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Sample records for canine tracheal smooth

  1. Mechanism of soman-induced contractions in canine tracheal smooth muscle. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.; Moore, D.H.; Filbert, M.G.

    1992-12-31

    The actions of the irreversible organophosphorus cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor soman were investigated on canine trachea smooth muscle in vitro. Concentrations of soman > or - 1 nM increased the amplitude and decay of contractions elicited by electric field stimulation. The effect on decay showed a marked dependence on stimulation frequency, undergoing a 2.4-fold increase between 3 and 60 Hz. Soman also potentiated tensions due to bath applied acetylcholine (ACh). Little or no potentiation was observed for contractions elicited by carbamylcholine, an agonist that is not hydrolyzed by ChE. Concentration of soman > or - 3 nM led to the appearance of sustained contractures. These contractures developed with a delayed onset and were well correlated with ChE activity. Alkylation of muscarinic receptors by propylbenzilylcholine mustard antagonized the actions of soman on both spontaneous and electrically-evoked muscle contractions. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which the toxic actions of soman are mediated by accumulation of neurally-released ACh secondary to inhibition of ChE activity. An important factor in this accumulation is suggested to be the buffering effect of the muscarinic receptors on the efflux of ACh from the neuroeffector junction. Tracheal smooth muscle, Cholinesterase inhibitors, Muscarinic receptor, Soman, Organophosphate.

  2. Contractile force and intracellular Ca2+ during relaxation of canine tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gunst, S J; Bandyopadhyay, S

    1989-08-01

    Muscle strips loaded with the Ca2+ indicator aequorin were studied in vitro to determine the effects of inhibitory stimuli on force and cytosolic free Ca2+. In muscles contracted isometrically with acetylcholine (ACh), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), carbachol, decreases in muscle force caused by isoproterenol (10(-5) M) or forskolin (10(-5) M) were accompanied by proportional decreases in aequorin luminescence. A similar relationship between decreases in muscle force and aequorin luminescence was observed when muscles were relaxed by stimulating Na+-K+-ATPase activity. These results suggest that the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile proteins was not decreased during adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent relaxation. However, aequorin luminescence did not decrease when muscles contracted by K+ depolarization were relaxed with isoproterenol. Incubation of muscles in forskolin depressed increases in both force and aequorin luminescence in response to 5-HT or ACh. Incubation of muscles in isoproterenol had a similar effect on responses to 5-HT but depressed increases in force without depressing increases in luminescence in response to ACh. Results indicate that under most conditions the reduction of cytosolic Ca2+ plays an important role in the cAMP-dependent relaxation of canine tracheal smooth muscle.

  3. Intracellular calcium in canine cultured tracheal smooth muscle cells is regulated by M3 muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, C. M.; Yo, Y. L.; Wang, Y. Y.

    1993-01-01

    1. The regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) during exposure to carbachol was measured directly in canine cultured tracheal smooth muscle cells (TSMCs) loaded with fura-2. Stimulation of muscarinic cholinoceptors (muscarinic AChRs) by carbachol produced a dose-dependent rise in [Ca2+]i which was followed by a stable plateau phase. The EC50 values of carbachol for the peak and sustained plateau responses were 0.34 and 0.33 microM, respectively. 2. Atropine (10 microM) prevented all the responses to carbachol, and when added during a response to carbachol, significantly, but not completely decreased [Ca2+]i within 5 s. Therefore, the changes in [Ca2+]i by carbachol were mediated through the muscarinic AChRs. 3. AF-DX 116 (a selective M2 antagonist) and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP, a selective M3 antagonist) inhibited the carbachol-stimulated increase in [Ca2+]i with pKB values of 6.4 and 9.4, respectively, corresponding to low affinity for AF-DX 119 and high affinity for 4-DAMP in antagonizing this response. 4. The plateau elevation of [Ca2+]i was dependent on the presence of external Ca2+. Removal of Ca2+ by the addition of 2 mM EGTA caused the [Ca2+]i to decline rapidly to the resting level. In the absence of external Ca2+, only an initial transient peak of [Ca2+]i was seen which then declined to the resting level; the sustained elevation of [Ca2+]i could then be evoked by the addition of Ca2+ (1.8 mM) in the continued presence of carbachol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8298822

  4. Anisotropic properties of tracheal smooth muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Sarma, P A; Pidaparti, R M; Meiss, R A

    2003-04-01

    The anisotropic (directional-dependent) properties of contracting tracheal smooth muscle tissue are estimated from a computational model based on the experimental data of length-dependent stiffness. The area changes are obtained at different muscle lengths from experiments in which stimulated muscle undergoes unrestricted shortening. Then, through an interative process, the anisotropic properties are estimated by matching the area changes obtained from the finite element analysis to those derived from the experiments. The results obtained indicate that the anisotropy ratio (longitudinal stiffness to transverse stiffness) is about 4 when the smooth muscle undergoes 70% strain shortening, indicating that the transverse stiffness reduces as the longitudinal stiffness increases. It was found through a sensitivity analysis from the simulation model that the longitudinal stiffness and the in-plane shear modulus are not very sensitive as compared to major Poisson's ratio to the area changes of the muscle tissue. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Involvement of MAPKs, NF-{kappa}B and p300 co-activator in IL-1{beta}-induced cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} expression in canine tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S.-F.; Lin, C.-C.; Chen, H.-C.; Lin, W.-N.; Lee, I-T.; Lee, C.-W.; Hsiao, L.-D.; Yang, C.-M.

    2008-11-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}) plays a pivotal role in mediating agonist-induced arachidonic acid release for prostaglandin (PG) synthesis during stimulation with interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}). However, the mechanisms underlying IL-1{beta}-induced cPLA{sub 2} expression and PGE{sub 2} synthesis by canine tracheal smooth muscle cells (CTSMCs) have not been defined. IL-1{beta} induced cPLA{sub 2} protein and mRNA expression, PGE{sub 2} production, and phosphorylation of p42/p44 MAPK, p38 MAPK (ATF{sub 2}), and JNK (c-Jun) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, determined by Western blotting, RT-PCR, and ELISA, which was attenuated by the inhibitors of MEK1/2 (U0126), p38 MAPK (SB202190), and JNK (SP600125), or transfection with dominant negative mutants of MEK1/2, p38, and JNK, respectively. Furthermore, IL-1{beta}-induced cPLA{sub 2} expression and PGE{sub 2} synthesis was inhibited by a selective NF-{kappa}B inhibitor (helenalin) or transfection with dominant negative mutants of NF-{kappa}B inducing kinase (NIK), I{kappa}B kinase (IKK)-{alpha}, and IKK-{beta}. Consistently, IL-1{beta} stimulated both I{kappa}B-{alpha} degradation and NF-{kappa}B translocation into nucleus in these cells. NF-{kappa}B translocation was blocked by helenalin, but not by U0126, SB202190, and SP600125. MAPKs together with NF-{kappa}B-activated p300 recruited to cPLA{sub 2} promoter thus facilitating the binding of NF-{kappa}B to cPLA{sub 2} promoter region and expression of cPLA{sub 2} mRNA. IL-1{beta}-induced cPLA{sub 2} expression and PGE{sub 2} production was inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating the involvement of transcriptional and translational events in these responses. These results suggest that in CTSMCs, IL-1{beta}-induced cPLA{sub 2} expression and PGE{sub 2} synthesis was independently mediated through activation of MAPKs and NF-{kappa}B pathways and was connected to p300 recruitment and activation.

  6. Menthol inhibiting parasympathetic function of tracheal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Menthol is used as a constituent of food and drink, tobacco and cosmetics nowadays. This cold receptor agonist has been used as a nasal inhalation solution in the daily life. The effect of menthol on nasal mucosa in vivo is well known; however, the effect of the drug on tracheal smooth muscle has been rarely explored. Therefore, during administration of the drug for nasal symptoms, it might also affect the trachea via oral intake or inhalation. We used our preparation to test the effectiveness of menthol on isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle. A 5 mm long portion of rat trachea was submersed in 30 ml Krebs solution in a muscle bath at 37ºC. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of a parasympathetic mimetic agent were measured using a transducer connected to a Pentium III computer equipped with polygraph software. The following assessments of menthol were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10-6 M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic; (3) effect of the drug on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. Results indicated that addition of a parasympathetic mimetic to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of menthol at doses of 10-5 M or above elicited a relaxation response to 10-6 M methacholine-induced contraction. Menthol could also inhibit electrical field stimulation (EFS) induced spike contraction. However, it alone had a minimal effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. We concluded that the degree of drug-induced tracheal contraction or relaxation was dose-dependent. In addition, this study indicated that high concentrations of menthol might actually inhibit parasympathetic function of the trachea. PMID:27994497

  7. Endothelin stimulates chloride secretion across canine tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Plews, P I; Abdel-Malek, Z A; Doupnik, C A; Leikauf, G D

    1991-08-01

    The endothelins (ET) are a group of isopeptides produced by a number of cells, including canine tracheal epithelial cells. Because these compounds are endogenous peptides that may activate eicosanoid metabolism, we investigated the effects of ET on Cl secretion in canine tracheal epithelium. Endothelin 1 (ET-1) was found to produce a dose-dependent change in short-circuit current (Isc) that increased slowly and reached a maximal value within 10-15 min. When isopeptides of ET were compared, 300 nM ET-1 and ET-2 produced comparable maximal increases in Isc, whereas ET-3 produced smaller changes in Isc (half-maximal concentrations of 2.2, 7.2, and 10.4 nM, respectively). Ionic substitution of Cl with nontransported anions, iodide and gluconate, reduced ET-1-induced changes in Isc. Furthermore, the response was inhibited by the NaCl cotransport inhibitor, furosemide. In paired tissues, ET-1 significantly increased mucosal net 36Cl flux without significant effect on 22Na flux. The increase in Isc induced by ET was diminished by pretreatment with indomethacin. The second messengers mediating the increase in Isc were investigated in cultured canine tracheal epithelial cells. ET-1 stimulated the release of [3H]arachidonate from membrane phospholipids, increased intracellular Ca2+ (occasionally producing oscillations), and increased adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate accumulation. The latter was diminished by indomethacin. Thus ET is a potent agonist of Cl secretion (with the isopeptides having the following potency: ET-1 greater than or equal to ET-2 greater than ET-3) and acts, in part, through a cyclooxygenase-dependent mechanism.

  8. Cigarette smoke inhibition of ion transport in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    To determine the effect of cigarette smoke on airway epithelial ion transport, the electrical properties and transepithelial Na and Cl fluxes were measured in canine tracheal epithelium. In vivo, the inhalation of the smoke from one cigarette acutely and reversibly decreased the electrical potential difference across the tracheal epithelium. In vitro, exposure of the mucosal surface of the epithelium to cigarette smoke decreased the short circuit current and transepithelial resistance. The decrease in short circuit current was due to an inhibition of the rate of Cl secretion with minimal effect on the rate of Na absorption. The effect of cigarette smoke was reversible, was not observed upon exposure of the submucosal surface to smoke, and was most pronounced when secretion was stimulated. The particulate phase of smoke was largely responsible for the inhibitory effect, since filtering the smoke minimized the effect. The effect of cigarette smoke was not prevented by addition of antioxidants to the bathing solutions, suggesting that the inhibition of Cl secretion cannot be entirely attributed to an oxidant mechanism. These results indicate that cigarette smoke acutely inhibits active ion transport by tracheal epithelium, both in vivo and in vitro. This effect may explain, in part, both the abnormal mucociliary clearance and the airway disease observed in cigarette smokers.

  9. Inhibition of tracheal smooth muscle contraction and myosin phosphorylation by ryanodine

    SciTech Connect

    Gerthoffer, W.T.; Murphey, K.A.; Khoyi, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that muscarinic activation of airway smooth muscle in low Ca++ solutions increases myosin phosphorylation without increasing tension. Blocking Ca++ influx reduced phosphorylation, but not to basal levels. It was proposed that release of intracellular Ca++ contributed to dissociation of phosphorylation and contraction. To test this hypothesis the effects of ryanodine were studied under similar conditions. Ryanodine (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) antagonized caffeine-induced contraction of canine tracheal smooth muscle. Ryanodine also reduced carbachol-induced contractions and carbachol-induced myosin phosphorylation. The effect of ryanodine on potassium and serotonin-induced contractions was also investigated to test for a nonspecific inhibitory effect. In contrast to the effect on carbachol responses, ryanodine (10(-5) M) potentiated the contractile response to low concentrations of serotonin and potassium, but had no effect on the maximum response to either stimulant. Carbachol (10(-6) M) and ryanodine (10(-5) M) both significantly decreased /sup 45/Ca++ content of tracheal muscle. The effect of ryanodine and carbachol together on /sup 45/Ca++ content was not greater than either drug alone suggesting that ryanodine reduces the caffeine and carbachol responses by depleting releaseable Ca++ stores. Ryanodine significantly reduced Ca++-induced contraction and myosin phosphorylation in carbachol-stimulated muscle, suggesting that some of the Ca++ responsible for elevated phosphorylation is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  10. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  11. Macromolecular properties and polymeric structure of canine tracheal mucins.

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, V; Virmani, A K; Naziruddin, B; Sachdev, G P

    1991-01-01

    Two high-Mr mucus glycoproteins (mucins), CTM-A and CTM-B, were highly purified from canine tracheal pouch secretions, and their macromolecular properties as well as polymeric structure were investigated. On SDS/composite-gel electrophoresis, a diffuse band was observed for each mucin. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis using 6% gels also showed the absence of low-Mr contaminants in the mucins. Comparison of chemical and amino acid compositions revealed significant differences between the two mucins. Using a static-laser-light-scattering technique, CTM-A and CTM-B were found to have weight-average Mr values of about 11.0 x 10(6) and 1.4 x 10(6) respectively. Both mucins showed concentration-dependent aggregation in buffer containing 6 M-guanidine hydrochloride. Under similar experimental conditions, reduced-alkylated CTM-A had an Mr of 5.48 x 10(6) and showed no concentration-dependent aggregation. Hydrophobic properties of the mucins, investigated by the fluorescent probe technique using mansylphenylalanine as the probe, showed the presence of a large number of low-affinity (KD approx. 10(5) M) binding sites. These sites appeared to be located on the non-glycosylated regions of the protein core, since Pronase digestion of the mucins almost completely eliminated probe binding. Reduction of disulphide bonds of CTM-A and CTM-B did not significantly alter the probe-binding properties. Also, addition of increasing NaCl concentrations (0.03-1.0 M) to the buffer caused only a small change in the hydrophobic properties of native and reduced-alkylated mucins. CTM-A was deglycosylated, without notable in the hydrophobic properties of native and reduced-alkylated mucins. CTM-A was deglycosylated, without notable degradation, using a combination of chemical and enzymic methods. On SDS/PAGE the protein core was estimated to have an Mr of approx. 60,000. On the basis of the protein and carbohydrate contents of the major mucin CTM-A, the mucin monomer was calculated to have an

  12. Substance P Regulates Environmental Tobacco Smoke-Enhanced Tracheal Smooth Muscle Responsiveness in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lan; Wu, Zhong-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is an environmental trigger that leads to airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in susceptible individuals and animals, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Substance P (SP) release from sensory nerve fibers has been linked to AHR. The present experiments characterize the role of SP in tracheal smooth muscle on ETS-increased airway responses. The mice were exposed to either sidestream tobacco smoke (SS), a surrogate to ETS, or filtered air (FA) for 1 day or 5 consecutive days. Contractions of tracheal smooth muscle to SP and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were not significantly altered in 1 of day SS-exposed mice. However, 5 of days SS exposure significantly increased airway smooth muscle contractions to SP and EFS. Administration of CP-99994, an antagonist of the neurokinin (NK)1 receptor, attenuates the SS exposure-enhanced tracheal smooth muscle responses to EFS. Furthermore, the immunohistochemistry showed that SP nerve fibers were increased in tracheal smooth muscle after 5 of days SS exposure. These results suggest that the increased SP production may contribute to SS-enhanced smooth muscle responsiveness in mice trachea. PMID:22927867

  13. Activity of guanylyl cyclase activators on the reaction of tracheal smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Glaza, Izabela; Szadujkis-Szadurski, Leszek; Szadujkis-Szadurski, Rafał; Gajdus, Marta; Rzepka, Alicja; Gurtowska, Natalia

    2011-08-05

    The subject of the study compare the influences of YC-1 guanylyl cyclase activator with ODQ guanylyl cyclase inhibitor on the tracheal smooth muscle contraction induced by carbachol. The study specified the influence of increasing concentrations of soluble guanylyl cyclase activators YC-1 and 8Br cGMP on the reaction of tracheal smooth muscle contraction released by carbachol. The author also examined the effect of increasing concentrations of soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ on the concentration-effect curves for carbachol. Testing was conducted on an isolated trachea of both sexes of Wistar rats with weight ranging between 350 g and 450 g. Tracheas were prepared in accordance with the Akcasu (1959) method in Szadujkis-Szadurski (1996) modification. Concentration-effect curves were determined with the use of cumulated concentration method, in accordance with the van Rossum method (1963) in Kenakin (2006) modification. According to conducted testing, activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase with the use of YC-1 and 8Br cGMP caused reduced reaction of the tracheal smooth muscle with carbachol on average to 80%. Comparing concentration-effect curves for carbachol before and after the use of 8Br cGMP, similar results were obtained for those released by YC-1. On the other hand, increasing concentrations of guanylyl cyclase inhibitor - ODQ cause shift of curves to the left, decrease of EC(50) value and an increase of maximum reaction to carbachol. Carbachol, depending on concentration, causes tracheal smooth muscle contraction. According to testing, we can confirm that activation of guanylyl cyclase leads to reduction of the reaction of tracheal smooth muscle to carbachol on average up to 80%

  14. Correlation of tracheal smooth muscle function with structure and protein expression during early development.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Aaron B; Cooke, Peter H; Driska, Steven P; Wolfson, Marla R; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2007-05-01

    With increased survival of premature infants, understanding the impact of development on airway function and structure is imperative. Airway smooth muscle plays a primary role in the modulation of airway function. The purpose of this study is to correlate the functional maturation of airway smooth muscle during the perinatal period with structural alterations at the cellular, ultrastructural, and molecular levels. Length-tension and dose-response analyses were performed on tracheal rings acquired from preterm and term newborn lambs. Subsequent structural analyses included isolated airway smooth muscle cell length, electron microscopy, and myosin heavy chain isoform expression measurements. Functionally the compliance, contractility, and agonist sensitivity of the tracheal rings matured during preterm to term development. Structurally, isolated cell lengths and electron microscopic ultrastructure were not significantly altered during perinatal development. However, expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms increased significantly across the age range analyzed, correlating with the maturational increase in smooth muscle contractility. In conclusion, the developmental alterations in tracheal function appear due, in part, to enhanced smooth muscle myosin heavy chain expression. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Paclitaxel Drug-eluting Tracheal Stent Could Reduce Granulation Tissue Formation in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Juan; Pei, Ying-Hua; Qiu, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Yu-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background: Currently available silicone and metallic stents for tracheal stenosis are associated with many problems. Granulation proliferation is one of the main complications. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of paclitaxel drug-eluting tracheal stent in reducing granulation tissue formation in a canine model, as well as the pharmacokinetic features and safety profiles of the coated drug. Methods: Eight beagles were randomly divided into a control group (bare-metal stent group, n = 4) and an experimental group (paclitaxel-eluting stent group, n = 4). The observation period was 5 months. One beagle in both groups was sacrificed at the end of the 1st and 3rd months, respectively. The last two beagles in both groups were sacrificed at the end of 5th month. The proliferation of granulation tissue and changes in tracheal mucosa were compared between the two groups. Blood routine and liver and kidney function were monitored to evaluate the safety of the paclitaxel-eluting stent. The elution method and high-performance liquid chromatography were used to characterize the rate of in vivo release of paclitaxel from the stent. Results: Compared with the control group, the proliferation of granulation tissue in the experimental group was significantly reduced. The drug release of paclitaxel-eluting stent was the fastest in the 1st month after implantation (up to 70.9%). Then, the release slowed down gradually. By the 5th month, the release reached up to 98.5%. During the observation period, a high concentration of the drug in the trachea (in the stented and adjacent unstented areas) and lung tissue was not noted, and the blood test showed no side effect. Conclusions: The paclitaxel-eluting stent could safely reduce the granulation tissue formation after stent implantation in vivo, suggesting that the paclitaxel-eluting tracheal stent might be considered for potential use in humans in the future. PMID:27824004

  16. Effect of Variations in Stent Placement on Outcome of Endoluminal Stenting for Canine Tracheal Collapse.

    PubMed

    Rosenheck, Stephanie; Davis, Garrett; Sammarco, Carl D; Bastian, Richard

    2017-03-14

    The study's objective was to determine effects of relative size and placement location of endoluminal stents on incidence of complications and survival for canine tracheal collapse. Measurements were obtained on lateral radiographs before and after stenting to determine percent of the trachea occupied by the stent. These values were monitored over time and compared to complication rates and survival. Overall median survival time was 502 days. Six month survival rate was 78%, 1 yr survival was 60%, and 2 yr survival was 26%. Median percent of trachea occupied by the stent at initial placement was 79% (range, 41-93%). Percent of the trachea occupied by the stent at the time of placement did not significantly correlate to complication rate (0.397) or survival time (0.853). Incidence of serious complications was 37%, including granuloma formation, pneumonia, material failure, and stent migration. For patients experiencing serious complications, median survival was shorter, at 208 days, but was not significantly different from survival without serious complications. Within the margins of the data from this study, the proportion of the trachea occupied by the stent at the time of placement does not appear to impact incidence of complications or survival time in dogs with tracheal collapse.

  17. Red wine polyphenolic compounds inhibit tracheal smooth muscle contraction during allergen-induced hyperreactivity of the airways.

    PubMed

    Franova, Sona; Nosalova, Gabriela; Pechanova, Olga; Sutovska, Martina

    2007-05-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate the short and long-term effects of Provinol (red wine polyphenolic compounds) on tracheal smooth muscle reactivity using an in-vitro model of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in guinea-pig trachea, and to evaluate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the bronchodilatory effect of Provinol. The amplitude of tracheal smooth muscle contraction in response to mediators of bronchoconstriction - histamine (10 nM-1 mM), acetylcholine (10 nM-1 mM) and to allergen (ovalbumin 10(-5)-10(-3) g mL(-1)) was used as a parameter of tracheal smooth muscle reactivity. To test the short-term effects of Provinol, isolated tracheal strips were pre-treated for 30 min with Provinol (10(-4) mg mL(-1)) alone or in combination with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10(-6) mol L(-1)). To test the long-term effects of Provinol, isolated tracheal strips were prepared from guinea pigs that had been treated for 14 days with Provinol (20 mg kg(-1) per day) alone or in combination with L-NAME (40 mg kg(-1) per day). Incubation of tracheal smooth muscle with Provinol decreased the amplitude of contraction in response to ovalbumin, histamine and acetylcholine. The non-selective NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME partially abolished the effect of Provinol on acetylcholine and ovalbumin-induced but not histamine-induced bronchoconstriction. A similar profile was observed after 14 days' oral administration of Provinol. In conclusion, Provinol inhibited the allergen- and spasmogen-induced contraction of tracheal smooth muscle in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs via a mechanism that was mediated at least partially through the metabolism of NO.

  18. Relaxation of tracheal smooth muscle independent on functional epithelium cells induced by lidocaine, bupivacaine and isomers in rats.

    PubMed

    Lautner, Roberto Q; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Sudo, Roberto T

    2009-05-21

    Lidocaine is a local anesthetic which has been used to protect spasm reaction during tracheal intubation and bronchoscopy. We compared the potency of lidocaine, bupivacaine (RS(+/-)-bupivacaine) and isomers (S(-)-bupivacaine and R(+)-bupivacaine) to promote relaxation of tracheal smooth muscle. Relaxation of airways smooth muscle can be dependent on the release of relaxing factors by epithelium such as prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Possible mechanisms involved in the tracheal smooth muscle relaxation induced by these local anesthetics were evaluated in preparation in which the epithelium layer was intact or denuded. Bupivacaine and its isomers were approximately six to eleven-fold more potent than lidocaine to promote relaxation on acetylcholine-induced contraction in tracheal rings. The concentration of lidocaine, RS(+/-)-bupivacaine, S(-)-bupivacaine and R(+)-bupivacaine necessary to produce a 50% reduction of maximal contraction to acetylcholine (IC(50)) in tracheal rings with intact epithelium was 1.25+/-0.01, 0.11+/-0.01, 0.15+/-0.01, 0.19+/-0.01 mM, respectively. Removal of epithelium or exposure to N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, indomethacin did not alter the IC(50). However, calcium influx of depolarized tracheal smooth muscle was inhibited by lidocaine, bupivacaine and isomers. S(-)-bupivacaine reduced by 78.8+/-7.4% the calcium influx followed by RS(+/-)-bupivacaine (41.8+/-6.7%) and R(+)-bupivacaine (25.6+/-9.5%). In conclusion, local anesthetic action was stereoselective and partially dependent on blockade of Ca(2+) influx to muscular cells. The isomer S(-)-bupivacaine is more potent and less toxic which could represent a valuable clinical advantage to use as broncholitic agent.

  19. Theophylline attenuates Ca2+ sensitivity and modulates BK channels in porcine tracheal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ise, Shinji; Nishimura, Junji; Hirano, Katsuya; Hara, Nobuyuki; Kanaide, Hideo

    2003-01-01

    Theophylline, a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has long been regarded as a major bronchodilator in the treatment of human asthma. Using front-surface fluorometry with fura-2 and α-toxin permeabilization, the effects of theophylline on intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), tension development and Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus were investigated in porcine tracheal smooth muscle strips. Application of theophylline induced a relaxation without a significant decrease in [Ca2+]i when strips were precontracted by 40 mM K+ depolarization, while theophylline significantly decreased both [Ca2+]i and tension induced by carbachol. The effects of theophylline on the increases in [Ca2+]i and tension induced by carbachol were significantly inhibited by iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, theophylline significantly attenuated carbachol-induced transient increases in tension development, while it did not affect carbachol-induced transient increase in [Ca2+]i. The [Ca2+]i–force relationship, which was determined by cumulative applications of extracellular Ca2+ (0–5 mM) during 40 mM K+ depolarization, was significantly shifted to the right by theophylline. In α-toxin permeabilized strips, theophylline significantly increased the EC50 value of [Ca2+]i for contraction and enhanced the effect of cAMP, but not of cGMP. These results indicate that theophylline induces relaxation of the porcine tracheal smooth muscle through an activation of BK channels, and a resultant decrease in [Ca2+]i and an attenuation of Ca2+ sensitivity, presumably through the action of cAMP. PMID:14517178

  20. A canine model of tracheal stenosis induced by cuffed endotracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhuquan; Li, Shiyue; Zhou, Ziqing; Chen, Xiaobo; Gu, Yingying; Chen, Yu; Zhong, Changhao; Zhong, Minglu; Zhong, Nanshan

    2017-01-01

    Postintubation tracheal stenosis is a complication of endotracheal intubation. The pathological mechanism and risk factors for endotracheal intubation-induced tracheal stenosis remain not fully understood. We aimed to establish an animal model and to investigate risk factors for postintubation tracheal stenosis. Beagles were intubated with 4 sized tubes (internal diameter 6.5 to 8.0 mm) and cuff pressures of 100 to 200 mmHg for 24 hr. The status of tracheal wall was evaluated by bronchoscopic and histological examinations. The model was successfully established by cuffed endotracheal intubation using an 8.0 mm tube and an intra-cuff pressure of 200 mmHg for 24 hr. When the intra-cuff pressures were kept constant, a larger sized tube would induce a larger tracheal wall pressure and more severe injury to the tracheal wall. The degree of tracheal stenosis ranged from 78% to 91% at 2 weeks postextubation. Histological examination demonstrated submucosal infiltration of inflammatory cells, hyperplasia of granulation tissue and collapse of tracheal cartilage. In summary, a novel animal model of tracheal stenosis was established by cuffed endotracheal intubation, whose histopathological feathers are similar to those of clinical cases of postintubation tracheal stenosis. Excessive cuff pressure and over-sized tube are the risk factors for postintubation tracheal stenosis. PMID:28349955

  1. Leukotriene D4 receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositide and mobilization of calcium in sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mong, S.; Miller, J.; Wu, H.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    A sheep tracheal smooth muscle primary culture cell system was developed to characterize leukotriene D4 (LTD4) receptor-mediated biochemical and pharmacological effects. (/sup 3/H)LTD4 binding to the enriched plasma membrane receptor was specific, stereoselective and saturable. LTE4 and high affinity receptor antagonists bound to the receptors with a rank-order potency that was expected from previous smooth muscle contraction studies. In the (/sup 3/H)myoinositol labeled cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-trisphosphate was rapid and the induction of biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-monophosphate by LTs was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited specifically by a receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. In the fura-2 loaded smooth muscle cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced transient intracellular Ca++ mobilization. The fura-2/Ca++ transient was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited by receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. These results suggest that the cultured sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells have plasma membrane receptors for LTD4. These receptors were coupled to a phospholipase C that, when activated by agonists, induced hydrolysis of inositol containing phospholipids. The hydrolysis products, e.g. diacylglycerol and inositol-trisphosphate, may serve as intracellular messengers that trigger or contribute to the contractile effect in sheep tracheal smooth muscle.

  2. Role of intracellular pH in relaxation of porcine tracheal smooth muscle by respiratory gases.

    PubMed

    Croxton, T L; Lande, B; Hirshman, C A

    1995-02-01

    Hypercapnia and hypoxia both relax airway smooth muscle, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Because hypercapnia and hypoxia can each decrease intracellular pH (pHi) and acidosis can inhibit Ca2+ channels, we hypothesized that decreased pHi mediates relaxation of trachealis muscle by each of these respiratory gases. To examine the relationship between pHi and tone, we measured isometric tension, bath pH, and fluorescence intensity (540 nm) in porcine tracheal smooth muscle strips loaded with 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein and excited alternately with 440- and 500-nm light. Strips equilibrated in Krebs-Henseleit solution bubbled with 95% O2-5% CO2 were contracted with carbachol and then relaxed with either 95% N2-5% CO2 or 93% O2-7% CO2. The ratio of fluorescence intensity at 500 nm to 440 nm was calibrated vs. pHi with use of nigericin. Baseline pHi was 7.19 +/- 0.03 (n = 13). Hypoxia decreased active tension by approximately 60% but did not change pHi. Hypercapnia induced decreases in tension that were associated with substantial decreases in pHi. Thus, decreased pHi does not mediate hypoxic relaxation, but the relaxation during physiologically relevant increases in CO2 concentration is associated with significant cellular acidification.

  3. Analysis of cytokine production in a newly developed canine tracheal epithelial cell line infected with H3N2 canine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo-Jung; Park, Byung-Joo; Song, Young-Jo; Lee, Dong-Hun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Choi, In-Soo

    2015-06-01

    The Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line is typically used to analyze pathological features after canine influenza virus (CIV) infection. However, MDCK cells are not the ideal cell type, because they are kidney epithelial cells. Therefore, we generated an immortalized canine tracheal epithelial cell line, KU-CBE, to more reliably study immune responses to CIV infection in the respiratory tract. KU-CBE cells expressed the influenza virus receptor, α-2,3-sialic acid (SA), but not α-2,6-SA. KU-CBE and MDCK cells infected with H3N2 CIV demonstrated comparable virus growth kinetics. Gene expression levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interferon (IFN)-β were estimated in both KU-CBE and MDCK cells infected with CIV by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Of these cytokines, IL-4, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-β mRNAs were detected in both cell lines. Gene expression of IL-4, IL-10, and TNF-α was not significantly different in the two cell lines. However, MDCK cells exhibited a significantly higher level of IFN-β mRNA than KU-CBE cells at 18 h post infection. Additionally, the protein concentrations of these four cytokines were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using cell culture supernatants obtained from the two CIV-infected cell lines. MDCK cells produced significantly higher amounts of IL-4 and IFN-β than KU-CBE cells. However, KU-CBE cells produced a significantly higher amount of TNF-α than MDCK cells. These data indicated that the newly developed canine tracheal epithelial cells exhibited different cytokine production patterns compared to MDCK cells when infected with CIV. Inflammation of the respiratory tract of dogs induced by CIV infection may be attributed to the elevated expression level of TNF-α in canine tracheal epithelial cells.

  4. Hydro-ethanolic Extract of Portulaca oleracea Affects Beta-adrenoceptors of Guinea Pig Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Hashemzehi, Milad; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Askari, Vahid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Thestimulatory effect of the extract of Portulaca oleracea (P. olerace) on β-adrenoceptor of tracheal smooth muscle was examined.To examine β-adrenoceptor stimulatory effect, concentration response curve to isoprenaline was obtained in pre-contracted tracheal smooth muscle in the presence of three concentrations of aqueous-ethanolic extract, propranolol, and saline. Values of EC50 (the effective concentration of isoprenaline, causing 50% of maximum response) and dose ratio-1(CR-1) were measured. This effect was tested innon-incubated tracheal smooth muscle (group 1) and incubated tissues with chlorpheniramine (group 2). Concentration-response curves to isoprenaline in the presence of two higher concentrations of the extract in group 1 and all three concentrations in group 2 showed leftward shifts compared to isoprenaline curves produced in the presence of saline in both groups. EC50 obtained in the presence of propranolol was significantly higher than that of saline in both groups of experiments (p<0.05 for both cases). However, the EC50 obtained in the presence of two higher concentrations of the extract in group 1 and lower concentration in group 2 were non-significantly but those obtained of medium and high extract concentrations in the group 2 were significantly (p<0.05 for both cases)lower than those of saline. The values of (CR-1) obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract in groups1 and 2 were significantly lower than that of propranolol (p<0.05 to p<0.001).The results indicated a stimulatory effect of the P. olerace extract on ß 2-adrenoceptors of tracheal smooth muscle. PMID:28243284

  5. Novel relaxant effects of RPL554 on guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle contractility

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasamy, R

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose We investigated the effectiveness of RPL554, a dual PDE3 and 4 enzyme inhibitor, on airway smooth muscle relaxation and compared it with that induced by salbutamol, ipratropium bromide, glycopyrrolate or their combination on bronchomotor tone induced by different spasmogenic agents. Experimental Approach Guinea pig tracheal preparations were suspended under 1 g tension in Krebs–Henseleit solution maintained at 37°C and aerated with 95% O2/5% CO2 and incubated in the presence of indomethacin (5 μM). Relaxation induced by cumulative concentrations of muscarinic receptor antagonists (ipratropium bromide or glycopyrrolate), β2‐adrenoceptor agonists (salbutamol or formoterol), PDE3 inhibitors (cilostamide, cilostazol or siguazodan) or a PDE4 inhibitor (roflumilast) was evaluated in comparison with RPL554. Maximal relaxation was calculated (% Emax papaverine) and expressed as mean ± SEM. Key Results Bronchomotor tone induced by the various spasmogens was reduced by the different bronchodilators to varying degrees. RPL554 (10‐300 μM) caused near maximum relaxation irrespective of the spasmogen examined, whereas the efficacy of the other relaxant agents varied according to the contractile stimulus used. During the evaluation of potential synergistic interactions between bronchodilators, RPL554 proved superior to salbutamol when either was combined with muscarinic receptor antagonists. Conclusions and implications RPL554 produced near maximal relaxation of highly contracted respiratory smooth muscle and provided additional relaxation compared with that produced by other clinically used bronchodilator drugs. This suggests that RPL554 has the potential to produce additional beneficial bronchodilation over and above that of maximal clinical doses of standard bronchodilators in highly constricted airways of patients. PMID:27174172

  6. [Effect of the hyaluronic acid on tracheal healing. A canine experimental mode].

    PubMed

    Olmos-Zúñiga, J R; Santos-Cordero, J A; Jasso-Victoria, R; Sotres-Vega, A; Gaxiola-Gaxiola, M O; Mora-Fol, J R; Franco-Oropeza, J A; Santillan-Doherty, P

    2004-02-01

    Several drugs have been used to modulate of the tracheal healing process in order to prevent tracheal stenosis. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a modulator of the fibrogenesis. In this work we evaluate the effect in order the application of hyaluronic acid has on tracheal healing, after cervical tracheoplasty in dogs. A cervical tracheal resection and tracheoplasty was performed in 12 dogs and they were treated following surgery as follows: Group I (n = 6) Topical application of normal saline solution (0.9%) on the anastomosis site. Group II Topical application of hyaluronic acid on the trachea anastomosed. The animals were evaluated clinical, radiological and tracheoscopically during 4 weeks and were submitted to euthanasia. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations of the tracheal anastomotic healing were evaluated. Biochemical collagen quantification by the Woessner method was performed to evaluate the collagen development at the anastomotic site. All the animals survived the surgical procedure and the study time. No animal presented differences in clinical evaluation. Radiological and endoscopical findings both two showed more development of the tracheal stenosis in-group than in group II. The tracheoscopy and macroscopic studies showed major inflammation and development of fibrotic tissue with a firm consistency in the healing of the group I than in group II. Microscopic examination in group I showed severe fibrosis and inflammatory reaction. The group II presented deposits of a thin and organized collagen fibers and minimal inflammatory reaction. Biochemical collagen concentration was larger in-group I, however significantly. We conclude that the hyaluronic acid applied after cervical tracheoplasty in dogs reduces postsurgical tracheal stenosis and inflammation, as well as improve the quality of the tracheal healing.

  7. Biochemical characterization of a V-ATPase of tracheal smooth muscle plasma membrane fraction.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, G; Lippo de Bécemberg, I; Gonzalez de Alfonzo, R; Alfonzo, M J

    1996-07-25

    A biochemical characterization of a Mg(2+)-ATPase activity associated with a plasma membrane fraction isolated from airway (tracheal) smooth muscle was performed. This enzyme is an integral part of the membrane remaining tightly bound after 0.6 M KCl extraction. This enzyme activity showed a cold inactivation in the presence of ATP and Mg2+. Also, this Mg(2+)-ATPase was stimulated by monovalent anions being Cl-, the best anion for such stimulation, even though Br- and I- were good substitutes and F- was ineffective. This Cl--stimulated activity showed a powerful nucleosidetriphosphatase activity having the following divalent cation specificity: Mg2+ > Mn2+ > Ca2+, where Zn2+ and Fe2+ were ineffective. This ATPase activity was not inhibited by ouabain oligomycin C and vanadate indicating that neither P- or F-ATPases were associated with this enzyme activity. However, the existence of a V-ATPase was shown by the significant inhibition causes by bafilomycin A1. Additionally, this V-ATPase seems to be coupled to Cl- conductor because duramycin inhibited this ATPase activity. The presence of a H+ pump associated to this V-ATPase was shown indirectly, through the stimulatory effect produced by uncouplers such as FCCP and 1799, which were able to produce significant stimulation of this V-ATPase indicating the existence of a H(+)-ATPase. Finally, the immunodetection of a 72 kDa polypeptide using a specific antibody against the A subunit (72 kDa) of V-ATPase from chromaffin granule demonstrated the presence of a V-ATPase in this plasma membrane fraction.

  8. A review of the relaxant effect of various medicinal plants on tracheal smooth muscle, their possible mechanism(s) and potency.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Farzaneh; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-12-04

    The therapeutic effects of the medicinal plants described in the current review on obstructive pulmonary diseases have found mention in ancient Iranian medical texts and in traditional folk medicine. These effects are attributed to their bronchodilatory activity, which relaxes the smooth muscles of the airway. Therefore, in the present review, the relaxant effects of various extracts, fractions and constituents of medicinal plants on tracheal smooth muscle are reviewed in light of their therapeutic effects on obstructive pulmonary diseases. The online literature was searched using Medline, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Google Scholar, Web of Science and SID (for articles written in Persian). Moreover, local books on ethnopharmacology from 1918 to 2014 were searched with keywords such as tracheal smooth muscle, airway smooth muscle, relaxant effect, bronchodilatory effect and related mechanisms to identify studies on the relaxant effects of medicinal plants on tracheal smooth muscle and the possible mechanism(s) of these effects. All studied plants showed significant relaxant effects on tracheal smooth muscle, which were similar or superior to the effect of theophylline at the used concentrations. According to the results, most of these plants also showed an inhibitory effect on muscarinic and histamine (H1) receptors, whereas some plants showed more pronounced stimulatory effects on the beta-adrenergic receptor. Some of the studied plants also showed inhibitory effects on calcium and potassium channels. The present article reviewed the relaxant effects of several medicinal plants on tracheal smooth muscle, which were comparable or superior to the effect of theophylline at the studied concentration. The possible mechanisms of the relaxant effects of the studied medicinal plants and a comparison of these effects were also reviewed. This review presents the fractions and constituents of plants with potent relaxant effects on tracheal smooth muscle, which can be used

  9. Protective effects of anisodamine on cigarette smoke extract-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and tracheal contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guang-Ni; Yang, Kai; Xu, Zu-Peng; Zhu, Liang; Hou, Li-Na; Qi, Hong; Chen, Hong-Zhuan Cui, Yong-Yao

    2012-07-01

    Anisodamine, an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), has been used therapeutically to improve smooth muscle function, including microvascular, intestinal and airway spasms. Our previous studies have revealed that airway hyper-reactivity could be prevented by anisodamine. However, whether anisodamine prevents smoking-induced airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation remained unclear. In this study, a primary culture of rat ASM cells was used to evaluate an ASM phenotype through the ability of the cells to proliferate and express contractile proteins in response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and intervention of anisodamine. Our results showed that CSE resulted in an increase in cyclin D1 expression concomitant with the G0/G1-to-S phase transition, and high expression of M2 and M3. Functional studies showed that tracheal hyper-contractility accompanied contractile marker α-SMA high-expression. These changes, which occur only after CSE stimulation, were prevented and reversed by anisodamine, and CSE-induced cyclin D1 expression was significantly inhibited by anisodamine and the specific inhibitor U0126, BAY11-7082 and LY294002. Thus, we concluded that the protective and reversal effects and mechanism of anisodamine on CSE-induced events might involve, at least partially, the ERK, Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways associated with cyclin D1 via mAChRs. Our study validated that anisodamine intervention on ASM cells may contribute to anti-remodeling properties other than bronchodilation. -- Highlights: ► CSE induces tracheal cell proliferation, hyper-contractility and α-SMA expression. ► Anisodamine reverses CSE-induced tracheal hyper-contractility and cell proliferation. ► ERK, PI3K, and NF-κB pathways and cyclin D1 contribute to the reversal effect.

  10. The effect of hydro-ethanolic extract of Achillea millefolium on muscarinic receptors of guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Feizpour, Azadeh; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Byrami, Goltaj; Golamnezhad, Zahra; Shafei, Mohammad Naser

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate one possible mechanism for the observed relaxant effect of A. millefolium (Achillea millefolium), in the present study the inhibitory effect of the extract of this plant on muscarinic receptors was examined. Materials and Methods: The effects of three concentrations of aqueous-ethanolic extract, 10 nM atropine, and saline on muscarinic receptors were tested in three conditions: In non incubated tracheal smooth muscle (group 1), tracheal chain incubated with propranolol and chlorpheniramine (group 2), and the one incubated with propranolol (group 3). Results: The EC50 obtained in the presence of all three concentrations of the extract were significantly higher compared to saline in groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.001and P < 0.01 in group 2 and 3 respectively). The EC50 obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract in group 2 were significantly improved compared to groups 1 and 3 (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001). The maximum responses to methacholine in presence of only the higher concentration of the extract (0.8mg/ml) was significantly lower than that of saline in groups 1 (P < 0.05). There was neither significant difference between slopes of methacholine-response curves obtained in the presence of different concentrations of the extract and that of saline nor between the three groups. The values of (CR-1), obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract, were significantly lower compared to atropine in the first group but were not significantly different in other groups. The values of (CR-1) obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract were significantly improved in groups 2, compared to groups 1 and 3 (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001). Conclusion: These results showed an inhibitory effect for the extract of A. millefolium on muscarinic receptors of tracheal smooth muscle. A histamine (H1) receptor blockade was also suggested for the extract. PMID:23543621

  11. The effect of hydro-ethanolic extract of Achillea millefolium on muscarinic receptors of guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Feizpour, Azadeh; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Byrami, Goltaj; Golamnezhad, Zahra; Shafei, Mohammad Naser

    2013-01-01

    To investigate one possible mechanism for the observed relaxant effect of A. millefolium (Achillea millefolium), in the present study the inhibitory effect of the extract of this plant on muscarinic receptors was examined. The effects of three concentrations of aqueous-ethanolic extract, 10 nM atropine, and saline on muscarinic receptors were tested in three conditions: In non incubated tracheal smooth muscle (group 1), tracheal chain incubated with propranolol and chlorpheniramine (group 2), and the one incubated with propranolol (group 3). The EC₅₀ obtained in the presence of all three concentrations of the extract were significantly higher compared to saline in groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01 in group 2 and 3 respectively). The EC₅₀ obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract in group 2 were significantly improved compared to groups 1 and 3 (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001). The maximum responses to methacholine in presence of only the higher concentration of the extract (0.8 mg/ml) was significantly lower than that of saline in groups 1 (P < 0.05). There was neither significant difference between slopes of methacholine-response curves obtained in the presence of different concentrations of the extract and that of saline nor between the three groups. The values of (CR-1), obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract, were significantly lower compared to atropine in the first group but were not significantly different in other groups. The values of (CR-1) obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract were significantly improved in groups 2, compared to groups 1 and 3 (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001). These results showed an inhibitory effect for the extract of A. millefolium on muscarinic receptors of tracheal smooth muscle. A histamine (H₁) receptor blockade was also suggested for the extract.

  12. Theophylline and cAMP inhibit lysophosphatidic acid-induced hyperresponsiveness of bovine tracheal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Jiro; Oike, Masahiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ito, Yushi

    2003-01-01

    We have established an in vitro model of airway hyperresponsiveness, using a bovine tracheal smooth muscle cell (BTSMC)-embedded collagen gel lattice. When the gel was pretreated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which activates the small G protein RhoA, ATP- and high K+ solution-induced gel contraction was significantly augmented. This was not due to the modulation of Ca2+ mobilizing properties, since ATP- and high K+-induced Ca2+ transients were not significantly different between control and LPA-treated BTSMC. Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho-kinase, suppressed the LPA-induced augmentation of gel contraction, whereas it did not inhibit the contraction of control gels. Theophylline (> 1 μm) reversed the LPA-induced augmentation of gel contraction, whereas it inhibited control gel contraction only with a very high concentration (100 μm). We confirmed that theophylline increased the intracellular concentration of cAMP ([cAMP]i) in BTSMC. Elevation of [cAMP]i with dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin also reversed the LPA-induced augmentation of gel contraction. Furthermore, theophylline, as well as dibutyryl cAMP and forskolin, suppressed the LPA-induced membrane translocation of RhoA, indicating that they prevented airway hyperresponsiveness by inhibiting RhoA. We conclude from these results that theophylline inhibits LPA-induced, RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated hyperresponsiveness of tracheal smooth muscle cells due to the accumulation of cAMP. PMID:12679373

  13. Antispasmodic effect of Mentha piperita essential oil on tracheal smooth muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Albertina Antonielly Sydney; Soares, Pedro Marcos Gomes; de Almeida, Arisa Nara Saldanha; Maia, Alana Rufino; de Souza, Emmanuel Prata; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio

    2010-07-20

    Mentha piperita is a plant popularly known in Brazil as "hortelã-pimenta" whose essential oil is used in folk medicine for its anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, expectorant actions and anti-congestive. Here, it was investigated the effect of Mentha piperita essential oil (peppermint oil) in rat tracheal rings along with its mechanism of action. Tracheal tissue from male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were used. Peppermint oil was added in cumulative concentrations [1-300 microg/ml] to the tissue basal tonus or pre-contracted by carbachol [10 microM] at 10 min intervals, incubated or not with indomethacin [10 microM], L-N-metyl-nitro-arginine [100 microM], hexamethonium [500 microM], or tetraethylammonium [5 mM]. Peppermint oil [100 and 300 microg/ml] inhibited the contractions induced by carbachol, which was reversed by indomethacin, L-N-metyl-nitro-arginine and hexamethonium, but not by tetraethylammonium. These data suggest the participation of prostaglandin E(2), nitric oxide and autonomic ganglions in the peppermint oil relaxant effect and may be correlated with its popular use in respiratory diseases. Peppermint oil exhibited antispasmodic activity on rat trachea involving prostaglandins and nitric oxide synthase. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stationary and nonstationary correlation-frequency analysis of heterodyne mode laser light scattering: magnitude and periodicity of canine tracheal ciliary beat frequency in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, T; Yeates, D B; Miller, I F; Wong, L B

    1994-01-01

    Stationary and nonstationary correlation-frequency analysis of heterodyne laser light scattering were utilized to make automated, on-line, objective measurements of tracheal ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in intact, anesthetized canines. The stationary correlation-frequency analysis laser light-scattering technique was used to assess the magnitude of the CBF stimulatory responses induced by aerosolized 10(-5) M fenoterol (sympathomimetic), and 10(-8) M and 10(-6) M methacholine (parasympathomimetic) delivered to the whole lungs of eight barbiturate-anesthetized beagles. The nonstationary correlation-frequency analysis laser light-scattering technique was used to measure the effect on tracheal CBF of increasing the cytosolic calcium ion concentration with a calcium ionophore, A23187. Aerosolized A23187 was delivered to the isolated tracheal lumens of eight beagle dogs in cumulative doses ranging from 10(-9)M to 10(-6) M. Administration of the ionophore synchronized the CBF with a period of 5.3 min. Dose dependencies were observed in both the time to the peak CBF stimulation and the magnitude of the stimulatory response. The magnitude of CBF stimulation was inhibited by prior administration of aerosolized nifedipine (2 mg/ml), a voltage-operated calcium channel blocker. The A23187-induced modulation period of tracheal CBF, was unchanged by nifedipine. These are the first data to demonstrate that the magnitude and periodicity of CBF are two independent coupled processes. The cooperativity of these two processes could be determined in the effectiveness of mucociliary transport. PMID:8011920

  15. Mounier-Kuhn syndrome: a case of tracheal smooth muscle remodeling.

    PubMed

    Cook, Daniel P; Adam, Ryan J; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H; Eberlein, Michael; Klesney-Tait, Julia A; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Meyerholz, David K; Stoltz, David A

    2017-02-01

    Mounier-Kuhn syndrome is a rare clinical disorder characterized by tracheobronchial dilation and recurrent lower respiratory tract infections. While the etiology of the disease remains unknown, histopathological analysis of Mounier-Kuhn airways demonstrates that the disease is, in part, characterized by cellular changes in airway smooth muscle.

  16. Co-axial bioassay of a smooth muscle relaxant factor released from guinea-pig tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, L B; Paterson, J W; Goldie, R G

    1989-01-01

    1. The ability of guinea-pig trachea to release an epithelium-derived relaxant factor (EpDRF) was assessed in a co-axial bioassay system. 2. Histamine (100 microM) and methacholine (25 microM) caused endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat isolated aorta, presumably via the release of endothelium-derived relaxant factor (EDRF). In contrast, endothelium-denuded rat aorta did not relax in response to these agents. 3. EDRF release was detected in response to methacholine in a co-axial bioassay system, consisting of intact rabbit aorta tube (EDRF donor) and endothelium-denuded rat aorta strip (assay preparation). These results indicated the transfer of EDRF from a donor to an assay preparation, thereby validating the co-axial bioassay method. 4. Substitution of endothelium-intact rabbit aorta tube by epithelium-intact guinea-pig tracheal tube tissue in co-axial assemblies, still allowed the assay preparation to relax in response to histamine or methacholine. Removal of the intact tracheal tube from the system, or removal of the epithelium from the donor tracheal tube in co-axial preparations, abolished such relaxant responses. These observations are consistent with histamine- or methacholine-induced release of an epithelium-derived relaxant factor (EpDRF) from the trachea. 5. In the co-axial assembly comprising intact guinea-pig trachea and endothelium-denuded rat aorta, histamine and methacholine produced concentration-dependent, EpDRF-induced aortic relaxation. Mean concentrations of histamine and methacholine producing 50% of the maximum relaxation (EC50) were 39.8 microM and 2.7 microM respectively. Histamine-induced relaxation was inhibited in the presence of mepyramine (2 microM) and responses to methacholine were inhibited by atropine (0.1 microM). 6. Methylene blue (50 microM) had no effect on such relaxant responses, indicating that EpDRF does not activate guanylate cyclase. Furthermore, the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (5 microM), the cyclo

  17. Mechanisms of relaxant activity of the nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator BAY 41-2272 in rat tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Toque, Haroldo A; Mónica, Fabíola Z T; Morganti, Rafael P; De Nucci, Gilberto; Antunes, Edson

    2010-10-25

    The soluble guanylyl cyclase is expressed in airway smooth muscle, and agents that stimulate this enzyme activity cause airway smooth muscle relaxation and bronchodilation. The compound 5-Cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrimidin-4-ylamine (BAY 41-2272) is a potent nitric oxide (NO)-independent soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator, but little is known about its effects in airway smooth muscle. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the relaxations of rat tracheal smooth muscle induced by BAY 41-2272. Tracheal rings were mounted in 10-ml organ baths for isometric force recording. BAY 41-2272 concentration-dependently relaxed carbachol-precontracted tracheal rings (pEC(50)=6.68+/-0.14). Prior incubation with the NO synthesis inhibitor l-NAME (100 microM) or the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (10 microM) caused significant rightward shifts in the concentration-response curves to BAY 41-2272. Sodium nitroprusside caused concentration-dependent relaxations, which were greatly potentiated by BAY 41-2272 and completely inhibited by ODQ. In addition, BAY 41-2272 shifted to the right the tracheal contractile responses to either carbachol (0.01-1 microM) or electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1-32 Hz). BAY 41-2272 (1 microM) also caused a marked rightward shift and decreased the maximal contractile responses to extracellular CaCl2, and such effect was not modified by pretreatment with ODQ. In addition, BAY 41-2272 (up to 1 microM) significantly increased the cGMP levels, and that was abolished by ODQ. Our results indicate that BAY 41-2272 causes cGMP-dependent rat tracheal smooth muscle relaxations in a synergistic fashion with exogenous NO. BAY 41-2272 has also an additional mechanism independently of soluble guanylyl cyclase activation possibly involving Ca(2+) entry blockade. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Muscarinic receptors: evidence for a nonuniform distribution in tracheal smooth muscle and exocrine glands

    SciTech Connect

    Basbaum, C.B.; Grillo, M.A.; Widdicombe, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    Muscarinic receptor distribution in smooth muscle, exocrine glands, and epithelium of the ferret trachea was determined using (3H)propylbenzilylcholine mustard ((3H)PrBCM) binding and autoradiography. Specific, atropine-sensitive (3H)PrBCM binding was quantified autoradiographically in the trachealis muscle (approximately 21 binding sites/microns2), surface epithelium (approximately 6 binding sites/microns2), and submucosal glands (approximately 5 binding sites/microns2). Serous and mucous cells in the glands did not differ in receptor density. Binding sites on gland and epithelial cells were associated with basolateral membranes. In the trachealis muscle, a gradient in receptor density was observed, with outer layers of muscle containing 3 to 10 times more receptors per unit area than inner layers. Receptor distribution in both glands and muscle paralleled the distribution of cholinergic axons. However, at the light microscope level, there was no evidence for the presence of receptor ''hot spots'' related to the position of individual axons. The parallelism in the distribution of axons and receptors suggests the possibility of neural control of the genesis and/or maintenance of receptor distribution in these tissues.

  19. cAMP generation inhibits inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate binding in rabbit tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Schramm, C M; Chuang, S T; Grunstein, M M

    1995-11-01

    Agonist-induced airway contraction involves the generation and subsequent binding of the phosphoinositide-derived second messenger, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3], to its Ca(2+)-mobilizing intracellular receptor. To the extent that regulatory cross-talk is known to exist between different signal transduction pathways, the present study examined whether activation of the adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway induces altered binding of Ins(1,4,5)P3 to its receptor in membrane homogenates of rabbit tracheal smooth muscle (TSM). In control TSM, monophasic binding curves provided mean +/- SE values for Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor density (Bmax) and binding affinity (Kd) amounting to 940 +/- 43 fmol/mg protein and 10.7 +/- 1.2 nM, respectively. Relative to control, binding of [3H]Ins(1,4,5)P3 was significantly reduced in paired TSM separately treated with isoproterenol, forskolin, or dibutyryl-cAMP. Ins(1,4,5)P3 binding was inhibited to a level averaging 60% of control binding by maximal concentrations of each agonist, an effect attributed to a reduction in Ins(1,4,5)P3 binding sites rather than altered ligand affinity. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that activation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathway is associated with inhibition of Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor binding and implicate a novel mechanism of action of beta-adrenergic agents in preventing and/or reversing airway contraction.

  20. Regulation of H1-receptor coupling and H1-receptor mRNA by histamine in bovine tracheal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pype, J L; Dupont, L J; Mak, J C W; Barnes, P J; Verleden, G M

    1998-01-01

    Pretreatment of bovine tracheal smooth muscle (BTSM) with histamine (1–100 μM, 1 h) induced a concentration-dependent desensitization of the contractile response to subsequently administered histamine, with a reduction of the maximum response of 72±8% (n=5) following pre-exposure to 100 μM histamine. In contrast, concentration-response curves to the muscarinic agonist, methacholine were not affected following histamine pretreatment, indicating a homologous desensitization. Furthermore, concentration-response curves to NaF, a G-protein activator, were not altered following histamine pre-incubation.The histamine H1-receptor (H1R) desensitization could be antagonized by mepyramine (an H1-receptor antagonist, 1 μM) but not by cimetidine (an H2-receptor antagonist, 10 μM), indicating that the desensitization occurred via stimulation of histamine H1-receptors, without evidence for the involvement of histamine H2-receptors.Indomethacin (10 μM) did not block the H1R desensitization, suggesting no involvement of prostaglandins. Furthermore, histamine pre-incubation in calcium free medium still induced a functional uncoupling of H1R.GF 109203X, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, and H-7, a non-selective kinase inhibitor, did not antagonize the homologous H1R desensitization.The steady-state level of H1R mRNA, assessed by Northern blot analysis, was not affected by prolonged histamine exposure (100 μM, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 16 and 24 h).These results suggest that histamine induces desensitization of the H1R at the level of the receptor protein, which involves a mechanism independent of PKC, PKA, PKG and calcium influx, suggesting the involvement of a receptor-specific kinase. PMID:9535029

  1. Phosphotidylinositol turnover in vascular, uterine, fundal, and tracheal smooth muscle: effect of serotonin (5HT)

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.L.; Wittenauer, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    In brain, platelets, and aorta, 5HT has been reported to increase phosphotidylinositol turnover, an effect linked to 5HT/sub 2/ receptors. The authors examined the effect of 5HT on /sup 3/H-inositol-1-phosphate (/sup 3/H-I-P) in tissues possessing 5HT/sub 2/ receptors that mediate contraction to 5HT (rat jugular vein, aorta, uterus and guinea pig trachea) and in a tissue in which contraction to 5HT is not mediated by 5HT/sub 2/ receptors (rat stomach fundus). Tissues were incubated (37/sup 0/C, 95% O/sub 2/, 5% CO/sub 2/) with /sup 3/H-inositol (90 min), washed, LiCl/sub 2/ (10 mM) and 5HT added for 90 min, extracted, and /sup 3/H-I-P eluted from a Dowex-1 column. Basal /sup 3/H-I-P was 10-fold higher in the uterus than in the other tissues. 5HT (10/sup -6/-10/sup -4/M) increased /sup 3/H-I-P in the jugular vein, aorta, and uterus but not in the trachea or fundus. Maximum increase was greatest in the jugular vein (8-fold) with an ED/sub 50/ of 0.4 ..mu..M 5HT. The selective 5HT/sub 2/ receptor blocker, LY53857 (10/sup -8/M) antagonized the increase in /sup 3/H-I-P by 5HT in the jugular vein, aorta and uterus. Pargyline (10/sup -5/M) added to the trachea and fundus did not unmask an effect of 5HT (10/sup -4/M). These data suggest that (1) the jugular vein produced the most sensitive response to 5HT-induced increases in /sup 3/H-I-P, (2) increases in /sup 3/H-I-P by 5HT in smooth muscle may be linked to 5HT/sub 2/ receptors and (3) activation of 5HT/sub 2/ receptors as occurred in the trachea will not always increase /sup 3/H-I-P.

  2. Functional and molecular expression of volume-regulated chloride channels in canine vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Jun; Duan, Dayue; Janiak, Robert; Kuenzli, Karri; Horowitz, Burton; Hume, Joseph R

    1998-01-01

    We examined the possibility of functional and molecular expression of volume-regulated Cl− channels in vascular smooth muscle using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on cells from canine pulmonary and renal arteries. Decreasing external osmolarity induced cell swelling, which was accompanied by activation of Cl−-dependent outward-rectifying membrane currents with an anion permeability sequence of SCN− > I− > Br− > Cl− > aspartate−. These currents were sensitive to block by DIDS, extracellular ATP and the antioestrogen compound tamoxifen. Experiments were performed to determine whether the molecular form of the volume-regulated chloride channel (ClC-3) is expressed in pulmonary and renal arteries. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed expression of ClC-3 in both types of smooth muscle. ClC-3 expression was 76.4% of β-actin in renal artery and 48.0% of β-actin in pulmonary artery. We conclude that volume-regulated Cl− channels are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells and exhibit functional properties similar to those found in other types of cells, presumably contributing to the regulation of cell volume, electrical activity and, possibly, myogenic tone. PMID:9508834

  3. Ionic mechanisms underlying electrical slow waves in canine airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Janssen, L J; Hague, C; Nana, R

    1998-09-01

    In canine bronchial smooth muscle (BSM), spasmogens evoke oscillations in membrane potential ("slow waves"). The depolarizing phase of the slow waves is mediated by voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels; we examined the roles played by Cl- and K+ currents and Na+-K+-ATPase activity in mediating the repolarizing phase. Slow waves were evoked using tetraethylammonium (25 mM) in the presence or absence of niflumic acid (100 microM; Cl- channel blocker) or ouabain (10 microM; block Na+-K+-ATPase) or after elevating external K+ concentration ([K+]) to 36 mM (to block K+ currents); curve fitting was performed to quantitate the rates of rise/fall and frequency under these conditions. Slow waves were markedly slowed, and eventually abolished, by niflumic acid but were unaffected by ouabain or high [K+]. Electrically evoked slow waves were also blocked in similar fashion by niflumic acid. We conclude that the repolarization phase is mediated by Ca2+-dependent Cl- currents. This information, together with our earlier finding that the depolarizing phase is due to voltage-dependent Ca2+ current, suggests that slow waves in canine BSM involve alternating opening and closing of Ca2+ and Cl- channels.

  4. Development of a composite and vascularized tracheal scaffold in the omentum for in situ tissue engineering: a canine model.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Masatsugu; Kojima, Fumitsugu; Koyasu, Sho; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Komatsu, Teruya; Ikuno, Tsuyoshi; Date, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2014-09-01

    We herein report on development of a composite (synthetic and biological) tracheal scaffold with vascularized autologous connective tissue in the omentum, followed by in situ tissue engineering of the composite scaffold with the pedicled omentum. In this preliminary report, we focus on development and evaluation of the vascularized autologous connective tissue in the omentum. In animal experiment 1, a polypropylene framework as a synthetic component was placed in the omental sac for 3 weeks and another was placed in the pouch of Douglas as a control in five beagle dogs. In animal experiment 2, a polypropylene framework placed in the omental sac for 3 weeks was compared with a polypropylene framework coated with porcine atelocollagen, which was also placed in the omental sac in another five dogs, to investigate whether the coating of porcine atelocollagen contributes to development of more vascularized connective tissue. Macroscopic, radiological and histological evaluations were performed for developed autologous connective tissue on the frameworks, with a focus on its thickness and capillary vessels. In animal experiment 1, the polypropylene framework in the omentum developed a composite tracheal scaffold with homogeneous and significantly thicker (2.6 ± 0.5 vs 1.2 ± 0.4 mm, P <0.0001) connective tissue in which more capillary vessels per 10-power field of view (3.5 ± 2.2 vs 0 ± 0, P = 0.015) were identified, compared with the control in the pouch of Douglas. In animal experiment 2, the omentum developed significantly thicker connective tissue on the polypropylene framework coated with porcine atelocollagen (3.6 ± 0.7 vs 2.2 ± 0.4 mm, P <0.0001) in which not significantly more capillary vessels were identified (3.5 ± 2.2 vs 5.0 ± 2.7, P = 0.12), compared with the framework that was not coated. Placement of the polypropylene framework in the omental sac resulted in development of homogeneous and vascularized autologous connective tissue on the polypropylene

  5. Barbed versus smooth poly-propylene three-loop pulley sutures for repair of canine gastrocnemius tendon.

    PubMed

    Perry, B S; Harper, T A; Mitchell, M A; McFadden, M S; Heggem Perry, B

    2014-01-01

    To compare the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and load to 1 and 3 mm gap formation of smooth (3-metric) and knotless barbed (4-metric) polypropylene sutures placed in a three-loop pulley pattern for canine gastrocnemius tendon repair. In vitro. Thirty-three paired bone-tendon units with one of each pair assigned to each suture type. Barbed suture size was based on previously published materials testing results. Each unit was placed in a servo-hydraulic testing machine and tested under single cycle tensile loading until repair failure. There was a significantly higher UTS for smooth polypropylene compared to the barbed polypropylene repairs. The loads resulting in 1 and 3 mm gaps for the barbed repairs were consistently significantly less than the corresponding smooth polypropylene repair values. The knotted smooth polypropylene repair was consistently stronger than the knotless barbed polypropylene repair when placed in a three-loop pulley pattern for gastrocnemius repair. Knotless barbed polypropylene suture should not be considered equivalent to knotted smooth polypropylene of comparable tensile strength when placed in a three-loop pulley pattern for canine gastrocnemius tendon repair. The low failure loads of the barbed repair are probably due to failure of the barbs to anchor consistently throughout the tendon in the knotless configuration.

  6. Relationship between calcium current and cytosolic calcium in canine gastric smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Vogalis, F; Publicover, N G; Hume, J R; Sanders, K M

    1991-05-01

    We measured free intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and Ca2+ current (ICa) simultaneously in voltage-clamped, indo-1-loaded smooth muscle cells isolated from the circular layer of the canine antrum. Resting [Ca2+]i averaged 144 +/- 20 nM in cells held at -70 mV. Depolarization positive to -50 mV elicited ICa and increased [Ca2+]i. Peak [Ca2+]i occurred between 0 and +10 mV and averaged 372 +/- 48 nM. On repolarization, [Ca2+]i decreased slowly (time constant 2-3 s) and the rate depended on the magnitude of [Ca2+]i. Cells were also voltage clamped with protocols that mimicked the upstroke and plateau phases of slow waves. With simulated plateau potentials of -55 to -45 mV, [Ca2+]i increased transiently as a result of the small transient ICa elicited by the upstroke depolarization. Sustained ICa was of sufficient magnitude with plateau depolarizations positive to -40 mV to cause a secondary rise in [Ca2+]i throughout the plateau phase. These data suggest that at the plateau potential of slow waves in situ, ICa is sufficient to cause a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i. The resulting accumulation of Ca2+ may couple the slow wave plateau to contraction and may increase the open probability of Ca(2+)-activated K channels. The latter may provide the outward current necessary to initiate repolarization.

  7. Inhibitory effects of amiloride on alpha adrenoceptors in canine vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, A.G.; Wang, Z.L.; Kwan, C.Y.; Daniel, E.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Amiloride inhibits vascular smooth muscle contractions from canine aorta and saphenous vein. The mechanisms were studied using radioligand binding and functional techniques. Amiloride inhibited ({sup 3}H)prazosin and ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine binding to alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in a concentration-dependent manner. Amiloride increased Kd values for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine without affecting the maximum binding of ({sup 3}H)prazosin. These results suggest that the drug interacts with the alpha-1 adrenoceptor binding sites in a competitive manner and with the alpha-2 adrenoceptor binding sites in a noncompetitive manner. Amiloride reduced maximal contractile responses to agonists selective for both alpha adrenoceptors and to elevated K+, the EC50 values were increased by about 10-fold in the presence of amiloride. In Ca+(+)-free Krebs' solution, contractions induced in saphenous vein after addition of Ca++ in saphenous vein in the presence of adrenoceptor agonists were inhibited by amiloride. Our results suggest that amiloride reduced alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptor-mediated responses and inhibited Ca++ influx.

  8. Interleukin(IL)-1 Regulates Ozone-enhanced Tracheal Smooth Muscle Responsiveness by Increasing Substance P (SP) Production in Intrinsic Airway Neurons of Ferret

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z.-X.; Barker, J. S.; Batchelor, T. P.; Dey, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to ozone induces airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) mediated partly by SP released from nerve terminals of intrinsic airway neurons. Our recent studies showed that IL-1, an important multifunctional proinflammatory cytokine, increases synthesis and release of SP from intrinsic airway neurons. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible involvement of endogenous IL-1 in modulating neural responses associated with ozone-enhanced airway responsiveness. Ferrets were exposed to 2 ppm ozone or filtered air for 3 hrs. IL-1 in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was significantly increased in ozone-exposed animals and responses of tracheal smooth muscle to methacholine (MCh) and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were elevated significantly. Both the SP nerve fiber density in tracheal smooth muscle and the number of SP-containing neurons in airway ganglia were significantly increased following ozone exposure. Pretreatment with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1 Ra) significantly diminished ozone-enhanced airway responses to EFS as well as ozone-increased SP in the airway. To selectively investigate intrinsic airway neurons, segments of ferret trachea were maintained in culture conditions for 24 hrs to eliminate extrinsic contributions from sensory nerves. The segments were then exposed to 2 ppm ozone in vitro for 3 hrs. The changes of ozone-induced airway responses to MCh and EFS, and the SP levels in airway neurons paralleled those observed with in vivo ozone exposure. The ozone-enhanced airway responses and neuronal SP levels were inhibited by pretreatment with IL-1 Ra. These findings show that IL-1 is released during ozone exposure enhances airway responsiveness by modulating SP expression in airway neurons. PMID:18718561

  9. Time-dependent changes in Ca2+ sensitivity during phasic contraction of canine antral smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, H; Gerthoffer, W T; Publicover, N G; Fusetani, N; Sanders, K M

    1991-01-01

    1. Relationships between cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt), myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and muscle tension were examined in circular smooth muscle of canine gastric antrum. 2. Electrical slow waves induced a transient increase in [Ca2+]cyt and muscle tension. [Ca2+]cyt increased before the initiation of contraction and reached a maximum before the peak of the phasic contractions. Following the first Ca2+ transient, a second rise in [Ca2+]cyt was often observed. The second Ca2+ transient was of similar magnitude to the first, but only in some cases was this increase in [Ca2+]cyt associated with a second phase of contraction. Relaxation occurred more rapidly than the restoration of resting levels of [Ca2+]cyt. 3. Acetylcholine (ACh; 3 x 10(-7) M) increased the amplitude of Ca2+ transients, caused MLC phosphorylation and increased the force of contraction. The decay of contraction and MLC dephosphorylation preceded that of [Ca2+]cyt. 4. Increasing external K+ (to 25-40 mM) caused a sustained increase in [Ca2+]cyt, but little change in resting tension. This suggests that the Ca2+ sensitivity decreased as [Ca2+]cyt increased. Increasing K+ to 59.5 mM further increased the level of [Ca2+]cyt, induced MLC phosphorylation and caused a transient contraction. When normal levels of K+ were restored, the rates of MLC dephosphorylation and relaxation exceeded the rate of decay in [Ca2+]cyt. 5. Removal of external Ca2+ in depolarized muscles decreased [Ca2+]cyt below the resting level without affecting resting tension. Readmission of Ca2+ to depolarized muscles caused force to develop at [Ca2+]cyt levels below the original resting level, suggesting that Ca2+ sensitivity was increased when the resting level of [Ca2+]cyt was decreased. 6. The phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin-A (10(-6) M), induced tonic contraction and MLC phosphorylation without an increase in [Ca2+]cyt. During these contractures, electrical activity caused transient increases in [Ca2+]cyt and

  10. Comparative capacitative calcium entry mechanisms in canine pulmonary and renal arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sean M; Mason, Helen S; Smith, Gregory D; Nicholson, Neil; Johnston, Louise; Janiak, Robert; Hume, Joseph R

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) can be activated in canine pulmonary and renal arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) and whether activation of CCE parallels the different functional structure of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in these two cell types. The cytosolic [Ca2+] was measured by imaging fura-2-loaded individual cells. Increases in the cytosolic [Ca2+] due to store depletion in pulmonary ASMCs required simultaneous depletion of both the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)- and ryanodine (RY)-sensitive SR Ca2+ stores. In contrast, the cytosolic [Ca2+] rises in renal ASMCs occurred when the SR stores were depleted through either the InsP3 or RY pathways. The increase in the cytosolic [Ca2+] due to store depletion in both pulmonary and renal ASMCs was present in cells that were voltage clamped and was abolished when cells were perfused with a Ca2+-free bathing solution. Rapid quenching of the fura-2 signal by 100 μM Mn2+ following SR store depletion indicated that extracellular Ca2+ entry increased in both cell types and also verified that activation of CCE in pulmonary ASMCs required the simultaneous depletion of the InsP3- and RY-sensitive SR Ca2+ stores, while CCE could be activated in renal ASMCs by the depletion of either of the InsP3- or RY-sensitive SR stores. Store depletion Ca2+ entry in both pulmonary and renal ASMCs was strongly inhibited by Ni2+ (0.1–10 mM), slightly inhibited by Cd2+ (200–500 μM), but was not significantly affected by the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGCC) blocker nisoldipine (10 μM). The non-selective cation channel blocker Gd3+ (100 μM) inhibited a portion of the Ca2+ entry in 6 of 18 renal but not pulmonary ASMCs. These results provide evidence that SR Ca2+ store depletion activates CCE in parallel with the organization of intracellular Ca2+ stores in canine pulmonary and renal ASMCs. PMID:12231648

  11. Mechanisms of relaxant action of a crude hexane extract of Gnaphalium liebmannii in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mendoza, María Elena; Torres, Gabriela; Arrieta, Jesús; Aguilar, Abigail; Castillo-Henkel, Carlos; Navarrete, Andrés

    2007-04-20

    We investigated the mechanisms of action of Gnaphalium liebmannii which is used as a folk medicine in México for treating various respiratory diseases such as gripe, fever, asthma, cough, cold, bronchitis, expectorating, and bronchial affections. The tension changes of guinea pig tracheal segments were isometrically recorder on a polygraph. Hexane extract of Gnaphalium liebmannii was the most active relaxant extract (IC(30)=54.23+/-19.79 microg/mL with 99.5+/-3.2 % of relaxation), followed by dichloromethane extract (IC(30)=120.22+/-5.27 microg/mL) and methanol extract (IC(30)=190.25+/-30.02 microg/mL). Hexane extract produced a parallel rightward shift of the concentration-response curve of carbachol in a competitive manner (pA(2)=-2.4), but did not modify the concentration-response curves for histamine. The relaxant effect of hexane extract of Gnaphalium liebmannii was unaffected by the presence of propranolol (3x10(-6)M) or glibenclamide (10 microM). However hexane extract produced a leftward shifts of the concentration-response curve of forskolin (10(-8) to 10(-3)M), nitroprusside (10(-10) to 10(-6)M), isoproterenol (3x10(-10) to 3x10(-5)M) and aminophylline (10(-11) to 10(-2)M). The above results suggest that Gnaphalium liebmannii induce relaxation of the tracheal muscle, probably via phosphodiesterase inhibition. The bronchodilator effect of Gnaphalium liebmannii might explain in part their traditional use as anti-asthmatic remedy.

  12. Intracellular chloride activities in canine tracheal epithelium. Direct evidence for sodium-coupled intracellular chloride accumulation in a chloride-secreting epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, M J

    1983-01-01

    Canine tracheal epithelium secretes Cl via an electrogenic transport process that appears to apply to a wide variety of secretory epithelia. To examine the mechanisms involved, intracellular chloride activity, acCl, was measured with Cl-selective intracellular microelectrodes. The results indicate that when the rate of secretion was minimal acCl was 37 mM; with stimulation of secretion the intracellular voltage depolarized, but acCl was not significantly altered, at 39 mM. These findings indicate that: (a) Cl is accumulated across the basolateral membrane under nonsecreting and secreting conditions at an activity 3.8 and 2.4 times, respectively, that predicted for an equilibrium distribution; (b) Cl exit across the apical membrane may be passive with an electrochemical driving force of 22 mV; and (c) stimulation of secretion enhanced the rate of Cl entry across the basolateral membrane, since Cl transport increased without a change in acCl. In the absence of Na in the extracellular fluid, acCl approached the value expected for an equilibrium distribution. This finding suggests that "uphill" entry of Cl into the cell against its electrochemical gradient is dependent upon, and energized by, the entry of Na down its gradient. Submucosal bumetanide, a loop diuretic, also decreased the rate of Cl secretion and decreased acCl, indicating an inhibition of Cl entry. These findings indicate that Cl entry into the cell is directed against its electrochemical gradient and is mediated by a Na-coupled, bumetanide-inhibitable, transport process at the basolateral membrane and that Cl may exit passively down a favorable electrochemical gradient across the apical membrane. PMID:6853719

  13. Cyclic AMP-mediated regulation of excitation-contraction coupling in canine gastric smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, H; Blondfield, D P; Hori, M; Sanders, K M; Publicover, N G

    1992-01-01

    1. Agonists known to increase cyclic AMP levels in gastrointestinal smooth muscles were studied in isolated circular muscles of the canine antrum to investigate the mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of these agents. 2. Muscles were electrically active, generating typical slow wave activity. Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt; measured by Indo-1 fluorescence) and tension increased in response to slow waves. 3. Stimulation by isoprenaline (via beta 2-receptors) or forskolin, in the presence or absence of acetylcholine, inhibited the plateau phase and reduced phasic [Ca2+]cyt and contractile responses. 4. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), had similar effects to isoprenaline and forskolin. 5. Increases in the plateau phase of slow waves and the associated increases in [Ca2+]cyt and tension caused by direct activation of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels by Bay K 8644 (0.1 microM) were also reduced by forskolin. 6. Isoprenaline and forskolin induced negative chronotropic effects, but VIP increased frequency. 7. At a given level of [Ca2+]cyt, contractions were greater under control conditions than in the presence of isoprenaline, VIP and CGRP, suggesting that part of the inhibition produced by these agents may be due to decreased Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus. 8. Experiments performed on alpha-toxin-permeabilized muscles confirmed that cyclic AMP-dependent effects involve reduced Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus. Addition of cyclic AMP (3-300 microM) caused a reduction in Ca(2+)-induced contraction at a constant level of Ca2+ (pCa 5.5). 9. These results suggest that increased cyclic AMP and probably subsequent activation of protein kinase A: (i) decrease [Ca2+]cyt and contraction by an inhibition of Ca2+ influx during slow waves, and (ii) decrease the sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to [Ca2+]cyt. The membrane effects might occur directly by inhibition of Ca2+ channels or indirectly by increasing

  14. Cyclic AMP-mediated regulation of excitation-contraction coupling in canine gastric smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, H; Blondfield, D P; Hori, M; Sanders, K M; Publicover, N G

    1992-02-01

    1. Agonists known to increase cyclic AMP levels in gastrointestinal smooth muscles were studied in isolated circular muscles of the canine antrum to investigate the mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of these agents. 2. Muscles were electrically active, generating typical slow wave activity. Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt; measured by Indo-1 fluorescence) and tension increased in response to slow waves. 3. Stimulation by isoprenaline (via beta 2-receptors) or forskolin, in the presence or absence of acetylcholine, inhibited the plateau phase and reduced phasic [Ca2+]cyt and contractile responses. 4. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), had similar effects to isoprenaline and forskolin. 5. Increases in the plateau phase of slow waves and the associated increases in [Ca2+]cyt and tension caused by direct activation of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels by Bay K 8644 (0.1 microM) were also reduced by forskolin. 6. Isoprenaline and forskolin induced negative chronotropic effects, but VIP increased frequency. 7. At a given level of [Ca2+]cyt, contractions were greater under control conditions than in the presence of isoprenaline, VIP and CGRP, suggesting that part of the inhibition produced by these agents may be due to decreased Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus. 8. Experiments performed on alpha-toxin-permeabilized muscles confirmed that cyclic AMP-dependent effects involve reduced Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus. Addition of cyclic AMP (3-300 microM) caused a reduction in Ca(2+)-induced contraction at a constant level of Ca2+ (pCa 5.5). 9. These results suggest that increased cyclic AMP and probably subsequent activation of protein kinase A: (i) decrease [Ca2+]cyt and contraction by an inhibition of Ca2+ influx during slow waves, and (ii) decrease the sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to [Ca2+]cyt. The membrane effects might occur directly by inhibition of Ca2+ channels or indirectly by increasing

  15. Carbachol induces a rapid and sustained hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositide in bovine tracheal smooth muscle measurements of the mass of polyphosphoinositides, 1,2-diacylglycerol, and phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Takuwa, Y; Takuwa, N; Rasmussen, H

    1986-11-05

    The effects of carbachol on polyphosphoinositides and 1,2-diacylglycerol metabolism were investigated in bovine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring both lipid mass and the turnover of [3H]inositol-labeled phosphoinositides. Carbachol induces a rapid reduction in the mass of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate and a rapid increase in the mass of 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. These changes in lipid mass are sustained for at least 60 min. The level of phosphatidylinositol shows a delayed and progressive decrease during a 60-min period of carbachol stimulation. The addition of atropine reverses these responses completely. Carbachol stimulates a rapid loss in [3H]inositol radioactivity from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate associated with production of [3H]inositol trisphosphate. The carbachol-induced change in the mass of phosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid is not affected by removal of extracellular Ca2+ and does not appear to be secondary to an increase in intracellular Ca2+. These results indicate that carbachol causes phospholipase C-mediated polyphosphoinositide breakdown, resulting in the production of inositol trisphosphate and a sustained increase in the actual content of 1,2-diacylglycerol. These results strongly suggest that carbachol-induced contraction is mediated by the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides with the resulting generation of two messengers: inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and 1,2-diacylglycerol.

  16. Carbachol induces a rapid and sustained hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositide in bovine tracheal smooth muscle measurements of the mass of polyphosphoinositides, 1,2-diacylglycerol, and phosphatidic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Takuwa, Y.; Takuwa, N.; Rasmussen, H.

    1986-11-05

    The effects of carbachol on polyphosphoinositides and 1,2-diacylglycerol metabolism were investigated in bovine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring both lipid mass and the turnover of (/sup 3/H)inositol-labeled phosphoinositides. Carbachol induces a rapid reduction in the mass of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate and a rapid increase in the mass of 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. These changes in lipid mass are sustained for at least 60 min. The level of phosphatidylinositol shows a delayed and progressive decrease during a 60-min period of carbachol stimulation. The addition of atropine reverses these responses completely. Carbachol stimulates a rapid loss in (/sup 3/H)inositol radioactivity from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate associated with production of (/sup 3/H)inositol trisphosphate. The carbachol-induced change in the mass of phosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid is not affected by removal of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ and does not appear to be secondary to an increase in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. These results indicate that carbachol causes phospholipase C-mediated polyphosphoinositide breakdown, resulting in the production of inositol trisphosphate and a sustained increase in the actual content of 1,2-diacylglycerol. These results strongly suggest that carbachol-induced contraction is mediated by the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides with the resulting generation of two messengers: inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and 1,2-diacylglycerol.

  17. Cloning and expression of a Kv1.2 class delayed rectifier K+ channel from canine colonic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hart, P J; Overturf, K E; Russell, S N; Carl, A; Hume, J R; Sanders, K M; Horowitz, B

    1993-10-15

    A cDNA (CSMK1) encoding a delayed rectifier K+ channel of the Kv1.2 class was cloned from canine colonic circular smooth muscle and expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These channels appear to be uniquely expressed in gastrointestinal muscles and may participate in the electrical slow wave activity. Functional expression of CSMK1 in Xenopus oocytes demonstrated a K+ current that activated in a voltage-dependent manner upon depolarization. This current was highly sensitive to 4-aminopyridine (IC50, 74 microM). A low-conductance K+ channel was identified in inside-out patches from oocytes injected with CSMK1. This channel displayed a linear current-voltage relation with a slope conductance of 14 pS. The channels were blocked in a concentration-dependent manner by 4-aminopyridine. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that CSMK1 is expressed in a wide variety of gastrointestinal smooth muscles. Portal vein, renal artery, and uterus do not express CSMK1, suggesting that, among smooth muscles, expression of this K+ channel may be restricted to gastrointestinal smooth muscles. CSMK1 is 91% homologous to RAK, a delayed rectifier K+ channel cloned from rat heart, but displays unique pharmacological properties and tissue distribution.

  18. Role of extracellular Na+, Ca2+-activated Cl- channels and BK channels in the contraction of Ca2+ store-depleted tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Romero-Méndez, Catalina; Algara-Suárez, Paola; Sánchez-Armass, Sergio; Mandeville, Peter B; Meza, Ulises; Espinosa-Tanguma, Ricardo

    2009-07-01

    1. In the present study, we investigated the series of events involved in the contraction of tracheal smooth muscle induced by the re-addition of Ca(2+) in an in vitro experimental model in which Ca(2+) stores had been depleted and their refilling had been blocked by thapsigargin. 2. Mean (+/-SEM) contraction was diminished by: (i) inhibitors of store-operated calcium channels (SOCC), namely 100 micromol/L SKF-96365 and 100 micromol/L 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl) imidazole (to 66.3 +/- 4.4 and 41.3 +/- 5.2% of control, respectively); (ii) inhibitors of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels Ca(V)1.2 channels, namely 1 micromol/L nifedipine and 10 micromol/L verapamil (to 86.2 +/- 3.4 and 76.9 +/- 5.9% of control, respectively); and (iii) 20 micromol/L niflumic acid, a non-selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels (to 41.1 +/- 9.8% of control). In contrast, contraction was increased 2.3-fold by 100 nmol/L iberiotoxin, a blocker of the large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels. 3. Furthermore, contraction was significantly inhibited when Na(+) in the bathing solution was replaced by N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG(+)) to 39.9 +/- 7.2% of control, but not when it was replaced by Li(+) (114.5 +/- 24.4% of control). In addition, when Na(+) had been replaced by NMDG(+), contractions were further inhibited by both nifedipine and niflumic acid (to 3.0 +/- 1.8 and 24.4 +/- 8.1% of control, respectively). Nifedipine also reduced contractions when Na(+) had been replaced by Li(+) (to 10.7 +/- 3.4% to control), the niflumic acid had no effect (116.0 +/- 4.5% of control). 4. In conclusion, the data of the present study demonstrate the roles of SOCC, BK channels and Ca(V)1.2 channels in the contractions induced by the re-addition of Ca(2+) to the solution bathing guinea-pig tracheal rings under conditions of Ca(2+)-depleted sarcoplasmic reticulum and inhibition of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase. The contractions were highly dependent on extracellular

  19. Caffeine inhibits InsP3 responses and capacitative calcium entry in canine pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Joseph R.; McAllister, Claire E.; Wilson, Sean M

    2009-01-01

    Caffeine is a well described and characterized ryanodine receptor (RyR) activator. Previous evidence from independent research studies also indicate caffeine inhibits InsP3 receptor functionality, which is important to activation of capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) in some cell types. In addition, RyR activation elicits excitatory-coupled Ca2+ entry (ECCE) in skeletal muscle myotubes. Recent studies by our group show that canine pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) have functional InsP3 receptors as well as RyRs, and that CCE is dependent on InsP3 receptor activity. The potential for caffeine to activate ECCE as well as inhibit InsP3 receptor function and CCE was examined using fura-2 fluorescent imaging in canine PASMCs. The data show caffeine causes transient as well as sustained cytosolic Ca2+ increases, though this is not due to CCE or ECCE activity as evidenced by a lack of an increase in Mn2+ quench of fura-2. The experiments also show caffeine reversibly inhibits 5-HT elicited – InsP3 mediated Ca2+ responses with an IC50 of 6.87 × 10−4 M and 10 mM caffeine fully inhibits CCE. These studies provide the first evidence that caffeine is an inhibitor of InsP3 generated Ca2+ signals and CCE in PASMCs. PMID:19084078

  20. Caffeine inhibits InsP3 responses and capacitative calcium entry in canine pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hume, Joseph R; McAllister, Claire E; Wilson, Sean M

    2009-01-01

    Caffeine is a well described and characterized ryanodine receptor (RyR) activator. Previous evidence from independent research studies also indicate caffeine inhibits InsP3 receptor functionality, which is important to activation of capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) in some cell types. In addition, RyR activation elicits excitatory-coupled Ca2+ entry (ECCE) in skeletal muscle myotubes. Recent studies by our group show that canine pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) have functional InsP3 receptors as well as RyRs, and that CCE is dependent on InsP3 receptor activity. The potential for caffeine to activate ECCE as well as inhibit InsP3 receptor function and CCE was examined using fura-2 fluorescent imaging in canine PASMCs. The data show caffeine causes transient as well as sustained cytosolic Ca2+ increases, though this is not due to CCE or ECCE activity as evidenced by a lack of an increase in Mn2+ quench of fura-2. The experiments also show caffeine reversibly inhibits 5-HT elicited-InsP3 mediated Ca2+ responses with an IC50 of 6.87x10(-4) M and 10 mM caffeine fully inhibits CCE. These studies provide the first evidence that caffeine is an inhibitor of InsP3 generated Ca2+ signals and CCE in PASMCs.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide induces VCAM-1 expression and neutrophil adhesion to human tracheal smooth muscle cells: Involvement of Src/EGFR/PI3-K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.-N.; Luo, S.-F.; Wu, C.-B.; Lin, C.-C.; Yang, C.-M.

    2008-04-15

    In our previous study, LPS has been shown to induce vascular cell adhesion molecule-1(VCAM-1) expression through MAPKs and NF-{kappa}B in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). In addition to these pathways, the non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src), EGF receptor (EGFR), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to be implicated in the expression of several inflammatory target proteins. Here, we reported that LPS-induced up-regulation of VCAM-1 enhanced the adhesion of neutrophils onto HTSMC monolayer, which was inhibited by LY294002 and wortmannin. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of protein tyrosine kinases including Src, PYK2, and EGFR, which were further confirmed using specific anti-phospho-Src, PYK2, or EGFR Ab, respectively, revealed by Western blotting. LPS-stimulated Src, PYK2, EGFR, and Akt phosphorylation and VCAM-1 expression were attenuated by the inhibitors of Src (PP1), EGFR (AG1478), PI3-K (LY294002 and wortmannin), and Akt (SH-5), respectively, or transfection with siRNAs of Src or Akt and shRNA of p110. LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression was also blocked by pretreatment with curcumin (a p300 inhibitor) or transfection with p300 siRNA. LPS-stimulated Akt activation translocated into nucleus and associated with p300 and VCAM-1 promoter region was further confirmed by immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This association of Akt and p300 to VCAM-1 promoter was inhibited by pretreatment with PP1, AG1478, wortmannin, and SH-5. LPS-induced p300 activation enhanced VCAM-1 promoter activity and VCAM-1 mRNA expression. These results suggested that in HTSMCs, Akt phosphorylation mediated through transactivation of Src/PYK2/EGFR promoted the transcriptional p300 activity and eventually led to VCAM-1 expression induced by LPS.

  2. Endothelin-1 induces VCAM-1 expression-mediated inflammation via receptor tyrosine kinases and Elk/p300 in human tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Lin, Wei-Ning; Hou, Wei-Chen; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2015-08-01

    The elevated level of endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage of patients with severe asthma, acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and sepsis. ET-1 may affect vessel tone together with lung physiology and pathology. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is one kind of adhesion molecules participating in the process of polymorphonuclear leukocyte transmigration and regulating the occurrence and amplification of tissue inflammation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ET-1-mediated expression of VCAM-1 on human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) were largely unknown. Here we reported that ET-1 stimulated expression of VCAM-1 gene on HTSMCs, which was blocked by pretreatment with the inhibitors of ET receptors, Src, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT, MEK1/2, and p300, suggesting the participation of these signaling components in ET-1-regulated HTSMC responses. Furthermore, transfection with small-interfering RNA (siRNA) of Src, AKT, p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), or p300 downregulated the respective proteins and significantly attenuated ET-1-induced VCAM-1 expression. ET-1 also stimulated phosphorylation of Src, EGFR, PDGFR, AKT, p42/p44 MAPK, and Elk-1 and acetylation of histone H4 on HTSMCs. Immunoprecipitation assay showed the association between Elk-1 and p300 in the nucleus. Adhesion assay revealed that the adhesion of THP-1 to HTSMCs challenged with ET-1 was increased, which was attenuated by the inhibitors of ET receptors, Src, MMPs, EGFR, PDGFR, PI3K, AKT, p42/p44 MAPK, and p300. Taken together, these data suggested that ET-1 promotes occurrence and amplification of pathology-related airway inflammation via enhancing VCAM-1 expression in an ET receptor/Src/MMP/EGFR, PDGFR/PI3K/AKT/p42/p44 MAPK/Elk-1/p300 pathway in HTSMCs.

  3. Role of Na+-K+ ATPase in cyclic GMP-mediated relaxation of canine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, J; Tagaya, E; Nishimura, K; Isono, K; Nagai, A

    1997-01-01

    Sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+-K+ ATPase) plays a role in the regulation of vascular tone, but contribution of this enzyme to nitrovasodilator-induced pulmonary vasodilatation remains uncertain. We thus studied the interaction between guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) and Na+-K+ ATPase in smooth muscle cells isolated from canine pulmonary artery. To assess the contractile properties, changes in smooth muscle cell length were determined microscopically. Application of potassium chloride (KCl) shortened the cell length, an effect which was reduced by sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo-cyclic GMP in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of cells with the cyclic GMP-dependent kinase inhibitor KT 5823 (2 μM) abolished the effects of sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. Ouabain (0.3 μM) did not alter the KCl-induced muscle shortening, but inhibited the relaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. Incubation of smooth muscle cells with sodium nitroprusside concentration-dependently increased intracellular cyclic GMP levels and ouabain-sensitive 86Rb uptake, and these values were significantly correlated. In the presence of KT 5823, sodium nitroprusside increased cyclic GMP levels but did not alter ouabain-sensitive 86Rb uptake. These results suggest that there is a link between accumulation of intracellular cyclic GMP and activation of sarcolemmal Na+-K+ ATPase in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and that this link may be involved in the sodium nitroprusside-induced pulmonary vasodilatation. PMID:9298536

  4. Relaxant effects of NKH477, a new water-soluble forskolin derivative, on guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle: the role of Ca2+-activated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Satake, K; Takagi, K; Kodama, I; Honjo, H; Toyama, J; Shibata, S

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the bronchorelaxant action of NKH477, a newly developed water-soluble forskolin derivative, were investigated in guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle. In muscles precontracted with 3 μM histamine, NKH477 (1 nM–1 μM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease of isometric tension, resulting in a complete relaxation at 300 nM. The EC50 for the relaxation was 32.6±4.3 nM (n=6). In the presence of 30 or 90 nM iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective blocker of the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channel, the relaxing action of NKH477 on the histamine-induced contraction was inhibited, giving rise to a parallel shift of the concentration-response curves; the EC50 of NKH477 was increased to 131.4±20.4 nM at 30 nM IbTX (n=4), and 125.3±12.2 nM at 90 nM IbTX (n=4). Pretreatment of muscles with 30 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA) caused a similar rightward shift of the concentration-response curve to NKH477 with an increase of the EC50 to 139.8±18.4 nM (n=5). In contrast, the relaxing action of NKH477 was unaffected by 10 μM glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker, or by 100 nM apamin, a blocker of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels. In muscles pretreated with 1 μM nifedipine, a blocker of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDC), 30–90 nM IbTX did not affect the relaxant effects of NKH477 on the histamine-induced contraction. In muscles precontracted by a K+-rich (40 mM) solution, NKH477 caused only minimal relaxation (19.8±1.7%, n=4) even at the highest concentration (1 μM). In experiments to measure the ratio of fura-2 fluorescence signals (R340/380) as an index of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), the application of 100 nM NKH477 or 200 nM isoprenaline to the preparation precontracted by 3 μM histamine resulted in a decrease in [Ca2+]i in association with a decrease in tension. The reduction of [Ca2+]i and tension by NKH477 was 47.0±5.6% and 62.8±7

  5. [Carbon-carbon materials and composites for experimental tracheal reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Jiang, Zhao-yang; Qin, Yong

    2010-08-01

    The Carbon fiber reinforced carbon matrix composites were employed for reconstruction of large circumferential defect of the cervical trachea. The biocompatibility and biofunctionality of the new type carbonaceous tracheal prosthesis were evaluated, and the feasibility for cervical tracheal reconstruction discussed. Two types of carbonaceous tracheal prosthesis with different weaving methods of carbon fiber were used on eight healthy canines. Three to six tracheal cartilage rings were resected circumferentially. The 2 cm long tracheal prosthesis was transplanted into canines and the anastomosis was completed by end-to-end, tracheal-into-prosthesis and prosthesis-into-tracheal method. The function of breathing, eating and infection was observed after surgery. Four months later, the five survival canines were sacrificed and the prosthesis with surrounding tissues was removed for observation by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. All dogs had cough symptom in different degree lasted 1 - 4 weeks after surgery. Two dogs with tracheal-into-prosthesis anastomosis showed eating disorders in different degree. One canine died due to airway obstruction caused by dislocation of prosthesis within three weeks after operation. Another two deaths in 11th week and 12th week were attributed to suffocation because of hypergranulation and scar formation. Prosthesis was surrounded by connective tissues and anchored firmly to the neighboring tissues. Most part of the luminal surface of tracheal prosthesis was not covered by respiratory mucosa. However, the inner layer showed scant re-epithelialization beyond the anastomosis. The implantation of the carbonaceous tracheal prosthesis can maintain the normal respiratory function of the experimental canines, but hypergranulation and scar formation around the end of the tracheal prosthesis and epithelium on the luminal surface of the prosthesis are questions still remained to be solved.

  6. Dependence of electrical slow waves of canine colonic smooth muscle on calcium gradient.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, S M; Sanders, K M

    1992-01-01

    1. The ionic dependence of the upstroke and plateau components of slow waves of canine colonic circular muscles was studied. 2. Reduced extracellular Ca2+ caused a decrease in the amplitude of the upstroke and plateau components, a decrease in the depolarization velocity, and a decrease in frequency. The reduction in the upstroke phase per 10-fold reduction in external Ca2+ was close to the value predicted by the Nernst relationship, suggesting that the membrane permeability to Ca2+ increases steeply during this phase. 3. Nifedipine (10(-9)-10(-6)) reduced the plateau component, but concentrations of 10(-6) M did not abolish the upstroke component. The data suggest that a nifedipine-resistant component of Ca2+ current may be involved in the upstroke. 4. Inorganic Ca2+ channel blockers (Mn2+ and Ni2+) blocked spontaneous slow waves at concentrations of 1.0 mM or less. 5. The upstroke component was more sensitive to Ni2+ than to Mn2+; a concentration of 0.040 mM-Ni2+ caused more than a 50% reduction in upstroke velocity. Ni2+ also reduced the plateau phase of slow waves. 6. The results suggest that the upstroke and plateau components of slow waves are dependent upon activation of voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents. The current responsible for the upstroke is partially resistant to dihydropyridines (at least at 10(-6) M). The current responsible for the plateau component is nifedipine-sensitive. PMID:1282930

  7. Dependence of electrical slow waves of canine colonic smooth muscle on calcium gradient.

    PubMed

    Ward, S M; Sanders, K M

    1992-09-01

    1. The ionic dependence of the upstroke and plateau components of slow waves of canine colonic circular muscles was studied. 2. Reduced extracellular Ca2+ caused a decrease in the amplitude of the upstroke and plateau components, a decrease in the depolarization velocity, and a decrease in frequency. The reduction in the upstroke phase per 10-fold reduction in external Ca2+ was close to the value predicted by the Nernst relationship, suggesting that the membrane permeability to Ca2+ increases steeply during this phase. 3. Nifedipine (10(-9)-10(-6)) reduced the plateau component, but concentrations of 10(-6) M did not abolish the upstroke component. The data suggest that a nifedipine-resistant component of Ca2+ current may be involved in the upstroke. 4. Inorganic Ca2+ channel blockers (Mn2+ and Ni2+) blocked spontaneous slow waves at concentrations of 1.0 mM or less. 5. The upstroke component was more sensitive to Ni2+ than to Mn2+; a concentration of 0.040 mM-Ni2+ caused more than a 50% reduction in upstroke velocity. Ni2+ also reduced the plateau phase of slow waves. 6. The results suggest that the upstroke and plateau components of slow waves are dependent upon activation of voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents. The current responsible for the upstroke is partially resistant to dihydropyridines (at least at 10(-6) M). The current responsible for the plateau component is nifedipine-sensitive.

  8. Alcohol-induced apoptosis of canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: role of extracellular and intracellular calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Li, Jianfeng; Liu, Weiming; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2004-01-16

    Exposure of canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to ethanol (10, 25 and 100 mM) for 1, 3 and 5 days induced apoptosis with its typical characteristics of nuclear shrinkage, condensation, and DNA breakage as well as formation of apoptotic bodies observed by fluorescence staining, terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling and comet assays. Such effects of alcohol on cerebral VSMCs were time- and concentration-dependent. The threshold ethanol concentration for induction of the apoptotic process was found to be 10 mM. Extracellular and intracellular Ca2+ chelators, i.e. ethylglycol-bisbeta-aminoethylether-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA, 5 mM) and 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid AM (BAPTA, 10(-6) M), respectively, ameliorated greatly the number of cerebral VSMCs which underwent apoptosis. Verapamil, however, failed to inhibit apoptosis of cerebral VSMCs. From these new findings, we suggest that alcohol-induced apoptosis may contribute to alcohol-induced brain-vascular damage and stroke. In addition, our findings point to potential caution for humans who imbibe two or more standard drinks per day or who undergo 'binge drinking'.

  9. Participation of Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels in electrical activity of canine gastric smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Carl, A; McHale, N G; Publicover, N G; Sanders, K M

    1990-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels participate in the repolarization of electrical slow waves was tested in isolated cells and intact muscles of the canine gastric antrum. 2. Freshly dispersed cells from the gastric antrum liberally express large conductance channels that were characterized as Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels by several criteria. 3. Mean slope conductance of these channels in symmetrical 140 mM-KCl solutions was 265 +/- 25 pS and reversal potential was 1.3 +/- 3.3 mV. The reversal potential was shifted when K+ was partially replaced with Na+ in a manner consistent with the Nernst equation for the K+ gradient. 4. Open probability was studied in excised patches in solutions containing 10(-7)-10(-6) M-Ca2+ with holding potentials ranging from -100 to +100 mV. Resulting activation curves were fitted by Boltzmann functions. 5. Increasing [Ca2+] from 10(-7) to 10(-6) M shifted the half-maximal activation from +99 to 0 mV. These data suggest that Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels may be activated in the voltage range and [Ca2+]i occurring during the plateau phase of the slow wave. 6. In intact muscles loaded with the photolabile Ca2+ chelator, nitr-5, photo-activated release of Ca2+ during the slow wave cycle produced changes consistent with activation of Ca2(+)-dependent outward currents. 7. The data are consistent with the idea that Ca2+ build-up during electrical slow waves shifts the activation voltage of Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels into the range of the plateau potential. Activation of these channels yields outward current and repolarization. 8. Since the force of contractions depends on slow wave amplitude and duration, regulation of these channels may be important in controlling gastric motility. PMID:2126041

  10. Participation of Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels in electrical activity of canine gastric smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Carl, A; McHale, N G; Publicover, N G; Sanders, K M

    1990-10-01

    1. The hypothesis that Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels participate in the repolarization of electrical slow waves was tested in isolated cells and intact muscles of the canine gastric antrum. 2. Freshly dispersed cells from the gastric antrum liberally express large conductance channels that were characterized as Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels by several criteria. 3. Mean slope conductance of these channels in symmetrical 140 mM-KCl solutions was 265 +/- 25 pS and reversal potential was 1.3 +/- 3.3 mV. The reversal potential was shifted when K+ was partially replaced with Na+ in a manner consistent with the Nernst equation for the K+ gradient. 4. Open probability was studied in excised patches in solutions containing 10(-7)-10(-6) M-Ca2+ with holding potentials ranging from -100 to +100 mV. Resulting activation curves were fitted by Boltzmann functions. 5. Increasing [Ca2+] from 10(-7) to 10(-6) M shifted the half-maximal activation from +99 to 0 mV. These data suggest that Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels may be activated in the voltage range and [Ca2+]i occurring during the plateau phase of the slow wave. 6. In intact muscles loaded with the photolabile Ca2+ chelator, nitr-5, photo-activated release of Ca2+ during the slow wave cycle produced changes consistent with activation of Ca2(+)-dependent outward currents. 7. The data are consistent with the idea that Ca2+ build-up during electrical slow waves shifts the activation voltage of Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels into the range of the plateau potential. Activation of these channels yields outward current and repolarization. 8. Since the force of contractions depends on slow wave amplitude and duration, regulation of these channels may be important in controlling gastric motility.

  11. Characterization of ionic currents of circular smooth muscle cells of the canine pyloric sphincter.

    PubMed

    Vogalis, F; Sanders, K M

    1991-05-01

    1. The ionic currents of circular muscle cells from canine pyloric sphincter were characterized using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. 2. Subpopulations of circular muscle cells from the myenteric and submucosal halves of the circular layer were isolated and studied separately to determine whether differences in the currents expressed by these cells could explain differences in electrical behaviour observed in situ. 3. Resting potentials of isolated cells were about 20 mV positive to cells in intact muscles. Polarization under current clamp to the level of tissue resting potentials caused spontaneous discharge of action potentials in many cells. 4. Outward current measured under voltage clamp could be divided into a voltage-dependent component and a voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent component. The latter was affected by manipulations of external [Ca2+], nifedipine and dialysis of cells with EGTA. 5. A few cells exhibited a channel that was activated with hyperpolarization. These channels produced inward current at potentials positive to the potassium reversal potential, EK, and reversed at -13 mV. 6. Inward currents, recorded from Cs(+)-loaded cells, were characterized by a transient phase and a sustained phase that persisted throughout the test depolarization. The inward current was reduced by nifedipine but in some cells a nifedipine-resistant component was observed. 7. There were no fundamental differences in the ionic currents recorded from circular muscle cells from the myenteric and submucosal regions, suggesting that the electrical activity of the tissue must be dependent upon structural characteristics (i.e. electrical coupling, fibre bundle dimensions, etc.) of the tissue. 8. The ionic conductance characterized can be related to many of the excitable events recorded from pyloric muscles.

  12. Alpha adrenergic modulation of the Na/sup +/ pump of canine vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Navran, S.S.; Adair, S.E.; Allen, J.C.; Seidel, C.L.

    1986-03-01

    Some vasoactive agents, eg. beta adrenergic agonists and forskolin, stimulate the Na/sup 7/ pump by a cAMP- dependent mechanism. The authors have now demonstrated that phenylephrine (PE) stimulates the Na/sup 7/ pump in intact blood vessels as quantitated by an increased ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake. The stimulation is dose-dependent (ED/sub 50/, 3 x 10/sup -6/M) and blocked by phentolamine (I/sub 50/, 10/sup -7/M), prazosin (I/sub 50/, 10/sup -8/M) yohimbine (I/sub 50/, 10/sup -6/M) or elevated intracellular Na/sup +/. These data suggest that the Na/sup +/ pump stimulation is mediated through alpha/sub 1/ receptors which produce an influx of extracellular Na/sup +/. In vascular smooth muscle cell cultures PE stimulates the Na/sup +/ pump, but only when cells have been deprived of fetal calf serum (FCS). Since FCS is known to stimulate Na/sup +/influx, in the continuous presence of FCS, these cells may already be Na/sup +/-loaded and therefore refractory to further stimulation by alpha-adrenergic agents. Unlike those vasorelaxants whose mechanism involves stimulation of the Na/sup +/ pump, alpha adrenergic agents are vasoconstrictors and therefore the role of Na/sup +/ pump stimulation in this case may be as a mechanism of feedback inhibition of contractility.

  13. Chiral recognition of pinacidil and its 3-pyridyl isomer by canine cardiac and smooth muscle: Antagonism by sulfonylureas

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.I.; Wiest, S.A.; Zimmerman, K.M.; Ertel, P.J.; Bemis, K.G.; Robertson, D.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Pinacidil, a potassium channel opener (PCO), relaxes vascular smooth muscle by increasing potassium ion membrane conductance, thereby causing membrane hyperpolarization. PCOs also act on cardiac muscle to decrease action potential duration (APD) selectively. To examine the enantiomeric selectivity of pinacidil, the stereoisomers of pinacidil (a 4-pyridylcyanoguanidine) and its 3-pyridyl isomer (LY222675) were synthesized and studied in canine Purkinje fibers and cephalic veins. The (-)-enantiomers of both pinacidil and LY222675 were more potent in relaxing phenylephrine-contracted cephalic veins and decreasing APD than were their corresponding (+)-enantiomers. The EC50 values for (-)-pinacidil and (-)-LY222675 in relaxing cephalic veins were 0.44 and 0.09 microM, respectively. In decreasing APD, the EC50 values were 3.2 microM for (-)-pinacidil and 0.43 microM for (-)-LY222675. The eudismic ratio was greater for the 3-pyridyl isomer than for pinacidil in both cardiac (71 vs. 22) and vascular (53 vs. 17) tissues. (-)-LY222675 and (-)-pinacidil (0.1-30 microM) also increased 86Rb efflux from cephalic veins to a greater extent than did their respective optical antipodes. The antidiabetic sulfonylurea, glyburide (1-30 microM), shifted the vascular concentration-response curve of (-)-pinacidil to the right by a similar extent at each inhibitor concentration. Glipizide also antagonized the response to (-)-pinacidil, but was about 1/10 as potent with a maximal shift occurring at 10 and 30 microM. Glyburide antagonized the vascular relaxant effects of 0.3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 2.3 microM) and reversed the decrease in APD caused by 3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 1.9 microM). Nitroprusside did not alter 86Rb efflux, and vascular relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was unaffected by sulfonylureas.

  14. [Case of perioperative tracheal laceration by electrocautery].

    PubMed

    Ariyama, Jun; Nakamura, China; Nakagawa, Hideyuki; Imanishi, Hirokazu; Mieda, Tsutomu; Terao, Kazuhisa; Kitamura, Akira

    2013-12-01

    Although tracheal laceration during surgical procedure is a rare complication, it can be life-threating. Its immediate recognition and treatment are important. A 72-year-old man with aortic valve regurgitation was scheduled for aortic valve replacement. At anesthetic induction an endotracheal tube was smoothly inserted and the tidal volume was set at 500 ml with ventilator rate of 12 min-1. After electrocautery maneuver of the upper sterna region, end-tidal carbon-oxide curve suddenly became flat. Immediately after the completion of median sternotomy air bubble was seen in the surgical field. An 8-mm longitudinal tracheal laceration at the fourth tracheal cartilage was identified. The tracheal laceration was repaired with interrupted suture and the mediastinal tissue was used to cover the suture line. Air leaks were no longer present. After surgical repair, the aortic valve replacement was performed. The postoperative courses of both tracheal laceration repair and aortic valve replacement were uneventful.

  15. Upstroke component of electrical slow waves in canine colonic smooth muscle due to nifedipine-resistant calcium current.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, S M; Sanders, K M

    1992-01-01

    1. Electrical slow waves of gastrointestinal smooth muscles are not abolished by organic Ca2+ channel blocking drugs, such as nifedipine or D600. These compounds reduce the amplitude and duration of the plateau phase, but the upstroke phase of slow waves persists. 2. Voltage clamp experiments were performed on isolated circular muscle cells from the canine proximal colon to characterize the dihydropyridine-resistant component of inward current. Inward currents were measured at 25 and 35 degrees C. The higher temperature increased the amplitudes of the transient and sustained phases of the inward current. The voltage dependence of activation and inactivation of the inward current was not significantly changed at 35 vs. 25 degrees C. 3. At 35 degrees C the transient phase of the inward current was reduced but not blocked by nifedipine (10(-6) M). The sustained phase was blocked by nifedipine. 4. The block by nifedipine was voltage dependent, increasing with depolarization. At voltages reached during the upstroke depolarization about 35% of the inward current persisted in the presence of nifedipine (10(-6) M). This may be sufficient inward current to sustain the upstroke depolarization in intact muscles. 5. Nifedipine caused a 20 mV negative shift in the voltage dependence of inactivation suggesting that dihydropyridines may preferentially bind to Ca2+ channels in an inactivated state. 6. Ni2+ (< 100 microM) significantly decreased the transient phase of inward current. A combination of Ni2+ (40 microM) and nifedipine (10(-6) M) blocked all of the inward current at 35 degrees C. Combination of nifedipine (10(-6) M) and Ni2+ (40 microM) blocked slow waves in intact muscles. 7. Bay K 8644 (10(-6) M) increased the amplitude of the transient and sustained components of inward current. On a percentage basis the increase in the sustained component was greater than the increase in the transient component with test potentials in the range of -50 to -20 mV. This may explain

  16. Upstroke component of electrical slow waves in canine colonic smooth muscle due to nifedipine-resistant calcium current.

    PubMed

    Ward, S M; Sanders, K M

    1992-09-01

    1. Electrical slow waves of gastrointestinal smooth muscles are not abolished by organic Ca2+ channel blocking drugs, such as nifedipine or D600. These compounds reduce the amplitude and duration of the plateau phase, but the upstroke phase of slow waves persists. 2. Voltage clamp experiments were performed on isolated circular muscle cells from the canine proximal colon to characterize the dihydropyridine-resistant component of inward current. Inward currents were measured at 25 and 35 degrees C. The higher temperature increased the amplitudes of the transient and sustained phases of the inward current. The voltage dependence of activation and inactivation of the inward current was not significantly changed at 35 vs. 25 degrees C. 3. At 35 degrees C the transient phase of the inward current was reduced but not blocked by nifedipine (10(-6) M). The sustained phase was blocked by nifedipine. 4. The block by nifedipine was voltage dependent, increasing with depolarization. At voltages reached during the upstroke depolarization about 35% of the inward current persisted in the presence of nifedipine (10(-6) M). This may be sufficient inward current to sustain the upstroke depolarization in intact muscles. 5. Nifedipine caused a 20 mV negative shift in the voltage dependence of inactivation suggesting that dihydropyridines may preferentially bind to Ca2+ channels in an inactivated state. 6. Ni2+ (< 100 microM) significantly decreased the transient phase of inward current. A combination of Ni2+ (40 microM) and nifedipine (10(-6) M) blocked all of the inward current at 35 degrees C. Combination of nifedipine (10(-6) M) and Ni2+ (40 microM) blocked slow waves in intact muscles. 7. Bay K 8644 (10(-6) M) increased the amplitude of the transient and sustained components of inward current. On a percentage basis the increase in the sustained component was greater than the increase in the transient component with test potentials in the range of -50 to -20 mV. This may explain

  17. Relaxant action mechanism of berberine identified as the active principle of Argemone ochroleuca Sweet in guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mendoza, María Elena; Castillo-Henkel, Carlos; Navarrete, Andrés

    2008-02-01

    In this study we investigated the relaxant effect of the aerial parts of Argemone ochroleuca (Papaveraceae), which is used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of various respiratory diseases such as cough, bronchitis and asthma. The alkaloid berberine was identified as one of the active relaxant principles (EC50 = 118.50 +/-3.91 microM) in the dichloromethane extract of A. ochroleuca (EC50 = 78.03 +/- 2.15 microg mL(-1) with 95.12 +/- 3.56% of relaxation). Berberine concentration-dependently relaxed the carbachol-induced precontractions but not histamine- or KCl-induced precontraction. The relaxant effect of berberine was unaffected by the presence of propranolol (3 microM), glibenclamide (10 microM) or ODQ (10microM). However, 2', 5'-dideoxyadenosine (10 microM) blocked the log concentration-response curves of berberine. On the other hand, berberine produced a leftward shift of the log concentration-response curves of isoproterenol, forskolin and nitroprusside. Additionally, berberine produced a parallel rightward shift of the concentration-response curve of carbachol in a competitive manner with a pA2 of 3.87 +/- 0.045. The above results suggest that the relaxant effect of berberine on tracheal muscle is due to its antagonistic effect on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

  18. Endodermal Wnt signaling is required for tracheal cartilage formation.

    PubMed

    Snowball, John; Ambalavanan, Manoj; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Sinner, Debora

    2015-09-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia is a common congenital defect in which the walls of the trachea and bronchi lack of adequate cartilage required for support of the airways. Deletion of Wls, a cargo receptor mediating Wnt ligand secretion, in the embryonic endoderm using ShhCre mice inhibited formation of tracheal-bronchial cartilaginous rings. The normal dorsal-ventral patterning of tracheal mesenchyme was lost. Smooth muscle cells, identified by Acta2 staining, were aberrantly located in ventral mesenchyme of the trachea, normally the region of Sox9 expression in cartilage progenitors. Wnt/β-catenin activity, indicated by Axin2 LacZ reporter, was decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wls(f/f);Shh(Cre/+) embryos. Proliferation of chondroblasts was decreased and reciprocally, proliferation of smooth muscle cells was increased in Wls(f/f);Shh(Cre/+) tracheal tissue. Expression of Tbx4, Tbx5, Msx1 and Msx2, known to mediate cartilage and muscle patterning, were decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wls(f/f);Shh(Cre/+) embryos. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that Wnt7b and Wnt5a, expressed by the epithelium of developing trachea, and active Wnt/β-catenin signaling are required for tracheal chondrogenesis before formation of mesenchymal condensations. In conclusion, Wnt ligands produced by the tracheal epithelium pattern the tracheal mesenchyme via modulation of gene expression and cell proliferation required for proper tracheal cartilage and smooth muscle differentiation.

  19. Endodermal Wnt signaling is required for tracheal cartilage formation

    PubMed Central

    Snowball, John; Ambalavanan, Manoj; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Sinner, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia is a common congenital defect in which the walls of the trachea and bronchi lack of adequate cartilage required for support of the airways. Deletion of Wls, a cargo receptor mediating Wnt ligand secretion, in the embryonic endoderm using ShhCre mice inhibited formation of tracheal-bronchial cartilaginous rings. The normal dorsal-ventral patterning of tracheal mesenchyme was lost. Smooth muscle cells, identified by Acta2 staining, were aberrantly located in ventral mesenchyme of the trachea, normally the region of Sox9 expression in cartilage progenitors. Wnt/β-catenin activity, indicated by Axin2 LacZ reporter, was decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ embryos. Proliferation of chondroblasts was decreased and reciprocally, proliferation of smooth muscle cells was increased in Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ tracheal tissue. Expression of Tbx4, Tbx5, Msx1 and Msx2, known to mediate cartilage and muscle patterning, were decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ embryos. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that Wnt7b and Wnt5a, expressed by the epithelium of developing trachea, and active Wnt/β-catenin signaling are required for tracheal chondrogenesis before formation of mesenchymal condensations. In conclusion, Wnt ligands produced by the tracheal epithelium pattern the tracheal mesenchyme via modulation of gene expression and cell proliferation required for proper tracheal cartilage and smooth muscle differentiation. PMID:26093309

  20. Endothelium-dependent relaxation and hyperpolarization of canine coronary artery smooth muscles in relation to the electrogenic Na-K pump.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G.; Hashitani, H.; Suzuki, H.

    1989-01-01

    1 In the smooth muscle cells of canine coronary artery, acetylcholine (ACh) produced a transient, endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization of the membrane. A similar hyperpolarization was also elicited by exposure to Krebs solution after incubation of the artery in K-free solution for 30 min. 2 A hyperpolarization of reproducible amplitude was generated when ACh was applied at intervals greater than 30 min. Repetitive application of ACh at 15 min intervals caused a successive reduction in the amplitude of hyperpolarization. 3 The reduction in the amplitude of relaxation during five successive applications of ACh at 15 min intervals was less than 10% of the first relaxation. 4 The ACh-induced hyperpolarization was blocked by atropine but not by ouabain, whereas the K-free induced hyperpolarization was blocked by ouabain. In low Na (Li-substituted) solution, ACh still induced a hyperpolarization but the K-free induced hyperpolarization was absent. 5 In coronary artery precontracted by high-K solution, ACh produced an endothelium-dependent relaxation, without membrane hyperpolarization. The associated relaxation was resistant to ouabain but sensitive to atropine. 6 It is concluded that in the canine coronary artery, the electrogenic Na-K pump does not contribute to the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization or relaxation. The results are consistent with the release of two different inhibitory factors from the vascular endothelium. PMID:2590775

  1. Effect of KC399, a newly synthesized K+ channel opener, on acetylcholine-induced electrical and mechanical activities in rabbit tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, K.; Nabata, H.; Kuriyama, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Itoh, T.

    1995-01-01

    1. Effects of KC399, an opener of ATP-sensitive K+ channels were investigated on membrane potential, isometric force and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) mobilization induced by acetylcholine (ACh) in smooth muscle from the rabbit trachea. 2. In these smooth muscle cells, ACh (0.1 and 1 microM) depolarized the membrane in a concentration-dependent manner, KC399 (1-100 nM) hyperpolarized the membrane whether in the presence or absence of ACh. When the concentration of ACh was increased, the absolute values of the membrane potential induced by the maximum concentration of KC399 were less negative. 3. ACh (0.1 to 10 microM) concentration-dependently produced a phasic, followed by a tonic increase in both [Ca2+]i and force. KC399 (above 3 nM) lowered the resting [Ca2+]i and attenuated the ACh-induced phasic and tonic increases in [Ca2+]i and force, in a concentration-dependent manner. The magnitude of the inhibition was greater for the ACh-induced tonic responses than for the phasic ones. Nicardipine (0.3 microM), a blocker of the L-type Ca2+ channel, attenuated the ACh-induced tonic, but not phasic, increases in [Ca2+]i and force. KC399 further attenuated the ACh-induced tonic responses in the presence of nicardipine. 4. In beta-escin-skinned strips, Ca2+ (0.3-10 microM) produced a contraction in a concentration-dependent manner. KC399 (0.1 microM) had no effect on the Ca(2+)-force relationship in the presence or absence of ATP with GTP. However, at a very high concentration (1 microM), this agent slightly shifted the relationship to the right and attenuated the maximum Ca(2+)-induced contraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8564210

  2. Bladder smooth muscle cells on electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone)/poly(l-lactic acid) scaffold promote bladder regeneration in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Shakhssalim, Nasser; Soleimani, Masoud; Dehghan, Mohammad M; Rasouli, Javad; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Torbati, Peyman M; Naji, Mohammad

    2017-06-01

    Engineering of urinary bladder has been the focus of numerous studies in recent decade. Novel biomaterials, innovative fabrication methods and various modification processes of scaffolds are the critical issues to find supportive matrices. Supportive characteristics of electrospun PCL/PLLA nano-scaffold for bladder augmentation in canine model and the role of bladder cells in regeneration process were appraised. Electrospun PCL/PLLA was fabricated by co-electrospinning of PCL and PLLA. Bladder cells were isolated and transduced with lentiviral particles encoding eGFP and JRed proteins. Electrospun PCL/PLLA was seeded with different bladder cells individually or in co-culture condition. Cell-free and cell-seeded electrospun PCL/PLLA scaffolds (10cm(2)) were surgically implanted in bladders of eight female dogs for three months. To evaluate bladder regeneration, the dogs were sacrificed and their bladders were examined macroscopically and microscopically for presence of tracking proteins, expression of cell-specific markers and histological attributes of regenerated tissues. All animals survived the experiment with no complication. In smooth muscle transplanted group complete regeneration and covering of scaffold were observed. Other groups revealed partial regeneration. A well-developed layer of urothelium was formed in all groups in regenerated parts. Smooth muscle transplanted group showed the most developed muscle layer. Regenerated tissue demonstrated typical expression of cell-specific markers. No expression of eGFP and JRed was observed. Electrospun PCL/PLLA scaffold with proper handling, suture retention, nano-sized surface features, maintenance of normal phenotype of cells and minimal adverse effects in body can be a supportive substrate for bladder wall regeneration when seeded with bladder smooth muscle cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Activation of ROS/NF-{kappa}B and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM kinase II are necessary for VCAM-1 induction in IL-1{beta}-treated human tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S.-F.; Chang, C.-C.; Lee, I-T.; Lee, C.-W.; Lin, W.-N.; Lin, C.-C.; Yang, C.-M.

    2009-05-15

    Histone acetylation regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) plays a critical role in the expression of inflammatory genes, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Oxidative processes have been shown to induce VCAM-1 expression. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying IL-1{beta}-induced VCAM-1 expression in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). Our results showed that IL-1{beta} enhanced HTSMCs-monocyte adhesion through up-regulation of VCAM-1, which was inhibited by pretreatment with selective inhibitors of PKC{alpha} (Goe6976), c-Src (PP1), NADPH oxidase [diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and apocynin (APO)], intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM), PI-PLC (U73122), CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II (KN62), p300 (garcinol), NF-{kappa}B (Bay11-7082), HDAC (trichostatin A), and ROS scavenger [N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC)] or transfection with siRNAs of MyD88, PKC{alpha}, Src, p47{sup phox}, p300, and HDAC4. Moreover, IL-1{beta} stimulated NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII phosphorylation through MyD88-dependent PI-PLC/PKC{alpha}/c-Src/ROS and PI-PLC/Ca{sup 2+}/CaM pathways, respectively. Activation of NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII may eventually lead to the acetylation of histone residues and phosphorylation of histone deacetylases. These findings suggested that IL-1{beta} induced VCAM-1 expression via these multiple signaling pathways in HTSMCs. Blockade of these pathways may reduce monocyte adhesion via VCAM-1 suppression and attenuation of the inflammatory responses in airway diseases.

  4. Activation of ROS/NF-kappaB and Ca2+/CaM kinase II are necessary for VCAM-1 induction in IL-1beta-treated human tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shue-Fen; Chang, Chia-Chi; Lee, I-Ta; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lin, Wei-Ning; Lin, Chih-Chung; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2009-05-15

    Histone acetylation regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) plays a critical role in the expression of inflammatory genes, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Oxidative processes have been shown to induce VCAM-1 expression. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying IL-1beta-induced VCAM-1 expression in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). Our results showed that IL-1beta enhanced HTSMCs-monocyte adhesion through up-regulation of VCAM-1, which was inhibited by pretreatment with selective inhibitors of PKCalpha (Gö6976), c-Src (PP1), NADPH oxidase [diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and apocynin (APO)], intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM), PI-PLC (U73122), CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II (KN62), p300 (garcinol), NF-kappaB (Bay11-7082), HDAC (trichostatin A), and ROS scavenger [N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC)] or transfection with siRNAs of MyD88, PKCalpha, Src, p47(phox), p300, and HDAC4. Moreover, IL-1beta stimulated NF-kappaB and CaMKII phosphorylation through MyD88-dependent PI-PLC/PKCalpha/c-Src/ROS and PI-PLC/Ca2+/CaM pathways, respectively. Activation of NF-kappaB and CaMKII may eventually lead to the acetylation of histone residues and phosphorylation of histone deacetylases. These findings suggested that IL-1beta induced VCAM-1 expression via these multiple signaling pathways in HTSMCs. Blockade of these pathways may reduce monocyte adhesion via VCAM-1 suppression and attenuation of the inflammatory responses in airway diseases.

  5. Distribution of phenotypically disparate myocyte subpopulations in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Halayko, Andrew J; Stelmack, Gerald L; Yamasaki, Akira; McNeill, Karol; Unruh, Helmut; Rector, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Phenotype and functional heterogeneity of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells in vitro is well known, but there is limited understanding of these features in vivo. We tested whether ASM is composed of myocyte subsets differing in contractile phenotype marker expression. We used flow cytometry to compare smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC) and smooth muscle-alpha-actin (sm-alpha-actin) abundance in myocytes dispersed from canine trachealis. Based on immunofluorescent intensity and light scatter characteristics (forward and 90 degrees side scatter), 2 subgroups were identified and isolated. Immunoblotting confirmed smMHC and sm-alpha-actin were 10- and 5-fold greater, respectively, in large, elongate myocytes that comprised approximately 60% of total cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed similar phenotype heterogeneity in human bronchial smooth muscle. Canine tracheal myocyte subpopulations isolated by flow cytometry were used to seed primary subcultures. Proliferation of subcultures established with myocytes exhibiting low levels of smMHC and sm-alpha-actin was approximately 2 x faster than subcultures established with ASM cells with a high marker protein content. These studies demonstrate broad phenotypic heterogeneity of myocytes in normal ASM tissue that is maintained in cell culture, as demonstrated by divergent proliferative capacity. The distinct roles of these subgroups could be a key determinant of normal and pathological lung development and biology.

  6. Antioxidants prevent ethanol-induced contractions of canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle: relation to alcohol-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zheng, T; Altura, B T; Altura, B M

    2001-03-30

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that alpha-tocopherol (Vit. E) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) might exert direct effects on alcohol-induced contractions of canine basilar cerebral arteries. After precontraction of arterial ring segments with ethanol, PDTC (10(-8)-10(-6) M) and Vit. E (10(-6)-10(-4) M) induced concentration-dependent relaxations of cerebral arteries, compared to untreated controls. The effective concentrations producing approximately 50% of the maximal relaxation responses (EC(50) values) were about 2.48+/-0.09 x 10(-7) M for PDTC, and 1.87+/-0.10 x 10(-5) mM for Vit. E, respectively. Preincubation of these arterial rings with EC(50)'s of PDTC or Vit. E for 40 min attenuate markedly the contractions produced by alcohol, at concentrations of 1-400 mM. However, both PDTC and Vit.E do not relax equi-potent precontractions induced by either KCl or prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) or inhibit their contractions. These data suggest that alcohol-induced contractions of cerebral arteries are mediated via excitation-contraction coupling pathways different from those used by KCl or receptor-mediated agonists such as PGF(2alpha). The present results, when viewed in light of other recently published data, suggest that antioxidants may prove useful in the amelioration and treatment of alcohol-induced brain damage and strokes.

  7. Catalase prevents elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) induced by alcohol in cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: Possible relationship to alcohol-induced stroke and brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Liu, Weimin; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2003-01-15

    Several studies have suggested that alcohol-induced brain injury is associated with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The recent findings, that antioxidants (Vitamin E and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC)) prevent intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) overload in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells, induced by alcohol, demonstrate indirectly that ROS formation is related to cerebral vascular injury. The present experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that catalase, an hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) scavenging enzyme, can prevent or ameliorate alcohol-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i). Preincubation of cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells with catalase (20-1000 units/ml) didn't produce any apparent changes from controls in resting levels of [Ca(2+)](i) after 1-3 days. Exposure of the cerebral vascular cells to culture media containing 10-100mM ethanol resulted in significant rises in [Ca(2+)](i) (p<0.01). Although exposure of these cells to a low concentration of catalase (20 units/ml) failed to prevent the increased level of [Ca(2+)](i) induced by ethanol, concomitant addition of higher concentrations of catalase (100-1000 units/ml) and ethanol (10-100mM) inhibited or ameliorated the rises of [Ca(2+)](i) induced by ethanol either at 24h or at 3 days, in a concentration-dependent manner. Catalase, in the range of 100-200 units/ml, inhibited approximately 50% of the [Ca(2+)](i) increases caused by ethanol in the first 24h. Catalase at a concentration of 1000 units/ml inhibited completely excessive [Ca(2+)](i) accumulation. The present results when viewed in light of other recently published data suggest that H(2)O(2) generation may be one of the earliest events triggered by alcohol in alcohol-induced brain-vascular damage, neurobehavioral actions and stroke.

  8. Antioxidants prevent depletion of [Mg2+]i induced by alcohol in cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: possible relationship to alcohol-induced stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zheng, T; Altura, B T; Altura, B M

    2001-07-01

    Low serum concentrations of Mg(2+) ions have been reported, recently, in patients with coronary disease, atherosclerosis, and stroke as well as in patients with cerebral hemorrhage. The aim of the present study was to determine whether potent antioxidants [alpha-tocopherol and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC)] can prevent or ameliorate intracellular Mg(2+) ([Mg(2+)](i)) depletion associated with cerebral vascular injury induced by alcohol. Exposure of cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells to alcohol (10-100 mM) for 24 h induced marked depletion in [Mg(2+)](i) (i.e., approximately 30-65%, depending upon alcohol concentration). Treatment of the cultured cells with either PDTC (0.1 microM) or alpha-tocopherol (15 microM) for 24 h, alone, failed to interfere with basal [Mg(2+)](i) levels. However, preincubation of the cells with either alpha-tocopherol or PDTC for 24 h completely inhibited the depletion of [Mg(2+)](i) induced by exposure to 10-100 mM ethanol. These results indicate that alpha-tocopherol and PDTC prevent decreases in [Mg(2+)](i) produced by ethanol. Moreover, these new results suggest that such protective effects of alpha-tocopherol and PDTC on cerebral vascular cells might be useful therapeutic tools in prevention and amelioration of cerebral vascular injury and stroke in alcoholics.

  9. Spontaneous release of nitric oxide inhibits electrical, Ca2+ and mechanical transients in canine gastric smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, H; Blondfield, D P; Hori, M; Publicover, N G; Kato, I; Sanders, K M

    1992-01-01

    1. In canine antrum, rhythmic electrical activity consists of a rapid upstroke phase followed by a plateau depolarization. In response to slow waves, cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) and tension increased. 2. Addition of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 0.5 microM) decreased the amplitude of the plateau phase of slow waves without significant effects on the upstroke depolarization. SNP also inhibited changes in [Ca2+]cyt and tension associated with the plateau potential. SNP induced a negative chronotropic effect at concentrations above 0.1 microM. 3. Similar to the effects of SNP, illumination of muscles during slow waves with ultraviolet (UV) light caused premature repolarization. UV illumination is known to release NO in some tissues. 4. L-NG-monomethyl-arginine (L-NMMA, 300 microM), Methylene Blue (MB, 5 microM) and oxyhaemoglobin (oxy-Hb, 5 microM) increased the force of contractions. In contrast, L-arginine (L-Arg, 300 microM) decreased contractile force and antagonized the effects of L-NMMA. 5. During the upstroke phase, SNP caused a small reduction in [Ca2+]cyt and a large reduction in force, suggesting that SNP caused a decrease in Ca2+ sensitivity. 6. In muscles permeabilized by alpha-toxin, cyclic GMP (100 microM) and UV illumination inhibited Ca(2+)-induced contraction (at pCa 5.5). 7. These data suggest that NO or NO-related compounds are spontaneously released in gastric muscles. These agents have two effects on excitation-contraction coupling: (i) inhibition (directly and/or indirectly) of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels that participate in the plateau phase of slow waves, and (ii) reduction in the Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile element.

  10. Spontaneous release of nitric oxide inhibits electrical, Ca2+ and mechanical transients in canine gastric smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, H; Blondfield, D P; Hori, M; Publicover, N G; Kato, I; Sanders, K M

    1992-01-01

    1. In canine antrum, rhythmic electrical activity consists of a rapid upstroke phase followed by a plateau depolarization. In response to slow waves, cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) and tension increased. 2. Addition of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 0.5 microM) decreased the amplitude of the plateau phase of slow waves without significant effects on the upstroke depolarization. SNP also inhibited changes in [Ca2+]cyt and tension associated with the plateau potential. SNP induced a negative chronotropic effect at concentrations above 0.1 microM. 3. Similar to the effects of SNP, illumination of muscles during slow waves with ultraviolet (UV) light caused premature repolarization. UV illumination is known to release NO in some tissues. 4. L-NG-monomethyl-arginine (L-NMMA, 300 microM), Methylene Blue (MB, 5 microM) and oxyhaemoglobin (oxy-Hb, 5 microM) increased the force of contractions. In contrast, L-arginine (L-Arg, 300 microM) decreased contractile force and antagonized the effects of L-NMMA. 5. During the upstroke phase, SNP caused a small reduction in [Ca2+]cyt and a large reduction in force, suggesting that SNP caused a decrease in Ca2+ sensitivity. 6. In muscles permeabilized by alpha-toxin, cyclic GMP (100 microM) and UV illumination inhibited Ca(2+)-induced contraction (at pCa 5.5). 7. These data suggest that NO or NO-related compounds are spontaneously released in gastric muscles. These agents have two effects on excitation-contraction coupling: (i) inhibition (directly and/or indirectly) of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels that participate in the plateau phase of slow waves, and (ii) reduction in the Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile element. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1501133

  11. Binding of a Calcium Antagonist, [3H]Nitrendipine, to High Affinity Sites in Bovine Aortic Smooth Muscle and Canine Cardiac Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lewis T.; Tremble, Patrice

    1982-01-01

    [3H]Nitrendipine, a potent calcium channel antagonist [3-ethyl-5-methyl-1-1,4-dihydro-2,6 - dimethyl - 4 - (3 - nitrophenyl) - 3,5 - pyridine carboxylate], was used to label high affinity binding sites on membranes prepared from bovine aortic smooth muscle. The binding of [3H]nitrendipine is rapid (t1/2 < 5 min) and reversible at 37°C. The binding sites have a high affinity for [3H]nitrendipine with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.1 nM. The density of sites is 40-60 fmol/mg of membrane protein. Analogues of nitrendipine compete for the binding sites with affinities consistent with their known biological effects as calcium antagonists. Nisoldipine, [isobutyl methyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(2-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridine carboxylate], a calcium antagonist more potent than nifedipine [2,6-dimethyl-3,5-dicarbomethoxy-4-(2-nitrophenyl)-1,4-dihydropyridine] in relaxing vascular smooth muscle, has an affinity three-fold higher than that of nifedipine in competing for the binding sites. A biologically inactive derivative of nifedipine does not compete for [3H]nitrendipine binding. Verapamil (α-isopropyl-α[(N-methyl - N-homoveratryl) -α-aminopropyl]-3,4-dimethyoxyphenyl acetonitrile), a structurally different calcium antagonist, only partially (25%) inhibits binding at high concentrations (1 μM). Prazosin, an alpha adrenergic antagonist does not compete for [3H]nitrendipine binding sites. The binding of [3H]nitrendipine is not affected by 1.5 mM calcium. Canine cardiac membranes also have high affinity [3H]nitrendipine binding sites, (KD = 6 nM) but bovine erythrocytes do not. The relative affinities of nisoldipine and nifedipine for the cardiac membrane binding sites reflect the relative activities of these compounds as calcium channel antagonists. These results suggest that the [3H]nitrendipine binding sites are the sites through which dihydropyridines act as calcium channel antagonists. PMID:6282938

  12. Radioisotope measurement of the velocity of tracheal mucus

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, K.J.; Palmer, D.W.; Beste, D.J.; Carl, G.A.; Belson, T.P.; Pelc, L.R.; Toohill, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    A radioisotope scanning technique for measuring the velocity of tracheal mucus has been developed utilizing a canine model. A solution of stannous phytate labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is introduced percutaneously into the lower trachea and the upward movement of the leading edge of the radioactivity is followed by repeat scanning at 2-minute intervals using a modified rectilinear scanner, thus allowing calculation of the velocity of the mucus. It is believed that this technique may be of value in studying the effect of experimentally induced tracheal injuries on mucus velocity. Possible applications of the technique for the study of the velocity of mucus in the human trachea are discussed.

  13. Viscoelastic Properties of Human Tracheal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Safshekan, Farzaneh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Abdouss, Majid; Shadmehr, Mohammad B

    2017-01-01

    The physiological performance of trachea is highly dependent on its mechanical behavior, and therefore, the mechanical properties of its components. Mechanical characterization of trachea is key to succeed in new treatments such as tissue engineering, which requires the utilization of scaffolds which are mechanically compatible with the native human trachea. In this study, after isolating human trachea samples from brain-dead cases and proper storage, we assessed the viscoelastic properties of tracheal cartilage, smooth muscle, and connective tissue based on stress relaxation tests (at 5% and 10% strains for cartilage and 20%, 30%, and 40% for smooth muscle and connective tissue). After investigation of viscoelastic linearity, constitutive models including Prony series for linear viscoelasticity and quasi-linear viscoelastic, modified superposition, and Schapery models for nonlinear viscoelasticity were fitted to the experimental data to find the best model for each tissue. We also investigated the effect of age on the viscoelastic behavior of tracheal tissues. Based on the results, all three tissues exhibited a (nonsignificant) decrease in relaxation rate with increasing the strain, indicating viscoelastic nonlinearity which was most evident for cartilage and with the least effect for connective tissue. The three-term Prony model was selected for describing the linear viscoelasticity. Among different models, the modified superposition model was best able to capture the relaxation behavior of the three tracheal components. We observed a general (but not significant) stiffening of tracheal cartilage and connective tissue with aging. No change in the stress relaxation percentage with aging was observed. The results of this study may be useful in the design and fabrication of tracheal tissue engineering scaffolds.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhances neutrophil adhesiveness: induction of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 via activation of Akt and CaM kinase II and modifications of histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase 4 in human tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lin, Chih-Chung; Luo, Shue-Fen; Lee, Hui-Chun; Lee, I-Ta; Aird, William C; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2008-05-01

    Up-regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) involves adhesions between both circulating and resident leukocytes and the human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) during airway inflammatory reaction. We have demonstrated previously that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression is regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-kappaB, and p300 activation in HTSMCs. In addition to this pathway, phosphorylation of Akt and CaM kinase II has been implicated in histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) activation. Here, we investigated whether these different mechanisms participated in TNF-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression and enhanced neutrophil adhesion. TNF-alpha significantly increased HTSMC-neutrophil adhesions, and this effect was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1 on the HTSMCs and was blocked by the selective inhibitors of Src [4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1)], epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR; 4-(3'-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline, (AG1478)], phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) [2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride(LY294002) and wortmannin],calcium[1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester; BAPTA-AM], phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PLC) [1-[6-[[17beta-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122)], protein kinase C (PKC) [12-(2-cyanoethyl)-6,7,12, 13-tetrahydro-13-methyl-5-oxo-5H-indolo(2,3-a)pyrrolo(3,4-c)-carbazole (Gö6976), rottlerin, and 3-1-[3-(amidinothio)propyl-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl) maleimide (bisindolylmaleimide IX) (Ro 31-8220)], CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II [(8R(*),9S(*),11S(*))-(-)-9-hydroxy-9-methoxycarbonyl-8-methyl-14-n-propoxy-2,3,9, 10-tetrahydro-8,11-epoxy, 1H,8H, 11H-2,7b,11a-triazadibenzo[a,g]cycloocta[cde]trinden-1-one (KT5926) and 1-[N,O-bis(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl

  15. Tracheal malignant melanoma: successful outcome with tracheal resection.

    PubMed

    Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Minamoto, Helio; Junqueira, Jader J M; Falzoni, Roberto; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2008-07-01

    Primary tracheal malignant melanomas are uncommon neoplasms: only five cases have been reported. Different therapeutic approaches are described, with a short life expectancy observed. We report a case of a young woman with a primary tracheal malignant melanoma who underwent complete tracheal resection and is free of disease 4 years after surgical treatment.

  16. Primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma and tracheal tumors during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abike, Faruk; Bingol, Banu; Temizkan, Osman; Dunder, Ilkkan; Kilic, Gokhan Sami; Cetin, Guven; Gundogdu, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Cancer complicates approximately 0.1% of all pregnancies. Primary tracheal carcinoma is one of very rarely seen tumors and the rate of its being seen makes up approximately % 0.2 of all tumors of respiratory tract. The patient, 28 years old, who has 28-weeks-pregnant, was diagnosed with primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma. Patient was made operation as thoracotomy and tracheal tumor was removed at the 28th week of pregnancy. Patient was delivered with sectio abdominale at the 39th week of pregnancy. Primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma is very rarely seen tumors and it is the first tracheal ACC with pregnancy case in literature to have been detected and surgically treated during pregnancy. We discussed primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma and tracheal tumors during pregnancy with literature. PMID:22066040

  17. Effects of artificial tracheal fixation on tracheal epithelial regeneration and prevention of tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nakaegawa, Yuta; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Tada, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Ryo; Takezawa, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Omori, Koichi

    2017-06-01

    Tight fixation of the artificial trachea is important for epithelialization and tracheal stenosis. The authors have developed an artificial trachea and have used it for tracheal reconstruction. Although various studies on tracheal reconstruction have been conducted, no studies have examined the effect of artificial tracheal fixation on tracheal stenosis and regeneration. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of artificial tracheal fixation. Preliminary animal experiment. Artificial tracheae were implanted into rabbits with partial tracheal defects. Tracheal stenosis and regeneration of the tracheal epithelium on the artificial tracheae were evaluated by endoscopic examination, scanning electron microscopic analysis, and histological examination. The artificial tracheae fixed to the tracheal defects were classified into three groups (0-point, 4-point, and 8-point) by the number of fixation points. At 14 and 28 days post-implantation, the luminal surface of the implantation area was mostly covered with epithelium in all fixation groups. However, a small amount of granulation tissue was observed in the 0-point fixation group at 14 days post-implantation. Moreover, tracheal stenosis did not occur in the 8-point fixation group, but stenosis was detected in the other groups.

  18. Relaxation of soman-induced contracture of airway smooth muscle in vitro. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Filbert, M.G.; Moore, D.H.; Adler, M.

    1992-12-31

    A possible role for beta-adrenergic agonists in the management of bronchoconstriction resulting from exposure to anticholinesterase compounds was investigated in vitro in canine tracheal smooth muscle. Norepinephrine, salbutamol and isoproterenol produced partial relaxation of soman-induced contractures. However, the relaxation induced was not sustained; muscle tensions returned to pretreatment levels within minutes despite the continued presence of beta-agonists. Increasing cAMP levels with the non beta-agonist bronchodilators such as thoophylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, or forskolin, a specific stimulator of adenylate cyclase, resulted in more complete and longer lasting relaxation, suggesting that beta-adrenoceptor desensitization may contribute to the failure by beta-agonists to produce sustained relaxation. Nerve agents, Soman, Toxicity, Airway smooth muscle, In vitro, Physiology, Effects.

  19. Ventilatory responses to hypoxia nullify hypoxic tracheal constriction in awake dogs.

    PubMed

    Sorkness, R L; Vidruk, E H

    1986-10-01

    Three awake dogs with chronic tracheostomies were used to study the effects of hypoxia (12% O2) on tracheal smooth muscle tone. Pressure changes within a water-filled cuff in an isolated portion of the cervical trachea reflected changes in tracheal tone. During spontaneous ventilation, hypoxia produced hyperventilation, but no significant change in tracheal tone. If hypocapnia was prevented with inspired CO2 during hypoxia, one of three dogs increased tracheal tone, and all dogs increased ventilation beyond that measured with hypoxia alone. When the awake dogs were ventilated mechanically to prevent changes in ventilation, hypoxia always increased tracheal tone. We made independent changes in ventilation and CO2 similar to the spontaneous responses to hypoxia to test these effects on tracheal tone. When the dogs were ventilated mechanically first with 2% CO2, and then with no CO2, the resulting drop in end-tidal CO2 always decreased tone. When the tidal volume on the ventilator was increased under hyperoxic, isocapnic conditions, tracheal tone always decreased. We conclude that the normal ventilatory response to hypoxia opposes the bronchoconstrictor effect of hypoxia, resulting in no net change in tracheal smooth muscle tone.

  20. Fiber optic tracheal detection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souhan, Brian E.; Nawn, Corinne D.; Shmel, Richard; Watts, Krista L.; Ingold, Kirk A.

    2017-02-01

    Poorly performed airway management procedures can lead to a wide variety of adverse events, such as laryngeal trauma, stenosis, cardiac arrest, hypoxemia, or death as in the case of failed airway management or intubation of the esophagus. Current methods for confirming tracheal placement, such as auscultation, direct visualization or capnography, may be subjective, compromised due to clinical presentation or require additional specialized equipment that is not always readily available during the procedure. Consequently, there exists a need for a non-visual detection mechanism for confirming successful airway placement that can give the provider rapid feedback during the procedure. Based upon our previously presented work characterizing the reflectance spectra of tracheal and esophageal tissue, we developed a fiber-optic prototype to detect the unique spectral characteristics of tracheal tissue. Device performance was tested by its ability to differentiate ex vivo samples of tracheal and esophageal tissue. Pig tissue samples were tested with the larynx, trachea and esophagus intact as well as excised and mounted on cork. The device positively detected tracheal tissue 18 out of 19 trials and 1 false positive out of 19 esophageal trials. Our proof of concept device shows great promise as a potential mechanism for rapid user feedback during airway management procedures to confirm tracheal placement. Ongoing studies will investigate device optimizations of the probe for more refined sensing and in vivo testing.

  1. H1- and H2-receptor characterization in the tracheal circulation of sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, S. E.; Salonen, R. O.; Widdicombe, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of histamine, the specific H1-agonist SKF 71481-A2 and the H2-agonist dimaprit were examined on tracheal vascular resistance in sheep anaesthetized with pentobarbitone. Tracheal vascular resistance was determined by perfusing the cranial tracheal arteries at constant flows and measuring inflow pressures. Changes in tracheal smooth muscle tone were also measured. 2. Histamine and SKF 71481-A2 contracted the tracheal smooth muscle and this effect was blocked by the H1-antagonist mepyramine. Stimulation of H2-receptors with dimaprit had no effect on tracheal smooth muscle tone. 3. Histamine had a complex action on the tracheal vasculature producing either a triphasic change (early dilatation then constriction followed by late dilatation) or just a constriction. SKF 71481-A2 always produced a biphasic change in vascular resistance (dilatation followed by constriction). Dimaprit dilated the tracheal vasculature. 4. The late dilatation produced by histamine in some sheep was blocked by bilateral cervical vagotomy but the mechanism for this effect is not known. No other responses to histamine, SKF 71481-A2 or dimaprit were affected by vagotomy. 5. The vasoconstriction produced by histamine and SKF 71481-A2 was antagonized by mepyramine indicating a H1-receptor-mediated effect. Cimetidine had no effect on the vasoconstriction to histamine suggesting a lack of involvement of H2-receptors. 6. The vasodilatation produced by histamine and SKF 71481-A2 was also antagonized by mepyramine, again suggesting a H1-receptor-mediated action. Cimetidine had no effect on the vasodilator response to histamine indicating no involvement of H2-receptors in this response. 7. The dilator effect of dimaprit was antagonized by cimetidine suggesting this effect was mediated by H2-receptors. 8. We conclude that H1-receptors in the various parts of the sheep tracheal vasculature can cause increases and decreases in total tracheal vascular resistance; that H2-receptors decrease

  2. New laser tracheal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungemach, Josef; Foth, Hans-Jochen; Hoermann, Karl; Preponis, E.

    1996-09-01

    The complication of a laser induced tube fire during surgery was first published in 1979. The protection of tracheal tubes against ignition is necessary to enable a safe laser surgery of the upper airway. in an experimental study a new compound tube was tested: this tube had a higher laser resistance than a pure metal tube. The damage threshold of this tube was tested against the emission of various lasers as CO2. The metal tube was damaged within seconds at CO2 laser power densities of 103 W/cm2 whereas the damage threshold of the compound tube was 3.106 W/cm2. We compared the compound laser tube to the so far used metal tube in a prospective clinical trial in our department of ENT in patients undergoing CO2-laser surgery of the upper airway. 66 patients were included into the study: 33 received the compound tube, 33 the metal tube. During endotracheal intubation the handling of the compound tube was better. During laser surgery high airway pressures occured more often with the metal tube. Whereas kinking was the problem of the compound tubes. Destruction of cuffs occured in both groups but did not cause any complications. No tube or cuff fire was noticed.

  3. Role of calcium-activated potassium channels in the genesis of 3,4-diaminopyridine-induced periodic contractions in isolated canine coronary artery smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yasumi; Maezawa, Yuko; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Uchida, Yasuto; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2011-09-01

    We found that 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP), a voltage-gated potassium channel (K(V)) inhibitor, elicits pH-sensitive periodic contractions (PCs) of coronary smooth muscles. Underlying mechanisms of PCs, however, remained to be elucidated. The present study was performed to examine the roles of ion channels in the genesis of PCs. To determine the electromechanical changes of smooth muscles, isolated coronary arterial rings from beagles were suspended in organ chambers filled with Krebs-Henseleit solution, and 10(-2) M 3,4-DAP was added to elicit PCs. 3,4-DAP caused periodic spike-and-plateau depolarization accompanied by contraction. PCs were not produced when the CaCl(2) concentration in the chamber was ≤ 0.3 × 10(-3) or ≥ 10(-2) M. PCs were eliminated by a CaCl(2) concentration ≥ 5 × 10(-3) M or by lowering pH below 7.20 with HCl and recovered by the addition of iberiotoxin or charybdotoxin, which inhibit large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (K(Ca)), or by elevating pH above 7.35 with NaOH. PCs, as well as the spike-and-plateau depolarization, were eliminated by nifedipine, which inhibits L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(V)). Influx of Ca(2+) through L-type Ca(V), which was opened because closing of K(Ca), secondary to 3,4-DAP-induced closing of K(V), resulted in contraction; the intracellular Ca(2+) increased by this influx opened K(Ca), leading to closure of Ca(V) and consequent cessation of Ca(2+) influx with resultant relaxation. These processes were repeated spontaneously to cause PCs. H(+) and OH(-) were considered to act as the opener and closer of K(Ca), respectively.

  4. Endoscopic treatment of tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Lutz; Darwiche, Kaid

    2014-02-01

    For all cases of tracheal obstructions surgery should be considered first. Interventional endoscopic procedures can provide immediate relief. Intraluminally growing tumors can be resected with laser, argon-plasma coagulation, an electrosurgical knife or cryo-probe. Photodynamic therapy of smaller tracheal tumors can be curative. Narrowing from intramural tumor growth or wall destruction requires internal splinting with an airway stent. Scar strictures can be dilated with balloons but the biotrauma may stimulate new scarring. In benign strictures and malacias, tracheal stents should only be placed if all other methods are exhausted. Complications including stent migration, mucostasis, halitosis and granulation tissue development must be considered. Most important for a good outcome is a multidisciplinary approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tracheal Sounds Acquisition Using Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Bersain A.; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H.

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds' amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD) for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR) can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r2 = 0.9693, 0.11 (−1.41 to 1.63) breaths-per-minute (bpm) for Galaxy S4, and r2 = 0.9672, 0.097 (–1.38 to 1.57) bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found. PMID:25196108

  6. Tracheal sounds acquisition using smartphones.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Bersain A; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H

    2014-07-30

    Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds' amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD) for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR) can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r² = 0.9693, 0.11 (-1.41 to 1.63) breaths-per-minute (bpm) for Galaxy S4, and r² = 0.9672, 0.097 (-1.38 to 1.57) bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found.

  7. 21 CFR 868.5730 - Tracheal tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal tube. 868.5730 Section 868.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5730 Tracheal tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube is...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5730 - Tracheal tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal tube. 868.5730 Section 868.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5730 Tracheal tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube is...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5730 - Tracheal tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube. 868.5730 Section 868.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5730 Tracheal tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube is...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5730 - Tracheal tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal tube. 868.5730 Section 868.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5730 Tracheal tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube is...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5730 - Tracheal tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal tube. 868.5730 Section 868.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5730 Tracheal tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube is...

  12. Tracheal allotransplantation after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Delaere, Pierre; Vranckx, Jan; Verleden, Geert; De Leyn, Paul; Van Raemdonck, Dirk

    2010-01-14

    Reconstruction of long-segment tracheal defects requires a vascularized allograft. We report successful tracheal allotransplantation after indirect revascularization of the graft in a heterotopic position. Immunosuppressive therapy was administered before the operation, and the tracheal allograft was wrapped in the recipient's forearm fascia. Once revascularization was achieved, the mucosal lining was replaced progressively with buccal mucosa from the recipient. At 4 months, the tracheal chimera was fully lined with mucosa, which consisted of respiratory epithelium from the donor and buccal mucosa from the recipient. After withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy, the tracheal allograft was moved to its correct anatomical position with an intact blood supply. No treatment-limiting adverse effects occurred.

  13. Morbid obesity and tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Jay B; Lemmens, Harry J M; Brock-Utne, John G; Vierra, Mark; Saidman, Lawrence J

    2002-03-01

    The tracheas of obese patients may be more difficult to intubate than those of normal-weight patients. We studied 100 morbidly obese patients (body mass index >40 kg/m(2)) to identify which factors complicate direct laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Preoperative measurements (height, weight, neck circumference, width of mouth opening, sternomental distance, and thyromental distance) and Mallampati score were recorded. The view during direct laryngoscopy was graded, and the number of attempts at tracheal intubation was recorded. Neither absolute obesity nor body mass index was associated with intubation difficulties. Large neck circumference and high Mallampati score were the only predictors of potential intubation problems. Because in all but one patient the trachea was intubated successfully by direct laryngoscopy, the neck circumference that requires an intervention such as fiberoptic bronchoscopy to establish an airway remains unknown. We conclude that obesity alone is not predictive of tracheal intubation difficulties. In 100 morbidly obese patients, neither obesity nor body mass index predicted problems with tracheal intubation. However, a high Mallampati score (greater-than-or-equal to 3) and large neck circumference may increase the potential for difficult laryngoscopy and intubation.

  14. [Research progress of tracheal prosthesis in reconstructing trachea].

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Shi, Hongcan; Chen, Huimin

    2007-05-01

    To review the recent research progress of base and clinical application of tracheal replacement. Literature concerning tracheal prosthesis and the current achievements were extensively and comprehensively reviewed. Most tracheal lesions can be resected and achieve primary reconstruction, but the resectable length was limited. Tracheal replacement was an efficient and feasible way to substitute the defects resulting from extended resection. New techniques such as tissue engineering, tracheal transplantation, new tracheal prosthesis of biomaterials break fresh ground for the more rapid development of tracheal surgery.

  15. Canine Distemper

    MedlinePlus

    ... and, often, the nervous systems of puppies and dogs. The virus also infects wild canids (e.g. ... How is Canine Distemper virus spread? Puppies and dogs usually become infected through airborne exposure to the ...

  16. Canine lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Madewell, B R

    1985-07-01

    This article presents an overview of the literature regarding canine malignant lymphoma. It includes a discussion of etiology, classification, systemic manifestations of disease, therapy, and supportive care for patient management.

  17. Systemic overexpression of matricellular protein CCN1 exacerbates obliterative bronchiolitis in mouse tracheal allografts.

    PubMed

    Raissadati, Alireza; Nykänen, Antti I; Tuuminen, Raimo; Syrjälä, Simo O; Krebs, Rainer; Arnaudova, Ralica; Rouvinen, Eeva; Wang, Xiaomin; Poller, Wolfgang; Lemström, Karl B

    2015-12-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) involves airway epithelial detachment, fibroproliferation, and inflammation, resulting in chronic rejection and transplant failure. Cysteine-rich 61 (CCN1) is an integrin receptor antagonist with a context-dependent role in inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes. We used a mouse tracheal OB model to investigate the role of CCN1 in the development of lung allograft OB. C57Bl/6 mice received a systemic injection of CCN1-expressing adenoviral vectors 2 days prior to subcutaneous implantation of tracheal allografts from major MHC-mismatched BALB/c mice. We treated another group of tracheal allograft recipients with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide to dissect the role of αvβ3-integrin signaling in mediating CCN1 effects in tracheal allografts. Allografts were removed 4 weeks after transplantation and analyzed for luminal occlusion, inflammation, and vasculogenesis. CCN1 overexpression induced luminal occlusion (P < 0.05), fibroproliferation, and smooth muscle cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Selective activation of αvβ3-integrin receptor failed to mimic the actions of CCN1, and blocking failed to inhibit the effects of CCN1 in tracheal allografts. In conclusion, CCN1 exacerbates tracheal OB by enhancing fibroproliferation via an αvβ3-integrin-independent pathway. Further experiments are required to uncover its potentially harmful role in the development of OB after lung transplantation.

  18. Scanning electron-microscopic evaluation of cuff shoulders in pediatric tracheal tubes.

    PubMed

    Moehrlen, Ueli; Ziegler, Urs; Weiss, Markus

    2008-03-01

    Technical and conceptual shortcomings of cuffed pediatric tracheal tubes have been pointed out in the past, all representing a potential risk for mucosal damage of the pediatric airway. In this study, cuffed pediatric tracheal tubes from different manufacturers were investigated with regard to the cuff shoulder design using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cuffed pediatric tracheal tubes with the smallest internal diameter available were ordered from five manufacturers. SEM scans were performed from the tube shaft - cuff shoulder - tube cuff assembly and from the cuff shoulder alone. Each investigation was repeated in four samples of each tube brand. In addition, thickness of cuff membrane was measured. Major differences were found among the cuff shoulders investigated ranging from smooth transitions, softened borders to very sharp steps. There was also considerable difference in the thickness among the cuff membranes between the different tube brands ranging from 18 microm in polyurethane cuffs up to 90 microm in polyvinylchloride cuffs. Because the gap between the outer tracheal tube and the internal mucosal layer of the pediatric airway is often very narrow, some of the observed irregularities have the potential to injure the airway mucosa in pediatric patients, particularly during long-term use and firm fit of the tracheal tube in the airway. As cuffed tubes are increasingly used in small children, the observed irregularities in some tracheal tube brands may need to be improved and their safety should be proved by the manufacturers.

  19. Idiopathic tracheal stenosis: a clinicopathologic study of 63 cases and comparison of the pathology with chondromalacia.

    PubMed

    Mark, Eugene J; Meng, Fanqing; Kradin, Richard L; Mathisen, Douglas J; Matsubara, Osamu

    2008-08-01

    Tracheal stenosis in adults usually is the result of mechanical injuries either from direct trauma or intubation. Rarely do cases develop in patients without such a precedent history, and there are few reports of the pathology of idiopathic tracheal stenosis (ITS). We reviewed clinicopathologically, 63 tracheal resections for tracheal stenosis in patients who had no antecedent explanation for their stenosis. We contrasted these 63 cases with 34 cases of tracheal stenosis owing to chondromalacia (CM) after mechanical injury. All 63 cases occurred in females, with a mean age of 49 years. The most common symptom was dyspnea on exertion. The average duration of symptoms was greater than 2 years. One-third of the patients gave a history of gastroesophageal reflux. All but one of the cases occurred in the subglottic region and/or upper one-third of the trachea. Pathologically, most cases showed extensive keloidal fibrosis and dilation of mucus glands, a finding that was not obvious in most cases of CM. ITS has relatively normal cartilage with smooth inner and outer perichondrium, whereas CM has extensive degeneration of cartilage with irregular border of inner perichondrium observable at shirt sleeve magnification. Immunohistochemical staining for estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor was positive in fibroblasts cells in most cases. ITS is a rare disease and restricted to females. It may represent some form of fibromatosis. ITS can be distinguished histologically from CM in tracheal resection specimens in most cases.

  20. Pharmacological effects of peptides on tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, J; Couture, R; Caranikas, S; Regoli, D

    1982-01-01

    Peptide and non-peptide agents were tested for their stimulatory or inhibitory effects on circular strips of guinea pig isolated tracheae. Substance P, eledoisin, physalaemin, neurotensin, angiotensin, histamine and carbachol were found to contract, while noradrenaline, dopamine, bradykinin, nucleotides (AMP, ADP, ATP) and prostaglandins (PGE1, PGE2, PGA2) induced concentration-dependent relaxations of tracheae contracted with substance P or carbachol. Indomethacin (2.8 X 10(-6) M) significantly potentiated the effect of substance P and blocked that of bradykinin. The contractions to substance P of tissues treated with indomethacin were not modified by atropine, methysergide, diphenhydramine, cimetidine, propranolol, phentolamine, [Leu8]-ATII, [Leu8]-des-Arg9-bradykinin, naloxone and baclofen. The order of potency of C-terminal fragments of substance P was: hexa(6-11) greater than hepta(5-11) greater than substance P greater than = octa(4-11). It is concluded that the guinea pig isolated trachea is a pharmacological preparation sensitive to numerous agents and useful for studying structure-activity relationship and the mechanism of cellular action of several peptides, particularly substance P.

  1. Tracheal microaspiration in adult cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ledson, M J; Wilson, G E; Tran, J; Walshaw, M J

    1998-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) has been implicated in the aetiology of lung disease. Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have a high incidence of GOR symptoms with demonstrable episodes of oesophageal acidification. We studied 24-hour ambulatory tracheal and oesophageal pH in 11 CF patients with GOR symptoms to identify any episodes of tracheal acidification and define their temporal relation to oesophageal reflux and respiratory symptoms. 8 patients had evidence of significant GOR (DeMeester score mean 58; range 17-107) and in 6 it was gross (DeMeester score > 30). 4 patients had tracheal acidification (defined as tracheal pH < 5.5): all had greatly raised DeMeester scores. Two patterns of lowered tracheal pH were seen: a gradual drift downwards of tracheal pH to < 5.5 which recovered slowly, and an acute fall in tracheal pH to < 5.5 with rapid recovery. Only one patient had a fall in peak expiratory flow in conjunction with a decline in tracheal pH, and no association was found between the presence of tracheal microaspiration and pulmonary function. We conclude that tracheal acidification occurs in adult CF patients with GOR.

  2. Endoscopic laser treatment of subglottic and tracheal stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Alex J.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Reinisch, Lou

    1999-06-01

    The ideal laser produces discrete wounds in a reproducible manner. The CO2 laser with its 10.6 micron wavelength is highly absorbed by water, its energy concentrated at the point of impact and the longer wavelength creates less scatter in tissue. The development of binocular endoscopic delivery system for use with binocular microlaryngoscopes have aided in using CO2 laser to treat patients with subglottic and tracheal stenosis. Often, patients with these disease processes require multiple endoscopic or open reconstructive procedures and my ultimately become tracheotomy dependent. The canine model of subglottic stenosis that has been develop allows testing of new agents as adjuncts to laser treatment. Mitomycin-C is an antibiotic with antitumor activity used in chemotherapy and also in ophthalmologic surgery due to its known inhibition of fibroblast proliferation. Current studies indicate this drug to have significant potential for improving our current management of this disease process.

  3. Effects of 3,4-dihydro-8-(2-hydroxy-3-isopropylaminopropoxy)-3-nitroxy-2H-1-benzopyran (K-351) on smooth muscle cells and neuromuscular transmission in the canine mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    Kou, K.; Kuriyama, H.; Suzuki, H.

    1982-01-01

    1 The effects of K-351 on the electrical and mechanical responses were investigated in the canine mesenteric artery by isometric tension recording and the use of intracellular microelectrodes. The results were compared to the responses observed with other alpha-adrenoceptor blocking agents. 2 K-351 (greater than 3 X 10(-7)M) consistently inhibited the contraction evoked by perivascular nerve stimulation; however, K-351 had no effect on the contraction evoked by direct muscle stimulation, after pretreatment with 3 X 10(-7)M tetrodotoxin. 3 Phentolamine enhanced and prazosin had no effect on the amplitude of contraction evoked by perivascular nerve stimulation at a high frequency (over 1.0 Hz). Pretreatment with phentolamine inhibited the contraction evoked by lower frequencies of perivascular nerve stimulation (below 0.5 Hz). 4 The potency for the inhibition of the response to perivascular nerve stimulation was in the order of K-351 greater than phentolamine greater than prazosin, while the contractions induced by exogenously applied noradrenaline (5 X 10(-7)M) were inhibited in the order: prazosin greater than phentolamine greater than K-351. 5 K-351 (less than 3 X 10(-5)M) did not modify the resting membrane potential or the membrane resistance, as estimated from the change in the amplitude of electrotonic potentials in the smooth muscle cell membranes. 6 K-351 (greater than 3 X 10(-7)M) inhibited the amplitude of the first e.j.p. and e.j.ps after completion of the facilitation process following stimulation at frequencies over 0.25 Hz. 7 K-351 (less than 3 X 10(-5)M) did not modify the compound action potentials recorded from peripheral nerve bundles distributed on the mesenteric artery. 8 Phentolamine (greater than 1 X 10(-8)M) inhibited the first e.j.p. but this agent either inhibited or enhanced the amplitude of e.j.p. after completion of the facilitation process produced by repetitive stimulation below or over 1.0 Hz stimulus frequencies, respectively

  4. [Modern diagnostics of tracheal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Müller, A

    2004-06-01

    Numerous new modalities in computertomography (CT), in particular Multislice-Spiral-CT and Virtual Endoscopy, and novel developments in endoscopy and spirometry gave us reason to review the current state of the art in diagnostics of tracheal stenosis (TS). This review evaluates the literature of the last decade regarding new trends and methods in diagnostics of tracheal stenosis. Pros and cons are discussed, and the future trends are highlighted. Spiral-CT scans at collimated slices of < or = 3 mm, PITCH < or = 1.5 and a segmentation level of - 350 HE permit a valid measurement of tracheal lumina. The flow-volume-plot is still the most important investigation to evaluate respiratory function in TS. Peak-Flow-Meters are suitable for patient self monitoring. The selective estimation of the TS related airway resistance using in situ measurements and numerical flow simulation studies are likely to reach importance in future. The ability to obtain exact measures from endoscopic recordings using EndoScan serves quality control in endoscopy. An objective comparison of different treatments becomes possible. Endosonography and methods for in-vitro tissue analysis (Optical Coherence Tomography) are more focused on the early diagnosis of malignant lesions. The Synopsis of endoscopy, CT-scan and spirometry provides the highest diagnostic accuracy today.

  5. Canine gastritis.

    PubMed

    Webb, Craig; Twedt, David C

    2003-09-01

    Gastritis--inflammation of the stomach--is a frequently cited differential yet rarely characterized diagnosis in cases of canine anorexia and vomiting. Although the list of rule-outs for acute or chronic gastritis is extensive, a review of the veterinary literature reveals fewer than 15 articles that have focused on clinical cases of canine gastritis over the last 25 years. The dog frequently appears in the human literature as an experimentally manipulated model for the study of endoscopic techniques or the effect of medications on gastric mucosa. In the veterinary patient, cases of acute gastritis are rarely pursued with the complete diagnostic armamentarium, and cases of chronic gastritis are rarely found to occur as an entity isolated from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract. This article focuses on those findings most clinically relevant to cases of canine gastritis in veterinary medicine.

  6. Longitudinal study of viruses associated with canine infectious respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Erles, Kerstin; Dubovi, Edward J; Brooks, Harriet W; Brownlie, Joe

    2004-10-01

    In this investigation a population of dogs at a rehoming center was monitored over a period of 2 years. Despite regular vaccination of incoming dogs against distemper, canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), and canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), respiratory disease was endemic. Tissue samples from the respiratory tract as well as paired serum samples were collected for analysis. The development of PCR assays for the detection of CPIV, canine adenovirus types 1 and 2, and canine herpesvirus (CHV) is described. Surprisingly, canine adenovirus was not detected in samples from this population, whereas 19.4% of tracheal and 10.4% of lung samples were positive for CPIV and 12.8% of tracheal and 9.6% of lung samples were positive for CHV. As reported previously, a novel canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV) was detected in this population (K. Erles, C. Toomey, H. W. Brooks, and J. Brownlie, Virology 310:216-223, 2003). Infections with CRCoV occurred mostly during the first week of a dog's stay at the kennel, whereas CPIV and CHV were detected at later time points. Furthermore, the evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to CPIV and an immunofluorescence assay for detection of antibodies to CHV is described. This study shows that CPIV is present at kennels despite vaccination. In addition, other agents such as CHV and CRCoV may play a role in the pathogenesis of canine respiratory disease, whereas CAV-2 and canine distemper virus were not present in this population, indicating that their prevalence in the United Kingdom is low due to widespread vaccination of dogs.

  7. Longitudinal Study of Viruses Associated with Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Erles, Kerstin; Dubovi, Edward J.; Brooks, Harriet W.; Brownlie, Joe

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation a population of dogs at a rehoming center was monitored over a period of 2 years. Despite regular vaccination of incoming dogs against distemper, canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), and canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), respiratory disease was endemic. Tissue samples from the respiratory tract as well as paired serum samples were collected for analysis. The development of PCR assays for the detection of CPIV, canine adenovirus types 1 and 2, and canine herpesvirus (CHV) is described. Surprisingly, canine adenovirus was not detected in samples from this population, whereas 19.4% of tracheal and 10.4% of lung samples were positive for CPIV and 12.8% of tracheal and 9.6% of lung samples were positive for CHV. As reported previously, a novel canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV) was detected in this population (K. Erles, C. Toomey, H. W. Brooks, and J. Brownlie, Virology 310:216-223, 2003). Infections with CRCoV occurred mostly during the first week of a dog's stay at the kennel, whereas CPIV and CHV were detected at later time points. Furthermore, the evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to CPIV and an immunofluorescence assay for detection of antibodies to CHV is described. This study shows that CPIV is present at kennels despite vaccination. In addition, other agents such as CHV and CRCoV may play a role in the pathogenesis of canine respiratory disease, whereas CAV-2 and canine distemper virus were not present in this population, indicating that their prevalence in the United Kingdom is low due to widespread vaccination of dogs. PMID:15472304

  8. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  9. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  10. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  11. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  12. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  13. Morphological study of tracheal shape in donkeys with and without tracheal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Powell, R J; du Toit, N; Burden, F A; Dixon, P M

    2010-03-01

    There is limited information on the gross tracheal morphology of donkeys with or without tracheal abnormalities. To: 1) examine the morphology of tracheas of donkeys with and without clinical and/or post mortem evidence of tracheal obstruction; 2) record the cross-sectional dimensions and shapes of tracheal rings at fixed sites; and 3) document prevalence, sites and characteristics of detected tracheal abnormalities. The tracheas of 75, predominantly aged (median age 30 years, range 7-48 years) donkeys that died or were subjected to euthanasia on humane grounds were examined. Five had severe dyspnoea due to tracheal obstruction (with intercurrent lung disease in 3), while 7 had post mortem evidence of severe tracheal airway obstruction. Every 5th tracheal ring was dissected free and the inner and outer vertical and transverse dimensions and cross sectional areas were measured. Each dissected ring was photographed and the shape of the trachea was classified as normal or, in one of 6 abnormal grades, according to the type and degree of structural abnormality present. The tracheas had a mean of 43 (range 34-50) tracheal rings that tended to be more oval in shape in the distal cervical region. Only 31.2% of rings examined had a circular to oval shape. Dorso-ventral flattening was present in 0.9% of tracheal rings, dorsal ligament separation in 24.4%, slight cartilage deformity in 26.0%, moderate cartilage deformity in 10.4%, marked cartilage deformity in 1.9% and miscellaneous other abnormalities in 4.9% of tracheal rings. The 12 donkeys with ante or post mortem evidence of tracheal obstruction had significantly increased tracheal abnormality grade in comparison to the remaining donkeys. Structural tracheal abnormalities are present in most old donkeys, but generally do not cause clinical problems in these sedentary animals unless intercurrent pulmonary disease is present.

  14. Tracheal remodelling in response to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Centanin, Lazaro; Gorr, Thomas A.; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    The insect tracheal system is a continuous tubular network that ramifies into progressively thinner branches to provide air directly to every organ and tissue throughout the body. During embryogenesis the basic architecture of the tracheal system develops in a stereotypical and genetically controlled manner. Later, in larval stages, the tracheal system becomes plastic, and adapts to particular oxygen needs of the different tissues of the body. Oxygen sensing is mediated by specific prolyl-4-hydroxylases that regulate protein stability of the alpha subunit of oxygen-responsive transcription factors from the HIF family. Tracheal cells are exquisitely sensitive to oxygen levels, modulating the expression of hypoxia-inducible proteins that mediate sprouting of tracheal branches in direction to oxygen-deprived tissues. PMID:19482033

  15. Optical metabolic imaging for monitoring tracheal health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Gil, Daniel A.; Choma, Michael A.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-04-01

    The health of the tracheal mucosa and submucosa is a vital yet poorly understood component of critical care medicine, and a minimally-invasive method is needed to monitor tracheal health in patients. Of particular interest are the ciliated cells of the tracheal epithelium that move mucus away from the lungs and prevent respiratory infection. Optical metabolic imaging (OMI) allows cellular-level measurement of metabolism, and is a compelling method for assessing tracheal health because ciliary motor proteins require ATP to function. In this pilot study, we apply multiphoton imaging of the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H and FAD to the mucosa and submucosa of ex vivo mouse trachea. We demonstrate the feasibility and potential diagnostic utility of these measurements for assessing tracheal health and pathophysiology at the single-cell level.

  16. First-line tracheal resection and primary anastomosis for postintubation tracheal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, AM; Soliman, S; Shoukry, T; El-Nori, AA; El-Bawab, HY

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal stenosis following intubation is the most common indication for tracheal resection and reconstruction. Endoscopic dilation is almost always associated with recurrence. This study investigated first-line surgical resection and anastomosis performed in fit patients presenting with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Methods Between February 2011 and November 2014, a prospective study was performed involving patients who underwent first-line tracheal resection and primary anastomosis after presenting with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Results A total of 30 patients (20 male) were operated on. The median age was 23.5 years (range: 13–77 years). Seventeen patients (56.7%) had had previous endoscopic tracheal dilation, four (13.3%) had had tracheal stents inserted prior to surgery and one (3.3%) had undergone previous tracheal resection. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had had a tracheostomy. Eight patients (26.7%) had had no previous tracheal interventions. The median time of intubation in those developing tracheal stenosis was 20.5 days (range: 0–45 days). The median length of hospital stay was 10.5 days (range: 7–21 days). The success rate for anastomoses was 96.7% (29/30). One patient needed a permanent tracheostomy. The in-hospital mortality rate was 3.3%: 1 patient died from a chest infection 21 days after surgery. There was no mortality or morbidity in the group undergoing first-line surgery for de novo tracheal lesions. Conclusions First-line tracheal resection with primary anastomosis is a safe option for the treatment of tracheal stenosis following intubation and obviates the need for repeated dilations. Endoscopic dilation should be reserved for those patients with significant co-morbidities or as a temporary measure in non-equipped centres. PMID:27138847

  17. 21 CFR 868.5790 - Tracheal tube stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal tube stylet. 868.5790 Section 868.5790...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5790 Tracheal tube stylet. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube stylet is a device used temporarily to make rigid a flexible tracheal tube to...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5790 - Tracheal tube stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal tube stylet. 868.5790 Section 868.5790...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5790 Tracheal tube stylet. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube stylet is a device used temporarily to make rigid a flexible tracheal tube to...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5790 - Tracheal tube stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube stylet. 868.5790 Section 868.5790...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5790 Tracheal tube stylet. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube stylet is a device used temporarily to make rigid a flexible tracheal tube to...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5790 - Tracheal tube stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal tube stylet. 868.5790 Section 868.5790...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5790 Tracheal tube stylet. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube stylet is a device used temporarily to make rigid a flexible tracheal tube to...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5790 - Tracheal tube stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal tube stylet. 868.5790 Section 868.5790...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5790 Tracheal tube stylet. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube stylet is a device used temporarily to make rigid a flexible tracheal tube to...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  7. [A 2-month-old child with complex tracheal hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    De Cloedt, L; Papadopoulos, J; Corouge, P; Khalil, T; Van Laer, P

    2013-12-01

    We describe the case of a 2-month-old child with complex tracheal hypoplasia with bilateral bronchial hypoplasia and left pulmonary hypoplasia. Tracheal hypoplasia is complex when it is associated with critical stenosis, cricoid stenosis, bronchial hypoplasia, tracheal bronchus, or esophageal atresia with severe tracheomalacia. Slide tracheoplasty is the gold standard treatment for the complex tracheal hypoplasia.

  8. Pentax-airway scope for tracheal intubation breaks through the limitation of neck motion in an ankylosing spondylitis patient wearing halo vest--a case report.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Chun; Jimmy-Ong; Lee, Chia-Ling; Lan, Cing-Hong; Chen, Tsung-Ying; Lai, Hsien-Yong

    2010-12-01

    The Airway Scope (AWS) provides better glottic view than the conventional direct laryngoscopy in tracheal intubation. With it, the endotracheal tube can be more easily inserted into the tracheal lumen easily. We hereby presented a 24-year-old ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patient wearing a halo vest who was successfully intubated for undergoing cervical spine surgery involving C1 and C2 under general anesthesia. Pre-operative airway assessment revealed that he was a case of difficult intubation. An AWS was used for oral tracheal intubation which was achieved smoothly in the first attempt. AWS can be an alternative device for airway management in a patient wearing halo vest.

  9. Ultrasound-guided fetal tracheal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Fauza, Dario O; Barnewolt, Carol; Brown, Stephen D; Jennings, Russell W

    2002-03-01

    This study was aimed at examining the feasibility of fetal tracheal occlusion guided exclusively by ultrasonography and at establishing the technical principles of this procedure based on current instrumentation and ultrasound technology. Time-dated pregnant ewes underwent a small laparotomy and partial uterine exposure. Under real-time ultrasound guidance, a steerable guide wire was fed into the fetal tracheal lumen. An 8F catheter then was fed around the guide wire into the trachea. This was followed by intratracheal placement of a 2F coaxial angiographic catheter, connected to a detachable silicone balloon at its extremity, which then was inflated with saline and delivered locally. Euthanasia was performed at term. Complete tracheal occlusion was achieved in all fetuses (n = 7) intraoperatively. Operating time needed for tracheal occlusion, once access to the amniotic cavity was established, varied widely, but could be as short 1 minute. Tracheal lumen dimensions outgrew balloon diameter in 57.1% of fetuses (4 of 7), resulting in balloon dislodgment in those animals. No balloon rupture was observed. (1) Accurate access to the fetal trachea and local delivery of an occlusive detachable silicone balloon are consistently feasible exclusively under real-time ultrasound guidance with commercially available instrumentation. (2) Balloon dimensions are determining factors of displacement risk and must be selected carefully before tracheal delivery. Ultrasound-guided fetal tracheal occlusion may be a preferable alternative to surgical intervention for treatment of fetal pulmonary hypoplasia. Copyright 2002 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  10. Anaesthetic management in thoracoscopic distal tracheal resection.

    PubMed

    Acosta Martínez, J; Beato López, J; Domínguez Blanco, A; López Romero, J L; López Villalobos, J L

    2017-03-01

    Surgical resection of tracheal tumours, especially distal tracheal tumours, is a challenge for the anaesthesiologists involved, mainly due to difficulties in ensuring adequate control of the airway and ventilation. We report the case of a patient undergoing tracheal resection and anastomosis by VATS, emphasizing the anaesthetic management. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Tracheal mucormycosis pneumonia: a rare clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Mohindra, Satyawati; Gupta, Bhumika; Gupta, Karan; Bal, Amanjit

    2014-11-01

    This article reports an unusual case of tracheal mucormycosis following H1N1 pneumonia and reviews previously reported cases. A 40-y-old female with a 5-y history of diabetes mellitus, adequately controlled by oral hypoglycemic agents, developed tracheal mucormycosis after successful treatment for H1N1 pneumonia. The condition was diagnosed during workup for decannulation due to subglottic and upper tracheal obstruction by necrotic chewing gum-like tissue and cartilage. The patient was managed successfully by treatment with amphotericin B and surgical intervention in the form of laryngofissure and Montgomery tube placement. A review of the literature revealed only 5 previously reported cases of tracheal mucormycosis. A high degree of suspicion, early endoscopy and biopsy, histopathological evidence of the infection, and early institution of therapy are the keys to successful outcome.

  12. Chondrodysplasia punctata presenting with tracheal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Claudia; Nassar, Michel N; Goebel, Debora; Rutter, Michael J

    2017-02-01

    Chondrodysplasia punctata is a group of congenital bone and cartilage disorders characterized by erratic calcification during development. Laryngeal and tracheal calcification and subsequent stenosis, while being reported in several cases of chondrodysplasia punctata, are not frequent findings and there are no proposed management techniques. We describe here a case of an infant with chondrodysplasia punctata associated to tracheal stenosis that was successfully treated with balloon dilation, and with long term follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. TGF-β antagonist attenuates fibrosis but not luminal narrowing in experimental tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Antón-Pacheco, Juan L; Usategui, Alicia; Martínez, Iván; García-Herrero, Carmen M; Gamez, Antonio P; Grau, Montserrat; Martínez, Ana M; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L; Pablos, José L

    2017-03-01

    Acquired tracheal stenosis (ATS) is an unusual disease often secondary to prolonged mechanical trauma. Acquired tracheal stenosis pathogenesis involves inflammation and subsequent fibrosis with narrowing of the tracheal lumen. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β) represents a pivotal factor in most fibrotic processes, and therefore a potential target in this context. The aim of this study is to analyze the role of TGF-β as a target for anti-fibrotic interventions in tracheal stenosis. Human stenotic tracheobronchial tissues from patients with benign airway stenosis and normal controls from pneumonectomy specimens were analyzed. Tracheal stenosis was induced in adult NZ rabbits by a circumferential thermal injury to the mucosa during open surgery and re-anastomosis. Rabbits were treated postoperatively with a peritracheal collagen sponge containing a TGF-β peptide antagonist (p17) or vehicle. Fibrosis was determined by Masson's trichrome staining, and smooth muscle cell α-actin(+) (α-SMA(+) Confirm accuracy.) myofibroblasts, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and p-Smad2/3 expression by immunohistochemistry. Human and rabbit stenotic tissues showed extensive submucosal fibrosis, characterized by significantly increased α-SMA(+) myofibroblasts and CTGF expression. In human stenotic lesions, increased p-Smad2/3(+) nuclei were also observed. p17 treatment significantly reduced the fibrotic thickness, as well as the density of α-SMA(+) myofibroblasts and CTGF(+) cells in rabbit stenotic lesions, but failed to improve the luminal area. ATS is characterized by a TGF-β dependent fibrotic process, but reduction of the fibrotic component by TGF-β1 antagonist therapy was not sufficient to improve tracheal narrowing, suggesting that fibrosis may not be the main contributor to luminal stenosis. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:561-567, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Association of Oversized Tracheal Tubes and Cuff Overinsufflation With Postintubation Tracheal Ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Sudhoff, Tobias H.; Seidl, Rainer O.; Estel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Postintubation tracheal ruptures (PTR) are rare but cause severe complications. Our objective was to investigate the tracheal pattern of injury resulting from cuff inflation of the tracheal tube, to study the two main factors responsible for PTR (cuff overinsufflation and inapplicable tube sizes), and to explain the context, why small women are particularly susceptible to PTR. Methods Experimental study performed on 28 fresh human laryngotracheal specimens (16 males, 12 females) within 24 hours post autopsy. Artificial ventilation was simulated by using an underwater construction and a standard tracheal tube. Tube sizes were selected according to our previously published nomogram. Tracheal lesions were detected visually and tracheal diameters measured. The influence of body size, sex difference and appropriate tube size were investigated according to patient height. Results In all 28 cases, the typical tracheal lesion pattern was a longitudinal median rupture of the posterior trachea. Appropriate tube sizes according to body size caused PTR with significantly higher cuff pressure when compared with oversized tubes. An increased risk of PTR was found in shorter patients, when oversized tubes were used. Sex difference did not have any significant influence. Conclusion This experimental model provides information about tracheal patterns in PTR for the first time. The model confirms by experiment the observations of case series in PTR patients, and therefore emphasizes the importance of correct tube size selection according to patient height. This minimizes the risk of PTR, especially in shorter patients, who have an increased risk of PTR when oversized tubes are used. PMID:26622963

  16. Indications and interventional options for non-resectable tracheal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Jenny Louise; Patterson, Caroline Marie

    2014-01-01

    Non-specific presentation and normal examination findings in early disease often result in tracheal obstruction being overlooked as a diagnosis until patients present acutely. Once diagnosed, surgical options should be considered, but often patient co-morbidity necessitates other interventional options. Non-resectable tracheal stenosis can be successfully managed by interventional bronchoscopy, with therapeutic options including airway dilatation, local tissue destruction and airway stenting. There are common aspects to the management of tracheal obstruction, tracheomalacia and tracheal fistulae. This paper reviews the pathogenesis, presentation, investigation and management of tracheal disease, with a focus on tracheal obstruction and the role of endotracheal intervention in management. PMID:24624290

  17. Tracheal and bronchial stenoses and other obstructive conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Claudia; Cohen, Aliza P.

    2016-01-01

    Although tracheal stenosis and bronchial stenosis are relatively rare in the pediatric population, they are both associated with significant morbidity and mortality. While most cases of congenital tracheal stenosis in children present as complete tracheal rings (CTRs), other congenital tracheal obstructions are also encountered in clinical practice. In addition, acquired obstructive tracheal conditions stemming from endotracheal trauma or previous surgical interventions may occur. Many affected children also have associated cardiovascular malformations, further complicating their management. Optimal management of children with tracheal or bronchial stenoses requires comprehensive diagnostic evaluation and optimization prior to surgery. Slide tracheoplasty has been the operative intervention of choice in the treatment of the majority of these children. PMID:28066618

  18. Recurred Post-intubation Tracheal Stenosis Treated with Bronchoscopic Cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ye-Ryung; Taek Jeong, Joon; Kyu Lee, Myoung; Kim, Sang-Ha; Joong Yong, Suk; Jeong Lee, Seok; Lee, Won-Yeon

    Post-intubation tracheal stenosis accounts for the greatest proportion of whole-cause tracheal stenosis. Treatment of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requires a multidisciplinary approach. Surgery or an endoscopic procedure can be used, depending on the type of stenosis. However, the efficacy of cryotherapy in post-intubation tracheal stenosis has not been validated. Here, we report a case of recurring post-intubation tracheal stenosis successfully treated with bronchoscopic cryotherapy that had previously been treated with surgery. In this case, cryotherapy was effective in treating web-like fibrous stenosis, without requiring more surgery. Cryotherapy can be considered as an alternative or primary treatment for post-intubation tracheal stenosis.

  19. Management of Post-Intubation Tracheal Membrane Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Eliçora, Aykut; Akgül, Aslı G; Topçu, Salih; Özbay, Serkan; Hoşten, Tülay; Sezer, Hüseyin F; Eliçora, Sultan Şevik

    2016-07-01

    Iatrogenic tracheal rupture is a rare complication after intubation. Overinflation of the tracheal cuff was speculated to be a frequent cause of tracheal rupture. The surgical approach is a widespread treatment for tracheal ruptures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of conservative and surgical therapy approaches in tracheal rupture cases inflicted by tracheal intubation. Data on 12 patients who experienced tracheal ruptures secondary to intubation were reviewed. The average age of the patients was 58 years (range of 38 to 81 years). Six patients were men and 6 patients were women. Four of the patients were performed thoracotomy for primary surgery and underwent surgical therapy. 8 patients were treated conservatively. The results of both approaches were evaluated. Patients, who underwent both conservative and surgical therapy, were completely recovered. There was no rupture originated complication or death. Both conservative and surgical therapies are appropriate for treatment of membranous tracheal rupture.

  20. Mechanisms of pneumothorax following tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Berg, L F; Mafee, M F; Campos, M; Applebaum, E L

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which pneumothorax may occur as a complication of tracheal intubation, we submitted four cats to tracheotomy and three to tracheal intubation. To simulate the dissection of air along fascial planes following tracheotomy, we placed catheters in either the pretracheal or subcutaneous plane and applied positive pressure to the catheters. The cats undergoing tracheal intubation were ventilated with excessive positive pressure. Computed tomography was used to document the progression of pneumothorax. High positive pressures during mechanical ventilation led to pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum, and the mechanism was primarily the dissection of air along the perivascular sheaths of the pulmonary arteries, presumably due to rupture of perivascular alveoli. Dissection of air along the pretracheal fascia following tracheotomy produced pneumomediastinum but not pneumothorax. This suggests that pneumothorax occurring clinically is more likely a complication of assisted ventilation than a complication of tracheotomy surgery.

  1. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube cleaning brush is a device consisting of a brush with plastic bristles...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube cleaning brush is a device consisting of a brush with plastic bristles...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube cleaning brush is a device consisting of a brush with plastic bristles...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube cleaning brush is a device consisting of a brush with plastic bristles...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube cleaning brush is a device consisting of a brush with plastic bristles...

  11. Dexmedetomidine for tracheal extubation in deeply anesthetized adult patients after otologic surgery: a comparison with remifentanil.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qing; Hu, Chunbo; Ye, Min; Shen, Xia

    2015-07-23

    Remifentanil and dexmedetomidine are well known to suppress airway reflexes during airway procedures. Smooth tracheal extubation is important after otologic surgery. The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of dexmedetomidine or remifentanil infusion for producing smooth tracheal extubation in deeply anesthetized patients after otologic surgery. Seventy-four ASA I-II adult patients (18-60 years old) scheduled for elective otologic surgery were randomly assigned to one of three groups: sevoflurane-remifentanil (Group SR, n = 25), sevoflurane-dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg) (Group SD5, n = 24), or sevoflurane-dexmedetomidine (0.7 μg/kg) (Group SD7, n = 25). Remifentanil or dexmedetomidine were administered for 10 min at the end of surgery. The primary outcome was the rate of smooth extubation. Respiratory pattern, airway obstruction, hemodynamic and respiratory profiles, time to awake, rescue analgesics in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), and postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) were also recorded. The rate of smooth tracheal extubation as defined 1 min post-extubation was the same for Groups SR and SD7 (P > 0.05), but the rate of smooth extubation was lower for Group SD5 than for the other two groups (p < 0.05). During extubation, the respiratory rate was lower in Group SR than in both dexmedetomidine groups (p < 0.05). The hemodynamic profiles at extubation were similar between groups (p > 0.05), but the mean arterial pressure and heart rate were higher in Group SR at 10 and 15 min after extubation (p < 0.05). The incidence of airway obstruction and time to awake were comparable for all groups (p > 0.05). The need for rescue analgesic in the PACU was more common in Group SR than in both dexmedetomidine groups (P < 0.01). Compared to Group SR, both dexmedetomidine groups had less PONV on postoperative day 1 (p < 0.05). Combined with 1 MAC sevoflurane, dexmedetomidine 0.7 ug/kg and remifentanil

  12. Canine thymoma.

    PubMed

    Aronsohn, M

    1985-07-01

    Thymoma is an uncommon canine neoplasm of thymic epithelial cells. It is seen in various breeds but may occur more frequently in German Shepherd Dogs. Middle-aged or older dogs can be affected and no sex predilection exists. A paraneoplastic syndrome of myasthenia gravis, nonthymic malignant tumors, and/or polymyositis occurs in a significant number of dogs with thymoma. Clinical signs are variable and are related to a space-occupying cranial mediastinal mass and/or manifestations of the paraneo-plastic syndrome. Dyspnea is the most common presenting clinical sign. Thoracic radiographs usually show a cranial mediastinal mass. Lymphoma is the main differential diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis may be made by closed biopsy but is more likely to be confirmed by thoracotomy. Thymomas may be completely contained within the thymic capsule or may spread by local invasion or metastasis. A staging system allows for an accurate prognosis and a therapeutic plan. Surgical removal of encapsulated thymomas may result in long-term survival or cure. Invasive or metastatic thymomas carry a guarded prognosis. Manifestations of the paraneoplastic syndrome complicate treatment. Adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy may be of value for advanced cases; however, adequate clinical trials have not been done in the dog.

  13. Tracheal lipoma mimicking obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Mota, Vinícius Turano; Maia, José Geraldo Soares; Barbosa, Ana Teresa Fernandes; Fernandes, Diego Franco Silveira; Rocha, Emanuelly Botelho

    2010-01-01

    Tracheal tumors are rare and can be difficult to diagnose due to their capacity to mimic other obstructive lung diseases, such as asthma and COPD. We report the case of a female patient with a tracheal tumor. She had previously been treated for asthma and COPD, with little response to the treatment. The onset of infectious complications prompted further investigation. Chest CT images suggested the presence of a tumor, which was confirmed by fiberoptic bronchoscopy. The tumor was endoscopically resected. However, the patient evolved to death due to pneumonia and septic shock.

  14. Tolerance following organophophate poisoning of tracheal muscle. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, J.M.; Dwyer, T.M.

    1987-07-21

    The effects of subacute exposure to the organophosphate acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (diisoprophylfluorophosphate, soman, sarin, and VX) on the binding properties of muscarinic receptors, the contractile responses, and the electrophysiological properties of swine tracheal smooth muscle were studied. Subacute organophosphate treatment decreased the number of muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle homogenates and in the surface membrane of isolated cells by 50-77%. DFP was the most potent, followed by sarin, VX, and soman. The organophosphates induced a change in the coupling of the receptor to the guanine nucleotide-binding protein, which resulted in a decrease in the number of high-affinity receptors available for agonist-induced actions. The sensitivity of the muscle to acetylcholine and bethanechol was largely unchanged by any of the organophosphates. It is concluded that tolerance development is a complex process and involves: changes in receptor number and coupling of these receptors to intra-cellular processes; changes in the sensitivity of the ganglia to cholinergic agonists; and changes in the membrane processes and channels controlling membrane potential. Surprisingly, the response of the muscle to agonists is not greatly affected even though 70% of the receptors are lost from the cell surface.

  15. Smooth Sailing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Beverley; Pincott, Maxine; Rebman, Ashley; Northcutt, Jen; Barsanti, Amy; Silkunas, Betty; Brighton, Susan K.; Reitz, David; Winkler, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Presents discipline tips from several teachers to keep classrooms running smoothly all year. Some of the suggestions include the following: a bear-cave warning system, peer mediation, a motivational mystery, problem students acting as the teacher's assistant, a positive-behavior-reward chain, a hallway scavenger hunt (to ensure quiet passage…

  16. Smooth Sailing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Beverley; Pincott, Maxine; Rebman, Ashley; Northcutt, Jen; Barsanti, Amy; Silkunas, Betty; Brighton, Susan K.; Reitz, David; Winkler, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Presents discipline tips from several teachers to keep classrooms running smoothly all year. Some of the suggestions include the following: a bear-cave warning system, peer mediation, a motivational mystery, problem students acting as the teacher's assistant, a positive-behavior-reward chain, a hallway scavenger hunt (to ensure quiet passage…

  17. Standard methods for tracheal mite research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter, for the COLOSS Beebook from the Bee Research Center in Switzerland, summarizes all the current information about the tracheal mite (Acarapis woodi) infesting honey bees (Apis mellifera). The chapter covers the effects on bees, its life history, and its range, as well as the identifica...

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography Evaluation of Tracheal Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    0.50). A dose - response curve shows a weak correlation between the increase in mucosal thickness with dosage of S Pneumoniae inoculated (Figure 5...10000 100000 1000000 Figure 5: Dose response curve for septic tracheal mucosal thickness. DISCUSSION These studies confirm the feasibility of high

  19. Tracheal replacement with an aortic autograft.

    PubMed

    Azorin, Jacques F; Bertin, Francois; Martinod, Emmanuel; Laskar, Marc

    2006-02-01

    Tracheal replacement after extensive resection remains a challenge for the thoracic surgeon. We propose an innovative solution: the use of an aortic autograft. After an experimental work on animals with aortic autografts and allografts [Martinod E, Seguin A, Pfeuty K, Fornes P, Kambouchner M, Azorin JF, Carpentier AF. Long-term evaluation of the replacement of the trachea with an autologous aortic graft. Ann Thorac Surg 2003;75(5):1572-8; Martinod E, Seguin A, Holder-Espinasse M, Kambouchner M, Duterque-Coquillaud M, Azorin JF, Carpentier AF. Tracheal regeneration following tracheal replacement with an allogenic aorta. Ann Thorac Surg 2005;79(3):942-8], we present the first human case of long tracheal replacement with an aortic autograft. In this case we replaced 7 cm of a tumoral trachea using an aortic infra-renal autograft supported by a silicone stent. The early postoperative course was uneventful. The stent was removed at three months. The patient died at six months from an acute pulmonary infection without any sign of anastomosis leakage or graft rupture. A new field of clinical study has to be investigated.

  20. Airway epithelium stimulates smooth muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Malavia, Nikita K; Raub, Christopher B; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Panettieri, Reynold A; George, Steven C

    2009-09-01

    Communication between the airway epithelium and stroma is evident during embryogenesis, and both epithelial shedding and increased smooth muscle proliferation are features of airway remodeling. Hence, we hypothesized that after injury the airway epithelium could modulate airway smooth muscle proliferation. Fully differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells at an air-liquid interface were co-cultured with serum-deprived normal primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM) using commercially available Transwells. In some co-cultures, the NHBE were repeatedly (x4) scrape-injured. An in vivo model of tracheal injury consisted of gently denuding the tracheal epithelium (x3) of a rabbit over 5 days and then examining the trachea by histology 3 days after the last injury. Our results show that HASM cell number increases 2.5-fold in the presence of NHBE, and 4.3-fold in the presence of injured NHBE compared with HASM alone after 8 days of in vitro co-culture. In addition, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and, more markedly, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 concentration increased in co-culture correlating with enhanced HASM growth. Inhibiting MMP-9 release significantly attenuated the NHBE-dependent HASM proliferation in co-culture. In vivo, the injured rabbit trachea demonstrated proliferation in the smooth muscle (trachealis) region and significant MMP-9 staining, which was absent in the uninjured control. The airway epithelium modulates smooth muscle cell proliferation via a mechanism that involves secretion of soluble mediators including potential smooth muscle mitogens such as IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, but also through a novel MMP-9-dependent mechanism.

  1. Strategies for diagnosis and treatment of iatrogenic tracheal ruptures.

    PubMed

    Deja, M; Menk, M; Heidenhain, C; Spies, C D; Heymann, A; Weidemann, H; Branscheid, D; Weber-Carstens, S

    2011-12-01

    Management of tracheal ruptures in critically ill patients is challenging. Conservative treatment has been described, but in mechanically ventilated patients with distal tracheal ruptures surgical repair might be inevitable. Strategies for diagnosis and treatment of tracheal ruptures and handling of mechanical ventilation remain to be clarified. Our aim was to comprise a structured diagnostic and treatment protocol for patients suspicious of tracheal injury, including detailed principles of mechanical ventilation and specific indications for conservative or surgical treatment. Patients with tracheal ruptures were compared in accordance to the need of mechanical ventilation and to indication for surgical repair. In patients suffering from tracheal ruptures affecting the whole tracheal wall and with protrusion of mediastinal structures into the lumen surgery was indicated. We compared ventilatory, hemodynamic and clinical parameters between the different patient groups. We report our structured approach in diagnostics and treatment of tracheal ruptures and place special emphasis on respiratory management. Seventeen patients with tracheal rupture were identified. In 8 patients surgical repair was performed 1.8±1.5 days after diagnosis. Previous to surgery, ventilation parameters improved significantly: plateau pressure decreased, percentage of assisted spontaneous breathing increased and compliance improved. Conservative treatment was successful in long-term ventilated patients (13.7±8 days) even when suffering from distal lesions. Invasiveness of mechanical ventilation and obstruction of tracheal lumen might indicate conservative or surgical treatment strategies in long-term ventilated patients suffering from iatrogenic tracheal rupture. Indications for surgical repair remain to be further clarified.

  2. Low extracellular magnesium ions induce lipid peroxidation and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B in canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle: possible relation to traumatic brain injury and strokes.

    PubMed

    Altura, Burton M; Gebrewold, Asefa; Zhang, Aimin; Altura, Bella T

    2003-05-08

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that administration of low extracellular levels of magnesium ions ([Mg(2+)](o)) to primary cultured cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells will cause lipid peroxidation, degradation of IkappaB-alpha, and activation of nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) in cultured cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells. Low [Mg(2+)](o) (0, 0.15, 0.3 and 0.48 mM) resulted in concentration-dependent rises in malondialdehyde (MDA) in as little as 3 h after exposure to low [Mg(2+)](o), rising to levels 3-12xnormal after 18-24 h; the lower the [Mg(2+)](o), the higher the MDA level. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and specific antibodies, low [Mg(2+)](o) caused two DNA-binding proteins (p50, p65) to rise in nuclear extracts in a concentration-dependent manner. High [Mg(2+)](o) (i.e. 4.8 mM) downregulated p50 and p65. Using a rabbit antibody, IkappaB phosphorylation (and degradation) was stimulated by low [Mg(2+)](o) (in a concentration-dependent manner) and inhibited by a low concentration of the NF-kappaB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. These new biochemical and molecular data indicate that low [Mg(2+)](o), in concentrations found in the blood of patients, after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and diverse types of strokes, can elicit rapid lipid peroxidation and activation of NF-kappaB in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells. The present results, when viewed in light of other recently published data, suggest that low [Mg(2+)](o)-induced lipid peroxidation and activation of NF-kappaB play important roles in TBI and diverse types of strokes.

  3. Surgical intervention strategies for congenital tracheal stenosis associated with a tracheal bronchus based on the location of stenosis.

    PubMed

    Morita, Keiichi; Yokoi, Akiko; Fukuzawa, Hiroaki; Hisamatsu, Chieko; Endo, Kosuke; Okata, Yuichi; Tamaki, Akihiko; Mishima, Yasuhiko; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Kosaku

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the appropriate surgical intervention strategies for congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS) associated with a tracheal bronchus based on the location of stenosis. The medical records of 13 pediatric patients with CTS associated with a tracheal bronchus at a single institution between January 2006 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Type 1: tracheal stenosis above the right upper lobe bronchus (RULB) (n = 1). One patient underwent slide tracheoplasty and was successfully extubated. Type 2: tracheal stenosis below the RULB (n = 7). Tracheal end-to-end anastomosis was performed before 2014, and one patient failed to extubate. Posterior-anterior slide tracheoplasty was performed since 2014, and all three patients were successfully extubated. Type 3: tracheal stenosis above the RULB to the carina (n = 5). One patient underwent posterior-anterior slide tracheoplasty and was successfully extubated. Two patients with left-right slide tracheoplasty and another two patients with tracheal end-to-end anastomosis for the stenosis below the RULB could not be extubated. Tracheal end-to-end anastomosis or slide tracheoplasty can be selected for tracheal stenosis above the RULB according to the length of stenosis. Posterior-anterior slide tracheoplasty appears feasible for tracheal stenosis below the RULB or above the RULB to the carina.

  4. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  5. Massive aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff caused by closed tracheal suction system.

    PubMed

    Dave, Mital H; Frotzler, Angela; Madjdpour, Caveh; Koepfer, Nelly; Weiss, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff has been recognized to be a risk factor for the development of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This study investigated the effect of closed tracheal suctioning on aspiration of fluid past the tracheal tube cuff in an in vitro benchtop model. High-volume low pressure tube cuffs of 7.5 mm internal diameter (ID) were placed in a 22 mm ID artificial trachea connected to a test lung. Positive pressure ventilation (PPV) with 15 cm H₂O peak inspiratory pressure and 5 cm H₂O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was used. A closed tracheal suction system (CTSS) catheter (size 14Fr) was attached to the tracheal tube and suction was performed for 5, 10, 15, or 20 seconds under 200 or 300 cm H₂O suction pressures. Amount of fluid (mL) aspirated along the tube cuff and the airway pressure changes were recorded for each suction procedure. Fluid aspiration during different suction conditions was compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test (Bonferroni correction [α = .01]). During 10, 15, and 20 seconds suction, airway pressure consistently dropped down to -8 to -13 cm H₂O (P < .001) from the preset level. Fluid aspiration was never observed under PPV + PEEP but occurred always during suctioning. Aspiration along the tube cuff was higher with -300 cm H₂O than with -200 cm H₂O suction pressure (P < .001) and was much more during 15 and 20 seconds suction time as compared to 5 seconds (P < .001). Massive aspiration of fluid occurs along the tracheal tube cuff during suction with the closed tracheal suction system. © SAGE Publications 2011.

  6. Localization of Impacted Canines

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Praveen; Bhagchandani, Jitendra; Singh, Ashish; Garg, Aarti; Kumar, Snehi; Sharma, Ashish; Yadav, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines is a frequently encountered clinical problem. The impaction of canine can be prevented in some situationsif the canine displacement is diagnosed in the early mixed dentition period and this would be extremely useful for the clinician. Hence,it is very important to focus on the means of early diagnosis and interception of this clinical situation. In the present article, the differentmodalities used to diagnose the impacted canine are reviewed with an insight into current 3-D modalities. PMID:25738100

  7. Relationship Between Adverse Tracheal Intubation Associated Events and PICU Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Parker, Margaret M; Nuthall, Gabrielle; Brown, Calvin; Biagas, Katherine; Napolitano, Natalie; Polikoff, Lee A; Simon, Dennis; Miksa, Michael; Gradidge, Eleanor; Lee, Jan Hau; Krishna, Ashwin S; Tellez, David; Bird, Geoffrey L; Rehder, Kyle J; Turner, David A; Adu-Darko, Michelle; Nett, Sholeen T; Derbyshire, Ashley T; Meyer, Keith; Giuliano, John; Owen, Erin B; Sullivan, Janice E; Tarquinio, Keiko; Kamat, Pradip; Sanders, Ronald C; Pinto, Matthew; Bysani, G Kris; Emeriaud, Guillaume; Nagai, Yuki; McCarthy, Melissa A; Walson, Karen H; Vanderford, Paula; Lee, Anthony; Bain, Jesse; Skippen, Peter; Breuer, Ryan; Tallent, Sarah; Nadkarni, Vinay; Nishisaki, Akira

    2017-04-01

    Tracheal intubation in PICUs is a common procedure often associated with adverse events. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between immediate events such as tracheal intubation associated events or desaturation and ICU outcomes: length of stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, and mortality. Prospective cohort study with 35 PICUs using a multicenter tracheal intubation quality improvement database (National Emergency Airway Registry for Children: NEAR4KIDS) from January 2013 to June 2015. Desaturation defined as Spo2 less than 80%. PICUs participating in NEAR4KIDS. All patients less than18 years of age undergoing primary tracheal intubations with ICU outcome data were analyzed. Five thousand five hundred four tracheal intubation encounters with median 108 (interquartile range, 58-229) tracheal intubations per site. At least one tracheal intubation associated event was reported in 892 (16%), with 364 (6.6%) severe tracheal intubation associated events. Infants had a higher frequency of tracheal intubation associated event or desaturation than older patients (48% infants vs 34% for 1-7 yr and 18% for 8-17 yr). In univariate analysis, the occurrence of tracheal intubation associated event or desaturation was associated with a longer mechanical ventilation (5 vs 3 d; p < 0.001) and longer PICU stay (14 vs 11 d; p < 0.001) but not with PICU mortality. The occurrence of severe tracheal intubation associated events was associated with longer mechanical ventilation (5 vs 4 d; p < 0.003), longer PICU stay (15 vs 12 d; p < 0.035), and PICU mortality (19.9% vs 9.6%; p < 0.0001). In multivariable analyses, the occurrence of tracheal intubation associated event or desaturation was significantly associated with longer mechanical ventilation (+12%; 95% CI, 4-21%; p = 0.004), and severe tracheal intubation associated events were independently associated with increased PICU mortality (OR = 1.80; 95% CI, 1.24-2.60; p = 0.002), after adjusted for patient

  8. [Video laryngoscopic tracheal intubation under sedation].

    PubMed

    Masquère, P; Lonjaret, L; Fourcade, O; Minville, V

    2013-05-01

    We report a video laryngoscopic tracheal intubation under sedation in a patient with a hip fracture. Preoperative assessment revealed signs of difficult airway management linked to a cervical spine immobilization. Here we describe an alternative method to awake fiber optic flexible intubation. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. [Surgery of traumatic tracheal and tracheobronchial injuries].

    PubMed

    Palade, E; Passlick, B

    2011-02-01

    Tracheal injuries are altogether rare events and can be divided into three broad categories: tracheobronchial injuries caused by external violence, iatrogenic ruptures of the trachea and inhalation trauma. Successful management of tracheobronchial injuries requires a fast and straightforward diagnostic evaluation. In all severely injured patients with cervicothoracic involvement an injury of the tracheobronchial system should be actively excluded. Although it is commonly agreed that posttraumatic injuries require surgical intervention the management of iatrogenic injuries is presently shifting towards a more conservative treatment.

  10. Tolerance Following Organophosphate Poisoning of Tracheal Muscle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-13

    tracheal function. Bronchoconstriction can be elicited in dogs by stimulation of the cervical branch vagus nerve (1,2,3), This effect appears to be...Widdicombe. The effect of vagotomy» vagal cooling and efferent vagal stimulation on breathing and lung mechanics of rabbits. J. Physiol. London...respect to [?H]QNB and tissue concentrations and was time- and pH-dependent. The association of [pH]QNE (180 pM) with the muscarinic receptors

  11. A rare complication of tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Shukeri, Wan Fadzlina Wan Muhd; Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan; Nadarajan, Chandran

    2016-01-01

    Accidental endobronchial intubation is a frequent complication in critically ill patients requiring tracheal intubation (TI). If such complication occurs, it is more often the right main bronchus that is intubated due to anatomical reasons. Left main bronchus (LMB) intubation is rare. Here, we report a case with auscultatory, bronchoscopic, and radiographic evidence of accidental LMB intubation in a pregnant woman with dengue shock syndrome. We highlight this case to increase awareness about this possible-but-rare complication of TI. PMID:27275080

  12. Recurred Post-intubation Tracheal Stenosis Treated with Bronchoscopic Cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ye-Ryung; Taek Jeong, Joon; Kyu Lee, Myoung; Kim, Sang-Ha; Joong Yong, Suk; Jeong Lee, Seok; Lee, Won-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Post-intubation tracheal stenosis accounts for the greatest proportion of whole-cause tracheal stenosis. Treatment of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requires a multidisciplinary approach. Surgery or an endoscopic procedure can be used, depending on the type of stenosis. However, the efficacy of cryotherapy in post-intubation tracheal stenosis has not been validated. Here, we report a case of recurring post-intubation tracheal stenosis successfully treated with bronchoscopic cryotherapy that had previously been treated with surgery. In this case, cryotherapy was effective in treating web-like fibrous stenosis, without requiring more surgery. Cryotherapy can be considered as an alternative or primary treatment for post-intubation tracheal stenosis. PMID:27853078

  13. Tracheal stenosis in a blue-billed currasow (Crax alberti).

    PubMed

    Evans, Alina; Atkins, Adrienne; Citino, Scott B

    2009-06-01

    A blue-billed curassow (Crax alberti) was anesthetized for a preshipment physical exam. Sixteen days later, the curassow presented with acute onset of dyspnea and respiratory stridor. The bird was stabilized by placement of an air sac canula. Tracheal stenosis was diagnosed with radiographs. It was suspected that the tracheal stenosis was due to trauma from a previous endotracheal tube placement. A tracheal resection and anastomosis was performed. Three days postoperatively the air sac canula was removed. Although there were increased respiratory sounds, the trachea had not completely restrictured. Ten months later, the currasow presented for dyspnea and died shortly thereafter. There was mycotic airsacculitis with Aspergillus organisms present. Tracheal stenosis in birds after tracheal intubation is a frequently discussed condition with very little published material available. This report describes a case of tracheal stenosis postintubation and the surgical treatment and subsequent complications that followed.

  14. Evaluation of magnesium-yttrium alloy as an extraluminal tracheal stent.

    PubMed

    Luffy, Sarah A; Chou, Da-Tren; Waterman, Jenora; Wearden, Peter D; Kumta, Prashant N; Gilbert, Thomas W

    2014-03-01

    Tracheomalacia is a relatively rare problem, but can be challenging to treat, particularly in pediatric patients. Due to the presence of mechanically deficient cartilage, the trachea is unable to resist collapse under physiologic pressures of respiration, which can lead to acute death if left untreated. However, if treated, the outcome for patients with congenital tracheomalacia is quite good because the cartilage tends to spontaneously mature over a period of 12 to 18 months. The present study investigated the potential for the use of degradable magnesium-3% yttrium alloy (W3) to serve as an extraluminal tracheal stent in a canine model. The host response to the scaffold included the formation of a thin, vascularized capsule consisting of collagenous tissue and primarily mononuclear cells. The adjacent cartilage structure was not adversely affected as observed by bronchoscopic, gross, histologic, and mechanical analysis. The W3 stents showed reproducible spatial and temporal fracture patterns, but otherwise tended to corrode quite slowly, with a mix of Ca and P rich corrosion product formed on the surface and observed focal regions of pitting. The study showed that the approach to use degradable magnesium alloys as an extraluminal tracheal stent is promising, although further development of the alloys is required to improve the resistance to stress corrosion cracking and improve the ductility.

  15. Surgical Reconstruction for Severe Tracheal Obstruction in Morquio A Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Christian; Davies, Ryan R; Theroux, Mary; Spurrier, Ellen A; Averill, Lauren W; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2016-10-01

    Progressive tracheal obstruction is commonly seen in Morquio A syndrome and can lead to life-threatening complications. Although tracheostomy can address severe upper airway obstruction, lower airway obstruction, commonly associated with a narrow thoracic inlet and vascular compression, requires an alternative approach. We describe the case of a 16-year-old patient with Morquio A syndrome whose near-fatal tracheal obstruction was relieved by timely surgical tracheal vascular reconstruction with dramatic resolution of his respiratory symptoms.

  16. Effects of ozone on the cholinergic secretory responsiveness of ferret tracheal glands

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, R.K.; Oberdoerster, G.; Marin, M.G. )

    1991-06-01

    Oxidant air pollutants exacerbate several pulmonary diseases. Inhalation of ozone has been shown to induce airway smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness. Oxidant injury could also affect airway secretory mechanisms. The authors postulated that oxidant exposure would alter the glycoconjugate secretory function of airway submucosal glands. To test this hypothesis they examined the effects of in vivo ozone exposure on the in vitro secretory responsiveness of ferret tracheal glands. Ferrets were exposed to 1 ppm ozone, 24 hr/day for 3 or 7 days. Following exposure, glandular explants, denuded of surface epithelial cells, were prepared and incubated in medium containing 3H-glucosamine for 18 hr. Basal secretion of labeled glycoconjugates was significantly increased 31% following 3 days of ozone exposure (P less than or equal to 0.05) and remained elevated 11% after 7 days of exposure compared to the air-exposed group. After 3 or 7 days of exposure to ozone, tracheal gland responsiveness to carbachol was increased as indicated by significantly lower EC50 values (log molar concentration) of -6.43 {plus minus} 0.04 (n = 6) and -6.50 {plus minus} 0.11 (n = 5), respectively; compared to -6.20 {plus minus} 0.08 (n = 6) for the air-exposed group. There was no difference in carbachol EC50 values for air and 7-day ozone-exposed animals treated with dexamethasone. Dexamethasone did not attenuate the ozone-induced increase in basal secretion. Tracheal gland responsiveness to {alpha}- or {beta}-adrenergic agonists was not changed by oxidant exposure. These experiments suggest that oxidant injury not only increases basal secretion of respiratory glycoconjugates but also increases tracheal gland sensitivity to a cholinergic agonist.

  17. Complete tracheal rupture after a failed suicide attempt.

    PubMed

    Costache, Victor S; Renaud, Claire; Brouchet, Laurent; Toma, Tudor; Le Balle, François; Berjaud, Jean; Dahan, Marcel

    2004-04-01

    Tracheal rupture is life-threatening and its management poses a considerable challenge to both anesthesiologists and surgeons. We report the case of a 44-year-old patient with a complete tracheal rupture after a failed suicide attempt by hanging. A rare bilateral injury of the laryngeal nerves was associated. An original tracheal intubation was performed using the video unit for thoracoscopy. The severity of the lesions required the placement of a tracheostomy cannula after the tracheal repair. The postoperative course was uneventful. The patient was discharged on the 12th day, with a remaining moderate dysphonia.

  18. Tracheal bronchus: a cause of prolonged atelectasis in intubated children.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, B P; Frassica, J J; Rayder, S M

    1998-02-01

    Tracheal bronchus is a common anomaly that occurs in approximately 2% of people. Two children with multiple medical problems which led to endotracheal intubation are described. The hospital course for each child was complicated by persistent right upper lobe atelectasis. The presence of a tracheal bronchus was not recognized in either case initially; identification of this anatomic variant allowed appropriate changes in airway management. The potential for tracheal bronchus to cause, or be associated with, localized pulmonary problems is reviewed. The diagnosis of tracheal bronchus should be considered early in the course of intubated patients with right upper lobe complications.

  19. An animal model study for repair of tracheal defects with autologous stem cells and differentiated chondrocytes from adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hashemibeni, Batool; Goharian, Vahid; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Sadeghi, Farzaneh; Fasihi, Farzaneh; Alipur, Razie; Valiani, Ali; Ghorbani, Masoud; Emami, Zahra Motavali; Shabani, Fatemeh; Goharian, Maryam

    2012-11-01

    Stenosis of trachea with mucosal and cartilage lesions is a challenging problem in tracheal surgery. Owing to ease of harvest and abundance, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are attractive and increasingly used in tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to evaluate the repair of trachea with autologous stem cells and differentiated chondrocytes from adipose-derived stem cells in an animal model. Six canine ADSCs were isolated and proliferated in monolayer culture and CD44; CD90 markers were investigated by flow cytometry. ADSCs were seeded in alginate beads and were differentiated into chondrocytes by TGF-β3. Cartilage-specific markers with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were demonstrated in differentiated cells. These differentiated cells and stem cells in alginate scaffold were separately transferred to a defect created in canine's trachea. After 8 weeks, the healing and cartilage formation in the trachea was evaluated by histological methods. We identified formed cartilage pieces and chondrocytes with lacuna and extracellular matrix in defects implanted with differentiated cells, but in other groups, staining of the sections did not show the presence of cartilage in the engineered tracheal wall. We showed that cartilage- engineered from differentiated adipose-derived stem cells in alginate biodegradable scaffold could repair tracheal cartilage defects. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Relaxant effects of a hydroalcoholic extract of Ruta graveolens on isolated rat tracheal rings.

    PubMed

    Águila, Luis; Ruedlinger, Jenny; Mansilla, Karina; Ordenes, José; Salvatici, Raúl; de Campos, Rui Ribeiro; Romero, Fernando

    2015-06-05

    Ruta graveolens L. (R. graveolens) is a medicinal plant employed in non-traditional medicines that has various therapeutic properties, including anthelmintic, and vasodilatory actions, among others. We evaluated the trachea-relaxant effects of hydroalcoholic extract of R. graveolens against potassium chloride (KCl)- and carbachol-induced contraction of rat tracheal rings in an isolated organ bath. The results showed that the airway smooth muscle contraction induced by the depolarizing agent (KCl) and cholinergic agonist (carbachol) was markedly reduced by R. graveolens in a concentration-dependent manner, with maximum values of 109 ± 7.9 % and 118 ± 2.6 %, respectively (changes in tension expressed as positive percentages of change in proportion to maximum contraction), at the concentration of 45 μg/mL (half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50: 35.5 μg/mL and 27.8 μg/mL for KCl- and carbachol-induced contraction, respectively). Additionally, the presence of R. graveolens produced rightward parallel displacement of carbachol dose-response curves and reduced over 35 % of the maximum smooth muscle contraction. The hydroalcoholic extract of R. graveolens exhibited relaxant activity on rat tracheal rings. The results suggest that the trachea-relaxant effect is mediated by a non-competitive antagonistic mechanism. More detailed studies are needed to identify the target of the inhibition, and to determine more precisely the pharmacological mechanisms involved in the observed biological effects.

  1. Tissue-engineered tracheal reconstruction using three-dimensionally printed artificial tracheal graft: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Won; Park, Su A; Park, Ju-Kyeong; Choi, Jae Won; Kim, Yoo-Suk; Shin, Yoo Seob; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2014-06-01

    Three-dimensional printing has come into the spotlight in the realm of tissue engineering. We intended to evaluate the plausibility of 3D-printed (3DP) scaffold coated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded in fibrin for the repair of partial tracheal defects. MSCs from rabbit bone marrow were expanded and cultured. A half-pipe-shaped 3DP polycaprolactone scaffold was coated with the MSCs seeded in fibrin. The half-pipe tracheal graft was implanted on a 10 × 10-mm artificial tracheal defect in four rabbits. Four and eight weeks after the operation, the reconstructed sites were evaluated bronchoscopically, radiologically, histologically, and functionally. None of the four rabbits showed any sign of respiratory distress. Endoscopic examination and computed tomography showed successful reconstruction of trachea without any collapse or blockage. The replaced tracheas were completely covered with regenerated respiratory mucosa. Histologic analysis showed that the implanted 3DP tracheal grafts were successfully integrated with the adjacent trachea without disruption or granulation tissue formation. Neo-cartilage formation inside the implanted graft was sufficient to maintain the patency of the reconstructed trachea. Scanning electron microscope examination confirmed the regeneration of the cilia, and beating frequency of regenerated cilia was not different from those of the normal adjacent mucosa. The shape and function of reconstructed trachea using 3DP scaffold coated with MSCs seeded in fibrin were restored successfully without any graft rejection. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Clinic, diagnosis and treatment of tracheal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Delgado Pecellín, I; González Valencia, J P; Machuca Contreras, M; Pineda Mantecón, M

    2009-05-01

    New surgical techniques have been developed for treatment of tracheal stenosis (TS) over the last few years. The aim of the present study is to examine the clinical, therapeutic characteristics and progress of the cases of TS diagnosed in our hospital from January 2004 to August 2007. We have reviewed the clinical history, focusing on age at diagnosis, clinical signs and symptoms, baseline pathology, previous history of mechanical ventilation, degree of stenosis, diagnostic technique, treatment and progress. A total of 16 cases were found, (2 congenital and 14 acquired). Mean age at diagnosis was 8.8 months (23 days-2.5 years). Of these, 14 patients had been intubated (3-44 days). Clinical suspicion was prompted by inspiratory stridor (44%), difficulty to be extubated or intubated (28%) and recurrent laryngotracheitis (39%). Three patients received CO(2) laser therapy and suffered a high number of restenosis and required re-interventions. Three patients underwent costal cartilage tracheoplasty and tracheal-cricoid split, showing a good prognosis and one patient underwent a slide tracheoplasty. Five patients with only a few clinical signs and mild stenosis, were managed on a wait and see basis. One patient with tracheal membrane underwent resection of the stenosed portion and end-to-end anastomosis with favourable progress. Another patient had a partial cricotracheal resection but suffered three restenoses. Two patients underwent surgical correction of the vascular ring. Asymptomatic patients may receive conservative therapy. In the case of short-segment stenosis, resection and end-to-end anastomosis is the therapy of choice and the long-segment stenosis has obtained good results by means of slide tracheoplasty, which involved no deaths and a very low morbidity.

  3. Tracheal agenesis: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Desai, AV; Rao, Sudha; Shanbhag, PR; Rupani, M

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal agenesis is an extremely rare congenital anomaly involving the respiratory system. It is generally associated with anomalies of other systems. Antenatal diagnosis of this condition is difficult; therefore, it presents as a medical emergency in the labor room. Intubation in these babies is difficult. As many of these babies are born prematurely, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) adds to the management difficulties. Here, we describe two babies with this lethal anomaly and RDS where esophageal intubation and surfactant therapy proved beneficial. Furthermore, described are other associated anomalies. PMID:27424553

  4. Bilobar atelectasis after difficult tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Sprung, J; Lozada, L J; Zanettin, G; Banoub, M

    1997-12-01

    Acute intra-operative collapse of a lobe without apparent cause is rare. We report a case of transient bilobar atelectasis that developed without any apparent cause after a difficult tracheal intubation in a healthy young patient. Intrabronchial obstruction was ruled out by bronchoscopy. The bilobar atelectasis developed acutely and resolved quickly with mechanical ventilation. The characteristics of the lung collapse were atypical, suggesting either its reflex nature or acute reduction of lung volume owing to intubation-induced coughing. We present a review of the mechanisms of atelectasis.

  5. Synchrotron imaging of the grasshopper tracheal system: morphological and physiological components of tracheal hypermetry

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Joanna R.; Kirkton, Scott D.; Westneat, Mark W.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Lee, Wah-Keat; Harrison, Jon F.

    2009-01-01

    As grasshoppers increase in size during ontogeny, they have mass specifically greater whole body tracheal and tidal volumes and ventilation than predicted by an isometric relationship with body mass and body volume. However, the morphological and physiological bases to this respiratory hypermetry are unknown. In this study, we use synchrotron imaging to demonstrate that tracheal hypermetry in developing grasshoppers (Schistocerca americana) is due to increases in air sacs and tracheae and occurs in all three body segments, providing evidence against the hypothesis that hypermetry is due to gaining flight ability. We also assessed the scaling of air sac structure and function by assessing volume changes of focal abdominal air sacs. Ventilatory frequencies increased in larger animals during hypoxia (5% O2) but did not scale in normoxia. For grasshoppers in normoxia, inflated and deflated air sac volumes and ventilation scaled hypermetrically. During hypoxia (5% O2), many grasshoppers compressed air sacs nearly completely regardless of body size, and air sac volumes scaled isometrically. Together, these results demonstrate that whole body tracheal hypermetry and enhanced ventilation in larger/older grasshoppers are primarily due to proportionally larger air sacs and higher ventilation frequencies in larger animals during hypoxia. Prior studies showed reduced whole body tracheal volumes and tidal volume in late-stage grasshoppers, suggesting that tissue growth compresses air sacs. In contrast, we found that inflated volumes, percent volume changes, and ventilation were identical in abdominal air sacs of late-stage fifth instar and early-stage animals, suggesting that decreasing volume of the tracheal system later in the instar occurs in other body regions that have harder exoskeleton. PMID:19710392

  6. Synchrotron imaging of the grasshopper tracheal system : morphological and physiological components of tracheal hypermetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlee, K. J.; Henry, J. R.; Kirkton, S. D.; Westneat, M. W.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.; Harrison, J. F.; North Dakota State Univ.; Arizona State Univ.; Union Coll.; Field Museum of Natural History

    2009-11-01

    As grasshoppers increase in size during ontogeny, they have mass specifically greater whole body tracheal and tidal volumes and ventilation than predicted by an isometric relationship with body mass and body volume. However, the morphological and physiological bases to this respiratory hypermetry are unknown. In this study, we use synchrotron imaging to demonstrate that tracheal hypermetry in developing grasshoppers (Schistocerca americana) is due to increases in air sacs and tracheae and occurs in all three body segments, providing evidence against the hypothesis that hypermetry is due to gaining flight ability. We also assessed the scaling of air sac structure and function by assessing volume changes of focal abdominal air sacs. Ventilatory frequencies increased in larger animals during hypoxia (5% O{sub 2}) but did not scale in normoxia. For grasshoppers in normoxia, inflated and deflated air sac volumes and ventilation scaled hypermetrically. During hypoxia (5% O{sub 2}), many grasshoppers compressed air sacs nearly completely regardless of body size, and air sac volumes scaled isometrically. Together, these results demonstrate that whole body tracheal hypermetry and enhanced ventilation in larger/older grasshoppers are primarily due to proportionally larger air sacs and higher ventilation frequencies in larger animals during hypoxia. Prior studies showed reduced whole body tracheal volumes and tidal volume in late-stage grasshoppers, suggesting that tissue growth compresses air sacs. In contrast, we found that inflated volumes, percent volume changes, and ventilation were identical in abdominal air sacs of late-stage fifth instar and early-stage animals, suggesting that decreasing volume of the tracheal system later in the instar occurs in other body regions that have harder exoskeleton.

  7. A pilot study of pepsin in tracheal and oral secretions.

    PubMed

    Schallom, Marilyn; Tricomi, Sally M; Chang, Yie-Hwa; Metheny, Norma A

    2013-09-01

    Because reflux of gastric juice into the oropharynx must precede its aspiration into the lungs, it is reasonable to hypothesize that the detection of pepsin (the major gastric enzyme in gastric juice) in oral secretions may provide a relatively noninvasive method of predicting risk for aspiration. To describe the incidence of pepsin in oral and tracheal secretions collected concurrently from a sample of 50 gastric-fed patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. An exploratory descriptive design with a convenience sample from 4 medical and surgical intensive care units. An oral secretion and a tracheal secretion were collected concurrently from each patient (yielding a sample of 50 oral and 50 tracheal secretions). The tracheal secretions were obtained via the inline suction system with an attached sputum trap; oral secretions were obtained via a Yankauer suction tip with an attached sputum trap. All specimens were assayed for pepsin by the Western blot method. Oral secretions from 10 patients (20%) and tracheal secretions from 2 patients (4%) were pepsin-positive. Both patients with pepsin-positive tracheal secretions also had pepsin-positive oral secretions. Pepsin was not found in the tracheal secretions from the remaining 8 patients with pepsin-positive oral secretions. Although reflux of gastric juice into the oropharynx must precede its aspiration into the lungs, individual reflux events do not necessarily lead to aspiration. Thus, it is reasonable that we found pepsin 5 times more often in oral secretions than in tracheal secretions.

  8. Tracheal rupture in a cat: diagnosis by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bhandal, Jitender; Kuzma, Alan

    2008-06-01

    A cat was presented with a history of worsening generalized subcutaneous emphysema following dental prophylaxis. Tentative diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made. The location and extent of the tear was confirmed with the help of computed tomography. This is the 1st computed tomographic description of tracheal rupture in the veterinary literature.

  9. Complete tracheal duplication with unilateral atelectasis in an adult.

    PubMed

    Chihaya, Keisuke; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Matsuoka, Shin; Nobuyama, Seiichi; Handa, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeo; Kida, Hirotaka; Kurimoto, Noriaki; Matsushita, Shoichiro; Fujikawa, Atsuko; Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Mineshita, Masamichi; Miyazawa, Teruomi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Duplication of the trachea is an extremely rare condition that has been infrequently reported in the medical literature. We report an adult case with complete tracheal duplication associated with unilateral atelectasis, which was incidentally detected by computed tomography. Tracheal duplication should be considered as a possible cause of severe atelectasis in adults.

  10. On the use of unsealed polypropylene mesh as tracheal replacement.

    PubMed

    Behrend, Matthias; Kluge, Eva; Schüttler, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The necessity of a cervical tracheal replacement arises with thyroid carcinoma, which occasionally infiltrates the trachea extensively, the rare primary tracheal tumors and, sporadically, benign stenoses. In the present study, we used an uncoated porous polypropylene prosthesis as cervical tracheal replacement in sheep. Specifically, we implanted a tracheal prosthesis of polypropylene mesh as a cervical tracheal replacement in five sheep, protecting the airways with self-expanding stents. Healing-in of the prostheses was checked bronchoscopically. The animals were killed after increasing survival times (7, 28, 64, 68, and >90 days), and incorporation of the prosthesis was examined macroscopically, microangiographically and histologically. Although medium-term survival was possible with a sufficiently wide airway, all animals were ultimately euthanized because of complications (airway stenosis, prolapse of prosthesis). Nevertheless, the results show that replacement of the cervical trachea with a polypropylene mesh can be successful under different experimental conditions.

  11. Fibrosarcoma of the trachea with severe tracheal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roncoroni, A. J.; Puy, R. J. M.; Goldman, E.; Fonseca, R.; Olmedo, Gloria

    1973-01-01

    Roncoroni, A. J., Puy, R. J. M., Goldman, E., Fonseca, R., and Olmedo, G. (1973).Thorax,28, 777-781. Fibrosarcoma of the trachea with severe tracheal obstruction. A patient with a tracheal fibrosarcoma is reported. The tumour was located just above the thoracic inlet and produced severe obstruction predominantly during expiration. An abnormal effort independent flow pattern was seen during inspiration in isovolume pressure-flow studies. Endoscopic resection induced temporary symptomatic remission, and airway resistance and expiratory flows became normal. Subsequently he required resection of eight tracheal rings with end-to-end tracheal anastomosis. Obstructive granulomata then developed at the suture sites, necessitating endoscopic removal. Later tracheal stenosis responded to periodic dilatation. Images PMID:4787990

  12. Evaluation of the potential of kartogenin encapsulated poly(L-lactic acid-co-caprolactone)/collagen nanofibers for tracheal cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yin, Haiyue; Wang, Juan; Gu, Ziqi; Feng, Wenhao; Gao, Manchen; Wu, Yu; Zheng, Hao; He, Xiaomin; Mo, Xiumei

    2017-09-01

    Tracheal stenosis is one of major challenging issues in clinical medicine because of the poor intrinsic ability of tracheal cartilage for repair. Tissue engineering provides an alternative method for the treatment of tracheal defects by generating replacement tracheal structures. In this study, we fabricated coaxial electrospun fibers using poly(L-lactic acid-co-caprolactone) and collagen solution as shell fluid and kartogenin solution as core fluid. Scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope images demonstrated that nanofibers had uniform and smooth structure. The kartogenin released from the scaffolds in a sustained and stable manner for about 2 months. The bioactivity of released kartogenin was evaluated by its effect on maintain the synthesis of type II collagen and glycosaminoglycans by chondrocytes. The proliferation and morphology analyses of mesenchymal stems cells derived from bone marrow of rabbits indicated the good biocompatibility of the fabricated nanofibrous scaffold. Meanwhile, the chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells cultured on core-shell nanofibrous scaffold was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results suggested that the core-shell nanofibrous scaffold with kartogenin could promote the chondrogenic differentiation ability of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Overall, the core-shell nanofibrous scaffold could be an effective delivery system for kartogenin and served as a promising tissue engineered scaffold for tracheal cartilage regeneration.

  13. The management of congenital tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Martin; Roebuck, Derek; Noctor, Clair; McLaren, Clare; Hartley, Ben; Mok, Quen; Dunne, Catherine; Pigott, Nick; Patel, Chirag; Patel, Alpesh; Wallis, Colin

    2003-12-01

    This paper reviews current concepts and results in the management of congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS). Diagnostic options are considered and the requirements for successful management defined. Chief amongst these is a multi-disciplinary approach with individualised patient management. Severe long-segment CTS represents the biggest challenge to clinicians and the worst problems for affected families. Near-death episodes are frequent in affected infants and some cannot be ventilated and require ECMO. Associated cardiovascular anomalies are frequent. Patients require immediate resuscitation and transfer to a specialist unit. After careful assessment, accurate diagnosis and discussion, primary resection and end-to-end repair with a slide technique should always be the first option, with concomitant repair of associated cardiac anomalies. If this is impossible because of the severity of the lesion, some form of patch tracheoplasty will be indicated. Cardiopulmonary bypass is often required. Patches include pericardium, autograft trachea, carotid artery, cartilage, and allograft trachea. Mortality ranges from 0 to 30% in the literature, which largely comprises single-centre long-term experience. Recurrence is common and can be managed by stenting and tracheal homograft implantation. Long-term quality of life of survivors is little reported but seems good. Physiological data are lacking. To improve results, we suggest a treatment algorithm to rationalise care.

  14. Regional and species differences in glyburide-sensitive K+ channels in airway smooth muscles as estimated from actions of KC 128 and levcromakalim.

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, K; Yoshida, S; Imagawa, J; Nabata, H; Kuriyama, H

    1994-01-01

    1. The purpose of the present experiments was to elucidate the differences in actions of two K+ channel openers, KC 128 and levcromakalim, on the carbachol-induced contraction, membrane potential and 86Rb+ efflux of the dog tracheal and bronchial smooth muscles. Furthermore, we compared the effects of these agents on guinea-pig and human airway smooth muscles. 2. In the dog tracheal and bronchial smooth muscle tissues, levcromakalim induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of the carbachol-induced contraction. The IC50 values were 0.35 microM (pIC50: 6.46 +/- 0.10, n = 9) and 0.55 microM (pIC50: 6.26 +/- 0.07, n = 5), respectively. KC 128 relaxed bronchial smooth muscles precontracted by carbachol with an IC50 value of 0.19 microM (pIC50: 6.73 +/- 0.10, n = 7). However, KC 128 had almost no effect on the contraction evoked by carbachol in the trachea (IC50 > 10 microM). The relaxations induced by levcromakalim and KC 128 were antagonized by glyburide (0.03-1 microM) but not by charybdotoxin (100 nM). 3. Levcromakalim (1 microM) hyperpolarized the membrane of both dog tracheal and bronchial smooth muscle cells, whereas KC 128 (1 microM) hyperpolarized the membrane of bronchial but not of tracheal smooth muscle cells. 4. Levcromakalim (10 microM) increased 86Rb+ efflux rate from both tracheal and bronchial smooth muscle tissues but KC 128 (10 microM) increased 86Rb+ efflux rate only from bronchial and not tracheal smooth muscle tissues. Glyburide (1 microM) prevented the hyperpolarization and the 86Rb+ efflux induced by these agents at the same concentration as observed for mechanical responses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7858882

  15. Canine hearing loss management.

    PubMed

    Scheifele, Lesa; Clark, John Greer; Scheifele, Peter M

    2012-11-01

    Dog owners and handlers are naturally concerned when suspicion of hearing loss arises for their dogs. Questions frequently asked of the veterinarian center on warning signs of canine hearing loss and what can be done for the dog if hearing loss is confirmed. This article addresses warning signs of canine hearing loss, communication training and safety awareness issues, and the feasibility of hearing aid amplification for dogs.

  16. Tracheal decannulation protocol in patients affected by traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zanata, Isabel de Lima; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Hirata, Gisela Carmona

    2014-04-01

    Introduction The frequency of tracheostomy in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) contrasts with the lack of objective criteria for its management. The study arose from the need for a protocol in the decision to remove the tracheal tube. Objective To evaluate the applicability of a protocol for tracheal decannulation. Methods A prospective study with 20 patients, ranging between 21 and 85 years of age (average 33.55), 4 of whom were women (20%) and 16 were men (80%). All patients had been diagnosed by a neurologist as having TBI, and the anatomical region of the lesion was known. Patients were evaluated following criteria for tracheal decannulation through a clinical evaluation protocol developed by the authors. Results Decannulation was performed in 12 (60%) patients. Fourteen (70%) had a score greater than 8 on the Glasgow Coma Scale and only 2 (14%) of these were not able to undergo decannulation. Twelve (60%) patients maintained the breathing pattern with occlusion of the tube and were successfully decannulated. Of the 20 patients evaluated, 11 (55%) showed no signs suggestive of tracheal aspiration, and of these, 9 (82%) began training on occlusion of the cannula. The protocol was relevant to establish the beginning of the decannulation process. The clinical assessment should focus on the patient's condition to achieve early tracheal decannulation. Conclusion This study allowed, with the protocol, to establish six criteria for tracheal decannulation: level of consciousness, respiration, tracheal secretion, phonation, swallowing, and coughing.

  17. Tracheal Decannulation Protocol in Patients Affected by Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zanata, Isabel de Lima; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Hirata, Gisela Carmona

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The frequency of tracheostomy in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) contrasts with the lack of objective criteria for its management. The study arose from the need for a protocol in the decision to remove the tracheal tube. Objective To evaluate the applicability of a protocol for tracheal decannulation. Methods A prospective study with 20 patients, ranging between 21 and 85 years of age (average 33.55), 4 of whom were women (20%) and 16 were men (80%). All patients had been diagnosed by a neurologist as having TBI, and the anatomical region of the lesion was known. Patients were evaluated following criteria for tracheal decannulation through a clinical evaluation protocol developed by the authors. Results Decannulation was performed in 12 (60%) patients. Fourteen (70%) had a score greater than 8 on the Glasgow Coma Scale and only 2 (14%) of these were not able to undergo decannulation. Twelve (60%) patients maintained the breathing pattern with occlusion of the tube and were successfully decannulated. Of the 20 patients evaluated, 11 (55%) showed no signs suggestive of tracheal aspiration, and of these, 9 (82%) began training on occlusion of the cannula. The protocol was relevant to establish the beginning of the decannulation process. The clinical assessment should focus on the patient's condition to achieve early tracheal decannulation. Conclusion This study allowed, with the protocol, to establish six criteria for tracheal decannulation: level of consciousness, respiration, tracheal secretion, phonation, swallowing, and coughing. PMID:25992074

  18. Endoscopic laser reshaping of rabbit tracheal cartilage: preliminary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Walter; Lam, Anthony; Protsenko, Dmitry; Wong, Brian J.

    2005-04-01

    Background: Tracheal cartilage deformities due to trauma, prolonged endotracheal intubation or infection are difficult to correct. Current treatment options such as dilation, laser ablation, stent placement, and segmental resection are only temporary or carry significant risks. The objectives of this project were to design and test a laser activated endotracheal stent system that can actively modify the geometry of tracheal cartilage, leading to permanent retention of a new and desirable tracheal geometry. Methods: Ex vivo rabbit tracheal cartilage (simulating human neonate trachea) were irradiated with an Er: Glass laser, (λ= 1.54um, 0.5W-2.5W, 1 sec to 5 sec). Shape change and gross thermal injury were assessed visually to determine the best laser power parameters for reshaping. A rigid endoscopic telescope and hollow bronchoscope were used to record endoscopic images. The stent was constructed from nitinol wire, shaped into a zigzag configuration. An ex vivo testing apparatus was also constructed. Results: The best laser power parameter to produce shape change was 1 W for 6-7 seconds. At this setting, there was significant shape change with only minimal thermal injury to the tracheal mucosa, as assessed by visual inspection. The bronchoscopy system functioned adequately during testing in the ex vivo testing apparatus. Conclusion: We have successfully designed instrumentation and created the capability to endoscopically reshape tracheal cartilage in an ex vivo rabbit model. The results obtained in ex vivo tracheal cartilage indicated that reshaping using Er: Glass laser can be accomplished.

  19. Endothelin-1 inhibits pre-stimulated tracheal submucosal gland secretion and epithelial albumin transport.

    PubMed Central

    Yurdakos, E.; Webber, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    1. Endothelin-1 potently contracts smooth muscle, including that in the airways. However, its effect on airway mucosal function has not so far been studied. 2. We have used the ferret whole trachea in vitro to examine the effect of endothelin-1 on tracheal smooth muscle tone, transepithelial potential difference (p.d.), submucosal gland secretion (including lysozyme secretion from serous cells) and active epithelial albumin transport. In addition we have examined the effects of endothelin on submucosal gland secretion and albumin transport pre-stimulated with the muscarinic agonist methacholine and the alpha-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. The effects of the Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine on the responses to endothelin have also been assessed. 3. Endothelin (0.1-100 nM) produced concentration-dependent increases in intraluminal tracheal pressure indicating smooth muscle contraction, and in the negativity of the transepithelial p.d. These effects were partially inhibited by nifedipine (10 microM). 4. Endothelin (0.01-100 nM) had no significant effect on baseline rates of mucus, lysozyme or albumin outputs, but produced concentration-dependent reductions in maintained methacholine- and phenylephrine-induced mucus, lysozyme and albumin outputs. In general endothelin was more potent against methacholine-induced effects. All of the concentration-response curves for endothelin were shallow and some appeared to be biphasic, suggesting the possibility of more than one mechanism of action of endothelin. 5. The effects of endothelin (at concentrations greater than 1 nM) on phenylephrine-induced mucus volume, lysozyme and albumin outputs were significantly inhibited by nifedipine. Similarly the effect of endothelin (greater than 1 nM) on methacholine-induced mucus volume and albumin outputs (but not lysozyme output) was attenuated by nifedipine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1810592

  20. Pharmacologic characterization of latex extracts by isolated guinea pig tracheal tissue.

    PubMed

    Schachter, E N; Zuskin, E; Rienzi, N; Goswami, S; Maayani, S

    1998-01-01

    Latex manufacturing workers are exposed to a heterogeneous aerosol of organic compounds. Previous studies of latex workers involved in glove production indicate that these individuals are at risk of developing respiratory symptoms and impaired lung function. The effect of latex extracts on isolated guinea pig tracheal smooth muscles was studied using latex water-soluble extracts obtained at different stages of the industrial process. Latex extracts were prepared as a 1:10 (w/v) solution. Dose-related contractions of nonsensitized guinea pig trachea were demonstrated using two latex extracts (latex 1 and latex 2). Latex 1 was prepared from the native latex and latex 2 from a processed form of latex which was relatively free of soluble proteins. Pharmacologic studies were performed by pretreating guinea pig tracheal tissue with drugs known to modulate smooth muscle contraction: atropine, indomethacin, pyrilamine, nordihydroguaiacetic acid, acivicin, trimethobenzoic acid and capsaicin. Constrictor effects of the dust extracts were inhibited by a wide variety of these agents. Atropine consistently and strikingly reduced the contractile effects of these extracts. This observation may suggest an interaction of the extracts with parasympathetic nerves or more directly with muscarinic receptors. Inhibition of contraction by blocking other mediators was less effective and varied with the dust extract. Pretreatment with capsaicin did not change the constrictor effects of latex 1 but enhanced the effects of latex 2. Depletion of neuropeptides, however, did not reduce the constrictor effect. We suggest that latex extracts cause dose-related airway smooth muscle constriction by nonimmunological mechanisms involving a variety of airway mediators and possibly cholinergic receptors. This effect is not dependent on the presensitization of guinea pigs.

  1. Snake Envenomation Causing Distant Tracheal Myonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Khimani, Amina; Mcnierney, Afton; Surani, Sara; Surani, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Snakebites are often believed to be poisonous. However, this is not always the case. In fact, each bite differs from snake to snake, depending on if the snake is poisonous and if there is envenomation. Venom in pit viper snakebites is often associated with local necrosis. The abundant literature selections and research articles justify local myonecrosis due to envenomation, but there is not much in the literature regarding myonecrosis at a site distant from the snakebite. We hereby present a case of a 42-year-old man who was transferred to our emergency department after a rattlesnake bit him twice. The patient, besides developing local myonecrosis at the site of the snakebite, developed necrosis of the scrotum as well as tracheal pressure myonecrosis at the site of the endotracheal tube balloon. In this review, we will attempt to discuss the myonecrosis pathophysiology and management related to the rattle snakebite. PMID:24083047

  2. Effect of tracheal suctioning on aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This clinical study evaluated the effect of a suctioning maneuver on aspiration past the cuff during mechanical ventilation. Methods Patients intubated for less than 48 hours with a PVC-cuffed tracheal tube, under mechanical ventilation with a PEEP ≥5 cm H2O and under continuous sedation, were included in the study. At baseline the cuff pressure was set at 30 cm H2O. Then 0.5ml of blue dye diluted with 3 ml of saline was instilled into the subglottic space just above the cuff. Tracheal suctioning was performed using a 16-French suction catheter with a suction pressure of – 400 mbar. A fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed before and after the suctioning maneuver, looking for the presence of blue dye in the folds within the cuff wall or in the trachea under the cuff. The sealing of the cuff was defined by the absence of leakage of blue dye either in the cuff wall or in the trachea under the cuff. Results Twenty-five patients were included. The size of the tracheal tube was 7-mm ID for 5 patients, 7.5-mm ID for 16 patients, and 8-mm ID for four patients. Blue dye was never seen in the trachea under the cuff before suctioning and only in one patient (4%) after the suctioning maneuver. Blue dye was observed in the folds within the cuff wall in 6 of 25 patients before suctioning and 11 of 25 after (p = 0.063). Overall, the incidence of sealing of the cuff was 76% before suctioning and 56% after (p = 0.073). Conclusions In patients intubated with a PVC-cuffed tracheal tube and under mechanical ventilation with PEEP ≥5 cm H2O and a cuff pressure set at 30 cm H2O, a single tracheal suctioning maneuver did not increase the risk of aspiration in the trachea under the cuff. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01170156 PMID:23134813

  3. Evaluation of changes in cartilage viability in detergent-treated tracheal grafts for immunosuppressant-free allotransplantation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Huang, Yiwei; Qiao, Yulei; Zhang, Yongxing; Liu, Yu

    2017-09-06

    The first tissue-engineered clinical tracheal transplant prepared using the detergent-enzymatic method resulted in graft stenosis, possibly from detergent-enzymatic method-induced graft non-viability. We reported on the transplantation of de-epithelialized tracheal allografts while maintaining cartilage viability in dogs. No lethal stenosis occurred in allografts. Herein, on the basis of previous experimentation, we assessed cartilage viability in detergent-treated cartilages. Six canine tracheal grafts were treated with detergent [1% t-octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-100)] before transplantation. The histoarchitecture was evaluated, and the viable chondrocytes ratio was calculated. Glycosaminoglycan was detected using safranin-O staining. Collagen II was tested using immunohistochemistry. The epithelium was completely removed in 5 grafts. Compared with fresh tracheas, the viable chondrocyte ratio was significantly reduced in the de-epithelialized grafts (100 vs 54.70 ± 8.56%; P  < 0.001). Image analysis revealed that the mean optical density of glycosaminoglycan (0.363 ± 0.027 vs 0.307 ± 0.012; P  = 0.007) and collagen II (0.115 ± 0.013 vs 0.092 ± 0.011; P  = 0.028) was decreased. The observation period ranged from 91 to 792 days. No stenosis occurred in 5 allografts; moderate stenosis developed in 1 allograft during the 4th week after surgery. The chondrocyte nuclei almost completely disappeared. Both glycosaminoglycan (0.307 ± 0.012 vs 0.164 ± 0.104; P  = 0.044) and collagen II (0.092 ± 0.011 vs 0.068 ± 0.022; P  = 0.022) were significantly degraded. This study demonstrated successful tracheal transplantation; about 50% of the viable chondrocytes were retained in the cartilage that could prevent development of a lethal stenosis in tracheal grafts.

  4. Tracheal intubation and sore throat: a mechanical explanation.

    PubMed

    Chandler, M

    2002-02-01

    Although tracheal intubation remains a valuable tool, it may result in pressure trauma and sore throat. The evidence for an association between these sequelae is not conclusive and sore throat may be caused at the time of intubation. This hypothesis was tested in a mechanical model and the results from tracheal intubation compared with those from insertion of a laryngeal mask airway, which is associated with a lower incidence of sore throat. Use of the model suggests that the tracheal tube and laryngeal mask airway impinge on the pharyngeal wall in different manners and involve different mechanisms for their conformation to the upper airway, but that in a static situation, the forces exerted on the pharyngeal wall are low with both devices. It also suggests that the incidence of sore throat should be lower for softer and smaller tracheal tubes and that the standard 'Magill' curve (radius of curvature 140 +/- 20 mm) is about optimum for the average airway.

  5. Tracheal Stenosis Because of Wegener Granulomatosis Misdiagnosed as Asthma.

    PubMed

    O'Hear, Kelley E; Ingrande, Jerry; Brodsky, Jay B; Morton, John M; Sung, Chih-Kwang

    2016-05-15

    We describe a patient with Wegener granulomatosis whose complaint of wheezing was incorrectly attributed to asthma. Anesthesiologists must recognize that tracheal stenosis is extremely common in Wegener granulomatosis and can mimic other causes of wheezing.

  6. Reresection for recurrent stenosis after primary tracheal repair

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, Maria Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Failure of the anastomosis after primary tracheal reconstruction for benign disease is uncommon. Here we review the available evidence on tracheal restenosis and the results of second reconstructions. Factors associated with failed primary anastomosis are examined. Temporizing immediate and alternative long-term management with T-tube or tracheostomy is described, emphasizing the role of tracheal stenting in abating the urgency for reoperation. From available evidence, elective reoperative treatment of failed tracheal reconstruction should be considered in selected patients after careful review and reversal of patient- and operation-specific factors that initiated failure. Referral to a high-volume center with a deep bench of nursing, anesthesiologic and surgical expertise is recommended for reoperation. PMID:26981266

  7. Re-epithelialization: a key element in tracheal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hengyi; Fu, Wei; Xu, Zhiwei

    2015-11-01

    Trachea-tissue engineering is a thriving new field in regenerative medicine that is reaching maturity and yielding numerous promising results. In view of the crucial role that the epithelium plays in the trachea, re-epithelialization of tracheal substitutes has gradually emerged as the focus of studies in tissue-engineered trachea. Recent progress in our understanding of stem cell biology, growth factor interactions and transplantation immunobiology offer the prospect of optimization of a tissue-engineered tracheal epithelium. In addition, advances in cell culture technology and successful applications of clinical transplantation are opening up new avenues for the construction of a tissue-engineered tracheal epithelium. Therefore, this review summarizes current advances, unresolved obstacles and future directions in the reconstruction of a tissue-engineered tracheal epithelium.

  8. Keratanase-sensitive cell surface glycans are synthesized by cultured tracheal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, L.S.; Varsano, S.; Borson, D.B.; Basbaum, C.B.; Nadel, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Canine tracheal epithelial cells grown in monolayer culture appear undifferentiated and are uniformly devoid of secretory granules. Cells at confluency were radiolabeled with (/sup 35/S)SO/sub 4/ and washed extensively with fresh unlabeled medium (2 h). Brief trypsin treatment of the cells caused release of /sup 35/S-labeled products which were harvested by immediate transfer at 4/sup 0/C into isolation buffer containing protease inhibitors and 0.4 mM saccharo-1,4-lactone and 2-acetamido-galactonolactone to minimize endogenous protease and glycosidase activities. Gel filtration on Sepharose C14B in associating conditions yielded two /sup 35/S fractions, one with apparent MWgreater than or equal to10/sup 6/ da and another at 3x10/sup 5/ da (Kavg=0.39). ..beta..-elimination in 0.05 M NaOH/1.0 M NaBH/sub 4/ yielded /sup 35/S products of greatly reduced MW (10,000 da) which were excluded from Bio-Gel P-10, characteristics of glycosaminoglycan chains. This sulfated fraction was resistant to chondroitinase ABC, heparinase and heparan sulfate lyase. However, it was completely degraded to oligosaccharides (2000 to greater than or equal to500 da) by endo-..beta..-galactosidase or keratanase. This suggests that sulfate is carried on glycosaminoglycan chains which have a polylactosamine repeating unit typical of keratans and which are attached to protein moiety through alkali-labile linkage. Immunofluorescence studies using a monoclonal antibody directed to a lactosamine sequence show intense localized staining of the tracheal epithelial surface.

  9. Measurement of tracheal mucous transport rate in the horse

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.; Hampe, D.W.

    1983-06-01

    Tracheal mucous transport rates were measured in 12 nonanesthetized horses after an intratracheal injection of 99mtechnetium-sulfur colloid. The transport rate of the subsequent bolus of radioactivity was determined, using a portable scaler rate meter fitted with a high-energy gamma-scintillation probe. A gamma-scintillation camera was used to verify bolus form and movement in 1 horse. The mean tracheal mucous transport rate was 1.66 +/- 0.24 cm/min.

  10. Tracheal cartilaginous sleeve with cricoid cartilage involvement in Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elloy, Marianne Dawn; Cochrane, Lesley Ann; Wyatt, Michelle

    2006-03-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome is one of a group of craniosynostosis syndromes in which rare tracheal anomalies have been described. This group of patients have a poor prognosis, and mortality can be related to airway complications and respiratory distress. We report a case of type II Pfeiffer syndrome with tracheal cartilaginous sleeve and cricoid cartilage involvement. We discuss our strategy for the management of the airway of this patient.

  11. Conservative management of intraoperative tracheal injury during cardiac operations.

    PubMed

    Kayatta, Michael O; Vasquez, Julio C; DeLaRosa, Jacob

    2014-04-01

    Iatrogenic intraoperative tracheal injuries are rare in cardiac operations. Management of this complication is not well described because of the low incidence and lack of reported cases. We present an 82-year-old woman who sustained a tracheal injury during aortic valve replacement. Soft tissue coverage of the trachea was obtained, the original cardiac operation was completed, and she was otherwise managed conservatively. She recovered without further complication and was discharged home 1 week after the surgical procedure.

  12. A Pilot Study of Pepsin in Tracheal and Oral Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Schallom, Marilyn; Tricomi, Sally M.; Chang, Yie-Hwa; Metheny, Norma A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Because reflux of gastric juice into the oropharynx must precede its aspiration into the lungs, it is reasonable to hypothesize that the detection of pepsin (the major gastric enzyme in gastric juice) in oral secretions may provide a relatively non-invasive method to predict risk for aspiration. Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the incidence of pepsin in oral and tracheal secretions collected concurrently from a sample of 50 mechanically ventilated, gastric-fed patients. Methods The study used an exploratory descriptive design with a convenience sample from four medical and surgical intensive care units. A single oral and tracheal secretion was collected concurrently from each patient (yielding a sample of 50 oral and 50 tracheal secretions). The tracheal secretions were obtained via the inline suction system with an attached sputum trap; oral secretions were obtained via a yankauer suction tip with an attached sputum trap. All specimens were assayed for pepsin by the Western Blot method. Results Oral secretions from ten patients (20%) were pepsin-positive while tracheal secretions from two patients (4%) were pepsin-positive. Both patients with pepsin-positive tracheal secretions also had pepsin-positive oral secretions. Pepsin was not found in the tracheal secretions from the remaining eight patients with pepsin-positive oral secretions. Conclusions Although reflux of gastric juice into the oropharynx must precede its aspiration into the lungs, individual reflux events do not necessarily lead to aspiration. Thus, it is reasonable that we found pepsin 5-times more often in oral secretions than in tracheal secretions. PMID:23996420

  13. Tracheal papillomatosis treated with Nd-Yag laser resection.

    PubMed

    Hunt, J M; Pierce, R J

    1988-10-01

    We report a case of tracheal papillomatosis in a 69-year-old woman who presented with stridor and functional evidence of large airway obstruction. She was successfully treated by endobronchial resection using a Neodymium Yag laser. This provided lasting symptomatic relief of dyspnea. Respiratory papillomatosis is a disease predominantly of the childhood larynx and its presentation with predominant tracheal involvement late in life is extremely uncommon. Laser therapy provides an extremely effective treatment modality for this condition.

  14. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isoenzymes in guinea-pig tracheal muscle and bronchorelaxation by alkylxanthines.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Kurita, M; Sakai, R; Sanae, F; Wakusawa, S; Takagi, K

    1994-09-15

    In this study the phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes in guinea-pig trachealis smooth muscle were separated by DEAE-Sepharose anion exchange chromatography, identified, and characterized. Furthermore the effect of theophylline and 1-n-butyl-3-n-propylxanthine (BPX) on the isolated PDE isoenzymes and on their tracheal relaxant effect were investigated and compared with the nonxanthine PDE inhibitors amrinone and Ro 20-1724. We identified five distinct isoenzymes in guinea-pig tracheal muscle; calcium/calmodulin-stimulated cyclic AMP PDE (PDE I), cyclic GMP-stimulated cyclic AMP PDE (PDE II), cyclic GMP-inhibited and amrinone-sensitive cyclic AMP PDE (PDE III), cyclic AMP-specific and Ro 20-1724-sensitive PDE (PDE IV), and cyclic GMP-specific PDE (PDE V). BPX strongly inhibited the PDE IV isoenzyme with high selectivity, while the inhibitory effect of theophylline was weak. The PDE IV inhibitors BPX and Ro 20-1724 synergistically increased the relaxant effect of the beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol in carbachol-contracted trachea much more strongly than theophylline. In contrast, amrinone, a PDE III inhibitor, hardly influenced the relaxant effect of salbutamol, suggesting that the PDE IV isoenzyme is functionally associated with beta 2-adrenoceptors in guinea-pig trachea and that inhibition of this enzyme potentiates the ability of salbutamol to increase the intracellular cyclic AMP content. These results indicate that the PDE IV isoenzyme plays a significant role in alkylxanthine-mediated relaxation of guinea-pig trachea.

  15. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors in the canine gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.P.; Gates, T.S.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Boehmer, C.G.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-11-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a putative neurotransmitter in both the brain and peripheral tissues. To define possible target tissues of VIP we have used quantitative receptor autoradiography to localize and quantify the distribution of /sup 125/I-VIP receptor binding sites in the canine gastrointestinal tract. While the distribution of VIP binding sites was different for each segment examined, specific VIP binding sites were localized to the mucosa, the muscularis mucosa, the smooth muscle of submucosal arterioles, lymph nodules, and the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle of the muscularis externa. These results identify putative target tissues of VIP action in the canine gastrointestinal tract. In correlation with physiological data, VIP sites appear to be involved in the regulation of a variety of gastrointestinal functions including epithelial ion transport, gastric secretion, hemodynamic regulation, immune response, esophageal, gastric and intestinal motility.

  16. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Foroughi-Parvar, Faeze; Hatam, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is the obligatory intracellular parasite of mammalian macrophages and causes zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL). The presence of infected dogs as the main reservoir host of ZVL is regarded as the most important potential risk for human infection. Thus the prevention of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is essential to stop the current increase of the Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis. Recently considerable advances in achieving protective immunization of dogs and several important attempts for achieving an effective vaccine against CVL lead to attracting the scientists trust in its important role for eradication of ZVL. This paper highlights the recent advances in vaccination against canine visceral leishmaniasis from 2007 until now. PMID:25628897

  17. Canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Martella, Vito; Elia, Gabrielle; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2008-07-01

    Vaccine-based prophylaxis has greatly helped to keep distemper disease under control. Notwithstanding, the incidence of canine distemper virus (CDV)-related disease in canine populations throughout the world seems to have increased in the past decades, and several episodes of CDV disease in vaccinated animals have been reported, with nation-wide proportions in some cases. Increasing surveillance should be pivotal to identify new CDV variants and to understand the dynamics of CDV epidemiology. In addition, it is important to evaluate whether the efficacy of the vaccine against these new strains may somehow be affected.

  18. Tracheal extubation in children: halothane versus isoflurane, anesthetized versus awake.

    PubMed

    Pounder, D R; Blackstock, D; Steward, D J

    1991-04-01

    The authors compared the incidence of respiratory complications and arterial hemoglobin desaturation during emergence from anesthesia in children whose tracheas were extubated while they were anesthetized or after they were awake and to whom halothane or isoflurane had been administered. One hundred children 1-4 yr of age undergoing minor urologic surgery were studied. After a standard induction technique, patients were randomized to receive either isoflurane or halothane. In 50 patients tracheal extubation was performed while they were breathing 2 MAC of either halothane or isoflurane in 100% oxygen. The remaining 50 patients received 2 MAC (volatile agent plus nitrous oxide) during the operation, but tracheal extubation was delayed until they were awake. A blinded observer recorded the incidence of respiratory complications and continuously measured hemoglobin saturation for 15 min after extubation. When tracheal extubation occurred in deeply anesthetized patients, no differences were found between the two volatile agents. When tracheal extubation of awake patients was performed, the use of isoflurane was associated with more episodes of coughing and airway obstruction than was halothane (P less than 0.05). Awake tracheal extubation following either agent was associated with significantly more episodes of hemoglobin desaturation than was tracheal extubation while anesthetized.

  19. [Biodegradation of tracheal carbon implant in animal experiment].

    PubMed

    Scierski, Wojciech; Namysłowski, Grzegorz; Nozyński, Jerzy; Turecka, Lucyna; Misiołek, Maciej; Czecior, Eugeniusz; Lisowska, Grazyna; Mrówka-Kata, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    The radical treatment of tracheal stenosis comprises segmental resection and its reconstruction. The most successful type of reconstruction is the "end to end" technique. In cases with large tracheal defects (over 6 cm) this kind of reconstruction is impossible. From many years the adequate biomaterial is searched for the tracheal reconstruction. Most of the implanted biomaterials undergo biodegradation process. The aim of the study was to analyze the biodegradation process in carbon fibers of prosthesis implanted in tracheal defects in animal experiment. We studied the prosthesis implanted in tracheal defects in sheep. The prosthesis were built with composite biomaterial composed of carbon fibers and polisulfone. The observation period was 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 24 and 38 weeks. In the morphometric evaluations the breadth, curve width, fullness factor and mean grey level of carbon fibers were assessed. The results showed that carbon fibers undergo progressively degradation in animal environment. The width gradually decreased. The mean grey level in the first three weeks decreased, but in the next period it increased. Conclusion. The carbon fibers of segmental tracheal prosthesis undergo gradually degradation process in biological environment expressed by decreasing of their dimensions connected with the lost of irregularities and changes of structure density.

  20. Relaxant effect of Thymus vulgaris on guinea-pig tracheal chains and its possible mechanism(s).

    PubMed

    Boskabady, M H; Aslani, M R; Kiani, S

    2006-01-01

    Thymus vulgaris for the treatment of respiratory diseases is indicated widely, and relaxant effects on smooth muscle have been shown previously. In the present study, the relaxant effects of macerated and aqueous extracts of Thymus vulgaris on tracheal chains of guinea-pigs were examined using cumulative concentrations of macerated and aqueous extracts in comparison with saline (as the negative control) and theophylline (as the positive control). The relaxant effects of four cumulative concentrations of macerated and aqueous extracts (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 g %) in comparison with saline (as the negative control) and four cumulative concentrations of theophylline (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 mm; as the positive control) were examined for their relaxant effects on precontracted tracheal chains of guinea-pig by 60 mm KCl and 10 microm methacholine in two different conditions: non-incubated tissues and incubated tissues with 1 microm propranolol and 1 microm chlorphenamine. There were significant correlations between the relaxant effects and the concentrations for both extracts and theophylline in all experimental groups (p < 0.01 to p < 0.001). These results demonstrated a potent relaxant effect of Thymus vulgaris on guinea-pig tracheal chains that was comparable to theophylline at the concentrations used.

  1. Family Presence During Pediatric Tracheal Intubations.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Ronald C; Nett, Sholeen T; Davis, Katherine Finn; Parker, Margaret M; Bysani, G Kris; Adu-Darko, Michelle; Bird, Geoffrey L; Cheifetz, Ira M; Derbyshire, Ashley T; Emeriaud, Guillaume; Giuliano, John S; Graciano, Ana Lia; Hagiwara, Yusuke; Hefley, Glenda; Ikeyama, Takanari; Jarvis, J Dean; Kamat, Pradip; Krishna, Ashwin S; Lee, Anthony; Lee, Jan Hau; Li, Simon; Meyer, Keith; Montgomery, Vicki L; Nagai, Yuki; Pinto, Matthew; Rehder, Kyle J; Saito, Osamu; Shenoi, Asha N; Taekema, Hester Christianne; Tarquinio, Keiko M; Thompson, Ann E; Turner, David A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Nishisaki, Akira

    2016-03-01

    Family-centered care, which supports family presence (FP) during procedures, is now a widely accepted standard at health care facilities that care for children. However, there is a paucity of data regarding the practice of FP during tracheal intubation (TI) in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Family presence during procedures in PICUs has been advocated. To describe the current practice of FP during TI and evaluate the association with procedural and clinician (including physician, respiratory therapist, and nurse practitioner) outcomes across multiple PICUs. Prospective cohort study in which all TIs from July 2010 to March 2014 in the multicenter TI database (National Emergency Airway Registry for Children [NEAR4KIDS]) were analyzed. Family presence was defined as a family member present during TI. This study included all TIs in patients younger than 18 years in 22 international PICUs. Family presence and no FP during TI in the PICU. The percentage of FP during TIs. First attempt success rate, adverse TI-associated events, multiple attempts (≥ 3), oxygen desaturation (oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry <80%), and self-reported team stress level. A total of 4969 TI encounters were reported. Among those, 81% (n = 4030) of TIs had documented FP status (with/without). The median age of participants with FP was 2 years and 1 year for those without FP. The average percentage of TIs with FP was 19% and varied widely across sites (0%-43%; P < .001). Tracheal intubations with FP (vs without FP) were associated with older patients (median, 2 years vs 1 year; P = .04), lower Paediatric Index of Mortality 2 score, and pediatric resident as the first airway clinician (23%, n = 179 vs 18%, n = 584; odds ratio [OR], 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.7). Tracheal intubations with FP and without FP were no different in the first attempt success rate (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.85-1.18), adverse TI-associated events (any events: OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.85-1.30 and severe events: OR

  2. Human turbinate mesenchymal stromal cell sheets with bellows graft for rapid tracheal epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Hun; Park, Ju Young; Nam, Inn-Chul; Hwang, Se-Hwan; Kim, Choung-Soo; Jung, Jin Woo; Jang, Jinah; Lee, Hyungseok; Choi, Yeongjin; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-10-01

    Rapid functional epithelial regeneration on the luminal surface is essential when using artificial tracheal grafts to repair tracheal defects. In this study, we imposed human turbinate mesenchymal stromal cell (hTMSC) sheets for tracheal epithelial regeneration, and then assessed their potential as a new clinical cell source. In vitro, hTMSCs sheets showed high capacity to differentiate into tracheal epithelium. We fabricated a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) tracheal graft by indirect three-dimensional (3D) printing technique and created a composite construct by transplanting the hTMSC sheets to its luminal surface of the tracheal graft, then applied this tissue-engineered tracheal graft to non-circumferential tracheal reconstruction in a rabbit model. 4 weeks after implantation, the luminal surface of tissue-engineered tracheal graft was covered by a mature and highly-ciliated epithelium, whereas tracheal grafts without hTMSC sheets were covered by only a thin, immature epithelium. Therefore, hTMSC sheets on the luminal surface of a tissue-engineered tracheal graft can accelerate the tracheal epithelial regeneration, and the tissue-engineered tracheal graft with hTMSC sheets provides a useful clinical alternative for tracheal epithelial regeneration.

  3. In vitro reactivity (“organ chamber”) of guinea pig tracheal rings—methodology considerations

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Agnes Afrodite Sumarelli; Carvalho, Marco Túlio Menezes; Evora, Patricia Martinez; de Nadai, Tales Rubens; Celotto, Andrea Carla

    2016-01-01

    The present text was motivated by the difficulties faced by our postgraduate students when using airways studies protocols and will take into consideration the three mechanisms of relaxation: (I) guanosine 3,5-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)/NO-dependent; (II) adenosine 3,5-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/PGI2-dependent, and (III) hyperpolarization-dependent. Tracheal rings are studied in an organ bath containing a gassed physiological salt solution, usually at a temperature of 37 °C. An agent or procedure that causes contraction [acetylcholine (Ach) or metacholine] of the smooth muscle is needed before study airway dilator drugs. The presented airways studies protocols are useful to study the bronchial epithelial-dependent reactivity. PMID:27386490

  4. Clinical canine dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Kristin M

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide small animal veterinarians in private practice a guideline for interpretation of the most common findings in canine intraoral radiology. Normal oral and dental anatomy is presented. A brief review of variations of normal, common periodontal and endodontic pathology findings and developmental anomalies is provided.

  5. Apoptosis in canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Moro, L; de Sousa Martins, A; de Moraes Alves, C; de Araújo Santos, F G; dos Santos Nunes, J E; Carneiro, R A; Carvalho, R; Vasconcelos, A C

    2003-01-01

    Canine distemper is a systemic viral disease characterized by immunosuppression followed by secondary infections. Apoptosis is observed in several immunosuppressive diseases and its occurrence on canine distemper in vivo has not been published. In this study, the occurrence of apoptosis was determined in lymphoid tissues of thirteen naturally infected dogs and nine experimentally inoculated puppies. Healthy dogs were used as negative controls. Samples of lymph nodes, thymus, spleen and brain were collected for histopathological purposes. Sections, 5 microm thick, of retropharingeal lymph nodes were stained by HE, Shorr, Methyl Green-Pyronin and TUNEL reaction. Shorr stained sections were further evaluated by morphometry. Canine distemper virus nucleoprotein was detected by immunohistochemistry. Retropharingeal lymph nodes of naturally and experimentally infected dogs had more apoptotic cells per field than controls. In addition, DNA from thymus of infected dogs were more fragmented than controls. Therefore, apoptosis is increased in lymphoid depletion induced by canine distemper virus and consequently play a role in the immunosuppression seen in this disease.

  6. A morphometric study of the tracheal system of Peripatus acacioi Marcus and Marcus (Onychophora).

    PubMed

    Bicudo, J E; Campiglia, S

    1985-04-01

    Volumes and surfaces of the tracheal system in Peripatus acacioi Marcus and Marcus (Onychophora) were evaluated using stereological techniques. The onychophorans were divided into three portions, arbitrarily denominated lead, body and tail segments. This procedure was used to provide information on the spatial distribution of tracheal tubes along the body. The mean weight specific tracheal volume for a 212 mg animal (average body weight) was 7.27 microliters g-1. Size appears to affect tracheal volume; the surface density of the tracheal system was greater in both lead and tail segments. There appears to be a positive correlation between tracheal surface density and tissue metabolic activity.

  7. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost–effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL. PMID:22566950

  8. The Canine Oral Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Klein, Erin A.; Thompson, Emily C.; Blanton, Jessica M.; Chen, Tsute; Milella, Lisa; Buckley, Catherine M. F.; Davis, Ian J.; Bennett, Marie-Lousie; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S rRNA-gene sequence comparison, shared between humans and dogs, two divergent mammalian species. Second, canine oral bacteria are of interest to veterinary and human medical communities for understanding their roles in health and infectious diseases. The bacteria involved are mostly unnamed and not linked by 16S rRNA-gene sequence identity to a taxonomic scheme. This manuscript describes the analysis of 5,958 16S rRNA-gene sequences from 65 clone libraries. Full length 16S rRNA reference sequences have been obtained for 353 canine bacterial taxa, which were placed in 14 bacterial phyla, 23 classes, 37 orders, 66 families, and 148 genera. Eighty percent of the taxa are currently unnamed. The bacterial taxa identified in dogs are markedly different from those of humans with only 16.4% of oral taxa are shared between dogs and humans based on a 98.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity cutoff. This indicates that there is a large divergence in the bacteria comprising the oral microbiomes of divergent mammalian species. The historic practice of identifying animal associated bacteria based on phenotypic similarities to human bacteria is generally invalid. This report describes the diversity of the canine oral microbiome and provides a provisional 16S rRNA based taxonomic scheme for naming and identifying unnamed canine bacterial taxa. PMID:22558330

  9. Tracheal regeneration: evidence of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell involvement.

    PubMed

    Seguin, Agathe; Baccari, Sonia; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Bruneval, Patrick; Carpentier, Alain; Taylor, Doris A; Martinod, Emmanuel

    2013-05-01

    Recent advances in airway transplantation have shown the ability of ex vivo or in vivo tracheal regeneration with bioengineered conduits or biological substitutes, respectively. Previously, we established a process of in vivo-guided tracheal regeneration using vascular allografts as a biological scaffold. We theorized that tracheal healing was the consequence of a mixed phenomenon associating tracheal contraction and regeneration. The aim of the present study was to determine the role that bone marrow stem cells play in that regenerative process. Three groups of 12 rabbits underwent a gender-mismatched aortic graft transplantation after tracheal resection. The first group received no cells (control group), the second group had previously received autologous green fluorescent protein-labeled mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, and the third group received 3 labeled mesenchymal stem cell injections on postoperative days 0, 10, and 21. The clinical results were impaired by stent complications (obstruction or migration), but no anastomotic leakage, dehiscence, or stenosis was observed. The rabbits were killed, and the trachea was excised for analysis at 1 to 18 months after tracheal replacement. In all 3 groups, microscopic examination showed an integrated aortic graft lined by metaplastic epithelium. By 12 months, immature cartilage was detected among disorganized elastic fibers. Positive SRY gene detection served as evidence for engraftment of cells derived from the male recipient. EF-green fluorescent protein detection showed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell involvement. The results of the present study imply a role for bone marrow stem cells in tracheal regeneration after aortic allografting. Studies are necessary to identify the local and systemic factors stimulating that regenerative process. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  10. The beta-adrenoceptor stimulant properties of OPC-2009 on guinea-pig isolated tracheal, right atrial and left atrial preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Yabuuchi, Y

    1977-01-01

    1. The beta-adrenoceptor stimulant properties of 5-(1-hydroxy-2-isopropylaminobutyl)-8-hydroxy-carbostyril hydrochloride hemihydrate (OPC-2009) were compared with those of isoprenaline and salbutamol on guinea-pig isolated tissues. 2. In producing tracheal relaxation, OPC-2009 was approximately 7 times more potent and salbutamol 5 times less potent than isoprenaline. Both compounds were less potent than isoprenaline in increasing either the rate of beating of isolated right atria or the contractile force of left atria, OPC-2009 being 4 and 127 times and salbutamol being 100 and 700 times less potent on the respective preparations. 3. Selectivity calculated from EC50 ratio indicates that OPC-2009 was approximately 26 times and salbutamol approximately 21 times more selective than isoprenaline for tracheal smooth muscle as compared to right atrial muscle, whereas OPC-2009 was approximately 850 times and salbutamol 140 times more selective than isoprenaline for tracheal smooth muscle as compared to left atria. 4. The responses to OPC-2009 on trachea and right atria were not altered by treatment of animals with reserpine 24 h previously. Propranolol was a competitive antagonist of OPC-2009 on these tissues. 5. OPC-2009 at high concentrations competitively antagonized the positive chronotropic and inotropic responses to isoprenaline, indicating that OPC-2009 like salbutamol, may be classified as a partial agonist. 6. The results indicate that the action of OPC-2009 is more selective for tracheal smooth muscle than cardiac muscle and are interpreted in the light of subdivisions of beta-adrenoceptors. PMID:23191

  11. Do canine parvoviruses affect canine neurons? An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Url, A; Schmidt, P

    2005-08-01

    In cats (most of which died from panleukopenia), cerebral neurons have recently been shown to be susceptible to canine parvovirus infection. In addition to positive immunostaining and distinct in situ hybridization signals, signs of neurodegeneration were identified by histopathology, mainly in the diencephalic area. Similar histological lesions of the diencephalic regions in dogs have also attracted attention; therefore, an immunohistochemical study was initiated to determine the possible infection of canine neurons with canine parvoviruses. The study was carried out on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded brain tissue, with and without signs of neurodegeneration, from 40 dogs, most of them dying from parvovirus enteritis. Immunohistochemistry, using polyclonal antiserum against canine parvoviruses, was negative in all 40 cases, suggesting that, unlike cats, canine parvoviruses do not seem capable of infecting canine neurons.

  12. Detection of canine pneumovirus in dogs with canine infectious respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Judy A; Cardwell, Jacqueline M; Renshaw, Randall W; Dubovi, Edward J; Brownlie, Joe

    2013-12-01

    Canine pneumovirus (CnPnV) was recently identified during a retrospective survey of kenneled dogs in the United States. In this study, archived samples from pet and kenneled dogs in the United Kingdom were screened for CnPnV to explore the relationship between exposure to CnPnV and the development of canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD). Within the pet dog population, CnPnV-seropositive dogs were detected throughout the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, with an overall estimated seroprevalence of 50% (n = 314/625 dogs). In the kennel population, there was a significant increase in seroprevalence, from 26% (n = 56/215 dogs) on the day of entry to 93.5% (n = 201/215 dogs) after 21 days (P <0001). Dogs that were seronegative on entry but seroconverted while in the kennel were 4 times more likely to develop severe respiratory disease than those that did not seroconvert (P < 0.001), and dogs with preexisting antibodies to CnPnV on the day of entry were significantly less likely to develop respiratory disease than immunologically naive dogs (P < 0.001). CnPnV was detected in the tracheal tissues of 29/205 kenneled dogs. Detection was most frequent in dogs with mild to moderate respiratory signs and histopathological changes and in dogs housed for 8 to 14 days, which coincided with a significant increase in the risk of developing respiratory disease compared to the risk of those housed 1 to 7 days (P < 0.001). These findings demonstrate that CnPnV is present in the United Kingdom dog population; there is a strong association between exposure to CnPnV and CIRD in the kennel studied and a potential benefit in vaccinating against CnPnV as part of a wider disease prevention strategy.

  13. Detection of Canine Pneumovirus in Dogs with Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cardwell, Jacqueline M.; Renshaw, Randall W.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Brownlie, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Canine pneumovirus (CnPnV) was recently identified during a retrospective survey of kenneled dogs in the United States. In this study, archived samples from pet and kenneled dogs in the United Kingdom were screened for CnPnV to explore the relationship between exposure to CnPnV and the development of canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD). Within the pet dog population, CnPnV-seropositive dogs were detected throughout the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, with an overall estimated seroprevalence of 50% (n = 314/625 dogs). In the kennel population, there was a significant increase in seroprevalence, from 26% (n = 56/215 dogs) on the day of entry to 93.5% (n = 201/215 dogs) after 21 days (P <0001). Dogs that were seronegative on entry but seroconverted while in the kennel were 4 times more likely to develop severe respiratory disease than those that did not seroconvert (P < 0.001), and dogs with preexisting antibodies to CnPnV on the day of entry were significantly less likely to develop respiratory disease than immunologically naive dogs (P < 0.001). CnPnV was detected in the tracheal tissues of 29/205 kenneled dogs. Detection was most frequent in dogs with mild to moderate respiratory signs and histopathological changes and in dogs housed for 8 to 14 days, which coincided with a significant increase in the risk of developing respiratory disease compared to the risk of those housed 1 to 7 days (P < 0.001). These findings demonstrate that CnPnV is present in the United Kingdom dog population; there is a strong association between exposure to CnPnV and CIRD in the kennel studied and a potential benefit in vaccinating against CnPnV as part of a wider disease prevention strategy. PMID:24088858

  14. A styletted tracheal tube with a posterior-facing bevel reduces epistaxis during nasal intubation: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Kazuna; Manabe, Yozo; Kohjitani, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Epistaxis is a common complication of nasal intubation. Ease of insertion of the tracheal tube may be influenced by bevel orientation and tip bending. We examined ease of insertion and epistaxis with two tubes with different orientations and with or without a stylet to modify tip bending. Two hundred patients scheduled to undergo oral or maxillofacial surgery were randomized into four groups according to method of nasal intubation used after induction of anesthesia. In one group, a Portex(®) tracheal tube was inserted with bevel facing left (Portex Group). In the second group, a Parker Flex-Tip(®) tube (Parker Group) was inserted with the bevel facing posteriorly, and in the last two groups, a stylet bent at 60° anteriorly was used with the Portex tube (Stylet-Portex Group) or Parker tube (Stylet-Parker Group). When the tube advanced without resistance, insertion was defined as "smooth", and when resistance was encountered, insertion was defined as "impinged". Severity of epistaxis was evaluated as none, mild, moderate, or severe. Smooth insertion was observed in 60% of patients in the Portex Group; 80% in the Parker Group; 100% in the Stylet-Portex Group; and 100% in the Stylet-Parker Group. Epistaxis was found in 50%, 24%, 20%, and 4% of patients, respectively. The styletted tip (difference: 30%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.3 to 38.5; P < 0.0001) was found to improve ease of insertion. Both the posterior-facing bevel (difference: 21%; 95% CI: 9.0 to 32.1; P = 0.0005) and stylet (difference: 25%; 95% CI: 13.1 to 35.9; P < 0.0001) contributed significantly to absence of epistaxis. Using a styletted tracheal tube with a posterior-facing bevel improves ease of insertion through the nasopharynx and decreases the severity of epistaxis during nasal intubation. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR), UMIN000011327.

  15. Tracheal compression in pupae of the beetle Zophobas morio

    PubMed Central

    Pendar, Hodjat; Kenny, Melissa C.; Socha, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Insects that are small or exhibit low metabolic rates are considered to not require active ventilation to augment diffusive gas exchange. Some pupae with low metabolic rates exhibit abdominal pumping, a behaviour that is known to drive tracheal ventilation in the adults of many species. However, previous work on pupae suggests that abdominal pumping may serve a non-respiratory role. To study the role of abdominal pumping in pupa of the beetle Zophobas morio, we visualized tracheal dynamics with X-rays while simultaneously measuring haemolymph pressure, abdominal movement, and CO2 emission. Pupae exhibited frequent tracheal compressions that were coincident with both abdominal pumping and pulsation of pressure in the haemolymph. However, more than 63% of abdominal pumping events occurred without any tracheal collapse and hence ventilation, suggesting that the major function of the abdominal pump is not respiratory. In addition, this study shows that the kinematics of abdominal pumping can be used to infer the status of the spiracles and internal behaviour of the tracheal system. PMID:26085499

  16. Residual paralysis at the time of tracheal extubation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Glenn S; Szokol, Joseph W; Marymont, Jesse H; Franklin, Mark; Avram, Michael J; Vender, Jeffery S

    2005-06-01

    Respiratory and pharyngeal muscle function are impaired during minimal neuromuscular blockade. Tracheal extubation in the presence of residual paresis may contribute to adverse respiratory events. In this investigation, we assessed the incidence and severity of residual neuromuscular block at the time of tracheal extubation. One-hundred-twenty patients presenting for gynecologic or general surgical procedures were enrolled. Neuromuscular blockade was maintained with rocuronium (visual train-of-four [TOF] count of 2) and all subjects were reversed with neostigmine at a TOF count of 2-4. TOF ratios were quantified using acceleromyography immediately before tracheal extubation, after clinicians had determined that complete neuromuscular recovery had occurred using standard clinical criteria (5-s head lift or hand grip, eye opening on command, acceptable negative inspiratory force or vital capacity breath values) and peripheral nerve stimulation (no evidence of fade with TOF or tetanic stimulation). TOF ratios were measured again on arrival to the postanesthesia care unit. Immediately before tracheal extubation, the mean TOF ratio was 0.67 +/- 0.2; among the 120 patients, 70 (58%) had a TOF ratio <0.7 and 105 (88%) had a TOF ratio <0.9. Significantly fewer patients had TOF ratios <0.7 (9 subjects, 8%) and <0.9 (38 subjects, 32%) in the postanesthesia care unit compared with the operating room (P < 0.001). Our results suggest that complete recovery from neuromuscular blockade is rarely present at the time of tracheal extubation.

  17. Tracheal compression in pupae of the beetle Zophobas morio.

    PubMed

    Pendar, Hodjat; Kenny, Melissa C; Socha, John J

    2015-06-01

    Insects that are small or exhibit low metabolic rates are considered to not require active ventilation to augment diffusive gas exchange. Some pupae with low metabolic rates exhibit abdominal pumping, a behaviour that is known to drive tracheal ventilation in the adults of many species. However, previous work on pupae suggests that abdominal pumping may serve a non-respiratory role. To study the role of abdominal pumping in pupa of the beetle Zophobas morio, we visualized tracheal dynamics with X-rays while simultaneously measuring haemolymph pressure, abdominal movement, and CO2 emission. Pupae exhibited frequent tracheal compressions that were coincident with both abdominal pumping and pulsation of pressure in the haemolymph. However, more than 63% of abdominal pumping events occurred without any tracheal collapse and hence ventilation, suggesting that the major function of the abdominal pump is not respiratory. In addition, this study shows that the kinematics of abdominal pumping can be used to infer the status of the spiracles and internal behaviour of the tracheal system. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthetic Tracheal Mucus with Native Rheological and Surface Tension Properties

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, R.; Fiegel, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the development of a model tracheal mucus with chemical composition and physical properties (bulk viscoelasticity and surface tension) matched to that of native tracheal mucus is described. The mucus mimetics were formulated using components that are abundant in tracheal mucus (glycoproteins, proteins, lipids, ions and water) at concentrations similar to those found natively. Pure solutions were unable to achieve the gel behavior observed with native mucus. The addition of a bi-functional crosslinking agent enabled control over the viscoelastic properties of the mucus mimetics by tailoring the concentration of the crosslinking agent and the duration of crosslinking. Three mucus mimetic formulations with different bulk viscoelastic properties, all within the normal range for non-diseased tracheal mucus, were chosen for investigation of surfactant spreading at the air-mimetic interface. Surfactant spread quickly and completely on the least viscoelastic mimetic surface, enabling the surface tension of the mimetic to be lowered to match native tracheal mucus. However, surfactant spreading on the more viscoelastic mimetics was hindered, suggesting that the bulk properties of the mimetics dictate the range of surface properties that can be achieved. PMID:23813841

  19. How to perform open tracheal suction via an endotracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Credland, Nicola

    2016-04-27

    Rationale and key points Tracheal suction involves the removal of pulmonary secretions from the respiratory tract using negative pressure under sterile conditions. Practitioners should be aware of the indications for, and risks associated with, open tracheal suction via an endotracheal tube. ▶ Respiratory assessment of the patient should be carried out to identify when tracheal suction is required. ▶ A suction pressure of 80-120mmHg is recommended, and suction should last no longer than 15 seconds. ▶ Reassurance and support should be given to the patient to minimise any discomfort and distress that might result from tracheal suction. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence-based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How you think this article will change your practice when performing open tracheal suction via an endotracheal tube. 2. How you could use this resource to educate your colleagues. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio .

  20. Fetal tracheal reconstruction with cartilaginous grafts engineered from mesenchymal amniocytes.

    PubMed

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Freedman, Deborah A; Fauza, Dario O

    2006-04-01

    This study was aimed at determining whether cartilaginous grafts engineered from mesenchymal cells normally present in the amniotic fluid could be used in fetal tracheal repair. Ovine mesenchymal amniocytes were expanded in culture, labeled with green fluorescent protein, and seeded onto biodegradable scaffold tubes maintained in chondrogenic medium. After chondrogenic differentiation of the constructs was confirmed, they were used to repair either partial or full circumferential tracheal defects in allogeneic fetal lambs (n = 7). Newborns were evaluated for signs of airway compromise. Implants were harvested over a 10-day period postnatally for multiple analyses. All 5 lambs that survived to term were able to breathe spontaneously at birth, 4 (80%) of them without stridor. However, variable degrees of stridor developed over time in all but one animal. Mild-to-moderate tracheal stenosis was present in all specimens. Histologically, grafts contained green fluorescent protein-positive cells, were lined with pseudostratified columnar epithelium, and remodeled into a predominantly fibrous cartilage pattern. Implants showed no significant changes in glycosaminoglycans, collagen, and elastin content at harvest. Engineered cartilaginous grafts derived from mesenchymal amniocytes may become a viable alternative for tracheal repair. The amniotic fluid can be a practical cell source for engineered tracheal reconstruction.

  1. Prediction of peak forces for a shortening smooth muscle tissue subjected to vibration.

    PubMed

    Pidaparti, Ramana M; Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Meiss, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the peak forces for a tracheal smooth muscle tissue subjected to an applied longitudinal vibration following isotonic shortening. A non-linear finite element analysis was carried out to simulate the vibratory response under experimental conditions that corresponds to forced length oscillations at 33 Hz for 1 second. The stiffness change and hysteresis estimated from the experimental data was used in the analysis. The finite element results of peak forces are compared to the experimental data obtained. The comparison of results indicate that the approach and the vibratory response obtained may be useful for describing the cross-bridge de-attachments within the cells as well as connective tissue connections characteristic of tracheal smooth muscle tissue.

  2. Canine parvovirus: current perspective.

    PubMed

    Nandi, S; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-06-01

    Canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2) has been considered to be an important pathogen of domestic and wild canids and has spread worldwide since its emergence in 1978. It has been reported from Asia, Australia, New Zealand, the Americas and Europe. Two distinct parvoviruses are now known to infect dogs-the pathogenic CPV-2 and CPV-1 or the minute virus of canine (MVC). CPV-2, the causative agent of acute hemorrhagic enteritis and myocarditis in dogs, is one of the most important pathogenic viruses with high morbidity (100%) and frequent mortality up to 10% in adult dogs and 91% in pups. The disease condition has been complicated further due to emergence of a number of variants namely CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c over the years and involvement of domestic and wild canines. There are a number of different serological and molecular tests available for prompt, specific and accurate diagnosis of the disease. Further, both live attenuated and inactivated vaccines are available to control the disease in animals. Besides, new generation vaccines namely recombinant vaccine, peptide vaccine and DNA vaccine are in different stages of development and offer hope for better management of the disease in canines. However, new generation vaccines have not been issued license to be used in the field condition. Again, the presence of maternal antibodies often interferes with the active immunization with live attenuated vaccine and there always exists a window of susceptibility in spite of following proper immunization regimen. Lastly, judicious use of the vaccines in pet dogs, stray dogs and wild canids keeping in mind the new variants of the CPV-2 along with the proper sanitation and disinfection practices must be implemented for the successful control the disease.

  3. [Surgical approaches in surgery for cicatrical tracheal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Parshin, V D; Rusakov, M A; Parshin, V V; Mirzoian, O S; Khoruzhenko, A I

    2015-01-01

    At present time several surgical approaches are being used for cicatrical tracheal stenosis including cervicotomy, longitudinal- circumferential sternotomy and thoracotomy. Besides location of stenosis an approach is being determined by constitutional and anatomical features of patient, surgeon's and anesthesiologist's experience, well-coordinated work of operating team. If pathological process is placed in cervico-laryngeal, cervical and upper thoracic segment cervicotomy is preferable. Partial longitudinal-circumferential sternotomy is believed to be adequate in case of lesion of thoracic trachea and its bifurcation. This approach provides all types of tracheal reconstructions. Technical difficulties appear if process is localized in membranous wall of suprabifurcational part, bifurcation and primary bronchus. In these cases we recommend thoracotomy through the bed of resected the 3rd or the 4th ribs and patient's position on his front. Interventions including pulmonary tissue resection and tracheal edges convergence are possible through thoracotomy.

  4. Primary tracheal papilloma disguised as asthma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Bin; Jiang, Jun-Hong; Guo, Ling-Chuan; Huang, Jian-An

    2016-12-01

    Tracheal papilloma presenting as asthma is a rare occurrence. We report a case of a 32-year-old male patient who presented with features of asthma. Flexible bronchoscopy demonstrated a large growth arising from the lower end of the trachea. Successful treatment using snare loop and argon plasma coagulation (APC) of the polyploidal growth was performed via flexible bronchoscope. The patient had immediate relief of airway obstruction and histopathological examination of the neoplasm demonstrated features of papilloma. Primary tracheal papilloma is mimicker of asthma, CT scan should be considered in patients with persistent chronic cough, or stridor. Endoscopic papillectomy is a safe and effective treatment and should be considered as first-line therapy for tracheal papilloma.

  5. [Tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma presenting as a thyroid tumor].

    PubMed

    Bahadir, Osman; Imamoğlu, Mehmet; Cobanoğlu, Umit; Korkmaz, Omer

    2006-01-01

    Primary tumors of the trachea are rare. Adenoid cystic carcinoma is the second most common tracheal malignancy and its symptoms are nonspecific. A 66-year-old woman presented with complaints of progressive dyspnea and cough of a two-week duration. She had received asthmatic treatment many times for the past four years. Physical examination revealed a large, firm, nontender, multilobular mass in the thyroid gland. Indirect laryngoscopic examination showed subglottic stenosis. On a plain cervical radiograph, there was narrowing of the tracheal lumen. Emergent tracheotomy was performed and a biopsy was taken from the mass. Histopathologic examination revealed adenoid cystic carcinoma, suggesting a thyroid mass with a tracheal origin. Despite medical treatment, the patient died in the fourth month.

  6. Two Fatal Complications after Parallel Tracheal-Esophageal Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, Christoph A.; Petersen, Bryan D.

    2002-03-15

    Two patients with malignant obstructions of both the trachea and esophagus underwent parallel stent placement with Gianturco-Roesch Z (GRZ) stents for palliation of symptoms. Fatal hemorrhage occurred in both patients 2 and 3 weeks after stent placement respectively. An autopsy performed on one of these patients demonstrated esophageal tissue necrosis and erosion with perforation of both the tracheal and esophageal walls at sites where the stent struts were in direct opposition, leading to bleeding from the esophageal venous plexus. GRZ stents have been successful in the treatment of both solitary tracheal and esophageal stenoses. However, parallel tracheal-esophageal stenting with GRZ stents places patients at high risk for complications due to the high radial force exerted by this particular stent and the minimal amount of intervening tissue between the two structures.

  7. American Canine Hepatozoonosis

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, S. A.; Panciera, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    American canine hepatozoonosis (ACH) is a tick-borne disease that is spreading in the southeastern and south-central United States. Characterized by marked leukocytosis and periosteal bone proliferation, ACH is very debilitating and often fatal. Dogs acquire infection by ingesting nymphal or adult Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) that, in a previous life stage, ingested the parasite in a blood meal taken from some vertebrate intermediate host. ACH is caused by the apicomplexan Hepatozoon americanum and has been differentiated from Old World canine hepatozoonosis caused by H. canis. Unlike H. canis, which is transmitted by the ubiquitous brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus), H. americanum is essentially an accidental parasite of dogs, for which Gulf Coast ticks are not favored hosts. The geographic portrait of the disease parallels the known distribution of the Gulf Coast tick, which has expanded in recent years. Thus, the endemic cycle of H. americanum involves A. maculatum as definitive host and some vertebrate intermediate host(s) yet to be identified. Although coyotes (Canis latrans) are known to be infected, it is not known how important this host is in maintaining the endemic cycle. This review covers the biology of the parasite and of the tick that transmits it and contrasts ACH with classical canine hepatozoonosis. Clinical aspects of the disease are discussed, including diagnosis and treatment, and puzzling epidemiologic issues are examined. Brief consideration is given to the potential for ACH to be used as a model for study of angiogenesis and of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. PMID:14557294

  8. [Canine histoplasmosis in Japan].

    PubMed

    Sano, Ayako; Miyaji, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a fungal infection caused by Histoplasma capsulatum and is distributed a worldwide. Although the disease has been treated as an imported mycosis, some autochthonous human, 1 equine and 4 canine cases suggested that the disease is endemic. Histoplasmosis is classified depending on the variety of causative agent. Histoplasmosis farciminosi known as pseudofarcy, is manifested only in Perissodactyla where it invades lymph nodes and lymph ducts, and is recognized by isolation from horses. Historically, Japan was one of the endemic areas of pseudofarcy before World War II, and more than 20,000 cases were recorded in horses used by the military. Interestingly, Japanese canine histoplasmosis uniformly showed skin ulcers and granulomatous lesions on the skin without pulmonary or gastrointestinal involvement, both of which were very similar to pseudofarcy. It was diagnosed as histoplasmosis by the detection of internal transcribed spacer legions of rRNA gene of H. capsulatum from paraffin embedded tissue samples. Furthermore, the fungal isolate from the human case with no history of going abroad or immigrating was identified as H. capsulatum var. farciminosum by a gene sequence. These facts indicated that pseudofarcy is not only an infectious disease in horses, but also a zoonotic fungal infection. Japanese autochthonous canine histoplasmosis might be a heteroecism of pseudofarcy because of its likeness to the human case, the similarity of clinical manifestations and the historical background at this stage.

  9. Retrospective review of tracheoplasty for congenital tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wijeweera, O; Ng, S B A

    2011-10-01

    Congenital tracheal stenosis is a rare but life-threatening obstructive airway disease. It usually presents in early infancy and requires surgical intervention. This study is a review of our experience in the management of congenital tracheal stenosis in children at KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore. All children who had undergone tracheoplasty for congenital tracheal stenosis between January 1999 and December 2008 were included. The patients' medical records were retrieved from our database, and the demographic data, comorbidities, clinical presentation and management, surgery performed, postoperative complications, final outcomes and follow-up were reviewed. A total of 11 children aged 12 days to six years underwent surgery for congenital long-segment tracheal stenosis, of which ten (90.9 percent) had associated cardiac and vascular anomalies and nine (81.8 percent) had left pulmonary artery sling predominance. Five (45.4 percent) children had associated bronchopulmonary abnormalities. All the patients underwent slide tracheoplasty with concomitant repair of congenital heart defects. Overall mortality was 45.4 percent (n is 5), including one late mortality due to an unrelated cause. With the exception of one, the follow-up of all patients was complete at this writing. One patient had mild residual tracheal stenosis and another had bilateral bronchomalacia. This is the largest case series of congenital long-segment tracheal stenosis reported in Southeast Asia to date. Slide tracheoplasty with concomitant repair of cardiac lesions is currently the preferred management for long-segment stenosis. Management of such patients remains a challenge for clinicians and the patients' families, and requires a multidisciplinary approach.

  10. Infection and Pathogenesis of Canine, Equine, and Human Influenza Viruses in Canine Tracheas

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Gaelle; Marshall, John F.; Morrell, Joanna; Robb, David; McCauley, John W.; Perez, Daniel R.; Parrish, Colin R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A viruses (IAVs) can jump species barriers and occasionally cause epidemics, epizootics, pandemics, and panzootics. Characterizing the infection dynamics at the target tissues of natural hosts is central to understanding the mechanisms that control host range, tropism, and virulence. Canine influenza virus (CIV; H3N8) originated after the transfer of an equine influenza virus (EIV) into dogs. Thus, comparing CIV and EIV isolates provides an opportunity to study the determinants of influenza virus emergence. Here we characterize the replication of canine, equine, and human IAVs in the trachea of the dog, a species to which humans are heavily exposed. We define a phenotype of infection for CIV, which is characterized by high levels of virus replication and extensive tissue damage. CIV was compared to evolutionarily distinct EIVs, and the early EIV isolates showed an impaired ability to infect dog tracheas, while EIVs that circulated near the time of CIV emergence exhibited a CIV-like infection phenotype. Inoculating dog tracheas with various human IAVs (hIAVs) showed that they infected the tracheal epithelium with various efficiencies depending on the virus tested. Finally, we show that reassortant viruses carrying gene segments of CIV and hIAV are viable and that addition of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) of CIV to the 2009 human pandemic virus results in a virus that replicates at high levels and causes significant lesions. This provides important insights into the role of evolution on viral emergence and on the role of HA and NA as determinants of pathogenicity. IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses (IAVs) have entered new host species in recent history, sometimes with devastating consequences. Canine influenza virus (CIV) H3N8 originated from a direct transfer of an equine influenza virus (EIV) in the early 2000s. We studied the infection patterns of IAVs that circulate in dogs or to which dogs are commonly exposed and showed that CIV

  11. Infection and pathogenesis of canine, equine, and human influenza viruses in canine tracheas.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Gaelle; Marshall, John F; Morrell, Joanna; Robb, David; McCauley, John W; Perez, Daniel R; Parrish, Colin R; Murcia, Pablo R

    2014-08-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) can jump species barriers and occasionally cause epidemics, epizootics, pandemics, and panzootics. Characterizing the infection dynamics at the target tissues of natural hosts is central to understanding the mechanisms that control host range, tropism, and virulence. Canine influenza virus (CIV; H3N8) originated after the transfer of an equine influenza virus (EIV) into dogs. Thus, comparing CIV and EIV isolates provides an opportunity to study the determinants of influenza virus emergence. Here we characterize the replication of canine, equine, and human IAVs in the trachea of the dog, a species to which humans are heavily exposed. We define a phenotype of infection for CIV, which is characterized by high levels of virus replication and extensive tissue damage. CIV was compared to evolutionarily distinct EIVs, and the early EIV isolates showed an impaired ability to infect dog tracheas, while EIVs that circulated near the time of CIV emergence exhibited a CIV-like infection phenotype. Inoculating dog tracheas with various human IAVs (hIAVs) showed that they infected the tracheal epithelium with various efficiencies depending on the virus tested. Finally, we show that reassortant viruses carrying gene segments of CIV and hIAV are viable and that addition of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) of CIV to the 2009 human pandemic virus results in a virus that replicates at high levels and causes significant lesions. This provides important insights into the role of evolution on viral emergence and on the role of HA and NA as determinants of pathogenicity. Influenza A viruses (IAVs) have entered new host species in recent history, sometimes with devastating consequences. Canine influenza virus (CIV) H3N8 originated from a direct transfer of an equine influenza virus (EIV) in the early 2000s. We studied the infection patterns of IAVs that circulate in dogs or to which dogs are commonly exposed and showed that CIV emergence was likely

  12. MED12 mutations occurring in benign and malignant mammalian smooth muscle tumors.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Dominique Nadine; Huhle, Sonja; Nimzyk, Rolf; Stenman, Göran; Löning, Thomas; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2013-03-01

    Mutations of the mediator subcomplex 12 gene (MED12) recently have been described in a large group of uterine leiomyomas (UL) but only in a single malignant uterine smooth muscle tumor. To further address the occurrence of fibroid-type MED12 mutations in smooth muscle tumors, we have analyzed samples from 34 leiomyosarcomas (LMS), 21 UL, two extrauterine leiomyomas (EL), and 10 canine genital leiomyomas for the presence of MED12 mutations of the UL-type. Interestingly, besides UL MED12 mutations were found in one uterine LMS, one EL, and two canine vaginal leiomyomas. The results confirm the occurrence of fibroid-type MED12 mutations in malignant uterine smooth muscle tumors thus suggesting a rare but existing leiomyoma-LMS sequence. In addition, for the first time MED12 mutations are reported in smooth muscle tumors in a non-primate mammalian species.

  13. Tracheal intubation in a child with trismus pseudocamptodactyly (Hecht) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seavello, J; Hammer, G B

    1999-05-01

    Tracheal intubation of a child with trismus pseudocamptodactyly (Hecht) syndrome is described. This disorder is characterized by progressive trismus and the need for repeated surgeries. Children intubated orally on a prior occasion may require an alternative approach subsequently due to progressive inability to open the mouth. An antegrade fiberoptic-guided nasotracheal technique initially was chosen due to extremely limited mouth opening. After this approach was unsuccessful, a retrograde guidewire-assisted fiberoptic intubation was performed. The manifestations of Hecht syndrome, as well as both techniques for tracheal intubation employed, are reviewed.

  14. Unstable endobronchial intubation in a cat undergoing tracheal laceration repair.

    PubMed

    Kästner, Sabine B R; Grundmann, Stefan; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula

    2004-07-01

    A peri-carinal tracheal laceration was produced in a 11-year-old cat during tracheal intubation. Before reconstructive surgery began, the leak was bypassed with an endobronchial tube positioned using endoscopy and direct vision. However, single-lung ventilation could not be sustained because the tube became dislodged and could not be repositioned. Consequently, surgery was completed with periods of intermittent apnoea interspersed with manually controlled hyperventilation. Cardiovascular variables were stable during anaesthesia and no signs of hypoxia were detected. The difficulties in maintaining endobronchial tube position resulted from the animal's small size relative to the dimensions of the endotracheal tube.

  15. [Tracheal rupture as a cause of unanticipated perioperative mortality].

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Cor J; Marsman, Marije; Knape, J T A Hans; van den Tweel, Jan G

    2013-01-01

    Here we report two cases in which healthy young patients died during surgery because ventilation was impossible by a clinical picture of massive subcutaneous emphysema. The probable diagnosis was tracheal rupture. This diagnosis was not confirmed during coroner's autopsy, but there had been no systematic search for a puncture in the trachea or the main bronchial tubes. Immediate recognition of this situation, and implementation of ventilation of one lung by pushing a narrower endobronchial tube beyond the tracheal rupture, is potentially life-saving.

  16. Lack of effect of leukotriene D4 on Ca-uptake in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Raeburn, D.; Rodger, I. W.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of verapamil on leukotriene D4 (LTD4)- and KCl-induced contractions and 45Ca-uptake were examined in guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle. Both LTD4 (0.1 to 200 nmol l-1) and KCl (8 to 125 mmol l-1) produced concentration-dependent increases in tension in the tracheal preparations. Verapamil (1 mumol l-1) inhibited the tension responses induced by both LTD4 and KCl. LTD4 failed to increase the lanthanum-resistant Ca content of tracheal smooth muscle at either low (EC25; 3 nmol l-1) or high (EC90; 50 nmol l-1) concentrations. Verapamil did not modify this result. KCl (90 mmol l-1) increased the lanthanum-resistant Ca content of the smooth muscle by approximately 60% over basal levels. This effect was completely inhibited by verapamil (1 mumol l-1). It is concluded that in this tissue, LTD4 utilizes principally an intracellular source of Ca2+ to initiate contraction whereas KCl is dependent upon the uptake of Ca2+ from the extracellular compartment. It is suggested that the inhibitory effects of verapamil may reflect an intracellular mechanism of action directed against Ca2+ release initiated by LTD4. PMID:6487905

  17. MgSO4 relaxes porcine airway smooth muscle by reducing Ca2+ entry.

    PubMed

    Kumasaka, D; Lindeman, K S; Clancy, J; Lande, B; Croxton, T L; Hirshman, C A

    1996-03-01

    Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is used clinically, but its mechanism of action is unknown. To determine whether MgSO4 relaxes airway smooth muscle and to investigate the pathways involved, we compared effects of MgSO4 in porcine tracheal and bronchial muscles contracted with either carbachol or KCl and measured the effects of MgSO4 on the concentration of intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i). Lungs were dissected after anesthesia and exsanguination. Tracheal strips and bronchial rings were suspended in tissue baths for measurement of isometric tension in the presence of different concentrations of MgSO4. In separate experiments, tracheal smooth muscle tension and [Ca2+]i were measured simultaneously, using the fluorescent dye fura 2. MgSO4 (1.2, 2.2, 9.2 mM) produced a concentration dependent rightward shift of contraction dose-response curves to KCl but not to carbachol. MgSO4 relaxed trachealis muscles precontracted with KCl or carbachol and simultaneously decreased [Ca2+]i. These findings indicate that MgSO4 directly relaxes airway smooth muscle and that the mechanism involves a decrease in [Ca2+]i. Because initiation and maintenance of contraction during KCl stimulation and maintenance of contraction during carbachol stimulation require Ca2+ entry through voltage-dependent calcium channels, MgSO4-induced relaxation may involve a decrease in Ca2+ entry via these channels.

  18. Immunohistochemical characteristics of normal canine eyes.

    PubMed

    Labelle, P; Reilly, C M; Naydan, D K; Labelle, A L

    2012-09-01

    Immunohistochemistry is widely utilized in diagnostic laboratories to study neoplastic and nonneoplastic diseases. Knowledge of the immunohistochemical characteristics of normal tissue is essential for interpretation of immunoreactivity in pathologic conditions. In this study, immunohistochemistry was performed with a broad panel of diagnostically relevant antibodies on 4 normal canine globes--namely, vimentin, pan-cytokeratin (AE1/AE3), cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 8/18, cytokeratin 20, α-smooth muscle actin, muscle specific actin, desmin, Melan-A, microphthalmia transcription factor, S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein, triple neurofilaments, neuron-specific enolase, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, laminin and CD31. Results include cytokeratin immunoreactivity limited to the conjunctival epithelium, corneal epithelium, and retinal pigment epithelium; distinct patterns of immunopositivity of muscle markers; and widespread immunoreactivity for vimentin and most neural/neuroendocrine markers. These findings in normal eyes provide the basis for interpretation of ocular immunohistochemistry in dogs. Published immunophenotypes of primary ocular neoplasms are also reviewed.

  19. Smoothed square well potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, P.; Vertse, T.

    2017-07-01

    The classical square well potential is smoothed with a finite range smoothing function in order to get a new simple strictly finite range form for the phenomenological nuclear potential. The smoothed square well form becomes exactly zero smoothly at a finite distance, in contrast to the Woods-Saxon form. If the smoothing range is four times the diffuseness of the Woods-Saxon shape both the central and the spin-orbit terms of the Woods-Saxon shape are reproduced reasonably well. The bound single-particle energies in a Woods-Saxon potential can be well reproduced with those in the smoothed square well potential. The same is true for the complex energies of the narrow resonances.

  20. Restoration of missing or misplaced canines.

    PubMed

    Bower, C F; Reinhardt, R A

    1985-06-01

    Restorative treatments for canines were discussed to correct three clinical abnormalities: (1) fully erupted permanent canine in the lateral incisor position, (2) missing permanent canines, and (3) partially exposed canines in normal arch position. The primary concerns are the development of esthetics, anterior guidance, and adequate support for fixed restorations.

  1. A National Emergency Airway Registry for children: landscape of tracheal intubation in 15 PICUs.

    PubMed

    Nishisaki, Akira; Turner, David A; Brown, Calvin A; Walls, Ron M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2013-03-01

    To characterize the landscape of process of care and safety outcomes for tracheal intubation across pediatric intensive care units Procedural process of care and safety outcomes of tracheal intubation across pediatric intensive care units has not been described. We hypothesize that the novel National Emergency Airway Registry for Children registry is a feasible tool to capture tracheal intubation process of care and outcomes. Prospective, descriptive. Fifteen academic PICUs in North America. Critically ill children requiring tracheal intubation in PICUs. Tracheal intubation quality improvement data were prospectively collected for all initial tracheal intubation in 15 PICUs from July 2010 to December 2011 using the National Emergency Airway Registry for Children tool with explicit site-specific compliance plans and operational definitions including adverse tracheal intubation associated events. One thousand seven hundred fifteen tracheal intubation encounters were reported (averaging 1/3.4 days, or 1/86 bed days). Ninety-eight percent of primary tracheal intubation were successful; 86% were successful with less than or equal to two attempts. First attempt was by pediatric residents in 23%, pediatric critical care fellows in 41%, and critical care attending physicians in 13%: first attempt success rate was 62%, first provider success rate was 79%. The first method was oral intubation in 1,659 (98%) and nasal in 55 (2%). Direct laryngoscopy was used in 96%. Ninety percent of tracheal intubation were with cuffed tracheal tubes. Adverse tracheal intubation associated events were reported in 20% of intubations (n = 372), with severe tracheal intubation associated events in 6% (n = 115). Esophageal intubation with immediate recognition was the most common tracheal intubation associated events (n = 167, 9%). History of difficult airway, diagnostic category, unstable hemodynamics, and resident provider as first airway provider were associated with occurrence of tracheal

  2. The indirect measurement of laryngeal and tracheal resistance.

    PubMed

    Schumann, K; Beck, C; Mann, W

    1979-06-01

    We used a body-plethysmograph to determine air-way resistances in 485 cases of laryngeal and tracheal stenoses. We decided in 143 cases to intervene after observing resistance exceeding 60 mm H2O/l and sec. A vocal chord was lateral fixated in 49 patients suffering bilateral recurrent paralysis. Optimal results were obtained at a postoperative resistance level of 30 mm H2O/l and sec (standard value: 14.77+/-6.53--n = 387). The patients could carry out work of medium intensity and had a steady voice. We performed tracheal interventions in 94 cases of tracheal stenoses. A mean, post-operative resistance of 29.9 mm H2O/l and sec, with a tracheal diameter of 7--8 mm was attained. In practice, only a few patients found the remaining obstruction a hindrance during work of maximal intensity. No recurrences were observed after treatment. Airway resistances exceeding 150 mm H2O/l and sec were found in 13 new admissions and 73 times in those undergoing therapy. In these cases asphyxiation threatens. These patients have to be tracheotomized or intubated immediately.

  3. Gas Exchange Models for a Flexible Insect Tracheal System.

    PubMed

    Simelane, S M; Abelman, S; Duncan, F D

    2016-06-01

    In this paper two models for movement of respiratory gases in the insect trachea are presented. One model considers the tracheal system as a single flexible compartment while the other model considers the trachea as a single flexible compartment with gas exchange. This work represents an extension of Ben-Tal's work on compartmental gas exchange in human lungs and is applied to the insect tracheal system. The purpose of the work is to study nonlinear phenomena seen in the insect respiratory system. It is assumed that the flow inside the trachea is laminar, and that the air inside the chamber behaves as an ideal gas. Further, with the isothermal assumption, the expressions for the tracheal partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, rate of volume change, and the rates of change of oxygen concentration and carbon dioxide concentration are derived. The effects of some flow parameters such as diffusion capacities, reaction rates and air concentrations on net flow are studied. Numerical simulations of the tracheal flow characteristics are performed. The models developed provide a mathematical framework to further investigate gas exchange in insects.

  4. Fluoroscopically Guided Balloon Dilation for Postintubation Tracheal Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Woong Hee; Kim, Jin Hyoung Park, Jung-Hun

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Little was known about the safety and long-term efficacy of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for postintubation tracheal stenosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and long-term efficacy of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation in patients with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Methods: From February 2000 to November 2010, 14 patients underwent fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for postintubation tracheal stenosis. Technical success, clinical success, and complications were evaluated. Patients were followed up for recurrent symptoms. Results: In all patients, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation was technically and clinically successful with no major complications. Following the initial procedure, six patients (43 %) remained asymptomatic during a follow-up period. Obstructive symptoms recurred in eight patients (57 %) within 6 months (mean, 1.7 months), who were treated with repeat balloon dilation (n = 4) and other therapies. Of the four patients who underwent repeat balloon dilation, three became asymptomatic. One patient became asymptomatic after a third balloon dilation. On long-term (mean, 74 months) follow-up, 71 % of patients experienced relief of symptoms following fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation. Conclusions: Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation may be safe, is easy to perform, and resulted in effective treatment in patients with postintubation tracheal stenosis.

  5. Tracheal and endobronchial involvement in disseminated histoplasmosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Youness, Houssein; Michel, Ross G; Pitha, Jan V; Jones, Kellie R; Kinasewitz, Gary T

    2009-12-01

    Histoplasmosis is an endemic fungal infection that can involve any organ when disseminated. Although oral, pharyngeal, laryngeal, and endobronchial involvement have been described, direct tracheal involvement has not been reported. We describe the first case of disseminated histoplasmosis with direct involvement of the trachea. The endobronchial manifestations of histoplasmosis are reviewed.

  6. Review of 23 cases of postintubation tracheal obstructions in birds.

    PubMed

    Sykes, John M; Neiffer, Donald; Terrell, Scott; Powell, David M; Newton, Alisa

    2013-09-01

    Although recognized as a potential complication after endotracheal intubation in birds, the complication rate of postintubation tracheal obstruction in this taxon is unknown. Twenty-three cases of postintubation obstruction in birds from two institutions are reported. Clinical signs were noted an average of 16.6 days postintubation and consisted primarily of indications of acute respiratory distress. Diagnosis was confirmed via tracheoscopy or radiology. Five birds died before treatment could be initiated. Medical treatment alone was successful in three birds that had mild changes consisting primarily of a luminal mucoid plug that could be manually removed without tracheal surgery but was unsuccessful in an additional six birds. Tracheal resection and anastamosis was successful in four birds and unsuccessful in five birds. Overall mortality was 70%. Postintubation tracheal obstruction in birds appears to be more common in zoo practice than is suggested by the literature, as a total of 1.8% (1.2-2.7%, 95% confidence interval) of intubations or 3.5% (2.3-5.3%, 95% confidence interval) of individual animals intubated in these institutions resulted in this complication. Multiple cases were found in Ciconiiformes (n = 4), Columbiformes (n = 4), Gruiformes (n = 4), Anseriformes (n = 3), Galliformes (n = 3), and Passeriformes (n = 2). No cases were found in Coraciiforms, Falconiforms, or Psittaciformes despite many (>40) recorded intubations. The specific cause of these lesions is unclear, but some type of tracheal mucosa trauma or irritation is suggested by histologic findings. Prevention may include selective intubation, use of a laryngeal mask airway in place of intubation, careful placement of an endotracheal tube, minimal movement of the head and neck after placement, humidification of anesthetic gases, and gentle positive-pressure ventilation.

  7. Smoothing error pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Clarmann, T.

    2014-04-01

    The difference due to the content of a priori information between a constrained retrieval and the true atmospheric state is usually represented by the so-called smoothing error. In this paper it is shown that the concept of the smoothing error is questionable because it is not compliant with Gaussian error propagation. The reason for this is that the smoothing error does not represent the expected deviation of the retrieval from the true state but the expected deviation of the retrieval from the atmospheric state sampled on an arbitrary grid, which is itself a smoothed representation of the true state. The idea of a sufficiently fine sampling of this reference atmospheric state is untenable because atmospheric variability occurs on all scales, implying that there is no limit beyond which the sampling is fine enough. Even the idealization of infinitesimally fine sampling of the reference state does not help because the smoothing error is applied to quantities which are only defined in a statistical sense, which implies that a finite volume of sufficient spatial extent is needed to meaningfully talk about temperature or concentration. Smoothing differences, however, which play a role when measurements are compared, are still a useful quantity if the involved a priori covariance matrix has been evaluated on the comparison grid rather than resulting from interpolation. This is, because the undefined component of the smoothing error, which is the effect of smoothing implied by the finite grid on which the measurements are compared, cancels out when the difference is calculated.

  8. Stopping smooth pursuit.

    PubMed

    Missal, Marcus; Heinen, Stephen J

    2017-04-19

    If a visual object of interest suddenly starts to move, we will try to follow it with a smooth movement of the eyes. This smooth pursuit response aims to reduce image motion on the retina that could blur visual perception. In recent years, our knowledge of the neural control of smooth pursuit initiation has sharply increased. However, stopping smooth pursuit eye movements is less well understood and will be discussed in this paper. The most straightforward way to study smooth pursuit stopping is by interrupting image motion on the retina. This causes eye velocity to decay exponentially towards zero. However, smooth pursuit stopping is not a passive response, as shown by behavioural and electrophysiological evidence. Moreover, smooth pursuit stopping is particularly influenced by active prediction of the upcoming end of the target. Here, we suggest that a particular class of inhibitory neurons of the brainstem, the omnipause neurons, could play a central role in pursuit stopping. Furthermore, the role of supplementary eye fields of the frontal cortex in smooth pursuit stopping is also discussed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Movement suppression: brain mechanisms for stopping and stillness'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Quantum State Smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Ivonne; Wiseman, Howard

    2015-10-01

    Smoothing is an estimation method whereby a classical state (probability distribution for classical variables) at a given time is conditioned on all-time (both earlier and later) observations. Here we define a smoothed quantum state for a partially monitored open quantum system, conditioned on an all-time monitoring-derived record. We calculate the smoothed distribution for a hypothetical unobserved record which, when added to the real record, would complete the monitoring, yielding a pure-state "quantum trajectory." Averaging the pure state over this smoothed distribution yields the (mixed) smoothed quantum state. We study how the choice of actual unraveling affects the purity increase over that of the conventional (filtered) state conditioned only on the past record.

  10. Quantum State Smoothing.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Ivonne; Wiseman, Howard

    2015-10-30

    Smoothing is an estimation method whereby a classical state (probability distribution for classical variables) at a given time is conditioned on all-time (both earlier and later) observations. Here we define a smoothed quantum state for a partially monitored open quantum system, conditioned on an all-time monitoring-derived record. We calculate the smoothed distribution for a hypothetical unobserved record which, when added to the real record, would complete the monitoring, yielding a pure-state "quantum trajectory." Averaging the pure state over this smoothed distribution yields the (mixed) smoothed quantum state. We study how the choice of actual unraveling affects the purity increase over that of the conventional (filtered) state conditioned only on the past record.

  11. Diamond Smoothing Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Diamond smoothing tools have been proposed for use in conjunction with diamond cutting tools that are used in many finish-machining operations. Diamond machining (including finishing) is often used, for example, in fabrication of precise metal mirrors. A diamond smoothing tool according to the proposal would have a smooth spherical surface. For a given finish machining operation, the smoothing tool would be mounted next to the cutting tool. The smoothing tool would slide on the machined surface left behind by the cutting tool, plastically deforming the surface material and thereby reducing the roughness of the surface, closing microcracks and otherwise generally reducing or eliminating microscopic surface and subsurface defects, and increasing the microhardness of the surface layer. It has been estimated that if smoothing tools of this type were used in conjunction with cutting tools on sufficiently precise lathes, it would be possible to reduce the roughness of machined surfaces to as little as 3 nm. A tool according to the proposal would consist of a smoothing insert in a metal holder. The smoothing insert would be made from a diamond/metal functionally graded composite rod preform, which, in turn, would be made by sintering together a bulk single-crystal or polycrystalline diamond, a diamond powder, and a metallic alloy at high pressure. To form the spherical smoothing tip, the diamond end of the preform would be subjected to flat grinding, conical grinding, spherical grinding using diamond wheels, and finally spherical polishing and/or buffing using diamond powders. If the diamond were a single crystal, then it would be crystallographically oriented, relative to the machining motion, to minimize its wear and maximize its hardness. Spherically polished diamonds could also be useful for purposes other than smoothing in finish machining: They would likely also be suitable for use as heat-resistant, wear-resistant, unlubricated sliding-fit bearing inserts.

  12. Canine spinal cord glioma.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Barber, Renee; Burnum, Annabelle; Miller, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord glioma is uncommonly reported in dogs. We describe the clinicopathologic and diagnostic features of 7 cases of canine spinal cord glioma and briefly review the veterinary literature on this topic. The median age at presentation was 7.2 y. Six females and 1 male were affected and 4 dogs were brachycephalic. The clinical course lasted from 3 d to 12 wk, and clinical signs were progressive and associated with multiple suspected neuroanatomic locations in the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging of 6 cases revealed T2-weighted hyperintense lesions with variable contrast enhancement in the spinal cord. All dogs had a presumptive clinical diagnosis of intraparenchymal neoplasia or myelitis based on history, advanced imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Euthanasia was elected in all cases because of poor outcome despite anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive treatment or because of poor prognosis at the time of diagnosis. Tumor location during autopsy ranged from C1 to L6, with no clear predilection for a specific spinal cord segment. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the immunohistochemistry expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2, 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, and Ki-67. Diagnoses consisted of 4 cases of oligodendroglioma, 2 cases of gliomatosis cerebri, and 1 astrocytoma. This case series further defines the clinicopathologic features of canine spinal glioma and highlights the need for comprehensive immunohistochemistry in addition to routine histopathology to confirm the diagnosis of these tumors.

  13. Canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Sorenmo, Karin

    2003-05-01

    The National Consensus Group recommends that all women with tumors larger than 1 cm be offered chemotherapy regardless of tumor histology of lymph node status. This recommendation is to ensure that everyone at risk for failing, even though the risk may be low in women with relatively small tumors and favorable histology, has a choice and receives the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. This type of treatment recommendation may also be made in dogs based on recognized, well-accepted prognostic factors such as tumor size, stage, type, and histologic differentiation. Based on the limited clinical information available in veterinary medicine, the drugs that are effective in human breast cancer, such as cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin, may also have a role in the treatment of malignant mammary gland tumors in dogs. Randomized prospective studies are needed, however, to evaluate the efficacy of chemotherapy in dogs with high-risk mammary gland tumors and to determine which drugs and protocols are the most efficacious. Until such studies are performed, the treatment of canine mammary gland tumors will be based on the individual oncologist's understanding of tumor biology, experience, interpretation of the available studies, and a little bit of gut-feeling. Table 2 is a proposal for treatment guidelines for malignant canine mammary gland tumors according to established prognostic factors, results from published veterinary studies, and current recommendations for breast cancer treatment in women.

  14. Genipin cross-linked decellularized tracheal tubular matrix for tracheal tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; Jiang, Yuan; Xu, Yanfei; Shi, Hongcan; Zhang, Siquan; Liu, Xingchen; Pan, Shu; Ye, Gang; Zhang, Weidong; Zhang, Fangbiao; Zhong, Chonghao

    2016-01-01

    Decellularization techniques have been widely used as an alternative strategy for organ reconstruction. This study investigated the mechanical, pro-angiogenic and in vivo biocompatibility properties of decellularized airway matrices cross-linked with genipin. New Zealand rabbit tracheae were decellularized and cross-linked with genipin, a naturally derived agent. The results demonstrated that, a significant (p < 0.05) increase in the secant modulus was computed for the cross-linked tracheae, compared to the decellularized samples. Angiogenic assays demonstrated that decellularized tracheal scaffolds and cross-linked tracheae treated with 1% genipin induce strong in vivo angiogenic responses (CAM analysis). Seven, 15 and 30 days after implantation, decreased (p < 0.01) inflammatory reactions were observed in the xenograft models for the genipin cross-linked tracheae matrices compared with control tracheae, and no increase in the IgM or IgG content was observed in rats. In conclusion, treatment with genipin improves the mechanical properties of decellularized airway matrices without altering the pro-angiogenic properties or eliciting an in vivo inflammatory response. PMID:27080716

  15. Comparison of /sup 45/Ca binding and mobilization in cartilage and smooth muscle of guinea pig trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, F.R.; Weiss, G.B.; Sturm, B.

    1986-03-01

    In guinea pig trachea, separation of smooth muscle from cartilage permits measurement of /sup 45/Ca fluxes in more homogeneous preparations. The role of cartilage Ca/sup + +/ as a source for smooth muscle Ca/sup + +/ mobilization can be assessed by similar experiments with the two dissociated preparations. Equilibration of /sup 45/Ca into cartilage occurred over 2 hr; plotting of /sup 45/Ca uptake on Scatchard coordinates yields high and low affinity Ca/sup + +/ uptake components similar to those in tracheal and other smooth muscles. Washout of /sup 45/Ca from cartilage demonstrated two components with the more rapid including the extracellular (/sup 14/C-sucrose) compartment. Washout of higher affinity /sup 45/Ca (after incubation in 0.03 mM Ca/sup + +/) was increased in cartilage by Sr/sup + +/, added Ca/sup + +/, La/sup + + +/ and EGTA. Comparison with tracheal smooth muscle /sup 45/Ca washouts indicates that those Ca/sup + +/ components previously identified as of intracellular origin were not present in cartilage. Exposure to 60 mM (added) K/sup +/ during /sup 45/Ca washout increased /sup 45/Ca efflux in cartilage but not in smooth muscle. This release of /sup 45/Ca by K/sup +/ may indicate that Ca/sup + +/ can be mobilized from cartilage sites by K/sup +/ to support smooth muscle contractile responses. Thus, cartilage Ca/sup + +/ could be an important source of Ca/sup + +/ for excitation-contraction coupling in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle.

  16. Discrete square root smoothing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminski, P. G.; Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The basic techniques applied in the square root least squares and square root filtering solutions are applied to the smoothing problem. Both conventional and square root solutions are obtained by computing the filtered solutions, then modifying the results to include the effect of all measurements. A comparison of computation requirements indicates that the square root information smoother (SRIS) is more efficient than conventional solutions in a large class of fixed interval smoothing problems.

  17. Sonographic detection of tracheal or esophageal intubation: A cadaver study

    PubMed Central

    Tejesh, CA; Manjunath, AC; Shivakumar, S; Vinayak, PS; Yatish, B; Geetha, CR

    2016-01-01

    Background: The correct position of the endotracheal tube is confirmed by various modalities, most of which are not entirely reliable. Ultrasound is now increasingly available to anesthesiologists in the operating theater and is an attractive alternative. To investigate the usefulness of sonography in identifying the correct tracheal tube position in human cadavers. Materials and Methods: Endotracheal tubes placed randomly into trachea or esophagus was identified with a linear ultrasound probe placed transversely just above the suprasternal notch by a single anesthesiologist. Results: Of the 100 intubations performed at random, 99 were correctly identified to give a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 97.9%. Conclusion: Sonography is a useful technique to identify correct position of the tracheal tube. PMID:27375387

  18. Iatrogenic tracheal laceration in the setting of chronic steroids.

    PubMed

    Singh, Punit; Wojnar, Margaret; Malhotra, Anita

    2017-02-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who presented with a 10-cm tracheal laceration from a presumed traumatic intubation in the setting of respiratory distress and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation and subsequently developed significant subcutaneous emphysema along her neck and mediastinum in addition to her peritoneum and mesentery. We were successfully able to treat this patient conservatively up until the time that tracheostomy was warranted. We discuss and review tracheobronchial injuries with respect to etiology, risk factors, and management and hope to benefit health care providers managing airways in patients at risk for tracheal injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Massive hemoptysis caused by tracheal hemangioma treated with interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Zambudio, Antonio Ríos; Calvo, Maria Jose Roca; Lanzas, Juan Torres; Medina, J García; Paricio, Pascual Parrilla

    2003-04-01

    Capillary hemangiomas of the tracheobronchial tree are extremely rare in adults, with hemoptysis being one of the most serious forms of presentation. An operation has been the treatment of choice, although it does involve high rates of morbidity and mortality, especially in emergency situations such as massive hemoptysis, which has led to the search for other therapeutic alternatives. There is no experience with embolization by interventional radiology when the hemoptysis is tracheal in origin, caused partly because the infrequency of this pathology; however, the foundations for it have been laid with the development of embolization for bronchopulmonary pathology. We report a case of a tracheal capillary hemangioma in a 66-year-old woman diagnosed with idiopathic thrombopenic purpura, which began as a massive hemoptysis and was treated successfully with embolization by interventional radiology. There has been no recurrence of the bleeding after 1 year's follow-up, and the patient's control fibrobronchoscopy is normal.

  20. [Tracheal rupture in a patient with head and thoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, E; Egea, A; González, J M; Hinojosa, A; Fernández-Valderrama, A; Gil, E; Benítez, A

    1995-01-01

    A 49-year-old patient presented with cranioencephalic injuries including subdural hematoma and severe mass effect, facial and thoracic injuries with bilateral rib fractures but no parenchymatous lesions or extrapulmonary air. After surgical evacuation of the subdural hematoma, the patient entered the intensive care unit. Twenty-four hours later the patient pulled out the tubes, which were reinserted after signs of respiratory failure appeared. A series of clinical and radiological signs then followed, namely subcutaneous cervicothoracic emphysema, mediastinitis accompanied by hyperinsufflated balloon tamponade (pressures < 28 cmH2O). Tracheal rupture was suspected, but fibrebronchoscopy through the trachea revealed no damage. Surgical exploration 72 hours after admission confirmed high tracheal rupture near the pars membranacea. The damage was sutured, but sepsis with severe respiratory distress and mediastinitis led to death.

  1. Cost-effectiveness and safety of reusable tracheal suction tubes.

    PubMed

    Nanta, Penjan; Senarat, Wilawan; Tribuddharat, Chanwit; Danchaivijitr, Somwang

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate whether the repetitive use of disposable tracheal suction tubes is cost-effective and safe over the single use. The cost intrinsic to the washing, cleaning, re-sterilization by ethylene oxide gas, and processing was determined and compared to the cost generated by disposable tubes. The reused disposable suction tubes were also determined for their properties in physical characters and probable contamination and damages. The evaluation showed that cost from single-use disposable suction tubes (8.66 baht) was cheaper than expenses generated from processing steps for recycling of disposable tubes (9.92 baht). The use of a disposable tube only once should minimize the risks posed by the use of the potentially unsafe reused disposable tubes both to the patients and health care workers. Recycling of tracheal suction tubes was neither cost-effective nor safe.

  2. Thyroid cancer with tracheal invasion: a pathological estimation.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Vincenzo; La Rosa, Stefano; Imperatori, Andrea; Rotolo, Nicola; Tanda, Maria Laura; Sessa, Andrea; Dominioni, Lorenzo; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2016-10-01

    We review the clinical and pathologic features of seven cases of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid that invaded the trachea and were treated by thyroidectomy, airway resection with reconstructive surgery over an interval of 15 years. We depicted the peculiarity of invasion of well differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cells is perpendicularly oriented to the tracheal lumen, in between cartilaginous rings, along blood vessels and collagen fibers. Tracheal rings appear non-infiltrated in all histological sections of well differentiated PTC infiltrating the trachea. Similar description of inter-cartilage PTC infiltration into the trachea was first provided by Shin et al. in 1993. Interestingly, our pathological revision support the estimation by Shin et al., though that cartilage rings infiltration did occur in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers with exiguous prognosis.

  3. Thyroid cancer with tracheal invasion: a pathological estimation

    PubMed Central

    Pappalardo, Vincenzo; La Rosa, Stefano; Imperatori, Andrea; Rotolo, Nicola; Tanda, Maria Laura; Sessa, Andrea; Dominioni, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    We review the clinical and pathologic features of seven cases of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid that invaded the trachea and were treated by thyroidectomy, airway resection with reconstructive surgery over an interval of 15 years. We depicted the peculiarity of invasion of well differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cells is perpendicularly oriented to the tracheal lumen, in between cartilaginous rings, along blood vessels and collagen fibers. Tracheal rings appear non-infiltrated in all histological sections of well differentiated PTC infiltrating the trachea. Similar description of inter-cartilage PTC infiltration into the trachea was first provided by Shin et al. in 1993. Interestingly, our pathological revision support the estimation by Shin et al., though that cartilage rings infiltration did occur in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers with exiguous prognosis. PMID:27867870

  4. Canine influenza viruses with modified NS1 proteins for the development of live-attenuated vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nogales, Aitor; Huang, Kai; Chauché, Caroline; DeDiego, Marta L; Murcia, Pablo R; Parrish, Colin R; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Canine Influenza Virus (CIV) H3N8 is the causative agent of canine influenza, a common and contagious respiratory disease of dogs. Currently, only inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) are available for the prevention of CIV H3N8. However, live-attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) are known to provide better immunogenicity and protection efficacy than IIVs. Influenza NS1 is a virulence factor that offers an attractive target for the preparation of attenuated viruses as LAIVs. Here we generated recombinant H3N8 CIVs containing truncated or a deleted NS1 protein to test their potential as LAIVs. All recombinant viruses were attenuated in mice and showed reduced replication in cultured canine tracheal explants, but were able to confer complete protection against challenge with wild-type CIV H3N8 after a single intranasal immunization. Immunogenicity and protection efficacy was better than that observed with an IIV. This is the first description of a LAIV for the prevention of H3N8 CIV in dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-04-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with (3H) glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques.

  6. Improvement of tracheal compression after pectus excavatum repair.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Go; Ignacio, Romeo C; Wood, Robert E; Inge, Thomas H

    2013-09-01

    A 4-year-old girl with pectus excavatum (PE), multiple prior respiratory infections, tracheomalacia and tracheal compression due to the innominate artery was referred for surgical evaluation. Aortopexy was deemed unlikely to improve airway diameter due to her chest concavity. Thoracoscopy-assisted PE repair was performed, resulting in marked improvement in the anteroposterior diameter of the trachea and resolution of her respiratory symptoms. Durability of the PE correction at 2 and 7 years following bar removal was demonstrated radiographically.

  7. Functional optical imaging of tracheal health (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Daniel A.; Sharick, Joe T.; Gamm, Ute A.; Choma, Michael A.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-04-01

    The health of the tracheal mucosa is an important, but poorly understood, aspect of critical care medicine. Many critical care patients are mechanically ventilated through an endotracheal tube that can cause local inflammation and blunt damage to the ciliated epithelial cells lining the trachea. These cilia clear mucus and infectious agents from the respiratory tract, so impaired ciliary function may lead to increased susceptibility to respiratory infection. Therefore, a minimally-invasive method to monitor mucosal health and ciliary function in intubated patients would be valuable to critical care medicine. Optical metabolic imaging (OMI) can quantitatively assess the metabolic state of cells by measuring the fluorescence intensities of endogenous metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H and FAD. OMI is especially attractive for assessing tracheal health because OMI is label-free, and ciliary function is tightly linked to the levels of NAD(P)H and FAD. In this study, we apply widefield OMI to ex vivo mouse tracheae (n=6), and demonstrate that the optical redox ratio (fluorescence intensity of NAD(P)H divided by the intensity of FAD) is sensitive to changes in the cellular metabolism of the tracheal mucosa. We observed a 46% increase in the redox ratio 20 minutes after treatment with 10mM of sodium cyanide (p<0.001, 95% CI [40%, 52%]), an inhibitor of oxidative cellular respiration. In addition to being a proof-of-concept demonstration, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important cause of morbidity and mortality in CF patients and in the ICU, produces hydrogen cyanide. Our results support the development of minimally-invasive fiber-optic probes for in vivo monitoring of tracheal health.

  8. Small tidal volume ventilation using a zero deadspace tracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, C S; Raw, R; Lipman, J; Moyes, D G; Cleaton-Jones, P E

    1999-02-01

    The zero deadspace tracheal tube (ZEDS-TT) is a double-lumen endobronchial tube with a truncated bronchial limb. Functionally it is unrelated to the familiar endobronchial tube used in lung isolation surgery. It is placed in the same position as a regular tracheal tube and, by means of special connectors, one limb is used for inspiration and the other for expiration, thereby greatly reducing anatomical and apparatus deadspace. In this study, we have compared respiratory and ventilatory effects of reduction of tidal volume (VT) via a single-lumen tracheal tube and the ZEDS-TT during controlled ventilation with a Siemens Elema 900C Servo ventilator. Eleven consenting adult patients (ASA I and II) undergoing elective peripheral surgery were studied. Starting at a VT value of 10 ml kg-1, data were recorded for each tube type. VT was reduced by 2.5 ml kg-1 every 10 min and stabilized data recorded. Minute volume was kept constant by increasing ventilatory frequency at each reduction in VT. We found that the ZEDS-TT produced a significant reduction in PaCO2 and airway pressure for any VT used, while maintaining oxygenation.

  9. [Vascular tracheal compression presenting as bronchiolitis in infants].

    PubMed

    Flurin, V; Deschildre, A; Fourier, C; Martinot, A; Hue, V; Ramon, P; Petyt, L; Vaksmann, G; Leclerc, F

    1995-06-01

    Anomalies of the aortic arch and pulmonary arteries may produce compression of the trachea with chronic stridor or wheezing aggravated by crying, feeding and flexion of the neck. Three infants, 3, 5 and 2 months-old, respectively, were admitted suffering from acute bronchiolitis. The first patient had intermittent wheezing for one month; lateral chest X-rays showed an opaque area inserted between the trachea and oesophagus and computed tomography showed pulmonary artery sling with tracheal stenosis which was successfully operated. The second patient displayed pulmonary atelectasia which required bronchoscopy; this technique showed tracheal stenosis which was due to pulmonary artery sling. The third patient had a history of congenital stridor: he required endotracheal intubation; a bronchoscopy performed because persistent pulmonary atelectasia showed tracheal stenosis which was secondary to a double aortic arch. The condition was improved after surgical correction. A history of stridor and/or wheezing in patients admitted for bronchiolitis must lead to consider the possibility of vascular compression of the trachea and to perform specific investigations.

  10. Evaluation of nocturnal bronchoconstriction by all night tracheal sound monitoring.

    PubMed Central

    Lenclud, C.; Cuttitta, G.; Van Gansbeke, D.; Visconti, A.; Van Muylem, A.; Bellia, V.; Yernault, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A study was undertaken to evaluate the reliability of a digital tracheal sound analyser (ELENS-DSA) in predicting nocturnal changes in airways resistance in asthmatic patients. This device allows continuous measurement of the proportion of the time occupied by wheezing (Wh%). METHODS: Nocturnal polygraphic studies with simultaneous continuous monitoring of tracheal sounds and airways resistance were performed in seven patients with nocturnal asthma. In order to evaluate the possible bias in wheezing estimation, each tracheal sound recording was passed through the automatic analyser and simultaneously monitored with earphones by an experienced observer. RESULTS: The device detected audible wheezing with an optimal sensitivity and specificity of 70%. Snoring was a minor cause of the relatively poor characteristics of the system. A close correlation (p < 0.001) between Wh% and airways resistance was observed only in those patients with the highest increase in resistance; when the results of all the subjects were pooled the correlation observed was poor. The predictive value of Wh% in detecting changes in airways resistance during 10 minute intervals was lower than 70%. The positive and negative predictive values of Wh% were raised to 79% and 83%, respectively, for 30 minute intervals. CONCLUSIONS: The ELENS-DSA system is a relatively crude means of detecting wheezing and assessing bronchoconstriction quantitatively. However, it is able to detect accurately nocturnal bronchoconstriction for 30 minute intervals. This finding, along with the fact that the monitoring is non-invasive, suggests that it may be a promising tool, especially for patients during sleep. PMID:8882075

  11. Smoothing error pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Clarmann, T.

    2014-09-01

    The difference due to the content of a priori information between a constrained retrieval and the true atmospheric state is usually represented by a diagnostic quantity called smoothing error. In this paper it is shown that, regardless of the usefulness of the smoothing error as a diagnostic tool in its own right, the concept of the smoothing error as a component of the retrieval error budget is questionable because it is not compliant with Gaussian error propagation. The reason for this is that the smoothing error does not represent the expected deviation of the retrieval from the true state but the expected deviation of the retrieval from the atmospheric state sampled on an arbitrary grid, which is itself a smoothed representation of the true state; in other words, to characterize the full loss of information with respect to the true atmosphere, the effect of the representation of the atmospheric state on a finite grid also needs to be considered. The idea of a sufficiently fine sampling of this reference atmospheric state is problematic because atmospheric variability occurs on all scales, implying that there is no limit beyond which the sampling is fine enough. Even the idealization of infinitesimally fine sampling of the reference state does not help, because the smoothing error is applied to quantities which are only defined in a statistical sense, which implies that a finite volume of sufficient spatial extent is needed to meaningfully discuss temperature or concentration. Smoothing differences, however, which play a role when measurements are compared, are still a useful quantity if the covariance matrix involved has been evaluated on the comparison grid rather than resulting from interpolation and if the averaging kernel matrices have been evaluated on a grid fine enough to capture all atmospheric variations that the instruments are sensitive to. This is, under the assumptions stated, because the undefined component of the smoothing error, which is the

  12. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  13. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  14. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  15. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION.... Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  16. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION.... Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  17. A Case of Symptomatic Tracheal Diverticulum and Surgical Resection as a Treatment Modality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shin-Young; Joo, Seok; Lee, Geun Dong; Ham, Seok Jin; Park, Chul Hwan; Lee, Sungsoo

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal diverticulum is often diagnosed incidentally and, due to its rarity, there is no standard treatment. It is a benign entity, but has the potential to cause specific symptoms, such as chronic upper respiratory infection and chronic cough. Symptomatic tracheal diverticulum can be medically treated, but likelihood of recurrence is high. We report a case of surgical resection of symptomatic tracheal diverticulum to prevent recurrence. PMID:27734005

  18. Effects of sodium metabisulphite on guinea pig contractile airway smooth muscle responses in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J.; Sakamoto, T.; Chung, K. F.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Sodium metabisulphite (MBS) is known to induce bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients. The effects of MBS on guinea pig airway smooth muscle and on neurally mediated contraction in vitro have been examined. METHODS--Tracheal and bronchial airway segments were placed in oxygenated buffer solution and electrical field stimulation was performed in the presence of indomethacin (10(-5) M) and propranolol (10(-6) M) for the measurement of isometric tension. Atropine (10(-6) M) was added to bronchial tissues. RESULTS--Concentrations of MBS up to 10(-3) M had no direct effect on airway smooth muscle contraction and did not alter either tracheal smooth muscle contraction induced by electrical field stimulation at all frequencies or acetylcholine-induced tracheal smooth muscle contraction. There was a similar response in the absence of epithelium, except for potentiation of the response induced by electrical field stimulation at 0.5 Hz (24 (10)% increase). However, MBS (10(-5), 10(-6) and 10(-7) M) augmented neurally-mediated non-adrenergic non-cholinergic contractile responses in the bronchi (13.3 (3.2)%, 23.8 (9.6)%, and 6.4 (1.6)%, respectively). MBS had no effect on the contractile response induced by substance P, but at higher concentrations (10(-3) M and 10(-4) M) it caused a time-dependent attenuation of responses induced by either electrical field stimulation or exogenously applied acetylcholine or substance P. CONCLUSIONS--MBS had no direct contractile responses but enhanced bronchoconstriction induced by activation of non-cholinergic neural pathways in the bronchus, probably through increased release of neuropeptides. At high concentrations MBS inhibited contractile responses initiated by receptor or neural stimulation. Images PMID:7570440

  19. Adenosine induces a cholinergic tracheal reflex contraction in guinea pigs in vivo via an adenosine A1 receptor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Sandra M; Docherty, Reginald; Robbins, Jon; Spina, Domenico; Page, Clive P

    2008-07-01

    Adenosine induces dyspnea, cough, and airways obstruction in asthma, a phenomenon that also occurs in various sensitized animal models in which a neuronal involvement has been implicated. Although adenosine has been suggested to activate cholinergic nerves, the precise mechanism has not been established. In the present study, the adenosine A(1) receptor agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) induced a cholinergic reflex, causing tracheal smooth muscle contraction that was significantly inhibited by the adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 100 microg/kg) (P < 0.05) in anesthetized animals. Furthermore, the adenosine A(2) agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl) phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS-21680) induced a small reflex, whereas the A(3) selective agonist N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-5'-N-methylcarbamoyladenosine (IB-MECA) was without effect. The tracheal reflex induced by CPA was also inhibited by recurrent nerve ligation or muscarinic receptor blockade (P < 0.001), indicating that a cholinergic neuronal mechanism of action accounted for this response. The cholinergic reflex in response to aerosolized CPA was significantly greater in passively sensitized compared with naive guinea pigs (P < 0.01). Chronic capsaicin treatment, which inhibited sensory nerve function, failed to inhibit CPA-induced reflex tracheal contractions in passively sensitized guinea pigs, although the local anesthetic lidocaine inhibited CPA-induced tracheal contractions. The effects of CPA on the reflex response was not dependent on the release of histamine from tissue mast cells or endogenous prostaglandins as shown by the lack of effect of the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist pyrilamine (1 mg/kg) or the cyclooxygenase inhibitor meclofenamic acid (3 mg/kg), respectively. In conclusion, activation of pulmonary adenosine A(1) receptors can stimulate cholinergic reflexes, and these reflexes are increased in allergic guinea pigs.

  20. Promotion of tracheal cartilage growth by intra-tracheal injection of basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF).

    PubMed

    Komura, Makoto; Komura, Hiroko; Konishi, Kenichirou; Ishimaru, Tetsuya; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Iwanaka, Tadashi

    2014-02-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) is a very effective growth factor that induces the proliferation of chondrocytes. This study aimed to investigate whether intra-tracheally-injected b-FGF solution promotes the growth of tracheal cartilage. Group 1: 500 μl of distilled water was injected at the posterior wall of the cervical trachea of New Zealand white rabbits by using a tracheoscope (n=5). Group 2: 100 μg/500 μl of b-FGF solution was injected at the posterior wall of the cervical trachea (n=5). Group 3: Biodegradable gelatin hydrogel microspheres incorporating 100 μg/500 μl of b-FGF solution were injected at the posterior wall of the cervical trachea (n=5). All animals were sacrificed 4 weeks later, and the outer diameter and luminal area of the cervical trachea at the site of b-FGF injection were measured. The cervical tracheas in the two b-FGF injection groups were spindle-shaped and had a maximum diameter at the injection site. The median outer diameter of the cervical trachea in Groups 1, 2, and 3 was 7.3, 8.0, and 8.0mm, respectively, showing a significant difference among Groups 1, 2, and 3 (P=0.04). The median luminal area in Groups 1, 2, and 3 was 27.4, 29.4, and 32.1mm(2), respectively. The ad hoc test showed a marginally significant difference only between groups 1 and 3 (p=0.056). Intra-tracheal injection of slowly released b-FGF enlarged the tracheal lumen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Teaching tracheal intubation: Airtraq is superior to Macintosh laryngoscope

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tracheal intubation with Macintosh laryngoscope is taught to medical students as it is a lifesaving procedure. However, it is a difficult technique to learn and the consequences of intubation failure are potentially serious. The Airtraq optical laryngoscope is a relatively novel intubation device, which allows visualization of the glottic plane without alignment of the oral, pharyngeal, and tracheal axes, possessing advantages over Macintosh for novice personnel. We introduced a teaching mode featured with a progressive evaluation scheme for preparation and performance of tracheal intubation with medical students in this prospective randomized crossover trial who had no prior airway management experience to find the superior one. Methods Twenty-six medical students of the 8-year programme in the 6th year participated in this trial, when they did their one-week rotation in the department of anaesthesiology. Each of the students intubated 6 patients, who were scheduled for surgeries under general anaesthesia, each laryngoscope for 3 patients respectively. One hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients scheduled for surgical procedures requiring tracheal intubation were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated to undergo tracheal intubation using Macintosh (n = 75) or Airtraq (n =74) laryngoscope. The progressive evaluation scheme was applied to each intubation attempt. Results Intubation success rate was significantly higher in Airtraq group than Macintosh group (87.8% vs. 66.7%, P < 0.05). Duration of glottis exposure was significantly shorter in Airtraq group compared to Macintosh group (50 ± 19 s vs. 81 ± 27 s, P < 0.001). A grade I Cormack and Lehane glottic view was obtained in 94.6% of patients in the Airtraq group versus 32% of patients in the Macintosh group (P <0.001). Duration of intubation in Airtraq group was significantly shorter (68 ± 21 s vs. 96 ± 22 s, P < 0.05) compared to Macintosh group

  2. Multiple tracheal resections and anastomoses in a blue and gold macaw (Ara ararauna).

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Gwen; Nevarez, Javier G; Beaufrere, Hugues; Baumgartner, Wes; Reed, Scott; Tully, Thomas N; Hedlund, Cheryl; Hennig, Geoff; Huck, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    A 1.5-year-old, male blue and gold macaw (Ara ararauna) was anesthetized for a health examination and blood collection. The following day it was returned for episodes of coughing. The bird was presented again 13 days after the initial presentation with severe dyspnea. A tracheal stenosis was diagnosed by endoscopy and treated by surgical resection of 5 tracheal rings and tracheal anastomosis. The bird was discharged but returned 2 days later with a recurrent stenosis. Bougienage and balloon dilation of the stenotic area were performed separately; each resulted in less than 48 hours' improvement in clinical signs after treatment. A second tracheal resection and anastomosis was performed, during which an additional 10 tracheal rings were removed. This second anastomosis was significantly more difficult to complete given the marked variation in diameter of the proximal and distal tracheal segments. The macaw recovered without complication and has had no recurrence of respiratory abnormalities 2 years after the second surgery. This report describes the longest total tracheal segment to be resected, followed by tracheal anastomosis, in a psittacine bird. The positive outcome in this case suggests that, when surgical therapy is elected, an aggressive approach is necessary to prevent recurrence of tracheal stenosis. In addition, macaws can recover well even after significant lengths of the trachea are resected.

  3. Rabbit model of tracheal stenosis induced by prolonged endotracheal intubation using a segmented tube.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Shin; Kim, Sung Won; Oak, Chulho; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Kang, Hyun Wook; Chun, Bong Kwon; Lee, Kang Dae

    2015-12-01

    Animal model of tracheal stenosis based on pathophysiology of prolonged endotracheal intubation has been rarely reported. We sought to verify the feasibility of inducing an animal model of tracheal stenosis by segmented endotracheal tube insertion in the New Zealand white rabbit model. Tracheal stenosis was induced by inserting a segmented endotracheal tube of 1.5cm length which was wrapped with a commercialized absorbable hemostat in 15 New Zealand white rabbits, while sham surgery controls (n=3) underwent tracheotomy and direct closure of tracheal exposure. The tube was removed transorally, 1 week after tube insertion. All rabbits were evaluated endoscopically at 1 week, 2 weeks and 3 weeks after the tube insertion. The rabbits were sacrificed 3 weeks after the surgery, and the excised tissue of trachea was processed along with the procedure of standard hematoxylin eosin staining and observed under a microscope. Tracheal stenosis was induced in all rabbits (range 32-84% stenosis) with no death of rabbits during the study. The histological features of tracheal stenosis demonstrated thickening and fibrosis of lamina propria and submucosa with relatively intact cartilage framework. We developed a rabbit model of tracheal stenosis induced by endotracheal intubation using a segmented tracheal tube. Since the model is based on the physiologic condition of prolonged endotracheal intubation, it may be used in variable studies related to tracheal stenosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy-assisted endotracheal intubation in a patient with a large tracheal tumor.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lei; Feng, Yan-Hua; Ma, Hai-Chun; Dong, Su

    2015-04-01

    In the event of a high degree of airway obstruction, endotracheal intubation can be impossible and even dangerous, because it can cause complete airway obstruction, especially in patients with high tracheal lesions. However, a smaller endotracheal tube under the guidance of a bronchoscope can be insinuated past obstructive tumor in most noncircumferential cases. Here we report a case of successful fiberoptic bronchoscopy-assisted endotracheal intubation in a patient undergoing surgical resection of a large, high tracheal tumor causing severe tracheal stenosis. A 42-year-old Chinese man presented with dyspnea, intermittent irritable cough, and sleep deprivation for one and a half years. X-rays and computed tomography scan of the chest revealed an irregular pedunculated soft tissue mass within the tracheal lumen. The mass occupied over 90% of the lumen and caused severe tracheal stenosis. Endotracheal intubation was done to perform tracheal tumor resection under general anesthesia. After several failed conventional endotracheal intubation attempts, fiberoptic bronchoscopy-assisted intubation was successful. The patient received mechanical ventilation and then underwent tumor resection and a permanent tracheostomy. This case provides evidence of the usefulness of the fiberoptic bronchoscopy-assisted intubation technique in management of an anticipated difficult airway and suggests that tracheal intubation can be performed directly in patients with a tracheal tumor who can sleep in the supine position, even if they have occasional sleep deprivation and severe tracheal obstruction as revealed by imaging techniques.

  5. [Missing cuff from the oro-tracheal tube during percutaneous dilatation tracheotomy].

    PubMed

    Damm, Anders Aarup Munk; Bundgaard, Helle

    2015-06-29

    During a percutaneous dilatation tracheotomy (PDT) performed at the intensive care unit of a regional hospital, subsequent to completion of the PDT a small segment of the cuff from the oro-tracheal tube was found missing, once the oro-tracheal tube was removed. The oto-rhino-laryngologist was called upon to carry out a flexible bronchoscopy and laryngoscopic examination of the patient. After deflation, the missing piece was located at the level of the tracheal tube cuff and removed successfully. We recommend examining the condition of the oro-tracheal tube cuff upon completion of the PDT procedure.

  6. Fetal Endoscopic Tracheal Intubation: A New Fetoscopic Procedure to Ensure Extrauterine Tracheal Permeability in a Case with Congenital Cervical Teratoma.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martinez, Rogelio; Moreno-Alvarez, Oscar; Garcia, Maritza; Méndez, Antonio; Pineda, Hugo; Cruz-Martinez, Miriam Alejandra; Cruz, Miriam A; Martinez-Morales, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Congenital neck masses are associated with high perinatal mortality and morbidity secondary to airway obstruction due to a mass effect of the tumor with subsequent neonatal asphyxia and/or neonatal death. Currently, the only technique designed to establish a secure neonatal airway is the ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure, which involves neonatal tracheal intubation while fetal oxygenation is maintained by the uteroplacental circulation in a partial fetal delivery under maternal general anesthesia. We present a case with a giant cervical teratoma and huge displacement and compression of the fetal trachea that was treated successfully at 35 weeks of gestation with a novel fetoscopic procedure to ensure extrauterine tracheal permeability by means of a fetal endoscopic tracheal intubation (FETI) before delivery. The procedure consisted of a percutaneous fetal tracheoscopy under maternal epidural anesthesia using an 11-Fr exchange catheter covering the fetoscope that allowed a conduit to introduce a 3.0-mm intrauterine orotracheal cannula under ultrasound guidance. After FETI, a conventional cesarean section was performed uneventfully with no need for an EXIT procedure. This report is the first to illustrate that in cases with large neck tumors involving fetal airways, FETI is feasible and could potentially replace an EXIT procedure by allowing prenatal airway control.

  7. Genomic Sequence of Canine Papillomavirus 19

    PubMed Central

    Tisza, Michael J.; Yuan, Hang; Schlegel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    It is generally assumed that individual papillomas (warts) are caused by infection with individual papillomavirus types. Deep sequencing of virions extracted from a canine oral papilloma revealed the presence of canine papillomavirus 1 (CPV1), CPV2, and a novel canine papillomavirus, CPV19. This suggests that papillomas sometimes harbor multiple viral species. PMID:27932663

  8. BRAF Mutations in Canine Cancers.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Kennedy, Katherine; Shapiro, Susan G; Breen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the BRAF gene lead to constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway. Although many human cancers carry the mutated BRAF gene, this mutation has not yet been characterized in canine cancers. As human and canine cancers share molecular abnormalities, we hypothesized that BRAF gene mutations also exist in canine cancers. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced the exon 15 of BRAF, mutation hot spot of the gene, in 667 canine primary tumors and 38 control tissues. Sequencing analysis revealed that a single nucleotide T to A transversion at nucleotide 1349 occurred in 64 primary tumors (9.6%), with particularly high frequency in prostatic carcinoma (20/25, 80%) and urothelial carcinoma (30/45, 67%). This mutation results in the amino acid substitution of glutamic acid for valine at codon 450 (V450E) of canine BRAF, corresponding to the most common BRAF mutation in human cancer, V600E. The evolutional conservation of the BRAF V600E mutation highlights the importance of MAPK pathway activation in neoplasia and may offer opportunity for molecular diagnostics and targeted therapeutics for dogs bearing BRAF-mutated cancers.

  9. Canine leishmaniosis in South America

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2009-01-01

    Canine leishmaniosis is widespread in South America, where a number of Leishmania species have been isolated or molecularly characterised from dogs. Most cases of canine leishmaniosis are caused by Leishmania infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi) and Leishmania braziliensis. The only well-established vector of Leishmania parasites to dogs in South America is Lutzomyia longipalpis, the main vector of L. infantum, but many other phlebotomine sandfly species might be involved. For quite some time, canine leishmaniosis has been regarded as a rural disease, but nowadays it is well-established in large urbanised areas. Serological investigations reveal that the prevalence of anti-Leishmania antibodies in dogs might reach more than 50%, being as high as 75% in highly endemic foci. Many aspects related to the epidemiology of canine leishmaniosis (e.g., factors increasing the risk disease development) in some South American countries other than Brazil are poorly understood and should be further studied. A better understanding of the epidemiology of canine leishmaniosis in South America would be helpful to design sustainable control and prevention strategies against Leishmania infection in both dogs and humans. PMID:19426440

  10. Smoothly deformed light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenholm, Stig

    1993-01-01

    A single mode cavity is deformed smoothly to change its electromagnetic eigenfrequency. The system is modeled as a simple harmonic oscillator with a varying period. The Wigner function of the problem is obtained exactly by starting with a squeezed initial state. The result is evaluated for a linear change of the cavity length. The approach to the adiabatic limit is investigated. The maximum squeezing is found to occur for smooth change lasting only a fraction of the oscillational period. However, only a factor of two improvement over the adiabatic result proves to be possible. The sudden limit cannot be investigated meaningfully within the model.

  11. Muscarinic receptor size on smooth muscle cells and membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S.M.; Jung, C.Y.; Grover, A.K.

    1986-08-01

    The loss of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) binding following high-energy radiation was used to compare the muscarinic receptor size on single smooth muscle cells isolated by collagenase digestion from the canine stomach and on plasma membranes derived from intact gastric smooth muscle without exposure to exogenous proteolysis. Radiation inactivation of galactose oxidase (68 kdaltons), yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (160 kdaltons), and pyruvate kinase (224 kdaltons) activities were used as molecular-weight standards. Radiation inactivation of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding to rat brain membranes, which gave a target size of 86 kdaltons, served as an additional control. In isolated smooth muscle cells, the calculated size of the muscarinic receptor was 80 +/- 8 kdaltons. In contrast, in a smooth muscle enriched plasma membrane preparation, muscarinic receptor size was significantly smaller at 45 +/- 3 kdaltons. Larger molecular sizes were obtained either in the presence of protease inhibitors (62 +/- 4 kdaltons) or by using a crude membrane preparation of gastric smooth muscle 86 +/- 7 kdaltons).

  12. 3D printed polyurethane prosthesis for partial tracheal reconstruction: a pilot animal study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soo Yeon; Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Ha Yeong; Park, Hae Sang; Wang, Zhan; Kim, Hyun Jun; Yoo, James J; Chung, Sung Min; Kim, Han Su

    2016-10-27

    A ready-made, acellular patch-type prosthesis is desirable in repairing partial tracheal defects in the clinical setting. However, many of these prostheses may not show proper biological integration and biomechanical function when they are transplanted. In this study, we developed a novel 3D printed polyurethane (PU) tracheal scaffold with micro-scale architecture to allow host tissue infiltration and adequate biomechanical properties to withstand physiological tracheal condition. A half-pipe shaped PU scaffold (1.8 cm of height, 0.18 cm thickness, and 2 cm of diameter) was fabricated by 3D printing of PU 200 μm PU beam. The 3D printed tracheal scaffolds consisted of a porous inner microstructure with 200 × 200 × 200 μm(3) sized pores and a non-porous outer layer. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds were 3.21 ± 1.02 MPa of ultimate tensile strength, 2.81 ± 0.58 MPa of Young's modulus, and 725% ± 41% of elongation at break. To examine the function of the 3D printed tracheal scaffolds in vivo, the scaffolds were implanted into 1.0 × 0.7 cm(2) sized anterior tracheal defect of rabbits. After implantation, bronchoscopic examinations revealed that the implanted tracheal scaffolds were patent for a 16 week-period. Histologic findings showed that re-epithelialization after 4 weeks of implantation and ciliated respiratory epithelium with ciliary beating after 8 weeks of implantation were observed at the lumen of the implanted tracheal scaffolds. The ingrowth of the connective tissue into the scaffolds was observed at 4 weeks after implantation. The biomechanical properties of the implanted tracheal scaffolds were continually maintained for 16 week-period. The results demonstrated that 3D printed tracheal scaffold could provide an alternative solution as a therapeutic treatment for partial tracheal defects.

  13. Podoplanin Expression in Canine Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Honma, Ryusuke; Kaneko, Mika K.; Fujii, Yuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    A type I transmembrane protein, podoplanin (PDPN), is expressed in several normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells or pulmonary type I alveolar cells. We recently demonstrated that anticanine PDPN monoclonal antibody (mAb), PMab-38, recognizes canine PDPN of squamous cell carcinomas, but does not react with lymphatic endothelial cells. Herein, we investigated whether PMab-38 reacts with canine melanoma. PMab-38 reacted with 90% of melanoma cells (9/10 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Of interest, PMab-38 stained the lymphatic endothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts in melanoma tissues, although it did not stain any lymphatic endothelial cells in normal tissues. PMab-38 could be useful for uncovering the function of PDPN in canine melanomas. PMID:27918691

  14. Podoplanin Expression in Canine Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Honma, Ryusuke; Kaneko, Mika K; Fujii, Yuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2016-12-01

    A type I transmembrane protein, podoplanin (PDPN), is expressed in several normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells or pulmonary type I alveolar cells. We recently demonstrated that anticanine PDPN monoclonal antibody (mAb), PMab-38, recognizes canine PDPN of squamous cell carcinomas, but does not react with lymphatic endothelial cells. Herein, we investigated whether PMab-38 reacts with canine melanoma. PMab-38 reacted with 90% of melanoma cells (9/10 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Of interest, PMab-38 stained the lymphatic endothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts in melanoma tissues, although it did not stain any lymphatic endothelial cells in normal tissues. PMab-38 could be useful for uncovering the function of PDPN in canine melanomas.

  15. Canine "honing" in Australopithecus afarensis.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L O

    1990-06-01

    The maxillary canines of Australopithecus afarensis show a distal wear facet that extends from the apex of the crown to a point near the distal cingulum. Although these facets bear a superficial resemblance to the honing facets found on the projecting portions of the canines of other anthropoids, a more detailed examination provided in this paper shows that they are not homologous or functionally equivalent. The facets are not related to the use of the maxillary canine as a weapon or as an additional masticatory surface. Instead, their presence in A. afarensis represented a blunting or dulling of the posterior edge of C so that its occlusion with P3 would be consistent with cheek tooth occlusion.

  16. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-05

    This code is a highly modular framework for developing smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations running on parallel platforms. The compartmentalization of the code allows for rapid development of new SPH applications and modifications of existing algorithms. The compartmentalization also allows changes in one part of the code used by many applications to instantly be made available to all applications.

  17. Hummocky and Smooth Plains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-15

    This image, from NASA Mariner 10 spacecraft which launched in 1974, is located about 500 km east of the Caloris basin and shows hummocky plains interpreted as Caloris ejecta in the upper half of the picture and smooth plains in the lower half.

  18. Mandibular canine index in establishing sex identity.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shishir; Nagabhushana, D; Rao, B Balaji; Mamatha, G P

    2002-01-01

    An investigation study on sex identity through mandibular canine index directed to detect sexual dimorphism using the Mesio-Distal width of mandibular permanent canines and inter canine and inter canine arch width in the mandible was conducted in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Bapuji Dental College and Hospital, Davangere. 360 patients were subjected to the mesio-distal measurement and inter canine arch width. Males were detected correctly in 83.3% and in females 81%. They were statistically significant and the related literatures reviewed.

  19. Polo-like Kinase 1 Regulates Vimentin Phosphorylation at Ser-56 and Contraction in Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Ruping; Gannon, Olivia J; Rezey, Alyssa C; Jiang, Sixin; Gerlach, Brennan D; Liao, Guoning; Tang, Dale D

    2016-11-04

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a serine/threonine-protein kinase that has been implicated in mitosis, cytokinesis, and smooth muscle cell proliferation. The role of Plk1 in smooth muscle contraction has not been investigated. Here, stimulation with acetylcholine induced Plk1 phosphorylation at Thr-210 (an indication of Plk1 activation) in smooth muscle. Contractile stimulation also activated Plk1 in live smooth muscle cells as evidenced by changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer signal of a Plk1 sensor. Moreover, knockdown of Plk1 in smooth muscle attenuated force development. Smooth muscle conditional knock-out of Plk1 also diminished contraction of mouse tracheal rings. Plk1 knockdown inhibited acetylcholine-induced vimentin phosphorylation at Ser-56 without affecting myosin light chain phosphorylation. Expression of T210A Plk1 inhibited the agonist-induced vimentin phosphorylation at Ser-56 and contraction in smooth muscle. However, myosin light chain phosphorylation was not affected by T210A Plk1. Ste20-like kinase (SLK) is a serine/threonine-protein kinase that has been implicated in spindle orientation and microtubule organization during mitosis. In this study knockdown of SLK inhibited Plk1 phosphorylation at Thr-210 and activation. Finally, asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, which largely stems from airway smooth muscle hyperreactivity. Here, smooth muscle conditional knock-out of Plk1 attenuated airway resistance and airway smooth muscle hyperreactivity in a murine model of asthma. Taken together, these findings suggest that Plk1 regulates smooth muscle contraction by modulating vimentin phosphorylation at Ser-56. Plk1 activation is regulated by SLK during contractile activation. Plk1 contributes to the pathogenesis of asthma. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Air-Q laryngeal airway for rescue and tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Ads, Ayman; Auerbach, Frederic; Ryan, Kelly; El-Ganzouri, Abdel R

    2016-08-01

    We report the successful use of the Air-Q laryngeal airway (Air-Q LA) as a ventilatory device and a conduit for tracheal intubation to rescue the airway in a patient with difficult airway and tracheal stenosis. This is the first case report of the device to secure the airway after two episodes of hypoxemia in the operating room and intensive care unit. Consent for submission of this case report was obtained from our institution's human studies institutional review board given that the patient died a few months after his discharge from the hospital before his personal consent could be obtained and before preparation of this report. All personal identifiers that could lead to his identification have been removed from this report. A 59-year-old man was scheduled for a flexible and rigid bronchoscopy with possible laser excision of tracheal stenosis. He had a history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes. Assessment of airway revealed a thyromental distance of 6.5 cm, Mallampati class II, and body weight of 110 kg. He had hoarseness and audible inspiratory/expiratory stridor with Spo2 90% breathing room air. After induction and muscle relaxation, tracheal intubation and flexible bronchoscopy were achieved without incident. The patient was then extubated and a rigid bronchoscopy was attempted but failed with Spo2 dropping to 92%; rocuronium 60 mg was given, and reintubation was accomplished with a 7.5-mm endotracheal tube. A second rigid bronchoscopy attempt failed, with Spo2 dropping to 63%. Subsequent direct laryngoscopy revealed a bloody hypopharynx. A size 4.5 Air-Q LA was placed successfully and confirmed with capnography, and Spo2 returned to 100%. The airway was suctioned through the Air-Q LA device, and the airway was secured using a fiberoptic bronchoscope to place an endotracheal tube of 7.5-mm internal diameter. The case was canceled because of edema of the upper airway from multiple attempts with rigid bronchoscopy. The patient was transported

  1. Smoothing non-smooth systems with low-pass filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, James

    2014-02-01

    Low pass filters, which are used to remove high frequency noise from time series data, smooth the signals they are applied to. In this paper we examine the action of low pass filters on discontinuous or non-differentiable signals from non-smooth dynamical systems. We show that the application of such a filter is equivalent to a change of variables, which transforms the non-smooth system into a smooth one. We examine this smoothing action on a variety of examples and demonstrate how it is useful in the calculation of a non-smooth system's Lyapunov spectrum.

  2. Long-term results after 110 tracheal resections

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, Godehard; Kyriss, Thomas; Leitenberger, Andrea; Toomes, Heikki

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Among the many therapeutic options for treating tracheal stenosis (e.g. bouginage, laser resection and stenting), segmental resection and reconstruction with end-to-end anastomosis is the method of choice. We verified this in an analysis of clinical material. Patients and methods: We retrospectively evaluated 110 tracheal sleeve resections performed between 1985 and 2001. Data before and after resection were analyzed, and the patients were interviewed. Results: The aetiology of stenosis was mainly postintubation injury (n = 92) (83.6%), followed by goiter with malacia (n = 8) (7.3%) and tumor (n = 6) (5.5%). There were a few other causes (n = 3) (2.7%). 48 patients (43.6%) had undergone prior conservative or surgical treatment other than sleeve resection. A cervical approach was used in 93 (84.6%), a cervicomediastinal in 15 (13.6%), and a transthoracic in two. Healing of anastomosis was uncomplicated in 101 patients (91.8%). Major and minor complications occurred in 29 patients (26.4); there were 4 dehiscences (3.6%), 3 restenoses (2.7%), 2 suture line granulations (1.8%) and 4 vocal cord dysfunctions (3.6%). The 30-day mortality rate was 0.9%. 77 patients were interviewed after surgery (median 80.1 months); 93.5% (n = 72) were satisfied with the surgical treatment. Conclusions: Resection and reconstruction offer the best treatment for tracheal stenosis. Lethal complications were due to severe comorbidity. Many patients today still undergo unsuccessful conservative treatment before being referred to surgery. PMID:19675708

  3. Thermoforming of tracheal cartilage: viability, shape change, and mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yongseok; Protsenko, Dmitriy; Holden, Paul K; Chlebicki, Cara; Wong, Brian J F

    2008-10-01

    Trauma, emergent tracheostomy, and prolonged intubation are common causes of severe deformation and narrowing of the trachea. Laser technology may be used to reshape tracheal cartilage using minimally invasive methods. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the dependence of tracheal cartilage shape change on temperature and laser dosimetry using heated saline bath immersion and laser irradiation, respectively, (2) the effect of temperature on the mechanical behavior of cartilage, and (3) tissue viability as a function of laser dosimetry. Ex vivo rabbit trachea cartilage specimens were bent and secured around a cylinder (6 mm), and then immersed in a saline bath (45 and 72 degrees C) for 5-100 seconds. In separate experiments, tracheal specimens were irradiated with a diode laser (lambda = 1.45 microm, 220-400 J/cm(2)). Mechanical analysis was then used to determine the elastic modulus in tension after irradiation. Fluorescent viability assays combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) were employed to image and identify thermal injury regions. Shape change transition zones, between 62 and 66 degrees C in the saline heating bath and above power densities of 350 J/cm(2) (peak temperatures 65+/-10 degrees C) for laser irradiation were identified. Above these zones, the elastic moduli were higher (8.2+/-4 MPa) than at lower temperatures (4.5+/-3 MPa). LSCM identified significant loss of viable chondrocytes within the laser-irradiation zones. Our results indicate a change in mechanical properties occurs with laser irradiation and further demonstrates that significant thermal damage is concurrent with clinically relevant shape change in the elastic cartilage tissues of the rabbit trachea using the present laser and dosimetry parameters. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Thermoforming of Tracheal Cartilage: Viability, Shape Change, and Mechanical Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Yongseok; Protsenko, Dmitriy; Holden, Paul K.; Chlebicki, Cara; Wong, Brian J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Trauma, emergent tracheostomy, and prolonged intubation are common causes of severe deformation and narrowing of the trachea. Laser technology may be used to reshape tracheal cartilage using minimally invasive methods. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the dependence of tracheal cartilage shape change on temperature and laser dosimetry using heated saline bath immersion and laser irradiation, respectively, (2) the effect of temperature on the mechanical behavior of cartilage, and (3) tissue viability as a function of laser dosimetry. Materials and Methods Ex vivo rabbit trachea cartilage specimens were bent and secured around a cylinder (6 mm), and then immersed in a saline bath (45 and 72°C) for 5– 100 seconds. In separate experiments, tracheal specimens were irradiated with a diode laser (λ = 1.45 μm, 220–400 J/cm2). Mechanical analysis was then used to determine the elastic modulus in tension after irradiation. Fluorescent viability assays combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) were employed to image and identify thermal injury regions. Results Shape change transition zones, between 62 and 66°C in the saline heating bath and above power densities of 350 J/cm2 (peak temperatures 65±10°C) for laser irradiation were identified. Above these zones, the elastic moduli were higher (8.2±4 MPa) than at lower temperatures (4.5±3 MPa). LSCM identified significant loss of viable chondrocytes within the laser-irradiation zones. Conclusion Our results indicate a change in mechanical properties occurs with laser irradiation and further demonstrates that significant thermal damage is concurrent with clinically relevant shape change in the elastic cartilage tissues of the rabbit trachea using the present laser and dosimetry parameters. PMID:18798288

  5. The feasibility of gamma radiation sterilization for decellularized tracheal grafts.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher M; Guo, DeHuang; Ryals, Stephanie; Postma, Gregory N; Weinberger, Paul M

    2017-08-01

    The most promising stem cell-derived tracheal transplantation approach is dependent upon the use of decellularized tracheal grafts. It has been assumed that a sterilization step, such as gamma radiation, would damage the delicate extracellular matrix of the graft, thus rendering it less viable for cellular repopulation, although this has not been thoroughly investigated. Laboratory-based comparative analysis. Fifteen murine tracheas of strain C57/B-6 mice were obtained. Thirteen were subjected to a detergent-enzymatic decellularization process. Of these decellularized tracheas (DT), eight were irradiated, exposing five tracheas to a radiation level of 25 kGy (DT25) and three to 5 kGy (DT5). Two were left untreated. The two untreated tracheas, two DTs, and two DT25s were prepared and examined using both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Bioburden calculations were obtained from three DTs, three DT25s, and three DT5s by homogenization, serial dilution, and streak plating. Electron microscopy of untreated fresh tracheas and DTs showed a slight qualitative degradation of cartilage ultrastructure due to the decellularization process. In contrast, examination of DT25 shows significant degradation including poor overall preservation of cartilage architecture with disorganized collagen fibers. The nonirradiated DTs had a calculated bacterial bioburden of 7.8 × 10(7) to 3.4 × 10(8) colony-forming units per gram. Both the DT25 and DT5 specimens were found to have a bioburden of zero. Gamma radiation at 25 kGy degrades the architecture of decellularized tracheal grafts. These ultrastructural changes may prove detrimental to graft viability; however, bioburden calculations suggest that a 5 kGy radiation dose may be sufficient for sterilization. NA Laryngoscope, 127:E258-E264, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. [Fetoscopic tracheal occlusion for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia: retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Braga, Angélica de Fátima de Assunção; da Silva Braga, Franklin Sarmento; Nascimento, Solange Patricia; Verri, Bruno; Peralta, Fabio C; Bennini Junior, João; Jorge, Karina

    The temporary fetal tracheal occlusion performed by fetoscopy accelerates lung development and reduces neonatal mortality. The aim of this paper is to present an anesthetic experience in pregnant women, whose fetuses have diaphragmatic hernia, undergoing fetoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO). Retrospective, descriptive study, approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. Data were obtained from medical and anesthetic records. FETO was performed in 28 pregnant women. Demographic characteristics: age 29.8±6.5; weight 68.64±12.26; ASA I and II. Obstetric: IG 26.1±1.10 weeks (in FETO); 32.86±1.58 (reversal of occlusion); 34.96±2.78 (delivery). Delivery: cesarean section, vaginal delivery. Fetal data: Weight (g) in the occlusion and delivery times, respectively (1045.82±222.2 and 2294±553); RPC in FETO and reversal of occlusion: 0.7±0.15 and 1.32±0.34, respectively. Preoperative maternal anesthesia included ranitidine and metoclopramide, nifedipine (VO) and indomethacin (rectal). Preanesthetic medication with midazolam IV. Anesthetic techniques: combination of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (5-10mg) and sufentanil; continuous epidural predominantly with 0.5% bupivacaine associated with sufentanil, fentanyl, or morphine; general. In 8 cases, there was need to complement via catheter, with 5 submitted to PC and 3 to BC. Thirteen patients required intraoperative sedation; ephedrine was used in 15 patients. Fetal Anesthesia: fentanyl 10 to 20mg·kg(-1) and pancuronium 0,1-0,2mg·kg(-1) (IM). Neonatal survival rate was 60.7%. FETO is a minimally invasive technique for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair. Combined blockade associated with sedation and fetal anesthesia proved safe and effective for tracheal occlusion. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Difficult Tracheal Intubation in Obese Gastric Bypass patients.

    PubMed

    Dohrn, Niclas; Sommer, Thorbjørn; Bisgaard, Jannie; Rønholm, Ebbe; Larsen, Jens Fromholt

    2016-11-01

    Endotracheal intubation is commonly perceived to be more difficult in obese patients than in lean patients. Primarily, we investigated the association between difficult tracheal intubation (DTI) and obesity, and secondarily, the association between DTI and validated scoring systems used to assess the airways, the association between DTI and quantities of anesthetics used to induce general anesthesia, and the association between DTI and difficulties with venous and arterial cannulation. This is a monocentric prospective observational clinical study of a consecutive series of 539 obese patients undergoing gastric bypass. Tracheal intubation was done preoperatively together with scoring of Intubation Score (IS), Mallampati (MLP), and Cormack-Lehane classification (CLC) and registration of the quantities of anesthetics and total attempts on cannulation. The overall proportion of patients with DTI was 3.5 % and the patients with DTI were more frequently males, had higher CLC, higher American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification (ASA), and noticeably, a lower BMI compared to the patients with easy tracheal intubation. After adjustment with multivariable analyses body mass index (BMI) <40, CLC >2, ASA scores >2, and male gender were risk factors of DTI. Males generally had higher CLC, MLP, and ASA scores compared to females, but no difference in BMI. There was no difference in quantities of anesthetics used between the two groups with or without DTI. Intra-venous and intra-arterial cannulation was succeeded in first attempt in 85 and 86 % of the patients, respectively, and there were no association between BMI and difficult vascular access. We found no association between increasing BMI and DTI.

  8. Equine and Canine Influenza H3N8 Viruses Show Minimal Biological Differences Despite Phylogenetic Divergence.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kurtis H; Gonzalez, Gaelle; Deng, Lingquan; Yu, Hai; Tse, Victor L; Huang, Lu; Huang, Kai; Wasik, Brian R; Zhou, Bin; Wentworth, David E; Holmes, Edward C; Chen, Xi; Varki, Ajit; Murcia, Pablo R; Parrish, Colin R

    2015-07-01

    The A/H3N8 canine influenza virus (CIV) emerged from A/H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV) around the year 2000 through the transfer of a single virus from horses to dogs. We defined and compared the biological properties of EIV and CIV by examining their genetic variation, infection, and growth in different cell cultures, receptor specificity, hemagglutinin (HA) cleavage, and infection and growth in horse and dog tracheal explant cultures. Comparison of sequences of viruses from horses and dogs revealed mutations that may be linked to host adaptation and tropism. We prepared infectious clones of representative EIV and CIV strains that were similar to the consensus sequences of viruses from each host. The rescued viruses, including HA and neuraminidase (NA) double reassortants, exhibited similar degrees of long-term growth in MDCK cells. Different host cells showed various levels of susceptibility to infection, but no differences in infectivity were seen when comparing viruses. All viruses preferred α2-3- over α2-6-linked sialic acids for infections, and glycan microarray analysis showed that EIV and CIV HA-Fc fusion proteins bound only to α2-3-linked sialic acids. Cleavage assays showed that EIV and CIV HA proteins required trypsin for efficient cleavage, and no differences in cleavage efficiency were seen. Inoculation of the viruses into tracheal explants revealed similar levels of infection and replication by each virus in dog trachea, although EIV was more infectious in horse trachea than CIV. Influenza A viruses can cross species barriers and cause severe disease in their new hosts. Infections with highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus and, more recently, avian H7N9 virus have resulted in high rates of lethality in humans. Unfortunately, our current understanding of how influenza viruses jump species barriers is limited. Our aim was to provide an overview and biological characterization of H3N8 equine and canine influenza viruses using various experimental

  9. Equine and Canine Influenza H3N8 Viruses Show Minimal Biological Differences Despite Phylogenetic Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kurtis H.; Gonzalez, Gaelle; Deng, Lingquan; Yu, Hai; Tse, Victor L.; Huang, Lu; Huang, Kai; Wasik, Brian R.; Zhou, Bin; Wentworth, David E.; Holmes, Edward C.; Chen, Xi; Varki, Ajit; Murcia, Pablo R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The A/H3N8 canine influenza virus (CIV) emerged from A/H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV) around the year 2000 through the transfer of a single virus from horses to dogs. We defined and compared the biological properties of EIV and CIV by examining their genetic variation, infection, and growth in different cell cultures, receptor specificity, hemagglutinin (HA) cleavage, and infection and growth in horse and dog tracheal explant cultures. Comparison of sequences of viruses from horses and dogs revealed mutations that may be linked to host adaptation and tropism. We prepared infectious clones of representative EIV and CIV strains that were similar to the consensus sequences of viruses from each host. The rescued viruses, including HA and neuraminidase (NA) double reassortants, exhibited similar degrees of long-term growth in MDCK cells. Different host cells showed various levels of susceptibility to infection, but no differences in infectivity were seen when comparing viruses. All viruses preferred α2-3- over α2-6-linked sialic acids for infections, and glycan microarray analysis showed that EIV and CIV HA-Fc fusion proteins bound only to α2-3-linked sialic acids. Cleavage assays showed that EIV and CIV HA proteins required trypsin for efficient cleavage, and no differences in cleavage efficiency were seen. Inoculation of the viruses into tracheal explants revealed similar levels of infection and replication by each virus in dog trachea, although EIV was more infectious in horse trachea than CIV. IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses can cross species barriers and cause severe disease in their new hosts. Infections with highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus and, more recently, avian H7N9 virus have resulted in high rates of lethality in humans. Unfortunately, our current understanding of how influenza viruses jump species barriers is limited. Our aim was to provide an overview and biological characterization of H3N8 equine and canine influenza viruses using

  10. Canine tooth size variability in primates.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, G

    1989-01-01

    I present an analysis of canine tooth size variability in male and female primates. The coefficient of variation (CV = SD X 100/mean) as an index of canine size variability proved to be dependent on mean canine size in males and, to a lower extent, in females. Therefore, variability tends to increase with increasing values of mean canine size. Using residuals from the regression of log SD on log mean canine size in male and female primates, I analysed the contribution of diet, habitat and mating system to canine size variability. Habitat and mating system are known to influence to a certain extent the degree of sexual dimorphism in canine size. Given the well-known relationship between sexual dimorphism and phenotypic variability, it was suggested that these factors might influence variability in canine size. Everything else being equal, males of polygynous species are characterized by more variable canine sizes than males of monogamous species. Habitat and diet did not contribute to the level of variability observed in either males or females. It is proposed that a high level of variability in canine size may be related to the likelihood that enlarged canines evolved as a result of male-male competition for mates in polygynous species.

  11. Treatment of Benign Tracheal Stenosis Using Endoluminal Spray Cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bhora, Faiz Y; Ayub, Adil; Forleiter, Craig M; Huang, Chyun-Yin; Alshehri, Khalid; Rehmani, Sadiq; Al-Ayoubi, Adnan M; Raad, Wissam; Lebovics, Robert S

    2016-11-01

    Tracheal stenosis is a debilitating disorder with heterogeneity in terms of disease characteristics and management. Repeated recurrences substantially alter patients' quality of life. There is limited evidence for the use of spray cryotherapy (SCT) in the management of benign airway disease. To report our early results for the use of SCT in patients with benign tracheal stenosis. Data were extracted from the medical records of a consecutive series of patients with benign airway stenosis secondary to granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) (n = 13), prior tracheotomy or tracheal intubation (n = 8), and idiopathic strictures (n = 5) treated from September 1, 2013, to September 30, 2015, at a tertiary care hospital. Airway narrowing was quantified on a standard quartile grading scale. Response to treatment was assessed by improvement in airway caliber and the time interval for reintervention. Delivery of 4 5-second SCT cycles and 2 balloon dilatations. Twenty-six patients (median [range] age, 53 [16-83] years; 20 [77%] female) underwent 48 SCT sessions. Spray cryotherapy was successfully used without any substantial intraoperative or postoperative complications in all patients. In a median (range) follow-up of 11 (1-26) months, all patients had improvement in symptoms. Before the institution of SCT, 23 patients (88%) had grade III or IV stenosis. At the last evaluation after induction of SCT, 4 (15%) had grade III or IV stenosis, with a mean (SD) change of 1.39 (0.51) (P < .001). Patients with GPA required significantly fewer SCT procedures (mean [SD], 1.38 [0.96] vs 2.31 [1.18]; P = .03) during the study period. Spray cryotherapy was a safe adjunct modality to accomplish airway patency in patients with benign tracheal stenosis. Although efficacy evidence is limited for SCT, it may be useful for patients who have experienced treatment failure with conventional modalities. Further analysis of this cohort will determine the physiologic durability of

  12. Tracheal malformation in a bicephalic Honduran milk snake (Lampropeltis hondurensis) and subsequent fatal Salmonella arizonae infection.

    PubMed

    Orós, J; Rodríguez, J L; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Rodríguez, F; Herráez, P; Fernández, A

    1997-09-01

    A bicephalic Honduran milk snake (Lampropeltis hondurensis) with tracheal duplication and malformation and Salmonella arizonae infection is described. There were atypically wide collapsed tracheal rings with necrotizing tracheitis and abundant necrotic epithelial debris and inflammatory cells obstructing the lumen in one of the duplicate tracheae. Salmonella arizonae was cultured from the malformed duplicate trachea and was considered to be the etiologic agent causing necrosis.

  13. 21 CFR 868.5740 - Tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube.../bronchial differential ventilation tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube is a device used to isolate the left or the right lung of a patient for anesthesia or...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5740 - Tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube.../bronchial differential ventilation tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube is a device used to isolate the left or the right lung of a patient for anesthesia or...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5740 - Tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube.../bronchial differential ventilation tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube is a device used to isolate the left or the right lung of a patient for anesthesia or...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5740 - Tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube.../bronchial differential ventilation tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube is a device used to isolate the left or the right lung of a patient for anesthesia or...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5740 - Tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube.../bronchial differential ventilation tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal/bronchial differential ventilation tube is a device used to isolate the left or the right lung of a patient for anesthesia or...

  18. Osteochondroma of the tracheal wall in a Fischer's lovebird (Agapornis fischeri, Reichenow 1887).

    PubMed

    Weissengruber, G; Loupal, G

    1999-01-01

    A Fischer's lovebird with dyspnea and stridorous breathing was examined by endoscopy. Tracheal stenosis was observed slightly cranial of the middle of the cervical segment. Histologically, an osteochondroma was identified as the cause of this stenosis. This is the first description of a tracheal osteochondroma in a bird.

  19. Tracheal laceration following double-lumen intubation during Ivor Lewis esophagogastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Barbetakis, Nikolaos; Samanidis, Georgios; Paliouras, Dimitrios; Tsilikas, Christodoulos

    2008-10-01

    A case of a 48-year-old man with an iatrogenic membranous tracheal wall rupture after double-lumen intubation during Ivor Lewis esophagogastrectomy is presented. Tracheal injury was successfully managed surgically with the use of a bovine pericardial patch and reinforcement with the gastric conduit which was moved toward the posterior wall of the membranous trachea sealing the wall laceration.

  20. Reepithelialization of orthotopic tracheal allografts prevents rejection after withdrawal of immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M; Govindaraj, Satish; Chaboki, Houtan; Cleven, Heidi; Fedorova, Elena; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Mayer, Lloyd

    2005-04-01

    Prior work has demonstrated that immunosuppressed orthotopic tracheal allografts undergo progressive reepithelialization over a 48-day period with recipient-derived tracheal epithelium. We hypothesized that reepithelialization of tracheal allografts would prevent rejection after withdrawal of immunosuppression. BALB/c murine tracheal grafts were transplanted orthotopically into either syngeneic or allogeneic C57/BL6 recipients. The recipients were either not immunosuppressed, immunosuppressed with cyclosporine A (10 mg/kg per day) continuously, or immunosuppressed for 48 days and then withdrawn from immunosuppression. The grafts were assessed for acute and chronic rejection 10 days and 50 days after immunosuppression withdrawal. The immunosuppressed allograft recipients maintained a ciliated epithelium acutely and chronically after immunosuppression withdrawal. Ten days after immunosuppression withdrawal, there was a mild cellular infiltrate, which resolved 50 days after withdrawal. Electron microscopy, lymphocyte subpopulation assays, and lamina propria analysis demonstrated that immunosuppression withdrawal did not result in tracheal allograft rejection. In vitro and in vivo assessments did not demonstrate evidence of systemic or local immune tolerance. We conclude that reepithelialization of orthotopic tracheal allografts with recipient-derived mucosa prevents rejection of allograft segments. Tracheal transplantation may require only transient immunosuppression, which can be withdrawn after tracheal reepithelialization.

  1. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to definitive tracheal reconstruction in neonates.

    PubMed

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Fauza, Dario O; Craig, Nancy; Jennings, Russell W

    2008-05-01

    Infants born with severe tracheal anomalies may not survive beyond the first few hours of life without aggressive cardiopulmonary support and/or emergent airway surgery. The purpose of this study was to review our experience with critically ill neonates supported on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) before tracheal reconstruction. A retrospective review of a single institution ECMO registry was conducted. Outcomes of neonates requiring tracheal repair were examined. Three children with tracheal anomalies (complete tracheal rings [n = 2]; bronchogenic cyst [n = 1]) underwent definitive airway reconstruction. All were placed on ECMO (venovenous [n = 2]; venoarterial [n = 1]) within 24 hours after birth. Tracheoplasties (tracheal resection with end-to-end anastomosis [n = 1]; slide tracheoplasty [n = 1]; carinal resection and reconstruction [n = 1]) were performed at 3.7 +/- 2.2 days of life. There were no hemorrhagic or thrombotic complications for an ECMO time of 117.3 +/- 60.1 hours. The postoperative durations until extubation and hospital discharge were 12.0 +/- 3.2 and 34.3 +/- 11.6 days, respectively. All children remain alive and well without cardiopulmonary and neurologic sequelae at a mean follow-up of 4.5 years. Excellent clinical outcomes can be achieved in neonates born with severe tracheal anomalies using ECMO as a bridge to definitive tracheal reconstruction.

  2. A case of bilateral tracheal bronchus: report of a rare association in multidetector computed tomography bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Candace; Doros, Caius; Miclaus, Gratian D; Matusz, Petru; Loukas, Marios

    2015-08-01

    Bilateral tracheal bronchus is a rare variation of the tracheobronchial tree. We present a 1-year 7-month-old male patient who presented with sepsis following endotracheal intubation. Upon review of multidetector computed tomography images, the patient was diagnosed with displaced bilateral tracheal bronchus. Imaging showed a right-sided anomalous bronchus arising 0.9 cm proximal to the carina. The left-sided anomalous bronchus arose 0.7 cm proximal to the carina, mimicking a tracheal trifurcation. When viewed together, the close proximity of both the right and left tracheal bronchi to the carina created a distinct tracheal quadrifurcation. This rare anatomic variation was additionally associated with an anorectal malformation (anal atresia). Unrecognized tracheal bronchus in patients undergoing endotracheal intubation can lead to serious complications. While bilateral tracheal bronchus is described in the literature, we are unaware of any case similar to this patient presentation. We present and analyze this unusual case of bilateral tracheal bronchus. The anatomy and clinical significance of this variation is then discussed.

  3. Canine and feline colostrum.

    PubMed

    Chastant-Maillard, S; Aggouni, C; Albaret, A; Fournier, A; Mila, H

    2016-11-30

    Puppy and kitten survival over the first weeks is particularly dependent on colostrum, a specific secretion of the mammary gland produced during the first 2 days post-partum. Colostrum is a source of nutrients and immunoglobulins. It also contributes to the digestive tract maturation. Colostrum differentiates from milk mainly based on its concentration in immunoglobulins G: 20-30 g/L in dog colostrum, 40-50 g/L in cats' vs <1 g/L in milk. IgG concentration rapidly drops after parturition (-50% in 24 hr). Immune quality of colostrum is highly variable between bitches, with no relationship with maternal blood IgG level, dam's age, breed size or litter size. In addition to systemic immune protection, colostrum also plays a major role for local digestive protection, due to IgA, lysozyme, lactoferrin, white blood cells and various cytokines. Energetic concentration of canine and feline colostrum is not superior to that of mature milk. It depends on colostrum fat concentration and is affected by breed size (higher in breeds <10 kg adult body weight). As puppies and kittens are almost agammaglobulinemic at birth, transfer of IgG from their digestive tract into their bloodstream is crucial for their survival, IgG absorption ending at 12-16 hr after birth. Energetic supply over the two first days of life, as evidenced by growth rate over the two first days of life, also affects risk of neonatal mortality. Early and sufficient suckling of colostrum is thus the very first care to be provided to newborns for their later health and survival.

  4. Canine lymphoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Zandvliet, M

    2016-06-01

    Canine lymphoma (cL) is a common type of neoplasia in dogs with an estimated incidence rate of 20-100 cases per 100,000 dogs and is in many respects comparable to non-Hodgkin lymphoma in humans. Although the exact cause is unknown, environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are thought to play an important role. cL is not a single disease, and a wide variation in clinical presentations and histological subtypes is recognized. Despite this potential variation, most dogs present with generalized lymphadenopathy (multicentric form) and intermediate to high-grade lymphoma, more commonly of B-cell origin. The most common paraneoplastic sign is hypercalcemia that is associated with the T-cell immunophenotype. Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice and a doxorubicin-based multidrug protocol is currently the standard of care. A complete remission is obtained for most dogs and lasts for a median period of 7-10 months, resulting in a median survival of 10-14 months. Many prognostic factors have been reported, but stage, immunophenotype, tumor grade, and response to chemotherapy appear of particular importance. Failure to respond to chemotherapy suggests drug resistance, which can be partly attributed to the expression of drug transporters of the ABC-transporter superfamily, including P-gp and BCRP. Ultimately, most lymphomas will become drug resistant and the development of treatments aimed at reversing drug resistance or alternative treatment modalities (e.g. immunotherapy and targeted therapy) are of major importance. This review aims to summarize the relevant data on cL, as well as to provide an update of the recent literature.

  5. Response of smooth bronchial musculature in bronchoconstrictor substances in newborn with lung atelectasis at the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS).

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Lirim; Islami, Pëllumb; Shabani, Nora; Jashanica, Adelina; Islami, Hilmi

    2014-01-01

    Role of the atelectasis (hypoxia) in the respiratory system of the live and exited newborn (250 up to 3000 g. of body weight), which has died due to different causes was studied in this work. Response of tracheal rings to dopamine, serotonine and ethanol in the different molar concentrations (dopamine: 0.05 mg/ml, 0.5 mg/ml, 5 mg/ml; serotonine (5-HT): 10(-4), 10(-3), 10(-2), 10(-1) mol/dm3; ethanol: 0.2 ml, 0.5 ml, 1.0 ml; 96%) was followed up. Study of the smooth tracheal musculature tone (STM) was elaborated in 16 tracheal preparations taken following the newborn death due to different causes. Based on functional researches of tracheal isolated preparations, it was ascertained as follows: atelectasis (cases born with lung hypoxia) has changed the response of STM to dopamine, serotonine and ethanol in a significant manner (p < 0.01) in comparison to cases of controlling group, which has died due to lung inflammatory processes (e.g. pneumonia, bronchopneumonia, cerebral hemorrhage), which have also caused significant response (p < 0.05). Results suggest that exited cases from lung atelectasis and cases of controlling group reacts to above mentioned substances by causing significant constrictor action of tracheobronchial system.

  6. Response of Smooth Bronchial Musculature in Bronchoconstrictor Substances in Newborn with Lung Atelectasis at the Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS)

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Lirim; Islami, Pëllumb; Shabani, Nora; Jashanica, Adelina; Islami, Hilmi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Role of the atelectasis (hypoxia) in the respiratory system of the live and exited newborn (250 up to 3000 g. of body weight), which has died due to different causes was studied in this work. Methods: Response of tracheal rings to dopamine, serotonine and ethanol in the different molar concentrations (dopamine: 0,05 mg/ml, 0,5 mg/ml, 5 mg/ml; serotonine (5-HT): 10-4, 10-3, 10-2, 10-1 mol/dm3; ethanol: 0,2 ml, 0,5 ml, 1,0 ml; 96%) was followed up. Study of the smooth tracheal musculature tone (STM) was elaborated in 16 tracheal preparations taken following the newborn death due to different causes. Results: Based on functional researches of tracheal isolated preparations, it was ascertained as follows: atelectasis (cases born with lung hypoxia) has changed the response of STM to dopamine, serotonine and ethanol in a significant manner (p<0,01) in comparison to cases of controlling group, which has died due to lung inflammatory processes (e.g. pneumonia, bronchopneumonia, cerebral hemorrhage), which have also caused significant response (p<0,05). Conclusion: Results suggest that exited cases from lung atelectasis and cases of controlling group reacts to above mentioned substances by causing significant constrictor action of tracheobronchial system. PMID:24783902

  7. [The Use of a Tracheal Tube for Guiding Nasogastric Tube Insertion].

    PubMed

    Saima, Shunsuke; Asai, Takashi; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-01

    An obese patient was scheduled for shoulder joint surgery under general anesthesia. After induction of anesthesia and tracheal intubation, insertion of a gastric tube was difficult. A new tracheal tube was prepared, the connecter was removed, and the tube was cut longitudinally. The tube was inserted orally into the esophagus. A gastric tube was passed through the nose, and its tip was taken out of the mouth. The tip of the gastric tube was passed through the tracheal tube, and its correct position in the stomach was confirmed by auscultation of the epigastrium. The tracheal tube was carefully taken out from the esophagus leaving the gastric tube in the stomach. The cut tracheal tube was peeled off from the gastric tube. Correct positioning of the gastric tube was re-confirmed.

  8. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Repair of Tracheal Injury during Transhiatal Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fermin, Lilibeth; Arnold, Sarah; Nunez, Lorena; Yakoub, Danny

    2017-01-01

    Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) for repair of tracheal injury during transhiatal esophagectomy Tracheal injury is a rare but potentially fatal complication of esophagectomies requiring prompt recognition and treatment. We describe a case of tracheal injury recognized in the operative period of an open transhiatal esophagectomy for squamous cell carcinoma of the mid to distal esophagus. When injury was discovered, attempts to improve oxygenation and ventilation by conventional methods were unsuccessful. Therefore, peripheral ECMO was used to support oxygenation during the tracheal defect repair. The use of ECMO for the repair of a tracheal injury during esophagectomy is very uncommon but, in our case, provided adequate oxygenation and ventilation while the surgeon repaired the injury and the patient was able to be promptly weaned from ECMO support and extubated not long after. PMID:28074826

  9. Development of a patient specific artificial tracheal prosthesis: design, mechanical behavior analysis and manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Chua C H, Matthew; Chui, Chee Kong; Rai, Bina; Lau D P, David

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to create patient specific organ replacements as there are differences in the anatomical dimensions among individuals. High failure rates in tracheal prosthesis are attributed to the lack of mechanical strength and flexibility, slow rate of growth of ciliated epithelium and leakage of interstitial fluid into the lumen. This paper proposes a methodology of design, simulations and fabrication of a patient specific artificial tracheal prosthesis for implantation to closely mimic the biomechanical properties of the natural trachea, and describes the prototype device and its materials. Results show that the patient-specific trachea prosthesis has mechanical properties approximate that of normal tracheal rings. The user centric tracheal prosthesis is demonstrated to be a promising candidate for tracheal replacement.

  10. Penicillium species as a rare isolate in tracheal granulation tissue: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Premjit S; Nouraei, SA Reza; Howard, David J; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Petrou, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Granulation tissue formation is a major problem complicating the treatment of upper airway stenosis. We present two cases of recurrent tracheal granulation tissue colonisation by Penicillium species in patients undergoing laryngotracheal reconstructive surgery for post-intubation tracheal stenosis. We believe that although most Penicillium species do not cause invasive disease they can be a contributory factor to the occurrence of upper airway stenosis. Case presentation A microbiological and mycological study of tracheal granulation tissue in two patients with recurrent laryngotracheal stenosis was carried out. Penicillium species was seen microscopically and cultured from tracheal granulation tissue. Neither patient grew any bacteria known to be associated with airway granulation tissue formation. Amphotericin B, itraconazole, flucytosine voriconazole and caspofungin were highly active against both isolates. Conclusion A search for a fungal cause should form part of the investigation for recurrent tracheal granulation tissue during laryngotracheal reconstruction. PMID:18346276

  11. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for repair of tracheal injury during transhiatal esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Fermin, Lilibeth; Arnold, Sarah; Nunez, Lorena; Yakoub, Danny

    2017-01-01

    Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) for repair of tracheal injury during transhiatal esophagectomy Tracheal injury is a rare but potentially fatal complication of esophagectomies requiring prompt recognition and treatment. We describe a case of tracheal injury recognized in the operative period of an open transhiatal esophagectomy for squamous cell carcinoma of the mid to distal esophagus. When injury was discovered, attempts to improve oxygenation and ventilation by conventional methods were unsuccessful. Therefore, peripheral ECMO was used to support oxygenation during the tracheal defect repair. The use of ECMO for the repair of a tracheal injury during esophagectomy is very uncommon but, in our case, provided adequate oxygenation and ventilation while the surgeon repaired the injury and the patient was able to be promptly weaned from ECMO support and extubated not long after.

  12. The Drosophila SRF homolog is expressed in a subset of tracheal cells and maps within a genomic region required for tracheal development.

    PubMed

    Affolter, M; Montagne, J; Walldorf, U; Groppe, J; Kloter, U; LaRosa, M; Gehring, W J

    1994-04-01

    The Drosophila homolog of the vertebrate serum response factor (SRF) was isolated by low stringency hybridization. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the Drosophila SRF homolog (DSRF) codes for a protein that displays 93% sequence identity with human SRF in the MADS domain, the region required for DNA binding, dimerization and interaction with accessory factors. The DSRF gene is expressed during several phases of embryonic development. In the egg, both the RNA and the protein are maternal in origin and slowly decrease in amount during gastrulation. After germ band retraction, high levels of zygotic expression are observed in a distinct subset of peripheral tracheal cells distributed throughout the embryo. Many of these cells are at the tip of tracheal branches and are in direct contact with the target tissues. The DSRF gene was mapped to position 60C on the second chromosome, and overlapping deficiencies which remove the gene were identified. Analysis of tracheal development in embryos carrying these deletions revealed a degeneration of most of the major branches of the tracheal system. Although the initial migration of tracheal cells was not affected in those deficient embryos, many tracheal cells appeared not to maintain their correct position and continued to migrate. Thus, the DSRF gene might play a role in the proper formation and maintenance of the trachea.

  13. Right Lung Agenesis with Tracheal Stenosis due to Complete Tracheal Rings and Postpneumonectomy Like Syndrome Treated with Tissue Expander Placement

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lung agenesis is an extremely rare condition with an estimated prevalence of 34 in 1,000,000 live births. It is often associated with other congenital malformations of the skeletal, cardiovascular, urogenital, and gastrointestinal systems. We discuss the case of a 5-month-old who presented with increasing stridor over 1 month. Imaging revealed right lung agenesis, complete dextromalposition of heart, and compression of distal trachea. An intrathoracic saline tissue expander was placed which marked improved distal tracheal stenosis. In patients who are symptomatic it becomes imperative to perform surgeries to increase survival as was the case in this patient. PMID:27882259

  14. Current developments in canine genetics.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Yvonne; Distl, Ottmar

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, canine genetics had made huge progress. In 1999 the first complete karyotype and ideogram of the dog was published. Several linkage and RH maps followed. Using these maps, sets of microsatellite markers for whole genome scans were compiled. In 2003 the sequencing of the DNA of a female Boxer began. Now the second version of the dog genome assembly has been put online, and recently, a microchip SNP array became available. Parallel to these developments, some causal mutations for different traits have been identified. Most of the identified mutations were responsible for monogenic canine hereditary diseases. With the tools available now, it is possible to use the advantages of the population structure of the various dog breeds to unravel complex genetic traits. Furthermore, the dog is a suitable model for the research of a large number of human hereditary diseases and particularly for cancer genetics, heart and neurodegenerative diseases. There are some examples where it was possible to benefit from the knowledge of canine genetics for human research. The search for quantitative trait loci (QTL), the testing of candidate genes and genome-wide association studies can now be performed in dogs. QTL for skeletal size variations and for canine hip dysplasia have been already identified and for these complex traits the responsible genes and their possible interactions can now be identified.

  15. Septic shock in canine babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Matijatko, Vesna; Kis, Ivana; Torti, Marin; Brkljacić, Mirna; Kucer, Nada; Rafaj, Renata Barić; Grden, Darko; Zivicnjak, Tanja; Mrljak, Vladimir

    2009-06-10

    The records of all canine patients (86) that had been diagnosed with babesiosis and that were admitted to the Clinic for Internal Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Zagreb from January 2007 to December 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. All dogs that had been diagnosed with canine babesiosis and that had systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) followed by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), and refractory hypotension, were included in this study. Of 86 patients diagnosed with canine babesiosis that were admitted during the study period, 10 had evidence of septic shock and were included in this study. Seven of the 10 dogs had a level of parasitaemia above 1%, with the highest level being 20.2%, seven of the 10 dogs were anaemic and three of the 10 dogs were leucopoenic. Thrombocytopenia was present in nine dogs. Hypoglycaemia was noted in two dogs, and bilirubinaemia in nine dogs. Four patients had involvement of two organs, five had involvement of three organs, and one had involvement of four organs. The organ that was most frequently involved was the kidney (nine cases). Central nervous system dysfunction was the rarest complication noted (one case). The mortality rate in non-septic shock canine babesiosis was 2.6%. All dogs that developed septic shock died between the first and the fourth day after admission. The 100% mortality rate that is reported here reflects the fact that in cases in which progression of the inflammatory response leads to the development of septic shock, an unfavourable outcome should be expected.

  16. Biomechanical and biocompatibility characteristics of electrospun polymeric tracheal scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ajalloueian, Fatemeh; Lim, Mei Ling; Lemon, Greg; Haag, Johannes C; Gustafsson, Ylva; Sjöqvist, Sebastian; Beltrán-Rodríguez, Antonio; Del Gaudio, Costantino; Baiguera, Silvia; Bianco, Alessandra; Jungebluth, Philipp; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    The development of tracheal scaffolds fabricated based on electrospinning technique by applying different ratios of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polyurethane (PU) is introduced here. Prior to clinical implantation, evaluations of biomechanical and morphological properties, as well as biocompatibility and cell adhesion verifications are required and extensively performed on each scaffold type. However, the need for bioreactors and large cell numbers may delay the verification process during the early assessment phase. Hence, we investigated the feasibility of performing biocompatibility verification using static instead of dynamic culture. We performed bioreactor seeding on 3-dimensional (3-D) tracheal scaffolds (PET/PU and PET) and correlated the quantitative and qualitative results with 2-dimensional (2-D) sheets seeded under static conditions. We found that an 8-fold reduction for 2-D static seeding density can essentially provide validation on the qualitative and quantitative evaluations for 3-D scaffolds. In vitro studies revealed that there was notably better cell attachment on PET sheets/scaffolds than with the polyblend. However, the in vivo outcomes of cell seeded PET/PU and PET scaffolds in an orthotopic transplantation model in rodents were similar. They showed that both the scaffold types satisfied biocompatibility requirements and integrated well with the adjacent tissue without any observation of necrosis within 30 days of implantation.

  17. Preauricular skin tags and difficult tracheal intubation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moschini, V; Collini, R

    2009-10-01

    Despite the large variety of equipment available for pediatric intubations, difficult tracheal intubation is still a main factor in deaths associated with anesthesia, especially in children with congenital anomalies of the airways or with rare diseases and syndromes. The aim of this study was to focus attention on the possibility of difficult intubation in children with preauricular tags. This condition is reported as both isolated and associated with more complex syndromes, including nephrourological anomalies and multiple craniofacial dysmorphysms. We retrospectively analyzed the anesthesia procedures for seven children (aged between 3 and 18 months) who underwent surgical ablation of preauricular tags between October 2006 and April 2008 at the Fondazione Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mangiagalli and Regina Elena of Milan. Two of these children, both native residents of Sri Lanka, presented with a problematic airway and difficult tracheal intubation, which was suspected in one case but totally unexpected in the other. Considering the International Guidelines for difficult intubation in pediatrics and the data of other authors, our conclusions for how to approach a child with preauricular tags are: 1) to verify whether the defect is isolated or associated with other malformations; 2) to analyze the medical history and to perform an accurate physical examination to identify a possibly difficult airway; and 3) to not exceed three attempts to intubate and, if possible, to choose an alternative strategy.

  18. Glycoprotein secretion in a tracheal organ culture system

    SciTech Connect

    Warunek, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Glycoprotein secretion in the rat trachea was studied in vitro, utilizing a modified, matrix embed/perfusion chamber. Baseline parameters of the culture environment were determined by enzymatic and biochemical procedures. The effect of pilocarpine on the release of labelled glycoproteins from the tracheal epithelium was assessed. After a single stimulation with the drug, there was a significant increase in the release of /sup 14/C-glucosamine and /sup 3/H-fucose-labelled glycoprotein. The response was dose-dependent. Similar results were obtained after a second exposure to pilocarpine. However, no dose response was observed. Morphological analyses of the tracheal epithelial secretory cells by Alcian Blue/Periodic Acid Schiff staining showed a significant decrease in the total number of Alcian Blue staining cells and an increase in the mixed cell population after a single exposure to pilocarpine. Second stimulation with the drug showed that the trachea was able to respond again, this time with a further decrease in the number of Alcian Blue staining cells and a decrease in the PAS staining cells as well. Carbohydrate analyses after the first simulation with pilocarpine showed increased levels of N-acetyl neuraminic acid and the neutral carbohydrates, fucose and galactose, in the precipitated glycoproteins.

  19. Vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulates tracheal submucosal gland secretion in ferret

    SciTech Connect

    Peatfield, A.C.; Barnes, P.J.; Bratcher, C.; Nadel, J.A.; Davis, B.

    1983-07-01

    We studied the effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on the output of 35S-labeled macromolecules from ferret tracheal explants either placed in beakers or suspended in modified Ussing chambers. In Ussing chamber experiments, the radiolabel precursor, sodium (35S)sulfate, and all drugs were placed on the submucosal side of the tissue. Washings were collected at 30-min intervals from the luminal side and were dialyzed to remove unbound 35S, leaving radiolabeled macromolecules. Vasoactive intestinal peptide at 3 X 10(-7) M stimulated bound 35S output by a mean of + 252.6% (n . 14). The VIP response was dose-dependent with a near maximal response and a half maximal response at approximately 10(-6) M and 10(-8), M, respectively. The VIP effect was not inhibited by a mixture of tetrodotoxin, atropine, I-propranolol, and phentolamine. Vasoactive intestinal peptide had no effect on the electrical properties of the of the tissues. We conclude that VIP stimulates output of sulfated-macromolecules from ferret tracheal submucosal glands without stimulating ion transport. Our studies also suggest that VIP acts on submucosal glands via specific VIP receptors. Vasoactive intestinal peptide has been shown to increase intracellular levels of cyclic AMP, and we suggest that this may be the mechanism for its effect on the output of macromolecules. This mechanism may be important in the neural regulation of submucosal gland secretion.

  20. Neuropeptides degranulate serous cells of ferret tracheal glands

    SciTech Connect

    Gashi, A.A.; Borson, D.B.; Finkbeiner, W.E.; Nadel, J.A.; Basbaum, C.B.

    1986-08-01

    To determine whether serous or mucous cells in tracheal submucosal glands respond to the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). The authors studied the peptide-induced changes in gland cell morphology accompanying release of TVSO4-labeled macromolecules from tracheal explants of ferrets. Explants were labeled for 1 h in medium containing TVSO4 and washed for 3.5 additional hours. Base-line secretion in the absence of drugs declined between 1.5 and 3.5 h after the pulse. Between 2.5 and 3.5 h, the average percent change in counts per minute recovered per sample period was not significantly different from zero. Substance P and VIP added 4 h after labeling each increased greatly the release of TVSO4-labeled macromolecules above base line. Bethanechol, a muscarinic-cholinergic agonist, increased secretion by an average of 142% above base line. Light and electron microscopy of the control tissues showed glands with narrow lumens and numerous secretory granules. Glands treated with SP or VIP had enlarged lumens and the serous cells were markedly degranulated. These phenomena were documented by morphometry and suggest that SP and VIP cause secretion from glands at least partially by stimulating exocytosis from serous cells.

  1. Tracheal dead space influences regional ventilation measurement in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Delaunois, L.; Boileau, R.; Martin, R.R. )

    1990-02-01

    The lung volume at which airway closure begins during expiration (closing volume, CV) can be measured (1) with a radioactive bolus inspired at residual volume (RV) and (2) with the single-breath N2 elimination test. In previous studies in dogs, we observed that N2 CV was systematically larger than 133Xe bolus CV (Xe CV) (N2 CV %vital capacity (VC) = 35 +/- 2.3 (SE) vs. Xe CV %VC = 24 +/- 2.2, P less than 0.01). Because the regional RV in the dog is evenly distributed throughout the lung and all airways closed at RV, N2 CV is related to the regional distribution of the tracheal N2; differences between N2 and Xe CV could then be related to the size of the inhaled dead space. Simultaneous measurements of Xe and N2 CV were performed at various sites of Xe bolus injection while the regional distribution of the bolus was measured. Injections at the level of the carina increased Xe CV to a value (30 +/- 1.4%VC) near simultaneous N2 CV (32 +/- 1.5%VC) and increased the unevenness of regional distribution of the Xe bolus. The difference between N2 and Xe CV is then the result of the size of the inspired tracheal dead space. Moreover, comparisons between different values of Xe CV require injections of the boluses at the same distance from the carina.

  2. [Pediatric use of cuffed tracheal tubes under general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Sozen, Reiko; Kayashima, Kenji; Yoshino, Hiroomi; Imai, Keiko

    2013-10-01

    Although the use of cuffed tracheal tubes (CTT) in children less than 8 years of age has increased, the criteria for selecting CTTs of appropriate sizes have not been determined. To study the criteria for choosing tubes of appropriate sizes (internal diameter: 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, or 5.5mm), we intubated 51 children aged 2-8 years under general anesthesia using an original protocol. We excluded 2 patients who received 4.0-mm tubes; thus, the outcomes in 48 patients were analyzed statistically. A larger CTT was replaced with a smaller one in 1 patient, and a CTT was replaced with an uncuffed tracheal tube (UTT) in another patient (excluded from analysis). No tube changes were required in 49 patients. Post-extubation stridor was observed in 3 patients. The 4.5-mm tubes seemed appropriate in 12 cases because average airway leakage in these cases was > 10%; 5.0- and 5.5-mm tubes did not seem appropriate in 17 and 19 cases, respectively, because the leakage was < 10% of the tidal volume. We recommend the pediatric use of CTTs because of the very low tube-exchange ratio and the acceptable incidence of stridor. However, the protocol may require modification.

  3. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  4. Association of tracheal mucus or blood and airway neutrophilia with racing performance in Thoroughbred horses in an Australian racing yard.

    PubMed

    Salz, R O; Ahern, B J; Boston, R; Begg, L M

    2016-04-01

    To determine the variation of tracheal mucus scores, tracheal blood scores and transendoscopic tracheal wash (TW) cytology in a population of Thoroughbred (TB) racehorses and assess their association with racing performance. A total of 220 endoscopic examinations were performed and TWs obtained from 155 TB racehorses. Samples were collected 60-120 min following gallop work. Tracheal mucus score, tracheal blood score and TW cytology were analysed and their association with racing performance assessed. Of the total examinations and samples, 194 from 135 horses fitted the criteria for inclusion. The overall prevalence of visible tracheal mucus was 2.5% (5/194) and of increased tracheal mucus was 0%. The prevalence of visible tracheal blood was 8.8% (17/194) and of increased tracheal blood was 4.6% (9/194). A total of 36% (70/194) of TWs contained elevated percentages of neutrophils and of these, 96% (67/70) occurred in the absence of any visible tracheal mucus. There was no significant association between tracheal mucus score or TW cytology and subsequent racing performance. There was a statistically significant association (P = 0.004) between increased tracheal blood scores and poor racing performance. Visible tracheal blood seen after strenuous exercise in clinically normal TB racehorses was a risk factor for poor racing performance, but the presence of airway neutrophilia was not. No horses in this study were found to have increased tracheal mucus, so the association of increased tracheal mucus with racing performance could not be assessed. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  5. Effects of age on muscarinic agonist-induced contraction an IP accumulation in airway smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Wills-Karp, M. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of age on carbachol-stimulated force development and ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphate production was studied in tracheal rings from guinea pigs aged 1 month and 25 months of age. The pD{sub 2} for the contractile response to carbachol was significantly reduced in tracheal tissues from old animals as compared to that of the young tissues, respectively. In contrast, inositol phosphate formation was not altered with increasing age when stimulated by carbachol or NaF, a direct activator of G proteins. Carbachol-induced inositol phosphate accumulation was inhibited by treatment with 1{mu}g/ml pertussis toxin, suggesting that IP1 accumulation is coupled to a pertussis-toxin-sensitive protein. The pD{sub 2} values for contraction were significantly different from the pD{sub 2} values for IP1 accumulation, in both young and old tissues, respectively. These data suggest that IP1 accumulation is not responsible for the decreased contractile ability in tracheal smooth muscle during aging.

  6. Ontogeny of canine dimorphism in extant hominoids.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, G T; Dean, C

    2001-07-01

    Many behavioral and ecological factors influence the degree of expression of canine dimorphism for different reasons. Regardless of its socioecological importance, we know virtually nothing about the processes responsible for the development of canine dimorphism. Our aim here is to describe the developmental process(es) regulating canine dimorphism in extant hominoids, using histological markers of tooth growth. Teeth preserve a permanent record of their ontogeny in the form of short- and long-period incremental markings in both enamel and dentine. We selected 52 histological sections of sexed hominoid canine teeth from a total sample of 115, from which we calculated the time and rate of cuspal enamel formation and the rate at which ameloblasts differentiate along the future enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) to the end of crown formation. Thus, we were able to reconstruct longitudinal growth curves for height attainment in male and female hominoid canines. Male hominoids consistently take longer to form canine crowns than do females (although not significantly so for our sample of Homo). Male orangutans and gorillas occasionally take up to twice as long as females to complete enamel formation. The mean ranges of female canine crown formation times are similar in Pan, Gorilla, and Pongo. Interspecific differences between female Pan canine crown heights and those of Gorilla and Pongo, which are taller, result from differences in rates of growth. Differences in canine crown heights between male Pan and the taller, more dimorphic male Gorilla and Pongo canines result both from differences in total time taken to form enamel and from faster rates of growth in Gorilla and Pongo. Although modern human canines do not emerge as significantly dimorphic in this study, it is well-known that sexual dimorphism in canine crown height exists. Larger samples of sexed modern human canines are therefore needed to identify clearly what underlies this.

  7. Smooth Phase Interpolated Keying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borah, Deva K.

    2007-01-01

    Smooth phase interpolated keying (SPIK) is an improved method of computing smooth phase-modulation waveforms for radio communication systems that convey digital information. SPIK is applicable to a variety of phase-shift-keying (PSK) modulation schemes, including quaternary PSK (QPSK), octonary PSK (8PSK), and 16PSK. In comparison with a related prior method, SPIK offers advantages of better performance and less complexity of implementation. In a PSK scheme, the underlying information waveform that one seeks to convey consists of discrete rectangular steps, but the spectral width of such a waveform is excessive for practical radio communication. Therefore, the problem is to smooth the step phase waveform in such a manner as to maintain power and bandwidth efficiency without incurring an unacceptably large error rate and without introducing undesired variations in the amplitude of the affected radio signal. Although the ideal constellation of PSK phasor points does not cause amplitude variations, filtering of the modulation waveform (in which, typically, a rectangular pulse is converted to a square-root raised cosine pulse) causes amplitude fluctuations. If a power-efficient nonlinear amplifier is used in the radio communication system, the fluctuating-amplitude signal can undergo significant spectral regrowth, thus compromising the bandwidth efficiency of the system. In the related prior method, one seeks to solve the problem in a procedure that comprises two major steps: phase-value generation and phase interpolation. SPIK follows the two-step approach of the related prior method, but the details of the steps are different. In the phase-value-generation step, the phase values of symbols in the PSK constellation are determined by a phase function that is said to be maximally smooth and that is chosen to minimize the spectral spread of the modulated signal. In this step, the constellation is divided into two groups by assigning, to information symbols, phase values

  8. Importance of extracellular Ca2+ and intracellular Ca2+ release in ethanol-induced contraction of cerebral arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Wang, J; Zheng, T; Altura, B T; Altura, B M

    2001-07-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the roles of extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]0) influx and intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) release in ethanol-induced contractions of isolated canine cerebral arteries and primary cultured, cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells. Ethanol (20-200 mM) produced significant contractions in isolated canine basilar arterial rings in a concentration-dependent manner. Removal of [Ca2+]0 and pretreatment of canine basilar arterial rings with verapamil (an antagonist of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels), thapsigargin (a selective antagonist of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump), caffeine plus ryanodine (a specific antagonist of ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release), or heparin (an inositol 1,4,5,-trisphosphate [InsP3]-mediated Ca2+ release antagonist) markedly attenuated (approximately 50%-80%) ethanol-induced contractions. The absence of [Ca2+]0 and preincubation of primary single smooth muscle cells obtained from canine basilar arteries with verapamil, thapsigargin, heparin, or caffeine plus ryanodine markedly attenuated (approximately 50%-80%) the transient and sustained elevations in [Ca2+]i induced by ethanol. Results of the present study suggest to us that both Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores (both InsP3 sensitive and ryanodine sensitive) are required for ethanol-induced contractions of isolated canine basilar arteries.

  9. Novel diabetes mellitus treatment: mature canine insulin production by canine striated muscle through gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Niessen, S J M; Fernandez-Fuente, M; Mahmoud, A; Campbell, S C; Aldibbiat, A; Huggins, C; Brown, A E; Holder, A; Piercy, R J; Catchpole, B; Shaw, J A M; Church, D B

    2012-07-01

    Muscle-targeted gene therapy using insulin genes has the potential to provide an inexpensive, low maintenance alternative or adjunctive treatment method for canine diabetes mellitus. A canine skeletal muscle cell line was established through primary culture, as well as through transdifferentiation of canine fibroblasts after infection with a myo-differentiation gene containing adenovirus vector. A novel mutant furin-cleavable canine preproinsulin gene insert (cppI4) was designed and created through de novo gene synthesis. Various cell lines, including the generated canine muscle cell line, were transfected with nonviral plasmids containing cppI4. Insulin and desmin immunostaining were used to prove insulin production by muscle cells and specific canine insulin ELISA to prove mature insulin secretion into the medium. The canine myoblast cultures proved positive on desmin immunostaining. All cells tolerated transfection with cppI4-containing plasmid, and double immunostaining for insulin and desmin proved present in the canine cells. Canine insulin ELISA assessment of medium of cppI4-transfected murine myoblasts and canine myoblast and fibroblast mixture proved presence of mature fully processed canine insulin, 24 and 48 h after transfection. The present study provides proof of principle that canine muscle cells can be induced to produce and secrete canine insulin on transfection with nonviral plasmid DNA containing a novel mutant canine preproinsulin gene that produces furin-cleavable canine preproinsulin. This technology could be developed to provide an alternative canine diabetes mellitus treatment option or to provide a constant source for background insulin, as well as C-peptide, alongside current treatment options.

  10. COMPARISON OF THE RADIOGRAPHIC AND TRACHEOSCOPIC APPEARANCE OF THE DORSAL TRACHEAL MEMBRANE IN LARGE AND SMALL BREED DOGS.

    PubMed

    Lindl Bylicki, Britany J; Johnson, Lynelle R; Pollard, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    The etiology and clinical significance of increased radiographic opacity along the dorsal margin of the tracheal lumen has long been debated. Most often, this opacity is attributed to redundancy of the dorsal tracheal membrane (DTM), a condition that occurs with tracheal collapse. We hypothesized that the underlying etiology of this radiographic opacity differs between small breed dogs with tracheal collapse and small or large breed dogs without tracheal collapse. The purpose of this prospective, cross-sectional study was to compare the radiographic appearance of an increased opacity within the trachea to tracheoscopy findings in a group of small and large breed dogs. A total of 17 small breed dogs and 16 large breed dogs were included. Of these, only one did not have a radiographically visible DTM. Small breed dogs were divided into groups with tracheal collapse (n = 8) and those without (n = 9) based on tracheoscopy. Tracheal collapse was absent in larger breed dogs, however both large and small breed dogs demonstrated inward invagination of the DTM. In dogs with tracheal collapse, the DTM occupied a larger percentage of the tracheal luminal height on radiographs and a larger percentage of tracheal circumference on tracheoscopy vs. dogs with an invaginated DTM on tracheoscopy and dogs with no collapse and no invagination of the DTM. Findings supported the hypothesis that increased radiographic opacity along the dorsal margin of the trachea arises from different etiologies in dogs with and without tracheal collapse.

  11. Maxillary canine-to-maxillary incisor transposition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yng-Tzer J

    2013-01-01

    Dental transposition is the positional interchange of two adjacent teeth. Canine transpositions are usually accompanied by other dental anomalies, such as: impaction of the incisors; missing teeth; peg-shaped lateral incisors; severe rotation or malposition of adjacent teeth; dilacerations; and malformations. Local pathologic processes, such as tumors, cysts, retained primary canines, and supernumerary teeth, might be responsible for canine transposition. The purpose of this paper was to present a rare case of maxillary canine-to-maxillary incisor transposition in an 8-year-old girl. The patient presented with noneruption of the permanent maxillary left central incisor, and a radiographic examination revealed an impacted dilacerated incisor. The central incisor was extracted because the root was severely dilacerated. At the 3-year follow-up, an oral examination revealed that the canine had transposed to the extraction site. Through orthodontic traction, combined with reshaping of the tooth, the transposed canine was successfully positioned into the incisor position.

  12. Cell autonomy of HIF effects in Drosophila: tracheal cells sense hypoxia and induce terminal branch sprouting.

    PubMed

    Centanin, Lázaro; Dekanty, Andrés; Romero, Nuria; Irisarri, Maximiliano; Gorr, Thomas A; Wappner, Pablo

    2008-04-01

    Drosophila tracheal terminal branches are plastic and have the capacity to sprout out projections toward oxygen-starved areas, in a process analogous to mammalian angiogenesis. This response involves the upregulation of FGF/Branchless in hypoxic tissues, which binds its receptor Breathless on tracheal cells. Here, we show that extra sprouting depends on the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF)-alpha homolog Sima and on the HIF-prolyl hydroxylase Fatiga that operates as an oxygen sensor. In mild hypoxia, Sima accumulates in tracheal cells, where it induces breathless, and this induction is sufficient to provoke tracheal extra sprouting. In nontracheal cells, Sima contributes to branchless induction, whereas overexpression of Sima fails to attract terminal branch outgrowth, suggesting that HIF-independent components are also required for full induction of the ligand. We propose that the autonomous response to hypoxia that occurs in tracheal cells enhances tracheal sensitivity to increasing Branchless levels, and that this mechanism is a cardinal step in hypoxia-dependent tracheal sprouting.

  13. Tracheal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma: radiological and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Kunisch-Hoppe, M; Hoppe, M; Rauber, K; Popella, C; Rau, W S

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiomorphologic and clinical features of tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma. From 1992 until 1998 the radiomorphologic and clinical key findings of all consecutive tracheal ruptures were retrospectively analyzed. The study included ten patients (7 men and 3 women; mean age 35 years); all had pneumothoraces which were persistent despite suction drainage. Seven patients developed a pneumomediastinum as well as a subcutaneous emphysema on conventional chest X-rays. In five patients, one major hint leading to the diagnosis was a cervical emphysema, discovered on the lateral cervical spine view. Contrast-media-enhanced thoracic CT was obtained in all ten cases and showed additional injuries (atelectasis n = 5; lung contusion n = 4; lung laceration n = 2; hematothorax n = 2 and hematomediastinum n = 4). The definite diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made by bronchoscopy, which was obtained in all patients. Tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma occurs rarely. Key findings were all provided by conventional chest X-ray. Tracheal rupture is suspected in front of a pneumothorax, a pneumomediastinum, or a subcutaneous emphysema on lateral cervical spine and chest films. Routine thoracic CT could also demonstrate these findings but could not confirm the definite diagnosis of an tracheal rupture except in one case; in the other 9 cases this was done by bronchoscopy. Thus, bronchoscopy should be mandatory in all suspicious cases of tracheal rupture and remains the gold standard.

  14. Awake tracheal intubation using Pentax airway scope in 30 patients: A Case series

    PubMed Central

    Kajekar, Payal; Mendonca, Cyprian; Danha, Rati; Hillermann, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Pentax airway scope (AWS) has been successfully used for managing difficult intubations. In this case series, we aimed to evaluate the success rate and time taken to complete intubation, when AWS was used for awake tracheal intubation. Methods: We prospectively evaluated the use of AWS for awake tracheal intubation in 30 patients. Indication for awake intubation, intubation time, total time to complete tracheal intubation, laryngoscopic view (Cormack and Lehane grade), total dose of local anaesthetic used, anaesthetists rating and patient's tolerance of the procedure were recorded. Results: The procedure was successful in 25 out of the 30 patients (83%). The mean (standard deviation) intubation time and total time to complete the tracheal intubation was 5.4 (2.4) and 13.9 (3.7) min, respectively in successful cases. The laryngeal view was grade 1 in 24 and grade 2 in one of 25 successful intubations. In three out of the five patients where the AWS failed, awake tracheal intubation was successfully completed with the assistance of flexible fibre optic scope (FOS). Conclusion: Awake tracheal intubation using AWS was successful in 83% of patients. Success rate can be further improved using a combination of AWS and FOS. Anaesthesiologists who do not routinely use FOS may find AWS easier to use for awake tracheal intubation using an oral route. PMID:25197114

  15. Rapidly polymerizing hydrogel prevents balloon dislodgement in a model of fetal tracheal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Robert; Komura, Makoto; Andreoli, Steven; Jennings, Russell; Wilson, Jay; Fauza, Dario

    2004-04-01

    This study examined whether an injectable hydrogel could buttress the balloon used in fetal tracheal occlusion, thus preventing its displacement. Fetal lambs (n = 11) underwent tracheal occlusion through local delivery of a detachable silicone balloon and were divided in 2 groups: group I had no further manipulations, and group II received an intratracheal injection of a rapidly polymerizing hydrogel, cranially to the balloon. Near term, balloon placement was examined, the lung volume-to-body weight ratio (LV:BW) was determined, and tracheal histology was performed. Statistical analysis was by the Fisher's Exact test, with significance set at P <.05. Complete tracheal occlusion was achieved in all fetuses intraoperatively. The rate of balloon dislodgement was significantly higher in group I (4 of 7, or 57.1%) than in group II (0 of 4). In group II, balloons were recovered in situ with a column of residual hydrogel reinforcing their cephalad position. Animals in which balloon occlusion was maintained had significantly higher LV:BW, with no evidence of tracheal damage. Intratracheal delivery of a rapidly polymerizing hydrogel cephalad to detachable silicone balloons results in improved fetal tracheal occlusion, with no harmful effects to the trachea. This adjuvant principle may enhance minimally invasive balloon tracheal occlusion for treatment of severe fetal pulmonary hypoplasia.

  16. Ciliated cells in vitamin A-deprived cultured hamster tracheal epithelium do divide

    SciTech Connect

    Rutten, A.A.; Beems, R.B.; Wilmer, J.W.; Feron, V.J.

    1988-09-01

    The pseudostratified tracheal epithelium, composed of a heterogeneous phenotypically varying cell population, was studied with respect to the in vitro cell proliferative activity of differentiated epithelial cells. Ciliated tracheal epithelial cells so far have been considered to be terminally differentiated, nonproliferating cells. Tracheal organ cultures obtained from vitamin A-deprived Syrian Golden hamsters were cultured in a vitamin A-deficient, serum-free, hormone-supplemented medium. In vitamin A-deprived tracheal epithelium treated with physiologically active all-trans retinol and low cigarette-smoke condensate concentrations it is possible to stimulate the cell proliferation of both basal and columnar cells. Therefore, the probability of finding proliferating columnar cells was increased compared with the in vivo and the vitamin A-deprived situation in which cell proliferative activity is relatively low. In the presence of cigarette-smoke condensate in a noncytotoxic concentration, basal, small mucous granule, ciliated, and indifferent tracheal epithelial cells incorporated (methyl-3H)-thymidine into the DNA during the S phase. The finding that ciliated cells were labeled was supported by serial sections showing the same labeled ciliated cell in two section planes separated by 2 to 3 micron, without labeled epithelial cells next to the ciliated cell. Furthermore, a ciliated tracheal epithelial cell incorporating (methyl-/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA was also seen in tracheal cultures of vitamin A-deprived hamsters treated with all-trans retinol in a physiologic concentration.

  17. Effects of ozone on lamb tracheal mucosa. Quantitative glycoconjugate histochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Mariassy, A.T.; Sielczak, M.W.; McCray, M.N.; Abraham, W.M.; Wanner, A. )

    1989-11-01

    Whether or not the previously reported O3-induced abnormality in the postnatal development of tracheal secretory function in lambs is accompanied by changes in epithelial cell populations and their glycoconjugate composition was determined. Six lambs were killed at birth and 12 lambs at age 2 weeks. Of the latter 12, six were exposed to O3 (1 ppm, 4 hours daily for 5 days during the 1st week of life) and five had air-sham exposures (controls). Tracheal glycoconjugates were localized in situ with lectins to detect N-acetyl-galactosamine (galNAc), alpha-D-galactose (alpha-gal), beta-D-gal(1----3)-galNAc (beta-gal), and fucose (fuc). Mean (+/- SD) epithelial cell density (cells/mm basal lamina) was 418 +/- 57 in the newborns, 385 +/- 63 in controls (P was not significant), and 342 +/- 47 in O3-exposed lambs (P less than 0.05). Mucous cell density was 87 +/- 12 in newborns, 63 +/- 10 in controls (P less than 0.05), and 76 +/- 10 in O3 exposed lambs (P was not significant). Ciliated cells remained unchanged from birth to 2 weeks (P was not significant), but decreased (P less than 0.05) in O3-exposed lambs. All counted mucous cells contained fuc and galNAc at birth and retained these residues after sham and O3 exposure. The alpha-gal-containing mucous cells declined from 97 +/- 13 to 7 +/- 1 (P less than 0.05) and beta-gal containing cells from 39 +/- 5 to 25 +/- 4 in controls. In contrast, cells containing alpha-gal 71 +/- 10 remained at newborn levels (97 +/- 13) and beta-gal-containing cells increased from 40 +/- 5 at birth to 58 +/- 8 in O3-exposed animals (P less than 0.05). It was concluded that early postnatal exposure of lambs to O3 causes a decrease in epithelial cell density, but retards the developmental decrease in the number of tracheal mucous cells and alters the lectin detectable carbohydrate composition of mucus in these cells.

  18. Incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ellero, Marco Serrano, Mar; Espanol, Pep

    2007-10-01

    We present a smoothed particle hydrodynamic model for incompressible fluids. As opposed to solving a pressure Poisson equation in order to get a divergence-free velocity field, here incompressibility is achieved by requiring as a kinematic constraint that the volume of the fluid particles is constant. We use Lagrangian multipliers to enforce this restriction. These Lagrange multipliers play the role of non-thermodynamic pressures whose actual values are fixed through the kinematic restriction. We use the SHAKE methodology familiar in constrained molecular dynamics as an efficient method for finding the non-thermodynamic pressure satisfying the constraints. The model is tested for several flow configurations.

  19. Repair of naphthalene-induced acute tracheal injury by basal cells depends on β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Han-Shui; Liu, Chen-Chi; Lin, Jiun-Han; Hsu, Tien-Wei; Su, Kelly; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about the role of Wnt/β-catenin in postnatal airway homeostasis and basal cell function. This study aimed to investigate the role of Wnt signaling in the self-renewal of basal cells and the involvement of β-catenin in tracheal repair after naphthalene-induced injury. Mice were treated with naphthalene and injected with 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Injury and repair of the tracheal epithelium after naphthalene-mediated secretory cell depletion was assessed by a immunohistochemical study. The involvement of Wnt and β-catenin signaling in basal cell proliferation was investigated during in vitro expansion. Immunohistochemical analysis of tracheal epithelium in wild-type mice showed a reduction in the number of Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP+) and forkhead box transcription factor (Fox-J1+) cells on days 2 to 5 after naphthalene-induced injury; this cell population was regenerated by day 10. After flush labeling, bromodeoxyuridine-positive (BrdU+) cells and Ki67+ cells were observed in tracheal epithelium on days 2 to 5 but not on days 10 and 21. Confocal microscopy visualizing K5+ and BrdU+ cells showed that Wnt3a promotes proliferation of K5+ cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of K5+ and CCSP+ in tracheal epithelial cells from wild-type littermate and K5-Cre-mediated β-catenin knock-out mice showed that on day 3, the number of CCSP+ cells was decreased in all mice. On day 10, CCSP+ cells were present in wild-type littermate mice but absent in conditional knock-out mice. Basal cells serve as stem cells in the tracheal epithelium, regenerating and maintaining tracheal epithelial cells in a mouse model of tracheal injury. β-Catenin is required for proliferation and self-renewal of tracheal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. INTERMEDIATE FILAMENTS IN SMOOTH MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dale D.

    2008-01-01

    The intermediate filament (IF) network is one of the three cytoskeletal systems in smooth muscle. The type III IF proteins vimentin and desmin are major constituents of the network in smooth muscle cells and tissues. Lack of vimentin or desmin impairs contractile ability of various smooth muscle preparations, implying their important role for smooth muscle force development. The IF framework has long been viewed as a fixed cytostructure that solely provides mechanical integrity for the cell. However, recent studies suggest that the IF cytoskeleton is dynamic in mammalian cells in response to various external stimulation. In this review, the structure and biological properties of IF proteins in smooth muscle are summarized. The role of IF proteins in the modulation of smooth muscle force development and redistribution/translocation of signaling partners (such as p130 Crk-associated substrate, CAS) is depicted. This review also summarizes our latest understanding on how the IF network may be regulated in smooth muscle. PMID:18256275

  1. Increased TGF-β: a drawback of tracheal occlusion in human and experimental congenital diaphragmatic hernia?

    PubMed

    Vuckovic, Aline; Herber-Jonat, Susanne; Flemmer, Andreas W; Ruehl, Ina M; Votino, Carmela; Segers, Valérie; Benachi, Alexandra; Martinovic, Jelena; Nowakowska, Dorota; Dzieniecka, Monika; Jani, Jacques C

    2016-02-15

    Survivors of severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) present significant respiratory morbidity despite lung growth induced by fetal tracheal occlusion (TO). We hypothesized that the underlying mechanisms would involve changes in lung extracellular matrix and dysregulated transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway, a key player in lung development and repair. Pulmonary expression of TGF-β signaling components, downstream effectors, and extracellular matrix targets were evaluated in CDH neonates who died between birth and the first few weeks of life after prenatal conservative management or TO, and in rabbit pups that were prenatally randomized for surgical CDH and TO vs. sham operation. Before tissue harvesting, lung tissue mechanics in rabbits was measured using the constant-phase model during the first 30 min of life. Human CDH and control fetal lungs were also collected from midterm onwards. Human and experimental CDH did not affect TGF-β/Smad2/3 expression and activity. In human and rabbit CDH lungs, TO upregulated TGF-β transcripts. Analysis of downstream pathways indicated increased Rho-associated kinases to the detriment of Smad2/3 activation. After TO, subtle accumulation of collagen and α-smooth muscle actin within alveolar walls was detected in rabbit pups and human CDH lungs with short-term mechanical ventilation. Despite TO-induced lung growth, mediocre lung tissue mechanics in the rabbit model was associated with increased transcription of extracellular matrix components. These results suggest that prenatal TO increases TGF-β/Rho kinase pathway, myofibroblast differentiation, and matrix deposition in neonatal rabbit and human CDH lungs. Whether this might influence postnatal development of sustainably ventilated lungs remains to be determined. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Pediatric tracheal tumor masked by a history of travel: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Pugnale, Marci J; Maresh, Alison; Sinha, Pranava; Rossi, Christopher; Murnick, Jonathan; Reilly, Brian K

    2015-04-01

    A previously healthy 10-year-old female reported a 1-month history of wheezing and hemoptysis. Initial evaluation and treatment were focused on refractory reactive airway disease and infectious etiologies prompted by her recent travels in Africa. Worsening respiratory distress prompted emergent evaluation with imaging and endoscopy. Bronchoscopy diagnosed a distal tracheal tumor; pathology of this tumor was benign fibrous histiocytoma. Successful management of this condition included imaging, rigid bronchoscopy with biopsy, and tracheal resection to surgically excise the lesion. Although rare, tracheal tumors should be considered when presentation of asthma is atypical and nonresponsive to medical interventions.

  3. [Contact allergy-induced tracheal stenosis caused by vulcanization accelerators in the endotracheal tube?].

    PubMed

    Niehaus, H H; Enzmann, H

    1995-07-01

    Tracheal stenoses occur mainly under iatrogenic conditions: they develop specially after long-term intubation, but also after tracheotomy. Etiological-pathogenic relevant factors include the mechanical irritation of mucosa, perichondrium and cartilage in addition to infected tracheal secretions. An allergic cell-mediated reaction in the respiratory tract has been already described. It is seldom recognized. The possibility of such a hyperergic, allergic, delayed reaction (Type IV Coombs-Gell response) with subsequent tracheal stenosis caused by rubber chemicals (accelerators) found in endotracheal tubes is presented in the following case report.

  4. Intraoperative Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal During Apneic Oxygenation with an EZ-Blocker in Tracheal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rispoli, Marco; Nespoli, Moana Rossella; Mattiacci, Dario Maria; Esposito, Marianna; Corcione, Antonio; Buono, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    Tracheal surgery requires continued innovation to manage the anesthetic during an open airway phase. A common approach is apneic oxygenation with continuous oxygen flow, but the lack of effective ventilation causes hypercapnia, with respiratory acidosis. We used extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for intraoperative decapneization during apneic oxygenation in a 64-year-old woman who was scheduled for tracheal surgery because of tracheal stenosis caused by long-term intubation. Our findings demonstrate that even after 40 minutes of total apnea, using an EZ-blocker for oxygenation and external decapneization, hemodynamic and gas exchange variables never demonstrated any dangerous alterations.

  5. A Novel Method for Insertion of the Straight Metallic Tracheal Stent.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kuruswamy Thurai; Ram, Babu; Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Dhooria, Sahajal; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-10-01

    A straight metallic tracheal stent can be inserted either during flexible or rigid bronchoscopy. However, in patients with significant airway obstruction or those requiring tumor debulking, rigid bronchoscopy is the method of choice. A tracheoscope size 12 or larger is generally required for the introduction of the straight metallic tracheal stent. Herein, we describe a novel method that facilitates the introduction of the straight metallic tracheal stent through a size 8.5 tracheoscope by using the introducer tube of the silicone stent applicator. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel technique for relieving anastomotic tension using halo-vest immobilization after tracheal sleeve resection.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kazuhiro; Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Saito, Hajime; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Kasukawa, Yuji; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Motoyama, Satoru; Sato, Yusuke; Shimada, Yoichi; Ogawa, Jun-ichi

    2013-07-01

    We describe a novel technique of using halo-vest-enforced immobilization to relieve anastomotic tension after tracheal sleeve resection. Immediately after the tracheal sleeve resection, four halo titanium pins were inserted in the skulls of the patients to secure the halo-vest. All patients fitted with halo-vests were able to eat and drink and their clinical course was good. Bronchoscopy confirmed the absence of anastomotic leaks and stenoses, and there were no complications associated with the halo-vest. We believe that ensuring neck flexion using a halo-vest after tracheal sleeve resection is an excellent way of relieving anastomotic tension that would predispose the wound to dehiscence.

  7. PCR-based detection of a tracheal mite of the honey bee Acarapis woodi.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yuriko; Yoshiyama, Mikio; Kimura, Kiyoshi; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2011-10-01

    The effects of the tracheal mite Acarapis woodi on the health of honey bees have been neglected since the prevalence of Varroa mites to Apis mellifera colonies. However, tracheal mite infestation of honey bee colonies still occurs worldwide and could impose negative impact on apiculture. The detection of A. woodi requires the dissection of honey bees followed by microscopic observation of the tracheal sacs. We thus developed PCR methods to detect A. woodi. These methods facilitate rapid and sensitive detection of A. woodi in many honey bee samples for epidemiologic surveys.

  8. [Tracheal rupture after orotracheal intubation in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Hayi-Slayman, D; Page, M; Ben Cheikh, A; Christin, F; Ber, C-E; Rimmelé, T

    2007-06-01

    We report a case of an iatrogenic tracheal rupture following an endotracheal intubation. The 78-year-old patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of an acute respiratory failure related to a severe nosocomial pneumonia occurring 21 days after an abdominal aorta surgery. His main antecedent was a cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Immediately after being intubated, a traumatic tracheobronchial rupture was suspected because of the sudden appearance of cervicothoracic subcutaneous emphysema. A thoracic computed tomography with multiplanar reformations confirmed the diagnosis and the evolution was unfortunately rapidly unfavourable. Risk factors, clinical and radiological aspects, and management of this rare but serious complication of endotracheal intubation will be discussed.

  9. Evolutional trends in the management of tracheal and bronchial injuries

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal and Bronchial injuries are potentially life threatening complications which require urgent diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. They typically occur in association with blunt and penetrating chest trauma although they are increasingly being encountered in patients following endobronchial intervention and percutaneous tracheostomy insertion. Their precise incidence is unknown. Presenting features include dyspnoea, stridor, respiratory and haemodynamic compromise, haemoptysis, surgical emphysema, pneumothorax and persistent significant airleak. There may be other additional injuries to consider in trauma patients with large airway injury. Familiarity with the diagnosis and management of large airway injuries is important for medical teams engaged in emergency medicine, thoracic surgery and medicine, anaesthesia and intensive care. Although early surgical intervention is the mainstay of treatment, endobronchial manoeuvres to seal defects are receiving increasing attention particularly for patients with medical co-morbidities which may contraindicate formal surgery or transfer or where local surgical expertise is not available. PMID:28203439

  10. Iatrogenic esophago-tracheal fistula: Challenges in diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Hovde, Øistein; Lie, Øyvind Haugen; Johansson, Per Arthur; Stubhaug, Øystein; Johnson, Egil; Hofstad, Bjørn; Hauge, Truls

    2013-01-01

    Esophageo-tracheal fistula is a rare condition, and in most cases such fistulas are caused by malignant disease or emergency endotracheal intubation. A case where a wrapped tablet produced a fistula between the esophagus and trachea is described. The patient is a male born in 1938 who swallowed a tablet without unwrapping it. The patient was treated with self-expanding metal stents (SEMS), but closure of the fistula was not achieved. Different examinations and treatment options are discussed. Surgical treatment for this condition has demonstrated considerable mortality and morbidity. In some cases closure of the fistula can be achieved by use of SEMS. Although we advise treatment of such cases with SEMS, in some cases treatment with stents will prove troublesome and the risk/benefit analysis will have to be reevaluated. PMID:23382643

  11. Successful Treatment of an Aggressive Tracheal Malignancy With Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Osho, Asishana A; Azzoli, Christopher J; Pai, Sara; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Faquin, William C; Huynh, Tiffany G; Lanuti, Michael; Mathisen, Douglas J; Muniappan, Ashok

    2017-02-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are emerging as therapeutic options for oncology patients in whom conventional treatment regimens have failed. These immunotherapies counteract tumor-induced tolerance and have been shown to be effective in thoracic malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This report highlights the successful use of nivolumab-an immunotherapeutic agent that binds to proteins involved in T-cell proliferation-for the management of recurrent tracheal squamous cell cancer after exhaustion of conventional surgical, chemotherapeutic, and radiation therapy options. Observations provide a strong indication of the potential value of checkpoint inhibitors for managing a wide array of thoracic malignancies. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Massive surgical emphysema secondary to iatrogenic tracheal laceration

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Sarah; Rahman, Habib; Frunza, Gabriela; Wickham, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman was admitted for a revision total hip replacement following a failed dynamic hip screw placed emergently 4 months earlier. Anaesthetic management consisted of general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation and femoral nerve block. The patient's perioperative course was unremarkable except for a promptly recognised and corrected oesophageal intubation and a short period of breathing against a closed adjustable pressure limiting valve. In recovery, following a period of hypotension resistant to fluid therapy, she suddenly desaturated, developed severe facial and upper thoracic subcutaneous emphysema and type 2 respiratory failure. She was diagnosed with bilateral pneumothoraces, pneumomediastinum, pneumopericardium and surgical emphysema. This was treated emergently with supplemental oxygen and bilateral chest drains. A CT scan demonstrated a tracheal laceration, which was managed conservatively in the critical care unit. The patient had a tracheostomy on day 5 to treat an on-going air leak and later made a full recovery. PMID:25750221

  13. X-ray microanalysis of hamster tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, A.J.; Roomans, G.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Studies of ion transport across respiratory epithelia are of great interest if we are to understand the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystic fibrosis in which ion transport is abnormal. Concentrations of elements were determined in various subcellular regions of normal or isoproterenol-treated hamster tracheal epithelium, using X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections. Samples of trachea were taken from animals under anesthesia and either frozen in situ or dissected and plunge frozen. Concentrations of Mg, P, S, Cl, K and Ca were higher in cytoplasm and nuclei of control epithelial cells in dissected samples than in cryoneedle samples. Following treatment with isoproterenol, a large decrease in the concentration of Cl was observed. The results confirm that cyclic AMP-regulated chloride secretion is unaffected by anesthesia.

  14. Sleep Stage Detection Using Tracheal Breathing Sounds: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Soltanzadeh, Ramin; Moussavi, Zahra

    2015-10-01

    Sleep stage detection is needed in many sleep studies and clinical assessments. Generally, sleep stages are identified using spectral analysis of electrocephologram (EEG) and electrooculogram (EOG) signals. This study, for the first time, has investigated the feasibility of detecting sleep stages using tracheal breathing sounds, and whether the change of breathing sounds due to sleeping stage differs at different periods of sleeping time; the motivation was seeking an alternative technique for sleep stage identification. The tracheal breathing sounds of 12 individuals, who were referred for full overnight polysomnography (PSG) assessment, were recorded using a microphone placed over the suprasternal notch, and analyzed using higher order statistical analysis. Five noise-and-snore-free breathing cycles from wakefulness, REM and Stage II of sleep were selected from each subject for analysis. Data of the REM and Stage II were selected from beginning, middle and close to end of sleeping time. Hurst exponent was calculated from the bispectra of the inspiratory sounds of each subject at each sleeping stage in different periods of sleeping time. The participants' sleep stage were determined by sleep lab technologists during the PSG study using EEG and EOG signals. The results show separate and non-overlapping clusters for wakefulness, REM and Stage II for each subject. Thus, using a simple linear classifier, we were able to classify REM and Stage II of each subject with 100% accuracy. In addition, the results show that the same pattern existed as long as the REM and Stage II segments were close (less than 3 h) to each other in terms of time.

  15. Failure to predict difficult tracheal intubation for emergency caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Columb, Malachy; Lyons, Gordon

    2010-11-01

    Difficult tracheal intubation following induction of general anaesthesia for caesarean section is a cause of morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to evaluate five bedside predictors that might identify women with potential intubation difficulty immediately prior to emergency caesarean section. Women requiring emergency caesarean section with general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation who had been assessed by the same experienced anaesthesiologist preoperatively were included in this study. Mallampati score, sternomental distance, thyromental distance, interincisor gap and atlantooccipital extension were all measured. The same anaesthesiologist performed laryngoscopy and graded the laryngeal view according to Cormack and Lehane. Exact logistic regression was used to identify significant independent predictors for difficult intubation (Cormack and Lehane grades ≥ 3) with two-sided P value less than 0.05 considered as significant. In 3 years, 239 women were recruited. Cormack and Lehane grades of 2 or less (easy) were found in 225 and grade of at least 3 (difficult) in 14 women. Patients' characteristics (age, height, weight, BMI or weight gain) were not significantly associated with difficulty of intubation. The incidence of difficult intubation was 1/17 women [95% confidence interval (CI) from 1/31 to 1/10]. A positive result from any of the five predictors combined had a sensitivity of 0.21 (95%CI 0.05-0.51), a specificity of 0.92 (95%CI 0.88-0.96), a positive predictive value of 0.15 (95%CI 0.032-0.38) and a negative predictive value of 0.95 (95%CI 0.91-0.97) for a Cormack and Lehane grade of at least 3 at laryngoscopy. Airway assessment using these tests cannot be relied upon to predict a difficult intubation at emergency caesarean section as the low sensitivity means that 79% (95%CI 49-95) of difficult intubations will be missed.

  16. Modeling expiratory flow from excised tracheal tube laws.

    PubMed

    Aljuri, N; Freitag, L; Venegas, J G

    1999-11-01

    Flow limitation during forced exhalation and gas trapping during high-frequency ventilation are affected by upstream viscous losses and by the relationship between transmural pressure (Ptm) and cross-sectional area (A(tr)) of the airways, i.e., tube law (TL). Our objective was to test the validity of a simple lumped-parameter model of expiratory flow limitation, including the measured TL, static pressure recovery, and upstream viscous losses. To accomplish this objective, we assessed the TLs of various excised animal tracheae in controlled conditions of quasi-static (no flow) and steady forced expiratory flow. A(tr) was measured from digitized images of inner tracheal walls delineated by transillumination at an axial location defining the minimal area during forced expiratory flow. Tracheal TLs followed closely the exponential form proposed by Shapiro (A. H. Shapiro. J. Biomech. Eng. 99: 126-147, 1977) for elastic tubes: Ptm = K(p) [(A(tr)/A(tr0))(-n) - 1], where A(tr0) is A(tr) at Ptm = 0 and K(p) is a parametric factor related to the stiffness of the tube wall. Using these TLs, we found that the simple model of expiratory flow limitation described well the experimental data. Independent of upstream resistance, all tracheae with an exponent n < 2 experienced flow limitation, whereas a trachea with n > 2 did not. Upstream viscous losses, as expected, reduced maximal expiratory flow. The TL measured under steady-flow conditions was stiffer than that measured under expiratory no-flow conditions, only if a significant static pressure recovery from the choke point to atmosphere was assumed in the measurement.

  17. Physiological vs. pharmacological signalling to myosin phosphorylation in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ning; Tsai, Ming-Ho; Chang, Audrey N; He, Weiqi; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhu, Minsheng; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2017-10-01

    Smooth muscle myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) is phosphorylated by Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase and dephosphorylated by myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP). Tracheal smooth muscle contains significant amounts of myosin binding subunit 85 (MBS85), another myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT) family member, in addition to MLCP regulatory subunit MYPT1. Concentration/temporal responses to carbachol demonstrated similar sensitivities for bovine tracheal force development and phosphorylation of RLC, MYPT1, MBS85 and paxillin. Electrical field stimulation releases ACh from nerves to increase RLC phosphorylation but not MYPT1 or MBS85 phosphorylation. Thus, nerve-mediated muscarinic responses in signalling modules acting on RLC phosphorylation are different from pharmacological responses with bath added agonist. The conditional knockout of MYPT1 or the knock-in mutation T853A in mice had no effect on muscarinic force responses in isolated tracheal tissues. MLCP activity may arise from functionally shared roles between MYPT1 and MBS85, resulting in minimal effects of MYPT1 knockout on contraction. Ca(2+) /calmodulin activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) initiates myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation for smooth muscle contraction with subsequent dephosphorylation for relaxation by myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) containing regulatory (MYPT1) and catalytic (PP1cδ) subunits. RLC phosphorylation-dependent force development is regulated by distinct signalling modules involving protein phosphorylations. We investigated responses to cholinergic agonist treatment vs. neurostimulation by electric field stimulation (EFS) in bovine tracheal smooth muscle. Concentration/temporal responses to carbachol demonstrated tight coupling between force development and RLC phosphorylation but sensitivity differences in MLCK, MYPT1 T853, MYPT1 T696, myosin binding subunit 85 (MBS85), paxillin and CPI-17 (PKC-potentiated protein

  18. Canine histiocytic neoplasia: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Fulmer, Amanda K.; Mauldin, Glenna E.

    2007-01-01

    Canine histiocytic neoplasms include cutaneous histiocytoma, as well as localized and disseminated histiocytic sarcoma. These tumors have variable biologic behavior, although the malignant disorders often have a poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry plays an essential role in differentiating histiocytic tumors from other neoplasias that may have similar histological appearances. This allows a definitive diagnosis to be established and provides a more accurate prediction of prognosis. This article reviews the biologic behavior, diagnosis, and treatment of histiocytic tumors in the dog. PMID:17987966

  19. Characterization of canine neutrophil granules.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, R T; Andersen, B R

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate distinct populations of canine neutrophil granules and to compare them with neutrophil granules from other species. Size, shape, density, and content of canine neutrophil granules were determined. Neutrophils obtained by Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation were homogenized, and granule populations were separated by isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient (rho, 1.14 to 1.22 g/ml). The most dense granule population (rho, 1.197 g/ml) contained all of the myeloperoxidase, beta-glucuronidase, and elastase, more than half of the acid beta-glycerophosphatase, and most of the lysozyme. The population with intermediate density (rho, 1.179 g/ml) contained lactoferrin, vitamin B12-binding protein, and the remainder of the acid beta-glycerophosphatase and lysozyme. The least dense granule population did not contain a major peak of any of the enzymes or binding proteins tested but was distinguished by density and morphology. The size and shape of the granules were determined from scanning electron micrographs and assessment of shape was aided by transmission electron micrographs. By these methods three populations of canine neutrophil granules were characterized and named: myeloperoxidase granules, vitamin B12-binding protein granules, and low-density granules. Images PMID:6292095

  20. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control.

  1. Genome Sequence of Canine Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Konstantinos V.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; McDonald, Michael; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Davison, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Canine herpesvirus is a widespread alphaherpesvirus that causes a fatal haemorrhagic disease of neonatal puppies. We have used high-throughput methods to determine the genome sequences of three viral strains (0194, V777 and V1154) isolated in the United Kingdom between 1985 and 2000. The sequences are very closely related to each other. The canine herpesvirus genome is estimated to be 125 kbp in size and consists of a unique long sequence (97.5 kbp) and a unique short sequence (7.7 kbp) that are each flanked by terminal and internal inverted repeats (38 bp and 10.0 kbp, respectively). The overall nucleotide composition is 31.6% G+C, which is the lowest among the completely sequenced alphaherpesviruses. The genome contains 76 open reading frames predicted to encode functional proteins, all of which have counterparts in other alphaherpesviruses. The availability of the sequences will facilitate future research on the diagnosis and treatment of canine herpesvirus-associated disease. PMID:27213534

  2. Fractal pattern of canine trichoblastoma.

    PubMed

    De Vico, Gionata; Cataldi, Marielda; Maiolino, Paola; Carella, Francesca; Beltraminelli, Stefano; Losa, Gabriele A

    2011-06-01

    To assess by fractal analysis the specific architecture, growth pattern, and tissue distribution that characterize subtypes of canine trichoblastoma, a benign tumor derived from or reduplicating the primitive hair germ of embryonic follicular development. Tumor masks and outlines obtained from immunohistologic images by gray threshold segmentation of epithelial components were analyzed by fractal and conventional morphometry. The fractal dimension [FD] of each investigated case was determined from the slope of the regression line describing the fractal region within a bi-asymptotic curve experimentally established. All tumor masks and outlines obtained by gray threshold segmentation of epithelial components showed fractal self-similar properties that were evaluated by peculiar FDs. However, only masks revealed significantly different FD values, ranging from 1.75 to 1.85, enabling the discrimination of canine trichoblastoma subtypes. The FD data suggest that an iterative morphogenetic process, involving both the air germ and associated dermal papilla, may be responsible of the peculiar tissue architecture of trichoblastoma. The present study emphasized the reliability of fractal analysis in achieving the objective characterization of canine trichoblastoma.

  3. Sewage surveillance reveals the presence of canine GVII norovirus and canine astrovirus in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Lizasoain, A; Tort, L F L; García, M; Gómez, M M; Leite, J P G; Miagostovich, M P; Cristina, J; Berois, M; Colina, R; Victoria, Matías

    2015-11-01

    Canine norovirus (NoV) and astrovirus (AstV) were studied in 20 domestic sewage samples collected in two cities in Uruguay. Four samples were characterized as canine AstV after phylogenetic analysis clustering with strains detected in Italy and Brazil in 2008 and 2012, respectively. One sample was characterized as canine NoV and clustered with a strain detected in Hong Kong and recently classified as GVII. This study shows the occurrence of a canine NoV GVII strain for the first time in the American continent and also warns about possible zoonotic infection, since canine strains were detected in domestic sewage.

  4. Tropism and pathological findings associated with canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV).

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Judy A; Brooks, Harriet W; Szladovits, Balázs; Erles, Kerstin; Gibbons, Rachel; Shields, Shelly; Brownlie, Joe

    2013-03-23

    Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) occurs frequently in densely housed dog populations. One of the common pathogens involved is canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), however little is known regarding its pathogenesis and the role it plays in the development of CIRD. The pathogenesis of five geographically unrelated canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV) isolates was investigated. Following experimental infection in dogs, all five CRCoV isolates gave rise to clinical signs of respiratory disease consistent with that observed during natural infection. The presence of CRCoV was associated with marked histopathological changes in the nares and trachea, with loss and damage to tracheal cilia, accompanied by inflammation. Viral shedding was readily detected from the oropharynx up to 10 days post infection, but there was little or no evidence of rectal shedding. The successful re-isolation of CRCoV from a wide range of respiratory and mucosal associated lymphoid tissues, and lung lavage fluids demonstrates a clear tropism of CRCoV for respiratory tissues and fulfils the final requirement for Koch's postulates. By study day 14 dogs had seroconverted to CRCoV and the antibodies raised were neutralising against both homologous and heterologous strains of CRCoV in vitro, thus demonstrating antigenic homogeneity among CRCoV strains from the two continents. Defining the role that CRCoV and other agents play in CIRD is a considerable, but important, challenge if the disease is to be managed, treated and prevented more successfully. Here we have successfully developed a model for studying the pathogenicity and the role of CRCoV in CIRD.

  5. Temperature-Sensitive Live-Attenuated Canine Influenza Virus H3N8 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Aitor; Rodriguez, Laura; Chauché, Caroline; Huang, Kai; Reilly, Emma C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Canine influenza is a respiratory disease of dogs caused by canine influenza virus (CIV). CIV subtypes responsible for influenza in dogs include H3N8, which originated from the transfer of H3N8 equine influenza virus to dogs; and the H3N2 CIV, which is an avian-origin virus that adapted to infect dogs. Influenza infections are most effectively prevented through vaccination to reduce transmission and future infection. Currently, only inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) are available for the prevention of CIV in dogs. However, the efficacy of IIVs is suboptimal, and novel approaches are necessary for the prevention of disease caused by this canine respiratory pathogen. Using reverse genetics techniques, we have developed a live-attenuated CIV vaccine (LACIV) for the prevention of H3N8 CIV. The H3N8 LACIV replicates efficiently in canine cells at 33°C but is impaired at temperatures of 37 to 39°C and was attenuated compared to wild-type H3N8 CIV in vivo and ex vivo. The LACIV was able to induce protection against H3N8 CIV challenge with a single intranasal inoculation in mice. Immunogenicity and protection efficacy were better than that observed with a commercial CIV H3N8 IIV but provided limited cross-reactive immunity and heterologous protection against H3N2 CIV. These results demonstrate the feasibility of implementing a LAIV approach for the prevention and control of H3N8 CIV in dogs and suggest the need for a new LAIV for the control of H3N2 CIV. IMPORTANCE Two influenza A virus subtypes has been reported in dogs in the last 16 years: the canine influenza viruses (CIV) H3N8 and H3N2 of equine and avian origins, respectively. To date, only inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) are available to prevent CIV infections. Here, we report the generation of a recombinant, temperature-sensitive H3N8 CIV as a live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), which was attenuated in mice and dog tracheal, explants compared to CIV H3N8 wild type. A single dose of H3N8

  6. Tracheal varices caused by mediastinal compression of a large intrathoracic goiter: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    LUCCHINI, R.; SANTOPRETE, S.; TRIOLA, R.; POLISTENA, A.; MONACELLI, M.; AVENIA, S.; SANGUINETTI, A.; PUMA, F.; AVENIA, N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal varices are a rare condition but they can be an important source of massive or recurrent haemoptysis. Usually they are related to increased pressure in the pulmonary veins. Mediastinal goiter is often associated to compressive effects on the surrounding structures, including mediastinal vessels with potential superior vena cava syndrome. Case report We describe a case, not previously reported in literature, of mediastinal goiter with hemoptysis as first clinical manifestation. Bleeding was attributed to a superior vena cava syndrome associated to a tracheal fragile mucosa with an easily bleeding intramural nodule which was diagnosed as tracheal varices after total thyroidectomy. The nodule in fact disappeared together with the venous hypertensive signs after venous decompression of the mediastinum. Conclusions Compressive symptoms including tracheal varices, related to mediastinal goiter, can be treated surgically by total thyroidectomy via cervicotomy and when required with associated median sternotomy. PMID:25827666

  7. Infected tracheal diverticulum: a rare association with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cecília Beatriz Alves; Silva, Sónia; Feijó, Salvato

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal diverticulum, defined as a benign outpouching of the tracheal wall, is rarely diagnosed in clinical practice. It can be congenital or acquired in origin, and most cases are asymptomatic, typically being diagnosed postmortem. We report a case of a 69-year-old woman who was hospitalized after presenting with fever, fatigue, pleuritic chest pain, and a right neck mass complicated by dysphagia. Her medical history was significant: pulmonary emphysema (alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency); bronchiectasis; and thyroidectomy. On physical examination, she presented diminished breath sounds and muffled heart sounds, with a systolic murmur. Laboratory tests revealed elevated inflammatory markers, a CT scan showed an air-filled, multilocular mass in the right tracheal wall, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the CT findings. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy failed to reveal any abnormalities. Nevertheless, the patient was diagnosed with tracheal diverticulum. The treatment approach was conservative, consisting mainly of antibiotics. After showing clinical improvement, the patient was discharged.

  8. Progressive tracheal and superior vena caval compression caused by benign neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed Central

    el Oakley, R.; Grotte, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    The case history presented is of a patient with progressive tracheal and superior vena caval compression caused by a benign neurofibroma, a previously unrecognised feature of neurofibromatosis. The patient was successfully treated by surgical decompression. Images PMID:8202913

  9. A case of Toriello-Carey syndrome with severe congenital tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Noritaka; Marumo, Chieko; Nishida, Yoshinobu; Iio, Jun; Maeda, Shinji; Nonaka, Michiko; Maihara, Toshiro; Chujoh, Satoru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sakazaki, Hisanori; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2013-09-01

    Toriello-Carey syndrome is rare condition characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum, the Pierre Robin sequence, and facial anomalies such as telecanthus, short palpebral fissures, and a small nose with anteverted nares [Toriello and Carey, 1988]. In addition, tracheal and laryngeal anomalies are common complications in patients with Toriello-Carey syndrome, and these anomalies can lead to death [Kataoka et al., 2003]. Congenital tracheal stenosis is a life-threatening condition with high mortality. Even if surgery is successful, several serious complications can result in a high risk of mortality. We describe a case of a Japanese boy with Toriello-Carey syndrome who had severe congenital tracheal stenosis, in whom surgical tracheal plasty was avoided because of adequate respiratory care, allowing the patient to be alive at 18 months of age. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Outer diameter and shape of paediatric tracheal tube cuffs at higher inflation pressures.

    PubMed

    Bernet, V; Dullenkopf, A; Maino, P; Weiss, M

    2005-11-01

    Cuffed tracheal tubes are becoming increasingly popular in paediatric anaesthesia and intensive care medicine. To avoid cuff related complications and airway morbidity, a thorough understanding of cuff volume/pressure behaviour and management is required. In this study, the outer cuff diameter and form stability of the cuff at high cuff pressure were assessed in a series of different paediatric cuffed tracheal tubes with internal diameter of between 3.0 and 5.0 mm. The main findings were that small amounts of inflated air led to a rapid increase in cuff pressure and volume and that the outer cuff diameters increased to 2-2.5 times the age-corresponding internal tracheal diameter following inadvertent syringe inflation. Careful cuff inflation under cuff pressure monitoring and/or automatic cuff pressure release is recommended in paediatric tracheal tube cuffs to prevent airway damage caused by manual inflation, pilot balloon compression and nitrous oxide diffusion.

  11. Identification of FGF-dependent genes in the Drosophila tracheal system.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Markus; Schuh, Reinhard; Adryan, Boris

    2007-01-01

    The embryonic development of the tracheal system of the fruit fly Drosophila provides a paradigm for genetic studies of branching morphogenesis. Efforts of many laboratories have identified Branchless (Bnl, a fibroblast growth factor homologue) and Breathless (Btl, the receptor homologue) as crucial factors at many stages of tracheal system development. The downstream targets of the Bnl/Btl signalling cascade, however, remain mostly unknown. Misexpression of the bnl gene results in specific tracheal phenotypes that lead to larval death. We characterised the transcriptional profiles of targeted over-expression of bnl in the embryonic trachea and of loss-of-function bnl(P1) mutant embryos. Gene expression data was mapped to high-throughput in situ hybridisation based ImaGO-annotation. Thus, we identified and confirmed by quantitative PCR 13 Bnl-dependent genes that are expressed in cells within and outside of the tracheal system.

  12. Possible involvement of Rho kinase in Ca2+ sensitization and mobilization by MCh in tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Kume, H; Honjo, H; Katoh, H; Kodama, I; Yamaki, K; Hayashi, H

    2001-06-01

    We examined the effects of Rho kinase on contraction and intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+](i)) in guinea pig trachealis by measuring isometric force and the fura 2 signal [340- to 380-nm fluorescence ratio (F340/F380)]. A Rho kinase inhibitor, Y-27632 (1-1,000 microM), inhibited methacholine (MCh)-induced contraction, with a reduction in F340/F380 in a concentration-dependent manner. The values of EC(50) for contraction and F340/F380 induced by 1 microM MCh with Y-27632 were 27.3 +/- 5.1 and 524.1 +/- 31.0 microM, respectively. With 0.1 microM MCh, the values for these parameters were decreased to 1.0 +/- 0.1 and 98.2 +/- 6.2 microM, respectively. Tension-F340/F380 curves for MCh indicated that Y-27632 caused an ~50% inhibition of MCh-induced contraction, without a reduction in F340/F380. These effects of Y-27632 were not inhibited by a protein kinase C inhibitor, GF-109203X. Our results indicate that inhibition of Rho kinase attenuates both Ca2+ sensitization and [Ca2+](i).

  13. The preparation of chicken tracheal organ cultures for virus isolation, propagation, and titration.

    PubMed

    Hennion, Ruth M

    2015-01-01

    Chicken tracheal organ cultures (TOCs), comprising transverse sections of chick embryo trachea with beating cilia, have proved useful in the isolation of several respiratory viruses and as a viral assay system, using ciliostasis as the criterion for infection. A simple technique for the preparation of chicken tracheal organ cultures in glass test tubes, in which virus growth and ciliostasis can be readily observed, is described.

  14. Use of Tracheal Aspirate Culture in Newly Intubated Patients with Community-Onset Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Lindsay M; Webb, Brandon J; Sorensen, Jeffrey; Dean, Nathan C

    2016-03-01

    Successful treatment of life-threatening community-acquired pneumonia requires appropriate empiric antibiotic coverage. But using conventional diagnostic techniques, a microbiological diagnosis is often not achieved. The diagnostic usefulness of tracheal aspirate at the time of intubation in patients with severe pneumonia has not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of tracheal aspirate culture in identifying pneumonia pathogens. We identified all patients older than 18 years of age with International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision codes and radiographic evidence of pneumonia seen in the emergency departments at 2 university-affiliated Utah hospitals from December 2009 to November 2010 and from December 2011 to November 2012. Patients intubated within 24 hours of arrival were then identified electronically. Postintubation orders instructed respiratory therapists to obtain tracheal aspirate for culture. All culture results were reviewed individually and defined as positive if a pneumonia pathogen was identified. Results of other microbiology studies were obtained from the electronic medical record. Of 2,011 patients with pneumonia, 94 were intubated and 84 had a tracheal aspirate obtained. Of these 84 patients, 47 (56%) had a pulmonary pathogen identified by tracheal aspirate culture, 80 also had blood cultures, and 71 underwent Pneumococcal and Legionella urinary antigen testing. A microbiological diagnosis was made in 55 patients (65.5%) by any diagnostic method. In 39% of patients (32 of 82), the tracheal aspirate culture was the only positive test, resulting in a unique microbiological diagnosis in patients who would have otherwise been classified as "culture negative." Tracheal aspirate cultures obtained as part of routine care identified a plausible pneumonia pathogen in more than one-half of emergency department adult patients with severe pneumonia requiring intubation. Tracheal aspirate culture offers important

  15. Update on the diagnosis and treatment of tracheal and bronchial injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhengwei; Zhang, Tianyi; Yin, Xunliang; Zhao, Jinbo; Li, Xiaofei

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal and bronchial injury, including iatrogenic injury and traumatic injury, the former usually occurred in the operation, intubation or bronchoscopy. The latter was occurred in a variety of blunt trauma, often combined with a variety of complex injuries. The therapeutic approach can be differentiated, surgical or conservative, no criteria has been universally accepted. Successful treatment of tracheobronchial injuries requires early diagnostic evaluation. This article aims to review the indications and therapeutic options for tracheal and bronchial injuries. PMID:28203437

  16. [Delayed iatrogenic tracheal post-intubation rupture. A short review of the aetiopathology and treatment].

    PubMed

    Pinegger, S; Gómez-Ríos, M A; Vizcaíno, L; Carillo, M

    2013-05-01

    Iatrogenic tracheal rupture is a rare complication with a high morbidity and mortality. Tracheal intubation is the main cause and its origin is multifactorial. The diagnosis is based on non-specific but highly suggestive signs and symptoms, such as subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothorax, respiratory distress, or haemoptysis. Confirmation of the diagnosis requires an examination by bronchoscopy. Surgical repair has traditionally been the treatment of choice although the current trend is conservative management.

  17. Correlated patterns of tracheal compression and convective gas exchange in a carabid beetle.

    PubMed

    Socha, John J; Lee, Wah-Keat; Harrison, Jon F; Waters, James S; Fezzaa, Kamel; Westneat, Mark W

    2008-11-01

    Rhythmic tracheal compression is a prominent feature of internal dynamics in multiple orders of insects. During compression parts of the tracheal system collapse, effecting a large change in volume, but the ultimate physiological significance of this phenomenon in gas exchange has not been determined. Possible functions of this mechanism include to convectively transport air within or out of the body, to increase the local pressure within the tracheae, or some combination thereof. To determine whether tracheal compressions are associated with excurrent gas exchange in the ground beetle Pterostichus stygicus, we used flow-through respirometry and synchrotron x-ray phase-contrast imaging to simultaneously record CO(2) emission and observe morphological changes in the major tracheae. Each observed tracheal compression (which occurred at a mean frequency and duration of 15.6+/-4.2 min(-1) and 2.5+/-0.8 s, respectively) was associated with a local peak in CO(2) emission, with the start of each compression occurring simultaneously with the start of the rise in CO(2) emission. No such pulses were observed during inter-compression periods. Most pulses occurred on top of an existing level of CO(2) release, indicating that at least one spiracle was open when compression began. This evidence demonstrates that tracheal compressions convectively pushed air out of the body with each stroke. The volume of CO(2) emitted per pulse was 14+/-4 nl, representing approximately 20% of the average CO(2) emission volume during x-ray irradiation, and 13% prior to it. CO(2) pulses with similar volume, duration and frequency were observed both prior to and after x-ray beam exposure, indicating that rhythmic tracheal compression was not a response to x-ray irradiation per se. This study suggests that intra-tracheal and trans-spiracular convection of air driven by active tracheal compression may be a major component of ventilation for many insects.

  18. Correlation Between Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure and Tracheal Wall Pressure Using Air and Saline Filled Cuffs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-31

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2017-0004 Correlation Between Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure and Tracheal Wall Pressure Using Air - and Saline-Filled... Air Force Research Laboratory 711th Human Performance Wing U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Aeromedical Research Department 2510 Fifth...Correlation Between Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure and Tracheal Wall Pressure Using Air - and Saline-Filled Cuffs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-14

  19. Is intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility correlated to clinical phenotypes and sex in patients with COPD?

    PubMed Central

    Camiciottoli, Gianna; Diciotti, Stefano; Bigazzi, Francesca; Lombardo, Simone; Bartolucci, Maurizio; Paoletti, Matteo; Mascalchi, Mario; Pistolesi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) develops various degree of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility. We studied whether the magnitude of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility could be different across clinical phenotypes and sex in COPD. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility measured at paired inspiratory–expiratory low dose computed tomography (CT) and its correlation with clinical, functional, and CT-densitometric data were investigated in 69 patients with COPD according to their predominant conductive airway or emphysema phenotypes and according to sex. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was higher in patients with predominant conductive airway disease (n=28) and in females (n=27). Women with a predominant conductive airway phenotype (n=10) showed a significantly greater degree of collapsibility than women with predominant emphysema (28.9%±4% versus 11.6%±2%; P<0.001). Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was directly correlated with inspiratory–expiratory volume variation at CT and with forced expiratory volume (1 second), and inversely correlated with reduced CT lung density and functional residual capacity. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was not correlated with cough and wheezing; however, intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility and clinical phenotypes of COPD are closely correlated. In patients with a predominant emphysematous phenotype, a reduced collapsibility may reflect the mechanical properties of the stiff hyperinflated emphysematous lung. The high collapsibility in patients with predominant airway disease, mild airway obstruction, and in women with this phenotype may reflect chronic airway inflammation. The lack of relationship with such symptoms as wheezing, cough, and dyspnea could indicate that intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility itself should be considered neither an abnormal feature of COPD nor a relevant clinical finding. PMID:25960647

  20. Tracheal amylase dosage as a marker for microaspiration: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Filloux, B; Bedel, A; Nseir, S; Mathiaux, J; Amadéo, B; Clouzeau, B; Pillot, J; Saghi, T; Vargas, F; Hilbert, G; Gruson, D; Boyer, A

    2013-09-01

    Devices that limit microaspiration through the cuffs of endotracheal tubes could help prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The amount of tracheal microaspirations could be a relevant study endpoint. The aim of our study was to assess whether amylase measured in tracheal secretions constituted a relevant marker for microaspiration. Twenty-six patients, intubated for at least 48 h and supplied with a subglottic secretion-suctioning device, constituted a group with a high risk of microaspiration. Twelve non-ventilated patients that required a bronchoscopy procedure constituted a group with a low risk of microaspiration (the control group). Tracheal (T) amylase was compared between the groups. In the intubated group, a series of oral (O), subglottic (Sg) and tracheal (T) suction samples were collected and T/O, T/Sg, Sg/O amylase ratios were determined. Amylase was measured in 277 (89 Sg, 96 B, 92 T) samples from the intubated group and in 12 T samples from the control group. Tracheal amylase was lower in the control group than the intubated group (191 [10-917] vs. 6661 [2774-19,358] IU/L, P<0.001). Amylase gradually increased from tracheal (6661 [2774-19,358] IU/L), to subglottic (130,750 [55,257-157,717] IU/L), to oral samples (307,606 [200,725-461,300] IU/L), resulting in a median 5.5% T/O ratio. In a subset of intubated patients, T amylase samples were assessed in two different laboratories, and gave reproducible results. Tracheal amylase was easy to collect, transport, and measure. The T/O amylase ratio is a first step towards quantifying oropharyngeal to tracheal microaspiration in mechanically-ventilated patients.

  1. Airtraq® versus Macintosh laryngoscope: A comparative study in tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Geeta; Shahi, K. S.; Asad, Mohammad; Bhakuni, Rajani

    2013-01-01

    Background: The curved laryngoscope blade described by Macintosh in 1943 remains the most widely used device to facilitate tracheal intubation. The Airtraq® (Prodol Meditec S.A, Vizcaya, Spain) is a new, single use, indirect laryngoscope introduced into clinical practice in 2005. It has wan exaggerated blade curvature with internal arrangement of optical lenses and a mechanism to prevent fogging of the distal lens. A high quality view of the glottis is provided without the need to align the oral, pharyngeal and tracheal axis. We evaluated Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes for success rate of tracheal intubation, overall duration of successful intubation, optimization maneuvers, POGO (percentage of glottic opening) score, and ease of intubation. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomly allocated by computer-generated random table to one of the two groups, comprising 40 patients each, group I (Airtraq) and group II (Macintosh). After induction of general anesthesia, tracheal intubation was attempted with the Airtraq or the Macintosh laryngoscope as per group. Primary end points were overall success rate of tracheal intubation, overall duration of successful tracheal intubation, optimization maneuvers, POGO score and ease of intubation between the two groups. Results: We observed that Airtraq was better than the Macintosh laryngoscope as duration of successful intubation was shorter in Airtraq 18.15 seconds (±2.74) and in the Macintosh laryngoscope it was 32.72 seconds (±8.31) P < 0.001. POGO was also better in the Airtraq group 100% grade 1 versus 67.5% in the Macintosh group, P < 0.001. Ease of intubation was also better in the Airtraq group. It was easy in 97.5% versus 42.5% in the Macintosh group, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Both Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes are equally effective in tracheal intubation in normal airways. Duration of successful tracheal intubation was shorter in the Airtraq group which was statistically significant. PMID:25885839

  2. Neuronal adrenergic and muscular cholinergic contractile hypersensitivity in canine jejunum after extrinsic denervation.

    PubMed

    Balsiger, Bruno M; He, Chong-Liang; Zyromski, Nicholas J; Sarr, Michael G

    2003-01-01

    Extrinsic denervation may be responsible for motor dysfunction after small bowel transplantation. The aim of this study was to examine the role of extrinsic innervation of canine jejunum on contractile activity. An in vitro dose response of cholinergic and adrenergic agonists was evaluated in canine jejunal strips of circular muscle at 0, 2, and 8 weeks in a control group and after jejunoileal extrinsic denervation (EX DEN). Neurons in circular muscle were quantitated by means of immunohistochemical techniques. Adrenergic and cholinergic responses did not differ at any time in the control group. However, at 2 and 8 weeks, extrinsic denervation caused an increased sensitivity to the procontractile effects of the cholinergic agonist bethanechol at the level of the smooth muscle cells, and increased sensitivity to the inhibitory effects of the adrenergic agent norepinephrine mediated at the level of the enteric nervous system. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a reduction in all neurons and a complete lack of adrenergic fibers in the EX DEN group after 2 and 8 weeks. Extrinsic denervation induces enteric neuronal cholinergic and adrenergic smooth muscle hypersensitivity in canine jejunal circular muscle.

  3. Mechanical properties of tracheal tubes in the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Matthew R.; De Vita, Raffaella; Twigg, Jeffrey N.; Socha, John J.

    2011-09-01

    Insects breathe using an extensive network of flexible air-filled tubes. In some species, the rapid collapse and reinflation of these tubes is used to drive convective airflow, a system that may have bio-inspired engineering applications. The mechanical behavior of these tracheal tubes is critical to understanding how they function in this deformation process. Here, we performed quasi-static tensile tests on ring sections of the main thoracic tracheal trunks from the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) to determine the tracheal mechanical properties in the radial direction. The experimental findings indicate that the stress-strain relationships of these tracheal tubes exhibit some nonlinearities. The elastic modulus of the linear region of the stress-strain curves tubes was found to be 1660 ± 512 MPa. The ultimate tensile strength, ultimate strain and toughness were found to be 23.7 ± 7.33 MPa, 2.0 ± 0.7% and 0.207 ± 0.153 MJ m-3, respectively. This study is the first experimental quantification of insect tracheal tissue, and represents a necessary step toward understanding the mechanical role of tracheal tubes in insect respiration.

  4. Tracheal rupture related to endotracheal intubation after thyroid surgery: a case report and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohan; Xing, Na; Chang, Yanzi; Du, Yingying; Li, Zhisong; Wang, Zhongyu; Yan, Jie; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Tracheobronchial rupture is an uncommon but potentially serious complication of endotracheal intubation. The most likely cause of tracheal injury is massive overinflation of the endotracheal tube cuff and pre-existing tracheal wall weakness. We review the relevant literature and predisposing factors contributing to this complication. Only articles that reported at least the demographic data (age and sex), the treatment performed and the outcome were included. Papers that did not detail these variables were excluded. We also focus on a case of tracheal laceration after tracheal intubation in a patient with severe thyroid carcinoma. This patient received surgical repair and recovered uneventfully. Two hundred and eight studies that reported cases or case series were selected for analysis. Most of the reported cases (57·2%) showed an uneventful recovery after surgical therapy. The overall mortality was 19·2% (40 patients). Our patient too recovered without any serious complication. Careful prevention, early detection and proper treatment of the problem are necessary when tracheal rupture occurs. The morbidity and mortality associated with tracheal injury mandate a high level of suspicion and expedient management. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Biodegradable polydioxanone stent as a new treatment strategy for tracheal stenosis in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Insu; Ono, Shigeru; Maeda, Kosaku

    2016-12-01

    Congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS) is a rare condition and difficult to treat. Slide tracheoplasty has unsatisfactory outcomes for severe neonatal symptomatic CTS. This study evaluated the use of biodegradable polydioxanone stents (BD stent) in a rabbit model of CTS. Tracheal stenosis was induced in female Japanese white rabbits, 9-10weeks old, by direct scraping of the tracheal mucosa with a nylon brush following transverse incision of the trachea (control group, n=4). Seven days later, we incised the trachea again and inserted a BD stent (15×5mm) into the trachea (stent group, n=4). Arterial blood gas analysis was performed twice weekly for 1month after the procedure. In the control group, respiratory acidosis arising from ventilatory failure was observed on postoperative days 7-10. Rabbits were sacrificed at 11.5days after scraping. Severe tracheal stenosis resulting from inflammatory granulation was detected in the scraped region in all rabbits. In the stent group, arterial blood gas analysis was normal at 28days after stent insertion. The BD stent maintained patency of the tracheal lumen and prolonged survival for 1month. The use of BD stent represents a promising new treatment method for tracheal stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prediction of the mid-tracheal level using surface anatomical landmarks in adults

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Young-Eun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Song, In-Kyung; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Ryu, Ho-Geoul; Kim, Hee-Soo; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Endotracheal tube (ETT) should be placed at the optimal level to avoid single lung ventilation or accidental extubation. This study was performed to estimate the mid-tracheal level by using surface anatomical landmarks in adult patients. Neck computed tomography images of 329 adult patients between the ages of 16 and 79 years were reviewed. In the midline sagittal plane, the levels corresponding to the vocal cords, cricoid cartilage, suprasternal notch, manubriosternal junction, and carina were identified. The surface distances from the cricoid cartilage to the suprasternal notch (extCC-SSN) and that from the suprasternal notch to the manubriosternal junction (extSSN-MSJ) were measured. The relationship between mid-tracheal level and the surface distances was analyzed using Bland–Altman plot. The difference between the extCC-SSN and the mid-tracheal level was −6.6 (12.5) mm, and the difference between the extSSN-MSJ and the mid-tracheal level was −19.2 (6.1) mm. The difference between the extCC-SSN and the mid-tracheal level was smaller in females compared with males [−1.7 (11.7) mm vs −12.8 (10.7) mm; P < 0.001]. The mid-tracheal level, which is helpful in planning the insertion depth of an ETT, can be predicted by the surface distance between the cricoid cartilage and suprasternal notch in adults, especially in females. PMID:28328810

  7. Iatrogenic post-intubation tracheal rupture treated conservatively without intubation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Prunet, Bertrand; Lacroix, Guillaume; Asencio, Yves; Cathelinaud, Olivier; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Goutorbe, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Background Tracheal rupture is a rare but life-threatening complication that most commonly occurrs after blunt trauma to the chest, but which may also complicate tracheal intubation. We report a case of post-intubation tracheal rupture after cataract surgery under general anesthesia treated conservatively. Case presentation Four hours after extubation, a 67 year-old woman developed subcutaneous emphysema of the facial, bilateral laterocervical and upper anterior chest. Tracheobronchial fiberendoscopy showed a posterior tracheal transmural rupture 4 cm long located 2.5 cm above the carina that opened in inspiration. The location of the lesion and features of the patient favoured conservative treatment with antibiotic cover. The patient made a full and uncomplicated recovery and was discharged fourteen days after the original injury. Conclusion Two therapeutic strategies are currently employed for post-intubation tracheal rupture: a non-surgical strategy for small injuries and a surgical strategy for larger injuries. This case report presented the non-surgical therapeutic strategy of a large tracheal injury. PMID:18945364

  8. Synergistic effect of laminin and mesenchymal stem cells on tracheal mucosal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doh Young; Lee, Jin Ho; Ahn, Hee-Jin; Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Hee-Bok; Park, Seok-Won; Kwon, Seong Keun

    2015-03-01

    Although several studies have been successfully undertaken of tracheal reconstruction in terms of the maintaining the framework of the graft, most cases of reconstruction failure have resulted from delayed mucosal regeneration. The purposes of this study were to evaluate whether laminin-coated asymmetrically porous membrane (APM) scaffold enhances mucosal regeneration, to compare the mucosalization capability with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) seeded APM, and to determine whether laminin coating and MSC seeding has a synergistic effect on mucosal regeneration. We reconstructed the full-thickness anterior tracheal defect of 36 New Zealand White rabbits with the APM scaffold. MSCs were isolated from the rabbit's inguinal fat. The animals were divided into 4 groups by the presence of laminin coating on APM and application of MSC [Group I, -/- (laminin/MSC); Group II, -/+; Group III, +/-; Group IV, +/+]. Endoscopy and histologic evaluation were performed and the results were compared among the groups. The results showed that ciliated columnar epithelium was regenerated earlier in groups II and III than in group I. Furthermore, the application of laminin and MSC had synergistic effects on tracheal epithelial regeneration. These results demonstrate that tracheal reconstruction by laminin-coated APM seeded with MSCs is most effective in enhancing tracheal mucosalization, and appears to be promising strategy in the regenerative treatment of tracheal defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Use of a gum elastic bougie for tracheal intubation with Pentax-AWS airway scope].

    PubMed

    Ueshima, Hironobu; Asai, Takashi; Shingu, Koh; Inoue, Hisashi; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Enomoto, Yoshiro; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2008-01-01

    Pentax-AWS laryngoscope (Pentax, Tokyo, Japan) consists of a disposable anatomically shaped blade, a 12-cm cable with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and a 2.4-inch liquid crystal device (LCD) color monitor display. A tracheal tube can be attached to the right side of the blade. The device may be useful in patients with difficult airways. One limitation of the device is that intubation may be difficult if it is difficult to position the glottis to the target symbol on the monitor display. We experienced such a difficulty in four patients, and the use of a gum elastic bougie enabled intubation. In a 57-year-old woman with a difficult airway, tracheal intubation using either a Macintosh laryngoscope or a fiberscope had failed. By inserting the AWS laryngoscope, the glottis was easily seen on the monitor display. Nevertheless, it was difficult to position the glottis to the target symbol, and advancing a tracheal tube collided with the tissue around the glottis. A bougie was passed through the tracheal tube, and it became possible to insert the bougie into the trachea by adjusting the angle of its tip. The tracheal tube was then easily passed over the bougie into the trachea. We successfully used the same technique in other three patients. We believe that the gum elastic bougie can be useful for tracheal intubation using the Pentax-AWS laryngoscope.

  10. Fascin links Btl/FGFR signalling to the actin cytoskeleton during Drosophila tracheal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Okenve-Ramos, Pilar; Llimargas, Marta

    2014-02-01

    A key challenge in normal development and in disease is to elucidate the mechanisms of cell migration. Here we approach this question using the tracheal system of Drosophila as a model. Tracheal cell migration requires the Breathless/FGFR pathway; however, how the pathway induces migration remains poorly understood. We find that the Breathless pathway upregulates singed at the tip of tracheal branches, and that this regulation is functionally relevant. singed encodes Drosophila Fascin, which belongs to a conserved family of actin-bundling proteins involved in cancer progression and metastasis upon misregulation. We show that singed is required for filopodia stiffness and proper morphology of tracheal tip cells, defects that correlate with an abnormal actin organisation. We propose that singed-regulated filopodia and cell fronts are required for timely and guided branch migration and for terminal branching and branch fusion. We find that singed requirements rely on its actin-bundling activity controlled by phosphorylation, and that active Singed can promote tip cell features. Furthermore, we find that singed acts in concert with forked, another actin cross-linker. The absence of both cross-linkers further stresses the relevance of tip cell morphology and filopodia for tracheal development. In summary, our results on the one hand reveal a previously undescribed role for forked in the organisation of transient actin structures such as filopodia, and on the other hand identify singed as a new target of Breathless signal, establishing a link between guidance cues, the actin cytoskeleton and tracheal morphogenesis.

  11. Conservative management of post-intubation tracheal tears—report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Just, Tino; Dommerich, Steffen; Hingst, Volker; Böttcher, Arne; Schuldt, Tobias; Guder, Ellen; Mencke, Thomas; Pau, Hans-Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic tracheal rupture is a rare complication after intubation. We present three patients with tracheal tears. In all of these patients, a common finding was a lesion of the posterior tracheal wall with postoperative subcutaneous and emphysema as the first clinical sign of the rupture. Diagnosis and follow-up were based on clinical and endoscopic findings and chest computed tomography (CT) scans. In our cases with progressive subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema or dyspnea, we performed a tracheotomy and bypassed the lesion with a tracheostomy tube to avoid an increase in air leakage into the mediastinum. Under broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, no mediastinitis occurred and all patients survived without sequelae. Closure of tracheostomy was scheduled for 1-2 months after tracheal injury. Analysis of surgical and anesthesiological procedures revealed no abnormalities and the accumulation of tracheal injuries was considered as accidental. We found that in clinically stable patients with spontaneous breathing and with no mediastinitis, a conservative management of tracheal tears is a safe procedure. PMID:24977034

  12. Early prediction of maxillary canine impaction

    PubMed Central

    Storms, Ann-Sophie; Voet, Martine; Fieuws, Steffen; Willems, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish prediction criteria for maxillary canine impaction in young patients, based on angular and linear measurements on panoramic radiographs. Methods: From 828 records having at least 2 panoramic radiographs, both taken between the ages of 7 and 14 years, with a minimum 1-year and maximum 3-year interval (T1 and T2), a training data set consisting of 30 subjects with unilateral canine impaction (12 males and 18 females) was selected. The patients' mean age was 10.1 years [standard deviation (SD) 1.3 years] at T1 and 11.9 years (SD 1.1 years) at T2. The training data set also consisted of 30 maxillary canines from the contralateral sides and an additional 60 normal erupted canines from 30 subjects. Those 30 subjects of a test data set were selected based on displaying bilateral maxillary canine eruption at T2 and being matched for gender and age with the subjects of the training data set [12 males and 18 females; mean age at T1, 10.1 years (SD 1.3 years) and at T2, 11.1 years (SD 1.2 years)]. Angular and linear measurements were performed separately by two observers on the total study sample at T1. Linear measurements were expressed as a multiplication of the maxillary central incisor width at the non-impacted side. Results: Significant differences for linear and angular measurements and radiographic factors were found between the maxillary impacted canine and erupted maxillary canine. The three best-discriminating parameters were canine to first premolar angle, canine cusp to midline distance and canine cusp to maxillary plane distance. These three parameters were combined in a multiple logistic regression model to calculate the probability of impaction, yielding a high area under the curve (AUC) equal to 0.97 (95% confidence interval: 0.94–0.99), with 90% sensitivity and 94% specificity. Conclusions: Prediction of maxillary canine impaction from a combination of parameters relating to angles and distances measured

  13. Molecular signalling pathways in canine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, C E; York, D; Higgins, R J; LeCouteur, R A; Dickinson, P J

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we determined the expression of key signalling pathway proteins TP53, MDM2, P21, AKT, PTEN, RB1, P16, MTOR and MAPK in canine gliomas using western blotting. Protein expression was defined in three canine astrocytic glioma cell lines treated with CCNU, temozolamide or CPT-11 and was further evaluated in 22 spontaneous gliomas including high and low grade astrocytomas, high grade oligodendrogliomas and mixed oligoastrocytomas. Response to chemotherapeutic agents and cell survival were similar to that reported in human glioma cell lines. Alterations in expression of key human gliomagenesis pathway proteins were common in canine glioma tumour samples and segregated between oligodendroglial and astrocytic tumour types for some pathways. Both similarities and differences in protein expression were defined for canine gliomas compared to those reported in human tumour counterparts. The findings may inform more defined assessment of specific signalling pathways for targeted therapy of canine gliomas.

  14. Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses have not been given high priority in China, although the role of companion animals as reservoirs for zoonotic parasitic diseases has been recognized worldwide. With an increasing number of dogs and cats under unregulated conditions in China, the canine and feline parasitic zoonoses are showing a trend towards being gradually uncontrolled. Currently, canine and feline parasitic zoonoses threaten human health, and cause death and serious diseases in China. This article comprehensively reviews the current status of major canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in mainland China, discusses the risks dogs and cats pose with regard to zoonotic transmission of canine and feline parasites, and proposes control strategies and measures. PMID:22839365

  15. Molecular identification of a component of delayed rectifier current in gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, F; Kinsella, J; Koh, S D; Vogalis, F; Schneider, A; Flynn, E R; Kenyon, J L; Horowitz, B

    1998-05-01

    Kv2.2, homologous to the shab family of Drosophila voltage-gated K+ channels, was isolated from human and canine colonic circular smooth muscle-derived mRNA. Northern hybridization analysis performed on RNA prepared from tissues and RT-PCR performed on RNA isolated from dispersed and selected smooth muscle cells demonstrate that Kv2.2 is expressed in smooth muscle cells found in all regions of the canine gastrointestinal (GI) tract and in several vascular tissues. Injection of Kv2.2 mRNA into Xenopus oocytes resulted in the expression of a slowly activating K+ current (time to half maximum current, 97 +/- 8.6 ms) mediated by 15 pS (symmetrical K+) single channels. The current was inhibited by tetraethylammonium (IC50 = 2.6 mM), 4-aminopyridine (IC50 = 1.5 mM at +20 mV), and quinine (IC50 = 13.7 microM) and was insensitive to charybdotoxin. Low concentrations of quinine (1 microM) were used to preferentially block the slow component of the delayed rectifier current in native colonic myocytes. These data suggest that Kv2.2 may contribute to this current in native GI smooth muscle cells.

  16. Management of laryngo-tracheal injuries associated with craniomaxillofacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, David S; Bell, R Bryan; Bagheri, Shahrokh C; Dierks, Eric J; Potter, Bryce E

    2006-02-01

    Laryngeal fractures can occur in association with maxillofacial injuries and may lead to life-threatening airway obstruction. Because of a low incidence and a paucity of peer-reviewed information, there is no universally accepted treatment protocol and few clinicians have extensive experience with complex laryngo-tracheal trauma. The purpose of this retrospective analysis is to validate a treatment protocol for the management of laryngo-tracheal injuries occurring in severely injured patients by assessing the outcome of a consecutive series of patients who were treated by the same surgeons over a 12-year period. All patients with laryngeal fractures admitted to the trauma service at Legacy Emanuel Hospital and Health Center (LEHHC; Portland, OR) from 1992 to 2004 were managed by the same surgeons, using a standard protocol based on the stability of the airway, and were retrospectively identified using the LEHHC Trauma Registry. Using information from the Trauma Registry and individual physician chart notes, a database was created for the purpose of assessing outcome. The following data were collected: age, gender, mechanism of injury, number of associated injuries and the Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale on admission, initial hematocrit, airway management techniques, length of hospital stay, LEHHC laryngeal injury classification, treatment modality, disposition, and any available follow-up. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographics, treatment, and outcome. Outcome measures were defined as complications, airway patency, speech, and deglutition. A total of 16,465 patients were identified from the Trauma Registry as having sustained head, neck, or facial injuries, of which 37 patients were diagnosed with laryngeal fractures. Complete patient records were available for 27 patients (mean age, 35.5 +/- 15.3 years; range, 8 to 80 years; 23 males, 4 females) who were classified according to the LEHHC laryngeal injury classification scheme. Most

  17. Population based cancer registry analysis of primary tracheal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Urdaneta, Alfredo I; Yu, James B; Wilson, Lynn D

    2011-02-01

    Primary carcinomas of the trachea are rare tumors, occurring at a rate of 2.6 new cases per 1,000,000 people per year. This study investigates the large observational cohort of patients recorded in the NCI Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 1973-2004 database, and provides information regarding epidemiology, treatment, and prognosis. The SEER database was investigated, and all patients for whom primary tracheal carcinoma was the first and only cancer were investigated. Demographic information was investigated. The cohort was analyzed for variables effecting survival, including age, gender, race, histology, extent of disease, extent of surgery, use of radiation, and year of diagnosis. Between 1973 and 2004, 578 cases of primary tracheal carcinomas were reported in the SEER database. There were 322 men (55.7%) and 256 women (44.3%). Squamous cell carcinoma was the predominant histology, representing 259 tumors (44.8%). Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) was the second most common tumor (16.3%). Localized, regional and distant disease was found in 140 (24.2%), 212 (36.7%), and 108 (18.7%), respectively. Twenty percent of the patients did not undergo staging. Patients with localized disease had a better prognosis than those with regional (P = 0.001) or distant disease (P = <0.001).A significant fraction of patients did not receive cancer directed local therapy; 34.3% did not undergo surgery and 29.1% did not receive any kind of radiation therapy. There was a statistically significant improved survival for patients who underwent any type of surgery in comparison with patients who did not undergo cancer directed surgery. There was no statistical benefit for patients who underwent radiation therapy.General overall 5-year survival for all patients was 27.1% (95% CI: 23.1-33.3%). Patients with localized disease had a better outcome than patients with regional or distant disease with an overall 5-year survival of 46% (95% CI: 37.3%-55.8%). Squamous cell carcinoma

  18. Protective effect of high-dose montelukast on salbutamol-induced homologous desensitisation in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Stefano; Stefanelli, Fabio; Martelli, Alma; Daniele, Simona; Testai, Lara; Calderone, Vincenzo; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Martini, Claudia; Breschi, Maria Cristina

    2013-12-01

    Montelukast (MK) is a potent cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor antagonist that causes dose-related improvements in chronic asthma. We sought to determine whether MK was able to prevent salbutamol-induced tolerance in airway smooth muscle. Homologous β2-adrenoceptor desensitisation models were established in guinea-pigs and in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC) by chronic salbutamol administration. Characterisation tools included measurement of the response of tracheal smooth muscle tissues to salbutamol, analysis of gene expression and receptor trafficking, evaluation of intracellular cAMP levels and phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in human bronchial smooth muscle cells. Salbutamol-induced β2-adrenoceptor desensitisation was characterised by β2-agonist hyporesponsiveness (-30%, p < 0.001) in desensitised tracheal smooth muscle, as compared to controls. MK, given intraperitoneally at 5 mg/kg/day for 6 consecutive days, completely restored tissue responsiveness to salbutamol. Prolonged salbutamol treatment significantly decreased cAMP synthesis, induced a complete removal of the β2-adrenoceptor from plasma membrane with a parallel increase in the cytosol and increased PDE4D5 gene transcription and PDE activity in human bronchial smooth muscle cells. In homologously desensitised BSMC, MK 30 μM for 24 h was able to prevent salbutamol subsensitivity and such an effect was associated with inhibition of salbutamol-induced PDE4 activity and restoration of membrane β2-adrenoceptor expression and function. These findings suggest the presence of a favourable interaction between MK and β2-adrenoceptor agonists that might improve the therapeutic index of bronchodilators in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

  19. Intensity of swimming exercise influences tracheal reactivity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Aline F.; Silva, Alexandre S.; Souza, Iara L. L.; Pereira, Joedna C.; Martins, Italo R. R.; Silva, Bagnólia A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies that evaluate the mechanisms for increased airway responsiveness are very sparse, although there are reports of exercise-induced bronchospasm. Therefore, we have evaluated the tracheal reactivity and the rate of lipid peroxidation after different intensities of swimming exercise in rats. Thus, male Wistar rats (age 8 weeks; 250–300 g) underwent a forced swimming exercise for 1 h whilst carrying attached loads of 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8% of their body weight (groups G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8, respectively; n=5 each). Immediately after the test, the trachea of each rat was removed and suspended in an organ bath to evaluate contractile and relaxant responses. The rate of lipid peroxidation was estimated by measuring malondialdehyde levels. According to a one-way ANOVA, all trained groups showed a significant decrease in the relaxation induced by aminophylline (10−12–10−1 M) (pD2=3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.3 and 3.2, respectively for G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8) compared to the control group (pD2=4.6) and the Emax values of G5, G6, G8 groups were reduced by 94.2, 88.0 and 77.0%, respectively. Additionally, all trained groups showed a significant increase in contraction induced by carbachol (10−9–10−3 M) (pD2=6.0, 6.5, 6.5, 7.2 and 7.3, respectively for G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8) compared to the control group (pD2=5.7). Lipid peroxidation levels of G3, G4 and G5 were similar in both the trachea and lung, however G6 and G8 presented an increased peroxidation in the trachea. In conclusion, a single bout of swimming exercise acutely altered tracheal responsiveness in an intensity-related manner and the elevation in lipid peroxidation indicates a degree of oxidative stress involvement. PMID:26497013

  20. Intensity of swimming exercise influences tracheal reactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Brito, Aline F; Silva, Alexandre S; Souza, Iara L L; Pereira, Joedna C; Martins, Italo R R; Silva, Bagnólia A

    2015-01-01

    Studies that evaluate the mechanisms for increased airway responsiveness are very sparse, although there are reports of exercise-induced bronchospasm. Therefore, we have evaluated the tracheal reactivity and the rate of lipid peroxidation after different intensities of swimming exercise in rats. Thus, male Wistar rats (age 8 weeks; 250-300 g) underwent a forced swimming exercise for 1h whilst carrying attached loads of 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8% of their body weight (groups G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8, respectively; n=5 each). Immediately after the test, the trachea of each rat was removed and suspended in an organ bath to evaluate contractile and relaxant responses. The rate of lipid peroxidation was estimated by measuring malondialdehyde levels. According to a one-way ANOVA, all trained groups showed a significant decrease in the relaxation induced by aminophylline (10(-12)-10(-1) M) (pD2=3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.3 and 3.2, respectively for G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8) compared to the control group (pD2=4.6) and the Emax values of G5, G6, G8 groups were reduced by 94.2, 88.0 and 77.0%, respectively. Additionally, all trained groups showed a significant increase in contraction induced by carbachol (10(-9)-10 (-3) M) (pD2=6.0, 6.5, 6.5, 7.2 and 7.3, respectively for G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8) compared to the control group (pD2=5.7). Lipid peroxidation levels of G3, G4 and G5 were similar in both the trachea and lung, however G6 and G8 presented an increased peroxidation in the trachea. In conclusion, a single bout of swimming exercise acutely altered tracheal responsiveness in an intensity-related manner and the elevation in lipid peroxidation indicates a degree of oxidative stress involvement.

  1. A review of canine pseudocyesis.

    PubMed

    Gobello, C; de la Sota, R L; Goya, R G

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the most relevant features of the physiology, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of canine pseudocyesis (PSC). This is a physiological syndrome, characterized by clinical signs such as: nesting, weight gain, mammary enlargement, lactation and maternal behaviour, which appears in non-pregnant bitches at the end of metaoestrus. PSC is a frequent finding in domestic dogs. Although it is generally admitted that prolactin (PRL) plays a central role in the appearance of PSC, its precise aetiophysiology is not completely understood yet. A number of clinical studies suggest that at some point of metaoestrus circulating PRL levels rise in overtly pseudopregnant bitches. Individual differences in sensitivity to PRL as well as the existence of molecular variants of canine PRL with different bioactivity versus immunoreactivity ratios may help clarify the aetiopathology of PSC. Diagnosis of PSC is based on the presence of typical clinical signs in metaoestrous non-pregnant bitches. Considering that PSC is a self limiting physiological state, mild cases usually need no treatment. Discouraging maternal behaviour and sometimes fitting Elizabethan collars to prevent licking of the mammary glands may suffice in these cases. Sex steroids (oestrogens, progestins and androgens) have been traditionally used to treat PSC but the side-effects usually outweigh the benefits of these medications. Inhibition of PRL release by ergot derivatives [bromocriptine (10-100 microg/kg per day for 10-14 days], cabergoline (5 microg/kg per day during 5-10 days), metergoline (0.2 mg/kg per day during 8-10 days) has proved to be effective for the treatment of canine PSC. Although some of these ergot derivatives present some untoward side-effects, they are transient and can usually be managed. Predisposed bitches not intended for breeding should be spayed as ovariectomy is the only permanent preventive measure.

  2. Concomitant canine distemper, infectious canine hepatitis, canine parvoviral enteritis, canine infectious tracheobronchitis, and toxoplasmosis in a puppy.

    PubMed

    Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo; Fritzen, Juliana Torres Tomazi; Garcia, João Luis; Weissenböck, Herbert; da Silva, Ana Paula; Bodnar, Livia; Okano, Werner; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    The concomitant infections of Canine distemper virus (CDV), Canine adenovirus A types 1 (CAdV-1) and 2 (CAdV-2), Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), and Toxoplasma gondii are described in a 43-day-old mixed-breed puppy. Clinically, there were convulsions and blindness with spontaneous death; 14 siblings of this puppy, born to a 10-month-old dam, which was seropositive (titer: 1,024) for T. gondii, also died. Necropsy revealed unilateral corneal edema (blue eye), depletion of intestinal lymphoid tissue, non-collapsible lungs, congestion of meningeal vessels, and a pale area in the myocardium. Histopathology demonstrated necrotizing myocarditis associated with intralesional apicomplexan protozoa; necrotizing and chronic hepatitis associated with rare intranuclear inclusion bodies within hepatocytes; necrotizing bronchitis and bronchiolitis; interstitial pneumonia associated with eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies within epithelial cells; atrophy and fusion of intestinal villi with cryptal necrosis; and white matter demyelination of the cerebrum and cerebellum associated with intranuclear inclusion bodies within astrocytes. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified the partial fragments (bp) of the CDV N gene (290 bp), CPV-2c VP2 capsid protein gene (583 bp), and CAdV-1 (508 bp) and CAdV-2 (1,030 bp) E gene from urine and tissue samples. The PCR assays demonstrated that the apicomplexan protozoa observed within several organs contained DNA specific for T. gondii; genotyping revealed T. gondii type III. The findings support the characterization of concomitant infections of CDV, CAdV-1, CAdV-2, CPV-2, and T. gondii in this puppy. Further, seroreactivity to T. gondii of the dam in association with the systemic disease observed in the puppy described herein is suggestive of congenital toxoplasmosis.

  3. Smooth eigenvalue correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrikse, Anne; Veldhuis, Raymond; Spreeuwers, Luuk

    2013-12-01

    Second-order statistics play an important role in data modeling. Nowadays, there is a tendency toward measuring more signals with higher resolution (e.g., high-resolution video), causing a rapid increase of dimensionality of the measured samples, while the number of samples remains more or less the same. As a result the eigenvalue estimates are significantly biased as described by the Marčenko Pastur equation for the limit of both the number of samples and their dimensionality going to infinity. By introducing a smoothness factor, we show that the Marčenko Pastur equation can be used in practical situations where both the number of samples and their dimensionality remain finite. Based on this result we derive methods, one already known and one new to our knowledge, to estimate the sample eigenvalues when the population eigenvalues are known. However, usually the sample eigenvalues are known and the population eigenvalues are required. We therefore applied one of the these methods in a feedback loop, resulting in an eigenvalue bias correction method. We compare this eigenvalue correction method with the state-of-the-art methods and show that our method outperforms other methods particularly in real-life situations often encountered in biometrics: underdetermined configurations, high-dimensional configurations, and configurations where the eigenvalues are exponentially distributed.

  4. Astrophysical smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, Stephan

    2009-04-01

    The paper presents a detailed review of the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method with particular focus on its astrophysical applications. We start by introducing the basic ideas and concepts and thereby outline all ingredients that are necessary for a practical implementation of the method in a working SPH code. Much of SPH's success relies on its excellent conservation properties and therefore the numerical conservation of physical invariants receives much attention throughout this review. The self-consistent derivation of the SPH equations from the Lagrangian of an ideal fluid is the common theme of the remainder of the text. We derive a modern, Newtonian SPH formulation from the Lagrangian of an ideal fluid. It accounts for changes of the local resolution lengths which result in corrective, so-called "grad-h-terms". We extend this strategy to special relativity for which we derive the corresponding grad-h equation set. The variational approach is further applied to a general-relativistic fluid evolving in a fixed, curved background space-time. Particular care is taken to explicitly derive all relevant equations in a coherent way.

  5. New smooth hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarides, George; Vamvasakis, Achilleas

    2007-10-15

    We consider the extension of the supersymmetric Pati-Salam model which solves the b-quark mass problem of supersymmetric grand unified models with exact Yukawa unification and universal boundary conditions and leads to the so-called new shifted hybrid inflationary scenario. We show that this model can also lead to a new version of smooth hybrid inflation based only on renormalizable interactions provided that a particular parameter of its superpotential is somewhat small. The potential possesses valleys of minima with classical inclination, which can be used as inflationary paths. The model is consistent with the fitting of the three-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe data by the standard power-law cosmological model with cold dark matter and a cosmological constant. In particular, the spectral index turns out to be adequately small so that it is compatible with the data. Moreover, the Pati-Salam gauge group is broken to the standard model gauge group during inflation and, thus, no monopoles are formed at the end of inflation. Supergravity corrections based on a nonminimal Kaehler potential with a convenient choice of a sign keep the spectral index comfortably within the allowed range without generating maxima and minima of the potential on the inflationary path. So, unnatural restrictions on the initial conditions for inflation can be avoided.

  6. Ceramic coatings on smooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A. (Inventor); Brindley, W. J. (Inventor); Rouge, C. J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A metallic coating is plasma sprayed onto a smooth surface of a metal alloy substitute or on a bond coating. An initial thin ceramic layer is low pressure sprayed onto the smooth surface of the substrate or bond coating. Another ceramic layer is atmospheric plasma sprayed onto the initial ceramic layer.

  7. Ryanodine receptors in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Gómez-Viquez, Leticia; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Rueda, Angélica

    2002-07-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of smooth muscle is endowed with two different types of Ca2+ release channels, i.e. inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In general, both release channels mobilize Ca2+ from the same internal store in smooth muscle. While the importance of IP3Rs in agonist-induced contraction is well established, the role of RyRs in excitation-contraction coupling of smooth muscle is not clear. The participation of smooth muscle RyRs in the amplification of Ca2+ transients induced by either opening of Ca2+-permeable channels or IP3-triggered Ca2+ release has been studied. The efficacy of both processes to activate RyRs by calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is highly variable and not widely present in smooth muscle. Although RyRs in smooth muscle generate Ca2+ sparks that are similar to those observed in striated muscles, the contribution of these local Ca2+ events to depolarization-induced global rise in [Ca2+]i is rather limited. Recent data suggest that RyRs are involved in regulating the luminal [Ca2+] of SR and also in smooth muscle relaxation. This review summarizes studies that were carried out mainly in muscle strips or in freshly isolated myocytes, and that were aimed to determine the physiological role of RyRs in smooth muscle.

  8. Canine dysautonomia: two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, P M; Scudamore, C L; Ruppert, C E; Mauchline, S; Simpson, J W

    2002-01-01

    Two clinical cases of canine dysautonomia are described. Two young female neutered dogs were presented with clinical signs including vomiting, diarrhoea, faecal tenesmus, dysphagia and urinary retention. Decreased tear production, dry mucous membranes, bilateral Horner's syndrome, decreased anal sphincter tone and gastrointestinal hypomotility were also observed. Presumptive diagnoses of dysautonomia were made based on the clinical presentation and investigations. Postmortem histopathological examination in one of the cases demonstrated marked depletion of neuronal cell bodies in the intestinal myenteric plexuses and parasympathetic ganglia, confirming the diagnosis in this case. Criteria for aiding the antemortem diagnosis of this rare condition based on clinical observations and diagnostic testing are proposed.

  9. Canine Breed-Specific Hepatopathies.

    PubMed

    Watson, Penny

    2017-05-01

    Canine hepatopathies, both congenital and acquired, arise from an interaction between genes and environment. Many show increased breed prevalences. This article reviews the current understanding on breed predispositions for congenital portosystemic shunts; microvascular dysplasia and portal vein hypoplasia; ductal plate abnormalities (congenital hepatic fibrosis and Caroli disease); chronic hepatitis (both copper associated and idiopathic); vacuolar hepatopathies; and gallbladder mucocele. Although all these diseases can occur in many breeds and crossbreeds, understanding breed predispositions helps recognition and will guide future research to improve understanding of causes and treatments. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of nonciliated tracheal epithelial cells in six mammalian species: ultrastructure and population densities.

    PubMed

    Plopper, C G; Mariassy, A T; Wilson, D W; Alley, J L; Nishio, S J; Nettesheim, P

    1983-12-01

    Three types of nonciliated epithelial cells in mammalian conducting respiratory airways are thought to be secretory: mucous (goblet) cells, serous epithelial cells, and Clara cells. Mucous and serous cells are considered to be the secretory cells of the trachea. Clara cells are considered to be the secretory cells of the most distal conducting airways or bronchioles. To ascertain if mucous and serous epithelial cells are common to the tracheal epithelium of mammalian species, we characterized the ultrastructure and population densities of tracheal epithelial cells in six species: hamster (H), rat (Rt), rabbit (Rb), cat (C), Bonnet monkey (M. radiata) (B), and sheep (S). Following fixation by airway infusion with glutaraldehyde/paraformaldehyde, tracheal tissue was processed for light and electron microscopy (EM) by a selective embedding technique. Tracheal epithelium over cartilage was quantitated by light microscopy and characterized by transmission EM. Mucous cells were defined by abundant large nonhomogeneous granules, numerous Golgi complexes, basally located nuclei and granular endoplasmic reticulum (GER). The percentage of mucous cells in the tracheal epithelium was: H (0%), Rt (0.5%), Rb (1.3%), C (20.2%), B (8%), S (5.1%). Serous cells had homogeneous, electron-dense granules and extensive GER. Serous cells were present only in rats (39.2%). Clara cells had homogeneous electron-dense granules, abundant agranular endoplasmic reticulum (AER) and basal GER. Clara cells were found in hamsters (41.4%) and rabbits (17.6%). In sheep trachea, 35.9% of the epithelial cells had small electron-lucent granules, abundant AER and numerous Golgi complexes. In Bonnet monkey trachea, 16% of the epithelial cells had small electron-lucent granules, numerous polyribosomes, perinuclear Golgi apparatus and moderate GER. In cat trachea, 5.4% of the epithelial cells lacked granules, and had moderate numbers of mitochondria, moderate amounts of polyribosomes, a central nucleus, and

  11. Traumatic tracheal diverticulum corrected with resection and anastomosis during one-lung ventilation and total intravenous anesthesia in a cat.

    PubMed

    Sayre, Rebecca S; Lepiz, Mauricio; Wall, Corey; Thieman-Mankin, Kelley; Dobbin, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the clinical findings and diagnostic images of a traumatic intrathoracic tracheal avulsion with a tracheal diverticulum in a cat. Furthermore, a complete description of the tracheal resection and anastomosis using one-lung ventilation (OLV) with total and partial intravenous anesthesia is made. A 3-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat weighing 6.8 kg was presented to the University Teaching Hospital for evaluation of increased respiratory noise 3 months following unknown trauma. Approximately 12 weeks prior to presentation, the cat had been seen by the primary care veterinarian for respiratory distress. At that time, the cat had undergone a tracheal ballooning procedure for a distal tracheal stricture diagnosed by tracheoscopy. The tracheal ballooning had provided only temporary relief. At presentation to our institution, the cat had increased respiratory effort with harsh upper airway noise auscultated during thoracic examination. The remainder of the physical examination was normal. Diagnostics included a tracheoscopy and a thoracic computed tomographic examination. The cat was diagnosed with tracheal avulsion, pseudotrachea with a tracheal diverticulum, and stenosis of the avulsed tracheal ends. Surgical correction of the tracheal stricture via a thoracotomy was performed using OLV with total and partial intravenous anesthesia. The cat recovered uneventfully and at last follow-up was active and doing well. This case report describes OLV using standard anesthesia equipment that is available at most private practices. Furthermore, this case describes the computed tomographic images of the intrathoracic tracheal avulsion and offers a positive outcome for tracheal resection and anastomosis. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  12. Conservative smoothing versus artificial viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, C.; Hicks, D.L.; Swegle, J.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report was stimulated by some recent investigations of S.P.H. (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method). Solid dynamics computations with S.P.H. show symptoms of instabilities which are not eliminated by artificial viscosities. Both analysis and experiment indicate that conservative smoothing eliminates the instabilities in S.P.H. computations which artificial viscosities cannot. Questions were raised as to whether conservative smoothing might smear solutions more than artificial viscosity. Conservative smoothing, properly used, can produce more accurate solutions than the von Neumann-Richtmyer-Landshoff artificial viscosity which has been the standard for many years. The authors illustrate this using the vNR scheme on a test problem with known exact solution involving a shock collision in an ideal gas. They show that the norms of the errors with conservative smoothing are significantly smaller than the norms of the errors with artificial viscosity.

  13. Pre-treatment with α-hederin increases β-adrenoceptor mediated relaxation of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Anne; Gosens, Reinoud; Meurs, Herman; Häberlein, Hanns

    2011-01-15

    Preparations of ivy leaves dry extract with secretolytic and bronchiolytic efficacy are widely used for the treatment of acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases. The mechanism by which ivy preparations improve lung functions is not fully understood. Here, we tested the influence of the three main saponins of ivy, α-hederin, hederacoside C and hederagenin, on the contraction and relaxation behaviour of isolated bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips by isometric tension measurements. None of the tested compounds altered histamine or methacholine-induced contraction of the smooth muscle strips. In contrast, the isoprenaline-induced relaxation of 100μM methacholine precontracted muscle strips was significantly enhanced when pre-treated with 1μM of α-hederin for 18h. The pre-treatment with hederacoside C or hederagenin had no effect on isoprenaline-induced relaxation. For the first time the bronchiolytic effect of α-hederin was demonstrated by isometric tension measurements using bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips. α-Hederin increases isoprenaline-induced relaxation indirectly, probably by inhibiting heterologous desensitization induced by high concentrations of muscarinic ligands like methacholine.

  14. Activation of muscarinic receptors in porcine airway smooth muscle elicits a transient increase in phospholipase D activity.

    PubMed

    Mamoon, A M; Smith, J; Baker, R C; Farley, J M

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is a phosphodiesterase that catalyses hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid and choline. In the presence of ethanol, PLD also catalyses the formation of phosphatidylethanol, which is a unique characteristic of this enzyme. Muscarinic receptor-induced changes in the activity of PLD were investigated in porcine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring the formation of [3H]phosphatidic acid ([3H]PA) and [3H]phosphatidylethanol ([3H]PEth) after labeling the muscle strips with [3H]palmitic acid. The cholinergic receptor agonist acetylcholine (Ach) significantly but transiently increased formation of both [3H]PA and [3H]PEth in a concentration-dependent manner (>105-400% vs. controls in the presence of 10(-6) to 10(-4) M Ach) when pretreated with 100 mM ethanol. The Ach receptor-mediated increase in PLD activity was inhibited by atropine (10(-6) M), indicating that activation of PLD occurred via muscarinic receptors. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) increased PLD activity that was effectively blocked by the PKC inhibitors calphostin C (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) and GFX (10(-8) to 10(-6) M). Ach-induced increases in PLD activity were also significantly, but incompletely, inhibited by both GFX and calphostin C. From the present data, we conclude that in tracheal smooth muscle, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-induced PLD activation is transient in nature and coupled to these receptors via PKC. However, PKC activation is not solely responsible for Ach-induced activation of PLD in porcine tracheal smooth muscle.

  15. Carbocisteine inhibits rhinovirus infection in human tracheal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, H; Yamaya, M; Sasaki, T; Inoue, D; Nakayama, K; Yamada, M; Asada, M; Yoshida, M; Suzuki, T; Nishimura, H; Sasaki, H

    2006-07-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of a mucolytic drug, carbocisteine, on rhinovirus (RV) infection in the airways. Human tracheal epithelial cells were infected with a major-group RV, RV14. RV14 infection increased virus titres and the cytokine content of supernatants. Carbocisteine reduced supernatant virus titres, the amount of RV14 RNA in cells, cell susceptibility to RV infection and supernatant cytokine concentrations, including interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, after RV14 infection. Carbocisteine reduced the expression of mRNA encoding intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, the receptor for the major group of RVs. It also reduced the supernatant concentration of a soluble form of ICAM-1, the number and fluorescence intensity of acidic endosomes in the cells before RV infection, and nuclear factor-kappaB activation by RV14. Carbocisteine also reduced the supernatant virus titres of the minor group RV, RV2, although carbocisteine did not reduce the expression of mRNA encoding a low density lipoprotein receptor, the receptor for RV2. These results suggest that carbocisteine inhibits rhinovirus 2 infection by blocking rhinovirus RNA entry into the endosomes, and inhibits rhinovirus 14 infection by the same mechanism as well as by reducing intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels. Carbocisteine may modulate airway inflammation by reducing the production of cytokines in rhinovirus infection.

  16. Sulfate transport in apical membrane vesicles isolated from tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Elgavish, A.; DiBona, D.R.; Norton, P.; Meezan, E.

    1987-09-01

    Sulfate uptake in apical membrane vesicles isolated from bovine tracheal epithelium is shown to occur into an osmotically sensitive intravesicular space, via a carrier-mediated system. This conclusion is based on three lines of evidence: 1) saturation kinetics: 2) substrate specificity; and 3) inhibition by the anion transport inhibitors SITS and DIDS. The affinity of the transport system is highest in low ionic strength media and decreases in the presence of gluconate. Chloride appears to cis-inhibit sulfate uptake and to trans-stimulate sulfate efflux. Cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation studies with a variety of anions indicate that this exchange system may be shared by HCO/sub 3//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/, SeO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ but not by H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/ or HAsO/sub 4//sup 2/. Studies indicate that protons may play two distinct roles in sulfate transport in this system. These studies show that the carrier-mediated system can function in the absence of chloride. The overshoot observed in the presence of a proton gradient indicates that under those conditions the mechanism of transport may be a SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-OH/sup -/ exchange.

  17. Tracheal gas insufflation: catheter effectiveness determined by expiratory flush volume.

    PubMed

    Ravenscraft, S A; Shapiro, R S; Nahum, A; Burke, W C; Adams, A B; Nakos, G; Marini, J J

    1996-06-01

    Used adjunctively during mechanical ventilation, tracheal gas insufflation (TGI) improves CO2 elimination, principally by decreasing effective anatomic dead space. Continuing lung deflation at end- expiration raises the end-expiratory C02 concentration within the proximal airway, and could theoretically reduce the efficiency of a given catheter flow. To test this possibility, we designed a series of experiments that examined the influence of TGI delivery patterns on the efficiency of CO2 elimination. Using a gating device, catheter flow was delivered selectively during desired portions of expiration. Paralyzed, ventilated dogs were studied at short and extended inspiratory time fractions (TI/TT) with inspiratory tidal volume and ventilator frequency held constant. The expiratory flush volume, not the pattern of gas delivery, determined the observed decline in PaCO2, provided that the end-expiratory period was included in the catheter flush period. Despite continuing end-expiratory lung deflation (extended TI/TT), catheter effectiveness remained the same at matched expiratory flush volumes. To determine if enhanced distal mixing at the higher catheter flows required during the extended TI/TT (to match expiratory flush volume) masked a decrease in efficiency, we repeated the experiment with a tip-inverted catheter. We again found that matched catheter delivered expiratory volumes were similarly effective. With or without ongoing lung deflation, the volume of gas flushed during the expiratory period determined the effectiveness of TGI, provided that inspired minute ventilation remains unchanged and end-expiration is included in the catheter flush period.

  18. Confirmation of correct tracheal tube placement in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Schmölzer, Georg M; O'Reilly, Megan; Davis, Peter G; Cheung, Po-Yin; Roehr, Charles Christoph

    2013-06-01

    Tracheal intubation remains a common procedure during neonatal intensive care. Rapid confirmation of correct tube placement is important because tube malposition is associated with serious adverse outcomes. The current gold standard test to confirm tube position is a chest radiograph, however this is often delayed until after ventilation has commenced. Hence, point of care methods to confirm correct tube placement have been developed. The aim of this article is to review the available literature on tube placement in newborn infants. We reviewed books, resuscitation manuals and articles from 1830 to the present with the search terms "Infant, Newborn", "Endotracheal intubation", "Resuscitation", "Clinical signs", "Radiography", "Respiratory Function Tests", "Laryngoscopy", "Ultrasonography", and "Bronchoscopy". Various techniques have been studied to help clinicians assess tube placement. However, despite 85 years of clinical practice, the search for higher success rates and quicker intubation continues. Currently, chest radiography remains the gold standard test to confirm tube position. However, rigorous evaluation of new techniques is required to ensure the safety of newborn infants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An Apical-Membrane Chloride Channel in Human Tracheal Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.

    1986-06-01

    The mechanism of chloride transport by airway epithelia has been of substantial interest because airway and sweat gland-duct epithelia are chloride-impermeable in cystic fibrosis. The decreased chloride permeability prevents normal secretion by the airway epithelium, thereby interfering with mucociliary clearance and contributing to the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Because chloride secretion depends on and is regulated by chloride conductance in the apical cell membrane, the patch-clamp technique was used to directly examine single-channel currents in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelium. The cells contained an anion-selective channel that was not strongly voltage-gated or regulated by calcium in cell-free patches. The channel was also blocked by analogs of carboxylic acid that decrease apical chloride conductance in intact epithelia. When attached to the cell, the channel was activated by isoproterenol, although the channel was also observed to open spontaneously. However, in some cases, the channel was only observed after the patch was excised from the cell. These results suggest that this channel is responsible for the apical chloride conductance in airway epithelia.

  20. Use of tracheal organ cultures in toxicity testing.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, B P; Miller, S L; Drummond, E J

    1976-01-01

    Fragments of tracheal epithelium alone or in continuity with connective tissues, can be maintained in culture medium and used for short term or long term studies of toxicity of a variety of chemicals. Large numbers of uniform cultures are prepared with the aid of a slicing device or by application of simple method for dissecting sheets of epithelium free from underlying cartilage. The cultures may be placed in an exposure chamber-incubator mounted on a microscope stage and monitored continually for ciliostasis and exfoliation of cells. Morphology is further studied by fixation of selected specimens and preparation for light microscopy and electron microscopy. Synthetic functions are evaluated by autoradiographic measurement of incorporation of radioactive precursors into macromolecules and other dynamic features are indirectly assessed by histochemical and histoenzymatic methods. Short-term studies using these several techniques have shown that ciliostasis does not correlate with cell injury in all instances, and a long-term study has demonstrated dose dependence of a cytotoxic agent when duration of culture viability is measured. The method lends itself to a broad range of investigations in which dose, period of exposure, and role of cofactors must be independently and quantitatively assessed. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. PMID:1017423

  1. Gel lubrication of the tracheal tube cuff reduces pulmonary aspiration.

    PubMed

    Blunt, M C; Young, P J; Patil, A; Haddock, A

    2001-08-01

    Leakage of fluid occurs along the longitudinal folds within the wall of an inflated high-volume, low-pressure cuff. Theoretically, lubrication of the cuff with a water-soluble gel might prevent aspiration by plugging the channels in the cuff wall. Pulmonary aspiration during anesthesia has been linked with postoperative pneumonia and during critical illness causes ventilator-associated pneumonia. Lubricated cuffs were compared with nonlubricated cuffs for leakage of dye placed in the subglottic space to the tracheobronchial tree in a benchtop model (n = 5) and in a prospective double-blinded randomized controlled trial of anesthetized patients (n = 36). The duration of the efficacy of the lubricant was determined in a prospective open observational study of critically ill patients with tracheostomies (n = 9). Dye was detected clinically by dye coloration of secretions during tracheal suctioning. In the benchtop model the incidence of leakage was 0% in the lubrication group and 100% in the nonlubrication group (P < 0.01). Dye leakage in anesthetized patients was 11% in the lubrication group and 83% in the nonlubrication group (P < 0.0001). In the critically ill patients with lubricated cuffed tracheostomy tubes, leakage first occurred after a median period of 48 h (range, 24-120 h). Cuff lubrication with a water-soluble gel reduces pulmonary aspiration in anesthetized patients. In the critically ill patient with a tracheostomy the protective effect is lost after 24-120 h.

  2. Dynamic decellularization and cross-linking of rat tracheal matrix.

    PubMed

    Baiguera, Silvia; Del Gaudio, Costantino; Kuevda, Elena; Gonfiotti, Alessandro; Bianco, Alessandra; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    Decellularized tissues and organs represent a suitable option for tissue engineering when specific scaffolds are needed. However, the optimal conditions to completely remove all the cellular components and minimally affect the biochemical and structural properties of the extracellular matrix are still to be found. For this aim, bioreactors could be an alternative means to dynamically treat the biological samples, automatically controlling all the variables involved in the process and speeding up the entire procedure in order to deal with a suitable scaffold within a limited time period. This paper presents the characterization of rat tracheae decellularized in dynamic conditions, implementing a detergent-enzymatic method, previously considered. Only 6 cycles were enough to generate a tracheal matrix that was histologically and structurally similar to the native one. The network of collagen, reticular and elastic fibers was well preserved, such as the epithelial cilia, the luminal basement membrane and the main matrix components. The elastin content decreased, even if not significantly, after the decellularization protocol. Mechanical properties of the treated tissues were slightly affected by the procedure, and were partially recovered after crosslinking with genipin, a naturally-derived agent. The use of bioreactors could enhance the decellularization procedure of tissues/organs, but a careful selection of the processing parameters is needed in order to prevent large modifications compared to the native condition.

  3. Direct Laryngoscopy and Endotracheal Intubation Complicated by Anterior Tracheal Laceration Secondary to Protrusion of Preloaded Endotracheal Tube Stylet.

    PubMed

    Warner, Matthew A; Fox, Jonathan F

    2016-02-15

    Tracheal wall disruption is a rare complication of endotracheal intubation, typically occurring in the posterior (membranous) trachea lacking cartilaginous support. We present the case of a 68-year-old man who developed an anterior tracheal tear after routine endotracheal intubation, most likely occurring secondary to protrusion of a factory-preloaded stylet beyond the distal orifice of the endotracheal tube. Tracheal disruption should be considered in any patient with subcutaneous emphysema and respiratory distress after tracheal extubation and confirmed with bronchoscopy. Conservative management may be appropriate for those with small tears, hemodynamic stability, and the ability to isolate the tear from positive pressure ventilation.

  4. Tracheal ulcer due to Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takeo; Fujisaki, Hideaki; Nishio, Suehiro; Hiroshige, Shigeo; Miyazaki, Eishi; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a tracheal stenosis circumscribed with soft tissue density and a left pulmonary nodule. Open biopsy of a right submandibular lymph node revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and the malignant cells were positive for Epstein-Barr virus gene products. Bronchofiberscopy revealed a tracheal necrotizing ulcer. After chemotherapy, the tracheal ulcer resolved. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly with a tracheal ulcer.

  5. Intraspecific variation in tracheal volume in the American locust, Schistocerca americana, measured by a new inert gas method.

    PubMed

    Lease, Hilary M; Wolf, Blair O; Harrison, Jon F

    2006-09-01

    The volume of a tracheal system influences breath-holding capacity and provides an index of an insect's investment in its respiratory system. Here, we describe a new, generally applicable method to measure tracheal volume that enables repeatable determinations on live animals. Animals are isolated in a closed chamber of a known volume and equilibrated with a helium:oxygen gas mixture. The chamber is then rapidly flushed with a nitrogen:oxygen gas mixture to eliminate the helium surrounding the animal, and sealed. After a period of time sufficient to allow equilibration of helium between tracheal system and chamber air, a gas sample is taken from the chamber, and tracheal volumes are calculated from the helium content of the sample, using a gas chromatograph. We show that relative investment in the tracheal system increases with age/size in the grasshopper; tracheal volume scales with mass to the power 1.3. This increased proportional investment in the tracheal system provides a mechanistic basis for the enhanced respiratory capacity of older grasshoppers. Tracheal volumes decrease strongly as grasshoppers grow within an instar stage, explaining reduced safety margins for oxygen delivery. Finally, tracheal volumes are smaller in gravid females than males, probably due to compression of air sacs by eggs.

  6. Craniosynostosis with tracheal sleeve: a patient with Pfeiffer syndrome, tracheal sleeve and additional malformations in whom an FGFR2 mutation was found.

    PubMed

    Zackai, Elaine H; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Stolle, Catherine; Huff, Dale S

    2003-07-01

    We discuss a patient with Pfeiffer syndrome who had a tracheal sleeve and an FGFR2 mutation. In the light of our findings, and previous reports of patients with craniosynostosis that also reported similar mutations, we suggest that genomic screening for FGFR2 may be useful in cases with negative FGFR2 mutation testing.

  7. Smooth and Scrambled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 June 2003

    A flat-floored crater in central Arabia hosts an interior crater with interesting ejecta. The scrambled patterns in the ejecta suggest fluidized flow during emplacement. This contrasts with the much smoother terrain on the left side of the image. Although there is some ambiguity, it appears that the smooth material has lapped up onto the ejecta, which raises the question of where the source is for this more recent flow of material.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 2.8, Longitude 37 East (323 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Tracheal reconstruction by re-inforced Gore-Tex in esophageal submuscular tunneling: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Hodjati, Hossein; Baezzat, Saeed Reza; Fazelzadeh, Afsoon; Tanideh, Nader; Geramizadeh, Bita

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tracheal reconstructions are aimed at rearranging or replacing parts of the tracheal tissue by different techniques. Here we introduce a new technique for tracheal reconstruction. METHODS: In 10 adult dogs, after intubation with an endotracheal tube, a segment of trachea including seven tracheal rings was resected circumferentially. A submuscular tunnel was induced between mucosal and muscular layers of the adjacent esophagus lying right next to the trachea. The esophageal submuscular tunnel starts and ends exactly at the level of distal and proximal ends of tracheal resection, respectively. Inforced Gore-Tex passed through the esophageal submuscular tunnel the distal segment of trachea and end-to-end anastomosis were made between distal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea, then endotracheal tube removed and the same procedure was made for proximal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea. Afterward, the proximal and distal ends of the esophageal tunnel were approximated to proximal and distal tracheal parts over the anastomosis. RESULTS: All dogs, except one due to anesthetic problem, survived and tolerated the operation; the first two dogs experienced postoperative fever, aspiration pneumonia, and died due to tracheoesophageal fistula. All survived animals were eating and barking well. We started to scarify dogs at least 6 and 12 weeks after operation for microscopy and pathologic examination. The Gore-Texes were patent and supported externally with fibrous connective tissue in esophageal tunneling, with in growth of respiratory epithelium on inner surfaces. CONCLUSION: Air tightness, good re-epithelialization, and relatively no limitation of esophageal length and no risk of luminal collapse are advantages of tracheal reconstruction by submuscular esophageal tunneling. This new method is worthy of further investigation, as it is technically feasible and easy to implement. PMID:21264166

  9. Stent-induced tracheal stenosis can be predicted by IL-8 expression in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Arellano-Orden, Elena; Serrano, Carolina; Montes-Worboys, Ana; Sánchez-López, Verónica; Laborda, Alicia; Lostalé, Fernando; Lahuerta, Celia; Rodríguez-Panadero, Francisco; de Gregorio, Miguel Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Bare metal stents may cause complications like fibrous encapsulation, granulation and tracheal stenosis. We investigated the behaviour of three commercially available stents in vivo (rabbits) and in vitro (coculture of those stents with epithelial and fibroblast cell lines). Also, we investigated whether development of tracheal stenosis could be predicted by any biological marker. The tracheae of 30 rabbits were implanted with either nitinol stents, with or without paclitaxel elution, or a cobalt-based stent. An additional ten rabbits underwent mock implantation (controls). Serial peripheral venous blood samples were taken throughout the study, and several cytokines measured. Animals were euthanized on day 90, with immediate tracheal endoscopy and lavage performed, then necropsy. Rabbits with cobalt-based stent exhibited more inflammation and the highest stenosis incidence, with reduced survival. Both in vivo and in vitro, this stent induced higher IL-8 levels than nitinol stents. Most important, the presence of stent-induced tracheal stenosis was closely associated to increase in IL-8 expression in blood just 1 day after tracheal stent implantation: a 1·19-fold increase vs. baseline had 83% sensitivity, 83% specificity, 77% positive predictive value, 88% negative predictive value and 83% accuracy to predict development of stenosis. The cobalt-based stent had the highest incidence of tracheal inflammation and stenosis. On the other hand, the paclitaxel-eluting nitinol stent did not prevent those complications and provoked a marked reaction compared with the bare nitinol stent. Early increase in IL-8 expression in blood after stent implantation could predict development of tracheal stenosis in rabbits. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  10. Assisted head extension minimizes the frequency of dental contact with laryngoscopic blade during tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Lee, Jung-Man; Bahk, Jae-Hyon

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that the assisted maintenance of head extension would reduce the frequency of direct contact between the laryngoscope blade and the maxillary incisors during tracheal intubation. Sixty-eight patients undergoing elective surgical procedures under general anesthesia were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, controlled crossover study. A single experienced anesthesiologist performed the simulated tracheal intubations with a classic Macintosh laryngoscope. After reaching the sniffing position during direct laryngoscopy, tracheal intubations with and without maintaining the head extension (by an assistant) were simulated twice in each patient in random order. The occurrence of dental contact with the laryngoscope blade was recorded during the simulated tracheal intubation. The distance between the laryngoscopic blade and maxillary central incisors was assessed using a digital caliper. The angle of head extension and the glottic view were also evaluated. The frequency of dental contact was lower with the assisted head extension than without it (25/68 [37%] vs 67/68 [99%], P < .001). The blade-to-tooth distance was longer with assistance than without it (1.8 ± 1.9 [0-8] mm vs 0.0 ± 0.1 [0-1] mm, P < .001). The angle of head extension was greater with assistance than without it (26.6° ± 5.8° [6.0°-37.4°] vs 19.9° ± 5.4° [3.4°-31.8°], P < .001). No significant difference was observed between 2 simulated tracheal intubations with regard to the glottic views. The assisted maintenance of head extension during the simulation of tracheal intubation reduced the frequency of dental contact with the laryngoscopic blade without compromising the laryngoscopic views. The results of this study suggest that assisted head extension during tracheal intubation may reduce the possibility of unexpected dental injury. © 2013.

  11. Evaluation of emergency pediatric tracheal intubation by pediatric anesthesiologists on inpatient units and the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenyu; Golmirzaie, Kristine; Burke, Constance; Van Veen, Tara; Christensen, Robert; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Malviya, Shobha

    2016-04-01

    There are limited data on pediatric emergency tracheal intubation on inpatient units and in the emergency department by anesthesiologists. This retrospective cohort study was designed to describe the frequency of difficult intubation and adverse events associated with emergency tracheal intubation performed by pediatric anesthesiologists in a large children's hospital. All emergency tracheal intubation on inpatient units and the emergency department performed by pediatric anesthesiologists over a 7-year period in children <18 years were identified by querying our perioperative clinical information system. Medical records were comprehensively reviewed to describe the emergency intubation process and outcomes. One hundred and thirty-two intubations from 120 children (median age 3.3 years) were eligible. The majority of emergency tracheal intubations were successful with 1-2 laryngoscopy attempts, while 14 (10.6%) were difficult. Despite grade 3 view in 3/14 cases, the airway was secured after multiple direct laryngoscopy attempts. Eleven required use of an alternative airway device to secure the airway. A preexisting airway abnormality or craniofacial abnormality was present in 57% of cases with difficult intubation including half with micrognathia or retrognathia. Major intubation-related adverse events such as aspiration, occurred in 5 (3.8%) emergency tracheal intubations. Mild-to-moderate intubation-related adverse events occurred in 23 (17.4%) emergency tracheal intubations including mainstem bronchus intubation (13.6%). A significant rate of difficult intubation and mild-to-moderate intubation-related adverse events were found in emergency tracheal intubations on inpatient units and the emergency department in children performed by a pediatric anesthesiology emergency airway team. Difficult intubation was observed frequently in children with preexisting airway and craniofacial abnormalities and often required the use of an alternative airway device to

  12. Aging in the Canine Kidney.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, R E; Benali, S L; Aresu, L

    2016-03-01

    Given the irreversible nature of nephron loss, aging of the kidney is of special interest to diagnostic and toxicologic pathologists. There are many similarities among histologic lesions in aged human and canine kidneys, including increased frequency of glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, and tubular atrophy. Unfortunately, there are few studies in which renal tissue from aged healthy dogs was adequately examined with advanced diagnostics-namely, transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence-so age-associated changes in canine podocytes and glomerular basement membranes are poorly characterized. An age-associated decrease in the glomerular filtration rate in humans and dogs (specifically small breed dogs) has been documented. Although lesions in aged rats and mice differ somewhat from those of aged dogs and humans, the knowledge gained from rodent models is still vital to elucidating the pathogenesis of age-associated renal disease. Many novel molecules implicated in renal aging have been identified through genetically modified rodent models and transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of human kidneys. These molecules represent intriguing therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers. Likewise, influencing critical pathways of cellular aging, such as telomere shortening, cellular senescence, and autophagy, could improve renal function in the elderly. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Ibuprofen in canine endotoxin shock.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, E R; Soulsby, M E; Bone, R C; Wilson, F J; Hiller, F C

    1982-01-01

    The participation of prostaglandins in the physiologic alterations of endotoxin shock has been well established with the aid of prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors. Our study was designed to investigate the potential of ibuprofen, a highly specific cyclooxygenase inhibitor, to reverse the hemodynamic and acid base abnormalities of canine endotoxin shock. Mean blood pressure fell to 49.8 +/- 6.6 mm Hg in dogs given endotoxin by 5 min after injection, and remained below 83 mm Hg for the duration of the 120-min observation period. In animals given endotoxin followed by ibuprofen, a similar initial drop of systemic blood pressure was seen, but it subsequently recovered to 150.2 +/- 4.1 mm Hg by 120 min (P less than 0.001). Cardiac index increased in animals given ibuprofen (2.3 +/- 0.28 liter/m2 per min) compared with animals given endotoxin alone (1.0 +/- 0.09 liter/m2 per min) by termination of the experiment. The arterial pH dropped in endotoxin treated animals to 7.18 +/- 0.03 by 120 min. Ibuprofen prevented the acidosis, the final pH in ibuprofen and endotoxin treated animals measuring 7.36 +/- 0.01. We conclude that ibuprofen protects against the hypotension, acidosis, and depression of cardiac index of canine endotoxin shock. PMID:7107893

  14. Identification of a Canine Adenovirus (Infectious Canine Hepatitis Virus) Inhibitor in Dog Liver Extracts as Arginase

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    Extracts of canine liver inhibited growth of infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) virus, a canine adenovirus. Purified extracts from mammalian, but not avian, liver tissue contained the inhibitor, and evidence is presented that the inhibitory factor is the enzyme arginase (arginine ureohydrolase). This study further emphasized the need for arginine in adenovirus growth and may explain some of the difficulties in isolating small amounts of ICH virus from suspensions of liver. Images PMID:4344396

  15. Canine size, shape, and bending strength in primates and carnivores.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J Michael; Ruff, Christopher B

    2008-05-01

    Anthropoid primates are well known for their highly sexually dimorphic canine teeth, with males possessing canines that are up to 400% taller than those of females. Primate canine dimorphism has been extensively documented, with a consensus that large male primate canines serve as weapons for intrasexual competition, and some evidence that large female canines in some species may likewise fu