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Sample records for canine kidney cells

  1. Characterization of hormone-sensitive Madin-Darby canine kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.; Beckner, S.K.; Darfler, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes the optimal conditions for maintaining hormone responsiveness, measurement of intracellular AMP, and the characteristics of several types of hormone sensitivity in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Cyclic AMP is measured by radioimmunoassay with (/sup 175/I) as tracer. The responsiveness of the kidney cells to glucagon, vasopressin, isoproterenol, and prostaglandin in presented.

  2. The multiplication of an influenza C virus in an established line of canine kidney (MDCK) cells.

    PubMed

    Nerome, K; Ishida, M

    1978-04-01

    JJ/50 and four other strains of influenza C virus grew in an established line of canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Multicycle virus growth was markedly enhanced by the addition of trypsin to the culture medium and these viruses could be passaged serially in this system. The addition of appropriate concentrations of trypsin to the agar overlay medium enabled plaquing of influenza C/JJ/50 virus. Titration by plaque assay on MDCK cells was more sensitive than that by intra-amniotic inoculation of fertile hens' eggs.

  3. Replication and plaque assay of influenza virus in an established line of canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Gaush, C R; Smith, T F

    1968-04-01

    A plaque assay system has been developed for types A and B influenza viruses in an established line of canine kidney cells (MDCK-USD). In addition to a homogeneous susceptible cell, consistent plaque production depends on the use of highly purified agar (Agarose). This quantitative system was used to determine the rate of adsorption, synthesis, and thermal inactivation of influenza viruses, as well as to determine a dose response curve. Plaque assays on the MDCK-USD line and the parent MDCK line showed that the latter was more sensitive to A/Swine and A(2)/Japan 305 viruses. Titration of standard virus pools in embryonated eggs and MDCK-USD indicated that the cell culture system was as sensitive as the in ovo assay.

  4. Three-dimensional imaging of cholesterol and sphingolipids within a Madin-Darby canine kidney cell.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Ashley N; Weber, Peter K; Kraft, Mary L

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic stable isotope incorporation and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling performed on a Cameca NanoSIMS 50 were used to image the (18)O-cholesterol and (15)N-sphingolipid distributions within a portion of a Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell. Three-dimensional representations of the component-specific isotope distributions show clearly defined regions of (18)O-cholesterol and (15)N-sphingolipid enrichment that seem to be separate subcellular compartments. The low levels of nitrogen-containing secondary ions detected at the (18)O-enriched regions suggest that these (18)O-cholesterol-rich structures may be lipid droplets, which have a core consisting of cholesterol esters and triacylglycerides. PMID:26746168

  5. Three-dimensional imaging of cholesterol and sphingolipids within a Madin-Darby canine kidney cell.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Ashley N; Weber, Peter K; Kraft, Mary L

    2016-06-08

    Metabolic stable isotope incorporation and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling performed on a Cameca NanoSIMS 50 were used to image the (18)O-cholesterol and (15)N-sphingolipid distributions within a portion of a Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell. Three-dimensional representations of the component-specific isotope distributions show clearly defined regions of (18)O-cholesterol and (15)N-sphingolipid enrichment that seem to be separate subcellular compartments. The low levels of nitrogen-containing secondary ions detected at the (18)O-enriched regions suggest that these (18)O-cholesterol-rich structures may be lipid droplets, which have a core consisting of cholesterol esters and triacylglycerides.

  6. Three-dimensional imaging of cholesterol and sphingolipids within a Madin-Darby canine kidney cell

    DOE PAGES

    Yeager, Ashley N.; Weber, Peter K.; Kraft, Mary L.

    2016-01-08

    Metabolic stable isotope incorporation and secondary ion mass spectrometry(SIMS) depth profiling performed on a Cameca NanoSIMS 50 were used to image the 18O-cholesterol and 15N-sphingolipid distributions within a portion of a Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell. Three-dimensional representations of the component-specific isotope distributions show clearly defined regions of 18O-cholesterol and 15N-sphingolipid enrichment that seem to be separate subcellular compartments. Furthermore, the low levels of nitrogen-containing secondary ions detected at the 18O-enriched regions suggest that these 18O-cholesterol-rich structures may be lipiddroplets, which have a core consisting of cholesterol esters and triacylglycerides.

  7. Polarized endocytosis by Madin-Darby canine kidney cells transfected with functional chicken liver glycoprotein receptor

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the expression of the chicken hepatic glycoprotein receptor (chicken hepatic lectin [CHL]) in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, by transfection of its cDNA under the control of a retroviral promotor. Transfected cell lines stably express 87,000 surface receptors/cell with a kd = 13 nM. In confluent monolayers, approximately 40% of CHL is localized at the plasma membrane. 98% of the surface CHL is expressed at the basolateral surface where it performs polarized endocytosis and degradation of glycoproteins carrying terminal N-acetylglucosamine at a rate of 50,000 ligand molecules/h. Studies of the half-life of metabolically labeled receptor and of the stability of biotinylated cell surface receptor after internalization indicate that transfected CHL performs several rounds of uptake and recycling before it gets degraded. The successful expression of a functional basolateral receptor in MDCK cells opens the way for the characterization of the mechanisms that control targeting and recycling of proteins to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells. PMID:2687287

  8. Asymmetry of plasma membrane lipid order in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Le Grimellec, C; Friedlander, G; Giocondi, M C

    1988-07-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy experiments have been done to estimate, in situ, the lipid order of the plasma membrane of polarized Madin-Darby Canine Kidney cells (MDCK) grown on glass cover slips and labeled by 1-[4-(trimethylamino)phenyl]-6-phenylhexa-1,3,5-triene (TMA-DPH), a specific marker of the plasma membrane of living cells. Fluorescence microscopy, back-exchange, and quenching experiments indicated that TMA-DPH labeled the highly ordered (r greater than or equal to 0.32, 37 degrees C) apical domain of the plasma membrane of confluent monolayers. Opening of tight junctions or addition of the probe to cell suspensions resulted in a homogeneous distribution of TMA-DPH over the cell surface and in a marked decrease in anisotropy (0.27 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.29) that was due neither to a direct effect of Ca2+ on the probe nor to a change in fluorescence lifetime. Our data indicate that the apical domain, likely the external leaflet, of the plasma membrane of polarized MDCK cells is much more ordered than its basolateral counterpart.

  9. Iterative sorting of apical and basolateral cargo in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    Treyer, Aleksandr; Pujato, Mario; Pechuan, Ximo; Müsch, Anne

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, the trans-Golgi network (TGN) was considered the most distal stop and hence the ultimate protein-sorting station for distinct apical and basolateral transport carriers that reach their respective surface domains in the direct trafficking pathway. However, recent reports of apical and basolateral cargoes traversing post-Golgi compartments accessible to endocytic ligands before their arrival at the cell surface and the post-TGN breakup of large pleomorphic membrane fragments that exit the Golgi region toward the surface raised the possibility that compartments distal to the TGN mediate or contribute to biosynthetic sorting. Here we describe the development of a novel assay that quantitatively distinguishes different cargo pairs by their degree of colocalization at the TGN and by the evolution of colocalization during their TGN-to-surface transport. Keys to the high resolution of our approach are 1) conversion of perinuclear organelle clustering into a two-dimensional microsomal spread and 2) identification of TGN and post-TGN cargo without the need for a TGN marker that universally cosegregates with all cargo. Using our assay, we provide the first evidence that apical NTRp75 and basolateral VSVG in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells still undergo progressive sorting after they exit the TGN toward the cell surface. PMID:27226480

  10. Iterative sorting of apical and basolateral cargo in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Treyer, Aleksandr; Pujato, Mario; Pechuan, Ximo; Müsch, Anne

    2016-07-15

    For several decades, the trans-Golgi network (TGN) was considered the most distal stop and hence the ultimate protein-sorting station for distinct apical and basolateral transport carriers that reach their respective surface domains in the direct trafficking pathway. However, recent reports of apical and basolateral cargoes traversing post-Golgi compartments accessible to endocytic ligands before their arrival at the cell surface and the post-TGN breakup of large pleomorphic membrane fragments that exit the Golgi region toward the surface raised the possibility that compartments distal to the TGN mediate or contribute to biosynthetic sorting. Here we describe the development of a novel assay that quantitatively distinguishes different cargo pairs by their degree of colocalization at the TGN and by the evolution of colocalization during their TGN-to-surface transport. Keys to the high resolution of our approach are 1) conversion of perinuclear organelle clustering into a two-dimensional microsomal spread and 2) identification of TGN and post-TGN cargo without the need for a TGN marker that universally cosegregates with all cargo. Using our assay, we provide the first evidence that apical NTRp75 and basolateral VSVG in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells still undergo progressive sorting after they exit the TGN toward the cell surface. PMID:27226480

  11. Determining Influenza Virus Shedding at Different Time Points in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, Asghar; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Tavassoti Kheiri, Masoumeh; Jamali, Abbas; Jamaati, Azam

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Monitoring of influenza virus shedding and optimization of multiplicities of infection (MOI) is important in the investigation of a virus one step growth cycle and for obtaining a high yield of virus in vaccine development and conventional basic diagnostic methods. However, eluted infectious viruses may still be present immediately after virus inoculation and when cells are washed following virus cultivation which may lead to a false positive virus infectivity assay. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, we investigated influenza virus progeny production in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells with five different MOI at determined time points. The results were analyzed by end point titration tests and immunofluorescence assay. Results: Higher titers of eluted virus were observed following a high MOI inoculation of virus in cell culture. Most probably, this was the result of sialic acid residues from viral hemagglutin in proteins that were cleaved by neuraminidase glycoproteins on the surface of the influenza virus, which promoted viral spread from the host cell to the culture supernatant or during endocytosis, where viruses recycle to the cell surface by recycling endosomes which culminated in virus shedding without replication. Conclusion: We demonstrated that the pattern of influenza virus progeny production was dose-dependent and not uniform. This production was influenced by several factors, particularly MOI. Understanding the exact features of viral particle propagation has a major impact in producing high virus yields in the development of vaccines. Use of lower MOI (0.01) could result in accurate, precise quantitative assays in virus diagnosis and titration methods. PMID:23862114

  12. Investigation of transport mechanism of exendin-4 across Madin Darby canine kidney cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengshu; Sun, Bingxue; Feng, Jiao; Zhang, Haihong; Liu, Bin; Li, Chun; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Yong; Kong, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the transport mechanism of exendin-4 using Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell monolayer as an in vitro model of the human intestinal barrier. The roles of active and passive mechanisms of exendin-4 in the cell models were well studied and the corresponding contributions of the transcelluar and paracellular pathway to exendin-4 transport were also evaluated. Moreover, the apparent permeability coefficient (P(app)) values of exendin-4 were determined in the presence of chitosan, sodium decanoate and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) to further confirm the relative transport mechanism and to evaluate their potential utility in future formulation design. The results revealed the low transport capacity of exendin-4 (P(app), 0.10±0.06×10(-6) cm/s). And exendin-4 transport across the cell models was time and concentration-dependence, direction and energy-independence, and similar to the passive transport marker. Drug efflux and active transport were not observed. In the presence of absorption enhancers, the P(app) value significantly increased up to 2.2-11.9 folds without apparent cytotoxicity, which is comparable to that of the paracellular transport marker. And the order of enhancement was to the effect of chitosan>EDTA>sodium decanoate, and the order of safety was sodium decanoate≈chitosan>EDTA. These findings demonstrated that exendin-4 transport across MDCK cell monolayer mainly by passive paracellular pathway, which agrees with the result of confocal laser scanning microscopy. And these absorption enhancers can be used as potential safe ingredients to improve oral efficacy of exendin-4.

  13. Transepithelial transport of aliphatic carboxylic acids studied in Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Cho, M J; Adson, A; Kezdy, F J

    1990-04-01

    Transport of 14C-labeled acetic, propionic (PA), butyric, valeric, heptanoic (HA), and octanoic (OA) acids across the Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell monolayer grown on a porous polycarbonate membrane was studied in Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS) at 37 degrees C in both apical-to-basolateral and basolateral-to-apical directions. At micromolar concentrations of solutes, metabolic decomposition was significant as evidenced by [14C]CO2 production during the OA transport. The apparent permeability (Pe) indicates that as lipophilicity increases, diffusion across the "unstirred" boundary layer becomes rate limiting. In support of this notion, transport of OA and HA was enhanced by agitation, showed an activation energy of 3.7 kcal/mol for OA, and resulted in identical Pe values for both transport directions. Analysis of Pe changes with varying alkyl chain length resulted in a delta G of -0.68 +/- 0.09 kcal/mol for -CH2-group transfer from an aqueous phase to the MDCK cells. When the intercellular tight junctions were opened by the divalent chelator EGTA in Ca2+/Mg2(+)-free HBSS, transport of the fluid-phase marker Lucifer yellow greatly increased because of paracellular leakage. PA transport also showed a significant increase, but OA transport was independent of EGTA. Although albumin also undergoes paracellular transport in the presence of EGTA and OA binds strongly to albumin, OA transport in EGTA solution was unchanged by albumin. These observations indicate that transmembrane transport is the major mechanism for lipophilic substances. The present study, together with earlier work on the transport of polar substances, shows that the MDCK cell monolayer is an excellent model of the transepithelial transport barrier.

  14. Transepithelial transport of aliphatic carboxylic acids studied in Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, M.J.; Adson, A.; Kezdy, F.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Transport of 14C-labeled acetic, propionic (PA), butyric, valeric, heptanoic (HA), and octanoic (OA) acids across the Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell monolayer grown on a porous polycarbonate membrane was studied in Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS) at 37{degrees}C in both apical-to-basolateral and basolateral-to-apical directions. At micromolar concentrations of solutes, metabolic decomposition was significant as evidenced by (14C)CO2 production during the OA transport. The apparent permeability (Pe) indicates that as lipophilicity increases, diffusion across the unstirred boundary layer becomes rate limiting. In support of this notion, transport of OA and HA was enhanced by agitation, showed an activation energy of 3.7 kcal/mol for OA, and resulted in identical Pe values for both transport directions. Analysis of Pe changes with varying alkyl chain length resulted in a delta G of -0.68 +/- 0.09 kcal/mol for -CH2-group transfer from an aqueous phase to the MDCK cells. When the intercellular tight junctions were opened by the divalent chelator EGTA in Ca2+/Mg2(+)-free HBSS, transport of the fluid-phase marker Lucifer yellow greatly increased because of paracellular leakage. PA transport also showed a significant increase, but OA transport was independent of EGTA. Although albumin also undergoes paracellular transport in the presence of EGTA and OA binds strongly to albumin, OA transport in EGTA solution was unchanged by albumin. These observations indicate that transmembrane transport is the major mechanism for lipophilic substances. The present study, together with earlier work on the transport of polar substances, shows that the MDCK cell monolayer is an excellent model of the transepithelial transport barrier.

  15. Cdc42-dependent Modulation of Tight Junctions and Membrane Protein Traffic in Polarized Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Raul; Ruiz, Wily G.; Leung, Som-Ming; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh; Apodaca, Gerard

    2001-01-01

    Polarized epithelial cells maintain the asymmetric composition of their apical and basolateral membrane domains by at least two different processes. These include the regulated trafficking of macromolecules from the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway to the appropriate membrane domain and the ability of the tight junction to prevent free mixing of membrane domain-specific proteins and lipids. Cdc42, a Rho family GTPase, is known to govern cellular polarity and membrane traffic in several cell types. We examined whether this protein regulated tight junction function in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and pathways that direct proteins to the apical and basolateral surface of these cells. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney cells that expressed dominant-active or dominant-negative mutants of Cdc42 under the control of a tetracycline-repressible system. Here we report that expression of dominant-active Cdc42V12 or dominant-negative Cdc42N17 altered tight junction function. Expression of Cdc42V12 slowed endocytic and biosynthetic traffic, and expression of Cdc42N17 slowed apical endocytosis and basolateral to apical transcytosis but stimulated biosynthetic traffic. These results indicate that Cdc42 may modulate multiple cellular pathways required for the maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. PMID:11514615

  16. The effects of parathyroid hormone and estradiol on cadmium accumulation by Madin-Darby canine kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Chronic exposure to the toxic metal cadmium causes osteomalacia, osteoporosis, increased serum parathyroid hormone, renal stone formation, hypercalciuria and renal tubular dysfunction, reflecting one or more disturbances of calcium homeostasis. Since renal cadmium (Cd[sup 2+]) transport proceeds in both proximal and distal tubules and parathyroid hormone (PTH) regulates calcium reabsorption at distal nephron sites, it was postulated that PTH may also stimulate Cd[sup 2+] transport in distal tubules. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, which express a distal phenotype including PTH-sensitive adenylate cyclase and calcium transport, were used as the cell model for the present study. Cadmium uptake was measured using [[sup 109]Cd[sup 2+

  17. Establishment and characterization of a Madin-Darby canine kidney reporter cell line for influenza A virus assays.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Jaber; Perez, Sandra; Guo, Zhu; Chen, Li-Mei; Donis, Ruben O

    2010-07-01

    Influenza virus diagnosis has traditionally relied on virus isolation in chicken embryo or cell cultures. Many laboratories have adopted rapid molecular methods for detection of influenza viruses and discontinued routine utilization of the relatively slow viral culture methods. We describe an influenza A virus reporter cell line that contributes to more efficient viral detection in cell culture. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were engineered to constitutively produce an influenza virus genome-like luciferase reporter RNA driven by the canine RNA polymerase I promoter. Induction of a high level of luciferase activity was detected in the Luc9.1 cells upon infection with various strains of influenza A virus, including 2009 H1N1 pandemic and highly pathogenic H5N1 virus. In contrast, infection with influenza B virus or human adenovirus type 5 did not induce significant levels of reporter expression. The reporter Luc9.1 cells were evaluated in neutralizing antibody assays with convalescent H3N2 ferret serum, yielding a neutralization titer comparable to that obtained by the conventional microneutralization assay, suggesting that the use of the reporter cell line might simplify neutralization assays by facilitating the establishment of infectious virus endpoints. Luc9.1 cells were also used to determine the susceptibility of influenza A viruses to a model antiviral drug. The equivalence to conventional antiviral assay results indicated that the Luc9.1 cells could provide an alternative cell-based platform for high-throughput drug discovery screens. In summary, the MDCK-derived Luc9.1 reporter cell line is highly permissive for influenza A virus replication and provides a very specific and sensitive approach for simultaneous detection and isolation of influenza A viruses as well as functional evaluation of antibodies and antiviral molecules. PMID:20504984

  18. High Yield Production of Influenza Virus in Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) Cells with Stable Knockdown of IRF7

    PubMed Central

    Hamamoto, Itsuki; Takaku, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Masato; Yamamoto, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Influenza is a serious public health problem that causes a contagious respiratory disease. Vaccination is the most effective strategy to reduce transmission and prevent influenza. In recent years, cell-based vaccines have been developed with continuous cell lines such as Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and Vero. However, wild-type influenza and egg-based vaccine seed viruses will not grow efficiently in these cell lines. Therefore, improvement of virus growth is strongly required for development of vaccine seed viruses and cell-based influenza vaccine production. The aim of our research is to develop novel MDCK cells supporting highly efficient propagation of influenza virus in order to expand the capacity of vaccine production. In this study, we screened a human siRNA library that involves 78 target molecules relating to three major type I interferon (IFN) pathways to identify genes that when knocked down by siRNA lead to enhanced production of influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 in A549 cells. The siRNAs targeting 23 candidate genes were selected to undergo a second screening pass in MDCK cells. We examined the effects of knockdown of target genes on the viral production using newly designed siRNAs based on sequence analyses. Knockdown of the expression of a canine gene corresponding to human IRF7 by siRNA increased the efficiency of viral production in MDCK cells through an unknown process that includes the mechanisms other than inhibition of IFN-α/β induction. Furthermore, the viral yield greatly increased in MDCK cells stably transduced with the lentiviral vector for expression of short hairpin RNA against IRF7 compared with that in control MDCK cells. Therefore, we propose that modified MDCK cells with lower expression level of IRF7 could be useful not only for increasing the capacity of vaccine production but also facilitating the process of seed virus isolation from clinical specimens for manufacturing of vaccines. PMID:23555825

  19. Sorting of Membrane and Fluid at the Apical Pole of Polarized Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Som-Ming; Ruiz, Wily G.; Apodaca, Gerard

    2000-01-01

    When fluid-phase markers are internalized from opposite poles of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, they accumulate in distinct apical and basolateral early endosomes before meeting in late endosomes. Recent evidence suggests that significant mixing of apically and basolaterally internalized membrane proteins occurs in specialized apical endosomal compartments, including the common recycling endosome and the apical recycling endosome (ARE). The relationship between these latter compartments and the fluid-labeled apical early endosome is unknown at present. We report that when the apical recycling marker, membrane-bound immunoglobulin A (a ligand for the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor), and fluid-phase dextran are cointernalized from the apical poles of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, they enter a shared apical early endosome (≤2.5 min at 37°C) and are then rapidly segregated from one another. The dextran remains in the large supranuclear EEA1-positive early endosomes while recycling polymeric immunoglobulin receptor–bound immunoglobulin A is delivered to a Rab11-positive subapical recycling compartment. This latter step requires an intact microtubule cytoskeleton. Receptor-bound transferrin, a marker of the basolateral recycling pathway, has limited access to the fluid-rich apical early endosome but is excluded from the subapical elements of the Rab11-positive recycling compartment. We propose that the term ARE be used to describe the subapical Rab11-positive compartment and that the ARE is distinct from both the transferrin-rich common recycling endosome and the fluid-rich apical early endosome. PMID:10848634

  20. Assembly of enveloped viruses in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells: polarized budding from single attached cells and from clusters of cells in suspension

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    In confluent monolayers of the dog kidney epithelial cell line Madin- Darby canine kidney (MDCK) assembly of RNA enveloped viruses reflects the functional polarization of the cells. Thus, influenza, Sendai, and Simian virus 5 bud from the apical (free) surface, while vesicular stomatitis virions (VSV) are assembled at basolateral plasma membrane domains (Rodriguez-Boulan, E., and D.D. Sabatini, 1978, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 75:5071-5075). MDCK cells derived from confluent monolayers by dissociation with trypsin-EDTA and maintained as single cells in spinner medium for 12-20 h before infection, lose their characteristic structural polarity. Furthermore, when these cells were infected with influenza or VSV, virions assembled in a nonpolarized fashion over most of the cell surface. However, when dissociated MDCK cells infected in suspension were sparsely plated on collagen gels to prevent intercellular contact and the formation of junctions, the characteristic polarity of viral budding observed in confluent monolayers was again manifested; i.e., VSV budded preferentially from adherent surfaces and influenza almost exclusively from free surface regions. Similar polarization was observed in cells which became aggregated during incubation in spinner medium: influenza budded from the free surface, while VSV was produced at regions of cell-cell contact. It therefore appears that in isolated epithelial cells attachment to a substrate or to another cell is sufficient to trigger the expression of plasma membrane polarity which is manifested in the asymmetric budding of viruses. PMID:6300140

  1. Effects of different concentrations of artemisinin and artemisinin-iron combination treatment on Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Payman; Mohammadpour, Hemn; Tayefi-Nasrabadi, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin is a sesquitrepenelactone with an endoperoxide bridge. It is a naturally occurring substance from Artemisia species plants. Artemisia species have been used in oriental medicine for centuries to treat malaria, gastrointestinal helminthosia, diarrhea, and as an antipyretic and sedative agent. Antileishmanial activity of the plants has been announced a few years ago. Dogs are the most important reservoir of leishmaniasis in some parts of the world. To use it as an antileishmanial drug in dogs, its side effects on different organs, among them the kidney as the organ of elimination have to be elucidated. Artemisinin with different concentrations (0.15, 0.3, 0.6 and 1.2 μg/ml) was added to the culture of MDCK (Madin darby canine kidney) cells with and without iron (86 μg/dl). All the changes were controlled and photographed every 12 hours using an invert microscope. After 60 hours, supernatants and cell extracts were examined for LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) concentration and total protein. Also TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) test was performed on cell extracts. Some microscopic slides were prepared from the cells and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic exams. Biochemical parameters showed cellular reaction and injury in a concentration dependent manner. Cell injury was more severe in the iron-added groups. Microscopic exams showed cell and nuclear swelling, granular degeneration, vacuole and vesicle formation, cellular detachment, piknosis, karyorrhexis, cellular necrosis and inhibition of new mitosis. On using the drug for leishmaniasis treatment in the dog, it should be done with caution and supervision. PMID:22783147

  2. Failure-to-thrive syndrome associated with tumor formation by Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in newborn nude mice.

    PubMed

    Brinster, Lauren R; Omeir, Romelda L; Foseh, Gideon S; Macauley, Juliete N; Snoy, Philip J; Beren, Joel J; Teferedegne, Belete; Peden, Keith; Lewis, Andrew M

    2013-08-01

    Tumors that formed in newborn nude mice that were inoculated with 10(7) Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were associated with a failure-to-thrive (FTT) syndrome consisting of growth retardation, lethargy, weakness, and dehydration. Scoliosis developed in 41% of affected pups. Pups were symptomatic by week 2; severely affected pups became moribund and required euthanasia within 3 to 4 wk. Mice with FTT were classified into categories of mild, moderate, and severe disease by comparing their weight with that of age-matched normal nude mice. The MDCK-induced tumors were adenocarcinomas that invaded adjacent muscle, connective tissue, and bone; 6 of the 26 pups examined had lung metastases. The induction of FTT did not correlate with cell-line aggressiveness as estimated by histopathology or the efficiency of tumor formation (tumor-forming dose 50% endpoint range = 10(2.8) to 10(7.5)); however, tumor invasion of the paravertebral muscles likely contributed to the scoliosis noted. In contrast to the effect of MDCK cells, tumor formation observed in newborn mice inoculated with highly tumorigenic, human-tumor-derived cell lines was not associated with FTT development. We suggest that tumor formation and FTT are characteristics of these MDCK cell inocula and that FTT represents a new syndrome that may be similar to the cachexia that develops in humans with cancer or other diseases. PMID:24209967

  3. Failure-to-Thrive Syndrome Associated with Tumor Formation by Madin–Darby Canine Kidney Cells in Newborn Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brinster, Lauren R; Omeir, Romelda L; Foseh, Gideon S; Macauley, Juliete N; Snoy, Philip J; Beren, Joel J; Teferedegne, Belete; Peden, Keith; Lewis, Andrew M

    2013-01-01

    Tumors that formed in newborn nude mice that were inoculated with 107 Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were associated with a failure-to-thrive (FTT) syndrome consisting of growth retardation, lethargy, weakness, and dehydration. Scoliosis developed in 41% of affected pups. Pups were symptomatic by week 2; severely affected pups became moribund and required euthanasia within 3 to 4 wk. Mice with FTT were classified into categories of mild, moderate, and severe disease by comparing their weight with that of age-matched normal nude mice. The MDCK-induced tumors were adenocarcinomas that invaded adjacent muscle, connective tissue, and bone; 6 of the 26 pups examined had lung metastases. The induction of FTT did not correlate with cell-line aggressiveness as estimated by histopathology or the efficiency of tumor formation (tumor-forming dose 50% endpoint range = 102.8 to 107.5); however, tumor invasion of the paravertebral muscles likely contributed to the scoliosis noted. In contrast to the effect of MDCK cells, tumor formation observed in newborn mice inoculated with highly tumorigenic, human-tumor–derived cell lines was not associated with FTT development. We suggest that tumor formation and FTT are characteristics of these MDCK cell inocula and that FTT represents a new syndrome that may be similar to the cachexia that develops in humans with cancer or other diseases. PMID:24209967

  4. Formation of unusual mannosamine-containing lipid-linked oligosaccharides in Madin-Darby canine kidney cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y T; De Gespari, R; Warren, C D; Elbein, A D

    1992-05-01

    Glc3Man9(GlcNAc)2-pyrophosphoryl-dolichol is the major lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) produced by Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in culture. However, when these cells are incubated in the presence of millimolar concentrations of mannosamine and labeled with [2-3H]mannose, they accumulate various LLO that have smaller-sized oligosaccharides with unusual structures and the Glc3Man9(GlcNAc)2-pyrophosphoryl-dolichol is not detected. Thus in the presence of 10 mM mannosamine, more than 80% of the oligosaccharides are eluted from concanavalin A-Sepharose with 10 mM alpha-methylglucoside, indicating that they no longer have the tight-binding characteristics of control oligosaccharides. In addition, 20-40% of these oligosaccharides bind to Dowex 50-H+, indicating the presence of mannosamine in these structures. Interestingly enough, these abnormal oligosaccharides are still transferred to protein. The mannosamine-induced oligosaccharides were separated into neutral and basic fractions on a cation exchange resin. The neutral oligosaccharides ranged in size from hexose3(GlcNAc)2 to hexose10(GlcNAc)2 with the major species being Man5(GlcNAc)2 to Man7(GlcNAc)2. These oligosaccharides were almost completely susceptible to digestion by alpha-mannosidase and by endoglucosaminidase H. The basic oligosaccharides showed anomolous behavior on the Bio-Gel P-4 columns and appeared to be of small size on the standard columns, ranging from hexose2 to hexose4. However, most of these oligosaccharides were susceptible to digestion by endoglucosaminidase H as well as by alpha-mannosidase, suggesting that they were of different size and structure than would be predicted from the gel filtration patterns. Significantly, when the basic oligosaccharides were subjected to chemical N-acetylation, or when the gel filtration columns were run at high pH rather than at the usual pH of 3.0, the basic oligosaccharides migrated like much larger oligosaccharides. These data provide strong evidence to

  5. Modulation of Endocytic Traffic in Polarized Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells by the Small GTPase RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Som-Ming; Rojas, Raul; Maples, Christopher; Flynn, Christopher; Ruiz, Wily G.; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh; Apodaca, Gerard

    1999-01-01

    Efficient postendocytic membrane traffic in polarized epithelial cells is thought to be regulated in part by the actin cytoskeleton. RhoA modulates assemblies of actin in the cell, and it has been shown to regulate pinocytosis and phagocytosis; however, its effects on postendocytic traffic are largely unexplored. To this end, we expressed wild-type RhoA (RhoAWT), dominant active RhoA (RhoAV14), and dominant inactive RhoA (RhoAN19) in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells expressing the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor. RhoAV14 expression stimulated the rate of apical and basolateral endocytosis, whereas RhoAN19 expression decreased the rate from both membrane domains. Polarized basolateral recycling of transferrin was disrupted in RhoAV14-expressing cells as a result of increased ligand release at the apical pole of the cell. Degradation of basolaterally internalized epidermal growth factor was slowed in RhoAV14-expressing cells. Although apical recycling of immunoglobulin A (IgA) was largely unaffected in cells expressing RhoAV14, transcytosis of basolaterally internalized IgA was severely impaired. Morphological and biochemical analyses demonstrated that a large proportion of IgA internalized from the basolateral pole of RhoAV14-expressing cells remained within basolateral early endosomes and was slow to exit these compartments. RhoAN19 and RhoAWT expression had little effect on these postendocytic pathways. These results indicate that in polarized MDCK cells activated RhoA may modulate endocytosis from both membrane domains and postendocytic traffic at the basolateral pole of the cell. PMID:10588664

  6. Effect of mannosamine on the formation of lipid-linked oligosaccharides and glycoproteins in canine kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Y.T.; Elbein, A.D.

    1985-11-01

    Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells normally form lipid-linked oligosaccharides having mostly the Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 oligosaccharide. However, when MDCK cells are incubated in 1 to 10 mM mannosamine and labeled with (2-/sup 3/H)mannose, the major oligosaccharides associated with the dolichol were Man5GlcNAc2 and Man6GlcNAc2 structures. Since both of these oligosaccharides were susceptible to digestion by endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H, the Man5GlcNAc2 must be different in structure than the Man5GlcNAc2 usually found as a biosynthetic intermediate in the lipid-linked oligosaccharides. Since pulse chase studies indicated that the lesion was in biosynthesis, it appears that mannosamine inhibits the in vivo formation of lipid-linked oligosaccharides perhaps by inhibiting the alpha-1,2-mannosyl transferases. Although the lipid-linked oligosaccharides produced in the presence of mannosamine were smaller in size than those of control cells and did not contain glucose, the oligosaccharides were still transferred in vivo to protein. Furthermore, the oligosaccharide portions of the glycoproteins were still processed as shown by the fact that the glycopeptides were of the complex and hybrid types and were labeled with (/sup 3/H)mannose or (/sup 3/H)galactose.

  7. Plaque assay and primary isolation of influenza A viruses in an established line of canine kidney cells (MDCK) in the presence of trypsin.

    PubMed

    Tobita, K; Sugiura, A; Enomote, C; Furuyama, M

    1975-12-30

    A wide variety of influenza A viruses, comprising human, equine, porcine, and avian strains, grew productively in an established line of canine kidney cells (MDCK) under an overlay medium containing trypsin, and formed well-defined plaques regardless of their prior passage history. Plaquing efficiency was comparable to the efficiency of infection in fertile eggs via allantoic route. MDCK cells have also been successfully employed for the primary isolation of influenza A virus from throat washings of patients. Parallel titration of several clinical specimens showed that the inoculation into MDCK cells followed by incubation in the presence of trypsin was an isolation procedure as sensitive as the amniotic inoculation into fertile eggs.

  8. Differences in the apical and basolateral pathways for glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Tram Thu; Prydz, Kristian; Tveit, Heidi

    2006-04-01

    Serglycin with a green fluorescent protein tag (SG-GFP) expressed in epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney cells is secreted mainly (85%) into the apical medium, but the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains on the SG-GFP protein core secreted basolaterally (15%) carry most of the sulfate added during biosynthesis (Tveit et al. (2005) J. Biol. Chem., 280, 29596-29603). Here we report further differences in apical and basolateral GAG synthesis. The less intensely sulfated chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains on apically secreted SG-GFP are longer than CS chains attached to basolateral SG-GFP, whereas the heparan sulfate (HS) chains are of similar lengths. When the supply of 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) is limited by chlorate treatment, the synthesis machinery maintains sulfation of HS chains on basolateral SG-GFP until it is inhibited at 50 mM chlorate, whereas basolateral CS chains lose sulfate already at 12.5 mM chlorate and become longer. Apically, incorporation of 35S-sulfate into CS is reduced to a lesser extent at higher chlorate concentrations than basolateral CS, although apical CS is less intensely sulfated than basolateral CS in control cells. Similar to what was found for basolateral HS, sulfation of apical HS was not reduced at chlorate concentrations below 50 mM. Also, protein-free, xyloside-based GAG chains secreted basolaterally are more intensely sulfated than their apical counterpart, supporting the view that separate apical and basolateral pathways exist for GAG synthesis and sulfation. Introduction of benzyl beta-d-xyloside (BX) to the GAG synthesis machinery reduces the apical secretion of SG-GFP dramatically and also the modification of SG-GFP by HS. PMID:16394120

  9. Intracellular transport of influenza virus hemagglutinin to the apical surface of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The intracellular pathway followed by the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) to the apical surface of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells was studied by radioimmunoassay, immunofluorescence, and immunoelectron microscopy. To synchronize the migration, we used a temperature- sensitive mutant of influenza WSN, ts61, which, at the nonpermissive temperature, 39.5 degrees C, exhibits a defect in the HA that prevents its exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. Upon transfer to permissive temperature, 32 degrees C, the HA appeared in the Golgi apparatus after 10 min, and on the apical surface after 30-40 min. In the presence of cycloheximide, the expression was not inhibited, indicating that the ts defect is reversible; a wave of HA migrated to the cell surface, where it accumulated with a half time of 60 min. After passage through the Golgi apparatus the HA was detected in a population of smooth vesicles, about twice the size of coated vesicles, located in the apical half of the cytoplasm. These HA-containing vesicles did not react with anti- clathrin antibodies. Monensin (10 microM) delayed the surface appearance of HA by 2 h, but not the transport to the Golgi apparatus. Incubation at 20 degrees C retarded the migration to the Golgi apparatus by approximately 30 min and blocked the surface appearance by acting at a late stage in the intracellular pathway, presumably at the level of the post-Golgi vesicles. The initial appearance of HA on the apical surface was in the center; no preference was observed for the tight-junctional regions. PMID:6707094

  10. Apical uptake of radiolabelled ochratoxin A into Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Schwerdt, G; Freudinger, R; Silbernagl, S; Gekle, M

    1998-11-16

    Uptake of ochratoxin A (OTA) across the apical cell membrane of collecting duct cells is the first step in reabsorption and partly mediated by proton-dipeptide cotransport. As the remaining part of apical OTA uptake remained unclear, we studied the characteristics of apical uptake of tritium-labelled OTA (3H-OTA) in MDCK-C11 cells in detail. Uptake of 3H-OTA was pH- and temperature-dependent and led to intracellular accumulation of OTA. Lowering pH led to an increase and lowering temperature (4 degrees C) to a decrease of OTA uptake. Besides dipeptides, the beta-lactam antibiotics cephalexin and ceftibuten inhibited the 3H-OTA uptake also confirming the role of the proton dipeptide cotransporter. In addition, substrates of organic anion transporter, taurocholate and methotrexate, inhibited 3H-OTA uptake in part. Aspartylphenylalanine methyl ester (aspartame) had no inhibitory effect on 3H-OTA uptake. Uptake of OTA was not dependent on sodium. Sixty minutes of preincubation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) led to increased apical uptake of OTA. The PMA effects were inhibited by ethylisopropylamilorid (EIPA). We conclude that apical uptake of OTA occurs by Na+-independent transport. One part of the uptake is mediated by proton-dipeptide cotransport (30%, dipeptide-inhibitable), by organic anion transporter (20%, taurocholate-inhibitable) and by diffusion (20%, responsible for uptake at 4 degrees C). The remaining part occurs by as yet unidentified but pH-dependent transport mechanisms. An acidic urine in distal parts of the nephron provides thus the main risk for OTA uptake leading to its reabsorption and consequently alkalinisation of the urine should help to prevent this reabsorption.

  11. Characterization of a 36,000-dalton protein from the surface of Madin- Darby canine kidney cells involved in cell attachment and spreading

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have identified and immunochemically characterized a 36,000-dalton membrane glycoprotein from Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. This protein is surface-labeled by lactoperoxidase-mediated iodination and metabolically labeled by [35S]methionine. It binds to Concanavalin A and incorporates 2-D-3H-mannose residues, thus indicating it is a glycoprotein. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies against this protein evenly decorate the external surface of trypsinized, unpolarized cells. The external apical surface of confluent monolayers, grown under culture conditions in which the tight junctions are closed and the cells have acquired polarity, is also evenly stained. The basolateral aspects of the external surface are stained only when the tight junctions are opened by removal of Ca++ or when the antibody has access to the monolayer from the basal side, which indicates an even distribution of this antigen on the surface of polarized cells. The antibody has no inhibitory effect on the opening and resealing of tight junctions in dense cultures, but does inhibit the attachment and spreading of cells on a substrate, which then blocks the establishment of a confluent functional monolayer. PMID:3889016

  12. Novel MAPK-dependent and -independent tubulogenes identified via microarray analysis of 3D-cultured Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Heszele, Maria F; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Hellman, Nathan E; McKenna, Sarah; Choi, Soo Young; Huang, Liwei; Tobias, John W; Park, Kwon Moo; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2014-05-01

    Cystogenesis and tubulogenesis are basic building blocks for many epithelial organs, including the kidney. Most researchers have used two-dimensional (2D) cell culture to investigate signaling pathways downstream of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). We hypothesize that three-dimensional (3D) collagen-grown Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, which form cysts and then tubulate in response to HGF, are a much more in vivo-like system for the identification of novel tubulogenes. With the use of a canine microarray containing over 20,000 genes, 2,417 genes were identified as potential tubulogenes that were differentially regulated, exclusively in 3D-grown MDCK cells. Among these, 840 were dependent on MAPK signaling. Importantly, this work shows that many putative tubulogenes, previously identified via microarray analysis of 2D cultures, including by us, do not change in 3D culture and vice versa. The use of a 3D-culture system allowed for the identification of novel MAPK-dependent and -independent genes that regulate early renal tubulogenesis in vitro, e.g., matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1). Knockdown of MMP1 led to defects in cystogenesis and tubulogenesis in 3D-grown MDCK cells, most likely due to problems establishing normal polarity. We suggest that data obtained from 2D cultures, even those using MDCK cells treated with HGF, should not be automatically extrapolated to factors important for cystogenesis and tubulogenesis. Instead, 3D culture, which more closely replicates the biological environment and is therefore a more accurate model for identifying tubulogenes, is preferred. Results from the present analysis will be used to build a more accurate model of the signaling pathways that control cystogenesis and tubulogenesis.

  13. Novel MAPK-dependent and -independent tubulogenes identified via microarray analysis of 3D-cultured Madin-Darby canine kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Heszele, Maria F.; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Hellman, Nathan E.; McKenna, Sarah; Choi, Soo Young; Huang, Liwei; Tobias, John W.; Park, Kwon Moo

    2014-01-01

    Cystogenesis and tubulogenesis are basic building blocks for many epithelial organs, including the kidney. Most researchers have used two-dimensional (2D) cell culture to investigate signaling pathways downstream of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). We hypothesize that three-dimensional (3D) collagen-grown Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, which form cysts and then tubulate in response to HGF, are a much more in vivo-like system for the identification of novel tubulogenes. With the use of a canine microarray containing over 20,000 genes, 2,417 genes were identified as potential tubulogenes that were differentially regulated, exclusively in 3D-grown MDCK cells. Among these, 840 were dependent on MAPK signaling. Importantly, this work shows that many putative tubulogenes, previously identified via microarray analysis of 2D cultures, including by us, do not change in 3D culture and vice versa. The use of a 3D-culture system allowed for the identification of novel MAPK-dependent and -independent genes that regulate early renal tubulogenesis in vitro, e.g., matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1). Knockdown of MMP1 led to defects in cystogenesis and tubulogenesis in 3D-grown MDCK cells, most likely due to problems establishing normal polarity. We suggest that data obtained from 2D cultures, even those using MDCK cells treated with HGF, should not be automatically extrapolated to factors important for cystogenesis and tubulogenesis. Instead, 3D culture, which more closely replicates the biological environment and is therefore a more accurate model for identifying tubulogenes, is preferred. Results from the present analysis will be used to build a more accurate model of the signaling pathways that control cystogenesis and tubulogenesis. PMID:24573390

  14. Type I collagen gel induces Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to become fusiform in shape and lose apical-basal polarity

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In the embryo, epithelia give rise to mesenchyme at specific times and places. Recently, it has been reported (Greenburg, G., and E. D. Hay. 1986. Dev. Biol. 115:363-379; Greenberg, G., and E. D. Hay. 1988. Development (Camb.). 102:605-622) that definitive epithelia can give rise to fibroblast-like cells when suspended within type I collagen gels. We wanted to know whether Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, an epithelial line, can form mesenchyme under similar conditions. Small explants of MDCK cells on basement membrane were suspended within or placed on top of extracellular matrix gels. MDCK cells on basement membrane gel are tall, columnar in shape, and ultrastructurally resemble epithelia transporting fluid and ions. MDCK explants cultured on type I collagen gel give rise to isolated fusiform-shaped cells that migrate over the gel surface. The fusiform cells extend pseudopodia and filopodia, lose cell membrane specializations, and develop an actin cortex around the entire cell. Unlike true mesenchymal cells, which express vimentin and type I collagen, fusiform cells produce both keratin and vimentin, continue to express laminin, and do not turn on type I collagen. Fusiform cells are not apically-basally polarized, but show mesenchymal cell polarity. Influenza hemagglutinin and virus budding localize to the front end or entire cell surface. Na,K-ATPase occurs intracellularly and also symmetrically distributes on the cell surface. Fodrin becomes diffusely distributed along the plasma membrane, ZO-1 cannot be detected, and desmoplakins distribute randomly in the cytoplasm. The loss of epithelial polarity and acquisition of mesenchymal cell polarity and shape by fusiform MDCK cells on type I collagen gel was previously unsuspected. The phenomenon may offer new opportunities for studying cytoplasmic and nuclear mechanisms regulating cell shape and polarity. PMID:2537838

  15. ToF-SIMS and laser-SNMS analysis of Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells with silver nanoparticles using an argon cluster ion beam.

    PubMed

    Nees, Ricarda; Pelster, Andreas; Körsgen, Martin; Jungnickel, Harald; Luch, Andreas; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F

    2015-06-15

    The use of nanoparticles is one of the fastest expanding fields in industrial as well as in medical applications, owing to their remarkable characteristics. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are among the most-commercialized nanoparticles because of their antibacterial effects. Laser postionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry in combination with argon cluster ion sputtering was used for the first time to investigate the effects of AgNPs on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) II cells. Depth profiles and high-resolution three dimensional (3D) images of nanoparticles and organic compounds from cells were obtained using an Ar cluster ion beam for sputtering and Bi3 (+) primary ions for the analysis. The 3D distribution of AgNPs and other organic compounds in MDCK II cells could be readily detected with very high efficiency, sensitivity, and submicron lateral resolution. The argon cluster ion beam is well suited for the sputtering of biological samples. It enables a high sample removal rate along with low molecular degradation. The outer membrane, the cytoplasm, and the nuclei of the cells could be clearly visualized using the signals PO(+) and C3H8N(+) or CN(+) and C3H8N(+). The laser-SNMS images showed unambiguously that AgNPs are incorporated by MDCK II cells and often form silver aggregates with a diameter of a few micrometers, mainly close to the outside of the cell nuclei.

  16. Microtubule-acting drugs lead to the nonpolarized delivery of the influenza hemagglutinin to the cell surface of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Rindler, M J; Ivanov, I E; Sabatini, D D

    1987-02-01

    The synchronized directed transfer of the envelope glycoproteins of the influenza and vesicular stomatitis viruses from the Golgi apparatus to the apical and basolateral surfaces, respectively, of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells can be achieved using temperature-sensitive mutant viruses and appropriate temperature shift protocols (Rindler, M. J., I. E. Ivanov, H. Plesken, and D. D. Sabatini, 1985, J. Cell Biol., 100:136-151). The microtubule-depolymerizing agents colchicine and nocodazole, as well as the microtubule assembly-promoting drug taxol, were found to interfere with the normal polarized delivery and exclusive segregation of hemagglutinin (HA) to the apical surface but not with the delivery and initial accumulation of G on the basolateral surface. Immunofluorescence analysis of permeabilized monolayers of influenza-infected MDCK cells treated with the microtubule-acting drugs demonstrated the presence of substantial amounts of HA protein on both the apical and basolateral surfaces. Moreover, in cells infected with the wild-type influenza virus, particles budded from both surfaces. Viral counts in electron micrographs showed that approximately 40% of the released viral particles accumulated in the intercellular spaces or were trapped between the cell and monolayer and the collagen support as compared to less than 1% on the basolateral surface of untreated infected cells. The effect of the microtubule inhibitors was not a result of a rapid redistribution of glycoprotein molecules initially delivered to the apical surface since a redistribution was not observed when the inhibitors were added to the cells after the HA was permitted to reach the apical surface at the permissive temperature and the synthesis of new HA was inhibited with cycloheximide. The altered segregation of the HA protein that occurs may result from the dispersal of the Golgi apparatus induced by the inhibitors or from the disruption of putative microtubules containing tracks

  17. Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin forms a heptameric pore within the detergent-insoluble microdomains of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and rat synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shigeru; Minami, Junzaburo; Tamai, Eiji; Matsushita, Osamu; Shimamoto, Seiko; Okabe, Akinobu

    2002-10-18

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin, which is responsible for enterotoxaemia in ungulates, forms a heptamer in rat synaptosomal and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell membranes, leading to membrane permealization. Thus, the toxin may target the detergent-resistant membrane domains (DRMs) of these membranes, in analogy to aerolysin, a heptameric pore-forming toxin that associates with DRMs. To test this idea, we examined the distribution of radiolabeled epsilon-toxin in DRM and detergent-soluble membrane fractions of MDCK cells and rat synaptosomal membranes. When MDCK cells and synaptosomal membranes were incubated with the toxin and then fractionated by cold Triton X-100 extraction and flotation on sucrose gradients, the heptameric toxin was detected almost exclusively in DRMs. The results of a toxin overlay assay revealed that the toxin preferentially bound to and heptamerized in the isolated DRMs. Furthermore, cholesterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin abrogated their association and lowered the cytotoxicity of the toxin toward MDCK cells. When epsilon-protoxin, an inactive precursor able to bind to but unable to heptamerize in the membrane, was incubated with MDCK cell membranes, it was detected mainly in their DRMs. These results suggest that the toxin is concentrated and induced to heptamerize on binding to a putative receptor located preferentially in DRMs, with all steps from initial binding through pore formation completed within the same DRMs.

  18. N-Glycans and Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchor Act on Polarized Sorting of Mouse PrPC in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Berta; Altmeppen, Hermann C.; Thurm, Dana; Geissen, Markus; Conrad, Catharina; Braulke, Thomas; Glatzel, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) plays a fundamental role in prion disease. PrPC is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein with two variably occupied N-glycosylation sites. In general, GPI-anchor and N-glycosylation direct proteins to apical membranes in polarized cells whereas the majority of mouse PrPC is found in basolateral membranes in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. In this study we have mutated the first, the second, and both N-glycosylation sites of PrPC and also replaced the GPI-anchor of PrPC by the Thy-1 GPI-anchor in order to investigate the role of these signals in sorting of PrPC in MDCK cells. Cell surface biotinylation experiments and confocal microscopy showed that lack of one N-linked oligosaccharide leads to loss of polarized sorting of PrPC. Exchange of the PrPC GPI-anchor for the one of Thy-1 redirects PrPC to the apical membrane. In conclusion, both N-glycosylation and GPI-anchor act on polarized sorting of PrPC, with the GPI-anchor being dominant over N-glycans. PMID:21931781

  19. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 control claudin-2 expression in Madin-Darby canine kidney strain I and II cells.

    PubMed

    Lipschutz, Joshua H; Li, Shixiong; Arisco, Amy; Balkovetz, Daniel F

    2005-02-01

    The tight junction of the epithelial cell determines the characteristics of paracellular permeability across epithelium. Recent work points toward the claudin family of tight junction proteins as leading candidates for the molecular components that regulate paracellular permeability properties in epithelial tissues. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) strain I and II cells are models for the study of tight junctions and based on transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) contain "tight" and "leaky" tight junctions, respectively. Overexpression studies suggest that tight junction leakiness in these two strains of MDCK cells is conferred by expression of the tight junction protein claudin-2. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation by hepatocyte growth factor treatment of MDCK strain II cells inhibited claudin-2 expression and transiently increased TER. This process was blocked by the ERK 1/2 inhibitor U0126. Transfection of constitutively active mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase into MDCK strain II cells also inhibited claudin-2 expression and increased TER. MDCK strain I cells have higher levels of active ERK 1/2 than do MDCK strain II cells. U0126 treatment of MDCK strain I cells decreased active ERK 1/2 levels, induced expression of claudin-2 protein, and decreased TER by approximately 20-fold. U0126 treatment also induced claudin-2 expression and decreased TER in a high resistance mouse cortical collecting duct cell line (94D). These data show for the first time that the ERK 1/2 signaling pathway negatively controls claudin-2 expression in mammalian renal epithelial cells and provide evidence for regulation of tight junction paracellular transport by alterations in claudin composition within tight junction complexes.

  20. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1980-01-01

    The following aspects of kidney cell electrophoresis are discussed: (1) the development and testing of electrophoresis solutions; (2) optimization of freezing and thawing; (3) procedures for evaluation of separated kidney cells; and (4) electrophoretic mobility characterization of kidney cells.

  1. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1979-01-01

    A kidney cell electrophoresis technique is described in four parts: (1) the development and testing of electrophoresis solutions; (2) optimization of freezing and thawing; (3) procedures for evaluation of separated kidney cells; and (4) electrophoretic mobility characteristics of kidney cells.

  2. Association of Rab25 and Rab11a with the Apical Recycling System of Polarized Madin–Darby Canine Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, James E.; Wang, Xiaoye; Kumar, Ravindra; Bhartur, Sheela G.; Navarre, Jennifer; Woodrum, Julie E.; Altschuler, Yoram; Ray, Greg S.; Goldenring, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that apical and basolateral endocytic pathways in epithelia converge in an apically located, pericentriolar endosomal compartment termed the apical recycling endosome. In this compartment, apically and basolaterally internalized membrane constituents are thought to be sorted for recycling back to their site of origin or for transcytosis to the opposite plasma membrane domain. We report here that in the epithelial cell line Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK), antibodies to Rab11a label an apical pericentriolar endosomal compartment that is dependent on intact microtubules for its integrity. Furthermore, this compartment is accessible to a membrane-bound marker (dimeric immunoglobulin A [IgA]) internalized from either the apical or basolateral pole, functionally defining it as the apical recycling endosome. We have also examined the role of a closely related epithelial-specific Rab, Rab25, in the regulation of membrane recycling and transcytosis in MDCK cells. When cDNA encoding Rab25 was transfected into MDCK cells, the protein colocalized with Rab11a in subapical vesicles. Rab25 transfection also altered the distribution of Rab11a, causing the coalescence of immunoreactivity into multiple denser vesicular structures not associated with the centrosome. Nevertheless, nocodazole still dispersed these vesicles, and dimeric IgA internalized from either the apical or basolateral membrane was detected in endosomes labeled with antibodies to both Rab11a and Rab25. Overexpression of Rab25 decreased the rate of IgA transcytosis and of apical, but not basolateral, recycling of internalized ligand. Conversely, expression of the dominant-negative Rab25T26N did not alter either apical recycling or transcytosis. These results indicate that both Rab11a and Rab25 associate with the apical recycling system of epithelial cells and suggest that Rab25 may selectively regulate the apical recycling and/or transcytotic pathways. PMID:9880326

  3. Oncogenic H-ras reprograms Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell-derived exosomal proteins following epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Tauro, Bow J; Mathias, Rommel A; Greening, David W; Gopal, Shashi K; Ji, Hong; Kapp, Eugene A; Coleman, Bradley M; Hill, Andrew F; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Hallows, Janice L; Shteynberg, David; Moritz, Robert L; Zhu, Hong-Jian; Simpson, Richard J

    2013-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenic process defined by the loss of epithelial characteristics and the acquisition of a mesenchymal phenotype. EMT is associated with increased aggressiveness, invasiveness, and metastatic potential in carcinoma cells. To assess the contribution of extracellular vesicles following EMT, we conducted a proteomic analysis of exosomes released from Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and MDCK cells transformed with oncogenic H-Ras (21D1 cells). Exosomes are 40-100 nm membranous vesicles originating from the inward budding of late endosomes and multivesicular bodies and are released from cells on fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane. Exosomes from MDCK cells (MDCK-Exos) and 21D1 cells (21D1-Exos) were purified from cell culture media using density gradient centrifugation (OptiPrep™), and protein content identified by GeLC-MS/MS proteomic profiling. Both MDCK- and 21D1-Exos populations were morphologically similar by cryo-electron microscopy and contained stereotypical exosome marker proteins such as TSG101, Alix, and CD63. In this study we show that the expression levels of typical EMT hallmark proteins seen in whole cells correlate with those observed in MDCK- and 21D1-Exos, i.e. reduction of characteristic inhibitor of angiogenesis, thrombospondin-1, and epithelial markers E-cadherin, and EpCAM, with a concomitant up-regulation of mesenchymal makers such as vimentin. Further, we reveal that 21D1-Exos are enriched with several proteases (e.g. MMP-1, -14, -19, ADAM-10, and ADAMTS1), and integrins (e.g. ITGB1, ITGA3, and ITGA6) that have been recently implicated in regulating the tumor microenvironment to promote metastatic progression. A salient finding of this study was the unique presence of key transcriptional regulators (e.g. the master transcriptional regulator YBX1) and core splicing complex components (e.g. SF3B1, SF3B3, and SFRS1) in mesenchymal 21D1-Exos. Taken

  4. Compartmentalization of prostaglandins in the canine kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan-Boyd, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The kidney has been shown to synthesize all of the naturally occurring major prostaglandins which may be restricted to a discrete part of the kidney where their actions are physiologically important, such as the vascular compartment and the tubular compartment. In order to examine this concept of compartmentalization, the authors conducted a series of experiments to determine whether PGl/sub 2/, measured as 6-keto-pGF/sub 1..cap alpha../, produced in the kidney is restricted to the renal vascular compartment or whether it also has access to the tubular compartment. Experiments were performed in the pentobarbital-anesthetized dog. Increasing pre-glomerular levels of 6-keto-PFG/sub 1..cap alpha../ caused marked increases in both the urinary excretion and the renal venous outflow to 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../. When /sup 3/H-6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ was co-infused with inulin into the renal artery, 33% of the radioactivity and 23% of the inulin was recovered on first pass. With infusion of /sup 3/H-PGl/sub 2/ and inulin, 20% of the radioactivity and 28% of the inulin reached the urine on first pass. Radioactive PGl/sub 2/ appeared to be less filterable at the glomeruli than either /sup 3/H-6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ or inulin. In the final set of experiments, in which dogs were prepared for a ureteral stopped-flow study, the PGE/sub 2//U/P/sub In/ ratio a peak was observed proximal to the Na/sup +/ plateau but distal to the Na+ nadir. In light of the results from the stopped-flow study and the intrarenal infusion studies, they conclude that PGE/sub 2/ synthesized in the kidney enters both the renal and tubular compartments. In contrast, they find that 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ of renal origin enters only the renal origin enters only the renal vascular compartment and not the tubular compartment.

  5. Modulation of the epithelial barrier by dexamethasone and prolactin in cultured Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, E B M I; Collares-Buzato, C B

    2006-02-01

    Glucocorticoids and prolactin (PRL) have a direct effect on the formation and maintenance of tight junctions (TJs) in cultured endothelial and mammary gland epithelial cells. In this work, we investigated the effect of a synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) and PRL on the paracellular barrier function in MDCK renal epithelial cells. DEX (4 microM)+PRL (2 microg/ml) and DEX alone increased significantly the transepithelial electrical resistance after chronic treatment (4 days) of confluent MDCK monolayers or after 24 h treatment of subconfluent monolayers. Immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry revealed no changes in the expression and distribution of TJ-associated proteins occludin, ZO-1 and claudin-1 in confluent monolayers after hormone addition. However, a marked increase in junctional content for occludin and ZO-1 with no changes in their total expression was observed in subconfluent MDCK monolayers 24 h exposed to DEX or DEX+PRL. No change in cell proliferation/growth was detected at subconfluent conditions following hormone treatment. An increase in the total number of viable cells was observed only in confluent MDCK monolayers after exposure to DEX+PRL suggesting that the main effect of these hormones on already established barrier may be associated with the inhibition of cell death. In conclusion, our data suggest that these hormones (specially dexamethasone) have an effect on TJ structure and function only during the formation of MDCK epithelial barrier by probably modulating the localization, stability or assembly of TJ proteins to membrane sites of intercellular contact.

  6. Meeting of the apical and basolateral endocytic pathways of the Madin- Darby canine kidney cell in late endosomes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Electron microscopic approaches have been used to study the endocytic pathways from the apical and basolateral surface domains of the polarized epithelial cell, MDCK strain I, grown on polycarbonate filters. The cells were incubated at 37 degrees C in the presence of two distinguishable markers administered separately to the apical or the basolateral domain. Initially each marker was visualized within distinct apical or basolateral peripheral endosomes. However, after 15 min at 37 degrees C, both markers were observed within common perinuclear structures. The compartment in which meeting first occurred was shown to be a late endosome (prelysosome) that labeled extensively with antibodies against the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR) on cryosections. With increasing incubation times, markers passed from these MPR-positive structures into a common set of MPR-negative lysosomes that were mainly located in the apical half of the cell. A detailed quantitative analysis of the endocytic pathways was carried out using stereological techniques in conjunction with horseradish peroxidase and acid phosphatase cytochemistry. This enabled us to estimate the absolute volumes and membrane surface areas of the endocytic organelles involved in apical and basolateral endocytosis. PMID:2557351

  7. A membrane-cytoskeletal complex containing Na+,K+-ATPase, ankyrin, and fodrin in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells: implications for the biogenesis of epithelial cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells, ankyrin, and the alpha- and beta-subunits of fodrin are components of the basolateral membrane-cytoskeleton and are colocalized with the Na+,K+-ATPase, a marker protein of the basolateral plasma membrane. Recently, we showed with purified proteins that the Na+,K+-ATPase is competent to bind ankyrin with high affinity and specificity (Nelson, W. J., and P. J. Veshnock. 1987. Nature (Lond.). 328:533-536). In the present study we have sought biochemical evidence for interactions between these proteins in MDCK cells. Proteins were solubilized from MDCK cells with an isotonic buffer containing Triton X-100 and fractionated rapidly in sucrose density gradients. Complexes of cosedimenting proteins were detected by analysis of sucrose gradient fractions in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels. The results showed that ankyrin and fodrin cosedimented in sucrose gradient. Analysis of the proteins from the sucrose gradient in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels revealed two distinct ankyrin:fodrin complexes that differed in their relative electrophoretic mobilities; both complexes had electrophoretic mobilities slower than that of purified spectrin heterotetramers. Parallel analysis of the distribution of solubilized Na+,K+-ATPase in sucrose gradients showed that there was a significant overlap with the distribution of ankyrin and fodrin. Analysis by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the alpha- and beta- subunits of the Na+,K+-ATPase colocalized with the slower migrating of the two ankyrin:fodrin complexes. The faster migrating ankyrin:fodrin complex did not contain Na+,K+-ATPase. These results indicate strongly that the Na+,K+-ATPase, ankyrin, and fodrin are coextracted from whole MDCK cells as a protein complex. We suggest that the solubilized complex containing these proteins reflects the interaction of the Na+,K+-ATPase, ankyrin, and fodrin in the cell. This interaction may play an

  8. Thermographic studies of phantom and canine kidneys thawed by microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Schmehl, M K; Graham, E F; Kilkowski, S M

    1990-06-01

    Whole organs, such as kidneys, must be thawed quickly and uniformly to prevent damage during thawing due to excessive heating. Electromagnetic heating with microwaves thaws the kidneys quickly but frequently produces "hot spots" with heat damage. To study heat damage, phantom gelatin kidneys with different dielectric constants and canine kidneys perfused with 12.5% glycerol, ethylene glycol, or dimethyl sulfoxide before freezing were microwave thawed, and the interior temperature was measured by thermography. Phantom kidneys were thawed free standing and canine kidneys were either free standing or packed in a gel mixture. Both phantom and canine kidneys were split symmetrically and separated with a sheet of Styrofoam to facilitate immediate separation and evaluation of the halves after thawing (approximately 3 sec). All the phantoms, regardless of dielectric properties, had areas less than 0 degrees C or greater than 37 degrees C after thawing. The free-standing canine kidneys and the gel-packed ethylene glycol-perfused kidneys had frozen areas (less than 0 degrees C) and hot spots (greater than 37 degrees C). However, glycerol- and dimethyl sulfoxide-perfused kidneys packed in gel before thawing had no areas less than 0 degrees C or greater than 37 degrees C. Altering the geometry from a "kidney shape" to a cylindrical shape with increased volume improved the uniformity of thawing and was more effective than altering the dielectric constant over the range evaluated.

  9. Thermographic studies of phantom and canine kidneys thawed by microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmehl, M.K.; Graham, E.F.; Kilkowski, S.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Whole organs, such as kidneys, must be thawed quickly and uniformly to prevent damage during thawing due to excessive heating. Electromagnetic heating with microwaves thaws the kidneys quickly but frequently produces hot spots with heat damage. To study heat damage, phantom gelatin kidneys with different dielectric constants and canine kidneys perfused with 12.5% glycerol, ethylene glycol, or dimethyl sulfoxide before freezing were microwave thawed, and the interior temperature was measured by thermography. Phantom kidneys were thawed free standing and canine kidneys were either free standing or packed in a gel mixture. Both phantom and canine kidneys were split symmetrically and separated with a sheet of Styrofoam to facilitate immediate separation and evaluation of the halves after thawing (approximately 3 sec). All the phantoms, regardless of dielectric properties, had areas less than 0 degrees C or greater than 37 degrees C after thawing. The free-standing canine kidneys and the gel-packed ethylene glycol-perfused kidneys had frozen areas (less than 0 degrees C) and hot spots (greater than 37 degrees C). However, glycerol- and dimethyl sulfoxide-perfused kidneys packed in gel before thawing had no areas less than 0 degrees C or greater than 37 degrees C. Altering the geometry from a kidney shape to a cylindrical shape with increased volume improved the uniformity of thawing and was more effective than altering the dielectric constant over the range evaluated.

  10. Kidney cell electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Tasks were undertaken in support of two objectives. They are: (1) to carry out electrophoresis experiments on cells in microgravity; and (2) assess the feasibility of using purified kidney cells from embryonic kidney cultures as a source of important cell products. Investigations were carried out in the following areas: (1) ground based electrophoresis technology; (2) cell culture technology; (3) electrophoresis of cells; (4) urokinase assay research; (5) zero-g electrophoresis; and (6) flow cytometry.

  11. P73 tumor suppressor and its targets, p21 and PUMA, are required for madin-darby canine kidney cell morphogenesis by maintaining an appropriate level of epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Young, Ashley; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xinbin

    2015-06-10

    P73, a member of p53 tumor suppressor family, plays a crucial role in tumor suppression and neural development. Due to the usage of two promoters, p73 is expressed as two isoforms, TAp73 and ∆Np73, with opposing functions. Here, we investigated the potential role of p73 in epithelial polarity and morphogenesis by using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells as a model system. We found that knockdown of TAp73 enhances, whereas knockdown of ∆Np73 inhibits, MDCK cell proliferation and migration in two-dimensional (2-D) culture. We also found that knockdown of TAp73, but not ∆Np73, disrupts cyst formation of MDCK cells in three-dimensional (3-D) culture. Interestingly, we found that p21 and PUMA, both of which are induced by TAp73 but repressed by ∆Np73, are required for suppressing cell proliferation and migration in 2-D culture and for MDCK ce ll morphogenesis in 3-D culture. Finally, we showed knockdown of TAp73, p21 or PUMA induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) with a decrease in E-cadherin and an increase in EMT transcription factors. Together, our data suggest that TAp73, p21 and PUMA play a critical role in modulating MDCK cell morphogenesis by maintaining an appropriate level of the EMT.

  12. Alpha 1-adrenergic receptor-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and prostaglandin E2 formation in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Possible parallel activation of phospholipase C and phospholipase A2

    SciTech Connect

    Slivka, S.R.; Insel, P.A.

    1987-03-25

    alpha 1-Adrenergic receptors mediate two effects on phospholipid metabolism in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK-D1) cells: hydrolysis of phosphoinositides and arachidonic acid release with generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The similarity in concentration dependence for the agonist (-)-epinephrine in eliciting these two responses implies that they are mediated by a single population of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. However, we find that the kinetics of the two responses are quite different, PGE2 production occurring more rapidly and transiently than the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides. The antibiotic neomycin selectively decreases alpha 1-receptor-mediated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis without decreasing alpha 1-receptor-mediated arachidonic acid release and PGE2 generation. In addition, receptor-mediated inositol trisphosphate formation is independent of extracellular calcium, whereas release of labeled arachidonic acid is largely calcium-dependent. Moreover, based on studies obtained with labeled arachidonic acid, receptor-mediated generation of arachidonic acid cannot be accounted for by breakdown of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate, phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate, or phosphatidic acid. Further studies indicate that epinephrine produces changes in formation or turnover of several classes of membrane phospholipids in MDCK cells. We conclude that alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in MDCK cells appear to regulate phospholipid metabolism by the parallel activation of phospholipase C and phospholipase A2. This parallel activation of phospholipases contrasts with models described in other systems which imply sequential activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol lipase or phospholipase A2.

  13. Apical expression of human full-length hCEACAM1-4L protein renders the Madin Darby Canine Kidney cells responsive to lipopolysaccharide leading to TLR4-dependent Erk1/2 and p38 MAPK signalling.

    PubMed

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Beau, Isabelle; Rougeaux, Clémence; Kansau, Imad; Fabrega, Sylvie; Brice, Cédric; Korotkova, Natalia; Moseley, Steve L; Servin, Alain L

    2011-05-01

    CEACAM1 expressed by granulocytes and epithelial cells is recognized as a membrane-associated receptor by some Gram-negative pathogens. Here we report a previously unsuspected role of human CEACAM1-4L (hCEACAM1-4L) in polarized epithelial cells. We find that in contrast with non-transfected cells, Madin Darby Canine Kidney strain II (MDCK) engineered for the apical expression of the long cytoplasmic chain protein hCEACAM1-4L showed a serum-independent increase in the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) after treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of wild-type, diffusely adhering Afa/Dr Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) strain IH11128. Aggregates of FITC-LPS bind the apical domain of MDCK-hCEACAM1-4L cells colocalizing with the apically expressed hCEACAM1-4L protein and do not bind MDCK-pCEP cells, and surface plasmon resonance analysis shows that LPS binds to the extracellular domain of the CEACAM1-4L protein. We showed that cell polarization and lipid rafts positively control the LPS-IH11128-induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 in MDCK-hCEACAM1-4L cells. Structure-function analysis using mutated hCEACAM1-4L protein shows that the cytoplasmic domain of the protein is needed for LPS-induced MAPK signalling, and that phosphorylation of Tyr-residues is not increased in association with MAPK signalling. The hCEACAM1-4L-dependent Erk1/2 phosphorylation develops in the presence of lipid A and does not develop in the presence of penta-acylated LPS. Finally, small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of canine TLR4 abolishes the hCEACAM1-4L-dependent, LPS-induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2. Collectively, our results support the notion that the apically expressed, full-length hCEACAM1-4L protein functions as a novel LPS-conveying molecule at the mucosal surface of polarized epithelial cells for subsequent MD-2/TLR4 receptor-dependent MAPK Erk1/2 and p38 signalling. PMID:21352462

  14. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride on infection of cells by canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pei; Fu, Xinliang; Yan, Zhongshan; Fang, Bo; Huang, San; Fu, Cheng; Hong, Malin; Li, Shoujun

    2015-11-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 causes significant viral disease in dogs, with high morbidity, high infectivity, and high mortality. Lithium chloride is a potential antiviral drug for viruses. We determined the antiviral effect of Lithium Chloride on canine parvovirus type 2 in feline kidney cells. The viral DNA and proteins of canine parvovirus were suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. Further investigation verified that viral entry into cells was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. These results indicated that lithium chloride could be a potential antiviral drug for curing dogs with canine parvovirus infection. The specific steps of canine parvovirus entry into cells that are affected by lithium chloride and its antiviral effect in vivo should be explored in future studies.

  15. Transcytosis of the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus after implantation into the apical plasma membrane of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. I. Involvement of endosomes and lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus, implanted into the apical plasma membrane of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, is rapidly transcytosed to the basolateral membrane. In this and the accompanying paper (Pesonen, M., R. Bravo, and K. Simons, 1984, J. Cell Biol. 99:803- 809.) we have studied the intracellular route by which the G protein traverses during transcytosis. Using Percoll density gradient centrifugation and free flow electrophoresis we could demonstrate that the G protein is endocytosed into a nonlysosomal compartment with a density of approximately 1.05 g/cm3, which has many of the characteristics of endosomes. Transcytosis to the basolateral membrane appeared to occur from this compartment. No direct evidence for the involvement of lysosomes in the transcytotic route could be obtained. No G protein was detected in the lysosomes when transcytosis of G protein was occurring. Moreover, at 21 degrees C when passage of G protein to the lysosomes was shown to be arrested, transcytosis of G protein could still be demonstrated. PMID:6088557

  16. Kidney Cell Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.

    1985-01-01

    Materials and procedures for microgravity electrophoresis of living human embryonic kidney cells were evaluated, ground support in the form of analytical cell electrophoresis and flow cytometry was provided and cells returned from space flight were analyzed. Preflight culture media, electrophoresis buffer, fraction collection media, temperature profiles, and urokinase assay procedures were tested prior to flight. Electrophoretic mobility distributions of aliquots of the cell population to be fractionated in flight were obtained. The protocol established and utilized is given.

  17. Tyrosine-Dependent Basolateral Targeting of Human Connexin43-eYFP in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells Can Be Disrupted by the Oculodentodigital Dysplasia Mutation L90V

    PubMed Central

    Chtchetinin, Jana; Gifford, Wes D.; Li, Sichen; Paznekas, William A.; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Lai, Albert

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Polarized membrane sorting of Connexin 43 (Cx43) has not been well-characterized. Based on the presence of a putative sorting signal, Y286KLV289, within its carboxy terminal cytoplasmic domain, we hypothesized that Cx43 is selectively expressed on the basolateral surface of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells in a tyrosine-dependent manner. We generated stable MDCK cell lines expressing human wild-type and mutant Cx43-eYFP and analyzed the membrane localization of Cx43-eYFP within polarized monolayers using confocal microscopy and selective surface biotinylation. We found that wild-type Cx43-eYFP was selectively targeted to the basolateral membrane domain of MDCK cells. Substitution of alanine for Y286 disrupted basolateral targeting of Cx43-eYFP. Additionally, transplantation of a sequence containing the transferrin receptor internalization signal, LSYTRF, for P284GYKLV289 also disrupted basolateral targeting. Taken together, these results indicate that Y286 in its native amino acid sequence is necessary for targeting Cx43-eYFP to the basolateral membrane domain of MDCK cells. To determine whether the F52dup or L90V oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD)-associated mutations could affect polarized sorting of Cx43-eYFP, we analyzed the expression of these Cx43-eYFP mutant constructs and found that the L90V mutation disrupted basolateral expression. These findings raise the possibility that alteration of polarized targeting of Cx43 by some ODDD- associated mutations may have a phenotypic contribution. PMID:19860828

  18. Raf-1 kinase possesses distinct binding domains for phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid regulates the translocation of Raf-1 in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-stimulated Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Strum, J C; Sciorra, V A; Daniel, L; Bell, R M

    1996-04-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the cysteine-rich amino-terminal domain of Raf-1 kinase interacts selectively with phosphatidylserine (Ghosh, S., Xie, W. Q., Quest, A. F. G., Mabrouk, G. M., Strum, J. C., and Bell, R. M. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 10000-10007). Further analysis showed that full-length Raf-1 bound to both phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid (PA). Specifically, a carboxyl-terminal domain of Raf-1 kinase (RafC; residues 295 648 of human Raf-1) interacted strongly with phosphatidic acid. The binding of RafC to PA displayed positive cooperativity with Hill numbers between 3.3 and 6.2; the apparent Kd ranged from 4.9 +/- 0.6 to 7.8 +/- 0.9 mol % PA. The interaction of RafC with PA displayed a pH dependence distinct from the interaction between the cysteine-rich domain of Raf-1 and PA. Also, the RafC-PA interaction was unaffected at high ionic strength. Of all the lipids tested, only PA and cardiolipin exhibited high affinity binding; other acidic lipids were either ineffective or weakly effective. By deletion mutagenesis, the PA binding site within RafC was narrowed down to a 35-amino acid segment between residues 389 and 423. RafC did not bind phosphatidyl alcohols; also, inhibition of PA formation in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells by treatment with 1% ethanol significantly reduced the translocation of Raf-1 from the cytosol to the membrane following stimulation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. These results suggest a potential role of the lipid second messenger, PA, in the regulation of translocation and subsequent activation of Raf-1 in vivo.

  19. STAT1 Is Required for Redifferentiation during Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minji; O'Brien, Lucy Erin; Kwon, Sang-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Tubule formation in vitro using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells consists mainly of two processes. First, the cells undergo a partial epithelial–mesenchymal transition (pEMT), losing polarity and migrating. Second, the cells redifferentiate, forming cords and then tubules with continuous lumens. We have shown previously that extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation is required for pEMT. However, the mechanism of how the pEMT phase is turned off and the redifferentiation phase is initiated is largely unknown. To address the central question of the sequential control of these two phases, we used MDCK cells grown as cysts and treated with hepatocyte growth factor to model tubulogenesis. We show that signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1 controls the sequential progression from the pEMT phase to the redifferentiation phase. Loss of STAT1 prevents redifferentiation. Constitutively active STAT1 allows redifferentiation to occur even when cells are otherwise prevented from progressing beyond the pEMT phase by exogenous activation of Raf. Moreover, tyrosine phosphorylation defective STAT1 partially restored cord formation in such cells, suggesting that STAT1 functions in part as nonnuclear protein mediating signal transduction in this process. Constitutively active or inactive forms of STAT1 did not promote lumen maturation, suggesting this requires a distinct signal. PMID:20861313

  20. A qualitative and quantitative comparison of the fat in human, feline and canine kidneys.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J.; Scott, G. B.

    1977-01-01

    While xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis in humans tends to be rich in birefringent fat, this variety cannot be demonstrated microscopically in the feline morphological counterpart of the condition, which is, however, rich in readily stainable fat. Since normal feline kidney is rich in such lipid, a qualitative and quantitative comparison of the lipid in human, feline and canine kidney was carried out in an attempt to throw further light on the possible origin of the birefringent fat in the human disease. No significant difference could be found in the amount of cholesterol in the 3 species. Despite its visual prominence in feline kidneys, human kidney was richer in neutral fat and the percentage of total lipid formed by cholesterol was greater in humans than in the other species. The results suggested that cases of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis may occur in those kidneys unusually rich in cholesterol. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:836763

  1. Growth hormone activates phospholipase C in proximal tubular basolateral membranes from canine kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.A.; Hammerman, M.R. )

    1989-08-01

    To delineate pathways for signal transduction by growth hormone (GH) in proximal tubule, the authors incubated basolateral membranes isolated from canine kidney with human growth hormone (hGH) or human prolactin (hPrl) and measured levels of inositol trisphosphate (InsP{sub 3}) in suspensions and of diacylglycerol extractable from the membranes. Incubation with hGH, but not hPrl, increased levels of InsP{sub 3} and diacylglycerol in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-maximal effects occurred between 0.1 and 1 nM hGH. Increased levels of InsP{sub 3} were measured after as little as 5 sec of incubation with 1 nM hGH, and increase was maximal after 15 sec. Increases were no longer detectable after 60 sec because of dephosphorylation of InsP{sub 3} in membrane suspensions. hGH did not affect rates of dephosphorylation. hGH-stimulated increases in InsP{sub 3} were detectable in membranes suspended in 0, 0.1, and 0.2 {mu}M calcium but not in 0.3 or 1.0 {mu}M calcium. {sup 125}I-labeled hGH-receptor complexes with M{sub r} values of 66,000 and 140,000 were identified in isolated basolateral membranes. The findings establish that GH activates phospholipase C in isolated canine renal proximal tubular basolateral membranes, potentially after binding to a specific receptor. This process could mediate signal transmission by GH across the plasma membrane of the proximal tubular cell and elsewhere.

  2. Changes in ganglioside content affect the binding of Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin to detergent-resistant membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Seiko; Tamai, Eiji; Matsushita, Osamu; Minami, Junzaburo; Okabe, Akinobu; Miyata, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    Epsilon-toxin (ET) of Clostridium perfringens, which causes fatal enterotoxemia in ungulates, was previously shown to bind to and form a heptameric pore within the detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) of MDCK cells. Depletion of cholesterol has also been shown to decrease the cytotoxicity of ET and its heptamerization. In this study, we investigated the effects of changes in sphingolipids, other DRM components of MDCK cells, on the cells' susceptibility to ET. Treatment with fumonisin B1 and PDMP, inhibitors of sphingolipid and glycosphingolipid syntheses, respectively, increased the susceptibility, while D609, a sphingomyelin synthesis inhibitor, had the opposite effect. The exogenous addition of ganglioside G(M1) dramatically decreased the ET binding, heptamerization and cytotoxicity. These effects were shown not to be due to ET binding to G(M1) or to denaturation of ET. We also found that the ET cytotoxicity towards MDCK cells decreased with an increase in culture time. In accordance with the resistance observed for prolonged cultured cells, G(M3), a major ganglioside component, increased and sialidase treatment increased their susceptibility. These results suggest that membrane-anchored sialic acid of G(M3) within DRMs inhibits ET binding, leading to prevention of the heptamerization of ET and cell death. It is also suggested that sialidase produced by this organism aids the targeting of ET to MDCK cells.

  3. Phorbol ester-stimulated phosphorylation of basolateral membranes from canine kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerman, M.R.; Rogers, S.; Morrissey, J.J.; Gavin, J.R. III

    1986-06-01

    To determine whether protein kinase C is present in the basolateral membrane of the renal proximal tubular cell, we performed experiments to ascertain whether specific binding of (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate could be demonstrated in basolateral membranes isolated from canine kidney. Specific binding was demonstrable that was half maximal at between 10(-7) and 10(-8) M phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate. Binding was inhibited by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and other tumor-promoting phorbol esters, but not by inactive phorbol esters, including 4 alpha-phorbol. Incubation of basolateral membranes with TPA and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, but not with 4 alpha-phorbol, in the presence of submicromolar concentrations of free calcium, enhanced phosphorylation of several proteins demonstrable in autoradiograms of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels originating from membranes subsequently exposed to (gamma-32P)ATP for 30 s. Dephosphorylation of (/sup 32/P)phosphoproteins was observed in gels from membranes incubated with (gamma-32P)ATP over time. TPA-stimulated phosphorylation of one protein band with Mr 135,000 was quantitated and was found to increase as a function of (TPA). Half-maximal TPA-stimulated phosphorylation of this protein band occurred at slightly less than 10(-9) M TPA. Our findings are consistent with a role for protein kinase C-effected phosphorylation of basolateral membrane proteins in the mediation or modulation of hormonal actions in the proximal tubular cell.

  4. The formation of lipid-linked oligosaccharides in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Changes in oligosaccharide profiles induced by glucosamine.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y T; Elbein, A D

    1982-03-25

    Glucosamine inhibits the incorporation of [2-3H]mannose into lipid-linked oligosaccharides and into glycoproteins in influenza virus-infected MDCK cells. Fifty per cent inhibition of these components requires about 2 mM glucosamine. The oligosaccharide portions of the lipid-linked oligosaccharides in cells inhibited with glucosamine were compared to that of normal cells by chromatography on Bio-Gel P-4 columns. In uninhibited cells, the major oligosaccharide formed from [2-3H]mannose was the Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 species as demonstrated by the products of endoglucosaminidase H and alpha-mannosidase digestion. At low concentrations of glucosamine (approximately 2 mM) or in short term incubations (1 to 2 h), the large oligosaccharide disappeared and was replaced by a Man7GlcNAc2 species. This was also characterized by various enzymatic treatments as well as its migration rate on Bio-Gel P-4 as compared to known oligosaccharides. At still higher glucosamine concentrations or longer incubation times, the Man7GlcNAc2 species also disappeared and was replaced by a Man3GlcNAc2 species. The effect of glucosamine was reversible such that when the cells were washed free of this inhibitor, they resumed the synthesis of the Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 species and the other two oligosaccharides disappeared. These smaller oligosaccharides were not observed when glucosamine was replaced by either 5 mM galactosamine or 5 mM N-acetylglucosamine. PMID:7061450

  5. Stem cells and kidney regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-Hsiang; Pan, Szu-Yu; Yang, Chian-Huei; Lin, Shuei-Liong

    2014-04-01

    Kidney disease is an escalating burden all over the world. In addition to preventing kidney injury, regenerating damaged renal tissue is as important as to retard the progression of chronic kidney disease to end stage renal disease. Although the kidney is a delicate organ and has only limited regenerative capacity compared to the other organs, an increasing understanding of renal development and renal reprogramming has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. Here, we will review the advances in the kidney regeneration including the manipulation of renal tubular cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages in renal disease. Several types of stem cells, such as bone marrow-derived cells, adipocyte-derived mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells are also applied for renal regeneration. Endogenous or lineage reprogrammed renal progenitor cells represent an attractive possibility for differentiation into multiple renal cell types. Angiogenesis can ameliorate hypoxia and renal fibrosis. Based on these studies and knowledge, we hope to innovate more reliable pharmacological or biotechnical methods for kidney regeneration medicine.

  6. Cytotoxic Effects of Loperamide Hydrochloride on Canine Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    REGAN, Rebecca Cohen; GOGAL, Robert Michael; BARBER, James Perry; TUCKFIELD, Richard Cary; HOWERTH, Elizabeth Wynne; LAWRENCE, Jessica Ann

    2014-01-01

    Loperamide is a peripheral opiate agonist that can cause apoptosis and G2/M arrest in human cancer cell lines and may sensitize cells to chemotherapy. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of loperamide on viability, apoptosis and cell cycle kinetics in canine cancer cells and to establish whether the drug sensitizes cells to doxorubicin. Cell viability was assessed using Alamar Blue. Cell death and cell cycle were studied using flow cytometry with 7-Aminoactinomycin-D (7-AAD) and propidium iodide (PI), respectively. Loperamide decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent fashion and was most effective against canine osteosarcoma cells. In all cell lines, it induced a dose and time dependent apoptosis and resulted in accumulation in G0/G1. When co-incubated with doxorubicin, loperamide induced a synergistic cell kill in canine carcinoma cells. Investigation is warranted into the role of loperamide in the treatment of canine cancer. PMID:25649936

  7. Lysis of human tumor cell lines by canine complement plus monoclonal antiganglioside antibodies or natural canine xenoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Helfand, S C; Hank, J A; Gan, J; Sondel, P M

    1996-01-10

    Because certain antiganglioside monoclonal antibodies can facilitate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against GD2+ ganglioside-bearing human and canine tumor cells, we wished to determine if clinically relevant antiganglioside monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) could also fix canine complement to lyse tumor cells in vitro. Using flow cytometry, human tumor cell lines (M21 melanoma and OHS osteosarcoma) were shown to highly express ganglioside GD2 and, to a lesser degree, GD3. In 51Cr release assays, M21 cells were lysed with canine serum, as a source of complement, plus either Mab 14.G2a or its mouse-human chimera, ch 14.18, specific for GD2. Heating canine serum abrogated its lytic activity and addition of rabbit complement reconstituted M21 lysis. Similar results were obtained with M21 cells when Mab R24 (against GD3) and canine serum were used. OHS cells were also lysed with canine serum plus Mab 14.G2a and lytic activity was abolished by heating canine serum but reconstituted with rabbit complement. Alone, canine serum or Mabs were not lytic to M21 or OHS cells. Conversely, human neuroblastoma (LAN-5) and K562 erythroleukemia cells were lysed by canine serum alone which was shown by flow cytometry to contain naturally occurring canine IgM antibodies that bound LAN-5 and K562 cells. The lytic activity of canine serum for LAN-5 or K562 cells was abolished by heating and restored by addition of either human or rabbit complement. Thus, human tumor cell lines can be lysed with antiganglioside Mabs through fixation and activation of canine complement-dependent lytic pathways. Canine xenoantibodies also mediate complement-dependent cytotoxicity of some human tumor cell lines. Together, these results are significant because they demonstrate an antitumor effect of the canine immune system which is of potential importance for cancer immunotherapy in a promising animal model.

  8. Canine Pluripotent Stem Cells: Are They Ready for Clinical Applications?

    PubMed

    Betts, Dean H; Tobias, Ian C

    2015-01-01

    The derivation of canine embryonic stem cells and generation of canine-induced pluripotent stem cells are significant achievements that have unlocked the potential for developing novel cell-based disease models, drug discovery platforms, and transplantation therapies in the dog. A progression from concept to cure in this clinically relevant companion animal will not only help our canine patients but also help advance human regenerative medicine. Nevertheless, many issues remain to be resolved before pluripotent cells can be used clinically in a safe and reproducible manner. PMID:26664969

  9. Gastrin receptors on isolated canine parietal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soll, A.H.; Amirian, D.A.; Thomas, L.P.; Reedy, T.J.; Elashoff, J.D.

    1984-05-01

    The receptors in the fundic mucosa that mediate gastrin stimulation of acid secretion have been studied. Synthetic human gastrin-17-I (G17) with a leucine substitution in the 15th position ((Leu15)-G17) was iodinated by chloramine T; high saturable binding was found to enzyme-dispersed canine fundic mucosal cells. /sup 127/I-(Leu15)-G17, but not /sup 127/I-G17, retained binding potency and biological activity comparable with uniodinated G17. Fundic mucosal cells were separated by size by using an elutriator rotor, and specific /sup 125/I-(Leu-15)-G17 binding in the larger cell fractions was highly correlated with the distribution of parietal cells. There was, however, specific gastrin binding in the small cell fractions, not accounted for by parietal cells. Using sequential elutriation and stepwise density gradients, highly enriched parietal and chief cell fractions were prepared; /sup 125/I-(Leu15)-G17 binding correlated positively with the parietal cell (r . 0.98) and negatively with chief cell content (r . -0.96). In fractions enriched to 45-65% parietal cells, specific /sup 125/I-(Leu15)-G17 binding was rapid, reaching a steady state at 37 degrees C within 30 min. Dissociation was also rapid, with the rate similar after 100-fold dilution or dilution plus excess pentagastrin. At a tracer concentration from 10 to 30 pM, saturable binding was 7.8 +/- 0.8% per 10(6) cells (mean +/- SE) and binding in the presence of excess pentagastrin accounted for 11% of total binding. G17 and carboxyl terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin (26-33) were equipotent in displacing tracer binding and in stimulating parietal cell function ((/sup 14/C)aminopyrine accumulation), whereas the tetrapeptide of gastrin (14-17) had a much lower potency. Proglumide inhibited gastrin binding and selectively inhibited gastrin stimulation of parietal cell function.

  10. Identification of link proteins in canine synovial cell cultures and canine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Link proteins are glycoproteins in cartilage that are involved in the stabilization of aggregates of proteoglycans and hyaluronic acid. We have identified link proteins in synovial cell cultures form normal canine synovium using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunofluorescence, and immunolocation with specific antibodies by electrophoretic transfer. We have also found evidence for the synthesis of link proteins in these cultures by fluorography of radiolabeled synovial cell extracts. We have identified a 70,000 mol-wt protein in canine synovial cell culture extracts that has antigenic cross-reactivity with the 48,000-mol-wt link protein. Three link proteins were identified in normal canine articular cartilage. These results indicate that link proteins are more widely distributed in connective tissues than previously recognized and may have biological functions other than aggregate stabilization. PMID:3980578

  11. Adult stem-like cells in kidney

    PubMed Central

    Hishikawa, Keiichi; Takase, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Taro; Nangaku, Masaomi; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent cells are promising for treatment for kidney diseases, but the protocols for derivation of kidney cell types are still controversial. Kidney tissue regeneration is well confirmed in several lower vertebrates such as fish, and the repair of nephrons after tubular damages is commonly observed after renal injury. Even in adult mammal kidney, renal progenitor cell or system is reportedly presents suggesting that adult stem-like cells in kidney can be practical clinical targets for kidney diseases. However, it is still unclear if kidney stem cells or stem-like cells exist or not. In general, stemness is defined by several factors such as self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage potency and characteristic gene expression profiles. The definite use of stemness may be obstacle to understand kidney regeneration, and here we describe the recent broad findings of kidney regeneration and the cells that contribute regeneration. PMID:25815133

  12. Adult stem-like cells in kidney.

    PubMed

    Hishikawa, Keiichi; Takase, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Taro; Nangaku, Masaomi; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-26

    Human pluripotent cells are promising for treatment for kidney diseases, but the protocols for derivation of kidney cell types are still controversial. Kidney tissue regeneration is well confirmed in several lower vertebrates such as fish, and the repair of nephrons after tubular damages is commonly observed after renal injury. Even in adult mammal kidney, renal progenitor cell or system is reportedly presents suggesting that adult stem-like cells in kidney can be practical clinical targets for kidney diseases. However, it is still unclear if kidney stem cells or stem-like cells exist or not. In general, stemness is defined by several factors such as self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage potency and characteristic gene expression profiles. The definite use of stemness may be obstacle to understand kidney regeneration, and here we describe the recent broad findings of kidney regeneration and the cells that contribute regeneration. PMID:25815133

  13. Identification of canine helper T-cell epitopes from the fusion protein of canine distemper virus

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Souravi; Walker, John; Jackson, David C

    2001-01-01

    The fusion protein of canine distemper virus (CDV-F), a 662 amino-acid envelope protein, was used as the target molecule for identification of canine T helper (Th) epitopes. A library of 94 peptides, each 17 residues in length overlapping by 10 residues and covering the entire sequence of CDV-F, was screened using a lymphocyte proliferation assay with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from dogs inoculated with canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine. Initially we observed low and inconsistent proliferation of PBMC in response to these peptides, even when using cells obtained from dogs that had received multiple doses of CDV. Subsequently, the use of expanded cell populations derived by in vitro stimulation of canine PBMC with pools of peptides allowed the identification of a number of putative canine Th-epitopes within the protein sequence of CDV-F. There were two major clusters of Th-epitopes identified close to the cleavage site of the F0 fusion protein, while some others were scattered in both the F1 and F2 fragments of the protein. Some of these peptides, in particular peptide 35 (p35), were stimulatory in dogs of different breeds and ages. The identification of such promiscuous canine Th-epitopes encouraged us to assemble p35 in tandem with luteinising hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) a 10 amino-acid residue synthetic peptide representing a B-cell epitope which alone induces no antibody in dogs. The totally synthetic immunogen was able to induce the production of very high titres of antibodies against LHRH in all dogs tested. These results indicate that p35 could be an ideal candidate for use as a Th-epitope for use in outbred dogs. PMID:11576221

  14. Downregulation of the KLF4 transcription factor inhibits the proliferation and migration of canine mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yung-Tien; Chang, Mei-Hsien; Chu, Pei-Yi; Lin, Chen-Si; Liu, Chen-Hsuan; Liao, Albert T

    2015-08-01

    Canine mammary tumor (CMT) is the most common neoplasm in female dogs, and over 50% of CMTs are diagnosed as malignant. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a member of the KLF family of transcription factors and is associated with cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. Although the role of KLF4 is still controversial in various human cancers, KLF4 has been identified as an oncogene in human breast cancer. Moreover, high KLF4 expression is correlated with an aggressive phenotype in CMT. Therefore, investigating the function of KLF4 may help better understand the pathogenesis of CMT. In this study, partial sequences of canine KLF4 and KLF4 expression were identified in various normal canine tissues, as well as CMT cells and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Kenpaullone, a small molecule inhibitor of KLF4, downregulated KLF4 expression in CMT cells and reduced CMT cell proliferation, migration, and colony formation in soft agar. Kenpaullone treatment induced S and G2/M phase arrest in CMT and MDCK cells, and induced death in CMT cells, but not in MDCK cells. It was concluded that KLF4 is expressed in various normal canine tissues, and downregulation of KLF4 inhibited CMT cell proliferation and migration, and induced cell death. The results of this study suggest that KLF4 may represent a suitable therapeutic target for CMT therapy. PMID:25616642

  15. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Afinitor (Everolimus) Aldesleukin Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  16. Stem Cell-Associated Marker Expression in Canine Hair Follicles.

    PubMed

    Gerhards, Nora M; Sayar, Beyza S; Origgi, Francesco C; Galichet, Arnaud; Müller, Eliane J; Welle, Monika M; Wiener, Dominique J

    2016-03-01

    Functional hair follicle (HF) stem cells (SCs) are crucial to maintain the constant recurring growth of hair. In mice and humans, SC subpopulations with different biomarker expression profiles have been identified in discrete anatomic compartments of the HF. The rare studies investigating canine HF SCs have shown similarities in biomarker expression profiles to that of mouse and human SCs. The aim of our study was to broaden the current repertoire of SC-associated markers and their expression patterns in the dog. We combined analyses on the expression levels of CD34, K15, Sox9, CD200, Nestin, LGR5 and LGR6 in canine skin using RT-qPCR, the corresponding proteins in dog skin lysates, and their expression patterns in canine HFs using immunohistochemistry. Using validated antibodies, we were able to define the location of CD34, Sox9, Keratin15, LGR5 and Nestin in canine HFs and confirm that all tested biomarkers are expressed in canine skin. Our results show similarities between the expression profile of canine, human and mouse HF SC markers. This repertoire of biomarkers will allow us to conduct functional studies and investigate alterations in the canine SC compartment of different diseases, like alopecia or skin cancer with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients.

  17. Stem Cell-Associated Marker Expression in Canine Hair Follicles.

    PubMed

    Gerhards, Nora M; Sayar, Beyza S; Origgi, Francesco C; Galichet, Arnaud; Müller, Eliane J; Welle, Monika M; Wiener, Dominique J

    2016-03-01

    Functional hair follicle (HF) stem cells (SCs) are crucial to maintain the constant recurring growth of hair. In mice and humans, SC subpopulations with different biomarker expression profiles have been identified in discrete anatomic compartments of the HF. The rare studies investigating canine HF SCs have shown similarities in biomarker expression profiles to that of mouse and human SCs. The aim of our study was to broaden the current repertoire of SC-associated markers and their expression patterns in the dog. We combined analyses on the expression levels of CD34, K15, Sox9, CD200, Nestin, LGR5 and LGR6 in canine skin using RT-qPCR, the corresponding proteins in dog skin lysates, and their expression patterns in canine HFs using immunohistochemistry. Using validated antibodies, we were able to define the location of CD34, Sox9, Keratin15, LGR5 and Nestin in canine HFs and confirm that all tested biomarkers are expressed in canine skin. Our results show similarities between the expression profile of canine, human and mouse HF SC markers. This repertoire of biomarkers will allow us to conduct functional studies and investigate alterations in the canine SC compartment of different diseases, like alopecia or skin cancer with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients. PMID:26739040

  18. The cell cycle and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Price, Peter M; Safirstein, Robert L; Megyesi, Judit

    2009-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) activates pathways of cell death and cell proliferation. Although seemingly discrete and unrelated mechanisms, these pathways can now be shown to be connected and even to be controlled by similar pathways. The dependence of the severity of renal-cell injury on cell cycle pathways can be used to control and perhaps to prevent acute kidney injury. This review is written to address the correlation between cellular life and death in kidney tubules, especially in acute kidney injury.

  19. Expression patterns and potential action of the calcium transport genes Trpv5, Trpv6, Ncx1 and Pmca1b in the canine duodenum, kidney and uterus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Ah; Yang, Hyun; Hwang, Inho; Jung, Eui-Man; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2011-01-01

    Four membrane calcium (Ca²⁺) channels are known to play an important role in calcium transport: transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V members 5 and 6 (Trpv5/6), Na⁺/Ca²⁺ exchanger 1 (Ncx1) and plasma membrane Ca²⁺-transporting ATPase1 (Pmca1b). These channels have been shown to mediate the transport of Ca²⁺ between the cytosol and bloodstream in multiple tissues, including the duodenum, kidney, and uterus. Trpv5 and Trpv6 are known to selectively import Ca²⁺ into cells, while Ncx1 and Pmca1b function to extrude Ca²⁺. The present study examined and compared expression patterns of these genes in the canine duodenum, kidney and uterus. We confirmed expression of all four genes in this canine model. To collect tissues for analysis, two adult (2.5-year-old) female dogs were euthanized and tissue samples were collected from an abdominal incision. Expression of Trpv5/6, Ncx1 and Pmca1b was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Trpv5, Trpv6 and Ncx1 mRNA were highly expressed in the kidney, while Pmca1b mRNA was primarily detected in the uterus. Protein expression was verified by Western blot analysis and localized by immunohistochemistry. Protein expression showed patterns similar to those of mRNA expression. Taken together, these results indicate that transcriptional and transitional expression of Tprv5, Trpv6, Ncx1 and Pmca1b may play a critical role in calcium transport in the canine duodenum, kidney and uterus.

  20. Nephron segment identification in the normal canine kidney by using lectin histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Akira; Mitani, Sawane; Mizukami, Keijiro; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-10-01

    Lectin-binding patterns in normal canine kidneys were histochemically investigated using eight lectins. WGA, ConA, and RCA-I showed positive signals in glomerular capillary walls, with signals for RCA-I being detected heterogeneously. In tubular segments, signals for WGA, s-WGA, ConA, and RCA-I were distributed widely from proximal tubules to collecting ducts, whereas those for SBA, PNA, DBA, and UEA-I were localized in thin limbs of the loop of Henle, thick ascending limbs, distal tubules, or collecting ducts. Apart from PNA and UEA-I, lectins showed heterogeneous bindings in collecting ducts with the heterogeneity. UEA-I-positive reactions were restricted to those parts of the distal tubules in close proximity to the glomeruli, and in these parts, signals in the macula densa were markedly stronger than in other regions. Based on the present findings, lectin probes, singly or in combination, could be utilized to identify the affected nephron segment in canine renal pathology.

  1. Experimental basis of shockwave-induced renal trauma in the model of the canine kidney.

    PubMed

    Rassweiler, J; Köhrmann, K U; Back, W; Fröhner, S; Raab, M; Weber, A; Kahmann, F; Marlinghaus, E; Jünemann, K P; Alken, P

    1993-01-01

    Using the new electromagnetic shockwave source of the Modulith SL 20 shockwave-induced renal trauma was evaluated by acute and chronic studies in the the canine kidney model. In a further study the electromagnetic shockwave source of the Lithostar Plus Overhead module was tested. Overall, 92 kidneys were exposed to shock waves coupled either by water bath (Modulith lab type) or by water cushion (Modulith prototype, Lithostar Overhead) under ultrasound localization. The generator voltage ranged between 11 and 21 kV, the number of impulses between 25 and 2500. After application of 1500/2500 shocks the extent of the renal lesion depended strictly on the applied generator voltage and was classified into 4 grades: Grade 0, no macroscopic trauma detectable (at 11-12 kV); grade 1, petechial medullary bleeding (at 13 kV); grade 2, cortical hematoma (at 14-16 kV); and grade 3, perirenal hematoma (17-20 kV). Whereas at low and medium energy levels the number of shocks played only a minor role, at maximal generator voltage (20 kV) even 25 impulses induced a grade 2 and 600 shocks a grade 3 lesion, emphasizing the importance of shockwave limitation in the upper energy range. In shockwave-induced renal trauma a vascular lesion was predominant and cellular necrosis was secondary. Coupling with a water cushion resulted in a 15%-20% decrease in the disintegrative and traumatic effect, which was compensated for by increasing the generator voltage by 2 kV. Long-term studies showed complete restitution following grade 1 and 2 trauma, whereas after a grade 3 lesion a small segmental and capsular fibrosis without hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus was observed. Based on the characteristic ultrasound pattern found in the first study, the threshold for induction of grade 1 lesion was investigated. With both lithotripters a wide range for induction of a grade 1 lesion (Modulith 234-411, Lithostar Plus 220-740) and also a significant overlapping with grade 0 and 2 lesions was

  2. Experimental basis of shockwave-induced renal trauma in the model of the canine kidney.

    PubMed

    Rassweiler, J; Köhrmann, K U; Back, W; Fröhner, S; Raab, M; Weber, A; Kahmann, F; Marlinghaus, E; Jünemann, K P; Alken, P

    1993-01-01

    Using the new electromagnetic shockwave source of the Modulith SL 20 shockwave-induced renal trauma was evaluated by acute and chronic studies in the the canine kidney model. In a further study the electromagnetic shockwave source of the Lithostar Plus Overhead module was tested. Overall, 92 kidneys were exposed to shock waves coupled either by water bath (Modulith lab type) or by water cushion (Modulith prototype, Lithostar Overhead) under ultrasound localization. The generator voltage ranged between 11 and 21 kV, the number of impulses between 25 and 2500. After application of 1500/2500 shocks the extent of the renal lesion depended strictly on the applied generator voltage and was classified into 4 grades: Grade 0, no macroscopic trauma detectable (at 11-12 kV); grade 1, petechial medullary bleeding (at 13 kV); grade 2, cortical hematoma (at 14-16 kV); and grade 3, perirenal hematoma (17-20 kV). Whereas at low and medium energy levels the number of shocks played only a minor role, at maximal generator voltage (20 kV) even 25 impulses induced a grade 2 and 600 shocks a grade 3 lesion, emphasizing the importance of shockwave limitation in the upper energy range. In shockwave-induced renal trauma a vascular lesion was predominant and cellular necrosis was secondary. Coupling with a water cushion resulted in a 15%-20% decrease in the disintegrative and traumatic effect, which was compensated for by increasing the generator voltage by 2 kV. Long-term studies showed complete restitution following grade 1 and 2 trauma, whereas after a grade 3 lesion a small segmental and capsular fibrosis without hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus was observed. Based on the characteristic ultrasound pattern found in the first study, the threshold for induction of grade 1 lesion was investigated. With both lithotripters a wide range for induction of a grade 1 lesion (Modulith 234-411, Lithostar Plus 220-740) and also a significant overlapping with grade 0 and 2 lesions was

  3. Stem cell growth factor receptor in canine vs. feline osteosarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Wolfesberger, Birgitt; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, Andrea; Hlavaty, Juraj; Meyer, Florian R.; Hofer, Martin; Steinborn, Ralf; Gebhard, Christiane; Walter, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is considered the most common bone cancer in cats and dogs, with cats having a much better prognosis than dogs, since the great majority of dogs with osteosarcoma develop distant metastases. In search of a factor possibly contributing to this disparity, the stem cell growth factor receptor KIT was targeted, and the messenger (m)RNA and protein expression levels of KIT were compared in canine vs. feline osteosarcomas, as well as in normal bone. The mRNA expression of KIT was quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and was observed to be significantly higher in canine (n=14) than in feline (n=5) osteosarcoma samples (P<0.001). KIT protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, which revealed that 21% of canine osteosarcoma samples did not exhibit KIT staining in their neoplastic cells, while in 14% of samples, a score of 1 (<10% positive tumour cells) was observed, and in 50% and 14% of samples, a score of 2 (10–50% positivity) and 3 (>50% positivity), respectively, was observed. By contrast, the cancer cells of all the feline bone tumour samples analysed were entirely negative for KIT. Notably, canine and feline osteocytes of healthy bone tissue lacked any KIT expression. These results could be the first evidence that KIT may be involved in the higher aggressiveness of canine osteosarcoma compared with feline osteosarcoma.

  4. Stem cell growth factor receptor in canine vs. feline osteosarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Wolfesberger, Birgitt; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, Andrea; Hlavaty, Juraj; Meyer, Florian R.; Hofer, Martin; Steinborn, Ralf; Gebhard, Christiane; Walter, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is considered the most common bone cancer in cats and dogs, with cats having a much better prognosis than dogs, since the great majority of dogs with osteosarcoma develop distant metastases. In search of a factor possibly contributing to this disparity, the stem cell growth factor receptor KIT was targeted, and the messenger (m)RNA and protein expression levels of KIT were compared in canine vs. feline osteosarcomas, as well as in normal bone. The mRNA expression of KIT was quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and was observed to be significantly higher in canine (n=14) than in feline (n=5) osteosarcoma samples (P<0.001). KIT protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, which revealed that 21% of canine osteosarcoma samples did not exhibit KIT staining in their neoplastic cells, while in 14% of samples, a score of 1 (<10% positive tumour cells) was observed, and in 50% and 14% of samples, a score of 2 (10–50% positivity) and 3 (>50% positivity), respectively, was observed. By contrast, the cancer cells of all the feline bone tumour samples analysed were entirely negative for KIT. Notably, canine and feline osteocytes of healthy bone tissue lacked any KIT expression. These results could be the first evidence that KIT may be involved in the higher aggressiveness of canine osteosarcoma compared with feline osteosarcoma. PMID:27698817

  5. Kidney cell electrophoresis, continuing task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Materials and procedures for microgravity electrophoresis of living human embryonic kidney cells were evaluated to provide ground support in the form of analytical cell electrophoresis and flow cytometry. Preflight culture media, electrophoresis buffer, fraction collection media, temperature profiles, and urokinase assay procedures were tested prior to flight. Electrophoretic mobility distributions of aliquots of the cell population to be fractionated in flight were obtained. Cells were prepared in suspension prior to flight in electrophoresis buffer and 10% calf serum. Electrophoretic separation proceeded in electrophoresis buffer without serum in the Continuous Flow Electrophoretic Separator, and fractions were collected into sample bags containing culture medium and concentrated serum. Fractions that yielded enough progeny cells were analyzed for morphology and electrophoretic mobility distributions. It is noted that the lowest mobility fraction studied produced higher mobility progeny while the other fractions produced progeny cells with mobilities related to the fractions from which they were collected.

  6. Kidney disease associated with plasma cell dyscrasias

    PubMed Central

    Goes, Nelson B.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Raje, Noopur S.; Humphreys, Benjamin D.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma cell dyscrasias are frequently encountered malignancies often associated with kidney disease through the production of monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig). Paraproteins can cause a remarkably diverse set of pathologic patterns in the kidney and recent progress has been made in explaining the molecular mechanisms of paraprotein-mediated kidney injury. Other recent advances in the field include the introduction of an assay for free light chains and the use of novel antiplasma cell agents that can reverse renal failure in some cases. The role of stem cell transplantation, plasma exchange, and kidney transplantation in the management of patients with paraprotein-related kidney disease continues to evolve. PMID:20462963

  7. A critical synopsis: Continuous growth of proximal tubular kidney epithelial cells in hormone-supplemented serum-free medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuman, L. M.; FINE; COHEN; Saier, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The kidney forms urine and reabsorbs electrolytes and water. Kidney cell lines and hormone supplemented serum free medium were used for growth. The hormones were insulin, transferrin, vasopressin, cholesterol, prostaglandins, hydrocortisone, and triidothyronine. Epithelial cell lines are polar and form hemicysts. The Madin-Darby canine kidney(MDCK) cell line used is distal tubulelike. LLC-PK sub 1 cells are derived from pig kidneys and have the properties of different kidney segments. The LLC-PK sub 1 cells with proximal tubule properties were maintained in hormone-supplemented serum free medium. Seven factors (the aforementioned homrones and selenium) were needed for growth. Hormone-defined medium supported LLC-PK sub 1 cell growth, allowed transport (as seen by hemicyst formation), and influenced cell morphology. Vasopressin (used for growth and morphology) could be partially replaced by isobutylmethylxanthine or dibutyryl cAMP. The defined medium was used to isolate rabbit proximal tubule kidney epithelial cells free of fibroblasts.

  8. Metabolic flux profiling of MDCK cells during growth and canine adenovirus vector production

    PubMed Central

    Carinhas, Nuno; Pais, Daniel A. M.; Koshkin, Alexey; Fernandes, Paulo; Coroadinha, Ana S.; Carrondo, Manuel J. T.; Alves, Paula M.; Teixeira, Ana P.

    2016-01-01

    Canine adenovirus vector type 2 (CAV2) represents an alternative to human adenovirus vectors for certain gene therapy applications, particularly neurodegenerative diseases. However, more efficient production processes, assisted by a greater understanding of the effect of infection on producer cells, are required. Combining [1,2-13C]glucose and [U-13C]glutamine, we apply for the first time 13C-Metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) to study E1-transformed Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells metabolism during growth and CAV2 production. MDCK cells displayed a marked glycolytic and ammoniagenic metabolism, and 13C data revealed a large fraction of glutamine-derived labelling in TCA cycle intermediates, emphasizing the role of glutamine anaplerosis. 13C-MFA demonstrated the importance of pyruvate cycling in balancing glycolytic and TCA cycle activities, as well as occurrence of reductive alphaketoglutarate (AKG) carboxylation. By turn, CAV2 infection significantly upregulated fluxes through most central metabolism, including glycolysis, pentose-phosphate pathway, glutamine anaplerosis and, more prominently, reductive AKG carboxylation and cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A formation, suggestive of increased lipogenesis. Based on these results, we suggest culture supplementation strategies to stimulate nucleic acid and lipid biosynthesis for improved canine adenoviral vector production. PMID:27004747

  9. Characterization of canine dental pulp cells and their neuroregenerative potential.

    PubMed

    Naito, Eiji; Kudo, Daichi; Sekine, Shin-ichiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Kobatake, Yui; Tamaoki, Naritaka; Inden, Masatoshi; Iida, Kazuki; Ito, Yusuke; Hozumi, Isao; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Maeda, Sadatoshi; Kamishina, Hiroaki

    2015-11-01

    Dental pulp cells (DPCs) of various species have been studied for their potentials of differentiation into functional neurons and secretion of neurotrophic factors. In canine, DPCs have only been studied for cell surface markers and differentiation, but there is little direct evidence for therapeutic potentials for neurological disorders. The present study aimed to further characterize canine DPCs (cDPCs), particularly focusing on their neuroregenerative potentials. It was also reported that superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles were useful for labeling of MSCs and tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our data suggested that cDPCs hold higher proliferation capacity than bone marrow stromal cells, the other type of mesenchymal stem cells which have been the target of intensive research. Canine DPCs constitutively expressed neural markers, suggesting a close relationship to the nervous system in their developmental origin. Canine DPCs promoted neuritogenesis of PC12 cells, most likely through secretion of neurotrophic factors. Furthermore, SPIO nanoparticles could be effectively transported to cDPCs without significant cytotoxicity and unfavorable effects on neuritogenesis. SPIO-labeled cDPCs embedded in agarose spinal cord phantoms were successfully visualized with a magnetic resonance imaging arousing a hope for noninvasive cell tracking in transplantation studies.

  10. Evaluation and Comparison of Vitamin D Responsive Gene Expression in Ovine, Canine and Equine Kidney.

    PubMed

    Azarpeykan, Sara; Dittmer, Keren E; Marshall, Jonathan C; Perera, Kalyani C; Gee, Erica K; Acke, Els; Thompson, Keith G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative abundance and relationship of vitamin D responsive and calcium transporting transcripts (TRPV5, TRPV6, calD9k, calD28k, PMCA, NCX1, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, and VDR) in ovine, canine and, equine kidney using quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR), and then perform a comparison between the three species. Renal tissue samples were harvested post-mortem from 10 horses, 10 sheep, and five dogs. Primers were designed for each gene. For each sample total RNA was extracted, cDNA synthesised, and RT-qPCR was performed. RT-qPCR data were normalised and statistical comparison was performed. Due to their consistent correlation with each other in each species, TRPV6, calD9k/calD28k, and PMCA appeared to be the main pathways involved in active transepithelial calcium transport in the kidney of sheep, dogs and horses. The results indicate that all of the studied genes were expressed in the renal tissue of studied species, although the expression levels and correlation of transcripts with each other were different from species to species. All vitamin D responsive and calcium transporting transcripts were highly correlated with VDR in equine kidney, but not in sheep and dogs. The CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 mRNAs showed a different renal expression pattern and correlation in horses compared with sheep and dogs. Given the high urinary calcium concentration and low serum 1,25(OH)2D concentration in horses, it could be expected that CYP27B1 expression would be lower than CYP24A1 in the horse, and this did not appear to be the case. The findings suggest that despite low serum vitamin D concentrations, vitamin D still plays a significant role in calcium metabolism in horses, especially given the strong correlations between VDR and vitamin D responsive transcripts in these animals. PMID:27632366

  11. Evaluation and Comparison of Vitamin D Responsive Gene Expression in Ovine, Canine and Equine Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Azarpeykan, Sara; Dittmer, Keren E.; Marshall, Jonathan C.; Perera, Kalyani C.; Gee, Erica K.; Acke, Els; Thompson, Keith G.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative abundance and relationship of vitamin D responsive and calcium transporting transcripts (TRPV5, TRPV6, calD9k, calD28k, PMCA, NCX1, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, and VDR) in ovine, canine and, equine kidney using quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR), and then perform a comparison between the three species. Renal tissue samples were harvested post-mortem from 10 horses, 10 sheep, and five dogs. Primers were designed for each gene. For each sample total RNA was extracted, cDNA synthesised, and RT-qPCR was performed. RT-qPCR data were normalised and statistical comparison was performed. Due to their consistent correlation with each other in each species, TRPV6, calD9k/calD28k, and PMCA appeared to be the main pathways involved in active transepithelial calcium transport in the kidney of sheep, dogs and horses. The results indicate that all of the studied genes were expressed in the renal tissue of studied species, although the expression levels and correlation of transcripts with each other were different from species to species. All vitamin D responsive and calcium transporting transcripts were highly correlated with VDR in equine kidney, but not in sheep and dogs. The CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 mRNAs showed a different renal expression pattern and correlation in horses compared with sheep and dogs. Given the high urinary calcium concentration and low serum 1,25(OH)2D concentration in horses, it could be expected that CYP27B1 expression would be lower than CYP24A1 in the horse, and this did not appear to be the case. The findings suggest that despite low serum vitamin D concentrations, vitamin D still plays a significant role in calcium metabolism in horses, especially given the strong correlations between VDR and vitamin D responsive transcripts in these animals. PMID:27632366

  12. The MDCK epithelial cell line expresses a cell surface antigen of the kidney distal tubule

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line to identify epithelial cell surface macromolecules involved in renal function. Lymphocyte hybrids were generated by fusing P3U-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from a C3H mouse immunized with MDCK cells. Hybridomas secreting anti-MDCK antibodies were obtained and clonal lines isolated in soft agarose. We are reporting on one hybridoma line that secretes a monoclonal antibody that binds to MDCK cells at levels 20-fold greater than background binding. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was utilized to study the distribution of antibody binding on MDCK cells and on frozen sections of dog kidney and several nonrenal tissues. In the kidney the fluorescence staining pattern demonstrates that the antibody recognizes an antigenic determinant that is expressed only on the epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loops and the distal convoluted tubule and appears to be localized on the basolateral plasma membrane. This antigen also has a unique distribution in non-renal tissues and can only be detected on cells known to be active in transepithelial ion movements. These results indicate the probable distal tubule origin of MDCK and suggest that the monoclonal antibody recognizes a cell surface antigen involved in physiological functions unique to the kidney distal tubule and transporting epithelia of nonrenal tissues. PMID:6178742

  13. Generating kidney tissue from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Little, MH

    2016-01-01

    With the isolation of human pluripotent stem cells came the possibility of generating specific cell types for regenerative medicine. This has required the development of protocols for directed differentiation into many distinct cell types. One of the more complicated tissue types to recreate is the kidney. Here we review recent progress towards the recreation of not only specific kidney cell types but complex kidney organoids, models of the developing human organ, in vitro. We will also discuss potential short and long term applications of these approaches. PMID:27551541

  14. The oncolytic effects of reovirus in canine solid tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    IGASE, Masaya; HWANG, Chung Chew; COFFEY, Matt; OKUDA, Masaru; NOGUCHI, Shunsuke; MIZUNO, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a new strategy for cancer treatment for humans and dogs. Reovirus has been proven to be a potent oncolytic virus in human medicine. Our laboratory has previously reported that canine mast cell tumor and canine lymphoma were susceptible to reovirus. In this study, canine solid tumor cell lines (mammary gland tumor, osteosarcoma and malignant melanoma) were tested to determine their susceptibility towards reovirus. We demonstrated that reovirus induces more than 50% cell death in three canine mammary gland tumors and one canine malignant melanoma cell line. The reovirus-induced cell death occurred via the activation of caspase 3. Ras activation has been shown to be one of the important mechanisms of reovirus-susceptibility in human cancers. However, Ras activation was not related to the reovirus-susceptibility in canine solid tumor cell lines, which was similar to reports in canine mast cell tumor and canine lymphoma. The results of this study highly suggest that canine mammary gland tumor and canine malignant melanoma are also potential candidates for reovirus therapy in veterinary oncology. PMID:25648933

  15. Mast cells in canine cutaneous hemangioma, hemangiosarcoma and mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Woldemeskel, Moges; Rajeev, Sreekumari

    2010-02-01

    Mast cell count (MCC) in 45 dogs with cutaneous hemangioma (HA, n = 12), hemangiosarcoma (HSA, n = 12), mammary adenoma (AD, n = 9) and mammary adenocarcinoma (AC, n = 12) was made using Toluidine blue stained sections. Antibodies against endothelial cell markers, Factor VIII and VEGF were used to visualize and determine the hot spot micro-vessel density (MVD). Total MCC and MCC along the invasive edges were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in canine mammary AC than in AD. The total MCC did not significantly differ (p > 0.05), in HSAs (8.6 +/- 3.3) than in HAs (5.5 +/- 2.8). There is a positive correlation (r = 0.14) between the hot spot MCC and MVD in mammary AC, although not significant (p = 0.3172), indicating that mast cells are associated with angiogenesis in canine mammary AC. This study suggests that mast cells may play an important role in neovascularization of canine cutaneous vascular and mammary neoplasms. Detailed studies encompassing correlation of MCC and MVD with clinical outcomes and prognosis in these neoplasms are recommended.

  16. Quantitative immunoferritin localization of [Na+,K+]ATPase on canine hepatocyte cell surface

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Distribution of [Na+,K+]ATPase on the cell surface of canine hepatocytes was investigated quantitatively by incubating prefixed and dissociated liver cells with ferritin antibody conjugates against canine kidney holo[Na+,K+]ATPase. We found that [Na+,K+]-ATPase exists bilaterally both on the bile canalicular and sinusoid-lateral surfaces. The particle density on the bile canalicular surface was much higher (approximately 2.5 times) than that on the sinusoid-lateral surface. In the latter region, the enzyme was detected almost equally both on the sinusoidal and lateral surfaces. On all the surfaces, the distribution of the enzyme was homogeneous and no clustering of the enzyme was detected. Total number of the enzyme on the sinusoid-lateral surface was, however, approximately three times higher than that on the bile canalicular region, because the sinusoid-lateral surface represents approximately 87% of the total cell surface of a hepatocyte. We suggest that the [Na+, K+]ATPase on the bile canalicular surface is responsible for the bile acid-independent bile flow and the other transport processes on the bile canalicular cell surface, while that on the sinusoid-lateral surface is responsible not only for the active transport of Na+ but also for the secondary active transport of various substances in this region. PMID:6090472

  17. VAMP7 Modulates Ciliary Biogenesis in Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Szalinski, Christina M.; Labilloy, Anatália; Bruns, Jennifer R.; Weisz, Ora A.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells elaborate specialized domains that have distinct protein and lipid compositions, including the apical and basolateral surfaces and primary cilia. Maintaining the identity of these domains is required for proper cell function, and requires the efficient and selective SNARE-mediated fusion of vesicles containing newly synthesized and recycling proteins with the proper target membrane. Multiple pathways exist to deliver newly synthesized proteins to the apical surface of kidney cells, and the post-Golgi SNAREs, or VAMPs, involved in these distinct pathways have not been identified. VAMP7 has been implicated in apical protein delivery in other cell types, and we hypothesized that this SNARE would have differential effects on the trafficking of apical proteins known to take distinct routes to the apical surface in kidney cells. VAMP7 expressed in polarized Madin Darby canine kidney cells colocalized primarily with LAMP2-positive compartments, and siRNA-mediated knockdown modulated lysosome size, consistent with the known function of VAMP7 in lysosomal delivery. Surprisingly, VAMP7 knockdown had no effect on apical delivery of numerous cargoes tested, but did decrease the length and frequency of primary cilia. Additionally, VAMP7 knockdown disrupted cystogenesis in cells grown in a three-dimensional basement membrane matrix. The effects of VAMP7 depletion on ciliogenesis and cystogenesis are not directly linked to the disruption of lysosomal function, as cilia lengths and cyst morphology were unaffected in an MDCK lysosomal storage disorder model. Together, our data suggest that VAMP7 plays an essential role in ciliogenesis and lumen formation. To our knowledge, this is the first study implicating an R-SNARE in ciliogenesis and cystogenesis. PMID:24466086

  18. Electrogene therapy with interleukin-12 in canine mast cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pavlin, Darja; Cemazar, Maja; Cör, Andrej; Sersa, Gregor; Pogacnik, Azra; Tozon, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Background Mast cell tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant cutaneous tumors in dogs with extremely variable biological behaviour. Different treatment approaches can be used in canine cutaneous MCT, with surgical excision being the treatment of choice. In this study, electrogene therapy (EGT) as a new therapeutic approach to canine MCTs, was established. Materials and methods. Eight dogs with a total of eleven cutaneous MCTs were treated with intratumoral EGT using DNA plasmid encoding human interleukin-12 (IL-12). The local response to the therapy was evaluated by repeated measurements of tumor size and histological examination of treated tumors. A possible systemic response was assessed by determination of IL-12 and interferon- γ (IFN-γ) in patients’ sera. The occurence of side effects was monitored with weekly clinical examinations of treated animals and by performing basic bloodwork, consisting of the complete bloodcount and determination of selected biochemistry parameters. Results Intratumoral EGT with IL-12 elicits significant reduction of treated tumors’ size, ranging from 13% to 83% (median 50%) of the initial tumor volume. Additionally, a change in the histological structure of treated nodules was seen. There was a reduction in number of malignant mast cells and inflammatory cell infiltration of treated tumors. Systemic release of IL-12 in four patients was detected, without any noticeable local or systemic side effects. Conclusions These data suggest that intratumoral EGT with plasmid encoding IL-12 may be useful in the treatment of canine MCTs, exerting a local antitumor effect. PMID:22933932

  19. Planar cell polarity of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Ulrike; Carroll, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) or tissue polarity refers to the polarization of tissues perpendicular to the apical-basal axis. Most epithelia, including the vertebrate kidney, show signs of planar polarity. In the kidney, defects in planar polarity are attributed to several disease states including multiple forms of cystic kidney disease. Indeed, planar cell polarity has been shown to be essential for several cellular processes that appear to be necessary for establishing and maintaining tubule diameter. However, uncovering the genetic mechanisms underlying PCP in the kidney has been complicated as the roles of many of the main players are not conserved in flies and vice versa. Here, we review a number of cellular and molecular processes that can affect PCP of the kidney with a particular emphasis on the mechanisms that do not appear to be conserved in flies or that are not part of canonical determinants.

  20. Immunohistochemical characterization of 13 canine renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gil da Costa, R M; Oliveira, J P; Saraiva, A L; Seixas, F; Faria, F; Gärtner, F; Pires, M A; Lopes, C

    2011-03-01

    Canine renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are uncommon aggressive tumors that occur mainly in middle-aged male dogs. Their histologic classification bears no relationship with prognosis, and little information is available concerning their immunohistochemical properties. In this retrospective study, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 13 canine RCCs were retrieved from the archives, classified histologically, and evaluated immunohistochemically. The dogs were 7 males and 6 females (1 spayed) of 10 different breeds, averaging 8 years in age. The tumors were classified as papillary, tubulopapillary, papillary-cystic, solid, or sarcomatoid. All 13 tumors were immunohistochemically positive for uromodulin, 12 for c-KIT, 11 for vimentin, 9 for wide-spectrum-screening cytokeratins, 7 for cytokeratins AE1/AE3 and carcinoembryonic antigen, 4 for cytokeratins CAM 5.2, and 3 for CD10. All 3 solid RCCs expressed vimentin, c-KIT, and carcinoembryonic antigen and were negative for cytokeratins. All 7 papillary and tubulopapillary tumors expressed vimentin; 6 (86%), cytokeratins; and 6 (86%), c-KIT. Both papillary-cystic RCCs were positive for cytokeratins and c-KIT and negative for vimentin. These results indicate that the different histologic types of RCC have characteristic immunohistochemical profiles and that c-KIT may be involved in the pathogenesis of canine RCC.

  1. Directed Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells to Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Albert Q.; Freedman, Benjamin S.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regenerative medicine affords a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease. Nephron progenitor cell populations exist only during embryonic kidney development. Understanding the mechanisms by which these populations arise and differentiate is integral to the challenge of generating new nephrons for therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from adults, have the potential to generate functional kidney cells and tissue. Studies in mouse and human PSCs have identified specific approaches to the addition of growth factors, including Wnt and fibroblast growth factor, that can induce PSC differentiation into cells with phenotypic characteristics of nephron progenitor populations with the capacity to form kidney-like structures. Although significant progress has been made, further studies are necessary to confirm the production of functional kidney cells and to promote their three-dimensional organization into bona fide kidney tissue. Human PSCs have been generated from patients with kidney diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Wilms tumor, and may be used to better understand phenotypic consequences of naturally occurring genetic mutations and to conduct “clinical trials in a dish”. The capability to generate human kidney cells from PSCs has significant translational applications, including the bioengineering of functional kidney tissue, use in drug development to test compounds for efficacy and toxicity, and in vitro disease modeling. PMID:25217273

  2. Directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Lam, Albert Q; Freedman, Benjamin S; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2014-07-01

    Regenerative medicine affords a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease. Nephron progenitor cell populations exist only during embryonic kidney development. Understanding the mechanisms by which these populations arise and differentiate is integral to the challenge of generating new nephrons for therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from adults, have the potential to generate functional kidney cells and tissue. Studies in mouse and human PSCs have identified specific approaches to the addition of growth factors, including Wnt and fibroblast growth factor, that can induce PSC differentiation into cells with phenotypic characteristics of nephron progenitor populations with the capacity to form kidney-like structures. Although significant progress has been made, further studies are necessary to confirm the production of functional kidney cells and to promote their three-dimensional organization into bona fide kidney tissue. Human PSCs have been generated from patients with kidney diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Wilms tumor, and may be used to better understand phenotypic consequences of naturally occurring genetic mutations and to conduct "clinical trials in a dish". The capability to generate human kidney cells from PSCs has significant translational applications, including the bioengineering of functional kidney tissue, use in drug development to test compounds for efficacy and toxicity, and in vitro disease modeling.

  3. Minor histocompatibility antigens on canine hemopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Martin; Lange, Claudia; Günther, Wolfgang; Franz, Monika; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kolb, Hans-Jochem

    2003-06-15

    Adoptive immunotherapy with CTL against minor histocompatibility Ags (mHA) provides a promising way to treat leukemia relapse in allogeneic chimeras. Here we describe the in vitro generation of CTL against mHA in the dog. We tested their inhibitory effect on the growth of hemopoietic progenitor cells stimulated by hemopoietic growth factors in a 4-day suspension culture. CTL were produced by coculture of donor PBMC with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs). These DCs were characterized by morphology, high expression of MHC class II and CD1a, and the absence of the monocyte-specific marker CD14. Characteristically these cells stimulated allogeneic lymphocytes (MLR) and, after pulsing with a foreign Ag (keyhole limpet hemocyanin), autologous T cells. CTL were generated either ex vivo by coculture with DCs of DLA-identical littermates or in vivo by immunization of the responder with DCs obtained from a DLA-identical littermate. In suspension culture assays the growth of hemopoietic progenitor cells was inhibited in 53% of DLA-identical littermate combinations. In canine families mHA segregated with DLA as restriction elements. One-way reactivity against mHA was found in five littermate combinations. In two cases mHA might be Y chromosome associated, in three cases autosomally inherited alleles were detected. We conclude that CTL can be produced in vitro and in vivo against mHA on canine hemopoietic progenitor cells using bone marrow-derived DCs. PMID:12794111

  4. Antiproliferative effect of α-mangostin on canine osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Krajarng, Aungkana; Nilwarankoon, Sirinun; Suksamrarn, Sunit; Watanapokasin, Ramida

    2012-10-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequently diagnosed primary bone tumor in dog. Since chemotherapeutics are quite limited due to high cost and severe toxicity, therefore, the ultimate goal is to discover cost-effective therapeutics with less toxicity. We have studied the effect of α-mangostin, a xanthone derivative isolated from pericarp of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn.) in canine osteosarcoma, D-17 cells. The results showed that α-mangostin induced antiproliferation with IC(50) at 15 μg/ml. Hoechst 33342 nuclear staining and nucleosomal DNA-gel electrophoresis revealed that α-mangostin could induce nuclear condensation and fragmentation, typically seen in apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that α-mangostin induced sub-G1 peak. In addition, α-mangostin also induced membrane flipping of the phosphatidylserine and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in D-17 cells. In conclusion, α-mangostin, induced apoptotic cell death against canine osteosarcoma D-17 cells, could be a potential candidate for preventive and therapeutic application for bone cancer treatment in dogs.

  5. Growth profiles of recent canine distemper isolates on Vero cells expressing canine signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM).

    PubMed

    Lan, N T; Yamaguchi, R; Uchida, K; Sugano, S; Tateyama, S

    2005-07-01

    Fresh samples of lymph node, lung and cerebrum taken post mortem from dogs no. 1, 2 and 3 yielded canine distemper virus (CDV) strains 007 Lm, 009 L and 011 C, respectively. These were titrated on Vero cells stably expressing canine signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM; Vero-DST cells). Growth curves of the three strains were produced by titration of the released virus and cell-associated virus at various timepoints. All three isolates, especially 007 Lm, grew well on Vero-DST cells. The titres of cell-associated virus of two strains (009 L and 011 C) were clearly lower than those of virus released into the culture supernate. The results indicate that Vero-DST cells are not only useful for primary isolation but also efficient for titrating virus from fresh tissues and for the study of growth profiles of recent CDV isolates.

  6. Natural history of intrahepatic canine islet cell autografts.

    PubMed Central

    Alejandro, R; Cutfield, R G; Shienvold, F L; Polonsky, K S; Noel, J; Olson, L; Dillberger, J; Miller, J; Mintz, D H

    1986-01-01

    We have serially followed the function of intrahepatic canine islet autografts in 15 beagle dogs for up to 24 mo. Of these, only 20% sustained normal levels of fasting blood glucose for greater than 15 mo posttransplant. Failure of autograft function was accompanied by a preferential loss of well-granulated beta cells in the engrafted islets. The chronic stimulation of an initially marginal intrahepatic beta-cell mass ultimately resulted in metabolic deterioration and loss of beta cells below the minimal threshold required to maintain normal fasting blood glucose levels. It is possible that transplantation of a larger mass of islets would result in indefinite graft function in dogs. However, it remains to be demonstrated in larger mammals, including humans, whether an islet cell mass that is initially adequate in a heterotropic site such as the liver can remain functionally competent over a prolonged period. Images PMID:3095376

  7. Canine cutaneous epitheliotropic lymphoma (mycosis fungoides) is a proliferative disorder of CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P. F.; Olivry, T.; Naydan, D.

    1994-01-01

    Canine epitheliotropic lymphoma (mycosis fungoides [MF]) is a spontaneous neoplasm of skin and mucous membranes that occurs in old dogs (mean age 11 years) and has no breed predilection. The lesions evolve from a patch-plaque stage with prominent epitheliotropism into a tumor stage in which distant metastasis is observed. Unlike human MF, epitheliotropism of the lymphoid infiltrate is still prominent in tumor stage lesions. Tropism of the lymphoid infiltrate for adnexal structures, especially hair follicles and apocrine sweat glands, was marked in all clinical stages of canine MF. Twenty-three cases of MF were subjected to extensive immunophenotypic analysis in which reagents specific for canine leukocyte antigens and fresh frozen tissue sections of the canine lesions were used. Canine MF proved to be a T cell lymphoma in which the epitheliotropic lymphocytes consistently expressed CD3 (22 cases) and CD8 (19 cases); CD3+CD4-CD8- lymphocytes predominated in the remaining 4 cases. In this regard, canine MF clearly differed from human MF in which a CD4 immunophenotype predominates in the T cell infiltrate. Lack of expression of CD45RA by epitheliotropic T cells and intense expression of a beta 1 integrin (VLA-4-like) suggested that T cells in canine MF belonged to the memory subpopulation, as has been suggested for T cells in human MF. Pan-T cell antigen loss or discordant expression also proved useful as phenotypic indicators of neoplasia in canine MF. Loss of CD5 was observed in epitheliotropic T cells in 63% of cases. Discordance of neoplastic T cell Thy-1 expression was frequently observed between epithelial and dermal or submucosal compartments. We conclude that canine MF still represents a useful spontaneous animal disease model of human cutaneous T cell lymphoma, despite the immunophenotypic differences, which may reflect operational differences between human and canine skin-associated lymphoid tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure

  8. Four cases of cell cannibalism in highly malignant feline and canine tumors.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Fernando Costa; Soares, Maria João; Carvalho, Sandra; Borralho, Liliana; Vicente, Gonçalo; Branco, Sandra; Correia, Jorge; Peleteiro, Maria Conceição

    2015-01-01

    Four cases of tumors in which cell internalization was frequently visualized are reported: one feline mammary carcinoma, one feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, one canine pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma and one canine pleural mesothelioma. Cell internalization was observed by cytology in two of these cases (the feline mammary tumour and the pleural effusion in the canine mesothelioma) and by histopathology in all but the canine mesothelioma. Immunohistochemical staining for pancytokeratin was positive for both internalized and host cells, while E-cadherin expression was frequently absent, although internalized cells occasionally stained positive. This cell-to-cell interaction seems to be associated with tumors displaying a strong epithelial-mesenchymal transitional phenotype, in which cancer cells become engulfed by other cancer cells. Such event could be regarded as an important hallmark of very high malignancy. PMID:26525147

  9. What Is Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Carcinoma)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about kidney cancer? What is kidney cancer? Kidney cancer is a cancer that starts ... and spread, see What Is Cancer? About the kidneys To understand more about kidney cancer, it helps ...

  10. Extreme Beta-Cell Deficiency in Pancreata of Dogs with Canine Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Emily J.; Lam, Carol J.; Cox, Aaron R.; Rankin, Matthew M.; Van Winkle, Thomas J.; Hess, Rebecka S.; Kushner, Jake A.

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of canine diabetes remains poorly understood, in part due to enigmatic clinical features and the lack of detailed histopathology studies. Canine diabetes, similar to human type 1 diabetes, is frequently associated with diabetic ketoacidosis at onset or after insulin omission. However, notable differences exist. Whereas human type 1 diabetes often occurs in children, canine diabetes is typically described in middle age to elderly dogs. Many competing theories have been proposed regarding the underlying cause of canine diabetes, from pancreatic atrophy to chronic pancreatitis to autoimmune mediated β-cell destruction. It remains unclear to what extent β-cell loss contributes to canine diabetes, as precise quantifications of islet morphometry have not been performed. We used high-throughput microscopy and automated image processing to characterize islet histology in a large collection of pancreata of diabetic dogs. Diabetic pancreata displayed a profound reduction in β-cells and islet endocrine cells. Unlike humans, canine non-diabetic islets are largely comprised of β-cells. Very few β-cells remained in islets of diabetic dogs, even in pancreata from new onset cases. Similarly, total islet endocrine cell number was sharply reduced in diabetic dogs. No compensatory proliferation or lymphocyte infiltration was detected. The majority of pancreata had no evidence of pancreatitis. Thus, canine diabetes is associated with extreme β-cell deficiency in both new and longstanding disease. The β-cell predominant composition of canine islets and the near-total absence of β-cells in new onset elderly diabetic dogs strongly implies that similar to human type 1 diabetes, β-cell loss underlies the pathophysiology of canine diabetes. PMID:26057531

  11. Investigation of the cytotoxic effect of flavopiridol in canine lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ema, Y; Igase, M; Takeda, Y; Yanase, T; Umeki, S; Hiraoka, H; Okuda, M; Mizuno, T

    2016-08-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, flavopiridol, was tested as a potential new cancer therapeutic agent to treat canine lymphoma by examining its effect on cell growth of canine lymphoma cell lines in vitro. Flavopiridol induced profound cell death in all eight lymphoma cell lines at 400 nM, and in all cases cell death was due to apoptosis. Apoptosis was inhibited by caspase inhibitor, despite the variable sensitivities between cell lines. Analysis of the mechanism of flavopiridol-induced apoptosis showed that Rb phosphorylation was inhibited, possibly due to CDK4 or CDK6 inhibition. There was also decreased expression of Rb protein and anti-apoptotic proteins, Mcl-1 and XIAP, possibly through transcriptional regulation by inhibition of CDK7 or CDK9 activation. Canine lymphoma cell line-xenotransplanted mice were then treated with flavopiridol and profound tumour shrinkage was observed. This study describes a new therapeutic approach using flavopiridol for canine lymphoma treatment. PMID:25623777

  12. Canine osteosarcoma cell lines contain stem-like cancer cells: biological and pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Monica; Wurth, Roberto; Vito, Guendalina; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Thellung, Stefano; Maniscalco, Lorella; De Maria, Raffaella; Villa, Valentina; Corsaro, Alessandro; Nizzari, Mario; Bajetto, Adriana; Ratto, Alessandra; Ferrari, Angelo; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of cells responsible for tumor formation and progression, drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasization. CSCs have been identified in many human tumors including osteosarcoma (OSA). CSC distinctive properties are the expression of stem cell markers, sustained growth, self-renewal and tumorigenicity. Here we report the isolation of stem-like cells from two canine OSA cultures, characterized by self-renewal, evaluated by sphere formation ability, differential marker expression, and in vitro proliferation when cultured in a medium containing EGF and bFGF. Current therapies for OSA increased survival time, but prognosis remains poor, due to the development of drug resistance and metastases. Chemotherapy shrinks the tumor mass but CSCs remain unaffected, leading to tumor recurrence. Metformin, a drug for type 2 diabetes, has been shown to possess antitumor properties affecting CSC survival in different human and animal cancers. Here we show that metformin has a significant antiproliferative effect on canine OSA stem-like cells, validating this in vitro model for further pre-clinical drug evaluations. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining CSC-enriched cultures from primary canine OSA cells as a promising model for biological and pharmacological studies of canine and human OSAs.

  13. Canine osteosarcoma cell lines contain stem-like cancer cells: biological and pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Monica; Wurth, Roberto; Vito, Guendalina; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Thellung, Stefano; Maniscalco, Lorella; De Maria, Raffaella; Villa, Valentina; Corsaro, Alessandro; Nizzari, Mario; Bajetto, Adriana; Ratto, Alessandra; Ferrari, Angelo; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of cells responsible for tumor formation and progression, drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasization. CSCs have been identified in many human tumors including osteosarcoma (OSA). CSC distinctive properties are the expression of stem cell markers, sustained growth, self-renewal and tumorigenicity. Here we report the isolation of stem-like cells from two canine OSA cultures, characterized by self-renewal, evaluated by sphere formation ability, differential marker expression, and in vitro proliferation when cultured in a medium containing EGF and bFGF. Current therapies for OSA increased survival time, but prognosis remains poor, due to the development of drug resistance and metastases. Chemotherapy shrinks the tumor mass but CSCs remain unaffected, leading to tumor recurrence. Metformin, a drug for type 2 diabetes, has been shown to possess antitumor properties affecting CSC survival in different human and animal cancers. Here we show that metformin has a significant antiproliferative effect on canine OSA stem-like cells, validating this in vitro model for further pre-clinical drug evaluations. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining CSC-enriched cultures from primary canine OSA cells as a promising model for biological and pharmacological studies of canine and human OSAs. PMID:27506084

  14. KRAS Mutations in Canine and Feline Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Crozier, C; Wood, G A; Foster, R A; Stasi, S; Liu, J H W; Bartlett, J M S; Coomber, B L; Sabine, V S

    2016-07-01

    Companion animals may serve as valuable models for studying human cancers. Although KRAS is the most commonly mutated gene in human ductal pancreatic cancers (57%), with mutations frequently occurring at codons 12, 13 and 61, human pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) lack activating KRAS mutations. In the present study, 32 pancreatic ACC samples obtained from 14 dogs and 18 cats, including seven metastases, were analyzed for six common activating KRAS mutations located in codons 12 (n = 5) and 13 (n = 1) using Sequenom MassARRAY. No KRAS mutations were found, suggesting that, similar to human pancreatic ACC, KRAS mutations do not play a critical role in feline or canine pancreatic ACC. Due to the similarity of the clinical disease in dogs and cats to that of man, this study confirms that companion animals offer potential as a suitable model for investigating this rare subtype of pancreatic carcinoma.

  15. Profiling of Host Cell Response to Successive Canine Parvovirus Infection Based on Kinetic Proteomic Change Identification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hang; Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Yi, Li; Sun, Yaru; Ren, Jingqiang; Tong, Mingwei; Cao, Zhigang; Li, Jiawei; Deng, Jinliang; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) reproduces by co-opting the resources of host cells, inevitably causing cytotoxic effects to the host cells. Feline kidney F81 cells are sensitive to CPV infection and show disparate growing statuses at different time points post-infection. This study analysed the response of F81 cells to CPV infection at successive infection time points by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) during 60 h of infection and at selected time points post-infection were identified by an analysis of variance test and a two-tailed unpaired t test, respectively. DEPs with similar quantitative changes were clustered by hierarchical clustering and analysed by gene ontology enrichment, revealing that 12 h and 60 h post-infection were the optimal times to analyse the autonomous parvovirus replication and apoptosis processes, respectively. Using the Metacore(TM) database, 29 DEPs were enriched in a network involved in p53 regulation. Besides, a significantly enriched pathway suggests that the CPV-induced cytopathic effect was probably due to the deficiency of functional CFTR caused by CPV infection. This study uncovered the systemic changes in key cellular factors involved in CPV infection and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of CPV and the cytopathic effects induced by CPV infection. PMID:27406444

  16. Profiling of Host Cell Response to Successive Canine Parvovirus Infection Based on Kinetic Proteomic Change Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hang; Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Yi, Li; Sun, Yaru; Ren, Jingqiang; Tong, Mingwei; Cao, Zhigang; Li, Jiawei; Deng, Jinliang; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) reproduces by co-opting the resources of host cells, inevitably causing cytotoxic effects to the host cells. Feline kidney F81 cells are sensitive to CPV infection and show disparate growing statuses at different time points post-infection. This study analysed the response of F81 cells to CPV infection at successive infection time points by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) during 60 h of infection and at selected time points post-infection were identified by an analysis of variance test and a two-tailed unpaired t test, respectively. DEPs with similar quantitative changes were clustered by hierarchical clustering and analysed by gene ontology enrichment, revealing that 12 h and 60 h post-infection were the optimal times to analyse the autonomous parvovirus replication and apoptosis processes, respectively. Using the MetacoreTM database, 29 DEPs were enriched in a network involved in p53 regulation. Besides, a significantly enriched pathway suggests that the CPV-induced cytopathic effect was probably due to the deficiency of functional CFTR caused by CPV infection. This study uncovered the systemic changes in key cellular factors involved in CPV infection and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of CPV and the cytopathic effects induced by CPV infection. PMID:27406444

  17. Profiling of Host Cell Response to Successive Canine Parvovirus Infection Based on Kinetic Proteomic Change Identification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hang; Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Yi, Li; Sun, Yaru; Ren, Jingqiang; Tong, Mingwei; Cao, Zhigang; Li, Jiawei; Deng, Jinliang; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) reproduces by co-opting the resources of host cells, inevitably causing cytotoxic effects to the host cells. Feline kidney F81 cells are sensitive to CPV infection and show disparate growing statuses at different time points post-infection. This study analysed the response of F81 cells to CPV infection at successive infection time points by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) during 60 h of infection and at selected time points post-infection were identified by an analysis of variance test and a two-tailed unpaired t test, respectively. DEPs with similar quantitative changes were clustered by hierarchical clustering and analysed by gene ontology enrichment, revealing that 12 h and 60 h post-infection were the optimal times to analyse the autonomous parvovirus replication and apoptosis processes, respectively. Using the Metacore(TM) database, 29 DEPs were enriched in a network involved in p53 regulation. Besides, a significantly enriched pathway suggests that the CPV-induced cytopathic effect was probably due to the deficiency of functional CFTR caused by CPV infection. This study uncovered the systemic changes in key cellular factors involved in CPV infection and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of CPV and the cytopathic effects induced by CPV infection.

  18. Gene expression alterations during HGF-induced dedifferentiation of a renal tubular epithelial cell line (MDCK) using a novel canine DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Balkovetz, Daniel F; Gerrard, Edward R; Li, Shixiong; Johnson, David; Lee, James; Tobias, John W; Rogers, Katherine K; Snyder, Richard W; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2004-04-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) elicits a broad spectrum of biological activities, including epithelial cell dedifferentiation. One of the most widely used and best-studied polarized epithelial cell lines is the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line. Here, we describe and validate the early response of polarized monolayers of MDCK cells stimulated with recombinant HGF using a novel canine DNA microarray designed to query 12,473 gene sequences. In our survey, eight genes previously implicated in the HGF signaling pathway were differentially regulated, demonstrating that the system was responsive to HGF. Also identified were 117 genes not previously known to be involved in the HGF pathway. The results were confirmed by real-time PCR or Western blot analysis for 38 genes. Of particular interest were the large number of differentially regulated genes encoding small GTPases, proteins involved in endoplasmic reticulum translation, proteins involved in the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix, and the hematopoietic and prostaglandin systems.

  19. Identification of a candidate therapeutic antibody for treatment of canine B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rue, Sarah M; Eckelman, Brendan P; Efe, Jem A; Bloink, Kristin; Deveraux, Quinn L; Lowery, David; Nasoff, Marc

    2015-04-15

    B-cell lymphoma is one of the most frequently observed non-cutaneous neoplasms in dogs. For both human and canine BCL, the standard of care treatment typically involves a combination chemotherapy, e.g. "CHOP" therapy. Treatment for human lymphoma greatly benefited from the addition of anti-CD20 targeted biological therapeutics to these chemotherapy protocols; this type of therapeutic has not been available to the veterinary oncologist. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a rituximab-like anti-CD20 antibody intended as a candidate treatment for canine B-cell lymphoma. A panel of anti-canine CD20 monoclonal antibodies was generated using a mouse hybridoma approach. Mouse monoclonal antibody 1E4 was selected for construction of a canine chimeric molecule based on its rank ordering in a flow cytometry-based affinity assay. 1E4 binds to approximately the same location in the extracellular domain of CD20 as rituximab, and 1E4-based chimeric antibodies co-stain canine B cells in flow cytometric analysis of canine leukocytes using an anti-canine CD21 antibody. We show that two of the four reported canine IgG subclasses (cIgGB and cIgGC) can bind to canine CD16a, a receptor involved in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Chimeric monoclonal antibodies were assembled using canine heavy chain constant regions that incorporated the appropriate effector function along with the mouse monoclonal 1E4 anti-canine CD20 variable regions, and expressed in CHO cells. We observed that 1E4-cIgGB and 1E4-cIgGC significantly deplete B-cell levels in healthy beagle dogs. The in vivo half-life of 1E4-cIgGB in a healthy dog was ∼14 days. The antibody 1E4-cIgGB has been selected for further testing and development as an agent for the treatment of canine B-cell lymphoma.

  20. Biosynthesis of somatostatin in canine fundic D cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, T; Park, J; Yamada, T

    1988-01-01

    The observation that virtually all of the somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the stomach consists of somatostatin-14 (S14), to the exclusion of somatostatin-28 (S28), suggests a unique pattern of prosomatostatin posttranslational processing. In order to examine the mechanisms by which S14 is produced from its precursor in the stomach, we investigated the biosynthesis of somatostatin in isolated canine fundic D cells. D cells pulse-labeled with [35S]cysteine revealed a cycloheximide inhibitable time-dependent incorporation of radioactivity into S14. A small fraction of radioactivity was incorporated into S28 but not into larger precursors. However, when the cells were incubated with monensin (1 microM), incorporation of radioactivity into a presumed somatostatin precursor was noted. Upon transfer of [35S]cysteine prelabeled cells to radioactivity-free medium, no conversion of S28 to S14 could be detected and the decrease of labeled S14 in cells correlated with a complimentary increase in the culture medium. Exogenous somatostatin inhibited somatostatin biosynthesis in a fashion that could be blocked by pertussis toxin pretreatment. Stimulation of prelabeled D cells with tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (10(-7) M) or forskolin (10(-4) M) for 2 h resulted in release of 41 and 33% of the newly synthesized radioactive S14, respectively, while only 9 and 6% of the total cell content of radioimmunoassayable somatostatin was secreted. These data suggest that: (a) somatostatin is synthesized in fundic D cells primarily as S14, (b) S14 is produced by rapid processing of a larger precursor but there is little, if any, conversion of S28 to S14, (c) somatostatin biosynthesis is autoregulated, and (d) newly synthesized S14 is preferentially released from D cells in response to stimulation. PMID:2892859

  1. Peripheral canine CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive T cells - unique amongst others.

    PubMed

    von Buttlar, Heiner; Bismarck, Doris; Alber, Gottfried

    2015-12-15

    T lymphocytes co-expressing CD4 and CD8 ("double-positive T cells") are commonly associated with a thymic developmental stage of T cells. Their first description in humans and pigs as extrathymic T cells with a memory phenotype almost 30 years ago came as a surprise. Meanwhile peripheral double-positive T cells have been described in a growing number of different species. In this review we highlight novel data from our very recent studies on canine peripheral double-positive T cells which point to unique features of double-positive T cells in the dog. In contrast to porcine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells forming a homogenous cellular population based on their expression of CD4 and CD8α, canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells can be divided into three different cellular subsets with distinct expression levels of CD4 and CD8α. Double-positive T cells expressing CD8β are present in humans and dogs but absent in swine. Moreover, canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells can not only develop from CD4(+) single-positive T cells but also from CD8(+) single-positive T cells. Together, this places canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells closer to their human than porcine counterparts since human double-positive T cells also appear to be heterogeneous in their CD4 and CD8α expression and have both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells as progenitor cells. However, CD4(+) single-positive T cells are the more potent progenitors for canine double-positive T cells, whereas CD8(+) single-positive T cells are more potent progenitors for human double-positive T cells. Canine double-positive T cells have an activated phenotype and may have as yet unrecognized roles in vivo in immunity to infection or in inflammatory diseases such as chronic infection, autoimmunity, allergy, or cancer.

  2. Human Urine as a Noninvasive Source of Kidney Cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Arcolino, Fanny; Tort Piella, Agnès; Papadimitriou, Elli; Bussolati, Benedetta; Antonie, Daniel J; Murray, Patricia; van den Heuvel, Lamberthus; Levtchenko, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Urine represents an unlimited source of patient-specific kidney cells that can be harvested noninvasively. Urine derived podocytes and proximal tubule cells have been used to study disease mechanisms and to screen for novel drug therapies in a variety of human kidney disorders. The urinary kidney stem/progenitor cells and extracellular vesicles, instead, might be promising for therapeutic treatments of kidney injury. The greatest advantages of urine as a source of viable cells are the easy collection and less complicated ethical issues. However, extensive characterization and in vivo studies still have to be performed before the clinical use of urine-derived kidney progenitors. PMID:26089913

  3. Human Urine as a Noninvasive Source of Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira Arcolino, Fanny; Tort Piella, Agnès; Papadimitriou, Elli; Bussolati, Benedetta; Antonie, Daniel J.; Murray, Patricia; van den Heuvel, Lamberthus; Levtchenko, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Urine represents an unlimited source of patient-specific kidney cells that can be harvested noninvasively. Urine derived podocytes and proximal tubule cells have been used to study disease mechanisms and to screen for novel drug therapies in a variety of human kidney disorders. The urinary kidney stem/progenitor cells and extracellular vesicles, instead, might be promising for therapeutic treatments of kidney injury. The greatest advantages of urine as a source of viable cells are the easy collection and less complicated ethical issues. However, extensive characterization and in vivo studies still have to be performed before the clinical use of urine-derived kidney progenitors. PMID:26089913

  4. CT-determined canine kidney and urine iodine concentration following intravenous administration of sodium diatrizoate, metrizamide, iopamidol, and sodium ioxaglate.

    PubMed

    Brennan, R E; Rapoport, S; Weinberg, I; Pollack, H M; Curtis, J A

    1982-01-01

    Following 24-hour fasting and fluid deprivation, sequential changes in CT numbers of the canine kidney were determined in 4 dogs, each of whom received, at intervals, IV sodium diatrizoate, metrizamide, iopamidol, and sodium ioxaglate at a dose of 500 mgI/kg body weight. The urinary bladder was catheterized for baseline determination of urine osmolality and, subsequently, urine volume and CT number, CT number of the bladder urine from 0 to 10 minutes and from 10 to 20 minutes post-injection was obtained by scanning known dilutions of urine in vitro. Peak renal cortical enhancement occurred within 2 minutes of bolus injection and was not dependent on the chemical make-up of the contrast agent. Peak medullary enhancement occurred within 3 minutes of bolus injection. Peak medulla CT number following sodium diatrizoate was significantly less than that following metrizamide (P less than 0.025) or iopamidol (P less than 0.01). Peak medulla CT number was significantly less following sodium diatrizoate (P less than 0.01), metrizamide (P less than 0.01) and iopamidol (P less than 0.05) than following sodium ioxaglate. Urine iodine concentrations followed a similar pattern, with significant differences as follows: sodium diatrizoate less than metrizamide = iopamidol less than sodium ioxaglate. It was concluded that the investigational agents metrizamide, iopamidol, and sodium ioxaglate have theoretical advantage for excretory urography. Differences in renal handling of these agents are detectable, with CT scanning as differences in renal medullary enhancement and urine iodine concentration.

  5. Mechanisms of kidney cell injury from metals.

    PubMed

    Fowler, B A

    1993-04-01

    The most environmentally abundant toxic metals/metalloids (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) are each known to produce cell injury in the kidney but the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are now being elucidated. It is clear that the nephrotoxicity of these agents is due, in part, to the fact that urinary elimination is a major route of excretion from the body. The role(s) of molecular factors such as metal-binding proteins, inclusion bodies, and cell-specific receptorlike proteins that appear to influence renal tubule cell expression, have attracted increased interest as determinants that modulate cell populations as special risk for toxicity and renal cancer. The future of mechanistic toxicology studies with regard to how and why only certain renal cell populations become targets for toxicity from these metals/metalloids and other less common inorganic nephrotoxicants must focus on the molecular handling of these agents by target cell populations.

  6. Detection of novel papillomaviruses in canine mucosal, cutaneous and in situ squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, N; Nespeca, G; Hauser, B; Ackermann, M; Favrot, C

    2005-10-01

    Papillomavirus (PV) DNA is frequently uncovered in samples of human skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). However, the role of these viruses in the development of such cancers in canine species remains controversial. While approximately 100 human PVs are known, only one single canine oral PV (COPV) has been identified and studied extensively. Therefore, we applied a narrow-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) suitable for the detection of classical canine and feline PVs, as well as a broad-range PCR, which has been used for the detection of various novel PVs in humans, in order to analyse 42 paraffin-embedded samples, representing three different forms of canine SCCs. Ten samples of skin tissues with various non-neoplastic conditions served as controls. While none of the negative controls reacted positively, PV DNA was discovered in 21% of the tested SCC samples. Interestingly, the classical COPV was amplified from only one sample, while the other positive cases were associated with a variety of thus far unknown PVs. This study suggests that a fraction of canine SCC is infected with PVs and that a genetic variety of canine PVs exists. Therefore, these results will facilitate the future study of the role of PVs in the development of canine skin cancers. PMID:16238808

  7. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Carol F.; Ratliff, Michelle L.; Powell, Rebecca; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  8. Characterization of foamy epithelial surface cells in the canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Bartel, C; Tichy, A; Walter, I

    2014-06-01

    In mature bitches, endometrial epithelial surface cells modify function and corresponding morphology during the oestrous cycle. During late metoestrous, endometrial epithelial surface cells frequently accumulate fat and thereby adopt a foamy morphology. This cyclic appearance of foamy endometrial epithelial cells (fEECs) seems to be physiological in the dog, whereas in other species, it indicates pathological changes. Function of these fEECs has not been identified until now. Therefore, the aim of the study was to characterize the fEECs by means of transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Different manifestations of fEECs were observed and analysed with regard to proliferative activity and presence of different epithelial adhesion molecules including PLEKHA7, β-catenin and E-cadherin. PLEKHA7 was restricted to the apical regions of the fEECs, whereas E-cadherin and β-catenin were demonstrated basolateral. The immunohistochemical detection of steroid hormone receptors demonstrated the responsiveness of the fEECs to steroid hormones. Intense progesterone receptor expression was observed in the fEECs indicating a high responsiveness to this hormone. Considering a potential function of the fEECs, we hypothesized that leptin, a hormone produced by other lipid-accumulating cells and described to be involved in reproduction, in particular during implantation, might also originate from the fEECs which was confirmed by immunohistochemical methods. Moreover, leptin receptor was found in fEECs indicating the fEECs as both, source and target for leptin. Therefore, we conclude that fEECs in the canine uterus have a potential role in early pregnancy events and that the different observed manifestations might simply reflect the variations of signs of pseudopregnancy among bitches.

  9. Tubular vimentin metaplasia in canine nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Vilafranca, M; Domingo, M; Ferrer, L

    1994-09-01

    The expression of the intermediate filament vimentin was examined immunocytochemically in 17 cases of histologically confirmed primary canine nephropathy, and compared with its expression in normal canine kidney. In normal renal tissue, the expression of vimentin was restricted to glomerular elements, but in all cases of chronic interstitial nephritis it extended to the cortical tubular epithelia, and was correlated with the degree of tubulo-interstitial damage. Three of four cases of renal cell carcinoma had vimentin reactivity in neoplastic cells. In only one case of familial renal disease was vimentin expressed in scattered epithelial cells of the cortical tubules.

  10. In vitro development of canine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in different culture media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; No, Jin-Gu; Choi, Mi-Kyung; Yeom, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Kyo; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Yoo, Jae Gyu; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Hong-Tea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of three different culture media on the development of canine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. Canine cloned embryos were cultured in modified synthetic oviductal fluid (mSOF), porcine zygote medium-3 (PZM-3), or G1/G2 sequential media. Our results showed that the G1/G2 media yielded significantly higher morula and blastocyst development in canine SCNT embryos (26.1% and 7.8%, respectively) compared to PZM-3 (8.5% and 0%or mSOF (2.3% and 0%) media. In conclusion, this study suggests that blastocysts can be produced more efficiently using G1/G2 media to culture canine SCNT embryos.

  11. Polycystin-1 and Gα12 regulate the cleavage of E-cadherin in kidney epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jen X.; Lu, Tzong-Shi; Li, Suyan; Wu, Yong; Ding, Lai; Denker, Bradley M.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of polycystin-1 (PC1) and Gα12 is important for development of kidney cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The integrity of cell polarity and cell-cell adhesions (mainly E-cadherin-mediated adherens junction) is altered in the renal epithelial cells of ADPKD. However, the key signaling pathway for this alteration is not fully understood. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells maintain the normal integrity of epithelial cell polarity and adherens junctions. Here, we found that deletion of Pkd1 increased activation of Gα12, which then promoted the cystogenesis of MDCK cells. The morphology of these cells was altered after the activation of Gα12. By using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found several proteins that could be related this change in the extracellular milieu. E-cadherin was one of the most abundant peptides after active Gα12 was induced. Gα12 activation or Pkd1 deletion increased the shedding of E-cadherin, which was mediated via increased ADAM10 activity. The increased shedding of E-cadherin was blocked by knockdown of ADAM10 or specific ADAM10 inhibitor GI254023X. Pkd1 deletion or Gα12 activation also changed the distribution of E-cadherin in kidney epithelial cells and caused β-catenin to shift from cell membrane to nucleus. Finally, ADAM10 inhibitor, GI254023X, blocked the cystogenesis induced by PC1 knockdown or Gα12 activation in renal epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate that the E-cadherin/β-catenin signaling pathway is regulated by PC1 and Gα12 via ADAM10. Specific inhibition of this pathway, especially ADAM10 activity, could be a novel therapeutic regimen for ADPKD. PMID:25492927

  12. Oxidative stress response in canine in vitro liver, kidney and intestinal models with seven potential dietary ingredients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoungju; Ortega, Maria T; Jeffery, Brett; Riviere, Jim E; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A

    2016-01-22

    In vitro cell culture systems are a useful tool to rapidly assess the potential safety or toxicity of chemical constituents of food. Here, we investigated oxidative stress and organ-specific antioxidant responses by 7 potential dietary ingredients using canine in vitro culture of hepatocytes, proximal tubule cells (CPTC), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) and enterocyte-like cells (ELC). Cellular production of free radical species by denatonium benzoate (DB), epigallocatechin gallate (EPI), eucalyptol (EUC), green tea catechin extract (GTE) and sodium copper chlorophyllin (SCC), tetrahydroisohumulone (TRA) as well as xylitol (XYL) were continuously measured for reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and superoxide (SO) for up to 24h. DB and TRA showed strong prooxidant activities in hepatocytes and to a lesser degree in ELC. DB was a weak prooxidant in BMSC. In contrast DB and TRA were antioxidants in CPTC. EPI was prooxidant in hepatocytes and BMSC but showed prooxidant and antioxidant activity in CPTC. SCC in hepatocytes (12.5mg/mL) and CPTC (0.78mg/mL) showed strong prooxidant and antioxidant activity in a concentration-dependent manner. GTE was effective antioxidant only in ELC. EUC and XYL did not induce ROS/RNS in all 4 cell types. SO production by EPI and TRA increased in hepatocytes but decreased by SCC in hepatocytes and ELC. These results suggest that organ-specific responses to oxidative stress by these potential prooxidant compounds may implicate a mechanism of their toxicities. PMID:26602166

  13. Oxidative stress response in canine in vitro liver, kidney and intestinal models with seven potential dietary ingredients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoungju; Ortega, Maria T; Jeffery, Brett; Riviere, Jim E; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A

    2016-01-22

    In vitro cell culture systems are a useful tool to rapidly assess the potential safety or toxicity of chemical constituents of food. Here, we investigated oxidative stress and organ-specific antioxidant responses by 7 potential dietary ingredients using canine in vitro culture of hepatocytes, proximal tubule cells (CPTC), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) and enterocyte-like cells (ELC). Cellular production of free radical species by denatonium benzoate (DB), epigallocatechin gallate (EPI), eucalyptol (EUC), green tea catechin extract (GTE) and sodium copper chlorophyllin (SCC), tetrahydroisohumulone (TRA) as well as xylitol (XYL) were continuously measured for reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and superoxide (SO) for up to 24h. DB and TRA showed strong prooxidant activities in hepatocytes and to a lesser degree in ELC. DB was a weak prooxidant in BMSC. In contrast DB and TRA were antioxidants in CPTC. EPI was prooxidant in hepatocytes and BMSC but showed prooxidant and antioxidant activity in CPTC. SCC in hepatocytes (12.5mg/mL) and CPTC (0.78mg/mL) showed strong prooxidant and antioxidant activity in a concentration-dependent manner. GTE was effective antioxidant only in ELC. EUC and XYL did not induce ROS/RNS in all 4 cell types. SO production by EPI and TRA increased in hepatocytes but decreased by SCC in hepatocytes and ELC. These results suggest that organ-specific responses to oxidative stress by these potential prooxidant compounds may implicate a mechanism of their toxicities.

  14. Intrarenal distributions and changes of Angiotensin-converting enzyme and Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in feline and canine chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Sawa, Mariko; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yamato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). ACE2 is a newly identified member of the RAS. The present immunohistochemical study focused on changes in intrarenal ACE and ACE2 immunoreactivity in feline and canine chronic kidney disease (CKD). ACE immunoreactivity was predominantly observed in the brush border of the proximal tubules in dogs and cats. ACE immunoreactivity was lower in CKD kidneys than in normal kidneys, and quantitative analysis demonstrated negative correlations between ACE and renal tissue damage in dogs. ACE2 immunoreactivity was also detected in the proximal tubules; it increased or decreased with CKD in dogs, depending on the renal region assessed. The changes in ACE and ACE2 in CKD were associated with the plasma creatinine concentration in dogs. Findings from dogs with glomerulonephritis were similar to those from dogs with non-glomerulonephritis. The present study suggests that changes in the intrarenal expression of ACE and ACE2 contribute to the pathological mechanisms of canine CKD, but not to the mechanisms of feline CKD. PMID:24004970

  15. Characterization of the novel indolylmaleimides' PDA-66 and PDA-377 effect on canine lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Laura C.; Roolf, Catrin; Pews-Davtyan, Anahit; Rütgen, Barbara C.; Hammer, Sabine; Willenbrock, Saskia; Sekora, Anett; Rolfs, Arndt; Beller, Matthias; Brenig, Bertram; Nolte, Ingo; Junghanss, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors are widely used in chemotherapeutic cancer regimens. Maleimide derivatives such as SB-216763 act as GSK-3 inhibitor targeting cell proliferation, cell death and cell cycle progression. Herein, the two arylindolylmaleimide derivatives PDA-66 and PDA-377 were evaluated as potential chemotherapeutic agents on canine B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Canine lymphoma represents a naturally occurring model closely resembling the human high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). PDA-66 showed more pronounced effects on both cell lines. Application of 2.5μM PDA-66 resulted in a significant induction of apoptosis (approx. 11 %), decrease of the metabolic activity (approx. 95 %), anti-proliferative effect (approx. 85 %) and cell death within 48h. Agent induced mode of action was characterized by whole transcriptome sequencing, 12 h and 24 h post-agent exposure. Key PDA-66-modulated pathways identified were cell cycle, DNA replication and p53 signaling. Expression analyses indicated that the drug acting mechanism is mediated through DNA replication and cycle arrest involving the spindle assembly checkpoint. In conclusion, both PDA derivatives displayed strong anti-proliferation activity in canine B-cell lymphoma cells. The cell and molecular PDA-induced effect characterization and the molecular characterization of the agent acting mechanism provides the basis for further evaluation of a potential drug for canine lymphoma serving as model for human NHL. PMID:27177088

  16. p16 Immunostaining of Canine Squamous Cell Carcinomas Is Not Associated with Papillomaviral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sabattini, Silvia; Savini, Federica; Gallina, Laura; Scagliarini, Alessandra; Bassi, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    While papillomavirus (PVs) are an established cause of human cancer, few reports have supported a relationship between PV and canine squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Human oncogenic PVs lead to an increased expression of the p16 tumor suppressor protein, and the latter can be demonstrated immunohistochemically to support a likely causal relationship between tumor and PV infection. In the present study, archive samples of canine SCC from different anatomical locations were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of PV DNA and by p16 immunohistochemistry. The aims were to investigate the relationship between p16 expression and presence of PV DNA, in order to assess the utility of p16 overexpression as a biomarker of PV infection in canine SCC. A total of 52 SCCs were included. Nine cases (17.3%) showed moderate p16 immunoreactivity, with no association with tumor degree of differentiation, histotype or mitotic activity. The canPVf/FAP64 primers amplified Canis familiaris PV-1 DNA from 3 out of 52 tumors (5.8%), one cutaneous, one oral and one tonsillar SCC. There was no association between PV presence and p16 immunostaining. These results do not support a significant role of PVs in the development of canine SCCs. Additionally, PV infection was apparently not the cause of the p16 immunostaining observed in a subset of canine SCCs. A better awareness of p16 level of expression and cellular function in canine cancer may help to define its diagnostic and prognostic role. PMID:27441555

  17. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Carol F.; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. PMID:26111446

  18. Increased release of norepinephrine and dopamine from canine kidney during bilateral carotid occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, T.; Hjemdahl, P.; DiBona, G.F.

    1987-02-01

    The renal overflow of norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) to plasma from the innervated kidney was studied at rest and during sympathetic nervous system activation by bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCO) in vagotomized dogs under barbiturate or barbiturate/nitrous oxide anesthesia. BCO elevated arterial pressure and the arterial plasma concentration of NE, DA, and epinephrine (Epi). Renal vascular resistance (renal arterial pressure kept constant) increased by 15 +/- 7% and the net renal venous outflows (renal veno-arterial concentration difference x renal plasma flow) of NE and DA were enhanced. To obtain more correct estimates of the renal contribution to the renal venous catecholamine outflow, they corrected for the renal extraction of arterial catecholamines, assessed as the extractions of (/sup 3/H)NE, (/sup 3/H)DA, or endogenous Epi. The (/sup 3/H)NE corrected renal NE overflow to plasma increased from 144 +/- 40 to 243 +/- 64 pmol-min/sup -1/ during BCO, which, when compared with a previous study of the (/sup 3/H)NE corrected renal NE overflow to plasma evoked by electrical renal nerve stimulation, corresponds to a 40% increase in nerve impulse frequency from approx. 0.6 Hz. If the renal catecholamine extraction was not taken into account the effect of BCO was underestimated. The renal DA overflow to plasma was about one-fifth of the NE overflow both at rest and during BCO, indicating that there was no preferential activation of noradrenergic or putative dopaminergic nerves by BCO.

  19. Stem cells: potential and challenges for kidney repair

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Marcela

    2013-01-01

    Renal damage resulting from acute and chronic kidney injury poses an important problem to public health. Currently, patients with end-stage renal disease rely solely on kidney transplantation or dialysis for survival. Emerging therapies aiming to prevent and reverse kidney damage are thus in urgent need. Although the kidney was initially thought to lack the capacity for self-repair, several studies have indicated that this might not be the case; progenitor and stem cells appear to play important roles in kidney repair under various pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the role of progenitor/stem cells on kidney repair as well as discuss their potential as a therapeutic approach for kidney diseases. PMID:24197069

  20. Evaluation of an additive solution for preservation of canine red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Wardrop, K J; Owen, T J; Meyers, K M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of an additive preservative solution on canine red blood cell posttransfusion viability (PTV) and on selected canine red blood cell biochemical parameters was studied. One unit (450 mL) of blood was collected from 6 clinically normal dogs into the anticoagulant citrate phosphate dextrose, centrifuged, and the plasma removed. The red blood cells were then suspended in 100 mL of a saline, adenine, dextrose, and mannitol solution and stored at 4 degrees C. Aliquots were removed for study at 1, 10, 20, 30, 37, and 44 days. The 24-hour PTV of autologous red blood cells was determined using a sodium chromate (51Cr) label. Red blood cell concentrations of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), and pH were also determined. Canine red blood cell PTV, pH, ATP, and 2,3-DPG concentrations decreased during storage (P < .05). The PTV decreased from 94% using day 1 red blood cells to 80% and 75% using day 37 and day 44 red blood cells, respectively (P < .05). Although the mean PTV of the day 44 stored units equaled the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) minimum standard for human red blood cells, the PTV was substandard in 75% of the day 44 units. The FDA standard was exceeded in 83% of the day 37 units. It was concluded that 37-day-old canine red blood cells preserved with a saline, adenine, dextrose, and mannitol solution are of acceptable quality for transfusion.

  1. Directed Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells into Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Morizane, Ryuji; Lam, Albert Q

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), represent an ideal substrate for regenerating kidney cells and tissue lost through injury and disease. Recent studies have demonstrated the ability to differentiate PSCs into populations of nephron progenitor cells that can organize into kidney epithelial structures in three-dimensional contexts. While these findings are highly encouraging, further studies need to be performed to improve the efficiency and specificity of kidney differentiation. The identification of specific markers of the differentiation process is critical to the development of protocols that effectively recapitulate nephrogenesis in vitro. In this review, we summarize the current studies describing the differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs into cells of the kidney lineage. We also present an analysis of the markers relevant to the stages of kidney development and differentiation and propose a new roadmap for the directed differentiation of PSCs into nephron progenitor cells of the metanephric mesenchyme. PMID:26417199

  2. Reliable and High Efficiency Extraction of Kidney Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Nistala, Ravi; Meuth, Alex; Smith, Cassandra; Annayya, Aroor

    2016-01-01

    Immune system activation occurs in multiple kidney diseases and pathophysiological processes. The immune system consists of both adaptive and innate components and multiple cell types. Sometimes, the cell type of interest is present in very low numbers among the large numbers of total cells isolated from the kidney. Hence, reliable and efficient isolation of kidney mononuclear cell populations is important in order to study the immunological problems associated with kidney diseases. Traditionally, tissue isolation of kidney mononuclear cells have been performed via enzymatic digestions using different varieties and strengths of collagenases/DNAses yielding varying numbers of viable immune cells. Recently, with the development of the mechanical tissue disruptors for single cell isolation, the collagenase digestion step is avoided and replaced by a simple mechanical disruption of the kidneys after extraction from the mouse. Herein, we demonstrate a simple yet efficient method for the isolation of kidney mononuclear cells for every day immune cell extractions. We further demonstrate an example of subset analysis of immune cells in the kidney. Importantly, this technique can be adapted to other soft and non-fibrous tissues such as the liver and brain. PMID:27583412

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies 13A4 and AC133 Do Not Recognize the Canine Ortholog of Mouse and Human Stem Cell Antigen Prominin-1 (CD133)

    PubMed Central

    Thamm, Kristina; Graupner, Sylvi; Werner, Carsten; Huttner, Wieland B.; Corbeil, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The pentaspan membrane glycoprotein prominin-1 (CD133) is widely used in medicine as a cell surface marker of stem and cancer stem cells. It has opened new avenues in stem cell-based regenerative therapy and oncology. This molecule is largely used with human samples or the mouse model, and consequently most biological tools including antibodies are directed against human and murine prominin-1. Although the general structure of prominin-1 including its membrane topology is conserved throughout the animal kingdom, its primary sequence is poorly conserved. Thus, it is unclear if anti-human and -mouse prominin-1 antibodies cross-react with their orthologs in other species, especially dog. Answering this issue is imperative in light of the growing number of studies using canine prominin-1 as an antigenic marker. Here, we address this issue by cloning the canine prominin-1 and use its overexpression as a green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to determine its immunoreactivity with antibodies against human or mouse prominin-1. We used immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry and immunoblotting techniques and surprisingly found no cross-species immunoreactivity. These results raise some caution in data interpretation when anti-prominin-1 antibodies are used in interspecies studies. PMID:27701459

  4. Oncolytic reovirus synergizes with chemotherapeutic agents to promote cell death in canine mammary gland tumor

    PubMed Central

    Igase, Masaya; Hwang, Chung Chew; Kambayashi, Satoshi; Kubo, Masato; Coffey, Matt; Miyama, Takako Shimokawa; Baba, Kenji; Okuda, Masaru; Noguchi, Shunsuke; Mizuno, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    The oncolytic effects of reovirus in various cancers have been proven in many clinical trials in human medicine. Oncolytic virotherapy using reovirus for canine cancers is being developed in our laboratory. The objective of this study was to examine the synergistic anti-cancer effects of a combination of reovirus and low doses of various chemotherapeutic agents on mammary gland tumors (MGTs) in dogs. The first part of this study demonstrated the efficacy of reovirus in canine MGTs in vitro and in vivo. Reovirus alone exerted significant cell death by means of caspase-dependent apoptosis in canine MGT cell lines. A single injection of reovirus impeded growth of canine MGT tumors in xenografted mice, but was insufficient to induce complete tumor regression. The second part of this study highlighted the anti-tumor effects of reovirus in combination with low doses of paclitaxel, carboplatin, gemcitabine, or toceranib. Enhanced synergistic activity was observed in the MGT cell line treated concomitantly with reovirus and in all the chemotherapeutic agents except toceranib. In addition, combining reovirus with paclitaxel or gemcitabine at half dosage of half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) enhanced cytotoxicity by activating caspase 3. Our data suggest that the combination of reovirus and low dose chemotherapeutic agents provides an attractive option in canine cancer therapy. PMID:26733729

  5. Nestin(+) kidney resident mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute kidney ischemia injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei Hua; Li, Guilan; Liu, Junfeng; Liu, Longshan; Wu, Bingyuan; Huang, Weijun; He, Wen; Deng, Chunhua; Wang, Dong; Li, Chunling; Lahn, Bruce T; Shi, Chenggang; Xiang, Andy Peng

    2015-05-01

    Renal resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important regulators of kidney homeostasis, repair or regeneration. However, natural distribution and the starting population properties of these cells remain elusive because of the lack of specific markers. Here, we identified post-natal kidney derived Nestin(+) cells that fulfilled all of the criteria as a mesenchymal stem cell. These isolated Nestin(+) cells expressed the typical cell-surface marker of MSC, including Sca-1, CD44, CD106, NG2 and PDGFR-α. They were capable of self-renewal, possessed high clonogenic potential and extensive proliferation for more than 30 passages. Under appropriate differentiation conditions, these cells could differentiate into adipocytes, osteocytes, chondrocytes and podocytes. After intravenous injection into acute kidney injury mice, Nestin(+) cells contributed to functional improvement by significantly decreasing the peak level of serum creatinine and BUN, and reducing the damaged cell apoptosis. Furthermore, conditioned medium from Nestin(+) cells could protect against ischemic acute renal failure partially through paracrine factor VEGF. Taken together, our findings indicate that renal resident Nestin(+) MSCs can be derived, propagated, differentiated, and repair the acute kidney injury, which may shed new light on understanding MSCs biology and developing cell replacement therapies for kidney disease.

  6. Intrinsic Radiosensitivity and Cellular Characterization of 27 Canine Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Froning, Coral E.; Brents, Colleen A.; Rose, Barbara J.; Thamm, Douglas H.; Kato, Takamitsu A.

    2016-01-01

    Canine cancer cell lines have progressively been developed, but are still underused resources for radiation biology research. Measurement of the cellular intrinsic radiosensitivity is important because understanding the difference may provide a framework for further elucidating profiles for prediction of radiation therapy response. Our studies have focused on characterizing diverse canine cancer cell lines in vitro and understanding parameters that might contribute to intrinsic radiosensitivity. First, intrinsic radiosensitivity of 27 canine cancer cell lines derived from ten tumor types was determined using a clonogenic assay. The 27 cell lines had varying radiosensitivities regardless tumor type (survival fraction at 2 Gy, SF2 = 0.19–0.93). In order to understand parameters that might contribute to intrinsic radiosensitivity, we evaluated the relationships of cellular radiosensitivity with basic cellular characteristics of the cell lines. There was no significant correlation of SF2 with S-phase fraction, doubling time, chromosome number, ploidy, or number of metacentric chromosomes, while there was a statistically significant correlation between SF2 and plating efficiency. Next, we selected the five most radiosensitive cell lines as the radiosensitive group and the five most radioresistant cell lines as the radioresistant group. Then, we evaluated known parameters for cell killing by ionizing radiation, including radiation-induced DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and apoptosis, in the radiosensitive group as compared to the radioresistant group. High levels of residual γ-H2AX foci at the sites of DSBs were present in the four out of the five radiosensitive canine cancer cell lines. Our studies suggested that substantial differences in intrinsic radiosensitivity exist in canine cancer cell lines, and radiation-induced DSB repair was related to radiosensitivity, which is consistent with previous human studies. These data may assist further investigations

  7. Intrinsic Radiosensitivity and Cellular Characterization of 27 Canine Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Junko; Froning, Coral E; Brents, Colleen A; Rose, Barbara J; Thamm, Douglas H; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2016-01-01

    Canine cancer cell lines have progressively been developed, but are still underused resources for radiation biology research. Measurement of the cellular intrinsic radiosensitivity is important because understanding the difference may provide a framework for further elucidating profiles for prediction of radiation therapy response. Our studies have focused on characterizing diverse canine cancer cell lines in vitro and understanding parameters that might contribute to intrinsic radiosensitivity. First, intrinsic radiosensitivity of 27 canine cancer cell lines derived from ten tumor types was determined using a clonogenic assay. The 27 cell lines had varying radiosensitivities regardless tumor type (survival fraction at 2 Gy, SF2 = 0.19-0.93). In order to understand parameters that might contribute to intrinsic radiosensitivity, we evaluated the relationships of cellular radiosensitivity with basic cellular characteristics of the cell lines. There was no significant correlation of SF2 with S-phase fraction, doubling time, chromosome number, ploidy, or number of metacentric chromosomes, while there was a statistically significant correlation between SF2 and plating efficiency. Next, we selected the five most radiosensitive cell lines as the radiosensitive group and the five most radioresistant cell lines as the radioresistant group. Then, we evaluated known parameters for cell killing by ionizing radiation, including radiation-induced DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and apoptosis, in the radiosensitive group as compared to the radioresistant group. High levels of residual γ-H2AX foci at the sites of DSBs were present in the four out of the five radiosensitive canine cancer cell lines. Our studies suggested that substantial differences in intrinsic radiosensitivity exist in canine cancer cell lines, and radiation-induced DSB repair was related to radiosensitivity, which is consistent with previous human studies. These data may assist further investigations

  8. Expression of PD-L1 on Canine Tumor Cells and Enhancement of IFN-γ Production from Tumor-Infiltrating Cells by PD-L1 Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Adachi, Mami; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1), an immunoinhibitory receptor, and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), its ligand, together induce the “exhausted” status in antigen-specific lymphocytes and are thus involved in the immune evasion of tumor cells. In this study, canine PD-1 and PD-L1 were molecularly characterized, and their potential as therapeutic targets for canine tumors was discussed. The canine PD-1 and PD-L1 genes were conserved among canine breeds. Based on the sequence information obtained, the recombinant canine PD-1 and PD-L1 proteins were constructed; they were confirmed to bind each other. Antibovine PD-L1 monoclonal antibody effectively blocked the binding of recombinant PD-1 with PD-L1–expressing cells in a dose-dependent manner. Canine melanoma, mastocytoma, renal cell carcinoma, and other types of tumors examined expressed PD-L1, whereas some did not. Interestingly, anti-PD-L1 antibody treatment enhanced IFN-γ production from tumor-infiltrating cells. These results showed that the canine PD-1/PD-L1 pathway is also associated with T-cell exhaustion in canine tumors and that its blockade with antibody could be a new therapeutic strategy for canine tumors. Further investigations are needed to confirm the ability of anti-PD-L1 antibody to reactivate canine antitumor immunity in vivo, and its therapeutic potential has to be further discussed. PMID:24915569

  9. Toward immunotherapy with redirected T cells in a large animal model: ex vivo activation, expansion, and genetic modification of canine T cells.

    PubMed

    Mata, Melinda; Vera, Juan F; Gerken, Claudia; Rooney, Cliona M; Miller, Tasha; Pfent, Catherine; Wang, Lisa L; Wilson-Robles, Heather M; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown promising antitumor activity in early phase clinical studies, especially for hematological malignancies. However, most preclinical models do not reliably mimic human disease. We reasoned that developing an adoptive T-cell therapy approach for spontaneous osteosarcoma (OS) occurring in dogs would more closely reproduce the condition in human cancer. To generate CAR-expressing canine T cells, we developed expansion and transduction protocols that allow for the generation of sufficient numbers of CAR-expressing canine T cells for future clinical studies in dogs within 2 weeks of ex vivo culture. To evaluate the functionality of CAR-expressing canine T cells, we targeted HER2(+) OS. We demonstrate that canine OS is positive for HER2, and that canine T cells expressing a HER2-specific CAR with human-derived transmembrane and CD28.ζ signaling domains recognize and kill HER2(+) canine OS cell lines in an antigen-dependent manner. To reduce the potential immunogenicity of the CAR, we evaluated a CAR with canine-derived transmembrane and signaling domains, and found no functional difference between human and canine CARs. Hence, we have successfully developed a strategy to generate CAR-expressing canine T cells for future preclinical studies in dogs. Testing T-cell therapies in an immunocompetent, outbred animal model may improve our ability to predict their safety and efficacy before conducting studies in humans.

  10. CD146(+) cells are essential for kidney vasculature development.

    PubMed

    Halt, Kimmo J; Pärssinen, Heikki E; Junttila, Sanna M; Saarela, Ulla; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Koivunen, Peppi; Myllyharju, Johanna; Quaggin, Susan; Skovorodkin, Ilya N; Vainio, Seppo J

    2016-08-01

    The kidney vasculature is critical for renal function, but its developmental assembly mechanisms remain poorly understood and models for studying its assembly dynamics are limited. Here, we tested whether the embryonic kidney contains endothelial cells (ECs) that are heterogeneous with respect to VEGFR2/Flk1/KDR, CD31/PECAM, and CD146/MCAM markers. Tie1Cre;R26R(YFP)-based fate mapping with a time-lapse in embryonic kidney organ culture successfully depicted the dynamics of kidney vasculature development and the correlation of the process with the CD31(+) EC network. Depletion of Tie1(+) or CD31(+) ECs from embryonic kidneys, with either Tie1Cre-induced diphtheria toxin susceptibility or cell surface marker-based sorting in a novel dissociation and reaggregation technology, illustrated substantial EC network regeneration. Depletion of the CD146(+) cells abolished this EC regeneration. Fate mapping of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-marked CD146(+)/CD31(-) cells indicated that they became CD31(+) cells, which took part in EC structures with CD31(+) wild-type ECs. EC network development depends on VEGF signaling, and VEGF and erythropoietin are expressed in the embryonic kidney even in the absence of any external hypoxic stimulus. Thus, the ex vivo embryonic kidney culture models adopted here provided novel ways for targeting renal EC development and demonstrated that CD146(+) cells are critical for kidney vasculature development. PMID:27165833

  11. Canine Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. TRANSMISSION OF SEROLOGIC ABNORMALITIES BY CELL-FREE FILTRATES

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Robert M.; Andre-Schwartz, Janine; Harbis, Gerald S.; Hirsch, Martin S.; Black, Paul H.; Schwartz, Robert S.

    1973-01-01

    The presence of viruses was sought in a colony of dogs bred from parents with systemic lupus crythematosus (SLE). Cell-free filtrates prepared from the spleens of these animals were injected into newborn dogs, mice, and rats. The canine recipients developed antinuclear antibody (ANA) and positive lupus erythematosus (LE) cell tests: ANA and, in some cases, antinative DNA antibodies were produced by the murine recipients: no abnormalities were detected in the rats. Serial passage of spleen cells or cell-free filtrates of spleen tissue in syngeneic mice reduced the time required for appearance of ANA from 9 to 4 mo. Some murine recipients of the canine filtrate developed malignant lymphomas. Murine leukemia viruses were identified in these tumors by electron microscopic, virologic, and serologic technics. These neoplasms, but not other tumors known to contain murine leukemia viruses, were associated with the production of ANA. Puppies inoculated with the canine filtrate-induced mouse lymphoma developed ANA and positive LE cell tests within 4 mo. The results were interpreted to indicate the presence in canine SLE of a virus capable of: (a) inducing the serologic abnormalities of SLE in normal dogs and mice: (b) activating latent murine leukemia viruses: and (c) spreading by both horizonal and vertical routes. Images PMID:4124208

  12. Apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM) reduces cell number in canine histiocytic sarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    UCHIDA, Mona; SAEKI, Kohei; MAEDA, Shingo; TAMAHARA, Satoshi; YONEZAWA, Tomohiro; MATSUKI, Naoaki

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM) is initially reported to protect macrophages from apoptosis. In this study, we determined the effect of AIM on the macrophage-derived tumor, histiocytic sarcoma cell lines (HS) of dogs. Five HS and five other tumor cell lines were used. When recombinant canine AIM was applied to non-serum culture media, cell numbers of all the HS and two of other tumor cell lines decreased dose-dependently. The DNA fragmentation, TUNEL staining and flow cytometry tests revealed that AIM induced both of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the HS. Although AIM is known as an apoptosis inhibitor, these results suggest that a high dose of AIM could have an opposite function in HS and some tumor cell lines. PMID:27246397

  13. Electrophoretic separation of kidney and pituitary cells on STS-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Barlow, G. H.; Cleveland, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Farrington, M. A.; Hatfield, J. M.; Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Lewis, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Specific secretory cells were separated from suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic cells and rat pituitary cells in microgravity conditions, with an objective of isolating the subfractions of kidney cells that produce the largest amount of urakinase, and the subfractions of rat pituitary cells that secrete growth hormones (GH), prolactin (PRL), and other hormones. It is inferred from the experimental observations that the surface charge distributions of the GH-containing cells differ from those of the PRL-containing cells, which is explained by the presence of secretory products on the surface of pituitary cells. For kidney cells, the electrophoretic mobility distributions in flight experiments were spread more than the ground controls.

  14. Anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate induces canine mammary cancer cell aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Joana T; Santos, Ana L; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  15. Anti-Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitor Oseltamivir Phosphate Induces Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Joana T.; Santos, Ana L.; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A.; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  16. Antitumor effects of celecoxib in COX-2 expressing and non-expressing canine melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyoung-won; Coh, Ye-rin; Rebhun, Robert B.; Ahn, Jin-ok; Han, Sei-Myung; Lee, Hee-woo; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a potential target for chemoprevention and cancer therapy. Celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, inhibits cell growth of various types of human cancer including malignant melanoma. In dogs, oral malignant melanoma represents the most common oral tumor and is often a fatal disease. Therefore, there is a desperate need to develop additional therapeutic strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer effects of celecoxib on canine malignant melanoma cell lines that express varying levels of COX-2. Celecoxib induced a significant anti-proliferative effect in both LMeC and CMeC-1 cells. In the CMeC cells, treatment of 50 µM celecoxib caused an increase in cells in the G0/G1 and a decreased proportion of cells in G-2 phase. In the LMeC cells, 50 µM of celecoxib led to an increase in the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and a significant activation of caspase-3 when compared to CMeC-1 cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that celecoxib exhibits antitumor effects on canine melanoma LMeC and CMeC-1 cells by induction of G1-S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our data suggest that celecoxib might be effective as a chemotherapeutic agent against canine malignant melanoma. PMID:24656746

  17. Isolation and characterization of canine amniotic membrane-derived multipotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Bum; Seo, Min-Soo; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that amniotic membrane tissue is a rich source of stem cells in humans. In clinical applications, the amniotic membrane tissue had therapeutic effects on wound healing and corneal surface reconstruction. Here, we successfully isolated and identified multipotent stem cells (MSCs) from canine amniotic membrane tissue. We cultured the canine amniotic membrane-derived multipotent stem cells (cAM-MSCs) in low glucose DMEM medium. cAM-MSCs have a fibroblast-like shape and adhere to tissue culture plastic. We characterized the immunophenotype of cAM-MSCs by flow cytometry and measured cell proliferation by the cumulative population doubling level (CPDL). We performed differentiation studies for the detection of trilineage multipotent ability, under the appropriate culture conditions. Taken together, our results show that cAM-MSCs could be a rich source of stem cells in dogs. Furthermore, cAM-MSCs may be useful as a cell therapy application for veterinary regenerative medicine.

  18. Use of CD10 as a marker of canine mammary myoepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Céspedes, R; Suárez-Bonnet, A; Millán, Y; Guil-Luna, S; Reymundo, C; Herráez, P; Espinosa de Los Monteros, A; Martin de Las Mulas, J

    2013-02-01

    CD10 is an important cell marker in the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and of breast myoepithelial (ME) cells in humans. The objective of this study was to assess the value of CD10 as a marker of canine ME cells using immunohistochemistry on routinely processed normal, dysplastic and neoplastic mammary tissue. Five different CD10 positive cell types were identified on the basis of cell morphology, pattern of immunoreactivity, and on the co-expression of additional cell lineage-specific markers. Type 1 cells were typical fusiform cells with a ME cell phenotype (calponin- and cytokeratin [CK] 14-positive, CK8/18-negative). Type 2 cells were typical or atypical polyhedral cells with a luminal epithelial (LE) cell phenotype (calponin- and CK14-negative, CK8/18-positive). Type 3 cells had a type 1 phenotype with variable morphology, and type 4 were atypical neoplastic cells with a mixed ME/LE phenotype. Type 5 cells were typical fusiform cells with a stromal phenotype. Type 1 cells were considered normal ME cells and were found in all sample types; type 2 cells were considered normal or neoplastic LE cells and were also found in all sample types; types 3 and 4 cells were restricted to tumour samples and to malignant tumours, respectively, and type 5 cells were found in all sample types, although predominantly in neoplastic tissue. The findings indicate that the CD10 antigen is a sensitive (although not specific) marker of canine ME cells in normal, dysplastic and neoplastic mammary tissue. Differences in the distribution and staining intensity of CD10-positive cells suggest a number of potential roles for this protein in the pathogenesis of canine mammary neoplasia. PMID:22819182

  19. Evaluation of the drug sensitivity and expression of 16 drug resistance-related genes in canine histiocytic sarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    ASADA, Hajime; TOMIYASU, Hirotaka; GOTO-KOSHINO, Yuko; FUJINO, Yasuhito; OHNO, Koichi; TSUJIMOTO, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS) is an aggressive tumor type originating from histiocytic cell lineages. This disease is characterized by poor response to chemotherapy and short survival time. Therefore, it is of critical importance to identify and develop effective antitumor drugs against HS. The objectives of this study were to examine the drug sensitivities of 10 antitumor drugs. Using a real-time RT-PCR system, the mRNA expression levels of 16 genes related to drug resistance in 4 canine HS cell lines established from dogs with disseminated HS were determined and compared to 2 canine lymphoma cell lines (B-cell and T-cell). These 4 canine HS cell lines showed sensitivities toward microtubule inhibitors (vincristine, vinblastine and paclitaxel), comparable to those in the canine B-cell lymphoma cell line. Moreover, it was shown that P-gp in the HS cell lines used in this study did not have enough function to efflux its substrate. Sensitivities to melphalan, nimustine, methotrexate, cytarabine, doxorubicin and etoposide were lower in the 4 HS cell lines than in the 2 canine lymphoma cell lines. The data obtained in this study using cultured cell lines could prove helpful in the developing of advanced and effective chemotherapies for treating dogs that are suffering from HS. PMID:25715778

  20. Relative biological effectiveness in canine osteosarcoma cells irradiated with accelerated charged particles

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Cartwright, Ian M.; Haskins, Jeremy S.; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kitamura, Hisashi; Fujimori, Akira; Thamm, Douglas H.; Kato, Takamitsu A.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy ions, characterized by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, have advantages compared with low LET protons and photons in their biological effects. The application of heavy ions within veterinary clinics requires additional background information to determine heavy ion efficacy. In the present study, comparison of the cell-killing effects of photons, protons and heavy ions was investigated in canine osteosarcoma (OSA) cells in vitro. A total of four canine OSA cell lines with various radiosensitivities were irradiated with 137Cs gamma-rays, monoenergetic proton beams, 50 keV/µm carbon ion spread out Bragg peak beams and 200 keV/µm iron ion monoenergetic beams. Clonogenic survival was examined using colony-forming as says, and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values were calculated relative to gamma-rays using the D10 value, which is determined as the dose (Gy) resulting in 10% survival. For proton irradiation, the RBE values for all four cell lines were 1.0–1.1. For all four cell lines, exposure to carbon ions yielded a decreased cell survival compared with gamma-rays, with the RBE values ranging from 1.56–2.10. Iron ions yielded the lowest cell survival among tested radiation types, with RBE values ranging from 3.51–3.69 observed in the three radioresistant cell lines. The radiosensitive cell line investigated demonstrated similar cell survival for carbon and iron ion irradiation. The results of the present study suggest that heavy ions are more effective for killing radioresistant canine OSA cells when compared with gamma-rays and protons. This markedly increased efficiency of cell killing is an attractive reason for utilizing heavy ions for radioresistant canine OSA. PMID:27446477

  1. Insights into kidney stem cell development and regeneration using zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Bridgette E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-01-01

    Kidney disease is an escalating global health problem, for which the formulation of therapeutic approaches using stem cells has received increasing research attention. The complexity of kidney anatomy and function, which includes the diversity of renal cell types, poses formidable challenges in the identification of methods to generate replacement structures. Recent work using the zebrafish has revealed their high capacity to regenerate the integral working units of the kidney, known as nephrons, following acute injury. Here, we discuss these findings and explore the ways that zebrafish can be further utilized to gain a deeper molecular appreciation of renal stem cell biology, which may uncover important clues for regenerative medicine. PMID:26981168

  2. Adoptive T-cell therapy improves treatment of canine non-Hodgkin lymphoma post chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Colleen M; Sheppard, Sabina; Hartline, Cassie A; Huls, Helen; Johnson, Mark; Palla, Shana L; Maiti, Sourindra; Ma, Wencai; Davis, R Eric; Craig, Suzanne; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard; Wilson, Heather; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2012-01-01

    Clinical observations reveal that an augmented pace of T-cell recovery after chemotherapy correlates with improved tumor-free survival, suggesting the add-back of T cells after chemotherapy may improve outcomes. To evaluate adoptive immunotherapy treatment for B-lineage non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we expanded T cells from client-owned canines diagnosed with NHL on artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of human interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21. Graded doses of autologous T cells were infused after CHOP chemotherapy and persisted for 49 days, homed to tumor, and significantly improved survival. Serum thymidine kinase changes predicted T-cell engraftment, while anti-tumor effects correlated with neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios and granzyme B expression in manufactured T cells. Therefore, chemotherapy can be used to modulate infused T-cell responses to enhance anti-tumor effects. The companion canine model has translational implications for human immunotherapy which can be readily exploited since clinical-grade canine and human T cells are propagated using identical approaches. PMID:22355761

  3. The antiproliferative effect of bovine lactoferrin on canine mammary gland tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuichi; Sato, Reeko; Kobayashi, Saori; Hankanga, Careen; Inanami, Osamu; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Momota, Yutaka; Tomizawa, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Jun

    2008-05-01

    Lactoferrin has several biological activities, including antitumor activities in some human and animal tumor cells. Clinical trials have been carried out in human medicine based on these effects. However, the antitumor effects of lactoferrin in veterinary medicine remain unknown. In this in vitro study, we demonstrated that co-incubation of canine mammary gland tumor cells (CIPp and CHMp) and bovine lactoferrin induced growth arrest of tumor cells. This growth arrest was associated with induction of G1 arrest. Furthermore, this effect was stronger in tumor cells than in normal cells. These findings demonstrate that bovine lactoferrin has anti-tumor activity in canine mammary tumors and has the potential for use in tumor-bearing dogs.

  4. Cyclopedic protein expression analysis of cultured canine mammary gland adenocarcinoma cells from six tumours.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, T; Watanabe, M; Ohashi, E; Uyama, R; Takauji, S; Mochizuki, M; Nishimura, R; Ogawa, H; Sugano, S; Sasaki, N

    2006-06-01

    We characterised cultured canine mammary gland adenocarcinoma cells by exhaustive step protein expression analysis to identify factors associated with tumour progression or metastasis of canine mammary gland tumour. Cultured adenocarcinoma cells derived from a total of 3 primary and 3 metastatic lesions from 3 dogs (CHMp/m, CIPp/m and CNMp/m, where CHM, CIP, and CNM indicate the 3 animals) were used in this study. The expression of 24 proteins reported to be related to tumourigenesis or malignancy of human breast cancers were examined by Western blot analysis using 24 antibodies. The expression of sialyl Lewis X [sLe(x)] was only observed in CHMm cells, which were derived from pleural effusion. This expression was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The levels of some factors, such as 14-3-3sigma, cyclinD1 and Rb, differed among cells or between the primary and metastatic cells in the pair. Though the difference in their expression was not consistent within the cells from primary and metastatic origin, this characterisation should provide useful information for further molecular analysis of these cultured cells. Since some of the factors, such as sLe(x), 14-3-3sigma, cyclinD1 and Rb, showed different levels of expression in the pair, these cultured cells might be meaningful tools for clarification of distant metastasis in canine mammary gland tumours.

  5. Comparison of primer sets for T-cell clonality testing in canine intestinal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Takanosu, Masamine; Kagawa, Yumiko

    2015-09-01

    Clonality testing based on polymerase chain reaction is an important tool for diagnosis of lymphoproliferative diseases. Many primers have been designed and used for canine clonality testing. Canine intestinal lymphoma is usually diagnosed pathologically by examination of excised intestinal or endoscopic biopsy tissues, and clonality testing is sometimes used to support the pathological diagnosis if this examination is inconclusive. In the present study, the sensitivity of each previously published primer set for clonality testing was examined by using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from 39 cases pathologically diagnosed as canine intestinal lymphoma (large-cell type). All 39 cases were immunohistochemically positive for cluster of differentiation (CD)3. Thirty-two out of the 39 cases showed clonality in the T-cell receptor gamma (TRG) with at least 1 of the tested primers. The primer set with the highest sensitivity detected all 32 cases with TRG clonality, with a sensitivity of 82.1%. These results provide useful evidence for the selection of primer sets for clonality testing of canine intestinal lymphoma.

  6. Characterization of HOX gene expression in canine mammary tumour cell lines from spontaneous tumours.

    PubMed

    DeInnocentes, P; Perry, A L; Graff, E C; Lutful Kabir, F M; Curtis Bird, R

    2015-09-01

    Spatial/temporal controls of development are regulated by the homeotic (HOX) gene complex and require integration with oncogenes and tumour suppressors regulating cell cycle exit. Spontaneously derived neoplastic canine mammary carcinoma cell models were investigated to determine if HOX expression profiles were associated with neoplasia as HOX genes promote neoplastic potential in human cancers. Comparative assessment of human and canine breast cancer expression profiles revealed remarkable similarity for all four paralogous HOX gene clusters and several unlinked HOX genes. Five canine HOX genes were overexpressed with expression profiles consistent with oncogene-like character (HOXA1, HOXA13, HOXD4, HOXD9 and SIX1) and three HOX genes with underexpressed profiles (HOXA11, HOXC8 and HOXC9) were also identified as was an apparent nonsense mutation in HOXC6. This data, as well as a comparative analysis of similar data from human breast cancers suggested expression of selected HOX genes in canine mammary carcinoma could be contributing to the neoplastic phenotype. PMID:24034269

  7. Characterization of HOX gene expression in canine mammary tumour cell lines from spontaneous tumours.

    PubMed

    DeInnocentes, P; Perry, A L; Graff, E C; Lutful Kabir, F M; Curtis Bird, R

    2015-09-01

    Spatial/temporal controls of development are regulated by the homeotic (HOX) gene complex and require integration with oncogenes and tumour suppressors regulating cell cycle exit. Spontaneously derived neoplastic canine mammary carcinoma cell models were investigated to determine if HOX expression profiles were associated with neoplasia as HOX genes promote neoplastic potential in human cancers. Comparative assessment of human and canine breast cancer expression profiles revealed remarkable similarity for all four paralogous HOX gene clusters and several unlinked HOX genes. Five canine HOX genes were overexpressed with expression profiles consistent with oncogene-like character (HOXA1, HOXA13, HOXD4, HOXD9 and SIX1) and three HOX genes with underexpressed profiles (HOXA11, HOXC8 and HOXC9) were also identified as was an apparent nonsense mutation in HOXC6. This data, as well as a comparative analysis of similar data from human breast cancers suggested expression of selected HOX genes in canine mammary carcinoma could be contributing to the neoplastic phenotype.

  8. Generation and characterization of LIF-dependent canine induced pluripotent stem cells from adult dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Wolvetang, Ernst J

    2012-08-10

    Dogs provide a more clinically relevant model of human disease than rodents, particularly with respect to hereditary diseases. Thus, the availability of canine stem cells will greatly facilitate the use of the dog in the development of stem cell-based gene therapies and regenerative medicine. In this study we describe the production of canine induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) from adult dermal fibroblasts. These cells have a morphology resembling previously described canine embryonic stem cells, a normal karyotype, and express pluripotency markers including alkaline phosphatase, Nanog, Oct4, Telomerase, SSEA1, SSEA4, TRA1-60, TRA1-81, and Rex1. Furthermore, the inactive X chromosome is reactivated indicating a ground-state pluripotency. In culture they readily form embryoid bodies, which in turn give rise to cell types from all 3 embryonic germ layers, as indicated by expression of the definitive endoderm markers Cxcr4 and α-fetoprotein, mesoderm markers Collagen IIA and Gata2, and ectoderm markers βIII-tubulin, Enolase, and Nestin. Of particular significance is the observation that these ciPSCs are dependent only on leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), making them similar to mouse and canine embryonic stem cells, but strikingly unlike the ciPSCs recently described in two other studies, which were dependent on both basic fibroblast growth factor and LIF in order to maintain their pluripotency. Thus, our ciPSCs closely resemble mouse ESCs derived from the inner cell mass of preimplantation embryos, while the previously described ciPSCs appear to be more representative of cells from the epiblast of mouse postimplantation embryos.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1), regulated by the MAPK pathway, are both necessary for Madin-Darby canine kidney tubulogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Nathan E; Spector, June; Robinson, Jonathan; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Tobias, John W; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2008-02-15

    A classic model of tubulogenesis utilizes Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. MDCK cells form monoclonal cysts in three-dimensional collagen and tubulate in response to hepatocyte growth factor, which activates multiple signaling pathways, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It was shown previously that MAPK activation is necessary and sufficient to induce the first stage of tubulogenesis, the partial epithelial to mesenchymal transition (p-EMT), whereas matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are necessary for the second redifferentiation stage. To identify specific MMP genes, their regulators, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), and the molecular pathways by which they are activated, we used two distinct MAPK inhibitors and a technique we have termed subtraction pathway microarray analysis. Of the 19 MMPs and 3 TIMPs present on the Canine Genome 2.0 Array, MMP13 and TIMP1 were up-regulated 198- and 169-fold, respectively, via the MAPK pathway. This was confirmed by two-dimensional and three-dimensional real time PCR, as well as in MDCK cells inducible for the MAPK gene Raf. Knockdown of MMP13 using short hairpin RNA prevented progression past the initial phase of p-EMT. Knockdown of TIMP1 prevented normal cystogenesis, although the initial phase of p-EMT did occasionally occur. The MMP13 knockdown phenotype is likely because of decreased collagenase activity, whereas the TIMP1 knockdown phenotype appears due to increased apoptosis. These data suggest a model, which may also be important for development of other branched organs, whereby the MAPK pathway controls both MDCK p-EMT and redifferentiation, in part by activating MMP13 and TIMP1.

  10. Targeting Cell Death Pathways for Therapeutic Intervention in Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Garg, Jay P; Vucic, Domagoj

    2016-05-01

    Precise regulation of cell death and survival is essential for proper maintenance of organismal homeostasis, development, and the immune system. Deregulated cell death can lead to developmental defects, neuropathies, infections, and cancer. Kidney diseases, especially acute pathologies linked to ischemia-reperfusion injury, are among illnesses that profoundly are affected by improper regulation or execution of cell death pathways. Attempts to develop medicines for kidney diseases have been impacted by the complexity of these pathologies given the heterogeneous patient population and diverse etiologies. By analyzing cell death pathways activated in kidney diseases, we attempt to differentiate their importance for these pathologies with a goal of identifying those that have more profound impact and the best therapeutic potential. Although classic apoptosis still might be important, regulated necrosis pathways including necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-associated cell death play a significantly role in kidney diseases, especially in acute kidney pathologies. Although targeting receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase appears to be the best therapeutic strategy, combination with inhibitors of other cell death pathways is likely to bring superior benefit and possible cure to patients suffering from kidney diseases. PMID:27339381

  11. Neurogenesis and precursor cell differences in the dorsal and ventral adult canine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Aileen; Dalton, Marshall; Sidhu, Kuldip; Sachdev, Perminder; Reynolds, Brent; Valenzuela, Michael

    2015-04-23

    During evolution a unique anterior-posterior flexure posited the canine dentate gyrus in two distinct dorsal and ventral positions. We therefore sought to explore neurogenesis and neurogenic cell-related difference along the canine hippocampal dorsal-ventral axis. Post mortem histological analysis revealed 49.1% greater doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells and a 158.5% greater percentage of double labeled DCX-positive/neuronal nuclei (NeuN) positive cells in the dorsal subgranular zone compared to the ventral. We then show neural precursor cells isolated from fresh hippocampal tissue are capable of proliferating long term, and after differentiation, express neuronal and glial markers. Dorsal hippocampal isolates produced a 120.0% higher frequency of sphere-forming neural precursor cells compared to ventral hippocampal tissue. Histological DCX and neurosphere assay results were highly correlated. Overall, we provide the first evidence that the dorsal canine hippocampus has a markedly higher rate of adult neurogenesis than the ventral hippocampus, possibly related to a greater frequency of contributory neural precursor cells.

  12. Canine papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Lange, Christian E; Favrot, Claude

    2011-11-01

    Papillomaviruses can infect epithelia and induce proliferative disorders. Different types of canine papillomaviruses have been found to be associated with distinct pathologies including exophytic warts as in canine oral papillomatosis, endophytic warts, and pigmented plaques and, in some cases, squamous cell carcinomas. Virus infection is followed by a phase of subclinical infection before the onset of symptoms. A diagnosis can in some cases be made clinically but should be verified if there are any doubts. Most papillomas do regress spontaneously within a few months. Preventative vaccination is possible but not on the market.

  13. Five decades of progress in hematopoietic cell transplantation based on the preclinical canine model

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, Marilena; Storb, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    The preclinical canine model has proved valuable for the development of principles and techniques of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) applicable to human patients. Studies in random-bred dogs concerning the impact of histocompatibility barriers on engraftment and graft-versus-host disease, the kinetics of immunological reconstitution, the efficacy of various pre-transplant conditioning regimens, post-transplantation immunosuppression protocols, treatment of malignant diseases, and graft-versus-tumor effects have advanced HCT from an investigational therapy with uncertain clinical benefit half a century ago to an important treatment choice for thousands of patients treated annually in transplantation centers worldwide. More recent preclinical canine studies have resulted in the clinical translation of nonmyeloablative, minimally invasive transplantation protocols that have extended allogeneic HCT to include older human patients with malignant and non-malignant, acquired or inherited hematological disorders, and those with comorbid conditions. Here we review the contributions of the canine model to modern HCT and describe the usefulness of HCT for the treatment of canine hematological disorders. PMID:19754798

  14. Density gradient electrophoresis of cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Giranda, V.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Ground based confirmation of the electrophoretic heterogeneity of human embryonic kidney cell cultures, the general characterization of their electrophoretic migration, and observations on the general properties of cultures derived from electrophoretic subpopulations were studied. Cell migration in a density gradient electrophoresis column and cell electrophoretic mobility was determined. The mobility and heterogeneity of cultured human embryonic kidney cells with those of fixed rat erythrocytes as model test particle was compared. Electrophoretically separated cell subpopulations with respect to size, viability, and culture characteristics were examined.

  15. Development of a Minor Histocompatibility Antigen Vaccine Regimen in the Canine Model of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rosinski, Steven L.; Stone, Brad; Graves, Scott S.; Fuller, Deborah H.; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Spies, Gregory A.; Mize, Gregory J.; Fuller, James T.; Storb, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Background Minor histocompatibility (miHA) antigen vaccines have the potential to augment graft-versus-tumor effects without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We used mixed hematopoietic chimerism in the canine model of MHC-matched allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as a platform to develop a miHA vaccination regimen. Methods We engineered DNA plasmids and replication-deficient human adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) constructs encoding large sections of canine SMCY and the entire canine SRY gene. Results Priming with rAd5 constructs and boosting with ex vivo plasmid-transfected dendritic cells and cutaneous delivery of plasmids with a particle-mediated epidermal delivery device (PMED) in two female dogs induced antigen-specific T cell responses. Similar responses were observed following a prime-boost vaccine regimen in three female HCT donors. Subsequent donor lymphocyte infusion resulted in a significant change of chimerism in 1 of 3 male recipients without any signs of GVHD. The change in chimerism in the recipient occurred in association with the development of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to the same peptide pools detected in the donor. Conclusions These studies describe the first in vivo response to miHA vaccination in a large, outbred animal model without using recipient cells to sensitize the donor. This model provides a platform for ongoing experiments designed to define optimal miHA targets, and develop protocols to directly vaccinate the recipient. PMID:25965411

  16. In vitro regeneration of kidney from pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Osafune, Kenji

    2010-10-01

    Although renal transplantation has proved a successful treatment for the patients with end-stage renal failure, the therapy is hampered by the problem of serious shortage of donor organs. Regenerative medicine using stem cells, including cell transplantation therapy, needs to be developed to solve the problem. We previously identified the multipotent progenitor cells in the embryonic mouse kidney that can give rise to several kinds of epithelial cells found in adult kidney, such as glomerular podocytes and renal tubular epithelia. Establishing the method to generate the progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells that have the capacity to indefinitely proliferate in vitro is required for the development of kidney regeneration strategy. We review the current status of the research on the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into renal lineages and describe cues to promote this research field.

  17. 6-Bromoindirubin-3'oxime (BIO) decreases proliferation and migration of canine melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chon, Esther; Flanagan, Brandi; de Sá Rodrigues, Lucas Campos; Piskun, Caroline; Stein, Timothy J

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent therapeutic advances, malignant melanoma is an aggressive tumor in dogs and is associated with a poor outcome. Novel, targeted agents are necessary to improve survival. In this study, 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO), a serine/threonine kinase inhibitor with reported specificity for glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) inhibition, was evaluated in vitro in three canine melanoma cell lines (CML-10C2, UCDK9M2, and UCDK9M3) for β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity, Axin2 gene and protein expression levels, cell proliferation, chemotoxicity, migration and invasion assays. BIO treatment of canine malignant melanoma cell lines at 5 µM for 72 h enhanced β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity, suggesting GSK-3β inhibition, and reduced cell proliferation and migration. There were no significant effects on invasion, chemotoxicity, or apoptosis. The results suggest that serine/threonine kinases may be viable therapeutic targets for the treatment of canine malignant melanoma.

  18. 6-Bromoindirubin-3′oxime (BIO) decreases proliferation and migration of canine melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Esther; Flanagan, Brandi; de Sá Rodrigues, Lucas Campos; Piskun, Caroline; Stein, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent therapeutic advances, malignant melanoma is an aggressive tumor in dogs and is associated with a poor outcome. Novel, targeted agents are necessary to improve survival. In this study, 6-bromoindirubin-3′-oxime (BIO), a serine/threonine kinase inhibitor with reported specificity for glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) inhibition, was evaluated in vitro in three canine melanoma cell lines (CML-10C2, UCDK9M2, and UCDK9M3) for β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity, Axin2 gene and protein expression levels, cell proliferation, chemotoxicity, migration and invasion assays. BIO treatment of canine malignant melanoma cell lines at 5 µM for 72 h enhanced β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity, suggesting GSK-3β inhibition, and reduced cell proliferation and migration. There were no significant effects on invasion, chemotoxicity, or apoptosis. The results suggest that serine/ threonine kinases may be viable therapeutic targets for the treatment of canine malignant melanoma. PMID:25130776

  19. P-glycoprotein expression in canine mammary gland tumours related with myoepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, N-H; Hwang, Y-H; Im, K-S; Kim, J-H; Chon, S-K; Kim, H-Y; Sur, J-H

    2012-12-01

    P-glycoprotein is influential in chemotherapy-resistance in numerous cancers and has been widely studied in human breast cancer research, but is less studied in canine mammary gland tumour (MGT). The study was to evaluate P-glycoprotein expression and its localisations related with prognostic factors with monoclonal antibody C219, by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of 68 cases of canine malignant (n=54) and benign (n=14) MGT. Additional immunofluorescence (IF) and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were also performed. There was a novel finding that P-glycoprotein expression with C219 localised at two different cell types: epithelial and myoepithelial cells. Myoepithelial localised tumours were 5 benign (35.5%) and 21 malignant (63.6%), while epithelial localised tumours were 12 cases, all malignant (36.5%). Unlike conventional belief, semi-quantitative evaluation of IHC intensity scores of C219 expression in malignant MGT was related with favourable histopathological parameters. PMID:22554937

  20. The effect of autologous bone marrow stromal cells differentiated on scaffolds for canine tibial bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells that form many tissues. Various scaffolds are available for bone reconstruction by tissue engineering. Osteoblastic differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) promote osteogenesis on scaffolds and stimulate bone regeneration. We investigated the use of cultured autologous BMSC on different scaffolds for healing defects in tibias of adult male canines. BMSC were isolated from canine humerus bone marrow, differentiated into osteoblasts in culture and loaded onto porous ceramic scaffolds including hydroxyapatite 1, hydroxyapatite gel and calcium phosphate. Osteoblast differentiation was verified by osteonectine and osteocalcine immunocytochemistry. The scaffolds with stromal cells were implanted in the tibial defect. Scaffolds without stromal cells were used as controls. Sections from the defects were processed for histological, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical and histomorphometric analyses to analyze the healing of the defects. BMSC were spread, allowed to proliferate and differentiate to osteoblasts as shown by alizarin red histochemistry, and osteocalcine and osteonectine immunostaining. Scanning electron microscopy showed that BMSC on the scaffolds were more active and adhesive to the calcium phosphate scaffold compared to the others. Macroscopic bone formation was observed in all groups, but scaffolds with stromal cells produced significantly better results. Bone healing occurred earlier and faster with stromal cells on the calcium phosphate scaffold and produced more callus compared to other scaffolds. Tissue healing and osteoblastic marker expression also were better with stromal cells on the scaffolds. Increased trabecula formation, cell density and decreased fibrosis were observed in the calcium phosphate scaffold with stromal cells. Autologous cultured stromal cells on the scaffolds were useful for healing of canine tibial bone defects. The calcium phosphate scaffold was the best for both cell

  1. Isolation, Genetic Manipulation, and Transplantation of Canine Spermatogonial Stem Cells: Progress Toward Transgenesis Through the Male Germ Line

    PubMed Central

    Harkey, Michael A.; Asano, Atsushi; Zoulas, Mary Ellen; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Nagashima, Jennifer; Travis, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The dog is recognized as a highly predictive model for pre-clinical research. Its size, life span, physiology and genetics more closely match human parameters than do those of the mouse model. Investigations of the genetic basis of disease and of new regenerative treatments have frequently taken advantage of canine models. However, full utility of this model hasn’t been realized because of the lack of easy transgenesis. Blastocyst-mediated transgenic technology developed in mice has been very slow to translate to larger animals, and somatic cell nuclear transfer remains technically challenging, expensive, and low yield. Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) transplantation, which does not involve manipulation of ova or blastocysts, has proven to be an effective alternative approach for generating transgenic offspring in rodents, and in some large animals. Our recent demonstration that canine testis cells can engraft in a host testis, and generate donor-derived sperm, suggests that SSC transplantation may offer a similar avenue to transgenesis in the canine model. Here, we explore the potential of SSC transplantation in dogs as a means of generating canine transgenic models for pre-clinical models of genetic diseases. Specifically, we 1) established markers for identification and tracking canine spermatogonial cells; 2) established methods for enrichment and genetic manipulation of these cells; 3) described their behavior in culture; and 4) demonstrated engraftment of genetically manipulated SSC, and production of transgenic sperm. These findings help set the stage for generation of transgenic canine models via SSC transplantation. PMID:23690628

  2. Isolation, genetic manipulation, and transplantation of canine spermatogonial stem cells: progress toward transgenesis through the male germ-line.

    PubMed

    Harkey, Michael A; Asano, Atsushi; Zoulas, Mary Ellen; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Nagashima, Jennifer; Travis, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    The dog is recognized as a highly predictive model for preclinical research. Its size, life span, physiology, and genetics more closely match human parameters than do those of the mouse model. Investigations of the genetic basis of disease and of new regenerative treatments have frequently taken advantage of canine models. However, full utility of this model has not been realized because of the lack of easy transgenesis. Blastocyst-mediated transgenic technology developed in mice has been very slow to translate to larger animals, and somatic cell nuclear transfer remains technically challenging, expensive, and low yield. Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) transplantation, which does not involve manipulation of ova or blastocysts, has proven to be an effective alternative approach for generating transgenic offspring in rodents and in some large animals. Our recent demonstration that canine testis cells can engraft in a host testis, and generate donor-derived sperm, suggests that SSC transplantation may offer a similar avenue to transgenesis in the canine model. Here, we explore the potential of SSC transplantation in dogs as a means of generating canine transgenic models for preclinical models of genetic diseases. Specifically, we i) established markers for identification and tracking canine spermatogonial cells; ii) established methods for enrichment and genetic manipulation of these cells; iii) described their behavior in culture; and iv) demonstrated engraftment of genetically manipulated SSC and production of transgenic sperm. These findings help to set the stage for generation of transgenic canine models via SSC transplantation.

  3. Electrophoretic separation of kidney and pituitary cells on STS-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Barlow, G. H.; Cleveland, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Farrington, M. A.; Hatfield, J. M.; Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Wilfinger, W.; Grindeland, R.; Lewis, M. L.

    A Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System (CFES) was used on Space Shuttle flight STS-8 to separate specific secretory cells from suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic kidney cells and rat pituitary cells. The objectives were to isolate the subfractions of kidney cells that produce the largest amounts of urokinase (plasminogen activator), and to isolate the subfractions of rat pituitary cells that secrete growth hormone, prolactin, and other hormones. Kidney cells were separated into more than 32 fractions in each of two electrophoretic runs. Electrophoretic mobility distributions in flight experiments were spread more than the ground controls. Multiple assay methods confirmed that all cultured kidney cell fractions produced some urokinase, and five to six fractions produced significantly more urokinase than the other fractions. Several fractions also produced tissue plasminogen activator. The pituitary cells were separated into 48 fractions in each of the two electrophoretic runs, and the amounts of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) released into the medium for each cell fraction were determined. Cell fractions were grouped into eight mobility classes and immunocytochemically assayed for the presence of GH, PRL, ACTH, LH, TSH, and FSH. The patterns of hormone distribution indicate that the specialized cells producing GH and PRL are isolatable due to the differences in electrophoretic mobilities.

  4. Potential to involve multiple effector cells with human recombinant interleukin-2 and antiganglioside monoclonal antibodies in a canine malignant melanoma immunotherapy model.

    PubMed

    Helfand, S C; Soergel, S A; Donner, R L; Gan, J; Hank, J A; Lindstrom, M J; Sondel, P M

    1994-10-01

    Human tumors originating from neuroectodermal cells such as malignant melanoma and neuroblastoma express high levels of disialogangliosides GD2 and GD3, making these antigens ideal for targeting by monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). The purpose of this study was to investigate expression and targeting of gangliosides on canine melanoma. Using immunohistochemical methods, we analyzed the expression of disialogangliosides GD2 and GD3 on canine oral malignant melanomas with murine Mabs 14.G2a and R24 that recognize GD2 and GD3 disialogangliosides, respectively, on human tumors. We also assessed the ability of Mab 14.G2a (and its mouse-human chimera, ch 14.18) to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro against a canine malignant melanoma cell line with human recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) activated canine peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), or canine neutrophil effector cells. Our data show that Mabs 14.G2a and R24 recognized fresh frozen canine oral melanoma. Mabs 14.G2a or ch 14.18, or IL-2, potentiated lysis of the canine malignant melanoma cell line by canine PBL. The killing effect observed using the combination of either Mab with IL-2 was additive. Mab 14.G2a mediated potent ADCC of canine melanoma by canine neutrophils. These studies indicate that disialogangliosides are expressed on fresh canine melanoma cells. Mabs reactive with these antigens can target and trigger tumor killing by multiple canine effector populations and IL-2 can potentiate these effects by canine lymphocytes. Thus, canine oral malignant melanoma, a spontaneously occurring, metastatic cancer in the dog, may be a relevant animal model to investigate combination immunotherapy using antitumor Mab and IL-2.

  5. Distinct cell tropism of canine distemper virus strains to adult olfactory ensheathing cells and Schwann cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Techangamsuwan, Somporn; Haas, Ludwig; Rohn, Karl; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Wewetzer, Konstantin

    2009-09-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) can enter the brain via infection of olfactory neurons. Whether olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are also infected by CDV, and if yes, how they respond to the virus has remained enigmatic. Here, we exposed adult canine OECs in vitro to several attenuated (CDV-2544, CDV-R252, CDV-Ond, CDV-OndeGFP) and one virulent CDV strain (CDV-5804PeGFP) and studied their susceptibility compared to Schwann cells, a closely related cell type sharing the phagocytizing activity. We show that OECs and Schwann cells were infected by CDV strains albeit to different levels. Ten days post-infection (dpi), a mild to severe cytopathic effect ranging from single cell necrosis to layer detachment was noted. The percentage of infection increased during 10 dpi and viral progenies were detected in each culture using virus titration. Interestingly, CDV-2544, CDV-OndeGFP, and CDV-5804PeGFP predominantly infected OECs, while CDV-Ond targeted Schwann cells. No significant differences were found between the virulent and attenuated CDV strains. The observation of a CDV strain-specific cell tropism is evidence for significant molecular differences between OECs and Schwann cells. Whether these differences are either related to strain-specific distemper pathogenesis or support a role of OECs during CDV infection and virus spread needs to be addressed in future studies.

  6. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-05-23

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms.

  7. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-01-01

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms. PMID:27323085

  8. Immunohistochemical identification of myoepithelial, epithelial, and connective tissue cells in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Destexhe, E; Lespagnard, L; Degeyter, M; Heymann, R; Coignoul, F

    1993-03-01

    Fifty-eight formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded canine mammary tumors, 19 malignant and 39 benign, were used in this study. Tumors were obtained from dogs submitted for surgical resection of lesions at private veterinary practices in Brussels or from the surgery unit of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège. Immunohistochemical evaluation was performed, using monoclonal antibodies directed against keratins 8-18 and 19, vimentin, desmin, and alpha-actin and polyclonal antibodies directed against high-molecular-weight keratins and S-100 protein. The main cell types, epithelial, myoepithelial, and connective, were identified, and myoepithelial cells represented the major component of most tumors, both benign and malignant. Myoepithelial cells had five patterns: resting and proliferative suprabasal cells, spindle and star-shaped interstitial cells, and cartilage. Reactivity to keratin 19, vimentin, alpha-actin, and S-100 protein suggested a progressive transformation from resting cells to cartilage. Epithelial cell reactivities were limited to keratins; only keratinized cells were positive for polyclonal keratins. Myofibroblasts were positive for both vimentin and alpha-actin, and connective tissue cells were positive for vimentin. Myoepithelial cells appeared to be the major component of carcinomas, justifying reevaluation and simplification of histomorphologic classifications, with a "pleomorphic carcinoma" group including all carcinomas except squamous, mucinous, and comedo carcinomas. Immunohistochemical evaluation, in addition to routine hematoxylin and eosin histopathologic evaluation is recommended for precise classification of canine mammary tumors. PMID:7682367

  9. Effect of serum-derived albumin scaffold and canine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells on osteogenesis in canine segmental bone defect model

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Daeyoung; Kang, Byung-Jae; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Seung Hoon; Rhew, Daeun; Kim, Wan Hee

    2015-01-01

    Composite biological and synthetic grafts with progenitor cells offer an alternative approach to auto- or allografts for fracture repair. This study was conducted to evaluate osteogenesis of autologous serum-derived albumin (ASA) scaffolds seeded with canine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (Ad-MSCs) in a canine segmental bone defect model. ASA scaffold was prepared with canine serum using cross-linking and freeze-drying procedures. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) was mixed at the cross-linking stage. Ad-MSCs were seeded into the scaffold and incubated for one day before implantation. After 16 weeks, the grafts were harvested for histological analysis. The dogs were divided into five groups: control, ASA scaffolds with and without Ad-MSCs, and ASA scaffolds including β-TCP with and without Ad-MSCs. ASA scaffolds with Ad-MSCs had a significantly larger area of increased opacity at the proximal and distal host cortex-implant interfaces in radiographs 16 weeks after implantation compared to the groups with β-TCP (p < 0.05). Histomorphometric analysis showed that ASA scaffolds with Ad-MSCs had significantly greater new bone formation than other groups (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Ad-MSCs seeded into ASA scaffolds enhanced osteogenesis in the bone defect model, but that β-TCP in the ASA scaffold might prevent penetration of the cells required for bone healing. PMID:26119162

  10. Mast cells in Canine parvovirus-2-associated enteritis with crypt abscess.

    PubMed

    Woldemeskel, M W; Saliki, J T; Blas-Machado, U; Whittington, L

    2013-11-01

    The role of mast cells (MCs) in allergic reactions and parasitic infections is well established. Their involvement in host immune response against bacterial and viral infections is reported. In this study, investigation is made to determine if MCs are associated with Canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2)-induced enteritis with crypt abscess (ECA). Mast cell count (MCC) was made on toluidine blue-stained intestinal sections from a total of 34 dogs. These included 16 dogs exhibiting ECA positive for CPV-2 and negative for Canine distemper virus and Canine coronavirus by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent antibody test, 12 dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and 6 non-ECA/non-IBD (control) dogs. The average total MCC per high-power field in ECA (40.8 ± 2.2) and IBD (24.7 ± 2.1) was significantly higher (P < .05) than in the control (3.4 ± 0.6). Although not significant (P > .05), MCC was also higher in ECA than in IBD. The present study for the first time has documented significantly increased MCs in CPV-2-associated ECA as was previously reported for IBD, showing that MCs may also play an important role in CPV-2-associated ECA. Further studies involving more CPV-infected dogs are recommended to substantiate the findings.

  11. Canine Distemper Virus Epithelial Cell Infection Is Required for Clinical Disease but Not for Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Wong, Xiao-Xiang; Hinkelmann, Sarah; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    To characterize the importance of infection of epithelial cells for morbillivirus pathogenesis, we took advantage of the severe disease caused by canine distemper virus (CDV) in ferrets. To obtain a CDV that was unable to enter epithelial cells but retained the ability to enter immune cells, we transferred to its attachment (H) protein two mutations shown to interfere with the interaction of measles virus H with its epithelial receptor, human nectin-4. As expected for an epithelial receptor (EpR)-blind CDV, this virus infected dog and ferret epithelial cells inefficiently and did not cause cell fusion or syncytium formation. On the other hand, the EpR-blind CDV replicated in cells expressing canine signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), the morbillivirus immune cell receptor, with similar kinetics to those of wild-type CDV. While ferrets infected with wild-type CDV died within 12 days after infection, after developing severe rash and fever, animals infected with the EpR-blind virus showed no clinical signs of disease. Nevertheless, both viruses spread rapidly and efficiently in immune cells, causing similar levels of leukopenia and inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation activity, two indicators of morbillivirus immunosuppression. Infection was documented for airway epithelia of ferrets infected with wild-type CDV but not for those of animals infected with the EpR-blind virus, and only animals infected with wild-type CDV shed virus. Thus, epithelial cell infection is necessary for clinical disease and efficient virus shedding but not for immunosuppression. PMID:22278252

  12. Canine malignant melanoma alpha-3 integrin binding peptides

    PubMed Central

    Aina, Olulanu H.; Maeda, Yoshiko; Harrison, Matthew; Zwingenberger, Allison L.; Walker, Naomi J.; Lam, Kit S.; Kent, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to develop novel targeted imaging and therapeutic agents that can aid in early diagnosis, detection of metastasis and treatment of melanoma. Alpha-3 integrin is overexpressed in 82% of metastatic melanomas in humans and may be a potential target for peptide ligands carrying therapeutic agents. Five melanoma cell lines were generated from canine primary oral and metastatic canine tumors, grown in mice, and validated with melanoma markers Melan A, S-100, Micropthalmia transcription factor (MITF), Tyrosinase, and MART-1. The melanoma cell lines were tested for binding affinity to previously published alpha-3 integrin-binding peptides containing the cdGXGXXc motif. Fluorescent conjugates of the alpha-3 integrin binding OA02 peptide were used to quantify receptor affinity in the cell lines, a specimen of canine primary oral melanoma, and melanoma xenografts. Alpha-3 integrin was expressed by all 5 canine melanoma cell lines. Four of the 5 lines as well as the primary canine tumor showed affinity to alpha-3 integrin binding peptides with the cdGXGXXc motif. Optical imaging of canine melanoma xenografts in nude mice indicates rapid, strong uptake of the optical tracer in the tumor with an average persistence of approximately 48 hours. Ex vivo images showed high tumor-to-background ratio, with tumor signals more than twice that of the kidney and other vital organs. We propose that integrin alpha-3 integrin binding ligands could potentially become useful probes for imaging and delivery of cytotoxic agents for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:21722969

  13. Expression of class II beta-tubulin by proliferative myoepithelial cells in canine mammary mixed tumors.

    PubMed

    Arai, K; Nakano, H; Shibutani, M; Naoi, M; Matsuda, H

    2003-11-01

    Benign mammary mixed tumors in dogs resemble human salivary pleomorphic adenomas with regard to their histogenesis, including the occurrence of cartilaginous or bony metaplasia as well as the expression pattern of cytoskeletal proteins in proliferative myoepithelial cells. Recently, a monoclonal antibody specific for class II beta-tubulin has been developed. The epitope it recognizes was determined to be the heptapeptide Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Gly-Glu-Asp, which is the common sequence found among the canine, rat, mouse, and human class II beta-tubulin-specific regions. We carried out immunohistochemical studies on mammary mixed tumors obtained from three female dogs using this the monoclonal antibody. The antibody to class II beta-tubulin reacted intensely with proliferative myoepithelial cells in canine mammary mixed tumors, whereas staining was barely detectable in normal myoepithelial cells surrounding alveoli and alveolar ducts within the tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Proliferative myoepithelial cells also expressed vimentin, but alpha-smooth muscle actin (alphaSMA) staining was barely detectable. Immunoblot analysis showed that class II beta-tubulin and vimentin were expressed in myoepithelial cell lines prepared from the three mammary mixed tumors. On the other hand, only one cell line, which was negative for alphaSMA, produced cartilage-specific type II collagen. These results suggest that class II beta-tubulin could be a new molecular marker of proliferating myoepithelial cells in canine mammary mixed tumors and that differential expression of cytoskeletal components is associated with cartilaginous metaplasia of proliferative myoepithelial cells in mixed mammary tumors.

  14. Ligand-independent canonical Wnt activity in canine mammary tumor cell lines associated with aberrant LEF1 expression.

    PubMed

    Gracanin, Ana; Timmermans-Sprang, Elpetra P M; van Wolferen, Monique E; Rao, Nagesha A S; Grizelj, Juraj; Vince, Silvijo; Hellmen, Eva; Mol, Jan A

    2014-01-01

    Pet dogs very frequently develop spontaneous mammary tumors and have been suggested as a good model organism for breast cancer research. In order to obtain an insight into underlying signaling mechanisms during canine mammary tumorigenesis, in this study we assessed the incidence and the mechanism of canonical Wnt activation in a panel of 12 canine mammary tumor cell lines. We show that a subset of canine mammary cell lines exhibit a moderate canonical Wnt activity that is dependent on Wnt ligands, similar to what has been described in human breast cancer cell lines. In addition, three of the tested canine mammary cell lines have a high canonical Wnt activity that is not responsive to inhibitors of Wnt ligand secretion. Tumor cell lines with highly active canonical Wnt signaling often carry mutations in key members of the Wnt signaling cascade. These cell lines, however, carry no mutations in the coding regions of intracellular Wnt pathway components (APC, β-catenin, GSK3β, CK1α and Axin1) and have a functional β-catenin destruction complex. Interestingly, however, the cell lines with high canonical Wnt activity specifically overexpress LEF1 mRNA and the knock-down of LEF1 significantly inhibits TCF-reporter activity. In addition, LEF1 is overexpressed in a subset of canine mammary carcinomas, implicating LEF1 in ligand-independent activation of canonical Wnt signaling in canine mammary tumors. We conclude that canonical Wnt activation may be a frequent event in canine mammary tumors both through Wnt ligand-dependent and novel ligand-independent mechanisms.

  15. Ligand-Independent Canonical Wnt Activity in Canine Mammary Tumor Cell Lines Associated with Aberrant LEF1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    van Wolferen, Monique E.; Rao, Nagesha A. S.; Grizelj, Juraj; Vince, Silvijo; Hellmen, Eva; Mol, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    Pet dogs very frequently develop spontaneous mammary tumors and have been suggested as a good model organism for breast cancer research. In order to obtain an insight into underlying signaling mechanisms during canine mammary tumorigenesis, in this study we assessed the incidence and the mechanism of canonical Wnt activation in a panel of 12 canine mammary tumor cell lines. We show that a subset of canine mammary cell lines exhibit a moderate canonical Wnt activity that is dependent on Wnt ligands, similar to what has been described in human breast cancer cell lines. In addition, three of the tested canine mammary cell lines have a high canonical Wnt activity that is not responsive to inhibitors of Wnt ligand secretion. Tumor cell lines with highly active canonical Wnt signaling often carry mutations in key members of the Wnt signaling cascade. These cell lines, however, carry no mutations in the coding regions of intracellular Wnt pathway components (APC, β-catenin, GSK3β, CK1α and Axin1) and have a functional β-catenin destruction complex. Interestingly, however, the cell lines with high canonical Wnt activity specifically overexpress LEF1 mRNA and the knock-down of LEF1 significantly inhibits TCF-reporter activity. In addition, LEF1 is overexpressed in a subset of canine mammary carcinomas, implicating LEF1 in ligand-independent activation of canonical Wnt signaling in canine mammary tumors. We conclude that canonical Wnt activation may be a frequent event in canine mammary tumors both through Wnt ligand-dependent and novel ligand–independent mechanisms. PMID:24887235

  16. Ligand-independent canonical Wnt activity in canine mammary tumor cell lines associated with aberrant LEF1 expression.

    PubMed

    Gracanin, Ana; Timmermans-Sprang, Elpetra P M; van Wolferen, Monique E; Rao, Nagesha A S; Grizelj, Juraj; Vince, Silvijo; Hellmen, Eva; Mol, Jan A

    2014-01-01

    Pet dogs very frequently develop spontaneous mammary tumors and have been suggested as a good model organism for breast cancer research. In order to obtain an insight into underlying signaling mechanisms during canine mammary tumorigenesis, in this study we assessed the incidence and the mechanism of canonical Wnt activation in a panel of 12 canine mammary tumor cell lines. We show that a subset of canine mammary cell lines exhibit a moderate canonical Wnt activity that is dependent on Wnt ligands, similar to what has been described in human breast cancer cell lines. In addition, three of the tested canine mammary cell lines have a high canonical Wnt activity that is not responsive to inhibitors of Wnt ligand secretion. Tumor cell lines with highly active canonical Wnt signaling often carry mutations in key members of the Wnt signaling cascade. These cell lines, however, carry no mutations in the coding regions of intracellular Wnt pathway components (APC, β-catenin, GSK3β, CK1α and Axin1) and have a functional β-catenin destruction complex. Interestingly, however, the cell lines with high canonical Wnt activity specifically overexpress LEF1 mRNA and the knock-down of LEF1 significantly inhibits TCF-reporter activity. In addition, LEF1 is overexpressed in a subset of canine mammary carcinomas, implicating LEF1 in ligand-independent activation of canonical Wnt signaling in canine mammary tumors. We conclude that canonical Wnt activation may be a frequent event in canine mammary tumors both through Wnt ligand-dependent and novel ligand-independent mechanisms. PMID:24887235

  17. Cultivation of vaccinia virus in sheep kidney cell cultures.

    PubMed

    SUBRAMANYAM, P; DIVAKARAN, S; VINODRAJ, P

    1961-01-01

    Attempts to find a suitable tissue for the preparation of cell monolayers for the cultivation of vaccinia virus and for the titration of this virus and its antibodies resulted in the use of sheep kidneys procured from freshly slaughtered healthy young sheep. The cultures are easy and economical to prepare and support the multiplication of the virus well. They can be used for the titration of the virus and its antibody and their sensitivity to virus is comparable to that of the chorio-allantoic membranes of chicken embryos. Preliminary trials indicate that the sheep kidney cell culture virus can be freeze-dried without suffering a significant loss in titre. Studies are in progress to determine the efficacy of a vaccine prepared from sheep kidney cell cultures.

  18. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel BTK Inhibitor Acalabrutinib in Canine Models of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Bonnie K; Gardner, Heather L; Izumi, Raquel; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; Coombes, Kevin R; Covey, Todd; Kaptein, Allard; Gulrajani, Michael; Van Lith, Bart; Krejsa, Cecile; Coss, Christopher C; Russell, Duncan S; Zhang, Xiaoli; Urie, Bridget K; London, Cheryl A; Byrd, John C; Johnson, Amy J; Kisseberth, William C

    2016-01-01

    Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) is a second-generation inhibitor of Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) with increased target selectivity and potency compared to ibrutinib. In this study, we evaluated acalabrutinib in spontaneously occurring canine lymphoma, a model of B-cell malignancy similar to human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). First, we demonstrated that acalabrutinib potently inhibited BTK activity and downstream effectors in CLBL1, a canine B-cell lymphoma cell line, and primary canine lymphoma cells. Acalabrutinib also inhibited proliferation in CLBL1 cells. Twenty dogs were enrolled in the clinical trial and treated with acalabrutinib at dosages of 2.5 to 20mg/kg every 12 or 24 hours. Acalabrutinib was generally well tolerated, with adverse events consisting primarily of grade 1 or 2 anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy. Overall response rate (ORR) was 25% (5/20) with a median progression free survival (PFS) of 22.5 days. Clinical benefit was observed in 30% (6/20) of dogs. These findings suggest that acalabrutinib is safe and exhibits activity in canine B-cell lymphoma patients and support the use of canine lymphoma as a relevant model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). PMID:27434128

  19. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel BTK Inhibitor Acalabrutinib in Canine Models of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Heather L.; Izumi, Raquel; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; Coombes, Kevin R.; Covey, Todd; Kaptein, Allard; Gulrajani, Michael; Van Lith, Bart; Krejsa, Cecile; Coss, Christopher C.; Russell, Duncan S.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Urie, Bridget K.; London, Cheryl A.; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.; Kisseberth, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) is a second-generation inhibitor of Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) with increased target selectivity and potency compared to ibrutinib. In this study, we evaluated acalabrutinib in spontaneously occurring canine lymphoma, a model of B-cell malignancy similar to human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). First, we demonstrated that acalabrutinib potently inhibited BTK activity and downstream effectors in CLBL1, a canine B-cell lymphoma cell line, and primary canine lymphoma cells. Acalabrutinib also inhibited proliferation in CLBL1 cells. Twenty dogs were enrolled in the clinical trial and treated with acalabrutinib at dosages of 2.5 to 20mg/kg every 12 or 24 hours. Acalabrutinib was generally well tolerated, with adverse events consisting primarily of grade 1 or 2 anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy. Overall response rate (ORR) was 25% (5/20) with a median progression free survival (PFS) of 22.5 days. Clinical benefit was observed in 30% (6/20) of dogs. These findings suggest that acalabrutinib is safe and exhibits activity in canine B-cell lymphoma patients and support the use of canine lymphoma as a relevant model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). PMID:27434128

  20. Expression and functionality of TRPV1 receptor in human MCF-7 and canine CF.41 cells.

    PubMed

    Vercelli, C; Barbero, R; Cuniberti, B; Odore, R; Re, G

    2015-06-01

    As canine mammary tumours (CMT) and human breast cancer share clinical and prognostic features, the former have been proposed as a model to study carcinogenesis and improved therapeutic treatment in human breast cancer. In recent years, it has been shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in different neoplastic tissues and its activation has been associated with regulation of cancer growth and progression. The aim of the present research was to demonstrate the presence of TRPV1 in human and canine mammary cancer cells, MCF-7 and CF.41, respectively, and to study the role of TRPV1 in regulating cell proliferation. The images obtained by Western blot showed a signal at 100 kDa corresponding to the molecular weight of TRPV1 receptor. All tested TRPV1 agonists and antagonists caused a significant decrease (P < 0.05) of cell growth rate in MCF-7 cells. By contrast, in CF.41 cells capsaicin and capsazepine induced a significant increase (P < 0.05) in cell proliferation, whereas resiniferatoxin (RTX) and 5-iodo-resiniferatoxin (5-I-RTX) had no influence on CF.41 cell proliferation. Further studies are needed to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for the different effects evoked by TRPV1 activation in MCF-7 and CF.41 cells. PMID:23510405

  1. Chondrogenic potential and anti-senescence effect of hypoxia on canine adipose mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jienny; Byeon, Jeong Su; Lee, Keum Sil; Gu, Na-Yeon; Lee, Gyeong Been; Kim, Hee-Ryang; Cho, In-Soo; Cha, Sang-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to differentiate into multi-lineage cells, which confers great promise for use in regenerative medicine. In this study, canine adipose MSCs (cAD-MSCs) were isolated from canine adipose tissue. These cells clearly represented stemness (Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog) and differentiation potential into the mesoderm (adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts) at early passages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hypoxia on the differentiation potential into mesoderm, and the expression of anti-apoptotic genes associated with cell survival for the optimal culturing of MSCs. We observed that the proliferation of the cAD-MSCs meaningfully increased when cultured under hypoxic condition than in normoxic condition, during 7 consecutive passages. Also, we found that hypoxia strongly expressed anti-senescence related genes such as HDAC1 (histone deacetylase 1), DNMT1 (DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1), Bcl-2 (inhibitor of apoptosis), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase), LDHA (lactate dehydrogenase A), SLC2A1 (glucose transporter), and DKC1 (telomere holoenzyme complex) and differentiation potential of cAD-MSCs into chondrocytes, than seen under the normoxic culture conditions. We also examined the multipotency of hypoxic conditioned MSCs using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. We found that the expression levels of stemness genes such as Oct-4, Nanog, and Sox-2 were increased in hypoxic condition when compared to the normoxic condition. Collectively, these results suggest that hypoxic conditions have the ability to induce proliferation of MSCs and augment their chondrogenic potential. This study suggests that cell proliferation of cAD-MSC under hypoxia could be beneficial, when considering these cells for cell therapies of canine bone diseases.

  2. Frequency of IFNγ-producing T cells correlates with seroreactivity and activated T cells during canine Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Ashley N; Cooley, Gretchen; Gwyn, Sarah; Orozco, Marcela M; Tarleton, Rick L

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines to prevent Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans or animals are not available, and in many settings, dogs are an important source of domestic infection for the insect vector. Identification of infected canines is crucial for evaluating peridomestic transmission dynamics and parasite control strategies. As immune control of T. cruzi infection is dependent on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, we aimed to define a serodiagnostic assay and T cell phenotypic markers for identifying infected dogs and studying the canine T. cruzi-specific immune response. Plasma samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from forty-two dogs living in a T. cruzi-endemic region. Twenty dogs were known to be seropositive and nine seronegative by conventional serologic tests two years prior to our study. To determine canine seroreactivity, we tested sera or plasma samples in a multiplex bead array against eleven recombinant T. cruzi proteins. Ninety-four percent (17/18) of dogs positive by multiplex serology were initially positive by conventional serology. The frequency of IFNγ-producing cells in PBMCs responding to T. cruzi correlated to serological status, identifying 95% of multiplex seropositive dogs. Intracellular staining identified CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations as the sources of T. cruzi lysate-induced IFNγ. Low expression of CCR7 and CD62L on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells suggested a predominance of effector/effector memory T cells in seropositive canines. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to correlate T. cruzi-specific antibody responses with T cell responses in naturally infected dogs and validate these methods for identifying dogs exposed to T. cruzi. PMID:24456537

  3. Enhanced replication of avian-origin H3N2 canine influenza virus in eggs, cell cultures and mice by a two-amino acid insertion in neuraminidase stalk.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Xie, Xing; Zhao, Yanbing; Kalhoro, Dildar Hussain; Lu, Chengping; Liu, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Canine influenza virus (CIV) is a newly identified, highly contagious respiratory pathogen in dogs. Recent studies indicate that avian-origin H3N2 CIV are circulating in Chinese dogs. To investigate the effects of a two-amino acid (2-aa) insertion naturally occurring at the distal end of the neuraminidase (NA) stalk found in Chinese isolates since 2010 on virus replication and virulence, we rescued the CIV strain, A/canine/Jiangsu/06/2011(H3N2) and its NA mutant without the 2-aa insertion using reverse genetics. The NA stalk length affected virus growth in cell culture. Compared to the short stalk strain (without 2-aa insertion), the long stalk strain (with 2-aa insertion) exhibited higher peak titers and greater yields in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, chicken embryo fibroblasts and canine bronchiolar epithelial cells, as well as much larger plaques in MDCK cell monolayers. Furthermore, mice inoculated with the long stalk strain showed more severe pathologic damage in lung and higher proportion of detectable viral RNA in tissues. The long stalk strain induced local IFN-γ production with faster kinetics and higher levels in mice. However, in chickens, the two viral strains showed no significant difference with nearly the same proportion of detectable viral RNA loads in tissues. These observations suggest that the 2-aa insertion in the NA stalk acquired by avian-origin H3N2 CIV helps to enhance viral replication and is likely a result of adaptive evolution in canine hosts. PMID:27160077

  4. Urine excretion strategy for stem cell-generated embryonic kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Shinya; Matsunari, Hitomi; Iwai, Satomi; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Uchikura, Ayuko; Fujimoto, Eisuke; Matsumoto, Kei; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    There have been several recent attempts to generate, de novo, a functional whole kidney from stem cells using the organogenic niche or blastocyst complementation methods. However, none of these attempts succeeded in constructing a urinary excretion pathway for the stem cell-generated embryonic kidney. First, we transplanted metanephroi from cloned pig fetuses into gilts; the metanephroi grew to about 3 cm and produced urine, although hydronephrosis eventually was observed because of the lack of an excretion pathway. Second, we demonstrated the construction of urine excretion pathways in rats. Rat metanephroi or metanephroi with bladders (developed from cloacas) were transplanted into host rats. Histopathologic analysis showed that tubular lumina dilation and interstitial fibrosis were reduced in kidneys developed from cloacal transplants compared with metanephroi transplantation. Then we connected the host animal’s ureter to the cloacal-developed bladder, a technique we called the “stepwise peristaltic ureter” (SWPU) system. The application of the SWPU system avoided hydronephrosis and permitted the cloacas to differentiate well, with cloacal urine being excreted persistently through the recipient ureter. Finally, we demonstrated a viable preclinical application of the SWPU system in cloned pigs. The SWPU system also inhibited hydronephrosis in the pig study. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the SWPU system may resolve two important problems in the generation of kidneys from stem cells: construction of a urine excretion pathway and continued growth of the newly generated kidney. PMID:26392557

  5. Biologic activity of the novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor LLL12 against canine osteosarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background STAT3 [1] has been shown to be dysregulated in nearly every major cancer, including osteosarcoma (OS). Constitutive activation of STAT3, via aberrant phosphorylation, leads to proliferation, cell survival and resistance to apoptosis. The present study sought to characterize the biologic activity of a novel allosteric STAT3 inhibitor, LLL12, in canine OS cell lines. Results We evaluated the effects of LLL12 treatment on 4 canine OS cell lines and found that LLL12 inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, reduced STAT3 phosphorylation, and decreased the expression of several transcriptional targets of STAT3 in these cells. Lastly, LLL12 exhibited synergistic anti-proliferative activity with the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin in the OS lines. Conclusion LLL12 exhibits biologic activity against canine OS cell lines through inhibition of STAT3 related cellular functions supporting its potential use as a novel therapy for OS. PMID:23244668

  6. Modeling Kidney Disease with iPS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin S.

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are somatic cells that have been transcriptionally reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like state. iPSCs are a renewable source of diverse somatic cell types and tissues matching the original patient, including nephron-like kidney organoids. iPSCs have been derived representing several kidney disorders, such as ADPKD, ARPKD, Alport syndrome, and lupus nephritis, with the goals of generating replacement tissue and ‘disease in a dish’ laboratory models. Cellular defects in iPSCs and derived kidney organoids provide functional, personalized biomarkers, which can be correlated with genetic and clinical information. In proof of principle, disease-specific phenotypes have been described in iPSCs and ESCs with mutations linked to polycystic kidney disease or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In addition, these cells can be used to model nephrotoxic chemical injury. Recent advances in directed differentiation and CRISPR genome editing enable more specific iPSC models and present new possibilities for diagnostics, disease modeling, therapeutic screens, and tissue regeneration using human cells. This review outlines growth opportunities and design strategies for this rapidly expanding and evolving field. PMID:26740740

  7. Canine neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Prier, J. E.; Brodey, R. S.

    1963-01-01

    The authors review current knowledge of spontaneous neoplasms in the dog. The prevalence of certain types of canine tumour has been studied, and comparisons have been made with the occurrence of similar neoplasms in man. Where there are appropriate analogies between the two species, the dog with spontaneous tumours can be used for studies that are not practicable in man. Nutritional and morphological studies have been done on cells cultured from canine tumours. Some consistency has been demonstrated in the morphology of cultures of different tumours of the same type. Nutritional studies with the transmissible venereal sarcoma of the dog have shown the cells to be subject to a growth-repressing effect by SH-containing amino-acids. Attempts to transmit tumours to other dogs or other species have generally been unsuccessful. A transplantable tumour developed in a mouse injected with non-cellular material from a canine thyroid carcinoma, but it is not certain that the tumour was induced. Cell-culture studies have shown that some tumours yield a factor that is cytopathogenic for normal cells, but none has been shown capable of inducing neoplasms in vivo. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 6 PMID:14058226

  8. Detection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptors Flt-1 and KDR in canine mastocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzi, Laura; Willmann, Michael; Sonneck, Karoline; Gleixner, Karoline V; Florian, Stefan; Kondo, Rudin; Mayerhofer, Matthias; Vales, Anja; Gruze, Alexander; Pickl, Winfried F; Thalhammer, Johann G; Valent, Peter

    2007-02-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a major regulator of angiogenesis and a potential autocrine growth factor for neoplastic cells in various malignancies. In the present study, we have investigated expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors in canine mastocytomas and the canine mastocytoma cell line C2. As assessed by immunostaining of tissue sections and cytospin slides, primary neoplastic mast cells (MC) and C2 cells were found to express the VEGF protein. In Northern blot and RT-PCR experiments, C2 cells expressed VEGF mRNA in a constitutive manner. VEGF mRNA expression in C2 cells was counteracted by LY294002 and rapamycin, suggesting involvement of the PI3-kinase/mTOR pathway. Moreover, C2 cells were found to express VEGF receptor-1 (Flt-1) and VEGF receptor-2 (KDR). However, recombinant VEGF failed to promote (3)H-thymidine uptake in C2 cells, and a neutralizing anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab) failed to downregulate spontaneous proliferation in these cells. In addition, rapamycin decreased the expression of VEGF in C2 cells at the mRNA and protein level without suppressing their proliferation. Together, canine mastocytoma cells express VEGF as well as VEGF receptors. However, despite co-expression of VEGF and its receptors, VEGF is not utilized as an autocrine growth regulator by canine mastocytoma cells. PMID:17196258

  9. Identification and isolation of kidney-derived stem cells from transgenic rats with diphtheria toxin-induced kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing-Zhen; Chen, Xu-Dong; Liu, Gang; Guan, Guang-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells have been well characterized in numerous organs, with the exception of the kidneys. Therefore, the present study aimed to identify and isolate kidney-derived stem cells. A total of 12 Fischer 344 transgenic rats expressing the human diphtheria toxin receptor in podocyte cells of the kidney, were used in the present study. The rats were administered 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in order to detect cellular proliferation. After 60 days, the rats were treated with the diphtheria toxin (DT), in order to induce kidney injury. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that the number of BrdU-positive cells were increased following DT treatment. In addition, the expression of octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct-4), a stem cell marker, was detected and suggested that kidney-specific stem cells were present in the DT-treated tissue samples. Furthermore, tissue samples exhibited repair of the DT-induced injury. Further cellular culturing was conducted in order to isolate the kidney-specific stem cells. After 5 weeks of culture, the majority of the cells were non-viable, with the exception of certain specialized, unique cell types, which were monomorphic and spindle-shaped in appearance. The unique cells were isolated and subjected to immunostaining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses in order to reconfirm the expression of Oct-4 and to detect the expression of Paired box 2 (Pax-2), which is necessary for the formation of kidney structures. The unique cells were positive for Oct-4 and Pax-2; thus suggesting that the identified cells were kidney-derived stem cells. The results of the present study suggested that the unique cell type identified in the kidneys of the DT-treated rats were kidney-specific stem cells that may have been involved in the repair of DT-induced tissue injury. In addition, these cells may provide a useful cell line for studying the fundamental characteristics of kidney stem cells, as well as identifying

  10. Measurements and modeling of water transport and osmoregulation in a single kidney cell using optical tweezers and videomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lúcio, A. D.; Santos, R. A.; Mesquita, O. N.

    2003-10-01

    With an optical tweezer installed in our optical microscope we grab a single Madin Darby Canine kidney cell and keep it suspended in the medium without touching the glass substrate or other cells. Since the optically trapped cell remains with a closely round shape, we can directly measure its volume by using videomicroscopy with digital image analysis. We submit this cell to a hyperosmotic shock (up-shock) and video record the process: the cell initially shrinks due to osmotic efflux of water and after a while, due to regulatory volume increase (RVI), an osmoregulation response, it inflates again (water influx) until it reaches a new volume (the regulatory volume VR). In addition to considering standard osmotic water transport, we model RVI using a simple phenomenological model. We obtain an expression for cell volume variation as a function of time that fits very well with our experimental data, where two characteristic times appear naturally: one related to water transport and the other related to RVI. From the fit we obtain water permeability, osmolyte influx rate for RVI, and regulatory volume. With the addition of the hormone vasopressin, water permeability increases while the regulatory volume decreases until inhibition of RVI. In summary, we present a technique to measure directly volume changes of a single isolated kidney cell under osmotic shock and a phenomenological analysis of water transport that takes into account osmoregulation.

  11. SiRNA knockdown of the DEK nuclear protein mRNA enhances apoptosis and chemosensitivity of canine transitional cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroki; Iwano, Tomomi; Otsuka, Saori; Kagawa, Yumiko; Hoshino, Yuki; Hosoya, Kenji; Okumura, Masahiro; Takagi, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) in dogs is an aggressive malignant neoplasm, originating in the epithelium of the urinary bladder. The DEK nuclear protein is overexpressed in several types of human bladder cancer, where it is involved in chromatin reconstruction, gene transcription and apoptosis. Since DEK represents a potential therapeutic target for canine TCC, this study was designed to investigate DEK expression in canine TCC and to determine the effects of DEK mRNA silencing on TCC cells in vitro. The gene expression profiles of seven selected cancer-associated genes was assessed in four canine TCC cell lines and expression of DEK protein was evaluated in bladder tissue biopsies from healthy dogs and those affected with cystitis or TCC. After transfection of four canine TCC cell lines with DEK-specific or scrambled siRNA, annexin V staining was performed to evaluate apoptosis, and methylthiazole tetrazolium assays were performed to assess both cell viability and sensitivity to carboplatin. DEK mRNA expression was relatively high in canine TCC cells and expression of the DEK protein was significantly greater in TCC tumours compared with the other tissue samples. After transfection with DEK-specific siRNA, apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, and enhanced sensitivity to carboplatin were observed in all TCC cells assessed. These research findings suggest that DEK could be a potential therapeutic target for canine TCC.

  12. Derivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from canine induced pluripotent stem cells by inhibition of the TGFβ/activin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Frith, Jessica E; Frith, Thomas J R; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Cooper-White, Justin J; Wolvetang, Ernst J

    2014-12-15

    In this study we have generated canine mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), also known as mesenchymal stem cells, from canine induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) by small-molecule inhibition of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/activin signaling pathway. These ciPSC-derived MSCs (ciPSC-MSCs) express the MSC markers CD73, CD90, CD105, STRO1, cPDGFRβ and cKDR, in addition to the pluripotency factors OCT4, NANOG and REX1. ciPSC-MSCs lack immunostaining for H3K27me3, suggesting that they possess two active X chromosomes. ciPSC-MSCs are highly proliferative and undergo robust differentiation along the osteo-, chondro- and adipogenic pathways, but do not form teratoma-like tissues in vitro. Of further significance for the translational potential of ciPSC-MSCs, we show that these cells can be encapsulated and maintained within injectable hydrogel matrices that, when functionalized with bound pentosan polysulfate, dramatically enhance chondrogenesis and inhibit osteogenesis. The ability to efficiently derive large numbers of highly proliferative canine MSCs from ciPSCs that can be incorporated into injectable, functionalized hydrogels that enhance their differentiation along a desired lineage constitutes an important milestone towards developing an effective MSC-based therapy for osteoarthritis in dogs, but equally provides a model system for assessing the efficacy and safety of analogous approaches for treating human degenerative joint diseases. PMID:25055193

  13. Derivation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Canine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Inhibition of the TGFβ/Activin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Frith, Jessica E.; Frith, Thomas J.R.; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Wolvetang, Ernst J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have generated canine mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), also known as mesenchymal stem cells, from canine induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) by small-molecule inhibition of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/activin signaling pathway. These ciPSC-derived MSCs (ciPSC-MSCs) express the MSC markers CD73, CD90, CD105, STRO1, cPDGFRβ and cKDR, in addition to the pluripotency factors OCT4, NANOG and REX1. ciPSC-MSCs lack immunostaining for H3K27me3, suggesting that they possess two active X chromosomes. ciPSC-MSCs are highly proliferative and undergo robust differentiation along the osteo-, chondro- and adipogenic pathways, but do not form teratoma-like tissues in vitro. Of further significance for the translational potential of ciPSC-MSCs, we show that these cells can be encapsulated and maintained within injectable hydrogel matrices that, when functionalized with bound pentosan polysulfate, dramatically enhance chondrogenesis and inhibit osteogenesis. The ability to efficiently derive large numbers of highly proliferative canine MSCs from ciPSCs that can be incorporated into injectable, functionalized hydrogels that enhance their differentiation along a desired lineage constitutes an important milestone towards developing an effective MSC-based therapy for osteoarthritis in dogs, but equally provides a model system for assessing the efficacy and safety of analogous approaches for treating human degenerative joint diseases. PMID:25055193

  14. The natural antioxidants, pomegranate extract and soy isoflavones, favourably modulate canine endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina M; Waldenberger, Ferdinand Rudolf; Freudenthaler, Angelika; Ginouvès-Guerdoux, Amandine; McGahie, David; Gatto, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, preceded by vascular endothelial dysfunction, is a prominent cause of death in dogs. L-carnitine and taurine, well known for their antioxidative capacity, beneficially affect cardiovascular disease as well as certain dog cardiomyopathies. It is well established that vascular endothelial dysfunction precedes cardiovascular disease and that "vasoprotective factors" (NO and antioxidants) prevent apoptosis, whereas "risk factors" such as oxidized LDL, hyperglycemia, and free fatty acids trigger it in cultured human vascular endothelial cells. Whereas human vascular cell in vitro models are widely established and used for the characterisation of potential vasoprotective substances, such models are not available for canine endothelial cells. In the present study we therefore developed an in vitro model, which allows the testing of the effects of different substances on proliferation and apoptosis in canine aortic endothelial cells. This model was used to test L-carnitine, taurine, pomegranate extract, and Soy Isoflavones in comparison to reference substances (glutathione and pioglitazone) previously shown to modulate human endothelial cell function. L-carnitine and taurine neither exhibited antiproliferative nor antiapoptotic activities in the context of this study. However extracts from pomegranate and soy isoflavones dramatically reduced proliferation and apoptosis in a dose dependent fashion, being in line with a vasoprotective activity in dogs.

  15. Comparison of primary skunk brain and kidney and raccoon kidney cells with established cell lines for isolation and propagation of street rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Umoh, J U; Blenden, D C

    1983-09-01

    Cell cultures prepared from skunk kidney, raccoon kidney, and skunk brain were compared with CER, murine neuroblastoma (C1300, clone NA), baby hamster kidney (BHK-21, S-13), and dog kidney (MDCK) cell lines for virus isolation and propagation of street and fixed rabies virus. The skunk brain cells were suitable for efficient replication of all the virus isolates. They were comparable to CER and murine neuroblastoma cells for virus isolation and propagation. None of the other cell cultures was satisfactory. Further work is under way to refine the skunk brain cell cultures.

  16. Differential infectious entry of human influenza A/NWS/33 virus (H1N1) in mammalian kidney cells.

    PubMed

    De Conto, Flora; Covan, Silvia; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Orlandini, Guido; Gatti, Rita; Dettori, Giuseppe; Chezzi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    In this report we focused our interest on the early events of the replication cycle of NWS/33 human influenza A (NWS) virus in MDCK (canine), LLC-MK2 (simian), and NSK (swine) kidney cells, with different susceptibility upon infection. We have previously demonstrated that actin organization induces restriction to viral replication during the early stages of NWS virus infection in simian kidney cells. To explore how cell endocytic mechanisms are hijacked by NWS virus and may modulate the outcome of viral infection, the effect of drugs affecting selectively the entry via clathrin-coated pits, caveolar/raft-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis was analyzed. Results point to critical differences in terms of internalization pathways exploited by NWS virus to enter the examined cell models. Moreover, we show that some ways of entry do not allow an effective virus internalization, depending on the cell type. Understanding how specific cell functions/components may regulate early phases of viral replication allows us to deepen our knowledge on influenza virus infection and provides new insights for anti-viral researches. PMID:20951747

  17. Minimal residual disease in canine lymphoma: An objective marker to assess tumour cell burden in remission.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masahiko; Yamazaki, Jumpei; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Setoguchi, Asuka; Takahashi, Masashi; Baba, Kenji; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2016-09-01

    Lymphoma is the most common haematopoietic malignancy in dogs. Since a high proportion of dogs with lymphoma achieve remission soon after initiation of chemotherapy, an objective marker assessing treatment efficacy is required. Following clinical remission, the residual population of tumour cells can be referred to as the minimal residual disease (MRD). MRD traditionally has been detected by cytology and flow cytometry; however, if the burden of malignant cells is low, these methods might not be sufficiently sensitive to detect MRD. As an extension of the development of PCR for antigen receptor gene rearrangements (PARR) in dogs, there has been recent progress in the application of real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) to canine lymphoma. With the RT-qPCR system, a very high sensitivity (1 cell per 10,000 cells) has been achieved by preparing allele-specific oligonucleotide primers and probes designed from neoplastic clones of each dog. A series of MRD diagnostics studies employing the RT-qPCR system has revealed its usefulness as a prognostic indicator, an objective marker of treatment efficacy and a predictor of relapse for dogs with lymphoma receiving chemotherapy. Introduction of the MRD monitoring system will provide an innovative scientific tool in the development of superior treatments and monitoring strategies for canine lymphoma.

  18. Radiation-induced DNA damage in canine hemopoietic cells and stromal cells as measured by the comet assay

    SciTech Connect

    Kreja, L.; Selig, C.; Plappert, U.; Nothdurft, W.

    1996-12-31

    Stromal cell progenitors (fibroblastoid colony-forming unit; CFU-Fs) are representative of the progenitor cell population of the hemopoietic microenvironment in bone marrow (BM). Previous studies of the radiation dose-effect relationships for colony formation have shown that canine CFU-Fs are relatively radioresistant as characterized by a D{sub 0} value of about 2.4 Gy. In contrast, hemopoietic progenitors are particularly radiosensitive (D{sub 0} values = 0.12-0.60 Gy). In the present study, the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis technique for the in situ quantitation of DNA strand breaks and alkalilabile site was employed. Canine buffy coat cells from BM aspirates and cells harvested from CFU-F colonies or from mixed populations of adherent BM stromal cell (SC) layers were exposed to increasing doses of X-rays, embedded in agarose gel on slides, lysed with detergents, and placed in an electric field. DNA migrating from single cells in the gel was made visible as {open_quotes}comets{close_quotes} by ethidium bromide staining. Immediate DNA damage was much less in cultured stromal cells than in hemopoietic cells in BM aspirates. These results suggest that the observed differences in clonogenic survival could be partly due to differences in the type of the initial DNA damage between stromal cells and hemopoietic cells. 37 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Urokinase production by electrophoretically separated cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Giranda, V.; Sedor, K.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Urokinase is a plasminogen activator found in urine. Relatively pure preparations have been tested in Europe, Japan and the United States for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and other dangerous blood clots. Human embryonic kidney cell cultures have been found to produce urokinase at much higher concentrations, but less than 5% of the cells in typical cultures are producers. Since human diploid cells become senescent in culture the selection of clones derived from single cells will not provide enough material to be useful, so a bulk purification method is needed for the isolation of urokinase producing cell populations. Preparative cell electrophoresis was chosen as the method, since evidence exists that human embryonic cell cultures are richly heterogeneous with respect to electrophoretic mobility, and preliminary electrophoretic separations on the Apollo-Soyuz space flight produced cell populations that were rich in urokinase production. Similarly, erythropoietin is useful in the treatment of certain anemias and is a kidney cell duct, and electrophoretically enriched cell populations producing this product have been reported. Thus, there is a clear need for diploid human cells that produce these products, and there is evidence that such cells should be separable by free-flow cell electrophoresis.

  20. Functional rescue of a kidney anion exchanger 1 trafficking mutant in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Carmen Y S; King, Jennifer C; Berrini, Mattia; Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the SLC4A1 gene encoding the anion exchanger 1 (AE1) can cause distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), a disease often due to mis-trafficking of the mutant protein. In this study, we investigated whether trafficking of a Golgi-retained dRTA mutant, G701D kAE1, or two dRTA mutants retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, C479W and R589H kAE1, could be functionally rescued to the plasma membrane of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells. Treatments with DMSO, glycerol, the corrector VX-809, or low temperature incubations restored the basolateral trafficking of G701D kAE1 mutant. These treatments had no significant rescuing effect on trafficking of the mis-folded C479W or R589H kAE1 mutants. DMSO was the only treatment that partially restored G701D kAE1 function in the plasma membrane of MDCK cells. Our experiments show that trafficking of intracellularly retained dRTA kAE1 mutants can be partially restored, and that one chemical treatment rescued both trafficking and function of a dRTA mutant. These studies provide an opportunity to develop alternative therapeutic solutions for dRTA patients. PMID:23460825

  1. Single cell dissection of early kidney development: multilineage priming.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, Eric W; Park, Joo-Seop; Chung, Eunah; Chen, Feng; Magella, Bliss; Potter, S Steven

    2014-08-01

    We used a single cell RNA-seq strategy to create an atlas of gene expression patterns in the developing kidney. At several stages of kidney development, histologically uniform populations of cells give rise to multiple distinct lineages. We performed single cell RNA-seq analysis of total mouse kidneys at E11.5 and E12.5, as well as the renal vesicles at P4. We define an early stage of progenitor cell induction driven primarily by gene repression. Surprising stochastic expression of marker genes associated with differentiated cell types was observed in E11.5 progenitors. We provide a global view of the polarized gene expression already present in the renal vesicle, the first epithelial precursor of the nephron. We show that Hox gene read-through transcripts can be spliced to produce intergenic homeobox swaps. We also identify a surprising number of genes with partially degraded noncoding RNA. Perhaps most interesting, at early developmental times single cells often expressed genes related to several developmental pathways. This provides powerful evidence that initial organogenesis involves a process of multilineage priming. This is followed by a combination of gene repression, which turns off the genes associated with most possible lineages, and the activation of increasing numbers of genes driving the chosen developmental direction. PMID:25053437

  2. Single cell dissection of early kidney development: multilineage priming

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, Eric W.; Park, Joo-Seop; Chung, Eunah; Chen, Feng; Magella, Bliss; Potter, S. Steven

    2014-01-01

    We used a single cell RNA-seq strategy to create an atlas of gene expression patterns in the developing kidney. At several stages of kidney development, histologically uniform populations of cells give rise to multiple distinct lineages. We performed single cell RNA-seq analysis of total mouse kidneys at E11.5 and E12.5, as well as the renal vesicles at P4. We define an early stage of progenitor cell induction driven primarily by gene repression. Surprising stochastic expression of marker genes associated with differentiated cell types was observed in E11.5 progenitors. We provide a global view of the polarized gene expression already present in the renal vesicle, the first epithelial precursor of the nephron. We show that Hox gene read-through transcripts can be spliced to produce intergenic homeobox swaps. We also identify a surprising number of genes with partially degraded noncoding RNA. Perhaps most interesting, at early developmental times single cells often expressed genes related to several developmental pathways. This provides powerful evidence that initial organogenesis involves a process of multilineage priming. This is followed by a combination of gene repression, which turns off the genes associated with most possible lineages, and the activation of increasing numbers of genes driving the chosen developmental direction. PMID:25053437

  3. Contact- and growth factor-dependent survival in a canine marrow-derived stromal cell line.

    PubMed

    Huss, R; Hoy, C A; Deeg, H J

    1995-05-01

    Cell-cell interactions and the presence of growth factors such as stem cell factor (SCF; or c-kit ligand) or interleukin-6 (IL-6) are involved in the proliferation and differentiation of the canine marrow-derived stromal cell line DO64. In the presence of SCF, stromal cells are induced to differentiate, but not to proliferate. In contrast, in the presence of IL-6, stromal cells are induced to proliferate rather than to differentiate in culture. Both SCF and IL-6 are produced by the stromal cells themselves and, thus, act as autocrine factors. In addition, DO64 cells also interact physically with each other in culture when grown under optimal culture conditions (70% to 90% cell confluence and in the presence of serum), thereby supporting proliferation and maintaining viability. Under conditions of lower cell density or low serum or growth factor concentrations in culture, DO64 cells tend to aggregate and form clusters. This increase in local cell concentration is associated with preservation of viability, presumably because of the accumulation of autocrine factors. If no signal, neither intercellular nor soluble, is provided, and DO64 cells are not able to reach a critical cell density or to produce sufficient factors in an autocrine fashion, the cells cease to proliferate and eventually die.

  4. Endothelial cell transplantation onto polymeric arteriovenous grafts evaluated using a canine model.

    PubMed

    Williams, S K; Jarrell, B E; Kleinert, L B

    1994-01-01

    Prosthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVG) placed for hemodialysis access fail in humans due to the thrombogenicity of the flow surface and development of cellular intimal hyperplasia, particularly at the venous anastomosis. The poor patency rates of prosthetic AVG result in significant morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. Consequently, investigators have been evaluating methods to improve the patency of prosthetic grafts by examining endothelial cell transplantation as a means of creating an antithrombogenic lining on artificial polymers. A canine model was developed to study the effects of cell transplantation of autologous, fat-derived microvessel endothelial cells (MVEC) onto the luminal surface of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) grafts. Microvessel endothelial cells were isolated from falciform ligament fat, with each dog receiving its own endothelial cells. Isolated cells were subsequently placed into the lumen of the graft (4 mm by 20 cm ePTFE). The graft lumen was pressurized to 5 pounds per square inch (psi) resulting in the partial denucleation of the graft, due to the flow of buffer into the interstices of the graft, and the forced deposition of cells onto the luminal surface. Animals were maintained on aspirin and persantine during the implant phase. During the implant phase, grafts were evaluated by both duplex ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). At explant, gross observation of the sodded grafts revealed a glistening white flow surface with no evidence of thrombosis. Morphologic and scanning electron microscopic evaluations revealed the presence of a cellular lining on the luminal flow surface that exhibited characteristics of antithrombogenic endothelial cells. Midgraft samples were evaluated by immunocytochemistry and indicated that cells on the luminal surface react positively with antibodies to von Willebrand factor. Results from this study demonstrate that the canine model provides an excellent method of studying the

  5. Claudin-4 forms a paracellular barrier, revealing the interdependence of claudin expression in the loose epithelial cell culture model opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Borovac, Jelena; Barker, Reid S; Rievaj, Juraj; Rasmussen, Andrew; Pan, Wanling; Wevrick, Rachel; Alexander, R Todd

    2012-12-15

    The effect of claudins on paracellular fluxes has been predominantly studied in either Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) or LLCPK cells. Neither model system has a very low transepithelial resistance (TER) as observed in leaky epithelia. Moreover, results from one model system are not always consistent with another. Opossum kidney (OK) cells form tight junctions yet have a very low TER. We therefore set out to characterize the paracellular transport properties of this cell culture model. Ussing chamber dilution potential measurements revealed that OK cells exhibit a very low TER (11.7 ± 1.4 Ω·cm(2)), slight cation selectivity (P(Na)/P(Cl) = 1.10 ± 0.01), and the Eisenman permeability sequence IV; the permeability of monovalent cations ranking K(+) > Cs(+) > Rb(+) > Na(+) > Li(+). Quantitative real-time PCR studies found that OK cells endogenously express claudin-4 > -1 > -6 > -20 > -9 > -12 > -11 > -15. Overexpression of claudin-4 significantly increased TER, decreased Na(+) and Cl(-) permeability, and increased levels of claudin-1, -6, and -9 mRNA. Knockdown of claudin-4 in the overexpressing cells significantly decreased TER without altering claudin expression; thus claudin-4 forms a barrier in OK cells. Knockdown of endogenous claudin-4 decreased claudin-1, -9, and -12 expression without altering TER. Claudin-2 overexpression decreased TER, significantly increased Na(+) and Cl(-) permeability, and decreased claudin-12 and -6 expression. Together these results demonstrate that claudin expression is tightly coupled in OK cells.

  6. DNA methylation contributes toward silencing of antioncogenic microRNA-203 in human and canine melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shunsuke; Mori, Takashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Itamoto, Kazuhito; Haraguchi, Tomoya; Mizuno, Takuya

    2015-10-01

    Melanoma is a poor-prognosis cancer in both humans and dogs. We have elucidated the antitumor mechanisms of antioncogenic microRNA (miR)-203 which is downregulated in human melanoma, as well as in canine melanoma. The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanism of this downregulation. We focused on epigenetic aberration of miR-203 transcription. Treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine (5-aza) markedly upregulated the expression level of miR-203 in almost all of the cell lines tested. Furthermore, bisulfite sequencing or methylation-specific PCR showed DNA methylation of CpG islands upstream of the miR-203 coding region (MIR203) in both human and canine melanoma cells, as well as in canine clinical specimens, but not in human normal melanocytes. The results of a luciferase activity assay showed obvious suppression of the transcription of miR-203 by DNA methylation. The use of the luciferase activity assay for CREB1 and an inhibition assay of miR-203 function performed with an miR-203 inhibitor confirmed the contribution of miR-203 upregulation toward the negative regulation of the target gene of miR-203. These results indicate that canine melanoma might be a preclinical model of human melanoma for epigenetic studies. In addition, this study suggests that agents that can demethylate MIR203 could be a common promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of human and canine melanomas.

  7. Canine amino acid transport system Xc(-): cDNA sequence, distribution and cystine transport activity in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maruo, Takuya; Kanemaki, Nobuyuki; Onda, Ken; Sato, Reiichiro; Ichihara, Nobuteru; Ochiai, Hideharu

    2014-04-01

    The cystine transport activity of a lens epithelial cell line originated from a canine mature cataract was investigated. The distinct cystine transport activity was observed, which was inhibited to 28% by extracellular 1 mM glutamate. The cDNA sequences of canine cysteine/glutamate exchanger (xCT) and 4F2hc were determined. The predicted amino acid sequences were 527 and 533 amino acid polypeptides, respectively. The amino acid sequences of canine xCT and 4F2hc showed high similarities (>80%) to those of humans. The expression of xCT in lens epithelial cell line was confirmed by western blot analysis. RT-PCR analysis revealed high level expression only in the brain, and it was below the detectable level in other tissues.

  8. Tubulocystic carcinoma of kidney associated with papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Mahesh; Shet, Tanuja; Bakshi, Ganesh; Desai, Sangeeta

    2011-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TCRCC) is a rare variant of renal cell carcinoma, which has distinct histology but there is some controversy about its association with papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC) and cell of origin in literature. We report an 18-year-old girl with the rare TCRCC of kidney associated with PRCC with metastases to the para-aortic nodes. The patient presented with hematuria and a right renal mass with enlarged regional nodes for which a radical nephrectomy with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection was done. On gross examination, a solid cystic lesion involving the lower pole and middle pole of the kidney measuring 12x9x9 cm was seen along with an additional cystic lesion in upper pole of kidney. Microscopically the main tumor showed the typical histology of a tubulocystic carcinoma with multiple cysts filled with secretions lined by variably flattened epithelium with hobnailing of cells. The mass in the upper pole was a high-grade PRCC and the nodal metastases had morphology similar to this component. To conclude, at least a small but definite subset of TCRCC is associated with PRCC, and cases associated with PRCC do seem to have a higher propensity for nodal metastasis as in the case we report.

  9. Human Genetic Relevance and Potent Antitumor Activity of Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibition in Canine Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Clemente-Vicario, Francisco; Alvarez, Carlos E.; Rowell, Jennie L.; Roy, Satavisha; London, Cheryl A.; Kisseberth, William C.; Lorch, Gwendolen

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been an open question how similar human and canine lung cancers are. This has major implications in availability of human treatments for dogs and in establishing translational models to test new therapies in pet dogs. The prognosis for canine advanced lung cancer is poor and new treatments are needed. Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is an ATPase-dependent molecular chaperone ubiquitously expressed in eukaryotic cells. HSP90 is essential for posttranslational conformational maturation and stability of client proteins including protein kinases and transcription factors, many of which are important for the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. We investigated the activity of STA-1474, a HSP90 inhibitor, in two canine lung cancer cell lines, BACA and CLAC. Results Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of both cell lines revealed genetic relevance to human non-small cell lung cancer. STA-1474 inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of both cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The ICs50 after 72 h treatment with STA-1474 were 0.08 and 0.11 μM for BACA and CLAC, respectively. When grown as spheroids, the IC50 of STA-1474 for BACA cells was approximately two-fold higher than when grown as a monolayer (0.348 μM vs. 0.168 μM), whereas CLAC spheroids were relatively drug resistant. Treatment of tumor-stromal fibroblasts with STA-1474 resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in their relative cell viability with a low IC50 of 0.28 μM. Conclusions Here we first established that lung adenocarcinoma in people and dogs are genetically and biochemically similar. STA1474 demonstrated biological activity in both canine lung cancer cell lines and tumor-stromal fibroblasts. As significant decreases in relative cell viability can be achieved with nanomolar concentrations of STA-1474, investigation into the clinical efficacy of this drug in canine lung cancer patients is warranted. PMID:26560147

  10. Cytological grading of canine cutaneous mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Filippo; Sabattini, Silvia; Bettini, Giuliano

    2016-09-01

    A cytological grading for mast cell tumours (MCTs) would be highly desirable, allowing to select the most appropriate therapeutic intervention prior to surgery. This study evaluates the applicability on fine-needle aspirations (FNAs) of the novel Kiupel grading system, based on number of mitoses, multinucleated cells, bizarre nuclei and presence of karyomegaly. Fifty consecutive cases with pre-operative cytological diagnosis were included. In cytological specimens, approximately 1000 cells were evaluated, and the histological grade was assessed on the corresponding resected specimens. On cytology, the above parameters were significantly different between histologically low-grade and high-grade tumours (P < 0.001). The cytograding correctly predicted the histological grade in 47 cases (accuracy, 94%; sensitivity, 84.6%; specificity, 97.3%). Two high-grade MCTs (4%) were not detected on cytology. The cytograding can provide helpful insights to assist clinical decisions in most cases. However, the risk of underestimation in a minority of patients represents a limit to the overall utility of the technique.

  11. Canine olfactory ensheathing cells from the olfactory mucosa can be engineered to produce active chondroitinase ABC.

    PubMed

    Carwardine, Darren; Wong, Liang-Fong; Fawcett, James W; Muir, Elizabeth M; Granger, Nicolas

    2016-08-15

    A multitude of factors must be overcome following spinal cord injury (SCI) in order to achieve clinical improvement in patients. It is thought that by combining promising therapies these diverse factors could be combatted with the aim of producing an overall improvement in function. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) present in the glial scar that forms following SCI present a significant block to axon regeneration. Digestion of CSPGs by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) leads to axon regeneration, neuronal plasticity and functional improvement in preclinical models of SCI. However, the enzyme activity decays at body temperature within 24-72h, limiting the translational potential of ChABC as a therapy. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) have shown huge promise as a cell transplant therapy in SCI. Their beneficial effects have been demonstrated in multiple small animal SCI models as well as in naturally occurring SCI in canine patients. In the present study, we have genetically modified canine OECs from the mucosa to constitutively produce enzymatically active ChABC. We have developed a lentiviral vector that can deliver a mammalian modified version of the ChABC gene to mammalian cells, including OECs. Enzyme production was quantified using the Morgan-Elson assay that detects the breakdown products of CSPG digestion in cell supernatants. We confirmed our findings by immunolabelling cell supernatant samples using Western blotting. OECs normal cell function was unaffected by genetic modification as demonstrated by normal microscopic morphology and the presence of the low affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NGF)) following viral transduction. We have developed the means to allow production of active ChABC in combination with a promising cell transplant therapy for SCI repair. PMID:27423610

  12. Small-Molecule Induction of Canine Embryonic Stem Cells Toward Naïve Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Ian C; Brooks, Courtney R; Teichroeb, Jonathan H; Villagómez, Daniel A; Hess, David A; Séguin, Cheryle A; Betts, Dean H

    2016-08-15

    Naïve and primed pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) reflect discrete pluripotent states that approximate the inner cell mass or the progressively lineage-restricted perigastrulation epiblast, respectively. Cells that occupy primed pluripotency have distinct epigenetic landscapes, transcriptional circuitry, and trophic requirements compared with their naïve counterparts. The existence of multiple pluripotent states has not been explored in dogs, which show promise as outbred biomedical models with more than 300 inherited diseases that also afflict humans. However, our understanding of canine embryogenesis and embryo-derived stem cells is limited. Herein, we converted leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-dependent and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2)-dependent canine embryonic stem cells (cESCs) resembling primed PSCs toward a naïve pluripotent state using LIF and inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 [called 2i and LIF (2iL)]. cESCs propagated in 2iL exhibited significant induction of genes associated with the naïve pluripotent state (eg, REX1, TBX3) and downregulation of primed pluripotency markers (eg, OTX2, FGF5) (P < 0.05). Differential phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and cell fate decisions on exposure to bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) suggested that a novel pluripotent identity has been established with 2iL. Accordingly, cESCs cultured with 2iL formed colonies at a greater efficiency than LIF-FGF2 cESCs following single-cell dissociation. Total genomic DNA methylation and histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation signals were reduced in 2iL-treated cESCs. Our data suggest that 2iL culture conditions promote the conversion of cESCs toward an epigenetically distinct pluripotent state resembling naïve PSCs. PMID:27392793

  13. Kidney Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Kidney Problems Basic Facts & Information The kidneys are two ... the production of red blood cells. What are Kidney Diseases? For about one-third of older people, ...

  14. Stem cells in the canine pituitary gland and in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Sarah J; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Hanson, Jeanette M; Penning, Louis C; Meij, Björn P

    2013-12-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) or pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism is a common endocrinopathy in dogs, with an estimated prevalence of 1 or 2 in 1000 dogs per year. It is caused by an adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting adenoma in the pars distalis or pars intermedia of the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland is a small endocrine gland located in the pituitary fossa. In the postnatal individual, the hypothalamus-pituitary axis plays a central role in maintaining homeostatic functions, like control of metabolism, reproduction, and growth. Stem cells are suggested to play a role in the homeostatic adaptations of the adult pituitary gland, such as the rapid specific cell-type expansion in response to pregnancy or lactation. Several cell populations have been suggested as pituitary stem cells, such as Side Population cells and cells expressing Sox2 or Nestin. These cell populations are discussed in this review. Also, stem and progenitor cells are thought to play a role in pituitary tumorigenesis, such as the development of pituitary adenomas in dogs. There are limited reports on the role of stem cells in pituitary adenomas, especially in dogs. Further studies are needed to identify and characterize this cell population and to develop specific cell targeting therapeutic strategies as a new way of treating canine CD.

  15. Galectin-7 modulates the length of the primary cilia and wound repair in polarized kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rondanino, Christine; Poland, Paul A; Kinlough, Carol L; Li, Hui; Rbaibi, Youssef; Myerburg, Michael M; Al-bataineh, Mohammad M; Kashlan, Ossama B; Pastor-Soler, Nuria M; Hallows, Kenneth R; Weisz, Ora A; Apodaca, Gerard; Hughey, Rebecca P

    2011-09-01

    Galectins (Gal) are β-galactoside-binding proteins that function in epithelial development and homeostasis. An overlapping role for Gal-3 and Gal-7 in wound repair was reported in stratified epithelia. Although Gal-7 was thought absent in simple epithelia, it was reported in a proteomic analysis of cilia isolated from cultured human airway, and we recently identified Gal-7 transcripts in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells (Poland PA, Rondanino C, Kinlough CL, Heimburg-Molinaro J, Arthur CM, Stowell SR, Smith DF, Hughey RP. J Biol Chem 286: 6780-6790, 2011). We now report that Gal-7 is localized exclusively on the primary cilium of MDCK, LLC-PK(1) (pig kidney), and mpkCCD(c14) (mouse kidney) cells as well as on cilia in the rat renal proximal tubule. Gal-7 is also present on most cilia of multiciliated cells in human airway epithelia primary cultures. Interestingly, exogenous glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Gal-7 bound the MDCK apical plasma membrane as well as the cilium, while the lectin Ulex europeaus agglutinin, with glycan preferences similar to Gal-7, bound the basolateral plasma membrane as well as the cilium. In pull-down assays, β1-integrin isolated from either the basolateral or apical/cilia membranes of MDCK cells was similarly bound by GST-Gal-7. Selective localization of Gal-7 to cilia despite the presence of binding sites on all cell surfaces suggests that intracellular Gal-7 is specifically delivered to cilia rather than simply binding to surface glycoconjugates after generalized secretion. Moreover, depletion of Gal-7 using tetracycline-induced short-hairpin RNA in mpkCCD(c14) cells significantly reduced cilia length and slowed wound healing in a scratch assay. We conclude that Gal-7 is selectively targeted to cilia and plays a key role in surface stabilization of glycoconjugates responsible for integrating cilia function with epithelial repair. PMID:21677144

  16. Cystine and dibasic amino acid uptake by opossum kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    States, B.; Segal, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The characteristics of the uptake of L-cystine by the continuous opossum kidney cell line, OK, were examined. Uptake of cystine is rapid and, in contrast to other continuous cultured cell lines, these cells retain the cystine/dibasic amino acid transport system which is found in vivo and in freshly isolated kidney tissue. Confluent monolayers of cells also fail to show the presence of the cystine/glutamate transport system present in LLC-PK1 cells, fibroblasts, and cultured hepatocytes. Uptake of cystine occurs via a high-affinity saturable process which is independent of medium sodium concentration. The predominant site of cystine transport is across the apical cell membrane. The intracellular concentration of GSH far exceeds that of cystine with a ratio greater than 100:1 for GSH:cysteine. Incubation of cells for 5 minutes with a physiological level of labelled cystine resulted in the labelling of 66% and 5% of the total intracellular cysteine and glutathione, respectively. The ability of these cells to reflect the shared cystine/dibasic amino acid transport system makes them a suitable model for investigation of the cystine carrier which is altered in human cystinuria.

  17. Molecular and immunohistochemical studies do not support a role for papillomaviruses in canine oral squamous cell carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; French, Adrienne; Harvey, Catherine J

    2015-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) are common neoplasms of dogs and are of unknown cause. Whereas papillomaviruses (PVs) are an established cause of human OSCCs, few studies have investigated canine OSCCs for a PV aetiology. In humans, a PV aetiology can be determined by detecting PV DNA and PV-induced increased p16(CDKN2A) protein (p16) within the OSCC. In this study, PCR, using four different primer sets and p16 immunohistochemistry, was used to evaluate 28 canine OSCCs for a possible PV aetiology. None of the primers amplified PV DNA from any of the OSCCs although four neoplasms contained intense p16 immunostaining. Intense p16 immunostaining would indicate a PV aetiology in a human OSCC but the absence of PV DNA suggests that the increase in p16 was not due to PV infection. Overall the results indicated that PVs are not a significant cause of canine OSCCs.

  18. Soluble and pelletable factors in porcine, canine and human notochordal cell-conditioned medium: implications for IVD regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bach, F C; de Vries, S A; Riemers, F M; Boere, J; van Heel, F W; van Doeselaar, M; Goerdaya, S S; Nikkels, P G; Benz, K; Creemers, L B; Maarten Altelaar, A F; Meij, B P; Ito, K; Tryfonidou, M A

    2016-01-01

    During intervertebral disc (IVD) maturation, notochordal cells (NCs) are replaced by chondrocyte-like cells (CLCs) in the nucleus pulposus, suggesting that NCs play a role in maintaining tissue health. Affirmatively, NC-conditioned medium (NCCM) exerts regenerative effects on CLC proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) production. The aim of this study was to identify NC-secreted substances that stimulate IVD regeneration. By mass spectrometry of porcine, canine and human NCCM, 149, 170 and 217 proteins were identified, respectively, with 66 proteins in common. Mainly ECM-related proteins were identified, but also organelle-derived and membrane-bound vesicle proteins. To determine whether the effect of NCCM was mediated by soluble and/or pelletable factors, porcine and canine NCCM were separated into a soluble (NCCM-S; peptides and proteins) and pelletable (NCCM-P; protein aggregates and extracellular vesicles) fraction by ultracentrifugation, and tested on bovine and canine CLCs in vitro, respectively. In each model, NCCM-S exerted a more pronounced anabolic effect than NCCM-P. However, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) uptake from the medium into the carrier gel prevented more definite conclusions. While the effect of porcine NCCM-P on bovine CLCs was negligible, canine NCCM-P appeared to enhance GAG and collagen type II deposition by canine CLCs. In conclusion, porcine and canine NCCM exerted their anabolic effects mainly through soluble factors, but also the pelletable NCCM factors showed moderate regenerative potential. Although the regenerative potential of NCCM-P should not be overlooked, future studies should focus on unraveling the protein-based regenerative mechanism from NCCM produced from isolated NCs, e.g. by NCCM fractionation and pathway blocking studies. PMID:27572543

  19. Canine Distemper Virus Infects Canine Keratinocytes and Immune Cells by Using Overlapping and Distinct Regions Located on One Side of the Attachment Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Langedijk, Johannes P. M.; Janda, Jozef; Origgi, Francesco C.; Örvell, Claes; Vandevelde, Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plattet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The morbilliviruses measles virus (MeV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) both rely on two surface glycoproteins, the attachment (H) and fusion proteins, to promote fusion activity for viral cell entry. Growing evidence suggests that morbilliviruses infect multiple cell types by binding to distinct host cell surface receptors. Currently, the only known in vivo receptor used by morbilliviruses is CD150/SLAM, a molecule expressed in certain immune cells. Here we investigated the usage of multiple receptors by the highly virulent and demyelinating CDV strain A75/17. We based our study on the assumption that CDV-H may interact with receptors similar to those for MeV, and we conducted systematic alanine-scanning mutagenesis on CDV-H throughout one side of the β-propeller documented in MeV-H to contain multiple receptor-binding sites. Functional and biochemical assays performed with SLAM-expressing cells and primary canine epithelial keratinocytes identified 11 residues mutation of which selectively abrogated fusion in keratinocytes. Among these, four were identical to amino acids identified in MeV-H as residues contacting a putative receptor expressed in polarized epithelial cells. Strikingly, when mapped on a CDV-H structural model, all residues clustered in or around a recessed groove located on one side of CDV-H. In contrast, reported CDV-H mutants with SLAM-dependent fusion deficiencies were characterized by additional impairments to the promotion of fusion in keratinocytes. Furthermore, upon transfer of residues that selectively impaired fusion induction in keratinocytes into the CDV-H of the vaccine strain, fusion remained largely unaltered. Taken together, our results suggest that a restricted region on one side of CDV-H contains distinct and overlapping sites that control functional interaction with multiple receptors. PMID:21849439

  20. Hepatic progenitor cells in canine and feline medicine: potential for regenerative strategies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    New curative therapies for severe liver disease are urgently needed in both the human and veterinary clinic. It is important to find new treatment modalities which aim to compensate for the loss of parenchymal tissue and to repopulate the liver with healthy hepatocytes. A prime focus in regenerative medicine of the liver is the use of adult liver stem cells, or hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), for functional recovery of liver disease. This review describes recent developments in HPC research in dog and cat and compares these findings to experimental rodent studies and human pathology. Specifically, the role of HPCs in liver regeneration, key components of the HPC niche, and HPC activation in specific types of canine and feline liver disease will be reviewed. Finally, the potential applications of HPCs in regenerative medicine of the liver are discussed and a potential role is suggested for dogs as first target species for HPC-based trials. PMID:24946932

  1. Conditioning with α-emitter based radioimmunotherapy in canine allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Chen, Yun; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    With the introduction of nonmyeloablative conditioning, hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has become a viable treatment option for patients who due to age or comorbidities are ineligible for high dose conditioning. However, relapse and toxicities are still major problems in HCT. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT)-based conditioning is a promising approach that has the ability to specifically target radiation to hematopoietic cells. The most widely investigated isotopes are the β-emitters, but because of long path lengths and low linear energy transfer, α-emitters which have more favorable physical characteristics, might prove to be a better alternative. In the current study we have investigated the efficacy and safety of α-emitter based RIT as the only form of conditioning in a preclinical model of canine allogeneic HCT. PMID:22772070

  2. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    George, Sunil K.; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D.; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  3. Molecular imaging of cyclooxygenase-2 in canine transitional cell carcinomas in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md Jashim; Bartges, Joseph W; Callens, Amanda; Legendre, Alfred M; Rathore, Kusum; Wright, Laura; Carter, Amanda; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2013-05-01

    The enzyme COX-2 is induced at high levels in tumors but not in surrounding normal tissues, which makes it an attractive target for molecular imaging of cancer. We evaluated the ability of novel optical imaging agent, fluorocoxib A to detect urinary bladder canine transitional cell carcinomas (K9TCC). Here, we show that fluorocoxib A uptake overlapped with COX-2 expression in primary K9TCC cells in vitro. Using subcutaneously implanted primary K9TCC in athymic mice, we show specific uptake of fluorocoxib A by COX-2-expressing K9TCC xenograft tumors in vivo. Fluorocoxib A uptake by COX-2-expressing xenograft tumors was blocked by 70% (P < 0.005) when pretreated with the COX-2 selective inhibitor, celecoxib (10 mg/kg), 4 hours before intravenous administration of fluorocoxib A (1 mg/kg). Fluorocoxib A was taken up by COX-2-expressing tumors but not by COX-2-negative human UMUC-3 xenograft tumors. UMUC-3 xenograft tumors with no expression of COX-2 showed no uptake of fluorocoxib A. In addition, fluorocoxib A uptake was evaluated in five dogs diagnosed with TCC. Fluorocoxib A specifically detected COX-2-expressing K9TCC during cystoscopy in vivo but was not detected in normal urothelium. Taken together, our findings show that fluorocoxib A selectively bound to COX-2-expressing primary K9TCC cells in vitro, COX-2-expressing K9TCC xenografts tumors in nude mice, and heterogeneous canine TCC during cystoscopy in vivo. Spontaneous cancers in companion animals offer a unique translational model for evaluation of novel imaging and therapeutic agents using primary cancer cells in vitro and in heterogeneous cancers in vivo. PMID:23531445

  4. Selective depletion of mouse kidney proximal straight tubule cells causes acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Michiko; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Morizane, Ryuji; Matsuoka, Kunie; Taya, Choji; Akita, Yoshiko; Joh, Kensuke; Itoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Matsuhiko; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Kohno, Kenji; Suzuki, Akemi; Yonekawa, Hiromichi

    2012-02-01

    The proximal straight tubule (S3 segment) of the kidney is highly susceptible to ischemia and toxic insults but has a remarkable capacity to repair its structure and function. In response to such injuries, complex processes take place to regenerate the epithelial cells of the S3 segment; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of this regeneration are still being investigated. By applying the "toxin receptor mediated cell knockout" method under the control of the S3 segment-specific promoter/enhancer, Gsl5, which drives core 2 β-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase gene expression, we established a transgenic mouse line expressing the human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor only in the S3 segment. The administration of DT to these transgenic mice caused the selective ablation of S3 segment cells in a dose-dependent manner, and transgenic mice exhibited polyuria containing serum albumin and subsequently developed oliguria. An increase in the concentration of blood urea nitrogen was also observed, and the peak BUN levels occurred 3-7 days after DT administration. Histological analysis revealed that the most severe injury occurred in the S3 segments of the proximal tubule, in which tubular cells were exfoliated into the tubular lumen. In addition, aquaporin 7, which is localized exclusively to the S3 segment, was diminished. These results indicate that this transgenic mouse can suffer acute kidney injury (AKI) caused by S3 segment-specific damage after DT administration. This transgenic line offers an excellent model to uncover the mechanisms of AKI and its rapid recovery.

  5. Continuous in vitro propagation of Cowdria ruminantium (Welgevonden stock) in a canine macrophage-monocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Zweygarth, E; Josemans, A I

    2001-06-01

    The Welgevonden stock of Cowdria ruminantium, aetiologic agent of heartwater, was continuously propagated in DH82 cells, a continuous canine macrophage-monocyte cell line. Cultures of DH82 cells were readily infected provided that the culture medium was supplemented with cycloheximide. Cultures were split at regular 3-day intervals and infection rates ranged between 60% and 95%. Cultures were continuously propagated through more than 125 passages over a period of more than one year. PMID:11585095

  6. Characterization of protamine uptake by opossum kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Junya; Komeda, Takuji; Katagiri, Yuki; Yumoto, Ryoko; Takano, Mikihisa

    2013-01-01

    Protamine, a mixture of polypeptides that is rich in arginine, has been used clinically as an antidote to heparin overdoses and a complexing agent in a long-acting insulin preparation. When protamine is administered intravenously, its abundant accumulation in the kidneys has been reported. However, the renal uptake mechanism for protamine is not clear. In this study, we examined the transport mechanism for protamine in opossum kidney (OK) cells, a suitable in vitro model for renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the association of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled protamine from salmon (FITC-protamine) by OK cells was inhibited by unlabeled protamine in a concentration-dependent manner. The association of FITC-protamine was temperature- and energy-dependent. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that the fluorescence was localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of OK cells. In addition, FITC-protamine association was inhibited by cationic drugs such as polycationic gentamicin and polymixin B, but it was increased by a basic amino acid, arginine. Inhibitors for clathrin- and caveolin-dependent endocytosis showed inhibitory effects on FITC-protamine association. Pretreatment with heparinase III partially but significantly decreased the association of FITC-protamine. These results suggest that protamine may be taken up by OK cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis, which may result in its localization in the cytoplasm and nucleus of the cells.

  7. Canine Distemper

    MedlinePlus

    Although this brochure provides basic information about canine distemper, your veterinarian is always your best source of health information. Consult your veterinarian for more information about canine distemper and its prevention. ...

  8. Characterization of a novel canine T-cell line established from a spontaneously occurring aggressive T-cell lymphoma with large granular cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Bonnefont-Rebeix, Catherine; Fournel-Fleury, Corinne; Ponce, Frédérique; Belluco, Sara; Watrelot, Dorothée; Bouteille, Sylvie E; Rapiteau, Sylvie; Razanajaona-Doll, Diane; Pin, Jean-Jacques; Leroux, Caroline; Marchal, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Dogs with lymphoma are established as good model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma studies. Canine cell lines derived from lymphomas may be valuable tools for testing new therapeutic drugs. In this context, we established a canine T-cell line, PER-VAS, from a primary aggressive T-cell lymphoma with large granular morphology. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a stable immunophenotype: PER-VAS cells were positively labelled for CD5, CD45, MHC II and TLR3, and were negative for CD3, CD4 and CD8 expression. Although unstable along the culture process, IL-17 and MMP12 proteins were detectable as late as at passages 280 and 325i.e. respectively 24 and 29 months post isolation. At passage 325, PER-VAS cells maintained the expression of IL-17, CD3, CD56, IFNγ and TNFα mRNAs as shown by RT-PCR analysis. Stable rearrangement of the TCRγ gene has been evidenced by PCR. PER-VAS cells have a high proliferation index with a doubling time of 16.5h and were tumorigenic in Nude mice. Compared to the canine cell lines already reported, PER-VAS cells display an original expression pattern, close to NKT cells, which makes them valuable tools for in vitro comparative research on lymphomas. PMID:26345430

  9. Generation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against canine tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Stokol, Tracy; Daddona, Janelle; DeLeonardis, Christine; Dong, Lynn; Wagner, Bettina

    2015-10-15

    Tissue factor (TF, coagulation factor III) has recently identified roles in innate immunity and cancer. We generated a murine mAb against canine TF (cTF) cloned from Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovarian (CHO) cells, with an equine IL-4 tag. One clone was selected for purification based on initial screening of CHO cell supernatants. The mAb was further characterized with flow cytometry, immunofluorescent microscopy, immunoblotting and immunohistochemical staining of normal and neoplastic canine tissue. The mAb labeled high, but not low, TF-expressing canine breast cancer (CMT25) and osteosarcoma (HMPOS) cells with flow cytometry and immunofluorescent microscopy. Immunoblotting revealed a 42kDa protein with homogenized canine brain and CMT25, but not HMPOS, lysates. The mAb labeled renal tubules and glomeruli, intestinal and dermal epithelium, and arteriolar adventitial cells in frozen tissues. Using immunofluorescent microscopy, increased numbers of labeled PBMCs were observed after LPS stimulation. Our results indicate that the anti-cTF mAb detects a protein with the expected tissue distribution and molecular weight of TF in normal, LPS-stimulated and neoplastic canine cells. This mAb may prove useful for exploring the role of TF in neoplastic and infectious disorders in dogs. PMID:26187440

  10. Exenatide Treatment Alone Improves β-Cell Function in a Canine Model of Pre-Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mkrtchyan, Hasmik J.; Stefanovski, Darko; Kabir, Morvarid; Iyer, Malini S.; Liu, Huiwen; Castro, Ana V. B.; Wu, Qiang; Broussard, Josiane L.; Kolka, Cathryn M.; Asare-Bediako, Isaac; Bergman, Richard N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Exenatide’s effects on glucose metabolism have been studied extensively in diabetes but not in pre-diabetes. Objective We examined the chronic effects of exenatide alone on glucose metabolism in pre-diabetic canines. Design and Methods After 10 weeks of high-fat diet (HFD), adult dogs received one injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 18.5 mg/kg). After induction of pre-diabetes, while maintained on HFD, animals were randomized to receive either exenatide (n = 7) or placebo (n = 7) for 12 weeks. β-Cell function was calculated from the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT, expressed as the acute insulin response, AIRG), the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, insulinogenic index) and the graded-hyperglycemic clamp (clamp insulinogenic index). Whole-body insulin sensitivity was assessed by the IVGTT. At the end of the study, pancreatic islets were isolated to assess β-cell function in vitro. Results OGTT: STZ caused an increase in glycemia at 120 min by 22.0% (interquartile range, IQR, 31.5%) (P = 0.011). IVGTT: This protocol also showed a reduction in glucose tolerance by 48.8% (IQR, 36.9%) (P = 0.002). AIRG decreased by 54.0% (IQR, 40.7%) (P = 0.010), leading to mild fasting hyperglycemia (P = 0.039). Exenatide, compared with placebo, decreased body weight (P<0.001) without altering food intake, fasting glycemia, insulinemia, glycated hemoglobin A1c, or glucose tolerance. Exenatide, compared with placebo, increased both OGTT- (P = 0.040) and clamp-based insulinogenic indexes (P = 0.016), improved insulin secretion in vitro (P = 0.041), but had no noticeable effect on insulin sensitivity (P = 0.405). Conclusions In pre-diabetic canines, 12-week exenatide treatment improved β-cell function but not glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity. These findings demonstrate partial beneficial metabolic effects of exenatide alone on an animal model of pre-diabetes. PMID:27398720

  11. Single adult kidney stem/progenitor cells reconstitute three-dimensional nephron structures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Shinji; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Makino, Hirofumi

    2015-03-01

    The kidneys are formed during development from two distinct primordial tissues, the metanephric mesenchyme and the ureteric bud. The metanephric mesenchyme develops into the kidney nephron, the minimal functional unit of the kidney. A nephron consists of several segments and regulates water, electrolyte, and acid-base homeostasis in addition to secreting certain hormones. It has been predicted that the kidney will be among the last organs successfully regenerated in vitro due to its complex structure and multiple functions. Here, we show that adult kidney stem/progenitor cells (KS cells), derived from the S3 segment of adult rat kidney nephrons, can reconstitute a three-dimensional kidney-like structure in vitro. Kidney-like structures were formed when a cluster of KS cells was suspended in an extracellular matrix gel and cultured in the presence of several growth factors. Morphological analyses revealed that these kidney-like structures contained every substructure of the kidney, including glomeruli, proximal tubules, the loop of Henle, distal tubules, and collecting ducts, but no vasculature. Our results demonstrate that a cluster of tissue stem/progenitor cells has the ability to reconstitute the minimum unit of its organ of origin by differentiating into specialized cells in the correct location. This process differs from embryonic kidney development, which requires the mutual induction of two different populations of progenitors, metanephric mesenchymal cells and ureteric bud cells.

  12. Bupivacaine induces apoptosis through caspase-dependent and -independent pathways in canine mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yi-Shu; Cheng, Yeong-Hsiang; Lin, Sui-Wen; Chang, Te-Sheng; Liou, Chian-Jiun; Lai, Yu-Shen

    2015-06-01

    Local anesthetics have been reported to induce apoptosis in various cell lines. In this study, we showed that bupivacaine also induced apoptosis in DTK-SME cells, a vimentin(+)/AE1(+)/CK7(+)/HSP27(+), tumorigenic, immortalized, canine mammary tumor cell line. Bupivacaine induced apoptosis in DTK-SME cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Apoptosis-associated morphological changes, including cell shrinkage and rounding, chromatin condensation, and formation of apoptotic bodies, were observed in the bupivacaine-treated DTK-SME cells. Apoptosis was further confirmed with annexin V staining, TUNEL staining, and DNA laddering assays. At the molecular level, the activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9 corresponded well to the degree of DNA fragmentation triggered by bupivacaine. We also demonstrated that the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, only partially inhibited the apoptosis induced by bupivacaine. Moreover, treated cells increased expression of endonuclease G, a death effector that acts independently of caspases. Our data suggested that bupivacaine-induced apoptosis occurs through both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptotic pathways.

  13. Hepatocyte growth factor-induced up-regulation of Twist drives epithelial-mesenchymal transition in a canine mammary tumour cell line.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kota; Choisunirachon, Nan; Saito, Tomochika; Matsumoto, Kaori; Saeki, Kohei; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Sasaki, Nobuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2014-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial step in tumour progression. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying EMT in canine tumours remain to be elucidated. In this study, the similarity or difference in the molecular mechanism of EMT in canine cells was evaluated and compared with that reported in human and mouse cells. We used eight cell lines derived from canine mammary cancers. Stimulation with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) increased cell motility and changed EMT-related markers towards mesenchyme in CHMm cell line. These changes were accompanied by an increase in Twist expression and did not occur in CHMm transfected with Twist siRNA, indicating that Twist plays a key role in this phenomenon in CHMm. However, the down-regulation of E-cadherin was not observed by HGF stimulation. Further studies are required to elucidate the difference between human and canine Twist.

  14. Anti-tumour effect of metformin in canine mammary gland tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Watanabe, M; Tsuboi, M; Sugano, S; Yoshitake, R; Tanaka, Y; Ong, S M; Saito, T; Matsumoto, K; Fujita, N; Nishimura, R; Nakagawa, T

    2015-08-01

    Metformin is an oral hypoglycaemic drug used in type 2 diabetes. Its pharmacological activity reportedly involves mitochondrial respiratory complex I, and mitochondrial respiratory complex inhibitors have a strong inhibitory effect on the growth of metastatic canine mammary gland tumour (CMGT) cell lines. It is hypothesised that metformin has selective anti-tumour effects on metastatic CMGT cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of metformin on cell growth, production of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in two CMGT clonal cell lines with different metastatic potential. In addition, transcriptome analysis was used to determine cellular processes disrupted by metformin and in vivo anti-tumour effects were examined in a mouse xenograft model. Metformin inhibited CMGT cell growth in vitro, with the metastatic clone (CHMp-5b) displaying greater sensitivity. ATP depletion and ROS elevation were observed to a similar extent in the metastatic and non-metastatic (CHMp-13a) cell lines after metformin exposure. However, subsequent AMPK activation and mTOR pathway inhibition were prominent only in metformin-insensitive non-metastatic cells. Microarray analysis revealed inhibition of cell cycle progression by metformin treatment in CHMp-5b cells, which was further confirmed by Western blotting and cell cycle analysis. Additionally, metformin significantly suppressed tumour growth in xenografted metastatic CMGT cells. In conclusion, metformin exhibited an anti-tumour effect in metastatic CMGT cells through AMPK-independent cell cycle arrest. Its mechanism of action differed in the non-metastatic clone, where AMPK activation and mTOR inhibition were observed. PMID:25981932

  15. Purification of infectious canine parvovirus from cell culture by affinity chromatography with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rimmelzwaan, G F; Groen, J; Juntti, N; Teppema, J S; UytdeHaag, F G; Osterhaus, A D

    1987-03-01

    Immuno affinity chromatography with virus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, directed to the haemagglutinating protein of canine parvovirus (CPV) was used to purify and concentrate CPV from infected cell culture. The procedure was monitored by testing the respective fractions in an infectivity titration system, in an ELISA, in a haemagglutination assay and by negative contrast electron microscopy to quantify CPV or CPV antigen. The degree of purification was further estimated by testing the fractions for total protein content in a colorimetric method, for bovine serum albumin content in an ELISA and by SDS-PAGE. Over 99% of the contaminating proteins proved to be removed, and 20% or 70-90% of infectious CPV or CPV antigen, respectively, was recovered.

  16. Display of neutralizing epitopes of Canine parvovirus and a T-cell epitope of the fusion protein of Canine distemper virus on chimeric tymovirus-like particles and its use as a vaccine candidate both against Canine parvo and Canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Dev; Shahana, Pallichera Vijayan; Rani, Gudavelli Sudha; Sugumar, Parthasarthy; Shankar, Chinchkar Ramchandra; Srinivasan, Villuppanoor Alwar

    2009-12-10

    Expression of Physalis mottle tymovirus coat protein in Escherichia coli was earlier shown to self-assemble into empty capsids that were nearly identical to the capsids formed in vivo. Amino acid substitutions were made at the N-terminus of wild-type Physalis mottle virus coat protein with neutralizing epitopes of Canine parvovirus containing the antigenic sites 1-2, 4 and 6-7 and T-cell epitope of the fusion protein of Canine distemper virus in various combinations to yield PhMV1, PhMV2, PhMV3, PhMV4 and PhMV5. These constructs were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The chimeric proteins self-assembled into chimeric tymovirus-like particles (TVLPs) as determined by electron microscopy. The TVLPs were purified by ultracentrifugation and injected into guinea pigs and dogs to determine their immunogenicity. Initial immunogenicity studies in guinea pigs indicated that PhMV3 gave a higher response in comparison to the other TVLPs for both CPV and CDV and hence all further experiments in dogs were done with PhMV3. HI was done against different isolates obtained from various parts of the country. Protective titres indicated the broad spectrum of the vaccine. In conclusion the study indicated that the above chimeric VLP based vaccine could be used in dogs to generate a protective immune response against diseases caused by both Canine parvo and Canine distemper virus. PMID:19818723

  17. CSF-1R as an inhibitor of apoptosis and promoter of proliferation, migration and invasion of canine mammary cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have high impact on the cancer development because they can facilitate matrix invasion, angiogenesis, and tumor cell motility. It gives cancer cells the capacity to invade normal tissues and metastasize. The signaling of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) which is an important regulator of proliferation and differentiation of monocytes and macrophages regulates most of the tissue macrophages. However, CSF-1R is expressed also in breast epithelial tissue during some physiological stages i.g.: pregnancy and lactation. Its expression has been also detected in various cancers. Our previous study has showed the expression of CSF-1R in all examined canine mammary tumors. Moreover, it strongly correlated with grade of malignancy and ability to metastasis. This study was therefore designed to characterize the role of CSF-1R in canine mammary cancer cells proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. As far as we know, the study presented hereby is a pioneering experiment in this field of veterinary medicine. Results We showed that csf-1r silencing significantly increased apoptosis (Annexin V test), decreased proliferation (measured as Ki67 expression) and decreased migration (“wound healing” assay) of canine mammary cancer cells. Treatment of these cells with CSF-1 caused opposite effect. Moreover, csf-1r knock-down changed growth characteristics of highly invasive cell lines on Matrigel matrix, and significantly decreased the ability of these cells to invade matrix. CSF-1 treatment increased invasion of cancer cells. Conclusion The evidence of the expression and functional role of the CSF-1R in canine mammary cancer cells indicate that CSF-1R targeting may be a good therapeutic approach. PMID:23561040

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Hou, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for end-stage renal disease, but its implementation is limited by organ shortage and immune rejection. Side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs, such as nephrotoxicity, opportunistic infection, and tumorigenic potential, influence long-term graft outcomes. In recent years, continued research and subsequent discoveries concerning the properties and potential utilization of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have aroused considerable interest and expectations. Biological characteristics of MSCs, including multi-lineage differentiation, homing potential, paracrine effect and immunomodulation, have opened new horizons for applications in kidney transplantation. However, many studies have shown that the biological activity of MSCs depends on internal inflammatory conditions, and the safety and efficacy of the clinical application of MSCs remain controversial. This review summarizes the findings of a large number of studies and aims to provide an objective viewpoint based on a comprehensive analysis of the presently established benefits and obstacles of implementing MSC-based therapy in kidney transplantation, and to promote its clinical translation. PMID:26852923

  19. Sensing, signaling and sorting events in kidney epithelial cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie; Ausiello, Dennis A; Marshansky, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    The kidney regulates body fluid, ion and acid/base homeostasis through the interaction of a host of channels, transporters and pumps within specific tubule segments, specific cell types and specific plasma membrane domains. Furthermore, renal epithelial cells have adapted to function in an often unique and challenging environment that includes high medullary osmolality, acidic pHs, variable blood flow and constantly changing apical and basolateral 'bathing' solutions. In this review, we focus on selected protein trafficking events by which kidney epithelial cells regulate body fluid, ion and acid-base homeostasis in response to changes in physiological conditions. We discuss aquaporin 2 and G-protein-coupled receptors in fluid and ion balance, the vacuolar H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) and intercalated cells in acid/base regulation and acidification events in the proximal tubule degradation pathway. Finally, in view of its direct role in vesicle trafficking that we outline in this study, we propose that the V-ATPase itself should, under some circumstances, be considered a fourth category of vesicle 'coat' protein (COP), alongside clathrin, caveolin and COPs. PMID:19170982

  20. Sensing, signaling and sorting events in kidney epithelial cell physiology

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie; Ausiello, Dennis A.; Marshansky, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    The kidney regulates body fluid, ion, and acid/base homeostasis via the interaction of a host of channels, transporters, and pumps within specific tubule segments, specific cell types, and specific plasma membrane domains. Furthermore, renal epithelial cells have adapted to function in an often unique and challenging environment that includes high medullary osmolality, acidic pHs, variable blood flow and constantly changing apical and basolateral “bathing” solutions. In this review, we focus on selected protein trafficking events by which kidney epithelial cells regulate body fluid, ion and acid-base homeostasis in response to changes in physiological conditions. We discuss aquaporin 2 and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in fluid and ion balance, the V-ATPase and intercalated cells (IC) in acid/base regulation, and acidification events in the proximal tubule degradation pathway. Finally, in view of its direct role in vesicle trafficking that we outline here, we propose that the V-ATPase itself should, under some circumstances, be considered as a fourth category of vesicle “coat” protein, alongside clathrin, caveolin, and COPs. PMID:19170982

  1. Aurora A kinase activity influences calcium signaling in kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, Olga V; Pugacheva, Elena N; Golemis, Erica A

    2011-06-13

    Most studies of Aurora A (AurA) describe it as a mitotic centrosomal kinase. However, we and others have recently identified AurA functions as diverse as control of ciliary resorption, cell differentiation, and cell polarity control in interphase cells. In these activities, AurA is transiently activated by noncanonical signals, including Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding. These and other observations suggested that AurA might be involved in pathological conditions, such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD). In this paper, we show that AurA is abundant in normal kidney tissue but is also abnormally expressed and activated in cells lining PKD-associated renal cysts. PKD arises from mutations in the PKD1 or PKD2 genes, encoding polycystins 1 and 2 (PC1 and PC2). AurA binds, phosphorylates, and reduces the activity of PC2, a Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channel and, thus, limits the amplitude of Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum. These and other findings suggest AurA may be a relevant new biomarker or target in the therapy of PKD.

  2. Autophagy and Tubular Cell Death in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Havasi, Andrea; Dong, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Many common renal insults such as ischemia and toxic injury primarily target the tubular epithelial cells, especially the highly metabolically active proximal tubular segment. Tubular epithelial cells are particularly dependent on autophagy to maintain homeostasis and respond to stressors. The pattern of autophagy in the kidney has a unique spatial and chronologic signature. Recent evidence has shown that there is complex cross-talk between autophagy and various cell death pathways. This review specifically discusses the interplay between autophagy and cell death in the renal tubular epithelia. It is imperative to review this topic because recent discoveries have improved our mechanistic understanding of the autophagic process and have highlighted its broad clinical applications, making autophagy a major target for drug development. PMID:27339383

  3. Raman spectroscopic study of a genetically altered kidney cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Joel; Garcia, Francisco; Centeno, Silvia P.; Joshi, N. V.

    2008-02-01

    A Raman spectroscopic investigation of a genetically altered Human Embryonic Kidney Cell (HEK293) along with a pathologically normal cell has been carried out by a conventional method. The genetic alteration was carried out with a standard protocol by using a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP). Raman spectra show that there are dramatic differences between the spectrum obtained from a genetically altered cell and that obtained from a pathologically normal cell. The former shows three broad bands; meanwhile the latter shows several sharp peaks corresponding to the ring vibrational modes of Phen, GFP and DNA. The present analysis provides an indication that the force field near Phen located at 64, 65 and 66 was altered during the genetic transformation. The Raman spectrum could be a direct experimental evidence for substantial modifications triggered due to the expression of specific genes.

  4. Establishment and Characterization of a New Cell Line of Canine Inflammatory Mammary Cancer: IPC-366

    PubMed Central

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; de Andres, Paloma J.; Illera, Maria J.; Lopez, Mirtha S.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Reuben, James M.; Illera, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366) for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics of IPC-366 were evaluated. Ten female Balb/SCID mice were inoculated with IPC-366 cells to assess their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Chromosome aberration test and Karyotype revealed the presence of structural aberration, numerical and neutral rearrangements, demonstrating a chromosomal instability. Microscopic examination of tumor revealed an epithelial morphology with marked anysocytosis. Cytological and histological examination of smears and ultrathin sections by electron microscopy revealed that IPC-366 is formed by highly malignant large round or polygonal cells characterized by marked atypia and prominent nucleoli and frequent multinucleated cells. Some cells had cytoplasmic empty spaces covered by cytoplasmic membrane resembling capillary endothelial cells, a phenomenon that has been related to s vasculogenic mimicry. IHC characterization of IPC-366 was basal-like: epithelial cells (AE1/AE3+, CK14+, vimentin+, actin-, p63-, ER-, PR-, HER-2, E-cadherin, overexpressed COX-2 and high Ki-67 proliferation index (87.15 %). At 2 weeks after inoculating the IPC-366 cells, a tumor mass was found in 100 % of mice. At 4 weeks metastases in lung and lymph nodes were found. Xenograph tumors maintained the original IHC characteristics of the female dog tumor. In summary, the cell line IPC-366 is a fast growing malignant triple negative cell line model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma that can be used for the comparative

  5. Epigenetic Silencing of TFPI-2 in Canine Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ferraresso, Serena; Bresolin, Silvia; Aricò, Arianna; Comazzi, Stefano; Gelain, Maria Elena; Riondato, Fulvio; Bargelloni, Luca; Marconato, Laura; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Aresu, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are important early events during carcinogenesis. In particular, hypermethylation of CpG islands in the promoter region of tumor suppressor genes is a well-known mechanism of gene silencing that contributes to cancer development and progression. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor 2 (TFPI-2) is a tumor suppressor involved in invasiveness inhibition. Although TFPI-2 transcriptional silencing, through promoter hypermethylation, has been widely reported in several human malignancies, it has never been explored in lymphoma. In the present study TFPI-2 methylation and gene expression have been investigated in canine Diffuse Large B-cell lymphomas (cDLBCL). The methylation level of 23 CpGs located within the TFPI-2 promoter was investigated by bisulfite-specific PCR and next generation amplicon deep sequencing (GS Junior 454, Roche) in 22 cDLBCLs and 9 controls. For the same specimens, TFPI-2 gene expression was assessed by means of Real-time RT-PCR. Sequence analysis clearly demonstrated that TFPI2 is frequently hypermethylated in cDLBCL. Hypermethylation of the TFPI-2 promoter was found in 77% of DLBCLs (17 out of 22) and in one normal lymph node. Globally, dogs with DLBCL showed a mean methylation level significantly increased compared to controls (p<0.01) and analysis of hypermethylation by site identified 19 loci out of 23 (82%) with mean methylation levels from 2- to 120-fold higher in cDLBCL. Gene expression analysis confirmed a significant down-regulation of TFPI-2 (p<0.05) in DLBCLs compared with normal lymph nodes, suggesting that TFPI-2 hypermethylation negatively regulates its transcription. In addition, a significant positive correlation (p<0.01) was found between TFPI-2 methylation levels and age providing the first indication of age-associated epigenetic modifications in canine DLBCL. To conclude, our findings demonstrated that epigenetic dysregulation of TFPI-2, leading to its reduced expression, is frequently detected in canine DLBCL

  6. Regulation of rat kidney mesangial cell phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Hack, N; Tay, A; Schultz, A; Muzin, N; Clayman, P; Egan, S; Skorecki, K L

    1996-01-01

    1. The precursor of eicosanoids is arachidonic acid, which emanates from the cleavage of the sn-2 position of phospholipids by phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Eicosanoids have diverse physiological and pathophysiological effects in the kidney. The regulation of phospholipase A2 has important implications for kidney function. 2. In the current communication we focus our attention on mesangial cell cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2) and its regulation at the post-translational and post-transcriptional level. 3. At the post-translational level, using site directed mutagenesis of cPLA2 and a dominant negative ras, we have demonstrated that cPLA2 can be phosphorylated by mitogen activated protein (MAP-2) kinase leading to increased cPLA2 enzymatic activity. 4. At the post-transcriptional level we show that the half-life of cPLA2 mRNA in mesangial cells is significantly increased when mesangial cells are stimulated by mitogens. We further demonstrate the presence of three ATTTA motifs in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the cPLA2 cDNA. 5. Using chimeric constructs bearing the 3' UTR from rat cPLA2 fused downstream of the luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that this region exerts a destabilizing effect on cPLA2. 6. We have isolated and mapped genomic DNA and polymorphic markers for cPLA2 in the human and rat.

  7. Generation of kidney organoids from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Takasato, Minoru; Er, Pei X; Chiu, Han S; Little, Melissa H

    2016-09-01

    The human kidney develops from four progenitor populations-nephron progenitors, ureteric epithelial progenitors, renal interstitial progenitors and endothelial progenitors-resulting in the formation of maximally 2 million nephrons. Until recently, the reported methods differentiated human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into either nephron progenitor or ureteric epithelial progenitor cells, consequently forming only nephrons or collecting ducts, respectively. Here we detail a protocol that simultaneously induces all four progenitors to generate kidney organoids within which segmented nephrons are connected to collecting ducts and surrounded by renal interstitial cells and an endothelial network. As evidence of functional maturity, proximal tubules within organoids display megalin-mediated and cubilin-mediated endocytosis, and they respond to a nephrotoxicant to undergo apoptosis. This protocol consists of 7 d of monolayer culture for intermediate mesoderm induction, followed by 18 d of 3D culture to facilitate self-organizing renogenic events leading to organoid formation. Personnel experienced in culturing hPSCs are required to conduct this protocol. PMID:27560173

  8. The diverging roles of dendritic cells in kidney allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Cucchiari, David; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a family of antigen presenting cells that play a paramount role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity. In murine models several subtypes of DCs have been identified, including classical DCs, monocyte-derived DCs, and plasmacytoid DCs. Quiescent, immature DCs and some subtypes of plasmacytoid cells favor the expression of regulatory T cells, but in an inflammatory milieu DCs become mature and after intercepting the antigen migrate to lymphatic system where they present the antigen to naïve T cells. Transplant rejection largely depends on the phenotype and maturation of DCs. The ischemia-reperfusion injury causes the release of endogenous molecules that are recognized as danger signals by the pattern recognition receptor of the innate immunity with subsequent activation of inflammatory cells and mediators. In this environment DCs become mature and migrate to lymphonodes where they present the alloantigen to T cells and direct their differentiation towards Th1 and Th17 effector cells. On the other hand, manipulation of DCs may favor T cell differentiation towards tolerant Th2 and T regulators (Treg). Experimental studies in murine models showed the possibility of inducing an operational tolerance by injecting immature tolerogenic DCs. Recently, such a possibility has been also confirmed in primates. Although manipulation of DCs may represent an important step ahead in kidney transplantation, a number of technical and ethical issues should be solved before its clinical application.

  9. Canine small clear cell/T-zone lymphoma: clinical presentation and outcome in a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Martini, V; Marconato, L; Poggi, A; Riondato, F; Aresu, L; Cozzi, M; Comazzi, S

    2016-08-01

    Published studies, taken together, suggest the existence of a single canine lymphoma entity, with a small clear cell appearance by cytological evaluation, a histopathological T-zone pattern and an aberrant CD45-negative T-cell phenotype, mostly characterized by long-term survival. We describe clinical presentation and outcome in a retrospective case series of canine small clear cell/T-zone lymphoma. Despite the reported predisposition of Golden retriever, this breed was not represented in our case series. Most dogs presented with stage V disease, whereas only few had clinical signs or peripheral cytopenias. Blood was almost always more infiltrated than bone marrow. Median survival confirmed the favourable prognosis described in literature, but a few dogs died within a short time. Also, a subgroup of dogs developed second malignancies, eventually leading to death. We did not investigate possible prognostic factors because of the wide variety in treatments, and further studies are needed to identify high-risk animals.

  10. α2C-Adrenoceptors modulate L-DOPA uptake in opossum kidney cells and in the mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Moura, Eduardo; Silva, Elisabete; Serrão, Maria Paula; Afonso, Joana; Kozmus, Carina Esteves Pinto; Vieira-Coelho, Maria Augusta

    2012-10-01

    Targeted deletion or selective pharmacological inhibition of α(2C)-adrenoceptors in mice results in increased brain tissue levels of dopamine and its precursor l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA), without significant changes in l-DOPA synthesis. l-DOPA uptake is considered the rate-limiting step in dopamine synthesis in the kidney. Since α(2C)-adrenoceptors may influence the transport of l-DOPA, we investigated the effect of α(2C)-adrenoceptor activation on l-DOPA uptake in a kidney cell line (opossum kidney cells). l-DOPA and dopamine kidney tissue levels in α(2C)-adrenoceptor knockout (α(2C)KO) mice and in mice treated with the selective α(2C)-adrenoceptor antagonist JP-1302 were also evaluated. The α(2)-adrenoceptor agonist medetomidine (0.1-1,000 nM) produced a concentration-dependent decrease in l-DOPA uptake in opossum kidney cells (IC(50): 2.5 ± 0.5 nM and maximal effect: 28 ± 5% of inhibition). This effect was abolished by a preincubation with JP-1302 (300 nM). Furthermore, the effect of medetomidine (100 nM) was abolished by a preincubation with U-0126 (10 μM), a MEK1/2 inhibitor. Kidney tissue levels of l-DOPA were significantly higher in α(2C)KO mice compared with wild-type mice (wild-type mice: 58 ± 2 pmol/g tissue and α(2C)KO mice: 81 ± 15 pmol/g tissue, P < 0.05) and in mice treated with JP-1302 (3 μmol/kg body wt) compared with control mice (control mice: 62 ± 2 pmol/g tissue and JP-1302-treated mice: 75 ± 1 pmol/g tissue, P < 0.05), both without significant changes in dopamine kidney tissue levels. However, mice treated with JP-1302 on a high-salt diet presented significantly higher dopamine levels in the kidney and urine compared with control animals on a high-salt diet. In conclusion, in a kidney cell line, α(2C)-adrenoceptor activation inhibits l-DOPA uptake, and in mice, deletion or blockade of α(2C)-adrenoceptors increases l-DOPA kidney tissue levels.

  11. Genome aberrations in canine mammary carcinomas and their detection in cell-free plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Beck, Julia; Hennecke, Silvia; Bornemann-Kolatzki, Kirsten; Urnovitz, Howard B; Neumann, Stephan; Ströbel, Philipp; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Brenig, Bertram; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Mammary tumors are the most frequent cancers in female dogs exhibiting a variety of histopathological differences. There is lack of knowledge about the genomes of these common dog tumors. Five tumors of three different histological subtypes were evaluated. Massive parallel sequencing (MPS) was performed in comparison to the respective somatic genome of each animal. Copy number and structural aberrations were validated using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Using mate-pair sequencing chromosomal aneuploidies were found in two tumors, frequent smaller deletions were found in one, inter-chromosomal fusions in one other, whereas one tumor was almost normal. These aberrations affect several known cancer associated genes such as cMYC, and KIT. One common deletion of the proximal end of CFA27, harboring the tumor suppressor gene PFDN5 was detected in four tumors. Using ddPCR, this deletion was validated and detected in 50% of tumors (N = 20). Breakpoint specific dPCRs were established for four tumors and tumor specific cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was detected in the plasma. In one animal tumor-specific cfDNA was found >1 year after surgery, attributable to a lung metastasis. Paired-end sequencing proved that copy-number imbalances of the tumor are reflected by the cfDNA. This report on chromosomal instability of canine mammary cancers reveals similarities to human breast cancers as well as special canine alterations. This animal model provides a framework for using MPS for screening for individual cancer biomarkers with cost effective confirmation and monitoring using ddPCR. The possibility exists that ddPCR can be expanded to screening for common cancer related variants. PMID:24098698

  12. Longitudinal Claudin Gene Expression Analyses in Canine Mammary Tissues and Thereof Derived Primary Cultures and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Susanne C.; Becker, Annegret; Rateitschak, Katja; Mohr, Annika; Lüder Ripoli, Florenza; Hennecke, Silvia; Junginger, Johannes; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Brenig, Bertram; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Nolte, Ingo; Murua Escobar, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Human and canine mammary tumours show partial claudin expression deregulations. Further, claudins have been used for directed therapeutic approaches. However, the development of claudin targeting approaches requires stable claudin expressing cell lines. This study reports the establishment and characterisation of canine mammary tissue derived cell lines, analysing longitudinally the claudin-1, -3, -4 and -7 expressions in original tissue samples, primary cultures and developed cell lines. Primary cultures were derived from 17 canine mammary tissues: healthy, lobular hyperplasia, simple adenoma, complex adenoma, simple tubular carcinoma, complex carcinoma, carcinoma arising in a benign mixed tumour and benign mixed tissue. Cultivation was performed, if possible, until passage 30. Claudin mRNA and protein expressions were analysed by PCR, QuantiGene Plex Assay, immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence. Further, cytokeratin expression was analysed immunocytochemically. Cultivation resulted in 11 established cell lines, eight showing epithelial character. In five of the early passages the claudin expressions decreased compared to the original tissues. In general, claudin expressions were diminished during cultivation. Three cell lines kept longitudinally claudin, as well as epithelial marker expressions, representing valuable tools for the development of claudin targeted anti-tumour therapies. PMID:27690019

  13. Cell proliferation and expression of connexins differ in melanotic and amelanotic canine oral melanomas.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Tarso Felipe; Gentile, Luciana Boffoni; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Mennecier, Gregory; Chaible, Lucas Martins; Cogliati, Bruno; Roman, Marco Antonio Leon; Gioso, Marco Antonio; Dagli, Maria Lucia Zaidan

    2014-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant neoplasm occurring in several animal species, and is the most frequently found tumor in the oral cavity in dogs. Melanomas are classified into two types: melanotic and amelanotic. Prior research suggests that human amelanotic melanomas are more aggressive than their melanotic counterparts. This study evaluates the behavior of canine melanotic and amelanotic oral cavity melanomas and quantifies cell proliferation and the expression of connexins. Twenty-five melanomas (16 melanotic and 9 amelanotic) were collected from dogs during clinical procedures at the Veterinary Hospital of the School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. After diagnosis, dogs were followed until death or euthanasia. Histopathology confirmed the gross melanotic or amelanotic characteristics and tumors were classified according to the WHO. HMB45 or Melan A immunostainings were performed to confirm the diagnosis of amelanotic melanomas. Cell proliferation was quantified both by counting mitotic figures and PCNA positive nuclei. Expressions of connexins 26 and 43 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR and Western blot. Dogs bearing amelanotic melanomas presented a shorter lifespan in comparison to those with melanotic melanomas. Cell proliferation was significantly higher in amelanotic melanomas. Expressions of Connexins 26 and 43 were significantly reduced in amelanotic melanomas. The results presented here suggest that oral cavity melanotic and amelanotic melanomas differ regarding their behavior, cell proliferation and connexin expression in dogs, indicating a higher aggressiveness of amelanotic variants. PMID:24126842

  14. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of renal tubular cells in canine glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Aresu, Luca; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Scanziani, Eugenio; Baily, James; Radaelli, Enrico; Pregel, Paola; Valenza, Federico

    2007-11-01

    Tubulo-interstitial fibrosis in dogs may result from primary injury to the interstitium or develop secondary to other renal diseases. As in human renal pathology, tubular epithelial cells (TEC) are believed to actively participate in the mechanisms of renal fibrosis. In this study, we examined the changes in the tubular epithelial component in two specific canine diseases. Immunohistochemistry showed the expression of the epithelial marker cytokeratin, the smooth muscle marker alpha-SMA, the mesenchymal marker vimentin and PCNA in 20 dogs with membranous glomerulonephritis and membrano-proliferative glomerulonephritis. Results showed that the loss of the epithelial marker in TEC was directly correlated to the grade of tubulo-interstitial disease present and independent of the type of glomerulonephritis. Varying degrees of vimentin positivity were detected in tubular epithelium in areas of inflammation, and low numbers of scattered alpha-SMA-positive cells were also observed. Immunohistochemistry showed that epithelial tubular cells lose their cytokeratin staining characteristics and transdifferentiate into cells exhibiting key mesenchymal immunophenotypic feature of vimentin-positive staining in both diseases investigated. The integrity of the tubular basement membrane is likely to be fundamental in maintaining the epithelial phenotype of TEC. Animal models provide opportunities for investigating the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis in humans.

  15. Lymphocyte adhesion molecules in T cell-mediated lysis of human kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Suranyi, M G; Bishop, G A; Clayberger, C; Krensky, A M; Leenaerts, P; Aversa, G; Hall, B M

    1991-02-01

    The complementary adhesion molecules LFA-1 (CD11a, 18)/ICAM-1 (CD54) and LFA-2 (CD2)/LFA-3 (CD58) have been shown to be important in T cell interaction with lymphoid target cells. The role of these ligand pairs in cytotoxicity against somatic cells is less well established. While LFA-3 is expressed by all cells in the kidney, ICAM-1 expression is low in normal kidneys but is increased in allograft rejection. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay was used to examine the relative importance of the two adhesion ligands in immune damage against kidney cells in rejection. HLA-A2 specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) recognition of cultured human kidney cells (HKC), of predominantly renal tubular cell origin, was studied. Immunofluorescence studies showed that both induced and uninduced HKC target cells expressed ICAM-1, MHC class I and LFA-3, but only MHC class I and class II antigens and ICAM-1 were significantly upregulated by cytokine induction. Effector cells expressed LFA-1 and LFA-2 but little or no ICAM-1 and LFA-3. Cytokine induction of ICAM-1 expression on HKC target cells increased their susceptibility to lysis. Monoclonal antibody against ICAM-1 or LFA-1 produced the greatest inhibition of HKC lysis, and their effects were not additive. Antibody against LFA-2 (CD2) or LFA-3 also produced significant inhibition, but to a lesser degree, and no additive effect was found.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1706002

  16. Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Kidney Associated With Large Calculus in Non-functioning Kidney: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Sher S; Udawat, Hema; Priyadarshi, Shivam; Vyas, Nachiket; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of renal pelvis is a rare neoplasm. A 75-year old male presented with history of chronic dull aching pain in left flank region for last 10-years with history of left pyelolithotomy about 30-years back. After proper workup, large calculus with heterogeneous density mass detected in nonfunctioning left kidney. After radical nephrectomy, histopathological examination revealed squamous cell carcinoma of renal pelvis. SCC should be suspected in a patient with long history of renal calculous and associated mass in non functioning kidney. PMID:27313983

  17. Characterization of ascorbic acid uptake by isolated rat kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers-Komro, D.M.; McCormick, D.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Isolated kidney cells accumulated L(1-14C)ascorbic acid in a time-dependent manner and reached a steady state after 15 min at 37 degrees C. Initial velocity for uptake was over 300 pmol/mg protein per min when cells were separated from the bathing solution using a density gradient established during centrifugation. The uptake process was saturable with an apparent concentration at half maximal uptake of 36 mumols/L. Ascorbate uptake was reduced by metabolic inhibitors and was temperature dependent. Although ascorbic acid is an acid anion at pH 7.4, uptake did not appear to be inhibited by other acid anions such as p-aminohippurate and probenecid; however, involvement of the ion gradient established by Na+, H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase could not be confirmed. Replacing the sodium ion with other monovalent ions reduced the accumulation of ascorbate significantly. Isoascorbic and dehydroascorbic acids inhibited ascorbate uptake (34 and 13 mmol/L, respectively), whereas high concentrations of glucose showed some stimulation. These findings indicated that ascorbic acid is reabsorbed by the kidney in a sodium-dependent active transport process that is not common to other acid anions and has some specificity for the ascorbic acid structure.

  18. A novel derivative of doxorubicin, AD198, inhibits canine transitional cell carcinoma and osteosarcoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic treatments for a wide range of cancers. N-benzyladriamycin-14-valerate (AD198) is a lipophilic anthracycline that has been shown to target conventional and novel isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC) in cytoplasm of cells. Because of the adverse effects of DOX, including hair loss, nausea, vomiting, liver dysfunction, and cardiotoxicity, novel derivatives of DOX have been synthesized and validated. In this study, we evaluated the effects of DOX and its derivative, AD198, on cell viability of three canine transitional cell carcinoma (K9TCC) (K9TCC#1-Lillie, K9TCC#2-Dakota, K9TCC#4-Molly) and three canine osteosarcoma (K9OSA) (K9OSA#1-Zoe, K9OSA#2-Nashville, K9OSA#3-JJ) primary cancer cell lines. DOX and AD198 significantly inhibited cell proliferation in all tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. AD198 inhibited cell viability of tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines more efficiently as compared to DOX at the same concentration using MTS (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2h-tetrazolium) assay. AD198 had lower IC50 values as compared to DOX for all tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. In addition, AD198 increased apoptosis in all tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. AD198 increased the caspase activity in tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines, which was confirmed by caspase-3/7 assay, and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was confirmed by Western blotting analysis. In addition, AD198 cleaved PKC-δ, which subsequently activated the p38 signaling pathway, resulting in the apoptosis of tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. Inhibition of the p38 signaling pathway by SB203580 rescued DOX- and AD198-induced apoptosis in tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. Our in vitro results suggest that AD198 might be considered as a new treatment option for K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines cancers in vivo. PMID:26451087

  19. Effect of selenodiglutathione on the metabolism of canine mammary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fico-Santoro, M.; Lebowitz, A.; Milner, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    Selenodiglutathione (SDG) has been shown to be an effective inhibitor of tumor growth. The present studies were designed to evaluate altered metabolism in canine mammary tumor cells (CMT-13) exposed to various concentrations of SDG. Addition of SDG at 0.025 ..mu..g Se/ml did not inhibit growth of CMT-13 cells after 24 h of incubation. At this concentration of SDG, approximately 25% of /sup 75/Se-/sup 35/S-SDG was retained in these tumor cells after 24 h of incubation. The nuclear fraction contained 96% of the /sup 75/Se and /sup 35/S radioactivity. The ratio of /sup 75/Se to /sup 35/S was 1 to 4.5 in the whole cell and in the nuclear fraction. SDG increased glutathione peroxidase activity by 40% compared to CMT-13 cells not exposed to SDG. Glutathione reductase activity was decreased by 63% by the addition of SDG. In addition, supplemental SDG resulted in a 55% decrease in GSH content but did not alter GSSG concentrations. After 4d of incubation, SDG at 0.1 and 0.5 ..mu..g Se/ml caused a 43 and 58% inhibition of growth of CMT-13 cells. Addition of GSH (100..mu..M) partially prevented, 68% and 54%, the growth inhibition caused by SDG at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.5 ..mu..g Se per ml respectively during the 4d incubation period. Preincubation of CMT-13 cells with GSH for 48 h before addition of SDG (0.5 ..mu..g Se/ml) completely prevented the growth inhibition caused by this seleno-compound.

  20. Replication and plaque formation of parainfluenza viruses in an established line of monkey kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Nerome, K; Ishida, M

    1982-05-01

    All four types of parainfluenza virus produced distinct plaques in an established line of monkey kidney cells (LLCMK2) under agar overlay containing trypsin and DEAE dextran. Parallel titration of these viruses in LLCMK2 and primary cynomologous monkey kidney (MK) cells showed that LLCMK2 cells were about tenfold more sensitive than MK cells. When trypsin was added to the fluid medium, the virus yield in LLCMK2 cells was significantly higher than in MK cells.

  1. In vivo Growth and Differentiation of Canine Olfactory Bulb-Derived Neural Progenitor Cells under Variable Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Raquel M.; Wolfe, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The dog serves as a large animal model for multiple neurologic diseases that may potentially benefit from neural progenitor cell (NPC) transplantation. In the adult brain, multipotent NPCs reside in the subventricular zone and its rostral and caudal extensions into the olfactory bulb and hippocampus. The olfactory bulb represents a surgically accessible site for obtaining cells for autologous NPC transplantation. To model conditions that would occur for ex vivo gene therapy in the postnatal brain, NPCs were isolated from the canine olfactory bulb, expanded ex vivo under different culture conditions, and compared quantitatively for growth and immunophenotype. Under standard growth conditions, canine olfactory bulb-derived NPCs (OB-cNPCs) could be expanded nearly 500-fold in the time evaluated. Canine OB-cNPCs grown on poly-D-lysine (PDL) or on PDL-fibronectin had similar growth rates, whereas supplementation with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) resulted in significantly slower growth. However, when OB-cNPC cultures were grown on PDL-fibronectin or PDL supplemented with LIF, a greater proportion of cells with neuronal markers were generated upon differentiation. PMID:18261803

  2. The effect of different implant biomaterials on the behavior of canine bone marrow stromal cells during their differentiation into osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Şen, B H; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of different implant biomaterials on cultured canine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) undergoing differentiation into osteoblasts (dBMSC). BMSC were isolated from canine humerus by marrow aspiration, cultured and differentiated on calcium phosphate scaffold (CPS), hydroxyapatite, hydroxyapatite in gel form and titanium mesh. We used the MTT method to determine the effects of osteogenic media on proliferation. The characteristics of dBMSC were assessed using alizarin red (AR), immunocytochemistry and osteoblastic markers including alkaline phosphatase/von Kossa (ALP/VK), osteocalcin (OC) and osteonectin (ON), and ELISA. The morphology of dBMSC on the biomaterials was investigated using inverted phase contrast microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. We detected expression of ALP/VK, AR, OC and ON by day 7 of culture; expression increased from day 14 until day 21. CPS supported the best adhesion, cell spreading, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. The effects of the biomaterials depended on their surface properties. Expression of osteoblastic markers showed that canine dBMSCs became functional osteoblasts. Tissue engineered stem cells can be useful clinically for autologous implants for treating bone wounds. PMID:27182756

  3. Plasticity of Th17 Cells in Autoimmune Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Christian F; Turner, Jan-Eric; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Kapffer, Sonja; Koyro, Tobias; Krohn, Sonja; Ufer, Friederike; Friese, Manuel A; Flavell, Richard A; Stockinger, Brigitta; Steinmetz, Oliver M; Stahl, Rolf A K; Huber, Samuel; Panzer, Ulf

    2016-07-15

    The ability of CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into pathogenic Th1 and Th17 or protective T regulatory cells plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Recent data suggest that CD4(+) T cell subsets display a considerable plasticity. This plasticity seems to be a critical factor for their pathogenicity, but also for the potential transition of pathogenic effector T cells toward a more tolerogenic phenotype. The aim of the current study was to analyze the plasticity of Th17 cells in a mouse model of acute crescentic glomerulonephritis and in a mouse chronic model of lupus nephritis. By transferring in vitro generated, highly purified Th17 cells and by using IL-17A fate reporter mice, we demonstrate that Th17 cells fail to acquire substantial expression of the Th1 and Th2 signature cytokines IFN-γ and IL-13, respectively, or the T regulatory transcription factor Foxp3 throughout the course of renal inflammation. In an attempt to therapeutically break the stability of the Th17 phenotype in acute glomerulonephritis, we subjected nephritic mice to CD3-specific Ab treatment. Indeed, this treatment induced an immunoregulatory phenotype in Th17 cells, which was marked by high expression of IL-10 and attenuated renal tissue damage in acute glomerulonephritis. In summary, we show that Th17 cells display a minimum of plasticity in acute and chronic experimental glomerulonephritis and introduce anti-CD3 treatment as a tool to induce a regulatory phenotype in Th17 cells in the kidney that may be therapeutically exploited.

  4. Salt intake, endothelial cell signaling, and progression of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Paul W

    2004-02-01

    It has been known for decades that increased dietary intake of salt (NaCl) shortens the life span of rats in a dose-dependent fashion. This review focuses specifically on the recently described biological effect and consequences of increased salt ingestion on the endothelium through a mechanism that is independent of blood pressure. Changes in salt intake are recognized by endothelial cells in the vascular tree and glomeruli through a physical process that promotes a series of signaling events involved in transcriptional regulation of genes that include transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (NOS3). A balance is struck between TGF-beta1 and NOS3 as salt intake varies and creates a negative feedback loop, because TGF-beta1 increased expression of NOS3 and NO inhibited production of TGF-beta1 in healthy rats. Changes in this feedback system have been observed in salt-sensitive hypertension and appear to impact end-organ damage, particularly the kidney. The data support an important benefit to reduction of salt intake in the setting of chronic kidney disease.

  5. Large Size Cells in the Visceral Adipose Depot Predict Insulin Resistance in the Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Morvarid; Stefanovski, Darko; Hsu, Isabel R.; Iyer, Malini; Woolcott, Orison O.; Zheng, Dan; Catalano, Karyn J.; Chiu, Jenny D.; Kim, Stella P.; Harrison, Lisa N.; Ionut, Viorica; Lottati, Maya; Bergman, Richard N.; Richey, Joyce M.

    2015-01-01

    Adipocyte size plays a key role in the development of insulin resistance. We examined longitudinal changes in adipocyte size and distribution in visceral (VIS) and subcutaneous (SQ) fat during obesity-induced insulin resistance and after treatment with CB-1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant (RIM) in canines. We also examined whether adipocyte size and/or distribution is predictive of insulin resistance. Adipocyte morphology was assessed by direct microscopy and analysis of digital images in previously studied animals 6 weeks after high-fat diet (HFD) and 16 weeks of HFD + placebo (PL; n = 8) or HFD + RIM (1.25 mg/kg/day; n = 11). At 6 weeks, mean adipocyte diameter increased in both depots with a bimodal pattern only in VIS. Sixteen weeks of HFD+PL resulted in four normally distributed cell populations in VIS and a bimodal pattern in SQ. Multilevel mixed-effects linear regression with random-effects model of repeated measures showed that size combined with share of adipocytes >75 µm in VIS only was related to hepatic insulin resistance. VIS adipocytes >75 µm were predictive of whole body and hepatic insulin resistance. In contrast, there was no predictive power of SQ adipocytes >75 µm regarding insulin resistance. RIM prevented the formation of large cells, normalizing to pre-fat status in both depots. The appearance of hypertrophic adipocytes in VIS is a critical predictor of insulin resistance, supporting the deleterious effects of increased VIS adiposity in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. PMID:21836643

  6. Cardiac Niche Influences the Direct Reprogramming of Canine Fibroblasts into Cardiomyocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Palazzolo, Giacomo; Quattrocelli, Mattia; Toelen, Jaan; Dominici, Roberto; Tettamenti, Guido; Barthelemy, Inès; Blot, Stephane; Gijsbers, Rik; Cassano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by mutation of dystrophin gene and primarily affect skeletal and cardiac muscles. Cardiac involvement in dystrophic GRMD dogs has been demonstrated by electrocardiographic studies with the onset of a progressive cardiomyopathy similar to the cardiac disease in DMD patients. In this respect, GRMD is a useful model to explore cardiac and skeletal muscle pathogenesis and for developing new therapeutic protocols. Here we describe a protocol to convert GRMD canine fibroblasts isolated from heart and skin into induced cardiac-like myocytes (ciCLMs). We used a mix of transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, TBX5, and MEF2C), known to be able to differentiate mouse and human somatic cells into ciCLMs. Exogenous gene expression was obtained using four lentiviral vectors carrying transcription factor genes and different resistance genes. Our data demonstrate a direct switch from fibroblast into ciCLMs with no activation of early cardiac genes. ciCLMs were unable to contract spontaneously, suggesting, differently from mouse and human cells, an incomplete differentiation process. However, when transplanted in neonatal hearts of SCID/Beige mice, ciCLMs participate in cardiac myogenesis. PMID:26681949

  7. Paneth cell-mediated multiorgan dysfunction after acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Kim, Joo Yun; Ham, Ahrom; Brown, Kevin M.; Mori-Akiyama, Yuko; Ouellette, André J.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequently complicated by extra-renal multi-organ injury including intestinal and hepatic dysfunction. In this study, we hypothesized that a discrete intestinal source of pro-inflammatory mediators drives multi-organ injury in response to AKI. After induction of AKI in mice by renal ischemia-reperfusion or bilateral nephrectomy, small intestinal Paneth cells increased the synthesis and release of IL-17A in conjunction with severe intestinal apoptosis and inflammation. We also detected significantly increased IL-17A in portal and systemic circulation after AKI. Intestinal macrophages appear to transport released Paneth cell granule constituents induced by AKI, away from the base of the crypts into the liver. Genetic or pharmacologic depletion of Paneth cells decreased small intestinal IL-17A secretion and plasma IL-17A levels significantly and attenuated intestinal, hepatic, and renal injury after AKI. Similarly, portal delivery of IL-17A in macrophage depleted mice decreased markedly, and intestinal, hepatic, and renal injury following AKI was attenuated without affecting intestinal IL-17A generation. In conclusion, AKI induces IL-17A synthesis and secretion by Paneth cells to initiate intestinal and hepatic injury by hepatic and systemic delivery of IL-17A by macrophages. Modulation of Paneth cell dysregulation may have therapeutic implications by reducing systemic complications arising from AKI. PMID:23109723

  8. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K J; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Gattone, Vincent H; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA.

  9. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, K. J.; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Dominguez, Jesus H.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA. PMID:26136112

  10. Agreement between the cell culture titrations of canine minute virus determined by two susceptibility-testing methods.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, A; Colao, V

    2013-09-01

    The correct diagnosis of canine minute virus is critical in dog breeding. In this study, the Bland Altman test was used to compare the performance of two susceptibility-testing methods, namely polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The agreement between IFA and PCR in monocytes revealed a mean difference of -1752.16 with 95% confidence and an interval ranging from -3229.80 to -274.53 (SD=2325.62). The agreement between IFA and PCR in Walter Reed canine cells (WRCC) revealed a mean difference of -2396.55 with 95% confidence and an interval ranging from -3774.63 to -1018.48 (SD=2168.93). The Bland Altman test confirmed the overall accuracy of PCR vs IFA and the plot showed that all points were not randomly arranged in the range of average ± 1.96 × SD of the differences.

  11. Implication of Ia-positive bone marrow interstitial stem cells in the induction of unresponsiveness to canine renal allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Rapaport, F.T.; Arnold, A.N.; Asari, H.; Sato, K.; Miura, S.; Chanana, A.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1987-02-01

    The removal from stored autologous host bone marrow of a monocytoid cell population by exposure to methylprednisolone is associated with successful introduction of unresponsiveness to renal allografts in irradiated recipients reconstituted with such treated marrow. The eliminated cells are a prominent component of the canine long bone marrow interstitium and share a number of important properties with dendritic cells (DC), including size and shape; poor or nonadherence to plastic or glass surfaces; negative staining for neutral esterase, acid phosphatase, or peroxidase; nonphagocytic; Ia positive, but negative for IgG or IgM; ability to act as accessory cells in augmenting the intensity of allogeneic mixed-lymphocyte reactions. Both cell types are of bone marrow origin and are susceptible to steroids in vitro. The results suggest that the bone marrow interstitial cells identified in the course of this study may be enriched with populations of canine dendritic cell precursors and dendritic cells at various stages of differentiation. The detection of a receptor site for Helix promatia on the surface of such cells may be of usefulness in their further characterization and in the analysis of their precise role in the modulation of allogeneic unresponsiveness.

  12. Effects of chronic kidney disease on blood cells membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Kaderjakova, Z; Lajdova, I; Horvathova, M; Morvova, M; Sikurova, L

    2012-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is progressive loss of renal function associated among others with increased intracellular calcium concentration. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of CKD on cell membrane properties such as human red blood cell Ca(2+) ATPase activity, lymphocyte plasma membrane P2X(7) receptor expression and function. This could help us in elucidating the origin of increased calcium concentration in blood cells. We found out Ca(2+) ATPase activity is decreased in early stage CKD patients resulting in altered calcium removal from cytoplasm. By means of flow cytometry we assessed that P2X(7) receptor expression on lymphocyte membrane is 1.5 fold increased for CKD patients. Moreover, we detected an increased uptake of ethidium bromide through this receptor in CKD at basal conditions. It means CKD lymphocyte membranes contain more receptors which are more permeable thus allowing increased calcium influx from extracellular milieu. Finally, we can state alterations in blood cell membranes are closely linked to CKD and may be responsible for intracellular calcium accumulation.

  13. Nonapoptotic cell death in acute kidney injury and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis causes a loss of renal function, which clinically presents as acute kidney failure (AKI). The biochemical signaling pathways that trigger necrosis have been investigated in detail over the past 5 years. It is now clear that necrosis (regulated necrosis, RN) represents a genetically driven process that contributes to the pathophysiology of AKI. RN pathways such as necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-induced regulated necrosis (MPT-RN) may be mechanistically distinct, and the relative contributions to overall organ damage during AKI in living organisms largely remain elusive. In a synchronized manner, some necrotic programs induce the breakdown of tubular segments and multicellular functional units, whereas others are limited to killing single cells in the tubular compartment. Importantly, the means by which a renal cell dies may have implications for the subsequent inflammatory response. In this review, the recent advances in the field of renal cell death in AKI and key enzymes that might serve as novel therapeutic targets will be discussed. As a consequence of the interference with RN, the immunogenicity of dying cells in AKI in renal transplants will be diminished, rendering inhibitors of RN indirect immunosuppressive agents. PMID:26759047

  14. Functional Genetic Targeting of Embryonic Kidney Progenitor Cells Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Junttila, Sanna; Saarela, Ulla; Halt, Kimmo; Manninen, Aki; Pärssinen, Heikki; Lecca, M. Rita; Brändli, André W.; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Skovorodkin, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic mammalian metanephric mesenchyme (MM) is a unique tissue because it is competent to generate the nephrons in response to Wnt signaling. An ex vivo culture in which the MM is separated from the ureteric bud (UB), the natural inducer, can be used as a classic tubule induction model for studying nephrogenesis. However, technological restrictions currently prevent using this model to study the molecular genetic details before or during tubule induction. Using nephron segment-specific markers, we now show that tubule induction in the MM ex vivo also leads to the assembly of highly segmented nephrons. This induction capacity was reconstituted when MM tissue was dissociated into a cell suspension and then reaggregated (drMM) in the presence of human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 7/human recombinant fibroblast growth factor 2 for 24 hours before induction. Growth factor–treated drMM also recovered the capacity for organogenesis when recombined with the UB. Cell tracking and time-lapse imaging of chimeric drMM cultures indicated that the nephron is not derived from a single progenitor cell. Furthermore, viral vector-mediated transduction of green fluorescent protein was much more efficient in dissociated MM cells than in intact mesenchyme, and the nephrogenic competence of transduced drMM progenitor cells was preserved. Moreover, drMM cells transduced with viral vectors mediating Lhx1 knockdown were excluded from the nephric tubules, whereas cells transduced with control vectors were incorporated. In summary, these techniques allow reproducible cellular and molecular examinations of the mechanisms behind nephrogenesis and kidney organogenesis in an ex vivo organ culture/organoid setting. PMID:25201883

  15. A cyclized peptide derived from alpha fetoprotein inhibits the proliferation of ER-positive canine mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristian Gabriel; Pino, Ana María; Sierralta, Walter Daniel

    2009-06-01

    The effects of estradiol (E2) and of an AFP-derived cyclized peptide (cP) on the proliferation of primary cultures of cancer cells isolated from spontaneous canine mammary tumors were studied. The cellular response to E2 and cP was related to the expression of estradiol receptor (isoforms alpha and beta). In ER-positive cells, 2 nM estradiol increased cell proliferation and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2; 2 microg/ml cP inhibited all these effects. Estradiol also increased HER2 immunoreactivity in ER-positive cells, an effect that was reverted to its basal values by cP. Estradiol stimulated in these cells the release of MMP2 and MMP9 and the shedding of HB-EGF, effects that the cP did not affect. ER-negative cells were refractory to estradiol or cP. All canine mammary tumor cells in culture responded to treatments analogously to human mammary cancer cells. Our results support the proposal of cP as a new, potentially effective therapeutic agent for the management of mammary cancer. PMID:19424616

  16. In vitro safety assessment of food ingredients in canine renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Koči, J; Jeffery, B; Riviere, J E; Monteiro-Riviere, N A

    2015-03-01

    In vitro models are useful tools to initially assess the toxicological safety hazards of food ingredients. Toxicities of cinnamaldehyde (CINA), cinnamon bark oil, lemongrass oil (LGO), thymol, thyme oil (TO), clove leaf oil, eugenol, ginger root extract (GRE), citric acid, guanosine monophosphate, inosine monophosphate and sorbose (SORB) were assessed in canine renal proximal tubule cells (CPTC) using viability assay and renal injury markers. At LC50, CINA was the most toxic (0.012mg/ml), while SORB the least toxic (>100mg/ml). Toxicities (LC50) of positive controls were as follows: 4-aminophenol (0.15mg/ml in CPTC and 0.083mg/ml in human PTC), neomycin (28.6mg/ml in CPTC and 27.1mg/ml in human PTC). XYL displayed lowest cytotoxic potency (LC50=82.7mg/ml in CPTC). In vivo renal injury markers in CPTC were not significantly different from controls. The LGO toxicity mechanism was analyzed using qPCR and electron microscopy. Out of 370 genes, 57 genes (15.4%) were significantly up (34, 9.1%) or down (23, 6.2%) regulated, with the most upregulated gene gsta3 (∼200-fold) and the most affected pathway being oxidative stress. LGO induced damage of mitochondria, phospholipid accumulation and lack of a brush border. Viability assays along with mechanistic studies in the CPTC model may serve as a valuable in vitro toxicity screening tool.

  17. In vitro safety assessment of food ingredients in canine renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Koči, J; Jeffery, B; Riviere, J E; Monteiro-Riviere, N A

    2015-03-01

    In vitro models are useful tools to initially assess the toxicological safety hazards of food ingredients. Toxicities of cinnamaldehyde (CINA), cinnamon bark oil, lemongrass oil (LGO), thymol, thyme oil (TO), clove leaf oil, eugenol, ginger root extract (GRE), citric acid, guanosine monophosphate, inosine monophosphate and sorbose (SORB) were assessed in canine renal proximal tubule cells (CPTC) using viability assay and renal injury markers. At LC50, CINA was the most toxic (0.012mg/ml), while SORB the least toxic (>100mg/ml). Toxicities (LC50) of positive controls were as follows: 4-aminophenol (0.15mg/ml in CPTC and 0.083mg/ml in human PTC), neomycin (28.6mg/ml in CPTC and 27.1mg/ml in human PTC). XYL displayed lowest cytotoxic potency (LC50=82.7mg/ml in CPTC). In vivo renal injury markers in CPTC were not significantly different from controls. The LGO toxicity mechanism was analyzed using qPCR and electron microscopy. Out of 370 genes, 57 genes (15.4%) were significantly up (34, 9.1%) or down (23, 6.2%) regulated, with the most upregulated gene gsta3 (∼200-fold) and the most affected pathway being oxidative stress. LGO induced damage of mitochondria, phospholipid accumulation and lack of a brush border. Viability assays along with mechanistic studies in the CPTC model may serve as a valuable in vitro toxicity screening tool. PMID:25458622

  18. Kidney Function, β-Cell Function and Glucose Tolerance in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ting; Risérus, Ulf; Xu, Hong; Lindholm, Bengt; Ärnlöv, Johan; Sjögren, Per; Cederholm, Tommy; Larsson, Tobias E.; Ikizler, Talat Alp

    2015-01-01

    Context: Kidney dysfunction induces insulin resistance, but it is unknown if β cell function is affected. Objective: To investigate insulin release (β cell function) and glucose tolerance following a standardized oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) across kidney function strata. Setting and Design: Community-based cohort study from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM). Participants and Main Outcome Measure: Included were 1015 nondiabetic Swedish men aged 70–71 years. All participants underwent OGTT and euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp (HEGC) tests, allowing determination of insulin sensitivity, β cell function, and glucose tolerance. Kidney function was estimated by cystatin C-algorithms. Mixed models were used to identify determinants of insulin secretion after the hyperglycemic load. Results: As many as 466 (46%) of participants presented moderate-advanced kidney disease. Insulin sensitivity (by HEGC) decreased across decreasing kidney function quartiles. After the OGTT challenge, however, β cell function indices (area under the curve for insulin release, the estimated first phase insulin release, and the insulinogenic index) were incrementally higher. Neither the oral disposition index nor the 2-h postload glucose tolerance differed across the kidney function strata. Mixed models showed that dynamic insulin release during the OGTT was inversely associated with kidney function, despite the correction for each individual's insulin sensitivity or its risk factors. Conclusions: In older men, β cell function after a hyperglycemic load appropriately compensated the loss in insulin sensitivity that accompanies kidney dysfunction. As a result, the net balance between insulin sensitivity and β cell function was preserved. PMID:25429626

  19. Identification and quantitation of morphological cell types in electrophoretically separated human embryonic kidney cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, K. B.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Four major cell types were identified by phase microscopy in early passage human embryonic kidney cell cultures. They are small and large epithelioid, domed, and fenestrated cells. Fibroblasts are also present in some explants. The percent of each cell type changes with passage number as any given culture grows. As a general rule, the fraction of small epithelioid cells increases, while the fraction of fenestrated cells, always small, decreases further. When fibroblasts are present, they always increase in percentage of the total cell population. Electrophoretic separation of early passage cells showed that the domed cells have the highest electrophoretic mobility, fibroblasts have an intermediate high mobility, small epithelioid cells have a low mobility, broadly distributed, and fenestrated cells have the lowest mobility. All cell types were broadly distributed among electrophoretic subfractions, which were never pure but only enriched with respect to a given cell type.

  20. Radiosensitivity and capacity for radiation-induced sublethal damage repair of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell lines.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, S L; Milner, R J; Salute, M E; Hintenlang, D E; Farese, J P; Bacon, N J; Bova, F J; Rajon, D A; Lurie, D M

    2011-09-01

    Understanding the inherent radiosensitivity and repair capacity of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) can aid in optimizing radiation protocols to treat this disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the parameters surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF(2) ), α/β ratio and capacity for sublethal damage repair (SLDR) in response to radiation. Dose-response and split-dose studies were performed using the clonogenic assay. The mean SF(2) for three established TCC cell lines was high at 0.61. All the three cell lines exhibited a low to moderate α/β ratio, with the mean being 3.27. Two cell lines exhibited statistically increased survival at 4 and 24 h in the dose-response assay. Overall, our results indicate that the cell lines are moderately radioresistant, have a high repair capacity and behave similarly to a late-responding normal tissue. These findings indicate that the radiation protocols utilizing higher doses with less fractionation may be more effective for treating TCC.

  1. Biological effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on three canine mast cell tumor cell lines with various KIT statuses.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Y; Fujino, Y; Fukushima, K; Watanabe, M; Nakagawa, T; Ohno, K; Sasaki, N; Sugano, S; Tsujimoto, H

    2012-02-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) can be important in the treatment of canine mast cell tumor (cMCT). Meanwhile, some TKIs have been identified as substrates for ABCB1. The inhibitory effect of four TKIs (axitinib, imatinib, masitinib, and vatalanib) for proliferation and phosphorylation of c-Kit receptor as well as the expression and function of ABCB1 were investigated in three cMCT cell lines (HRMC, VIMC1, and CMMC1). The IC(50) values of the TKIs in HRMC, the only cell line with wild-type KIT, were clearly higher than those in CMMC1 and VIMC1. In HRMC and CMMC1, both the growth and phosphorylation of c-Kit receptor were suppressed proportionally by the TKIs. VIMC1 required higher concentrations for the inhibition of c-Kit receptor phosphorylation than those in cell growth. The treatment with cyclosporine increased the effects of the TKIs on VIMC1 since ABCB1 was expressed in VIMC1. The results indicated that cMCT cell lines harboring wild-type KIT had lower sensitivity to TKIs. The growth of VIMC1 was seemingly reduced by TKIs through the inhibition of other tyrosine kinases than c-Kit receptor. There was little influence of ABCB1 on TKI effects to the proliferation of VIMC1. These results will be helpful to understand the different sensitivity to TKIs in cMCT patients. PMID:21480930

  2. Haematuria as an uncommon initial presenting symptom of metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) to kidney.

    PubMed

    Kawsar, Hameem I; Spiro, Timothy P; Daw, Hamed A

    2011-01-01

    A 47-year-old female presented with a 2-week history of painless haematuria. Urine dipstick showed moderate leucocytes. Blood and urine cultures were negative and cytology was negative for malignant cells. Flexible cystoscopy was negative for any bladder pathology. An ultrasonogram of the abdomen showed a mass in the left kidney. CT showed a mass-like lesion within the left kidney suspicious for renal carcinoma, and cavitary lesions in both lungs. Biopsy of the lung showed clusters of atypical cells suspicious for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and left kidney lesion showed malignant cells derived from SCC. A whole body positron emission tomography/CT showed lesions in the lungs, left kidney and skeleton. Complete clinical examination, laboratory and imaging studies did not reveal any site of primary tumour in any part of the body. Haematuria is a very unusual initial presentation of metastatic tumour to kidney. PMID:22688475

  3. Serendipitous finding of transitional cell carcinoma of the kidney on bone and gallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Toney, M.A.; Griffith, J.C.; Rodriguez, A.A.; Turnbull, G.L. )

    1991-03-01

    A 50-year-old woman presented with low back pain. Bone scintigraphy showed a focus of increased activity in the upper pole of the left kidney. Subsequent Ga-67 citrate scintigraphy demonstrated this same abnormal focus as a region of increased activity. Ultrasonography showed a renal mass in the upper pole of the left kidney. At surgery a transitional cell carcinoma of the upper pole of the left kidney was found.

  4. Insights into leukemia initiating cell frequency and self-renewal from a novel canine model of leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Imren, Suzan; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Humphries, R. Keith; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective Leukemia initiating cells (LICs) have been the subject of considerable investigation because of their ability to self-renew and maintain leukemia. Thus, selective targeting and killing of LIC would provide highly efficient and novel therapeutic strategies. Here we explored whether we could use a canine leukemia cell line (G374) derived from a dog that received HOXB4 transduced repopulating cells to study leukemia in the murine xenograft model and the dog. Materials and Methods G374 cells were infused in dogs intravenously (IV) and in NOD/SCID and NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull mice either IV or directly into the bone cavity (IF). Animals were bled to track engraftment and proliferation of G374 cells, and were sacrificed when they appeared ill. Results We found that canine LICs are capable of sustained in vitro self-renewal while maintaining their ability to induce AML that resembles human disease in both dogs and mice. Furthermore, we developed a novel strategy for the quantification of LIC frequency in large animals and showed that this frequency was highly comparable to that determined by limited dilution in mouse xenotransplants. We also demonstrated, using single cell analysis, that LICs are heterogenous in their self-renewal capacity and regenerate a leukemic cell population consistent with a hierarchical leukemia model. Conclusions The availability of this novel framework should accelerate the characterization of LICs and the translation of animal studies into clinical trials. PMID:20933571

  5. Combinatorial Treatment of DNA and Chromatin-Modifying Drugs Cause Cell Death in Human and Canine Osteosarcoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Park, ChangWon; Sarver, Aaron L.; Kartha, Reena V.; Korpela, Derek M.; Graef, Ashley J.; Steer, Clifford J.; Modiano, Jaime F.; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2012-01-01

    Downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) at the 14q32 locus stabilizes the expression of cMYC, thus significantly contributing to osteosarcoma (OS) pathobiology. Here, we show that downregulation of 14q32 miRNAs is epigenetically regulated. The predicted promoter regions of miRNA clusters at 14q32 locus showed no recurrent patterns of differential methylation, but Saos2 cells showed elevated histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. Treatment with 4-phenylbutyrate increased acetylation of histones associated with 14q32 miRNAs, but interestingly, robust restoration of 14q32 miRNA expression, attenuation of cMYC expression, and induction of apoptosis required concomitant treatment with 5-Azacytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. These events were associated with genome-wide gene expression changes including induction of pro-apoptotic genes and downregulation of cell cycle genes. Comparable effects were achieved in human and canine OS cells using the HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA/Vorinostat) and the DNA methylation inhibitor Zebularine (Zeb), with significantly more pronounced cytotoxicity in cells whose molecular phenotypes were indicative of aggressive biological behavior. These results suggested that the combination of these chromatin-modifying drugs may be a useful adjuvant in the treatment of rapidly progressive OS. PMID:22957032

  6. Vaccination for invasive canine meningioma induces in situ production of antibodies capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Brian M; Pluhar, G Elizabeth; Seiler, Charles E; Goulart, Michelle R; SantaCruz, Karen S; Schutten, Melissa M; Meints, Joyce P; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Bentley, R Timothy; Packer, Rebecca A; Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Faissler, Dominik; Chen, Wei; Hunt, Matthew A; Olin, Michael R; Ohlfest, John R

    2013-05-15

    Malignant and atypical meningiomas are resistant to standard therapies and associated with poor prognosis. Despite progress in the treatment of other tumors with therapeutic vaccines, this approach has not been tested preclinically or clinically in these tumors. Spontaneous canine meningioma is a clinically meaningful but underutilized model for preclinical testing of novel strategies for aggressive human meningioma. We treated 11 meningioma-bearing dogs with surgery and vaccine immunotherapy consisting of autologous tumor cell lysate combined with toll-like receptor ligands. Therapy was well tolerated, and only one dog had tumor growth that required intervention, with a mean follow up of 585 days. IFN-γ-elaborating T cells were detected in the peripheral blood of 2 cases, but vaccine-induced tumor-reactive antibody responses developed in all dogs. Antibody responses were polyclonal, recognizing both intracellular and cell surface antigens, and HSP60 was identified as one common antigen. Tumor-reactive antibodies bound allogeneic canine and human meningiomas, showing common antigens across breed and species. Histologic analysis revealed robust infiltration of antibody-secreting plasma cells into the brain around the tumor in posttreatment compared with pretreatment samples. Tumor-reactive antibodies were capable of inducing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity to autologous and allogeneic tumor cells. These data show the feasibility and immunologic efficacy of vaccine immunotherapy for a large animal model of human meningioma and warrant further development toward human trials.

  7. Canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells suppress alloreactive lymphocyte proliferation in vitro but fail to enhance engraftment in canine bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Sik; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Graves, Scott S; Iwata, Mineo; Venkataraman, G M; Mielcarek, Marco; Peterson, Laura J; Ikehara, Susumu; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Storb, Rainer

    2011-04-01

    Stable mixed hematopoietic chimerism has been consistently established in dogs who were mildly immunosuppressed by 200 cGy of total body irradiation (TBI) before undergoing dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)-identical bone marrow (BM) transplantation and who received a brief course of immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil (28 days) and cyclosporine (35 days) after transplantation. However, when TBI was reduced from 200 to 100 cGy, grafts were nearly uniformly rejected within 3-12 weeks. Here, we asked whether stable engraftment could be accomplished after a suboptimal dose of 100 cGy TBI with host immunosuppression enhanced by donor-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) given after transplantation. MSCs were cultured from BM cells and evaluated in vitro for antigen expression. They showed profound immunosuppressive properties in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) in a cell dose-dependent manner not restricted by DLA. MSC and lymphocyte contact was not required, indicating that immunosuppression was mediated by soluble factors. Prostaglandin E2 was increased in culture supernatant when MSCs were cocultured in MLRs. The addition of indomethacin restored lymphocyte proliferation in cultures containing MSCs. MSCs expressed CD10, CD13, CD29, CD44, CD73/SH-3, CD90/Thy-1, and CD106/VCAM-1. For in vivo studies, MSCs were injected on the day of BM grafting and on day 35, the day of discontinuation of posttransplantation cyclosporine. MSCs derived from the respective BM donors failed to avert BM graft rejection in 4 dogs who received DLA-identical grafts after nonmyeloablative conditioning with 100 cGy TBI in a time course not significantly different from that of control dogs not given MSCs. Although the MSCs displayed in vitro characteristics similar to those reported for MSCs from other species, their immunosuppressive qualities failed to sustain stable BM engraftment in vivo in this canine model. PMID:20457265

  8. Voltage-dependent capacitance of human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Brenda; Do Shope, Cythnia; Brownell, William E.

    2006-04-01

    We determine membrane capacitance, C as a function of dc voltage for the human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell. C was calculated from the admittance, Y , obtained during a voltage ramp when the HEK cell was held in whole-cell patch-clamp configuration. Y was determined at frequencies of 390.625 and 781.25Hz from the measured current, i obtained with a dual-sinusoidal stimulus. We find that the fractional increase in the capacitance, C is small (<1%) and grows with the square of the voltage, Ψ . C can be described by: C=C(0)(1+α(Ψ+ψs)2) [where C(0) : Capacitance at 0volts , ψs : Difference in surface potential between cytoplasmic and extracellular leaflets and α : Proportionality constant]. We find that α and ψs are 0.120 (±0.01)V-2 and -0.073 (±0.017)V in solutions that contain ion channel blockers and 0.108 (±0.29)V-2 and -0.023 (±0.009)V when 10mM sodium salicylate was added to the extracellular solution. This suggests that salicylate does not affect the rate at which C grows with Ψ , but reduces the charge asymmetry of the membrane. We also observe an additional linear differential capacitance of about (-46fFV-1) in about 60% of the cells, this additional component acts simultaneously with the quadratic component and was not observed when salicylate was added to the solution. We suggest that the voltage dependent capacitance originates from electromechanical coupling either by electrostriction and/or Maxwell stress effects and estimate that a small electromechanical force (≈1pN) acts at physiological potentials. These results are relevant to understand the electromechanical coupling in outer hair cells (OHCs) of the mammalian cochlea, where an asymmetric bell-shaped C versus Ψ relationship is observed upon application of a similar field. Prestin, a membrane protein expressed in OHCs is required to observe this function. When we compare the total charge contributions from HEK cell membrane ( 7×104 electrons, 10pF cell) with that determined for

  9. The antagonist activity of lipid IVa on the stimulation by lipid A of TNF-alpha production from canine blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Takasawa, Kenji; Kano, Rui; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi

    2011-09-15

    Lipid A, the active component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), exists in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and binds to the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 complex. On the other hand, the synthetic precursor of Escherichia coli lipid A, tetraacylated lipid IVa, is an agonist for TLR4 and MD-2 complex in murine, equine and feline cells but is an antagonist for lipid A in human cells. The aim of the study was to examine the function of canine Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 complex on canine blood mononuclear cells (BMC), by analyzing lipid A- or lipid IVa-induction of TNF-α production from these cells in order to understand canine innate immune system. After 5-h culture of canine BMC with lipid A (lipid A culture) or lipid IVa (lipid IVa culture), the TNF-α, as determined by ELISA, had increased in the supernatants of the lipid A cultures in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the TNF-α was undetectable in supernatant of lipid IVa-treated cultures. The TNF-α was statistically significantly different between the lipid A and lipid IVa cultures (100 and 1000 ng/ml). TNF-α production from canine BMC was inhibited, in a lipid IVa-dose-dependent manner, when the BMC were pre-cultured with lipid IVa for 60 min and then cultured with lipid A for 5h, while in control BMC cultures production if TNF-α was unchanged. These results indicate that the TNF-α production stimulated by lipid A was competed out by pre-exposing the BMC to lipid IVa. Thus, lipid A is an agonist for TNF-α production in canine BMC, whereas lipid IVa appears to be an antagonist against this lipid A stimulation of canine BMC.

  10. Action of diclofenac on kidney mitochondria and cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Lin Eng; Vincent, Annette S.; Halliwell, Barry; Wong, Kim Ping . E-mail: bchsitkp@nus.edu.sg

    2006-09-22

    The mitochondrial membrane potential measured in isolated rat kidney mitochondria and in digitonin-permeabilized MDCK type II cells pre-energized with succinate, glutamate, and/or malate was reduced by micromolar diclofenac dose-dependently. However, ATP biosynthesis from glutamate/malate was significantly more compromised compared to that from succinate. Inhibition of the malate-aspartate shuttle by diclofenac with a resultant decrease in the ability of mitochondria to generate NAD(P)H was demonstrated. Diclofenac however had no effect on the activities of NADH dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase. In conclusion, decreased NAD(P)H production due to an inhibition of the entry of malate and glutamate via the malate-aspartate shuttle explained the more pronounced decreased rate of ATP biosynthesis from glutamate and malate by diclofenac. This drug, therefore affects the bioavailability of two major respiratory complex I substrates which would normally contribute substantially to supplying the reducing equivalents for mitochondrial electron transport for generation of ATP in the renal cell.

  11. C-kit(+) cells isolated from developing kidneys are a novel population of stem cells with regenerative potential.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Erika B; Gomes, Samirah A; Dulce, Raul A; Premer, Courtney; Rodrigues, Claudia O; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M; Oskouei, Behzad; Carvalho, Decio A; Ruiz, Phillip; Reiser, Jochen; Hare, Joshua M

    2013-08-01

    The presence of tissue specific precursor cells is an emerging concept in organ formation and tissue homeostasis. Several progenitors are described in the kidneys. However, their identity as a true stem cell remains elusive. Here, we identify a neonatal kidney-derived c-kit(+) cell population that fulfills all of the criteria as a stem cell. These cells were found in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and exhibited clonogenicity, self-renewal, and multipotentiality with differentiation capacity into mesoderm and ectoderm progeny. Additionally, c-kit(+) cells formed spheres in nonadherent conditions when plated at clonal density and expressed markers of stem cells, progenitors, and differentiated cells. Ex vivo expanded c-kit(+) cells integrated into several compartments of the kidney, including tubules, vessels, and glomeruli, and contributed to functional and morphological improvement of the kidney following acute ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats. Together, these findings document a novel neonatal rat kidney c-kit(+) stem cell population that can be isolated, expanded, cloned, differentiated, and used for kidney repair following acute kidney injury. These cells have important biological and therapeutic implications.

  12. The V domain of dog PVRL4 (nectin-4) mediates canine distemper virus entry and virus cell-to-cell spread

    SciTech Connect

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S.; Richardson, Christopher D.

    2014-04-15

    The entry of canine distemper virus (CDV) is a multistep process that involves the attachment of CDV hemagglutinin (H) to its cellular receptor, followed by fusion between virus and cell membranes. Our laboratory recently identified PVRL4 (nectin-4) to be the epithelial receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. In this study, we demonstrate that the V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry and virus cell-to-cell spread. Furthermore, four key amino acid residues within the V domain of dog PVRL4 and two within the CDV hemagglutinin were shown to be essential for receptor-mediated virus entry. - Highlights: • PVRL4 (nectin-4) is the epithelial cell receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. • V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry, cell-to-cell spread, and syncytia formation. • Chimeric PVRL1 backbone substituted with the V domain of PVRL4 can function as a receptor. • Amino acids (F132/P133/A134/G135) within the V domain are essential for PVRL4 receptor activity. • Amino acids (P493/Y539) within CDV H protein are essential for PVRL4 receptor interaction.

  13. Growing Kidney Tissue from Stem Cells: How Far from "Party Trick" to Medical Application?

    PubMed

    Little, Melissa H

    2016-06-01

    The successful generation of kidney-like structures from human pluripotent stem cells, although slower to come than other tissue types, brings the hope of new therapies. While the demand for alternative treatments for kidney failure is acute, huge challenges remain to move these exciting but preliminary results toward clinical use.

  14. Spontaneous bilateral kidney rupture during autologous stem cell transplantation in a patient affected by amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrannini, Michele; Vischini, Gisella; De Angelis, Gottardo; Giannakakis, Konstantinos; Arcese, William

    2011-01-01

    Kidney spontaneous rupture is not a recognized complication neither for amyloidosis nor of autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). A 46-year-old white woman, affected by nephrotic syndrome, was diagnosed as AL amyloidosis by renal biopsy. We report the singular case of a bilateral spontaneous kidney rupture during ASCT for AL with renal rescue. PMID:25984105

  15. Electrophoretic characterization of aldehyde-fixed red blood cells, kidney cells, lynphocytes and chamber coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Ground-based electrokinetic data on the electrophoresis flight experiment to be flown on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project experiment MA-011 are stipulated. Aldehyde-fixed red blood cells, embryonic kidney cells and lymphocytes were evaluated by analytical particle electrophoresis. The results which aided in the interpretation of the final analysis of the MA-011 experiment are documented. The electrophoresis chamber surface modifications, the buffer, and the material used in the column system are also discussed.

  16. Canine cutaneous histiocytoma is an epidermotropic Langerhans cell histiocytosis that expresses CD1 and specific beta 2-integrin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P. F.; Schrenzel, M. D.; Affolter, V. K.; Olivry, T.; Naydan, D.

    1996-01-01

    Canine cutaneous histiocytoma (CCH) is a common, benign neoplasm of the dog. Histiocytomas most commonly occur as solitary lesions that undergo spontaneous regression. The age-specific incidence rate for histiocytomas drops precipitously after 3 years, although histiocytomas occur in dogs of all ages. Langerhans cells (LCs) in humans and dogs express abundant major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and a variety of leukocyte antigens characteristic of dendritic cell differentiation including CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD11c. The immunophenotype of CCH resembled that of cutaneous LCs by virtue of the expression of CD1 molecules (CD1a, -b, and -c), CD11c, and major histocompatibility complex class II. Furthermore, histiocytoma cells had a tropism for epidermis, which was also consistent with an epidermal LC lineage. The expression of adhesion molecules such as CD11b (variable), CD44, CD54 (ICAM-1), and CD49d (VLA-4) in CCH indicated that the infiltrating cells had some of the characteristics of activated LCs, as these molecules are not expressed by normal, resting canine epidermal LCs. CCH did not express Thy-1 or CD4. Thy-1 expression is a characteristic of human and canine dermal dendrocytes, which are perivascular dendritic antigen-presenting cells closely related to epidermal LCs. CD4 expression is prevalent in human LC histiocytosis, and in this respect CCH differed from human LC histiocytosis. Here we demonstrate that CCH is a localized form of self-limiting LC histiocytosis, which predominantly expresses an epidermal LC phenotype. CCH occurs as solitary or, less commonly, as multiple cutaneous nodules or plaques, which rarely may extend beyond the skin to local lymph nodes. Regression of CCH occurs spontaneously in the vast majority of cases in primary and secondary sites, and is mediated by CD8+ alpha beta T cells. The high frequency of CCH within the general canine population offers the potential that the dog may provide an interesting model system to

  17. Mesangial Localization of Immune Complexes in Experimental Canine Adenovirus Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, N. G.; Morrison, W. I.; Thompson, H.; Cornwell, H. J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Each of a group of 14 dogs was infected experimentally by an intravenous dose of canine adenovirus calculated to allow survival until the initial stages of antibody production; the kidneys of infected dogs were examined during the period of 4-14 days after administration of virus. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with localization of IgG, C3 and viral antigen in mesangial regions was demonstrated. With the electron microscope, electron dense deposits were found scattered throughout the mesangium. There was proliferation of mesangial cells, infiltration into the glomerular tuft of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and, in some cases, focal glomerular necrosis with intracapsular and tubular haemorrhage. By means of an indirect immunofluorescence test, anti-viral antibody was detected in kidney eluates; anti-kidney antibody was not present. ImagesFigs. 5-8Figs. 9-10Figs. 1-4 PMID:4375485

  18. Autosomal mutants of proton-exposed kidney cells display frequent loss of heterozygosity on nonselected chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grygoryev, Dmytro; Dan, Cristian; Gauny, Stacey; Eckelmann, Bradley; Ohlrich, Anna P; Connolly, Marissa; Lasarev, Michael; Grossi, Gianfranco; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2014-05-01

    High-energy protons found in the space environment can induce mutations and cancer, which are inextricably linked. We hypothesized that some mutants isolated from proton-exposed kidneys arose through a genome-wide incident that causes loss of heterozygosity (LOH)-generating mutations on multiple chromosomes (termed here genomic LOH). To test this hypothesis, we examined 11 pairs of nonselected chromosomes for LOH events in mutant cells isolated from the kidneys of mice exposed to 4 or 5 Gy of 1 GeV protons. The mutant kidney cells were selected for loss of expression of the chromosome 8-encoded Aprt gene. Genomic LOH events were also assessed in Aprt mutants isolated from isogenic cultured kidney epithelial cells exposed to 5 Gy of protons in vitro. Control groups were spontaneous Aprt mutants and clones isolated without selection from the proton-exposed kidneys or cultures. The in vivo results showed significant increases in genomic LOH events in the Aprt mutants from proton-exposed kidneys when compared with spontaneous Aprt mutants and when compared with nonmutant (i.e., nonselected) clones from the proton-exposed kidneys. A bias for LOH events affecting chromosome 14 was observed in the proton-induced Aprt mutants, though LOH for this chromosome did not confer increased radiation resistance. Genomic LOH events were observed in Aprt mutants isolated from proton-exposed cultured kidney cells; however the incidence was fivefold lower than in Aprt mutants isolated from exposed intact kidneys, suggesting a more permissive environment in the intact organ and/or the evolution of kidney clones prior to their isolation from the tissue. We conclude that proton exposure creates a subset of viable cells with LOH events on multiple chromosomes, that these cells form and persist in vivo, and that they can be isolated from an intact tissue by selection for a mutation on a single chromosome.

  19. CD3 and CD20 Coexpression in a Case of Canine Cutaneous Epitheliotropic T-Cell Lymphoma (Mycosis Fungoides).

    PubMed

    Brachelente, C; Affolter, V K; Fondati, A; Porcellato, I; Sforna, M; Lepri, E; Mechelli, L; Bongiovanni, L

    2016-05-01

    A 14-year-old female spayed Dachshund was presented with generalized scaling, erythema, pruritus, poor quality of hair coat, and progressive weight loss. Cutaneous epitheliotropic T-cell lymphoma (CETCL) was suspected. Skin biopsies were suggestive of CETCL. However, immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of numerous CD20+ and CD3+ cells. Clonality assay demonstrated a clonal T-cell receptor gamma rearrangement and a polyclonal IgH gene rearrangement. Double-label immunofluorescence confirmed coexpression of CD3 and CD20 by neoplastic cells. By double immunohistochemistry, neoplastic cells were CD3+ and PAX5-. The results are compatible with a CD3+, CD20+ CETCL. Coexpression of CD20 and CD3 has been recognized in peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Although documented in human CETCL, it has not been reported in canine CETCL. The pathogenetic basis of CD20 expression in mycosis fungoides is explored. PMID:26354309

  20. Relationship between P-glycoprotein expression and cyclosporin A in kidney. An immunohistological and cell culture study.

    PubMed Central

    García del Moral, R.; O'Valle, F.; Andújar, M.; Aguilar, M.; Lucena, M. A.; López-Hidalgo, J.; Ramírez, C.; Medina-Cano, M. T.; Aguilar, D.; Gómez-Morales, M.

    1995-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded in humans by the mdr-1 gene, acts physiologically as an efflux pump to expel hydrophobic substances from cells. This glycoprotein is closely related to multidrug resistance in tumor cells and can be modulated by cyclosporin A (CsA). We investigated the relationship between CsA and P-gp in 52 renal allograft biopsies and in cultures of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) renal tubule cells to determine whether the intrarenal accumulation of CsA or chronic stimulation with the drug modified the expression of P-gp. Expression of P-gp and CsA was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Immunostaining was evaluated semiquantitatively. Modulation of P-gp in MDCK cells after chronic stimulation with CsA for 7, 30, and 60 days was analyzed by flow cytometry. P-gp and CsA immunostaining in renal post-transplant biopsies showed considerable overlap in all cases (Spearman's test, r = 0.577, P < 0.001). After 7 days in vitro, the number of cells expressing P-gp increased progressively; a further increase in mean fluorescence was found after 60 days (P < 0.001, Student's t-test). Our findings suggest that in non-neoplastic cells, CsA may stimulate P-gp as a mechanism of detoxification. Individual differences in the adaptive responses to glycoprotein may be responsible for the appearance of nephrotoxicity or a CsA-resistant rejection reaction in cases of overexpression on lymphocytes and macrophages. Images Figure 1 PMID:7856751

  1. Analysis of microRNA-203 function in CREB/MITF/RAB27a pathway: comparison between canine and human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, S; Kumazaki, M; Mori, T; Baba, K; Okuda, M; Mizuno, T; Akao, Y

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-203 is downregulated and acts as an anti-oncomir in melanoma cells. Here, using human and canine melanoma cells, we elucidated the effects of miR-203 on cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB)/microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF)/RAB27a pathway, which is known to be important for the development and progression of human melanoma. In this study, we showed that miR-203 directly targeted CREB1 and regulated its downstream targets, MITF and RAB27a. miR-203 significantly suppressed the growth of human and canine melanoma cells and inhibited melanosome transport through the suppression of the signalling pathway. In conclusion, miR-203 was shown to be a common tumour-suppressive miRNA in human and canine melanoma and thus to play a crucial role in the biological mechanisms of melanoma development.

  2. In vitro infection by Ehrlichia ruminantium of baby hamster kidney (BHK), Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and Madin Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells.

    PubMed

    Zweygarth, E; Josemans, A I

    2003-06-01

    The Welgevonden stock of Ehrlichia ruminantium, aetiological agent of heartwater, was propagated in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells and Madin Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. The cultures required supplementation of the medium with cycloheximide for reliable growth of E. ruminantium. Growth of the Welgevonden stock in BHK and CHO-K1 cells could lead to the development of suspension cultures suitable for the mass production of E. ruminantium for an inactivated elementary body vaccine.

  3. Canine and feline parvoviruses preferentially recognize the non-human cell surface sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Löfling, Jonas; Michael Lyi, Sangbom; Parrish, Colin R.; Varki, Ajit

    2013-05-25

    Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) is a pathogen whose canine-adapted form (canine parvovirus (CPV)) emerged in 1978. These viruses infect by binding host transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR), but also hemagglutinate erythrocytes. We show that hemagglutination involves selective recognition of the non-human sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) but not N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), which differs by only one oxygen atom from Neu5Gc. Overexpression of α2-6 sialyltransferase did not change binding, indicating that both α2-3 and α2-6 linkages are recognized. However, Neu5Gc expression on target cells did not enhance CPV or FPV infection in vitro. Thus, the conserved Neu5Gc-binding preference of these viruses likely plays a role in the natural history of the virus in vivo. Further studies must clarify relationships between virus infection and host Neu5Gc expression. As a first step, we show that transcripts of CMAH (which generates Neu5Gc from Neu5Ac) are at very low levels in Western dog breed cells. - Highlights: ► Feline and canine parvoviruses recognize Neu5Gc but not Neu5Ac, which differ by one oxygen atom. ► The underlying linkage of these sialic acids does not affect recognition. ► Induced Neu5Gc expression on target cells that normally express Neu5Ac did not enhance infection. ► Thus, the conserved binding preference plays an important yet unknown role in in vivo infections. ► Population and breed variations in Neu5Gc expression occur, likely by regulating the gene CMAH.

  4. Expression of claudins, occludin, junction adhesion molecule A and zona occludens 1 in canine organs.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Changhwan; Shin, Da-Hye; Lee, Dongoh; Kang, Su-Myung; Seok, Ju-Hyung; Kang, Hee Young; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-10-01

    Tight junctions are the outermost structures of intercellular junctions and are classified as transmembrane proteins. These factors form selective permeability barriers between cells, act as paracellular transporters and regulate structural and functional polarity of cells. Although tight junctions have been previously studied, comparison of the transcriptional‑translational levels of these molecules in canine organs remains to be investigated. In the present study, organ‑specific expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin, occludin, junction adhesion molecule A and zona occludens 1 was examined in the canine duodenum, lung, liver and kidney. Results of immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that the tight junctions were localized in intestinal villi and glands of the duodenum, bronchiolar epithelia and alveolar walls of the lung, endometrium and myometrium of the hepatocytes, and the distal tubules and glomeruli of the kidney. These results suggest that tight junctions are differently expressed in organs, and therefore may be involved in organ‑specific functions to maintain physiological homeostasis. PMID:27600198

  5. Expression of claudins, occludin, junction adhesion molecule A and zona occludens 1 in canine organs

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Changhwan; Shin, Da-Hye; Lee, Dongoh; Kang, Su-Myung; Seok, Ju-Hyung; Kang, Hee Young; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions are the outermost structures of intercellular junctions and are classified as transmembrane proteins. These factors form selective permeability barriers between cells, act as paracellular transporters and regulate structural and functional polarity of cells. Although tight junctions have been previously studied, comparison of the transcriptional-translational levels of these molecules in canine organs remains to be investigated. In the present study, organ-specific expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin, occludin, junction adhesion molecule A and zona occludens 1 was examined in the canine duodenum, lung, liver and kidney. Results of immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that the tight junctions were localized in intestinal villi and glands of the duodenum, bronchiolar epithelia and alveolar walls of the lung, endometrium and myometrium of the hepatocytes, and the distal tubules and glomeruli of the kidney. These results suggest that tight junctions are differently expressed in organs, and therefore may be involved in organ-specific functions to maintain physiological homeostasis. PMID:27600198

  6. Automated enumeration and viability measurement of canine stromal vascular fraction cells using fluorescence-based image cytometry method.

    PubMed

    Chan, Leo Li-Ying; Cohen, Donald A; Kuksin, Dmitry; Paradis, Benjamin D; Qiu, Jean

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, the lipoaspirate collected from adipose tissue has been seen as a valuable source of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for autologous cellular therapy. For multiple applications, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells are isolated from the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue. Because the fresh stromal vascular fraction typically contains a heterogeneous mixture of cells, determining cell concentration and viability is a crucial step in preparing fraction samples for downstream processing. Due to a large amount of cellular debris contained in the SVF sample, as well as counting irregularities standard manual counting can lead to inconsistent results. Advancements in imaging and optics technologies have significantly improved the image-based cytometric analysis method. In this work, we validated the use of fluorescence-based image cytometry for SVF concentration and viability measurement, by comparing to standard flow cytometry and manual hemocytometer. The concentration and viability of freshly collected canine SVF samples are analyzed, and the results highly correlated between all three methods, which validated the image cytometry method for canine SVF analysis, and potentially for SVF from other species. PMID:24740550

  7. Morphology of human embryonic kidney cells in culture after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.; Kunze, M. E.; Williams, K.; Morrison, D. R.; Lewis, M. L.; Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability of human embyronic kidney cells to differentiate into small epithelioid, large epithelioid, domed, and fenestrated morphological cell types following space flight is examined. Kidney cells exposed to 1 day at 1 g, then 1 day in orbit, and a 12 minute passage through the electrophoretic separator are compared with control cultures. The data reveal that 70 percent of small epithelioid, 16 percent of large epithelioid, 9 percent of dome-forming, and 5 percent of fenestrated cells formed in the space exposed cells; the distributions correlate well with control data. The formation of domed cells from cells cultured from low electrophoretic mobility fractions and small epithelioid cells from high mobility fractions is unaffected by space flight conditions. It is concluded that storage under microgravity conditions does not influence the morphological differentiation of human embryonic kidney cells in low-passage culture.

  8. Development of high-content assays for kidney progenitor cell expansion in transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sanker, Subramaniam; Cirio, Maria Cecilia; Vollmer, Laura L; Goldberg, Natasha D; McDermott, Lee A; Hukriede, Neil A; Vogt, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    Reactivation of genes normally expressed during organogenesis is a characteristic of kidney regeneration. Enhancing this reactivation could potentially be a therapeutic target to augment kidney regeneration. The inductive events that drive kidney organogenesis in zebrafish are similar to the initial steps in mammalian kidney organogenesis. Therefore, quantifying embryonic signals that drive zebrafish kidney development is an attractive strategy for the discovery of potential novel therapeutic modalities that accelerate kidney regeneration. The Lim1 homeobox protein, Lhx1, is a marker of kidney development that is also expressed in the regenerating kidneys after injury. Using a fluorescent Lhx1a-EGFP transgene whose phenotype faithfully recapitulates that of the endogenous protein, we developed a high-content assay for Lhx1a-EGFP expression in transgenic zebrafish embryos employing an artificial intelligence-based image analysis method termed cognition network technology (CNT). Implementation of the CNT assay on high-content readers enabled automated real-time in vivo time-course, dose-response, and variability studies in the developing embryo. The Lhx1a assay was complemented with a kidney-specific secondary CNT assay that enables direct measurements of the embryonic renal tubule cell population. The integration of fluorescent transgenic zebrafish embryos with automated imaging and artificial intelligence-based image analysis provides an in vivo analysis system for structure-activity relationship studies and de novo discovery of novel agents that augment innate regenerative processes.

  9. Canine and Feline Parvoviruses Can Use Human or Feline Transferrin Receptors To Bind, Enter, and Infect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parker, John S. L.; Murphy, William J.; Wang, Dai; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Parrish, Colin R.

    2001-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) enters and infects cells by a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway, and viral capsids colocalize with transferrin in perinuclear vesicles of cells shortly after entry (J. S. L. Parker and C. R. Parrish, J. Virol. 74:1919–1930, 2000). Here we report that CPV and feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), a closely related parvovirus, bind to the human and feline transferrin receptors (TfRs) and use these receptors to enter and infect cells. Capsids did not detectably bind or enter quail QT35 cells or a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell-derived cell line that lacks any TfR (TRVb cells). However, capsids bound and were endocytosed into QT35 cells and CHO-derived TRVb-1 cells that expressed the human TfR. TRVb-1 cells or TRVb cells transiently expressing the feline TfR were susceptible to infection by CPV and FPV, but the parental TRVb cells were not. We screened a panel of feline-mouse hybrid cells for susceptibility to FPV infection and found that only those cells that possessed feline chromosome C2 were susceptible. The feline TfR gene (TRFC) also mapped to feline chromosome C2. These data indicate that cell susceptibility for these viruses is determined by the TfR. PMID:11264378

  10. Calcium oxalate calculi-induced clusterin expression in kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Yi; Liu, Junjiang; Jiang, Junyi; Pumill, Chris; Elaiho, Cordelia; Zhang, Yunxia; Li, Shoubin; Zhou, Tie

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate clusterin expression in the kidney and evaluate the urine clusterin level in the kidney stone formers. (1) In vitro, we treated the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line with different concentrations of calcium oxalate (CaOx), and then the clusterin protein expression in the cells was evaluated by Western blotting. (2) Kidney stone patients who received percutaneous nephrolithotomy were enrolled in our study. Urine samples were collected before surgery, the kidney punctured to obtain kidney tissue guided by ultrasound intraoperatively. Clusterin expression in the human kidney tissue was evaluated by immunochemistry. The urine clusterin level was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Non-kidney disease subjects were chosen as controls. In vitro, the clusterin expression was up-regulated in the MDCK cells induced by CaOx. The study included 49 patients and 41 non-kidney disease subjects. All calculi were composed of calcium oxalate monohydrate or calcium oxalate dihydrate and a few also contained protein or uric acid. Mean ± SD urine clusterin level was 17.47 ± 18.61 μg/ml in patients, and 3.31 ± 5.42 μg/ml in non-kidney disease subjects, respectively (p < 0.001). Immunohistochemistry revealed the clusterin was located in the cytoplasm of the renal distal and collecting tubular epithelial cells. Also the tissue clusterin expression increased significantly in the kidney stone formers compared to the control groups (p = 0.001). CaOx could induce clusterin expression in renal tubular cells, and increase clusterin levels in the kidney and urine from the kidney stone formers.

  11. Global Gene Expression Analysis of Canine Cutaneous Mast Cell Tumor: Could Molecular Profiling Be Useful for Subtype Classification and Prognostication?

    PubMed Central

    Baratto, Chiara; Marconato, Laura; Vascellari, Marta; Morello, Emanuela M.; Vercelli, Antonella; Mutinelli, Franco; Dacasto, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Prognosis and therapeutic management of dogs with cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) depend on clinical stage and histological grade. However, the prognostic value of this latter is still questionable. In the present study, MCT transcriptome was analyzed to identify a set of candidate genes potentially useful for predicting the biological behavior of MCTs. Fifty-one canine MCT biopsies were analyzed. Isolated and purified total RNAs were individually hybridized to the Agilent Canine V2 4x44k DNA microarray. The comparison of reference differentiated and undifferentiated MCT transcriptome revealed a total of 597 differentially expressed genes (147 down-regulated and 450 up-regulated). The functional analysis of this set of genes provided evidence that they were mainly involved in cell cycle, DNA replication, p53 signaling pathway, nucleotide excision repair and pyrimidine metabolism. Class prediction analysis identified 13 transcripts providing the greatest accuracy of class prediction and divided samples into two categories (differentiated and undifferentiated), harboring a different prognosis. The Principal Component Analysis of all samples, made by using the selected 13 markers, confirmed MCT classification. The first three components accounted for 99.924% of the total variance. This molecular classification significantly correlated with survival time (p = 0.0026). Furthermore, among all marker genes, a significant association was found between mRNA expression and MCT-related mortality for FOXM1, GSN, FEN1 and KPNA2 (p<0.05). Finally, marker genes mRNA expression was evaluated in a cohort of 22 independent samples. Data obtained enabled to identify MCT cases with different prognosis. Overall, the molecular characterization of canine MCT transcriptome allowed the identification of a set of 13 transcripts that clearly separated differentiated from undifferentiated MCTs, thus predicting outcome regardless of the histological grade. These results may have clinical

  12. Results of computer calculations for a simulated distribution of kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micale, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    The results of computer calculations for a simulated distribution of kidney cells are given. The calculations were made for different values of electroosmotic flow, U sub o, and the ratio of sample diameter to channel diameter, R.

  13. Species Diversity Regarding the Presence of Proximal Tubular Progenitor Cells of the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, J.; Ericsson, A.E.; Axelson, H.; Johansson, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular source for tubular regeneration following kidney injury is a matter of dispute, with reports suggesting a stem or progenitor cells as the regeneration source while linage tracing studies in mice seemingly favor the classical theory, where regeneration is performed by randomly surviving cells. We, and others have previously described a scattered cell population localized to the tubules of human kidney, which increases in number following injury. Here we have characterized the species distribution of these proximal tubular progenitor cells (PTPCs) in kidney tissue from chimpanzee, pig, rat and mouse using a set of human PTPC markers. We detected PTPCs in chimpanzee and pig kidneys, but not in mouse tissue. Also, subjecting mice to the unilateral urethral obstruction model, caused clear signs of tubular injury, but failed to induce the PTPC phenotype in renal tubules. PMID:26972712

  14. Kidney organoids from human iPS cells contain multiple lineages and model human nephrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takasato, Minoru; Er, Pei X; Chiu, Han S; Maier, Barbara; Baillie, Gregory J; Ferguson, Charles; Parton, Robert G; Wolvetang, Ernst J; Roost, Matthias S; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; Little, Melissa H

    2015-10-22

    The human kidney contains up to 2 million epithelial nephrons responsible for blood filtration. Regenerating the kidney requires the induction of the more than 20 distinct cell types required for excretion and the regulation of pH, and electrolyte and fluid balance. We have previously described the simultaneous induction of progenitors for both collecting duct and nephrons via the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. Paradoxically, although both are of intermediate mesoderm in origin, collecting duct and nephrons have distinct temporospatial origins. Here we identify the developmental mechanism regulating the preferential induction of collecting duct versus kidney mesenchyme progenitors. Using this knowledge, we have generated kidney organoids that contain nephrons associated with a collecting duct network surrounded by renal interstitium and endothelial cells. Within these organoids, individual nephrons segment into distal and proximal tubules, early loops of Henle, and glomeruli containing podocytes elaborating foot processes and undergoing vascularization. When transcription profiles of kidney organoids were compared to human fetal tissues, they showed highest congruence with first trimester human kidney. Furthermore, the proximal tubules endocytose dextran and differentially apoptose in response to cisplatin, a nephrotoxicant. Such kidney organoids represent powerful models of the human organ for future applications, including nephrotoxicity screening, disease modelling and as a source of cells for therapy.

  15. Effects of mycotoxins in cultured kidney cells: cytotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 in Madin-Darby and primary fetal bovine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, M; Sharma, R P; Elsner, Y Y

    1987-04-01

    The cytotoxicity of aflatoxin B1, a fungal metabolite and an important food contaminant, was evaluated in an established cell line, Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells, and in primary fetal bovine kidney (PFBK) cells. Cells were grown in monolayers and treated with media containing AFB1 for 24 hr. Both culture systems were sensitive to the chemical; the PFBK cultures were approximately four times more susceptible to the cytotoxic effect. Cell multiplication decreased in both systems in long-term cultures. Adherence of MDBK cells was only slightly reduced at the toxic concentrations of the chemical. Electron microscopy revealed condensation of chromatin, separation of nuclei from the cytoplasm, cytoplasmic vacuolization, and loss of surface microvilli. Results indicated differential sensitivity of the two culture systems.

  16. The archetype enhancer of simian virus 40 DNA is duplicated during virus growth in human cells and rhesus monkey kidney cells but not in green monkey kidney cells.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Frank J; Greenlee, John E; Carney, Helen

    2003-05-25

    Archetype SV40, obtained directly from its natural host, is characterized by a single 72-bp enhancer element. In contrast, SV40 grown in cell culture almost invariably exhibits partial or complete duplication of the enhancer region. This distinction has been considered important in studies of human tumor material, since SV40-associated tumor isolates have been described having a single enhancer region, suggesting natural infection as opposed to possible contamination by laboratory strains of virus. However, the behavior of archetypal SV40 in cultured cells has never been methodically studied. In this study we reengineered nonarchetypal 776-SV40 to contain a single 72-bp enhancer region and used this reengineered archetypal DNA to transfect a number of simian and human cell lines. SV40 DNA recovered from these cells was analyzed by restriction endonuclease analysis, PCR, and DNA sequencing. Reengineered archetype SV40 propagated in green monkey TC-7 or BSC-1 kidney cells remained without enhancer region duplication even after extensive serial virus passage. Archetype SV40 grown in all but one of the rhesus or human cell lines initially appeared exclusively archetypal. However, when virus from these cell types was transferred to green monkey cells, variants with partial enhancer duplication appeared after as little as a single passage. These findings suggest (1) that virus with a single 72-bp enhancer may persist in cultured cells of simian and human origin; (2) that variants with partially duplicated enhancer regions may arise within cell lines in quantities below limits of detection; (3) that these variants may enjoy a selective advantage in cell types other than those from which they arose (e.g., green monkey kidney cells); and (4) that certain cell lines may support a selective growth advantage for the variants without supporting their formation. Our data indicate that enhancer duplication may also occur in human as well as rhesus kidney cells. Thus, detection of

  17. Kidney cell electrophoresis in space flight: Rationale, methods, results and flow cytometry applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.; Morrison, Dennis R.; Barlow, Grant H.; Lewis, Marian L.; Lanham, J. W.; Cleveland, C.; Williams, K.; Kunze, M. E.; Goolsby, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    Cultures of human embryonic kidney cells consistently contain an electrophoretically separable subpopulation of cells that produce high levels of urokinase and have an electrophoretic mobility about 85 percent as high as that of the most mobile human embryonic kidney cells. This subpopulation is rich in large epithelioid cells that have relatively little internal structure. When resolution and throughput are adequate, free fluid electrophoresis can be used to isolate a broad band of low mobility cells which also produces high levels of plasminogen activators (PAs). In the course of performing this, it was discovered that all electrophoretic subpopulations of cultured human embryonic kidney cells produce some PAs and that separate subpopulations produce high quantities of different types of PA's. This information and the development of sensitive assays for this project have provided new insights into cell secretion mechanisms related to fibrinolysis. These advances would probably not have been made without the NASA program to explore fundamental questions of free fluid electrophoresis in space.

  18. Recellularization of well-preserved acellular kidney scaffold using embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bonandrini, Barbara; Figliuzzi, Marina; Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Perico, Norberto; Casiraghi, Federica; Dipl, Chemistry; Sangalli, Fabio; Conti, Sara; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Andrea; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    For chronic kidney diseases, there is little chance that the vast majority of world's population will have access to renal replacement therapy with dialysis or transplantation. Tissue engineering would help to address this shortcoming by regeneration of damaged kidney using naturally occurring scaffolds seeded with precursor renal cells. The aims of the present study were to optimize the production of three-dimensional (3D) rat whole-kidney scaffolds by shortening the duration of organ decellularization process using detergents that avoid nonionic compounds, to investigate integrity of extracellular matrix (ECM) structure and to enhance the efficacy of scaffold cellularization using physiological perfusion method. Intact rat kidneys were successfully decellularized after 17 h perfusion with sodium dodecyl sulfate. The whole-kidney scaffolds preserved the 3D architecture of blood vessels, glomeruli, and tubuli as shown by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT) scan confirmed integrity, patency, and connection of the vascular network. Collagen IV, laminin, and fibronectin staining of decellularized scaffolds were similar to those of native kidney tissues. After infusion of whole-kidney scaffolds with murine embryonic stem (mES) cells through the renal artery, and pressure-controlled perfusion with recirculating cell medium for 24 and 72 h, seeded cells were almost completely retained into the organ and uniformly distributed in the vascular network and glomerular capillaries without major signs of apoptosis. Occasionally, mES cells reached peritubular capillary and tubular compartment. We observed the loss of cell pluripotency and the start of differentiation toward meso-endodermal lineage. Our findings indicate that, with the proposed optimized protocol, rat kidneys can be efficiently decellularized to produce renal ECM scaffolds in a relatively short time, and rapid recellularization of vascular structures and

  19. Loss of Glis2/NPHP7 causes kidney epithelial cell senescence and suppresses cyst growth in the Kif3a mouse model of cystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dongmei; Rauhauser, Alysha; Li, Binghua; Ren, Chongyu; McEnery, Kayla; Zhu, Jili; Chaki, Moumita; Vadnagara, Komal; Elhadi, Sarah; Jetten, Anton M; Igarashi, Peter; Attanasio, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Enlargement of kidney tubules is a common feature of multiple cystic kidney diseases in humans and mice. However, while some of these pathologies are characterized by cyst expansion and organ enlargement, in others, progressive interstitial fibrosis and kidney atrophy prevail. The Kif3a knockout mouse is an established non-orthologous mouse model of cystic kidney disease. Conditional inactivation of Kif3a in kidney tubular cells results in loss of primary cilia and rapid cyst growth. Conversely, loss of function of the gene GLIS2/NPHP7 causes progressive kidney atrophy, interstitial inflammatory infiltration, and fibrosis. Kif3a null tubular cells have unrestrained proliferation and reduced stabilization of p53 resulting in a loss of cell cycle arrest in the presence of DNA damage. In contrast, loss of Glis2 is associated with activation of checkpoint kinase 1, stabilization of p53, and induction of cell senescence. Interestingly, the cystic phenotype of Kif3a knockout mice is partially rescued by genetic ablation of Glis2 and pharmacological stabilization of p53. Thus, Kif3a is required for cell cycle regulation and the DNA damage response, whereas cell senescence is significantly enhanced in Glis2 null cells. Hence, cell senescence is a central feature in nephronophthisis type 7 and Kif3a is unexpectedly required for efficient DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest. PMID:27181777

  20. Synergistic growth inhibitory effect of deracoxib with doxorubicin against a canine mammary tumor cell line, CMT-U27

    PubMed Central

    BAKIREL, Tülay; ALKAN, Fulya Üstün; ÜSTÜNER, Oya; ÇINAR, Suzan; YILDIRIM, Funda; ERTEN, Gaye; BAKIREL, Utku

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors have been shown to exert anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities on many types of malignant tumors. These anticancer properties make it worthwhile to examine the possible benefit of combining COX inhibitors with other anti-cancer agents. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of deracoxib (DER) in potentiating antitumor activity of doxorubicin (DOX) in canine mammary carcinoma cells (CMT-U27). DER (50–250 µM) enhanced the antiproliferative activity of DOX by reducing the IC50 (approximately 3- to 3.5 fold). Interaction analysis of the data showed that combinations of DOX at 0.9 µM with DER (100–250 µM) produced synergism in the CMT-U27 cell line, with a ratio index ranging from 1.98 to 2.33. In additional studies identifying the mechanism of observed synergistic effect, we found that DER strongly potentiated DOX-caused G0/G1 arrest in cell cycle progression. Also, DER (100–250 µM) augmented apoptosis induction with approximately 1.35- and 1.37- fold increases in apoptotic response caused by DOX in the cells. DER enhanced the antiproliferative effect of DOX in conjunction with induction of apoptosis by modulation of Bcl-2 expression and changes in the cell cycle of the CMT-U27 cell line. Although the exact molecular mechanism of the alterations in the cell cycle and apoptosis observed with DER and DOX combinations require further investigations, the results suggest that the synergistic effect of DOX and DER combinations in CMT therapy may be achieved at relatively lower doses of DOX with lesser side effects. Therefore, combining DER with DOX may prove beneficial in the clinical treatment of canine mammary cancer. PMID:26822118

  1. Toxicological effects of pet food ingredients on canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and enterocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ortega, M T; Jeffery, B; Riviere, J E; Monteiro-Riviere, N A

    2016-02-01

    We developed an in vitro method to assess pet food ingredients safety. Canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) were differentiated into enterocyte-like cells (ELC) to assess toxicity in cells representing similar patterns of exposure in vivo. The toxicological profile of clove leave oil, eugenol, guanosine monophosphate (GMP), GMP + inosine monophosphate, sorbose, ginger root extract, cinnamon bark oil, cinnamaldehyde, thyme oil, thymol and citric acid was assessed in BMSC and ELC. The LC50 for GMP + inosine monophosphate was 59.42 ± 0.90 and 56.7 ± 3.5 mg ml(-1) for BMSC and ELC; 56.84 ± 0.95 and 53.66 ± 1.36 mg ml(-1) for GMP; 0.02 ± 0.001 and 1.25 ± 0.47 mg ml(-1) for citric acid; 0.077 ± 0.002 and 0.037 ± 0.01 mg ml(-1) for cinnamaldehyde; 0.002 ± 0.0001 and 0.002 ± 0.0008 mg ml(-1) for thymol; 0.080 ± 0.003 and 0.059 ± 0.001 mg ml(-1) for thyme oil; 0.111 ± 0.002 and 0.054 ± 0.01 mg ml(-1) for cinnamon bark oil; 0.119 ± 0.0004 and 0.099 ± 0.011 mg ml(-1) for clove leave oil; 0.04 ± 0.001 and 0.028 ± 0.002 mg ml(-1) for eugenol; 2.80 ± 0.11 and 1.75 ± 0.51 mg ml(-1) for ginger root extract; > 200 and 116.78 ± 7.35 mg ml(-1) for sorbose. Lemon grass oil was evaluated at 0.003-0.9 in BMSC and .03-0.9 mg ml(-1) in ELC and its mechanistic effect was investigated. The gene toxicology studies showed regulation of 61% genes in CYP450 pathway, 37% in cholestasis and 33% in immunotoxicity pathways for BMSC. For ELC, 80% for heat shock response, 69% for beta-oxidation and 65% for mitochondrial energy metabolism. In conclusion, these studies provide a baseline against which differential toxicity of dietary feed ingredients can be assessed in vitro for direct effects on canine cells and demonstrate differential toxicity in differentiated cells that represent gastrointestinal epithelial cells. PMID

  2. Toxicological effects of pet food ingredients on canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and enterocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ortega, M T; Jeffery, B; Riviere, J E; Monteiro-Riviere, N A

    2016-02-01

    We developed an in vitro method to assess pet food ingredients safety. Canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) were differentiated into enterocyte-like cells (ELC) to assess toxicity in cells representing similar patterns of exposure in vivo. The toxicological profile of clove leave oil, eugenol, guanosine monophosphate (GMP), GMP + inosine monophosphate, sorbose, ginger root extract, cinnamon bark oil, cinnamaldehyde, thyme oil, thymol and citric acid was assessed in BMSC and ELC. The LC50 for GMP + inosine monophosphate was 59.42 ± 0.90 and 56.7 ± 3.5 mg ml(-1) for BMSC and ELC; 56.84 ± 0.95 and 53.66 ± 1.36 mg ml(-1) for GMP; 0.02 ± 0.001 and 1.25 ± 0.47 mg ml(-1) for citric acid; 0.077 ± 0.002 and 0.037 ± 0.01 mg ml(-1) for cinnamaldehyde; 0.002 ± 0.0001 and 0.002 ± 0.0008 mg ml(-1) for thymol; 0.080 ± 0.003 and 0.059 ± 0.001 mg ml(-1) for thyme oil; 0.111 ± 0.002 and 0.054 ± 0.01 mg ml(-1) for cinnamon bark oil; 0.119 ± 0.0004 and 0.099 ± 0.011 mg ml(-1) for clove leave oil; 0.04 ± 0.001 and 0.028 ± 0.002 mg ml(-1) for eugenol; 2.80 ± 0.11 and 1.75 ± 0.51 mg ml(-1) for ginger root extract; > 200 and 116.78 ± 7.35 mg ml(-1) for sorbose. Lemon grass oil was evaluated at 0.003-0.9 in BMSC and .03-0.9 mg ml(-1) in ELC and its mechanistic effect was investigated. The gene toxicology studies showed regulation of 61% genes in CYP450 pathway, 37% in cholestasis and 33% in immunotoxicity pathways for BMSC. For ELC, 80% for heat shock response, 69% for beta-oxidation and 65% for mitochondrial energy metabolism. In conclusion, these studies provide a baseline against which differential toxicity of dietary feed ingredients can be assessed in vitro for direct effects on canine cells and demonstrate differential toxicity in differentiated cells that represent gastrointestinal epithelial cells.

  3. Canine Lymphoma, More Than a Morphological Diagnosis: What We Have Learned about Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aresu, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common canine aggressive B-cell lymphoma worldwide, and new recent molecular approaches have shown that DLBCL constitutes a heterogeneous tumor that cannot be unraveled by morphology and immunophenotype. DLBCL behaves aggressively, typically progressing over a short period of time, and the therapy response may be difficult to be predicted. Recently, the rate of bone marrow infiltration by flow cytometry has been demonstrated to be prognostic, but more sensible markers are needed. As the clinical behavior is different, there is vast clinical and basic research devoted to identifying prognostically or biologically distinct DLBCL subgroups. Transcriptomic analysis by gene expression profile, copy number variations by array comparative genomic hybridization and epigenetic perturbations have tentatively described this heterogeneity. Molecular subgroups using oncogenic pathways and target genes have also been correlated to different outcome in a small number of cases. The objectives of this review are to summarize the current knowledge on the biology, clinical, and pathological characteristics of canine DLBCL. To date, DLBCL probably is the most investigated tumor in veterinary medicine, and its relevance as spontaneous model for human DLBCL has been confirmed by these studies. In future, these discoveries will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms, possibly translating into more effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:27630997

  4. Canine Lymphoma, More Than a Morphological Diagnosis: What We Have Learned about Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aresu, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common canine aggressive B-cell lymphoma worldwide, and new recent molecular approaches have shown that DLBCL constitutes a heterogeneous tumor that cannot be unraveled by morphology and immunophenotype. DLBCL behaves aggressively, typically progressing over a short period of time, and the therapy response may be difficult to be predicted. Recently, the rate of bone marrow infiltration by flow cytometry has been demonstrated to be prognostic, but more sensible markers are needed. As the clinical behavior is different, there is vast clinical and basic research devoted to identifying prognostically or biologically distinct DLBCL subgroups. Transcriptomic analysis by gene expression profile, copy number variations by array comparative genomic hybridization and epigenetic perturbations have tentatively described this heterogeneity. Molecular subgroups using oncogenic pathways and target genes have also been correlated to different outcome in a small number of cases. The objectives of this review are to summarize the current knowledge on the biology, clinical, and pathological characteristics of canine DLBCL. To date, DLBCL probably is the most investigated tumor in veterinary medicine, and its relevance as spontaneous model for human DLBCL has been confirmed by these studies. In future, these discoveries will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms, possibly translating into more effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:27630997

  5. Canine Lymphoma, More Than a Morphological Diagnosis: What We Have Learned about Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aresu, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common canine aggressive B-cell lymphoma worldwide, and new recent molecular approaches have shown that DLBCL constitutes a heterogeneous tumor that cannot be unraveled by morphology and immunophenotype. DLBCL behaves aggressively, typically progressing over a short period of time, and the therapy response may be difficult to be predicted. Recently, the rate of bone marrow infiltration by flow cytometry has been demonstrated to be prognostic, but more sensible markers are needed. As the clinical behavior is different, there is vast clinical and basic research devoted to identifying prognostically or biologically distinct DLBCL subgroups. Transcriptomic analysis by gene expression profile, copy number variations by array comparative genomic hybridization and epigenetic perturbations have tentatively described this heterogeneity. Molecular subgroups using oncogenic pathways and target genes have also been correlated to different outcome in a small number of cases. The objectives of this review are to summarize the current knowledge on the biology, clinical, and pathological characteristics of canine DLBCL. To date, DLBCL probably is the most investigated tumor in veterinary medicine, and its relevance as spontaneous model for human DLBCL has been confirmed by these studies. In future, these discoveries will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms, possibly translating into more effective therapeutic strategies.

  6. Nephron organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells model kidney development and injury.

    PubMed

    Morizane, Ryuji; Lam, Albert Q; Freedman, Benjamin S; Kishi, Seiji; Valerius, M Todd; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2015-11-01

    Kidney cells and tissues derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) may enable organ regeneration, disease modeling and drug screening. We report an efficient, chemically defined protocol for differentiating hPSCs into multipotent nephron progenitor cells (NPCs) that can form nephron-like structures. By recapitulating metanephric kidney development in vitro, we generate SIX2+ SALL1+ WT1+ PAX2+ NPCs with 90% efficiency within 9 days of differentiation. The NPCs possess the developmental potential of their in vivo counterparts and form PAX8+ LHX1+ renal vesicles that self-organize into nephron structures. In both two- and three-dimensional culture, NPCs form kidney organoids containing epithelial nephron-like structures expressing markers of podocytes, proximal tubules, loops of Henle and distal tubules in an organized, continuous arrangement that resembles the nephron in vivo. We also show that this organoid culture system can be used to study mechanisms of human kidney development and toxicity.

  7. Differential Expression of Functional Fc-Receptors and Additional Immune Complex Receptors on Mouse Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suwanichkul, Adisak; Wenderfer, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which circulating immune complexes accumulate in the kidney to form deposits in glomerulonephritis are not well understood. In particular, the role of resident cells within glomeruli of the kidney has been widely debated. Immune complexes have been shown to bind one glomerular cell type (mesangial cells) leading to functional responses such as pro-inflammatory cytokine production. To further assess the presence of functional immunoreceptors on resident glomerular cells, cultured mouse renal epithelial, endothelial, and mesangial cells were treated with heat-aggregated mouse IgG or preformed murine immune complexes. Mesangial and renal endothelial cells were found to bind IgG complexes, whereas glomerular epithelial cell binding was minimal. A blocking antibody for Fc-gamma receptors reduced binding to mesangial cells but not renal endothelial cells, suggesting differential immunoreceptor utilization. RT-PCR and immunostaining based screening of cultured renal endothelial cells showed limited low-level expression of known Fc-receptors and Igbinding proteins. The interaction between mesangial cells and renal endothelial cells and immune complexes resulted in distinct, cell-specific patterns of chemokine and cytokine production. This novel pathway involving renal endothelial cells likely contributes to the predilection of circulating immune complex accumulation within the kidney and to the inflammatory responses that drive kidney injury. PMID:23911392

  8. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra; Pinton, Paolo; Senno, Laura del; Aguiari, Gianluca

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 μg/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 μg/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new

  9. The effects of topical mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in canine experimental cutaneous wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Won; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Lyoo, Young S; Jung, Dong-In; Park, Hee-Myung

    2013-01-01

    Background Adult stem cells have been widely investigated in bioengineering approaches for tissue repair therapy. We evaluated the clinical value and safety of the application of cultured bone marrow-derived allogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treating skin wounds in a canine model. Hypothesis Topical allogenic MSC transplantation can accelerate the closure of experimental full-thickness cutaneous wounds and attenuate local inflammation. Animals Adult healthy beagle dogs (n = 10; 3–6 years old; 7.2–13.1 kg) were studied. Methods Full-thickness skin wounds were created on the dorsum of healthy beagles, and allogenic MSCs were injected intradermally. The rate of wound closure and the degree of collagen production were analysed histologically using haematoxylin and eosin staining and trichrome staining. The degree of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis was evaluated by immunocytochemistry using proliferating cell nuclear antigen-, vimentin- and α-smooth muscle actin-specific antibodies. Local mRNA expression levels of interleukin-2, interferon-γ, basic fibroblast growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-2 were evaluated by RT-PCR. Results Compared with the vehicle-treated wounds, MSC-treated wounds showed more rapid wound closure and increased collagen synthesis, cellular proliferation and angiogenesis. Moreover, MSC-treated wounds showed decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-2 and interferon-γ) and wound healing-related factors (basic fibroblast growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-2). Conclusion and clinical importance Topical transplantation of MSCs results in paracrine effects on cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, as well as modulation of local mRNA expression of several factors related to cutaneous wound healing. Résumé Contexte Les cellules souches adultes ont été largement étudiées dans les approches de bio-ingénierie pour la thérapie de réparation tissulaire. Nous évaluons l

  10. A Genetically Engineered Adenovirus Vector Targeted to CD40 Mediates Transduction of Canine Dendritic Cells and Promotes Antigen-Specific Immune Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Erin E.; Nakayama, Masaharu; Smith, Bruce F.; Bird, R. Curtis; Muminova, Zhanat; Strong, Theresa; Timares, Laura; Korokhov, Nikolay; O'Neill, Ann Marie; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Tani, Kenzaburo; Curiel, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Targeting viral vectors encoding tumor-associated antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo is likely to enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapeutic cancer vaccines. We have previously shown that genetic modification of adenovirus (Ad) 5 to incorporate CD40 ligand (CD40L) rather than native fiber allows selective transduction and activation of DCs in vitro. Here, we examine the capacity of this targeted vector to induce immune responses to the tumor antigen CEA in a stringent in vivo canine model. CD40-targeted Ad5 transduced canine DCs via the CD40-CD40L pathway in vitro, and following vaccination of healthy dogs, CD40-targeted Ad5 induced strong anti-CEA cellular and humoral responses. These data validate the canine model for future translational studies and suggest targeting of Ad5 vectors to CD40 for in vivo delivery of tumor antigens to DCs is a feasible approach for successful cancer therapy. PMID:19786146

  11. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost–effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL. PMID:22566950

  12. Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome with Embryonal Cell Carcinoma along with Ectopic Cross Fused Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, NR Manju; Narayana, V; Raja, V Om Pramod Kumar; Jambula, Pranav Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS) is a form of internal male pseudohermaphroditism, where there is normal development of male secondary sexual characters, along with the presence of bilateral fallopian tubes and uterus. Majority of these cases go undetected and some cases are accidentally diagnosed while investigating for other problems. Cross fused renal ectopia is a condition where one kidney lies in the opposite side, fused to the other kidney. We present an extremely rare case of a phenotypical male presenting with mass per abdomen and bilateral cryptorchidism, turned out to have uterus with bilateral fallopian tubes, ectopic cross fused right kidney and Embryonal cell carcinoma of left undescended testis. PMID:26894123

  13. Isolation and Culture of Cells from the Nephrogenic Zone of the Embryonic Mouse Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aaron C.; Blank, Ulrika; Adams, Derek C.; Karolak, Michele J.; Fetting, Jennifer L.; Hill, Beth L.; Oxburgh, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic development of the kidney has been extensively studied both as a model for epithelial-mesenchymal interaction in organogenesis and to gain understanding of the origins of congenital kidney disease. More recently, the possibility of steering naïve embryonic stem cells toward nephrogenic fates has been explored in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. Genetic studies in the mouse have identified several pathways required for kidney development, and a global catalog of gene transcription in the organ has recently been generated http://www.gudmap.org/, providing numerous candidate regulators of essential developmental functions. Organogenesis of the rodent kidney can be studied in organ culture, and many reports have used this approach to analyze outcomes of either applying candidate proteins or knocking down the expression of candidate genes using siRNA or morpholinos. However, the applicability of organ culture to the study of signaling that regulates stem/progenitor cell differentiation versus renewal in the developing kidney is limited as cultured organs contain a compact extracellular matrix limiting diffusion of macromolecules and virus particles. To study the cell signaling events that influence the stem/progenitor cell niche in the kidney we have developed a primary cell system that establishes the nephrogenic zone or progenitor cell niche of the developing kidney ex vivo in isolation from the epithelial inducer of differentiation. Using limited enzymatic digestion, nephrogenic zone cells can be selectively liberated from developing kidneys at E17.5. Following filtration, these cells can be cultured as an irregular monolayer using optimized conditions. Marker gene analysis demonstrates that these cultures contain a distribution of cell types characteristic of the nephrogenic zone in vivo, and that they maintain appropriate marker gene expression during the culture period. These cells are highly accessible to small molecule and recombinant

  14. Correction of the disease phenotype in canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency using ex vivo hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas R.; Hai, Mehreen; Tuschong, Laura M.; Burkholder, Tanya H.; Gu, Yu-chen; Sokolic, Robert A.; Ferguson, Cole; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Hickstein, Dennis D.

    2006-01-01

    Canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) represents the canine counter-part of the human disease leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD). Defects in the leukocyte integrin CD18 adhesion molecule in both CLAD and LAD lead to recurrent, life-threatening bacterial infections. We evaluated ex vivo retroviral-mediated gene therapy in CLAD using 2 nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens—200 cGy total body irradiation (TBI) or 10 mg/kg busulfan—with or without posttransplantation immunosuppression. In 6 of 11 treated CLAD dogs, therapeutic levels of CD18+ leukocytes were achieved. Conditioning with either TBI or busulfan allowed long-term engraftment, and immunosuppression was not required for efficacy. The percentage of CD18+ leukocytes in the peripheral blood progressively increased over 6 to 8 months after infusion to levels ranging from 1.26% to 8.37% at 1-year follow-up in the 6 dogs. These levels resulted in reversal or moderation of the severe CLAD phenotype. Linear amplification–mediated polymerase chain reaction assays indicated polyclonality of insertion sites. These results describe ex vivo hematopoietic stem cell gene transfer in a disease-specific, large animal model using 2 clinically applicable conditioning regimens, and they provide support for the use of nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens in preclinical protocols of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for nonmalignant hematopoietic diseases such as LAD. PMID:16868255

  15. Kidney specific protein-positive cells derived from embryonic stem cells reproduce tubular structures in vitro and differentiate into renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Morizane, Ryuji; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Fujii, Shizuka; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Homma, Koichiro; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Okano, Hideyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into various organs and tissues, and are regarded as new tools for the elucidation of disease mechanisms as well as sources for regenerative therapies. However, a method of inducing organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells is urgently needed. Although many scientists have been developing methods to induce various organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells, renal lineage cells have yet to be induced in vitro because of the complexity of kidney structures and the diversity of kidney-component cells. Here, we describe a method of inducing renal tubular cells from mouse embryonic stem cells via the cell purification of kidney specific protein (KSP)-positive cells using an anti-KSP antibody. The global gene expression profiles of KSP-positive cells derived from ES cells exhibited characteristics similar to those of cells in the developing kidney, and KSP-positive cells had the capacity to form tubular structures resembling renal tubular cells when grown in a 3D culture in Matrigel. Moreover, our results indicated that KSP-positive cells acquired the characteristics of each segment of renal tubular cells through tubular formation when stimulated with Wnt4. This method is an important step toward kidney disease research using pluripotent stem cells, and the development of kidney regeneration therapies.

  16. Injured kidney endothelium is only marginally repopulated by cells of extrarenal origin.

    PubMed

    Schirutschke, Holger; Vogelbacher, Regina; Stief, Andrea; Parmentier, Simon; Daniel, Christoph; Hugo, Christian

    2013-10-01

    The role of bone marrow marrow-derived cells after kidney endothelial injury is controversial. In this study, we investigated if and to what extent extrarenal cells incorporate into kidney endothelium after acute as well as during chronic endothelial injury. Fischer F-344wt (wild type) rat kidney grafts were transplanted into R26-hPAP (human placental alkaline phosphatase) transgenic Fischer F-344 recipient rats to allow identification of extrarenal cells by specific antibody staining. A severe model of renal thrombotic microangiopathy was induced via graft perfusion with antiglomerular endothelial cell (GEN) antibody and resulted in eradication of 85% of the glomerular and 69% of the peritubular endothelium (GEN group). At week 4 after injury, renal endothelial healing as well as recovery of the kidney function was seen. Endothelial chimerism was evaluated by double staining for hPAP and endothelial markers RECA-1 or JG-12. Just 0.25% of the glomerular and 0.1% of the peritubular endothelium was recipient derived. In a second experiment, chronic endothelial injury was induced by combination of kidney transplantation with 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 Nx group). After 14 wk, only 0.86% of the peritubular and 0.05% of the glomerular endothelium was of recipient origin. In summary, despite demonstration of extensive damage and loss as well as excellent regeneration, just a minority of extrarenal cells were incorporated into kidney endothelium in rat models of acute and chronic renal endothelial cell injury. Our results highlight that kidney endothelial regeneration after specific and severe injury is almost exclusively of renal origin.

  17. Canine Parvovirus

    MedlinePlus

    Finally, do not let your puppy or adult dog to come into contact with the fecal waste of other dogs while walking or playing outdoors. Prompt and proper ... advisable as a way to limit spread of canine parvovirus infection as well as other diseases that ...

  18. Identification of the IFN-β response in H3N2 canine influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Huang, San; Fu, Cheng; Wang, Lifang; Zheng, Yun; Zhou, Pei; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    Canine influenza viruses (CIVs) circulate continuously in the dog population, providing opportunities for exposure to humans and other species. Although the dog genome has been sequenced, innate immunity in dogs is not well characterized, which limits the understanding of H3N2 canine influenza virus pathogenesis. Equally, how this virus evades the canine host innate immune response to successfully establish infection remains unclear. To analyse the IFN-β response to CIV infection in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, the canine IFN-β promoter sequence and its positive regulatory domain motifs were first cloned and identified using a luciferase reporter system. Next, we found that infection with the CIV strain GD/12 blocked the IFN-β response primarily by inhibiting the NF-κB and IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) signalling pathways. Expression of GD/12 non-structural protein 1 alone was sufficient to inhibit Sendai virus-induced NF-κB and IRF3 activation by suppressing p65 and IRF3 phosphorylation, suggesting the important role of this protein in the CIV-mediated inhibition of the IFN-β response. These results suggest that inhibition of the IFN-β signalling pathway may have played a role in CIV establishment and spread in dog populations. PMID:26490006

  19. Identification of the IFN-β response in H3N2 canine influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Huang, San; Fu, Cheng; Wang, Lifang; Zheng, Yun; Zhou, Pei; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    Canine influenza viruses (CIVs) circulate continuously in the dog population, providing opportunities for exposure to humans and other species. Although the dog genome has been sequenced, innate immunity in dogs is not well characterized, which limits the understanding of H3N2 canine influenza virus pathogenesis. Equally, how this virus evades the canine host innate immune response to successfully establish infection remains unclear. To analyse the IFN-β response to CIV infection in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, the canine IFN-β promoter sequence and its positive regulatory domain motifs were first cloned and identified using a luciferase reporter system. Next, we found that infection with the CIV strain GD/12 blocked the IFN-β response primarily by inhibiting the NF-κB and IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) signalling pathways. Expression of GD/12 non-structural protein 1 alone was sufficient to inhibit Sendai virus-induced NF-κB and IRF3 activation by suppressing p65 and IRF3 phosphorylation, suggesting the important role of this protein in the CIV-mediated inhibition of the IFN-β response. These results suggest that inhibition of the IFN-β signalling pathway may have played a role in CIV establishment and spread in dog populations.

  20. 1-Methylnicotinamide ameliorates lipotoxicity-induced oxidative stress and cell death in kidney proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuki; Kume, Shinji; Araki, Hisazumi; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Shin-ichi; Nakagawa, Fumiyuki; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Free fatty acid-bound albumin (FFA-albumin)-related oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of proximal tubular cell (PTC) damage and subsequent renal dysfunction in patients with refractory proteinuria. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism has recently been focused on as a novel therapeutic target for several modern diseases, including diabetes. This study was designed to identify a novel molecule in NAD metabolism to protect PTCs from lipotoxicity-related oxidative stress. Among 19 candidate enzymes involved in mammalian NAD metabolism, the mRNA expression level of nicotinamide n-methyltransferase (NNMT) was significantly increased in both the kidneys of FFA-albumin-overloaded mice and cultured PTCs stimulated with palmitate-albumin. Knockdown of NNMT exacerbated palmitate-albumin-induced cell death in cultured PTCs, whereas overexpression of NNMT inhibited it. Intracellular concentration of 1-Methylnicotinamide (1-MNA), a metabolite of NNMT, increased and decreased in cultured NNMT-overexpressing and -knockdown PTCs, respectively. Treatment with 1-MNA inhibited palmitate-albumin-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and cell death in cultured PTCs. Furthermore, oral administration of 1-MNA ameliorated oxidative stress, apoptosis, necrosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in the kidneys of FFA-albumin-overloaded mice. In conclusion, NNMT-derived 1-MNA can reduce lipotoxicity-mediated oxidative stress and cell damage in PTCs. Supplementation of 1-MNA may have potential as a new therapy in patients with refractory proteinuria.

  1. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy for Transitional Cell Carcinoma of a Right Pelvic Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Michael E.; Shetty, Zubin; Pridmore, David; Dave, Chirag N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Nephroureterectomy is the standard of care for transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) involving the upper urinary tract. However, few published case reports exist describing the surgical treatment of ectopic kidneys with TCC. Surgical removal of a pelvic kidney can be complicated by aberrant vasculature supply, a tortuous ureter and abutting anatomical structures. Thus, it is necessary to determine the most appropriate surgical technique for treatment of pelvic kidneys with suspected malignancy. Case Presentation: A 65-year-old female who presented with hematuria and lower abdominal pain was found to have a right pelvic kidney with a heterogeneous mass on computed tomography (CT) urogram. A robot-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy of the right pelvic kidney was performed. Histopathological analysis revealed high-grade TCC with microscopic extension through the muscularis propria of the renal pelvis and superficially into the renal parenchyma. Conclusion: This case demonstrates the successful use of robot-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy in the treatment of a pelvic kidney with TCC. Preoperative CT angiography is critical to define vascular anatomy and to prevent significant blood loss and damage to surrounding structures during surgery. This case was presented because TCC of a pelvic kidney is a rare occurrence and the use of robot-assisted nephroureterectomy for treatment of this disease is novel. PMID:27579441

  2. Effects of steroid hormones on differentiated glandular epithelial and stromal cells in a three dimensional cell culture model of the canine endometrium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Oestrogens and progesterone have a significant impact on the endometrium during the canine oestrous cycle. Their receptors mediate plasma steroid hormone levels and are expressed in several endometrial cell types. Altered steroid receptor expression patterns are involved in serious uterine diseases; however the mechanisms of hormone action during pathogenesis in these tissues remain unclear. The development of 3D culture systems of canine endometrial cells provides an opportunity for the effects of steroid hormones to be quantitatively assessed in a more in vivo-like setting. The present study aimed to determine the effects of the steroid hormones 17β-estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) on the expression of the oestrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR), and on proliferative activity, in a 3D co-culture system of canine uterine origin, comprising differentiated endometrial glands, and stromal cells (SCs). Results Morphology, differentiation, and apical-basolateral polarity of cultured glandular epithelial cells (GECs) were comparable to those in native uterine tissue as assessed by immunohistochemistry using differentiation markers (β-catenin, laminin), lectin histochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy. Supplementation of our 3D-culture system with E (at 15, 30 and 100 pg/mL) resulted in constant levels of ER expression in GECs, but reduced expression levels in SCs. PR expression was reduced in both GECs and SCs following treatment with E. 3 ng/mL P resulted in increased ER expression in GECs, but a decrease in SCs. PR expression in GECs increased in all P-treated groups, whereas PRs in SCs decreased with the lowest and highest doses, but increased with the middle dose of treatment. Proliferative activity, assessed by Ki67 staining, remained below 1% in all assays and cell types. Conclusions The present study demonstrates the applicability of our 3D organotypic canine endometrium-derived culture system for cellular-level studies. 3D

  3. CD4+CD25+ T Cells in primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongdong; Luo, Yang; Liang, Yumei; Long, Xidai; Peng, Youming; Liu, Zhihua; Wen, Xiaojun; Jia, Meng; Tian, Ru; Bai, Chengli; Li, Cui; He, Fuliang; Lin, Qiushi; Wang, Xueyan; Dong, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ T cells are critical for maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance. We measured the number of CD4+CD25+ cells in the patients with primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury, to explore the molecular pathogenesis of this disease. We selected 30 patients with primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury and 30 healthy volunteers. Information on clinical characteristics and laboratory tests was obtained from each subject. The number of CD4+CD25+ cells and glomerular injury were assessed by flow cytometry and histopathology, respectively. Both serum IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6 and endothelial cell markers were analyzed by ELISA. ADAMTS13 antibody was detected by Western blotting. CD4+CD25+ cells were significantly reduced in patients with primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury compared to controls (P < 0.05). The number of CD4+CD25+ cells was negatively related to blood urea nitrogen, serum uric acid, proteinuria, and supernatant IL-4; whereas positively associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients. Gradually decreasing CD4+CD25+ cells were also found as increasing renal injury. Additionally, patients exhibited increasing supernatant IL-4, serum IL-2 and IL-6, endothelial cell markers, and anti-ADAMTS13 antibody compared with controls (all P < 0.05). CD4+CD25+ cells may play a key role in the pathogenesis of primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury. PMID:27278520

  4. Properties of electrophoretic fractions of human embryonic kidney cells separated on space shuttle flight STS-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Lewis, M. L.; Barlow, G. H.; Todd, P. W.; Kunze, M. E.; Sarnoff, B. E.; Li, Z. K.

    1985-01-01

    Suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic kidney cells were subjected to continuous flow electrophoresis on Space Shuttle flight STS-8. The objectives of the experiments were to obtain electrophoretically separated fractions of the original cell populations and to test these fractions for the amount and kind of urokinase (a kidney plasminogen activator that is used medically for digesting blood clots), the morphologies of cells in the individual fractions, and their cellular electrophoretic mobilities after separation and subsequent proliferation. Individual fractions were successfully cultured after return from orbit, and they were found to differ substantially from one another and from the starting sample with respect to all of these properties.

  5. Analytical study of electrophoretic characterization of kidney cells. [conducted during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Embryonic kidney cells were studied as a follow-up to the MA-011 Electrophoresis Technology Experiment which was conducted during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). The postflight analysis of the performance of the ASTP zone electrophoresis experiment involving embryonic kidney cells is reported. The feasibility of producing standard particles for electrophoresis was also studied. This work was undertaken in response to a need for standardization of methods for producing, calibrating, and storing electrophoretic particle standards which could be employed in performance tests of various types of electrophoresis equipment. Promising procedures were tested for their suitability in the production of standard test particles from red blood cells.

  6. Recent advances in the cell biology of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Brendan J; Snyder, Richard W; Balkovetz, Daniel F; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2003-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a significant familial disorder, crossing multiple ethnicities as well as organ systems. The goal of understanding and, ultimately, curing ADPKD has fostered collaborative efforts among many laboratories, mustered on by the opportunity to probe fundamental cellular biology. Here we review what is known about ADPKD including well-accepted data such as the identification of the causative genes and the fact that PKD1 and PKD2 act in the same pathway, fairly well-accepted concepts such as the "two-hit hypothesis," and somewhat confusing information regarding polycystin-1 and -2 localization and protein interactions. Special attention is paid to the recently discovered role of the cilium in polycystic kidney disease and the model it suggests. Studying ADPKD is important, not only as an evaluation of a multisystem disorder that spans a lifetime, but as a testament to the achievements of modern biology and medicine.

  7. Establishment of a canine mammary gland tumor cell line and characterization of its miRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Tomohiro; Sunden, Yuji; Sugiyama, Akihiko; Azuma, Kazuo; Murahata, Yusuke; Tsuka, Takeshi; Ito, Norihiko; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2016-09-30

    Canine mammary gland tumors (CMGTs), which are the most common neoplasms in sexually intact female dogs, have been suggested as a model for studying human breast cancer because of several similarities, including relative age of onset, risk factors, incidence, histological and molecular features, biological behavior, metastatic pattern, and responses to therapy. In the present study, we established a new cell line, the SNP cell line, from a CMGT. A tumor formed in each NOD.CB17-Prkdc(scid)/J mouse at the site of subcutaneous SNP cell injection. SNP cells are characterized by proliferation in a tubulopapillary pattern and are vimentin positive. Moreover, we examined miRNA expression in the cultured cells and found that the expression values of miRNA-143 and miRNA-138a showed the greatest increase and decrease, respectively, of all miRNAs observed, indicating that these miRNAs might play a significant role in the malignancy of SNP cells. Overall, the results of this study indicate that SNP cells might serve as a model for future genetic analysis and clinical treatments of human breast tumors.

  8. Prediction of cellular radiosensitivity from DNA damage induced by gamma-rays and carbon ion irradiation in canine tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Seiichi; Van Khoa, Tran; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Tomoo; Ogihara, Kikumi; Ueno, Shunji; Ito, Nobuhiko

    2005-11-01

    Diseases of companion animals are shifting from infectious diseases to neoplasms (cancer), and since radiation therapy is one of the effective choices available for cancer treatment, the application of radiotherapy in veterinary medicine is likely to increase. However tumor tissues have different radiosensitivities, and therefore it is important to determine the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumors in individual patients in advance of radiotherapy. We have studied the relationship between the surviving cell fraction measured by a clonogenic assay and DNA double strand breaks detected by a comet assay under neutral conditions in three canine tumor cell lines, after gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation. In all the cell lines, cell death assessed by the clonogenic assay was much higher following irradiation with carbon ions than with gamma-rays. The initial and residual (4 hr) DNA damage due to gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation were higher in a radiosensitive cell line than in a radioresistant cell line. The surviving cell fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) showed a tendency for correlation with both the initial and residual DNA damage. In particular, the residual damage per Gy was significantly correlated with SF2, regardless of the type of radiation. This indicates that cellular radiosensitivity can be predicted by detection of radiation-induced residual DNA damage.

  9. Protective Role of Selenium Compounds on the Proliferation, Apoptosis, and Angiogenesis of a Canine Breast Cancer Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuzhi; Li, Wenyu; Guo, Mengyao; Li, Chengye; Qiu, Changwei

    2016-01-01

    We herein examined the effects of different doses, forms, and compatibilities of selenium on a canine mammary gland tumor cell line, CTM1211, and explored the related mechanisms. Three selenium compounds, sodium selenite (SSE), methylseleninic acid (MSA), and methylselenocysteine (MSC), were selected for these experiments, and cyclophosphamide (CTX) served as a positive control. In the cell viability assay, the cell viability of each group at 48/72 h decreased significantly compared with the control group (p < 0.05), and the cell viability of the CTX + MSA group was lower than that of CTX and MSA groups (p < 0.05). Moreover, the inhibitory effect of selenium on cell proliferation was time-dependent but not concentration-dependent. In the cell apoptosis assay, the apoptosis values of each group increased significantly compared with the control group, and the apoptosis values of the CTX + MSA group increased the most significantly (p < 0.01). The protein and mRNA expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor-alpha (VEGF-alpha), angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), and hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) were downregulated in each group, while that of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) were upregulated (p < 0.05). In conclusion, these three selenium compounds, especially MSA, could significantly inhibit the viability and growth of the CTM1211 cell line, which is partly due to the induction of apoptosis and regulation of tumor angiogenesis.

  10. Establishment of a canine mammary gland tumor cell line and characterization of its miRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Yuji; Sugiyama, Akihiko; Azuma, Kazuo; Murahata, Yusuke; Tsuka, Takeshi; Ito, Norihiko; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Canine mammary gland tumors (CMGTs), which are the most common neoplasms in sexually intact female dogs, have been suggested as a model for studying human breast cancer because of several similarities, including relative age of onset, risk factors, incidence, histological and molecular features, biological behavior, metastatic pattern, and responses to therapy. In the present study, we established a new cell line, the SNP cell line, from a CMGT. A tumor formed in each NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J mouse at the site of subcutaneous SNP cell injection. SNP cells are characterized by proliferation in a tubulopapillary pattern and are vimentin positive. Moreover, we examined miRNA expression in the cultured cells and found that the expression values of miRNA-143 and miRNA-138a showed the greatest increase and decrease, respectively, of all miRNAs observed, indicating that these miRNAs might play a significant role in the malignancy of SNP cells. Overall, the results of this study indicate that SNP cells might serve as a model for future genetic analysis and clinical treatments of human breast tumors. PMID:26726024

  11. The potential role of regucalcin in kidney cell regulation: Involvement in renal failure (Review).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-11-01

    The kidneys play a physiologic role in the regulation of urine formation and nutrient reabsorption in the proximal tubule epithelial cells. Kidney development has been shown to be regulated through calcium (Ca2+) signaling processes that are present through numerous steps of tubulogenesis and nephron induction during embryonic development of the kidneys. Ca2+-binding proteins, such as calbindin-D28k and regucalcin are important proteins that are commonly used as biomarkers in pronephric tubules, and the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme. Previous research on regucalcin focused on Ca2+ sensors that are involved in renal organogenesis and the link between Ca2+-dependent signals and polycystins. Moreover, regucalcin has been highlighted to play a multifunctional role in kidney cell regulation. The regucalcin gene, which is localized on the X chromosome, is regulated through various transcription factors. Regucalcin has been found to regulate intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells. Regucalcin has been demonstrated to regulate the activity of various enzymes that are involved in intracellular signaling pathways. It has been noted that regucalcin suppresses DNA synthesis and regulates the gene expression of various proteins related to mineral transport, transcription factors, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The overexpression of regucalcin has been shown to exert suppressive effects on cell proliferation and apoptotic cell death, which are stimulated by various stimulatory factors. Moreover, regucalcin gene expression was found to to be involved in various pathophysiological states, including renal failure. This review discusses recent findings concerning the potential role of regucalcin as a regulatory protein in the kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells.

  12. Postembryonic Nephrogenesis and Persistence of Six2-Expressing Nephron Progenitor Cells in the Reptilian Kidney.

    PubMed

    Camarata, Troy; Howard, Alexis; Elsey, Ruth M; Raza, Sarah; O'Connor, Alice; Beatty, Brian; Conrad, Jack; Solounias, Nikos; Chow, Priscilla; Mukta, Saima; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    New nephron formation (nephrogenesis) ceases in mammals around birth and is completely absent in adults. In contrast, postembryonic nephrogenesis is well documented in the mesonephric kidneys of fishes and amphibians. The transient mesonephros in reptiles (including birds) and mammals is replaced by the metanephros during embryogenesis. Thus, one may speculate that postembryonic nephrogenesis is restricted to the mesonephric kidney. Previous reports have suggested the metanephros of non-avian reptiles (hereafter reptiles) may continually form nephrons throughout life. We investigated the presence of adult nephrogenesis in reptiles by examining adult kidneys from several species including Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, Boa constrictor, Tupinambis tegu, Anolis carolinensis, and Alligator mississipiensis among others. We found that all major reptilian groups (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamates) showed the presence of adult nephrogenesis. The total amount of nephrogenesis varied greatly between species with turtles displaying the highest density of nephrogenesis. In contrast, we were unable to detect adult nephrogenesis in monotremes, and in the iguanid A. carolinensis. Nephron progenitor cells express the transcription factor Six2, which in mammals, becomes downregulated as the progenitor cell population is exhausted and nephrogenesis ends. Using the alligator as a model, we were able to detect Six2-positive cap mesenchyme cells in the adult kidney, which spatially correlated with areas of nephrogenesis. These results suggest that the metanephric kidney of reptiles has maintained the ability to continually grow new nephrons during postembryonic life, a process lost early in mammalian evolution, likely due to the persistence of a Six2-expressing progenitor cell population. PMID:27144443

  13. The costimulatory immunogen LPS induces the B-Cell clones that infiltrate transplanted human kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Rajesh K.; Cheng, Julong; Peng, Yingjie; Jones, Teresa M.; Ruiz, Diana I.; Ulevitch, Richard J.; Glass, John I.; Dennis, Edward A.; Salomon, Daniel R.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of chronic rejection of transplanted human kidneys is unknown. An understanding of this process is important because, chronic rejection ultimately leads to loss of the kidney allograft in most transplants. One feature of chronic rejection is the infiltration of ectopic B-cell clusters that are clonal into the transplanted kidney. We now show that the antibodies produced by these B-cells react strongly with the core carbohydrate region of LPS. Since LPS is a costimulatory immunogen that can react with both the B-cell receptor (BCR) and the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), these results suggest a mechanism for the selective pressure that leads to clonality of these B-cell clusters and opens the possibility that infection and the attendant exposure to LPS plays a role in the chronic rejection of human kidney transplants. If confirmed by clinical studies, these results suggest that treating patients with signs of chronic rejection with antibiotics may improve kidney allograft survival. PMID:22492977

  14. Postembryonic Nephrogenesis and Persistence of Six2-Expressing Nephron Progenitor Cells in the Reptilian Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Camarata, Troy; Howard, Alexis; Elsey, Ruth M.; Raza, Sarah; O’Connor, Alice; Beatty, Brian; Conrad, Jack; Solounias, Nikos; Chow, Priscilla; Mukta, Saima; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    New nephron formation (nephrogenesis) ceases in mammals around birth and is completely absent in adults. In contrast, postembryonic nephrogenesis is well documented in the mesonephric kidneys of fishes and amphibians. The transient mesonephros in reptiles (including birds) and mammals is replaced by the metanephros during embryogenesis. Thus, one may speculate that postembryonic nephrogenesis is restricted to the mesonephric kidney. Previous reports have suggested the metanephros of non-avian reptiles (hereafter reptiles) may continually form nephrons throughout life. We investigated the presence of adult nephrogenesis in reptiles by examining adult kidneys from several species including Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, Boa constrictor, Tupinambis tegu, Anolis carolinensis, and Alligator mississipiensis among others. We found that all major reptilian groups (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamates) showed the presence of adult nephrogenesis. The total amount of nephrogenesis varied greatly between species with turtles displaying the highest density of nephrogenesis. In contrast, we were unable to detect adult nephrogenesis in monotremes, and in the iguanid A. carolinensis. Nephron progenitor cells express the transcription factor Six2, which in mammals, becomes downregulated as the progenitor cell population is exhausted and nephrogenesis ends. Using the alligator as a model, we were able to detect Six2-positive cap mesenchyme cells in the adult kidney, which spatially correlated with areas of nephrogenesis. These results suggest that the metanephric kidney of reptiles has maintained the ability to continually grow new nephrons during postembryonic life, a process lost early in mammalian evolution, likely due to the persistence of a Six2-expressing progenitor cell population. PMID:27144443

  15. Postembryonic Nephrogenesis and Persistence of Six2-Expressing Nephron Progenitor Cells in the Reptilian Kidney.

    PubMed

    Camarata, Troy; Howard, Alexis; Elsey, Ruth M; Raza, Sarah; O'Connor, Alice; Beatty, Brian; Conrad, Jack; Solounias, Nikos; Chow, Priscilla; Mukta, Saima; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    New nephron formation (nephrogenesis) ceases in mammals around birth and is completely absent in adults. In contrast, postembryonic nephrogenesis is well documented in the mesonephric kidneys of fishes and amphibians. The transient mesonephros in reptiles (including birds) and mammals is replaced by the metanephros during embryogenesis. Thus, one may speculate that postembryonic nephrogenesis is restricted to the mesonephric kidney. Previous reports have suggested the metanephros of non-avian reptiles (hereafter reptiles) may continually form nephrons throughout life. We investigated the presence of adult nephrogenesis in reptiles by examining adult kidneys from several species including Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, Boa constrictor, Tupinambis tegu, Anolis carolinensis, and Alligator mississipiensis among others. We found that all major reptilian groups (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamates) showed the presence of adult nephrogenesis. The total amount of nephrogenesis varied greatly between species with turtles displaying the highest density of nephrogenesis. In contrast, we were unable to detect adult nephrogenesis in monotremes, and in the iguanid A. carolinensis. Nephron progenitor cells express the transcription factor Six2, which in mammals, becomes downregulated as the progenitor cell population is exhausted and nephrogenesis ends. Using the alligator as a model, we were able to detect Six2-positive cap mesenchyme cells in the adult kidney, which spatially correlated with areas of nephrogenesis. These results suggest that the metanephric kidney of reptiles has maintained the ability to continually grow new nephrons during postembryonic life, a process lost early in mammalian evolution, likely due to the persistence of a Six2-expressing progenitor cell population.

  16. Pharmacological GLI2 inhibition prevents myofibroblast cell-cycle progression and reduces kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kramann, Rafael; Fleig, Susanne V.; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Fabian, Steven L.; DiRocco, Derek P.; Maarouf, Omar; Wongboonsin, Janewit; Ikeda, Yoichiro; Heckl, Dirk; Chang, Steven L.; Rennke, Helmut G.; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Humphreys, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is characterized by interstitial fibrosis and proliferation of scar-secreting myofibroblasts, ultimately leading to end-stage renal disease. The hedgehog (Hh) pathway transcriptional effectors GLI1 and GLI2 are expressed in myofibroblast progenitors; however, the role of these effectors during fibrogenesis is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that GLI2, but not GLI1, drives myofibroblast cell-cycle progression in cultured mesenchymal stem cell–like progenitors. In animals exposed to unilateral ureteral obstruction, Hh pathway suppression by expression of the GLI3 repressor in GLI1+ myofibroblast progenitors limited kidney fibrosis. Myofibroblast-specific deletion of Gli2, but not Gli1, also limited kidney fibrosis, and induction of myofibroblast-specific cell-cycle arrest mediated this inhibition. Pharmacologic targeting of this pathway with darinaparsin, an arsenical in clinical trials, reduced fibrosis through reduction of GLI2 protein levels and subsequent cell-cycle arrest in myofibroblasts. GLI2 overexpression rescued the cell-cycle effect of darinaparsin in vitro. While darinaparsin ameliorated fibrosis in WT and Gli1-KO mice, it was not effective in conditional Gli2-KO mice, supporting GLI2 as a direct darinaparsin target. The GLI inhibitor GANT61 also reduced fibrosis in mice. Finally, GLI1 and GLI2 were upregulated in the kidneys of patients with high-grade fibrosis. Together, these data indicate that GLI inhibition has potential as a therapeutic strategy to limit myofibroblast proliferation in kidney fibrosis. PMID:26193634

  17. Electrophoretic mobilities of cultured human embryonic kidney cells in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Data on the electrophoretic mobility distributions of cells in the new D-1 buffer and the interlaboratory standardization of urokinase assay methods are presented. A table of cell strains and recent data on cell dispersal methods are also included. It was decided that glycerol in A-1 electrophoretic mobility data on cultured human embryonic kidney cells subjected to electrophoresis in this buffer. The buffer composition is presented.

  18. Effect of passage number on electrophoretic mobility distributions of cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    A systematic investigation was undertaken to characterize population shifts that occur in cultured human embryonic kidney cells as a function of passage number in vitro after original explantation. This approach to cell population shift analysis follows the suggestion of Mehreshi, Klein and Revesz that perturbed cell populations can be characterized by electrophoretic mobility distributions if they contain subpopulations with different electrophoretic mobilities. It was shown that this is the case with early passage cultured human embryo cells.

  19. Fibronectin Binding Proteins SpsD and SpsL Both Support Invasion of Canine Epithelial Cells by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Giampiero; Gianotti, Valentina; Richards, Amy; Nobile, Giulia; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Rindi, Simonetta; Monk, Ian R.; Bordt, Andrea S.; Foster, Timothy J.; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the cell wall-anchored fibronectin-binding proteins SpsD and SpsL from the canine commensal and pathogen Staphylococcus pseudintermedius for their role in promoting bacterial invasion of canine progenitor epidermal keratinocytes (CPEK). Invasion was examined by the gentamicin protection assay and fluorescence microscopy. An ΔspsD ΔspsL mutant of strain ED99 had a dramatically reduced capacity to invade CPEK monolayers, while no difference in the invasion level was observed with single mutants. Lactococcus lactis transformed with plasmids expressing SpsD and SpsL promoted invasion, showing that both proteins are important. Soluble fibronectin was required for invasion, and an RGD-containing peptide or antibodies recognizing the integrin α5β1 markedly reduced invasion, suggesting an important role for the integrin in this process. Src kinase inhibitors effectively blocked internalization, suggesting a functional role for the kinase in invasion. In order to identify the minimal fibronectin-binding region of SpsD and SpsL involved in the internalization process, recombinant fragments of both proteins were produced. The SpsD520–846 and SpsL538–823 regions harboring the major fibronectin-binding sites inhibited S. pseudintermedius internalization. Finally, the effects of staphylococcal invasion on the integrity of different cell lines were examined. Because SpsD and SpsL are critical factors for adhesion and invasion, blocking these processes could provide a strategy for future approaches to treating infections. PMID:26238710

  20. Fibronectin Binding Proteins SpsD and SpsL Both Support Invasion of Canine Epithelial Cells by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius.

    PubMed

    Pietrocola, Giampiero; Gianotti, Valentina; Richards, Amy; Nobile, Giulia; Geoghegan, Joan A; Rindi, Simonetta; Monk, Ian R; Bordt, Andrea S; Foster, Timothy J; Fitzgerald, J Ross; Speziale, Pietro

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the cell wall-anchored fibronectin-binding proteins SpsD and SpsL from the canine commensal and pathogen Staphylococcus pseudintermedius for their role in promoting bacterial invasion of canine progenitor epidermal keratinocytes (CPEK). Invasion was examined by the gentamicin protection assay and fluorescence microscopy. An ΔspsD ΔspsL mutant of strain ED99 had a dramatically reduced capacity to invade CPEK monolayers, while no difference in the invasion level was observed with single mutants. Lactococcus lactis transformed with plasmids expressing SpsD and SpsL promoted invasion, showing that both proteins are important. Soluble fibronectin was required for invasion, and an RGD-containing peptide or antibodies recognizing the integrin α5β1 markedly reduced invasion, suggesting an important role for the integrin in this process. Src kinase inhibitors effectively blocked internalization, suggesting a functional role for the kinase in invasion. In order to identify the minimal fibronectin-binding region of SpsD and SpsL involved in the internalization process, recombinant fragments of both proteins were produced. The SpsD520-846 and SpsL538-823 regions harboring the major fibronectin-binding sites inhibited S. pseudintermedius internalization. Finally, the effects of staphylococcal invasion on the integrity of different cell lines were examined. Because SpsD and SpsL are critical factors for adhesion and invasion, blocking these processes could provide a strategy for future approaches to treating infections.

  1. Renal Cell Protection of Erythropoietin beyond Correcting The Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Currently many patients with chronic renal failure have profited from the use of erythropoietin to correct anemia (1,2). In chronic kidney disease, anemia is believed to be a surrogate index for tissue hypoxia that continues preexisting renal tissue injury (1-3). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and facilitates erythropoiesis. It is a 30.4 kD glycoprotein and class I cytokine containing 165 amino acids (3,4). Approximately 90% of systemic erythropoietin in adults is produced by peritubular interstitial fibroblasts in the renal cortex and outer medulla of the kidney (3-5). A feedback mechanism involving oxygen delivery to the tissues seems to regulate erythropoietin production. Hypoxia-inducible factor regulates transcription of the erythropoietin gene in the kidney, which determines erythropoietin synthesis (3-5). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and mediates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow (4-6). Kidney fibrosis is the last common pathway in chronic renal failure irrespective of the initial etiology (5,6). Constant inflammatory cell infiltration and pericyte-myofibroblast transition lead to renal fibrosis and insufficiency which result in decreased production of erythropoietin (4-7). Thus far, therapeutic efforts to treat patients with chronic renal failure by administering erythropoietin have been made only to correct anemia and putative hypoxic tissue damage. The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin has marked a significant advance in the management of anemia associated with chronic renal failure (6-9). With an increasing number of patients with chronic renal failure receiving erythropoietin treatment, emerging evidence suggests that erythropoietin not only has an erythropoietic function, but also has renoprotective potential. In fact, in recent years, the additional non

  2. Hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether combined with He–Ne laser irradiation-induced apoptosis in canine breast cancer cells through the mitochondrial pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huatao; Tong, Jinjin; Bao, Jun; Tang, Damu; Tian, Wenru

    2016-01-01

    Hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME) combined with He-Ne laser irradiation is a novel and promising photodynamic therapy (PDT)-induced apoptosis that can be applied in vitro on canine breast cancer cells. However, the exact pathway responsible for HMME-PDT in canine breast cancer cells remains unknown. CHMm cells morphology and apoptosis were analyzed using optical microscope, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling fluorescein staining and DNA ladder assays. Apoptotic pathway was further confirmed by Real-time-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting assays. Our results showed that HMME-PDT induced significant changes in cell morphology, such as formation of cytoplasmic vacuoles and the gradual rounding of cells coupled with decreased size and detachment. DNA fragmentation and cell death was shown to occur in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, HMME-PDT increased the activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and released cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. HMME-PDT also significantly increased both mRNA and protein levels of Bax and decreased P53 gene expression in a time-dependent manner, while the mRNA and protein expression of Bcl-2 were repressed. These alterations suggest that HMME-PDT induced CHMm cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and had anti-canine breast cancer effects in vitro. PMID:26645330

  3. Kidney-derived mesenchymal stem cells contribute to vasculogenesis, angiogenesis and endothelial repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Park, Hyeong-Cheon; Addabbo, Francesco; Ni, Jie; Pelger, Edward; Li, Houwei; Plotkin, Matthew; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    We isolated a clonal cell line (4E) from kidneys of mice expressing green fluorescent protein controlled by the endothelial-specific Tie2 promoter. When grown in a three-dimensional matrigel matrix they formed a fluorescent capillary network. In vivo angiogenesis assays using growth factor-depleted matrigel implanted plugs promoted a moderate angiogenesis of host endothelial cells. Using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and fibroblast growth factor-2 in the plugs containing 4E-cells resulted in a robust vasculogenesis. Transplantation of 4E cells into mice with acute renal ischemia showed selective engraftment in the ischemic kidney which promoted tubular regeneration by increasing epithelial proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. This resulted in an accelerated functional recovery 3 days after ischemia. These mice showed a 5-fold increase in tissue VEGF expression compared to controls, but no difference in plasma VEGF level corresponding with better preservation of peritubular capillaries, perhaps due to a local paracrine effect following systemic 4E infusion. One month after ischemia, 9% of engrafted 4E cells expressed green fluorescent protein in the peritubular region while half of them expressed α-smooth muscle actin. Our study shows that kidney mesenchymal stem cells are capable of differentiation toward endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages in vitro and in vivo, support new blood vessel formation in favorable conditions and promote functional recovery of an ischemic kidney. PMID:18596729

  4. Canine distemper virus persistence in demyelinating encephalitis by swift intracellular cell-to-cell spread in astrocytes is controlled by the viral attachment protein.

    PubMed

    Wyss-Fluehmann, Gaby; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Vandevelde, Marc; Plattet, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    The mechanism of viral persistence, the driving force behind the chronic progression of inflammatory demyelination in canine distemper virus (CDV) infection, is associated with non-cytolytic viral cell-to-cell spread. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms of viral spread of a recombinant fluorescent protein-expressing virulent CDV in primary canine astrocyte cultures. Time-lapse video microscopy documented that CDV spread was very efficient using cell processes contacting remote target cells. Strikingly, CDV transmission to remote cells could occur in less than 6 h, suggesting that a complete viral cycle with production of extracellular free particles was not essential in enabling CDV to spread in glial cells. Titration experiments and electron microscopy confirmed a very low CDV particle production despite higher titers of membrane-associated viruses. Interestingly, confocal laser microscopy and lentivirus transduction indicated expression and functionality of the viral fusion machinery, consisting of the viral fusion (F) and attachment (H) glycoproteins, at the cell surface. Importantly, using a single-cycle infectious recombinant H-knockout, H-complemented virus, we demonstrated that H, and thus potentially the viral fusion complex, was necessary to enable CDV spread. Furthermore, since we could not detect CD150/SLAM expression in brain cells, the presence of a yet non-identified glial receptor for CDV was suggested. Altogether, our findings indicate that persistence in CDV infection results from intracellular cell-to-cell transmission requiring the CDV-H protein. Viral transfer, happening selectively at the tip of astrocytic processes, may help the virus to cover long distances in the astroglial network, "outrunning" the host's immune response in demyelinating plaques, thus continuously eliciting new lesions.

  5. Transforming growth factor-β inhibits cystogenesis in human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elberg, Dorit; Jayaraman, Siddarth; Turman, Martin A; Elberg, Gerard

    2012-08-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited cause of kidney failure and characterized by the formation of multiple fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys. It is believed that environmental factors may play an important role in the disease progression. However, the molecular identity of autocrine/paracrine factors influencing cyst formation is largely unknown. In this study, we identified transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2) secreted by normal human kidney (NHK) and ADPKD cells as an inhibitor of cystogenesis in 3D culture system using ADPKD cells from human kidneys. TGF-β2 was identified in conditioned media (CM) of NHK and ADPKD cells as a latent factor activated by heat in vitro. While all TGF-β isoforms recombinant proteins (TGF-β1, -β2, or -β3) displayed a similar inhibitory effect on cyst formation, TGF-β2 was the predominant isoform detected in CM. The involvement of TGF-β2 in the suppression of cyst formation was demonstrated by using a TGF-β2 specific blocking antibody and a TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor. TGF-β2 inhibited cyst formation by a mechanism other than activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase that mediated cell death in ADPKD cells. Further, we found that TGF-β2 modulated expression of various genes involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and extracellular matrix proteins that may play a role in the regulation of cystogenesis. Collectively, our results suggest that TGF-β2 secreted by renal epithelial cells may be an inhibitor of cystogenesis influencing the progression of ADPKD.

  6. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function.

    PubMed

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H; Johnson, Andrew D; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B; Nolte, Ilja M; van der Most, Peter J; Wright, Alan F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Morrison, Alanna C; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V; Dreisbach, Albert W; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K; Mitchell, Braxton D; Buckley, Brendan M; Peralta, Carmen A; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N; Shaffer, Christian M; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B; Navis, Gerjan J; Curhan, Gary C; Ehret, George B; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J Wouter; Wilson, James F; Felix, Janine F; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A; Faul, Jessica D; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K; Sale, Michele M; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B; Ridker, Paul M; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P S; Carroll, Robert J; Penninx, Brenda W; Scott, Rodney J; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J; Turner, Stephen T; Rosas, Sylvia E; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J F; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H; Böger, Carsten A; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W H Linda; Fox, Caroline S

    2016-01-01

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways. PMID:26831199

  7. Angiogenin Mediates Cell-Autonomous Translational Control under Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Attenuates Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Mami, Iadh; Bouvier, Nicolas; El Karoui, Khalil; Gallazzini, Morgan; Rabant, Marion; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Li, Shuping; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Beaune, Philippe; Thervet, Eric; Chevet, Eric; Hu, Guo-Fu; Pallet, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the pathophysiology of kidney disease and aging, but the molecular bases underlying the biologic outcomes on the evolution of renal disease remain mostly unknown. Angiogenin (ANG) is a ribonuclease that promotes cellular adaptation under stress but its contribution to ER stress signaling remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the ANG-mediated contribution to the signaling and biologic outcomes of ER stress in kidney injury. ANG expression was significantly higher in samples from injured human kidneys than in samples from normal human kidneys, and in mouse and rat kidneys, ANG expression was specifically induced under ER stress. In human renal epithelial cells, ER stress induced ANG expression in a manner dependent on the activity of transcription factor XBP1, and ANG promoted cellular adaptation to ER stress through induction of stress granules and inhibition of translation. Moreover, the severity of renal lesions induced by ER stress was dramatically greater in ANG knockout mice (Ang(-/-)) mice than in wild-type mice. These results indicate that ANG is a critical mediator of tissue adaptation to kidney injury and reveal a physiologically relevant ER stress-mediated adaptive translational control mechanism. PMID:26195817

  8. Angiogenin Mediates Cell-Autonomous Translational Control under Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Attenuates Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Mami, Iadh; Bouvier, Nicolas; El Karoui, Khalil; Gallazzini, Morgan; Rabant, Marion; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Li, Shuping; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Beaune, Philippe; Thervet, Eric; Chevet, Eric; Hu, Guo-Fu; Pallet, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the pathophysiology of kidney disease and aging, but the molecular bases underlying the biologic outcomes on the evolution of renal disease remain mostly unknown. Angiogenin (ANG) is a ribonuclease that promotes cellular adaptation under stress but its contribution to ER stress signaling remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the ANG-mediated contribution to the signaling and biologic outcomes of ER stress in kidney injury. ANG expression was significantly higher in samples from injured human kidneys than in samples from normal human kidneys, and in mouse and rat kidneys, ANG expression was specifically induced under ER stress. In human renal epithelial cells, ER stress induced ANG expression in a manner dependent on the activity of transcription factor XBP1, and ANG promoted cellular adaptation to ER stress through induction of stress granules and inhibition of translation. Moreover, the severity of renal lesions induced by ER stress was dramatically greater in ANG knockout mice (Ang(-/-)) mice than in wild-type mice. These results indicate that ANG is a critical mediator of tissue adaptation to kidney injury and reveal a physiologically relevant ER stress-mediated adaptive translational control mechanism.

  9. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y.; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F.; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B.; Nolte, Ilja M.; van der Most, Peter J.; Wright, Alan F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V.; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I.; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Peralta, Carmen A.; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N.; Shaffer, Christian M.; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Curhan, Gary C.; Ehret, George B.; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I. Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wilson, James F.; Felix, Janine F.; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B.; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C.; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K.; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L.; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E.; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A.; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K.; Sale, Michele M.; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H.; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ridker, Paul M.; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Adair, Linda S.; Alexander, Myriam; Altshuler, David; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E.; Arora, Pankaj; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Ines; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Bis, Joshua C.; Boehnke, Michael; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burton, Paul R.; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Chaturvedi, Nish; Shin Cho, Yoon; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Collins, Rory; Connell, John M.; Cooper, Jackie A.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Cooper, Richard S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Dörr, Marcus; Dahgam, Santosh; Danesh, John; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Deloukas, Panos; Denniff, Matthew; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Dong, Yanbin; Doumatey, Ayo; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eyheramendy, Susana; Farrall, Martin; Fava, Cristiano; Forrester, Terrence; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Fox, Ervin R.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Galan, Pilar; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Garcia, Melissa; Gaunt, Tom R.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Go, Min Jin; Goel, Anuj; Grässler, Jürgen; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Groop, Leif; Guarrera, Simonetta; Guo, Xiuqing; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hardy, Rebecca; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heath, Simon; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hedblad, Bo; Hercberg, Serge; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hilton, Gina; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Howard, Philip; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Ikram, M. Arfan; Islam, Muhammad; Iwai, Naoharu; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jackson, Anne U.; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Johnson, Toby; Kathiresan, Sekar; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kinra, Sanjay; Kita, Yoshikuni; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kumar, M. J. Kranthi; Kuh, Diana; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Laakso, Markku; Laan, Maris; Laitinen, Jaana; Lakatta, Edward G.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Larson, Martin G.; Lathrop, Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Nanette R.; Levy, Daniel; Li, Yali; Longstreth, Will T.; Luan, Jian'an; Lucas, Gavin; Ludwig, Barbara; Mangino, Massimo; Mani, K. Radha; Marmot, Michael G.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Matullo, Giuseppe; McArdle, Wendy L.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meneton, Pierre; Meschia, James F.; Miki, Tetsuro; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mooser, Vincent; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Richard W.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Najjar, Samer; Narisu, Narisu; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Nilsson, Peter; Nyberg, Fredrik; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ong, RickTwee-Hee; Ongen, Halit; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Org, Elin; Orru, Marco; Palmas, Walter; Palmen, Jutta; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Parker, Alex N.; Peden, John F.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Pihur, Vasyl; Platou, Carl G. P.; Plump, Andrew; Prabhakaran, Dorairajan; Psaty, Bruce M.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Rasheed, Asif; Ricceri, Fulvio; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rosengren, Annika; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudock, Megan E.; Sõber, Siim; Salako, Tunde; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwartz, Steven M.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Scott, Laura J.; Scott, James; Scuteri, Angelo; Sehmi, Joban S.; Seielstad, Mark; Seshadri, Sudha; Sharma, Pankaj; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Shi, Gang; Shrine, Nick R. G.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Sim, Xueling; Singleton, Andrew; Sjögren, Marketa; Smith, Nicholas L.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Spector, Tim D.; Staessen, Jan A.; Stancakova, Alena; Steinle, Nanette I.; Strachan, David P.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sun, Yan V.; Swift, Amy J.; Tabara, Yasuharu; Tai, E-Shyong; Talmud, Philippa J.; Taylor, Andrew; Terzic, Janos; Thelle, Dag S.; Tobin, Martin D.; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tripathy, Vikal; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Uda, Manuela; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Umemura, Satoshi; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vartiainen, Erkki; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Veldre, Gudrun; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Viigimaa, Margus; Vinay, D. G.; Vineis, Paolo; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Wain, Louise V.; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Thomas J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Weder, Alan B.; Whincup, Peter H.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Yao, Jie; Young, J. H.; Zelenika, Diana; Zhai, Guangju; Zhang, Weihua; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Haidong; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zitting, Paavo; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Okada, Yukinori; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gu, Dongfeng; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Maeda, Shiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Chen, Peng; Lim, Su-Chi; Wong, Tien-Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Young, Terri L.; Aung, Tin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kim, Young Jin; Kang, Daehee; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Li-Ching; Fann, S. -J. Cathy; Mei, Hao; Hixson, James E.; Chen, Shufeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Isono, Masato; Albrecht, Eva; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Reilly, Muredach P; Schunkert, Heribert; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Hall, Alistair; Hengstenberg, Christian; König, Inke R.; Laaksonen, Reijo; McPherson, Ruth; Thompson, John R.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ziegler, Andreas; Absher, Devin; Chen, Li; Cupples13, L. Adrienne; Halperin, Eran; Li, Mingyao; Musunuru, Kiran; Preuss, Michael; Schillert, Arne; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wells, George A.; Holm, Hilma; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Fortmann, Stephen; Go, Alan; Hlatky, Mark; Iribarren, Carlos; Knowles, Joshua; Myers, Richard; Quertermous, Thomas; Sidney, Steven; Risch, Neil; Tang, Hua; Blankenberg, Stefan; Schnabel, Renate; Sinning, Christoph; Lackner, Karl J.; Tiret, Laurence; Nicaud, Viviane; Cambien, Francois; Bickel, Christoph; Rupprecht, Hans J.; Perret, Claire; Proust, Carole; Münzel, Thomas F.; Barbalic, Maja; Chen, Ida Yii-Der; Demissie-Banjaw, Serkalem; Folsom, Aaron; Lumley, Thomas; Marciante, Kristin; Taylor, Kent D.; Volcik, Kelly; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Andersen, Karl; Fischer, Marcus; Grosshennig, Anika; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Stark, Klaus; Schreiber, Stefan; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Bruse, Petra; Doering, Angela; Klopp, Norman; Diemert, Patrick; Loley, Christina; Medack, Anja; Nahrstedt, Janja; Peters, Annette; Wagner, Arnika K.; Willenborg, Christina; Böhm, Bernhard O.; Dobnig, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Hoffmann, Michael M.; Meinitzer, Andreas; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Pilz, Stefan; Renner, Wilfried; Scharnagl, Hubert; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Winkler, Karl; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noel; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Dandona, Sonny; Jarinova, Olga; Qu, Liming; Wilensky, Robert; Matthai, William; Hakonarson, Hakon H.; Devaney, Joe; Burnett, Mary Susan; Pichard, Augusto D.; Kent, Kenneth M.; Satler, Lowell; Lindsay, Joseph M.; Waksman, Ron; Knouff, Christopher W.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Walker, Max C.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Rader, Daniel J.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Ball, Stephen G.; Loehr, Laura R.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Benjamin, Emelia; Haritunians, Talin; Couper, David; Murabito, Joanne; Wang, Ying A.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Chang, Patricia P.; Willerson, James T.; Felix, Stephan B.; Watzinger, Norbert; Aragam, Jayashri; Zweiker, Robert; Lind, Lars; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Greiser, Karin Halina; Deckers, Jaap W.; Stritzke, Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Kullo, Iftikhar; Haerting, Johannes; Reffelmann, Thorsten; Redfield, Margaret M.; Werdan, Karl; Mitchell, Gary F.; Arnett, Donna K.; Gottdiener, John S.; Blettner, Maria; Friedrich, Nele; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S.; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Carroll, Robert J.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Scott, Rodney J.; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J.; Turner, Stephen T.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B.; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H.; Böger, Carsten A.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways. PMID:26831199

  10. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function.

    PubMed

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H; Johnson, Andrew D; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B; Nolte, Ilja M; van der Most, Peter J; Wright, Alan F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Morrison, Alanna C; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V; Dreisbach, Albert W; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K; Mitchell, Braxton D; Buckley, Brendan M; Peralta, Carmen A; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N; Shaffer, Christian M; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B; Navis, Gerjan J; Curhan, Gary C; Ehret, George B; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J Wouter; Wilson, James F; Felix, Janine F; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A; Faul, Jessica D; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K; Sale, Michele M; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B; Ridker, Paul M; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P S; Carroll, Robert J; Penninx, Brenda W; Scott, Rodney J; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J; Turner, Stephen T; Rosas, Sylvia E; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J F; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H; Böger, Carsten A; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W H Linda; Fox, Caroline S

    2016-01-21

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways.

  11. Disruption of Splenic Lymphoid Tissue and Plasmacytosis in Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis: Changes in Homing and Survival of Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva-O’Hare, Joselli; de Oliveira, Isabela Silva; Klevorn, Thaís; Almeida, Valter A.; Oliveira, Geraldo G. S.; Atta, Ajax M.; de Freitas, Luiz Antonio R.; dos-Santos, Washington L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a disease caused by Leishmania infantum, which is transmitted by phlebotomine sandflies. Dogs are the main urban reservoir of this parasite and the disease presents similar characteristics in both humans and dogs. In this paper, we investigated the potential pathways involved in plasma cell replacement of normal cell populations in the spleen, with respect to disease severity in dogs from an endemic area for visceral leishmaniasis. To this end, canine spleen samples were grouped into three categories: TYPE1SC- (non-infected dogs or without active infection with organized white pulp), TYPE1SC+ (infected dogs with organized white pulp) or TYPE3SC+ (infected animals with disorganized white pulp). We analyzed the distribution of different plasma cell isotypes (IgA, IgG and IgM) in the spleen. The expression of cytokines and chemokines involved in plasma cell homing and survival were assessed by real time RT-PCR. Polyclonal B cell activation and hypergammaglobulinemia were also evaluated. The proportion of animals with moderate or intense plasmacytosis was higher in the TYPE3SC+ group than in the other groups (Fisher test, P<0.05). This was mainly due to a higher density of IgG+ plasma cells in the red pulp of this group. The albumin/globulin ratio was lower in the TYPE3SC+ animals than in the TYPE1SC- or TYPE1SC+ animals, which evidences VL-associated dysproteinemia. Interestingly, TYPE3SC+ animals showed increased expression of the BAFF and APRIL cytokines, as well as chemokine CXCL12. Aberrant expression of BAFF, APRIL and CXCL12, together with amplified extrafollicular B cell activation, lead to plasma cell homing and the extended survival of these cells in the splenic red pulp compartment. These changes in the distribution of immunocompetent cells in the spleen may contribute to the progression of VL, and impair the spleen’s ability to protect against blood borne pathogens. PMID:27243459

  12. Identification of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide sequences that induce IFN-gamma production in canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Keigo; Iwata, Akira; Masuda, Kenichi; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2004-12-28

    Oligodeoxynucleotides containing the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) motif (CpG-ODNs) have been shown to induce T(H)1 immune responses in animals. Since the sequences of CpG-ODNs that induce T(H)1 responses are considered to vary among animal species, it is necessary to identify effective CpG-ODNs in each animal. In order to identify the sequences of CpG-ODNs that induce T(H)1 responses in dogs, mRNA expression and protein production of IFN-gamma were examined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy dogs treated with 11 kinds of synthetic CpG-ODNs. One of the 11 CpG-ODNs (No. 2 CpG-ODN, 5'-GGTGCATCGATGCAGGGGGG-3') was shown to significantly increase mRNA expression and protein production of IFN-gamma in canine PBMCs in a manner dependent on the sequence of the CpG motif. This CpG-ODN also enhanced the expression of IL-12 p40 mRNA in canine PBMCs, whereas expression of IL-12 p35, IL-18, and IL-4 mRNAs was not induced by this CpG-ODN. These results indicate that this CpG-ODN was able to produce IFN-gamma by induction of T(H)1-skewed immune response in dogs. CpG-ODNs may be useful for inducing prophylactic and therapeutic immunity against allergic diseases, viral infection, and tumors in dogs. PMID:15541797

  13. Susceptibility of a line of dolphin kidney cell culture to several herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Kadoi, K; Mochizuki, A; Ikeda, T; Kamata, H; Yukawa, M; Inoue, Y

    1992-01-01

    A cell line was established from cell cultures of kidney cortex of a pantropical spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuate. The replication of 6 strains of herpesviruses was studied in the cells. Five strains of them, herpes simplex virus type I and type II, equine rhinopneumonitis virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus and Aujeszky's disease virus, were grown fairly well in showing clear cytopathic effects and plaques under agar overlay medium. PMID:1460566

  14. Summary electrophoretic data base on human embryonic kidney cell strain 8514

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Arquiza, M. V.; Morrison, D. R.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    To properly plan the electrophoresis equipment verification test (EEVT) and continuous flow electrophoresis system (CFES) experiments with human embryonic kidney cells, first a candidate cell lot had to be chosen on the basis of electrophoretic heterogeneity, growth potential, cytogenetics, and urokinase production. Cell lot 8514 from MA Bioproducts, Inc. was chosen for this purpose, and several essential analytical electrophoresis experiments were performed to test its final suitability for these experiments.

  15. Double-Negative αβ T Cells Are Early Responders to AKI and Are Found in Human Kidney.

    PubMed

    Martina, Maria N; Noel, Sanjeev; Saxena, Ankit; Bandapalle, Samatha; Majithia, Richa; Jie, Chunfa; Arend, Lois J; Allaf, Mohamad E; Rabb, Hamid; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A

    2016-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of AKI, and previous studies established important roles for conventional CD4(+) T cells, natural killer T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in AKI pathogenesis. We recently identified CD4(-)CD8(-) (double-negative; DN) T cells as an important subset of αβ T cell receptor-positive cells residing in mouse kidney. However, little is known about the pathophysiologic functions of kidney DN T cells. In this study, we phenotypically and functionally characterized murine kidney DN T cells in the steady state and in response to IRI. Unlike CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, DN T cells in the steady state expressed high levels of CD69, CD28, and CD40L; differentially expressed IL-27 and IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokines; spontaneously proliferated at a very high rate; and suppressed in vitro proliferation of activated CD4(+) T cells. Within the first 3-24 hours after IRI, kidney DN T cells expanded significantly and upregulated expression of IL-10. In adoptive transfer experiments, DN T cells significantly protected recipients from AKI by an IL-10-dependent mechanism. DN T cells also made up a large fraction of the T cell compartment in human kidneys. Our results indicate that DN T cells are an important subset of the resident αβ(+) T cell population in the mammalian kidney and are early responders to AKI that have anti-inflammatory properties.

  16. Effects of inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and downstream pathways of receptor tyrosine kinases involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin or mitogen-activated protein kinase in canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Mami; Hoshino, Yuki; Izumi, Yusuke; Sakai, Hiroki; Takagi, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is a progressive malignant neoplasm with no current effective treatment. Previous studies showed that receptor tyrosine kinases and molecules within their downstream pathways involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR) or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were overexpressed in canine, human, and murine tumors, including HSA. The present study investigated the effects of inhibitors of these pathways in canine splenic and hepatic HSA cell lines using assays of cell viability and apoptosis. Inhibitors of the MAPK pathway did not affect canine HSA cell viability. However, cell viability was significantly reduced by exposure to inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and the PI3K/Akt/m-TOR pathway; these inhibitors also induced apoptosis in these cell lines. These results suggest that these inhibitors reduce the proliferation of canine HSA cells by inducing apoptosis. Further study of these inhibitors, using xenograft mouse models of canine HSA, are warranted to explore their potential for clinical application. PMID:27408334

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Kidney Disease: A Review of Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells form a population of self-renewing, multipotent cells that can be isolated from several tissues. Multiple preclinical studies have demonstrated that the administration of exogenous MSC could prevent renal injury and could promote renal recovery through a series of complex mechanisms, in particular via immunomodulation of the immune system and release of paracrine factors and microvesicles. Due to their therapeutic potentials, MSC are being evaluated as a possible player in treatment of human kidney disease, and an increasing number of clinical trials to assess the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of MSC-based therapy in various kidney diseases have been proposed. In the present review, we will summarize the current knowledge on MSC infusion to treat acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and kidney transplantation. The data obtained from these clinical trials will provide further insight into safety, feasibility, and efficacy of MSC-based therapy in renal pathologies and allow the design of consensus protocol for clinical purpose. PMID:27721835

  18. Induction of castration by immunization of male dogs with recombinant gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-canine distemper virus (CDV) T helper cell epitope p35.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mi-Jeong; Moon, Young-Chan; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Yeh, Jung-Yong; Kim, Sun-Eui; Chang, Wha-Seok; Park, Seung-Young; Song, Chang-Seon; Kim, Hwi-Yool; Park, Keun-Kyu; McOrist, Steven; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2005-03-01

    Immunocastration is a considerable alternative to a surgical castration method especially in male animal species for alleviating unwanted male behaviors and characteristics. Induction of high titer of antibody specific for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) correlates with the regression of testes. Fusion proteins composed of canine GnRH and T helper (Th) cell epitope p35 originated from canine distemper virus (CDV) F protein and goat rotavirus VP6 protein were produced in E. coli. When these fusion proteins were injected to male dogs which were previously immunized with CDV vaccine, the fusion protein of GnRH-CDV Th cell epitope p35 induced much higher antibody than that of GnRH-rotavirus VP6 protein or GnRH alone. The degeneration of spermatogenesis was also verified in the male dogs immunized with the fusion protein of GnRH-CDV Th cell epitope p35. These results indicate that canine GnRH conjugated to CDV Th cell epitope p35 acted as a strong immunogen and the antibody to GnRH specifically neutralized GnRH in the testes. This study also implies a potential application of GnRH-based vaccines for immunocastration of male pets. PMID:15785119

  19. White kidney bean lectin exerts anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Xia, Lixin; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-04-01

    A 60-kDa glucosamine binding lectin, white kidney bean lectin (WKBL), was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. white kidney beans, by application of anion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, and FPLC-size exclusion on Superdex 75. The anti-proliferative activity of WKBL on HONE1 cells and HepG2 cells was stronger than the activity on MCF7 cells and WRL68 cells (IC50 values for a 48-h treatment with WKBL on HONE1 cells: 18.8 μM; HepG2 cells: 19.7 μM; MCF7 cells: 26.9 μM; and WRL68 cells: >80 μM). The activity could be reduced by addition of glucosamine, which occupies the binding sites of WKBL, indicating that carbohydrate binding is crucial for the activity. Annexin V-FITC and PI staining, JC-1 staining and Hoechst 33342 staining revealed that apoptosis was induced on WKBL-treated HONE1 cells and HepG2 cells, but not as obviously on MCF7 cells. Cell cycle analysis also showed a slight cell cycle arrest on HONE1 cells after WKBL treatment. Western blotting suggested that WKBL induced apoptosis of HONE1 cells occurred through the extrinsic apoptosis pathway, with detection of increased level of active caspase 3, 8 and 9.

  20. Characterization of kidney epithelial cells from the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Sweat JMDunigan, D D; Wright, S D

    2001-06-01

    The West-Indian manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris, is a herbivorous marine mammal found in the coastal waters of Florida. Because of their endangered status, animal experimentation is not allowed. Therefore, a cell line was developed and characterized from tissue collected during necropsies of the manatees. A primary cell culture was established by isolating single cells from kidney tissue using both enzymatic and mechanical techniques. Primary manatee kidney (MK) cells were subcultured for characterization. These cells were morphologically similar to the cell lines of epithelial origin. An immunocytochemistry assay was used to localize the cytokeratin filaments common to cells of epithelial origin. At second passage, epithelial-like cells had an average population-doubling time of 48 h, had an optimum seeding density of 5 x 10(3) cells/cm2, and readily attached to plastic culture plates with a high level of seeding efficiency. Although the epithelial-like cells had a rapid growth rate during the first three passages, the cloning potential was low. These cells did not form colonies in agar medium, were serum dependent, had a limited life span of approximately nine passages, and possessed cell-contact inhibition. These data suggest that the cells were finite (noncontinuous growth), did not possess transformed properties, and were of epithelial origin. These cells are now referred to as MK epithelial cells.

  1. White kidney bean lectin exerts anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Xia, Lixin; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-04-01

    A 60-kDa glucosamine binding lectin, white kidney bean lectin (WKBL), was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. white kidney beans, by application of anion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, and FPLC-size exclusion on Superdex 75. The anti-proliferative activity of WKBL on HONE1 cells and HepG2 cells was stronger than the activity on MCF7 cells and WRL68 cells (IC50 values for a 48-h treatment with WKBL on HONE1 cells: 18.8 μM; HepG2 cells: 19.7 μM; MCF7 cells: 26.9 μM; and WRL68 cells: >80 μM). The activity could be reduced by addition of glucosamine, which occupies the binding sites of WKBL, indicating that carbohydrate binding is crucial for the activity. Annexin V-FITC and PI staining, JC-1 staining and Hoechst 33342 staining revealed that apoptosis was induced on WKBL-treated HONE1 cells and HepG2 cells, but not as obviously on MCF7 cells. Cell cycle analysis also showed a slight cell cycle arrest on HONE1 cells after WKBL treatment. Western blotting suggested that WKBL induced apoptosis of HONE1 cells occurred through the extrinsic apoptosis pathway, with detection of increased level of active caspase 3, 8 and 9. PMID:26769089

  2. TCF21 hypermethylation in genetically quiescent clear cell sarcoma of the kidney | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney (CCSK) is a rare childhood tumor whose molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. We analyzed a discovery set of 13 CCSKs for changes in chromosome copy number, mutations, rearrangements, global gene expression and global DNA methylation. No recurrent segmental chromosomal copy number changes or somatic variants (single nucleotide or small insertion/deletion) were identified.

  3. Stabilizing Effect of Magnesium Sulfate on Avian Infectious Bronchitis Virus Propagated in Chicken Embryo Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coria, Manuel F.

    1972-01-01

    The Beaudette strain of avian infectious bronchitis virus propagated in chicken embryo kidney cells is stabilized by exposure to 1 M MgSO4 at 50 C for 80 min, at pH values ranging from 4 to 10. PMID:4622823

  4. A Polycystin-1 Multiprotein Complex Is Disrupted in Polycystic Kidney Disease CellsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Roitbak, Tamara; Ward, Christopher J.; Harris, Peter C.; Bacallao, Robert; Ness, Scott A.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2004-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is typified by the accumulation of fluid-filled cysts and abnormalities in renal epithelial cell function. The disease is principally caused by mutations in the gene encoding polycystin-1, a large basolateral plasma membrane protein expressed in kidney epithelial cells. Our studies reveal that, in normal kidney cells, polycystin-1 forms a complex with the adherens junction protein E-cadherin and its associated catenins, suggesting a role in cell adhesion or polarity. In primary cells from ADPKD patients, the polycystin-1/polycystin-2/E-cadherin/β-catenin complex was disrupted and both polycystin-1 and E-cadherin were depleted from the plasma membrane as a result of the increased phosphorylation of polycystin-1. The loss of E-cadherin was compensated by the transcriptional upregulation of the normally mesenchymal N-cadherin. Increased cell surface N-cadherin in the disease cells in turn stabilized the continued plasma membrane localization of β-catenin in the absence of E-cadherin. The results suggest that enhanced phosphorylation of polycystin-1 in ADPKD cells precipitates changes in its localization and its ability to form protein complexes that are critical for the stabilization of adherens junctions and the maintenance of a fully differentiated polarized renal epithelium. PMID:14718571

  5. Effect of Melatonin in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition Markers and Invasive Properties of Breast Cancer Stem Cells of Canine and Human Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Naiane do Nascimento; Colombo, Jucimara; Lopes, Juliana Ramos; Gelaleti, Gabriela Bottaro; Moschetta, Marina Gobbe; Sonehara, Nathália Martins; Hellmén, Eva; Zanon, Caroline de Freitas; Oliani, Sônia Maria; Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires de Campos

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been associated with metastasis and therapeutic resistance and can be generated via epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Some studies suggest that the hormone melatonin acts in CSCs and may participate in the inhibition of the EMT. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the formation of mammospheres from the canine and human breast cancer cell lines, CMT-U229 and MCF-7, and the effects of melatonin treatment on the modulation of stem cell and EMT molecular markers: OCT4, E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin, as well as on cell viability and invasiveness of the cells from mammospheres. The CMT-U229 and MCF-7 cell lines were subjected to three-dimensional culture in special medium for stem cells. The phenotype of mammospheres was first evaluated by flow cytometry (CD44(+)/CD24(low/-) marking). Cell viability was measured by MTT colorimetric assay and the expression of the proteins OCT4, E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin was evaluated by immunofluorescence and quantified by optical densitometry. The analysis of cell migration and invasion was performed in Boyden Chamber. Flow cytometry proved the stem cell phenotype with CD44(+)/CD24(low/-) positive marking for both cell lines. Cell viability of CMT-U229 and MCF-7 cells was reduced after treatment with 1mM melatonin for 24 h (P<0.05). Immunofluorescence staining showed increased E-cadherin expression (P<0.05) and decreased expression of OCT4, N-cadherin and vimentin (P<0.05) in both cell lines after treatment with 1 mM melatonin for 24 hours. Moreover, treatment with melatonin was able to reduce cell migration and invasion in both cell lines when compared to control group (P<0.05). Our results demonstrate that melatonin shows an inhibitory role in the viability and invasiveness of breast cancer mammospheres as well as in modulating the expression of proteins related to EMT in breast CSCs, suggesting its potential anti-metastatic role in canine and human breast cancer cell

  6. Effect of Melatonin in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition Markers and Invasive Properties of Breast Cancer Stem Cells of Canine and Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Naiane do Nascimento; Colombo, Jucimara; Lopes, Juliana Ramos; Gelaleti, Gabriela Bottaro; Moschetta, Marina Gobbe; Sonehara, Nathália Martins; Hellmén, Eva; Zanon, Caroline de Freitas; Oliani, Sônia Maria; Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires de Campos

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been associated with metastasis and therapeutic resistance and can be generated via epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Some studies suggest that the hormone melatonin acts in CSCs and may participate in the inhibition of the EMT. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the formation of mammospheres from the canine and human breast cancer cell lines, CMT-U229 and MCF-7, and the effects of melatonin treatment on the modulation of stem cell and EMT molecular markers: OCT4, E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin, as well as on cell viability and invasiveness of the cells from mammospheres. The CMT-U229 and MCF-7 cell lines were subjected to three-dimensional culture in special medium for stem cells. The phenotype of mammospheres was first evaluated by flow cytometry (CD44+/CD24low/- marking). Cell viability was measured by MTT colorimetric assay and the expression of the proteins OCT4, E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin was evaluated by immunofluorescence and quantified by optical densitometry. The analysis of cell migration and invasion was performed in Boyden Chamber. Flow cytometry proved the stem cell phenotype with CD44+/CD24low/- positive marking for both cell lines. Cell viability of CMT-U229 and MCF-7 cells was reduced after treatment with 1mM melatonin for 24 h (P<0.05). Immunofluorescence staining showed increased E-cadherin expression (P<0.05) and decreased expression of OCT4, N-cadherin and vimentin (P<0.05) in both cell lines after treatment with 1 mM melatonin for 24 hours. Moreover, treatment with melatonin was able to reduce cell migration and invasion in both cell lines when compared to control group (P<0.05). Our results demonstrate that melatonin shows an inhibitory role in the viability and invasiveness of breast cancer mammospheres as well as in modulating the expression of proteins related to EMT in breast CSCs, suggesting its potential anti-metastatic role in canine and human breast cancer cell lines. PMID

  7. Effect of Melatonin in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition Markers and Invasive Properties of Breast Cancer Stem Cells of Canine and Human Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Naiane do Nascimento; Colombo, Jucimara; Lopes, Juliana Ramos; Gelaleti, Gabriela Bottaro; Moschetta, Marina Gobbe; Sonehara, Nathália Martins; Hellmén, Eva; Zanon, Caroline de Freitas; Oliani, Sônia Maria; Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires de Campos

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been associated with metastasis and therapeutic resistance and can be generated via epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Some studies suggest that the hormone melatonin acts in CSCs and may participate in the inhibition of the EMT. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the formation of mammospheres from the canine and human breast cancer cell lines, CMT-U229 and MCF-7, and the effects of melatonin treatment on the modulation of stem cell and EMT molecular markers: OCT4, E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin, as well as on cell viability and invasiveness of the cells from mammospheres. The CMT-U229 and MCF-7 cell lines were subjected to three-dimensional culture in special medium for stem cells. The phenotype of mammospheres was first evaluated by flow cytometry (CD44(+)/CD24(low/-) marking). Cell viability was measured by MTT colorimetric assay and the expression of the proteins OCT4, E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin was evaluated by immunofluorescence and quantified by optical densitometry. The analysis of cell migration and invasion was performed in Boyden Chamber. Flow cytometry proved the stem cell phenotype with CD44(+)/CD24(low/-) positive marking for both cell lines. Cell viability of CMT-U229 and MCF-7 cells was reduced after treatment with 1mM melatonin for 24 h (P<0.05). Immunofluorescence staining showed increased E-cadherin expression (P<0.05) and decreased expression of OCT4, N-cadherin and vimentin (P<0.05) in both cell lines after treatment with 1 mM melatonin for 24 hours. Moreover, treatment with melatonin was able to reduce cell migration and invasion in both cell lines when compared to control group (P<0.05). Our results demonstrate that melatonin shows an inhibitory role in the viability and invasiveness of breast cancer mammospheres as well as in modulating the expression of proteins related to EMT in breast CSCs, suggesting its potential anti-metastatic role in canine and human breast cancer cell

  8. Proteomic analysis of V-ATPase-rich cells harvested from the kidney and epididymis by fluorescence-activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Nicolas; Pisitkun, Trairak; Belleannée, Clémence; Miller, Lance R.; Nelson, Raoul; Knepper, Mark A.; Brown, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Proton-transporting cells are located in several tissues where they acidify the extracellular environment. These cells express the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) B1 subunit (ATP6V1B1) in their plasma membrane. We provide here a comprehensive catalog of the proteins that are expressed in these cells, after their isolation by enzymatic digestion and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) from transgenic B1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) mice. In these mice, type A and B intercalated cells and connecting segment cells of the kidney, and narrow and clear cells of the epididymis, which all express ATP6V1B1, also express EGFP, while all other cell types are negative. The proteome of renal and epididymal EGFP-positive (EGFP+) cells was identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and compared with their respective EGFP-negative (EGFP−) cell populations. A total of 2,297 and 1,564 proteins were detected in EGFP+ cells from the kidney and epididymis, respectively. Out of these proteins, 202 and 178 were enriched by a factor greater than 1.5 in EGFP+ cells compared with EGFP− cells, in the kidney and epididymis respectively, and included subunits of the V-ATPase (B1, a4, and A). In addition, several proteins involved in intracellular trafficking, signaling, and cytoskeletal dynamics were identified. A novel common protein that was enriched in renal and epididymal EGFP+ cells is the progesterone receptor, which might be a potential candidate for the regulation of V-ATPase-dependent proton transport. These proteomic databases provide a framework for comprehensive future analysis of the common and distinct functions of V-ATPase-B1-expressing cells in the kidney and epididymis. PMID:20181927

  9. Induction of scattering and cellular invasion by trefoil peptides in src- and RhoA-transformed kidney and colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Emami, S; Le Floch, N; Bruyneel, E; Thim, L; May, F; Westley, B; Rio, M; Mareel, M; Gespach, C

    2001-02-01

    Trefoil factors (TFFs) are protease-resistant peptides that promote epithelial cell migration and mucosal restitution during inflammatory conditions and wound healing in the gastrointestinal tract. To date, the molecular mechanism of TFFs action and their possible role in tumor progression are unclear. In the present study, we observed that premalignant human colonic PC/AA/C1 and canine kidney MDCK epithelial cells are not competent to invade collagen gels in response to exogenously added TFFs (pS2, spasmolytic polypeptide, and intestinal trefoil factor). In contrast, activated src and RhoA exert permissive induction of invasion by the TFFs that produce similar parallel dose-response curves in src-transformed MDCKts.src and PCmsrc cells (EC50=20-40 nM). Cell scattering is also induced by TFFs in MDCKts.src cells. Stable expression of the pS2 cDNA promotes constitutive invasiveness in MDCKts.src-pS2 cells and human colonic HCT8/S11-pS2 cells established from a sporadic tumor. Furthermore, we found that TFF-mediated cellular invasion is dependent of several signaling pathways implicated in cell transformation and survival, including phosphoinositide PI3'-kinase, phospholipase C, protein kinase C, and the rapamycin target TOR. Constitutive and intense expression of pS2 was revealed by Western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry in human colorectal tumors and their adjacent control mucosa during the neoplastic progression, from the adenoma to the liver metastases. Our studies indicated that TFFs can be involved in cell scattering and tumor invasion via autocrine loops and may serve as potential targets in the control of colon cancer progression.

  10. Induction of scattering and cellular invasion by trefoil peptides in src- and RhoA-transformed kidney and colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Emami, S; Le Floch, N; Bruyneel, E; Thim, L; May, F; Westley, B; Rio, M; Mareel, M; Gespach, C

    2001-02-01

    Trefoil factors (TFFs) are protease-resistant peptides that promote epithelial cell migration and mucosal restitution during inflammatory conditions and wound healing in the gastrointestinal tract. To date, the molecular mechanism of TFFs action and their possible role in tumor progression are unclear. In the present study, we observed that premalignant human colonic PC/AA/C1 and canine kidney MDCK epithelial cells are not competent to invade collagen gels in response to exogenously added TFFs (pS2, spasmolytic polypeptide, and intestinal trefoil factor). In contrast, activated src and RhoA exert permissive induction of invasion by the TFFs that produce similar parallel dose-response curves in src-transformed MDCKts.src and PCmsrc cells (EC50=20-40 nM). Cell scattering is also induced by TFFs in MDCKts.src cells. Stable expression of the pS2 cDNA promotes constitutive invasiveness in MDCKts.src-pS2 cells and human colonic HCT8/S11-pS2 cells established from a sporadic tumor. Furthermore, we found that TFF-mediated cellular invasion is dependent of several signaling pathways implicated in cell transformation and survival, including phosphoinositide PI3'-kinase, phospholipase C, protein kinase C, and the rapamycin target TOR. Constitutive and intense expression of pS2 was revealed by Western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry in human colorectal tumors and their adjacent control mucosa during the neoplastic progression, from the adenoma to the liver metastases. Our studies indicated that TFFs can be involved in cell scattering and tumor invasion via autocrine loops and may serve as potential targets in the control of colon cancer progression. PMID:11156951

  11. Cell therapy, advanced materials, and new approaches to acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Yevzlin, Alexander S; Humes, H David

    2009-12-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common clinical syndrome characterized by an abrupt deterioration in kidney function, resulting in abnormalities in volume-regulatory, metabolic-regulatory, excretory, and endocrine functions. Despite decades of improvements in the provision of intensive care, and specifically in the provision of renal replacement therapy, the morbidity and mortality associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) remain extremely high. This article highlights novel cell therapies, advanced materials, and approaches to AKI with the aim of illuminating a potential path for future basic, translational, and clinical research using these novel modalities.

  12. Setting the proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells co-cultured with canine macrophages infected with Leishmania chagasi.

    PubMed

    Viana, Kelvinson Fernandes; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian Oliveira; Ker, Henrique Gama; Resende, Lucilene Aparecida; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine Maria; Dutra, Walderez Ornelas; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; da Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Sant'Ana, Rita de Cássia Oliveira; Wardini, Amanda Brito; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro

    2015-07-30

    New methods for evaluating the canine immune system are necessary, not only to monitor immunological disorders, but also to provide insights for vaccine evaluations and therapeutic interventions, reducing the costs of assays using dog models, and provide a more rational way for analyzing the canine immune response. The present study intended to establish an in vitro toll to assess the parasitological/immunological status of dogs, applicable in pre-clinical trials of vaccinology, prognosis follow-up and therapeutics analysis of canine visceral leishmaniasis. We have evaluated the performance of co-culture systems of canine Leishmania chagasi-infected macrophages with different cell ratios of total lymphocytes or purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from uninfected dogs were used for the system set up. Employing the co-culture systems of L. chagasi-infected macrophages and purified CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cell subsets we observed a microenvironment compatible with the expected status of the analyzed dogs. In this context, it was clearly demonstrated that, at this selected T-cell:target ratio, the adaptive immune response of uninfected dogs, composed by L. chagasi-unprimed T-cells was not able to perform the in vitro killing of L. chagasi-infected macrophages. Our data demonstrated that the co-culture system with T-cells from uninfected dogs at 1:5 and 1:2 ratio did not control the infection, yielding to patent in vitro parasitism (≥ 80%), low NO production (≤ 5 μM) and IL-10 modulated (IFN-γ/IL-10 ≤ 2) immunological profile in vitro. CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cells at 1:5 or 1:2 ratio to L. chagasi-infected macrophages seems to be ideal for in vitro assays. This co-culture system may have great potential as a canine immunological analysis method, as well as in vaccine evaluations, prognosis follow-up and therapeutic interventions.

  13. Bardoxolone methyl modulates efflux transporter and detoxifying enzyme expression in cisplatin-induced kidney cell injury.

    PubMed

    Atilano-Roque, Amandla; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Joy, Melanie S

    2016-09-30

    Cisplatin is prescribed for the treatment of solid tumors and elicits toxicity to kidney tubules, which limits its clinical use. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, NFE2L2) is a critical transcription factor that has been shown to protect against kidney injury through activation of antioxidant mechanisms. We aimed to evaluate the ability of short-term treatment with the Nrf2 activator bardoxolone methyl (CDDO-Me) to protect against cisplatin-induced kidney cell toxicity. Cell viability was assessed in human kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells (hPTCs) exposed to low, intermediate, and high cisplatin concentrations in the presence and absence of CDDO-Me, administered either prior to or after cisplatin. Treatment with cisplatin alone resulted in reductions in hPTC viability, while CDDO-Me administered prior to or after cisplatin exposure yielded significantly higher cell viability (17%-71%). Gene regulation (mRNA expression) studies revealed the ability of CDDO-Me to modify protective pathways including Nrf2 induced detoxifying genes [GCLC (increased 1.9-fold), NQO1 (increased 9.3-fold)], and an efflux transporter [SLC47A1 (increased 4.5-fold)] at 12h. Protein assessments were in agreement with gene expression. Immunofluorescence revealed localization of GCLC and NQO1 to the nucleus and cytosol, respectively, with CDDO-Me administered prior to or after cisplatin exposure. The findings of enhanced cell viability and increased expression of detoxifying enzymes (GCLC and NQO1) and the multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1) efflux transporter (SLC47A1) in hPTCs exposed to CDDO-Me, suggest that intermittent treatment with CDDO-Me prior to or after cisplatin exposure may be a promising approach to mitigate acute kidney injury.

  14. Bardoxolone methyl modulates efflux transporter and detoxifying enzyme expression in cisplatin-induced kidney cell injury.

    PubMed

    Atilano-Roque, Amandla; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Joy, Melanie S

    2016-09-30

    Cisplatin is prescribed for the treatment of solid tumors and elicits toxicity to kidney tubules, which limits its clinical use. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, NFE2L2) is a critical transcription factor that has been shown to protect against kidney injury through activation of antioxidant mechanisms. We aimed to evaluate the ability of short-term treatment with the Nrf2 activator bardoxolone methyl (CDDO-Me) to protect against cisplatin-induced kidney cell toxicity. Cell viability was assessed in human kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells (hPTCs) exposed to low, intermediate, and high cisplatin concentrations in the presence and absence of CDDO-Me, administered either prior to or after cisplatin. Treatment with cisplatin alone resulted in reductions in hPTC viability, while CDDO-Me administered prior to or after cisplatin exposure yielded significantly higher cell viability (17%-71%). Gene regulation (mRNA expression) studies revealed the ability of CDDO-Me to modify protective pathways including Nrf2 induced detoxifying genes [GCLC (increased 1.9-fold), NQO1 (increased 9.3-fold)], and an efflux transporter [SLC47A1 (increased 4.5-fold)] at 12h. Protein assessments were in agreement with gene expression. Immunofluorescence revealed localization of GCLC and NQO1 to the nucleus and cytosol, respectively, with CDDO-Me administered prior to or after cisplatin exposure. The findings of enhanced cell viability and increased expression of detoxifying enzymes (GCLC and NQO1) and the multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1) efflux transporter (SLC47A1) in hPTCs exposed to CDDO-Me, suggest that intermittent treatment with CDDO-Me prior to or after cisplatin exposure may be a promising approach to mitigate acute kidney injury. PMID:27480280

  15. A retinoid responsive cytokine gene, MK, is preferentially expressed in the proximal tubules of the kidney and human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, M.; Shirasawa, T.; Mitarai, T.; Muramatsu, T.; Maruyama, N.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the expression of an embryonic cytokine gene, MK, in the normal organs and neoplastic tissues of adults. Northern analysis showed that MK mRNA was exclusively expressed in the kidney among murine organs including thymus, lung, heart, spleen, liver, and kidney. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that MK expression was localized in the proximal tubules and metaplastic Bowman's epithelium, but not in other nephron segments such as glomeruli, loop of Henle, distal tubules, and collecting ducts. To investigate whether MK expression is a marker of tubular cell lineage, several cell lines originating from renal tubules were tested. No expression of MK was detected in PtK1 and LLC-PK1 cells derived from marsupial and porcine proximal tubules or in MDBK and MDCK cells from bovine and canine distal/collecting tubules. Unexpectedly, the MK gene was expressed in a human renal cell carcinoma line, VMRC-RCW, and the expression was up-regulated in the presence of retinoic acid. To elucidate the involvement of MK in the development of tumors, we further examined its expression in a variety of human neoplastic cell lines: YMB-1-C (breast cancer), EBC-1 (lung squamous cell carcinoma), RERF-LC-OK (lung adenocarcinoma), SBC-3 (lung small cell carcinoma), HSC-2 (mouth squamous cell carcinoma), NUGC-2 (gastric cancer), COLO201 (colon cancer), HepG2 (hepatoma), MIA PaCa-2 (pancreatic cancer), MCAS (ovarian cancer), HeLa (cervical cancer), BeWo (chorionic carcinoma), ITO-II (testicular tumor), T24 (urinary bladder tumor), and G-401 (Wilms' tumor). Strong signals were detected in COLO201, HepG2, ITO-II, T24, G-401, and weaker but distinct signals were detected in YMB-1-C, HSC-2, and MCAS cells. The MK gene was, therefore, widely expressed in neoplastic cells originating from genital organs, intestinal tract, liver, mammary gland, and urinary tract, and the expression was not restricted to adenocarcinomas, but was also observed in other types of

  16. 20-HETE mediates proliferation of renal epithelial cells in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Frank; Sweeney, William E; Jia, Guangfu; Roman, Richard J; Avner, Ellis D

    2008-10-01

    Polycystic kidney diseases are characterized by abnormal proliferation of renal epithelial cells. In this study, the role of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), an endogenous cytochrome P450 metabolite of arachidonic acid with mitogenic properties, was evaluated in cystic renal disease. Daily administration of HET-0016, an inhibitor of 20-HETE synthesis, significantly reduced kidney size by half in the BPK mouse model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. In addition, compared with untreated BPK mice, this treatment significantly reduced collecting tubule cystic indices and approximately doubled survival. For evaluation of the role of 20-HETE as a mediator of epithelial cell proliferation, principal cells isolated from cystic BPK and noncystic Balb/c mice were genetically modified using lentiviral vectors. Noncystic Balb/c cells overproducing Cyp4a12 exhibited a four- to five-fold increase in cell proliferation compared with control Balb/c cells, and this increase was completely abolished when 20-HETE synthesis was inhibited; therefore, this study suggests that 20-HETE mediates proliferation of epithelial cells in the formation of renal cysts.

  17. Evidence for Intermediate Mesoderm and Kidney Progenitor Cell Specification by Pax2 and PTIP Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ranghini, Egon J.; Dressler, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the Pax2 gene marks the intermediate mesoderm shortly after gastrulation, as the mesoderm becomes compartmentalized into paraxial, intermediate, and lateral plate. Using an EGFP knock-in allele of Pax2 to identify and sort cells of the intermediate mesodermal lineage, we compared gene expression patterns in EGFP positive cells that were heterozygous or homozygous null for Pax2. Thus, we identified critical regulators of intermediate mesoderm and kidney development whose expression depended on Pax2 function. In cell culture models, Pax2 is thought to recruit epigenetic modifying complex to imprint activating histone methylation marks through interactions with the adaptor protein PTIP. In kidney organ culture, conditional PTIP deletion showed that many Pax2 target genes, which were activated early in renal progenitor cells, remained on once activated, whereas Pax2 target genes expressed later in kidney development were unable to be fully activated without PTIP. In Pax2 mutants, we also identified a set of genes whose expression was up-regulated in EGFP positive cells and whose expression was consistent with a cell fate transformation to paraxial mesoderm and its derivatives. These data provide evidence that Pax2 specifies the intermediate mesoderm and renal epithelial cells through epigenetic mechanisms and in part by repressing paraxial mesodermal fate. PMID:25617721

  18. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Maria R; Rocca, Bruno J; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T; Tripodi, Sergio A; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  19. A Minireview on Vasopressin-regulated Aquaporin-2 in Kidney Collecting Duct Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eui-Jung; Kwon, Tae-Hwan

    2015-06-01

    The kidney collecting duct is an important renal tubular segment for the regulation of body water and salt homeostasis. Water reabsorption in the collecting duct cells is regulated by arginine vasopressin (AVP) via the vasopressin V2-receptor (V2R). AVP increases the osmotic water permeability of the collecting duct cells through aquaporin-2 (AQP2) and aquaporin-3 (AQP3). AVP induces the apical targeting of AQP2 and transcription of AQP2 gene in the kidney collecting duct principal cells. The signaling transduction pathways resulting in the AQP2 trafficking to the apical plasma membrane of the collecting duct principal cells, include AQP2 phosphorylation, RhoA phosphorylation, actin depolymerization and calcium mobilization, and the changes of AQP2 protein abundance in water balance disorders have been extensively studied. These studies elucidate the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of body water homeostasis and provide the basis for the treatment of body water balance disorders. PMID:26240594

  20. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Maria R.; Rocca, Bruno J.; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T.; Tripodi, Sergio A.; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  1. Biosynthesis and polarized distribution of neutral endopeptidase in primary cultures of kidney proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, F; Dehbi, M; Berteloot, A; Crine, P

    1994-01-01

    When cultured in defined medium, kidney proximal convoluted tubule (PCT) cells form a homogeneous population and retain a number of differentiated functions. To characterize this cell system further as a functional model of epithelial polarity, we investigated the biogenic pathway of neutral endopeptidase (NEP), one of the most abundant microvillar membrane proteins in intestinal and kidney cells. We showed that, in contrast with some tumoral cell lines, RNA extracted from PCT cells shows the presence of a single mRNA species encoding NEP. Pulse-chase studies followed by selective immunoprecipitation of NEP molecules present either at the cell surface or in intracellular cell compartments showed that newly synthesized NEP molecules reached the cell surface as early as 30 min after the beginning of the chase with maximum cell surface expression at 60 min. When grown on semipermeable supports, PCT cells were found to target NEP exclusively to the apical plasma membrane. Similar results have been described using MDCK cells to study targeting of recombinant NEP. Thus primary cultures of PCT cells represent a new model with which to investigate the biogenic pathway of endogenous proteins in native epithelial cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7945190

  2. Nutrient requirements and other factors involved in the culture of human kidney cells on microcarrier beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1987-01-01

    The culture of human kidney cells on microcarrier beads in the Bioprocessing Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center is described. These were the first series of studies performed before and during 1983 to determine optimum conditions, including medium type, bead type and density. The composition of several medium types and the molecular weights of some common culture medium supplements and cellular proteins are included. The microgravity cell-to-bead attachment experiment performed on Space Transportation System Flight 8 is described.

  3. Potential of primary kidney cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer mediated transgenesis in pig

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is currently the most efficient and precise method to generate genetically tailored pig models for biomedical research. However, the efficiency of this approach is crucially dependent on the source of nuclear donor cells. In this study, we evaluate the potential of primary porcine kidney cells (PKCs) as cell source for SCNT, including their proliferation capacity, transfection efficiency, and capacity to support full term development of SCNT embryos after additive gene transfer or homologous recombination. Results PKCs could be maintained in culture with stable karyotype for up to 71 passages, whereas porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs) and porcine ear fibroblasts (PEFs) could be hardly passaged more than 20 times. Compared with PFFs and PEFs, PKCs exhibited a higher proliferation rate and resulted in a 2-fold higher blastocyst rate after SCNT and in vitro cultivation. Among the four transfection methods tested with a GFP expression plasmid, best results were obtained with the NucleofectorTM technology, resulting in transfection efficiencies of 70% to 89% with high fluorescence intensity, low cytotoxicity, good cell proliferation, and almost no morphological signs of cell stress. Usage of genetically modified PKCs in SCNT resulted in approximately 150 piglets carrying at least one of 18 different transgenes. Several of those pigs originated from PKCs that underwent homologous recombination and antibiotic selection before SCNT. Conclusion The high proliferation capacity of PKCs facilitates the introduction of precise and complex genetic modifications in vitro. PKCs are thus a valuable cell source for the generation of porcine biomedical models by SCNT. PMID:23140586

  4. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Limited inhibitory effects of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs on in vitro osteogenic differentiation in canine cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Namgil; Sunaga, Takafumi; Yamazaki, Hiroki; Hosoya, Kenji; Takagi, Satoshi; Okumura, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 participates essentially in bone healing, demonstrated by COX-2 knockout mice that showed delayed fracture repair. Considerable controversy still exists on inhibitory effects of COX-2 inhibitors on bone healing in clinical cases. To assess stage-dependent effects of short-term treatment of COX-2 inhibitors on osteogenic differentiation, a canine POS osteosarcoma cell line which spontaneously differentiates into osteoblastic cell was exposed to COX-2 inhibitors such as carprofen and meloxicam for 72 hours during three different stages of osteoblast differentiation, including day 0 to 3 (pre-osteoblastic stage), day 4 to 7 (transitional stage) and day 8 to 11 (mature osteoblastic stage). As osteogenic markers, expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was estimated by analysis of mRNA expression, enzymatic activity and ALP staining, and expression of osteocalcin was estimated by analysis of mRNA expression after the drug treatments. Calcified matrix formation was finally observed by von Kossa staining on day 14. Expressions of ALP showed no significant suppression by carprofen and meloxicam during all three stages. However, expressions of osteocalcin mRNA and non-calcified nodule formations were delayed by carprofen and meloxicam during transitional stage. Nevertheless, fully calcified nodule formation was observed in all experimental groups during post-medication period. These results indicate that short-term treatment of carprofen and meloxicam would reversibly suppress the differentiation of osteoblasts. PMID:24059095

  6. A cell kinetic model of granulopoiesis under radiation exposure: extension from rodents to canines and humans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2011-02-01

    As significant ionising radiation exposure will occur during prolonged space travel in future, it is essential to understand their adverse effects on the radiosensitive organ systems that are important for immediate survival of humans, e.g. the haematopoietic system. In this paper, a biomathematical model of granulopoiesis is used to analyse the granulocyte changes seen in the blood of mammalians under acute and continuous radiation exposure. This is one of a set of haematopoietic models that have been successfully utilised to simulate and interpret the experimental data of acute and chronic radiation on rodents. Extension to canine and human systems indicates that the results of the model are consistent with the cumulative experimental and empirical data from various sources, implying the potential to integrate them into one united model system to monitor the haematopoietic response of various species under irradiation. The suppression of granulocytes' level of a space traveller under chronic stress of low-dose irradiation as well as the granulopoietic response when encountering a historically large solar particle event is also discussed.

  7. Expression of phospholipase A2 receptor in primary cultured podocytes derived from dog kidneys.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Go; Kamiie, Junichi; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Mineshige, Takayuki; Shirota, Kinji

    2016-06-01

    Phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) expressed in human podocytes has been highlighted as a causative autoantigen of human idiopathic membranous nephropathy. However, its expression was found to be minimal or absent in murine and rat podocytes. In this study, immunofluorescence revealed the expression of PLA2R in the glomerular podocytes in the kidney tissue sections of dogs. We then attempted to culture canine podocytes and investigate the expression of PLA2R in these cells. Glomeruli were isolated from dog kidneys and cultured to obtain podocytes using nylon mesh-based isolation method as followed for isolating rat podocytes. The cultured cells expressed PLA2R mRNA and protein in addition to other podocyte markers (synaptopodin, podocin and nephrin). These results indicate that the canine podocytes express PLA2R.

  8. Expression of phospholipase A2 receptor in primary cultured podocytes derived from dog kidneys

    PubMed Central

    SUGAHARA, Go; KAMIIE, Junichi; KOBAYASHI, Ryosuke; MINESHIGE, Takayuki; SHIROTA, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) expressed in human podocytes has been highlighted as a causative autoantigen of human idiopathic membranous nephropathy. However, its expression was found to be minimal or absent in murine and rat podocytes. In this study, immunofluorescence revealed the expression of PLA2R in the glomerular podocytes in the kidney tissue sections of dogs. We then attempted to culture canine podocytes and investigate the expression of PLA2R in these cells. Glomeruli were isolated from dog kidneys and cultured to obtain podocytes using nylon mesh-based isolation method as followed for isolating rat podocytes. The cultured cells expressed PLA2R mRNA and protein in addition to other podocyte markers (synaptopodin, podocin and nephrin). These results indicate that the canine podocytes express PLA2R. PMID:26854253

  9. Genotoxic effects of 1 GeV/amu Fe ions in mouse kidney epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Gauny, S. S.; Connolly, L.; Turker, M.

    Human exploration of space places individuals in environments where they are exposed to charged particle radiation. The goal of our studies is to assess the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of high energy Fe ions (1 GeV/amu) in kidney epithelial cells of the mouse irradiated either in vitro or in vivo. The initial study focused on establishing the toxicity of these heavy ions (LET=159 keV/micron) in two Aprt heterozygous kidney epithelial cell lines: K06 cells derived from a C57BL6/129Sv animal, and clone 4a cells derived from a C57BL6/DBA2 animal. Cells were exposed in vitro to graded doses of Fe ions (0-300 cGy) and the toxicity of the treatment was established using colony forming assays. Experiments were performed in triplicate at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The results indicate that Fe ions are toxic to mouse kidney epithelial cells and that no shoulder is observed on the survival curve for cells from either genetic background. The clone 4a cells were more sensitive to Fe ion exposures than the K06 cells. The D(37) for clone 4a cells was 92 cGy and the D(10) was 212 cGy. The more resistant K06 cells had a D(37) of 192 cGy and an estimated D(10) of 388 cGy. Parallel experiments are underway to establish the RBE's for cell killing for these two cell lines. Supported by NASA grant T-403X to A. Kronenberg

  10. CDK4/6 inhibition induces epithelial cell cycle arrest and ameliorates acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    DiRocco, Derek P.; Bisi, John; Roberts, Patrick; Strum, Jay; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sharpless, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and urgently requires new preventative therapies. Expression of a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor transgene protects against AKI, suggesting that manipulating the tubular epithelial cell cycle may be a viable therapeutic strategy. Broad spectrum small molecule CDK inhibitors are protective in some kidney injury models, but these have toxicities and epithelial proliferation is eventually required for renal repair. Here, we tested a well-tolerated, novel and specific small molecule inhibitor of CDK4 and CDK6, PD 0332991, to investigate the effects of transient cell cycle inhibition on epithelial survival in vitro and kidney injury in vivo. We report that CDK4/6 inhibition induced G0/G1 cycle arrest in cultured human renal proximal tubule cells (hRPTC) at baseline and after injury. Induction of transient G0/G1 cycle arrest through CDK4/6 inhibition protected hRPTC from DNA damage and caspase 3/7 activation following exposure to the nephrotoxins cisplatin, etoposide, and antimycin A. In vivo, mice treated with PD 0332991 before ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) exhibited dramatically reduced epithelial progression through S phase 24 h after IRI. Despite reduced epithelial proliferation, PD 0332991 ameliorated kidney injury as reflected by improved serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels 24 h after injury. Inflammatory markers and macrophage infiltration were significantly decreased in injured kidneys 3 days following IRI. These results indicate that induction of proximal tubule cell cycle arrest with specific CDK4/6 inhibitors, or “pharmacological quiescence,” represents a novel strategy to prevent AKI. PMID:24338822

  11. CDK4/6 inhibition induces epithelial cell cycle arrest and ameliorates acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    DiRocco, Derek P; Bisi, John; Roberts, Patrick; Strum, Jay; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sharpless, Norman; Humphreys, Benjamin D

    2014-02-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and urgently requires new preventative therapies. Expression of a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor transgene protects against AKI, suggesting that manipulating the tubular epithelial cell cycle may be a viable therapeutic strategy. Broad spectrum small molecule CDK inhibitors are protective in some kidney injury models, but these have toxicities and epithelial proliferation is eventually required for renal repair. Here, we tested a well-tolerated, novel and specific small molecule inhibitor of CDK4 and CDK6, PD 0332991, to investigate the effects of transient cell cycle inhibition on epithelial survival in vitro and kidney injury in vivo. We report that CDK4/6 inhibition induced G0/G1 cycle arrest in cultured human renal proximal tubule cells (hRPTC) at baseline and after injury. Induction of transient G0/G1 cycle arrest through CDK4/6 inhibition protected hRPTC from DNA damage and caspase 3/7 activation following exposure to the nephrotoxins cisplatin, etoposide, and antimycin A. In vivo, mice treated with PD 0332991 before ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) exhibited dramatically reduced epithelial progression through S phase 24 h after IRI. Despite reduced epithelial proliferation, PD 0332991 ameliorated kidney injury as reflected by improved serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels 24 h after injury. Inflammatory markers and macrophage infiltration were significantly decreased in injured kidneys 3 days following IRI. These results indicate that induction of proximal tubule cell cycle arrest with specific CDK4/6 inhibitors, or "pharmacological quiescence," represents a novel strategy to prevent AKI.

  12. Cytotoxicity of municipal solid waste incinerator ash wastes toward mammalian kidney cell lines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wu-Jang; Tsai, Jia-Lin; Liao, Ming-Huei

    2008-05-01

    In this study, three municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) ash wastes-bottom ash, scrubber residue, and baghouse ash-were extracted using a toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) extractant. These so-called final TCLP extracts were applied to African green monkey kidney cells (Vero), baby hamster kidney cells (BHK-21), and pig kidney cells (PK-15), multi-well absorption reader analysis was performed to test how the cytotoxicity of the incineration ashes would affect the digestive systems of animals. Ion-coupled plasma analyses indicated that the baghouse ash extract possessed the highest pH and heavy metal concentration, its cytotoxicity was also the highest. In contrast, the bottom ash and the scrubber residue exhibited very low cytotoxicities. The cytotoxicities of mixtures of baghouse ash and scrubber residue toward the three tested cell lines increased as the relative ratio of the baghouse ash increased, especially for the Vero cells. The slight cytotoxicity of the scrubber residue arose mainly from the presence of Cr species, whereas the high cytotoxicity of the baghouse ash resulted from its high content of heavy metals and alkali ions. In addition, it appears that the dissolved total organic carbon content of these ash wastes can reduce the cytotoxicity of ash wastes that collect in animal cells. PMID:18329068

  13. Dual role of acetaminophen in promoting hepatoma cell apoptosis and kidney fibroblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    YU, YUNG-LUEN; YIANG, GIOU-TENG; CHOU, PEI-LUN; TSENG, HSU-HUNG; WU, TSAI-KUN; HUNG, YU-TING; LIN, PEI-SHIUAN; LIN, SHU-YU; LIU, HSIAO-CHUN; CHANG, WEI-JUNG; WEI, CHYOU-WEI

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP), is a safe analgesic and antipyretic drug at therapeutic dose, and is widely used in the clinic. However, high doses of APAP can induce hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Most studies have focused on high-dose APAP-induced acute liver and kidney injury. So far, few studies have investigated the effects of the therapeutic dose (1/10 of the high dose) or of the low dose (1/100 of the high dose) of APAP on the cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular effects of therapeutic- or low-dose APAP treatment on hepatoma cells and kidney fibroblasts. As expected, high-dose APAP treatment inhibited while therapeutic and low-dose treatment did not inhibit cell survival of kidney tubular epithelial cells. In addition, therapeutic-dose treatment induced an increase in the H2O2 level, activated the caspase-9/-3 cascade, and induced cell apoptosis of hepatoma cells. Notably, APAP promoted fibroblast proliferation, even at low doses. This study demonstrates that different cellular effects are exerted upon treatment with different APAP concentrations. Our results indicate that treatment with the therapeutic dose of APAP may exert an antitumor activity on hepatoma, while low-dose treatment may be harmful for patients with fibrosis, since it may cause proliferation of fibroblasts. PMID:24682227

  14. Nano-silicon dioxide toxicological characterization on two human kidney cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paget, V.; Sergent, J. A.; Chevillard, S.

    2011-07-01

    Silicon dioxide nanoparticles (n-SiO2) have recently encountered a wide variety of applications in medicine or engineering but their toxicological effects are poorly understood. In this study, we have used SiO2-25 nm and SiO2-100 nm mono-dispersed nanoparticles labeled with Rhodamine B and TMPyP respectively. These two fluorophores were incorporated during synthesis in order to track nanoparticles cell incorporation. Up-to-date, no evaluation of the toxicological effects of these nanoparticles upon human kidney has been published. As kidney is one of the major traditional retention organs, the aim of our study is to evaluate the potential toxicity of these nanoparticles on two human cell lines from proximal tubule (Caki-1 and Hek293). Our results report that the two cell lines do not show similar responses after 24 hours of exposure to SiO2-nanoparticles disregarding a similar origin in the kidney. Interestingly, our results indicate that for both tested SiO2-nanoparticles, Caki-1 cells present a higher sensitivity in terms of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than Hek293 cells. Furthermore, our results show that for similar concentration of exposure, SiO2-25 nm seems to be more cytotoxic and genotoxic than SiO2-100nm for both tested cell lines.

  15. Immunophenotypic classification of canine malignant lymphoma on formalin-mixed paraffin wax-embedded tissue by means of CD3 and CD79a cell markers.

    PubMed

    Milner, R J; Pearson, J; Nesbit, J W; Close, P

    1996-12-01

    Canine malignant lymphoma (CML) is a common lymphoid tumour. Identification of the immunophenotype is of prognostic importance: T-cell lymphomas have a worse prognosis than B-cell lymphomas. Until recently, identification of T- or B-cell lymphomas was undertaken by means of flow cytometry or fluorescent immunocytochemistry on frozen sections. Whilst valid in the research field, these methods are impractical for routine diagnostic histopathology in CML. Commercially available CD3 antibody has been successfully employed in T-cell identification in dogs in formalin-fixed paraffin wax-embedded tissue sections, but the lack of a B-cell marker has been a hindrance until the recent introduction of a commercially available pan-B cell marker, CD79a (DAKO M7051), suitable for diagnostic application upon formalin-fixed paraffin wax-embedded material. Antibody markers to CD3 and CD79a show cross-reactivity across species lines for B cells and T cells respectively. In this group of five selected canine cases, two were identified as B-cell and the other three as T-cell lymphoma, by means of CD3 and CD79a. To the best of our knowledge application of CD79a in cases of CML has not been reported.

  16. Electrophoretic separation of human kidney cells at zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.; Lazer, S. L.; Rueter, A.; Allen, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Electrophoretic isolation of cells results in a loss of resolution power caused by the sedimentation of the cells in the media. The results of an experiment to extract urokinase from human embryos during the Apollo Soyuz mission are presented and discussed.

  17. [Analysis of the biological effect of city smog extract. V. Comparative investigations on the effect of city smog extracts on DNA synthesis of Syrian hamster kidney and embryonic cells and of African green monkey kidney cells in vitro (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Krampitz, G; Seemayer, N

    1979-01-01

    We analysed the effect of two samples of city smog extract from Bochum and Duisburg on DNA synthesis of mammalian cells in vitro. As a test system we used tissue cultures of kidney and embryonic cells from the Syrian golden hamster and monkey kidney cells from Cercopithecus aethiops. DNA synthesis of cells was measured by autoradiography using 3H-Thymidine. Both samples of city smog extract exerted a dose-dependent decrease of the rate of DNA synthesis in tissue culture cells. These alterations of nucleic acid metabolism were expressed by a reduction of DNA-synthesizing cells and by a delay of entrance of cells in DNA synthesis. High concentrations of city smog extracts induced a large number of cell necroses. Monkey kidney cells were more sensitive to the toxic action than hamster cells. Furthermore the city smog extract from Duisburg showed a stronger toxic effect than the extract from Bochum.

  18. The physiological expression of scavenger receptor SR-B1 in canine endometrial and placental epithelial cells and its potential involvement in pathogenesis of pyometra.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, C; Becher-Deichsel, A; Hlavaty, J; Mair, G; Walter, I

    2016-06-01

    Pyometra, the purulent inflammation of the uterus, is a common uterine disease of bitches that has potentially life-threatening consequences. The opportunistic bacterial infection of the uterus often progresses into the serious systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In a previous study, we characterized epithelial foam cells in the canine endometrial surface occurring in metestrus, and we regularly observed pronounced epithelial foam-cell formations in pyometra-affected uteri. Therefore, it was assumed that the mechanism behind lipid droplet accumulation in surface epithelial cells might even increase bacterial binding capacity and promote pyometra development. Lipid droplet accumulation in epithelial cells is accomplished via specialized lipid receptors called scavenger receptors (SR). Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is an important receptor for lipid accumulation in diverse cell types, but it is also a strong binding partner for bacteria, and thereby enhances bacterial adhesion and clinical signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In the present study, after the isolation of metestrous surface epithelial cells from canine uteri by laser capture microdissection, SR-B1 was identified at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and also at the protein level by means of immunohistochemistry. In pyometra-affected uteri, SR-B1 mRNA expression was higher than that in the healthy control samples, and SR-B1 protein was expressed in the surface and crypt epithelial cells. Furthermore, to understand the physiological role of SR-B1 expression in the metestrus surface epithelial cells, we investigated its expression in the epithelial cells of the glandular chambers of canine placenta in different stages of gestation because these cells are also characterized by lipid droplet accumulation. SR-B1 was present in the placental epithelial cells of the glandular chambers from 25 to 30 and 45 to 50 days of gestation

  19. Canine Notochordal Cell-Secreted Factors Protect Murine and Human Nucleus Pulposus Cells from Apoptosis by Inhibition of Activated Caspase-9 and Caspase-3/7

    PubMed Central

    Mehrkens, Arne; Karim, M. Zia; Kim, Sarah; Hilario, Raychel; Fehlings, Michael G.; Erwin, William Mark

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Effective therapies that may stop or even reverse disc degeneration remain elusive. A minimally invasive method through which nucleus pulposus (NP) cell viability could be achieved would revolutionize the treatment of degenerative disc disease (DDD). With the presented work, we have investigated if nonchondrodystrophic (NCD) canine intervertebral disc (IVD)-derived notochordal cell conditioned medium (NCCM) and chondrodystrophic (CD) canine IVD-derived conditioned medium (CDCM) are able to protect murine and human NP cells from apoptosis. Materials and Methods We developed NC