demonstration of simple airfoils: Structural design and materials choices

    SciTech Connect

    Bunnell, L.R.; Piippo, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    An educational unit is presented for building and evaluating simple wing structures, in order to learn about materials choice and lightweight construction. This unit is appropriate for a high school materials science class or lower-division college courses in structural engineering, materials science, or aeronautical engineering.

  17. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  18. Combining Structure and Power in Battery Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    A reprint from Proceedings of the American Chemical Society Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering ( PMSE Preprints...from Proceedings of the American Chemical Society Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering ( PMSE Preprints), Vol. 91, Fall 2004...Science & Engineering ( PMSE Preprints) by the American Chemical Society in Fall 2004. Many current applications demand lighter and stronger

  19. Perspective: Role of structure prediction in materials discovery and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2016-05-01

    Materials informatics owes much to bioinformatics and the Materials Genome Initiative has been inspired by the Human Genome Project. But there is more to bioinformatics than genomes, and the same is true for materials informatics. Here we describe the rapidly expanding role of searching for structures of materials using first-principles electronic-structure methods. Structure searching has played an important part in unraveling structures of dense hydrogen and in identifying the record-high-temperature superconducting component in hydrogen sulfide at high pressures. We suggest that first-principles structure searching has already demonstrated its ability to determine structures of a wide range of materials and that it will play a central and increasing part in materials discovery and design.

  20. A survey of structural material issues for a space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagaman, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    An NASA enters the definition phase of the space station project, one of the important issues to be considered is structural material selection. The complexity of the space station and its long life requirement are two key factors which must be considered in the material selection process. Both aluminum and graphite/epoxy are considered as potential structural materials. Advantages and disadvantages of these materials with respect to mechanical and thermal considerations, space environment, manufacturing, and cost are discussed.

  1. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokenek, Selma

    The optical and chemical properties of the materials used in catalytic and sensing applications directly determine the characteristics of the resultant catalyst or sensor. It is well known that a catalyst needs to have high activity, selectivity, and stability to be viable in an industrial setting. The hydrogenation activity of palladium catalysts is known to be excellent, but the industrial applications are limited by the cost of obtaining catalyst in amounts large enough to make their use economical. As a result, alloying palladium with a cheaper, more widely available metal while maintaining the high catalytic activity seen in monometallic catalysts is, therefore, an attractive option. Similarly, the optical properties of nanoscale materials used for sensing must be attuned to their application. By adjusting the shape and composition of nanoparticles used in such applications, very fine changes can be made to the frequency of light that they absorb most efficiently. The design, synthesis, and characterization of (i) size controlled monometallic palladium nanoparticles for catalytic applications, (ii) nickel-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles and (iii) silver-palladium nanoparticles with applications in drug detection and biosensing through surface plasmon resonance, respectively, will be discussed. The composition, size, and shape of the nanoparticles formed were controlled through the use of wet chemistry techniques. After synthesis, the nanoparticles were analyzed using physical and chemical characterization techniques such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy- Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (STEM-EDX). The Pd and Ni-Pd nanoparticles were then supported on silica for catalytic testing using mass spectrometry. The optical properties of the Ag-Pd nanoparticles in suspension were further investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-Vis). Monometallic palladium particles have

  2. Structural origination of charge transfer complex nanostructures: Excellent candidate for field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Shreyasi; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2016-05-23

    Worldwide strategies for amalgamating rationally controlled one-dimensional organic nanowires are of fundamental importance for their applications in flexible, cheaper and lighter electronics. In this work we have fabricated large-area, ordered CuTCNQ (copper-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) nano architecture arrays over flexible conducting substrate and discussed the rational growth and integration of nanostructures. Here we adopted the organic solid phase reaction (VLS) technique for the growth of organic hierarchies and investigated how field emission properties changes by tuning the nanostructures morphology i.e., by varying length, diameter, alignment and orientation over flexible substrate. The CuTCNQ nanowires with optimized geometry exhibit excellent high field emission performance with low turn-on and threshold field values. The result strongly indicate that CuTCNQ nanowires on flexible carbon cloth substrate are promising candidates for constructing cold cathode based emission display devices, vacuum nanoelectronics, and etc.

  3. Material with core-shell structure

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia [Rio Rancho, NM; Richard, Monique N [Ann Arbor, MI; Dehne, Aaron [Maumee, OH; Phillips, Jonathan [Rio Rancho, NM; Stamm, Kimber L [Ann Arbor, MI; Fanson, Paul T [Brighton, MI

    2011-11-15

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  4. A study of the photocatalytic effects of aqueous suspensions of platinized semiconductor materials on the reaction rates of candidate redox reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of powdered semiconductor materials in photocatalyzing candidate redox reactions was investigated. The rate of the photocatalyzed oxidation of cyanide at platinized TiO2 was studied. The extent of the cyanide reaction was followed directly using an electroanalytical method (i.e. differential pulse polarography). Experiments were performed in natural or artificial light. A comparison was made of kinetic data obtained for photocatalysis at platinized powders with rate data for nonplatinized powders.

  5. The changing market for wood materials used in farm structures.

    Treesearch

    David C. Baumgartner

    1971-01-01

    This reports describes the number, type, and size of farm structures built in a 17-state area during the years 1963-1965, together with information relating to the use and marketing of wood materials in such structures.

  6. 2nd Generation RLV Airframe Structures and Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.

    2000-01-01

    The goals and objectives of the project summarized in this viewgraph presentation are the following: (1) Develop and demonstrate verified airframe and cryotank structural design and analysis technologies, including damage tolerance, safety, reliability, and residual strength technologies, robust nonlinear shell and cryotank analysis technologies, high-fidelity analysis and design technologies for local structural detail features and joints, and high-fidelity analysis technologies for sandwich structures; (2) Demonstrate low cost, robust materials and processing, including polymeric matrix composite (PMC) and metallic materials and processing, and refractory composite and metallic hot structures materials and processing; (3) Develop and demonstrate robust airframe structures and validated integrated airframe structural concepts, including low cost fabrication and joining, operations efficient designs and inspection techniques (non-destructive evaluation), scale-up and integrated thermal structure tests, and airframe structures IVHM; (4) Demonstrate low cost, robust repair techniques; and (5) Develop verified integrated airframe structural concepts, including integrated structural concepts.

  7. Probing structural variation and multifunctionality in niobium doped bismuth vanadate materials.

    PubMed

    Saithathul Fathimah, Sameera; Prabhakar Rao, Padala; James, Vineetha; Raj, Athira K V; Chitradevi, G R; Leela, Sandhyakumari

    2014-11-14

    Multifunctional materials are developed in BiV1-xNbxO4 solid solutions via structural variations. A citrate gel route has been employed to synthesize these materials followed by calcination at various temperatures leading to fine particles. The effects of niobium doping over the structural variation and its influence on the optical properties are assessed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. These solid solutions exhibit superior coloristic properties which are comparable to commercially available yellow pigments. These materials also show remarkable reflectance in the NIR region which makes them potential candidates for cool roof applications. A notable methylene blue dye degradation property is observed in Nb(5+) doped BiVO4 under sunlight irradiation.

  8. Effect of Different Structural Materials on Neutronic Performance of a Hybrid Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übeyli, Mustafa; Tel, Eyyüp

    2003-06-01

    Selection of structural material for a fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor is very important by taking into account of neutronic performance of the blanket. Refractory metals and alloys have much higher operating temperatures and neutron wall load (NWL) capabilities than low activation materials (ferritic/martensitic steels, vanadium alloys and SiC/SiC composites) and austenitic stainless steels. In this study, effect of primary candidate refractory alloys, namely, W-5Re, T111, TZM and Nb-1Zr on neutronic performance of the hybrid reactor was investigated. Neutron transport calculations were conducted with the help of SCALE 4.3 System by solving the Boltzmann transport equation with code XSDRNPM. Among the investigated structural materials, tantalum had the worst performance due to the fact that it has higher neutron absorption cross section than others. And W-5Re and TZM having similar results showed the best performance.

  9. Combustion: Structural interaction in a viscoelastic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. Y.; Chang, J. P.; Kumar, M.; Kuo, K. K.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of interaction between combustion processes and structural deformation of solid propellant was considered. The combustion analysis was performed on the basis of deformed crack geometry, which was determined from the structural analysis. On the other hand, input data for the structural analysis, such as pressure distribution along the crack boundary and ablation velocity of the crack, were determined from the combustion analysis. The interaction analysis was conducted by combining two computer codes, a combustion analysis code and a general purpose finite element structural analysis code.

  10. NASA research on structures and materials for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, P. A.; Heldenfels, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The technology and data base necessary for sound technical decisions regarding long haul supersonic cruise aircraft transportation systems are considered. The objectives and status of the research elements in the structures and materials program phase of the program are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on reductions in structural mass by research on advanced structural concepts, light-weight materials, improved loads, aeroelastic predictive techniques, and by development of efficient structural design procedures.

  11. Development of Steel Foam Materials and Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Kremer; Anthony Liszkiewicz; James Adkins

    2004-10-20

    In the past few years there has been a growing interest in lightweight metal foams. Demands for weight reduction, improved fuel efficiency, and increased passenger safety in automobiles now has manufacturers seriously considering the use of metal foams, in contrast to a few years ago, when the same materials would have been ruled out for technical or economical reasons. The objective of this program was to advance the development and use of steel foam materials, by demonstrating the advantages of these novel lightweight materials in selected generic applications. Progress was made in defining materials and process parameters; characterization of physical and mechanical properties; and fabrication and testing of generic steel foam-filled shapes with compositions from 2.5 wt.% to 0.7 wt.% carbon. A means of producing steel foam shapes with uniform long range porosity levels of 50 to 60 percent was demonstrated and verified with NDE methods. Steel foam integrated beams, cylinders and plates were mechanically tested and demonstrated advantages in bend stiffness, bend resistance, and crush energy absorption. Methods of joining by welding, adhesive bonding, and mechanical fastening were investigated. It is important to keep in mind that steel foam is a conventional material in an unconventional form. A substantial amount of physical and mechanical properties are presented throughout the report and in a properties database at the end of the report to support designer's in applying steel foam in unconventional ways.

  12. Progress in smart microwave materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, P. V.; Chambers, B.; Barnes, A.; Lees, K.; Despotakis, A.

    2000-06-01

    Smart windows that regulate the transmission of visible light are well known, but with the continuing interest in modifying the radar signature of military hardware, there is a need also for smart microwave windows and surfaces. The paper reviews progress on the fabrication and characterization of poly(aniline)-silver-polymer electrolyte composite materials. Discs and films of this material have been characterized over the frequency range 0.5-18 GHz. The materials demonstrate a rapid and reversible change in their microwave reflectivity when a small dc potential is applied across them. The best samples have exhibited a reflectivity change in excess of 20 dB in a coaxial line test set. Cyclic voltammetry studies of these composite materials are discussed in the light of a poly(aniline)|polymer electrolyte|silver single-cell model. The effect of the poly(aniline) counter ion, the polymer electrolyte and the application of a bias potential on the dc and microwave results is discussed. Geometries of smart surfaces that might utilize these materials are then proposed and their characteristics are evaluated.

  13. Optical Spectroscopy of Nano Materials and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenhao

    In this thesis, nanostructures and nanomaterials ranging from 3D to OD will be studied compresively, by using optical methods. Firstly, for 3D and 2D nanomaterials, nanoporous zeolite crystals, such as AFI and AEL are introduced as host materials to accommodate diatomic iodine molecules. Polarized Raman spectroscopy is utilized to identify the two configurations of iodine molecules to stay in the channels of AEL: the lying mode (the bond of the two atoms is parallel to the direction of the channels) and the standing mode (the bond is perpendicular to the direction of the channels). The lying mode and standing mode are switchable and can be well controlled by the amount of water molecules inside the crystal, revealed by both molecule dynamics simulation and experiment observation. With more water molecules inside, iodine molecules choose to stay in the standing mode, while with less water molecules, iodine molecules prefer to lie along the channel. Therefore, the configurations of molecules could be precisely controlled, globally by the surrounding pressure and temperature, and locally by the laser light. Ii is believed that this easy and reversible control of single molecule will be valuable in nanostructured devices, such as molecular sieving or molecular detection. Secondly, for 1D case, the PL spectrum of ZnO nanowire under uniaxial strain is studied. When a ZnO nanowire is bent, besides the lattice constant induced bandgap change on the tensile and compressive sides, there is a piezoelectric field generated along the cross section. This piezoelectric potential, together with the bandgap changes induced by the deformation, will redistribute the electrons excited by incident photons from valence band to conduction band. As a result, the electrons occupying the states at the tensile side will largely outnumbered the ones at the compressive side. Therefore, the PL spectrum we collected at the whole cross section will manifest a redshift, other than the peak

  14. Selection of candidate container materials for the conceptual waste package design for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Halsey, W.G.; McCright, R.D.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Gdowski, G.E.

    1993-02-01

    Preliminary selection criteria have been developed, peer-reviewed, and applied to a field of 41 candidate materials to choose three alloys for further consideration during the advanced conceptual design phase of waste package development for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These three alloys are titanium grade 12, Alloy C-4, and Alloy 825. These selections are specific to the particular conceptual design outlined in the Site Characterization Plan. Other design concepts that may be considered in the advanced conceptual design phase may favor other materials choices.

  15. Course Modules on Structural Health Monitoring with Smart Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Hui-Ru; Walters, Wilbur L.; Zheng, Wei; Everett, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is an emerging technology that has multiple applications. SHM emerged from the wide field of smart structures, and it also encompasses disciplines such as structural dynamics, materials and structures, nondestructive testing, sensors and actuators, data acquisition, signal processing, and possibly much more. To…

  16. Investigation of candidate data structures and search algorithms to support a knowledge based fault diagnosis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, Edward L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The focus of this research is the investigation of data structures and associated search algorithms for automated fault diagnosis of complex systems such as the Hubble Space Telescope. Such data structures and algorithms will form the basis of a more sophisticated Knowledge Based Fault Diagnosis System. As a part of the research, several prototypes were written in VAXLISP and implemented on one of the VAX-11/780's at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This report describes and gives the rationale for both the data structures and algorithms selected. A brief discussion of a user interface is also included.

  17. Nature-Inspired Structural Materials for Flexible Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqing; He, Ke; Chen, Geng; Leow, Wan Ru; Chen, Xiaodong

    2017-10-09

    Exciting advancements have been made in the field of flexible electronic devices in the last two decades and will certainly lead to a revolution in peoples' lives in the future. However, because of the poor sustainability of the active materials in complex stress environments, new requirements have been adopted for the construction of flexible devices. Thus, hierarchical architectures in natural materials, which have developed various environment-adapted structures and materials through natural selection, can serve as guides to solve the limitations of materials and engineering techniques. This review covers the smart designs of structural materials inspired by natural materials and their utility in the construction of flexible devices. First, we summarize structural materials that accommodate mechanical deformations, which is the fundamental requirement for flexible devices to work properly in complex environments. Second, we discuss the functionalities of flexible devices induced by nature-inspired structural materials, including mechanical sensing, energy harvesting, physically interacting, and so on. Finally, we provide a perspective on newly developed structural materials and their potential applications in future flexible devices, as well as frontier strategies for biomimetic functions. These analyses and summaries are valuable for a systematic understanding of structural materials in electronic devices and will serve as inspirations for smart designs in flexible electronics.

  18. High-throughput combinatorial database of electronic band structures for inorganic scintillator materials.

    PubMed

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Gaume, Romain M; Lam, Stephanie; Feigelson, Robert S; Curtarolo, Stefano

    2011-07-11

    For the purpose of creating a database of electronic structures of all the known inorganic compounds, we have developed a computational framework based on high-throughput ab initio calculations (AFLOW) and an online repository (www.aflowlib.org). In this article, we report the first step of this task: the calculation of band structures for 7439 compounds intended for the research of scintillator materials for γ-ray radiation detection. Data-mining is performed to select the candidates from 193,456 compounds compiled in the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database. Light yield and scintillation nonproportionality are predicted based on semiempirical band gaps and effective masses. We present a list of materials, potentially bright and proportional, and focus on those exhibiting small effective masses and effective mass ratios.

  19. Star cell type core configuration for structural sandwich materials

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    A new pattern for cellular core material used in sandwich type structural materials. The new pattern involves star shaped cells intermixed with hexagonal shaped cells. The new patterned cellular core material includes star shaped cells interconnected at points thereof and having hexagonal shape cells positioned adjacent the star points. The new pattern allows more flexibility and can conform more easily to curved shapes.

  20. Thermoelectric Materials With the Skutterudite Structure: New Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleurial, J. -P.; Caillat, T.; Borshchevsky, A.

    1995-01-01

    New experimental findings on semiconductors with the relatively complex 32 atom unit cell skutterudite crystal structure show that these materials possess attractive transport properties and have a good potential for achieving ZT values larger than for state-of- the-art thermoelectric materials. An overview of recent results is provided, and current approaches to experimentally achieving high ZT in skutterudite materials are discussed.

  1. Friction stir method for forming structures and materials

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Frederick, David Alan

    2011-11-22

    Processes for forming an enhanced material or structure are disclosed. The structure typically includes a preform that has a first common surface and a recess below the first common surface. A filler is added to the recess and seams are friction stir welded, and materials may be stir mixed.

  2. Structures and Materials Competency Vision and Purpose at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    Vision: The revolutionary materials and structures technologies developed at NASA Langley Research Center meet the needs of the Aerospace Community and benefit the quality of life on Earth Purpose: Develop and deliver useable research and technology results to meet Agency program objectives and to enable the Agency to develop future aerospace materials and structures

  3. SRM (Solid Rocket Motor) propellant and polymer materials structural modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The following investigation reviews and evaluates the use of stress relaxation test data for the structural analysis of Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellants and other polymer materials used for liners, insulators, inhibitors, and seals. The stress relaxation data is examined and a new mathematical structural model is proposed. This model has potentially wide application to structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. A dynamic modulus is derived from the new model for stress relaxation modulus and is compared to the old viscoelastic model and experimental data.

  4. Hypervelocity impact testing of advanced materials and structures for micrometeoroid and orbital debris shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2013-02-01

    A series of 66 hypervelocity impact experiments have been performed to assess the potential of various materials (aluminium, titanium, copper, stainless steel, nickel, nickel/chromium, reticulated vitreous carbon, silver, ceramic, aramid, ceramic glass, and carbon fibre) and structures (monolithic plates, open-cell foam, flexible fabrics, rigid meshes) for micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shielding. Arranged in various single-, double-, and triple-bumper configurations, screening tests were performed with 0.3175 cm diameter Al2017-T4 spherical projectiles at nominally 6.8 km/s and normal incidence. The top performing shields were identified through target damage assessments and their respective weight. The top performing candidate shield at the screening test condition was found to be a double-bumper configuration with a 0.25 mm thick Al3003 outer bumper, 6.35 mm thick 40 PPI aluminium foam inner bumper, and 1.016 mm thick Al2024-T3 rear wall (equal spacing between bumpers and rear wall). In general, double-bumper candidates with aluminium plate outer bumpers and foam inner bumpers were consistently found to be amongst the top performers. For this impact condition, potential weight savings of at least 47% over conventional all-aluminium Whipple shields are possible by utilizing the investigated materials and structures. The results of this study identify materials and structures of interest for further, more in-depth, impact investigations.

  5. SRM propellant and polymer materials structural test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The SRM propellant and polymer materials structural test program has potentially wide application to the testing and structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. The test program will provide a basis for characterization of the dynamic failure criteria for Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellant, insulation, inhibitor and liners. This experimental investigation will also endeavor to obtain a consistent complete set of materials test data. This test will be used to improve and revise the presently used theoretical math models for SRM propellant, insulators, inhibitor, liners, and O-ring seals.

  6. Quantitative property-structural relation modeling on polymeric dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke

    Nowadays, polymeric materials have attracted more and more attention in dielectric applications. But searching for a material with desired properties is still largely based on trial and error. To facilitate the development of new polymeric materials, heuristic models built using the Quantitative Structure Property Relationships (QSPR) techniques can provide reliable "working solutions". In this thesis, the application of QSPR on polymeric materials is studied from two angles: descriptors and algorithms. A novel set of descriptors, called infinite chain descriptors (ICD), are developed to encode the chemical features of pure polymers. ICD is designed to eliminate the uncertainty of polymer conformations and inconsistency of molecular representation of polymers. Models for the dielectric constant, band gap, dielectric loss tangent and glass transition temperatures of organic polymers are built with high prediction accuracy. Two new algorithms, the physics-enlightened learning method (PELM) and multi-mechanism detection, are designed to deal with two typical challenges in material QSPR. PELM is a meta-algorithm that utilizes the classic physical theory as guidance to construct the candidate learning function. It shows better out-of-domain prediction accuracy compared to the classic machine learning algorithm (support vector machine). Multi-mechanism detection is built based on a cluster-weighted mixing model similar to a Gaussian mixture model. The idea is to separate the data into subsets where each subset can be modeled by a much simpler model. The case study on glass transition temperature shows that this method can provide better overall prediction accuracy even though less data is available for each subset model. In addition, the techniques developed in this work are also applied to polymer nanocomposites (PNC). PNC are new materials with outstanding dielectric properties. As a key factor in determining the dispersion state of nanoparticles in the polymer matrix

  7. Novel tubulin and tau neuroprotective fragments sharing structural similarities with the drug candidate NAP (Davuentide).

    PubMed

    Gozes, Illana; Iram, Tal; Maryanovsky, Evgenia; Arviv, Carmit; Rozenberg, Liora; Schirer, Yulie; Giladi, Eliezer; Furman-Assaf, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    NAP (NAPVSIPQ, davunetide) is a microtubule stabilizing peptide drug candidate. Here, we set out to identify NAP-like peptides that provide neuroprotection and reduce tau pathology. NAP-like peptides were derived using publically available search engines, which identified sequence homologies in the microtubule subunit tubulin and in the microtubule associated protein, tau. NATLSIHQ (NAT) and STPTAIPQ were derived from tubulin, and TAPVPMPD (TAP) was derived from tau. All peptides provided neuroprotection against the Alzheimer's disease (AD) toxin, the amyloid-β 1-42 peptide, although NAT and TAP were much more potent than STPTAIPQ. NAT also protected astrocytes, while STPTAIPQ was active only at micromolar concentrations. Because NAT and TAP were much more potent than STPTAIPQ in neuroprotection, those peptides were also tested for inhibition of tau-like aggregation (the second protein hallmark pathology of AD). Both NAT and TAP inhibited tau-like aggregation, with NAT being active over a very broad concentration range. NAT also protected in vivo in a frontotemporal dementia transgenic mouse model (Tau-Tg), when tested at the age of ~10 months. Results showed significantly decreased levels of the NAP parent protein, activity-dependent neuroprotective protein in the cerebral cortex of the Tau-Tg which was increased back to normal levels by NAT treatment. This was coupled to protection of Brain-Body weight ratio in the compromised Tau-Tg. With AD being the major tauopathy and with tau taking part in frontotemporal dementia, novel NAP derivatives that reduce tauopathy and provide neuroprotection are of basic and clinical interest.

  8. ACEE Composite Structures Technology: Review of selected NASA research on composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program was designed to develop technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Research on composite materials, aircraft structures, and aircraft design is presented herein. The following parameters of composite materials were addressed: residual strength, damage tolerance, toughness, tensile strength, impact resistance, buckling, and noise transmission within composite materials structures.

  9. Graphene materials having randomly distributed two-dimensional structural defects

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H; Zhao, Xin; Hayner, Cary M; Kung, Mayfair C

    2013-10-08

    Graphene-based storage materials for high-power battery applications are provided. The storage materials are composed of vertical stacks of graphene sheets and have reduced resistance for Li ion transport. This reduced resistance is achieved by incorporating a random distribution of structural defects into the stacked graphene sheets, whereby the structural defects facilitate the diffusion of Li ions into the interior of the storage materials.

  10. Graphene materials having randomly distributed two-dimensional structural defects

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H.; Zhao, Xin; Hayner, Cary M.; Kung, Mayfair C.

    2016-05-31

    Graphene-based storage materials for high-power battery applications are provided. The storage materials are composed of vertical stacks of graphene sheets and have reduced resistance for Li ion transport. This reduced resistance is achieved by incorporating a random distribution of structural defects into the stacked graphene sheets, whereby the structural defects facilitate the diffusion of Li ions into the interior of the storage materials.

  11. Failure Analysis of Composite Structure Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-27

    starting point of the investigation. Such techniques included flow charts describing the logical arrangement of investigative operations along with...to determine the causes of failure in continuous fiber reinforced composite materials. Such techniques included flow charts describing the logical...sub-FALN’s were developed to describe the logical flow of analysis in greater detail for each major discipline (see section 6.0). To aid investigators

  12. Multifunctional Materials and Structures Gordon Research Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-08

    Discussion Leader 9:05 am - 9:40 am Richard Weinkamer (Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Germany) "Osteocyte Networks, Functional...34Reconfigurable Materials from Programmable Colloids " 9:05 pm - 9:25 pm Discussion 9:25 pm - 9:30 pm General Discussion Tuesday 7:30 am - 8:30 am...Purdue University Poster Presenter Registered Skorb, Katsiaryna Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces Attendee Registered Smith, Lisa

  13. Digital Representation of Materials Grain Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    reconstructing microstructures have been developed in a number of fields, especially for modeling geological materials ( Fernandes 1996, Oren 2002...terminolo- gy were used. The works of Profs. Tony Rollett and Somnath Ghosh; as well as Drs. David Rowenhorst, Dennis Dimiduk, Mike Uchic, Sukbin...Hamann B (2007) IEEE Trans Visual Comp Graphics Feltham P (1957) Acta Metall 5:97-105 Fernandes CP et al. (1996) Physical Review E 54:1734-1741

  14. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-06

    electrical potential !!generates mechanical strain and vise versa, an applied stress will result in the generation of an electric! !charge. When piezoelectric...a “smart board” for vibration suppression. More recently Sato et al. [5] applied a hydrothermal method to grow PZT coating onto nickel titanium ...surface cracking under strain. Additionally, the plastic nature and high coefficient of thermal expansion of metallic materials can lead to high

  15. Structure and Properties of Energetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-02

    into 5 distinct classes - i) normal , N; ii) mixed, M; iii) hetero, H; iv) azido complexe., C: and v) metal organo complexes, 0. These abbreviations are...Energetic materials represent a multibillion dollar industry for both commercial and military uses. These are among the earliest of man-made classes of...new class of high-nitrogen molecules that may prove to be high performance explosives. INTRODUCTION The goal of the high explosives synthesis effort

  16. Lectures on Composite Materials for Aircraft Structures,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    alumina (A120 3 ) , boric acid (H3B03 ) and calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ). Another type of glass is S-glass (S for strength). This is based on silica...the surface may be etched P. * in either the gas phase or liquid phase by oxidising agents including chlorine and bromine, nitric acid and chlorates... alternative materials. For example, resins of improved strength and durability are obtained by replacing the normal ortho phthalic acid by isophthalic acid

  17. Fatigue Prediction for Composite Materials and Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Eugenio OÑATE CIMNE (International Center for Numerical Methods in Engineering) Building C-1, Campus Nord UPC -C/ Gran Capitán s/n 08034 Barcelona...SPAIN * salomon@cimne.upc.edu ABSTRACT The objective of this paper is to present a new computational methodology for predicting the durability of... methodology is validated using experimental data from tests on CFRR composite material samples. 1.0 INTRODUCTION Fatigue is defined as "the process

  18. Research in structures, structural dynamics and materials, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William F. (Compiler); Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    Topics addressed include: composite plates; buckling predictions; missile launch tube modeling; structural/control systems design; optimization of nonlinear R/C frames; error analysis for semi-analytic displacement; crack acoustic emission; and structural dynamics.

  19. Research in structures, structural dynamics and materials, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, W.F.; Noor, A.K.

    1989-04-01

    Topics addressed include: composite plates; buckling predictions; missile launch tube modeling; structural/control systems design; optimization of nonlinear R/C frames; error analysis for semi-analytic displacement; crack acoustic emission; and structural dynamics.

  20. Effects of space environment on structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miglionico, C.; Stein, C.; Roybal, R.; Robertson, R.; Murr, L. E.; Quinones, S.; Rivas, J.; Marquez, B.; Advani, A. H.; Fisher, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary study of materials exposed in space in a low Earth orbit for nearly six years has revealed a wide range of micrometeorite or microparticle impact craters ranging in size from 1 to 1000 micron in diameter, debris particles from adjacent and distant materials systems, reaction products, and other growth features on the specimen surfaces, and related phenomena. The exposed surface features included fine grained and nearly amorphous materials as well as a large array of single crystal particles. A replication type, lift off technique was developed to remove reaction products and debris from the specimen surfaces in order to isolate them from the background substrate without creating microchemical or microstructural artifacts or alterations. This resulted in surface features resting on a carbon support film which was virtually invisible to observation by electron microscopy and nondispersive x ray analysis. Some evidence for blisters on leading edge aluminum alloy surfaces and a high surface region concentration of oxygen determined by Auger electron spectrometry suggests oxygen effects where fluences exceed 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm.

  1. Effects of space environment on structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miglionico, C.; Stein, C.; Roybal, R.; Robertson, R.; Murr, L. E.; Quinones, S.; Rivas, J.; Marquez, B.; Advani, A. H.; Fisher, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary study of materials exposed in space in a low Earth orbit for nearly six years has revealed a wide range of micrometeorite or microparticle impact craters ranging in size from 1 to 1000 micron in diameter, debris particles from adjacent and distant materials systems, reaction products, and other growth features on the specimen surfaces, and related phenomena. The exposed surface features included fine grained and nearly amorphous materials as well as a large array of single crystal particles. A replication type, lift off technique was developed to remove reaction products and debris from the specimen surfaces in order to isolate them from the background substrate without creating microchemical or microstructural artifacts or alterations. This resulted in surface features resting on a carbon support film which was virtually invisible to observation by electron microscopy and nondispersive x ray analysis. Some evidence for blisters on leading edge aluminum alloy surfaces and a high surface region concentration of oxygen determined by Auger electron spectrometry suggests oxygen effects where fluences exceed 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm.

  2. Types of architectural structures and the use of smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavşan, Cengiz; Sipahi, Serkan

    2017-07-01

    The developments in technology following the industrial revolution had their share of impact on both construction techniques, and material technologies. The change in the materials used by the construction industry brought along numerous innovations, which, in turn, took on an autonomous trend of development given the rise of nano-tech materials. Today, nano-tech materials are used extensively in numerous construction categories. Nano-tech materials, in general, are characterized by their reactionary nature, with the intent of repeating the reactions again and again under certain conditions. That is why nano-tech materials are often called smart materials. In construction industry, smart materials are categorized under 4 major perspectives: Shape-shifting smart materials, power generating smart materials, self-maintenance smart materials, and smart materials providing a high level of insulation. In architecture, various categories of construction often tend to exhibit their own approaches to design, materials, and construction techniques. This is a direct consequence of the need for different solutions for different functions. In this context, the use of technological materials should lead to the use of a set of smart materials for a given category of structures, while another category utilizes yet another set. In the present study, the smart materials used in specific categories of structures were reviewed with reference to nano-tech practices implemented in Europe, with a view to try and reveal the changes in the use of smart materials with reference to categories of structures. The study entails a discussion to test the hypothesis that nano-tech materials vary with reference to structure categories, on the basis of 18 examples from various structure categories, built by the construction firms with the highest level of potential in terms of doing business in Europe. The study comprises 3 major sections: The first section reiterates what the literature has to say

  3. Challenges and recommendations for obtaining chemical structures of industry-provided repurposing candidates.

    PubMed

    Southan, Christopher; Williams, Antony J; Ekins, Sean

    2013-01-01

    There is an expanding amount of interest directed at the repurposing and repositioning of drugs, as well as how in silico methods can assist these endeavors. Recent repurposing project tendering calls by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (USA) and the Medical Research Council (UK) have included compound information and pharmacological data. However, none of the internal company development code names were assigned to chemical structures in the official documentation. This not only abrogates in silico analysis to support repurposing but consequently necessitates data gathering and curation to assign structures. Here, we describe the approaches, results and major challenges associated with this.

  4. Materials and light thermal structures research for advanced space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1991-01-01

    The Light Thermal Structures Center at the University of Virginia sponsors educational and research programs focused on the development of reliable, lightweight structures to function in hostile thermal environments. Technology advances in materials and design methodology for light thermal structures will contribute to improved space vehicle design concepts with attendant weight savings. This paper highlights current research activities in three areas relevant to space exploration: low density, high temperature aluminum alloys, composite materials, and structures with thermal gradients. Advances in the development of new aluminum-lithium alloys and mechanically alloyed aluminum alloys are described. Material properties and design features of advanced composites are highlighted. Research studies in thermal structures with temperature gradients include inelastic panel buckling and thermally induced unstable oscillations. Current and future research is focused on the integration of new materials with applications to structural components with thermal gradients.

  5. Delineation of candidate genes responsible for structural brain abnormalities in patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q27

    PubMed Central

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Nagamani, Sandesh CS; Erez, Ayelet; Hunter, Jill V; Holder Jr, J Lloyd; Carlin, Mary E; Bader, Patricia I; Perras, Helene MF; Allanson, Judith E; Newman, Leslie; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna; Powell, Erin; Mohanty, Aaron; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Bi, Weimin; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2015-01-01

    Patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q present with structural brain abnormalities including agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and cerebellar malformations. The 6q27 region harbors genes that are important for the normal development of brain and delineation of a critical deletion region for structural brain abnormalities may lead to a better genotype–phenotype correlation. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven unrelated patients with deletions involving chromosome 6q27. All patients had structural brain abnormalities. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. The smallest region of overlap spans 1.7 Mb and contains DLL1, THBS2, PHF10, and C6orf70 (ERMARD) that are plausible candidates for the causation of structural brain abnormalities. Our study reiterates the importance of 6q27 region in normal development of brain and helps identify putative genes in causation of structural brain anomalies. PMID:24736736

  6. Do Clinical Clerks Provide Candidates with Adequate Formative Assessment during Objective Structured Clinical Examinations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiter, Harold I.; Rosenfeld, Jack; Nandagopal, Kiruthiga; Eva, Kevin W.

    2004-01-01

    Context: Various research studies have examined the question of whether expert or non-expert raters, faculty or students, evaluators or standardized patients, give more reliable and valid summative assessments of performance on Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). Less studied has been the question of whether or not non-faculty…

  7. Innovative Energy Absorbing Composite Material for Crashworthy Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-12

    Innovative Energy Absorbing Composite Material for Crashworthy Structures Charles E. Bakis, Edward C. Smith, Chandrashekhar Tiwari, Todd C. Henry...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Innovative Energy Absorbing Composite Material for Crashworthy Structures 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-09-1...vehicles by providing outstanding energy absorption with minimal weight. The structural element is an array of concentric fiber reinforced composite tubes

  8. Design of Spintronic Materials with Simple Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, C Y; Qian, M C; Liu, K; Yang, L H; Pask, J E

    2007-05-03

    A brief comparison of conventional electronics and spintronics is given. The key features of half metallic binary compounds with the zincblende structure are presented, using MnAs as an example. We discuss the interactions responsible for the half metallic properties. Special properties of superlattices and a digital ferromagnetic heterostructure incorporating zincblende half metals are also discussed.

  9. Quantitative nondestructive evaluation of materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was undertaken to quantify damage tolerance and resistance in composite materials impacted using the drop-weight method. Tests were conducted on laminates of several different carbon-fiber composite systems, such as epoxies, modified epoxies, and amorphous and semicrystalline thermoplastics. Impacted composite specimens were examined using destructive and non-destructive techniques to establish the characteristic damage states. Specifically, optical microscopy, ultrasonic, and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to identify impact induced damage mechanisms. Damage propagation during post impact compression was also studied.

  10. Space Fission Reactor Structural Materials: Choices Past, Present and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Leonard, Keith J

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear powered spacecraft will enable missions well beyond the capabilities of current chemical, radioisotope thermal generator and solar technologies. The use of fission reactors for space applications has been considered for over 50 years, although, structural material performance has often limited the potential performance of space reactors. Space fission reactors are an extremely harsh environment for structural materials with high temperatures, high neutron fields, potential contact with liquid metals, and the need for up to 15-20 year reliability with no inspection or preventative maintenance. Many different materials have been proposed as structural materials. While all materials meet many of the requirements for space reactor service, none satisfy all of them. However, continued development and testing may resolve these issues and provide qualified materials for space fission reactors.

  11. Structure based drug discovery of Rab38 protein- Identification of antagonists as cancer drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Vuruputuri, Uma; Abdelmonsef, Aboubakr Haredi; Dulapalli, Ramasree; Dasari, Thirupathi; Padmarao, Lavanya Souda; Mukkera, Thirupathi

    2016-10-26

    Cancer is responsible for one in eight deaths worldwide. The Rab family members are involved in important processes including membrane trafficking, cell growth and differentiation. It has been shown that Rab38 is located in melanosomes, and overexpressed at the RNA level in melanoma cancers. Rab38 represents a novel class of cellular modulators that can affect both initiation or progression of tumor cells in Homo sapiens. In the present work, the 3D structure of Rab38 (211 residues) was generated using homology modelling method; the structure shows the presence of 6 α- helices and 6 β- strands. The 3D structure was energy minimized and validated using standard protocols. The active site was identified using computational prediction tools like CASTp, efindsite and SiteMap, which show that the residues (Ser35 to Leu63) are important for binding. Protein-protein docking studies were carried out between the target protein and its natural substrate BLOC-3 using patchDock tool. Virtual screening studies were carried out with small ligand databases using glide Schrödinger suite. The ligands which are potential antagonists against the Rab38 protein were prioritized from the results of virtual screening based on glide score, glide energy and acceptable ADME properties.

  12. FGM (Functionally Graded Material) Thermal Barrier Coatings for Hypersonic Structures - Design and Thermal Structural Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-29

    1 AOARD REPORT Contract No. 064043 FGM (Functionally Graded Material) Thermal Barrier Coatings for Hypersonic Structures – Design and...Material) Thermal Barrier Coatings for Hypersonic Structures ? Design and Thermal Structural Analysis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA48690610074 5b. GRANT...modeling. Additionally, the TBCs will be applied to realistic hypersonic structures such as a cylindrical combustor and tested under realistic combustion

  13. Integrating Structure with Power in Battery Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    LiOTf Glass , Silica Silica Ethox. (30) Bis-A PEO 550 Acrylate PEO 1,000k Alumina Alumina 3.2 Experimental Chemicals were handled in a glove...samples, received from Sartomer Company, Inc., were mixed thoroughly with the appropriate amount of lithium triflate in a glass vial. Dissolution...enhances the structural capacity of the composite. A layer of glass fabric is also included in the design, to ensure electrical isolation of the anode

  14. Bioinspired Materials for Compact Power Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    single gold nanoparticles. Finally, hybrid organic-inorganic nanorods and nanowires were synthesized, and the electrical properties of these structures...were studied. Newly synthesized nanowires can self-assemble into "mushroom", "sheet" and "tubular superstructures", a process that is driven by the...strong interactions between the polymer domains. The diameter and length of these novel 3-D complexes are determined by individual nanowire components

  15. Structural changes in borohydride hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ravhi; Cornelius, Andrew; Nicol, Malcolm

    2008-03-01

    Angle dispersive powder x-ray diffraction and Raman experiments were performed on ABH4 (A = K, Rb) at high pressures up to 27 GPa. We demonstrate that KBH4 exhibits structural phase transitions from the ambient α-KBH4 phase (cubic Fm-3m) to β-KBH4 (tetragonal-P421c) at 3.8 GPa and to γ-KBH4 phase (orthorhombic-Pnma) at 6.8 GPa which is similar to the phase transition sequence observed for NaBH4 earlier [1]. However, RbBH4 undergoes two successive pressure induced structural transitions from the ambient cubic Fm-3m phase to an orthorhombic Pnma phase around 2.9 GPa and then to a monoclinic phase above 8 GPa. The high pressure monoclinic phase is found to be stable up to 27 GPa. The experimental results reveal the phase transition sequence exhibited by RbBH4 is different from the pressure induced changes observed in similar cubic compounds NaBH4 and KBH4. The results further show that both the transition pressure and the structural ordering at high pressures are influenced by the atomic size of the alkali cation in these compounds. [1]. R.S. Kumar and Andrew L. Cornelius, App.Phys.Lett., 2005, 87, 261916.

  16. Flight service environmental effects on composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Baker, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Langley and the U.S. Army have jointly sponsored programs to assess the effects of realistic flight environments and ground-based exposure on advanced composite materials and structures. Composite secondary structural components were initially installed on commercial transport aircraft in 1973; secondary and primary structural components were installed on commercial helicopters in 1979; and primary structural components were installed on commercial aircraft in the mid-to-late 1980's. Service performance, maintenance characteristics, and residual strength of numerous components are reported. In addition to data on flight components, 10 year ground exposure test results on material coupons are reported. Comparison between ground and flight environmental effects for several composite material systems are also presented. Test results indicate excellent in-service performance with the composite components during the 15 year period. Good correlation between ground-based material performance and operational structural performance has been achieved.

  17. Method for fabricating high aspect ratio structures in perovskite material

    DOEpatents

    Karapetrov, Goran T.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Crabtree, George W.; Iavarone, Maria

    2003-10-28

    A method of fabricating high aspect ratio ceramic structures in which a selected portion of perovskite or perovskite-like crystalline material is exposed to a high energy ion beam for a time sufficient to cause the crystalline material contacted by the ion beam to have substantially parallel columnar defects. Then selected portions of the material having substantially parallel columnar defects are etched leaving material with and without substantially parallel columnar defects in a predetermined shape having high aspect ratios of not less than 2 to 1. Etching is accomplished by optical or PMMA lithography. There is also disclosed a structure of a ceramic which is superconducting at a temperature in the range of from about 10.degree. K. to about 90.degree. K. with substantially parallel columnar defects in which the smallest lateral dimension of the structure is less than about 5 microns, and the thickness of the structure is greater than 2 times the smallest lateral dimension of the structure.

  18. Testing of Candidate Rigid Heatshield Materials at LHMEL for the Entry, Descent, and Landing Technology Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepka, Steven; Gasch, Matthew; Beck, Robin A.; White, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The material testing results described in this paper were part of a material development program of vendor-supplied, proposed heat shield materials. The goal of this program was to develop low density, rigid material systems with an appreciable weight savings over phenolic-impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) while improving material response performance. New technologies, such as PICA-like materials in honeycomb or materials with variable density through-the-thickness were tested. The material testing took place at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Laser Hardened Materials Laboratory (LHMEL) using a 10.6 micron CO2 laser operating with the test articles immersed in a nitrogen-gas environment at 1 atmosphere pressure. Test measurements included thermocouple readings of in-depth temperatures, pyrometer readings of surface temperatures, weight scale readings of mass loss, and sectioned-sample readings of char depth. Two laser exposures were applied. The first exposure was at an irradiance of 450 W/cm2 for 50 or 60 seconds to simulate an aerocapture maneuver. The second laser exposure was at an irradiance of 115 W/cm2 for 100 seconds to simulate a planetary entry. Results from Rounds 1 and 2 of these screening tests are summarized.

  19. Event-horizon-scale structure in the supermassive black hole candidate at the Galactic Centre.

    PubMed

    Doeleman, Sheperd S; Weintroub, Jonathan; Rogers, Alan E E; Plambeck, Richard; Freund, Robert; Tilanus, Remo P J; Friberg, Per; Ziurys, Lucy M; Moran, James M; Corey, Brian; Young, Ken H; Smythe, Daniel L; Titus, Michael; Marrone, Daniel P; Cappallo, Roger J; Bock, Douglas C-J; Bower, Geoffrey C; Chamberlin, Richard; Davis, Gary R; Krichbaum, Thomas P; Lamb, James; Maness, Holly; Niell, Arthur E; Roy, Alan; Strittmatter, Peter; Werthimer, Daniel; Whitney, Alan R; Woody, David

    2008-09-04

    The cores of most galaxies are thought to harbour supermassive black holes, which power galactic nuclei by converting the gravitational energy of accreting matter into radiation. Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the compact source of radio, infrared and X-ray emission at the centre of the Milky Way, is the closest example of this phenomenon, with an estimated black hole mass that is 4,000,000 times that of the Sun. A long-standing astronomical goal is to resolve structures in the innermost accretion flow surrounding Sgr A*, where strong gravitational fields will distort the appearance of radiation emitted near the black hole. Radio observations at wavelengths of 3.5 mm and 7 mm have detected intrinsic structure in Sgr A*, but the spatial resolution of observations at these wavelengths is limited by interstellar scattering. Here we report observations at a wavelength of 1.3 mm that set a size of 37(+16)(-10) microarcseconds on the intrinsic diameter of Sgr A*. This is less than the expected apparent size of the event horizon of the presumed black hole, suggesting that the bulk of Sgr A* emission may not be centred on the black hole, but arises in the surrounding accretion flow.

  20. Surface structure and electronic properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is developed to explain dopant effects on chemical vapor deposition. Auger analysis of the interaction between allotropic forms of carbon and silicon films has shown Si-C formation for all forms by glassy carbon. LEED intensity measurements have been used to determine the mean square displacement of surface atoms of silicon single crystals, and electron loss spectroscopy has shown the effect of structure and impurities on surface states located within the band gap. A thin film of Al has been used to enhance film crystallinity at low temperature.

  1. Space Transportation Materials and Structures Technology Workshop. Volume 2; Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazier, Frank W., Jr. (Compiler); Gardner, James E. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The Space Transportation Materials and Structures Technology Workshop was held on September 23-26, 1991, in Newport News, Virginia. The workshop, sponsored by the NASA Office of Space Flight and the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology, was held to provide a forum for communication within the space materials and structures technology developer and user communities. Workshop participants were organized into a Vehicle Technology Requirements session and three working panels: Materials and Structures Technologies for Vehicle Systems, Propulsion Systems, and Entry Systems.

  2. Neutron Scattering Studies of Nanomagnetism and Artificially Structured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Bader, S.D.; Borchers, J.A.; Felcher, G.P.; Furdyna, J.K.; Hoffmann, A.; Kortright, J.B.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Schulthess, T.C.; Sinha, S.K.; Toney, M.F.; Weller, D.; Wolf, S.

    2003-02-01

    Nanostructured magnetic materials are intensively studied due to their unusual properties and promise for possible applications. The key issues in these materials relate to the connection between their physical properties (transport, magnetism, mechanical, etc.) and their chemical-physical structure. In principle, a detailed knowledge of the chemical and physical structure allows calculation of their physical properties. Theoretical and computational methods are rapidly evolving so that magnetic properties of nanostructured materials might soon be predicted. Success in this endeavor requires detailed quantitative understanding of the magnetic structure and properties.

  3. Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-01-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

  4. Fuel, Structural Material and Coolant for an Advanced Fast Micro-Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Nascimento, J. A.; Duimarães, L. N. F.; Ono, S.

    The use of nuclear reactors in space, seabed or other Earth hostile environment in the future is a vision that some Brazilian nuclear researchers share. Currently, the USA, a leader in space exploration, has as long-term objectives the establishment of a permanent Moon base and to launch a manned mission to Mars. A nuclear micro-reactor is the power source chosen to provide energy for life support, electricity for systems, in these missions. A strategy to develop an advanced micro-reactor technologies may consider the current fast reactor technologies as back-up and the development of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials. The next generation reactors (GEN-IV) for terrestrial applications will operate with high output temperature to allow advanced conversion cycle, such as Brayton, and hydrogen production, among others. The development of an advanced fast micro-reactor may create a synergy between the GEN-IV and space reactor technologies. Considering a set of basic requirements and materials properties this paper discusses the choice of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials for a fast micro-reactor. The chosen candidate materials are: nitride, oxide as back-up, for fuel, lead, tin and gallium for coolant, ferritic MA-ODS and Mo alloys for core structures. The next step will be the neutronic and burnup evaluation of core concepts with this set of materials.

  5. Structural and Machine Design Using Piezoceramic Materials: A Guide for Structural Design Engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Daniel J.; Cudney, Harley H.

    2000-01-01

    Using piezoceramic materials is one way the design engineer can create structures which have an ability to both sense and respond to their environment. Piezoceramic materials can be used to create structural sensors and structural actuators. Because piezoceramic materials have transduction as a material property, their sensing or actuation functions are a result of what happens to the material. This is different than discrete devices we might attach to the structure. For example, attaching an accelerometer to a structure will yield an electrical signal proportional to the acceleration at the attachment point on the structure. Using a electromagnetic shaker as an actuator will create an applied force at the attachment point. Active material elements in a structural design are not easily modeled as providing transduction at a point, but rather they change the physics of the structure in the areas where they are used. Hence, a designer must not think of adding discrete devices to a structure to obtain an effect, but rather must design a structural system which accounts for the physical principles of all the elements in the structure. The purpose of this manual is to provide practicing engineers the information necessary to incorporate piezoelectric materials in structural design and machine design. First, we will review the solid-state physics of piezoelectric materials. Then we will discuss the physical characteristics of the electrical-active material-structural system. We will present the elements of this system which must be considered as part of the design task for a structural engineer. We will cover simple modeling techniques and review the features and capabilities of commercial design tools that are available. We will then cover practical how-to elements of working with piezoceramic materials. We will review sources of piezoceramic materials and built-up devices, and their characteristics. Finally, we will provide two design examples using piezoceramic

  6. Medium- and high-spin band structure of the chiral candidate 132La

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuti, I.; Timár, J.; Sohler, D.; Paul, E. S.; Starosta, K.; Astier, A.; Bazzacco, D.; Bednarczyk, P.; Boston, A. J.; Buforn, N.; Chantler, H. J.; Chiara, C. J.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.; Descovich, M.; Dombrádi, Zs.; Fallon, P.; Fossan, D. B.; Fox, C.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; Hecht, A. A.; Kintz, N.; Koike, T.; Lee, I. Y.; Lunardi, S.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Nolan, P. J.; Nyakó, B. M.; Petrache, C. M.; Sampson, J. A.; Scraggs, H. C.; Tornyi, T. G.; Wadsworth, R.; Walker, A.; Zolnai, L.

    2013-04-01

    Medium- and high-spin states of 132La have been studied based on the data obtained from 100Mo(36S,p3n) and 116Cd(23Na,α3n) fusion-evaporation reactions using the EUROBALL and Gammasphere detector arrays, respectively. Triple-γ coincidence relations, angular correlations, and linear polarizations of the observed γ transitions have been deduced. The level scheme of 132La has been considerably extended, and unambiguous spin and parity values have been assigned to most of the excited states. The configuration of one of the bands is πg7/2(h11/2)2νh11/2 instead of the previously thought πh11/2νh11/2; thus its previously suggested magnetic rotational character cannot be upheld. The observed similarities between the level structures of 132La and 134Pr suggest the possible existence of a third πh11/2νh11/2 band in 132La that may show chiral features.

  7. Immunostimulation by Synthetic Lipopeptide-Based Vaccine Candidates: Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mehfuz; Toth, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Peptide-based vaccines offer several advantages over conventional whole organism or protein approaches by offering improved purity and specificity in inducing immune response. However, peptides alone are generally non-immunogenic. Concerns remain about the toxicity of adjuvants which are critical for immunogenicity of synthetic peptides. The use of lipopeptides in peptide vaccines is currently under intensive investigation because potent immune responses can be generated without the use of adjuvant (thus are self-adjuvanting). Several lipopeptides derived from microbial origin, and their synthetic versions or simpler fatty acid moieties impart this self-adjuvanting activity by signaling via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Engagement of this innate immune receptor on antigen-presenting cell leads to the initiation and development of potent immune responses. Therefore optimization of lipopeptides to enhance TLR2-mediated activation is a promising strategy for vaccine development. Considerable structure-activity relationships that determine TLR2 binding and consequent stimulation of innate immune responses have been investigated for a range of lipopeptides. In this mini review we address the development of lipopeptide vaccines, mechanism of TLR2 recognition, and immune activation. An overview is provided of the best studied lipopeptide vaccine systems. PMID:24130558

  8. Effects of atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation on candidate elastomeric materials for long duration missions. Test series no.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, R. C.; Finckenor, M. M.; Kamenetzky, R. R.; Gray, P.

    1993-01-01

    Research was conducted at MSFC on the behavior of elastomeric materials after exposure to simulated space environment. Silicone S383 and Viton V747 samples were exposed to thermal vacuum, ultraviolet radiation, and atomic oxygen and then evaluated for changes in material properties. Characterization of the elastomeric materials included weight, hardness, optical inspection under normal and black light, spectrofluorescence, solar absorptance and emittance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and permeability. These results indicate a degree of sensitivity to exposure and provided some evidence of UV and atomic oxygen synergism.

  9. Low-Thermal-Stress Structural Joints For Dissimilar Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matza, Edward C.

    1990-01-01

    Structural joint developed for attachment of hypersonic control surface to aircraft wing structure. Transmits large torque loads from composite control surface and torque tube to wing structure through metallic attachment lug and collar. Torque load transmitted from tube to collar by series of radially oriented cleats. Bearing surfaces of cleats plane passing through center-line of torque tube. Such joints accommodate differential thermal growth between parts of dissimilar materials. Potential for application to high-temperature structural joints associated with hypervelocity vehicles.

  10. Porous Organic Materials: Strategic Design and Structure-Function Correlation.

    PubMed

    Das, Saikat; Heasman, Patrick; Ben, Teng; Qiu, Shilun

    2017-02-08

    Porous organic materials have garnered colossal interest with the scientific fraternity due to their excellent gas sorption performances, catalytic abilities, energy storage capacities, and other intriguing applications. This review encompasses the recent significant breakthroughs and the conventional functions and practices in the field of porous organic materials to find useful applications and imparts a comprehensive understanding of the strategic evolution of the design and synthetic approaches of porous organic materials with tunable characteristics. We present an exhaustive analysis of the design strategies with special emphasis on the topologies of crystalline and amorphous porous organic materials. In addition to elucidating the structure-function correlation and state-of-the-art applications of porous organic materials, we address the challenges and restrictions that prevent us from realizing porous organic materials with tailored structures and properties for useful applications.

  11. Materials and structures for stretchable energy storage and conversion devices.

    PubMed

    Xie, Keyu; Wei, Bingqing

    2014-06-11

    Stretchable energy storage and conversion devices (ESCDs) are attracting intensive attention due to their promising and potential applications in realistic consumer products, ranging from portable electronics, bio-integrated devices, space satellites, and electric vehicles to buildings with arbitrarily shaped surfaces. Material synthesis and structural design are core in the development of highly stretchable supercapacitors, batteries, and solar cells for practical applications. This review provides a brief summary of research development on the stretchable ESCDs in the past decade, from structural design strategies to novel materials synthesis. The focuses are on the fundamental insights of mechanical characteristics of materials and structures on the performance of the stretchable ESCDs, as well as challenges for their practical applications. Finally, some of the important directions in the areas of material synthesis and structural design facing the stretchable ESCDs are discussed.

  12. Classic and New Materials Used for Structural Rehabilitation. Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lute, M.

    2016-06-01

    New materials development with different combination of properties were always a challenge in terms of their adequate use in civil engineering. Introduction of carbon fibres as strength material for structures was a beginning of a new approach in structural rehabilitation, and sometimes meant the end of classic rehabilitation solution use. The present paper gives an example of a building rehabilitation that use a melt of both new and old solutions in order to achieve the optimum result for building itself. The problem was even more challenging, because the structure considered is only 22 years old, but having some design faults in terms of seismic behaviour and, in addition, one floor was added to existing structure. The chosen solution was a compromise between the use of old and new materials in places where their qualities were best suitable and their minuses could be compensated by the other material.

  13. Mesoscopic hydrothermodynamics of complex-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, Áurea R.; Silva, A. A. P.; Luzzi, Roberto; Casas-Vázquez, J.; Jou, David

    2013-10-01

    Some experimental results in the study of disordered systems, polymeric fluids, solutions of micelles and surfactants, ionic-glass conductors, and others show a hydrodynamic behavior labeled “anomalous” with properties described by some kind of fractional power laws in place of the standard ones. This is a consequence of the fractal-like structure that is present in these systems of which we do not have a detailed description, thus impairing the application of the conventional ensemble formalism of statistical mechanics. In order to obtain a physical picture of the phenomenon for making predictions which may help with technological and industrial decisions, one may resort to different styles (so-called nonconventional) in statistical mechanics. In that way can be introduced a theory for handling such impaired situations, a nonconventional mesoscopic hydrothermodynamics (MHT). We illustrate the question presenting an application in a contracted description of such nonconventional MHT, consisting in the use of the Renyi approach to derive a set of coupled nonstandard evolution equations, one for the density, a nonconventional Maxwell-Cattaneo equation, which in a limiting case goes over a non-Fickian diffusion equation, and other for the velocity in fluids under forced flow. For illustration the theory is applied to the study of the hydrodynamic motion in several soft-matter systems under several conditions such as streaming flow appearing in electrophoretic techniques and flow generated by harmonic forces arising in optical traps. The equivalence with Lévy processes is discussed and comparison with experiment is done.

  14. Tunable structural color in organisms and photonic materials for design of bioinspired materials.

    PubMed

    Fudouzi, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the key topics of tunable structural color in biology and material science are overviewed. Color in biology is considered for selected groups of tropical fish, octopus, squid and beetle. It is caused by nanoplates in iridophores and varies with their spacing, tilting angle and refractive index. These examples may provide valuable hints for the bioinspired design of photonic materials. 1D multilayer films and 3D colloidal crystals with tunable structural color are overviewed from the viewpoint of advanced materials. The tunability of structural color by swelling and strain is demonstrated on an example of opal composites.

  15. Tunable structural color in organisms and photonic materials for design of bioinspired materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fudouzi, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the key topics of tunable structural color in biology and material science are overviewed. Color in biology is considered for selected groups of tropical fish, octopus, squid and beetle. It is caused by nanoplates in iridophores and varies with their spacing, tilting angle and refractive index. These examples may provide valuable hints for the bioinspired design of photonic materials. 1D multilayer films and 3D colloidal crystals with tunable structural color are overviewed from the viewpoint of advanced materials. The tunability of structural color by swelling and strain is demonstrated on an example of opal composites.

  16. Tunable structural color in organisms and photonic materials for design of bioinspired materials

    PubMed Central

    Fudouzi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the key topics of tunable structural color in biology and material science are overviewed. Color in biology is considered for selected groups of tropical fish, octopus, squid and beetle. It is caused by nanoplates in iridophores and varies with their spacing, tilting angle and refractive index. These examples may provide valuable hints for the bioinspired design of photonic materials. 1D multilayer films and 3D colloidal crystals with tunable structural color are overviewed from the viewpoint of advanced materials. The tunability of structural color by swelling and strain is demonstrated on an example of opal composites. PMID:27877454

  17. Star cell type core configuration for structural sandwich materials

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, R.M.

    1995-08-01

    A new pattern for cellular core material used in sandwich type structural materials is disclosed. The new pattern involves star shaped cells intermixed with hexagonal shaped cells. The new patterned cellular core material includes star shaped cells interconnected at points thereof and having hexagonal shape cells positioned adjacent the star points. The new pattern allows more flexibility and can conform more easily to curved shapes. 3 figs.

  18. Development of a Portable Sensitive Equipment Decontamination System. Volume 1: Commercial Candidates Materials Evaluation (Chemical Agent Studies)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    residual agent from the disk. After a 60 min extraction period, the IPA extract was analyzed for residual HD by Gas Chromatography - Flame Photometric...to the start of a test, the identification number, material type, and dimensions of the test coupon to be used as a substrate in the test were...not conducted on nylon webbing. All of the tests were run at room temperature and ambient relative humidity. The identification number, material

  19. Material design and structural color inspired by biomimetic approach.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira

    2011-12-01

    Generation of structural color is one of the essential functions realized by living organisms, and its industrial reproduction can result in numerous applications. From this viewpoint, the mechanisms, materials, analytical methods and fabrication technologies of the structural color are reviewed in this paper. In particular, the basic principles of natural photonic materials, the ideas developed from these principles, the directions of applications and practical industrial realizations are presented by summarizing the recent research results.

  20. Material design and structural color inspired by biomimetic approach

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Generation of structural color is one of the essential functions realized by living organisms, and its industrial reproduction can result in numerous applications. From this viewpoint, the mechanisms, materials, analytical methods and fabrication technologies of the structural color are reviewed in this paper. In particular, the basic principles of natural photonic materials, the ideas developed from these principles, the directions of applications and practical industrial realizations are presented by summarizing the recent research results. PMID:27877459

  1. Simultaneous dynamic electrical and structural measurements of functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchini, C.; Thompson, P.; Stewart, M.; Muñiz-Piniella, A.; McMitchell, S. R. C.; Wooldridge, J.; Lepadatu, S.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S.; Wermeille, D.; Bikondoa, O.; Lucas, C. A.; Hase, T. P. A.; Lesourd, M.; Dontsov, D.; Cain, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    A new materials characterization system developed at the XMaS beamline, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in France, is presented. We show that this new capability allows to measure the atomic structural evolution (crystallography) of piezoelectric materials whilst simultaneously measuring the overall strain characteristics and electrical response to dynamically (ac) applied external stimuli.

  2. Simultaneous dynamic electrical and structural measurements of functional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchini, C.; Stewart, M.; Muñiz-Piniella, A.; Wooldridge, J.; Thompson, P.; McMitchell, S. R. C.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S.; Wermeille, D.; Lucas, C. A.; Lepadatu, S.; Bikondoa, O.; Hase, T. P. A.; Lesourd, M.; Dontsov, D.; Cain, M. G.

    2015-10-15

    A new materials characterization system developed at the XMaS beamline, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in France, is presented. We show that this new capability allows to measure the atomic structural evolution (crystallography) of piezoelectric materials whilst simultaneously measuring the overall strain characteristics and electrical response to dynamically (ac) applied external stimuli.

  3. Progressive failure analysis of fibrous composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahei-El-din, Yehia A.

    1990-01-01

    A brief description is given of the modifications implemented in the PAFAC finite element program for the simulation of progressive failure in fibrous composite materials and structures. Details of the memory allocation, input data, and the new subroutines are given. Also, built-in failure criteria for homogeneous and fibrous composite materials are described.

  4. DIFFERENTIALLY STRUCTURED INTRODUCTORY LEARNING MATERIALS AND LEARNING TASKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GROTELUESCHEN, ARDEN

    AN ATTEMPT WAS MADE TO ASSESS THE EFFECTS ON ADULT LEARNING OF DIFFERENTIALLY STRUCTURED INTRODUCTORY COGNITIVE LEARNING TASKS AND MATERIALS, AND THE INTERACTION OF INTELLIGENCE WITH THE EXPERIMENTALLY MANIPULATED MATERIAL AND TASK CATEGORIES. ABOUT 96 ADULTS WHO WERE UNFAMILIAR WITH THE CONCEPT OF NUMBER BASES WERE CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO A 4X3X4…

  5. A quantification model for the structure of clay materials.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liansheng; Sang, Haitao; Chen, Haokun; Sun, Yinlei; Zhang, Longjian

    2016-07-04

    In this paper, the quantification for clay structure is explicitly explained, and the approach and goals of quantification are also discussed. The authors consider that the purpose of the quantification for clay structure is to determine some parameters that can be used to quantitatively characterize the impact of clay structure on the macro-mechanical behaviour. According to the system theory and the law of energy conservation, a quantification model for the structure characteristics of clay materials is established and three quantitative parameters (i.e., deformation structure potential, strength structure potential and comprehensive structure potential) are proposed. And the corresponding tests are conducted. The experimental results show that these quantitative parameters can accurately reflect the influence of clay structure on the deformation behaviour, strength behaviour and the relative magnitude of structural influence on the above two quantitative parameters, respectively. These quantitative parameters have explicit mechanical meanings, and can be used to characterize the structural influences of clay on its mechanical behaviour.

  6. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  7. Structural parameter effect of porous material on sound absorption performance of double-resonance material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, C.; Tian, Y.; Wang, Z. Q.; Nie, J. K.; Wang, G. K.; Liu, X. S.

    2017-06-01

    In view of the noise feature and service environment of urban power substations, this paper explores the idea of compound impedance, fills some porous sound-absorption material in the first resonance cavity of the double-resonance sound-absorption material, and designs a new-type of composite acoustic board. We conduct some acoustic characterizations according to the standard test of impedance tube, and research on the influence of assembly order, the thickness and area density of the filling material, and back cavity on material sound-absorption performance. The results show that the new-type of acoustic board consisting of aluminum fibrous material as inner structure, micro-porous board as outer structure, and polyester-filled space between them, has good sound-absorption performance for low frequency and full frequency noise. When the thickness, area density of filling material and thickness of back cavity increase, the sound absorption coefficient curve peak will move toward low frequency.

  8. Systematic Structural Characterization of Metabolites in Arabidopsis via Candidate Substrate-Product Pair Networks[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Morreel, Kris; Saeys, Yvan; Dima, Oana; Lu, Fachuang; Van de Peer, Yves; Vanholme, Ruben; Ralph, John; Vanholme, Bartel; Boerjan, Wout

    2014-01-01

    Plant metabolomics is increasingly used for pathway discovery and to elucidate gene function. However, the main bottleneck is the identification of the detected compounds. This is more pronounced for secondary metabolites as many of their pathways are still underexplored. Here, an algorithm is presented in which liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry profiles are searched for pairs of peaks that have mass and retention time differences corresponding with those of substrates and products from well-known enzymatic reactions. Concatenating the latter peak pairs, called candidate substrate-product pairs (CSPP), into a network displays tentative (bio)synthetic routes. Starting from known peaks, propagating the network along these routes allows the characterization of adjacent peaks leading to their structure prediction. As a proof-of-principle, this high-throughput cheminformatics procedure was applied to the Arabidopsis thaliana leaf metabolome where it allowed the characterization of the structures of 60% of the profiled compounds. Moreover, based on searches in the Chemical Abstract Service database, the algorithm led to the characterization of 61 compounds that had never been described in plants before. The CSPP-based annotation was confirmed by independent MSn experiments. In addition to being high throughput, this method allows the annotation of low-abundance compounds that are otherwise not amenable to isolation and purification. This method will greatly advance the value of metabolomics in systems biology. PMID:24685999

  9. The dyslexia candidate locus on 2p12 is associated with general cognitive ability and white matter structure.

    PubMed

    Scerri, Thomas S; Darki, Fahimeh; Newbury, Dianne F; Whitehouse, Andrew J O; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Matsson, Hans; Ang, Qi W; Pennell, Craig E; Ring, Susan; Stein, John; Morris, Andrew P; Monaco, Anthony P; Kere, Juha; Talcott, Joel B; Klingberg, Torkel; Paracchini, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Independent studies have shown that candidate genes for dyslexia and specific language impairment (SLI) impact upon reading/language-specific traits in the general population. To further explore the effect of disorder-associated genes on cognitive functions, we investigated whether they play a role in broader cognitive traits. We tested a panel of dyslexia and SLI genetic risk factors for association with two measures of general cognitive abilities, or IQ, (verbal and non-verbal) in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort (N>5,000). Only the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus showed statistically significant association (minimum P = 0.00009) which was further supported by independent replications following analysis in four other cohorts. In addition, a fifth independent sample showed association between the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus and white matter structure in the posterior part of the corpus callosum and cingulum, connecting large parts of the cortex in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes. These findings suggest that this locus, originally identified as being associated with dyslexia, is likely to harbour genetic variants associated with general cognitive abilities by influencing white matter structure in localised neuronal regions.

  10. The Dyslexia Candidate Locus on 2p12 Is Associated with General Cognitive Ability and White Matter Structure

    PubMed Central

    Scerri, Thomas S.; Darki, Fahimeh; Newbury, Dianne F.; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Matsson, Hans; Ang, Qi W.; Pennell, Craig E.; Ring, Susan; Stein, John; Morris, Andrew P.; Monaco, Anthony P.; Kere, Juha; Talcott, Joel B.; Klingberg, Torkel; Paracchini, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Independent studies have shown that candidate genes for dyslexia and specific language impairment (SLI) impact upon reading/language-specific traits in the general population. To further explore the effect of disorder-associated genes on cognitive functions, we investigated whether they play a role in broader cognitive traits. We tested a panel of dyslexia and SLI genetic risk factors for association with two measures of general cognitive abilities, or IQ, (verbal and non-verbal) in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort (N>5,000). Only the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus showed statistically significant association (minimum P = 0.00009) which was further supported by independent replications following analysis in four other cohorts. In addition, a fifth independent sample showed association between the MRPL19/C2ORF3 locus and white matter structure in the posterior part of the corpus callosum and cingulum, connecting large parts of the cortex in the parietal, occipital and temporal lobes. These findings suggest that this locus, originally identified as being associated with dyslexia, is likely to harbour genetic variants associated with general cognitive abilities by influencing white matter structure in localised neuronal regions. PMID:23209710

  11. VFV as a New Effective CYP51 Structure-Derived Drug Candidate for Chagas Disease and Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Rachakonda, Girish; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Pomel, Sébastien; Cojean, Sandrine; Nde, Pius N.; Nes, W. David; Locuson, Charles W.; Calcutt, M. Wade; Waterman, Michael R.; Daniels, J. Scott; Loiseau, Philippe M.; Villalta, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Sterol 14α-demethylases (CYP51) are the enzymes essential for sterol biosynthesis. They serve as clinical targets for antifungal azoles and are considered as targets for treatment of human Trypanosomatidae infections. Recently, we have shown that VNI, a potent and selective inhibitor of trypanosomal CYP51 that we identified and structurally characterized in complex with the enzyme, can cure the acute and chronic forms of Chagas disease. The purpose of this work was to apply the CYP51 structure/function for further development of the VNI scaffold. As anticipated, VFV (R)-N-(1-(3,4′-difluorobiphenyl-4-yl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl)-4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)benzamide, the derivative designed to fill the deepest portion of the CYP51 substrate-binding cavity, reveals a broader antiprotozoan spectrum of action. It has stronger antiparasitic activity in cellular experiments, cures the experimental Chagas disease with 100% efficacy, and suppresses visceral leishmaniasis by 89% (vs 60% for VNI). Oral bioavailability, low off-target activity, favorable pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution characterize VFV as a promising new drug candidate. PMID:25883390

  12. Thermal response of substrate structural materials during a plasma disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Smith, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    Intense energy fluxes to in-vessel components like the first wall and the divertor plate of a fusion reactor are expected during plasma disruptions. This high energy deposition in short times may cause severe surface erosion of these components resulting from melting and vaporization. Coatings and tile materials are proposed to protect and maintain the integrity of the underneath structural materials from both erosion losses as well as from high thermal stresses encountered during a disruption. The coating thickness should be large enough to withstand both erosion losses and to reduce the temperature rise in the substrate structural material. Yet the coating thickness should be minimized to reduce potential problems from radioactivity, toxicity, and plasma contamination. Tile materials such as graphite and coating materials such as tungsten and beryllium on structural materials like copper and steel are analyzed as potential divertor and first wall design options. The disruption is assumed to be composed of two phases: a thermal quench phase followed by a current quench phase. The minimum coating thickness required to protect the structural material is discussed for range of disruption parameters. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Thermal response of substrate structural materials during a plasma disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanein, Ahmed; Smith, Dale L.

    1992-09-01

    Intense energy fluxes to in-vessel components like the first wall and the divertor plate of a fusion reactor are expected during plasma disruptions. This high energy deposition in short times may cause severe surface erosion of these components resulting from melting and vaporization. Coatings and tile materials are proposed to protect and maintain the integrity of the underneath structural materials from both erosion losses as well as from high thermal stresses encountered during a disruption. The coating thickness should be large enough to withstand both erosion losses and to reduce the temperature rise in the substrate structural material. Yet the coating thickness should be minimized to reduce potential problems from radioactivity, toxicity, and plasma contamination. Tile materials such as graphite and coating materials such as tungsten and beryllium on structural materials like copper and steel are analyzed as potential divertor and first wall design options. The minimum coating thickness required to protect the structural material is discussed for a range of disruption parameters.

  14. Thermal response of substrate structural materials during a plasma disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Smith, D.L.

    1991-12-31

    Intense energy fluxes to in-vessel components like the first wall and the divertor plate of a fusion reactor are expected during plasma disruptions. This high energy deposition in short times may cause severe surface erosion of these components resulting from melting and vaporization. Coatings and tile materials are proposed to protect and maintain the integrity of the underneath structural materials from both erosion losses as well as from high thermal stresses encountered during a disruption. The coating thickness should be large enough to withstand both erosion losses and to reduce the temperature rise in the substrate structural material. Yet the coating thickness should be minimized to reduce potential problems from radioactivity, toxicity, and plasma contamination. Tile materials such as graphite and coating materials such as tungsten and beryllium on structural materials like copper and steel are analyzed as potential divertor and first wall design options. The disruption is assumed to be composed of two phases: a thermal quench phase followed by a current quench phase. The minimum coating thickness required to protect the structural material is discussed for range of disruption parameters. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Materials for Adaptive Structural Acoustic Control. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-06

    headings: 1. General Summary Papers. 2. Materials Studies. 3. Composite Sensors. 4. Actuator Studies. 5. Integration Issues. 6. Processing Studies. 7...both composite sensors and actuators we have continued to explore and exploit the remarkable versatility of the flextensional moonie type structure...cap geometries and load conditions. In actuator studies inultilayer structures have been combined with flextensional moonie endcaps to yield high

  16. Low-Cost Composite Materials and Structures for Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, Ravi B.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Holzwarth, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of current applications of composite materials and structures in military, transport and General Aviation aircraft is presented to assess the maturity of composites technology, and the payoffs realized. The results of the survey show that performance requirements and the potential to reduce life cycle costs for military aircraft and direct operating costs for transport aircraft are the main reasons for the selection of composite materials for current aircraft applications. Initial acquisition costs of composite airframe components are affected by high material costs and complex certification tests which appear to discourage the widespread use of composite materials for aircraft applications. Material suppliers have performed very well to date in developing resin matrix and fiber systems for improved mechanical, durability and damage tolerance performance. The next challenge for material suppliers is to reduce material costs and to develop materials that are suitable for simplified and inexpensive manufacturing processes. The focus of airframe manufacturers should be on the development of structural designs that reduce assembly costs by the use of large-scale integration of airframe components with unitized structures and manufacturing processes that minimize excessive manual labor.

  17. Promising Thermoelectric Bulk Materials with 2D Structures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiming; Zhao, Li-Dong

    2017-07-24

    Given that more than two thirds of all energy is lost, mostly as waste heat, in utilization processes worldwide, thermoelectric materials, which can directly convert waste heat to electricity, provide an alternative option for optimizing energy utilization processes. After the prediction that superlattices may show high thermoelectric performance, various methods based on quantum effects and superlattice theory have been adopted to analyze bulk materials, leading to the rapid development of thermoelectric materials. Bulk materials with two-dimensional (2D) structures show outstanding properties, and their high performance originates from both their low thermal conductivity and high Seebeck coefficient due to their strong anisotropic features. Here, the advantages of superlattices for enhancing the thermoelectric performance, the transport mechanism in bulk materials with 2D structures, and optimization methods are discussed. The phenomenological transport mechanism in these materials indicates that thermal conductivities are reduced in 2D materials with intrinsically short mean free paths. Recent progress in the transport mechanisms of Bi2 Te3 -, SnSe-, and BiCuSeO-based systems is summarized. Finally, possible research directions to enhance the thermoelectric performance of bulk materials with 2D structures are briefly considered. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Low-Cost Composite Materials and Structures for Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, Ravi B.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Holzwarth, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of current applications of composite materials and structures in military, transport and General Aviation aircraft is presented to assess the maturity of composites technology, and the payoffs realized. The results of the survey show that performance requirements and the potential to reduce life cycle costs for military aircraft and direct operating costs for transport aircraft are the main reasons for the selection of composite materials for current aircraft applications. Initial acquisition costs of composite airframe components are affected by high material costs and complex certification tests which appear to discourage the widespread use of composite materials for aircraft applications. Material suppliers have performed very well to date in developing resin matrix and fiber systems for improved mechanical, durability and damage tolerance performance. The next challenge for material suppliers is to reduce material costs and to develop materials that are suitable for simplified and inexpensive manufacturing processes. The focus of airframe manufacturers should be on the development of structural designs that reduce assembly costs by the use of large-scale integration of airframe components with unitized structures and manufacturing processes that minimize excessive manual labor.

  19. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, Roberto J.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI) Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  20. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI), Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.