Science.gov

Sample records for canine oral papillomavirus

  1. Involvement of canine oral papillomavirus in generalized oral and cutaneous verrucosis in a Chinese Shar Pei dog.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Smith, E K; Herron, A J; Jenson, A B; Burk, R D; Van Ranst, M

    1994-03-01

    Severe papillomatosis developed in the oral cavity and spread throughout the haired skin of the trunk and limbs of an 8-month-old female Chinese Shar Pei dog. The dog had received corticosteroids prior to referral, which was associated with the onset of demodecosis and papillomatosis. Papillomavirus structural antigens were detected in biopsies by immunohistochemistry using a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. An 8.2-kilobase papillomavirus-specific DNA molecule was detected in the cutaneous lesions by high stringency Southern blot hybridization using a cloned canine oral papillomavirus DNA probe. Restriction enzyme analysis revealed that the virus in the cutaneous lesions was identical to the canine oral papillomavirus. Discontinuation of the steroids combined with the use of a mitocide, antibiotics, and an autogenous vaccine resolved the demodecosis and papillomatosis. This case report suggests that corticosteroid-induced immunosuppression can expand the tissue tropism of papillomaviruses.

  2. Genomic Sequence of Canine Papillomavirus 19

    PubMed Central

    Tisza, Michael J.; Yuan, Hang; Schlegel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    It is generally assumed that individual papillomas (warts) are caused by infection with individual papillomavirus types. Deep sequencing of virions extracted from a canine oral papilloma revealed the presence of canine papillomavirus 1 (CPV1), CPV2, and a novel canine papillomavirus, CPV19. This suggests that papillomas sometimes harbor multiple viral species. PMID:27932663

  3. Spontaneously regressing oral papillomas induce systemic antibodies that neutralize canine oral papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Ghim, S; Newsome, J; Bell, J; Sundberg, J P; Schlegel, R; Jenson, A B

    2000-06-01

    Canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) infection of naive beagle dogs causes oral papillomas, most of which spontaneously regress. Regressor beagles do not develop new oral papillomas because of COPV type-specific, cell-mediated immunity, COPV neutralizing antibodies, or both. Formalin-fixed native and recombinant COPV vaccines that target the systemic immune system induce neutralizing antibodies that prevent development of oral papillomas. This study was designed to determine whether spontaneously regressing mucosal papillomas also targeted the systemic immune system to induce circulating, neutralizing IgG antibodies that protect against infection by COPV. To accomplish this goal, IgG was fractionated from sera collected from weanling beagles and regressor beagles and tested for conferring protection by passive immunization. Serum was tested by ELISA for antibodies against intact virions and then pooled for passive transfer to naive beagles. Preimmune sera were neither reactive by ELISA nor protective by passive transfer. On the other hand, IgG antibodies from regressor beagles were reactive by ELISA and passive transfer conferred protection against COPV challenge. Circulating IgG antibodies induced by spontaneous regression of canine oral papillomas protect beagles against intraoral infection by COPV, a model for mucosotropic HPV. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  4. Genomic characterisation of canine papillomavirus type 17, a possible rare cause of canine oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; Dunowska, Magda; Laurie, Rebecca E; Hills, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) are the second most common cancer of the canine oral cavity resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Recently a dog with multiple oral SCCs that contained a novel papillomavirus (PV) was reported. The aim of the present study was to determine the genome of this novel PV. To do this a short section of PV DNA was amplified from an oral SCC and 'back-to-back' primers were designed. Due to the circular nature of PV DNA, these primers were then used to amplify the remainder of the genome by inverse PCR. The PCR product was sequenced using next generation sequencing and the full genome of the PV, consisting of 8007 bp, was assembled and analysed. As this is the seventeenth PV identified from the domestic dog, the novel PV was designated Canis familiaris papillomavirus (CPV) type 17. Similar to other CPV types, the putative coding regions of CPV-17 were predicted to produce 5 early and 2 late proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of ORF L1 revealed greater than 70% similarity to CPV-2 and CPV-7 and we propose that CPV-17 also be classified as a Taupapillomavirus 1. While it appears CPV-17 is only rarely present in canine oral SCCs, evidence suggests that this PV could influence the development of oral SCCs in this species.

  5. Antibody titres against canine papillomavirus 1 peak around clinical regression in naturally occurring oral papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Sancak, Arda; Favrot, Claude; Geisseler, Marco D; Müller, Martin; Lange, Christian E

    2015-02-01

    Most forms of canine papillomatosis are believed to be associated with papillomavirus infections. Canine papillomavirus type 1 (CPV1) is considered to be responsible for most oral cases and several forms of cutaneous papillomatosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate cases of naturally occurring oral papillomatosis with regard to the type of virus involved, antibody induction and remission time. Forty dogs showing different degrees of classical oral papillomatosis were included as a single study group. Tissue and serum samples were acquired upon initial presentation; serum samples were collected again upon remission (n = 13) and after 3 months of convalescence (n = 4). None of the dogs underwent antiviral therapy. Tissue samples were tested by PCR to detect CPV DNA, while serum samples were tested using a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibodies against the L1 capsid protein of CPV1. All tissue samples were positive for CPV1 DNA, and 87.5% of all serum samples contained measurable levels of antibody against the virus (cut-off value 0.3). The average optical density measured in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was 0.51 at initial presentation, 1.65 upon remission and 0.83 at 3 months postrecovery. Time to clinical regression varied between 1 month and 1 year. These data support existing evidence for a high prevalence of CPV1 in canine oral papillomatosis. The healing process seems to correlate with a strong antibody response, and antibody titres peaked around the time of clinical recovery. In contrast to previous data from laboratory settings, the variation in remission time was very high. © 2014 ESVD and ACVD.

  6. Molecular and immunohistochemical studies do not support a role for papillomaviruses in canine oral squamous cell carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; French, Adrienne; Harvey, Catherine J

    2015-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) are common neoplasms of dogs and are of unknown cause. Whereas papillomaviruses (PVs) are an established cause of human OSCCs, few studies have investigated canine OSCCs for a PV aetiology. In humans, a PV aetiology can be determined by detecting PV DNA and PV-induced increased p16(CDKN2A) protein (p16) within the OSCC. In this study, PCR, using four different primer sets and p16 immunohistochemistry, was used to evaluate 28 canine OSCCs for a possible PV aetiology. None of the primers amplified PV DNA from any of the OSCCs although four neoplasms contained intense p16 immunostaining. Intense p16 immunostaining would indicate a PV aetiology in a human OSCC but the absence of PV DNA suggests that the increase in p16 was not due to PV infection. Overall the results indicated that PVs are not a significant cause of canine OSCCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of six novel papillomavirus sequences within canine pigmented plaques

    PubMed Central

    Luff, Jennifer A.; Affolter, Verena K.; Yeargan, Bret; Moore, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    In dogs, papillomaviruses are thought to cause oral and cutaneous papillomas and pigmented plaques. Eight canine papillomaviruses have been fully sequenced to date. Four of these canine papillomaviruses, including Canis familiaris papillomavirus (CPV)-3, CPV-4, CPV-5, and CPV-8, were amplified from pigmented plaques. Given this recent identification of several different canine papillomaviruses within pigmented plaques, it is likely that there are additional papillomavirus sequences that have not been previously identified. The aim of this study was to detect papillomavirus DNA sequences from pigmented plaques and identify potentially novel PV sequences through nucleotide sequence analysis. Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify DNA sequences of the papillomavirus L1 gene from 27 pigmented plaques. Identification of novel papillomavirus sequences was based upon less than 90% shared DNA homology to any known papillomavirus. Ten different papillomaviruses were detected within the pigmented plaques, including 6 novel PV sequences. CPV-4 was detected within 41% (11/27) of the pigmented plaques, while CPV-5 was identified within 2 pigmented plaques and CPV-3 within a single pigmented plaque. A previously identified novel papillomavirus sequence was identified within 2 pigmented plaques in this study. The remaining 11 pigmented plaques contained 6 papillomavirus DNA sequences that have not been previously reported. These novel PV sequences were most similar to papillomaviruses that have been detected within canine pigmented plaques. PMID:22529129

  8. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Isolates of Canis familiaris Oral Papillomavirus from South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Regnard, Guy L.; Baloyi, Nwaxigombe M.; Bracher, Leonard R.; Hitzeroth, Inga I.

    2016-01-01

    Canis familiaris oral papillomavirus, formerly canine oral papillomavirus, is a causative agent of the self-resolving canine oral papillomatosis and was first described in 1994. This is the first report of two full-length genome sequences described in South Africa and indicates the highly conserved nature of Canis familiaris oral papillomavirus. PMID:27932637

  9. A Retrospective Investigation on Canine Papillomavirus 1 (CPV1) in Oral Oncogenesis Reveals Dogs Are Not a Suitable Animal Model for High-Risk HPV-Induced Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Porcellato, Ilaria; Brachelente, Chiara; Guelfi, Gabriella; Reginato, Alice; Sforna, Monica; Bongiovanni, Laura; Mechelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    CPV1 (also called COPV) is a papillomavirus responsible for oral papillomatosis in young dogs. The involvement of this viral type in oral oncogenesis has been hypothesized in oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), but has never been investigated in other neoplastic and hyperplastic oral lesions of dogs. Aim of this study was to investigate the presence of CPV1 in different neoplastic and hyperplastic lesions in order to assess its role in canine oral oncogenesis; according to the results obtained, a second aim of the study was to define if the dog can be considered a valid animal model for oral high risk HPV-induced tumors. Eighty-eight formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) canine oral lesions including 78 oral tumors (papillomas, SCCs, melanomas, ameloblastomas, oral adenocarcinomas) and 10 hyperplastic lesions (gingival hyperplasia) were investigated with immunohistochemistry for the presence of papillomavirus L1 protein and with Real-Time PCR for CPV1 DNA. RT-PCR for RNA was performed on selected samples. All viral papillomas tested were positive for immunohistochemistry and Real-time PCR. In 3/33 (10%) SCCs, viral DNA was demonstrated but no viral RNA could be found. No positivity was observed both with immunohistochemistry and Real-Time PCR in the other hyperplastic and neoplastic lesions of the oral cavity of dogs. Even though the finding of CPV1 DNA in few SCCs in face of a negative immunohistochemistry could support the hypothesis of an abortive infection in the development of these lesions, the absence of viral RNA points out that CPV1 more likely represents an innocent bystander in SCC oncogenesis. The study demonstrates a strong association between CPV1 and oral viral papillomas whereas viral contribution to the pathogenesis of other oral lesions seems unlikely. Moreover, it suggests that a canine model of CPV1 infection for HPV-induced oncogenesis could be inappropriate. PMID:25401953

  10. The Canine Oral Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Klein, Erin A.; Thompson, Emily C.; Blanton, Jessica M.; Chen, Tsute; Milella, Lisa; Buckley, Catherine M. F.; Davis, Ian J.; Bennett, Marie-Lousie; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S rRNA-gene sequence comparison, shared between humans and dogs, two divergent mammalian species. Second, canine oral bacteria are of interest to veterinary and human medical communities for understanding their roles in health and infectious diseases. The bacteria involved are mostly unnamed and not linked by 16S rRNA-gene sequence identity to a taxonomic scheme. This manuscript describes the analysis of 5,958 16S rRNA-gene sequences from 65 clone libraries. Full length 16S rRNA reference sequences have been obtained for 353 canine bacterial taxa, which were placed in 14 bacterial phyla, 23 classes, 37 orders, 66 families, and 148 genera. Eighty percent of the taxa are currently unnamed. The bacterial taxa identified in dogs are markedly different from those of humans with only 16.4% of oral taxa are shared between dogs and humans based on a 98.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity cutoff. This indicates that there is a large divergence in the bacteria comprising the oral microbiomes of divergent mammalian species. The historic practice of identifying animal associated bacteria based on phenotypic similarities to human bacteria is generally invalid. This report describes the diversity of the canine oral microbiome and provides a provisional 16S rRNA based taxonomic scheme for naming and identifying unnamed canine bacterial taxa. PMID:22558330

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Canine Papillomavirus Type 10

    PubMed Central

    Luff, Jennifer; Moore, Peter; Zhou, Dan; Wang, Jingang; Usuda, Yukari; Affolter, Verena; Schlegel, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are epitheliotropic, nonenveloped, circular, double-stranded DNA viruses within the family Papillomaviridae that are associated with benign and malignant tumors in humans and animals. We report the complete genome sequence of canine papillomavirus type 10 identified from a pigmented plaque located on the head of a mixed-breed bloodhound. PMID:22997424

  12. Complete canine papillomavirus life cycle in pigmented lesions.

    PubMed

    Lange, Christian E; Tobler, Kurt; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Vetsch, Elisabeth; Fischer, Nina M; Ackermann, Mathias; Favrot, Claude

    2013-03-23

    Canine papillomaviruses (CPVs) have been identified in various benign and malignant neoplastic skin disorders. The most frequent manifestations of CPV infections are classical warts and pigmented plaques. Although the etiology of canine oral papillomatosis is well established, knowledge about CPVs role in the development of pigmented plaques remains vague. Indeed, as CPV DNA may frequently be found on clinically healthy canine skin, its mere detection in lesions cannot be regarded as a sufficient indicator of causality. Whether CPVs are actually active in pigmented plaques, a requirement for any conceivable involvement, is consequently an open question. To inquire such viral activity, two distinct clinical cases of canine pigmented lesions were evaluated in greater detail. The histological findings in the two cases supported the clinical diagnosis of pigmented viral plaques. Sequencing of amplified DNA from these lesions revealed the genomes of two novel CPV types, i.e. CPV9 and CPV14, both putatively belonging to the genus Chi. Furthermore, transcription and splicing of corresponding CPV mRNA could be shown by RT-PCR in the respective lesions. Finally, viral particles were detected by electron microscopy in homogenates as well as in nuclei of keratinocytes in pigmented lesions. In conclusion, the results link clinical signs of pigmented plaques to histological changes, the presence of CPV specific DNA, viral gene transcription, and the presence of viral particles in and from the lesions. Thus, the findings outline the entire replicative cycle of CPVs in pigmented plaques, which might help understanding the relationship between these viruses and the associated disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in Children.

    PubMed

    Ilea, Aranka; Boşca, Bianca; Miclăuş, Viorel; Rus, Vasile; Băbţan, Anida Maria; Mesaros, Anca; Crişan, Bogdan; Câmpian, Radu Septimiu

    2016-02-01

    Oral human papillomavirus infection is rare in children, but the presence of a villous lesion with slow but continuous growth concerns parents, who need information and therapeutic solutions from the physician. All these aspects are discussed based on a case report of a 9-year-old child with an oral human papillomavirus infection.

  14. Human papillomavirus in oral lesions.

    PubMed

    González, Joaquín V; Gutiérrez, Rafael A; Keszler, Alicia; Colacino, Maria del Carmen; Alonio, Lidia V; Teyssie, Angelica R; Picconi, Maria Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral cancer; however its involvement is still controversial. This study evaluates the frequency of HPV DNA in a variety of oral lesions in patients from Argentina. A total of 77 oral tissue samples from 66 patients were selected (cases); the clinical-histopathological diagnoses corresponded to: 11 HPV- associated benign lesions, 8 non-HPV associated benign lesions, 33 premalignant lesions and 25 cancers. Sixty exfoliated cell samples from normal oral mucosa were used as controls. HPV detection and typing were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers MY09, 11, combined with RFLP or alternatively PCR using primers GP5+, 6+ combined with dot blot hybridization. HPV was detected in 91.0% of HPV- associated benign lesions, 14.3% of non-HPV associated benign lesions, 51.5% of preneoplasias and 60.0% of cancers. No control sample tested HPV positive. In benign HPV- associated lesions, 30.0% of HPV positive samples harbored high-risk types, while in preneoplastic lesions the value rose to 59.9%. In cancer lesions, HPV detection in verrucous carcinoma was 88.9% and in squamous cell carcinoma 43.8%, with high-risk type rates of 75.5% and 85.6%, respectively. The high HPV frequency detected in preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions supports an HPV etiological role in at least a subset of oral cancers.

  15. An Update on Canine, Feline and Bovine Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Gil da Costa, R M; Peleteiro, M C; Pires, M A; DiMaio, D

    2017-10-01

    Over recent years, a growing number of papillomaviruses have been identified, which cause a wide range of lesions in domestic and wild animals. Papillomavirus-induced lesions may have a great impact on animal health, and some diseases observed in farm animals are associated with significant economic losses. This concise review brings together recent advancements on animal papillomavirus research, providing the scientific community and veterinary practitioners with an update on this rapidly evolving field. Among others, bovine, canine and feline papillomaviruses (BPV, CPV and FcaPV) are most extensively discussed, in view of the recent discovery of new viral types and their worldwide importance for animal health. Feline papillomaviruses 2 is an emerging, highly prevalent pathogen in domestic cats, associated with a subset of malignant skin lesions. Aspects related to cross-species infection by BPV and its environmental co-factors are also addressed. Animal papillomaviruses are also fascinating models for studying molecular and cell biology and have recently inspired some major breakthroughs. Overall, it is clear that additional, international and systematic efforts are needed to clarify which lesions are caused by which viral types and to develop experimental models for studying animal papillomavirus. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Detection of novel papillomaviruses in canine mucosal, cutaneous and in situ squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, N; Nespeca, G; Hauser, B; Ackermann, M; Favrot, C

    2005-10-01

    Papillomavirus (PV) DNA is frequently uncovered in samples of human skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). However, the role of these viruses in the development of such cancers in canine species remains controversial. While approximately 100 human PVs are known, only one single canine oral PV (COPV) has been identified and studied extensively. Therefore, we applied a narrow-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) suitable for the detection of classical canine and feline PVs, as well as a broad-range PCR, which has been used for the detection of various novel PVs in humans, in order to analyse 42 paraffin-embedded samples, representing three different forms of canine SCCs. Ten samples of skin tissues with various non-neoplastic conditions served as controls. While none of the negative controls reacted positively, PV DNA was discovered in 21% of the tested SCC samples. Interestingly, the classical COPV was amplified from only one sample, while the other positive cases were associated with a variety of thus far unknown PVs. This study suggests that a fraction of canine SCC is infected with PVs and that a genetic variety of canine PVs exists. Therefore, these results will facilitate the future study of the role of PVs in the development of canine skin cancers.

  17. Epidemiology of oral human papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Christine H.; Bagheri, Ashley; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is known to cause a subset of oropharyngeal cancers. Data regarding oral HPV infection is limited but emerging. HPV infection of the genital tract has been more thoroughly researched and helps inform our understanding of oral HPV infection. In this article we review current data on HPV prevalence, natural history, mode of acquisition, and risk factors for oral HPV infection. PMID:24080455

  18. [Papillomavirus in the genesis of oral leukoplakia].

    PubMed

    Babichenko, I I; Rabinovich, O F; Ivina, A A; Rabinovich, I M; Togonidze, A A

    2014-01-01

    Immunohistochemical examination of the proliferative activity of cells was made investigating the expression of Ki-67 protein and the location of proteins associated with epithelial cell papillomavirus infection involving P16(INK4a) and HPV16 proteins in different cell areas of the intact mucosa, in leukoplakia with the signs of hyperplasia and dysplasia, and in squamous cell carcinoma. There was a positive correlation between the proliferative activity of cells in the parabasal cell areas and the expression of P16(INK4a) protein in oral leukoplakia with the signs of hyperplasia (r(s)=0.397; p=0.018). In oral leukoplakia with dysplastic changes, there was a positive correlation between the proliferation of cells in the parabasal and prickle cell layers and the location of HPV type 16 antigens (r(s)=0.515; p=0.041 and r(s)=0.651; p=0.006). Detection of papillomavirus infection in leukoplakia can solve not only the problems with its genesis, but this is also a morphological basis for the effective prevention and treatment of this common oral mucosal disease.

  19. Novel papillomavirus isolated from the oral mucosa of a polar bear does not cluster with other papillomaviruses of carnivores.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Hans; Rector, Annabel; Bertelsen, Mads F; Leifsson, Pall S; Van Ranst, Marc

    2008-05-25

    Papillomatosis has been documented in several carnivores, and papillomavirus (PV) types have been characterized from lesions in a number of carnivore species: the canine oral PV (COPV), the Felis domesticus PV type 1 (FdPV-1) isolated from a Persian cat, the Procyon lotor PV type 1 (PlPV-1) isolated from a raccoon, the canine PV type 2 (CPV-2) from a dog's foot pad lesion and the canine PV type 3 (CPV-3) associated with a canine epidermodysplasia verruciformis - like disease. A tissue sample was taken from a papillomatous lesion on the oral mucosa of a polar bear (Ursus maritimus). Extracted DNA was used as a template for multiply primed rolling-circle amplification (RCA), and restriction enzyme analysis of the RCA product indicated the presence of papillomaviral DNA. The genome of this PV was cloned and the complete genomic sequence was determined. The Ursus maritimus PV type 1 (UmPV-1) genome counts 7582 basepairs and is smaller than that of other papillomaviruses from carnivore species. UmPV-1 contains the typical noncoding region NCR1, but unlike the carnivore PVs of the Lambda genus, UmPV-1 does not possess a second noncoding region NCR2. Phylogenetic analysis based on a nucleotide sequence alignment of the L1 ORF of UmPV-1 and 51 other PV types indicates that UmPV-1 does not cluster with any of the other carnivore PVs, but branches off near the root of the common branch of the genus Alphapapillomavirus.

  20. Identification of canine papillomavirus by PCR in Greyhound dogs

    PubMed Central

    Anis, Eman A.; Frank, Linda A.; Francisco, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Background Corns are hard protuberances that occur on the digital footpads of Greyhound dogs. The cause of these lesions is unknown and there is little information about them in the veterinary literature. We received anecdotal examples of dog to dog spread of corns suggesting an infectious cause. The aim of this study was to determine if papillomavirus (PV) is associated with Greyhound corns. Methods We examined four corns from two unrelated adult Greyhound dogs that resided in Florida and Washington, respectively, for PV by PCR. The samples were obtained by owner coring of two lesions from one dog and laser removal of two lesions from the other dog. Total nucleic acid was extracted and DNA was amplified using two PCR primer sets that have been shown to amplify a broad range of PVs from humans and animals: FAP59/ FAP64 and MY11/ MY09. The DNA sequences were compared with all sequences in GenBank. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from the footpads of four dogs with other inflammatory dermatoses were also examined. Results PV DNA was amplified from all four corn lesions, while no PV DNA was amplified from other tissues. Comparison of the 444-bp sequences amplified by the MY11/ MY09 primers identified two different PVs. One showed 96% nucleotide sequence similarity with the L1 gene of canine PV type 12. The other showed 78% similarity to canine PV type 16 and, therefore, represents a novel PV. In one of the corns, infection by two of the identified PVs was found. Discussion These results suggest PV infection could be involved in the pathogenesis of corns in Greyhound dogs. PMID:27957392

  1. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  2. Human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Lucia; Campisi, Giuseppina; Lama, Anna; Giambalvo, Ornella; Osborn, John; Margiotta, Valerio; Ammatuna, Pietro

    2002-03-15

    This study determined the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in oral mucosa cells from 121 patients with different types of oral mucosal lesions (13 squamous cell carcinomas, 59 potentially malignant lesions, 49 benign erosive ulcerative lesions) and from 90 control subjects. HPV DNA was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction, and genotype was determined by DNA sequencing. HPV prevalence was 61.5% in carcinomas, 27.1% in potentially malignant lesions, 26.5% in erosive ulcerative lesions, and 5.5% in control subjects. The risk of malignant or potentially malignant lesions was associated with HPV and was statistically significant. HPV-18 was found in 86.5% of HPV-positive lesions but was not associated with a particular type of lesion and was found in 80% of the HPV-positive control subjects. HPV infection was related to older age but not to sex, smoking, or alcohol use; the presence of lesions in the oral cavity increased the risk of HPV infection.

  3. An update on oral human papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Ankit H.; Chotaliya, Kiran; Marfatia, Y. S.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) constitutes the majority of newly acquired sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in United States as per the centers for disease control factsheet 2013. Genital HPV is the most common STI with incidence of about 5.5 million world-wide, nearly 75% of sexually active men and women have been exposed to HPV at some point in their lives. Oral Sexual behavior is an important contributor to infection of HPV in the oral mucosa especially in cases known to practice high risk behavior and initiating the same at an early age. HPV infection of the oral mucosa currents is believed to affect 1-50% of the general population, depending on the method used for diagnosis. The immune system clears most HPV naturally within 2 years (about 90%), but the ones that persist can cause serious diseases. HPV is an essential carcinogen being implicated increasingly in association with cancers occurring at numerous sites in the body. Though there does not occur any specific treatment for the HPV infection, the diseases it causes are treatable such as genital warts, cervical and other cancers. PMID:24339456

  4. Oral papillomatosis caused by Enhydra lutris papillomavirus 1 (ElPV-1) in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Miller, Melissa A; Kondov, Nikola O; Dodd, Erin M; Batac, Francesca; Manzer, Mike; Ives, Sarah; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) is a threatened marine sentinel. During postmortem investigations of stranded sea otters from 2004 to 2013 in California, US, papillomas were detected in the oral cavity of at least seven otters via necropsy and histopathology. Next-generation sequencing of viral particles purified from a single papilloma revealed a novel papillomavirus, Enhydra lutris papillomavirus 1 (ElPV-1). The genome of ElPV-1 was obtained, representing the first fully sequenced viral genome from southern sea otters. Phylogenetic analysis of the entire L1 gene, as well as a concatenated protein identities plot of all papillomaviral genes revealed that ElPV-1 is a λ-papillomavirus, related to a raccoon papillomavirus (Procyon lotor papillomavirus type 1) and a canine oral papillomavirus. Immunohistochemical staining, using a cross-reactive bovine papillomavirus antibody, suggested that ElPV-1 is present in intranuclear inclusions and intracytoplasmic keratin granules. Virus-infected cells were scattered throughout the stratum granulosum and stratum spinosum of the gingival and buccal papillomas. Using ElPV-1-specific PCR, we confirmed viral DNA in oral papillomas from all seven stranded sea otters, with identical L1 sequences. This virus is associated with the development of oral papillomatosis in southern sea otters.

  5. Multiple oral carcinomas associated with a novel papillomavirus in a dog.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; Tucker, Russell S; Kiupel, Matti; Harvey, Catherine J

    2015-03-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are well recognized to cause human oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). However, there is currently little evidence that PVs similarly cause oral cancer in dogs. In the present case, a dog developed an invasive SCC and multiple in situ carcinomas within the mouth. Cell changes consistent with PV infection were prominent within the neoplasms and the surrounding gingiva. Immunohistochemical staining revealed PV antigens and intense p16(CDKN2A) protein (p16) immunostaining within the invasive SCC. Papillomaviral DNA sequences were amplified from the invasive and in situ carcinomas. Sequencing revealed that the DNA was from a novel PV that appears most closely related to canine PV-2 and -7. To the authors' knowledge, multiple carcinomas have not been previously reported in the mouth of a dog. Additionally, the current study describes PV cytopathology in a canine oral SCC. Whether the PV infection influenced neoplasm development cannot be definitively determined in this case. However, the presence of p16 immunostaining and the development of multiple oral carcinomas support a role of the PV in tumorigenesis in this dog.

  6. Genomic characterisation of Felis catus papillomavirus 4, a novel papillomavirus detected in the oral cavity of a domestic cat.

    PubMed

    Dunowska, Magdalena; Munday, John S; Laurie, Rebecca E; Hills, Simon F K

    2014-02-01

    Three papillomaviruses (PVs) from the domestic cat have been fully sequenced so far including Felis domesticus PV-1 (FdPV-1), FdPV-2, and a recently described Felis catus PV-3 (FcaPV-4). In the current article, we describe the full genomic sequence of a fourth PV from the domestic cat. This PV was amplified from the oral cavity of a cat with severe gingivitis. However, the aetiological involvement of FcaPV-4 in development of lesions observed in this cat remains uncertain. The complete genome of the novel virus comprised 7,616 bp and was predicted to encode five early (E1, E2, E4, E6 and E7) and two late (L1 and L2) genes, with the organisation typical for PVs. The L1 showed 65.1 % nucleotide sequence identity to L1 of FcaPV-3 and approximately 60 % identity to L1 of canine tau-papillomaviruses CPV-2 and CPV-7. The novel virus clustered with FcaPV-3, CPV-2 and CPV-7 on a phylogenetic tree constructed from a concatenated alignment of 3,013 bp from E1, E2, L1 and L2. Based on the genomic and phylogenetic data, we propose that the novel virus is classified as a distinct species within the same genus as FcaPV-3. We also propose that both viruses are classified within the genus Taupapillomavirus, although this classification may need to be re-visited after more tau-PV genomes become available.

  7. Two Canine Papillomaviruses Associated With Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Two Related Basenji Dogs.

    PubMed

    Luff, J; Rowland, P; Mader, M; Orr, C; Yuan, H

    2016-11-01

    Papillomaviruses (PV) are associated with benign mucosal and cutaneous epithelial proliferations. In dogs, PV-associated pigmented plaques and papillomas can undergo malignant transformation, but this is rare, and most cases of canine squamous cell carcinoma do not arise from PV-induced precursor lesions. We describe herein the progression of pigmented plaques to invasive and metastatic squamous cell carcinoma associated with 2 canine papillomaviruses (CPV) in 2 related Basenji dogs. Immunohistochemistry for PV antigen revealed strong nuclear immunoreactivity within keratinocytes from pigmented plaques from both dogs, consistent with a productive viral infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using degenerate primers for the L1 gene revealed PV DNA sequences from 2 different CPVs. In situ hybridization for CPV revealed strong hybridization signals within the pigmented plaques and neoplastic squamous epithelial cells from both dogs. We report here progression of PV-associated pigmented plaques to metastatic squamous cell carcinoma within 2 Basenji dogs associated with 2 different CPVs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Human papillomavirus-associated oral intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sook-Bin; Cashman, Emma C; Lerman, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated an unusual subset of oral epithelial dysplasia for the presence of transcriptionally active high-risk HPV subtypes and to further characterize the histological criteria for this condition. There were 20 cases diagnosed as epithelial dysplasia with marked apoptosis of the anterior oral cavity. Clinical and follow-up data were collected and histopathological features were documented. Immunoperoxidase studies were performed for p16 and in situ hybridization studies were performed for low- and high-risk HPV sub-types. Gender- and site-matched controls of conventional moderate-to-severe oral epithelial dysplasia were similarly evaluated using immunoperoxidase studies for p16 and in situ hybridization; the number of apoptotic cells for study and control cases was counted at two different tissue sites. There were 17 men and 3 women with a median age of 56 years. Seventeen lesions were described as white and five were described as rough or papillary. Thirteen were located on the lateral or ventral tongue, some extending onto the floor of the mouth. Epithelial hyperplasia with marked karyorrhexis and apoptosis were present in all the cases, along with features of conventional oral epithelial dysplasia. A statistically significant number of apoptotic cells were identified in the study cases when compared with controls (P>0.0001). Twenty cases were positive for high-risk HPV by in situ hybridization and all 19 nineteen cases evaluated for p16 demonstrated overexpression. Two patients were diagnosed with squamous cell carcinomas and one patient developed recurrent disease. We report a subset of oral epithelial dysplasia that occurs mostly in adult men on the ventral or lateral tongue and is positive for high-risk HPV and for p16. We propose use of the term 'HPV-associated Oral Intraepithelial Neoplasia' to characterize these lesions of the oral cavity for consistency in nomenclature with HPV-associated lesions of the lower anogenital tract. One case

  9. Detection of antibodies against epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated canine papillomavirus 3 in sera of dogs from Europe and Africa by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Lange, C E; Tobler, K; Favrot, C; Müller, M; Nöthling, J O; Ackermann, M

    2009-01-01

    The role of papillomaviruses (PVs) in the development of canine cancers is controversial. However, recently a novel canine PV (CPV3) was detected in a dog affected with a condition reminiscent of epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). The aim of the present study was to investigate the seroprevalence of CPV3 by using generic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of antibodies against either canine oral PV (COPV) or CPV3. Therefore, the capsid proteins of both PV types were expressed as glutathione S-transferase fusion protein antigens and adsorbed to glutathione-casein-coated ELISA plates. After showing that PV type-specific antibodies could be detected in the sera from dogs with confirmed COPV or CPV3 infection, CPV3- and COPV-seropositive samples were detected in two sets of canine sera collected in Switzerland and South Africa, respectively. We found specific antibodies against COPV and CPV3 among the tested sera and also a large number that were positive for both antigens. The seroprevalences of PV antibodies of 21.9% (COPV) and 26.9% (CPV3) among the tested dogs from South Africa were higher than those among the dogs from Switzerland at 10.5% (COPV) and 1.3% (CPV3). Our data suggest a need for further CPV-related seroepidemiological surveys in different countries, especially in the context of clinical manifestations and possible breed predispositions. For this purpose, the newly developed ELISAs can be a useful tool.

  10. Roles of Human Papillomaviruses and p16 in Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sritippho, Thanun; Chotjumlong, Pareena; Iamaroon, Anak

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer, including oral cancer, is the sixth most common cancer in humans worldwide. More than 90% of oral cancers are of squamous cell carcinoma type. Recent studies have shown a strong relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and head and neck cancer, especially oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Moreover, the incidence of HPV-related OSCC appears to be on the rise while HPV-unrelated OSCC tends to have stabilized in the past decades. p16, a tumor suppressor gene, normally functions as a regulator of the cell cycle. Upon infection with high-risk types of HPV (HR-HPV), particularly types 16, 18, 31, 33, 34, 35, 39, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68, and 70, the expression of p16 is aberrantly overexpressed. Therefore, the expression of p16 is widely used as a surrogate marker for HPV infection in head and neck cancer.

  11. Low prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in oral cavity carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence shows that Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is preferentially associated with some head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), with variable infection rates reported. Methods We assessed HPV involvement in HNSCC using the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test, which can detect 37 different HPV types. We examined the prevalence of HPV infection in 92 HNSCCs (oropharynx, oral cavity, and other HNSCC sites). Results HPV was frequently detected in oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs) (16/22, 73%), but was uncommon in oral cavity cancers (2/53, 4%), and in other HNSCC subsites (1/17, 6%). HPV positive tumors were associated with patients that were 40-60 years old (p = 0.02), and node positive (p = < 0.0001). HPV 16 was the most prevalent type, but other types detected included 6, 18, 33, 35, 45, and 52/58. Conclusion Our results show that in contrast to oropharyngeal cancers, oral cancers and other HNSCCs infrequently harbor HPV. PMID:20226055

  12. Focal epithelial hyperplasia: a multifocal oral human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Flaitz, C M

    2000-01-01

    Widespread, slightly elevated and confluent nodules are observed throughout the oral mucosa in a young Hispanic girl. Repeated irritation of the soft tissues from a compromised occlusion is an aggravating factor for the spread of these lesions. A diagnosis of focal epithelial hyperplasia, a human papillomavirus infection, is made following histopathologic diagnosis and viral typing. Recognition of this specific type of warts is important in order to avoid the mistaken identification of condyloma acuminata, which may have significant repercussions in the life of a young child.

  13. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids.

    PubMed

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-02-16

    Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of protection, is still unclear. We determined IgG and neutralising antibodies against low-risk HPV6 and high-risk HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids from healthy females (n=20) before and after quadrivalent HPV-vaccination and compared the results with non-vaccinated controls. HPV-vaccination induced type-specific antibodies in sera and oral fluids of the vaccinees. Importantly, the antibodies in oral fluids were capable of neutralising HPV pseudovirions in vitro, indicating protection from infection. The increased neutralising antibody levels against HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids post-vaccination correlated significantly within an individual. We provide experimental proof that HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies to the vaccine-targeted types in oral fluids. Hence, immunisation may confer direct protection against type-specific HPV infection and associated diseases of the oropharyngeal tract. Measurement of antibodies in oral fluids represents a suitable tool to assess vaccine-induced protection within the mucosal milieu of the orophayrynx.

  14. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids

    PubMed Central

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of protection, is still unclear. Methods: We determined IgG and neutralising antibodies against low-risk HPV6 and high-risk HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids from healthy females (n=20) before and after quadrivalent HPV-vaccination and compared the results with non-vaccinated controls. Results: HPV-vaccination induced type-specific antibodies in sera and oral fluids of the vaccinees. Importantly, the antibodies in oral fluids were capable of neutralising HPV pseudovirions in vitro, indicating protection from infection. The increased neutralising antibody levels against HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids post-vaccination correlated significantly within an individual. Conclusions: We provide experimental proof that HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies to the vaccine-targeted types in oral fluids. Hence, immunisation may confer direct protection against type-specific HPV infection and associated diseases of the oropharyngeal tract. Measurement of antibodies in oral fluids represents a suitable tool to assess vaccine-induced protection within the mucosal milieu of the orophayrynx. PMID:26867163

  15. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of canine oral amelanotic melanocytic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Smedley, R C; Lamoureux, J; Sledge, D G; Kiupel, M

    2011-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of canine oral melanocytic neoplasms is often difficult because of variability in pigmentation and cellular pleomorphism. These neoplasms can resemble carcinomas, sarcomas, and round cell neoplasms, which differ in prognosis and treatment. A variety of immunohistochemical antibodies have been used for diagnosis of melanocytic neoplasms in humans and dogs; however, sensitivity and specificity of many markers have not been determined in amelanotic melanocytic neoplasms in dogs. The authors investigated a comprehensive panel of immunohistochemical markers in 49 canine oral amelanotic melanocytic neoplasms--namely, Melan-A, PNL2, HMB-45, microphthalmia transcription factor (MiTF), S-100, tyrosine hydroxylase, tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related proteins 1 and 2 (TRP-1 and TRP-2), and CD34. Ten well-differentiated cutaneous soft tissue spindle cell sarcomas were negative controls. Melan-A, PNL2, TRP-1, and TRP-2 were highly sensitive and 100% specific for the diagnosis of canine oral amelanotic melanocytic neoplasms. S-100 and MiTF showed high sensitivity but were less specific; that is, they also labeled a proportion of the soft tissue spindle cell sarcomas. HMB-45, tyrosinase, and tyrosine hydroxylase were 100% specific but had low sensitivities. CD34 did not label any of the melanocytic neoplasms but did label 80% of the soft tissue spindle cell sarcomas. A cost-effective and efficient immunodiagnostic cocktail containing antibodies against PNL2, Melan-A, TRP-1, and TRP-2 was created that had 100% specificity and 93.9% sensitivity in identifying canine oral amelanotic melanocytic neoplasms. The spindloid variant was the variant with the lowest sensitivity to the cocktail. The likelihood of correctly diagnosing canine oral amelanotic melanocytic neoplasms was dramatically higher when biopsy samples contained ample overlying and adjacent epithelium.

  16. Presence of highly oncogenic human papillomavirus in the oral mucosa of asymptomatic men.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ana Paula; Gatto de Almeida, Flávia; Bonin, Camila Mareti; Martins Prata, Thiago Theodoro; Sobrinho Ávilla, Leandro; Junqueira Padovani, Cacilda Tezelli; Teixeira Ferreira, Alda Maria; dos Santos Fernandes, Carlos Eurico; Tozetti, Inês Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify highly oncogenic forms of human papillomavirus in the oral mucosa of asymptomatic men. In this study, we analyzed samples of exfoliated cells from the oral cavity of 559 asymptomatic men. DNA-human papillomavirus was detected using the consensus primers PGMY09/11; viral genotyping was performed using type-specific PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism. DNA-human papillomavirus was detected in 1.3% of the study participants and of those 42.8% were infected by more than one type of virus. Viral types included HPV6, 11, 89 (low oncogenic risk), and HPV52, 53 (high oncogenic risk). Increased vulnerability to human papillomavirus infection was observed in individuals aged over 26 years, among those who reported oral sex practices, and in those who have had more than 16 sexual partners since first engaging in sexual intercourse. There was a low prevalence of human papillomavirus detection in the oral mucosa of asymptomatic men. Highly oncogenic human papillomavirus types and infection by more than one viral type was observed. Oral sex practices and a large number of sexual partners may increase the risk of acquiring human papillomavirus infection. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  17. Oral melphalan for the treatment of relapsed canine lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mastromauro, M L; Suter, S E; Hauck, M L; Hess, P R

    2017-09-21

    Oral melphalan has been included in multi-agent rescue protocols for canine lymphoma but its activity as a single-agent for this purpose has not been established. Inexpensive cost, ease of administration and tolerability make oral melphalan an attractive candidate for single-agent rescue therapy of canine lymphoma. Retrospective evaluation of 19 cases of relapsed canine lymphoma treated with oral melphalan was performed. Melphalan was primarily administered (n = 16) via a high dose protocol (HDM) with a median dosage of 19.4 mg m(-2) . Fifteen dogs (78.9%) were treated concurrently with corticosteroids. Response evaluation was possible for all dogs with a calculated overall clinical benefit (partial response [PR] + stable disease [SD]) of 31.6% (PR 3/19; SD 3/19). Times to progression following melphalan (TTP-M) were 14, 24 and 34 days for responders and 20, 28 and 103 days for dogs experiencing SD. Twelve of 17 dogs evaluable for toxicity experienced an adverse event (AE) with only 3 dogs experiencing a grade III or higher AE. Haematologic toxicity was common (11/17) while gastrointestinal toxicity was rare (1/17). Although treatment resulted in limited clinical benefit and non-durable responses, oral melphalan was well-tolerated and may be a reasonable rescue option in cases where minimal effective agents remain. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Oral sex practices, oral human papillomavirus and correlations between oral and cervical human papillomavirus prevalence among female sex workers in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Cabral, A; Carcamo, C; Gravitt, P E; Halsey, N

    2015-01-01

    Summary Few data exist on oral human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence in female sex workers (FSWs). Information regarding oral sex practices of 185 Peruvian FSWs, 18–26 years of age, was obtained via survey and compared with HPV testing results of oral rinse samples. Oral HPV prevalence was 14/185 (7.6%); four (28.9%) HPV genotypes were carcinogenic. One hundred and eighty-two participants reported having had oral sex; 95% reported condom use during oral sex with clients and 9.5% with partners. Women who had oral sex more than three times with their partners in the past month were more likely to have oral HPV than women who had oral sex three times or less (P = 0.06). Ten (71.4%) women with oral HPV were HPV-positive at the cervix; conversely 8.3% of women with cervical HPV were HPV-positive in the oral cavity. The prevalence of oral HPV was relatively low, considering the high rates of oral sex practiced by these women. PMID:22096051

  19. Oral sex practices, oral human papillomavirus and correlations between oral and cervical human papillomavirus prevalence among female sex workers in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Cabral, A; Carcamo, C; Gravitt, P E; Halsey, N

    2011-11-01

    Few data exist on oral human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence in female sex workers (FSWs). Information regarding oral sex practices of 185 Peruvian FSWs, 18-26 years of age, was obtained via survey and compared with HPV testing results of oral rinse samples. Oral HPV prevalence was 14/185 (7.6%); four (28.9%) HPV genotypes were carcinogenic. One hundred and eighty-two participants reported having had oral sex; 95% reported condom use during oral sex with clients and 9.5% with partners. Women who had oral sex more than three times with their partners in the past month were more likely to have oral HPV than women who had oral sex three times or less (P = 0.06). Ten (71.4%) women with oral HPV were HPV-positive at the cervix; conversely 8.3% of women with cervical HPV were HPV-positive in the oral cavity. The prevalence of oral HPV was relatively low, considering the high rates of oral sex practiced by these women.

  20. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-associated Oral Cancers and Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    Sathish, N; Wang, X; Yuan, Y

    2014-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is known to be associated with several types of human cancer, including cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal, and head-and-neck cancers. Among these cancers, HPV-associated head-and-neck cancers, inclusive of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (OCSCC), have recently risen dramatically in men under 50 years old. Within 20 years, the percentage of HPV-positive OSCC in total OSCC went from less than 20% to more than 70% in the United States and some European countries. This article reviews the incidence trend and pathogenesis of HPV-associated head-and-neck cancers as well as current treatment modalities for the disease.

  1. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intention among College Men: What's Oral Sex Got to Do with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Richard A.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Salazar, Laura F.; Nash, Rachel; Younge, Sinead; Head, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify associations between engaging in oral sex and perceived risk of oral cancer among college men. Also, to identify associations, and their moderating factors, between oral sex and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance. Methods: Young men were recruited from 2 university campuses in the South (N = 150). Men completed an…

  2. Oral Human Papillomavirus in Youth From the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Farhat, Sepideh; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Ryder, Mark I; Russell, Jonathan S; Van Dyke, Russell B; Hazra, Rohan; Shiboski, Caroline H

    2016-08-01

    In contrast to high rates of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, only 2% of 209 perinatally HIV-infected youth had oral HPV. This rate was similar in HIV-exposed but uninfected youth. No association was found with sexual activity; however, low CD4 counts were associated with oral HPV.

  3. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intention among College Men: What's Oral Sex Got to Do with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Richard A.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Salazar, Laura F.; Nash, Rachel; Younge, Sinead; Head, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify associations between engaging in oral sex and perceived risk of oral cancer among college men. Also, to identify associations, and their moderating factors, between oral sex and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance. Methods: Young men were recruited from 2 university campuses in the South (N = 150). Men completed an…

  4. [Determination of human papillomavirus in oral leukoplakia,oral lichen planus and oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Cao, Jie; Jin, Jian-qiu; Deng, Da-jun; Liu, Hong-wei

    2016-02-18

    To investigate the possibility for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to be a predictable signal for the carcinogenesis of oral mucosa by comparing the prevalences of HPV in each stage of oral mucosal carcinogenesis and to compare the sensitivity differences of the two methods in detecting HPV infection in oral cavity. The hybrid capture (HC-II) was used to detect infection of HPV in 255 samples taken from 12 cases of healthy oral mucosa, 211 cases of patients with pathological diagnosis and 32 cases of patients with clinical diagnosis. The diagnosed cases included 8 cases of benign lesions of the oral mucosa, precancerous lesions [74 cases of oral leukoplakia (OLK) with hyperplasia and 42 cases of OLK with oral epithelial dysplasia (OED)], 91 cases of precancerous condition [oral lichen planus (OLP)] and 28 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). And in situ hybridization (ISH) was used to detect infection of HPV in 33 cases of OSCC and 76 cases of OLK, including 30 cases of hyperplasia, 15 cases of mild OED, 15 cases of moderate OED and 16 cases of severe OED. The prevalence of HPV in OLP samples was higher (12.12%, 8/66) than that of OLK (2.59%, 3/116) (χ(2)=4.666, P=0.031) and OSCC(7.14%, 2/28, χ(2)=0.513, P=0.474). The prevalence of HPV in OSCC (7.14%, 2/28) was higher than that of OLK (2.59%, 3/116), and no significant difference was found. There was only one case of smoke spot and statistical analysis was not carried out. ISH was used to detect type 16/18 and type 31/33 HPV DNA in 109 cases of oral mucosal lesions in paraffin sections and only one case of OSCC was HPV positive. Thirty-seven cases were detected by HC-II and ISH methods at the same time. The same negative results by the two methods were found in 94.6% samples (35/37). In the other two samples, one was OSCC with early infiltration and the other was OLK with hyperplasia, The HC-II results were positive while the ISH results were negative. The patients with OLP and HPV testing results

  5. Korean Sa-Ahm Acupuncture for Treating Canine Oral Fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Keum Hwa; Flynn, Kristi

    2017-06-01

    A nine-year-old male neutered Golden Retriever presented with oral fibrosarcoma. Sa-Ahm Traditional Korean acupuncture was provided along with medicinal herb treatment. Based on Sa-Ahm's theory, the constitution of this case was hypoactive Large-Intestine (LI) meridian qi. The acupuncture treatment was focused on reinforcing LI meridian qi along with reinforcing Small-Intestine and Liver meridian qi. The necrosis of the tumor started from 8 months after treatments and was completely necrotized around 1 month after initiation of tumor necrosis. Karnofsky Performance Status score was 80 to 100 % throughout the treatment except during the active stage of tumor necrosis having KPS of 50%. In this study, oral fibrosarcoma was managed well by both Sa-Ahm acupuncture and medicinal herb treatment. The result suggested that Sa-Ahm acupuncture along with herbal treatment could be a potential medical option for canine oral FSA therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Human papillomavirus DNA in oral squamous cell carcinomas and normal oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kansky, A A; Poljak, M; Seme, K; Kocjan, B J; Gale, N; Luzar, B; Golouh, R

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the putative etiologic role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in oral carcinogenesis, a comparative study was carried out on 62 tissue specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and on 62 specimens of histologically normal oral mucosa obtained from the individuals who matched the subjects with OSCC in age, gender, localization of obtained tissue specimens, drinking and smoking habits. Internal control amplification showed that amplifiable DNA was recovered from 59/62 and 61/62 tissue samples of OSCC and normal oral mucosa, respectively. The amplification with two different HPV L1 and one HPV E6 consensus primer sets showed the presence of the HPV DNA genotypes 16, 33, 58 in 5/59 (8.4%) OSCC specimens and HPV genotypes 11, 16, 31, 68 in 4/61 (6.6%) tissue samples of normal oral mucosa tested. In the study in which a comparative examination of the presence of HPV DNA was for the first time performed on the tissue samples of the patients with OSCC and the age- and gender-matched control subjects there was no significant difference in the prevalence of HPV DNA among both study groups. Our results suggest that occasional findings of HPV DNA in OSCC tissue specimens may be the result of an incidental HPV colonization of oral mucosa, rather than of viral infection, and that HPVs play a limited role in the etiopathogenesis of the majority of OSCC.

  7. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) in tissue specimens of oral squamous cell papillomas and normal oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kansky, Andrej A; Seme, Katja; Maver, Polona J; Luzar, Bostjan; Gale, Nina; Poljak, Mario

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of oral squamous cell papillomas (OSCP) is still unresolved. The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) was examined, using PCR and three different consensus primers, in tissue specimens obtained from 49 patients with OSCP and 49 tissue specimens of histologically-normal oral mucosa obtained from the same number of individuals, who matched the patients with OSCP in age, gender and localization of the obtained tissue specimens. Amplifiable DNA was recovered from 44 out of 49 and 45 out of 49 tissue specimens of OSCP and normal oral mucosa, respectively. HPV-6 was detected in three and HPV-16 in one out of 44 OSCP specimens tested. Three tissue specimens of normal oral mucosa were HPV DNA-positive, harboring HPV-6, HPV-11 and HPV-31. Since no significant difference in the prevalence of HPV DNA between the patients with OSCP and the control subjects (9.1% vs. 6.7%; p=0.694) was observed, HPV is deemed to play a limited role in the etiology of OSCP, at least in Europe.

  8. Human papillomavirus-32-associated focal epithelial hyperplasia accompanying HPV-16-positive papilloma-like lesions in oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Wang, Jiayi; Lei, Lei; Li, Yanzhong; Zhou, Min; Dan, Hongxia; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2013-05-01

    Human papillomavirus infection can cause a variety of benign or malignant oral lesions, and the various genotypes can cause distinct types of lesions. To our best knowledge, there has been no report of 2 different human papillomavirus-related oral lesions in different oral sites in the same patient before. This paper reported a patient with 2 different oral lesions which were clinically and histologically in accord with focal epithelial hyperplasia and oral papilloma, respectively. Using DNA extracted from these 2 different lesions, tissue blocks were tested for presence of human papillomavirus followed by specific polymerase chain reaction testing for 6, 11, 13, 16, 18, and 32 subtypes in order to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Finally, human papillomavirus-32-positive focal epithelial hyperplasia accompanying human papillomavirus-16-positive oral papilloma-like lesions were detected in different sites of the oral mucosa. Nucleotide sequence sequencing further confirmed the results. So in our clinical work, if the simultaneous occurrences of different human papillomavirus associated lesions are suspected, the multiple biopsies from different lesions and detection of human papillomavirus genotype are needed to confirm the diagnosis.

  9. Next-generation sequencing analysis for detecting human papillomavirus in oral verrucous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Samman, Manar; Wood, Henry; Conway, Caroline; Berri, Stefano; Pentenero, Monica; Gandolfo, Sergio; Cassenti, Adele; Cassoni, Paola; Al Ajlan, Abdulaziz; Barrett, A William; Chengot, Preetha; MacLennan, Kenneth; High, Alec S; Rabbitts, Pamela

    2014-07-01

    The etiology of oral verrucous carcinoma is unknown, and human papillomavirus 'involvement' remains contentious. The uncertainty can be attributed to varied detection procedures and difficulties in defining 'gold-standard' histologic criteria for diagnosing 'verrucous' lesions. Their paucity also hampers investigation. We aimed to analyze oral verrucous lesions for human papillomavirus (HPV) subtype genomes. We used next-generation sequencing for the detection of papillomavirus sequences, identifying subtypes and computing viral loads. We identified a total of 78 oral verrucous cases (62 carcinomas and 16 hyperplasias). DNA was extracted from all and sequenced at a coverage between 2.5% and 13%. An HPV-16 sequence was detected in 1 carcinoma and 1 hyperplasia, and an HPV-2 sequence was detected in 1 carcinoma out of the 78 cases, with viral loads of 2.24, 8.16, and 0.33 viral genomes per cell, respectively. Our results indicate no conclusive human papillomavirus involvement in oral verrucous carcinoma or hyperplasia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human papillomavirus vaccine intention among college men: what's oral sex got to do with it?

    PubMed

    Crosby, Richard A; DiClemente, Ralph J; Salazar, Laura F; Nash, Rachel; Younge, Sinead; Head, Sara

    2012-01-01

    To identify associations between engaging in oral sex and perceived risk of oral cancer among college men. Also, to identify associations, and their moderating factors, between oral sex and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance. Young men were recruited from 2 university campuses in the South (N = 150). Men completed an audio computer-assisted self-administered interview. With the exception of receiving fellatio, each measure of oral sex behavior was significantly associated with greater perceived risk of oral cancer. Four oral sex behaviors evidenced significant associations with vaccine acceptance. Men engaging in recent oral sex or reporting oral sex behaviors with more than 2 partners were more likely to indicate vaccine intent. African American/black race, communication with parents about sex-related topics, and HPV-related stigma/shame were identified as moderating factors. Young college men giving or receiving oral sex with multiple partners may be predisposed to HPV vaccination.

  11. Canine keratinocytes upregulate type I interferons and proinflammatory cytokines in response to poly(dA:dT) but not to canine papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Luff, Jennifer A; Yuan, Hang; Suter, Maja M; Müller, Eliane J; Schlegel, Richard; Moore, Peter F

    2013-06-15

    Papillomaviruses (PV) are double stranded (ds) DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells within the skin or mucosa, most often causing benign neoplasms that spontaneously regress. The immune system plays a key role in the defense against PVs. Since these viruses infect keratinocytes, we wanted to investigate the role of the keratinocyte in initiating an immune response to canine papillomavirus-2 (CPV-2) in the dog. Keratinocytes express a variety of pattern recognition receptors (PRR) to distinguish different cutaneous pathogens and initiate an immune response. We examined the mRNA expression patterns for several recently described cytosolic nucleic acid sensing PRRs in canine monolayer keratinocyte cultures using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Unstimulated normal cells were found to express mRNA for melanoma differentiation associated gene 5 (MDA5), retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I), DNA-dependent activation of interferon regulatory factors, leucine rich repeat flightless interacting protein 1, and interferon inducible gene 16 (IFI16), as well as their adaptor molecules myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, interferon-β promoter stimulator 1, and endoplasmic reticulum-resident transmembrane protein stimulator of interferon genes. When stimulated with synthetic dsDNA [poly(dA:dT)] or dsRNA [poly(I:C)], keratinocytes responded with increased mRNA expression levels for interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-β, RIG-I, IFI16, and MDA5. There was no detectable increase in mRNA expression, however, in keratinocytes infected with CPV-2. Furthermore, CPV-2-infected keratinocytes stimulated with poly(dA:dT) and poly(I:C) showed similar mRNA expression levels for these gene products when compared with expression levels in uninfected cells. These results suggest that although canine keratinocytes contain functional PRRs that can recognize and respond to dsDNA and dsRNA ligands, they do not appear to recognize or

  12. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. A unique manifestation of human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    van der Voort, E A M; Arani, S Fallah; Hegt, V Noordhoek; van Praag, M C G

    2009-03-01

    A 34-year old Creole woman appeared at the dermatology department with white-pink spots on the oral mucosa, which had been there for some time. Histology showed lesions characteristic of focal epithelial hyperplasia. The patient was treated with a CO2 laser. Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare benign lesion and is caused by human papillomavirus subtypes 13 or 32; it only appears on the oral mucosa.

  13. Role of human papillomavirus in oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral potentially malignant disorders: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shikha; Gupta, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are epitheliotropic viruses with an affinity for keratinocytes and are principally found in the anogenital tract, urethra, skin, larynx, tracheobronchial and oral mucosa. On the basis of high, but variable frequency of HPV in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), malignant potential of HPV infection has been hypothesized but not definitely confirmed. The aim of this review was to highlight the genomic structure and possible mechanism of infection and carcinogenesis by HPV in the oral mucosa and to review the frequency of HPV prevalence in OSCC and oral potentially malignant disorders. A computer database search was performed through the use of PubMed from 1994 to 2014. Search keywords used were: HPV and oral cancer, HPV and oral leukoplakia, HPV and oral lichen planus, HPV and OSCC, HPV and verrucous carcinoma, HPV and proliferative verrucous leukoplakia, HPV and oral papilloma. PMID:26097339

  14. Oral selamectin in the treatment of canine generalised demodicosis.

    PubMed

    Schnabl, B; Bettenay, S; Glos, N; Linek, M; Loewenstein, C; Mueller, R S

    2010-06-05

    The success rates and adverse effects of a selamectin spot-on preparation, given orally weekly or every other week, against canine generalised demodicosis were evaluated in 44 dogs, 39 with juvenile-onset demodicosis and five with adult-onset demodicosis. The dogs received selamectin at a dose of 24 to 48 mg/kg once a week, or the same dose every two weeks. Thirty-eight dogs completed the study, four dogs were lost to follow-up and two dogs died. Nine dogs went into remission: all had the juvenile-onset form of the disease. There was no difference between the two treatment groups, but dogs with clinical scores of 65 or less responded significantly better than those with a score of over 65 (P=0.0015). The most frequent adverse effects were vomiting and diarrhoea. Two dogs exhibited mild reversible neurological side effects, which resolved with cessation of treatment. Difficulties in oral administration were observed in several dogs.

  15. Papillomaviruses: Molecular and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Howley, P.M.; Broker, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains nine sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are : Papillomaviruses and Human Genital Tract Diseases;Papillomaviruses and Human Cutaneous Diseases, Papillomaviruses and Human Oral and Laryngeal Diseases;Therapeutic Approaches to Papillomavirus Infections;Animal Papillomaviruses;Molecular Biology;Transcription, Replication, and Genome Organization;Epithelial Cell Culture;Papillomavirus Transformation;and Viral Vectors.

  16. The expression of calretinin and cytokeratins in canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fulton, A; Arzi, B; Murphy, B; Naydan, D K; Verstraete, F J M

    2014-12-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma (CAA) represent two epithelium-derived neoplasms that affect the oral cavity of dogs. The expression of cytokeratins (CKs) and calretinin has been previously established in the canine tooth bud and odontogenic tumours. The aim of this study was to characterize the CK and calretinin expression profile of OSCC in comparison to CAA and canine tooth bud tissues. Samples from 15 OSCC and 15 CAA cases, as well as 6 tooth buds and 2 normal gingival tissues were examined. OSCC CK expression was consistent with the CK expression profile of CAA and canine tooth bud tissue. Calretinin was positively expressed in 10 of 15 OSCC cases, with 5 cases demonstrating high staining intensity. Only 2 of 15 CAA cases demonstrated mild-moderate staining intensity. The statistically significant difference in staining pattern and intensity of calretinin in OSCC and CAA can help distinguish between these two tumour types. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Significant changes in sexual behavior after a diagnosis of human papillomavirus-positive and human papillomavirus-negative oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Taberna, Miren; Inglehart, Ronald C; Pickard, Robert K L; Fakhry, Carole; Agrawal, Amit; Katz, Mira L; Gillison, Maura L

    2017-04-01

    Sexual behavior and oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection are risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The effects of OSCC diagnosis and treatment on subsequent relationship stress and sexual behavior are unknown. Incident cases of HPV-positive or HPV-negative OSCC in patients who had a partnered relationship and partners of patients with oropharyngeal cancer were eligible for a study in which surveys were administered at diagnosis and at the 6-month follow-up time point to assess relationship distress, HPV transmission and concerns about health consequences, and sexual behavior. The frequency distributions of responses, stratified by tumor HPV status, were compared at baseline and follow-up. In total, 262 patients with OSCC and 81 partners were enrolled. Among the patients, 142 (54.2%) had HPV-positive OSCC, and 120 (45.8%) had HPV-negative OSCC. Relationship distress was infrequently reported, and 69% of patients felt that their relationship had strengthened since the cancer diagnosis. Both HPV-positive patients (25%) and their partners (14%) reported feelings of guilt or responsibility for the diagnosis of an HPV-caused cancer. Concern over sexual, but not nonsexual, HPV transmission to partners was reported by 50%. Significant declines in the frequency of vaginal and oral sexual behaviors were reported at follow-up, regardless of tumor HPV status. From baseline to 6 months, significant increases in abstinence from vaginal sex (from 10% to 34%; P < .01) and oral sex (from 25% to 80%; P < .01) were reported. Diagnosis and treatment of OSCC are associated with significant declines in the frequency of vaginal and oral sex, regardless of tumor HPV status. Sexual behavior is an important quality-of-life outcome to assess within clinical trials. [See related editorial on pages 000-000, this issue.] Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2017;123:1156-1165. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. A new understanding of oral and dental disorders of the equine incisor and canine teeth.

    PubMed

    Earley, Edward; Rawlinson, Jennifer T

    2013-08-01

    This article discusses the classification systems for dental fractures and how the assessment affects treatment options. Diagonal incisor malocclusion is discussed in relation to skull asymmetry and how this commonly relates to premolar and molar occlusion. Oral and radiographic assessment of incisive bone fracture and incisor avulsion is reviewed for determining treatment options. A summary of incisor and canine resorption and hypercementosis is presented. Clinical presentations, staging, and classifications of tooth resorption as well as canine odontoplasty are discussed. Excessive plaque and calculus formation on lower canines leading to periodontal disease and abscess is examined.

  19. Low prevalence of high risk human papillomavirus in normal oral mucosa by hybrid capture 2

    PubMed Central

    González-Losa, Maria del Refugio; Manzano-Cabrera, Luis; Rueda-Gordillo, Florencio; Hernández-Solís, Sandra E.; Puerto-Solís, Luis

    2008-01-01

    High risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) are recognized as a necessary factor to development cervical cancer. During the last decade many studies have found HR-HPV in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and normal oral mucosa, however the association between HR-HPV and OSCC is still uncertain. The aim of the study was to determine DNA HR-HPV in normal oral cavity of healthy adults. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 77 patients with normal oral cavity were collected at the Dentistry school, Autonomous University of Yucatan, Merida, Yucatan, México. HR-HPV was detected by hybrid capture 2. One sample out of 77(1.2%) was positive for HR-PVH. It was from a man of 50 years old. HRHPV is present in low rate among healthy oral mucosa. Hybrid capture 2 could be a good methodology for large epidemiology studies. PMID:24031173

  20. Comparison of the Oral Microbiomes of Canines and Their Owners Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Changin; Lee, Kunkyu; Cheong, Yeotaek; Lee, Sang-Won; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2015-01-01

    The oral microbiome, which is closely associated with many diseases, and the resident pathogenic oral bacteria, which can be transferred by close physical contact, are important public health considerations. Although the dog is the most common companion animal, the composition of the canine oral microbiome, which may include human pathogenic bacteria, and its relationship with that of their owners are unclear. In this study, 16S rDNA pyrosequencing was used to compare the oral microbiomes of 10 dogs and their owners and to identify zoonotic pathogens. Pyrosequencing revealed 246 operational taxonomic units in the 10 samples, representing 57 genera from eight bacterial phyla. Firmicutes (57.6%), Proteobacteria (21.6%), Bacteroidetes (9.8%), Actinobacteria (7.1%), and Fusobacteria (3.9%) were the predominant phyla in the human oral samples, whereas Proteobacteria (25.7%), Actinobacteria (21%), Bacteroidetes (19.7%), Firmicutes (19.3%), and Fusobacteria (12.3%) were predominant in the canine oral samples. The predominant genera in the human samples were Streptococcus (43.9%), Neisseria (10.3%), Haemophilus (9.6%), Prevotella (8.4%), and Veillonella (8.1%), whereas the predominant genera in the canine samples were Actinomyces (17.2%), Unknown (16.8), Porphyromonas (14.8), Fusobacterium (11.8), and Neisseria (7.2%). The oral microbiomes of dogs and their owners were appreciably different, and similarity in the microbiomes of canines and their owners was not correlated with residing in the same household. Oral-to-oral transfer of Neisseria shayeganii, Porphyromonas canigingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Streptococcus minor from dogs to humans was suspected. The finding of potentially zoonotic and periodontopathic bacteria in the canine oral microbiome may be a public health concern. PMID:26134411

  1. Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals. PVs cause infections without triggering a strong immune response, and natural infection provides only limited protection against reinfection. Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota. In some cases, infections by certain PVs take diverse clinical presentations from highly productive self-limited warts to invasive cancers. We propose PVs as an excellent model system to study the evolutionary interactions between the immune system and pathogens causing chronic infections: genotypically, PVs are very diverse, with hundreds of different genotypes infecting skin and mucosa; phenotypically, they display extremely broad gradients and trade-offs between key phenotypic traits, namely productivity, immunogenicity, prevalence, oncogenicity and clinical presentation. Public health interventions have been launched to decrease the burden of PV-associated cancers, including massive vaccination against the most oncogenic human PVs, as well as systematic screening for PV chronic anogenital infections. Anti-PVs vaccines elicit protection against infection, induce cross-protection against closely related viruses and result in herd immunity. However, our knowledge on the ecological and intrapatient dynamics of PV infections remains fragmentary. We still need to understand how the novel anthropogenic selection pressures posed by vaccination and screening will affect viral circulation and epidemiology. We present here an overview of PV evolution and the connection between PV genotypes and the phenotypic, clinical manifestations of the diseases they cause. This differential link between viral evolution and the gradient cancer-warts-asymptomatic infections makes PVs a privileged playground for evolutionary medicine research. PMID:25634317

  2. Sexual behaviors and other risk factors for oral human papillomavirus infections in young women.

    PubMed

    Cook, Robert L; Thompson, Erika L; Kelso, Natalie E; Friary, John; Hosford, Jennifer; Barkley, Phillip; Dodd, Virginia J; Abrahamsen, Martha; Ajinkya, Shaun; Obesso, Peter Daniel; Rashid, Mohammed H; Giuliano, Anna R

    2014-08-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with a rising incidence of certain head and neck cancers, and oral sex has been associated with oral HPV. This study sought to identify more specific patterns of oral sexual activity, including self-inoculation, that are associated with oral HPV infections in young women. A total of 1010 women attending a large university completed a computer-based questionnaire and provided oral specimens that were tested for any oral HPV using a Linear Array assay that detects any HPV as well as 37 HPV genotypes. Twenty-seven women provided additional samples up to 12 months after enrollment. Bivariable and multivariable analyses were conducted to identify oral sexual patterns and other risk factors associated with prevalent oral HPV. Nineteen women had prevalent oral HPV (1.9%), with 10 women (1%) having a type-specific infection. Oral HPV was significantly associated with lifetime coital sex partnership numbers (P = 0.03), lifetime and yearly oral sex partnership numbers (P < 0.01), and hand and/or sex toy transfer from genitals to mouth (P < 0.001). Oral HPV was also associated with greater use of alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana, and sharing of smoking devices, lipstick, or toothbrushes (P < 0.05 for each), with an apparent dose-response for alcohol use and smoking behavior, stratified by number of sexual partners. Of 7 women with prevalent HPV who provided follow-up samples, none had evidence of a persistent type-specific infection. These data provide additional evidence of transmission of oral HPV from oral sexual activity and also suggest possible transmission from self-inoculation or sharing of oral products.

  3. Human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus associated conditions of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Stojanov, Ivan J; Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections of the oral mucosa may present as both benign and malignant conditions. Squamous papilloma, verruca vulgaris, and condyloma acuminatum are benign, HPV-associated growths treated with simple excision while multifocal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck disease) usually occurs in children and adolescents and resolves over time. HPV-associated oral dysplasia is uncommon and HPV-carcinoma comprises 6% of oral squamous cell carcinomas. EBV is responsible for oral hairy leukoplakia, a benign condition seen in immunocompromised patients, while the EBV-associated mucocutaneous ulcer is a recently-described, indolent condition associated with an atypical lymphoid proliferation seen immunocompromised patients as well as older adults, the latter likely because of immunosenescence. Awareness of these conditions is important for the practicing pathologist because some of these conditions may represent the first sign of underlying immunocompromise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CE: Human Papillomavirus-Related Oral Cancers: The Nurse's Role in Mitigating Stigma and Dispelling Myths.

    PubMed

    Katz, Anne

    2017-01-01

    : The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral cancers has been rising, the cancers occurring in adults at a younger age than HPV-negative oral cancers typically do and in men more often than women. Patients who are diagnosed often don't understand the disease's etiology. Because HPV is sexually transmitted, diagnosis with an HPV-related oral cancer may prompt feelings of shame, embarrassment, and guilt. There are currently three vaccines for HPV. It's essential for nurses to educate patients on HPV transmission and HPV-related oral cancer, thus helping to mitigate the stigma and dispel myths, and to promote vaccination in at-risk populations, including children and young adults.

  5. Oral squamous papilloma and condyloma acuminatum as manifestations of buccal-genital infection by human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Helena Lucia B.; Rabelo, Priscila C.; de Santana, Maria Rúbia F.; Ferreira, Dennis Carvalho; Filho, Antônio C.

    2009-01-01

    Genital infection by human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted disease (STD), has increased considerably due to the changes in sexual behaviour and an increase in the practice of oral sex. HPV, in a parallel manner, has been closely studied due to its oncogenic potential. We present the case of a 27-year-old patient, with a multi-partner sexual history and frequent practice of oral sex, who suffered from warts lesions on the genitalia and tongue. Squamous papilloma was diagnosed from a tongue biopsy. The treatment of the oral lesion was by way of surgery, without relapse in the first two years. Our discussion in this report is regarding the HPV infection in the oral cavity. PMID:21938114

  6. CE: Human Papillomavirus-Related Oral Cancers: The Nurse's Role in Mitigating Stigma and Dispelling Myths.

    PubMed

    Katz, Anne

    2016-12-13

    Frank discussion is essential to both treatment and prevention. The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral cancers has been rising, the cancers occurring in adults at a younger age than HPV-negative oral cancers typically do and in men more often than women. Patients who are diagnosed often don't understand the disease's etiology. Because HPV is sexually transmitted, diagnosis with an HPV-related oral cancer may prompt feelings of shame, embarrassment, and guilt. There are currently three vaccines for HPV. It's essential for nurses to educate patients on HPV transmission and HPV-related oral cancer, thus helping to mitigate the stigma and dispel myths, and to promote vaccination in at-risk populations, including children and young adults.

  7. Human Papillomavirus in the Lesions of the Oral Mucosa According to Topography

    PubMed Central

    Mravak-Stipetić, Marinka; Sabol, Ivan; Kranjčić, Josip; Knežević, Marjana; Grce, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Background The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) types and oral lesions has been shown in many studies. Considering the significance that HPV has in the development of malignant and potentially malignant disorders of the oral mucosa, the purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV DNA in different oral lesions. In addition, we wanted to elucidate whether the HPV infection is associated predominantly with either the lesion or a particular anatomic site of the oral cavity. Methodology/Principal Findings The study included 246 subjects with different oral lesions, and 73 subjects with apparently healthy oral mucosa (controls). The oral lesions were classified according to their surface morphology and clinical diagnosis. The epithelial cells were collected with a cytobrush from different topographic sites in the oral cavity of the oral lesions and controls. The presence of HPV DNA was evaluated by consensus and type-specific primer-directed polymerase chain reaction. The HPV positivity was detected in 17.7% of oral lesions, significantly more than in apparently healthy mucosa (6.8%), with a higher presence in benign proliferative mucosal lesions (18.6%). High-risk HPV types were predominantly found in potentially malignant oral disorders (HPV16 in 4.3% and HPV31 in 3.4%), while benign proliferative lesions as well as healthy oral mucosa contained mainly undetermined HPV type (13.6 and 6.8%, respectively). Conclusions/Significance The distribution of positive HPV findings on the oral mucosa seems to be more associated with a particular anatomical site than the diagnosis itself. Samples taken from the vermilion border, labial commissures, and hard palate were most often HPV positive. Thus, topography plays a role in HPV prevalence findings in oral lesions. Because of the higher prevalence of the high-risk HPV types in potentially malignant oral disorders, these lesions need to be continuously controlled and treated. PMID:23922786

  8. Differences in oral sexual behaviors by gender, age, and race explain observed differences in prevalence of oral human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Cullen, Kevin; Bowie, Janice; Thorpe, Roland; Fakhry, Carole

    2014-01-01

    This study explores whether gender, age and race differences in oral sexual behavior account for the demographic distribution of oral human papillomavirus infection (HPV) and HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer (HPV-OSCC). This analysis included 2,116 men and 2,140 women from NHANES (2009-10) who answered a behavioral questionnaire and provided an oral-rinse sample for HPV detection. Weighted prevalence estimates and prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated for sexual behaviors and oral HPV infection by gender, age-cohort (20-29, 30-44, 45-59, 60-69), and race, and contrasted with incidence rate ratios (IRR) of OSCC from SEER 2009. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate predictors of oral sexual behavior and oral HPV16 infection. Differences in oral sexual behavior were observed by gender, age-cohort and race. Most men (85.4%) and women (83.2%) had ever performed oral sex, but men had more lifetime oral and vaginal sexual partners and higher oral HPV16 prevalence than women (each p<0.001). 60-69 year olds (yo) were less likely than 45-59 or 30-44 (yo) to have performed oral sex (72.7%, 84.8%, and 90.3%, p<0.001), although oral HPV16 prevalence was similar. Prevalence ratios (PR) of ever oral sex in men vs. women (PR = 1.03), and 45-59 vs. 30-44 year-old men (PR = 0.96) were modest relative to ratios for oral HPV16 infection (PRs = 1.3-6.8) and OSCC (IRR = 4.7-8.1). In multivariate analysis, gender, age-cohort, and race were significant predictors of oral sexual behavior. Oral sexual behavior was the primary predictor of oral HPV16 infection; once this behavior was adjusted for, age-cohort and race were no longer associated with oral HPV16. There are differences in oral sexual behaviors when considering gender, age-cohort and race which explain observed epidemiologic differences in oral HPV16 infection across these groups.

  9. Differences in Oral Sexual Behaviors by Gender, Age, and Race Explain Observed Differences in Prevalence of Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Cullen, Kevin; Bowie, Janice; Thorpe, Roland; Fakhry, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study explores whether gender, age and race differences in oral sexual behavior account for the demographic distribution of oral human papillomavirus infection (HPV) and HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer (HPV-OSCC) Methods This analysis included 2,116 men and 2,140 women from NHANES (2009–10) who answered a behavioral questionnaire and provided an oral-rinse sample for HPV detection. Weighted prevalence estimates and prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated for sexual behaviors and oral HPV infection by gender, age-cohort (20–29, 30–44, 45–59, 60–69), and race, and contrasted with incidence rate ratios (IRR) of OSCC from SEER 2009. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate predictors of oral sexual behavior and oral HPV16 infection. Results Differences in oral sexual behavior were observed by gender, age-cohort and race. Most men (85.4%) and women (83.2%) had ever performed oral sex, but men had more lifetime oral and vaginal sexual partners and higher oral HPV16 prevalence than women (each p<0.001). 60–69 year olds (yo) were less likely than 45–59 or 30–44 (yo) to have performed oral sex (72.7%, 84.8%, and 90.3%, p<0.001), although oral HPV16 prevalence was similar. Prevalence ratios (PR) of ever oral sex in men vs. women (PR = 1.03), and 45–59 vs. 30–44 year-old men (PR = 0.96) were modest relative to ratios for oral HPV16 infection (PRs = 1.3–6.8) and OSCC (IRR = 4.7–8.1). In multivariate analysis, gender, age-cohort, and race were significant predictors of oral sexual behavior. Oral sexual behavior was the primary predictor of oral HPV16 infection; once this behavior was adjusted for, age-cohort and race were no longer associated with oral HPV16. Conclusion There are differences in oral sexual behaviors when considering gender, age-cohort and race which explain observed epidemiologic differences in oral HPV16 infection across these groups. PMID:24475067

  10. Six-month natural history of oral versus cervical human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Fakhry, Carole; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Seaberg, Eric C; Weber, Kathleen; Minkoff, Howard L; Anastos, Kathryn; Palefsky, Joel M; Gillison, Maura L

    2007-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is etiologically associated with a subset of oral cancers, and yet, the natural history of oral HPV infection remains unexplored. The feasibility of studying oral HPV natural history was evaluated by collecting oral rinse samples on 2 occasions at a 6-month interval from 136 HIV-positive and 63 HIV-negative participants. Cervical vaginal lavage samples were concurrently collected for comparison. HPV genomic DNA was detected in oral and cervical samples by consensus primer PCR and type-specified for 37 HPV types. The six-month cumulative prevalence of oral HPV infection was significantly less than for cervical infection (p < 0.0001). HIV-positive women were more likely than HIV-negative women to have an oral (33 vs. 15%, p = 0.016) or cervical (78 vs. 51%, p < 0.001) infection detected. Oral HPV infections detected at baseline were as likely as cervical infections to persist to 6 months among HIV-negative (60% vs. 51%, p = 0.70) and HIV-positive (55% vs. 63%, p = 0.27) women. Factors that independently elevated odds for oral HPV persistence differed from cervical infection and included current smoking (OR = 8, 95% CI = 1.3-53), age above 44 years (OR = 20, 95% CI = 4.1-83), CD4 < 500 (OR = 6, 95% CI = 1.1-26), use of HAART therapy (OR = 12, 95% CI = 1.0-156), and time on HAART therapy (trend p = 0.04). The rate of oral HPV infections newly detected at follow-up was significantly lower than cervical infection among HIV-positive (p < 0.001) and HIV-negative women (p < 0.001). Our study not only demonstrates that it is feasible to study the natural history of oral HPV infection with oral rinse sampling, but also indicates that oral and cervical HPV natural history may differ.

  11. Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in HPV-positive patients with oropharyngeal cancer and their partners.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Gross, Neil D; Pai, Sara I; Haddad, Robert; Anderson, Karen S; Rajan, Shirani; Gerber, Jennifer; Gillison, Maura L; Posner, Marshall R

    2014-08-10

    To better understand oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cancer risk among long-term sexual partners of patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer (HPV-OPC). An oral rinse sample, risk factor survey, cancer history, and oral examination (partners only) were collected from patients with HPV-OPC and their partners. Oral rinse samples were evaluated for 36 types of HPV DNA using PGMY 09/11 primers and line-blot hybridization and HPV16 copy number using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Oral HPV prevalence was compared with infection among those age 45 to 65 years using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2010. A total of 164 patients with HPV-OPC and 93 of their partners were enrolled. Patients were primarily men (90%), were never-smokers (51%), and had performed oral sex (97%), with a median age of 56 years; they had a high prevalence of oncogenic oral HPV DNA (61%) and oral HPV16 DNA (54%) at enrollment. Female partners had comparable oncogenic oral HPV prevalence compared with members of the general population of the same age (1.2% v 1.3%). Among the six male partners, no oncogenic oral HPV infections were detected. No precancers or cancers were identified during partner oral cancer screening examinations. However, a history of cervical disease was reported by nine partners (10.3%) and two female patients (11.8%), and three patients (2.0%) reported a previous partner who developed invasive cervical cancer. Oral HPV16 DNA is commonly detected among patients with HPV-OPC at diagnosis, but not among their partners. Partners of patients with HPV-OPC do not seem to have elevated oral HPV infection compared with the general population. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Oral Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection in HPV-Positive Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer and Their Partners

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Gross, Neil D.; Pai, Sara I.; Haddad, Robert; Anderson, Karen S.; Rajan, Shirani; Gerber, Jennifer; Gillison, Maura L.; Posner, Marshall R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To better understand oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cancer risk among long-term sexual partners of patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer (HPV-OPC). Patients and Methods An oral rinse sample, risk factor survey, cancer history, and oral examination (partners only) were collected from patients with HPV-OPC and their partners. Oral rinse samples were evaluated for 36 types of HPV DNA using PGMY 09/11 primers and line-blot hybridization and HPV16 copy number using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Oral HPV prevalence was compared with infection among those age 45 to 65 years using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2010. Results A total of 164 patients with HPV-OPC and 93 of their partners were enrolled. Patients were primarily men (90%), were never-smokers (51%), and had performed oral sex (97%), with a median age of 56 years; they had a high prevalence of oncogenic oral HPV DNA (61%) and oral HPV16 DNA (54%) at enrollment. Female partners had comparable oncogenic oral HPV prevalence compared with members of the general population of the same age (1.2% v 1.3%). Among the six male partners, no oncogenic oral HPV infections were detected. No precancers or cancers were identified during partner oral cancer screening examinations. However, a history of cervical disease was reported by nine partners (10.3%) and two female patients (11.8%), and three patients (2.0%) reported a previous partner who developed invasive cervical cancer. Conclusion Oral HPV16 DNA is commonly detected among patients with HPV-OPC at diagnosis, but not among their partners. Partners of patients with HPV-OPC do not seem to have elevated oral HPV infection compared with the general population. PMID:24778397

  13. Regenerative endodontic treatment of an immature permanent canine following infant oral mutilation.

    PubMed

    Noy, Avia Fux; Nuni, Eyal; Moskovitz, Moti

    2013-01-01

    Extracting primary canine tooth buds is a ritual ceremony that prevails in some African countries. This procedure is considered infant oral mutilation (IOM) and may damage the permanent successor and adjacent primary and permanent teeth, resulting in dysplastic or deformed teeth. The purpose of this report was to describe regenerative endodontic treatment of a permanent mandibular canine with extensive coronal hypoplasia, immature root, and a periapical radiolucency following damage to the permanent canine that was probably a result of infant oral mutilation. Regenerative endodontic treatment was initiated by irrigating the root canal, followed by applying triple antibiotic paste dressing over three weeks and creating a blood clot scaffold covered with mineral trioxide aggregate. A 4-year clinical and radiographic follow-up demonstrated healing of the periapical radiolucency. This treatment may serve as a substitute for traditional apexification with calcium hydroxide or creation of an artificial apical barrier with mineral trioxide aggregate.

  14. Human papillomavirus-mediated carcinogenesis and HPV-associated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Part 2: Human papillomavirus associated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feller, Liviu; Wood, Neil H; Khammissa, Razia A G; Lemmer, Johan

    2010-07-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the mouth and oropharynx can be acquired by a variety of sexual and social forms of transmission. HPV-16 genotype is present in many oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomata. It has an essential aetiologic role in the development of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in a subset of subjects who are typically younger, are more engaged with high-risk sexual behaviour, have higher HPV-16 serum antibody titer, use less tobacco and have better survival rates than in subjects with HPV-cytonegative oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. In this subset of subjects the HPV-cytopositive carcinomatous cells have a distinct molecular profile. In contrast to HPV-cytopositive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, the causal association between HPV-16 and other high-risk HPV genotypes and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral mucosa is weak, and the nature of the association is unclear. It is likely that routine administration of HPV vaccination against high-risk HPV genotypes before the start of sexual activity will bring about a reduction in the incidence of HPV-mediated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. This article focuses on aspects of HPV infection of the mouth and the oropharynx with emphasis on the link between HPV and squamous cell carcinoma, and on the limitations of the available diagnostic tests in identifying a cause-and-effect relationship of HPV with squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth and oropharynx.

  15. Detection of Human Papillomavirus Type 2 Related Sequence in Oral Papilloma

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Taihei; Shindoh, Masanobu; Amemiya, Akira; Inoue, Nobuo; Kawamura, Masaaki; Sakaoka, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masakazu; Fujinaga, Kei

    1998-01-01

    Oral papilloma is a benign tumourous lesion. Part of this lesion is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. We analysed the genetical and histopathological evidence for HPV type 2 infection in three oral papillomas. Southern blot hybridization showed HPV 2a sequence in one lesion. Cells of the positive specimen appeared to contain high copy numbers of the viral DNA in an episomal state. In situ staining demonstrated virus capsid antigen in koilocytotic cells and surrounding cells in the hyperplastic epithelial layer. Two other specimens contained no HPV sequences by labeled probe of full length linear HPVs 2a, 6b, 11, 16, 18, 31 and 33 DNA under low stringency hybridization conditions. These results showed the possibility that HPV 2 plays a role in oral papilloma. PMID:9699941

  16. Diabetes correction in pancreatectomized canines by orally absorbable insulin-deoxycholate complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Kyoon; Lee, Seulki; Jin, Sunji; Moon, Hyun Tae; Jeon, Ok Cheol; Lee, Dong Yun; Byun, Youngro

    2010-06-07

    Oral insulin therapy has great potential benefits over conventional therapy for diabetic patients as well as mimicking the physiological fate of insulin. Here we evaluated the characteristics of insulin and deoxycholate-based synthetic N(alpha)-deoxycholyl-L-lysyl-methylester (DCK) complex, and diabetes correction in pancreatectomized canines after oral administration. After the insulin/DCK complexation was made, the insulin's folding structure, stability against digestive enzymes, lipophilicity and permeability to Caco-2 monolayer were evaluated in vitro. Diabetic canines were kept under fasting conditions, and Eudragit-coated gelatin capsules containing insulin or insulin/DCK powder were singly or triply administered. Evaluation of glucodynamics, pharmacokinetics, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and reproducibility were carried out. After complexation with DCK, the folding structure of insulin did not become denatured and the resistance against digestive enzymes was powerfully improved. The lipophilicity and permeability of insulin/DCK (coupling ratio up to 1:10) were also highly increased. The insulin/DCK complex, administered orally into diabetic canines at the doses of 21, 42, and 81 IU/kg, reduced the plasma glucose levels by about 28%, 44% and 67%, respectively, while the plasma insulin concentrations increased. During OGTT, insulin/DCK nearly maintained the normoglycemic state in the diabetic canines, whereas the hyperglycemic state of placebo-treated controls was not corrected. During oral administration of insulin/DCK, it repetitively showed similar therapeutic efficacy in diabetic canines for 3 days. The therapeutic efficacy of insulin/DCK was exhibited in its digestive enzyme resistance, deoxycholate-based lipophilicity for enhancing permeability and intact insulin delivery without chemical modification, providing potential oral therapeutic remedy as an alternative to injectable insulin medication.

  17. Mouse papillomavirus MmuPV1 infects oral mucosa and preferentially targets the base of the tongue

    PubMed Central

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn R; Balogh, Karla K.; Cooper, Timothy K.; Hu, Jiafen; Christensen, Neil D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, a new mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1, was discovered in a colony of NMRI- Foxn1nu /Foxn1nu athymic mice in India. This finding was significant because it was the first papillomavirus to be found in a laboratory mouse. In this paper we report successful infections of both dorsal and ventral surfaces of the rostral tongues of outbred athymic nude mice. We also report the observation that the base of the tongue, the area of the tongue often targeted by cancer-associated high-risk papillomavirus infections in humans, is especially susceptible to infection. A suitable animal model for the study of oral papillomavirus infections, co-infections, and cancers has long been sought. The work presented here suggests that such a model is now at hand. PMID:26609937

  18. Papillomavirus infections in the oral and genital mucosa of asymptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ledy Horto Santos; Santos, Larissa Silva; Silva, Carolina Oliveira; Augusto, Everton Faccini; Neves, Felipe Piedade Gonçalves

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been found in several regions of the body, including the oral cavity. Recently, this virus has been associated with oropharyngeal cancer, but little is known about HPV transmission to the oral cavity. We carried out a study to investigate concurrent oral and cervical infections in 76 asymptomatic women attending a healthcare program. Demographic and behavior data were obtained through a structured questionnaire. Oral and cervical mucosa scrapings were collected and stored for DNA extraction. HPV DNA amplification was performed by polymerase chain reaction assay (PCR) using both primers My09/My11 and FAP59/64, followed by HPV typing with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP) and sequencing. The data collected revealed no risk factors for HPV infection in these 76 women. HPV prevalence of 9.2 and 5.3% was found in cervical and oral mucosa, respectively. Concurrent infections by discordant types were detected in one case only. Sequencing procedures allowed us to detect a new putative HPV 17 subtype from the Betapapillomavirus genus. Our results support the view that cervical and oral HPV infections are independent events. The observed low prevalence of both oral and cervical HPV infections could be associated with attendance in a healthcare program. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of three novel human papillomavirus types isolated from oral rinse samples of healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Erin; Dang, Juliet; Bzhalava, Davit; Stern, Joshua; Edelstein, Zoe R; Koutsky, Laura A.; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Feng, Qinghua

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the strong evidence of HPV infection as the etiological agent in a subset of oral cancer, oral α-HPV detection is rare in healthy individuals, and little is known of the existing of novel HPV types in oral cavity. Objective We determined whether novel HPV types can be isolated from oral rinse samples collected from healthy individuals. Study design We performed rolling circle amplification (RCA) coupled with degenerated PCR assay on 48 oral rinse samples to amplify novel HPV types. Full length HPV DNA was cloned using long range PCR. Quantitative type specific Taqman assays were used to determine the prevalence of novel HPV types in 158 archived oral tissue samples. Results We were able to isolate four novel human papillomavirus types. Full length HPV DNA was cloned for three of the four novel HPV types. All four HPV types belong to the genus Gammapapillomavirus (γ-PV), where HPV 171 is most closely related to HPV 169, showing 88% similarity; HPV 172 is most closely related to HPV 156, showing 70% similarity; HPV 173 is most closely related to HPV 4, showing 73% similarity; oral sample lavage (OSL) 37 is most closely related to HPV 144, showing 69% similarity. Finally, we showed that HPV 173 was rarely present in oral tissues (2/158), HPV 172 was only detected in normal oral tissues (25/76), and HPV 171 was more prevalent in malignant oral tissues (17/82 vs 10/76, p=0.21). Conclusions Novel γ-HPV types are present in oral cavity of healthy individuals. PMID:24268765

  20. Characterization of three novel human papillomavirus types isolated from oral rinse samples of healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Martin, Erin; Dang, Juliet; Bzhalava, Davit; Stern, Joshua; Edelstein, Zoe R; Koutsky, Laura A; Kiviat, Nancy B; Feng, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Despite the strong evidence of HPV infection as the etiological agent in a subset of oral cancer, oral α-HPV detection is rare in healthy individuals, and little is known of the existing of novel HPV types in oral cavity. We determined whether novel HPV types can be isolated from oral rinse samples collected from healthy individuals. We performed rolling circle amplification (RCA) coupled with degenerated PCR assay on 48 oral rinse samples to amplify novel HPV types. Full length HPV DNA was cloned using long range PCR. Quantitative type specific Taqman assays were used to determine the prevalence of novel HPV types in 158 archived oral tissue samples. We were able to isolate four novel human papillomavirus types. Full length HPV DNA was cloned for three of the four novel HPV types. All four HPV types belong to the genus Gammapapillomavirus (γ-PV), where HPV 171 is most closely related to HPV 169, showing 88% similarity; HPV 172 is most closely related to HPV 156, showing 70% similarity; HPV 173 is most closely related to HPV 4, showing 73% similarity; oral sample lavage (OSL) 37 is most closely related to HPV 144, showing 69% similarity. Finally, we showed that HPV 173 was rarely present in oral tissues (2/158), HPV 172 was only detected in normal oral tissues (25/76), and HPV 171 was more prevalent in malignant oral tissues (17/82 vs. 10/76, p=0.21). Novel γ-HPV types are present in oral cavity of healthy individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection and Oral Lesions in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Katia; Kazimiroff, Julie; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Smith, Richard V.; Wiltz, Mauricio; Polanco, Jacqueline; Grossberg, Robert M.; Belbin, Thomas J.; Strickler, Howard D.; Burk, Robert D.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the risk factors associated with oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and oral lesions in 161 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive patients and 128 HIV-negative patients presenting for oral examination at 2 urban healthcare centers. Patients were interviewed on risk factors and provided oral-rinse samples for HPV DNA typing by polymerase chain reaction. Statistical associations were assessed by logistic regression. Oral HPV was prevalent in 32% and 16% of HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative patients, respectively, including high-risk HPV type 16 (8% and 2%, respectively; P = .049) and uncommon HPV types 32/42 (6% and 5%, respectively; P = .715). Among HIV-negative patients, significant risk factors for oral HPV included multiple sex partners (≥21 vs ≤5; odds ratio [OR], 9.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7–49.3), heavy tobacco smoking (>20 pack-years vs none; OR, 9.2; 95% CI, 1.4–59.4), and marijuana use (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.3–12.4). Among HIV-positive patients, lower CD4+ T-cell count only was associated with oral HPV detection (≤200 vs ≥500 cells/mm3; OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.3–15.5). Detection of high-risk HPV was also associated with concurrent detection of potentially cancerous oral lesions among HIV-negative patients but not among HIV-positive patients. The observed risk factor associations with oral HPV in HIV-negative patients are consistent with sexual transmission and local immunity, whereas in HIV-positive patients, oral HPV detection is strongly associated with low CD4+ T-cell counts. PMID:25681375

  2. No role for human papillomavirus infection in oral cancers in a region in southern India.

    PubMed

    Laprise, Claudie; Madathil, Sreenath A; Allison, Paul; Abraham, Priya; Raghavendran, Anantharam; Shahul, Hameed P; ThekkePurakkal, Akhil-Soman; Castonguay, Geneviève; Coutlée, François; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Rousseau, Marie-Claude; Franco, Eduardo L; Nicolau, Belinda

    2016-02-15

    Oral cancer is a major public health issue in India with ∼ 77,000 new cases and 52,000 deaths yearly. Paan chewing, tobacco and alcohol use are strong risk factors for this cancer in India. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are also related to a subset of head and neck cancers (HNCs). We examined the association between oral HPV and oral cancer in a sample of Indian subjects participating in a hospital-based case-control study. We recruited incident oral cancer cases (N = 350) and controls frequency-matched by age and sex (N = 371) from two main referral hospitals in Kerala, South India. Sociodemographic and behavioral data were collected by interviews. Epithelial cells were sampled using Oral CDx® brushes from the oral cancer site and the normal mucosa. Detection and genotyping of 36 HPV genotypes were done using a polymerase chain reaction protocol. Data collection procedures were performed by qualified dentists via a detailed protocol with strict quality control, including independent HPV testing in India and Canada. HPV DNA was detected in none of the cases or controls. Associations between oral cancer and risk factors usually associated with HPV infection, such as oral sex and number of lifetime sexual partners, were examined by logistic regression and were not associated with oral cancer. Lack of a role for HPV infection in this study may reflect cultural or religious characteristics specific to this region in India that are not conducive to oral HPV transmission. A nationwide representative prevalence study is needed to investigate HPV prevalence variability among Indian regions. © 2015 UICC.

  3. Human papillomavirus infection in oral fluids of HIV-1-positive men:prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Gaester, Karen; Fonseca, Luiz A. M.; Luiz, Olinda; Assone, Tatiane; Fontes, Adriele Souza; Costa, Fernando; Duarte, Alberto J. S.; Casseb, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. The natural history of oral HPV infection is unclear, and its risk factors have not been explored. Immunocompromised individuals, as exemplified by HIV patients, are at high risk for HPV-related diseases. The mean of this study is to determine the prevalence ofHPV in the oral tract of HIV-1-positive male subjects and its association with risk factors. A total of 283 oral wash samples from HIV-1-positive men were tested. The oral fluid samples were used for DNA extraction and conventional PCR amplification; HPV genotyping was performed by hybridization. HPV genotyping revealed that nine samples (3.5%) were positive for HPV DNA; the major high-risk HPV types identified were 51 and 66. Worldwide studies have shown a variable prevalence of oral HPV. The diversity of genotypes and the high prevalence of multiple infections in HIV-infected subjects can be better explained by the effects of HIV-induced immunosuppression. The most important risk factors are unprotected sexual intercourse, but other factors for this infection have been described elsewhere including smoking, age and HIV-positive serostatus. In this study, smoking was the most important risk factor for acquiring oral HPV in HIV-1-infected subjects in Brazil. PMID:25322857

  4. Role of human papillomavirus and tumor suppressor genes in oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manvikar, Vardendra; Kulkarni, Rama; Koneru, Anila; Vanishree, M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high and is associated with many deaths in both Western and Asian countries. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are now well known, including smoking, drinking and consumption of smokeless tobacco products. Genetic predisposition to oral cancer has been found in certain cases, but its components are not yet entirely clear. In accordance with the multi-step theory of carcinogenesis, the natural history of oral cancer seems to gradually evolve through transitional precursor lesions from normal epithelium to a full-blown metastatic phenotype. A number of genomic lesions accompany this transformation and a wealth of related results has appeared in recent literature and is being summarized here. Furthermore, several key genes have been implicated, especially well-known tumor suppressors such as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, TP53 and RB1 and oncogenes such as the cyclin family, epidermal growth factor receptor and RAS. Viral infections, particularly oncogenic human papillomavirus subtypes and Epstein–Barr virus, can have a tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia and their role is discussed, along with potential therapeutic interventions. A brief explanatory theoretical model of oral carcinogenesis is provided and potential avenues for further research are highlighted. PMID:27194871

  5. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia: report of 3 cases with human papillomavirus DNA sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Gültekin, S E; Tokman Yildirim, Benay; Sarisoy, S

    2011-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), or Heck's disease, is a benign proliferative viral infection of the oral mucosa that is related to Human Papil-lomavirus (HPV), mainly subtypes 13 and 32. Although this condition is known to exist in numerous populations and ethnic groups, the reported cases among Caucasians are relatively rare. It presents as asymptomatic papules or nodules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. Histopathologically, it is characterized by parakeratosis, epithelial hyperplasia, focal acanthosis, fusion, and horizontal outgrowth of epithelial ridges and the cells named mitozoids. The purpose of this case report was to present 3 cases of focal epithelial hyperplasia in a pediatric age group. Histopathological and clinical features of cases are discussed and DNA sequencing analysis is reported in which HPV 13, HPV 32, and HPV 11 genomes are detected.

  6. Prevalence and correlates of oral human papillomavirus infection among healthy males and females in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Brian J; Walter, Leora; Gilman, Robert H; Cabrerra, Lilia; Gravitt, Patti E; Marks, Morgan A

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated head and neck cancers (HNCs) have been increasing in Peru. However, the burden of oral HPV infection in Peru has not been assessed. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence and correlates of oral HPV infection in a population-based sample from males and females from Lima, Peru. Between January 2010 and June 2011, a population-based sample of 1099 individuals between the ages of 10 and 85 from a low-income neighbourhood in Lima, Peru was identified through random household sampling. Information on demographic, sexual behaviours, reproductive factors and oral hygiene were collected using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Oral rinse specimens were collected from each participant, and these specimens were genotyped using the Roche Linear Array assay. ORs were used to assess differences in the prevalence of any oral HPV and any high-risk oral HPV infection by demographic factors, sexual practices and oral hygiene among individuals 15+ years of age. The prevalence of any HPV and any high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was 6.8% and 2.0%, respectively. The three most common types were HPV 55 (3.4%), HPV 6 (1.5%) and HPV 16 (1.1%). Male sex (aOR, 2.21; 95% CI 1.22 to 4.03) was associated with any HPV infection after adjustment. The prevalence of oral HPV in this study was similar to estimates observed in the USA. Higher prevalence of oral infections in males was consistent with a male predominance of HPV-associated HNCs and may signal a sex-specific aetiology in the natural history of infection. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Rates and Determinants of Oral Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection in Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Zoe R.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Hawes, Stephen; Hughes, James P.; Feng, Qinghua; Stern, Michael E.; O’Reilly, Sandra; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Xi, Long Fu; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about rates and determinants of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, an infection that is etiologically linked with oropharyngeal cancers. Methods A cohort of male university students (18–24 years of age) was examined every 4 months (212 men; 704 visits). Oral specimens were collected via gargle/rinse and swabbing of the oropharynx. Genotyping for HPV type 16 (HPV-16) and 36 other alpha-genus types was performed by PCR-based assay. Data on potential determinants was gathered via clinical examination, in-person questionnaire, and biweekly online diary. Hazard ratios (HR) were used to measure associations with incident infection. Results Prevalence of oral HPV infection at enrollment was 7.5% and 12-month cumulative incidence was 12.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 7.0, 21.3). Prevalence of oral HPV-16 was 2.8% and 12-month cumulative incidence was 0.8% (CI: 0.1, 5.7). 28.6% of prevalent and none of incident oral HPV infections were detected more than once. In a multivariate model, incident oral HPV infection was associated with recent frequency of performing oral sex (≥1 per week: HR=3.7; CI: 1.4, 9.8), recent anal sex with men (HR=42.9; CI: 8.8, 205.5), current infection with the same HPV type in the genitals (HR=6.2; CI: 2.4, 16.4) and hyponychium (HR=11.8, CI: 4.1; 34.2). Conclusions Although nearly 20% of sexually active male university students had evidence of oral HPV infection within 12 months, most infections were transient. HPV-16 was not common. Sexual contact and autoinoculation appeared to play independent roles in the transmission of alpha-genus HPV to the oral cavity of young men. PMID:23064535

  8. Tracking vaginal, anal and oral infection in a mouse papillomavirus infection model

    PubMed Central

    Budgeon, Lynn R.; Cladel, Nancy M.; Balogh, Karla; Myers, Roland; Cooper, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and practical techniques to longitudinally track viral infection are sought after in clinical practice. We report a proof-of-principle study to monitor the viral DNA copy number using a newly established mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1) mucosal infection model. We hypothesized that viral presence could be identified and quantified by collecting lavage samples from cervicovaginal, anal and oral sites. Nude mice infected at these sites with infectious MmuPV1 were tracked for up to 23 weeks starting at 6 weeks post-infection. Viral DNA copy number was determined by SYBR Green Q-PCR analysis. In addition, we tracked viral DNA load through three complete oestrous cycles to pinpoint whether there was a correlation between the DNA load and the four stages of the oestrous cycle. Our results showed that high viral DNA copy number was reproducibly detected from both anal and cervicovaginal lavage samples. The infection and disease progression were further confirmed by histology, cytology, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Interestingly, the viral copy number fluctuated over the oestrous cycle, with the highest level at the oestrus stage, implying that multiple sampling might be necessary to provide a reliable diagnosis. Virus DNA was detected in oral lavage samples at a later time after infection. Lower viral DNA load was found in oral samples when compared with those in anal and vaginal tracts. To our knowledge, our study is the first in vivo study to sequentially monitor papillomavirus infection from mucosal anal, oral and vaginal tracts in a preclinical model. PMID:26399579

  9. Keratinocyte antiviral response to Poly(dA:dT) stimulation and papillomavirus infection in a canine model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Luff, Jennifer A; Yuan, Hang; Kennedy, Douglas; Schlegel, Richard; Felsburg, Peter; Moore, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is caused by a genetic mutation within the common gamma chain (γc), an essential component of the cytokine receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21. XSCID patients are most commonly treated with bone marrow transplants (BMT) to restore systemic immune function. However, BMT-XSCID humans and dogs remain at an increased risk for development of cutaneous papillomavirus (PV) infections and their associated neoplasms, most typically cutaneous papillomas. Since basal keratinocytes are the target cell for the initial PV infection, we wanted to determine if canine XSCID keratinocytes have a diminished antiviral cytokine response to poly(dA:dT) and canine papillomavirus-2 (CPV-2) upon initial infection. We performed quantitative RT-PCR for antiviral cytokines and downstream interferon stimulated genes (ISG) on poly(dA:dT) stimulated and CPV-2 infected monolayer keratinocyte cultures derived from XSCID and normal control dogs. We found that XSCID keratinocytes responded similarly to poly(dA:dT) as normal keratinocytes by upregulating antiviral cytokines and ISGs. CPV-2 infection of both XSCID and normal keratinocytes did not result in upregulation of antiviral cytokines or ISGs at 2, 4, or 6 days post infection. These data suggest that the antiviral response to initial PV infection of basal keratinocytes is similar between XSCID and normal patients, and is not the likely source for the remaining immunodeficiency in XSCID patients.

  10. Keratinocyte Antiviral Response to Poly(dA:dT) Stimulation and Papillomavirus Infection in a Canine Model of X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Luff, Jennifer A.; Yuan, Hang; Kennedy, Douglas; Schlegel, Richard; Felsburg, Peter; Moore, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is caused by a genetic mutation within the common gamma chain (γc), an essential component of the cytokine receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21. XSCID patients are most commonly treated with bone marrow transplants (BMT) to restore systemic immune function. However, BMT-XSCID humans and dogs remain at an increased risk for development of cutaneous papillomavirus (PV) infections and their associated neoplasms, most typically cutaneous papillomas. Since basal keratinocytes are the target cell for the initial PV infection, we wanted to determine if canine XSCID keratinocytes have a diminished antiviral cytokine response to poly(dA:dT) and canine papillomavirus-2 (CPV-2) upon initial infection. We performed quantitative RT-PCR for antiviral cytokines and downstream interferon stimulated genes (ISG) on poly(dA:dT) stimulated and CPV-2 infected monolayer keratinocyte cultures derived from XSCID and normal control dogs. We found that XSCID keratinocytes responded similarly to poly(dA:dT) as normal keratinocytes by upregulating antiviral cytokines and ISGs. CPV-2 infection of both XSCID and normal keratinocytes did not result in upregulation of antiviral cytokines or ISGs at 2, 4, or 6 days post infection. These data suggest that the antiviral response to initial PV infection of basal keratinocytes is similar between XSCID and normal patients, and is not the likely source for the remaining immunodeficiency in XSCID patients. PMID:25025687

  11. Prevalence and Determinants of Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in 500 Young Adults from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Höfler, Daniela; Menegaldo, Anna; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo; Del Mistro, Annarosa; Da Mosto, Maria Cristina; Pawlita, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Although the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increasing in developed countries and becoming a relevant health issue, the natural history of oral HPV infection is still unclear. Estimating the infection’s prevalence in specific populations and identifying risk factors can widen our understanding of its natural history and help to delineate appropriate prevention strategies. This study sought to (i) determine oral HPV prevalence and genotype distribution in a large series of young Italian adults, (ii) validate an oral rinse sampling/storage protocol, and (iii) pinpoint factors associated with oral HPV infection. Five hundred students, nurses, and technicians (19–35 years-old) studying and working at/for the University of Padua were recruited. Each participant was provided with an oral rinse sampling kit and instructions for use. They were also asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire concerning their demographic characteristics and behaviors. The questionnaires and oral rinse containers were labeled with the same identification code number. The oral rinse samples were tested using a bead-based multiplex BSGP5+/6+-MPG genotyping assay which amplifies the L1 region of 51 mucosal HPV types. The prevalence of oral HPV infection was 4.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 2.5%-6.1%); those of 14 high-risk HPV types and of HPV-type 16 (HPV16) infection were 2.2% (95% CI, 1.1%-3.9%) and 1.6% (95% CI, 0.6%-3.1%), respectively. HPV16 was the most frequent genotype (40.0% of oral HPV infections). No association was found between oral infection and the co-variables studied (gender, tobacco, alcohol and illegal drug use, number of sex and oral sex partners, HPV vaccination status, history of HPV and sexually transmitted infections, abnormal pap smears, recurrent tonsillitis and tonsillectomy). The oral rinse sampling protocol outlined here proved to be simple, efficient and well tolerated, and the prevalence

  12. Human papillomavirus infection and oral cancer: a case-control study in Montreal, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pintos, Javier; Black, Martin J; Sadeghi, Nader; Ghadirian, Parviz; Zeitouni, Anthony G; Viscidi, Raphael P; Herrero, Rolando; Coutlée, François; Franco, Eduardo L

    2008-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and risk of developing oral cancer. The investigation followed a hospital-based case-control design. Cases consisted of newly diagnosed patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx. Controls were frequency matched to cases on gender, age, and hospital. Subjects were interviewed to elicit information on putative risk factors. Oral exfoliated cells were tested for detection of HPV DNA by the PGMY09/11 polymerase chain reaction protocol. Serum antibodies against HPV 16, 18, and 31 viral capsids were detected using an immunoassay technique. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of oral cancer according to HPV exposure variables. HPV DNA was detected in 19% of cases (14 out of 72), and 5% of controls (six out of 129). Among tonsil-related cancers (palatine tonsil and base of tongue) viral DNA was detected in 43% of cases (nine out of 21). The OR for tonsil-related cancers for high-risk HPV types was 19.32 (95%CI: 2.3-159.5), after adjustment for socio-demographic characteristics, tobacco, and alcohol consumption. The equivalent OR for HPV 16 seropositivity was 31.51 (95%CI: 4.5-219.7). The ORs of non-tonsillar oral cancers for high risk HPV DNA in oral cells and for seropositivity were 2.14 (95%CI: 0.4-13.0) and 3.16 (95%CI: 0.8-13.0), respectively. These results provide evidence supporting a strong causal association between HPV infection and tonsil-related cancers. The evidence for an etiologic link is less clear for non-tonsillar oral cancers.

  13. Oral and genital human herpesvirus 8 and human papillomavirus in heterosexual partners.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Catarina da Mota Vasconcelos; Ribeiro, Camila Maria Beder; Leão, Jair Carneiro

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify a possible co-infection of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) in commonly associated human papillomavirus (HPV) penile lesions and to determine the frequency of detection of these viruses in the oral mucosa of their female counterparts. Thirty-one male subjects underwent penile swabs from clinical HPV-related lesions. Their female counterparts underwent swabs of the vagina, uterine cervix, and oral mucosa. HPV and HHV-8 detection was performed by polymerase chain reaction using the consensus primers MY11/MY09 and KS1/KS2, respectively. HPV DNA was detected in 31/31 penile lesions. HPV DNA was also detected in 18/31 (58%) female genital brushings and 17/31 (54%) female oral brushings. HHV-8 DNA was detected in 1/31 (3.2%) male genital brushings and 3/31 (9.6%) female oral mucosa brushings. None of the female genital brushings were HHV-8 DNA-infected. Based upon the results of this study, co-infection between HPV and HHV-8 in malignant and pre-malignant penile lesions is an unlikely finding. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of tea catechin against canine oral bacteria and the functional mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    BAI, Lanlan; TAKAGI, Shiaki; ANDO, Tasuke; YONEYAMA, Hiroshi; ITO, Kumiko; MIZUGAI, Hiroyuki; ISOGAI, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is the major polyphenolic compound of green tea. Polyphenolic compounds were extracted from the leaf of Camellia sinensis (Japanese green tea), and the minimum inhibitory concentration against canine oral bacteria was measured. Subsequently, we investigated the inhibitory effects of polyphenolic compounds and EGCG on the growth of canine oral bacteria. EGCG showed antimicrobial activity against a model bacterium, Streptococcus mutans. Our results indicate that EGCG can inhibit the growth and biofilm formation of S. mutans and that EGCG does not interact with streptococcal lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Furthermore, our findings suggest that EGCG interacts with other component(s) of the bacterial membrane aside from streptococcal LTA to inhibit biofilm formation and damage biofilms. PMID:27246281

  15. Invasive Front Grading and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Canine Oral and Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, E; Hirayama, K; Matsuda, K; Okamoto, M; Ohmachi, T; Uchida, K; Kadosawa, T; Taniyama, H

    2017-09-01

    Oral and cutaneous tissues are the most frequent origin in canine squamous cell carcinoma (SSC). In SCC, changes in adhesion molecule expression and transition from epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype are thought to be important in development of invasive behavior of neoplastic cells at the leading front of the tumor. We therefore investigated histological invasive front grading and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both oral SCCs and cutaneous SCCs. EMT was assessed by evaluating immunohistochemical expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin, desmoglein, vimentin, and N-cadherin. Regardless of the anatomic location, invasive front grading resulted in higher histological grades than grading of the surface. Most oral SCCs were of significantly higher histologic grade than cutaneous SCCs ( P < .01). Expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and desmoglein was significantly lower in oral SCC compared with cutaneous SCC ( P < .01). A significant association was found between invasive front grading and loss of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and desmoglein ( P < .01). Also, vimentin-positive neoplastic cells had low immunoreactivity of these adhesion molecules, and a few of these neoplastic cells were positive for N-cadherin. These results suggest not only E-cadherin and β-catenin but also desmoglein as markers for predicting biological behavior of canine SCC. Depending on their primary sites, EMT correlates with biological behavior and therefore histological grade of canine SCC. We suggest that combining invasive front grading with assessment of immunohistochemical expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and desmoglein may allow more accurate prediction of biological behavior of canine SCCs.

  16. The Combined Influence of Oral Contraceptives and Human Papillomavirus Virus on Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.; Toland, Amanda E.; Lea, C. Suzanne; Phillips, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) will occur in those with fair complexion, tendency to burn, and high ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. Organ transplant recipients also are an important population at great risk for CSCC. An association has been reported between oral contraceptive (OC) use, human papillomavirus virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, and there could be a similar association for CSCC. The cutaneous HPV β-E6 protein, a close cousin of the transformative E6 protein underlying anogenital cancers, has been shown to inhibit apoptosis in response to UVR damage and stimulate morphologic transformation in rodent fibroblast cell lines. Furthermore, OC use has been shown to enhance HPV transcription and may contribute to CSCC risk through this pathway. PMID:21499554

  17. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Oral Human Papillomavirus Among Young Women in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Gonzalez, Paula; Struijk, Linda; Castro, Felipe; Hildesheim, Allan; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Quint, Wim; Lowy, Douglas R.; Porras, Carolina; DelVecchio, Corey; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Jimenez, Silvia; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Schiller, John; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Herrero, Rolando; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Herrero, Rolando; Alfaro, Mario; Bratti, M. Concepción; Cortés, Bernal; Espinoza, Albert; Estrada, Yenory; Guillén, Diego; Jiménez, Silvia E.; Morales, Jorge; Villegas, Luis; Morera, Lidia Ana; Porras, Carolina; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Macklin, Nora; Schiffman, Mark; Schiller, John T.; Sherman, Mark; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Freer, Enrique; Bonilla, José; García-Piñeres, Alfonso; Silva, Sandra; Atmella, Ivannia; Ramírez, Margarita; Pinto, Ligia; Kemp, Troy; Eklund, Claire; Hutchinson, Martha; Sidawy, Mary; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Struijk, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the epidemiology of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) in Latin America. Methods. Women (N = 5838) aged 22–29 in the control and vaccine arms of an HPV-16/18 vaccine trial in Costa Rica had oral, cervical, and anal specimens collected. Samples were tested for alpha mucosal HPV types (SPF10/LiPA25 version 1); a subset of oral samples (n = 500) was tested for cutaneous HPV types in the genera alpha, beta, gamma, mu, and nu. Results. In the control arm (n = 2926), 1.9% of women had an oral alpha mucosal HPV detected, 1.3% had carcinogenic HPV, and 0.4% had HPV-16; similar patterns for non-16/18 HPV types were observed in the vaccine arm. Independent risk factors for any oral alpha mucosal HPV among women in the control arm included marital status (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8–5.7 for single compared to married/living as married), number of sexual partners (AOR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.0–6.1 for ≥4 partners compared to 0–1 partners), chronic sinusitis (AOR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.5–6.7), and cervical HPV infection (AOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.4–4.6). Detection of beta HPV was common (18.6%) and not associated with sexual activity. Conclusions. Unlike cutaneous HPV types, alpha mucosal HPV types were uncommon in the oral region and were predominately associated with sexual behavior. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00128661. PMID:24014882

  18. Prevalence of and risk factors for oral human papillomavirus among young women in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A; Gonzalez, Paula; Struijk, Linda; Castro, Felipe; Hildesheim, Allan; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Quint, Wim; Lowy, Douglas R; Porras, Carolina; Delvecchio, Corey; Katki, Hormuzd A; Jimenez, Silvia; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Schiller, John; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Herrero, Rolando; Kreimer, Aimée R

    2013-11-15

    Little is known about the epidemiology of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) in Latin America. Women (N = 5838) aged 22-29 in the control and vaccine arms of an HPV-16/18 vaccine trial in Costa Rica had oral, cervical, and anal specimens collected. Samples were tested for alpha mucosal HPV types (SPF10/LiPA25 version 1); a subset of oral samples (n = 500) was tested for cutaneous HPV types in the genera alpha, beta, gamma, mu, and nu. In the control arm (n = 2926), 1.9% of women had an oral alpha mucosal HPV detected, 1.3% had carcinogenic HPV, and 0.4% had HPV-16; similar patterns for non-16/18 HPV types were observed in the vaccine arm. Independent risk factors for any oral alpha mucosal HPV among women in the control arm included marital status (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-5.7 for single compared to married/living as married), number of sexual partners (AOR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.0-6.1 for ≥4 partners compared to 0-1 partners), chronic sinusitis (AOR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.5-6.7), and cervical HPV infection (AOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.4-4.6). Detection of beta HPV was common (18.6%) and not associated with sexual activity. Unlike cutaneous HPV types, alpha mucosal HPV types were uncommon in the oral region and were predominately associated with sexual behavior. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00128661.

  19. Incidence and clearance of oral human papillomavirus infection in men: the HIM cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Hildesheim, Allan; Villa, Luisa L.; Salmerón, Jorge J.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection causes a subset of oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers disproportionately affect men, are increasing in incidence, and have no proven prevention methods. We aimed to establish the natural history of oral HPV infection in men. Methods To estimate incidence and clearance of HPV infections, men residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the USA who were HIV negative and reported no history of anogenital cancer were recruited into the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) cohort study. A subset of the cohort who provided two or more oral rinse-and-gargle samples with valid HPV results and who completed a minimum of 2 weeks of follow-up were included in this analysis. Oral rinse-and-gargle samples and questionnaire data were obtained every 6 months for up to 4 years. Samples were analysed for the presence of oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPV infections by the linear array method. Findings 1626 men aged 18–73 years and with a median follow-up of 12·7 months (IQR 12·1–14·7) were included in the analysis. During the first 12 months of follow-up, 4·4% (95% CI 3·5–5·6; n=115 incident infections) of men acquired an incident oral HPV infection, 1·7% (1·2–2·5; n=53 incident infections) an oral oncogenic HPV infection, and 0·6% (0·3–1·1; n=18 incident infections) an oral HPV 16 infection. Acquisition of oral oncogenic HPV was significantly associated with smoking and not being married or cohabiting, but was similar across countries, age groups, and reported sexual behaviours. Median duration of infection was 6·9 months (95 % CI 6·2–9·3; n=45 cleared infections) for any HPV, 6·3 months (6·0–9·9; n=18 cleared infections) for oncogenic HPV, and 7·3 months (6·0–not estimable; n=5 cleared infections) for HPV 16. Eight of the 18 incident oral HPV 16 infections persisted for two or more study visits. Interpretation Newly acquired oral oncogenic HPV infections in healthy men were rare and most were cleared within 1 year

  20. In situ hybridization analysis of human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Zeuss, M S; Miller, C S; White, D K

    1991-06-01

    Commercial biotinylated DNA probes specific for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11; 16 and 18; and 31, 33, and 35 were used for in situ hybridization analysis of 105 oral mucosal specimens from 5 cases of verruca vulgaris, 15 cases of condyloma acuminatum, 30 cases of squamous papilloma, 20 cases of hyperkeratosis/acanthosis, 15 cases of epithelial dysplasia, 5 cases of carcinoma in situ, and 15 cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Positive hybridization signals were found in 26 specimens (24.8%). Only HPV-6/11 was detected. HPV DNA occurred significantly more often (p less than 0.005, chi-square analysis) in condyloma acuminatum (100%) and verruca vulgaris (100%) than squamous papilloma (13.3%), hyperkeratotic/acanthotic lesions (10%), and malignant and premalignant lesions (0%). The tongue (19.1%) and labial epithelium (17.1%) were infected most frequently. Nuclear reaction products indicating HPV infection were associated primarily with koilocytes. These results demonstrate the usefulness of commercial biotinylated probes for HPV DNA analysis in routine paraffin-embedded lesion specimens. They confirm HPV involvement in benign lesions of the oral mucosa but fail to associate HPV infection with oral cancer and precancer.

  1. Human papillomavirus in the oral cavity of patients with and without renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Barbara; Wilkins, Douglas; Li, Wei; Tran, Nham; Thompson, Carol; Cossart, Yvonne; McGeechan, Kevin; O'Brien, Christopher; Eris, Josette

    2006-08-27

    This study investigates human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the oral cavities of 88 Australian renal transplant recipients and 88 immunocompetent controls. Oral cavities were examined for lesions and brushings collected for HPV analysis by consensus PCR. No warts were identified; HPV DNA was detected in 18% of transplant versus 1% control samples (P<0.001). Cutaneous HPVs predominated. One patient had HPV16 in samples taken four years apart without evidence of associated lesions or malignancy. Transplant recipients were more likely than controls to have current cutaneous warts (P<0.001), fewer sexual partners (P=0.001), and to have never consumed alcohol (P=0.01). Among the transplant group, the risk of an HPV-positive sample was higher among older patients (P=0.05), and those with past cutaneous warts (P=0.04). This study extends previous surveys by encompassing overt and asymptomatic infection, a broad spectrum of cutaneous and genital HPVs, and by providing new data on risk factors for oral HPV infection.

  2. Do high-risk human papillomaviruses cause oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Mirghani, H; Amen, F; Moreau, F; Lacau St Guily, J

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are an established etiologic factor for a growing number of oropharyngeal cancers. However, their potential role in other upper aerodigestive tract locations is still a matter of debate, particularly in the oral cavity. This is of paramount importance as in the future diagnosis, treatment and follow up in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma may vary according to HPV status. This article reviews the recent published data and highlights some of the pitfalls that have hampered the accurate assessment of HR-HPV oncological role outside the oropharynx. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the oropharynx, only a small fraction of cancers located in the oral cavity seem to be HPV-related even in young non-smoking non-drinking patients. We emphasize several relevant factors to consider in assumed HPV-induced oral cavity cancers and discuss the current theories that explain why HPV-induced cancers arise preferentially in the oropharynx. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral human papillomavirus infection in men might contribute to HPV serology.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, S; Waterboer, T; Kero, K; Rautava, J; Syrjänen, K; Grenman, S; Pawlita, M

    2015-02-01

    The prospective Finnish Family HPV Study evaluated the dynamics of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection within families. Here, we focused on HPV serology in men. Seroprevalence at baseline, seroconversion and decay of low-risk (LR)-HPV6 and 11, and high risk (HR)-HPV16, 18 and 45 L1 antibodies in 122 men at 12, 24 and 36 months were determined using Luminex-based multiplex HPV serology, and correlated with demographic data. At baseline, seropositivity to HPV6, 11, 16, 18 and 45 was observed in 41.0, 11.5, 23.0, 13.9 and 5.7 % of the men, respectively. In univariate analysis, LR-HPV seropositivity was related to smoking status, history of genital warts and being seropositive to HR-HPV. Oral HR-HPV DNA and baseline LR-HPV seropositivity predicted HR-HPV seropositivity. Seroconversion to HPV6, 11, 16, 18 and 45 antigens during follow-up was found in 24.6, 11.5, 5.7, 5.7 and 0.8 %, respectively. Seroconversion to LR-HPV was negatively related to a higher number of children and oral sex, and positively associated with seroconversion to HR-HPV. In multivariate analysis, the same predictors remained significant except for the number of children. In univariate generalised estimating equations (GEE) for HR-HPV, being seroconverted to LR-HPV was the only predictor, but lost its significance in multivariate analyses. Decay of all HPV L1 antibodies was rare and observed in 0-2 %. The HPV antibody profile in men was dominated by response to HPV6, also showing the highest cumulative seroconversion. Oral HPV infection might affect HPV serology: (1) HPV DNA in oral mucosa is associated with baseline HR-HPV seropositivity and (2) practising oral sex significantly reduces longitudinal seroconversion to HPV6 and/or 11.

  4. Genotypic determination by PCR-RFLP of human papillomavirus in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma samples in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Llamas-Martínez, Silvia; Esparza-Gómez, German; Campo-Trapero, Julián; Cancela-Rodríguez, Paloma; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Moreno-López, Luis Alberto; García-Núñez, Juan Antonio; Cerero-Lapiedra, Rocío

    2008-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs), especially genotypes 16 and 18, are considered to be human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). They are the most important etiological agents of uterine cervix cancer but their true role in oral carcinogenesis is controversial. To detect the presence of HPV genome genotypes in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and analyze their relationship with clinicopathological variables. Presence of genome ofHPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 39, 42, 45, and 52 was studied by polymerase chain reaction in samples of normal mucosa (30 controls), oral leukoplakia (35 cases) and OSCC (33 cases). Results were compared between groups and differences were examined in relation to clinical and histological variables. HPV genome was detected in 23.3% of controls, 45.7% of oral leukoplakias, and 39.4% of OSCCs. Only HPV-16 was significantly (p=0.0005) more frequently detected in leukoplakias (40%) and OSCCs (33.3%) versus controls (0%). No significant relationship was found between the presence of viral genome and the main clinicopathological variables. According to these findings, the presence of HPV-16 is significantly associated with oral leukoplakia and OSCC lesions, therefore in our setting this virus may be a carcinogenic element in this disease.

  5. Papillomaviruses in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; Thomson, Neroli A; Luff, Jennifer A

    2017-07-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) cause disease in both dogs and cats. In dogs, PVs are thought to cause oral papillomatosis, cutaneous papillomas and canine viral pigmented plaques, whereas PVs have been rarely associated with the development of oral and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in this species. In cats, PVs are currently thought to cause oral papillomas, feline viral plaques, Bowenoid in situ carcinomas and feline sarcoids. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that PVs may also be a cause of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas in cats. These diseases are discussed in this review. Additionally, there is a brief overview of PV biology, including how these viruses cause disease. Diagnostic techniques and possible methods to prevent PV infection are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx].

    PubMed

    Villagómez-Ortíz, Vicente José; Paz-Delgadillo, Diana Estela; Marino-Martínez, Iván; Ceseñas-Falcón, Luis Ángel; Sandoval-de la Fuente, Anabel; Reyes-Escobedo, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the head and neck comprises a group of neoplasms that share a similar anatomical origin. Most originate from the epithelium of the aerodigestive tract and 90% correspond to squamous cell carcinoma. In the last 15 years, an increase in the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma induced by human papillomavirus (HPV) has been seen, mainly types 16 and 18, which are the most frequent found in cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, and types 6 and 11 in laryngeal cancer. There are reports in the literature that show HPV as the leading cause of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Determine the prevalence of infection with high-risk HPV in patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx. An observational, cross-sectional, descriptive, unblinded study was performed. Prevalence of HPV infection was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in DNA samples from tumour tissue of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx. Typing was subsequently performed in HPV positive samples in order to detect types 18, 16, 11 and 6, using custom primers. A total of 45 patients were included. The association between laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and HPV was established in two patients, which represented an overall prevalence of 4.4% in our population, and 10% for laringeal tumours. There is a low prevalence of HPV infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx, in our population. Prospective studies on younger patients could provide more information. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Human papillomavirus infection in oral squamous cell carcinomas from Chilean patients.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Montserrat; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Pennacchiotti, Gina; Carrillo, Diego; Muñoz, Juan P; Peña, Nelson; Montes, Rodrigo; Lobos, Nelson; Aguayo, Francisco

    2015-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causal agent of cervical, anogenital and a subset of oropharyngeal carcinomas. In addition, the role of HPV in oral carcinogenesis has been suggested, although the findings are inconclusive. In this study, using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genotyping by specific PCR and DNA sequencing, we analyzed the HPV presence in 80 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) from Chilean subjects. In addition, we determined the expression of p16, p53, pRb and Ki-67 using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The CDKN2A (p16) promoter methylation was evaluated using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). HPV sequences were found in 9/80 (11%) OSCCs. Non-statistically significant association with p53, pRb, Ki-67 and p16 levels were found (p=0.77; 0.29; 0.83; 0.21, respectively). HPV-16 and 18 were the most prevalent HPV genotypes in 8/9 (89%) OSCCs. In addition, CDKN2A (p16) was methylated in 39% of OSCCs. No association with HPV presence (p=0.917) was found. These results suggest that HPV positive OSCCs are entities that do not resemble the molecular alterations of HPV-associated tumors in a Chilean population. More studies are warranted to determine the role of HPV in OSCCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human Papillomavirus Promotes Epstein-Barr Virus Maintenance and Lytic Reactivation in Immortalized Oral Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Makielski, Kathleen R.; Lee, Denis; Lorenz, Laurel D.; Nawandar, Dhananjay M.; Chiu, Ya- Fang; Kenney, Shannon C.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomaviruses are human tumor viruses that infect and replicate in upper aerodigestive tract epithelia and cause head and neck cancers. The productive phases of both viruses are tied to stratified epithelia highlighting the possibility that these viruses may affect each other’s life cycles. Our lab has established an in vitro model system to test the effects of EBV and HPV co-infection in stratified squamous oral epithelial cells. Our results indicate that HPV increases maintenance of the EBV genome in the co-infected cells and promotes lytic reactivation of EBV in upper layers of stratified epithelium. Expression of the HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 were found to be necessary and sufficient to account for HPV-mediated lytic reactivation of EBV. Our findings indicate that HPV increases the capacity of epithelial cells to support the EBV life cycle, which could in turn increase EBV-mediated pathogenesis in the oral cavity. PMID:27179345

  9. E6-Specific Detection and Typing of Human Papillomaviruses in Oral Cavity Specimens from Iranian Patients

    PubMed

    Razavi Nikoo, Hadi; Ardebili, Abdollah; Ravanshad, Mehrdad; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Teimoori, Ali; Khanizadeh, Sayyad; Pouriayevali, Mohammad Hassan; Ajorloo, Mehdi

    2017-05-02

    Detection and quantification of human Papillomavirus (HPV) genome in oral carcinoma play an important role in diagnosis, as well as implications for progression of disease. We evaluated tissues from 50 esopharyngeal cancers collected from different regions of Iran for HPV E6 using the two type-specific primers sets. E6 gene of HPV genotypes was amplified by specific primers. The sensitivity of PCR assay was analyzed and determined using HPV-DNA-containing plasmids. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the prevalence and HPV viral load in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Eighteen (36%) specimens were positive for HPV. Among the 18 positive specimens, 10 showed HPV-18 (55.55%), and 8 specimens were positive for HPV-11 (44.44%). Of the 18 infected specimens, 6 (33.32%) and 12 (66.65%) were identified as high-titer and low-titer viral load, respectively. The PCR-based assay, developed in the current study, could be used for HPV detection, quantification, and genotyping in epidemiological and clinical studies.

  10. Oral immunization of raccoons and skunks with a canine adenovirus recombinant rabies vaccine.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Heather; Jackson, Felix; Bean, Kayla; Panasuk, Brian; Niezgoda, Michael; Slate, Dennis; Li, Jianwei; Dietzschold, Bernard; Mattis, Jeff; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2009-11-27

    Oral vaccination is an important part of wildlife rabies control programs. Currently, the vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus is the only oral rabies vaccine licensed in the United States, and it is not effective in skunks. In the current study, captive raccoons and skunks were used to evaluate a vaccine developed by incorporating the rabies virus glycoprotein gene into a canine adenovirus serotype 2 vector (CAV2-RVG). Seven of 7 raccoons orally vaccinated with CAV2-RVG developed virus neutralizing antibodies and survived lethal challenge. Five of 5 and 6 of 6 skunks in 2 experimental groups receiving 10-fold different dilutions of CAV2-RVG developed neutralizing antibodies and survived challenge. The results of this preliminary study suggest that CAV2-RVG stimulates protective immunity against rabies in raccoons and skunks.

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in canine oral squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    MARTANO, MANUELA; RESTUCCI, BRUNELLA; CECCARELLI, DORA MARIA; LO MUZIO, LORENZO; MAIOLINO, PAOLA

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is crucial for the growth and metastasis of malignant tumours, and various proangiogenic factors promote this process. One of these factors is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which appears to play a key role in tumour angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to assess whether VEGF expression is associated with angiogenesis, disease progression and neoplastic proliferation in canine oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissue. VEGF immunoreactivity was quantified by immunohistochemistry in 30 specimens, including normal oral mucosa and OSCC tissues graded as well, moderately or poorly differentiated. VEGF expression was correlated with tumour cell proliferation, as assessed using the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) marker and microvessel density (data already published). The present results revealed that VEGF and PCNA expression increased significantly between normal oral tissue and neoplastic tissue, and between well and moderately/poorly differentiated tumours. In addition, VEGF expression was strongly correlated with PCNA expression and microvessel density. It was concluded that VEGF may promote angiogenesis through a paracrine pathway, stimulating endothelial cell proliferation and, similarly, may induce tumour cell proliferation through an autocrine pathway. The present results suggest that the evaluation of VEGF may be a useful additional criterion for estimating malignancy and growth potential in canine OSCCs. PMID:26870224

  12. Human papillomavirus and Epstein Barr virus in oral hairy leukoplakia among HIV positive Venezuelan patients.

    PubMed

    Correnti, María; González, Xiomara; Avila, Maira; Perrone, Marianella; Rivera, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) is commonly found in individuals infected with HIV and represents the most frequent oral manifestation. The purpose of this study was to detect the presence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) in OHL of HIV+ Venezuelan patients. We evaluated 21 HIV+ adult patients with clinically present OHL lesions: 11 under antiretroviral therapy, 10 without therapy, and 10 oral mucosal samples as controls. Nested-PCR was used to detect EBV and HPV infection. The INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping v2 was applied to determine the HPV genotype. The EBV genome was found in 16/21 (76%) of the HIV+ patients with OHL. No difference was observed in EBV+ and EBV- patients related to antiretroviral therapy viral load and CD4+ Tcell coant. HPV-DNA was observed in 7/21 HIV positive cases (33%). The HPV genotypes detected were: 6, 11, 31, 33, 52, and 56/74. The most frequently HPV found was genotype 6 in 7/7, while two cases were HPV-11 and two HPV-52. Of the positive cases, 5/7 (71%) presented co-infection with more than one HPV genotype and 4/7 (57%) had HPV coinfection with high and low risk types. No case was EBV or HPV positive in the control group. In this study, a higher EBV prevalence was observed in OHL-HIV+ patients, confirming the etiologic role in this entity. A considerable number of cases were positive for HPV infection, and many patients presented coinfection with more than one HPV genotype as well as the presence of high oncogenic risk HPV in OHL.

  13. Distribution of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Sardinian Patients with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Montaldo, Caterina; Mastinu, Andrea; Zorco, Stefania; Santini, Noemi; Pisano, Elisabetta; Piras, Vincenzo; Denotti, Gloria; Peluffo, Carla; Erriu, Matteo; Garau, Valentino; Orrù, Germano

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) seem to play an important role in the pathogenesis of gynecological carcinomas and in head and neck carcinomas. The aim of this study was to detect and genotype HPVs in fresh oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) from a Sardinian population, and to determine whether HPV presence was significantly associated with the development of OSCC. The oral mucosa tissues were obtained from 120 samples (68 OSCC and 52 control samples) taken from a Sardinian population seen at the Dental Clinic of the Department of Surgery and Odontostomatological Sciences, University of Cagliari (Italy) and the “ Ospedale SS Trinità”, Cagliari (A.S.L. 8) between 2007 and 2008. PCR was used for the detection of HPV DNA and the genotype was determined by DNA sequencing. The frequency of HPV infection was evaluated in relation to age, sex, smoking and alcohol use. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 11.5 software. The results showed the presence of HPV-DNA in 60.3% of OSCC with HPV-16 (51.2%) being the most frequent genotype. In these Sardinian OSCC patients, HPV-DNA was detected more in males (65.8%) than in females (34.1%) while controls show a 0% of HPV presence. HPV positive was highly associated with OSCC among subjects with a history of heavy tobacco and alcohol use and among those with no such history. A greater frequency of high risk HPV presence was observed in patients with OSCC compared to health control patients. In addition these results suggested that oral HPV presence could be associated in OSCC subjects. Our results need more analyses to detect the HPV-DNA integration into tumoral cells. PMID:21249161

  14. Prognostic evaluation of Ki67 threshold value in canine oral melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bergin, I L; Smedley, R C; Esplin, D G; Spangler, W L; Kiupel, M

    2011-01-01

    Oral melanoma is a common canine cancer with a historically poor prognosis. Recent evidence suggests that a subset of cases may have a more favorable outcome, defined as long-term survival in the absence of intervention other than initial surgery. Traditional histological parameters have had prognostic significance in some studies but not in others, potentially due to interobserver variation. We evaluated the prognostic utility of Ki67 immunohistochemistry in a group of 79 canine oral melanomas using a technique easily applied in a veterinary diagnostic laboratory. A threshold Ki67 value of >19.5 had a sensitivity and specificity of 87.1% and 85.4%, respectively, at predicting death or euthanasia due to melanoma by 1 year postdiagnosis. Threshold values for classical histological parameters were also identified for most cases and were >4 (>30%; sensitivity = 83.9%, specificity = 86.0%) for the nuclear atypia score and >4/10 hpfs (sensitivity = 90.3%, specificity = 84.4%) for the mitotic index. In this study, the percentages correctly classified with respect to death by 1 year postdiagnosis were comparable for Ki67 (86.1%, 68/79), the nuclear atypia score (86.3%, 63/73), and the mitotic index (86.8%, 66/76). High pigmentation (>50%) had a high negative predictive value of 90.9% (18/20), but overall, only 61.0% (47/77) of cases could be correctly classified by this parameter. Based on these results, we recommend a panel of prognostic parameters, including the nuclear atypia score, the mitotic index, Ki67, and pigmentation quantification to more accurately predict the likely outcome of canine oral melanomas.

  15. Concordant Oral and Vaginal Human Papillomavirus Infection in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kedarisetty, Suraj; Orosco, Ryan K; Hecht, Avram S; Chang, David C; Weissbrod, Philip A; Coffey, Charles S

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common infection in adults, with tropism for sites in the head and neck and the genital tracts. To date, few studies have addressed concurrent infection in these sites. To understand the prevalence, characteristics, and concordance of HPV infections in the oral and vaginal regions. This study was a retrospective analysis of cross-sectional survey data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009-2012. The database was reviewed for all women aged 18 to 69 years with available oral and vaginal HPV DNA screening data. The study was performed from August 1, 2014, to November 1, 2014. Data analysis was performed from November 1, 2014, to June 30, 2015. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify factors associated with infection. Covariates for multivariate analysis included age, income to poverty ratio, number of prior sexual partners, number of prior oral sex partners, and having recent oral sex partners. Dual infection was defined as having an infection of any serotype in both the oral and vaginal HPV regions. Concordant infection was defined as an infection of matching serotype in both locations. A total of 3463 women were identified (mean [SD] age, 37.5 [12.1] years). Racial distribution was 1341 white (38.7%), 786 black (22.7%), 554 Mexican American (16.0%), 378 other Hispanic (10.9%), and 404 self-identified as other (11.7%). Vaginal HPV infection was present in 1586 (45.2%) and oral HPV infection in 141 (4.1%). Dual infection was identified in 107 (3.0%) of all patients, and concordant infection was observed in 41 (1.1%). The prevalence of dual infection was 75.9% in those with oral infection and 6.8% in those with vaginal infection. On multivariate analysis, age (30-50 years) and higher income to poverty ratios had negative associations with dual and concordant infections. A new sexual partner within the last year was positively associated with dual infection (odds ratio, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.03-5.02; P

  16. Oral and subcutaneous therapy of canine atopic dermatitis with recombinant feline interferon omega.

    PubMed

    Litzlbauer, Petra; Weber, Karin; Mueller, Ralf S

    2014-03-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is a common allergic skin disease that has been treated with subcutaneously administered interferons (IFN). Recombinant feline IFN-ω (rFeIFN-ω) was reported to be efficacious for CAD. Whether dogs develop neutralizing antibodies against rFeIFN-ω during long-term treatment and whether orally administered IFNs are efficacious in CAD is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential development of antibodies against rFeIFN-ω in atopic dogs and to compare subcutaneous and oral IFN therapy. Twenty-six atopic dogs were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group (n=15) received eight subcutaneous injections of rFeIFN-ω (Virbagen® omega, Virbac, Carros, France) over four months, the second group (n=11) received rFeIFN-ω daily orally. Concurrent medication was permitted, except systemically acting glucocorticoids and cyclosporin, which had to be withdrawn at least two weeks prior to the study. Serum samples for antibody detection were collected before and after the study. On days 0, 60 and 120 skin lesions and pruritus were evaluated using a validated lesion score (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index=CADESI) and a validated pruritus score. Concurrent medications were recorded. For every visit a total score, consisting of CADESI, pruritus score and medication score was created. For antibody detection an indirect ELISA, using Virbagen® omega as antigen, was performed. Comparison of pruritus scores, CADESI and total scores between days 0 and 120 showed improvement in both groups, however, significant improvement could only be detected in the oral group with CADESI and total scores (61%, P=0.04 and 36%, P=0.02 respectively). Serum antibodies against rFeIFN-ω could not be detected in any of the dogs. In this study antibody production could not be demonstrated. It suggests better efficacy with oral IFN administration, which should be further verified in larger, randomized, controlled studies.

  17. Risk Factors for Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in Healthy Individuals: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Sugiyama, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with oral cancer development. However, few epidemiologic investigations have focused on oral HPV prevalence in healthy individuals. The objective of this study was to provide updated information regarding oral HPV prevalence in patients without oral cancer worldwide. Methods We systematically reviewed 29 studies reporting the prevalence of oral HPV infection that included 22,756 subjects (10,124 males, 12,623 females, and nine unknown gender; age range 2 - 89 years) and were published from January 2012 to June 2015. Results The prevalence of overall HPV, low-risk type HPV, high-risk type HPV, and HPV16 in the reported cases was 5.5%, 2.2%, 2.7%, and 1.0%, respectively. The prevalence of overall HPV was considerably higher in males who had sex with males (12.2%) as compared to heterosexual males (4.7%) and females (2.9%). A meta-analysis was performed to elucidate significant risk factors for oral HPV infection, which revealed a significant statistical association for oral sex and smoking with oral HPV infection (odds ratio (OR): 1.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.51 - 2.39, P < 0.0001; OR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.32 - 3.43, P = 0.002). Conclusions Our findings suggest that sexual behavior and smoking are importantly related to oral HPV infection in healthy individuals. PMID:27635177

  18. Association of high-risk human papillomavirus infection with oral epithelial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    McCord, Christina; Xu, Jing; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Xin; McComb, Richard John; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Bradley, Grace

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate cases of oral epithelial dysplasia for biologically significant human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Forty consecutive cases of high-grade dysplasia and 37 cases of low-grade dysplasia were examined for p16(INK4a) expression by immunohistochemistry. High-risk HPV infection was assessed in p16-positive cases using in situ hybridization. Proliferation index was assessed with MIB-1 immunohistochemistry. Eleven of 40 high-grade dysplasias and one of 37 low-grade dysplasias were p16 positive. High-risk HPV was detected in seven cases of p16-positive high-grade dysplasia. The difference between high- and low-grade dysplasia was statistically significant (P = .01). HPV-positive high-grade dysplasias showed a distinctive histologic appearance and MIB-1 labeling pattern. Most high-risk HPV-positive cases were seen in the floor of mouth. High-risk HPV was associated with a subset of cases of severe epithelial dysplasia/carcinoma in situ that demonstrated diffuse loss of squamous differentiation and a high proliferation index. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Histologic variation in high grade oral epithelial dysplasia when associated with high-risk human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Sujita; Trainor, Patrick J; Zahin, Maryam; Ghim, Shin-Je; Joh, Joongho; Rai, Shesh N; Jenson, Alfred Bennett; Shumway, Brian S

    2017-05-01

    Reported cytologic alterations associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) in oral epithelial dysplasia (HPV-OED) need further characterization. Archival cases of high-grade oral epithelial dysplasia (hgOED) (N = 38) were assigned a cytologic score (CS) based on the average number of mitotic, karyorrhectic, and apoptotic cells per high-power field. Three groups were then generated on the basis of increasing CS: Focal (group 1, N = 14), Intermediate (group 2, N = 12), and Diffuse (group 3, N = 12). Polymerase chain reaction-based HPV genotyping and p16 immunohistochemistry were performed. HR-HPV was found significantly more in group 3 (83.3%) compared with groups 1 and 2 (group 1&2; 42.9% and 41.7%, respectively; P = .047). HPV16 predominated in HR-HPV-positive cases (90.5%). By location, the tongue or the floor of mouth was associated with all groups (P = .04). Increasing CS was associated with a slightly younger age (P = .04) and increased expression of p16 (P = .005). CS and p16 expression were not sensitive but were highly specific predictors for HR-HPV presence. Based on limited follow-up information, HPV-OED does not differ in clinical aggressiveness compared with conventional OED. Increased CS in hgOED is strongly associated with HR-HPV (mostly HPV16) and p16 expression. CS and p16 expression are specific predictors of HR-HPV presence. Further molecular study and long-term follow-up of HPV-OED are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of oral and intramuscular recombinant canine distemper vaccination in African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus).

    PubMed

    Connolly, Maren; Thomas, Patrick; Woodroffe, Rosie; Raphael, Bonnie L

    2013-12-01

    A series of three doses of recombinant canary-pox-vectored canine distemper virus vaccine was administered at 1-mo intervals, orally (n = 8) or intramuscularly (n = 13), to 21 previously unvaccinated juvenile African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) at the Wildlife Conservation Society's Bronx Zoo. Titers were measured by serum neutralization at each vaccination and at intervals over a period of 3.5-21.5 mo after the initial vaccination. All postvaccination titers were negative for orally vaccinated animals at all sampling time points. Of the animals that received intramuscular vaccinations, 100% had presumed protective titers by the end of the course of vaccination, but only 50% of those sampled at 6.5 mo postvaccination had positive titers. None of the three animals sampled at 21.5 mo postvaccination had positive titers.

  1. The Prevalence of Canine Oral Protozoa and Their Association with Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Niran; Colyer, Alison; Harris, Steve; Holcombe, Lucy; Andrew, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Periodontal disease is one of the most important health concerns for companion animals. Research into canine forms of periodontitis has focused on the identification and characterization of the bacterial communities present. However, other microorganisms are known to inhabit the oral cavity and could also influence the disease process. A novel, broad spectrum 18S PCR was developed and used, in conjunction with next-generation sequencing analyses to target the identification of protists. Trichomonas sp. and Entamoeba sp. were identified from 92 samples of canine plaque. The overall prevalence of trichomonads was 56.52% (52/92) and entamoebae was 4.34% (4/92). Next-generation sequencing of pooled healthy, gingivitis, early-stage periodontitis, and severe periodontitis samples revealed the proportion of trichomonad sequences to be 3.51% (health), 2.84% (gingivitis), 6.07% (early periodontitis), and 35.04% (severe periodontitis), respectively, and entamoebae to be 0.01% (health), 0.01% (gingivitis), 0.80% (early-stage periodontitis), and 7.91% (severe periodontitis) respectively. Both genera of protists were statistically associated with plaque from dogs with periodontal disease. These findings provide the first conclusive evidence for the presence of oral protozoa in dog plaque and suggest a possible role for protozoa in the periodontal disease process. © 2016 The Author(s) The Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Protistologists.

  2. Gene expression profiles of cell adhesion molecules, matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors in canine oral tumors.

    PubMed

    Pisamai, Sirinun; Rungsipipat, Anudep; Kalpravidh, Chanin; Suriyaphol, Gunnaporn

    2017-09-08

    Perturbation of cell adhesion can be essential for tumor cell invasion and metastasis, but the current knowledge on the gene expression of molecules that mediate cell adhesion in canine oral tumors is limited. The present study aimed to investigate changes in the gene expression of cell adhesion molecules (E-cadherin or CDH1, syndecan 1 or SDC1, NECTIN2 and NECTIN4), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs), in canine oral tumors, including benign tumors, oral melanoma (OM) and non-tonsillar oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. When compared with the normal gingival controls, decreased CDH1, SDC1 and NECTIN4 expression levels were observed in OSCC and OM, reflecting a possible role as cell adhesion molecules and tumor suppressors in canine oral cancers in contrast to the upregulation of MMP2 expression. Downregulated MMP7 was specifically revealed in the OM group. In the late-stage OM, the positive correlation of MMP7 and CDH1 expression was noticed as well as that of SDC1 and NECTIN4. Enhanced TIMP1 expression was shown in all tumor groups with prominent expression in the benign tumors and the early-stage OM. MMP14 expression was notable in the early-stage OM. Higher MMP9 and TIMP1 expression was observed in the acanthomatous ameloblastoma. In conclusion, this study revealed that the altered expression of cell adhesion molecules, MMP7 and MMP2 was correlated with clinicopathologic features in canine oral cancers whereas TIMP1 and MMP14 expression was probably associated with early-stage tumors; therefore, these genes might serve as molecular markers for canine oral tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of oral and oropharyngeal human papillomavirus in a sample of South African men: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Christy Lana; Richter, Karin Louise; Van der Linde, Mike; Coetsee, Judy; Boy, Sonja Catharina

    2014-03-26

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is well known to be associated with head and neck cancers (HNCs). HPV-associated HNCs are related to sexual behaviour, particularly the lifetime number of oral sex partners, but the epidemiology of oral and oropharyngeal HPV in South African men has not yet been studied. To determine the oral and oropharyngeal HPV strain prevalence and associated factors in a selected male population in Pretoria, South Africa (SA). Male factory workers were recruited. Oral rinse and gargle samples were tested for 37 HPV types using the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Molecular Systems). A questionnaire was used to obtain information regarding age, medical conditions, substance and alcohol use and sexual behaviour. HIV testing was optional. The HPV prevalence was 5.6% among men (N=125) aged 17 - 64 years. High-risk HPV (hrHPV) types 16 and 68 were found in two men. Oral sex seemed to be an uncommon practice in the majority of respondents, but the two respondents with hrHPV did practise oral sex. There was a statistically significant association between HPV infection and an increased number of sexual partners (p=0.027), but not between HPV and substance use, HIV status or clinical mucosal pathology. The prevalence of oral and oropharyngeal HPV was lower than reported in other countries. An association between oral HPV and having multiple sexual partners was found. A larger nationwide study would give a more representative view of the burden of oral and oropharyngeal HPV infection in SA.

  4. The clearance of oral high-risk human papillomavirus infection is impaired by long-term persistence of cervical human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Louvanto, K; Rautava, J; Syrjänen, K; Grénman, S; Syrjänen, S

    2014-11-01

    Persistence of high-risk (HR-) human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the uterine cervix increases the risk of cervical cancer. Oral HPV infections are among potential covariates of long-term genotype-specific persistent cervical HR-HPV infections. It is not known whether this persistence reflects inability of the host to reject HPV infections in general. A case-control setting was designed to estimate the covariates of long-term persistent cervical HR-HPV infections using multivariate generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. HPV was detected with PCR using GP05+/GP06+-primers and genotyped for 24 HPVs with a Multimetrix-kit. The cases (n=43) included women who had genotype-specific persistent cervical HR-HPV infection for at least 24 months (24M+) and controls were women who tested repeatedly HPV-negative in their cervical samples (n=52). These women represent a sub-cohort of the Finnish Family HPV Study. The cases differed significantly from the HPV-negative controls in several aspects: they were younger, had a longer mean time to incident oral HPV infection (40.7 versus 23.6 months), longer duration of oral HPV persistence (38.4 versus 14.1 months), and longer time to clearance of their oral HPV infection (50.0 versus 28.2 months). In multivariate GEE analysis, the second pregnancy during the follow up was the only independent predictor with significant protective effect against 24M+ persistent cervical HR-HPV infections, OR of 0.15 (95% CI 0.07-0.34). To conclude, long-term persistent cervical HR-HPV infections are associated with a prolonged clearance of oral HR-HPV infections while new pregnancy protects against persistent cervical HR-HPV infections. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  5. Human papillomavirus infection in the oral cavity of HIV patients is not reduced by initiating antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, Caroline H.; Lee, Anthony; Chen, Huichao; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Seaman, Todd; Landovitz, Raphael J.; John, Malcolm; Reilly, Nancy; Naini, Linda; Palefsky, Joel; Jacobson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral malignancies is increasing among HIV-infected populations, and the prevalence of oral warts has reportedly increased among HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We explored whether ART initiation among treatment-naive HIV-positive adults is followed by a change in oral HPV infection or the occurrence of oral warts. Design: Prospective, observational study. Methods: HIV-1 infected, ART-naive adults initiating ART in a clinical trial were enrolled. End points included detection of HPV DNA in throat-washes, changes in CD4+ T-cell count and HIV RNA, and oral wart diagnosis. Results: Among 388 participants, 18% had at least one HPV genotype present before initiating ART, and 24% had at least one genotype present after 12–24 weeks of ART. Among those with undetectable oral HPV DNA before ART, median change in CD4+ count from study entry to 4 weeks after ART initiation was larger for those with detectable HPV DNA during follow-up than those without (P =  0.003). Both prevalence and incidence of oral warts were low (3% of participants having oral warts at study entry; 2.5% acquiring oral warts during 48 weeks of follow-up). Conclusion: These results suggest: effective immune control of HPV in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients is not reconstituted by 24 weeks of ART; whereas ART initiation was not followed by an increase in oral warts, we observed an increase in oral HPV DNA detection after 12–24 weeks. The prevalence of HPV-associated oral malignancies may continue to increase in the modern ART era. PMID:26919735

  6. In vivo particle-mediated cytokine gene transfer into canine oral mucosa and epidermis.

    PubMed

    Keller, E T; Burkholder, J K; Shi, F; Pugh, T D; McCabe, D; Malter, J S; MacEwen, E G; Yang, N S; Ershler, W B

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines can stimulate immune effector cells present within the oral mucosa and epidermis to respond to vaccination or to combat cancer. However, intravenous cytokine delivery is often inefficient and frequently accompanied by systemic toxicity. The goal of this study was to evaluate dogs as a large animal model for gene therapy of cancer because they develop spontaneous oral and epidermal tumors. In this report, we demonstrate that particle-mediated gene transfer of beta-galactosidase, luciferase, interleukin-2, interleukin-6, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) complementary DNA (cDNA) into the oral mucosa and epidermis of healthy dogs resulted in effective, localized, transgenic protein expression. Additionally, the epidermal sites transfected with GM-CSF developed a profound inflammatory reaction characterized by neutrophilic infiltration. Clinical pathology analyses were unremarkable. These results demonstrate that in vivo particle-mediated gene transfer of canine oral mucosa and epidermis with cytokine cDNA can result in production of biologically active transgenic cytokines with minimal toxicity. These findings have applications to cancer immunotherapy using a gene gun approach.

  7. Control of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) by medicinal mushrooms, Trametes versicolor and Ganoderma lucidum: a preliminary clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Donatini, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    This preliminary randomized study investigated the efficacy of medicinal mushrooms, Trametes versicolor (TV), Ganoderma lucidum (GL), and Laetiporus sulphureus (LS), on the clearance of oral human papillomavirus (HPV, serotypes 16 and 18). Among 472 patients who underwent oral swabs for gingivitis, 61 patients were positive for HPV16 or HPV18. Twenty patients were included in group 1 (LS) and 41 patients were included in group 2 (TV+GL) for 2 months. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HPV was performed at inclusion and after 2 months. In group 1, the clearance was equal to 5% after 2 months of treatment. In group 2, the clearance was equal to 88% (P<0.001). The detection of HPV16 or HPV18 could become relevant in routine since positivity is frequent and because a harmless and costless treatment may exist. The use of TV+GL for the clearance of oral HPV deserves further investigation.

  8. Protective immunity to rabbit oral and cutaneous papillomaviruses by immunization with short peptides of L2, the minor capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Embers, Monica E; Budgeon, Lynn R; Pickel, Martin; Christensen, Neil D

    2002-10-01

    The papillomavirus minor capsid protein, L2, has been shown to exhibit immunogenicity, whereby a variety of B-cell epitopes, predominantly in the amino terminus of L2, have been deduced. However, immunity to L2 in vivo has not been examined extensively. Notably, a common neutralization epitope for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 16 was mapped to amino acids (aa) 108 to 120. The objectives of this study were to derive antisera from rabbits using the corresponding sequences from rabbit viruses and to assess the ability of these peptides to protect against infection. Synthetic peptides consisting of two overlapping sequences each in the region of aa 94 to 122 of the rabbit oral (ROPV) and cottontail rabbit (CRPV) papillomaviruses were used to immunize rabbits. Rabbits were then infected with both ROPV and CRPV and monitored for the development of oral and cutaneous papillomas, respectively. Serum derived from rabbits immunized with either of the two peptides was shown to (i) react to purified L2 from the cognate virus, (ii) specifically recognize L2 within virus-infected cells, and (iii) neutralize virus in vitro. Following viral challenge, cutaneous papilloma growth was completely absent in rabbits immunized with either CRPV peptide. Likewise, ROPV peptide-immunized rabbits were protected from oral papillomatosis. Challenge of CRPV peptide-immune rabbits with the viral genome resulted in efficient papilloma growth, suggesting a neutralizing antibody-mediated mechanism of protection. These results afford in vivo evidence for the immunogenicity provided by a distinct region of L2 and further support previous evidence for the ability of this region to elicit antiviral immunity.

  9. High-risk human papillomavirus in the oral cavity of women with cervical cancer, and their children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Association of High-risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) with oral cancer has been established recently. Detecting these viruses in oral cavity is important to prevent oral lesions related to them. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HR-HPV in the oral cavity of women with cervical cancer, and their children. A total of 70 women, previously diagnosed with cervical cancer, and 46 children of these women, born by vaginal delivery only, were selected for this study. Buccal swabs were collected from their oral cavity and HPV detection was carried out using Hybrid Capture 2 high-risk HPV (HC2 HR-HPV) detection system. Results Out of 70 women with cervical cancer, four (5.71%) were found to be positive for HR-HPV in their oral cavity. No association of HR-HPV was found with sociodemographic profile, marital status, reproductive history, tobacco and alcohol usage, contraceptive pills usage, and presence of oral lesions (p>0.05). Among children, HR-HPV in the oral cavity was detected in only 1 of the 46 subjects examined (2.17%). Clinically healthy oral mucosa, without any oral lesions, was observed in all the HR-HPV positive subjects. Conclusion The result of this study showed that there is low, if any, risk of HR-HPV infection in the oral cavity of women with cervical cancer. Further, our study suggests that there is very low risk for children of women with cervical cancer, to acquire and sustain HR-HPV in their oral cavity until childhood or adolescence. PMID:20550718

  10. Human Papillomavirus as an Independent Predictor in Oral Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dan; Xu, Qin-gan; Chen, Xin-ming; Fan, Ming-wen

    2009-01-01

    Aim There is an increasing evidence for the role of high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relevance of HPV infection to the survival and prognosis of OSCC. Methodology Fifty-two patients with OSCC were followed from 4 to 88 months with a median of 50.7 months. HPV DNA was identified in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens by nested PCR with MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6+ primer pairs and the HPV genotype was determined by direct DNA sequencing. Association between the HPV status and risk factors for cancer as well as tumor-host characteristics were analyzed. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed using the log-rank test. Results HPV was found in 40.4% of the tumors with HPV16 accounting for 63.5%, HPV18 for 30.8%, HPV6 for 3.9% and HPV11 for 1.8%. No infection with more than one HPV genotype was detected. HPV infection was significantly associated with poor histological grade, TNM stage I–II, alcohol usage and no smoking status. Multi-variate analysis showed that HPV had an independent prognostic effect on the overall survival after adjusting other confounding factors such as histological grade, TNM stage and tobacco usage. The presence of HPV was significantly correlated with a better survival in patients with OSCC. Conclusion HPV infection can act as an independent predictor for the survival and prognosis of OSCC. PMID:20695077

  11. PCNA and grade in 13 canine oral squamous cell carcinomas: association with prognosis.

    PubMed

    Mestrinho, L A; Faísca, P; Peleteiro, M C; Niza, M M R E

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the prognosis factors of age, tumour size, anatomic location, histological grade and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in 13 dogs with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with bone invasion and without signs of lymph node or distant metastasis. All animals were treated with radical excision performed with at least 1 cm margin, based on computed tomography images. In the 2-year follow-up, median disease-free survival was 138 days for dogs with grade 3 tumours and was not reached for those with grade 2 tumours. Grade 3 tumours and PCNA labelling index ≥65% were related with a shorter disease-free survival time and consequently poor prognosis (p = 0.003 and p = 0.034, respectively). Mean PCNA labelling index was significantly higher in recurrent cases (p = 0.011). Histological grade and PCNA expression may be important prognosis factors in canine OSCC.

  12. Analysis of KIT expression and KIT exon 11 mutations in canine oral malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A; Mori, T; Sakai, H; Murakami, M; Yanai, T; Hoshino, Y; Maruo, K

    2011-09-01

    KIT, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, is one of the specific targets for anti-cancer therapy. In humans, its expression and mutations have been identified in malignant melanomas and therapies using molecular-targeted agents have been promising in these tumours. As human malignant melanoma, canine malignant melanoma is a fatal disease with metastases and the poor response has been observed with all standard protocols. In our study, KIT expression and exon 11 mutations in dogs with histologically confirmed malignant oral melanomas were evaluated. Although 20 of 39 cases were positive for KIT protein, there was no significant difference between KIT expression and overall survival. Moreover, polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of KIT exon 11 in 17 samples did not detect any mutations and proved disappointing. For several reasons, however, KIT expression and mutations of various exons including exon 11 should be investigated in more cases.

  13. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules.

    PubMed

    McDonald, James E; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, 'universal' SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by 'universal' primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology.

  14. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, James E.; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J.; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J.; Allison, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, ‘universal’ SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by ‘universal’ primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  15. Human papillomavirus molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    Human papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses with a tropism for squamous epithelia. A unique aspect of human papillomavirus molecular biology involves dependence on the differentiation status of the host epithelial cell to complete the viral lifecycle. A small group of these viruses are the etiologic agents of several types of human cancers, including oral and anogenital tract carcinomas. This review focuses on the basic molecular biology of human papillomaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral mucosal lesions of patients at the Ambulatory of Oral Diagnosis of the Federal University of Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Mariana Goveia Melo; MARCOLINO, Larissa Doddi; RAMOS, Bruna Ribeiro de Andrade; MIRANDA, Elaine Alves; TRENTO, Cleverson Luciano; JAIN, Sona; GURGEL, Ricardo Queiroz; da SILVA, Márcia Guimarães; DOLABELLA, Silvio Santana

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral carcinogenesis is still controversial as detection rates of the virus in oral cavity reported in the literature varies greatly. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of HPV infection and its genotypes in patients with oral lesions at the Ambulatory of Oral Diagnosis of the Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil. Material and Methods We conducted a molecular study with 21 patients (15 females) aged from two to 83 years with clinically detectable oral lesions. Samples were collected through exfoliation of lesions and HPV-DNA was identified using MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ primers. Genotyping was performed by multiplex PCR. Results Benign, premalignant and malignant lesions were diagnosed by histopathology. HPV was detected in 17 samples. Of these, HPV-6 was detected in 10 samples, HPV-18 in four and HPV-16 in one sample. When samples were categorized by lesion types, HPV was detected in two papilloma cases (2/3), five carcinomas (5/6), one hyperplasia (1/1) and nine dysplasia cases (9/11). Conclusion Unlike other studies in the literature, we reported high occurrence of HPV in oral lesions. Further studies are required to enhance the comprehension of natural history of oral lesions. PMID:28198978

  17. Correlation between koilocytes and human papillomavirus detection by PCR in oral and oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma biopsies.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Glauco Issamu; Simonato, Luciana Estevam; Mattar, Neivio José; Camilo Jr, Deolino João; Biasoli, Eder Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the histopathological analysis with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods to predict the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in oral squamous cell carcinoma biopsies. Eighty-three paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from patients with oropharynx and mouth floor squamous cell carcinoma were submitted to histopathological analysis under light microscopy, specifically for the determination of the presence of koilocytes. Subsequently, DNA was purified from the same paraffin-embedded specimens and submitted to PCR. Fisher's exact test showed no statistically significant correlation between the two methods. The results suggest that the presence of koilocytes is unreliable for the detection of HPV presence in oral and oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma.

  18. p16 - a Possible Surrogate Marker for High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses in Oral Cancer?

    PubMed

    Sritippho, Thanun; Pongsiriwet, Surawut; Lertprasertsuke, Nirush; Buddhachat, Kittisak; Sastraruji, Thanapat; Iamaroon, Anak

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV), particularly types 16 and 18, have been found to play an important role in head and neck cancer, including oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). p16, a cell cycle inhibitor, has been postulated as a surrogate marker for HR-HPV, since p16 is aberrantly overexpressed in such lesions, especially in HR-HPV-positive OPSCC. However, p16 as a surrogate marker for HR-HPV infection in cancers of the oral cavity remains controversial. The objectives of the study were to investigate the expression of p16 and the presence of HR-HPV in OSCC and oral verrucous carcinoma (VC) and to determine if p16 could be used as a surrogate marker for HR-HPV. Forty one formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of OSCC (n=37) or VC (n=4) with clinical and histopathologic data of each case were collected. Expression of p16 was determined by immunohistochemistry, focusing on both staining intensity and numbers of positive cells. The presence of HPV types 16 and 18 was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Descriptive statistics were employed to describe the demographic, clinical, and histopathologic parameters. Associations between p16 overexpression, HR-HPV and all variables were determined by Fisher's exact test, odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In addition, the use of p16 as a surrogate marker for HR-HPV was analyzed by sensitivity and specificity tests. p16 was overexpressed in 8/37 cases (21.6%) of OSCC and 2/4 cases (50%) of VC. HPV-16 was detected in 4/34 OSCC cases (11.8%) and HPV-18 was detected in 1/34 OSCC cases (2.9%). Co-infection of HPV-16/18 was detected in 1/4 VC cases (25%). Both p16 overexpression and HR-HPV were significantly associated with young patients with both OSCC and VC (<0.05, OR 20, 95% CI 1.9-211.8; <0.05, OR 23.3, 95% CI 2.4-229.7, respectively). p16 was able to predict the presence of HPV-16/18 in OSCC with 40% sensitivity and 79

  19. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    King, Eleanor M.; Oomeer, Soonita; Gilson, Richard; Copas, Andrew; Beddows, Simon; Soldan, Kate; Jit, Mark; Edmunds, W. John; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men who have sex with men (MSM) differs from anogenital HPV infection. The impact of HPV vaccination has, to date, largely focussed on anogenital outcomes. Vaccination of MSM in the UK has been recommended and, if implemented, baseline estimates of oral HPV prevalence will be useful. Methods We searched Medline, Embase and psycINFO databases for studies reporting prevalence, incidence, and clearance of oral HPV infection in MSM. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis and meta-regression on prevalence estimates and summarised within-study risk factors for oral HPV DNA detection and incidence/clearance rates. We also performed a meta-analysis of the effect of MSM on oral HPV prevalence compared to heterosexual men. Results 26 publications were identified. The pooled prevalence of oral HPV16 from twelve estimates was 3.0% (95%CI 0.5–5.5) in HIV-negative and 4.7% (95%CI 2.1–7.3) in HIV-positive MSM. Median age of study participants explained 38% of heterogeneity (p<0.01) in HPV prevalence estimates (pooled = 17% and 29% in HIV-negative and HIV-positive, respectively; 22 estimates). Nine studies compared MSM to heterosexual men and found no difference in oral HPV prevalence (pooled OR 1.07 (95%CI 0.65–1.74)). The clearance rate was higher than incidence within studies. Type-specific concordance between oral and anogenital sites was rare. Conclusion There was substantial heterogeneity between estimates of oral HPV prevalence in MSM populations that was partly explained by HIV status and median age. PMID:27384050

  20. Detection of human papillomavirus in normal oral cavity in a group of Pakistani subjects using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Gichki, Abdul Samad; Buajeeb, Waranun; Doungudomdacha, Sombhun; Khovidhunkit, Siribang-on Pibooniyom

    2012-01-01

    Since there is evidence that human papillomavirus (HPV) may play some role in oral carcinogenesis, we investigated the presence of HPV in a group of Pakistani subjects with normal oral cavity using real-time PCR analysis. Two-hundred patients attending the Dental Department, Sandaman Provincial Hospital, Balochistan, Pakistan, were recruited. After interview, oral epithelial cells were collected by scraping and subjected to DNA extraction. The HPV-positive DNA samples were further analyzed using primer sets specific for HPV-16 and -18. It was found that out of 200 DNA samples, 192 were PCR-positive for the β-globin gene and these were subsequently examined for the presence of HPV DNA. Among these, 47 (24.5%) were HPV-positive with the virus copy number ranged between 0.43-32 copies per 1 μg of total DNA (9-99 copies per PCR reaction). There were 4 and 11 samples containing HPV-16 and -18, respectively. Additionally, one sample harbored both types of HPV. Among the investigated clinical parameters, smoking habit was associated with the presence of HPV (p=0.001) while others indicated no significant association. The prevalence of HPV in normal oral cavity in our Pakistani subjects appears to be comparable to other studies. However, the association between the presence of HPV and smoking warrants further investigations whether both of these factors can cooperate in inducing oral cancer in this group of patients.

  1. Oral Papillomas Associated With Felis catus Papillomavirus Type 1 in 2 Domestic Cats.

    PubMed

    Munday, J S; Fairley, R A; Mills, H; Kiupel, M; Vaatstra, B L

    2015-11-01

    Multiple small sessile raised lesions were detected on the ventral surface of the tongue in two 13-year-old domestic cats. The lesions were incidental in both cats. Lesions from both cats appeared histologically as well-demarcated foci of markedly thickened folded epithelium that formed keratin-filled shallow cuplike structures. Large keratinocytes that contained a swollen nucleus surrounded by a clear cytoplasmic halo (koilocytes) were common, suggesting a diagnosis of a papillomavirus-induced papillomas, and papillomavirus antigen was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. The papillomas exhibited diffuse intense cytoplasmic and nuclear immunoreactivity against cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A protein (also known as p16 or INK4a protein). Felis catus papillomavirus type 1 DNA sequences were amplified from both papillomas. The papillomas resolved in 1 cat within 3 months of diagnosis, while the papillomas were still visible 4 months after diagnosis in the other cat. This is the first evidence that these papillomas are caused by F. catus papillomavirus type 1.

  2. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) L1 Serum Antibodies and the Risk of Subsequent Oral HPV Acquisition in Men: The HIM Study.

    PubMed

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Viscidi, Raphael P; Torres, B Nelson; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; Abrahamsen, Martha; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Villa, Luisa L; Kreimer, Aimée R; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-07-01

    The role of antibody-mediated immunity in preventing newly acquired oral human papillomavirus (HPV) is not well understood. Among 1618 men participating in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study, we evaluated oral rinses for HPV DNA and baseline sera for HPV-6, -11, -16, and -18 L1 antibodies. Thirty percent of men (486) were seropositive for ≥1 HPV type, and 25 men developed incident oral HPV infection (HPV-6 was detected in 7, HPV-11 in 0, HPV-16 in 17, and HPV-18 in 1). Cox models revealed that men with circulating antibodies to HPV-6, -11, -16, or -18 were not less likely to acquire type-specific oral HPV than men without antibodies (hazard ratio for the risk of acquiring HPV-6, -11, -16, or -18, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, .56-4.76). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Improving oral human papillomavirus detection using toothbrush sampling in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jason J; Read, Tim; Chen, Marcus; Walker, Sandra; Law, Matthew; Bradshaw, Catriona; Garland, Suzanne M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Cornall, Alyssa; Grulich, Andrew; Hocking, Jane; Fairley, Christopher K

    2014-06-01

    Pre- and postabrasion oral rinse samples (ORS) and a toothbrush sample detected human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in at least one sample among 45 (26%) of 173 HIV-positive men who have sex with men. There was moderate agreement for HPV genotype detection between the preabrasion and postabrasion ORS (κ = 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37 to 0.61). There was good agreement between postabrasion ORS and toothbrushes (κ = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.80). The sensitivities for HPV genotypes detected were 80% (95% CI, 69 to 88) for preabrasion ORS, 65% (95% CI, 54 to 76) for postabrasion ORS, and 75% (95% CI, 63 to 84) for toothbrushes.

  4. [Influence of the use of oral contraceptives as risk factors for human papillomavirus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Salazar, E Lucia; González, J Luis; Olmos, Alejandro; Calzada, Leobardo

    2005-02-01

    To study the influence of oral contraception use as risk factor for human papillomavirus infection (HPV) and progression to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). A prospective, transversal and comparative study of 84 female patients in reproductive age that had used oral contraception for more than three years as birth control method and who had CIN mild (CIN I), moderate (CIN II) or severe (CIN III) associated or not to HPV infection documented by colposcopy, pathology and cytology was done. 84 cases and 60 controls submitted to a directed interrogation were studied. Differences among groups were determined by linear regression, multivariance and logistic regression tests, p <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Average age for cases and controls was 37.5 and 36.2 years, respectively. The 70% of patients started their active sexual life in the second decade of their life. The most frequent age was 18 and 19 years. 50.6% of these patients had more than one sexual partner, two in average. 67.8% of cases had HPV infection and applying the multivariance analysis: sexual partners (p < 0.05), age at first pregnancy (p < 0.05) and oral contraception use (p < 0.05) were considered statistically significant. According to the CIN grade, the HPV presence was found as highly statistically significant (p < 0.001). Oral contraception use was found as risk factor for HPV infection by logistic regression (p = 0.0242); OR = 3.2714; CI = 1.1670-9.1702. As for the CIN degree, HPV presence was found as highly significant (p = 0.0001); OR = 2.4158; CI = 1.7150-3.4028. A high incidence of HPV was found in our study. This is an important risk factor during cellular transformation, so the use of oral contraception as birth control method could accelerate the viral oncogenes expression present in HPV cellular genome. It is highly recommended to discard HPV infection before prescribing oral contraception as birth control method.

  5. Felis catus papillomavirus types 1 and 4 are rarely present in neoplastic and inflammatory oral lesions of cats.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; French, Adrienne F

    2015-06-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) are common feline cancers. Why OSCCs are so common in cats is unknown; however, 25% of human OSCCs are caused by papillomaviruses (PVs). Two feline oral PVs (FcaPV-1 and 4) are recognized. As PVs are highly host and location specific, if PVs do cause feline OSCCs, FcaPV-1 and 4 are the most likely etiological agents. PCR primers specific for FcaPV-1 amplified DNA from 1 of 36 feline OSCCs and 1 of 16 inflammatory oral lesions. No DNA was amplified by primers specific for FcaPV-4. PV DNA was not amplified from any additional sample using consensus primers. No PV cytopathology was visible in the OSCC that contained FcaPV-1 DNA, but viral cytopathology was present in a focus of epithelial hyperplasia in the non-neoplastic sample. This study does not support a PV etiology of feline OSCCs, but shows that FcaPV-1 can asymptomatically infect the mouth of cats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A canine chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting PD-L1 and its clinical efficacy in canine oral malignant melanoma or undifferentiated sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Izumi, Yusuke; Deguchi, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Chie; Kato, Yukinari; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Uemura, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-08-21

    Immunotherapy targeting immune checkpoint molecules, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1), using therapeutic antibodies has been widely used for some human malignancies in the last 5 years. A costimulatory receptor, PD-1, is expressed on T cells and suppresses effector functions when it binds to its ligand, PD-L1. Aberrant PD-L1 expression is reported in various human cancers and is considered an immune escape mechanism. Antibodies blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 axis induce antitumour responses in patients with malignant melanoma and other cancers. In dogs, no such clinical studies have been performed to date because of the lack of therapeutic antibodies that can be used in dogs. In this study, the immunomodulatory effects of c4G12, a canine-chimerised anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody, were evaluated in vitro, demonstrating significantly enhanced cytokine production and proliferation of dog peripheral blood mononuclear cells. A pilot clinical study was performed on seven dogs with oral malignant melanoma (OMM) and two with undifferentiated sarcoma. Objective antitumour responses were observed in one dog with OMM (14.3%, 1/7) and one with undifferentiated sarcoma (50.0%, 1/2) when c4G12 was given at 2 or 5 mg/kg, every 2 weeks. c4G12 could be a safe and effective treatment option for canine cancers.

  7. Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detected in the Oral Cavity and Fingernails of Mid-Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tsung-chieh (Jane); Hughes, James P.; Feng, Qinghua; Hulbert, Ayaka; Hawes, Stephen E.; Xi, Long Fu; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Stern, Joshua E.; Koutsky, Laura A.; Winer, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral and fingernail human papillomavirus (HPV) detection may be associated with HPV-related carcinoma risk at these non-genital sites and foster transmission to the genitals. We describe the epidemiology of oral and fingernail HPV among mid-adult women. Methods Between 2011–2012, 409 women aged 30–50 years were followed for 6 months. Women completed health and behavior surveys and provided self-collected oral, fingernail, and vaginal specimens at enrollment and exit for type-specific HPV DNA testing. Concordance of type-specific HPV detection across anatomic sites was described with kappa statistics. Using generalized estimating equations or exact logistic regression, we measured the univariate associations of various risk factors with type-specific oral and fingernail HPV detection. Results Prevalence of detecting HPV in the oral cavity (2.4%) and fingernails (3.8%) was low compared to the vagina (33.1%). Concordance across anatomic sites was poor (kappa<.20 for all comparisons). However, concurrent vaginal infection with the same HPV type (OR=101.0;95%CI: 31.4–748.6) and vaginal HPV viral load (OR per one log10 viral load increase=2.2;95%CI:1.5–5.5) were each associated with fingernail HPV detection. Abnormal Pap history (OR=11.1;95%CI:2.8-infinity), lifetime number of male vaginal sex partners ≥10 (OR vs. 0–3 partners=5.0;95%CI:1.2-infinity), and lifetime number of open-mouth kissing partners ≥16 (OR vs. 0–15 partners=infinity;95%CI:2.6-infinity, by exact logistic regression) were each associated with oral HPV detection. Conclusions While our findings support HPV DNA deposition or autoinoculation between anatomic sites in mid-adult women, the rarity of HPV in the oral cavity and fingernails suggests that oral/fingernail HPV does not account for a significant fraction of HPV in genital sites. PMID:26562696

  8. Oropharyngeal and laryngeal but not oral cancers are strongly associated with high-risk human papillomavirus in 172 Greek patients.

    PubMed

    Tsimplaki, Elpida; Argyri, Elena; Sakellaridis, Athanassios; Kyrodimos, Efthimios; Xesfyngi, Dimitra; Panotopoulou, Efstathia

    2017-01-01

    A strong and consistent association has been reported between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and oropharyngeal cancer, whereas a similar link has not yet been clarified in oral and laryngeal cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between HPV infection and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in Greek patients. Cytological or tissue specimens from 172 cases patients with HNSCC and cytological specimens from 91 control subjects were analyzed for HPV DNA detection and genotyping using a microarray-based assay. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for the association between the presence of HPV infection and HNSCC for each of the tumor site, after adjustment for potential confounders. The adjusted ORs for positivity to high-risk HPV infection for oropharyngeal and laryngeal cancer were 20.3 (95% CI: 1.7-250.1) and 22.8 (95% CI: 2.5-206.2), respectively. High-risk HPV infection was not significantly associated with oral cancer. HPV infection was independently associated with poorly differentiated tumors (OR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.1-7.5). Our results suggest a strong association of high-risk HPV infection with oropharyngeal and laryngeal cancer. J. Med. Virol. 89:170-176, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men who have sex with men: prevalence and lack of anogenital concordance.

    PubMed

    King, Eleanor M; Gilson, Richard; Beddows, Simon; Soldan, Kate; Panwar, Kavita; Young, Carmel; Jit, Mark; Edmunds, W John; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2015-06-01

    To estimate the prevalence of oral detectable human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) attending a sexual health clinic in London and concordance with anogenital HPV infection. Such data are important to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of oral HPV and the potential use of vaccines to prevent oropharyngeal cancers. Paired oral rinse samples and anogenital samples were available from 151 HIV-negative MSM within a larger cross-sectional survey. All samples were tested in parallel for 21 types of HPV DNA using an in-house assay. The median age of participants was 30 (IQR 25-35). The prevalence of any oral HPV and of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was 13.7% (n=21; 95% CI 8.7 to 20.2) and 5.9% (n=9; 95% CI 2.7 to 10.9) compared with 64.9% (n=98; 95% CI 56.7 to 72.5) and 34.4% (n=52; 95% CI 26.9 to 42.6) in any anogenital sample, respectively. The prevalence of types prevented by the bivalent (HPV16/18), quadrivalent (HPV6/11/16/18) and nonavalent (HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) vaccines was 1.3% (95% CI 0.2 to 4.7), 2.6% (95% CI 0.7 to 6.6) and 4.6% (95% CI 1.9 to 9.3), respectively. There was no concordance between HPV genotypes detected in oral and anogenital sites. HR-HPV DNA, including HPV 16/18, was detected in oral specimens from HIV-negative MSM attending sexual health clinics, suggesting a potential role for vaccination, but is far less common than anogenital infection. How this relates to the risk and natural history of HPV-related head and neck cancers warrants further study. Lack of concordance with anogenital infection also suggests that oral HPV infection should be considered separately when estimating potential vaccine impact. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men who have sex with men: prevalence and lack of anogenital concordance

    PubMed Central

    King, Eleanor M; Gilson, Richard; Beddows, Simon; Soldan, Kate; Panwar, Kavita; Young, Carmel; Jit, Mark; Edmunds, W John; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of oral detectable human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) attending a sexual health clinic in London and concordance with anogenital HPV infection. Such data are important to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of oral HPV and the potential use of vaccines to prevent oropharyngeal cancers. Methods Paired oral rinse samples and anogenital samples were available from 151 HIV-negative MSM within a larger cross-sectional survey. All samples were tested in parallel for 21 types of HPV DNA using an in-house assay. Results The median age of participants was 30 (IQR 25–35). The prevalence of any oral HPV and of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was 13.7% (n=21; 95% CI 8.7 to 20.2) and 5.9% (n=9; 95% CI 2.7 to 10.9) compared with 64.9% (n=98; 95% CI 56.7 to 72.5) and 34.4% (n=52; 95% CI 26.9 to 42.6) in any anogenital sample, respectively. The prevalence of types prevented by the bivalent (HPV16/18), quadrivalent (HPV6/11/16/18) and nonavalent (HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) vaccines was 1.3% (95% CI 0.2 to 4.7), 2.6% (95% CI 0.7 to 6.6) and 4.6% (95% CI 1.9 to 9.3), respectively. There was no concordance between HPV genotypes detected in oral and anogenital sites. Conclusions HR-HPV DNA, including HPV 16/18, was detected in oral specimens from HIV-negative MSM attending sexual health clinics, suggesting a potential role for vaccination, but is far less common than anogenital infection. How this relates to the risk and natural history of HPV-related head and neck cancers warrants further study. Lack of concordance with anogenital infection also suggests that oral HPV infection should be considered separately when estimating potential vaccine impact. PMID:25887283

  11. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection Incidence and Clearance: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Wood, Zoe C; Bain, Christopher J; Smith, David D; Whiteman, David C; Antonsson, Annika

    2017-02-01

    Subclinical oral HPV infection that persists for decades is likely to precede a HPV-driven HNSCC, however little is known about the natural history of oral HPV. We systematically reviewed and abstracted data from nine manuscripts that examined HIV-negative and cancer-free subjects for oral HPV DNA to determine the pooled baseline prevalence and incidence of newly acquired oral HPV infections, and specifically for HPV-16. We also documented the clearance rate and the median time to clearance, where data existed. Of 3,762 individuals, 7.5% had an oral infection with any HPV type (1.6% for HPV-16). Meta-regression analysis estimated the 12-month cumulative incidence to be 4.8% (95% CI 3.2-7.3%). The overall oral HPV clearance was reported to be 0% to 80% between studies, and the median time to clearance from 6.5 months to 18 months. Oral HPV-16 clearance was 43%-83%, and median time to clearance for HPV-16 was 7 to 22 months. Oral HPV prevalence, incidence and clearance vary considerably between published studies from different geographical regions. Further research is required to identify predictors of persistent oral HPV infection. Measurable baseline prevalence was observed in all studies, as well non-trivial incidence of newly acquired oral HPV infections and incomplete clearance.

  12. Oral Human Papillomavirus Detection in Older Adults Who Have Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Chen, Zigui; Bottalico, Danielle; McKinney, Sharod; Ostoloza, Janae; Dunne, Anne; Burk, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate reproducibility of oral rinse self-collection for HPV detection and investigate associations between oral HPV, oral lesions, immune and sociodemographic factors, we performed a cross-sectional study of older adults with HIV infection. Study Design We collected oral rinse samples from 52 subjects at two different times of day followed by an oral examination and interview. We identified HPV using PCR platforms optimized for detection of mucosal and cutaneous types. Results Eighty seven percent of individuals had oral HPV, of which 23% had oncogenic alpha, 40% had non-oncogenic alpha, and 46% had beta or gamma HPV. Paired oral specimens were concordant in all parameters tested. Significant associations observed for oral HPV with increased HIV viral load, hepatitis-C seropositivity, history of sexually transmitted diseases and lifetime number of sexual partners. Conclusions Oral cavity may be a reservoir of subclinical HPV in older adults who have HIV infection. Understanding natural history, transmission and potential implications of oral HPV warrants further investigations. PMID:23375488

  13. High Oral Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Load Predicts Long-term Persistence in Individuals With or at Risk for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Beachler, Daniel C.; Guo, Yingshi; Xiao, Wiehong; Burk, Robert D.; Minkoff, Howard; Strickler, Howard D.; Cranston, Ross D.; Wiley, Dorothy J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Weber, Kathleen M.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Reddy, Susheel; Gillison, Maura L.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    The association between oral human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) DNA load and infection clearance was evaluated among 88 individuals with oral HPV16 infection who were identified within a prospective cohort of 1470 HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. Oral rinse specimens were collected semiannually for up to 5 years. The oral HPV16 load at the time of the first positive test result was significantly associated with the time to clearance of infection (continuous P trends <.01). Notably, clearance rates by 24 months were 41% and 94% in the highest and lowest HPV16 load tertiles (P = .03), respectively. High oral HPV16 load warrants consideration as a biomarker for infection persistence, the presumed precursor of HPV16-associated oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:25954049

  14. High Oral Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Load Predicts Long-term Persistence in Individuals With or at Risk for HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Beachler, Daniel C; Guo, Yingshi; Xiao, Wiehong; Burk, Robert D; Minkoff, Howard; Strickler, Howard D; Cranston, Ross D; Wiley, Dorothy J; Jacobson, Lisa P; Weber, Kathleen M; Margolick, Joseph B; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Reddy, Susheel; Gillison, Maura L; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-11-15

    The association between oral human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) DNA load and infection clearance was evaluated among 88 individuals with oral HPV16 infection who were identified within a prospective cohort of 1470 HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. Oral rinse specimens were collected semiannually for up to 5 years. The oral HPV16 load at the time of the first positive test result was significantly associated with the time to clearance of infection (continuous P trends <.01). Notably, clearance rates by 24 months were 41% and 94% in the highest and lowest HPV16 load tertiles (P = .03), respectively. High oral HPV16 load warrants consideration as a biomarker for infection persistence, the presumed precursor of HPV16-associated oropharyngeal cancer.

  15. Immunohistochemical Analysis of PD-L1 Expression in Canine Malignant Cancers and PD-1 Expression on Lymphocytes in Canine Oral Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Izumi, Yusuke; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Kato, Yukinari; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous cancers are common diseases in dogs. Among these, some malignant cancers such as oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, and mast cell tumor are often recognized as clinical problems because, despite their high frequencies, current treatments for these cancers may not always achieve satisfying outcomes. The absence of effective systemic therapies against these cancers leads researchers to investigate novel therapeutic modalities, including immunotherapy. Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is a costimulatory receptor with immunosuppressive function. When it binds its ligands, PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) or PD-L2, PD-1 on T cells negatively regulates activating signals from the T cell receptor, resulting in the inhibition of the effector function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Aberrant PD-L1 expression has been reported in many human cancers and is considered an immune escape mechanism for cancers. In clinical trials, anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies induced tumor regression for several malignancies, including advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. In this study, to assess the potential of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis as a novel therapeutic target for canine cancer immunotherapy, immunohistochemical analysis of PD-L1 expression in various malignant cancers of dogs was performed. Here, we show that dog oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumor, mammary adenocarcinoma, and prostate adenocarcinoma expressed PD-L1, whereas some other types of cancer did not. In addition, PD-1 was highly expressed on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes obtained from oral melanoma, showing that lymphocytes in this cancer type might have been functionally exhausted. These results strongly encourage the clinical application of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors as novel therapeutic agents against these cancers in dogs. PMID:27276060

  16. Risk factors for development of sterile haemorrhagic cystitis in canine lymphoma patients receiving oral cyclophosphamide: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gaeta, R; Brown, D; Cohen, R; Sorenmo, K

    2014-12-01

    Sterile haemorrhagic cystitis (SHC) is a known risk of cyclophosphamide treatment; however, most canine reports are case series. This case-control study examined risk factors for SHC in dogs with lymphoma receiving oral cyclophosphamide. Twenty-two dogs with SHC and 66 control dogs were identified. On univariate analysis, SHC risk factors included age (P = 0.041), induction protocol (P = 0.021) and cumulative cyclophosphamide dose (P = 0.002). On multivariate analysis, increasing cumulative cyclophosphamide dose was associated with increased risk of SHC and the 'short' induction protocol (protocol 1) was associated with decreased risk. Controlling for age and induction protocol, odds of SHC increased by 2.21 per 750 mg m(-2) increase in cyclophosphamide dose (P = 0.001). SHC from oral cyclophosphamide is a predominately delayed toxicity resulting from high cumulative doses.

  17. Genotype-specific concordance of oral and genital human papillomavirus infections among marital couples is low.

    PubMed

    Kero, K; Rautava, J; Louvanto, K; Syrjänen, K; Grenman, S; Syrjänen, S

    2016-04-01

    Data on genotype-specific concordance of oral-oral and genital-oral HPV infections among marital couples are key to understand HPV transmission between spouses. Genotype-specific concordance of HPV infections (oral/genital) and their co-variates among 131 marital couples were determined during 6-year follow-up (FU). Seven oral scrapings were taken from both spouses, accompanied by six genital samplings from the women and one (at baseline) from the male partners. HPV-genotyping was performed by nested PCR and a Luminex®-based Multimetrix Assay. Demographic data were collected with questionnaires at baseline and study conclusion. Prevalence of oral HPV varied from 10.3 to 27.0 % and 15.8 to 31.3 % in women and men, respectively. At baseline, 37.6 % of the male genital samples were HPV-positive while in female genital samples, HPV prevalence varied from 13.3 to 59.4 %. Only 15 couples had HPV genotype-specific concordance (oral-oral n = 7; male oral-female genital n = 9; female oral-male genital n = 2). In the nested case-control setting, higher number of deliveries (OR 0.145, 95%CI 0.030-0.706, p = 0.017) and higher number of intercourse (OR 0.488, 95%CI 0.243-0.978, p = 0.043) decreased the likelihood of concordant HPV infections while practicing oral sex increased the risk (OR 0.299, 95%CI 0.120-0.748, p = 0.010). In multivariate analysis, the likelihood of concordance was decreased by higher number of pregnancies of the female partner (p = 0.020) and by higher frequency of intercourse reported by the male spouse (p = 0.027). To conclude, asymptomatic HPV infections were common in both spouses while genotype-specific concordance was low. This supports the view that HPV profile of the spouses has been established before the current marital relationship.

  18. High prevalence of human papillomavirus infection and possible association with betel quid chewing and smoking in oral epidermoid carcinomas in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, K W; Chang, C S; Lai, K S; Chou, M J; Choo, K B

    1989-05-01

    Seventeen oral epidermoid carcinomas, three oral papillomas, and 17 normal gingival tissues were tested for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, and 18 sequences by Southern blot hybridization. Episomal HPV-16 sequences in various amounts were detected in 76.4% of the oral carcinomas and in all three cases of papilloma. However, only one of the 17 normal tissues was HPV positive with an unknown type. None of the samples contained HPV-6, -11, or -18 sequences. Examination of the habits of the patients showed that 59% of the patients were betel quid chewers and 82% were smokers. Thus, the concurrent incidence of HPV infection and betal quid chewing and/or smoking habits in oral carcinoma patients observed in Taiwan is consistent with the view that both viral and chemical factors may be involved in the process of carcinogenesis.

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity often overexpresses p16 but is rarely driven by human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Zafereo, Mark E.; Xu, Li; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Viamonte, Carlo A.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Wei, Qingyi; Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a causal and prognostic factor for oropharyngeal cancer, but its role in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC) is unclear. We sought to clarify HPV's role in SCCOC. Materials and Methods Patients with newly diagnosed SCCOC (N=460) were prospectively recruited, treated, and followed at one institution. p16/HPV status was determined by p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) (N=210), PCR-based HPV 16/18 E6/7 DNA testing (N=403), and/or HPV in situ hybridization (ISH) (N=178). Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests were used to compare survival by p16/HPV status. Results p16 expression was detected in 30% of tumors (62/210) and HPV 16/18 E6/7 DNA in 28% (114/403), although correlation between these two assays was poor (r=−0.01). Patients with p16-positive tumors were more likely to be younger and have primary tumors of the oral tongue. Only 4% of tumors (7/171) were positive for HPV by ISH. Comparisons of patients with p16-positive and p16-negative tumors, patients with HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors by PCR, and patients with HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors by ISH showed no significant differences in disease-specific or disease-free survival by p16/HPV status. When we applied a more stringent definition of HPV positivity based on a combination of assay results, only 10 of 166 tumors were HPV positive, and there were no significant differences in demographic, exposure, clinical, or survival characteristics between these patients and the 156 HPV-negative patients. Conclusions Very few patients with SCCOC have HPV-driven tumors. SCCOC that overexpresses p16 may be a unique subset deserving of further study. PMID:27086486

  20. Amplification of EGFR and cyclin D1 genes associated with human papillomavirus infection in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chuerduangphui, Jureeporn; Pientong, Chamsai; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Chotiyano, Apinya; Vatanasapt, Patravoot; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Promthet, Supannee; Swangphon, Piyawut; Bumrungthai, Sureewan; Pimson, Charinya; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2017-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with several genetic alterations including oncogene amplification, leading to increased aggression of tumors. Recently, a relationship between HPV infection and oncogene amplification has been reported, but this finding remains controversial. This study therefore investigated relationships between HPV infection and amplification of genes in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling cascade in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Extracted DNA from 142 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) OSCC tissues was performed to investigate the copy number of EGFR, KRAS, c-myc and cyclin D1 genes using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and compared with calibrators. A tissue microarray of OSCC tissues was used for detection of c-Myc expression and HPV infection by immunohistochemistry and HPV E6/E7 RNA in situ hybridization, respectively. HPV infection was also investigated using PCR and RT-PCR. Of the 142 OSCC samples, 81 (57%) were HPV-infected cases. The most frequently amplified gene was c-myc (55.6%), followed by cyclin D1 (26.1%), EGFR (23.9%) and KRAS (19.7%). Amplification of c-myc was significantly associated with levels of its protein product. EGFR amplification was also significantly associated with amplification of genes in the signaling cascade: KRAS (50.0%), c-myc (34.2%) and cyclin D1 (46.0%). Interestingly, HPV infection was significantly associated with amplification of both EGFR (76.5%) and cyclin D1 (73.0%). Only cyclin D1 amplification was significantly associated with severity of OSCC histopathology. HPV infection may play an important synergistic role in amplification of genes in the EGFR signaling cascade, leading to increased aggression in oral malignancies.

  1. Associations of Oral α-, β-, and γ-Human Papillomavirus Types With Risk of Incident Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Agalliu, Ilir; Gapstur, Susan; Chen, Zigui; Wang, Tao; Anderson, Rebecca L.; Teras, Lauren; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Hayes, Richard B.; Freedman, Neal D.; Burk, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Prospective studies are needed to examine the temporal relationship between oral human papillomavirus (HPV) detection and risk of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Moreover, the oral cavity contains a wide spectrum of α-, β-, and γ- HPV types, but their association with risk of HNSCC is unknown. OBJECTIVE To prospectively examine associations between α-, β-, and γ-HPV detection in the oral cavity and incident HNSCC. DESIGN A nested case-control study was carried out among 96 650 participants, cancer free at baseline, with available mouthwash samples in 2 prospective cohort studies: (1) the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort and (2) the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Incident cases of HNSCC (n = 132) were identified duringan average 3.9 years of follow-up in both cohorts. Three controls per case (n = 396) were selected through incidence density sampling and matched on age, sex, race/ethnicity, and time since mouthwash collection. METHODS Through a next-generation sequencing assay, DNA from α-, β-, and γ-HPV types were detected. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs, adjusting for smoking history, alcohol consumption, and detection of HPV-16 for β- and γ-HPVs. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Incident HNSCC, which includes cancers of the oropharynx, oral cavity, and larynx. RESULTS A total of 132 participants developed HNSCC during the follow-up period (103 men and 29 women; average age at baseline, 66.5 years). Oral HPV-16 detection was associated with incident HNSCC (OR, 7.1; 95% CI, 2.2–22.6), with positive association for oropharyngeal SCC (OR, 22.4; 95% CI, 1.8–276.7), but not for oral cavity (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 0.6–34.7) or laryngeal SCCs (OR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.01–834.80). Detection of β1-HPV-5 and β2-HPV-38 types, as well as γ-11 and γ-12 species, had ORs for HNSCC that ranged from 2.64 to 5.45 (P < .01 for

  2. BUBR1 expression in benign oral lesions and squamous cell carcinomas: correlation with human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Lira, Régia C P; Miranda, Fabiana A; Guimarães, Márcia C M; Simões, Renata T; Donadi, Eduardo A; Soares, Christiane P; Soares, Edson G

    2010-04-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common head and neck cancer. Only in Brazil, the estimate is for 14,160 new cases in 2009. HPV is associated with increasing risk of oral cancer, but its role in carcinogenesis is still controversial. BUBR1, an important protein in the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), has been associated with some virus-encoded proteins and cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of BUBR1 in non-malignant oral lesions and OSCC with and without metastasis associated with HPV infection. We performed immunohistochemistry for BUBR1 in 70 OSCC biopsies divided into three groups (in situ tumors, invasive tumors without metastasis and invasive tumors with metastasis) with their respective lymph nodes from samples with metastasis and in 16 non-malignant oral lesions. PCR was performed in order to detect HPV DNA. Significantly higher BUBR1 expression associated with shorter survival (p=0.0479) was observed in malignant lesions. There was also a significant correlation (r=1.000) with BUBR1 expression in lesions with metastasis and their lymph nodes. Ninety percent of OSCC and 100% of benign lesions were HPV positive. HPV16 and HVP18 were present in 13 and 24% of HPV-positive OSCC samples, respectively. HPV was more prevalent (76%) in samples with a high BUBR1 expression and the absence of viral DNA had no influence on BUBR1 expression. These findings suggest that HPV could be associated with overexpression of BUBR1 in OSCC, but not in benign oral lesions.

  3. Human papillomavirus in oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas in the central region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Petito, Guilherme; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida Dos Santos; Santos, Sílvia Helena de Rabello; Silva, Antonio Marcio Teodoro Cordeiro; Alencar, Rita de Cassia; Gontijo, Antonio Paulo; Saddi, Vera Aparecida

    Molecular studies about carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx demonstrate the presence of human papilomavirus genome in these tumors, reinforcing the participation of human papilomavirus in oral carcinogenesis. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of human papilomavirus and genotype distribution of HPV16 and HPV18 in oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas, as well as their association with clinical characteristics of the tumors. This is a retrospective study, with clinical data collected from 82 patients. Human papilomavirus detection was conducted on specimens of oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas included in paraffin blocks. Patients were assisted in a cancer reference center, in the central region of Brazil, between 2005 and 2007. Polymerase chain reaction was used for the detection and genotyping of human papilomavirus. Among the patients evaluated, 78% were male. The average age of the group was about 58 years. Risk factors, such as smoking (78%) and alcohol consumption (70.8%) were recorded for the group. HPV DNA was detected in 21 cases (25.6%; 95% confidence interval 16.9-36.6) of which 33.3% were HPV16 and 14.3% were HPV18. The presence of lymph node metastases and registered deaths were less frequent in human papilomavirus positive tumors, suggesting a better prognosis for these cases; however, the differences between the groups were not statistically significant. The results obtained in the present study, with respect to the presence of the high-risk HPV16 and HPV18 genotypes, highlight the importance of human papilomavirus vaccination in the control of oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. High-risk human papillomavirus detection in oropharyngeal, nasopharyngeal, and, oral cavity cancers: Comparison of multiple methods

    PubMed Central

    Walline, Heather M; Komarck, Chris; McHugh, Jonathan B; Byrd, Serena A; Spector, Matthew E; Hauff, Samantha J.; Graham, Martin P; Bellile, Emily; Moyer, Jeffrey S; Prince, Mark E; Wolf, Gregory T; Chepeha, Douglas B; Worden, Francis P; Stenmark, Matthew H; Eisbruch, Avraham; Bradford, Carol R; Carey, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Importance Human papillomaviruses are now recognized as an etiologic factor in a growing subset of head and neck cancers and have critical prognostic importance that affects therapeutic decision making. There is no universally accepted gold standard for high-risk HPV (hrHPV) assessment in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens, nor is there a clear understanding of the frequency or role of hrHPV in sites other than oropharynx. Objective To determine the optimal assessment of hrHPV in FFPE head and neck tumors. Design Assessment of hrHPV by p16 immunohistochemical staining, in situ hybridization (ISH), and PCR-MassArray (PCR-MA), with L1 PGMY-PCR (PGMY-PCR) and sequencing to resolve method discordance, was applied to 338 FFPE oropharyngeal, nasopharyngeal, and oral cavity tumors. Relative sensitivity and specificity were compared to develop a standard optimal test protocol. Setting Large Midwestern referral center. Participants Tissue specimens from 338 head and neck cancer patients treated during the period 2001-2011 in the departments of Otolaryngology, Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology. Patients with oropharyngeal and oral cancer were consented for IRB approved study through the Head and Neck SPORE. Tissue blocks from nasopharyngeal cancer patients were retrieved from pathology archives under IRB approval for existing tissue and data. Intervention Patients received standard therapy. Main outcomes and measurements Optimal hrHPV identification, detection, and activity in head and neck cancers. Results Using combined PCR-MA with PGMY-PCR and sequencing for conclusive results, we found PCR-MA to have 99.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity, p16 to have 94.2% sensitivity and 85.5% specificity, and ISH to have 82.9% sensitivity and 81% specificity. Among HPV-positive tumors, HPV16 was most frequently detected, but 10 non-HPV16 types accounted for 6-50% of tumors, depending on site. Overall, 86% of oropharynx, 50% of nasopharynx and 26% of oral

  5. Concurrence of oral and genital human papillomavirus infection in healthy men: a population-based cross-sectional study in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangfang; Hang, Dong; Deng, Qiuju; Liu, Mengfei; Xi, Longfu; He, Zhonghu; Zhang, Chaoting; Sun, Min; Liu, Ying; Li, Jingjing; Pan, Yaqi; Ning, Tao; Guo, Chuanhai; Liang, Yongmei; Xu, Ruiping; Zhang, Lixin; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, a primary cause of genital cancer, is also related to the increasing incidence of oropharyngeal cancer among young men. Relatively little is known about the concurrence of oral and genital infection among healthy individuals. Oral and genital swab exfoliated cells were collected simultaneously from 2566 men in rural China. Using general primer-mediated (SPF1/GP6+) PCR and sequencing, HPV testing results were obtained from 2228 men with both valid oral and genital specimens (β-globin-positive). The prevalence of HPV infection was 6.7% in the oral cavity and 16.9% for the external genitalia. Among 43 men (1.9%, 43/2228) with oral-genital coinfection, 60.5% (26/43) harbored an identical HPV type at both sites. The risk of oral HPV infection was higher among men with genital infection than among uninfected men (11.4% vs. 5.7%, Adjusted OR = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.6–3.4). In addition, having multiple lifetime sexual partners was a significant risk for oral-genital HPV coinfection (Adjusted OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.0–7.0; 2 partners vs. 1 partner). These findings provide a basis for further understanding the natural history and transmission dynamics of oral HPV infection. PMID:26503510

  6. Diversity of Beta-papillomavirus at anogenital and oral anatomic sites of men: The HIM Study

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Emily Montosa; Sudenga, Staci L.; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C.; Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.; Villa, Luisa L.; Sichero, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Summary Our goal was to describe prevalence of β-HPVs at three anatomic sites among 717 men from Brazil, Mexico and US enrolled in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. β-HPVs were genotyped using Luminex technology. Overall, 77.7%, 54.3% and 29.3% men were positive for any β-HPV at the genitals, anal canal, and oral cavity, respectively. Men from US and Brazil were significantly less likely to have β-HPV at the anal canal than men from Mexico. Older men were more likely to have β-HPV at the anal canal compared to younger men. Prevalence of β-HPV at the oral cavity was significantly associated with country of origin and age. Current smokers were significantly less likely to have β-HPV in the oral cavity than men who never smoked. Lack of associations between β-HPV and sexual behaviors may suggest other routes of contact such as autoinoculation which need to be explored further. PMID:27161202

  7. Evaluation of oral and subcutaneous delivery of an experimental canarypox recombinant canine distemper vaccine in the Siberian polecate (Mustela eversmanni)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wimsatt, Jeffrey; Biggins, Dean E.; Innes, Kim; Taylor, Bobbi; Garell, Della

    2003-01-01

    We assessed the safety and efficacy of an experimental canarypox-vectored recombinant canine distemper virus (CDV) subunit vaccine in the Siberian polecat (Mustela eversmanni), a close relative of the black-footed ferret, (M. nigripes), an endangered species that is highly susceptible to the virus. Siberian polecats were randomized into six treatment groups. Recombinant canine distemper vaccine was administered s.c. at three dose levels (104.5, 105.0, and 105.5 plaque-forming units [PFU] per dose) and was administered orally by spraying the vaccine into the oropharnyx at two dose levels (105.5, 108.0 PFU per dose). The sixth group of control animals was not vaccinated. For both routes of administration, two 1-ml doses of reconstituted vaccine were delivered 4 wk apart, followed by live virus challenge 3 wk after the second vaccination. During the challenge, Synder Hill test strain CDV obtained from the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, was administered i.p. Serial blood samples for CDV serology were collected immediately before vaccination and challenge, and 10, 15, and 20 days after challenge. Clinical signs and body weights were recorded up to 32 days after challenge. The survival rate in animals receiving vaccine at the highest oral dose (108.0 PFU per dose) was 83.3%. Survival rate was 50.0% in the high s.c. and 60.0% in the medium s.c. groups. All animals in the low–s.c. dose, low–oral dose, and control groups died after exposure. Vaccine dose overall (oral and s.c.) and dose in response to s.c. administration when considered alone were significant predictors of survival (P = 0.006 and P = 0.04, respectively). Among the polecats challenged with virulent virus, those that died became sick sooner than those that survived. Animals that died lost significantly more weight during the 10 days after challenge than did animals that survived (P = 0.02). Survival rates did not differ by sex, founder female status, or breeding pedigree in any of

  8. A comparison of oral and intravenous pimonidazole in canine tumors using intravenous CCI-103F as a control hypoxia marker

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiter, Miriam M.; Thrall, Donald E.; Malarkey, David E.; Ji Xiaoshen; Lee, David Y.W.; Chou, S.-C.; Raleigh, James A. . E-mail: james_raleigh@med.unc.edu

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: Pimonidazole HCl is widely used in immunohistochemical analyses of hypoxia in normal and malignant tissues. The present study investigates oral administration as a means of minimizing invasiveness. Methods and Materials: Twelve dogs with confirmed malignancy received 0.5 g/m{sup 2} of pimonidazole HCl: 6 by mouth and 6 by i.v. infusion. All dogs received i.v. CCI-103F as a control. Plasma levels of pimonidazole, pimonidazole N-oxide, and CCI-103F were measured. Tumor biopsies were formalin fixed, paraffin embedded, sectioned, immunostained, and analyzed for pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding. pH dependence for pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding was studied in vitro. Results: Pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding in carcinomas and sarcomas was strongly correlated for both oral and i.v. pimonidazole HCl (r {sup 2} = 0.97). On average, the extent of pimonidazole binding exceeded that for CCI-103F by a factor of approximately 1.2, with the factor ranging from 1.0 to 1.65. Binding of both markers was pH dependent, but pimonidazole binding was greater at all values of pH. Conclusions: Oral pimonidazole HCl is effective as a hypoxia marker in spontaneously arising canine tumors. Selective cellular uptake and concomitant higher levels of binding in regions of hypoxia at the high end of pH gradients might account for the greater extent of pimonidazole binding.

  9. Influence of guidance concept in complete dentures on oral health related quality of life - Canine guidance vs. bilateral balanced occlusion.

    PubMed

    Schierz, Oliver; Reissmann, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    To compare the impact of canine guided vs. bilateral balanced occlusion on oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) as a patient-reported outcome measure. In this randomized single-blind crossover trial, 19 patients have been provided with new complete dentures in the maxilla and mandible. OHRQoL was assessed using the 49-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49) before the start of the prosthodontic treatment (B), 3 months after insertion of the new dentures (T1), and 3 months after rework into the alternative concept (T2). Multilevel mixed-effect linear regression models were computed to determine the effect provided by the new set of dentures and the specific impact of the occlusal concept on OHRQoL using summary scores of the OHIP-49 and of a 19-items subset specific for edentulous patients (OHIP-EDENT). At baseline, participants' OHRQoL was substantially impaired indicated by an average OHIP-49 score of 42.1 points and an OHIP-EDENT score of 21.1 points. The effect of provision of a new set of complete dentures was a statistically significant decrease of 8.3 points (OHIP-49) and 4.0 points (OHIP-EDENT), respectively, representing a clinically relevant improvement in OHRQoL. When wearing dentures with bilateral balanced occlusion, participants showed on average 1.6 points higher OHIP-49 scores and 0.9 points higher OHIP-EDENT scores compared to canine guided dentures. This effect of the occlusal concept was neither statistically nor clinically significant. Both investigated occlusal concepts for complete dentures were comparable in their effect on patients' perceptions with none being considerably superior in terms of OHRQoL. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Magnitude of the Association between Human Papillomavirus and Oral Lichen Planus: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxian; Zhang, Jinshan; Zhang, Yan; Lv, Tingting; Liu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The role of human papilloma virus (HPV) in oral lichen planus (OLP) is controversial. The primary aim of the current study is to calculate the pooled risk estimates of HPV infection in OLP when compared with healthy controls. Bibliographic searches were conducted in three electronic databases. Articles on the association between HPV and OLP were selected from case-control studies or cross-sectional studies, following predefined criteria. Pooled data were analyzed by calculating odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Of the 233 publications identified, 22 case-control studies met the inclusion criteria. Collectively, 835 cases and 734 controls were available for analysis. The summary estimate showed that OLP patients have significantly higher HPV prevalence (OR: 6.83; 95% CI: 4.15-11.27) than healthy controls. In subgroup analyses, the association of HPV and OLP varied significantly by geographic populations. The ORs ranged from 2.43 to 132.04. The correlation of HPV and erosive-atrophic oral lichen planus (EA-OLP) (OR: 9.34) was comparable and well above that of HPV and non-EA-OLP (OR: 4.32). Among HPV genotypes, HPV 16 showed an extremely strong association with OLP (OR: 11.27), and HPV 18 showed a relatively strong one (OR: 6.54). In conclusion, a significant association was found between HPV and OLP. The strength of the association varied across geographic populations, clinical types of OLP, and HPV genotypes. The results suggest that HPV might play an important causal role in OLP and in its malignant to progression.

  11. The Magnitude of the Association between Human Papillomavirus and Oral Lichen Planus: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Tingting; Liu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of human papilloma virus (HPV) in oral lichen planus (OLP) is controversial. Objectives The primary aim of the current study is to calculate the pooled risk estimates of HPV infection in OLP when compared with healthy controls. Methods Bibliographic searches were conducted in three electronic databases. Articles on the association between HPV and OLP were selected from case-control studies or cross-sectional studies, following predefined criteria. Pooled data were analyzed by calculating odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Of the 233 publications identified, 22 case-control studies met the inclusion criteria. Collectively, 835 cases and 734 controls were available for analysis. The summary estimate showed that OLP patients have significantly higher HPV prevalence (OR: 6.83; 95% CI: 4.15–11.27) than healthy controls. In subgroup analyses, the association of HPV and OLP varied significantly by geographic populations. The ORs ranged from 2.43 to 132.04. The correlation of HPV and erosive-atrophic oral lichen planus (EA-OLP) (OR: 9.34) was comparable and well above that of HPV and non-EA-OLP (OR: 4.32). Among HPV genotypes, HPV 16 showed an extremely strong association with OLP (OR: 11.27), and HPV 18 showed a relatively strong one (OR: 6.54). Conclusion In conclusion, a significant association was found between HPV and OLP. The strength of the association varied across geographic populations, clinical types of OLP, and HPV genotypes. The results suggest that HPV might play an important causal role in OLP and in its malignant to progression. PMID:27571417

  12. Electron microscopic detection of human papillomavirus particles in oral proliferative lesions.

    PubMed

    Broich, G; Sasaki, T

    1989-11-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) has been demonstrated in a series of benign proliferative lesions of skin and mucosae. To prove the distribution of HPV in the oral proliferative lesions at the ultrastructural level, we performed electron microscopic analysis of 10 specimens taken from 5 patients through large excisional biopsy. All of them were diagnosed pathologically as fibropapilloma. In each patient, specimens were taken from both clinically evident proliferative lesions and clinically normal surrounding mucosa. Obtained specimens were fixed in a glutaraldehyde solution and processed for routine ultrathin sectioning. Before electron microscopic observation, the tissue sections on copper grids were subjected to amylase digestion of glycogen granules. Spherical viral particles of 40-55 nm in diameter were detected the non-keratinized epithelial cells in all specimens examined. Of particular interest were the large amounts of viral particles found in the cytoplasmic matrix and nuclei (especially on their chromatin masses) of the cells in intermediate and surface layers, which did not form a crystal array. All the membranous cell organelles of epithelial cells were, however, devoid of viral particles. Some viral particles were distributed in the extracellular spaces of an intermediate layer. Viral particles were hardly observed in the cells of a basal/suprabasal and prickle cell layers. There were no significant differences in the HPV distribution between the cells derived from the proliferative lesion and those derived from the surrounding normal mucosa.

  13. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in oral squamous cell carcinomas in northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Santamarta, Tania; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; García-Pedrero, Juana M; Álvarez-Teijeiro, Saúl; Ángeles Villaronga, M; Suárez-Fernández, Laura; Alvarez-Argüelles, Marta E; Astudillo, Aurora; de Vicente, Juan Carlos

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of high-risk HPV in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in a northern Spanish population, as well as to ascertain the prognostic role of p16(INK4a) expression. The examination samples were collected from paraffin tissue blocks, from 125 patients surgically treated between 1996 and 2007. All cases were histologically evaluated, and the presence of HPV was assessed by p16 and p53immunohistochemistry followed by DNA detection by in situ hybridization (ISH) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using the combination of consensus primers MY11/GP6 + . Fourteen cases (11 %) were p16-immunopositive, and p53 was scored positive in 73 cases (58 %). Five cases (4 %) showed a simultaneous p16-positive and p53-negative immunostaining. ISH was negative in all the cases. Among the p16INK4a-immunopositive cases, PCR amplification failed to reveal HPV DNA in any tumor samples. There were no statistically significant differences in any clinical or pathological characteristics of the patients regarding p16(INK4a) expression. T classification, neck-node metastasis, and clinical stage showed outcome relevance. However, no significant differences in cause-specific survival based on p16INK4a were observed. We did not find any high-risk HPV types in our patients, thus, are unlikely that HPV has an important role in the etiology of OSCC. p16INK4a protein was neither an accurate marker of HPV infection nor a prognosis marker in OSCC.

  14. Reduced Prevalence of Oral Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 4 Years after Bivalent HPV Vaccination in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Rolando; Quint, Wim; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula; Struijk, Linda; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Wacholder, Sholom; Kreimer, Aimée R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly with type 16, causes a growing fraction of oropharyngeal cancers, whose incidence is increasing, mainly in developed countries. In a double-blind controlled trial conducted to investigate vaccine efficacy (VE) of the bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against cervical infections and lesions, we estimated VE against prevalent oral HPV infections 4 years after vaccination. Methods and Findings A total of 7,466 women 18–25 years old were randomized (1∶1) to receive the HPV16/18 vaccine or hepatitis A vaccine as control. At the final blinded 4-year study visit, 5,840 participants provided oral specimens (91·9% of eligible women) to evaluate VE against oral infections. Our primary analysis evaluated prevalent oral HPV infection among all vaccinated women with oral and cervical HPV results. Corresponding VE against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection was calculated for comparison. Oral prevalence of identifiable mucosal HPV was relatively low (1·7%). Approximately four years after vaccination, there were 15 prevalent HPV16/18 infections in the control group and one in the vaccine group, for an estimated VE of 93·3% (95% CI = 63% to 100%). Corresponding efficacy against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection for the same cohort at the same visit was 72·0% (95% CI = 63% to 79%) (p versus oral VE = 0·04). There was no statistically significant protection against other oral HPV infections, though power was limited for these analyses. Conclusions HPV prevalence four years after vaccination with the ASO4-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine was much lower among women in the vaccine arm compared to the control arm, suggesting that the vaccine affords strong protection against oral HPV16/18 infection, with potentially important implications for prevention of increasingly common HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. ClinicalTrials.gov, Registry number NCT00128661 PMID:23873171

  15. Reduced prevalence of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) 4 years after bivalent HPV vaccination in a randomized clinical trial in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Rolando; Quint, Wim; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula; Struijk, Linda; Katki, Hormuzd A; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Wacholder, Sholom; Kreimer, Aimée R

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly with type 16, causes a growing fraction of oropharyngeal cancers, whose incidence is increasing, mainly in developed countries. In a double-blind controlled trial conducted to investigate vaccine efficacy (VE) of the bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against cervical infections and lesions, we estimated VE against prevalent oral HPV infections 4 years after vaccination. A total of 7,466 women 18-25 years old were randomized (1∶1) to receive the HPV16/18 vaccine or hepatitis A vaccine as control. At the final blinded 4-year study visit, 5,840 participants provided oral specimens (91·9% of eligible women) to evaluate VE against oral infections. Our primary analysis evaluated prevalent oral HPV infection among all vaccinated women with oral and cervical HPV results. Corresponding VE against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection was calculated for comparison. Oral prevalence of identifiable mucosal HPV was relatively low (1·7%). Approximately four years after vaccination, there were 15 prevalent HPV16/18 infections in the control group and one in the vaccine group, for an estimated VE of 93·3% (95% CI = 63% to 100%). Corresponding efficacy against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection for the same cohort at the same visit was 72·0% (95% CI = 63% to 79%) (p versus oral VE = 0·04). There was no statistically significant protection against other oral HPV infections, though power was limited for these analyses. HPV prevalence four years after vaccination with the ASO4-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine was much lower among women in the vaccine arm compared to the control arm, suggesting that the vaccine affords strong protection against oral HPV16/18 infection, with potentially important implications for prevention of increasingly common HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. ClinicalTrials.gov, Registry number NCT00128661.

  16. p16 Immunostaining of Canine Squamous Cell Carcinomas Is Not Associated with Papillomaviral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sabattini, Silvia; Savini, Federica; Gallina, Laura; Scagliarini, Alessandra; Bassi, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    While papillomavirus (PVs) are an established cause of human cancer, few reports have supported a relationship between PV and canine squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Human oncogenic PVs lead to an increased expression of the p16 tumor suppressor protein, and the latter can be demonstrated immunohistochemically to support a likely causal relationship between tumor and PV infection. In the present study, archive samples of canine SCC from different anatomical locations were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of PV DNA and by p16 immunohistochemistry. The aims were to investigate the relationship between p16 expression and presence of PV DNA, in order to assess the utility of p16 overexpression as a biomarker of PV infection in canine SCC. A total of 52 SCCs were included. Nine cases (17.3%) showed moderate p16 immunoreactivity, with no association with tumor degree of differentiation, histotype or mitotic activity. The canPVf/FAP64 primers amplified Canis familiaris PV-1 DNA from 3 out of 52 tumors (5.8%), one cutaneous, one oral and one tonsillar SCC. There was no association between PV presence and p16 immunostaining. These results do not support a significant role of PVs in the development of canine SCCs. Additionally, PV infection was apparently not the cause of the p16 immunostaining observed in a subset of canine SCCs. A better awareness of p16 level of expression and cellular function in canine cancer may help to define its diagnostic and prognostic role. PMID:27441555

  17. Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 in oral and cervical cancers in population from Gujarat, West India.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kinjal R; Vajaria, Bhairavi N; Begum, Rasheedunnisa; Desai, Ava; Patel, Jayendra B; Shah, Franky D; Shukla, Shilin N; Patel, Prabhudas S

    2014-04-01

    Oral and cervical cancers are major malignancies in men and women, respectively, in India. This study evaluated occurrence of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 infections in oral and cervical cancers to estimate HPV-associated burden of these cancers in the population from Gujarat, West India. A total of 97 malignant oral carcinoma tissues and 52 cervical carcinoma tissues were analyzed by type-specific PCR for the presence of HPV type 16 and 18 infections. None of the oral cancer patients revealed the presence of HPV type 16 and 18 infection. In cervical cancer, 31 (59.6%) patients were infected with HPV 16 and 18. Of these 31 HPV-positive cervical cancer patients, 28 (90.3%) were infected with HPV 16 and 3 (9.7%) were infected with HPV 18. The results suggested that HPV 16 and 18 do not play an important role in oral carcinogenesis in the population from Gujarat, West India. However, HPV 16 is highly prevalent in the cervical cancer patients, which may be considered for planning of prevention programs such as screening and vaccination in women from this region. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Systemic immunization with papillomavirus L1 protein completely prevents the development of viral mucosal papillomas.

    PubMed Central

    Suzich, J A; Ghim, S J; Palmer-Hill, F J; White, W I; Tamura, J K; Bell, J A; Newsome, J A; Jenson, A B; Schlegel, R

    1995-01-01

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8524802

  19. Systemic immunization with papillomavirus L1 protein completely prevents the development of viral mucosal papillomas.

    PubMed

    Suzich, J A; Ghim, S J; Palmer-Hill, F J; White, W I; Tamura, J K; Bell, J A; Newsome, J A; Jenson, A B; Schlegel, R

    1995-12-05

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy.

  20. Systemic Immunization with Papillomavirus L1 Protein Completely Prevents the Development of Viral Mucosal Papillomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzich, Joann A.; Ghim, Shin-Je; Palmer-Hill, Frances J.; White, Wendy I.; Tamura, James K.; Bell, Judith A.; Newsome, Joseph A.; Bennett Jenson, A.; Schlegel, Richard

    1995-12-01

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy.

  1. Nasal, Oral and Ear Swabs for Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis Diagnosis: New Practical Approaches for Detection of Leishmania infantum DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Sidney de Almeida; Almeida, Gregório Guilherme; Silva, Soraia de Oliveira; Vogas, Gabriela Peixoto; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; de Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro; Melo, Maria Norma

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential use of nasal, oral, and ear swabs for molecular diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) in an endemic urban area in Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings Sixty-two naturally infected and ten healthy dogs were enrolled in this study. Bone marrow aspirates, peripheral blood, skin biopsy, and conjunctival, nasal, oral, and ear swabs were collected. All samples, except blood, were submitted to conventional PCR (cPCR) and quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) to detect and quantify Leishmania infantum DNA, respectively. All dogs were submitted to thorough clinical analysis and were included based on a combination of serological (ELISA immunoassay and immunofluorescent antibody test) and parasitological methods. The cPCR positivity obtained from nasal swab samples was 87% (54/62), equivalent to those from other samples (P>0.05). Positive results were obtained for 79% (22/28) in oral swabs and 43% (12/28) in ear swab samples. A significant difference was observed between these data (P = 0.013), and the frequency of positive results from oral swab was equivalent to those from other samples (P>0.05). The use of ear swab samples for cPCR assays is promising because its result was equivalent to skin biopsy data (P>0.05). The qPCR data revealed that parasite loads in mucosal tissues were similar (P>0.05), but significantly lower than the parasite burden observed in bone marrow and skin samples (P<0.05). Conclusions Nasal and oral swab samples showed a high potential for the qualitative molecular diagnosis of CVL because their results were equivalent to those observed in samples collected invasively. Considering that mucosae swab collections are painless, noninvasive, fast and practical, the combination of these samples would be useful in massive screening of dogs. This work highlights the potential of practical approaches for molecular diagnosis of CVL and human leishmaniasis infections. PMID:23593518

  2. Comparison of Histological and Proliferation Features of Canine Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Based on Intraoral Location: 36 Cases.

    PubMed

    Mestrinho, Lisa A; Pissarra, Hugo; Carvalho, Sandra; Peleteiro, Maria C; Gawor, Jerzy; Niza, Maria M R E

    2017-06-01

    Grade and labeling indices for immunohistochemical tumor proliferation markers Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were evaluated in 36 cases of canine oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) based upon intraoral location. Grade was significantly associated with location ( P = .035). Grade II tumors were most frequently diagnosed. Grade I tumors were identified in the gingiva and the buccal mucosa, and grade III tumors were seen in the gingiva and the tonsillar region. Animals with tumors arising from the tonsils and of the tongue tended to be older ( P = .007), and those in the former group were more likely to have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis ( P = .001). Mean expression of PCNA and Ki-67 proliferation index (PI) for all tumors were 62.54% and 50.70%, respectively, and there was a statistical significant association between the 2 variables ( R = .70; P < .001). Proliferation index was not associated with any of the intraoral locations evaluated, but higher PCNA PI was significantly associated with grade ( P = .031). Ki-67 PI was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis at the time of diagnosis, especially for OSCC of gingival location ( P = .028). The results obtained in this study are preliminary but clinically relevant, since they provide information that can explain differences in biologic behavior among intraoral locations and contribute to more accurate tumor staging to support the choice for different treatment strategies available for OSCC.

  3. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in a case-control study of oral squamous cell carcinoma and its increasing trend in northeastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Phusingha, Pensiri; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya; Vatanasapt, Patravoot; Loyha, Kulchaya; Promthet, Supannee; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Chuerduangphui, Jureeporn; Pientong, Chamsai

    2016-12-09

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an independent risk factor for development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). This study aimed to investigate the role of HPV infection and the trend in percentage of HPV-associated OSCC over a 5-year period in northeastern Thailand. In this case-control study, 91 exfoliated oral cell samples and 80 lesion cell samples from OSCC cases and exfoliated oral cells from 100 age/gender-matched controls were collected. HPV infection was investigated by PCR using GP5+/GP6+ primers followed by HPV genotyping using reverse line blot hybridization. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to evaluate HPV oncogene transcription. Temporal trends of HPV infection were evaluated in archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) OSCC tissues using in situ hybridization. HPV DNA was found in 17.5% (14/80) of lesion samples from OSCC cases and 29.7% (27/91) of exfoliated oral cell samples from the same cases. These values were significantly higher than in exfoliated oral cell samples from controls (13%, 13/100). HPV-16 was the genotype most frequently found in OSCC cases (92.8%, 13/14 infected cases). Interestingly, HPV oncogene mRNA expression was detected and correlated with OSCC cases (P < 0.005). Of 146 archived FFPE OSCC samples, 82 (56.2%) were positive for high-risk HPV DNA and 64 (43.8%) cases were positive for HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression. There was a trend of increasing percentage of HPV-associated OSCC from 2005 to 2010. This was especially so for females with well-differentiated tumors in specific tongue sub-sites. We suggest that HPV infection plays an important role in oral carcinogenesis in northeastern Thailand.

  4. Sites of origin of oral cavity cancer in nonsmokers vs smokers: possible evidence of dental trauma carcinogenesis and its importance compared with human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Perry, Brendan J; Zammit, Andrew P; Lewandowski, Andrew W; Bashford, Julia J; Dragovic, Adrian S; Perry, Emily J; Hayatbakhsh, Reza; Perry, Christopher F L

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high and possibly rising incidence of mouth squamous cell carcinoma in nonsmokers, especially women, without obvious cause has been noted by previous authors. Is chronic dental trauma and irritation a carcinogen, and what is its importance compared with human papillomavirus (HPV) oropharyngeal cancer in nonsmokers? To determine whether oral cavity cancers occurred more commonly at sites of dental trauma and how the position of these cancers varied between nonsmokers lacking major identified carcinogens and smokers. If these cancers occurred more frequently at sites of chronic trauma, especially in nonsmokers, it would suggest chronic dental trauma as a possible carcinogen. A retrospective analysis of 881 patients with oral cavity or oropharyngeal cancers seen through a tertiary referral hospital between 2001 and 2011 was performed. Patient medical records were analyzed to determine the location of the tumor within the oral cavity and oropharynx and how it relates to patient demographics, smoking and alcohol histories, and comorbidities. Dental histories were also sought, including use of dentures. Nonsmokers comprised 87 of 390 patients with mouth cancer (22%) and 48 of 334 patients with oropharyngeal cancer (14%). Female nonsmoking patients included 53 with oral cancer (61%) but only 12 with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (25%). Oral cancers occurred on the lateral tongue, a potential site of chronic dental trauma, in 57 nonsmokers (66%) compared with 107 smokers/ex-smokers (33%) (P < .001). Gingival and floor of mouth lesions occurred in older patients, possibly from chronic denture rubbing. Twenty-six patients had dental abnormalities recorded in close proximity to where their tumor developed. Oral cavity cancers occur predominantly at sites of potential dental and denture trauma, especially in nonsmokers without other risk factors. Recognizing teeth irritation as a potential carcinogen would have an impact on prevention and treatment

  5. Feline papillomas and papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Van Ranst, M; Montali, R; Homer, B L; Miller, W H; Rowland, P H; Scott, D W; England, J J; Dunstan, R W; Mikaelian, I; Jenson, A B

    2000-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are highly species- and site-specific pathogens of stratified squamous epithelium. Although PV infections in the various Felidae are rarely reported, we identified productive infections in six cat species. PV-induced proliferative skin or mucous membrane lesions were confirmed by immunohistochemical screening for papillomavirus-specific capsid antigens. Seven monoclonal antibodies, each of which reacts with an immunodominant antigenic determinant of the bovine papillomavirus L1 gene product, revealed that feline PV capsid epitopes were conserved to various degrees. This battery of monoclonal antibodies established differential expression patterns among cutaneous and oral PVs of snow leopards and domestic cats, suggesting that they represent distinct viruses. Clinically, the lesions in all species and anatomic sites were locally extensive and frequently multiple. Histologically, the areas of epidermal hyperplasia were flat with a similarity to benign tumors induced by cutaneotropic, carcinogenic PVs in immunosuppressed human patients. Limited restriction endonuclease analyses of viral genomic DNA confirmed the variability among three viral genomes recovered from available frozen tissue. Because most previous PV isolates have been species specific, these studies suggest that at least eight different cat papillomaviruses infect the oral cavity (tentative designations: Asian lion, Panthera leo, P1PV; snow leopard, Panthera uncia, PuPV-1; bobcat, Felis rufus, FrPV; Florida panther, Felis concolor, FcPV; clouded leopard, Neofelis nebulosa, NnPV; and domestic cat, Felis domesticus, FdPV-2) or skin (domestic cat, F. domesticus, FdPV-1; and snow leopard, P. uncia, PuPV-2).

  6. Animal papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Rector, Annabel; Van Ranst, Marc

    2013-10-01

    We provide an overview of the host range, taxonomic classification and genomic diversity of animal papillomaviruses. The complete genomes of 112 non-human papillomavirus types, recovered from 54 different host species, are currently available in GenBank. The recent characterizations of reptilian papillomaviruses extend the host range of the Papillomaviridae to include all amniotes. Although the genetically diverse papillomaviruses have a highly conserved genomic lay-out, deviations from this prototypic genome organization are observed in several animal papillomaviruses, and only the core ORFs E1, E2, L2 and L1 are present in all characterized papillomavirus genomes. The discovery of papilloma-polyoma hybrids BPCV1 and BPCV2, containing a papillomaviral late region but an early region encoding typical polyomaviral nonstructural proteins, and the detection of recombination breakpoints between the early and late coding regions of cetacean papillomaviruses, could indicate that early and late gene cassettes of papillomaviruses are relatively independent entities that can be interchanged by recombination. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of oral afoxolaner for the treatment of canine generalised demodicosis.

    PubMed

    Beugnet, Frédéric; Halos, Lénaïg; Larsen, Diane; de Vos, Christa

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of oral treatment with a chewable tablet containing afoxolaner 2.27% w/w (NexGard(®), Merial) administered orally was assessed in eight dogs diagnosed with generalised demodicosis and compared with efficacy in eight dogs under treatment with a topical combination of imidacloprid/moxidectin (Advocate(®), Bayer). Afoxolaner was administered at the recommended dose (at least 2.5 mg/kg) on Days 0, 14, 28 and 56. The topical combination of imidacloprid/moxidectin was given at the same intervals at the recommended concentration. Clinical examinations and deep skin scrapings were performed every month in order to evaluate the effect on mite numbers and the resolution of clinical signs. The percentage reductions of mite counts were 99.2%, 99.9% and 100% on Days 28, 56 and 84, respectively, in the afoxolaner-treated group, compared to 89.8%, 85.2% and 86.6% on Days 28, 56 and 84 in the imidacloprid/moxidectin-treated group. Skin condition of the dogs also improved significantly from Day 28 to Day 84 in the afoxolaner-treated group. Mite reductions were significantly higher on Days 28, 56 and 84 in the afoxolaner-treated group compared to the imidacloprid/moxidectin-treated group. The results of this study demonstrated that afoxolaner, given orally, was effective in treating dogs with generalised demodicosis within a two-month period.

  8. Efficacy of oral afoxolaner for the treatment of canine generalised demodicosis

    PubMed Central

    Beugnet, Frédéric; Halos, Lénaïg; Larsen, Diane; de Vos, Christa

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of oral treatment with a chewable tablet containing afoxolaner 2.27% w/w (NexGard®, Merial) administered orally was assessed in eight dogs diagnosed with generalised demodicosis and compared with efficacy in eight dogs under treatment with a topical combination of imidacloprid/moxidectin (Advocate®, Bayer). Afoxolaner was administered at the recommended dose (at least 2.5 mg/kg) on Days 0, 14, 28 and 56. The topical combination of imidacloprid/moxidectin was given at the same intervals at the recommended concentration. Clinical examinations and deep skin scrapings were performed every month in order to evaluate the effect on mite numbers and the resolution of clinical signs. The percentage reductions of mite counts were 99.2%, 99.9% and 100% on Days 28, 56 and 84, respectively, in the afoxolaner-treated group, compared to 89.8%, 85.2% and 86.6% on Days 28, 56 and 84 in the imidacloprid/moxidectin-treated group. Skin condition of the dogs also improved significantly from Day 28 to Day 84 in the afoxolaner-treated group. Mite reductions were significantly higher on Days 28, 56 and 84 in the afoxolaner-treated group compared to the imidacloprid/moxidectin-treated group. The results of this study demonstrated that afoxolaner, given orally, was effective in treating dogs with generalised demodicosis within a two-month period. PMID:27012161

  9. Photodynamic detection of canine mammary gland tumours after oral administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Osaki, T; Yokoe, I; Ogura, S; Takahashi, K; Murakami, K; Inoue, K; Ishizuka, M; Tanaka, T; Li, L; Sugiyama, A; Azuma, K; Murahata, Y; Tsuka, T; Ito, N; Imagawa, T; Okamoto, Y

    2017-09-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is widely used in photodynamic detection (PDD) and therapy. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of 5-ALA-induced porphyrins and its effectiveness in PDD in dogs with mammary gland tumours (MGTs) following oral administration. Healthy dogs and those with MGTs (nine each) were orally administered 4 mg kg(-1) 5-ALA. Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) was not detected in the plasma of healthy dogs but it peaked in dogs with MGT at 2 h after 5-ALA administration. In the PDD study, 16 dogs with MGT were orally administered 40 mg kg(-1) 5-ALA, and MGT but not normal tissue showed red fluorescence after 2-4 h. Photon counts were 6635-63 890 and 59-4011 (median, 19 943 and 919) for MGT and non-tumour tissues, respectively. Cell density strongly correlated with PpIX photon counts of MGT tissue of the dogs (R = 0.743, P = 0.0009). We suggest that 5-ALA-PDD might be an effective diagnostic tool for MGTs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Detection of Human Papillomavirus 16-Specific IgG and IgM Antibodies in Patient Sera: A Potential Indicator of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Risk Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kerishnan, Jesinda P.; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Kai, Sia Bik; Tang, Thean-Hock; Ng, Helen Lee-Ching; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Hashim, Uda; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and oral cancer has been widely reported. However, detecting anti-HPV antibodies in patient sera to determine risk for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has not been well studied. In the present investigation, a total of 206 OSCC serum samples from the Malaysian Oral Cancer Database & Tissue Bank System, with 134 control serum samples, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) to detect HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies. In addition, nested PCR analysis using comprehensive consensus primers (PGMY09/11 and GP5+/6+) was used to confirm the presence of HPV. Furthermore, we have evaluated the association of various additional causal factors (e.g., smoking, alcohol consumption, and betel quid chewing) in HPV-infected OSCC patients. Statistical analysis of the Malaysian population indicated that OSCC was more prevalent in female Indian patients that practices betel quid chewing. ELISA revealed that HPV16 IgG, which demonstrates past exposure, could be detected in 197 (95.6%) OSCC patients and HPV16-specific IgM was found in a total of 42 (20.4%) OSCC patients, indicating current exposure. Taken together, our study suggest that HPV infection may play a significant role in OSCC (OR: 13.6; 95% CI: 3.89-47.51) and HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies could represent a significant indicator of risk factors in OSCC patients. PMID:27279791

  11. Detection of Human Papillomavirus 16-Specific IgG and IgM Antibodies in Patient Sera: A Potential Indicator of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Risk Factor.

    PubMed

    Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Gopinath, Subash C B; Kai, Sia Bik; Tang, Thean-Hock; Ng, Helen Lee-Ching; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Hashim, Uda; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and oral cancer has been widely reported. However, detecting anti-HPV antibodies in patient sera to determine risk for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has not been well studied. In the present investigation, a total of 206 OSCC serum samples from the Malaysian Oral Cancer Database & Tissue Bank System, with 134 control serum samples, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) to detect HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies. In addition, nested PCR analysis using comprehensive consensus primers (PGMY09/11 and GP5(+)/6(+)) was used to confirm the presence of HPV. Furthermore, we have evaluated the association of various additional causal factors (e.g., smoking, alcohol consumption, and betel quid chewing) in HPV-infected OSCC patients. Statistical analysis of the Malaysian population indicated that OSCC was more prevalent in female Indian patients that practices betel quid chewing. ELISA revealed that HPV16 IgG, which demonstrates past exposure, could be detected in 197 (95.6%) OSCC patients and HPV16-specific IgM was found in a total of 42 (20.4%) OSCC patients, indicating current exposure. Taken together, our study suggest that HPV infection may play a significant role in OSCC (OR: 13.6; 95% CI: 3.89-47.51) and HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies could represent a significant indicator of risk factors in OSCC patients.

  12. Papillomaviruses and human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Syrjanen, K.; Gissman, L.; Koss, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Papillomaviruses: particles, genome organization and proteins; Physical state of papillomavirus DNA in tumors; Transforming and regulatory functions of bovine papillomavirus Type 1; and Transcription of papillomavirus genomes.

  13. p63 and E-cadherin Expression in Canine Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mestrinho, L A; Pissarra, H; Faísca, P B; Bragança, M; Peleteiro, M C; Niza, M M R E

    2015-07-01

    The expression of p63 and E-cadherin was studied in 22 oral squamous cell carcinomas in the dog according to immunohistochemical techniques. The association between these markers and clinicopathologic parameters was assessed. All tumor cells studied showed enhanced p63 expression. Regarding E-cadherin expression, 17 of 22 cases (77.3%) showed decreased immunoreactivity, and in 13 of 22 cases (59.1%), its expression was cytoplasmic. Neither p63 nor E-cadherin expression patterns were associated with tumor size, bone invasion, or lymph node metastasis. p63 score was related to proliferating cell nuclear antigen proliferative index (P = .020). A statistically significant correlation between the expression patterns of these 2 markers was noted (P = .026). Furthermore, they were related with tumor grade. An atypical p63 labeling and a cytoplasmic E-cadherin staining were statistically related with a higher tumor grade (P = .022 and P = .017, respectively). These findings suggest that changes in p63 and E-cadherin expression are frequent events in oral squamous cell carcinoma in dogs.

  14. Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Induces HPV-Specific Antibodies in the Oral Cavity: Results From the Mid-Adult Male Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ligia A.; Kemp, Troy J.; Torres, B. Nelson; Isaacs-Soriano, Kimberly; Ingles, Donna; Abrahamsen, Martha; Pan, Yuanji; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmeron, Jorge; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Human papillomavirus virus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18 cause a large proportion of oropharyngeal cancers, which are increasing in incidence among males, and vaccine efficacy against oral HPV infections in men has not been previously evaluated. Methods. Sera and saliva collected in mouthwash and Merocel sponges at day 1 and month 7 were obtained from 150 men aged 27–45 years from Tampa, Florida, and Cuernavaca, Mexico, who received Gardasil at day 1 and months 2 and 6. Specimens were tested for anti–HPV-16 and anti–HPV-18 immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels by an L1 virus-like particle–based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. All participants developed detectable serum anti–HPV-16 and anti–HPV-18 antibodies, and most had detectable antibodies in both oral specimen types at month 7 (HPV-16 was detected in 93.2% of mouthwash specimens and 95.7% of sponge specimens; HPV-18 was detected in 72.1% and 65.5%, respectively). Antibody concentrations in saliva were approximately 3 logs lower than in serum. HPV-16– and HPV-18–specific antibody levels, normalized to total IgG levels, in both oral specimen types at month 7 were significantly correlated with serum levels (for HPV-16, ρ was 0.90 for mouthwash specimens and 0.92 for sponge specimens; for HPV-18, ρ was 0.89 and 0.86, respectively). Conclusions. This is the first study demonstrating that vaccination of males with Gardasil induces HPV antibody levels at the oral cavity that correlate with circulating levels. PMID:27511896

  15. Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Induces HPV-Specific Antibodies in the Oral Cavity: Results From the Mid-Adult Male Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ligia A; Kemp, Troy J; Torres, B Nelson; Isaacs-Soriano, Kimberly; Ingles, Donna; Abrahamsen, Martha; Pan, Yuanji; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmeron, Jorge; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-10-15

    Human papillomavirus virus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18 cause a large proportion of oropharyngeal cancers, which are increasing in incidence among males, and vaccine efficacy against oral HPV infections in men has not been previously evaluated. Sera and saliva collected in mouthwash and Merocel sponges at day 1 and month 7 were obtained from 150 men aged 27-45 years from Tampa, Florida, and Cuernavaca, Mexico, who received Gardasil at day 1 and months 2 and 6. Specimens were tested for anti-HPV-16 and anti-HPV-18 immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels by an L1 virus-like particle-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All participants developed detectable serum anti-HPV-16 and anti-HPV-18 antibodies, and most had detectable antibodies in both oral specimen types at month 7 (HPV-16 was detected in 93.2% of mouthwash specimens and 95.7% of sponge specimens; HPV-18 was detected in 72.1% and 65.5%, respectively). Antibody concentrations in saliva were approximately 3 logs lower than in serum. HPV-16- and HPV-18-specific antibody levels, normalized to total IgG levels, in both oral specimen types at month 7 were significantly correlated with serum levels (for HPV-16, ρ was 0.90 for mouthwash specimens and 0.92 for sponge specimens; for HPV-18, ρ was 0.89 and 0.86, respectively). This is the first study demonstrating that vaccination of males with Gardasil induces HPV antibody levels at the oral cavity that correlate with circulating levels. © 2016 World Health Organization; licensee Oxford Journals.

  16. Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) enhances tumor growth and cancer stemness of HPV-negative oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cells via miR-181 regulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hee; Lee, Chang-Ryul; Rigas, Nicole Kristina; Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Park, No-Hee; Shin, Ki-Hyuk

    2015-12-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (e.g., HPV16, HPV18) are closely associated with the development of head and neck cancers including oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We previously demonstrated immortalization of normal human oral keratinocytes by introducing high-risk HPV whole genome, suggesting that HPV infection plays an important role in the early stage of oral carcinogenesis. Although HPV infection may occur in different stages of cancer development, roles of HPV in exacerbating malignant phenotypes in already-transformed cells in the context of cancer stemness are not clearly defined. In this study, we investigated the role of HPV16 in promoting the virulence of HPV-negative OSCC. Introducing HPV16 whole genome in HPV-negative OSCC increased malignant growth and self-renewal capacity, a key characteristic of cancer stem cells (CSCs). HPV16 also enhanced other CSC properties, including aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity, migration/invasion, and CSC-related factor expression. Mechanistically, we found that HPV16 inhibited the expression of miR-181a and miR-181d (miR-181a/d) at the transcriptional level. Ectopic expression of miR-181a/d decreased anchorage independent growth and CSC phenotype of HPV16-transfected OSCC. Furthermore, silencing of miR-181a/d target genes, i.e., K-ras and ALDH1, abrogated the effects of HPV16 in HPV16-transfected OSCC, supporting the functional importance of HPV16/miR-181a/d axis in HPV-mediated oral carcinogenesis. Our study suggests that high-risk HPV infection further promotes malignancy in HPV-negative OSCC by enhancing cancer stemness via miR-181a/d regulation. Consequently, miR-181a/d may represent a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of HPV-positive OSCC.

  17. Human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 in epithelial dysplasia of oral cavity and oropharynx: A meta-analysis, 1985–2010

    PubMed Central

    Jayaprakash, Vijayvel; Reid, Mary; Hatton, Elizabeth; Merzianu, Mihai; Rigual, Nestor; Marshall, James; Gill, Steve; Frustino, Jennifer; Wilding, Gregory; Loree, Thom; Popat, Saurin; Sullivan, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are causally related to a sub-set of oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancers. However, a clear estimate of the prevalence of HPV-16/18 in oral cavity and oropharyngeal dysplasia (OOPD) is not available. This literature review and meta-analysis was conducted to provide a prevalence estimate for HPV-16/18 in OOPD. Twenty-two studies that reported prevalence of HPV-16 and/or 18 in 458 OOPD lesions were analyzed. Meta-analysis was used to evaluate the prevalence of HPV-16/18 and logistic regression was used for stratified analysis by age, gender, and histological grade. The overall prevalence of HPV-16/18 in OOPD lesions was 24.5% [95% confidence interval (CI), 16.4–36.7%)]. The individual prevalence for HPV-16 alone was 24.4%. The prevalence of HPV-16/18 in oral cavity lesions alone was 25.3% (95% CI, 14.2–45.2%). The odds of detection of HPV-16/18 in dysplastic lesions in males were twice that of females [odds ratio (OR), 2.44]. HPV-16/18 were 3 times more common in dysplastic lesions (OR, 3.29; 95% CI, 1.95–5.53%) and invasive cancers (OR, 3.43; 95% CI, 2.07–5.69%), when compared to normal biopsies. There was no significant difference in HPV-16/18 rates between dysplastic lesions and cancers or between mild, moderate or severe dysplastic lesions. This meta-analysis provides a quantification of the prevalence of HPV types 16/18 in OOPD lesions. These results also support the assumption that HPV-16/18 infection occurs during the early phase of the oral cavity and oropharyngeal carcinogenesis. PMID:21816661

  18. Human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 in epithelial dysplasia of oral cavity and oropharynx: a meta-analysis, 1985-2010.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, Vijayvel; Reid, Mary; Hatton, Elizabeth; Merzianu, Mihai; Rigual, Nestor; Marshall, James; Gill, Steve; Frustino, Jennifer; Wilding, Gregory; Loree, Thom; Popat, Saurin; Sullivan, Maureen

    2011-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are causally related to a sub-set of oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancers. However, a clear estimate of the prevalence of HPV-16/18 in oral cavity and oropharyngeal dysplasia (OOPD) is not available. This literature review and meta-analysis was conducted to provide a prevalence estimate for HPV-16/18 in OOPD. Twenty-two studies that reported prevalence of HPV-16 and/or 18 in 458 OOPD lesions were analyzed. Meta-analysis was used to evaluate the prevalence of HPV-16/18 and logistic regression was used for stratified analysis by age, gender, and histological grade. The overall prevalence of HPV-16/18 in OOPD lesions was 24.5% [95% confidence interval (CI), 16.4-36.7%)]. The individual prevalence for HPV-16 alone was 24.4%. The prevalence of HPV-16/18 in oral cavity lesions alone was 25.3% (95% CI, 14.2-45.2%). The odds of detection of HPV-16/18 in dysplastic lesions in males were twice that of females [odds ratio (OR), 2.44]. HPV-16/18 were 3 times more common in dysplastic lesions (OR, 3.29; 95% CI, 1.95-5.53%) and invasive cancers (OR, 3.43; 95% CI, 2.07-5.69%), when compared to normal biopsies. There was no significant difference in HPV-16/18 rates between dysplastic lesions and cancers or between mild, moderate or severe dysplastic lesions. This meta-analysis provides a quantification of the prevalence of HPV types 16/18 in OOPD lesions. These results also support the assumption that HPV-16/18 infection occurs during the early phase of the oral cavity and oropharyngeal carcinogenesis.

  19. Low prevalence of oral and nasal human papillomavirus in employees performing CO2-laser evaporation of genital warts or loop electrode excision procedure of cervical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Kristian; Norrbom, Christina; Forslund, Ola; Møller, Charlotte; Frøding, Ligita P; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Markauskas, Algirdas; Blomberg, Maria; Baumgartner-Nielsen, Jane; Madsen, Jakob Torp; Strauss, Gitte; Madsen, Klaus G; Sand, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    Risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission during laser vaporisation of genital warts or loop electrode excision procedure is controversial. An oral rinse, a nasal swabs, history of HPV related diseases and data on HPV exposure were collected from 287 employees at departments of dermato-venerology and gynaecology in Denmark. A mucosal HPV type was found among 5.8% of employees with experience of laser treatment of genital warts as compared to 1.7% of those with no experience (p = 0.12). HPV prevalence was not higher in employees participating in electrosurgical treatment or cryotherapy of genital warts, or loop electrode excision procedure compared with those who did not. HPV 6 or 11 were not detected in any samples. Hand warts after the age of 24 years was more common among dermatology than among non-dermatology personnel (18% vs. 8.0%, p = 0.03). Mucosal HPV types are infrequent in the oral and nasal cavity of health care personnel, however, employees at departments of dermato-venereology are at risk of acquiring hand warts.

  20. The effects of oral nafazatrom (= BAY g 6575) on canine coronary artery thrombosis and myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, V B

    1983-01-01

    The in-vivo effects of the new antithrombotic compound nafazatrom on experimental thrombosis of the left circumflex coronary artery, on hemodynamics and on ultimate infarct size were studied in pentobarbital-anesthetized, open-chest dogs. Coronary artery thrombosis was induced by low amperage stimulation (150 microA, DC for 6 hr) of the circumflex artery intimal lining. The effects of oral pretreatment of 1%-Tylose suspension as drug diluent and 5 mg/kg nafazatrom plus vehicle were determined. Both agents were administered twice a day before onset of current stimulation. In the drug vehicle group, coronary thrombosis caused severe hemodynamic alterations, e.g. blood pressure and left ventricular pressure decrease, as well as reduction in the LV dP/dtmax associated with increases in end-diastolic filling pressure and heart rate. Time to coronary artery occlusion was delayed by nafazatrom (5.2 +/- 1.1 vs 3.1 +/- 0.4 hr, p less than 0.05). Smaller blood pressure and LV dP/dtmax reductions and minor heart rate and filling pressure increases around the time of thrombus formation suggested cardioprotection with the drug. Smaller R wave changes and S-T segment elevation indicated minor ischemia at the time of occlusive coronary artery occlusion in nafazatrom-treated hearts (24 +/- 0.5 vs 72 +/- 7% ST segment elevation, p less than 0.01). Thrombus wet weight was 18.4 +/- 2.6 mg in the nafazatrom group, but 63.7 +/- 3.1 mg in controls (p less than 0.01). Thus, ultimate infarct size was smaller in nafazatrom-treated hearts as related to left ventricular mass (8.4 +/- 1.4 vs 32.3 +/- 3.1%, p less than 0.02) or to the occluded artery perfusion area at risk for infarction (16 +/- 3.4 vs 53 +/- 6.2%, p less than 0.05). No ex-vivo effect of nafazatrom on collagen-induced platelet aggregation was observed. These results may indicate efficacy of the drug in prevention of acute coronary artery disease as one cause of ischemic jeopardy of the myocardium and/or therapeutic value in

  1. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related oral squamous cell carcinoma in Okinawa, a subtropical island, in southern Japan--simultaneously infected with human papillomavirus (HPV).

    PubMed

    Higa, Mayumi; Kinjo, Takao; Kamiyama, Kazuya; Chinen, Katsuni; Iwamasa, Teruo; Arasaki, Akira; Sunakawa, Hajime

    2003-06-01

    Up to now, many authors have reported on the EBV infection and its carcinogenic importance in undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (WHO classification, type III), but the infection of the virus in well differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma has not been well described. We introduce the EBV-related well differentiated oral squamous cell carcinomas in Okinawa, a subtropical island in the southernmost part of Japan. This study aimed to clarify the pathogenesis of this malignancy in this area by carrying out analysis of the histology and the Epstein-Barr (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. In the Department of Oral Surgery, Ryukyu University Hospital Okinawa, 188 cases of oral malignant tumours were encountered from 1996 to 2000. The histopathological examination and the sequence analysis of LMP-1 carboxy terminal region and EBNA2 region of EBV were carried out, as were the analysis of virus subtypes, A and B, BamHI-F and f, and C and D. Additionally, HPV infection in the squamous cell carcinomas were demonstrated using E6 and E7 region primer sets by PCR method. In Okinawa, 94% (177/188) of the cases were squamous cell carcinomas. A surprisingly large number of EBV (72%) and HPV (78%) infections in the oral squamous cell carcinomas were demonstrated. EBV type B virus infection was found in 36% of EBV-related oral squamous cell carcinoma in Okinawa, but in only 2-5% of the mainland cases. In both regions the incidence of the BamHI- f variant infection was very low. The infected virus in 79 out of 80 (39 Okinawan and 41 mainland) cases was BamHI- F type. In Okinawa, the numbers of C and D variants were almost equal, whereas in the mainland the D variant was rare. Further, a 30 bp deletion in LMP-1 gene was frequently demonstrated in Okinawan and mainland cases of type A virus, but not in type B virus. Lastly, single nucleotide mutations in EBNA2 region of type A virus when compared with B95-8 strain were demonstrated in Okinawan cases. The

  2. Human Papillomavirus and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Correlation With Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Parameters.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Seong; Park, Mina; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Koh, Yoon Woo; Lee, Seung-Koo; Kim, Jinna

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) parameters on the basis of the status of human papillomavirus (HPV) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarkers in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and oropharynx by use of histogram analysis. A total of 22 consecutive patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC underwent DCE-MRI before receiving treatment. DCE parameter maps of the volume transfer constant (K(trans)), the flux rate constant (kep), and the extravascular extracellular volume fraction (ve) were obtained. The histogram parameters were calculated using the entire enhancing tumor volume and were compared between the patient subgroups on the basis of HPV and EGFR biomarker statuses. The cumulative histogram parameters of K(trans) and kep showed lower values in the HPV-negative and EFGR-overexpression group than in the HPV-positive EGFR-negative group. These differences were statistically significant for the mean (p = 0.009), 25th, 50th, and 75th percentile values of K(trans) and for the 25th percentile value of kep when correlated with HPV status in addition to the mean K(trans) value (p = 0.047) and kep value (p = 0.004) when correlated with EGFR status. No statistically significant difference in ve was found on the basis of HPV and EGFR status. DCE-MRI is useful for the assessment of the tumor microenvironment associated with HPV and EGFR biomarkers before treatment of patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC.

  3. Transmission of human papillomavirus DNA from patient to surgical masks, gloves and oral mucosa of medical personnel during treatment of laryngeal papillomas and genital warts.

    PubMed

    Ilmarinen, Taru; Auvinen, Eeva; Hiltunen-Back, Eija; Ranki, Annamari; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2012-11-01

    The risk of occupational human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission from patient to medical personnel during laser vaporization procedures remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of HPV transmission from the patient to the protective surgical masks, gloves and oral mucosa of medical personnel during the treatment of laryngeal papillomas and genital warts. The study involved five male patients scheduled for the surgical treatment of laryngeal papillomas, and five male patients undergoing carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser treatment for urethral warts. Oral mucosa specimens were obtained from the study patients and the employees pre- and postoperatively. Samples were collected from the HPV-infected patient tissue, and from the surgical masks and gloves used by the employees. A total of 120 samples were analyzed for the presence of HPV DNA by PCR, using the degenerated MY09/11/HMB01 primers. After the papilloma procedures, the surgeons' gloves tested HPV positive in one of the five cases and those of the surgical nurse in three of the five cases. After the treatment of genital warts, HPV DNA corresponding to the patient tissue specimens was present in all the samples obtained from the surgical gloves of the operators. All oral mucosa samples obtained from 18 different employees tested HPV negative, as did the surgical mask specimens. According to our study, HPV may contaminate protective equipment, most of all surgical gloves, but transmission of HPV DNA to medical personnel is unlikely to occur provided that protective surgical gloves and masks are applied and disposed of properly.

  4. Long-term persistence of oral human papillomavirus type 16: The HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christine M. Pierce; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; O’Keefe, Michael T.; Ingles, Donna J.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Persistent infection with oral HPV16 is believed to drive the development of most oropharyngeal cancers. However, patterns of oral HPV16 persistence remain understudied, particularly among HIV-negative individuals. Oral HPV16 persistence was evaluated among 1626 participants of the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Twenty-three oral HPV16-positive men who provided an oral gargle sample on ≥2 study visits were included in the analysis. Archived oral samples from all follow-up visits were tested for HPV16 using Linear Array and INNO-LiPA detection methods. Persistence was evaluated using consecutive HPV16-positive visits held approximately 6 months apart and using the Kaplan-Meier method. Oral HPV16-positive men were aged 18–64 years (median, 36 years; IQR, 25–42) and were followed for a median of 44.4 months (IQR, 29.9–49.5). Of 13 incident infections, 4 (30.8%) persisted ≥12 months, 1 (10.0%) persisted ≥24 months, and none persisted ≥36 months (median infection duration, 7.3 months [95% CI, 6.4–NA]). Of 10 prevalent infections, 9 (90.0%) persisted ≥12 months, 8 (80.0%) persisted ≥24 months, 4 (57.1%) persisted ≥36 months, and 2 (40.0%) persisted ≥48 months (median infection duration, NA). Twelve-month persistence of incident infections increased significantly with age (P trend=0.028). Prevalent oral HPV16 infections in men persisted longer than newly acquired infections, and persistence appeared to increase with age. These findings may explain the high prevalence of oral HPV observed at older ages. Understanding oral HPV16 persistence will aid in the identification of men at high-risk of developing HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:25575501

  5. p16 expression independent of human papillomavirus is associated with lower stage and longer disease-free survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Satgunaseelan, Laveniya; Virk, Sohaib A; Lum, Trina; Gao, Kan; Clark, Jonathan R; Gupta, Ruta

    2016-08-01

    There is limited information regarding the incidence of p16 expression, its association with human papillomavirus (HPV) and prognosis in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The role of p16 in OSCC is evaluated in 215 cases using tissue microarrays (TMAs). p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV in situ hybridisation were performed on TMAs following histopathology review of 215 patients with OSCC in the Sydney Head and Neck Cancer Institute database. Thirty-seven (17.2%) cases showed p16 expression without association with HPV. p16 expression significantly decreased with increasing pT category (p=0.002). p16 expression was associated with longer disease-specific survival on univariable analysis (p=0.044) but not on multivariable analysis adjusting for depth of invasion. Amongst patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy, patients with p16 expression had significantly longer disease-free and overall survival. p16 expression was seen in early stage OSCCs and was associated with better survival following surgery and radiotherapy. While not an independent predictor of survival, p16 may mediate its effects by contributing to reduced proliferative capacity, leading to smaller tumour size and lower invasive potential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Prevalence of anal, oral, penile and urethral Human Papillomavirus in HIV infected and HIV uninfected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Ucciferri, Claudio; Tamburro, Manuela; Falasca, Katia; Sammarco, Michela Lucia; Ripabelli, Giancarlo; Vecchiet, Jacopo

    2017-09-14

    Aims of the study were to evaluate Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and type-specific prevalence in four anatomical sites in HIV infected men who have sex with men (MSM) compared with HIV uninfected MSM. Participants were recruited among the attendees of Infectious Diseases Clinics in Central Italy. A trained medical practitioner collected by interview sociodemographic data and information on medical history, sexual behavior and drug use. Swabs from anal canal, oral cavity, urethral mucosa and coronal sulcus were tested for HPV DNA and genotyping. Ninety MSM were enrolled, 45 subjects within each group. Overall, 48.9% MSM were HPV positive and prevalence was higher in HIV infected men (60% vs 37.8%, P = 0.035). HPV at multiple anatomic sites occurred in 59.1% MSM, with 34.1% and 22.7% at two and three sites respectively. Prevalence of anal, coronal sulcus, oral and urethral HPV was 96.3%, 37%, 21.6% and 18.5% in HIV infected MSM, and 70.6%, 70.6%, 29.4% and 23.5% among HIV uninfected. A similar proportion of HIV infected and uninfected MSM (59.2% and 58.8%) carried at least one high-risk genotype. Prevalence of types covered by nonavalent vaccine was 77.8% in HIV infected compared with 82.3% in HIV uninfected MSM. HPV 58 and 16 were mostly detected in HIV positive (43.7% and 31.2%) and negative MSM (50% and 40%). HPV detection rate underlined the high vulnerability of MSM to acquire multisite infections, characterized by various genotype combinations. Since nonavalent vaccine could have prevented 80% of HPV infections, study findings support the implementation of vaccination programs among MSM. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypoxia-Related Marker GLUT-1, CAIX, Proliferative Index and Microvessel Density in Canine Oral Malignant Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Meier, Valeria; Guscetti, Franco; Roos, Malgorzata; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Pruschy, Martin; Rohrer Bley, Carla

    2016-01-01

    For various types of tumor therapy, it is suggested that co-targeting of tumor microenvironment, mainly tumor vasculature, mediates tumor response mechanisms. Immunohistochemistry for glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), carbonic anhydrase-IX (CAIX), Ki-67, and von Willebrand factor VIII for microvessel density (MVD) were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of canine oral malignant neoplasms. Polarographic oxygen measurements (median pO2) and perfusion data via contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (median vascularity, median blood volume) provided additional information. Ninety-two samples were analyzed: sarcomas (n = 32), carcinomas (n = 30), and malignant melanomas (n = 30). Polarographic oxygen and perfusion data was available in 22.8% (sarcomas n = 9, carcinomas n = 7, melanomas n = 5), and 27.1% (sarcomas n = 10, carcinomas n = 8, melanomas n = 7) of cases, respectively. GLUT-1 expression was detected in 46.7% of all samples, and was generally weak. CAIX expression was found in 34.8% of all samples. Median Ki-67 score and MVD count was 19% and 17, respectively. The evaluation of the GLUT-1 score and continuous data showed significantly lower GLUT-1 levels in sarcomas (mean 5.1%, SD 6.2) versus carcinomas and melanomas (mean 16.5%/ 19.0%, SD 17.3/ 20.9, p = 0.001). The expression of CAIX correlated mildly positively with GLUT-1 (p = 0.018, rho = 0.250) as well as with Ki-67 (p = 0.014, rho = 0.295). MVD showed a significantly lower level in melanomas (mean 12.6, SD 7.7) versus sarcomas and carcinomas (mean 21.8/ 26.9, SD 13.0/20.4, p = 0.001). Median vascularity and blood volume were significantly lower in sarcomas (mean 10.4%, SD 11.0, and mean 6.3%, SD 6.5, respectively) versus carcinomas (mean 39.2%, SD 16.4 and mean 33.0%, SD 25.6, respectively) and melanomas (mean 36.0%, SD 18.3, and 31.5%, SD 24.5). Between the 3 histological groups, there was neither a significant difference in the GLUT-1 and CAIX score and continuous data, nor the Ki

  8. Hypoxia-Related Marker GLUT-1, CAIX, Proliferative Index and Microvessel Density in Canine Oral Malignant Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Valeria; Guscetti, Franco; Roos, Malgorzata; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Pruschy, Martin; Rohrer Bley, Carla

    2016-01-01

    For various types of tumor therapy, it is suggested that co-targeting of tumor microenvironment, mainly tumor vasculature, mediates tumor response mechanisms. Immunohistochemistry for glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), carbonic anhydrase-IX (CAIX), Ki-67, and von Willebrand factor VIII for microvessel density (MVD) were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of canine oral malignant neoplasms. Polarographic oxygen measurements (median pO2) and perfusion data via contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (median vascularity, median blood volume) provided additional information. Ninety-two samples were analyzed: sarcomas (n = 32), carcinomas (n = 30), and malignant melanomas (n = 30). Polarographic oxygen and perfusion data was available in 22.8% (sarcomas n = 9, carcinomas n = 7, melanomas n = 5), and 27.1% (sarcomas n = 10, carcinomas n = 8, melanomas n = 7) of cases, respectively. GLUT-1 expression was detected in 46.7% of all samples, and was generally weak. CAIX expression was found in 34.8% of all samples. Median Ki-67 score and MVD count was 19% and 17, respectively. The evaluation of the GLUT-1 score and continuous data showed significantly lower GLUT-1 levels in sarcomas (mean 5.1%, SD 6.2) versus carcinomas and melanomas (mean 16.5%/ 19.0%, SD 17.3/ 20.9, p = 0.001). The expression of CAIX correlated mildly positively with GLUT-1 (p = 0.018, rho = 0.250) as well as with Ki-67 (p = 0.014, rho = 0.295). MVD showed a significantly lower level in melanomas (mean 12.6, SD 7.7) versus sarcomas and carcinomas (mean 21.8/ 26.9, SD 13.0/20.4, p = 0.001). Median vascularity and blood volume were significantly lower in sarcomas (mean 10.4%, SD 11.0, and mean 6.3%, SD 6.5, respectively) versus carcinomas (mean 39.2%, SD 16.4 and mean 33.0%, SD 25.6, respectively) and melanomas (mean 36.0%, SD 18.3, and 31.5%, SD 24.5). Between the 3 histological groups, there was neither a significant difference in the GLUT-1 and CAIX score and continuous data, nor the Ki

  9. Clinical canine dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Kristin M

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide small animal veterinarians in private practice a guideline for interpretation of the most common findings in canine intraoral radiology. Normal oral and dental anatomy is presented. A brief review of variations of normal, common periodontal and endodontic pathology findings and developmental anomalies is provided.

  10. Prevalence of human papillomavirus16 DNA and p16(INK4a) protein in oral squamous cell carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Smitha, T; Mohan, C V; Hemavathy, S

    2017-01-01

    Indian patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) are etiologically associated with the use of tobacco and alcohol; yet, a proportion of tumors that may harbor human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cannot be neglected. The following meta-analysis was conducted to address the association of p16(INK4a) and HPV DNA with OSCC. In addition, the study also provides the updated prevalence of HPV-induced OSCC. Literature survey was performed using databases such as PubMed with the help of the following keywords - "HPV infection," "oral squamous cell carcinoma," "p16(INK4a)," "HPV DNA," "E6," "E7," "L1," "L2" and "LCR." Proportion method was performed to derive the forest plot using MedCalc statistical software version 16.4.3. Among 145 research articles, 33 articles were selected for further analysis, in which 13 articles were related to HPV DNA detection in tissues, 11 articles detected the overexpression of p16(INK4a) and nine articles reported the detection of both HPV DNA and p16(INK4a) expression. Meta-analysis revealed significant heterogeneity (P < 0.0001) among the articles. Overall, the study consisted of 3339 patients with OSCC, among which 559 patients were diagnosed with the presence of HPV16 DNA with a random proportion of 20.1% at 95% confidence interval (CI) (13.9-27.1, P < 0.0001). Overexpression of p16(INK4a) protein was observed in 709 patients with a random proportion of 25.4% at 95% CI (14.3-38.3, P < 0.0001). HPV DNA and expression of p16(INK4a) was suggested as gold standard for the detection of HPV infection in many cases of cancers. Frequency of HPV infection is significantly higher in patients with OSCC as identified through the detection of HPV DNA and p16(INK4a) expression. Even though the association of HPV infection has been established in head and neck cancer, this review could further the establishment of molecular level interaction of HPV in patients with oral cancer.

  11. High prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral mucosal lesions of patients at the Ambulatory of Oral Diagnosis of the Federal University of Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mariana Goveia Melo; Marcolino, Larissa Doddi; Ramos, Bruna Ribeiro de Andrade; Miranda, Elaine Alves; Trento, Cleverson Luciano; Jain, Sona; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz; Silva, Márcia Guimarães da; Dolabella, Silvio Santana

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of HPV infection and its genotypes in patients with oral lesions at the Ambulatory of Oral Diagnosis of the Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil. We conducted a molecular study with 21 patients (15 females) aged from two to 83 years with clinically detectable oral lesions. Samples were collected through exfoliation of lesions and HPV-DNA was identified using MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ primers. Genotyping was performed by multiplex PCR. Benign, premalignant and malignant lesions were diagnosed by histopathology. HPV was detected in 17 samples. Of these, HPV-6 was detected in 10 samples, HPV-18 in four and HPV-16 in one sample. When samples were categorized by lesion types, HPV was detected in two papilloma cases (2/3), five carcinomas (5/6), one hyperplasia (1/1) and nine dysplasia cases (9/11). Unlike other studies in the literature, we reported high occurrence of HPV in oral lesions. Further studies are required to enhance the comprehension of natural history of oral lesions.

  12. Human papillomavirus type 6 and 11 genetic variants found in 71 oral and anogenital epithelial samples from Australia.

    PubMed

    Danielewski, Jennifer A; Garland, Suzanne M; McCloskey, Jenny; Hillman, Richard J; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation of 49 human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and 22 HPV11 isolates from recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) (n = 17), genital warts (n = 43), anal cancer (n = 6) and cervical neoplasia cells (n = 5), was determined by sequencing the long control region (LCR) and the E6 and E7 genes. Comparative analysis of genetic variability was examined to determine whether different disease states resulting from HPV6 or HPV11 infection cluster into distinct variant groups. Sequence variation analysis of HPV6 revealed that isolates cluster into variants within previously described HPV6 lineages, with the majority (65%) clustering to HPV6 sublineage B1 across the three genomic regions examined. Overall 72 HPV6 and 25 HPV11 single nucleotide variations, insertions and deletions were observed within samples examined. In addition, missense alterations were observed in the E6/E7 genes for 6 HPV6 and 5 HPV11 variants. No nucleotide variations were identified in any isolates at the four E2 binding sites for HPV6 or HPV11, nor were any isolates found to be identical to the HPV6 lineage A or HPV11 sublineage A1 reference genomes. Overall, a high degree of sequence conservation was observed between isolates across each of the regions investigated for both HPV6 and HPV11. Genetic variants identified a slight association with HPV6 and anogenital lesions (p = 0.04). This study provides important information on the genetic diversity of circulating HPV 6 and HPV11 variants within the Australian population and supports the observation that the majority of HPV6 isolates cluster to the HPV6 sublineage B1 with anogenital lesions demonstrating an association with this sublineage (p = 0.02). Comparative analysis of Australian isolates for both HPV6 and HPV11 to those from other geographical regions based on the LCR revealed a high degree of sequence similarity throughout the world, confirming previous observations that there are no geographically specific variants for these HPV types.

  13. [The presence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in microinvasive in situ spinocellular carcinoma of the oral cavity. Preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Mignogna, M D; Duraccio, R; Carbone, R; Mignogna, R E; Lo Muzio, L

    1997-06-01

    The authors examined 15 cases of in situ and early oral SCC to detect the presence of HPV genoma. They proceeded to in situ hybridization on paraffined specimens utilizing DNA-biotinylated fragments in commercial kit (Vyra Type in situ, Life Technologies, Gaithersburg, MD, USA). HPV-DNA was detected in 9 cases: 6/11, 16/18, 31/33/35 serotypes were detected. The distribution of viral serotypes by sites showed a prevalence of 16/18 serotype in tongue and floor of the mouth carcinoma, a prevalence of 6/11 serotype in gingiva, hard palate and buccal mucosa carcinoma, and 31/33/35 in commissura. The results suggest an important role of HPV in oral carcinogenesis, but further investigations are necessary to confirm these data on larger groups of patients to obtain a higher significance of the results.

  14. Experimental oral immunization of ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) with a recombinant canine adenovirus vaccine CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP and an attenuated rabies virus SRV9.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinghui; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Shoufeng; Fang, Lijun; Zhang, Fei; Hu, Rongliang

    2014-04-01

    Ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) are a major reservoir of rabies virus in southeastern China. Oral immunization has been shown to be a practical method for wildlife rabies management in Europe and North America. Two groups of 20 ferret badgers were given a single oral dose of a recombinant canine adenovirus-rabies vaccine, CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP, or an experimental attenuated rabies virus vaccine, SRV9. At 21 days, all ferret badgers had seroconverted, with serum virus-neutralizing antibodies ranging from 0.1 to 4.5 IU/mL. Titers were >0.50 IU/mL (an acceptable level) in 17/20 and 16/20 animals receiving CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP or SRV9, respectively. The serologic results indicate that the recombinant CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP is at least as effective as the attenuated rabies virus vaccine. Both may be considered for additional research as oral rabies vaccine candidates for ferret badgers.

  15. Efficacy of an oral nutraceutical for the treatment of canine osteoarthritis. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ruth M; Evans, Richard; Conzemius, Michael G

    2017-09-12

    To assess the safety and efficacy of an orally administered nutraceutical (Glu/CS+; + for additional ingredient) for the treatment of clinical osteoarthritis (OA) in dogs. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial, client-owned dogs with clinical signs of OA in one or more joints were assigned to a Glu/CS+ (n = 30) or placebo (n = 30) group. Dogs were administered Glu/CS+ or placebo orally and wore an activity monitor (AM) continuously throughout a 97 day study period. Prior to the initiation of the treatment, seven days of baseline activity was collected. On days -7, 30, 60 and 90 of the study, owners completed a patient assessment form (Canine Brief Pain Inventory). Data between groups were compared. No serious adverse events were reported. No difference was found between groups when evaluating daily activity counts during the seven-day pre-treatment period and the 90-day treatment period. Owner assessment (pain interference and pain severity scores) improved over the 90-day treatment period for both groups, however no difference was found between treatment groups. Treatment with oral Glu/CS+ for a 90 day treatment period when compared to placebo treatment did not result in a significant increase in activity counts in dogs with clinical OA. However, owner assessment scores similarly improved throughout the study period for dogs in both groups, suggesting a caregiver placebo effect in this outcome measure.

  16. Human papillomavirus-16 infection in advanced oral cavity cancer patients is related to an increased risk of distant metastases and poor survival.

    PubMed

    Lee, Li-Ang; Huang, Chung-Guei; Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Kang, Chung-Jan; Ng, Shu-Hang; Yang, Shu-Li; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Chang, Yu-Liang; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an oncogenic virus causing oropharyngeal cancers and resulting in a favorable outcome after the treatment. The role of HPV in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remains ambiguous. This study aimed to examine the effect of HPV infection on disease control among patients with OSCC following radical surgery with radiation-based adjuvant therapy. We prospectively followed 173 patients with advanced OSCC (96% were stage III/IV) who had undergone radical surgery and adjuvant therapy between 2004 and 2006. They were followed between surgery and death or up to 60 months. Surgical specimens were examined using a PCR-based HPV blot test. The primary endpoints were the risk of relapse and the time to relapse; the secondary endpoints were disease-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCC was 22%; HPV-16 (9%) and HPV-18 (7%) were the genotypes most commonly encountered. Solitary HPV-16 infection was a poor predictor of 5-year distant metastases (hazard ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-8.0; P = 0.005), disease-free survival (P = 0.037), disease-specific survival (P = 0.006), and overall survival (P = 0.010), whereas HPV-18 infection had no impact on 5-year outcomes. The rate of 5-year distant metastases was significantly higher in the HPV-16 or level IV/V metastasis group compared with both the extracapsular spread or tumor depth ≥ 11-mm group and patients without risk factors (P<0.001). HPV infections in advanced OSCC patients are not uncommon and clinically relevant. Compared with HPV-16-negative advanced OSCC patients, those with a single HPV-16 infection are at higher risk of distant metastases and poor survival despite undergoing radiation-based adjuvant therapy and require a more aggressive adjuvant treatment and a more thorough follow-up.

  17. Mandibular canine index in establishing sex identity.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shishir; Nagabhushana, D; Rao, B Balaji; Mamatha, G P

    2002-01-01

    An investigation study on sex identity through mandibular canine index directed to detect sexual dimorphism using the Mesio-Distal width of mandibular permanent canines and inter canine and inter canine arch width in the mandible was conducted in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, Davangere. 360 patients were subjected to the mesio-distal measurement and inter canine arch width. Males were detected correctly in 83.3% and in females 81%. They were statistically significant and the related literatures reviewed.

  18. Pathological features of betel quid-related oral epithelial lesions in taiwan with special emphasis on the tumor progression and human papillomavirus association.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kong-Chao; Su, Ih-Jen; Tsai, Sen-Tien; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Jin, Ying-Tai

    2002-01-01

    Betel quid (BQ) chewing has been a well-documented cause of oral epithelial lesions (OEL). Evolution from early hyperplastic lesions to the late or carcinomatous stage has been recognized. The pathobiological and molecular mechanism, however, remains to be elucidated. In this study, a total of 232 samples obtained from 153 cases of BQ-related OEL were retrospectively evaluated for the expression of p53 and bcl-2 in comparison with 26 cases of BQ-unrelated lesions (n = 29). The possible role of human papillomavirus (HPV) was also investigated. These BQ-related OELs included verrucous hyperplasia (VIH, n = 57, 24.6%), epithelial dysplasia (n = 23, 9.9%), verrucous carcinoma (VC, n = 5, 2.1%) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, n = 106, 45.7%). Fifty-four cases (35.3%) had multiple lesions. In comparison with the BQ-unrelated OELs, the characteristics of BQ-related OELs were a younger age, male predilection and multicentricity. In contrast to the tongue in BQ-unrelated OELs, the most common site for all types of BQ-related lesions was the buccal mucosa. Immunohistochemical studies of BQ-related lesions showed p53 staining in 30% of dysplasia and 38% of SCC, but a consistent absence in VH and VC. The cases with p53-positive SCC had a higher recurrence rate than p53-negative ones. Bcl-2 expression was negligible for all types of lesions. HPV-6/11 was detectable in 10% of dysplasia and 13% of SCC, but in neither VH nor VC. HPV-16/18, however, was consistently negative for all types of lesions. Our data suggest that p53, but not bcl-2, may play a role in tumor progression of BQ-related OELs, and that VH and VC are distinct and closely related histological lesions. The consistent absence of the malignant-type HPV in all BQ-related lesions suggests that HPV plays an insignificant role in the tumorigenesis of BQ-related oral cancers, although a cooperative role may exist between the benign-type HPV and BQ chewing. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Comparable efficacy of a topical 0.0584% hydrocortisone aceponate spray and oral ciclosporin in treating canine atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Tim J; McEwan, Neil A; Bensignor, Emmanuel; Cornegliani, Luisa; Löwenstein, Christine; Rème, Christophe A

    2012-02-01

    This study compared the efficacy of a 0.0584% hydrocortisone aceponate (HCA) spray (Cortavance(®); Virbac SA) and ciclosporin (Atopica(®); Novartis Animal Health) in canine atopic dermatitis in a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Dogs received HCA (two sprays/100 cm(2); n=24) or ciclosporin (5 mg/kg; n=21). Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index (CADESI)-03, pruritus (visual analog scale with grade descriptors) and owner scores (5-point scales) were recorded every 28 days for 84 days. Intention-to-treat data were analysed. CADESI-03 and pruritus significantly decreased over time (P<0.0001), but there was no difference between the treatment groups (P=0.91 and P=0.52, respectively). Similar proportions of HCA- and ciclosporin-treated dogs achieved ≥50% reductions in CADESI-03 and pruritus scores at 28 days (CADESI-03 58.3 and 57.1%, P=0.76; pruritus 33.3 and 38.1%, P=1.0), 56 days (CADESI-03 70.8 and 81.0%, P=1.0; pruritus 62.5 and 57.1%, P=1.0) and 84 days (CADESI-03 75 and 85.7%, P=0.72; pruritus 65.2 and 57.1%, P=0.76). The CADESI-03 and pruritus scores were close to equivalence (0.47 and 0.51, respectively). By 84 days, every-other-day or twice-weekly therapy was achieved in 13 of 24 HCA- and 12 of 21 ciclosporin-treated dogs (P=0.85). There were no significant differences in scores for efficacy (P=0.82), tolerance (P=0.62) and ease of administration (P=0.25). Scores for tolerance (0.49) and administration (0.46) were close to equivalence. The score for efficacy favoured HCA (0.68). Mild adverse events were noted in six of 21 ciclosporin and none of 24 HCA dogs (P=0.008). Five HCA-treated dogs and three ciclosporin-treated dogs were prematurely withdrawn (P=0.7). In conclusion, HCA and ciclosporin proved equally effective in treating canine atopic dermatitis for up to 84 days.

  20. Oral vaccination of dogs (Canis familiaris) with baits containing the recombinant rabies-canine adenovirus type-2 vaccine confers long-lasting immunity against rabies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shoufeng; Liu, Ye; Fooks, Anthony R; Zhang, Fei; Hu, Rongliang

    2008-01-17

    Rabies is a reemerging and fatal infectious disease in Asia mainly caused by exposure to rabid dogs. Prevention of dog rabies would be the most effective way to stop rabies transmission to humans. However, vaccinating stray dogs in urban and rural areas using conventional vaccines is always difficult and is not cost-effective for use in most areas including China. Further to previous studies from our laboratory, we developed a bait containing the recombinant rabies vaccine and performed a non-parenteral trial in dogs. This vaccine was intranasally administrated once to 46 dogs in solution form with 1 x 10(8.5) PFU and orally to 90 dogs in specially designed baits with 3 x 10(8.5) PFU of the recombinant canine adenovirus. Results showed that about 87.5% (119/136) of the immunized dogs developed virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA). The immune response against rabies in dogs was detectable at 2-3 weeks after administration, reaching a peak by 5-6 weeks. Among the seroconverted animals, 90.8% (108/119) elicited a VNA response for over 24 months. The antibody titer during the 2 years was above 0.5IU /ml while showing a gradual but slow decline from the 6th week after vaccination. In a challenge experiment of 10 dogs with 60,000 mouse LD(50) of CVS-24 2 years after the vaccination, all the dogs survived. This demonstrated that the recombinant vaccine could be orally administrated and the bait was effective for the oral vaccination of dogs.

  1. Human Papillomavirus-16 Infection in Advanced Oral Cavity Cancer Patients Is Related to an Increased Risk of Distant Metastases and Poor Survival

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Kang, Chung-Jan; Ng, Shu-Hang; Yang, Shu-Li; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Chang, Yu-Liang; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an oncogenic virus causing oropharyngeal cancers and resulting in a favorable outcome after the treatment. The role of HPV in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remains ambiguous. Objective This study aimed to examine the effect of HPV infection on disease control among patients with OSCC following radical surgery with radiation-based adjuvant therapy. Patients and Method We prospectively followed 173 patients with advanced OSCC (96% were stage III/IV) who had undergone radical surgery and adjuvant therapy between 2004 and 2006. They were followed between surgery and death or up to 60 months. Surgical specimens were examined using a PCR-based HPV blot test. The primary endpoints were the risk of relapse and the time to relapse; the secondary endpoints were disease-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Results The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCC was 22%; HPV-16 (9%) and HPV-18 (7%) were the genotypes most commonly encountered. Solitary HPV-16 infection was a poor predictor of 5-year distant metastases (hazard ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.4–8.0; P = 0.005), disease-free survival (P = 0.037), disease-specific survival (P = 0.006), and overall survival (P = 0.010), whereas HPV-18 infection had no impact on 5-year outcomes. The rate of 5-year distant metastases was significantly higher in the HPV-16 or level IV/V metastasis group compared with both the extracapsular spread or tumor depth ≥11-mm group and patients without risk factors (P<0.001). Conclusions HPV infections in advanced OSCC patients are not uncommon and clinically relevant. Compared with HPV-16-negative advanced OSCC patients, those with a single HPV-16 infection are at higher risk of distant metastases and poor survival despite undergoing radiation-based adjuvant therapy and require a more aggressive adjuvant treatment and a more thorough follow-up. PMID:22808258

  2. Development of a PCR Assay to detect Papillomavirus Infection in the Snow Leopard

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a group of small, non-encapsulated, species-specific DNA viruses that have been detected in a variety of mammalian and avian species including humans, canines and felines. PVs cause lesions in the skin and mucous membranes of the host and after persistent infection, a subset of PVs can cause tumors such as cervical malignancies and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in humans. PVs from several species have been isolated and their genomes have been sequenced, thereby increasing our understanding of the mechanism of viral oncogenesis and allowing for the development of molecular assays for the detection of PV infection. In humans, molecular testing for PV DNA is used to identify patients with persistent infections at risk for developing cervical cancer. In felids, PVs have been isolated and sequenced from oral papillomatous lesions of several wild species including bobcats, Asian lions and snow leopards. Since a number of wild felids are endangered, PV associated disease is a concern and there is a need for molecular tools that can be used to further study papillomavirus in these species. Results We used the sequence of the snow leopard papillomavirus UuPV1 to develop a PCR strategy to amplify viral DNA from samples obtained from captive animals. We designed primer pairs that flank the E6 and E7 viral oncogenes and amplify two DNA fragments encompassing these genes. We detected viral DNA for E6 and E7 in genomic DNA isolated from saliva, but not in paired blood samples from snow leopards. We verified the identity of these PCR products by restriction digest and DNA sequencing. The sequences of the PCR products were 100% identical to the published UuPV1 genome sequence. Conclusions We developed a PCR assay to detect papillomavirus in snow leopards and amplified viral DNA encompassing the E6 and E7 oncogenes specifically in the saliva of animals. This assay could be utilized for the molecular investigation of papillomavirus in

  3. Preclinical evaluation of the novel, orally bioavailable Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) KPT-335 in spontaneous canine cancer: results of a phase I study.

    PubMed

    London, Cheryl A; Bernabe, Luis Feo; Barnard, Sandra; Kisseberth, William C; Borgatti, Antonella; Henson, Mike; Wilson, Heather; Jensen, Kiersten; Ito, Daisuke; Modiano, Jaime F; Bear, Misty D; Pennell, Michael L; Saint-Martin, Jean-Richard; McCauley, Dilara; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activity of Selective Inhibitors of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds that inhibit the function of the nuclear export protein Exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) against canine tumor cell lines and perform a Phase I clinical trial of KPT-335 in dogs with spontaneous cancer to provide a preliminary assessment of biologic activity and tolerability. Canine tumor cell lines derived from non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), mast cell tumor, melanoma and osteosarcoma exhibited growth inhibition and apoptosis in response to nanomolar concentrations of SINE compounds; NHL cells were particularly sensitive with IC50 concentrations ranging from 2-42 nM. A Phase I clinical trial of KPT-335 was performed in 17 dogs with NHL (naive or relapsed), mast cell tumor or osteosarcoma. The maximum tolerated dose was 1.75 mg/kg given orally twice/week (Monday/Thursday) although biologic activity was observed at 1 mg/kg. Clinical benefit (CB) including partial response to therapy (PR, n = 2) and stable disease (SD, n = 7) was observed in 9/14 dogs with NHL with a median time to progression (TTP) for responders of 66 days (range 35-256 days). A dose expansion study was performed in 6 dogs with NHL given 1.5 mg/kg KPT-335 Monday/Wednesday/Friday; CB was observed in 4/6 dogs with a median TTP for responders of 83 days (range 35-354 days). Toxicities were primarily gastrointestinal consisting of anorexia, weight loss, vomiting and diarrhea and were manageable with supportive care, dose modulation and administration of low dose prednisone; hepatotoxicity, anorexia and weight loss were the dose limiting toxicities. This study provides evidence that the novel orally bioavailable XPO1 inhibitor KPT-335 is safe and exhibits activity in a relevant, spontaneous large animal model of cancer. Data from this study provides critical new information that lays the groundwork for evaluation of SINE compounds in human cancer.

  4. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel, Orally Bioavailable Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) KPT-335 in Spontaneous Canine Cancer: Results of a Phase I Study

    PubMed Central

    London, Cheryl A.; Bernabe, Luis Feo; Barnard, Sandra; Kisseberth, William C.; Borgatti, Antonella; Henson, Mike; Wilson, Heather; Jensen, Kiersten; Ito, Daisuke; Modiano, Jaime F.; Bear, Misty D.; Pennell, Michael L.; Saint-Martin, Jean-Richard; McCauley, Dilara; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activity of Selective Inhibitors of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds that inhibit the function of the nuclear export protein Exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) against canine tumor cell lines and perform a Phase I clinical trial of KPT-335 in dogs with spontaneous cancer to provide a preliminary assessment of biologic activity and tolerability. Methods and Findings Canine tumor cell lines derived from non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), mast cell tumor, melanoma and osteosarcoma exhibited growth inhibition and apoptosis in response to nanomolar concentrations of SINE compounds; NHL cells were particularly sensitive with IC50 concentrations ranging from 2–42 nM. A Phase I clinical trial of KPT-335 was performed in 17 dogs with NHL (naive or relapsed), mast cell tumor or osteosarcoma. The maximum tolerated dose was 1.75 mg/kg given orally twice/week (Monday/Thursday) although biologic activity was observed at 1 mg/kg. Clinical benefit (CB) including partial response to therapy (PR, n = 2) and stable disease (SD, n = 7) was observed in 9/14 dogs with NHL with a median time to progression (TTP) for responders of 66 days (range 35–256 days). A dose expansion study was performed in 6 dogs with NHL given 1.5 mg/kg KPT-335 Monday/Wednesday/Friday; CB was observed in 4/6 dogs with a median TTP for responders of 83 days (range 35–354 days). Toxicities were primarily gastrointestinal consisting of anorexia, weight loss, vomiting and diarrhea and were manageable with supportive care, dose modulation and administration of low dose prednisone; hepatotoxicity, anorexia and weight loss were the dose limiting toxicities. Conclusions This study provides evidence that the novel orally bioavailable XPO1 inhibitor KPT-335 is safe and exhibits activity in a relevant, spontaneous large animal model of cancer. Data from this study provides critical new information that lays the groundwork for evaluation of SINE compounds in human cancer

  5. Animal models of papillomavirus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Campo, M Saveria

    2002-11-01

    Tumorigenesis due to papillomavirus (PV) infection was first demonstrated in rabbits and cattle early last century. Despite the evidence obtained in animals, the role of viruses in human cancer was dismissed as irrelevant. It took a paradigm shift in the late 1970s for some viruses to be recognised as 'tumour viruses' in humans, and in 1995, more than 60 years after Rous's first demonstration of CRPV oncogenicity, WHO officially declared that 'HPV-16 and HPV-18 are carcinogenic to humans'. Experimental studies with animal PVs have been a determining factor in this decision. Animal PVs have been studied both as agents of disease in animals and as models of human PV infection. In addition to the study of PV infection in whole animals, in vitro studies with animal PV proteins have contributed greatly to the understanding of the mechanisms of cell transformation. Animal PVs cause distressing diseases in both farm and companion animals, such as teat papillomatosis in cattle, equine sarcoids and canine oral papillomatosis and there is an urgent need to understand the pathogenesis of these problematic infections. Persistent and florid teat papillomatosis in cows can lead to mastitis, prevent the suckling of calves and make milking impossible; heavily affected animals are culled and so occasionally are whole herds. Equine sarcoids are often recurrent and untreatable and lead to loss of valuable animals. Canine oral papillomatosis can be very extensive and persistent and lead to great distress. Thus the continuing research in the biology of animal PVs is amply justified. BPVs and CRPV have been for many years the model systems with which to study the biology of HPV. Induction of papillomas and their neoplastic progression has been experimentally demonstrated and reproduced in cattle and rabbits, and virus-cofactor interactions have been elucidated in these systems. With the advancements in molecular and cell culture techniques, the direct study of HPV has become less

  6. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  7. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... outside of the body. To Learn More About HPV Human Papillomavirus Vaccine More in For Women Medication ...

  8. Cancerl cells 5. Papillomaviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, B.M.; Brandsma, J.L. ); Taichman, L.B. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 30 selections. Some of the titles are: Elements that Control the Transcription of Genital Human Papillomavirus Type 18; Human Paillomavirus Gene Expression; RNA Probes to Analyze Human Papillomavirus Gene Expression in Squamous Papilloma of the Respiratory Tract; Expression of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 E4 Gene Products in Warts; and Underreplication of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 DNA in Cultures of Foreskin Keratinocytes.

  9. Molecular characterization of the L1 gene of papillomaviruses in epithelial lesions of cats and comparative analysis with corresponding gene sequences of human and feline papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Anis, Eman A; O'Neill, Sarah H; Newkirk, Kim M; Brahmbhatt, Rupal A; Abd-Eldaim, Mohamed; Frank, Linda A; Kania, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    To characterize the L1 gene of papillomaviruses detected in epithelial lesions of cats and to determine the relationship between those L1 gene nucleotide sequences and known L1 gene sequences of human and feline papillomaviruses. 10 tissue samples of epithelial lesions from 8 cats. DNA was extracted from tissue samples. Primers were designed to amplify the L1 gene of papillomaviruses. Amplicons of DNA were sequenced; nucleotide sequences were compared with known L1 gene nucleotide sequences of papillomaviruses and used for phylogenetic analysis. Tissue samples were obtained from lesions (diagnosed as dysplasia [n=1], squamous cell carcinoma in situ [3], or squamous cell carcinoma [6]) of the skin (9) and oral mucosa [1]. Two amplicons had 99% homology with the L1 gene nucleotide sequence of human papillomavirus type 38b subtype FA125. Another amplicon had 84% homology with the L1 gene nucleotide sequence of human papillomavirus type 80 and was considered to be a new type of papillomavirus. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that these 3 papillomaviruses were grouped into 2 clades that were not similar to the clades of Felis domesticus papillomavirus type 1 or F domesticus papillomavirus type 2 (FdPV2). The remaining 7 amplicons had 98% to 100% homology with the L1 gene nucleotide sequence of FdPV2. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that those 7 papillomaviruses were grouped nto a single clade with FdPV2. Results support the likelihood of transmission of papillomaviruses between humans and cats.

  10. Maxillary canine-to-maxillary incisor transposition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yng-Tzer J

    2013-01-01

    Dental transposition is the positional interchange of two adjacent teeth. Canine transpositions are usually accompanied by other dental anomalies, such as: impaction of the incisors; missing teeth; peg-shaped lateral incisors; severe rotation or malposition of adjacent teeth; dilacerations; and malformations. Local pathologic processes, such as tumors, cysts, retained primary canines, and supernumerary teeth, might be responsible for canine transposition. The purpose of this paper was to present a rare case of maxillary canine-to-maxillary incisor transposition in an 8-year-old girl. The patient presented with noneruption of the permanent maxillary left central incisor, and a radiographic examination revealed an impacted dilacerated incisor. The central incisor was extracted because the root was severely dilacerated. At the 3-year follow-up, an oral examination revealed that the canine had transposed to the extraction site. Through orthodontic traction, combined with reshaping of the tooth, the transposed canine was successfully positioned into the incisor position.

  11. Canine Distemper

    MedlinePlus

    ... and, often, the nervous systems of puppies and dogs. The virus also infects wild canids (e.g. ... How is Canine Distemper virus spread? Puppies and dogs usually become infected through airborne exposure to the ...

  12. Canine lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Madewell, B R

    1985-07-01

    This article presents an overview of the literature regarding canine malignant lymphoma. It includes a discussion of etiology, classification, systemic manifestations of disease, therapy, and supportive care for patient management.

  13. Aerobic bacterial flora of oral and nasal fluids of canines with reference to bacteria associated with bites.

    PubMed

    Bailie, W E; Stowe, E C; Schmitt, A M

    1978-02-01

    Oral and nasal fluids of 50 dogs were examined to determine the prevalence of aerobic bacteria frequently associated with animal bite wounds. The most frequently isolated microorganisms included: IIj, EF-4, Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, group D streptococci, Corynebacterium sp., Enterobacteria, Neisseria sp., Moraxella sp., and Bacillus sp. Other species and genera were infrequently recovered and may represent transient flora. The high incidence of IIj, EF-4, P. multocida, and S. aureus, all known human pathogens, suggests that they should be considered as probably contaminants in bite wounds.

  14. Aerobic bacterial flora of oral and nasal fluids of canines with reference to bacteria associated with bites.

    PubMed Central

    Bailie, W E; Stowe, E C; Schmitt, A M

    1978-01-01

    Oral and nasal fluids of 50 dogs were examined to determine the prevalence of aerobic bacteria frequently associated with animal bite wounds. The most frequently isolated microorganisms included: IIj, EF-4, Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, group D streptococci, Corynebacterium sp., Enterobacteria, Neisseria sp., Moraxella sp., and Bacillus sp. Other species and genera were infrequently recovered and may represent transient flora. The high incidence of IIj, EF-4, P. multocida, and S. aureus, all known human pathogens, suggests that they should be considered as probably contaminants in bite wounds. Images PMID:632349

  15. Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garbuglia, Anna Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is currently considered to be a major etiologic factor, in addition to tobacco and alcohol, for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) development. HPV positive OPCs are epidemiologically distinct from HPV negative ones, and are characterized by younger age at onset, male predominance, and strong association with sexual behaviors. HPV16 is the most prevalent types in oral cavity cancer (OCC), moreover the prevalence of beta, and gamma HPV types is higher than that of alpha HPV in oral cavity. PMID:25256828

  16. Comparative pharmacokinetics of a new oral long-acting formulation of doxycycline hyclate: A canine clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Arciniegas Ruiz, Sara Melisa; Gutiérrez Olvera, Lilia; Bernad Bernad, María Josefa; Caballero Chacón, Sara Del Carmen; Vargas Estrada, Dinorah

    2015-12-01

    Doxycicline is used in dogs as treatment of several bacterial infections, mycoplasma, chlamydia and rickettsial diseases. However, it requires long treatments and several doses to be effective. The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of four formulations of doxycycline hyclate, administered orally, with different proportions of excipients, acrylic acid-polymethacrylate-based matrices, to obtain longer therapeutic levels than conventional formulation. Forty-eight dogs were randomly assigned in five groups to receive a single oral dose (20mg/kg) of doxycycline hyclate without excipients (control) or a long-acting formulation containing doxycycline, acrylic acid polymer, and polymethacrylate in one of the following four proportions: DOX1(1:0.25:0.0035), DOX2(1:0.5:0.0075), DOX3 (1:1:0.015), or DOX4(1:2:0.0225). Temporal profiles of serum concentrations were obtained at several intervals after each treatment. Therapeutic concentrations were observed for 60h for DOX1 and DOX4, 48h for DOX2 and DOX3 and only 24h for DOX-C. None of the pharmacokinetic parameter differed significantly between DOX1 and DOX2 or between DOX3 and DOX4; however, the findings for the control treatment were significantly different compared to all four long-acting formulations. Results indicated that DOX1 had the most adequate pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships for a time-dependent drug and had longer release times than did doxycycline alone. However, all four formulations can be effective depend on the minimum effective serum doxycycline concentration of the microorganism being treated. These results suggest that the use of any of these formulations can reduce the frequency of administration, the patient's stress, occurrence of adverse effects and the cost of treatment.

  17. [Human papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Gross, G

    2003-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect exclusively the basal cells of the skin and of mucosal epithelia adjacent to the skin such as the mouth, the upper respiratory tract, the lower genital tract and the anal canal. HPV does not lead to a viremia. Basically there are three different types of HPV infection: Clinically visible lesions, subclinical HPV infections and latent HPV infections. Distinct HPV types induce morphologically and prognostically different clinical pictures. The most common HPV associated benign tumor of the skin is the common wart. Infections of the urogenitoanal tract with specific HPV-types are recognised as the most frequent sexually transmitted viral infections. So-called "high-risk" HPV-types (HPV16, 18 and others) are regarded by the world health organisation as important risk-factors for the development of genital cancer (mainly cervical cancer), anal cancer and upper respiratory tract cancer in both genders. Antiviral substances with a specific anti-HPV effect are so far unknown. Conventional therapies of benign skin warts and of mucosal warts are mainly nonspecific. They comprise tissue-destroying therapies such as electrocautery, cryotherapy and laser. In addition cytotoxic substances such as podophyllotoxin and systemic therapy with retinoids are in use. Systemically and topically administered immunotherapies represent a new approach for treatment. Both interferons and particularly the recently developed imiquimod, an interferon-alpha and cytokine-inductor lead to better results and are better tolerated then conventional therapies. HPV-specific vaccines have been developed in the last 5 years and will be used in future for prevention and treatment of benign and malignant HPV-associated tumors of the genitoanal tract in both sexes.

  18. Canine gastritis.

    PubMed

    Webb, Craig; Twedt, David C

    2003-09-01

    Gastritis--inflammation of the stomach--is a frequently cited differential yet rarely characterized diagnosis in cases of canine anorexia and vomiting. Although the list of rule-outs for acute or chronic gastritis is extensive, a review of the veterinary literature reveals fewer than 15 articles that have focused on clinical cases of canine gastritis over the last 25 years. The dog frequently appears in the human literature as an experimentally manipulated model for the study of endoscopic techniques or the effect of medications on gastric mucosa. In the veterinary patient, cases of acute gastritis are rarely pursued with the complete diagnostic armamentarium, and cases of chronic gastritis are rarely found to occur as an entity isolated from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract. This article focuses on those findings most clinically relevant to cases of canine gastritis in veterinary medicine.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Crocuta crocuta Papillomavirus Type 1 (CcrPV1) from a Spotted Hyena, the First Papillomavirus Characterized in a Member of the Hyaenidae

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Hans; Heylen, Elisabeth; De Keyser, Karlien; Maes, Roger; Kiupel, Matti; Wise, Annabel; Nelson, Keith; Holekamp, Kay; Engh, Anne; McKnight, Christy; Rector, Annabel

    2013-01-01

    We report the complete genomic sequence of the Crocuta crocuta papillomavirus type 1 (CcrPV1), isolated from an oral papillomatous lesion of a wild spotted hyena. This virus is the first papillomavirus found in a species belonging to the Hyaenidae family of carnivores, and it can be classified in the genus Lambdapapillomavirus. PMID:23405364

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Crocuta crocuta Papillomavirus Type 1 (CcrPV1) from a Spotted Hyena, the First Papillomavirus Characterized in a Member of the Hyaenidae.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Hans; Heylen, Elisabeth; De Keyser, Karlien; Maes, Roger; Kiupel, Matti; Wise, Annabel; Nelson, Keith; Holekamp, Kay; Engh, Anne; McKnight, Christy; Van Ranst, Marc; Rector, Annabel

    2013-01-01

    We report the complete genomic sequence of the Crocuta crocuta papillomavirus type 1 (CcrPV1), isolated from an oral papillomatous lesion of a wild spotted hyena. This virus is the first papillomavirus found in a species belonging to the Hyaenidae family of carnivores, and it can be classified in the genus Lambdapapillomavirus.

  1. Vaccination against human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Claudia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus infection is common and causes different manifestations. This infection is a public health concern because it has been associated with genital tract malignant diseases among men and women. Currently two vaccines are available to prevent the human papillomavirus infection and its associated diseases. PMID:24488402

  2. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... of Cancer, 1975-2009, featuring the burden and trends in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers and HPV ...

  3. Human papillomavirus 16 and 18 in squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity and sexual practices: A pilot study at a Tertiary Care Hospital of North India

    PubMed Central

    Parshad, Sanjeev; Nandi, Sourabh; Marwah, Nisha; Mehta, Promod; Tripathi, Mayank; Netrapal; Gogna, Shekhar; Karwasra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignancy in India and tobacco and betel nut chewing are well established risk factors. Despite successful campaigns to help people shun this habit in developing countries the incidence has rather gone up and HPV and sexual practices are now definitely implicated for this. Aim: An attempt was made to generate Indian data on role of HPV and sexual practices in relation to OSCC. Settings and Design: A prospective observational study was conducted on 50 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Tissue biopsies from fifty patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) were subjected to PCR analysis to look for presence of HPV 16 and 18. Fifty patients with benign lesions were taken as control. Statistical Methods Used: The data was statistically analysed using SPSS version 22 and chi square test. Results: 42% of OSCC patients were found to harbour HPV 16 and 18 whereas only 8% of patients with benign lesions had HPV 16 and 18. A significant number of HPV positive patients i.e. 9 out of 21 gave history of multiple sexual partners and oral sex. Conclusions: This high percentage of HPV in OSCC in an Indian population from a tertiary care centre in north India and its association with prevailing sexual practices is quite significant. PMID:27390494

  4. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Significant association of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) but not of p53 polymorphisms with oral squamous cell carcinomas in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Saini, Rajan; Tang, Thean-Hock; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Cheong, Sok Ching; Musa, Kamarul Imran; Saini, Deepti; Ismail, Abdul Rashid; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Mustafa, Wan Mahadzir Wan; Santhanam, Jacinta

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of HPV and p53 polymorphisms in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) affecting Malaysian population. We analysed frozen samples from 105 OSCC as well as 105 oral specimens derived from healthy individuals. PCR assays targeting two regions of the virus were used. PCR amplification for the analysis of p53 codon 72 arginine/proline alleles was carried out in a separate reaction. HPV DNA was detected in 51.4% OSCC samples, while 24.8% controls were found to be HPV positive. HPV was found to be significantly associated with OSCC (P < 0.001, OR = 4.3 after adjustment for habits) when compared to controls. High-risk HPV was found to be significantly associated with OSCC cases (P < 0.05). Demographic profiles of age, gender, race and habits were not associated with HPV presence in cases and controls. However, significantly less HPV positivity was seen in poorly differentiated compared to well-differentiated OSCCs. No significant association was found between HPV positivity and p53 polymorphisms in cases and control groups. Additionally, we found no association of codon 72 polymorphism with oral cancer. This study indicates that high-risk HPV infection is one of the contributing factors for OSCCs. HPV 16 was the predominant type found in Malaysian patients with OSCC. Further, we did not find any association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and HPV infection or between the p53 polymorphism and the risk of oral cancer.

  6. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Histograms of Human Papillomavirus-Positive and Human Papillomavirus-Negative Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Assessment of Tumor Heterogeneity and Comparison with Histopathology.

    PubMed

    de Perrot, T; Lenoir, V; Domingo Ayllón, M; Dulguerov, N; Pusztaszeri, M; Becker, M

    2017-09-14

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma associated with human papillomavirus infection represents a distinct tumor entity. We hypothesized that diffusion phenotypes based on the histogram analysis of ADC values reflect distinct degrees of tumor heterogeneity in human papillomavirus-positive and human papillomavirus-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. One hundred five consecutive patients (mean age, 64 years; range, 45-87 years) with primary oropharyngeal (n = 52) and oral cavity (n = 53) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma underwent MR imaging with anatomic and diffusion-weighted sequences (b = 0, b = 1000 s/mm(2), monoexponential ADC calculation). The collected tumor voxels from the contoured ROIs provided histograms from which position, dispersion, and form parameters were computed. Histogram data were correlated with histopathology, p16-immunohistochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction for human papillomavirus DNA. There were 21 human papillomavirus-positive and 84 human papillomavirus-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. At histopathology, human papillomavirus-positive cancers were more often nonkeratinizing (13/21, 62%) than human papillomavirus-negative cancers (19/84, 23%; P = .001), and their mitotic index was higher (71% versus 49%; P = .005). ROI-based mean and median ADCs were significantly lower in human papillomavirus-positive (1014 ± 178 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s and 970 ± 187 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s, respectively) than in human papillomavirus-negative tumors (1184 ± 168 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s and 1161 ± 175 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s, respectively; P < .001), whereas excess kurtosis and skewness were significantly higher in human papillomavirus-positive (1.934 ± 1.386 and 0.923 ± 0.510, respectively) than in human papillomavirus-negative tumors (0.643 ± 0.982 and 0.399 ± 0.516, respectively; P < .001). Human papillomavirus-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma had symmetric normally distributed ADC histograms, which corresponded

  7. The role of high-risk human papillomavirus infection in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in non-smoking and non-drinking patients: a clinicopathological and molecular study of 46 cases.

    PubMed

    Laco, Jan; Vosmikova, Hana; Novakova, Vendula; Celakovsky, Petr; Dolezalova, Helena; Tucek, Lubos; Nekvindova, Jana; Vosmik, Milan; Cermakova, Eva; Ryska, Ales

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection in the etiopathogenesis of oral (OSCC) and oropharyngeal (OPSCC) squamous cell carcinoma in non-smoking and non-drinking patients (NSNDP). Twenty-four OSCCs and 22 OPSCCs were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for p16(INK4a) protein (p16) expression and by chromogene in situ hybridization (CISH) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HR-HPV DNA presence. The series included 23 males and 23 females aged 35-93 years. p16 expression was seen in 7 out of 24 (29%) OSCCs and in 22 out of 22 (100%) OPSCCs. Using CISH, HR-HPV DNA was observed in 6 out of 24 (25%) OSCCs and in 21 out of 22 (95%) OPSCCs. HPV DNA was found in 3 out of 24 (13%) OSCCs and in 18 out of 22 (82%) OPSCCs using PCR. HPV 16 and 33 were detected in 16 and in two cases, respectively. Compared with OSCCs, OPSCCs more frequently showed basaloid morphology (p < 0.0001), lymph node involvement (p = 0.0063), diffuse p16 expression (p < 0.0001), HR-HPV DNA presence using both CISH and PCR (p < 0.0001; p < 0.0001), and better outcome. The sensitivity and specificity of p16 expression for HR-HPV DNA presence detected by CISH were 0.89 and 0.95, respectively, and 0.95 and 0.85 for PCR detected HPV DNA. The sensitivity and specificity of CISH for PCR detected presence of HPV DNA were 1.00 and 0.73, respectively. Our study is the first larger study analyzing OSCC and OPSCC in NSNDP. Our results indicate that unlike OSCC, a vast majority of OPSCCs may be associated with HR-HPV infection.

  8. Focal epithelial hyperplasia caused by human papillomavirus 13.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Natasha R; Scolnik, Dennis; Rebbapragada, Anuradha; Koelink, Eric; Craw, Lindsey; Roth, Sherryn; Aronson, Leya; Perusini, Stephen; Silverman, Michael S

    2010-06-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a benign, papulo-nodular disease of the oral cavity. It is rare, affecting primarily Native American populations during childhood. It is closely associated with human papillomavirus 13 and 32. This report describes the diagnosis of 2 cases of focal epithelial hyperplasia in children from southern Guyana. The diagnosis was made using clinical criteria, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing.

  9. The human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Orth, G; Jablonska, S; Breitburd, F; Favre, M; Croissant, O

    1978-01-01

    Recent biochemical and serological studies have shown the existence of at least four distinct types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) causing benign skin lesions. These viruses show hardly no antigenic relationships; their DNAs differ by their sensitivity to restriction endonucleases, and show little, if any, sequence homology, as detected by molecular hybridization using complementary RNAs transcribed in vitro. Data on the pathogenicity of HPVs are still incomplete but indicate that some types of benign skin lesions (plantar warts, common warts, flat warts) may be preferentially associated with some types of HPV. Most interesting is that epidermodysplasia verruciformis has been found associated with two types of virus, and that malignant conversion of some lesions has been observed in all the patients infected with one of them. This suggests that at least a HPV may have a higher oncogenic potential, as do rabbit (Shope) papillomavirus and bovine alimentary tract papillomavirus. Much remains to be known on human papilloma-viruses and further studies may lead to the characterization of additional types of HPVs, especially in genital condylomata acuminata and laryngeal papillomas whose malignant conversion, although rare, may be observed. Progress in this field has been and remains hampered by the lack of cell culture systems allowing replication of these highly host and tissue specific viruses, and by the widely variable virus content of the different human lesions known to be associated with a papillomavirus. Further studies are warranted by the possible role of these widespread and epitheliotropic viruses in the origin of some carcinomas in man.

  10. Papillomaviruses: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Araldi, Rodrigo Pinheiro; Assaf, Suely Muro Reis; Carvalho, Rodrigo Franco de; Carvalho, Márcio Augusto Caldas Rocha de; Souza, Jacqueline Mazzuchelli de; Magnelli, Roberta Fiusa; Módolo, Diego Grando; Roperto, Franco Peppino; Stocco, Rita de Cassia; Beçak, Willy

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, a group of viruses has received great attention due to its relationship with cancer development and its wide distribution throughout the vertebrates: the papillomaviruses. In this article, we aim to review some of the most relevant reports concerning the use of bovines as an experimental model for studies related to papillomaviruses. Moreover, the obtained data contributes to the development of strategies against the clinical consequences of bovine papillomaviruses (BPV) that have led to drastic hazards to the herds. To overcome the problem, the vaccines that we have been developing involve recombinant DNA technology, aiming at prophylactic and therapeutic procedures. It is important to point out that these strategies can be used as models for innovative procedures against HPV, as this virus is the main causal agent of cervical cancer, the second most fatal cancer in women.

  11. Papillomaviruses: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Araldi, Rodrigo Pinheiro; Assaf, Suely Muro Reis; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Franco; de Carvalho, Márcio Augusto Caldas Rocha; de Souza, Jacqueline Mazzuchelli; Magnelli, Roberta Fiusa; Módolo, Diego Grando; Roperto, Franco Peppino; Stocco, Rita de Cassia; Beçak, Willy

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In the last decades, a group of viruses has received great attention due to its relationship with cancer development and its wide distribution throughout the vertebrates: the papillomaviruses. In this article, we aim to review some of the most relevant reports concerning the use of bovines as an experimental model for studies related to papillomaviruses. Moreover, the obtained data contributes to the development of strategies against the clinical consequences of bovine papillomaviruses (BPV) that have led to drastic hazards to the herds. To overcome the problem, the vaccines that we have been developing involve recombinant DNA technology, aiming at prophylactic and therapeutic procedures. It is important to point out that these strategies can be used as models for innovative procedures against HPV, as this virus is the main causal agent of cervical cancer, the second most fatal cancer in women. PMID:28212457

  12. [Oncogenic potential of papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Váňová, B; Golais, F

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses belong to a group of viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). These viruses are believed to induce benign as well as malignant tumour growth. Thanks to professor zur Hausen, the connection between the infection by human papillomaviruses (HPV) and cervix cancer was described in detail a few years ago. However, there exist certain types of HPV viruses, in which no association with malignancies was ever demonstrated. Hence, we can divide HPV into "high-risk" (HR) and "low-risk" (LR) group. Our work describes the life cycle of HPV, molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis and aims to compare HR HPV and LR HPV within these terms.

  13. The Relationship between Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Human Papillomavirus: A Meta-Analysis of a Chinese Population (1994–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changtai; Ling, Yang; Dong, Chunlei; Zhou, Xifa; Wang, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies indicated that oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) might be related to human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. However, up to now, there still lacks a large sample study to analyze the relationship between OSCC in a Chinese population and oral HPV infection. In the present study, we used a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship of OSCC with HPV infection in a Chinese population. Methods The reports on HPV and OSCC in a Chinese population published between January, 1994, and September, 2011 were retrieved via CNKI/WANFANG/OVID/MEDLINE databases. According to the inclusion criteria, we selected 18 eligible case-control studies. After testing the heterogeneity of the studies by the Cochran Q test, the meta-analyses for HPV and HPV16 were performed using the fixed effects model. Results The overall positive rates of HPV and HPV16 in OSCC were 58.0% (354/610; 95% confidence interval [CI], 54.1–61.9) and 47.47% (169/356; 95% CI: 42.3–52.7), respectively; which were significantly higher than those in normal controls 10.44% (26/249; 95% CI: 7.2–14.7) and 7.1% (13/182; 95% CI: 4.2–11.8). Quantitative meta-analysis revealed that, compared with normal controls, the combined odds ratios of OSCC with HPV or HPV16 infection were 12.7 (95% CI: 8.0–20.0) and 9.0 (95% CI: 5.1–15.6), respectively. Both Begg's test and funnel plots revealed that no publication bias was found in this present study (P>0.05). Conclusions High incidences of HPV infection (mainly involving HPV16) were found in the samples of Chinese OSCC. For the Chinese population, HPV infection elevates the risk of OSCC tumorigenesis. Prophylactic HPV-vaccination may reduce the burden of HPV-related OSCC in China. PMID:22570701

  14. Canine thymoma.

    PubMed

    Aronsohn, M

    1985-07-01

    Thymoma is an uncommon canine neoplasm of thymic epithelial cells. It is seen in various breeds but may occur more frequently in German Shepherd Dogs. Middle-aged or older dogs can be affected and no sex predilection exists. A paraneoplastic syndrome of myasthenia gravis, nonthymic malignant tumors, and/or polymyositis occurs in a significant number of dogs with thymoma. Clinical signs are variable and are related to a space-occupying cranial mediastinal mass and/or manifestations of the paraneo-plastic syndrome. Dyspnea is the most common presenting clinical sign. Thoracic radiographs usually show a cranial mediastinal mass. Lymphoma is the main differential diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis may be made by closed biopsy but is more likely to be confirmed by thoracotomy. Thymomas may be completely contained within the thymic capsule or may spread by local invasion or metastasis. A staging system allows for an accurate prognosis and a therapeutic plan. Surgical removal of encapsulated thymomas may result in long-term survival or cure. Invasive or metastatic thymomas carry a guarded prognosis. Manifestations of the paraneoplastic syndrome complicate treatment. Adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy may be of value for advanced cases; however, adequate clinical trials have not been done in the dog.

  15. What factors are associated with impacted canines in cleft patients?

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Anna; Sjöström, Mats; Björnström, Lena; Ransjö, Maria

    2014-11-01

    It is important to predict and prevent the impaction of canines. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of impacted canines in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and to identify factors associated with impaction. This retrospective cohort study included patients with nonsyndromic UCLP. The predictors were pre-eruptive inclination angle, deviation in tooth number (agenesis or supernumerary lateral incisors), and reoperation of bone transplant. The outcome variable was impacted and surgically exposed canines. The prevalence of impacted and surgically exposed canines in the 68 consecutive patients with UCLP was 20.6%. The pre-eruptive inclination angle was significantly larger (34.4°) for the impacted canines on the cleft side compared with the spontaneously erupted canines on the cleft and non-cleft sides (25.5° vs 15.4; P < .05). Reoperation of the bone transplant significantly increased canine impaction (50%; P < .05). The eruption of maxillary canines needs to be supervised carefully in patients with UCLP, because the prevalence of impaction is 10 times higher compared with the general population. Factors associated with canine impaction are a pre-eruptive inclination larger than 30° and reoperation of the bone transplant. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Papillomavirus E6 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Howie, Heather L; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A; Galloway, Denise A

    2009-01-01

    The papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses that encode approximately eight genes, and require the host cell DNA replication machinery for their viral DNA replication. Thus papillomaviruses have evolved strategies to induce host cell DNA synthesis balanced with strategies to protect the cell from unscheduled replication. While the papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes are directly involved in viral replication by binding to and unwinding the origin of replication, the E6 and E7 proteins have auxillary functions that promote proliferation. As a consequence of disrupting the normal checkpoints that regulate cell cycle entry and progression, the E6 and E7 proteins play a key role in the oncogenic properties of human papillomaviruses with a high risk of causing anogenital cancers (HR HPVs). As a consequence, E6 and E7 of HR HPVs are invariably expressed in cervical cancers. This article will focus on the E6 protein and its numerous activities including inactivating p53, blocking apoptosis, activating telomerase, disrupting cell adhesion, polarity and epithelial differentiation, altering transcription and reducing immune recognition. PMID:19081593

  17. Papillomavirus E6 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Howie, Heather L.; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2009-02-20

    The papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses that encode approximately eight genes, and require the host cell DNA replication machinery for their viral DNA replication. Thus papillomaviruses have evolved strategies to induce host cell DNA synthesis balanced with strategies to protect the cell from unscheduled replication. While the papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes are directly involved in viral replication by binding to and unwinding the origin of replication, the E6 and E7 proteins have auxillary functions that promote proliferation. As a consequence of disrupting the normal checkpoints that regulate cell cycle entry and progression, the E6 and E7 proteins play a key role in the oncogenic properties of human papillomaviruses with a high risk of causing anogenital cancers (HR HPVs). As a consequence, E6 and E7 of HR HPVs are invariably expressed in cervical cancers. This article will focus on the E6 protein and its numerous activities including inactivating p53, blocking apoptosis, activating telomerase, disrupting cell adhesion, polarity and epithelial differentiation, altering transcription and reducing immune recognition.

  18. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control.

  19. Oral surgery. Basic techniques.

    PubMed

    Ross, D L; Goldstein, G S

    1986-09-01

    Some of the clinical problems most frequently seen in veterinary dentistry and their surgical solutions are discussed. Extraction of teeth, surgical repositioning of teeth, tooth transplant, oral abscesses of tooth origin, impaction of teeth, repair of maxillary canine oronasal fistula, and simple techniques for oral wiring are among the issues considered.

  20. Morphology and immunoreactivity of canine and feline extramedullary plasmacytomas.

    PubMed

    Mikiewicz, M; Otrocka-Domagała, I; Paździor-Czapula, K; Gesek, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was the evaluation of morphology and immunophenotype of canine (19 cases) and feline (7 cases) extramedullary plasmacytomas. Tumours, located in skin, oral cavity and spleen were surgically excised, fixed and processed for histopathology and immunohistochemistry (CD79α, CD18, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, metallothionein). Histologically, tumours were classified into mature, cleaved, asynchronous, polymorphous blastic, hyalin, or monomorphous blastic type. All evaluated tumours showed cytoplasmic expression of CD79α antigen. The expression of CD18 was observed in canine cutaneous and splenic tumours. In canine tumours expression of metallothionein was low to moderate, while in feline plasmacytomas - absent or low. In canine tumours, the mitotic index and proliferating cell nuclear antigen index were positively correlated with the expression of metallothionein. In feline tumours no correlation between mitotic index, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and metallothionein was found. This is the first study describing expression of metallothionein in canine and feline extramedullary plasmacytoma.

  1. [Immunosuppression in dogs and pigs infected with canine distemper virus].

    PubMed

    Sereda, A D; Nogina, I V

    2011-01-01

    Immunosuppression manifesting itself as leukopenia and a considerably lower lymphocyte proliferative response to T- and B-cell mitogens develops in pigs and dogs within 2-3 weeks after intramuscular or oral infection with canine distemper virus (CDV). CDV antigens are detectable in the oral secretions of the animals within 2-2.5 week after infection.

  2. Papillomavirus-associated cutaneous papillomas in a population of wild spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Nelson, Keith G; Engh, Anne L; McKnight, Christy A; Kiupel, Matti; Wise, Annabel G; Maes, Roger K; Stevens, Hans; Heylen, Elisabeth; De Keyser, Karlien; Rector, Annabel; Van Ranst, Marc; Flies, Andrew S; Holekamp, Kay E

    2013-07-01

    Beginning in 1997 Michigan State University Mara Hyena Project investigators observed waxing and waning progression of oral and genital masses during long-term behavioral observations of a population of wild spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) from the Masai Mara Game Reserve, Kenya. From 1999-2000, we darted adult spotted hyenas to obtain routine physiologic and hematologic data and collected small, raised, lobulated, pigmented masses from the oral or genital areas of eight animals. Microscopically, masses consisted of variably thickened epidermis with thick elongate rete pegs, prominent stratum spinosum, and few koilocytes, consistent with papillomavirus-induced lesions. Immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded papilloma tissue revealed positive intranuclear labeling for papillomavirus antigen in the superficial stratum granulosum and in sloughing keratin layers of multiple samples. Polymerase chain reaction on DNA extracts from tumor tissue amplified a papillomavirus-specific 418 base pair amplicon in the E1 ORF. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool analysis of the sequenced amplicon suggests a novel hyaenid papillomavirus. Confirmatory complete genomic sequencing was performed later by the Rega Institute in Belgium. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a papillomavirus in a Hyaenidae species. Spotted hyena social behavior might facilitate oral-genital transmission of papillomavirus in this population.

  3. Recent advances in preclinical model systems for papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Neil D; Budgeon, Lynn R; Cladel, Nancy M; Hu, Jiafen

    2017-03-02

    Preclinical model systems to study multiple features of the papillomavirus life cycle have greatly aided our understanding of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) biology, disease progression and treatments. The challenge to studying HPV in hosts is that HPV along with most PVs are both species and tissue restricted. Thus, fundamental properties of HPV viral proteins can be assessed in specialized cell culture systems but host responses that involve innate immunity and host restriction factors requires preclinical surrogate models. Fortunately, there are several well-characterized and new animal models of papillomavirus infections that are available to the PV research community. Old models that continue to have value include canine, bovine and rabbit PV models and new rodent models are in place to better assess host-virus interactions. Questions arise as to the strengths and weaknesses of animal PV models for HPV disease and how accurately these preclinical models predict malignant progression, vaccine efficacy and therapeutic control of HPV-associated disease. In this review, we examine current preclinical models and highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the various models as well as provide an update on new opportunities to study the numerous unknowns that persist in the HPV research field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Localization of Impacted Canines

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Praveen; Bhagchandani, Jitendra; Singh, Ashish; Garg, Aarti; Kumar, Snehi; Sharma, Ashish; Yadav, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines is a frequently encountered clinical problem. The impaction of canine can be prevented in some situationsif the canine displacement is diagnosed in the early mixed dentition period and this would be extremely useful for the clinician. Hence,it is very important to focus on the means of early diagnosis and interception of this clinical situation. In the present article, the differentmodalities used to diagnose the impacted canine are reviewed with an insight into current 3-D modalities. PMID:25738100

  5. Kinetics of canine dental calculus crystallization: an in vitro study on the influence of inorganic components of canine saliva.

    PubMed

    Borah, Ballav M; Halter, Timothy J; Xie, Baoquan; Henneman, Zachary J; Siudzinski, Thomas R; Harris, Stephen; Elliott, Matthew; Nancollas, George H

    2014-07-01

    This work identifies carbonated hydroxyapatite (CAP) as the primary component of canine dental calculus, and corrects the long held belief that canine dental calculus is primarily CaCO3 (calcite). CAP is known to be the principal crystalline component of human dental calculus, suggesting that there are previously unknown similarities in the calcification that occurs in these two unique oral environments. In vitro kinetic experiments mimicking the inorganic components of canine saliva have examined the mechanisms of dental calculus formation. The solutions were prepared so as to mimic the inorganic components of canine saliva; phosphate, carbonate, and magnesium ion concentrations were varied individually to investigate the roll of these ions in controlling the nature of the phases that is nucleated. To date, the inorganic components of the canine oral systems have not been investigated at concentrations that mimic those in vivo. The mineral composition of the synthetic calculi grown under these conditions closely resembled samples excised from canines. This finding adds new information about calculus formation in humans and canines, and their sensitivity to chemicals used to treat these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Low rate of oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection among women with cervical lesion. Preliminary results from the South-Eastern Hungarian population].

    PubMed

    Vanya, Melinda; Jakó, Mária; Terhes, Gabriella; Szakács, László; Kaiser, László; Deák, Judit; Bártfai, György

    2016-01-10

    Although the natural history of cervical and oral human papillomavirus infection has been intensively investigated in the past years, the ability of this virus to infect oral and genital mucosae in the same individual and its potential to co-infect both cervical and oral mucosa are still unclear. The aim of the authors was to assess the presence of oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection in women with cervical lesions in the South-Eastern Hungarian population. The total of 103 women have been included in the study between March 1, 2013 and January 1, 2015. Brushing was used to collect cells from the oropharyngeal mucosa. Human papillomavirus DNA was detected using polymerase chain reaction, and Amplicor line blot test was used for genotyping. Oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection was detected in 2 cases (3%). The detected genotypes were 31, 40/61 and 73 in the oropharyngeal region. The results indicate that in women with cervical lesions oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection rarely occurs.

  7. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Emma J; Einstein, Mark H; Franceschi, Silvia; Kitchener, Henry C

    2013-09-07

    Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus infection. Most human papillomavirus infection is harmless and clears spontaneously but persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (especially type 16) can cause cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and oropharynx. The virus exclusively infects epithelium and produces new viral particles only in fully mature epithelial cells. Human papillomavirus disrupts normal cell-cycle control, promoting uncontrolled cell division and the accumulation of genetic damage. Two effective prophylactic vaccines composed of human papillomavirus type 16 and 18, and human papillomavirus type 16, 18, 6, and 11 virus-like particles have been introduced in many developed countries as a primary prevention strategy. Human papillomavirus testing is clinically valuable for secondary prevention in triaging low-grade cytology and as a test of cure after treatment. More sensitive than cytology, primary screening by human papillomavirus testing could enable screening intervals to be extended. If these prevention strategies can be implemented in developing countries, many thousands of lives could be saved.

  8. [Network Research on Human Papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Paniagua, Ramón; Furuya, María ElenaYuriko

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the research in important health questions at a national and institutional levels, the Human Papillomavirus Research Network of the Health Research Coordination of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social offers this supplement with the purpose of assisting patients that daily look for attention due to the human papillomavirus or to cervical cancer.

  9. In-vivo kinetics of ALA-induced fluorescence in the canine oral cavity: influence of drug dose and tissue type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Vijay; Rastegar, Sohi; Fossum, Theresa W.; Flores, P.; van der Breggen, E. W. J.; Egger, N. G.; Jacques, Steven L.; Motamedi, Massoud

    1997-06-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopic detection and photodynamic therapy may provide an effective approach for early detection and treatment of oral cancer. Thus the development of a safe photosensitizer that could enhance the spectroscopic contrast between normal and neoplastic tissue, while allowing for selective photosensitization and treatment of pre-malignant and malignant lesions in the oral cavity, is highly desired. In this study, the pharmacokinetics and a safety of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) that could induce an endogenous precursor of protoporphyrin IX and heme in the biosynthetic pathway was investigated. Two doses of ALA:25 and 75 mg/kg were administered intravenously to 4 and 3 dogs, respectively. A 'wash-out' period of 1 week between administration of each does was allowed to ensure against PpIX build-up. Using an optical multichannel analyzer, the fluorescence from the oral cavity was recorded at 3 sites: buccal mucosa, gums, and the tongue, and also from a remote site, the skin. A fiber optic probe was used to deliver excitation and collect the emitted fluorescence. Results showed that the ALA-induced fluorescence reached a peak at 2-4 hours, and returned to baseline in 24-31 hours. The dogs were stable during the course of the study, minimal vomiting was noted. In conclusion, the study showed that higher doses result in a higher peak at a later time.It was observed that different tissues have different pharmacokinetic response, the tongue and the gums have the highest peak fluorescence values, followed by the buccal mucosa and skin.

  10. Bovine papillomavirus DNA in milk, blood, urine, semen, and spermatozoa of bovine papillomavirus-infected animals.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, C L; Almeida, M E; Vicari, C F; Carvalho, C; Yaguiu, A; Freitas, A C; Beçak, W; Stocco, R C

    2009-01-01

    Papillomavirus infection in bovines is associated with cutaneous papillomatosis on the hide, udders and other epithelial tissues, as well as in oral respiratory, alimentary and urinary tract mucosa. Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) is also considered the etiological agent of esophageal tumors and the malignant bladder tumors that characterize the clinical condition associated with chronic enzootic hematuria. After infective viral DNA was found in cattle blood and BPV1, 2 and 4 DNA in cattle reproductive and embryonic tissues, we looked for and found BPV DNA in blood, milk, urine, seminal fluid, and spermatozoa of BPV-infected animals. Peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures from BPV-infected animals had high rates of chromosome aberrations, including radial rearrangements that signal oncogenic potential and viral interaction with telomeric regions. The finding of BPV DNA in body fluids and tissues other than the epithelium demonstrates co-infection of other tissues or cell types by papillomavirus and shows the potential role of lymphocytes, seminal fluid and spermatozoa in BPV transmission. Our findings reinforce a peremptory need for prophylactic and therapeutic instruments to curtail this disease in bovine livestock.

  11. Effects of oral cyclosporine on canine T-cell expression of IL-2 and IFN-gamma across a 12-h dosing interval

    PubMed Central

    FELLMAN, C. L.; ARCHER, T. M.; STOKES, J. V.; WILLS, R. W.; LUNSFORD, K. V.; MACKIN, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The duration of immunosuppressive effects following oral cyclosporine in dogs is unknown. This study used flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate the effects of high-dose oral cyclosporine across a 12-h dosing interval. Expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) was compared before and after 8 days of cyclosporine at 10 mg/kg every 12 h in six healthy dogs. Samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h postdosing for analysis of unactivated and activated T-cell and whole blood cytokine expression using flow cytometry and qRT-PCR, respectively, and at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 h postdosing for measurement of cyclosporine concentrations. Flow cytometry and qRT-PCR both demonstrated significant marked reductions in IL-2 and IFN-γ levels at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h after dosing compared to pretreatment levels (P < 0.05) for activated samples, with less consistent effects observed for unactivated samples. Both flow cytometry and qRT-PCR are viable techniques for measuring cyclosporine pharmacodynamics in dogs, yielding comparable results with activated samples. Two hours postdrug administration is the preferred time for concurrent assessment of peak drug concentration and cytokine expression, and T-cell activation is needed for optimal results. PMID:26676223

  12. Model systems of human papillomavirus-associated disease.

    PubMed

    Doorbar, John

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a range of serious diseases, including the vast majority of cervical cancers, most anal cancers and around half of head and neck cancers. They are also responsible for troublesome benign epithelial lesions, including genital warts and laryngeal papillomas, and in some individuals HPVs lead to recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and other difficult-to-manage diseases. As a result, there is a great need for model systems that accurately mimic papillomavirus infections in humans. This is complicated by the diverse variety of HPVs, which now number over 200 types, and the different strategies they have evolved to persist in the population. The most well-developed models involve the culture of HPV-containing keratinocytes in organotypic raft culture, an approach which appears to accurately mimic the life cycle of several of the high-risk cancer-associated HPV types. Included amongst these are HPV16 and 18, which cause the majority of cervical cancers. The low-risk HPV types persist less well in tissue-culture models, and our ability to study the productive life cycle of these viruses is more limited. Although ongoing research is likely to improve this situation, animal models of papillomavirus disease can provide considerable basic information as to how lesions form, regress and can be controlled by the immune system. The best studied are cottontail rabbit papillomavirus, rabbit oral papillomavirus and, more recently, mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV), the last of which is providing exciting new insights into viral tropisms and immune control. In addition, transgenic models of disease have helped us to understand the consequences of persistent viral gene expression and the importance of co-factors such as hormones and UV irradiation in the development of neoplasia and cancer. It is hoped that such disease models will eventually lead us to better understanding and better treatments for human disease.

  13. Identification of a Novel Bat Papillomavirus by Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Andy S. P.; Ho, Chi-Chun; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of novel viruses in animals expands our knowledge of viral diversity and potentially emerging zoonoses. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) technology gives millions or even billions of sequence reads per run, allowing a comprehensive survey of the genetic content within a sample without prior nucleic acid amplification. In this study, we screened 156 rectal swab samples from apparently healthy bats (n = 96), pigs (n = 9), cattles (n = 9), stray dogs (n = 11), stray cats (n = 11) and monkeys (n = 20) using a HTS metagenomics approach. The complete genome of a novel papillomavirus (PV), Miniopterus schreibersii papillomavirus type 1 (MscPV1), with L1 of 60% nucleotide identity to Canine papillomavirus (CPV6), was identified in a specimen from a Common Bent-wing Bat (M. schreibersii). It is about 7.5kb in length, with a G+C content of 45.8% and a genomic organization similar to that of other PVs. Despite the higher nucleotide identity between the genomes of MscPV1 and CPV6, maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis of the L1 gene sequence showed that MscPV1 and Erethizon dorsatum papillomavirus (EdPV1) are most closely related. Estimated divergence time of MscPV1 from the EdPV1/MscPV1 common ancestor was approximately 60.2–91.9 millions of years ago, inferred under strict clocks using the L1 and E1 genes. The estimates were limited by the lack of reliable calibration points from co-divergence because of possible host shifts. As the nucleotide sequence of this virus only showed limited similarity with that of related animal PVs, the conventional approach of PCR using consensus primers would be unlikely to have detected the novel virus in the sample. Unlike the first bat papillomavirus RaPV1, MscPV1 was found in an asymptomatic bat with no apparent mucosal or skin lesions whereas RaPV1 was detected in the basosquamous carcinoma of a fruit bat Rousettus aegyptiacus. We propose MscPV1 as the first member of the novel Dyolambda-papillomavirus

  14. Clinical and serological response of wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) to vaccination against canine distemper, canine parvovirus infection and rabies.

    PubMed

    van Heerden, J; Bingham, J; van Vuuren, M; Burroughs, R E J; Stylianides, E

    2002-03-01

    Wild dogs Lycaon pictuis (n = 8) were vaccinated 4 times against canine distemper (n = 8) (initially with inactivated and subsequently with live attenuated strains of canine distemper) and canine parvovirus infection (n = 8) over a period of 360 days. Four of the wild dogs were also vaccinated 3 times against rabies using a live oral vaccine and 4 with an inactivated parenteral vaccine. Commercially-available canine distemper, canine parvovirus and parenteral rabies vaccines, intended for use in domestic dogs, were used. None of the vaccinated dogs showed any untoward clinical signs. The inactivated canine distemper vaccine did not result in seroconversion whereas the attenuated live vaccine resulted in seroconversion in all wild dogs. Presumably protective concentrations of antibodies to canine distemper virus were present in all wild dogs for at least 451 days. Canine parvovirus haemagglutination inhibition titres were present in all wild dogs prior to the administration of vaccine and protective concentrations persisted for at least 451 days. Vaccination against parvovirus infection resulted in a temporary increase in canine parvovirus haemagglutination inhibition titres in most dogs. Administration of both inactivated parenteral and live oral rabies vaccine initially resulted in seroconversion in 7 of 8 dogs. These titres, however, dropped to very low concentrations within 100 days. Booster administrations resulted in increased antibody concentrations in all dogs. It was concluded that the vaccines were safe to use in healthy subadult wild dogs and that a vaccination protocol in free-ranging wild dogs should at least incorporate booster vaccinations against rabies 3-6 months after the first inoculation.

  15. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    McBride, Alison A

    2017-10-19

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are an ancient group of viruses with small, double-stranded DNA circular genomes. They are species-specific and have a strict tropism for mucosal and cutaneous stratified squamous epithelial surfaces of the host. A subset of these viruses has been demonstrated to be the causative agent of several human cancers. Here, we review the biology, natural history, evolution and cancer association of the oncogenic HPVs.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human oncogenic viruses'. © 2017 The Authors.

  16. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are an ancient group of viruses with small, double-stranded DNA circular genomes. They are species-specific and have a strict tropism for mucosal and cutaneous stratified squamous epithelial surfaces of the host. A subset of these viruses has been demonstrated to be the causative agent of several human cancers. Here, we review the biology, natural history, evolution and cancer association of the oncogenic HPVs. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human oncogenic viruses’. PMID:28893940

  17. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia in a howler monkey (Alouatta fusca).

    PubMed

    Sá, L R; DiLoreto, C; Leite, M C; Wakamatsu, A; Santos, R T; Catão-Dias, J L

    2000-09-01

    Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare and seldom reported disease in animals and humans induced by a papillomavirus. The present report is the first description of this disease in a Neotropical primate, a howler monkey (Alouatta fusca). The diagnosis was based on gross and microscopic findings. The generic papillomavirus antigen was identified by immunohistochemistry and was found not to be related to any human papillomavirus DNA tested by in situ hybridization. This virus is probably a specific papillomavirus of the howler monkey (HMPV).

  18. Severe papillomavirus infection progressing to metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in bone marrow-transplanted X-linked SCID dogs.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Michael H; Kennedy, Jeffrey S; Kennedy, Douglas R; Yuan, Hang; Holt, David E; Casal, Margret L; Traas, Anne M; Mauldin, Elizabeth A; Moore, Peter F; Henthorn, Paula S; Hartnett, Brian J; Weinberg, Kenneth I; Schlegel, Richard; Felsburg, Peter J

    2006-07-01

    Canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is due to mutations in the common gamma chain (gammac) gene and is identical clinically and immunologically to human XSCID, making it a true homologue of the human disease. Bone marrow-transplanted (BMT) XSCID dogs not only engraft donor T cells and reconstitute normal T-cell function but, in contrast to the majority of transplanted human XSCID patients, also engraft donor B cells and reconstitute normal humoral immune function. Shortly after our initial report of successful BMT of XSCID dogs, it soon became evident that transplanted XSCID dogs developed late-onset severe chronic cutaneous infections containing a newly described canine papillomavirus. This is analogous to the late-onset cutaneous papillomavirus infection recently described for human XSCID patients following BMT. Of 24 transplanted XSCID dogs followed for at least 1 year post-BMT, 71% developed chronic canine papillomavirus infection. Six of the transplanted dogs that developed cutaneous papillomas were maintained for >3 1/2 years post-BMT for use as breeders. Four of these six dogs (67%) developed invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), with three of the dogs (75%) eventually developing metastatic SCC, an extremely rare consequence of SCC in the dog. This finding raises the question of whether SCC will develop in transplanted human XSCID patients later in life. Canine XSCID therefore provides an ideal animal model with which to study the role of the gammac-dependent signaling pathway in the response to papillomavirus infections and the progression of these viral infections to metastatic SCC.

  19. HPV-associated oral warts.

    PubMed

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Wood, N H; Marnewick, J C; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

    2011-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is strictly epitheliotropic, infecting stratified squamous cutaneous and mucosal epithelial cells. Oral HPV infection may be subclinical or putatively associated with benign or malignant oral neoplasms. The benign HPV-associated oral lesions, focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck disease), oral squamous cell papilloma, oral verruca vulgaris (common wart) and oral condyloma acuminatum, are collectively referred to as oral warts. Oral warts are usually asymptomatic, may be persistent or uncommonly, may regress spontaneously. HPV-associated oral warts have a prevalence of 0.5% in the general population, occur in up to 5% of HIV-seropositive subjects, and in up to 23% of HIV-seropositive subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy. This paper is a clinico-pathological review of HPV-associated oral warts.

  20. Canine hearing loss management.

    PubMed

    Scheifele, Lesa; Clark, John Greer; Scheifele, Peter M

    2012-11-01

    Dog owners and handlers are naturally concerned when suspicion of hearing loss arises for their dogs. Questions frequently asked of the veterinarian center on warning signs of canine hearing loss and what can be done for the dog if hearing loss is confirmed. This article addresses warning signs of canine hearing loss, communication training and safety awareness issues, and the feasibility of hearing aid amplification for dogs.

  1. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Facts & Brochures HPV Fact Sheet HPV & ...

  2. Papillomaviruses in felids.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S

    2014-03-01

    The ability of papillomaviruses (PVs) to cause disease in human beings and most domestic animals has long been recognised. However, disease due to PVs in cats was not reported until 1990. Since this first description of feline cutaneous viral plaques, additional feline diseases have been causally linked to PVs, and PV-induced disease has been reported in a wide range of felids. In this review, the PV replication cycle and the subsequent immune response are discussed, along with diagnostic methods to confirm intralesional infection. In domestic cats, viral plaques, Bowenoid in situ carcinomas and feline sarcoids are thought to be caused by PV infection; the appearance, clinical behaviour and causative PVs of these diseases are discussed. Recent evidence that PVs could also be a significant cause of feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas is reviewed. Lastly, PV-associated diseases of exotic felids are presented.

  3. [Papillomaviruses and human tumors].

    PubMed

    Vonka, V; Hamsíková, E; Sobotková, E; Smahel, M; Kitasato, H; Sainerová, H; Ludvíková, V; Zák, R; Kanka, J; Kolár, Z; Kovarík, J

    2000-12-01

    The report summarizes the main results obtained in the course of our research project. The results of immunological and epidemiological studies provide further proofs that human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the etiological agents in cervical neoplasia. In addition, they raise hopes that immunological methods may be utilized in diagnostics of cervical cancer and for monitoring the clinical course of this disease in the near future. Since the etiological relationship between HPV and cervical carcinoma seems to be proven beyond reasonable doubt, the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines has become the dominant of the contemporary HPV reseach. For studying immune reactions against HPV-induced tumours we developed a model of HPV16-transformed rodent cells.

  4. Papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Vande Pol, Scott B.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses induce benign and malignant epithelial tumors, and the viral E6 oncoprotein is essential for full transformation. E6 contributes to transformation by associating with cellular proteins, docking on specific acidic LXXLL peptide motifs found on the associated cellular proteins. This review examines insights from recent studies of human and animal E6 proteins that determine the three-dimensional structure of E6 when bound to acidic LXXLL peptides. The structure of E6 is related to recent advances in the purification and identification of E6 associated protein complexes. These E6 protein-complexes, together with other proteins that bind to E6, alter a broad array of biological outcomes including modulation of cell survival, cellular transcription, host cell differentiation, growth factor dependence, DNA damage responses, and cell cycle progression. PMID:23711382

  5. The Papillomavirus E2 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Alison A.

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E2 proteins are pivotal to the viral life cycle and have well characterized functions in transcriptional regulation, initiation of DNA replication and partitioning the viral genome. The E2 proteins also function in vegetative DNA replication, post-transcriptional processes and possibly packaging. This review describes structural and functional aspects of the E2 proteins and their binding sites on the viral genome. It is intended to be a reference guide to this viral protein. - Highlights: • Overview of E2 protein functions. • Structural domains of the papillomavirus E2 proteins. • Analysis of E2 binding sites in different genera of papillomaviruses. • Compilation of E2 associated proteins. • Comparison of key mutations in distinct E2 functions.

  6. Determination of platinum originating from carboplatin in human urine and canine excretion products by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Tine; Brouwers, Elke E M; de Vos, Johan P; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2011-04-01

    We present highly sensitive, rapid methods for the determination of Pt originating from carboplatin in human urine and canine urine, feces, and oral fluid. The methods are based on the quantification of Pt by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and allow quantification of 7.50 ng/L Pt in human and canine urine (in 15 μL of matrix), 15.0 ng/L Pt in canine oral fluid (in 15 μL of matrix), and 0.105 ng/g Pt in canine feces (in 5 μg of matrix). Sample pretreatment mainly involved dilution with appropriate diluents. The performance of the methods fulfilled the most recent FDA guidelines for bioanalytical method validation. Validated ranges of quantification were 7.50 to 1.00 × 10(4) ng/L Pt in human and canine urine, 0.105-30.0 ng/g Pt in canine feces, and 15.0 to 1.00 × 10(4) ng/L Pt in canine oral fluid. Canine urine and oral fluid cannot be easily obtained. Therefore, we also investigated the validity of the usage of human matrix samples for the preparation of calibration standards and quality control samples as alternatives, to be used in future clinical studies. The assays are used to support biomonitoring studies and pharmacokinetic studies in pet dogs treated with carboplatin.

  7. Carcinogenic human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Mark; Doorbar, John; Wentzensen, Nicolas; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Fakhry, Carole; Monk, Bradley J; Stanley, Margaret A; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Infections with human papillomavirus (HPV) are common and transmitted by direct contact. Although the great majority of infections resolve within 2 years, 13 phylogenetically related, sexually transmitted HPV genotypes, notably HPV16, cause - if not controlled immunologically or by screening - virtually all cervical cancers worldwide, a large fraction of other anogenital cancers and an increasing proportion of oropharyngeal cancers. The carcinogenicity of these HPV types results primarily from the activity of the oncoproteins E6 and E7, which impair growth regulatory pathways. Persistent high-risk HPVs can transition from a productive (virion-producing) to an abortive or transforming infection, after which cancer can result after typically slow accumulation of host genetic mutations. However, which precancerous lesions progress and which do not is unclear; the majority of screening-detected precancers are treated, leading to overtreatment. The discovery of HPV as a carcinogen led to the development of effective preventive vaccines and sensitive HPV DNA and RNA tests. Together, vaccination programmes (the ultimate long-term preventive strategy) and screening using HPV tests could dramatically alter the landscape of HPV-related cancers. HPV testing will probably replace cytology-based cervical screening owing to greater reassurance when the test is negative. However, the effective implementation of HPV vaccination and screening globally remains a challenge.

  8. Emerging human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Barbara; Maraj, Bharat; Tran, Nam Phuong; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Alvarez, Ronald D; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the etiologic factor of cervical, anogenital, and a subset of head and neck cancers has stimulated the development of preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines to control HPV-associated malignancies. Excitement has been generated by the commercialization of two preventive L1-based vaccines, which use HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) to generate capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, factors such as high cost and requirement for cold chain have prevented widespread implementation where they are needed most. Areas covered Next generation preventive HPV vaccine candidates have focused on cost-effective stable alternatives and generating broader protection via targeting multivalent L1 VLPs, L2 capsid protein, and chimeric L1/L2 VLPs. Therapeutic HPV vaccine candidates have focused on enhancing T cell-mediated killing of HPV-transformed tumor cells, which constitutively express HPV-encoded proteins, E6 and E7. Several therapeutic HPV vaccines are in clinical trials. Expert opinion Although progress is being made, cost remains an issue inhibiting the use of preventive HPV vaccines in countries that carry the majority of the cervical cancer burden. In addition, progression of therapeutic HPV vaccines through clinical trials may require combination strategies employing different therapeutic modalities. As research in the development of HPV vaccines continues, we may generate effective strategies to control HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:23163511

  9. [Human papillomavirus prophylactic vaccine].

    PubMed

    Kawana, Kei

    2012-06-01

    Human papillomavirus causes viral-dependent cancers, including cervical, anal, vulvar, penile, vaginal, and oropharyngeal, and condyloma acuminata. In the last decade, HPV prophylactic vaccine has been developed and spread worldwide after many large-scale clinical studies. These studies demonstrate significant clinical efficacy for prevention of HPV16/18/6/11-related diseases. In particular, prevention of cervical cancer should be the most important role in the world. In Japan, incidence of cervical cancer does not increase, but the peak of age of the patients at 2005 is 25-45 years old and became 20 years younger than that at 1985. The current two HPV vaccines can prevent the infection of HPV16/18 among high-risk HPVs and will provide a significant impact especially on young-age onset cervical cancer. Furthermore, quadrivalent HPV vaccine, Gardasil, has shown population impact that is decrease of patients with condyloma acuminate in several countries. The clinical efficacy seems to be convincing. Here HPV vaccine will be reviewed based on the literatures.

  10. Human papillomavirus vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Fife, K H

    1998-11-01

    The greatest successes in combating important viral infections have been achieved using vaccines. A vaccine to prevent genital tract human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, especially those types associated with genital tract malignancy, could significantly reduce morbidity and mortality from cervical and other genital tract cancers. However, several barriers currently stand in the way of HPV vaccine development. The immunological response to natural HPV infection is incompletely understood and there is uncertainty about which viral antigen(s) should be included in a candidate vaccine. It is clear that immunization of several animal species with the L1 major capsid protein (usually in the form of virus-like particles) spurs the production of anti-HPV antibodies that are neutralizing in several assay systems. However, it is not clear if neutralizing antibody will be present in the genital tract in sufficient quantities to block infection. A second problem is the lack of a reliable serological assay for HPV. This is a major problem for clinical trials in which the identification of susceptible individuals, and incident infections, usually relies on serological diagnosis. Finally, there is also interest in the development of a vaccine that is used to treat individuals who are already infected--a therapeutic vaccine. It is likely that a therapeutic vaccine will need to target different or additional antigens to those comprising a prophylactic vaccine.

  11. Genital human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lowy, D R; Kirnbauer, R; Schiller, J T

    1994-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a common sexually transmitted disease that at the present time is not effectively controlled or treated. Many infections are inapparent and transient. However, some HPV infections result in persistent lesions that in some cases undergo carcinogenic progression. A subset of genital HPVs, designated high-risk types, are preferentially associated with high-grade dysplasias and carcinomas. About 90% of cervical cancers contain high-risk HPV DNA, most often HPV16. Development of a subunit vaccine against high-risk genital HPVs is a desirable and, it appears, an increasingly feasible long-term goal. The viral E6 and E7 oncoproteins are selectively maintained and expressed in progressed HPV tumors and could potentially be targets for therapeutic vaccines. The L1 major virion structural proteins have recently been shown to self-assemble into virus-like particles when expressed in insect cells. These particles might serve as the basis for a prophylactic vaccine to prevent genital HPV infection. Images PMID:8146136

  12. Human papillomaviruses and cancer.

    PubMed

    Haedicke, Juliane; Iftner, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small oncogenic DNA viruses of which more than 200 types have been identified to date. A small subset of these is etiologically linked to the development of anogenital malignancies such as cervical cancer. In addition, recent studies established a causative relationship between these high-risk HPV types and tonsillar and oropharyngeal cancer. Clinical management of cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is largely standardized and involves surgical removal of the tumor tissue as well as adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Notably, the response to therapeutic intervention of HPV-positive HNSCCs has been found to be better as compared to HPV-negative tumors. Although the existing HPV vaccine is solely licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer, it might also have prophylactic potential for the development of high-risk HPV-associated HNSCCs. Another group of viruses, which belongs to the beta-HPV subgroup, has been implicated in nonmelanoma skin cancer, however, the etiology remains to be established. Treatment of HPV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is based on local excision. However, topically applied immune-modulating substances represent non-surgical alternatives for the management of smaller cutaneous tumors. In this review we present the current knowledge of the role of HPV in cancer development and discuss clinical management options as well as targets for the development of future intervention therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Foroughi-Parvar, Faeze; Hatam, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is the obligatory intracellular parasite of mammalian macrophages and causes zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL). The presence of infected dogs as the main reservoir host of ZVL is regarded as the most important potential risk for human infection. Thus the prevention of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is essential to stop the current increase of the Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis. Recently considerable advances in achieving protective immunization of dogs and several important attempts for achieving an effective vaccine against CVL lead to attracting the scientists trust in its important role for eradication of ZVL. This paper highlights the recent advances in vaccination against canine visceral leishmaniasis from 2007 until now. PMID:25628897

  14. Canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Martella, Vito; Elia, Gabrielle; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2008-07-01

    Vaccine-based prophylaxis has greatly helped to keep distemper disease under control. Notwithstanding, the incidence of canine distemper virus (CDV)-related disease in canine populations throughout the world seems to have increased in the past decades, and several episodes of CDV disease in vaccinated animals have been reported, with nation-wide proportions in some cases. Increasing surveillance should be pivotal to identify new CDV variants and to understand the dynamics of CDV epidemiology. In addition, it is important to evaluate whether the efficacy of the vaccine against these new strains may somehow be affected.

  15. Lack of prognostic significance of angiogenesis in canine melanocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Cuitiño, M C; Massone, A R; Idiart, J R

    2012-01-01

    The prognostic significance of angiogenesis in some canine tumours has been investigated, but little is known about its relevance in canine melanocytic tumours (MTs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of angiogenesis in canine MTs. A total of 36 cutaneous melanocytomas (benign MTs), 40 cutaneous melanomas (malignant MTs) and 43 oral melanomas were studied. Survival data were available for a subset of 59 cases. Microvessel density (MVD) and endothelial area (EA) were determined by immunolabelling using an antibody specific for von Willebrand factor (vWF). Mean MVD (expressed as the number of microvessels per mm(2)) was 129 ± 14 in melanocytomas, 191 ± 16 in cutaneous melanomas and 208 ± 16 in oral melanomas. Mean EA (expressed as the percentage of the total area) was 1.5 ± 0.14 in melanocytomas, 2.6 ± 0.2 in cutaneous melanomas and 2.4 ± 0.3 in oral melanomas. The differences in MVD and EA between melanocytomas and melanomas were significant (P = 0.001 and P = 0.003, respectively). MVD and EA were significantly correlated between cutaneous and oral MTs (r = 0.54; P <0.001 and r = 0.63; P <0.001, respectively). MVD and EA were not related to survival in cutaneous and oral MTs. In conclusion, tumour vascularization was higher in melanomas than in melanocytomas, but it seemed to have no prognostic significance in these tumours. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Lara S.; Fernández, Maria E.; Jobe, David; Carmack, Chakema C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Research is needed to understand parental factors influencing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, particularly in groups with a higher burden of cervical cancer. Purpose To determine correlates of HPV vaccination among a sample of low-income parents of age-eligible daughters (aged 9–17 years) who called the 2-1-1 Helpline. Secondary analyses describe potential differences in HPV vaccination correlates by Hispanic and black parent groups, specifically. Methods This 2009 cross-sectional feasibility survey of cancer prevention needs was conducted in Houston at the 2-1-1 Texas/United Way Helpline. In 2012, to examine the association between parental psychosocial, cognitive, and decisional factors and HPV vaccination uptake (one or two doses), bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted for minority parents and for Hispanic and black parent groups, separately. Results Lower rates of HPV vaccination uptake were reported among minority daughters of 2-1-1 callers (29% overall) compared with national and Texas rates. In final adjusted analysis, factors positively associated with HPV vaccination uptake included being offered the vaccination by a doctor or nurse, belief that the vaccine would prevent cervical cancer, and Hispanic ethnicity. Secondary analyses detected differences in factors associated with vaccination in Hispanic and black groups. Conclusions Findings indicate low levels of vaccination among 2-1-1 callers. Increased understanding of determinants of HPV vaccination in low-income minority groups can guide interventions to increase coverage. Because 2-1-1 informational and referral services networks reach populations considered medically underserved, 2-1-1 can serve as a community hub for informing development of and implementing approaches aimed at hard-to-reach groups. PMID:23157770

  17. First New World Primate Papillomavirus Identification in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil: Alouatta guariba papillomavirus 1.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; de Souza, Alex Junior Souza; Júnior, Edivaldo Costa Sousa; Silva, Allan Kaio; de Mello, Wyller Alencar; Nunes, Marcio Roberto T; Júnior, João Lídio S G V; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; de Vasconcelos, Janaina Mota; de Oliveira, Layanna Freitas; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; da Silva, Adriana Marques J; Fries, Brigida Gomes; Summa, Maria Eugênia L; de Sá, Lilian Rose M

    2016-08-18

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the first papillomavirus detected in a New World primate, howler monkey, Alouatta guariba clamitans papillomavirus 1 (AgPV1), from the Atlantic Forest in São Paulo State, Brazil.

  18. Apoptosis in canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Moro, L; de Sousa Martins, A; de Moraes Alves, C; de Araújo Santos, F G; dos Santos Nunes, J E; Carneiro, R A; Carvalho, R; Vasconcelos, A C

    2003-01-01

    Canine distemper is a systemic viral disease characterized by immunosuppression followed by secondary infections. Apoptosis is observed in several immunosuppressive diseases and its occurrence on canine distemper in vivo has not been published. In this study, the occurrence of apoptosis was determined in lymphoid tissues of thirteen naturally infected dogs and nine experimentally inoculated puppies. Healthy dogs were used as negative controls. Samples of lymph nodes, thymus, spleen and brain were collected for histopathological purposes. Sections, 5 microm thick, of retropharingeal lymph nodes were stained by HE, Shorr, Methyl Green-Pyronin and TUNEL reaction. Shorr stained sections were further evaluated by morphometry. Canine distemper virus nucleoprotein was detected by immunohistochemistry. Retropharingeal lymph nodes of naturally and experimentally infected dogs had more apoptotic cells per field than controls. In addition, DNA from thymus of infected dogs were more fragmented than controls. Therefore, apoptosis is increased in lymphoid depletion induced by canine distemper virus and consequently play a role in the immunosuppression seen in this disease.

  19. Correction of bilateral impacted mandibular canines with a lip bumper for anchorage reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sachin; Yadav, Sumit; Shah, Neelesh V; Valiathan, Ashima; Uribe, Flavio; Nanda, Ravindra

    2013-03-01

    Multiple treatment options are available to patients with impacted manibular canines in addition to a retained deciduous canine. This article describes the treatment of a prepubertal girl, aged 10 years 6 months, with a skeletal Class I, dental Class II Division 1 malocclusion, retrognathic mandible, deep overbite, proclined maxillary incisors, midline diastema, and bilateral mandibular canine impaction. The orthodontic treatment plan included extraction of the deciduous canine and forced eruption of the impacted canines. A modified lip bumper appliance was used both for forced eruption and to reinforce anchorage. Through the collaborative efforts of an orthodontist and an oral surgeon, an excellent esthetic and functional outcome was achieved. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human Papillomavirus and Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hennessey, P.T.; Westra, W.H.; Califano, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been established as a risk factor for developing head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, independent of tobacco and alcohol use. In particular, HPV is strongly associated with the development of oropharyngeal cancer and a small minority of oral cavity cancers. In this review, we summarize what is currently known about the biology of HPV, the mechanisms by which it effects malignant transformation, and the potential impact of HPV status on the clinical management of persons with head and neck cancer. PMID:19407148

  1. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost–effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL. PMID:22566950

  2. Adjuvant effect of Japanese herbal medicines on the mucosal type 1 immune responses to human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 in mice immunized orally with Lactobacillus-based therapeutic HPV vaccine in a synergistic manner.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Ayumi; Kawana, Kei; Yokoyama, Terufumi; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Yamashita, Aki; Tomio, Kensuke; Kojima, Satoko; Oda, Katsutoshi; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Kozuma, Shiro

    2012-08-03

    The Japanese herbal medicines, Juzen-taiho-to (JTT) and Hochu-ekki-to (HET), have been shown to enhance humoral immune responses to vaccine antigen when used as adjuvants for prophylactic vaccines. However, their adjuvant effect on mucosal cellular immune responses remains unstudied. The precursor lesion of cervical cancer, high-grade CIN that expresses HPV E7 oncoprotein ubiquitously is a target for HPV therapeutic vaccines that elicit mucosal E7-specific type 1 T cell responses. We have demonstrated that oral immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing HPV16 E7 (LacE7) is more effective in eliciting mucosal E7-specific IFNγ-producing cells than subcutaneous or intramuscular antigen delivery. Here we report the synergistic effect of an oral Lactobacillus-based vaccine and Japanese herbal medicines on mucosal immune responses. Oral immunization of mice with LacE7 plus either a Japanese herbal medicine (JTT or HET) or a mucosal adjuvant, heated-labile enterotoxin T subunit (LTB), promotes systemic E7-specific type 1 T cell responses but not mucosal responses. Administration of LacE7 plus either Japanese herbal medicine and LTB enhanced mucosal E7-specific type 1 T cell response to levels approximately 3-fold higher than those after administration of LacE7 alone. Furthermore, secretion of IFNγ and IL-2 into the intestinal lumen was observed after oral administration of LacE7 and was enhanced considerably by the addition of Japanese herbal medicines and LTB. Our data indicated that Japanese herbal medicines, in synergy with Lactobacillus and LTB, enhance the mucosal type 1 immune responses to orally immunized antigen. Japanese herbal medicines may be excellent adjuvants for oral Lactobacillus-based vaccines and oral immunization of LacE7, HET and LTB may have the potential to elicit extremely high E7-specific mucosal cytotoxic immune response to HPV-associated neoplastic lesions.

  3. Do canine parvoviruses affect canine neurons? An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Url, A; Schmidt, P

    2005-08-01

    In cats (most of which died from panleukopenia), cerebral neurons have recently been shown to be susceptible to canine parvovirus infection. In addition to positive immunostaining and distinct in situ hybridization signals, signs of neurodegeneration were identified by histopathology, mainly in the diencephalic area. Similar histological lesions of the diencephalic regions in dogs have also attracted attention; therefore, an immunohistochemical study was initiated to determine the possible infection of canine neurons with canine parvoviruses. The study was carried out on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded brain tissue, with and without signs of neurodegeneration, from 40 dogs, most of them dying from parvovirus enteritis. Immunohistochemistry, using polyclonal antiserum against canine parvoviruses, was negative in all 40 cases, suggesting that, unlike cats, canine parvoviruses do not seem capable of infecting canine neurons.

  4. Protection of rabbits against challenge with rabbit papillomaviruses by immunization with the N terminus of human papillomavirus type 16 minor capsid antigen L2.

    PubMed

    Gambhira, Ratish; Jagu, Subhashini; Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Gravitt, Patti E; Culp, Timothy D; Christensen, Neil D; Roden, Richard B S

    2007-11-01

    Current L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines provide type-restricted protection against a small subset of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes associated with cervical cancer, necessitating continued cytologic screening of vaccinees. Cervical cancer is most problematic in countries that lack the resources for screening or highly multivalent HPV VLP vaccines, suggesting the need for a low-cost, broadly protective vaccinogen. Here, N-terminal L2 polypeptides comprising residues 1 to 88 or 11 to 200 derived from HPV16, bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1), or cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) were produced in bacteria. Rabbits were immunized with these N-terminal L2 polypeptides and concurrently challenged with CRPV and rabbit oral papillomavirus (ROPV). Vaccination with either N-terminal L2 polypeptides of CRPV effectively protected rabbits from CRPV challenge but not from papillomas induced by cutaneous challenge with CRPV genomic DNA. Furthermore, papillomas induced by CRPV genomic DNA deficient for L2 expression grew at the same rate as those induced by wild-type CRPV genomic DNA, further suggesting that the L2 polypeptide vaccines lack therapeutic activity. Neutralizing serum antibody titers of >15 correlated with protection (P < 0.001), a finding consistent with neutralizing antibody-mediated protection. Surprisingly, a remarkable degree of protection against heterologous papillomavirus types was observed after vaccination with N-terminal L2 polypeptides. Notably, vaccination with HPV16 L2 11-200 protected against cutaneous and mucosal challenge with CRPV and ROPV, respectively, papillomaviruses that are evolutionarily divergent from HPV16. Further, vaccination with HPV16 L2 11-200 generates broadly cross-neutralizing serum antibody, suggesting the potential of L2 as a second-generation preventive HPV vaccine antigen.

  5. A case report of a rare finding of supernumerary primary and permanent canines

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Kate; Hay, Norman

    2014-01-01

    A supernumerary tooth is a tooth that is additional to the normal series of teeth. These can occur anywhere in the primary or permanent dentition and are most commonly found in the anterior maxilla. Supernumerary canines are rare with little available literature and case reports in this area. This case presents a patient with a unilateral maxillary supernumerary deciduous and permanent canine associated with an unusual cleft of the alveolus. How to cite the article: Parker K, Hay N. A case report of a rare finding of supernumerary primary and permanent canines. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):129-131. PMID:24876714

  6. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  7. Persistence of viral DNA in the epithelial basal layer suggests a model for papillomavirus latency following immune regression

    PubMed Central

    Maglennon, Gareth Adam; McIntosh, Pauline; Doorbar, John

    2011-01-01

    Rabbit oral papillomavirus (ROPV) causes benign and spontaneously regressing oral lesions in rabbits, and is a useful model of disease associated with low-risk human papillomavirus types. Here we have adapted the ROPV system to study papillomavirus latency. Following lesion regression, ROPV DNA persists at the majority of regressed sites at levels substantially lower than those found in productive papillomas. Spliced viral transcripts were also detected. ROPV persistence in the absence of disease could be demonstrated for a year following infection and lesion-regression. This was not associated with completion of the virus life-cycle or new virion production, indicating that ROPV persists in a latent state. Using novel laser capture microdissection techniques, we could show that the site of latency is a subset of basal epithelial cells at sites of previous experimental infection. We hypothesize that these cells are epithelial stem cells and that reactivation of latency may be a source of recurrent disease. PMID:21492895

  8. Canine parvovirus: current perspective.

    PubMed

    Nandi, S; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-06-01

    Canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2) has been considered to be an important pathogen of domestic and wild canids and has spread worldwide since its emergence in 1978. It has been reported from Asia, Australia, New Zealand, the Americas and Europe. Two distinct parvoviruses are now known to infect dogs-the pathogenic CPV-2 and CPV-1 or the minute virus of canine (MVC). CPV-2, the causative agent of acute hemorrhagic enteritis and myocarditis in dogs, is one of the most important pathogenic viruses with high morbidity (100%) and frequent mortality up to 10% in adult dogs and 91% in pups. The disease condition has been complicated further due to emergence of a number of variants namely CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c over the years and involvement of domestic and wild canines. There are a number of different serological and molecular tests available for prompt, specific and accurate diagnosis of the disease. Further, both live attenuated and inactivated vaccines are available to control the disease in animals. Besides, new generation vaccines namely recombinant vaccine, peptide vaccine and DNA vaccine are in different stages of development and offer hope for better management of the disease in canines. However, new generation vaccines have not been issued license to be used in the field condition. Again, the presence of maternal antibodies often interferes with the active immunization with live attenuated vaccine and there always exists a window of susceptibility in spite of following proper immunization regimen. Lastly, judicious use of the vaccines in pet dogs, stray dogs and wild canids keeping in mind the new variants of the CPV-2 along with the proper sanitation and disinfection practices must be implemented for the successful control the disease.

  9. American Canine Hepatozoonosis

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, S. A.; Panciera, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    American canine hepatozoonosis (ACH) is a tick-borne disease that is spreading in the southeastern and south-central United States. Characterized by marked leukocytosis and periosteal bone proliferation, ACH is very debilitating and often fatal. Dogs acquire infection by ingesting nymphal or adult Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) that, in a previous life stage, ingested the parasite in a blood meal taken from some vertebrate intermediate host. ACH is caused by the apicomplexan Hepatozoon americanum and has been differentiated from Old World canine hepatozoonosis caused by H. canis. Unlike H. canis, which is transmitted by the ubiquitous brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus), H. americanum is essentially an accidental parasite of dogs, for which Gulf Coast ticks are not favored hosts. The geographic portrait of the disease parallels the known distribution of the Gulf Coast tick, which has expanded in recent years. Thus, the endemic cycle of H. americanum involves A. maculatum as definitive host and some vertebrate intermediate host(s) yet to be identified. Although coyotes (Canis latrans) are known to be infected, it is not known how important this host is in maintaining the endemic cycle. This review covers the biology of the parasite and of the tick that transmits it and contrasts ACH with classical canine hepatozoonosis. Clinical aspects of the disease are discussed, including diagnosis and treatment, and puzzling epidemiologic issues are examined. Brief consideration is given to the potential for ACH to be used as a model for study of angiogenesis and of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. PMID:14557294

  10. [Canine histoplasmosis in Japan].

    PubMed

    Sano, Ayako; Miyaji, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a fungal infection caused by Histoplasma capsulatum and is distributed a worldwide. Although the disease has been treated as an imported mycosis, some autochthonous human, 1 equine and 4 canine cases suggested that the disease is endemic. Histoplasmosis is classified depending on the variety of causative agent. Histoplasmosis farciminosi known as pseudofarcy, is manifested only in Perissodactyla where it invades lymph nodes and lymph ducts, and is recognized by isolation from horses. Historically, Japan was one of the endemic areas of pseudofarcy before World War II, and more than 20,000 cases were recorded in horses used by the military. Interestingly, Japanese canine histoplasmosis uniformly showed skin ulcers and granulomatous lesions on the skin without pulmonary or gastrointestinal involvement, both of which were very similar to pseudofarcy. It was diagnosed as histoplasmosis by the detection of internal transcribed spacer legions of rRNA gene of H. capsulatum from paraffin embedded tissue samples. Furthermore, the fungal isolate from the human case with no history of going abroad or immigrating was identified as H. capsulatum var. farciminosum by a gene sequence. These facts indicated that pseudofarcy is not only an infectious disease in horses, but also a zoonotic fungal infection. Japanese autochthonous canine histoplasmosis might be a heteroecism of pseudofarcy because of its likeness to the human case, the similarity of clinical manifestations and the historical background at this stage.

  11. Human papillomavirus infections in nonsexually active perinatally HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-02-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy.

  12. The cytoskeleton in papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Sapp, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Cytoskeleton defines the shape and structural organization of the cell. Its elements participate in cell motility, intracellular transport and chromosome movement during mitosis. Papillomaviruses (PV) are strictly epitheliotropic and induce self-limiting benign tumors of skin and mucosa, which may progress to malignancy. Like many other viruses, PV use the host cytoskeletal components for several steps during their life cycle. Prior to internalization, PV particles are transported along filopodia to the cell body. Following internalization, retrograde transport along microtubules via the dynein motor protein complex is observed. In addition, viral minichromosomes depend on the host cell machinery for partitioning of viral genomes during mitosis, which may be affected by oncoproteins E6 and E7 of high-risk human PV types. This mini-review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of papillomavirus' interactions with the host cell cytoskeletal elements.

  13. The Papillomavirus E2 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Alison A.

    2013-01-01

    The papillomavirus E2 proteins are pivotal to the viral life cycle and have well characterized functions in transcriptional regulation, initiation of DNA replication and partitioning the viral genome. The E2 proteins also function in vegetative DNA replication, post-transcriptional processes and possibly packaging. This review describes structural and functional aspects of the E2 proteins and their binding sites on the viral genome. It is intended to be a reference guide to this viral protein. PMID:23849793

  14. Characterization of a novel papillomavirus species (ZcPV1) from two California sea lions (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Rivera, Rebecca; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Hoffman, Elizabeth M; Stacy, Brian A; Jensen, Eric D; Nollens, Hendrik H; Wellehan, James F X

    2012-03-23

    A seven-year old California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) presented with focally extensive, bilaterally symmetric, proliferative axillary skin lesions and preputial lesions. A second California sea lion in the same population presented with similar proliferative lesions on the underside of the tail. Histopathology revealed epidermal hyperplasia with severe hyperkeratosis, with proliferating keratinocytes forming broad, branching pegs that extended into the dermis. Pan-papillomaviral consensus PCR was used to obtain initial E1 sequence template and the complete genome was determined using a combination of rolling circle amplification and specific-primer PCR. Analysis revealed a novel papillomavirus, Zalophus californianus papillomavirus 1 (ZcPV1), with seven open reading frames encoding five early proteins (E6, E7, E1, E2 and E4) and two late proteins (L1 and L2). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that (ZcPV1) is most closely related to Equine papillomavirus 1 (EcPV1) in the genus Zetapapillomavirus, and Canine papillomaviruses 3 and 4 (CPV3, CPV4) in the genus Chipapillomavirus. The lesions regressed without intervention over a period of several months. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Pathogenesis of infection by human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Brendle, Sarah A; Bywaters, Stephanie M; Christensen, Neil D

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with benign lesions known as warts and several cancer types including cancer of the cervix, penis, anus and oral cavity. HPVs are classified by their oncogenic potential and are divided into high-risk oncogenic HPVs and low-risk HPVs. Tissue tropism is used as another means of classifying the virus, and HPVs are divided into types that infect mucosal or cutaneous tissues. Several risk factors have been identified that elevate an individual's likelihood of becoming infected with HPV including cigarette smoking, a large number of lifetime sexual partners and immunosuppression. Most HPV infections are cleared naturally, although persistent infection with oncogenic HPV types can lead to the cancers mentioned above. HPV has employed several mechanisms to avoid detection by the host immune system. Virus is released along with shedding skin cells in a nonlytic manner, and the virus has an altered codon usage leading to reduced expression of viral proteins. Infections from high-risk oncogenic HPV types that progress cause neoplasias that are defined as CIN1-CIN3 depending on the amount of abnormal cell growth and the level of cellular differentiation.

  16. Oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Nguyen, Ly M.; Thomas, Sroka; Hong-Ly, Bevan; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We aimed to study the prevalence of oral sex and its possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection in the development of oropharyngeal cancer in the US population for possible prevention. Methods: We conduct a systemic review on the prevalence of oral sex among Americans among different age groups, the prevalence of HPV 16 infection reported in oropharyngeal cancer, and correlation between oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer. Results: Oral sex is prevalent among adolescents and sexually active adults. Sixty percent of oropharyngeal cancer reported in the United States is associated with HPV 16 infections. Individuals who practiced oral sex with multiple partners are at risk for developing oropharyngeal cancer and need to be informed about practicing safe sex or getting vaccination. Conclusion: Family physicians will play a key role in prevention and educating the public about the risk of oral sex. PMID:27428229

  17. Dissolution media simulating the proximal canine gastrointestinal tract in the fasted state.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Marcel; Chokshi, Hitesh; Tang, Kin; Parrott, Neil J; Reppas, Christos; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2013-08-01

    Human biorelevant media have been shown to be a useful tool in pharmaceutical development and to provide input for in silico prediction of pharmacokinetic profiles after oral dosing. Dogs, in particular Beagles, are often used as animal models for preclinical studies. Key differences in the composition of human and canine gastric and intestinal fluids are described in the literature and underscore the need to develop a discrete set of biorelevant media, adapted to the conditions of the proximal canine gastrointestinal (GI) tract, to improve forecast and interpretation of preclinical results using in vitro dissolution studies. Canine biorelevant media can also be used in the development of oral dosage forms for companion animals, which is a rapidly growing market. The compositions of Fasted State Simulated Gastric Fluid canine (FaSSGFc) and Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid canine (FaSSIFc) are adapted to the physiological composition of the corresponding gastrointestinal fluids in terms of pH, buffer capacity, osmolality, surface tension, as well as the bile salt, phospholipid, and free fatty acid content (in terms of concentration and reported subtypes). It was demonstrated that canine Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIFc) is superior in predicting the solubility of model compounds in Canine Intestinal Fluid (CIF) compared to the human biorelevant media (FaSSIF and FaSSIF-V2). Two different versions of FaSSGFc, composed at pH 1.5 and pH 6.5, offer the possibility to design in vitro studies which correspond to the in vivo study design, depending on whether pentagastrin is used to decrease the gastric pH in the dogs or not. Canine biorelevant media can therefore be recommended to achieve more accurate forecasting and interpretation of pharmacokinetic studies of oral drug products in dogs.

  18. Restoration of missing or misplaced canines.

    PubMed

    Bower, C F; Reinhardt, R A

    1985-06-01

    Restorative treatments for canines were discussed to correct three clinical abnormalities: (1) fully erupted permanent canine in the lateral incisor position, (2) missing permanent canines, and (3) partially exposed canines in normal arch position. The primary concerns are the development of esthetics, anterior guidance, and adequate support for fixed restorations.

  19. Consequences of crown shortening canine teeth in Greenland sled dogs.

    PubMed

    Kortegaard, H E; Anthony Knudsen, T; Dahl, S; Agger, J F G; Eriksen, T

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the consequences of crown shortening, focusing on the prevalence of pulp exposure and periapical pathology in Greenland sled dogs that had had their canine crowns shortened at an early age. Five cadaver heads and 54 sled dogs underwent an oral examination for dental fractures and pulp exposure of canines. All canines were radiographed and evaluated for periapical pathology. The prevalence of canine pulp exposure in 12 (5 heads and 7 dogs) crown shortened dogs was 91 · 7%, and 21 · 3% in 47 not-crown shortened dogs. A significant (P < 0 · 001) risk of pulp exposure of the canines in the crown shortened group compared to the not-crown shortened group was seen with a relative risk of 4 · 3 on a dog basis and a relative risk of 12 · 2 on a tooth basis. In dogs with pulp exposure of canines (n = 51) the prevalence of periapical pathology was 82 · 4%, but only 0 · 8% in dogs without pulp exposure (n = 133) resulting in a significant (relative risk, 109 · 5; P < 0 · 001) risk of periapical pathology in teeth with pulp exposure compared to teeth without pulp exposure. The high risk of periapical pathology observed in teeth with pulp exposure confirms that these teeth should not be neglected in affected dogs. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  20. Strain-specific detection of orally administered canine jejunum-dominated Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20 in dog faeces by real-time PCR targeted to the novel surface layer protein.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Saris, P E J

    2013-10-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20 has potential to be a probiotic strain because it can be present at high numbers in the jejunum of dog. To specifically detect LAB20 from dog faecal samples, a real-time PCR protocol was developed targeting the novel surface (S) layer protein gene of LAB20. The presence of S-layer protein was verified by N-terminal sequencing of the approximately 50-kDa major band from SDS-PAGE gel. The corresponding S-layer gene was amplified by inverse PCR using homology to known S-layers and sequenced. This novel S-layer protein has low sequence similarity to other S-layer proteins in the N-terminal region (32-211 aa, 7-39%). This enabled designing strain-specific PCR primers. The primer set was utilized to study intestinal persistence of LAB20 in dog that was fed with LAB20 fermented milk for 5 days. The results showed that LAB20 can be detected from dog faecal sample after 6 weeks with 10(4·53)  DNA copies g(-1) postadministration. It suggested that LAB20 could be a good candidate to study the mechanism behind its persistence and dominance in dog intestine and maybe utilize it as a probiotic for canine. A real-time PCR method was developed to detect Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20, a strain that was previously found dominant in canine gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The quantitative detection was based on targeting to variation region of a novel S-layer protein found in LAB20, allowing to specifically enumerate LAB20 from dog faeces. The results showed that the real-time PCR method was sensitive enough to be used in later intervention studies. Interestingly, LAB20 was found to persist in dog GI tract for 6 weeks. Therefore, LAB20 could be a good candidate to study its colonization and potentially utilize as a canine probiotic. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Type I interferons in the pathogenesis and treatment of canine diseases.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Daniela; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Gerhauser, Ingo

    2017-09-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) such as IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-ε, IFN-κ, and IFN-ω represent cytokines, which are deeply involved in the regulation and activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. They possess strong antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory activities allowing their use in the therapy of different viral diseases, neoplasms, and immune-mediated disorders, respectively. Initially, treatment strategies were based on nonspecific inducers of type I IFNs, which were soon replaced by different recombinant proteins. Drugs with type I IFNs as active agents are currently used in the treatment of hepatitis B and C virus infection, lymphoma, myeloid leukemia, renal carcinoma, malignant melanoma, and multiple sclerosis in humans. In addition, recombinant feline IFN-ω has been approved for the treatment of canine parvovirus, feline leukemia virus, and feline immunodeficiency virus infections. However, the role of type I IFNs in the pathogenesis of canine diseases remains largely undetermined so far, even though some share pathogenic mechanisms and clinical features with their human counterparts. This review summarizes the present knowledge of type I IFNs and down-stream targets such as Mx and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase proteins in the pathogenesis of infectious and immune-mediated canine diseases. Moreover, studies investigating the potential use of type I IFNs in the treatment of canine lymphomas, melanomas, sarcomas, and carcinomas, canine distemper virus, parvovirus, and papillomavirus infections as well as immune-mediated keratoconjunctivitis sicca and atopic dermatitis are presented. A separate chapter is dedicated to the therapeutic potential of IFN-λ, a type III IFN, in canine diseases. However, further future studies are still needed to unravel the exact functions of the different subtypes of type I IFNs and their target genes in healthy and diseased dogs and the full potential action of type I IFNs as treatment strategy. Copyright

  2. Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease): report of two cases with PCR detection of human papillomavirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Jayasooriya, P R; Abeyratne, S; Ranasinghe, A W; Tilakaratne, W M

    2004-07-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) (Heck's disease) is essentially a benign oral infection produced by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although this condition is known to exist in numerous populations and ethnic groups, it is relatively rare in South-East Asia. The following report is based on two cases of adult FEH with histopathological features in favour of the disease. In addition, polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the presence of HPV DNA in the lesions in order to confirm the histopathological diagnosis.

  3. Role of miRNA in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, therapy and regulation of its expression by Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomaviruses: With special reference to oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Jatinder Pal Singh; Iyer, Nageshwar; Soodan, Kanwaldeep Singh; Sharma, Atul; Khurana, Sunpreet Kaur; Priyadarshni, Pratiksha

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate numerous biological processes by targeting broad set of messenger RNAs. Research on miRNA-based biomarkers has witnessed phenomenal growth, owing to non-invasive nature of miRNA based screening assays and their sensitivity and specificity in detecting cancers. Their discovery in humans in 2000 has led to an explosion in research in terms of their role as biomarker, therapeutic target and trying to elucidate their function. This review aims to summarize the function of microRNAs as well as to examine how dysregulation at any step in their biogenesis or functional pathway can play a role in development of cancer, together with its possible involvement in oral cancer. Overexpression of oncogenic miRNA may reduce protein products of tumor-suppressor genes but loss of tumor-suppressor miRNA expression may cause elevated levels of oncogenic protein. One or both of these alterations could represent new targets for cancer diagnosis and treatment in future. Many researchers have focused on genetic and epigenetic alterations in OSCC cells. The genetic susceptibility, endemic environment factors, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection are believed to be the major etiologic factors of OSCC. Once metastasis occurs, prognosis is very poor. It is urgently needed to develop biomarkers for early clinical diagnosis/prognosis, and novel effective therapies for oral carcinoma. High-risk HPV infection leads to aberrant expression of cellular oncogenic and tumor suppressive miRNAs. The emergence of miRNA knowledge, and its potential interactive action with such alterations, therefore creates new understanding of cell transformation.

  4. Canine spinal cord glioma.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Barber, Renee; Burnum, Annabelle; Miller, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord glioma is uncommonly reported in dogs. We describe the clinicopathologic and diagnostic features of 7 cases of canine spinal cord glioma and briefly review the veterinary literature on this topic. The median age at presentation was 7.2 y. Six females and 1 male were affected and 4 dogs were brachycephalic. The clinical course lasted from 3 d to 12 wk, and clinical signs were progressive and associated with multiple suspected neuroanatomic locations in the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging of 6 cases revealed T2-weighted hyperintense lesions with variable contrast enhancement in the spinal cord. All dogs had a presumptive clinical diagnosis of intraparenchymal neoplasia or myelitis based on history, advanced imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Euthanasia was elected in all cases because of poor outcome despite anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive treatment or because of poor prognosis at the time of diagnosis. Tumor location during autopsy ranged from C1 to L6, with no clear predilection for a specific spinal cord segment. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the immunohistochemistry expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2, 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, and Ki-67. Diagnoses consisted of 4 cases of oligodendroglioma, 2 cases of gliomatosis cerebri, and 1 astrocytoma. This case series further defines the clinicopathologic features of canine spinal glioma and highlights the need for comprehensive immunohistochemistry in addition to routine histopathology to confirm the diagnosis of these tumors.

  5. Canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Sorenmo, Karin

    2003-05-01

    The National Consensus Group recommends that all women with tumors larger than 1 cm be offered chemotherapy regardless of tumor histology of lymph node status. This recommendation is to ensure that everyone at risk for failing, even though the risk may be low in women with relatively small tumors and favorable histology, has a choice and receives the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. This type of treatment recommendation may also be made in dogs based on recognized, well-accepted prognostic factors such as tumor size, stage, type, and histologic differentiation. Based on the limited clinical information available in veterinary medicine, the drugs that are effective in human breast cancer, such as cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin, may also have a role in the treatment of malignant mammary gland tumors in dogs. Randomized prospective studies are needed, however, to evaluate the efficacy of chemotherapy in dogs with high-risk mammary gland tumors and to determine which drugs and protocols are the most efficacious. Until such studies are performed, the treatment of canine mammary gland tumors will be based on the individual oncologist's understanding of tumor biology, experience, interpretation of the available studies, and a little bit of gut-feeling. Table 2 is a proposal for treatment guidelines for malignant canine mammary gland tumors according to established prognostic factors, results from published veterinary studies, and current recommendations for breast cancer treatment in women.

  6. [Melanoma and Human Papillomaviruses: Is There an Outlook for Study?].

    PubMed

    Volgareva, G M; Mikhaylova, I N; Golovina, D A

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive human malignant tumors. Its incidence and mortality are growing steadily. Ultraviolet irradiation is the main risk factor for melanoma involved in melanomagenesis. The probability of viral etiology of melanoma has been discussed. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been mentioned among candidates for its etiologic agents because some HPV types are the powerful carcinogens causing cervical cancer and other cancers. The review analyses the literature data on the association of melanoma with HPV Several groupsfound HPVin skin melanomas as well as in mucosa; viruses of high oncogenic risk were detected in some cases. For some organs the etiological role of high-risk HPV as inducers of invasive carcinomas is confirmed. These organs require special mention: cervix uteri, vulva, vagina, penis, anal region, and oral cavity. However in the majority of the studies in which viral DNA-positive melanomas were found, testing for viral genome expression was not done while this is the fact of primary importance. HPVare found in normal skin and mucous membranes thus creating justifiable threat of tumor specimen contamination with viral DNA in vivo. There are limited data on aggravation of the disease prognosis in papillomavirus-positive melanomas. However, any systematic observation of a sizeable patient group distinguished by that tumor type has not been performed yet. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk papillomaviruses were shown to be able to transform normal human melanocytes in vitro experiments. Thus, we can assume the presence of the association of melanoma with oncogenic HPV. The clinical significance of this problem is indisputable under the conditions of the steady increase in melanoma incidence and mortality rates in Russia and abroad. The problem requires further study.

  7. Oral myiasis in a captive hippopotamus.

    PubMed

    Rossi Júnior, João Luiz; Guião-Leite, Flaviana L; Gioso, Marco Antonio; Falqueiro, Léslie M Domingues; Fecchio, Roberto Silveira

    2009-01-01

    Causes of dental infections can be related to failed dental eruption, malocclusion, abrasion, fractures with or without exposure of the dental pulp, and periodontal disease. Reports of oral myiasis in megavertebrates in captivity are infrequent, perhaps due to the difficulty in observing the oral cavity in such species. This report describes a case of oral myiasis in an adult male hippopotamus in the gingival area and alveolar mucosa of the left mandibular canine tooth.

  8. Sus scrofa papillomavirus 2 - genetic characterization of a novel suid papillomavirus from wild boar in Germany.

    PubMed

    Link, Ellen Kathrin; Hoferer, Marc; Strobel, Birte; Rigbers, Kerstin; Langenmayer, Martin Christoph; Sutter, Gerd; Fux, Robert

    2017-08-01

    We identified a novel papillomavirus, Sus scrofa papillomavirus 2 (SsPV2), which is the first papillomavirus associated with papillomas in pigs. In skin alterations of a German wild boar, showing typical gross and histological appearance of papillomas, papillomavirus-like particles were demonstrated by electron microscopy. Degenerate papillomavirus-specific primers were used to amplify and sequence parts of the viral DNA. Subsequently, the complete genomic DNA was cloned and sequenced. The SsPV2 genome had a length of 8218 bp, encoded the early proteins E6, E7, E1 and E2, the late proteins L1 and L2 and contained an upstream regulatory region. Genomic characterization demonstrated papillomavirus-typical characteristics as well as unique features. For example, the E2 protein was significantly larger than in every other known papillomavirus species. Phylogenetic analysis was not able to relate SsPV2 unambiguously with other papillomavirus species or existing genera. Therefore, it might be representative of a new papillomavirus genus.

  9. Successful experimental challenge of dogs with canine parvovirus-2.

    PubMed Central

    Carman, S; Povey, C

    1982-01-01

    Withholding food from dogs for 24 hours prior to, and for 48 hours following oral challenge with a gut mucosal homogenate of canine parvovirus-2, was a successful means of reproducing gastroenteric signs of canine parvovirus-2 infection. Twenty-one of 24 dogs, which had previously received various vaccine preparations of mink enteritis virus or were unvaccinated, and which were starved at challenge, developed soft or liquid feces with large or without large clots of mucus. Altered feces were most frequent on postexposure day 11. Seven dogs passed frank blood in their stools on one or more occasions and seven dogs vomited sporadically. Pyrexia was noted in 71.6% of the dogs on postexposure day 6 and lymphopenia was detected on postexposure day 5 or 6 in 50% of the dogs monitored. In contrast, four dogs not starved at the time of challenge remained free of gastrointestinal signs apart from one dog which passed a soft stool with scant mucus on one day, postexposure day 6. Also four dogs vaccinated with a killed canine parvovirus-2 vaccine preparation and subsequently starved at the time of challenge, remained clinically healthy. Apart from these last mentioned four dogs, all others shed canine parvovirus-2 in their feces following challenge. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6280819

  10. Human papillomaviruses in epigenetic regulations.

    PubMed

    Durzynska, Julia; Lesniewicz, Krzysztof; Poreba, Elzbieta

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are double-stranded DNA viruses, that infect epithelial cells and are etiologically involved in the development of human cancer. Today, over 200 types of human papillomaviruses are known. They are divided into low-risk and high-risk HPVs depending on their potential to induce carcinogenesis, driven by two major viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7. By interacting with cellular partners, these proteins are involved in interdependent viral and cell cycles in stratified differentiating epithelium, and concomitantly induce epigenetic changes in infected cells and those undergoing malignant transformation. E6 and E7 oncoproteins interact with and/or modulate expression of many proteins involved in epigenetic regulation, including DNA methyltransferases, histone-modifying enzymes and subunits of chromatin remodeling complexes, thereby influencing host cell transcription program. Furthermore, HPV oncoproteins modulate expression of cellular micro RNAs. Most of these epigenetic actions in a complex dynamic interplay participate in the maintenance of persistent infection, cell transformation, and development of invasive cancer by a considerable deregulation of tumor suppressor and oncogenes. In this study, we have undertaken to discuss a number of studies concerning epigenetic regulations in HPV-dependent cells and to focus on those that have biological relevance to cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Durvalumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  12. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  13. Identification of human papillomavirus in pterygium.

    PubMed

    Hamed-Azzam, Shirin; Edison, Natalia; Briscoe, Daniel; Mukari, Abed; Elmalah, Irit

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the involvement of human papillomavirus in the pathogenesis of primary and recurrent pterygium in northern Israel. A retrospective study examined 100 randomly chosen pterygium specimens with solar elastosis, from 100 patients who underwent pterygium surgery during 2012-2013 at the Emek Medical Center. All the specimens were analysed for evidence of human papillomavirus infection by immunohistochemistry. Human papillomavirus was not detected in any of the 100 pterygia samples by immunohistochemistry. These used samples were taken from 100 patients with mean age of 51.5 years and a primary: recurrent ratio of 8.09:1. We conclude from our study that human papillomavirus infection does not appear to be an important pathogenic factor of pterygium in Israel. © 2015 Emek Medical Center.

  14. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  15. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  16. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  17. Evidence and Impact of Human Papillomavirus Latency

    PubMed Central

    Gravitt, Patti E

    2012-01-01

    At present, there is no consensus in the scientific community regarding the ability for human papillomavirus (HPV) infections to establish latency. Based on animal studies, a model of papillomavirus latency has been proposed in which papillomaviruses can be retained in the basal epithelial stem cell pool as latent infections and periodically induced to reactivate when the stem cell divides and one daughter cell is committed to terminal differentiation and induction of the viral life cycle. Tissue resident memory T-cells are hypothesized to control these periodic reactivation episodes and thus limit their duration. In this paper, evidence from human studies consistent with this model of papillomavirus latency is reviewed. Given the strong circumstantial evidence supporting a natural history of HPV infection which includes a immunologically controlled latent state, the longer term implications of HPV latency on a highly infected and aging population may warrant a more serious evaluation. PMID:23341855

  18. Bovine and human papillomaviruses: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Munday, J S

    2014-11-01

    Fifty years ago, inoculation with bovine papillomavirus (BPV) was found to cause mesenchymal tumors of the skin in cattle and horses, as well as tumors of the bladder in cattle. Subsequent to these studies of BPVs, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) were found to cause cervical cancer resulting in intense research into papillomaviruses. During the past 50 years, the ways that HPVs and BPVs cause disease have been investigated, and both HPVs and BPVs have been associated with an increasingly diverse range of diseases. Herein, the biology, oncogenic mechanisms, and diseases associated with BPVs are compared with those of HPVs. As reviewed, there are currently significant differences between BPVs and HPVs. However, research 50 years ago into BPVs formed a prologue for the recognition that papillomaviruses have a significant role in human disease, and it is possible that future research may similarly reveal that BPVs are less different from HPVs than is currently recognized. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. [Prognostic and predictive value of koilocytosis, expression of e6 hpv types 16/18, p16ink4a, p53 in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of oral cavity and oropharynx, associated with human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Riaboshapka, A N

    2014-11-01

    To determine the predictive and prognostic value of koilocytosis, expression of E6 HPV types 16/18, p16INK4a, p53 in patients with locally advanced HPV-associated squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity and oropharynx. In biopsy specimens of squamous cell carcinomas of oral cavity and oropharynx from 60 patients performed koylocytes count, immunohistochemical detection of HPV 16/18 types E6 protein, proteins p16INK4a and p53. Koilocytosis was detected in 50 patients (83.3%); in all 60 patients (100%) were simultaneous expression of p16INK4a and E6 HPV types 16/18; p53 expression was found in 37 patients (61.7%). After combined treatment (induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy) stable disease (SD) was detected in 11 patients (18.3%), partial response (PR) - in 25 patients (41.7%), complete response (CR) - in 24 patients (40.0%). There were no cases of disease progression. Treatment effect correlated with expression of p16INK4a (ρ = 0.3, p = 0.024) and expression of p53 (ρ = - 0.3, p = 0.019). Patients with a low expression of p16INK4a (2 points) and high expression of p53 (4 "+") had a high level of SD and had no CR. For all patients, the median of overall survival (OS) was 17 months, 1-year cumulative survival rate was 66.7%, 2-year cumulative survival rate - 35.0%. Median of overall survival was correlated with koilocytosis (ρ=0.5, p<0,001) and expression of E6 HPV types 16/18 (ρ=0.9, p<0.001), p16INK4a (ρ=0.9, p=0.037), p53 (ρ=-0.9; p<0.001). Patients with low expression of p53 (0 and 1 "+") had cumulative 1-year survival rates 87% and 90%, respectively (p<0.001), 2-year survival rates - 52% and 80%, respectively (p=0.015). In the Cox proportional hazards model the significant prognostic factors were prevalence of primary tumor (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3 - 3.5, p=0.003) and p53 expression (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1=1.7, p=0.016). High expression of p16INK4a associated with a high effect of combined treatment, high expression of a p53 - with low effect of

  20. First New World Primate Papillomavirus Identification in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil: Alouatta guariba papillomavirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; de Souza, Alex Junior Souza; Silva, Allan Kaio; de Mello, Wyller Alencar; Nunes, Marcio Roberto T.; Júnior, João Lídio S. G. V.; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; de Vasconcelos, Janaina Mota; de Oliveira, Layanna Freitas; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; da Silva, Adriana Marques J.; Fries, Brigida Gomes; Summa, Maria Eugênia L.; de Sá, Lilian Rose M.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the first papillomavirus detected in a New World primate, howler monkey, Alouatta guariba clamitans papillomavirus 1 (AgPV1), from the Atlantic Forest in São Paulo State, Brazil. PMID:27540053

  1. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  2. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  3. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  4. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION.... Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  5. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION.... Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  6. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/ ... statements/hpv.html . CDC review information for HPV (Human Papillomavirus) VIS: Page last reviewed: December 2, 2016 ...

  7. [Apoptosis modulation by human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Ratkovich-González, Sarah; Olimón-Andalón, Vicente; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important processes to keep the homeostasis in organisms is the apoptosis, also called programmed cell death. This mechanism works through two pathways: The intrinsic or mitochondrial, which responds to DNA damage and extern agents like UV radiation; and the extrinsic or receptor-mediated, which binds to their ligands to initiate the apoptotic trail. The evasion of apoptosis is one of the main causes of cellular transformation to malignity. Many viruses had shown capacity to modify the apoptotic process; among them is the human papillomavirus, which, by means of its oncoproteins, interferes in pathways, reacting with the receptors and molecules and participating in the death mechanism. This creates ideal conditions for cancer development.

  8. The Cytoskeleton in Papillomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Sapp, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Cytoskeleton defines the shape and structural organization of the cell. Its elements participate in cell motility, intracellular transport and chromosome movement during mitosis. Papillomaviruses (PV) are strictly epitheliotropic and induce self-limiting benign tumors of skin and mucosa, which may progress to malignancy. Like many other viruses, PV use the host cytoskeletal components for several steps during their life cycle. Prior to internalization, PV particles are transported along filopodia to the cell body. Following internalization, retrograde transport along microtubules via the dynein motor protein complex is observed. In addition, viral minichromosomes depend on the host cell machinery for partitioning of viral genomes during mitosis, which may be affected by oncoproteins E6 and E7 of high-risk human PV types. This mini-review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of papillomavirus’ interactions with the host cell cytoskeletal elements. PMID:21994730

  9. Monitoring of human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dillner, J; Arbyn, M; Unger, E; Dillner, L

    2011-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is a necessary causal factor in the development of cervical cancer. Moreover, HPV, predominately type 16 and to a lesser degree type 18, is linked causally to varying proportions of other anogenital cancers (vulva, vagina, penis, anus) as well as cancers elsewhere in the body (oropharynx, larynx, conjunctiva). HPV types 6 and 11 cause most of genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. Effective prophylactic vaccines have been developed. In this review, we address briefly the immunological aspects of HPV infection and the results of HPV vaccination trials. Internationally standardized monitoring and evaluation of prophylactic HPV vaccination programmes will be essential for arriving at the most cost-effective strategies for cancer control. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2010 British Society for Immunology.

  10. Monitoring of human papillomavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Dillner, J; Arbyn, M; Unger, E; Dillner, L

    2011-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is a necessary causal factor in the development of cervical cancer. Moreover, HPV, predominately type 16 and to a lesser degree type 18, is linked causally to varying proportions of other anogenital cancers (vulva, vagina, penis, anus) as well as cancers elsewhere in the body (oropharynx, larynx, conjunctiva). HPV types 6 and 11 cause most of genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. Effective prophylactic vaccines have been developed. In this review, we address briefly the immunological aspects of HPV infection and the results of HPV vaccination trials. Internationally standardized monitoring and evaluation of prophylactic HPV vaccination programmes will be essential for arriving at the most cost-effective strategies for cancer control. PMID:21062269

  11. The low-risk papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Doorbar, John

    2017-03-02

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) research has been dominated by the study of a subset of Alpha papillomaviruses that together cause almost 5% of human cancers worldwide, with the focus being on the two most prominent of these (HPV16 and 18). These viruses are referred to as 'high-risk' (hrHPV), to distinguish them from the over 200 prevalent HPV types that more commonly cause only benign epithelial lesions. The 'low-risk' (lrHPV) term used to describe this group belies their cumulative morbidity. Persistent laryngeal papillomas, which occur rarely in children and adults, require regular surgical de-bulking to allow breathing. Such infections are not curable, and despite being caused by HPV11 (a lrHPV) are associated with 1-3% risk of cancer progression if not resolved. Similarly, the ubiquitous Beta HPV types, which commonly cause asymptomatic infections at cutaneous sites, can sometimes cause debilitating papillomatosis with associated cancer risk. Recalcitrant genital warts, which affect 1 in 200 young adults in the general population, and even the ubiquitous common warts and verrucas that most of us at some time experience, cannot be reliably eradicated, with treatment strategies advancing little over the last 100 years. The review highlights molecular similarities between high and low-risk HPV types, and focuses on the different pathways that the two groups use to ensure persistent infection and adequate virus shedding from the epithelial surface. Understanding the normal patterns of viral gene expression that underlie lesion formation, and which also prevent loss of the infected basal cells in established lesions, are particularly important when considering new treatment options. Finally, the common requirement for deregulated viral gene expression and genome persistence in development of cancers, unites both high and low-risk HPV types, and when considered alongside viral protein functions, provides us with a working understanding of the mechanisms that underlie

  12. Epidemiology of oral HPV in the oral mucosa in women without signs of oral disease from Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Losa, María del Refugio; Barrera, Ernesto Soria; Herrera-Pech, Verónica; Conde-Ferráez, Laura; Puerto-Solís, Marylin; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are considered necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, there is no doubt that some types of oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with HR-HPV. The epidemiology of oral HPV infections in healthy subjects remains unclear due to a lack of knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa without pathology. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 390 women seeking prenatal care, Pap smears, family planning or gynecological diseases were studied. Oral cells were collected by direct swab sampling. Information regarding sociodemographic status, sexual behavior, infectious diseases, contraceptive history and tobacco and alcohol consumption were obtained through direct interviews. HPV and genotypes were detected by type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 14% of the women studied had an oral HPV infection. Women ≤ 20 years of age had the highest HPV prevalence (24.5%). In total, seven genotypes were identified, including the high-risk genotypes 16, 18, 58 and 59 and the low-risk genotypes 6, 81 and 13, the latter of which is a type exclusive to oral mucosa. Sexual behavior was not associated with the presence of genital HPV types in the oral mucosa. Genital HPV types were present in the oral mucosa of women without associated clinical manifestations; however, sexual behavior was not associated with infection, and therefore others routes of transmission should be explored. PMID:26221121

  13. Epidemiology of oral HPV in the oral mucosa in women without signs of oral disease from Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Losa, María Del Refugio; Barrera, Ernesto Soria; Herrera-Pech, Verónica; Conde-Ferráez, Laura; Puerto-Solís, Marylin; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are considered necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, there is no doubt that some types of oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with HR-HPV. The epidemiology of oral HPV infections in healthy subjects remains unclear due to a lack of knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa without pathology. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 390 women seeking prenatal care, Pap smears, family planning or gynecological diseases were studied. Oral cells were collected by direct swab sampling. Information regarding sociodemographic status, sexual behavior, infectious diseases, contraceptive history and tobacco and alcohol consumption were obtained through direct interviews. HPV and genotypes were detected by type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 14% of the women studied had an oral HPV infection. Women ≤ 20 years of age had the highest HPV prevalence (24.5%). In total, seven genotypes were identified, including the high-risk genotypes 16, 18, 58 and 59 and the low-risk genotypes 6, 81 and 13, the latter of which is a type exclusive to oral mucosa. Sexual behavior was not associated with the presence of genital HPV types in the oral mucosa. Genital HPV types were present in the oral mucosa of women without associated clinical manifestations; however, sexual behavior was not associated with infection, and therefore others routes of transmission should be explored.

  14. Treatment of an avulsed maxillary permanent central incisor by autotransplantation of a primary canine tooth.

    PubMed

    Sönmez, D; Dalci, K; Tunç, E Sen

    2008-07-01

    To present a case in which an avulsed permanent maxillary central incisor was replaced by autotransplantation of a primary canine tooth. The present case describes transplantation of a primary canine tooth into the space left by an avulsed permanent maxillary central incisor after a delay of several days. After root canal treatment, the primary canine tooth was extracted and placed into the prepared socket. To provide better adaptation of the donor tooth, the recipient alveolar site was remodeled using surgical burs. Semi-rigid splinting was maintained for 15 days. The crown of the primary canine was reshaped with composite resin and with an interim prosthesis, preventing movement of the lateral incisor tooth into the space of the transplanted canine. After 24-month follow-up the autotransplanted primary canine showed ankylosis but the tooth was in an acceptable state. The use of permanent tooth autotransplantation has been well documented. However a literature search revealed only one case report on the autotransplantation of primary teeth. Long term results of primary tooth autotransplantation are scarce but the procedure in this case report could be considered as a temporary space maintainer for the treatment of a patient with a lost permanent incisor under 10 years of age. Success of primary tooth autotransplantation may be affected by several factors, such as case selection, extra oral time, surgical and endodontic procedures.

  15. BRAF Mutations in Canine Cancers.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Kennedy, Katherine; Shapiro, Susan G; Breen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the BRAF gene lead to constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway. Although many human cancers carry the mutated BRAF gene, this mutation has not yet been characterized in canine cancers. As human and canine cancers share molecular abnormalities, we hypothesized that BRAF gene mutations also exist in canine cancers. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced the exon 15 of BRAF, mutation hot spot of the gene, in 667 canine primary tumors and 38 control tissues. Sequencing analysis revealed that a single nucleotide T to A transversion at nucleotide 1349 occurred in 64 primary tumors (9.6%), with particularly high frequency in prostatic carcinoma (20/25, 80%) and urothelial carcinoma (30/45, 67%). This mutation results in the amino acid substitution of glutamic acid for valine at codon 450 (V450E) of canine BRAF, corresponding to the most common BRAF mutation in human cancer, V600E. The evolutional conservation of the BRAF V600E mutation highlights the importance of MAPK pathway activation in neoplasia and may offer opportunity for molecular diagnostics and targeted therapeutics for dogs bearing BRAF-mutated cancers.

  16. Canine leishmaniosis in South America

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2009-01-01

    Canine leishmaniosis is widespread in South America, where a number of Leishmania species have been isolated or molecularly characterised from dogs. Most cases of canine leishmaniosis are caused by Leishmania infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi) and Leishmania braziliensis. The only well-established vector of Leishmania parasites to dogs in South America is Lutzomyia longipalpis, the main vector of L. infantum, but many other phlebotomine sandfly species might be involved. For quite some time, canine leishmaniosis has been regarded as a rural disease, but nowadays it is well-established in large urbanised areas. Serological investigations reveal that the prevalence of anti-Leishmania antibodies in dogs might reach more than 50%, being as high as 75% in highly endemic foci. Many aspects related to the epidemiology of canine leishmaniosis (e.g., factors increasing the risk disease development) in some South American countries other than Brazil are poorly understood and should be further studied. A better understanding of the epidemiology of canine leishmaniosis in South America would be helpful to design sustainable control and prevention strategies against Leishmania infection in both dogs and humans. PMID:19426440

  17. Genomic characterization of two novel reptilian papillomaviruses, Chelonia mydas papillomavirus 1 and Caretta caretta papillomavirus 1.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Lawrence H; Lenz, Jack; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Chen, Zigui; Stacy, Brian A; Wellehan, James F X; Manire, Charles A; Burk, Robert D

    2009-01-05

    In this paper we describe the characterization of the genomes of two sea turtle papillomaviruses, Chelonia mydas PV (CmPV-1) and Caretta caretta PV (CcPV-1). The isolation and sequencing of the first non-avian reptilian PVs extend the evolutionary history of PVs to include all amniotes. PVs have now been described in mammals, birds and non-avian reptiles. The chelonian PVs form a distinct clade most closely related to the avian PVs. Unlike the avian PVs, both chelonian PVs have canonical E6 and E7 ORFs, indicating that these genes were present in the common ancestor to mammalian and non-mammalian amniote PVs. Rates of evolution among the non-mammalian PVs were generally slower than those estimated for mammalian PVs, perhaps due to lower metabolic rates among the ectothermic reptiles.

  18. The potential of plants for the production and delivery of human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Govea-Alonso, Dania O

    2015-07-01

    The available vaccines against human papillomavirus have some limitations such as low coverage due to their high cost, reduced immune coverage and the lack of therapeutic effects. Recombinant vaccines produced in plants (genetically engineered using stable or transient expression systems) offer the possibility to obtain low cost, efficacious and easy to administer vaccines. The status on the development of plant-based vaccines against human papillomavirus is analyzed and placed in perspective in this review. Some candidates have been characterized at a preclinical level with interesting outcomes. However, there is a need to perform the immunological characterization of several vaccine prototypes, especially through the oral administration route, as well as develop new candidates based on new chimeric designs intended to provide broader immunoprotection and therapeutic activity.

  19. Four Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR242511 in Dogs. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-03

    diarrhea. All dogs will have been vaccinated against Page 3 t STUDY MO m REVISED PAGE PlATf. c/c- in BfiUMFTI Contract No.: DAMD17-92-C-2001...Task Order No.: UIC-7J UIC/TRL Study No.: 134 canine distemper, infectious canine hepatitis, leptospirosis, parainfluenza, parvo , oral papilloma

  20. Ciprofloxacin Pharmacokinetics in Clinical Canine Patients.

    PubMed

    Papich, M G

    2017-09-01

    Ciprofloxacin generic tablets approved for human use frequently are administered to dogs for treatment of bacterial infections because they are inexpensive and readily available. However, previous work indicated low and variable oral absorption in healthy research dogs. To examine orally administered ciprofloxacin in a group of clinical canine patients using population pharmacokinetics in order to identify minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) that potentially could be achieved with orally administered ciprofloxacin in dogs. Thirty-four clinical canine patients; mean weight, 22.95 kg (range, 4.6-57 kg). Ciprofloxacin generic tablets intended for human use were administered to dogs in a prospective study (mean dose, 23.5 mg/kg). Sparse blood sampling was used to obtain population pharmacokinetic results with nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. These data were used to estimate a breakpoint for susceptible bacteria. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the probability of target attainment (PTA) for an area under the curve (AUC)/MIC ratio of ≥100, the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target for fluoroquinolones. The values for volume of distribution, peak concentration, and half-life were 10.7 L/kg (11.7%), 1.9 μg/mL (11.66%), and 4.35 hours (7.62%), respectively (mean, % coefficient of variation [CV]). The size of the dog was an important covariate with larger dogs achieving lower plasma drug concentrations than smaller dogs, despite a similar mg/kg dose. Ninety percent PTA was obtained for a MIC ≤ 0.06 μg/mL. A breakpoint (susceptible) of ≤0.06 μg/mL should be considered when ciprofloxacin tablets are administered to dogs at a dose of 25 mg/kg once daily, which is much lower than the breakpoint of ≤1 μg/mL in humans. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. Podoplanin Expression in Canine Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Honma, Ryusuke; Kaneko, Mika K.; Fujii, Yuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    A type I transmembrane protein, podoplanin (PDPN), is expressed in several normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells or pulmonary type I alveolar cells. We recently demonstrated that anticanine PDPN monoclonal antibody (mAb), PMab-38, recognizes canine PDPN of squamous cell carcinomas, but does not react with lymphatic endothelial cells. Herein, we investigated whether PMab-38 reacts with canine melanoma. PMab-38 reacted with 90% of melanoma cells (9/10 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Of interest, PMab-38 stained the lymphatic endothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts in melanoma tissues, although it did not stain any lymphatic endothelial cells in normal tissues. PMab-38 could be useful for uncovering the function of PDPN in canine melanomas. PMID:27918691

  2. Podoplanin Expression in Canine Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Honma, Ryusuke; Kaneko, Mika K; Fujii, Yuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2016-12-01

    A type I transmembrane protein, podoplanin (PDPN), is expressed in several normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells or pulmonary type I alveolar cells. We recently demonstrated that anticanine PDPN monoclonal antibody (mAb), PMab-38, recognizes canine PDPN of squamous cell carcinomas, but does not react with lymphatic endothelial cells. Herein, we investigated whether PMab-38 reacts with canine melanoma. PMab-38 reacted with 90% of melanoma cells (9/10 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Of interest, PMab-38 stained the lymphatic endothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts in melanoma tissues, although it did not stain any lymphatic endothelial cells in normal tissues. PMab-38 could be useful for uncovering the function of PDPN in canine melanomas.

  3. Canine "honing" in Australopithecus afarensis.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L O

    1990-06-01

    The maxillary canines of Australopithecus afarensis show a distal wear facet that extends from the apex of the crown to a point near the distal cingulum. Although these facets bear a superficial resemblance to the honing facets found on the projecting portions of the canines of other anthropoids, a more detailed examination provided in this paper shows that they are not homologous or functionally equivalent. The facets are not related to the use of the maxillary canine as a weapon or as an additional masticatory surface. Instead, their presence in A. afarensis represented a blunting or dulling of the posterior edge of C so that its occlusion with P3 would be consistent with cheek tooth occlusion.

  4. Canine tooth size variability in primates.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, G

    1989-01-01

    I present an analysis of canine tooth size variability in male and female primates. The coefficient of variation (CV = SD X 100/mean) as an index of canine size variability proved to be dependent on mean canine size in males and, to a lower extent, in females. Therefore, variability tends to increase with increasing values of mean canine size. Using residuals from the regression of log SD on log mean canine size in male and female primates, I analysed the contribution of diet, habitat and mating system to canine size variability. Habitat and mating system are known to influence to a certain extent the degree of sexual dimorphism in canine size. Given the well-known relationship between sexual dimorphism and phenotypic variability, it was suggested that these factors might influence variability in canine size. Everything else being equal, males of polygynous species are characterized by more variable canine sizes than males of monogamous species. Habitat and diet did not contribute to the level of variability observed in either males or females. It is proposed that a high level of variability in canine size may be related to the likelihood that enlarged canines evolved as a result of male-male competition for mates in polygynous species.

  5. Canine and feline colostrum.

    PubMed

    Chastant-Maillard, S; Aggouni, C; Albaret, A; Fournier, A; Mila, H

    2016-11-30

    Puppy and kitten survival over the first weeks is particularly dependent on colostrum, a specific secretion of the mammary gland produced during the first 2 days post-partum. Colostrum is a source of nutrients and immunoglobulins. It also contributes to the digestive tract maturation. Colostrum differentiates from milk mainly based on its concentration in immunoglobulins G: 20-30 g/L in dog colostrum, 40-50 g/L in cats' vs <1 g/L in milk. IgG concentration rapidly drops after parturition (-50% in 24 hr). Immune quality of colostrum is highly variable between bitches, with no relationship with maternal blood IgG level, dam's age, breed size or litter size. In addition to systemic immune protection, colostrum also plays a major role for local digestive protection, due to IgA, lysozyme, lactoferrin, white blood cells and various cytokines. Energetic concentration of canine and feline colostrum is not superior to that of mature milk. It depends on colostrum fat concentration and is affected by breed size (higher in breeds <10 kg adult body weight). As puppies and kittens are almost agammaglobulinemic at birth, transfer of IgG from their digestive tract into their bloodstream is crucial for their survival, IgG absorption ending at 12-16 hr after birth. Energetic supply over the two first days of life, as evidenced by growth rate over the two first days of life, also affects risk of neonatal mortality. Early and sufficient suckling of colostrum is thus the very first care to be provided to newborns for their later health and survival.

  6. Canine lymphoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Zandvliet, M

    2016-06-01

    Canine lymphoma (cL) is a common type of neoplasia in dogs with an estimated incidence rate of 20-100 cases per 100,000 dogs and is in many respects comparable to non-Hodgkin lymphoma in humans. Although the exact cause is unknown, environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are thought to play an important role. cL is not a single disease, and a wide variation in clinical presentations and histological subtypes is recognized. Despite this potential variation, most dogs present with generalized lymphadenopathy (multicentric form) and intermediate to high-grade lymphoma, more commonly of B-cell origin. The most common paraneoplastic sign is hypercalcemia that is associated with the T-cell immunophenotype. Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice and a doxorubicin-based multidrug protocol is currently the standard of care. A complete remission is obtained for most dogs and lasts for a median period of 7-10 months, resulting in a median survival of 10-14 months. Many prognostic factors have been reported, but stage, immunophenotype, tumor grade, and response to chemotherapy appear of particular importance. Failure to respond to chemotherapy suggests drug resistance, which can be partly attributed to the expression of drug transporters of the ABC-transporter superfamily, including P-gp and BCRP. Ultimately, most lymphomas will become drug resistant and the development of treatments aimed at reversing drug resistance or alternative treatment modalities (e.g. immunotherapy and targeted therapy) are of major importance. This review aims to summarize the relevant data on cL, as well as to provide an update of the recent literature.

  7. Human Alpha and Beta Papillomaviruses Use Different Synonymous Codon Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Bertotto, Alex; Christensen, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses use rare codons relative to their hosts. It has been theorized that this is a mechanism to allow the virus to escape immune surveillance. In the present study we examined the codings of four major genes of 21 human alpha (mucosatropic) viruses and 16 human beta (cutaneous-tropic) viruses. We compared the codon usage of different genes from a given papillomavirus and also the same genes from different papillomaviruses. Our data showed that codon usage was not always uniform between two genes of a given papillomavirus or between the same genes of papillomaviruses from different genera. We speculate as to why this might be and conclude that codon usage in the papillomaviruses may not only play a role in facilitating escape from immune surveillance but may also underlie some of the unanswered questions in the papillomavirus field. PMID:20157772

  8. Human alpha and beta papillomaviruses use different synonymous codon profiles.

    PubMed

    Cladel, Nancy M; Bertotto, Alex; Christensen, Neil D

    2010-06-01

    Human papillomaviruses use rare codons relative to their hosts. It has been theorized that this is a mechanism to allow the virus to escape immune surveillance. In the present study, we examined the codings of four major genes of 21 human alpha (mucosatropic) viruses and 16 human beta (cutaneous-tropic) viruses. We compared the codon usage of different genes from a given papillomavirus and also the same genes from different papillomaviruses. Our data showed that codon usage was not always uniform between two genes of a given papillomavirus or between the same genes of papillomaviruses from different genera. We speculate as to why this might be and conclude that codon usage in the papillomaviruses may not only play a role in facilitating escape from immune surveillance but may also underlie some of the unanswered questions in the papillomavirus field.

  9. The Papillomavirus Major Capsid Protein L1

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Christopher B.; Day, Patricia M.; Trus, Benes L.

    2013-01-01

    The elegant icosahedral surface of the papillomavirus virion is formed by a single protein called L1. Recombinant L1 proteins can spontaneously self-assemble into a highly immunogenic structure that closely mimics the natural surface of native papillomavirus virions. This has served as the basis for two highly successful vaccines against cancer-causing human papillomaviruses (HPVs). During the viral life cycle, the capsid must undergo a variety of conformational changes, allowing key functions including the encapsidation of the ~8 kb viral genomic DNA, maturation into a more stable state to survive transit between hosts, mediating attachment to new host cells, and finally releasing the viral DNA into the newly infected host cell. This brief review focuses on conserved sequence and structural features that underlie the functions of this remarkable protein. PMID:23800545

  10. Protection against papillomavirus with a polynucleotide vaccine.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, J J; Martinez, D; Jansen, K U; Ellis, R W; Montgomery, D L; Liu, M A

    1996-02-01

    Genital infections with human papillomavirus (HPV) are increasingly recognized as a significant source of human disease; HPV is now implicated in up to 90% of cervical carcinomas. Neutralizing antibodies against papillomaviruses recognize conformational epitopes formed when viral capsid proteins assemble into virions or virus-like particles. Immunization with plasmid DNA encoding the major viral capsid protein L1 was studied as a means of inducing neutralizing antibodies and protection against virus challenge. In a cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) model, immunization with plasmid DNA encoding L1 elicited conformationally specific neutralizing antibodies and provided immunity against papilloma formation upon challenge with CRPV. Immunization with DNA encoding the capsid protein may provide a means of protecting humans against HPV and would simplify the production of multivalent vaccines by combining plasmids that encode the viral capsid proteins of different strains. This may be of importance given the multiplicity of HPV types capable of causing disease.

  11. Global challenges of implementing human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Graham, Janice E; Mishra, Amrita

    2011-06-30

    Human Papillomavirus vaccines are widely hailed as a sweeping pharmaceutical innovation for the universal benefit of all women. The implementation of the vaccines, however, is far from universal or equitable. Socio-economically marginalized women in emerging and developing, and many advanced economies alike, suffer a disproportionately large burden of cervical cancer. Despite the marketing of Human Papillomavirus vaccines as the solution to cervical cancer, the market authorization (licensing) of the vaccines has not translated into universal equitable access. Vaccine implementation for vulnerable girls and women faces multiple barriers that include high vaccine costs, inadequate delivery infrastructure, and lack of community engagement to generate awareness about cervical cancer and early screening tools. For Human Papillomavirus vaccines to work as a public health solution, the quality-assured delivery of cheaper vaccines must be integrated with strengthened capacity for community-based health education and screening.

  12. Global challenges of implementing human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus vaccines are widely hailed as a sweeping pharmaceutical innovation for the universal benefit of all women. The implementation of the vaccines, however, is far from universal or equitable. Socio-economically marginalized women in emerging and developing, and many advanced economies alike, suffer a disproportionately large burden of cervical cancer. Despite the marketing of Human Papillomavirus vaccines as the solution to cervical cancer, the market authorization (licensing) of the vaccines has not translated into universal equitable access. Vaccine implementation for vulnerable girls and women faces multiple barriers that include high vaccine costs, inadequate delivery infrastructure, and lack of community engagement to generate awareness about cervical cancer and early screening tools. For Human Papillomavirus vaccines to work as a public health solution, the quality-assured delivery of cheaper vaccines must be integrated with strengthened capacity for community-based health education and screening. PMID:21718495

  13. Human papillomaviruses-related cancers

    PubMed Central

    Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin; Al-Awadhi, Rana; Missaoui, Nabiha; Adam, Ishag; Durusoy, Raika; Ghabreau, Lina; Akil, Nizar; Ahmed, Hussain Gadelkarim; Yasmeen, Amber; Alsbeih, Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are estimated to be the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Meanwhile, it is well established that infection by high-risk HPVs is considered the major cause of cervical cancer since more than 96% of these cancers are positive for high-risk HPVs, especially types 16 and 18. Moreover, during the last 2 decades, numerous studies pointed-out the possible involvement of high-risk HPV in several human carcinomas including head and neck, colorectal and breast cancers. The association between high-risk HPVs and cervical cancer and potentially other human malignancies would necessitate the introduction of vaccines which were generated against the 2 most frequent high-risk HPVs (types 16 and 18) worldwide, including the Middle East (ME) as well as North African countries. The presence of high-risk HPVs in the pathogenesis of human cancers in the ME, which is essential in order to evaluate the importance of vaccination against HPVs, has not been fully investigated yet. In this review, we present an overview of the existing epidemiological evidence regarding the presence of HPV in human cancers in the ME and the potential impact of vaccination against HPV infections and its outcome on human health in this region. PMID:25424787

  14. Bovine papillomavirus isolation by ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Araldi, R P; Giovanni, D N S; Melo, T C; Diniz, N; Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J; Sant'Ana, T A; Carvalho, R F; Beçak, W; Stocco, R C

    2014-11-01

    The bovine papillomavirus (BPV) is the etiological agent of bovine papillomatosis, which causes significant economic losses to livestock, characterized by the presence of papillomas that regress spontaneously or persist and progress to malignancy. Currently, there are 13 types of BPVs described in the literature as well as 32 putative new types. This study aimed to isolate viral particles of BPV from skin papillomas, using a novel viral isolation method. The virus types were previously identified with new primers designed. 77 cutaneous papilloma samples of 27 animals, Simmental breed, were surgically removed. The DNA was extracted and subjected to PCR using Delta-Epsilon and Xi primers. The bands were purified and sequenced. The sequences were analyzed using software and compared to the GenBank database, by BLAST tool. The viral typing showed a prevalence of BPV-2 in 81.81% of samples. It was also detected the presence of the putative new virus type BR/UEL2 in one sample. Virus isolation was performed by ultracentrifugation in a single density of cesium chloride. The method of virus isolation is less laborious than those previously described, allowing the isolation of complete virus particles of BPV-2.

  15. Human papillomaviruses and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Smola, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect squamous epithelia and can induce hyperproliferative lesions. More than 120 different HPV types have been characterized and classified into five different genera. While mucosal high-risk HPVs have a well-established causal role in anogenital carcinogenesis, the biology of cutaneous HPVs is less well understood. The clinical relevance of genus beta-PV infection has clearly been demonstrated in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare inherited disease associated with ahigh rate of skin cancer. In the normal population genus beta-PV are suspected to have an etiologic role in skin carcinogenesis as well but this is still controversially discussed. Their oncogenic potency has been investigated in mouse models and in vitro. In 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the genus beta HPV types 5 and 8 as "possible carcinogenic" biological agents (group 2B) in EV disease. This chapter will give an overview on the knowns and unknowns of infections with genus beta-PV and discuss their potential impact on skin carcinogenesis in the general population.

  16. Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Eileen M.

    2003-01-01

    Of the many types of human papillomavirus (HPV), more than 30 infect the genital tract. The association between certain oncogenic (high-risk) strains of HPV and cervical cancer is well established. Although HPV is essential to the transformation of cervical epithelial cells, it is not sufficient, and a variety of cofactors and molecular events influence whether cervical cancer will develop. Early detection and treatment of precancerous lesions can prevent progression to cervical cancer. Identification of precancerous lesions has been primarily by cytologic screening of cervical cells. Cellular abnormalities, however, may be missed or may not be sufficiently distinct, and a portion of patients with borderline or mildly dyskaryotic cytomorphology will have higher-grade disease identified by subsequent colposcopy and biopsy. Sensitive and specific molecular techniques that detect HPV DNA and distinguish high-risk HPV types from low-risk HPV types have been introduced as an adjunct to cytology. Earlier detection of high-risk HPV types may improve triage, treatment, and follow-up in infected patients. Currently, the clearest role for HPV DNA testing is to improve diagnostic accuracy and limit unnecessary colposcopy in patients with borderline or mildly abnormal cytologic test results. PMID:12525422

  17. First report: Yersinia enterocolitica recovered from canine tonsils.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brenda P; Drummond, Niall; Ringwood, Tamara; O'Sullivan, Edmund; Buckley, James F; Whyte, Paul; Prentice, Mike B; Fanning, Séamus

    2010-12-15

    Yersinia enterocolitica (Y. enterocolitica) is a known zoonotic pathogen and is often found in pig tonsils as the primary site of colonisation. In this study we investigated whether or not Y. enterocolitica could be recovered from canine tonsils. During a study on the prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in animal populations in Ireland, 144 canine tonsils and 72 canine rectal swabs were procured over a ten-month period and subjected to microbiological examination for the presence of this human pathogen. Molecular methods were used to determine virulence and all strains were negative for the chromosomally mediated virulence factor (ail) and plasmid-encoded adhesion molecule (pYad). Y. enterocolitica was recovered from 25 of 216 (12%) samples. Twenty-four strains were from tonsils along with one from a rectal swab. All were biotype 1A. Antimicrobial resistance profiling showed two of 25 (8%) were resistant to cephalothin and the remaining strains were resistant to ampicillin and cephalothin with six of these additionally resistant to streptomycin. Our evidence that a human pathogen may be harboured in the oral cavity of dogs' adds a new dimension to the epidemiology of this organism, identifying a potential public health risk following exposure to dogs.

  18. Interspecies dynamics among bacteria associated with canine periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Sanguansermsri, P; Nobbs, A H; Jenkinson, H F; Surarit, R

    2017-09-28

    The etiology and pathogenic mechanisms associated with canine periodontal disease are less well understood than the disease in humans. In this study we have reconstructed defined consortia biofilms in vitro of microorganisms identified as prevalent in a same-breed cohort of dogs with or without periodontal disease. Frederiksenia canicola and Neisseria canis were selected as potential early colonizers of salivary pellicle, and Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gulae were included as high incidence canine oral bacteria. N. canis formed a biofilm substratum under aerobic conditions, but was unable to tolerate anaerobic conditions. Fr. canicola exhibited synergistic biofilm growth with P. gulae under anaerobic conditions, but displayed an antagonistic relationship with F. nucleatum. However, strong co-adhesion between F. nucleatum and P. gulae was able to overcome the inhibitory effects of Fr. canicola to facilitate three-species biofilm formation. Parvimonas micra, an anaerobic, asaccharolytic Gram-positive coccus found only under disease conditions in vivo, was able to form biofilms in conjunction with Fr. canicola and P. gulae. Furthermore, the specific proteolytic activities of biofilms containing Fr. canicola and P. gulae or F. nucleatum and P. gulae were several-fold increased upon the addition of Pa. micra. This suggests that anaerobic cocci such as Pa. micra might provide a catalyst for progressive tissue destruction, inflammation, and alveolar bone loss in canine periodontal disease, in keeping with the keystone-pathogen hypothesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic alterations by human papillomaviruses in oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazo, P A; Gallego, M I; Ballester, S; Feduchi, E

    1992-03-30

    The integration sites in the cellular genome of human papillomavirus are located in chromosomal regions always associated with oncogenes or other known tumor phenotypes. Two regions, 8q24 and 12q13, are common to several cases of cervical carcinoma and can have integrated more than one type of papillomavirus DNA. These two chromosomal regions contain several genes implicated in oncogenesis. These observations strongly imply that viral integration sites of DNA tumor viruses can be used as the access point to chromosomal regions where genes implicated in the tumor phenotype are located, a situation similar to that of non-transforming retroviruses.

  20. The Papillomavirus Episteme: a major update to the papillomavirus sequence database

    PubMed Central

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Li, Zhiwen; Xirasagar, Sandhya; Maes, Piet; Kaminsky, David; Liou, David; Sun, Qiang; Kaur, Ramandeep; Huyen, Yentram; McBride, Alison A.

    2017-01-01

    The Papillomavirus Episteme (PaVE) is a database of curated papillomavirus genomic sequences, accompanied by web-based sequence analysis tools. This update describes the addition of major new features. The papillomavirus genomes within PaVE have been further annotated, and now includes the major spliced mRNA transcripts. Viral genes and transcripts can be visualized on both linear and circular genome browsers. Evolutionary relationships among PaVE reference protein sequences can be analysed using multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees. To assist in viral discovery, PaVE offers a typing tool; a simplified algorithm to determine whether a newly sequenced virus is novel. PaVE also now contains an image library containing gross clinical and histopathological images of papillomavirus infected lesions. Database URL: https://pave.niaid.nih.gov/. PMID:28053164

  1. Current developments in canine genetics.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Yvonne; Distl, Ottmar

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, canine genetics had made huge progress. In 1999 the first complete karyotype and ideogram of the dog was published. Several linkage and RH maps followed. Using these maps, sets of microsatellite markers for whole genome scans were compiled. In 2003 the sequencing of the DNA of a female Boxer began. Now the second version of the dog genome assembly has been put online, and recently, a microchip SNP array became available. Parallel to these developments, some causal mutations for different traits have been identified. Most of the identified mutations were responsible for monogenic canine hereditary diseases. With the tools available now, it is possible to use the advantages of the population structure of the various dog breeds to unravel complex genetic traits. Furthermore, the dog is a suitable model for the research of a large number of human hereditary diseases and particularly for cancer genetics, heart and neurodegenerative diseases. There are some examples where it was possible to benefit from the knowledge of canine genetics for human research. The search for quantitative trait loci (QTL), the testing of candidate genes and genome-wide association studies can now be performed in dogs. QTL for skeletal size variations and for canine hip dysplasia have been already identified and for these complex traits the responsible genes and their possible interactions can now be identified.

  2. Septic shock in canine babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Matijatko, Vesna; Kis, Ivana; Torti, Marin; Brkljacić, Mirna; Kucer, Nada; Rafaj, Renata Barić; Grden, Darko; Zivicnjak, Tanja; Mrljak, Vladimir

    2009-06-10

    The records of all canine patients (86) that had been diagnosed with babesiosis and that were admitted to the Clinic for Internal Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Zagreb from January 2007 to December 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. All dogs that had been diagnosed with canine babesiosis and that had systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) followed by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), and refractory hypotension, were included in this study. Of 86 patients diagnosed with canine babesiosis that were admitted during the study period, 10 had evidence of septic shock and were included in this study. Seven of the 10 dogs had a level of parasitaemia above 1%, with the highest level being 20.2%, seven of the 10 dogs were anaemic and three of the 10 dogs were leucopoenic. Thrombocytopenia was present in nine dogs. Hypoglycaemia was noted in two dogs, and bilirubinaemia in nine dogs. Four patients had involvement of two organs, five had involvement of three organs, and one had involvement of four organs. The organ that was most frequently involved was the kidney (nine cases). Central nervous system dysfunction was the rarest complication noted (one case). The mortality rate in non-septic shock canine babesiosis was 2.6%. All dogs that developed septic shock died between the first and the fourth day after admission. The 100% mortality rate that is reported here reflects the fact that in cases in which progression of the inflammatory response leads to the development of septic shock, an unfavourable outcome should be expected.

  3. The Duration of Immunity to an Inactivated Adjuvanted Canine Parvovirus Vaccine. A 52 and 64 Week Postvaccination Challenge Study

    PubMed Central

    Povey, R. C.; Carman, P. S.; Ewert, E.

    1983-01-01

    Dogs were successfully isolated for a period of either 52 or 64 weeks following vaccination with an inactivated, adjuvanted canine parvovirus-2 vaccine. Antibody persisted in all ten vaccinated dogs, although in one case by 52 weeks postvaccination only virus neutralizing antibody, and not hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody, could be detected. Sentinel unvaccinated dogs housed alongside the vaccinated dogs throughout the study remained free of canine parvovirus-2 antibody until challenged. Upon oral challenge with canine parvovirus-2 infected material all unvaccinated dogs developed one or more signs of canine parvovirus-2 disease, shed virus and developed antibody. None of the vaccinated dogs became overtly sick. Of the five vaccinated dogs challenged 52 weeks after vaccination, three shed virus and one showed a significant rise in antibody. At 64 weeks after vaccination only one of the five challenged dogs shed virus and showed a boost in antibody titer. PMID:17422291

  4. Avian papillomaviruses: the parrot Psittacus erithacus papillomavirus (PePV) genome has a unique organization of the early protein region and is phylogenetically related to the chaffinch papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Tachezy, Ruth; Rector, Annabel; Havelkova, Marta; Wollants, Elke; Fiten, Pierre; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Jenson, A Bennett; Sundberg, John P; Van Ranst, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Background An avian papillomavirus genome has been cloned from a cutaneous exophytic papilloma from an African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus). The nucleotide sequence, genome organization, and phylogenetic position of the Psittacus erithacus papillomavirus (PePV) were determined. This PePV sequence represents the first complete avian papillomavirus genome defined. Results The PePV genome (7304 basepairs) differs from other papillomaviruses, in that it has a unique organization of the early protein region lacking classical E6 and E7 open reading frames. Phylogenetic comparison of the PePV sequence with partial E1 and L1 sequences of the chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs) papillomavirus (FPV) reveals that these two avian papillomaviruses form a monophyletic cluster with a common branch that originates near the unresolved center of the papillomavirus evolutionary tree. Conclusions The PePV genome has a unique layout of the early protein region which represents a novel prototypic genomic organization for avian papillomaviruses. The close relationship between PePV and FPV, and between their Psittaciformes and Passeriformes hosts, supports the hypothesis that papillomaviruses have co-evolved and speciated together with their host species throughout evolution. PMID:12110158

  5. Ontogeny of canine dimorphism in extant hominoids.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, G T; Dean, C

    2001-07-01

    Many behavioral and ecological factors influence the degree of expression of canine dimorphism for different reasons. Regardless of its socioecological importance, we know virtually nothing about the processes responsible for the development of canine dimorphism. Our aim here is to describe the developmental process(es) regulating canine dimorphism in extant hominoids, using histological markers of tooth growth. Teeth preserve a permanent record of their ontogeny in the form of short- and long-period incremental markings in both enamel and dentine. We selected 52 histological sections of sexed hominoid canine teeth from a total sample of 115, from which we calculated the time and rate of cuspal enamel formation and the rate at which ameloblasts differentiate along the future enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) to the end of crown formation. Thus, we were able to reconstruct longitudinal growth curves for height attainment in male and female hominoid canines. Male hominoids consistently take longer to form canine crowns than do females (although not significantly so for our sample of Homo). Male orangutans and gorillas occasionally take up to twice as long as females to complete enamel formation. The mean ranges of female canine crown formation times are similar in Pan, Gorilla, and Pongo. Interspecific differences between female Pan canine crown heights and those of Gorilla and Pongo, which are taller, result from differences in rates of growth. Differences in canine crown heights between male Pan and the taller, more dimorphic male Gorilla and Pongo canines result both from differences in total time taken to form enamel and from faster rates of growth in Gorilla and Pongo. Although modern human canines do not emerge as significantly dimorphic in this study, it is well-known that sexual dimorphism in canine crown height exists. Larger samples of sexed modern human canines are therefore needed to identify clearly what underlies this.

  6. HPV Vaccine Slashes Rates of Oral Infection.

    PubMed

    2017-07-01

    Vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) reduces the prevalence of oral infection by an estimated 88% among young adults in the United States, a protection that could help reduce rates of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers, according to data that will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL. However, the population-level benefit will remain low unless more people get vaccinated. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Genomic characterization of Felis catus papillomavirus-3: a novel papillomavirus detected in a feline Bowenoid in situ carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; Dunowska, Magda; Hills, Simon F; Laurie, Rebecca E

    2013-08-30

    There is increasing evidence that papillomaviruses (PVs) may cause skin cancer in cats. Neoplasms most frequently contain Felis domesticus PV type 2 (FdPV-2) DNA, but other PV DNA sequences have also been detected suggesting multiple PVs could cause disease. One of these sequences, FdPV-MY2, was previously detected in 5 of a series of 70 feline skin cancers. The aim was to determine the genome sequence of this PV. Using the circular nature of PV DNA, 'outward facing' primers specific for FdPV-MY2 were designed and amplified a 7300 bp length of DNA from a feline Bowenoid in situ carcinoma (BISC) that showed microscopic evidence of a viral etiology and tested positive for FdPV-MY2 DNA. The PCR product was sequenced using next generation sequencing technology. The full genomic sequence of the virus, comprising 7583 bp, was assembled and analyzed. As this is the third PV from a domestic cat, the virus was designated Felis catus PV type 3 (FcaPV-3). Consistent with other PVs, the putative coding regions of FcaPV-3 were predicted to produce 6 early proteins and 2 late ones. Classification was difficult as the virus contained over 60% nucleotide similarity within the ORF L1 with PVs from 3 different genera. However, based on phylogenetic analysis of ORF L1, FcaPV-3 was most closely related to the tau-PVs CPV-2 and CPV-7. As FcaPV-3 has over 60% nucleotide similarity with the ORF L1 of both tau-PVs, it is proposed that FcaPV-3 is classified in the genus Taupapillomavirus and is the first non-canine PV in this genus.

  8. Prevalence of papillomavirus in Brazil: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Colpani, Verônica; Bidinotto, Augusto Bacelo; Falavigna, Maicon; Giozza, Silvana Pereira; Benzaken, Adele Schwartz; Pimenta, Cristina; Maranhão, Ana Goretti Kalume; Domingues, Carla Magda Allan Santos; Hammes, Luciano Serpa; Wendland, Eliana M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a cause of premalignant and malignant cancer in the lower genital and digestive tracts. In Brazil, there have been no prevalence studies that included a nationwide sample, and the prevalence of HPV has not been determined in many regions. Methods We will search the EMBASE, LILACS, MEDLINE, Web of Science and SciELO databases and previously published review articles to identify original research articles assessing HPV prevalence of the perineal (cervical, penile and anal) and oral areas. No exclusion criteria related to language or publication date will apply. 2 reviewers will independently screen for eligibility and perform data extraction. Discrepancies will be resolved through consensus; the opinion of a third reviewer will be sought as necessary. Relevant measures and data about study and population characteristics will be extracted from the included studies. Where possible, study prevalence will be pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the studies will be assessed using an adapted version of the NIH ‘Quality Assessment Tool for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies’. The overall quality of evidence will be assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). Ethics and dissemination We expect to estimate the prevalence of perineal and oral HPV infection in the general population as well as the prevalence of HPV infection in individuals with premalignant and malignant lesions in Brazil and its 5 geographic regions. This systematic review does not require ethical approval. Trial registration number CRD42016032751. PMID:27881522

  9. Comparative analysis of clinical and experimental methods for determination of sexual dimorphism of mandibular canines.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bindu; Gorea, R K; Gorea, Abhinav; Gorea, Arshdeep

    2016-11-01

    The identification of gender is of significance in case of major disasters where bodies are often damaged beyond recognition Teeth are the hardest and chemically the most stable structure in the body. Moreover teeth show signs of least amount of changes in morphology and are easily accessible for examination. Therefore teeth are a first-rate material for genetic and forensic investigations. Out of all the teeth mandibular canines are considered as the "key teeth" for personal identification. Many studies have not been conducted simultaneously intra-orally and on the dental casts to establish the sexual dimorphism in the mandibular canines. The present study was undertaken in north Indian population to check the significance of intraoral measurements - mesio distal width and inter-canine distance as compared with the measurements on the dental casts. The study revealed that both the methods were equally reliable in gender determination.

  10. Novel diabetes mellitus treatment: mature canine insulin production by canine striated muscle through gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Niessen, S J M; Fernandez-Fuente, M; Mahmoud, A; Campbell, S C; Aldibbiat, A; Huggins, C; Brown, A E; Holder, A; Piercy, R J; Catchpole, B; Shaw, J A M; Church, D B

    2012-07-01

    Muscle-targeted gene therapy using insulin genes has the potential to provide an inexpensive, low maintenance alternative or adjunctive treatment method for canine diabetes mellitus. A canine skeletal muscle cell line was established through primary culture, as well as through transdifferentiation of canine fibroblasts after infection with a myo-differentiation gene containing adenovirus vector. A novel mutant furin-cleavable canine preproinsulin gene insert (cppI4) was designed and created through de novo gene synthesis. Various cell lines, including the generated canine muscle cell line, were transfected with nonviral plasmids containing cppI4. Insulin and desmin immunostaining were used to prove insulin production by muscle cells and specific canine insulin ELISA to prove mature insulin secretion into the medium. The canine myoblast cultures proved positive on desmin immunostaining. All cells tolerated transfection with cppI4-containing plasmid, and double immunostaining for insulin and desmin proved present in the canine cells. Canine insulin ELISA assessment of medium of cppI4-transfected murine myoblasts and canine myoblast and fibroblast mixture proved presence of mature fully processed canine insulin, 24 and 48 h after transfection. The present study provides proof of principle that canine muscle cells can be induced to produce and secrete canine insulin on transfection with nonviral plasmid DNA containing a novel mutant canine preproinsulin gene that produces furin-cleavable canine preproinsulin. This technology could be developed to provide an alternative canine diabetes mellitus treatment option or to provide a constant source for background insulin, as well as C-peptide, alongside current treatment options.

  11. Lichenoid drug eruption after human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Laschinger, Mary E; Schleichert, Rachel A; Green, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Lichenoid drug reactions have been linked to a long and growing list of medications, most of which are used mainly in adults, making these reactions exceedingly rare in children. To the best of our knowledge, this case report is the first of a lichenoid drug eruption in a child after human papillomavirus vaccination.

  12. Conserved Features in Papillomavirus and Polyomavirus Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Belnap, David M.; Olson, Norman H.; Cladel, Nancy M.; Newcomb, William W.; Brown, Jay C.; Kreider, John W.; Christensen, Neil D.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Capsids of papilloma and polyoma viruses (papovavirus family) are composed of 72 pentameric capsomeres arranged on a skewed icosahedral lattice (triangulation number of seven, T = 7). Cottontail rabbit papillo mavirus (CRPV) was reported previously to be a T = 7laevo (left-handed) structure, whereas human wart virus, simian virus 40, and murine polyomavirus were shown to be T = 7dextro (right-handed). The CRPV structure determined by cryoelectron microscopy and image reconstruction was similar to previously determined structures of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) and human papillomavirus type 1 (HPV-1). CRPV capsids were observed in closed (compact) and open (swollen) forms. Both forms have star-shaped capsomeres, as do BPV-1 and HPV-1, but the open CRPV capsids are ~2 nm larger in radius. The lattice hands of all papillomaviruses examined in this study were found to be T = 7dextro. In the region of maximum contact, papillomavirus capsomeres interact in a manner similar to that found in polyomaviruses. Although papilloma and polyoma viruses have differences in capsid size (~60 versus ~50 nm), capsomere morphology (11 to 12 nm star-shaped versus 8 nm barrel-shaped), and intercapsomere interactions (slightly different contacts between capsomeres), papovavirus capsids have a conserved, 72-pentamer, T = 7dextro structure. These features are conserved despite significant differences in amino acid sequences of the major capsid proteins. The conserved features may be a consequence of stable contacts that occur within capsomeres and flexible links that form among capsomeres. PMID:8656427

  13. Replication and Assembly of Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Conway, M.J.; Meyers, C.

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small dsDNA tumor viruses, which are the etiologic agents of most cervical cancers and are associated with a growing percentage of oropharyngeal cancers. The HPV capsid is non-enveloped, having a T=7 icosahedral symmetry formed via the interaction among 72 pentamers of the major capsid protein, L1. The minor capsid protein L2 associates with L1 pentamers, although it is not known if each L1 pentamer contains a single L2 protein. The HPV life cycle strictly adheres to the host cell differentiation program, and as such, native HPV virions are only produced in vivo or in organotypic “raft” culture. Research producing synthetic papillomavirus particles—such as virus-like particles (VLPs), papillomavirus-based gene transfer vectors, known as pseudovirions (PsV), and papillomavirus genome-containing quasivirions (QV)—has bypassed the need for stratifying and differentiating host tissue in viral assembly and has allowed for the rapid analysis of HPV infectivity pathways, transmission, immunogenicity, and viral structure. PMID:19407149

  14. Four historic legends in human papillomaviruses research.

    PubMed

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infection and HPVs-associated lesions, including skin warts in children and adults and cervical neoplasia in women, have been excessively studied since ancient years. In our article, we present briefly four major researchers from the HPVs pre-vaccination historic period: Hippokrates the Asclepiad, Domenico Antonio Rigoni-Stern, George N. Papanicolaou and Harald zur Hausen.

  15. Human Papillomavirus: A Catalyst to a Killer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Alice

    2005-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most prevalent and widespread sexually transmitted disease and is responsible for almost all cases of cervical cancer worldwide. However, HPV has received little public health attention, is not a reportable STD, and often is absent from the repertoire of STDs. In addition, there is pervasive misinformation…

  16. Ancillary Studies in Determining Human Papillomavirus Status of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cantley, Richard L.; Gabrielli, Eleonora; Montebelli, Francesco; Cimbaluk, David; Gattuso, Paolo; Petruzzelli, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and pharynx represents the sixth most common form of malignancy worldwide. A significant proportion of these cases are related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. In general, HPV-associated SCC is more commonly nonkeratinizing and poorly differentiated, whereas non-HPV-associated SCC is typically keratinizing and moderately differentiated. Nevertheless, significant overlap in morphology is seen between these two forms of SCC. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the utility of ancillary studies in the establishment of HPV status of oropharyngeal SCC, including p16 immunohistochemistry, high-risk HPV in situ hybridization, polymerase chain reaction, and newer HPV detection modalities. PMID:21772959

  17. Thirteen Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR238605 with a Thirteen Week Recovery Period in Dogs. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-11

    upon arrival for fleas, lice, and ticks. All dogs were previously vaccinated by the animal supplier against canine distemper, infectious canine...hepatitis, oral papilloma, leptospirosis, parainfluenza, parvo and rabies. Blood samples were collected within three days of arrival for quarantine

  18. Effect of Glucosamine Sulfate on Osteoarthritis in the Cruciate-Deficient Canine Model of Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Wolfram; Hornung, Christian; Cramer, Christopher; Schroeder, Malte; Hoffmann, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Objective Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability worldwide. The investigation of disease-modifying treatment options for OA has become an important aspect of orthopedic care. To assess the effect of intra-articular and oral glucosamine sulfate (GS) versus placebo on osteoarthritis in a canine model. Materials In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study, OA was induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) according to the Pond-Nuki model in 32 canines. All canines were allocated into 4 treatment subgroups with treatment administered for 8 weeks: GS (400 mg) intra-articular, placebo intra-articular, GS (200 mg/kg body weight) oral, and placebo oral. The contralateral nonoperated stifle (knee) served as control. After 8 weeks, the medial and lateral femoral condyles, the medial and lateral tibial plateau and patella were histologically examined and anatomic changes quantified by light microscopy using the modified Mankin score. Results After 8 weeks, mean Mankin score values significantly ( P < 0.002) decreased in the intra-articular GS group (8.1; range 7.9-8.8) compared with the intra-articular placebo group (13.9; range 11.6-15.9) and again significantly ( P < 0.002) in the oral GS group (12.1; range 9.9-12.7) compared with the oral placebo group (15.1; range 12.5-17.0). Mean Mankin score values were significantly ( P < 0.002) lower in the intra-articular GS group compared with the oral GS group. Conclusion Both, intra-articular and oral administered GS significantly reduced histological signs of OA in the Pond-Nuki model, with the intra-articular application being more effective compared to oral administration.

  19. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  20. Proteomic Approaches to the Study of Papillomavirus-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    White, Elizabeth A.; Howley, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of interactions between viral and host cellular proteins has provided major insights into papillomavirus research, and these interactions are especially relevant to the role of papillomaviruses in the cancers with which they are associated. Recent advances in mass spectrometry technology and data processing now allow the systematic identification of such interactions. This has led to an improved understanding of the different pathologies associated with the many papillomavirus types, and the diverse nature of these viruses is reflected in the spectrum of interactions with host proteins. Here we review a history of proteomic approaches, particularly as applied to the papillomaviruses, and summarize current techniques. Current proteomic studies on the papillomaviruses use yeast-two-hybrid or affinity purification-mass spectrometry approaches. We detail the advantages and disadvantages of each and describe current examples of papillomavirus proteomic studies, with a particular focus on the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins. PMID:23217616

  1. Field clinical study evaluating the efficacy and safety of an oral formulation containing milbemycin oxime/praziquantel (Milbemax®, Novartis Animal Health) in the chemoprevention of the zoonotic canine infection by Dirofilaria repens.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Angela; Braun, Gabriele; Di Giulio, Emanuela; Paoletti, Barbara; Aquilino, Vincenzo; Bartolini, Roberto; La Torre, Francesco; Meloni, Silvana; Drake, Jason; Pandolfi, Federico; Avolio, Stefania; Traversa, Donato

    2014-07-29

    Dirofilaria repens is the causative agent of subcutaneous dirofilariosis of dogs, other animals and humans. This nematode is transmitted by mosquitoes of Aedes, Anopheles and Culex genera. In dogs, the parasite may cause subclinical infection or cutaneous signs. Recently, D. repens has emerged and spread in different geographical areas, with an increase of cases in dogs and humans. Chemoprevention in dogs in endemic areas is the most reliable approach for controlling this infection. This paper describes a randomized, blocked and multicentric clinical field study investigating the efficacy of an oral, chewable formulation containing milbemycin oxime/praziquantel (Milbemax®, Novartis Animal Health) in the chemoprevention of subcutaneous dirofilariosis in dogs. This study was conducted in endemic areas of Italy. A total of 249 dogs, at two sites, negative for D. repens, were allocated into two groups (i.e. Treated -T1 vs Untreated-T2) with a ratio of 1:1, and subjected to clinical visits and blood sampling once monthly until the end of the study. All blood samples were microscopically and genetically examined. Animals belonging to T1 group received a minimum target dose of 0.5 mg/kg bodyweight of milbemycin oxime and 5 mg/kg of praziquantel in commercial tablets (Milbemax®) according body weight once every 4 weeks. Animals of group T2 were not treated with Milbemax® but received, when necessary, specific parasiticide treatments. The study duration was 336 ± 2 days for each dog. A total of 219 dogs completed the study (i.e. 111 in T1 and 108 in T2), while 30 dogs (i.e. 13 in T1, 17 in T2) were withdrawn for a variety of reasons unrelated to administration of Milbemax®. The percentages of animals not showing microfilariae of D. repens were 100% (111 animals) in T1 and 94.7% (108 animals out of 114) in group T2. Milbemax® was shown to be safe in treated dogs. The results of this study confirm that the monthly use of Milbemax® in dogs is effective and safe for the

  2. Canine histiocytic neoplasia: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Fulmer, Amanda K.; Mauldin, Glenna E.

    2007-01-01

    Canine histiocytic neoplasms include cutaneous histiocytoma, as well as localized and disseminated histiocytic sarcoma. These tumors have variable biologic behavior, although the malignant disorders often have a poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry plays an essential role in differentiating histiocytic tumors from other neoplasias that may have similar histological appearances. This allows a definitive diagnosis to be established and provides a more accurate prediction of prognosis. This article reviews the biologic behavior, diagnosis, and treatment of histiocytic tumors in the dog. PMID:17987966

  3. Papillomavirus DNA replication - From initiation to genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Kadaja, Meelis; Silla, Toomas; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2009-02-20

    Papillomaviruses establish their productive life cycle in stratified epithelium or mucosa, where the undifferentiated proliferating keratinocytes are the initial targets for the productive viral infection. Papillomaviruses have evolved mechanisms to adapt to the normal cellular growth control pathways and to adjust their DNA replication and maintenance cycle to contend with the cellular differentiation. We provide overview of the papillomavirus DNA replication in the differentiating epithelium and describe the molecular interactions important for viral DNA replication on all steps of the viral life cycle.

  4. Characterization of canine neutrophil granules.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, R T; Andersen, B R

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate distinct populations of canine neutrophil granules and to compare them with neutrophil granules from other species. Size, shape, density, and content of canine neutrophil granules were determined. Neutrophils obtained by Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation were homogenized, and granule populations were separated by isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient (rho, 1.14 to 1.22 g/ml). The most dense granule population (rho, 1.197 g/ml) contained all of the myeloperoxidase, beta-glucuronidase, and elastase, more than half of the acid beta-glycerophosphatase, and most of the lysozyme. The population with intermediate density (rho, 1.179 g/ml) contained lactoferrin, vitamin B12-binding protein, and the remainder of the acid beta-glycerophosphatase and lysozyme. The least dense granule population did not contain a major peak of any of the enzymes or binding proteins tested but was distinguished by density and morphology. The size and shape of the granules were determined from scanning electron micrographs and assessment of shape was aided by transmission electron micrographs. By these methods three populations of canine neutrophil granules were characterized and named: myeloperoxidase granules, vitamin B12-binding protein granules, and low-density granules. Images PMID:6292095

  5. Genome Sequence of Canine Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Konstantinos V.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; McDonald, Michael; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Davison, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Canine herpesvirus is a widespread alphaherpesvirus that causes a fatal haemorrhagic disease of neonatal puppies. We have used high-throughput methods to determine the genome sequences of three viral strains (0194, V777 and V1154) isolated in the United Kingdom between 1985 and 2000. The sequences are very closely related to each other. The canine herpesvirus genome is estimated to be 125 kbp in size and consists of a unique long sequence (97.5 kbp) and a unique short sequence (7.7 kbp) that are each flanked by terminal and internal inverted repeats (38 bp and 10.0 kbp, respectively). The overall nucleotide composition is 31.6% G+C, which is the lowest among the completely sequenced alphaherpesviruses. The genome contains 76 open reading frames predicted to encode functional proteins, all of which have counterparts in other alphaherpesviruses. The availability of the sequences will facilitate future research on the diagnosis and treatment of canine herpesvirus-associated disease. PMID:27213534

  6. Fractal pattern of canine trichoblastoma.

    PubMed

    De Vico, Gionata; Cataldi, Marielda; Maiolino, Paola; Carella, Francesca; Beltraminelli, Stefano; Losa, Gabriele A

    2011-06-01

    To assess by fractal analysis the specific architecture, growth pattern, and tissue distribution that characterize subtypes of canine trichoblastoma, a benign tumor derived from or reduplicating the primitive hair germ of embryonic follicular development. Tumor masks and outlines obtained from immunohistologic images by gray threshold segmentation of epithelial components were analyzed by fractal and conventional morphometry. The fractal dimension [FD] of each investigated case was determined from the slope of the regression line describing the fractal region within a bi-asymptotic curve experimentally established. All tumor masks and outlines obtained by gray threshold segmentation of epithelial components showed fractal self-similar properties that were evaluated by peculiar FDs. However, only masks revealed significantly different FD values, ranging from 1.75 to 1.85, enabling the discrimination of canine trichoblastoma subtypes. The FD data suggest that an iterative morphogenetic process, involving both the air germ and associated dermal papilla, may be responsible of the peculiar tissue architecture of trichoblastoma. The present study emphasized the reliability of fractal analysis in achieving the objective characterization of canine trichoblastoma.

  7. Sewage surveillance reveals the presence of canine GVII norovirus and canine astrovirus in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Lizasoain, A; Tort, L F L; García, M; Gómez, M M; Leite, J P G; Miagostovich, M P; Cristina, J; Berois, M; Colina, R; Victoria, Matías

    2015-11-01

    Canine norovirus (NoV) and astrovirus (AstV) were studied in 20 domestic sewage samples collected in two cities in Uruguay. Four samples were characterized as canine AstV after phylogenetic analysis clustering with strains detected in Italy and Brazil in 2008 and 2012, respectively. One sample was characterized as canine NoV and clustered with a strain detected in Hong Kong and recently classified as GVII. This study shows the occurrence of a canine NoV GVII strain for the first time in the American continent and also warns about possible zoonotic infection, since canine strains were detected in domestic sewage.

  8. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T.; Gatewood, Robert; Mendiola, Paul; Quinata, Katrina; Paulino, Yvette C.

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years) chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether microbial changes

  9. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Brenda Y; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T; Gatewood, Robert; Mendiola, Paul; Quinata, Katrina; Paulino, Yvette C

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years) chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether microbial changes

  10. Self-reported Oral Health, Oral Hygiene, and Oral HPV Infection in At-Risk Women in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Tran, Ly Thi-Hai; Markham, Christine M.; Huynh, Thuy Thi-Thu; Tran, Loi Thi; Pham, Vy Thi-Tuong; Tran, Quan Minh; Hoang, Ngoc Hieu; Hwang, Lu-Yu; Sturgis, Erich Madison

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to examine the relationship between self-reported oral health, oral hygiene practices, and oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among women at risk for sexually transmitted infections in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Study design Convenience and referral sampling methods were used in a clinic-based setting to recruit 126 women aged 18–45 years between August–October 2013. Behavioral factors were self-reported. Oral-rinse samples were tested for HPV DNA of two low-risk and 13 high-risk genotypes. Results A higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with poorer self-rated overall oral health (p=.001), reporting oral lesions/problems in the past year (p=.001), and reporting a tooth loss not because of injury (p=.001). Higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was also associated with two measures of oral hygiene: lower frequencies of toothbrush per day (p=.047) and gargling without toothbrush (p=.037). After adjusting for other factors in multivariable logistic regression models, poorer self-rated overall oral health remained statistically associated with oral HPV infection (p=.042); yet, the frequency of toothbrush per day did not (p=.704). Conclusion Results corroborate the association between self-reported poor oral health and oral HPV infection. The effect of oral hygiene on oral HPV infection remains inconclusive. PMID:26093681

  11. Persistence of viral DNA in the epithelial basal layer suggests a model for papillomavirus latency following immune regression.

    PubMed

    Maglennon, Gareth Adam; McIntosh, Pauline; Doorbar, John

    2011-06-05

    Rabbit oral papillomavirus (ROPV) causes benign and spontaneously regressing oral lesions in rabbits, and is a useful model of disease associated with low-risk human papillomavirus types. Here we have adapted the ROPV system to study papillomavirus latency. Following lesion regression, ROPV DNA persists at the majority of regressed sites at levels substantially lower than those found in productive papillomas. Spliced viral transcripts were also detected. ROPV persistence in the absence of disease could be demonstrated for a year following infection and lesion-regression. This was not associated with completion of the virus life-cycle or new virion production, indicating that ROPV persists in a latent state. Using novel laser capture microdissection techniques, we could show that the site of latency is a subset of basal epithelial cells at sites of previous experimental infection. We hypothesize that these cells are epithelial stem cells and that reactivation of latency may be a source of recurrent disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  13. Early prediction of maxillary canine impaction

    PubMed Central

    Storms, Ann-Sophie; Voet, Martine; Fieuws, Steffen; Willems, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish prediction criteria for maxillary canine impaction in young patients, based on angular and linear measurements on panoramic radiographs. Methods: From 828 records having at least 2 panoramic radiographs, both taken between the ages of 7 and 14 years, with a minimum 1-year and maximum 3-year interval (T1 and T2), a training data set consisting of 30 subjects with unilateral canine impaction (12 males and 18 females) was selected. The patients' mean age was 10.1 years [standard deviation (SD) 1.3 years] at T1 and 11.9 years (SD 1.1 years) at T2. The training data set also consisted of 30 maxillary canines from the contralateral sides and an additional 60 normal erupted canines from 30 subjects. Those 30 subjects of a test data set were selected based on displaying bilateral maxillary canine eruption at T2 and being matched for gender and age with the subjects of the training data set [12 males and 18 females; mean age at T1, 10.1 years (SD 1.3 years) and at T2, 11.1 years (SD 1.2 years)]. Angular and linear measurements were performed separately by two observers on the total study sample at T1. Linear measurements were expressed as a multiplication of the maxillary central incisor width at the non-impacted side. Results: Significant differences for linear and angular measurements and radiographic factors were found between the maxillary impacted canine and erupted maxillary canine. The three best-discriminating parameters were canine to first premolar angle, canine cusp to midline distance and canine cusp to maxillary plane distance. These three parameters were combined in a multiple logistic regression model to calculate the probability of impaction, yielding a high area under the curve (AUC) equal to 0.97 (95% confidence interval: 0.94–0.99), with 90% sensitivity and 94% specificity. Conclusions: Prediction of maxillary canine impaction from a combination of parameters relating to angles and distances measured

  14. Molecular signalling pathways in canine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, C E; York, D; Higgins, R J; LeCouteur, R A; Dickinson, P J

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we determined the expression of key signalling pathway proteins TP53, MDM2, P21, AKT, PTEN, RB1, P16, MTOR and MAPK in canine gliomas using western blotting. Protein expression was defined in three canine astrocytic glioma cell lines treated with CCNU, temozolamide or CPT-11 and was further evaluated in 22 spontaneous gliomas including high and low grade astrocytomas, high grade oligodendrogliomas and mixed oligoastrocytomas. Response to chemotherapeutic agents and cell survival were similar to that reported in human glioma cell lines. Alterations in expression of key human gliomagenesis pathway proteins were common in canine glioma tumour samples and segregated between oligodendroglial and astrocytic tumour types for some pathways. Both similarities and differences in protein expression were defined for canine gliomas compared to those reported in human tumour counterparts. The findings may inform more defined assessment of specific signalling pathways for targeted therapy of canine gliomas.

  15. Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses have not been given high priority in China, although the role of companion animals as reservoirs for zoonotic parasitic diseases has been recognized worldwide. With an increasing number of dogs and cats under unregulated conditions in China, the canine and feline parasitic zoonoses are showing a trend towards being gradually uncontrolled. Currently, canine and feline parasitic zoonoses threaten human health, and cause death and serious diseases in China. This article comprehensively reviews the current status of major canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in mainland China, discusses the risks dogs and cats pose with regard to zoonotic transmission of canine and feline parasites, and proposes control strategies and measures. PMID:22839365

  16. Hypertrophic osteodystrophy preceding canine juvenile cellulitis in an Australian shepherd puppy

    PubMed Central

    Wentzell, Meaghan L.

    2011-01-01

    A 10-week-old intact female Australian shepherd dog was presented sternally recumbent, mildly pyrexic, and painful on long bone palpation of both forelimbs. Based on radiographs she was diagnosed with hypertrophic osteodystrophy. Analgesia was provided with intravenous, oral, and topical medications. Approximately 2 wk later she was presented for facial swelling, regional dermatitis, and lymphadenopathy. Canine juvenile cellulitis was diagnosed and successfully treated. PMID:21731101

  17. Multifocal papillomavirus epithelial hyperplasia: successful treatment with CO2 laser therapy combined with interferon alpha-2b.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Aynur; Anadolu, Rana; Anadolu, Yücel; Ekmekci, Pelin; Gürgey, Erbak; Akay, Nisa

    2003-09-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infections of the oral mucosa presents with various clinical and histopathologic features in relation with the causative HPV type and chronicity and the extent of the infection.1 The entity is known by several names based on histopathologic variations such as focal epithelial hyperplasia, oral florid papillomatosis, verrucous hyperplasia, oral florid verrucosis, and Ackerman's tumor. In recent years, the term multifocal papillomavirus epithelial hyperplasia (MPVEH) has been proposed to define the variant that usually occurs in childhood and is characterized by diffuse confluent papillomatous lesions in the oral mucosa.1 Despite the lesions' benign appearance, early diagnosis and therapy of MPVEH is essential because of its high capacity for progression and its tendency for malign degeneration.

  18. A Case Report of Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia (Heck's disease) with PCR Detection of Human Papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Bora; Gunduz, Kaan; Gunhan, Omer; Ozden, Feyza Otan

    2011-12-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia or Heck's disease, is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by human papillomavirus. The frequency of this disease varies widely from one geographic region to another. In Caucasians there have been only few cases reported. This paper reports a case of focal epithelial hyperplasia and demonstrates the association with HPV subtype 32 through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of PCR products. A 7-year-old Caucasian girl was admitted to our clinic for investigation of multiple oral mucosal lesions in the mouth. Lesion was excised under local anesthesia without any complication. The lesion was diagnosed as focal epithelial hyperplasia according to both clinical and histopathological features. Dental staff should be aware of these kind of lesions and histopathological examination together with a careful clinical observation should be carried out for a definitive diagnosis.

  19. Human papillomavirus and invasive cervical cancer in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Eluf-Neto, J.; Booth, M.; Muñoz, N.; Bosch, F. X.; Meijer, C. J.; Walboomers, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    A hospital-based case-control study was undertaken to examine the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the development of invasive cervical cancer in Brazil. The study included 199 histologically confirmed incident cases and 225 age-frequency-matched controls selected from a wide range of diagnostic categories. A polymerase chain reaction technique was used to detect HPV DNA in cervical specimens collected with spatula and brush. HPV DNA was detected in 84% of the cases compared with 17% of controls. Grouping HPV types 16, 18, 31 and 33, 66% of the cases were positive compared with only 6% of the controls. In addition to HPV, number of sexual partners, early age at first intercourse, parity and duration of oral contraceptive use were significantly associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer. A history of previous Papanicolaou smears was significantly associated with a decreased risk. After adjustment, only presence of HPV DNA, parity and history of previous smears remained as independent risk factors. The adjusted odds ratios of cervical cancer associated with HPV 16, 18, 31, and 33 was 69.7 (95% confidence interval 28.7-169.6) and with unidentified types was 12.0 (5.1-28.5). The very high risks found in this study further implicate this virus in the aetiology of cervical cancer. PMID:8286192

  20. Adolescent Premature Ovarian Insufficiency Following Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Harvey Rodrick Grenville

    2014-01-01

    Three young women who developed premature ovarian insufficiency following quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination presented to a general practitioner in rural New South Wales, Australia. The unrelated girls were aged 16, 16, and 18 years at diagnosis. Each had received HPV vaccinations prior to the onset of ovarian decline. Vaccinations had been administered in different regions of the state of New South Wales and the 3 girls lived in different towns in that state. Each had been prescribed the oral contraceptive pill to treat menstrual cycle abnormalities prior to investigation and diagnosis. Vaccine research does not present an ovary histology report of tested rats but does present a testicular histology report. Enduring ovarian capacity and duration of function following vaccination is unresearched in preclinical studies, clinical and postlicensure studies. Postmarketing surveillance does not accurately represent diagnoses in adverse event notifications and can neither represent unnotified cases nor compare incident statistics with vaccine course administration rates. The potential significance of a case series of adolescents with idiopathic premature ovarian insufficiency following HPV vaccination presenting to a general practice warrants further research. Preservation of reproductive health is a primary concern in the recipient target group. Since this group includes all prepubertal and pubertal young women, demonstration of ongoing, uncompromised safety for the ovary is urgently required. This matter needs to be resolved for the purposes of population health and public vaccine confidence. PMID:26425627

  1. Human papillomavirus (HPV): making the case for 'Immunisation for All'.

    PubMed

    Prue, G; Lawler, M; Baker, P; Warnakulasuriya, S

    2016-08-05

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) contributes to the most common sexually transmitted infections, with repeated and persistent infection with particular types causing disease in both men and women. Infection with low-risk HPV types can lead to genital warts and benign lesions of the oral cavity, while high-risk types can cause various HPV-related malignancies. The incidence of head and neck cancers has been rising in the past number of decades mostly due to oropharyngeal cancer linked to HPV infection. HPV vaccination has been shown to be effective for cervical and other anogenital HPV-related cancers, and there is significant potential for HPV vaccination to prevent oropharyngeal cancers, given that the HPV types implicated in this disease can be protected against by the HPV vaccine. Few countries have implemented a universal HPV vaccination programme for males and females, with many countries arguing that female-only vaccination programmes protect males via herd immunity and that men who have sex with men will be protected via targeted vaccination programmes. We argue these may be limited in their effectiveness. We propose that the most effective, practical, ethical and potentially cost-effective solution is universal HPV vaccination that might lead to control of HPV-related diseases in men and women alike.

  2. Management of human papillomavirus-related head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, A M; Qiu, S; Underbrink, M P

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck malignancies (HNMs) have become a serious health risk over the past 20 years. Despite decreases in non-HPV-related HNMs, the incidence of HPV-related HNMs has skyrocketed, and a new form of tumorigenesis is developing. HPV type 16 is the primary offender, and the majority of these tumors present in the oropharynx, with a smaller proportion in the larynx and oral cavity. While traditionally treated with surgery, the paradigm has shifted to more of a nonoperative chemoradiation therapy approach, with the hope of improving vital functions after therapy. Unfortunately, we continue to see significant dysphagia in these patients after treatment, and work is being done to improve outcomes. With the advent of transoral robotic surgery, we have again been able to reconsider treatment options for these patients, although it has been met with some skepticism and resistance. Here we discuss the scope of HPV-related HNMs, the treatment options and prognosis for the disease, and finally touch upon psychosocial issues related to HPV-related HNMs. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. The interaction between human papillomavirus and other viruses.

    PubMed

    Guidry, J T; Scott, R S

    2017-03-02

    The etiological role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in anogenital tract and head and neck cancers is well established. However, only a low percentage of HPV-positive women develop cancer, indicating that HPV is necessary but not sufficient in carcinogenesis. Several biological and environmental cofactors have been implicated in the development of HPV-associated carcinoma that include immune status, hormonal changes, parity, dietary habits, tobacco usage, and co-infection with other sexually transmissible agents. Such cofactors likely contribute to HPV persistent infection through diverse mechanisms related to immune control, efficiency of HPV infection, and influences on tumor initiation and progression. Conversely, HPV co-infection with other factors may also harbor anti-tumor effects. Here, we review epidemiological and experimental studies investigating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), BK virus (BKV), JC virus (JCV), and adeno-associated virus (AAV) as viral cofactors in or therapeutic factors against the development of genital and oral HPV-associated carcinomas.

  4. Human papillomaviruses and non-melanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E

    2015-04-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect the squamous epithelium and can induce benign and malignant lesions. To date, more than 200 different HPV types have been identified and classified into five genera, α, β, γ, μ, and ν. While high-risk α mucosal HPVs have a well-established role in cervical carcinoma and a significant percentage of other anogenital tract and oral carcinomas, the biology of the cutaneous β HPVs and their contribution to non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has been less studied. Although the association of β HPV infection with NMSC in patients with a rare, genetically determined condition, epidermodysplasia verruciformis has been well established, the role of β HPV infection with NMSC in the normal population remains controversial. In stark contrast to α HPV-associated cancers, the presence of the β HPV genome does not appear to be mandatory for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Moreover, the mechanism of action of the β HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins differs from the β HPV oncoproteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A review of canine pseudocyesis.

    PubMed

    Gobello, C; de la Sota, R L; Goya, R G

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the most relevant features of the physiology, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of canine pseudocyesis (PSC). This is a physiological syndrome, characterized by clinical signs such as: nesting, weight gain, mammary enlargement, lactation and maternal behaviour, which appears in non-pregnant bitches at the end of metaoestrus. PSC is a frequent finding in domestic dogs. Although it is generally admitted that prolactin (PRL) plays a central role in the appearance of PSC, its precise aetiophysiology is not completely understood yet. A number of clinical studies suggest that at some point of metaoestrus circulating PRL levels rise in overtly pseudopregnant bitches. Individual differences in sensitivity to PRL as well as the existence of molecular variants of canine PRL with different bioactivity versus immunoreactivity ratios may help clarify the aetiopathology of PSC. Diagnosis of PSC is based on the presence of typical clinical signs in metaoestrous non-pregnant bitches. Considering that PSC is a self limiting physiological state, mild cases usually need no treatment. Discouraging maternal behaviour and sometimes fitting Elizabethan collars to prevent licking of the mammary glands may suffice in these cases. Sex steroids (oestrogens, progestins and androgens) have been traditionally used to treat PSC but the side-effects usually outweigh the benefits of these medications. Inhibition of PRL release by ergot derivatives [bromocriptine (10-100 microg/kg per day for 10-14 days], cabergoline (5 microg/kg per day during 5-10 days), metergoline (0.2 mg/kg per day during 8-10 days) has proved to be effective for the treatment of canine PSC. Although some of these ergot derivatives present some untoward side-effects, they are transient and can usually be managed. Predisposed bitches not intended for breeding should be spayed as ovariectomy is the only permanent preventive measure.

  6. Concomitant canine distemper, infectious canine hepatitis, canine parvoviral enteritis, canine infectious tracheobronchitis, and toxoplasmosis in a puppy.

    PubMed

    Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo; Fritzen, Juliana Torres Tomazi; Garcia, João Luis; Weissenböck, Herbert; da Silva, Ana Paula; Bodnar, Livia; Okano, Werner; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    The concomitant infections of Canine distemper virus (CDV), Canine adenovirus A types 1 (CAdV-1) and 2 (CAdV-2), Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), and Toxoplasma gondii are described in a 43-day-old mixed-breed puppy. Clinically, there were convulsions and blindness with spontaneous death; 14 siblings of this puppy, born to a 10-month-old dam, which was seropositive (titer: 1,024) for T. gondii, also died. Necropsy revealed unilateral corneal edema (blue eye), depletion of intestinal lymphoid tissue, non-collapsible lungs, congestion of meningeal vessels, and a pale area in the myocardium. Histopathology demonstrated necrotizing myocarditis associated with intralesional apicomplexan protozoa; necrotizing and chronic hepatitis associated with rare intranuclear inclusion bodies within hepatocytes; necrotizing bronchitis and bronchiolitis; interstitial pneumonia associated with eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies within epithelial cells; atrophy and fusion of intestinal villi with cryptal necrosis; and white matter demyelination of the cerebrum and cerebellum associated with intranuclear inclusion bodies within astrocytes. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified the partial fragments (bp) of the CDV N gene (290 bp), CPV-2c VP2 capsid protein gene (583 bp), and CAdV-1 (508 bp) and CAdV-2 (1,030 bp) E gene from urine and tissue samples. The PCR assays demonstrated that the apicomplexan protozoa observed within several organs contained DNA specific for T. gondii; genotyping revealed T. gondii type III. The findings support the characterization of concomitant infections of CDV, CAdV-1, CAdV-2, CPV-2, and T. gondii in this puppy. Further, seroreactivity to T. gondii of the dam in association with the systemic disease observed in the puppy described herein is suggestive of congenital toxoplasmosis.

  7. Canine dysautonomia: two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, P M; Scudamore, C L; Ruppert, C E; Mauchline, S; Simpson, J W

    2002-01-01

    Two clinical cases of canine dysautonomia are described. Two young female neutered dogs were presented with clinical signs including vomiting, diarrhoea, faecal tenesmus, dysphagia and urinary retention. Decreased tear production, dry mucous membranes, bilateral Horner's syndrome, decreased anal sphincter tone and gastrointestinal hypomotility were also observed. Presumptive diagnoses of dysautonomia were made based on the clinical presentation and investigations. Postmortem histopathological examination in one of the cases demonstrated marked depletion of neuronal cell bodies in the intestinal myenteric plexuses and parasympathetic ganglia, confirming the diagnosis in this case. Criteria for aiding the antemortem diagnosis of this rare condition based on clinical observations and diagnostic testing are proposed.

  8. Canine Breed-Specific Hepatopathies.

    PubMed

    Watson, Penny

    2017-05-01

    Canine hepatopathies, both congenital and acquired, arise from an interaction between genes and environment. Many show increased breed prevalences. This article reviews the current understanding on breed predispositions for congenital portosystemic shunts; microvascular dysplasia and portal vein hypoplasia; ductal plate abnormalities (congenital hepatic fibrosis and Caroli disease); chronic hepatitis (both copper associated and idiopathic); vacuolar hepatopathies; and gallbladder mucocele. Although all these diseases can occur in many breeds and crossbreeds, understanding breed predispositions helps recognition and will guide future research to improve understanding of causes and treatments. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Early Canine Plaque Biofilms: Characterization of Key Bacterial Interactions Involved in Initial Colonization of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Holcombe, Lucy J.; Patel, Niran; Colyer, Alison; Deusch, Oliver; O’Flynn, Ciaran; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is a significant problem in dogs affecting between 44% and 63.6% of the population. The main etiological agent for PD is plaque, a microbial biofilm that colonizes teeth and causes inflammation of the gingiva. Understanding how this biofilm initiates on the tooth surface is of central importance in developing interventions against PD. Although the stages of plaque development on human teeth have been well characterized little is known about how canine plaque develops. Recent studies of the canine oral microbiome have revealed distinct differences between the canine and human oral environments and the bacterial communities they support, particularly with respect to healthy plaque. These differences mean knowledge about the nature of plaque formation in humans may not be directly translatable to dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial species important in the early stages of canine plaque formation in vivo and then use isolates of these species in a laboratory biofilm model to develop an understanding of the sequential processes which take place during the initial colonization of enamel. Supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 12 dogs at 24 and 48 hour time points following a full mouth descale and polish. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA identified 134 operational taxonomic units after statistical analysis. The species with the highest relative abundance were Bergeyella zoohelcum, Neisseria shayeganii and a Moraxella species. Streptococcal species, which tend to dominate early human plaque biofilms, had very low relative abundance. In vitro testing of biofilm formation identified five primary colonizer species, three of which belonged to the genus Neisseria. Using these pioneer bacteria as a starting point, viable two and three species communities were developed. Combining in vivo and in vitro data has led us to construct novel models of how the early canine plaque biofilm develops. PMID:25463050

  10. Early canine plaque biofilms: characterization of key bacterial interactions involved in initial colonization of enamel.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Lucy J; Patel, Niran; Colyer, Alison; Deusch, Oliver; O'Flynn, Ciaran; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is a significant problem in dogs affecting between 44% and 63.6% of the population. The main etiological agent for PD is plaque, a microbial biofilm that colonizes teeth and causes inflammation of the gingiva. Understanding how this biofilm initiates on the tooth surface is of central importance in developing interventions against PD. Although the stages of plaque development on human teeth have been well characterized little is known about how canine plaque develops. Recent studies of the canine oral microbiome have revealed distinct differences between the canine and human oral environments and the bacterial communities they support, particularly with respect to healthy plaque. These differences mean knowledge about the nature of plaque formation in humans may not be directly translatable to dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial species important in the early stages of canine plaque formation in vivo and then use isolates of these species in a laboratory biofilm model to develop an understanding of the sequential processes which take place during the initial colonization of enamel. Supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 12 dogs at 24 and 48 hour time points following a full mouth descale and polish. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA identified 134 operational taxonomic units after statistical analysis. The species with the highest relative abundance were Bergeyella zoohelcum, Neisseria shayeganii and a Moraxella species. Streptococcal species, which tend to dominate early human plaque biofilms, had very low relative abundance. In vitro testing of biofilm formation identified five primary colonizer species, three of which belonged to the genus Neisseria. Using these pioneer bacteria as a starting point, viable two and three species communities were developed. Combining in vivo and in vitro data has led us to construct novel models of how the early canine plaque biofilm develops.

  11. Xenograft Model for Identifying Chemotherapeutic Agents against Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pawellek, A.; Hewlett, G.; Kreuter, J.; Rübsamen-Waigmann, H.; Weber, O.

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the establishment and characterization of a mouse xenograft transplantation model for the study of papillomavirus infection of bovine skin. Calf scrotal skin was inoculated with bovine papillomavirus type 2 before grafting it to the dorsum of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The grafted skin contained epidermis, dermis, and a thin layer of fat. After 5 months the induced warts not only showed histological features of papillomavirus infections but also tested positive for viral DNA and papillomavirus capsid antigen. The formation of infectious virions was demonstrated by inoculation of new transplants with crude extract from the induced warts as well as in a cell culture focus assay. Topical application of bromovinyl-2′-deoxyuridine led to a reduction in viral DNA content in the developing wart. This small-animal xenograft model should be useful for characterizing antiviral compounds and providing an understanding of the regulation of papillomavirus infections. PMID:11257010

  12. Computed tomographic appearance of canine tonsillar neoplasia: 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Thierry, Florence; Longo, Maurizio; Pecceu, Evi; Zani, Davide D; Schwarz, Tobias

    2017-09-19

    The palatine tonsil is an uncommon site of oral canine neoplasia. For affected tonsils, squamous cell carcinoma is the most frequent type of neoplasia, followed by melanoma and lymphoma. Computed tomography (CT) is increasingly used for investigation of canine oropharyngeal pathology; however, limited information is available on the CT appearance of tonsillar neoplasms. Objectives of this retrospective descriptive case series were to characterize the CT features of canine tonsillar neoplasia and determine whether specific CT features differentiate nonneoplastic from neoplastic tonsils. Computed tomographic studies of 14 dogs diagnosed with tonsillar neoplasia were retrieved from two referral hospitals and reviewed by two observers. Diagnosis was based on histology or cytology. Carcinoma was diagnosed in 11 dogs, melanoma in two and lymphoma in one dog. Specific CT features of the tonsil and regional lymph nodes did not differentiate neoplastic from nonneoplastic tonsillar diseases, but regional lymph node CT features were useful for diagnosis in some cases. Marked enlargement (width ≥ 18 mm, 12/18), heterogeneity (16/18), and loss of the hypoattenuating hilus (18/18) of the medial retropharyngeal lymph node were common concomitant features of tonsillar neoplasia. The medial retropharyngeal and mandibular lymphadenomegaly was ipsilateral to the neoplastic tonsil in 8/12 and 6/9 dogs, respectively. Five dogs demonstrated little or no enlargement of the tonsil despite the associated metastatic lymphadenomegaly. Tonsillar neoplasia should therefore be considered as a differential diagnosis for dogs with CT evidence of isolated medial retropharyngeal lymphadenomegaly (regardless of normally sized tonsils), or of any enlarged tonsil with no associated lymphadenomegaly. © 2017 The Authors. Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  13. Human papillomavirus in upper digestive tract tumors from three countries

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Andres; Koriyama, Chihaya; Higashi, Michiyo; Anwar, Muhammad; Bukhari, Mulazim Hussain; Carrascal, Edwin; Mancilla, Lida; Okumura, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Masataka; Sugihara, Kazumasa; Natsugoe, Shoji; Eizuru, Yoshito; Akiba, Suminori

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To clarify human papillomavirus (HPV) involvement in carcinogenesis of the upper digestive tract of virological and pathological analyses. METHODS: The present study examined the presence of HPV in squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity (n = 71), and esophagus (n = 166) collected from Japan, Pakistan and Colombia, with different HPV exposure risk and genetic backgrounds. The viral load and physical status of HPV16 and HPV16-E6 variants were examined. Comparison of p53 and p16INK4a expression in HPV-positive and HPV-negative cases was also made. RESULTS: HPV16 was found in 39 (55%) oral carcinomas (OCs) and 24 (14%) esophageal carcinomas (ECs). This site-specific difference in HPV detection between OCs and ECs was statistically significant (P < 0.001). There was a significant difference in the geographical distribution of HPV16-E6 variants. Multiple infections of different HPV types were found in 13 ECs, but multiple infections were not found in OCs. This difference was statistically significant (P = 0.001). The geometric means (95% confidence interval) of HPV16 viral load in OCs and ECs were 0.06 (0.02-0.18) and 0.12 (0.05-0.27) copies per cell, respectively. The expression of p16INK4a proteins was increased by the presence of HPV in ECs (53% and 33% in HPV-positive and -negative ECs, respectively; P = 0.036), and the high-risk type of the HPV genome was not detected in surrounding normal esophageal mucosa of HPV-positive ECs. CONCLUSION: Based on our results, we cannot deny the possibility of HPV16 involvement in the carcinogenesis of the esophagus. PMID:22219599

  14. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  15. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  16. Aging in the Canine Kidney.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, R E; Benali, S L; Aresu, L

    2016-03-01

    Given the irreversible nature of nephron loss, aging of the kidney is of special interest to diagnostic and toxicologic pathologists. There are many similarities among histologic lesions in aged human and canine kidneys, including increased frequency of glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, and tubular atrophy. Unfortunately, there are few studies in which renal tissue from aged healthy dogs was adequately examined with advanced diagnostics-namely, transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence-so age-associated changes in canine podocytes and glomerular basement membranes are poorly characterized. An age-associated decrease in the glomerular filtration rate in humans and dogs (specifically small breed dogs) has been documented. Although lesions in aged rats and mice differ somewhat from those of aged dogs and humans, the knowledge gained from rodent models is still vital to elucidating the pathogenesis of age-associated renal disease. Many novel molecules implicated in renal aging have been identified through genetically modified rodent models and transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of human kidneys. These molecules represent intriguing therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers. Likewise, influencing critical pathways of cellular aging, such as telomere shortening, cellular senescence, and autophagy, could improve renal function in the elderly. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Ibuprofen in canine endotoxin shock.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, E R; Soulsby, M E; Bone, R C; Wilson, F J; Hiller, F C

    1982-01-01

    The participation of prostaglandins in the physiologic alterations of endotoxin shock has been well established with the aid of prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors. Our study was designed to investigate the potential of ibuprofen, a highly specific cyclooxygenase inhibitor, to reverse the hemodynamic and acid base abnormalities of canine endotoxin shock. Mean blood pressure fell to 49.8 +/- 6.6 mm Hg in dogs given endotoxin by 5 min after injection, and remained below 83 mm Hg for the duration of the 120-min observation period. In animals given endotoxin followed by ibuprofen, a similar initial drop of systemic blood pressure was seen, but it subsequently recovered to 150.2 +/- 4.1 mm Hg by 120 min (P less than 0.001). Cardiac index increased in animals given ibuprofen (2.3 +/- 0.28 liter/m2 per min) compared with animals given endotoxin alone (1.0 +/- 0.09 liter/m2 per min) by termination of the experiment. The arterial pH dropped in endotoxin treated animals to 7.18 +/- 0.03 by 120 min. Ibuprofen prevented the acidosis, the final pH in ibuprofen and endotoxin treated animals measuring 7.36 +/- 0.01. We conclude that ibuprofen protects against the hypotension, acidosis, and depression of cardiac index of canine endotoxin shock. PMID:7107893

  18. Identification of a Canine Adenovirus (Infectious Canine Hepatitis Virus) Inhibitor in Dog Liver Extracts as Arginase

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    Extracts of canine liver inhibited growth of infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) virus, a canine adenovirus. Purified extracts from mammalian, but not avian, liver tissue contained the inhibitor, and evidence is presented that the inhibitory factor is the enzyme arginase (arginine ureohydrolase). This study further emphasized the need for arginine in adenovirus growth and may explain some of the difficulties in isolating small amounts of ICH virus from suspensions of liver. Images PMID:4344396

  19. Canine size, shape, and bending strength in primates and carnivores.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J Michael; Ruff, Christopher B

    2008-05-01

    Anthropoid primates are well known for their highly sexually dimorphic canine teeth, with males possessing canines that are up to 400% taller than those of females. Primate canine dimorphism has been extensively documented, with a consensus that large male primate canines serve as weapons for intrasexual competition, and some evidence that large female canines in some species may likewise function as weapons. However, apart from speculation that very tall male canines may be relatively weak and that seed predators have strong canines, the functional significance of primate canine shape has not been explored. Because carnivore canine shape and size are associated with killing style, this group provides a useful comparative baseline for primates. We evaluate primate maxillary canine tooth size, shape and relative bending strength against body size, skull size, and behavioral and demographic measures of male competition and sexual selection, and compare them to those of carnivores. We demonstrate that, relative to skull length and body mass, primate male canines are on average as large as or larger than those of similar sized carnivores. The range of primate female canine sizes embraces that of carnivores. Male and female primate canines are generally as strong as or stronger than those of carnivores. Although we find that seed-eating primates have relatively strong canines, we find no clear relationship between male primate canine strength and demographic or behavioral estimates of male competition or sexual selection, in spite of a strong relationship between these measures and canine crown height. This suggests either that most primate canines are selected to be very strong regardless of variation in behavior, or that primate canine shape is inherently strong enough to accommodate changes in crown height without compromising canine function.

  20. Evidence-based veterinary dermatology: a systematic review of the pharmacotherapy of canine atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Olivry, T; Mueller, R S

    2003-06-01

    The efficacy of pharmacological interventions used to treat canine atopic dermatitis, excluding fatty acid supplementation and allergen-specific immunotherapy, was evaluated based on the systematic review of prospective clinical trials published between 1980 and 2002. Studies were compared with regard to design characteristics (randomization generation and concealment, masking, intention-to-treat analyses and quality of enrolment of study subjects), benefit (improvement in skin lesions or pruritus scores) and harm (type, severity and frequency of adverse drug events) of the various interventions. Meta-analysis of pooled results was not possible because of heterogeneity of the drugs evaluated. Forty trials enrolling 1607 dogs were identified. There is good evidence for recommending the use of oral glucocorticoids and cyclosporin for the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis, and fair evidence for using topical triamcinolone spray, topical tacrolimus lotion, oral pentoxifylline or oral misoprostol. Insufficient evidence is available for or against recommending the prescription of oral first- and second-generation type-1 histamine receptor antagonists, tricyclic antidepressants, cyproheptadine, aspirin, Chinese herbal therapy, an homeopathic complex remedy, ascorbic acid, AHR-13268, papaverine, immune-modulating antibiotics or tranilast and topical pramoxine or capsaicin. Finally, there is fair evidence against recommending the use of oral arofylline, leukotriene synthesis inhibitors and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists.

  1. Evidence for canine rehabilitation and physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Millis, Darryl L; Ciuperca, Ionut Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews some important studies regarding canine physical rehabilitation. Bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons undergo atrophy if loading is decreased. Knowledge of the changes that occur with immobilization and the time course of events helps in the development of a rehabilitation program to improve tissue integrity. Outcome assessment instruments are clinically useful indicators of patient progress and the success of rehabilitation programs. A number of physical modalities are used in canine rehabilitation, although there are relatively few canine-specific studies. Rehabilitation has specific benefits in the treatment of various orthopedic and neurologic conditions.

  2. Dynamic Analysis of New Bone Obtained by Nonvascular Transport Distraction Osteogenesis in Canines.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng; Zhou, Nuo; Lu, Xia; Huang, Xuan-Ping; Jiang, Xian-Fang; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to construct a nonvascular transport disc to repair the canine mandibular defects model and to perform a dynamic analysis of the new bone obtained by nonvascular transport distraction osteogenesis (NTDO) in canines. Thirty adult dogs were randomly divided into 3 groups, with 10 dogs in each group. Canine mandibular defect models of NTDO were constructed. All the dogs were marked by tetracycline hydrochloride at a different distraction stage. The dogs were euthanized at 2, 4, and 12 weeks after distraction, and the quality ratio of calcium and phosphate for the new bone was measured using electron dispersive spectroscopy. The canine mandibular defects were successfully repaired. Using tetracycline hydrochloride, we successfully observed the quality and speed of new bone formation. The quality ratio of calcium and phosphate was similar between the new bone formation and the original bone. The time spent using a nonvascular transport disc to repair mandibular defects was consistent with using a vascularized transport disc, and the quality of the new bone and the original bone was exactly the same. When the bone mass is insufficient or the conditions are not suitable for a vascularized transport disc, the nonvascular transport disc can be used as an alternative. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nasolacrimal obstruction caused by root abscess of the upper canine in a cat.

    PubMed

    Anthony, James M G; Sandmeyer, Lynne S; Laycock, Amanda R

    2010-03-01

    A 10-year-old, castrated male domestic short hair cat was presented to the Small Animal Clinic at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine with a presenting complaint of chronic, ocular discharge from the left eye. Ocular examination confirmed epiphora and mucopurulent discharge but there were no apparent reasons for the ocular discharge, and nasolacrimal obstruction was suspected. The cat had swelling of the left side of the face, severe periodontal disease and a fractured upper left canine tooth with pulpal exposure. Dacryocystorhinography revealed narrowing of the nasolacrimal duct above the root of the fractured upper left canine and dental radiographs showed a severe periapical lucency at the apex of the upper left canine tooth. The fractured canine tooth was removed. Subsequently, the ocular discharge and facial swelling resolved. After 2 years, the epiphora has never reoccurred. This is a noteworthy case because a suspected root abscess resulted in extralumenal compression of the nasolacrimal duct, which shows the importance of a thorough oral examination when nasolacrimal obstruction is evident.

  4. Reported changes in sexual behaviour and human papillomavirus knowledge in Peruvian female sex workers following participation in a human papillomavirus vaccine trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Heidari, O; Carcamo, C; Halsey, N A

    2013-07-01

    Limited data exist on the effect of clinical trial participation on sexual behavioural change. Two hundred female sex workers working in Lima, Peru received human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in either the standard (0, 2, 6 months) or modified (0, 3, 6 months) schedule. Participants received comprehensive screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), counselling on safe sex practices, education about HPV and the HPV vaccine, contraceptives (oral and condoms) and family planning at each visit. We assessed vaccine completion rates, change in sexual practices, and changes in HPV knowledge before and after participation in the vaccine trial. There were high rates of vaccine completion, 91% overall. The estimated number of reported new and total clients over a 30-day period decreased significantly (P < 0.001). Knowledge about HPV and HPV-related disease increased among all participants. In addition, all participants listed at least one preventive strategy during the month 7 follow-up survey.

  5. Clinicopathological study of canine transmissible venereal tumour in leishmaniotic dogs.

    PubMed

    Marino, G; Gaglio, G; Zanghì, A

    2012-06-01

    Canine transmissible venereal tumour is occasionally observed in leishmaniotic dogs, and Leishmania amastigotes can be harboured in canine transmissible venereal tumour cells. The aim of this paper was to investigate the clinicopathological significance of the association of both diseases. Nineteen dogs affected by canine transmissible venereal tumour and canine leishmaniasis were studied retrospectively. In these dogs, the tumour manifested a large size and often aggressive behaviour (42%) and no predictive sign of spontaneous regression was observed. Sporadic Leishmania amastigotes were found within the canine transmissible venereal tumour in three cases, probably transported by infected macrophages often infiltrating the tumour. A high Leishmania parasitisation of canine transmissible venereal tumour was observed in two other cases and verified by immunohistochemistry. Canine transmissible venereal tumour is a tumour of the dog able to harbour a large number of Leishmania parasites. Alternatively, the systemic disease (canine leishmaniasis) may lower the immune defence against malignancy (canine transmissible venereal tumour). © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  6. Canine distemper virus infection of canine footpad epidermis.

    PubMed

    Gröne, Andrea; Doherr, Marcus G; Zurbriggen, Andreas

    2004-06-01

    Infection of the footpad epidermis can occur in natural canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of dogs. Footpads from 19 dogs experimentally inoculated with virulent distemper strain A75/17 and from two nonexposed dogs were examined histopathologically and assessed for the presence of viral antigen and nucleoprotein mRNA, as well as number of inflammatory and apoptotic cells. Dogs were divided into four groups based on inoculation status and postmortem examination: inoculated dogs with severe distemper (group 1, n = 7); inoculated dogs with mild distemper (group 2, n = 4); inoculated dogs without distemper (group 3, n = 8); and noninoculated dogs (group 4, n = 2). Footpads from dogs of all groups had a comparably thick epidermis. Eosinophilic viral inclusions and syncytial cells were present in footpad epidermis of one dog of group 1. Footpads of group 1 dogs contained viral antigen and mRNA in the epidermis with strongest staining in a subcorneal location. Additionally, in these dogs footpad dermal structures including eccrine glands and vascular walls were positive for virus particles. No CDV antigen or mRNA was present in the footpad epidermis and dermis of any other dog. Group 1 dogs had more CD3-positive cells and apoptotic cells within the basal layer of the epidermis when compared to the other groups. These findings demonstrate that in experimental infection CDV antigen and mRNA were colocalized in all layers of the infected canine footpad epidermis. The scarcity of overt pathological reactions with absence of keratinocyte degeneration indicates a noncytocidal persisting infection of footpad keratinocytes by CDV.

  7. Estimating canine tooth crown height in early Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J Michael; Ward, Carol V; Paulus, Faydre L

    2009-07-01

    Canine tooth size reduction and the associated reduction in canine dimorphism is a basal hominin character that also provides important evidence for models of behavioral evolution. Two specimens of Australopithecus anamensis (KNM-KP 29287 and KNM-KP 29283) that do not preserve the canine crown, but do preserve the root or alveolus, appear to suggest that canine size variation and canine dimorphism in this species may have been greater than in other hominins. We evaluate canine root and crown dimensions in a series of extant hominoids, and estimate canine crown height in Australopithecus afarensis and A. anamensis. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to generate estimates of canine crown height from basal canine crown and root dimensions with a moderate degree of accuracy. Estimates of maxillary canine crown size for A. anamensis are slightly larger than those of A. afarensis, and are approximately the same size as canines of modern female chimpanzees. Estimated mandibular canine crown height is very similar in the two species. Variation within the A. anamensis sample of estimated canine crown heights is similar to that of modern humans, suggesting a low degree of sexual dimorphism. Inclusion of estimates for KNM-KP 29287 and KNM-KP 29283 does not substantially increase either the estimate of overall canine size or variation for A. anamensis.

  8. Comparative functional characterization of canine IgG subclasses.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Lisa M; McCandless, Erin E; Dunham, Steve; Dunkle, Bill; Zhu, Yaqi; Shelly, John; Lightle, Sandra; Gonzales, Andrea; Bainbridge, Graeme

    2014-01-15

    To date, very little is known about the functional characteristics of the four published canine IgG subclasses. It is not clear how each subclass engages the immune system via complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), or how long each antibody may last in serum. Such information is critical for understanding canine immunology and for the discovery of canine therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Through both in vitro and ex vivo experiments to evaluate canine Fc's for effector function, complement binding, FcRn binding, and ADCC, we are now able to categorize canine subclasses by function. The subclasses share functional properties with the four human IgG subclasses and are reported herein with their function-based human analog. Canine Fc fusions, canine chimeras, and caninized antibodies were characterized. Canine subclasses A and D appear effector-function negative while subclasses B and C bind canine Fc gamma receptors and are positive for ADCC. All canine subclasses bind the neonatal Fc receptor except subclass C. By understanding canine IgGs in this way, we can apply what is known of human immunology toward translational and veterinary medicine. Thus, this body of work lays the foundation for evaluating canine IgG subclasses for therapeutic antibody development and builds upon the fundamental scholarship of canine immunology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nuclear morphometry in canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas and squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Martano, M; Damiano, S; Restucci, B; Paciello, O; Russo, V; Maiolino, P

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether morphometrical analysis can be of diagnostic value for canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma. We calculated, by means of an automated image analyser, some morphometric nuclear parameters, in particular: mean nuclear area (MNA), mean nuclear perimeter (MNP), maximum and minimum diameters (MDx and MDm) coefficient of variation of the nuclear area (NACV), largest to smallest dimension ratio (LS ratio), and form factor (FF), in 8 canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas, and we compared these morphometric data to those of 13 squamous cell carcinomas of canine gingiva. The results indicated a progressive increase of the MNA, NACV, MNP and MDm proceeding from acanthomatous ameloblastomas (MNA: 42.11+/-8.74; NACV: 28,36+/-7,23; MNP: 24.18+/- 2.68; MDm: 5.69+/-0.49) to squamous cell carcinomas (MNA:49,69+/-9,10; NACV: 30,89+/-7,75; MNP: 25.63+/-2.54; MDm: 6.64+/-0.73). On the contrary, the LS ratio and the FF resulted greater in acanthomatous ameloblastomas (LS ratio: 1,63+/-0,12; FF: 1,13+/-0,002) than in SCCs (LS ratio: 1,40+/-0,12; FF:0.91+/-0.38). Moreover, the MNA, MNP,MDx and MDm resulted similar (MNA: p=0.89; MNP: p=0,65; MDm: p=0,16; MDx: p=0,13) in a subset of four acanthomatous ameloblastomas with cellular atypia (MNA:49,01+/-6,88; MNP: 26,28+/-1,99; MDm: 6.08+/-0.41; MDx: 10.18+/-0.88) and in squamous cell carcinomas (MNA:49.69+/-9,10; MNP: 25.63+/-2.54; MDm: 6.64+/-0.73; MDx: 9.26+/-1.05). While the NACV values resulted higher in typical acanthomatous ameloblastoma (29,99+/-6,06) than in atypical acanthomatous ameloblastoma (26,74+/-8,84) and similar to those of the SCCs (30,89+/-7,75). These results seem to confirm that acanthomatous ameloblastoma is a malignant or potentially malignant lesion and emphasizes that nuclear morphometry analysis can be an useful diagnostic and prognostic method in canine oral pathology.

  10. Maturation of the Human Papillomavirus 16 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, Giovanni; Moyer, Adam L.; Cheng, Naiqian; Thompson, Cynthia D.; Dvoretzky, Israel; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Buck, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Papillomaviruses are a family of nonenveloped DNA viruses that infect the skin or mucosa of their vertebrate hosts. The viral life cycle is closely tied to the differentiation of infected keratinocytes. Papillomavirus virions are released into the environment through a process known as desquamation, in which keratinocytes lose structural integrity prior to being shed from the surface of the skin. During this process, virions are exposed to an increasingly oxidative environment, leading to their stabilization through the formation of disulfide cross-links between neighboring molecules of the major capsid protein, L1. We used time-lapse cryo-electron microscopy and image analysis to study the maturation of HPV16 capsids assembled in mammalian cells and exposed to an oxidizing environment after cell lysis. Initially, the virion is a loosely connected procapsid that, under in vitro conditions, condenses over several hours into the more familiar 60-nm-diameter papillomavirus capsid. In this process, the procapsid shrinks by ~5% in diameter, its pentameric capsomers change in structure (most markedly in the axial region), and the interaction surfaces between adjacent capsomers are consolidated. A C175S mutant that cannot achieve normal inter-L1 disulfide cross-links shows maturation-related shrinkage but does not achieve the fully condensed 60-nm form. Pseudoatomic modeling based on a 9-Å resolution reconstruction of fully mature capsids revealed C-terminal disulfide-stabilized “suspended bridges” that form intercapsomeric cross-links. The data suggest a model in which procapsids exist in a range of dynamic intermediates that can be locked into increasingly mature configurations by disulfide cross-linking, possibly through a Brownian ratchet mechanism. PMID:25096873

  11. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  12. Oral Cancer and Oral Precancerous Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Roda, Giulia; Brygo, Alexandre; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Other risk factors include age over 40, male sex, several dietary factors, nutritional deficiencies, viruses, sexually transmitted infections, human papillomavirus, chronic irritation, and possibly genetic predisposition. Precancerous lesions in the oral cavity include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and lichen planus. Histology of oral cancer varies widely but the great majority are squamous cell carcinomas.Epidemiological studies and cancer registries have shown a consistently increased risk of oral malignancies in kidney, bone marrow, heart, or liver transplantation, in graft vs host disease, and in patients with HIV infection. Because of the increasing use of immunosuppressive drugs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, it is useful to more accurately delineate the consequences of chronic immunosuppression to the oral cavity. Oral cancer and precancerous oral lesions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] have been scarcely reported and reviews on the topic are lacking.We conducted a literature search using the terms and variants of all cancerous and precancerous oral manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases. By retrieving the existing literature, it is evident that patients with IBD belong to the high-risk group of developing these lesions, a phenomenon amplified by the increasing HPV prevalence. Education on modifiable risk behaviours in patients with oral cancer is the cornerstone of prevention.Oral screening should be performed for all IBD patients, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or biological drug.

  13. Evidence of Human Papillomavirus in the Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Weyn, Christine; Thomas, Dominique; Jani, Jacques; Guizani, Meriem; Donner, Cathérine; Van Rysselberge, Michel; Hans, Christine; Bossens, Michel; Englert, Yvon

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an epitheliotropic virus typically infecting keratinocytes but also possibly epithelial trophoblastic placental cells. In the present study, we set out to investigate whether HPV can be recovered from transabdominally obtained placental cells to avoid any confounding contamination by HPV-infected cervical cells. Thirty-five placental samples from women undergoing transabdominal chorionic villous sampling were analyzed, and we detected HPV-16 and HPV-62 in 2 placentas. This study suggests that HPV infection of the placenta can occur early in pregnancy. The overall clinical implication of these results remains to be elucidated. PMID:21208925

  14. Clinical significance of human papillomavirus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Jin; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, and the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main causative agent for its development. HPV is a heterogeneous virus, and a persistent infection with a high-risk HPV contributes to the development of cancer. In recent decades, great advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology of HPV, and HPV's significance in cervical cancer prevention and management has received increased attention. In this review, we discuss the role of HPV genotyping in cervical cancer by addressing: clinically important issues in HPV virology; the current application of HPV genotyping in clinical medicine; and potential future uses for HPV genotyping.

  15. Human Papillomavirus Entry: Hiding in a Bubble.

    PubMed

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Sapp, Martin

    2016-09-15

    Incoming human papillomavirus (HPV) utilize vesicular transport to traffic from the plasma membrane to the trans-Golgi network. Following nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis, the viral DNA associates with condensed chromosomes utilizing spindle microtubules for delivery. Most intriguingly, the viral DNA resides in a transport vesicle until mitosis is completed and the nuclear envelope has reformed. This finding provides support for the transient existence of nuclear membrane-bound vesicles. Due to their transient nature, it also points to the existence of a cell pathway for the disposal of vesicles ending up fortuitously or purposefully in the nucleus. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Human Papillomavirus Entry: Hiding in a Bubble

    PubMed Central

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Incoming human papillomavirus (HPV) utilize vesicular transport to traffic from the plasma membrane to the trans-Golgi network. Following nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis, the viral DNA associates with condensed chromosomes utilizing spindle microtubules for delivery. Most intriguingly, the viral DNA resides in a transport vesicle until mitosis is completed and the nuclear envelope has reformed. This finding provides support for the transient existence of nuclear membrane-bound vesicles. Due to their transient nature, it also points to the existence of a cell pathway for the disposal of vesicles ending up fortuitously or purposefully in the nucleus. PMID:27412595

  17. The human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E. Muenger, Karl

    2009-02-20

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncoprotein shares functional similarities with such proteins as adenovirus E1A and SV40 large tumor antigen. As one of only two viral proteins always expressed in HPV-associated cancers, E7 plays a central role in both the viral life cycle and carcinogenic transformation. In the HPV viral life cycle, E7 disrupts the intimate association between cellular differentiation and proliferation in normal epithelium, allowing for viral replication in cells that would no longer be in the dividing population. This function is directly reflected in the transforming activities of E7, including tumor initiation and induction of genomic instability.

  18. Human Papillomavirus: What Every Provider Should Know

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Britt K.; Alvarez, Ronald D.; Huh, Warner K.

    2012-01-01

    Persistence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Additionally, infection with HPV is implicated in the majority of cases of other genital tract malignancies including vulvar, penile, and vaginal cancer. HPV testing and vaccination are a routine part of OB/GYN clinical practice. With an enhanced public awareness of HPV infections, many patients turn to their OB/GYN with questions about transmission, testing and prevention. In this review, we will discuss the biology of HPV, epidemiology of disease, methods and indications for testing, and vaccination strategies. PMID:23021131

  19. [Infection therapeutic modalities in human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Pacheco, Adia; Hernández Valencia, Marcelino; Hernández Quijano, Tomás; Zárate, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genital it can infect any mucous of the body and to cause cancer of the uterine cervix. Until recently specific treatments did not exist on this infection, for what had to destroy or to remove the injured tissue by diverse procedures, what could have obstetric repercussions in young women. Recently some surgical modalities and topical drugs have arisen, as well as of systemic employment that allow to arrive to the lesions difficult to approach, and have demonstrated good effectiveness to cure the infection for HPV, for what an analysis of the medical treatment of this infection type is made.

  20. Isolation and cloning of a papillomavirus from a North American porcupine by using multiply primed rolling-circle amplification: the Erethizon dorsatum papillomavirus type 1.

    PubMed

    Rector, Annabel; Tachezy, Ruth; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; MacNamara, Tracey; Burk, Robert D; Sundberg, John P; Van Ranst, Marc

    2005-01-20

    The complete genome of a novel papillomavirus was isolated from a cutaneous papillomatous lesion of a North American porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum) using multiply primed rolling-circle amplification (RCA). The nucleotide sequence, genome organization, and phylogenetic position of the Erethizon dorsatum papillomavirus type 1 (EdPV-1) were determined. EdPV-1 is only distantly related to other benign cutaneous papillomavirus sequences and is the first member of the novel Sigma papillomavirus genus.

  1. Oral myiasis.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  2. Oral Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  3. Development of multiple pigmented viral plaques and squamous cell carcinomas in a dog infected by a novel papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; O'Connor, Karin I; Smits, Bronwyn

    2011-02-01

    Canine viral plaques are uncommon skin lesions that are induced by papillomaviruses (PVs). Plaques are usually of little clinical significance in dogs, although they have been reported rarely to progress to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Here is described a 7-year-old mixed-breed dog that developed numerous darkly pigmented plaques up to 8 cm in diameter. Multiple ulcerated nodular masses were visible within plaques on the ventrum and axilla. The dog showed no clinical evidence of immunodeficiency and appeared otherwise healthy. Over the next 2 years, five surgeries were performed to remove 23 ulcerated masses that ranged in size from 2 to 5 cm in diameter. Five masses were submitted for histology, and all were SCCs. Each was surrounded by epidermis that contained histological features consistent with those described in canine plaques. Suggestive of a PV aetiology, massive numbers of large keratohyaline granules were present throughout the thickened epidermis. Additionally, koilocytes were focally present, and one sample contained a band of keratinocytes within the superficial epidermis that contained pale cytoplasm and marginated chromatin. From two samples, DNA sequences from a previously unreported PV were amplified, and immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of PV antigen in both. The PV DNA sequences were most similar to those of canine PVs previously associated with plaque formation. The plaques observed in this case were unusual owing to their rapid growth, large size and frequent malignant transformation. It is unknown whether this unusual behaviour was due to the specific PV detected in this case or to host factors within the dog.

  4. [Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of an invaginated canine].

    PubMed

    Fernández Guerrero, F; Miñana Laliga, R; Bullon Fernandez, P

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of a maxillary canine with a dens invaginatus treated successfully. The patient had pain, swelling and a sinus tract coming from the inmature apex of the canine. The canals were enlarged and cleaned and the main canal was filled with Calcium Hydroxide to allow the root development. Seven months later, the patient was asymptomatic and the tooth was obturated with guttapercha. One year later it was confirm the success in the treatment.

  5. Parturition prediction and timing of canine pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, YeunHee; Travis, Alexander J.; Meyers-Wallen, Vicki N.

    2007-01-01

    An accurate method of predicting the date of parturition in the bitch is clinically useful to minimize or prevent reproductive losses by timely intervention. Similarly, an accurate method of timing canine ovulation and gestation is critical for development of assisted reproductive technologies, e.g. estrous synchronization and embryo transfer. This review discusses present methods for accurately timing canine gestational age and outlines their use in clinical management of high-risk pregnancies and embryo transfer research. PMID:17904630

  6. [Fractures of the canines require attention].

    PubMed

    van Foreest, Andries

    2005-01-15

    Hardly any attention was paid to a barely visible fracture of a canine tooth (104) in an 18-month-old dog. When the dog was 6-years old, a fistulous opening was seen on the bridge of the nose. A year later, radiography revealed a periapical process. The investigations performed and treatment given are described, as is the correct way to handle fractures of the canines.

  7. Canine adenovirus type 1 in a fennec fox (Vulpes zerda).

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Lee, Hyun-Kyoung; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2014-12-01

    A 10-mo-old female fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) with drooling suddenly died and was examined postmortem. Histologic examination of different tissue samples was performed. Vacuolar degeneration and diffuse fatty change were observed in the liver. Several diagnostic methods were used to screen for canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus, canine influenza virus, canine coronavirus, canine parainfluenza virus, and canine adenovirus (CAdV). Only CAdV type 1 (CAdV-1) was detected in several organs (liver, lung, brain, kidney, spleen, and heart), and other viruses were not found. CAdV-1 was confirmed by virus isolation and nucleotide sequencing.

  8. Endodontic treatment of a multirooted permanent maxillary canine.

    PubMed

    Galhotra, Virat; Pandit, I K; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to report an unusual case of multirooted permanent maxillary canine. A 16-year-old female patient presented with pain and swelling related to the upper right permanent canine. Radiographic examination revealed a multirooted permanent maxillary canine--an unusual finding. Endodontic treatment was performed after amputation of 2 extra roots, and then the tooth was intentionally reimplanted. The prevalence of birooted permanent mandibular canines in the Japanese population has been reported, but the prevalence of this 3-rooted maxillary canine is still unknown. This report also states the potential etiological factors, effects on the developing dentition, and various treatment options for the multirooted maxillary permanent canine.

  9. Canine epitheliotropic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: an investigation of T-cell receptor immunophenotype, lesion topography and molecular clonality.

    PubMed

    Moore, Peter F; Affolter, Verena K; Graham, Petra S; Hirt, Barbara

    2009-10-01

    Canine epitheliotropic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a spontaneous neoplasm of the skin and mucous membranes of aged dogs. The WHO classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues in human beings recognizes three forms of cutaneous epitheliotropic CTCL: mycosis fungoides (MF), Sézary syndrome and pagetoid reticulosis. In this series of dogs (n = 56), there were 39 cases of MF, 16 cases of pagetoid reticulosis and a single case of Sézary syndrome. Epitheliotropic T cells in CTCL lesions expressed CD8 in 44 of 55 dogs (80%) assessed; neither CD4 nor CD8 was expressed in the remainder. This contrasts with human MF in which alphabeta T-cell receptors (TCR) and CD4 are dominantly expressed. Molecular clonality assessment of canine epitheliotropic CTCL utilizing PCR primers specific for canine TCR gamma (TCRG) was performed. Of the 45 canine cases assessed, TCRG monoclonality was detected in 36 cases (80%). TCR typing of canine epitheliotropic CTCL revealed that TCRgammadelta was expressed in 60% of cases, including all cases of canine pagetoid reticulosis assessed. Either muco-cutaneous junctions or tissues of the oral cavity were the sites of lesions in 32 dogs (57%) with epitheliotropic CTCL. Analysis of the topography of lesions revealed an association with TCR type. If epitheliotropic CTCL lesions occurred in both locations, T cells were more likely to express TCRgammadelta (gammadelta : alphabeta = 2.0). These data establish that canine skin trafficking T cells have a far wider range than previously thought; this includes tongue, gingival, buccal and palatine mucosae.

  10. Environmental contamination by canine geohelminths

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal nematodes affecting dogs, i.e. roundworms, hookworms and whipworms, have a relevant health-risk impact for animals and, for most of them, for human beings. Both dogs and humans are typically infected by ingesting infective stages, (i.e. larvated eggs or larvae) present in the environment. The existence of a high rate of soil and grass contamination with infective parasitic elements has been demonstrated worldwide in leisure, recreational, public and urban areas, i.e. parks, green areas, bicycle paths, city squares, playgrounds, sandpits, beaches. This review discusses the epidemiological and sanitary importance of faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites in urban environments and the integrated approaches useful to minimize the risk of infection in different settings. PMID:24524656

  11. Canine viral enteritis. Recent developments.

    PubMed

    Pollock, R V; Carmichael, L

    1979-05-01

    Two apparently novel viral gastroenteritides of dogs were recognized in 1978: one caused by a parvo-like virus (CPV) and one by a corona-like virus (CCV). A rotavirus has also been tentatively associated with neonatal pup enteritis. Canine viral enteritis is characterized by a sudden onset of vomiting and diarrhea, rapid spread and high morbidity. Treatment is only supportive but must be initiated promptly. Infected animals should be isolated immediately; the extremely contagious nature of these diseases makes them difficult to contain. Feces from infected dogs appear to be the primary means of transmission. Sodium hypochlorite solutions (eg, Clorox) are recommended for disinfection. The development of effective vaccines is an immediate and pressing problem.

  12. Biomarkers in canine parvovirus enteritis.

    PubMed

    Schoeman, J P; Goddard, A; Leisewitz, A L

    2013-07-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) enteritis has, since its emergence in 1978, remained a common and important cause of morbidity and mortality in young dogs. The continued incidence of parvoviral enteritis is partly due to the virus' capability to evolve into more virulent and resistant variants with significant local gastrointestinal and systemic inflammatory sequelae. This paper reviews current knowledge on historical-, signalment-, and clinical factors as well as several haematological-, biochemical- and endocrine parameters that can be used as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in CPV enteritis. These factors include season of presentation, purebred nature, bodyweight, vomiting, leukopaenia, lymphopaenia, thrombocytopaenia, hypercoagulability, hypercortisolaemia, hypothyroxinaemia, hypoalbuminaemia, elevated C-reactive protein and tumour necrosis factor, hypocholesterolaemia and hypocitrullinaemia. Factors contributing to the manifestations of CPV infection are multiple with elements of host, pathogen, secondary infections, underlying stressors and environment affecting severity and outcome. The availability of several prognosticators has made identification of patients at high risk of death and their subsequent targeted management more rewarding.

  13. Environmental contamination by canine geohelminths.

    PubMed

    Traversa, Donato; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Di Cesare, Angela; La Torre, Francesco; Drake, Jason; Pietrobelli, Mario

    2014-02-13

    Intestinal nematodes affecting dogs, i.e. roundworms, hookworms and whipworms, have a relevant health-risk impact for animals and, for most of them, for human beings. Both dogs and humans are typically infected by ingesting infective stages, (i.e. larvated eggs or larvae) present in the environment. The existence of a high rate of soil and grass contamination with infective parasitic elements has been demonstrated worldwide in leisure, recreational, public and urban areas, i.e. parks, green areas, bicycle paths, city squares, playgrounds, sandpits, beaches. This review discusses the epidemiological and sanitary importance of faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites in urban environments and the integrated approaches useful to minimize the risk of infection in different settings.

  14. Age estimation from canine volumes.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Danilo; Gaudio, Daniel; Guercini, Nicola; Cipriani, Filippo; Gibelli, Daniele; Caputi, Sergio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Techniques for estimation of biological age are constantly evolving and are finding daily application in the forensic radiology field in cases concerning the estimation of the chronological age of a corpse in order to reconstruct the biological profile, or of a living subject, for example in cases of immigration of people without identity papers from a civil registry. The deposition of teeth secondary dentine and consequent decrease of pulp chamber in size are well known as aging phenomena, and they have been applied to the forensic context by the development of age estimation procedures, such as Kvaal-Solheim and Cameriere methods. The present study takes into consideration canines pulp chamber volume related to the entire teeth volume, with the aim of proposing new regression formulae for age estimation using 91 cone beam computerized scans and a freeware open-source software, in order to permit affordable reproducibility of volumes calculation.

  15. CANINE: a robotic mine dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Brian A.; Hyams, Jeffrey; Shelley, Jordan; Babu, Kartik; Badino, Hernán.; Bansal, Aayush; Huber, Daniel; Batavia, Parag

    2013-01-01

    Neya Systems, LLC competed in the CANINE program sponsored by the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) which culminated in a competition held at Fort Benning as part of the 2012 Robotics Rodeo. As part of this program, we developed a robot with the capability to learn and recognize the appearance of target objects, conduct an area search amid distractor objects and obstacles, and relocate the target object in the same way that Mine dogs and Sentry dogs are used within military contexts for exploration and threat detection. Neya teamed with the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University to develop vision-based solutions for probabilistic target learning and recognition. In addition, we used a Mission Planning and Management System (MPMS) to orchestrate complex search and retrieval tasks using a general set of modular autonomous services relating to robot mobility, perception and grasping.

  16. Regression of oral hairy leukoplakia after orally administered acyclovir therapy.

    PubMed

    Resnick, L; Herbst, J S; Ablashi, D V; Atherton, S; Frank, B; Rosen, L; Horwitz, S N

    1988-01-15

    To define the role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of oral hairy leukoplakia, 13 human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive men with clinical and histologic evidence of oral hairy leukoplakia were enrolled in an open-label trial of orally administered acyclovir therapy (3.2 g/d for 20 days). Of six patients who received therapy, five exhibited clinical regression. Once therapy was discontinued, recurrences occurred in all responders. Among seven patients who refused therapy, no spontaneous remissions occurred. Before therapy, EBV replication within the leukoplakia was demonstrated by immunofluorescence tissue staining or electron microscopy in five patients who were studied. Human papillomavirus was not detected by immunocytochemistry or electron microscopy from tissue specimens of six patients. After therapy, biopsy specimens from two patients with complete responses revealed a normalization of histologic abnormalities and an inability to detect EBV in previously involved mucosa by immunofluorescence or in situ DNA hybridization assays. It was concluded that EBV replication within the epithelial cells of the tongue is necessary for the development of oral hairy leukoplakia.

  17. Influence of oral sex and oral cancer information on young adults' oral sexual-risk cognitions and likelihood of HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Stock, Michelle L; Peterson, Laurel M; Houlihan, Amy E; Walsh, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Public health information and educational interventions regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) have focused on the link between vaginal sex and cervical cancer among women. Many people are unaware that HPV can be transmitted through oral sex or that HPV causes oral cancers. Given that HPV infections and unprotected oral sex are increasing, research on oral sex-related HPV risk is important. This study examined the effect of a brief informational intervention regarding HPV and oral sex on the sexual risk cognitions of young adults. College students (N = 238) read information on HPV, oral sex, and oral cancer or no information. Participants then completed measures of oral sex and HPV knowledge, oral sex willingness, HPV vaccination likelihood, and risk perceptions. Participants who read the information on HPV and oral sex and cancer (compared to those who did not) reported greater knowledge, perceived risk and concern, and lower willingness to engage in oral sex. These effects were only significant among women. However, men reported a higher likelihood of future HPV vaccination compared to women who had not yet received the vaccine. Focusing on oral sex and cancer, this study adds to research investigating ways to reduce HPV infections.

  18. Platelets Inhibit Migration of Canine Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Bulla, S C; Badial, P R; Silva, R C; Lunsford, K; Bulla, C

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between platelets and tumour cells is important for tumour growth and metastasis. Thrombocytopenia or antiplatelet treatment negatively impact on cancer metastasis, demonstrating potentially important roles for platelets in tumour progression. To our knowledge, there is no information regarding the role of platelets in cancer progression in dogs. This study was designed to test whether canine platelets affected the migratory behaviour of three canine osteosarcoma cell lines and to give insights of molecular mechanisms. Intact platelets, platelet lysate and platelet releasate inhibited the migration of canine osteosarcoma cell lines. Addition of blood leucocytes to the platelet samples did not alter the inhibitory effect on migration. Platelet treatment also significantly downregulated the transcriptional levels of SNAI2 and TWIST1 genes. The interaction between canine platelets or molecules released during platelet activation and these tumour cell lines inhibits their migration, which suggests that canine platelets might antagonize metastasis of canine osteosarcoma. This effect is probably due to, at least in part, downregulation of genes related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Prevalence of asymmetric molar and canine relationship.

    PubMed

    Behbehani, Faraj; Roy, Rino; Al-Jame, Badreia

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of occlusal asymmetries in the molar and canine regions in a large population-based sample of adolescent Kuwaitis. Using a stratified cluster sampling method, 1299 Kuwaiti adolescents (674 boys mean age 13.3 years and 625 girls mean age 13.2 years), representing approximately 6.7 per cent of that age stratum in the population, were examined clinically for sagittal molar and canine relationships, with a view to recording half and full-step asymmetries. In this sample, 1244 subjects were examined clinically, while for the remaining 55, pre-treatment study models were assessed. All subjects were in the early permanent dentition stage. Descriptive statistical analyses were used to determine the proportion of different molar and canine asymmetries. Antero-posterior asymmetries were found to be a distinctive and common feature of the dental arches, with half-step outweighing full-step asymmetries both in the anterior and posterior regions. The total prevalence of an asymmetric molar or canine relationship was 29.7 and 41.4 per cent, respectively, with more than 95 per cent falling in the mild category. Patient gender did not influence the prevalence or magnitude of asymmetry. The results showed a clinically significant prevalence of asymmetric molar and canine relationships, which were mainly in the category of half-step asymmetry. Class II half and full-step asymmetries were more prevalent than Class III asymmetries in the molar and canine regions.

  20. Genetic and Biochemical Biomarkers in Canine Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Graham, K L; McCowan, C; White, A

    2017-03-01

    In many health-related fields, there is great interest in the identification of biomarkers that distinguish diseased from healthy individuals. In addition to identifying the diseased state, biomarkers have potential use in predicting disease risk, monitoring disease progression, evaluating treatment efficacy, and informing pathogenesis. This review details the genetic and biochemical markers associated with canine primary glaucoma. While there are numerous molecular markers (biochemical and genetic) associated with glaucoma in dogs, there is no ideal biomarker that allows early diagnosis and/or identification of disease progression. Genetic mutations associated with canine glaucoma include those affecting ADAMTS10, ADAMTS17, Myocilin, Nebulin, COL1A2, RAB22A, and SRBD1. With the exception of Myocilin, there is very limited crossover in genetic biomarkers identified between human and canine glaucomas. Mutations associated with canine glaucoma vary between and within canine breeds, and gene discoveries therefore have limited overall effects as a screening tool in the general canine population. Biochemical markers of glaucoma include indicators of inflammation, oxidative stress, serum autoantibodies, matrix metalloproteinases, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β. These markers include those that indicate an adaptive or protective response, as well as those that reflect the damage arising from oxidative stress.

  1. Lambdapapillomavirus 2 in a gray wolf (Canis lupus) from Minnesota with oral papillomatosis and sarcoptic mange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knowles, Susan N.; Windels, Steve K.; Adams, Marie; Hall, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Oral papillomatosis was diagnosed in a gray wolf (Canis lupus) with sarcoptic mange from Minnesota, USA found dead in February 2015. Intranuclear inclusion bodies were evident histologically, and papillomaviral antigens were confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Sequencing of the L1 papillomavirus gene showed closest similarity to Lambdapapillomavirus 2.

  2. Efficacy of oral zinc therapy in epidermodysplasia verruciformis with squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhanshu; Barman, Krishna Deb; Sarkar, Rashmi; Manjhi, Mukesh; Garg, Vijay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare, inherited disorder that predisposes patients to widespread human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas. There is still no definitive therapeutic modality for EV. A 24 year old male patient with EV was treated with oral zinc sulphate, one of the cheapest and safe immuno-modulator available as therapeutic agent with satisfactory result.

  3. Human papillomavirus detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vietía, Dayahindara; Liuzzi, Juan; Avila, Maira; De Guglielmo, Zoraya; Prado, Yrneh; Correnti, María

    2014-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with benign and malignant lesions in different epitheliums. The relationship between specific genotypes of high-risk HPV and some human cancers is well established. The aim of this work was to detect the HPV genotypes present in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We evaluated 71 samples of patients with histopathological diagnosis of HNSCC. The DNA extraction was conducted with the QIAGEN commercial kit. HPV detection and genotyping were performed by reverse hybridisation (INNO-LiPA) following the commercial specifications. The mean age of the patients evaluated was 60.7 ± 13.11 years. The distribution of the lesions included 25 (35.20%) cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity, 23 (32.39%) of larynx, 16 (22.50%) of the oropharynx, 4 (5.63%) of paranasal sinus, and 2 (2. 80%) cases of SCC of the nostril. Of the patients, 78.9% were males, and of these 76% were tobacco users and 67.6% were alcohol consumers. The viral DNA was detected in 67.6% of the samples. The oral cavity and the larynx were the highest HPV-positivity sites with 35.40% and 29.10% respectively. The most frequent genotype was 16 as single infection (18.70%), or in combination with another HPV types. In the oral cavity and larynx the genotypes 16 or the combination 6 and 51 were present in 11.76% and 14.28%, respectively; and in the oropharynx the most frequent genotype was 16 in 22.50% of the cases, and in the paranasal sinus 50% presented infection with HPV-6. We observed that tumours with most advanced size and stage presented greater HPV positivity. This study shows a high percentage of HPV positivity in SCC is mainly associated with high-risk HPV. It is important to highlight that viral infection, especially HPV-16, could be a risk factor in HNSCC progression.

  4. Human papillomavirus detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vietía, Dayahindara; Liuzzi, Juan; Ávila, Maira; De Guglielmo, Zoraya; Prado, Yrneh; Correnti, María

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with benign and malignant lesions in different epitheliums. The relationship between specific genotypes of high-risk HPV and some human cancers is well established. The aim of this work was to detect the HPV genotypes present in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods We evaluated 71 samples of patients with histopathological diagnosis of HNSCC. The DNA extraction was conducted with the QIAGEN commercial kit. HPV detection and genotyping were performed by reverse hybridisation (INNO-LiPA) following the commercial specifications. Results The mean age of the patients evaluated was 60.7 ± 13.11 years. The distribution of the lesions included 25 (35.20%) cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity, 23 (32.39%) of larynx, 16 (22.50%) of the oropharynx, 4 (5.63%) of paranasal sinus, and 2 (2. 80%) cases of SCC of the nostril. Of the patients, 78.9% were males, and of these 76% were tobacco users and 67.6% were alcohol consumers. The viral DNA was detected in 67.6% of the samples. The oral cavity and the larynx were the highest HPV-positivity sites with 35.40% and 29.10% respectively. The most frequent genotype was 16 as single infection (18.70%), or in combination with another HPV types. In the oral cavity and larynx the genotypes 16 or the combination 6 and 51 were present in 11.76% and 14.28%, respectively; and in the oropharynx the most frequent genotype was 16 in 22.50% of the cases, and in the paranasal sinus 50% presented infection with HPV-6. We observed that tumours with most advanced size and stage presented greater HPV positivity. Conclusions This study shows a high percentage of HPV positivity in SCC is mainly associated with high-risk HPV. It is important to highlight that viral infection, especially HPV-16, could be a risk factor in HNSCC progression. PMID:25374623

  5. Four novel papillomavirus sequences support a broad diversity among equine papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Lange, Christian E; Vetsch, Elisabeth; Ackermann, Mathias; Favrot, Claude; Tobler, Kurt

    2013-06-01

    Papillomaviruses appear to be species-specific pathogens, and it was suggested that each animal species might harbour its own set of papillomaviruses. However, all approaches addressing the underlying evolutionary phenomena still suffer from very limited data about animal papillomaviruses. In case of the horse for example, only three equine papillomaviruses (EcPVs) have been identified. To further address the situation in this host, suspected papillomavirus-associated lesions were tested for EcPV DNA. Four novel EcPV types were detected and their genomes entirely cloned and sequenced. They display the characteristic organization, with early (E) and late (L) regions harbouring the seven classical open reading frames divided by non-coding regions. They were named EcPVs 4, 5, 6 and 7, according to their dissimilarity to other papillomaviruses. Most L1 nucleotide identities were shared with EcPV2 in case of EcPV4 (62 %) and EcPV5 (60 %) or with EcPV3 in case of EcPV6 (70 %) and EcPV7 (71 %). Thus, EcPVs 4 and 5 may establish novel species within the genus Dyoiota, while EcPVs 6 and 7 might fit into the genus Dyorho and belong to the same species as EcPV3. They were found in genital plaques (EcPV4), aural plaques (EcPV5, EcPV6) or penile masses (EcPV7). Interestingly, PCR analysis revealed the DNA of EcPV2 and EcPV4 as well as of EcPV3 and EcPV6 together in the same tissue samples, respectively. In conclusion, the DNA of four novel EcPV types was identified and cloned. They cluster with the known types and support broad genetic EcPV diversity in at least two of the known clades. Furthermore, PCR assays also provide evidence for EcPV co-infections in horses.

  6. Prognostic value of p16 expression irrespective of human papillomavirus status in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuki; Yoshida, Masafumi; Omura, Go; Kobayashi, Kenya; Fujimoto, Chisato; Ando, Mizuo; Sakamoto, Takashi; Asakage, Takahiro; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-09-01

    In a previous study, we reported the value of p16 expression and alcohol consumption in oropharyngeal carcinoma in Japan. We now report the clinical significance of human papillomavirus status and p16 expression in oropharyngeal carcinoma in Japan. Over a 9-year period, a retrospective case comparison study of the pathology database was conducted at the University of Tokyo to identify tumor samples of oropharyngeal carcinoma. We performed immunohistochemistry for the p16 protein, in situ hybridization for human papillomavirus-deoxyribonucleic acid and polymerase chain reaction for the human papillomavirus-deoxyribonucleic acid oncogene E6 in oropharyngeal carcinoma in Japanese patients. We evaluated the human papillomavirus status in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma to determine its prevalence and association with prognosis. We defined human papillomavirus(+) and human papillomavirus(-) oropharyngeal carcinoma cohorts as those with and without polymerase chain reaction for the human papillomavirus-deoxyribonucleic acid oncogene E6 or in situ hybridization-human papillomavirus. In oropharyngeal carcinoma, the prevalences of p16(+)human papillomavirus(+), p16(+)human papillomavirus(-), p16(-)human papillomavirus(+) and p16(-)human papillomavirus(-) were 32% (48/150), 7% (10/150), 2% (3/150) and 59% (89/150), respectively. Low tobacco and alcohol consumption, tonsil or base of tongue localization, but not age, were associated with p16(+)human papillomavirus(+). Low alcohol consumption was associated with p16(+)human papillomavirus(-). There was a significant difference in overall survival between p16(+)human