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Sample records for canis larval antigen

  1. Toxocara canis: monoclonal antibodies to larval excretory-secretory antigens that bind with genus and species specificity to the cuticular surface of infective larvae.

    PubMed

    Bowman, D D; Mika-Grieve, M; Grieve, R B

    1987-12-01

    When maintained in culture, the infective-stage larvae of Toxocara canis produce a group of excretory-secretory antigens. Monoclonal antibodies to these antigens have been produced and partially characterized. Hybridomas were made using spleens from mice that had been given 250 embryonated eggs of T. canis followed by immunization with excretory-secretory antigens. Monoclonal antibodies were first screened against excretory-secretory antigens using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Those antibodies positive in this assay were then screened against the surfaces of formalin-fixed, infective-stage larvae using an indirect fluorescent antibody assay. The two monoclonal antibodies showing fluorescence were also tested against the surfaces of infective-stage larvae of Toxocara cati, Baylisascaris procyonis, Toxascaris leonina, Ascaris suum, a Porrocaecum sp., and Dirofilaria immitis. One of these two antibodies bound to the surface of T. canis and T. cati while the other bound only to the surface of T. canis; neither were reactive with the other ascaridoid larvae or the larvae of D. immitis. Enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blotting techniques were used to demonstrate that the cross-reactive antibody recognized antigens with molecular weights of about 200 kDa while the more specific monoclonal antibody recognized antigens with approximate molecular weights of 80 kDa. The specificity of these two antibodies for T. canis and T. cati should prove helpful in the development of more specific assays for the diagnosis of visceral and ocular larva migrans.

  2. In vitro production of Toxocara canis excretory-secretory (TES) antigen.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Divyamol; Jeyathilakan, N; Abdul Basith, S; Senthilkumar, T M A

    2016-09-01

    Toxocara canis is a widespread gastrointestinal nematode parasite of dogs and cause Toxocara larva migrans, an important zoonotic disease in humans on ingestion of infective eggs. Toxocarosis is one of the few human parasitic diseases whose serodiagnosis uses a standardized antigen, T. canis excretory secretory antigen (TES). The present study describes collection of T. canis adult worm, collection and embryonation of T. canis eggs, hatching and separation of T. canis larvae, in vitro maintenance of T. canis second stage larvae for production of TES, concentration of culture fluid TES and yield of TES in correlation with various methods cited in literature.

  3. Characterization of antigenic property of Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonina adults and larvae through immunodiagnostic electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blot technique.

    PubMed

    el-Massry, A A

    1999-08-01

    Differential molecular studies were performed by sodium dodecyle sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis--SDS-PAGE--between somatic antigen of Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonina, adults and larvae, recovered from dogs. SDS-PAGE of both adults somatic antigen showed two closely similar bands (90.00, 91.95 KDa and 69.25-70.56 KDa). Each parasite had characteristic bands clustered in different molecular weights. While for their larval antigen, T. canis showed a very different antigenic profile when analysed in comparison to T. leonina antigen except at one band (66.85-66.89 KDa). The Western blot analysis showed four prominent bands represented immunoreaction between the separated somatic antigen of T. canis adults and experimentally immunized rabbit with the corresponding parasite (125.37, 117.73, 90.00 and 69.25 KDa). While separated antigen of T. leonina adults immune reacted with the corresponding hyperimmune rabbit sera at 119.04, 91.95 and 70.56 KDa. The Western blot showed cross reactive immune bands between T. canis and T. leonina adults somatic antigen at two bands (90.00, 91.95 KDa and 69.25-70.56 KDa). The polypeptide bands reacted at 125.37 KDa and 117.73 KDa can be used as specific finger print for T. canis adults while that at 119.04 KDa was specific for T. leonina adult worm.

  4. Production of Toxocara cati TES-120 Recombinant Antigen and Comparison with its T. canis Homolog for Serodiagnosis of Toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Zahabiun, Farzaneh; Sadjjadi, Seyed Mahmoud; Yunus, Muhammad Hafiznur; Rahumatullah, Anizah; Moghaddam, Mohammad Hosein Falaki; Saidin, Syazwan; Noordin, Rahmah

    2015-08-01

    Toxocariasis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic disease caused by the infective larvae of Toxocara canis and T. cati. Diagnosis in humans is usually based on clinical symptoms and serology. Immunoglobulin G (IgG)-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits using T. canis excretory-secretory (TES) larval antigens are commonly used for serodiagnosis. Differences in the antigens of the two Toxocara species may influence the diagnostic sensitivity of the test. In this study, T. cati recombinant TES-120 (rTES-120) was cloned, expressed, and compared with its T. canis homolog in an IgG4-western blot. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of T. cati rTES-120 were 70% (33/47) and 100% (39/39), respectively. T. canis rTES-120 showed 57.4% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity. When the results of assays using rTES-120 of both species were considered, the diagnostic sensitivity was 76%. This study shows that using antigens from both Toxocara species may improve the serodiagnosis of toxocariasis.

  5. Production of Toxocara cati TES-120 Recombinant Antigen and Comparison with its T. canis Homolog for Serodiagnosis of Toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Zahabiun, Farzaneh; Sadjjadi, Seyed Mahmoud; Yunus, Muhammad Hafiznur; Rahumatullah, Anizah; Moghaddam, Mohammad Hosein Falaki; Saidin, Syazwan; Noordin, Rahmah

    2015-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic disease caused by the infective larvae of Toxocara canis and T. cati. Diagnosis in humans is usually based on clinical symptoms and serology. Immunoglobulin G (IgG)-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits using T. canis excretory–secretory (TES) larval antigens are commonly used for serodiagnosis. Differences in the antigens of the two Toxocara species may influence the diagnostic sensitivity of the test. In this study, T. cati recombinant TES-120 (rTES-120) was cloned, expressed, and compared with its T. canis homolog in an IgG4-western blot. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of T. cati rTES-120 were 70% (33/47) and 100% (39/39), respectively. T. canis rTES-120 showed 57.4% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity. When the results of assays using rTES-120 of both species were considered, the diagnostic sensitivity was 76%. This study shows that using antigens from both Toxocara species may improve the serodiagnosis of toxocariasis. PMID:26033026

  6. Cross-reactions of sera from Toxocara canis-infected mice with Toxascaris leonina and Ascaris suum antigens.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, C; Fenoy, S; Guillén, J L

    1992-05-01

    The ELISA method using larval excretory-secretory (E/S) products and homogenized Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina and Ascaris suum adult worm extract were used to determine possible cross-reactions in BALB/c and C57BL/10 mice, inoculated with embryonated eggs or adult worm extract of T. canis in single and multiple doses. When we used sera of mice infected with embryonated eggs of T. canis against different heterologous antigens, we observed no cross-reactions in BALB/c mice against A. suum E/S and adult worm extract antigens with a single dose. In multiple doses this was absent too against T. leonina adult worm extract in BALB/c mice, and in both strains against A. suum E/S and adult worm extract. In BALB/c mice inoculated with adult worm extract of T. canis we did not observe cross-reactions with A. suum E/S antigen with both inoculation doses. In the remainder of the experiments, we observed cross-reactions of different intensities.

  7. Flotation of Toxocara canis Eggs in Commercial Bleach and Effects of Bleach Treatment Times on Larval Development in These Eggs.

    PubMed

    von Dohlen, Alexa Rosypal; Houk-Miles, Alice E; Zajac, Anne M; Lindsay, David S

    2017-04-01

    Toxocara canis is a common intestinal nematode of young dogs. Puppies contaminate the environment with large numbers of eggs that can embryonate and become infective in less than a month. Embryonated eggs are infectious for humans and other paratenic hosts. Most T. canis infections in humans are asymptomatic; however, migration of T. canis larvae in the eye and in the central nervous system can result in vision loss, blindness, and even death. The eggs of T. canis are highly resistant to harsh environmental conditions and routinely used chemical disinfectants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of full-strength commercial bleach (5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution) treatment on development of T. canis eggs and to report our serendipitous finding that T. canis eggs in dog feces can float in passive fecal flotation tests using bleach. We also demonstrated that T. canis eggs could be identified using the McMaster's fecal eggs counting test using 100% bleach. Toxocara canis eggs collected from the feces of naturally infected 4-8 wk old puppies were treated with full-strength bleach (5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution) for 15 min, 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min; washed free of bleach smell by centrifugation; and resuspended in 0.1 N sulfuric acid solution to undergo larval development at room temperature for 18 days after exposure to bleach. Motile larvae were observed in T. canis eggs in all groups treated for 15-120 min and eggs continuously exposed to bleach for 18 days. Our results indicate that bleach may not be an appropriate disinfectant for dog kennels, cages, or laboratory utensils and work surfaces. Toxocara canis eggs are resistant to bleach treatment and continue to pose a risk for canine and human infections. Further study is needed to find the most appropriate methods for disinfection and removal of eggs to reduce the risk of transmission of this parasite.

  8. EFFICACY OF NITAZOXANIDE AGAINST Toxocara canis: LARVAL RECOVERY AND HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSE IN EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED MICE.

    PubMed

    Lescano, Susana A Zevallos; Santos, Sergio Vieira dos; Assis, Jesiel Maurício Lemos; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of nitazoxanide (NTZ) against toxocariasis was investigated in an experimental murine model and results were compared to those obtained using mebendazole. Sixty male BALB/c mice, aged six to eight weeks-old, were divided into groups of 10 each; fifty were orally infected with 300 larvaed eggs of T. canis and grouped as follows, G I: infected untreated mice; G II: infected mice treated with MBZ (15 mg/kg/day) 10 days postinfection (dpi); G III: infected mice treated with NTZ (20 mg/kg/day) 10 dpi; G IV: infected mice treated with MBZ 60 dpi; G V: infected mice treated with NTZ 60 dpi; GVI: control group comprising uninfected mice. Mice were bled via retro-orbital plexus on four occasions between 30 and 120 dpi. Sera were processed using the ELISA technique to detect IgG anti- Toxocara antibodies. At 120 dpi, mice were sacrificed for larval recovery in the CNS, liver, lungs, kidneys, eyes and carcass. Results showed similar levels of anti- Toxocara IgG antibodies among mice infected but not submitted to treatment and groups treated with MBZ or NTZ, 10 and 60 dpi. Larval recovery showed similar values in groups treated with NTZ and MBZ 10 dpi. MBZ showed better efficacy 60 dpi, with a 72.6% reduction in the parasite load compared with NTZ, which showed only 46.5% reduction. We conclude that administration of these anthelmintics did not modify the humoral response in experimental infection by T. canis. No parasitological cure was observed with either drug; however, a greater reduction in parasite load was achieved following treatment with MBZ.

  9. Characterization of excretory-secretory antigens of adult Toxocara canis by western blotting.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, N R; Samanta, S; Sahu, Shivani; Raina, O K; Gupta, S C; Goswami, T K; Lokesh, K M; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-06-01

    Toxocara canis is one of the most common helminth worm of dogs which continues to stimulate both public health concern alongside the higher scientific interest. It may cause visceral and ocular damage in humans especially in children. The identification of specific antigens of T. canis is important so as to develop better diagnostic techniques. Excretory-secretory (ES) antigens were prepared by culturing the adult T. canis worms in RPMI 1640 medium without serum supplementation followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation. These antigens were separated using sodium dodecyl sulphate-electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Recovered proteins ranged from 30 to 384 kDa. The specific reactivity of the T. canis excretory-secretory (TC-ES) proteins was checked by western blotting. The immuno-reactivity of the naturally infected dog sera with the TC-ES antigens showed five bands at 43, 57,105, 139 and 175 kDa. The immuno-reactivity of the hyper immune serum raised in rabbits against TC-ES antigens was observed with ten polypeptides of 21, 25, 30, 37, 45, 50, 57, 69, 77 and 105 kDa. Common antigens band were observed at 57 and 105 KDa. These antigens merit further evaluation as candidate for use in diagnosis of toxocariasis in humans and adult dogs.

  10. Use of Brucella canis antigen for detection of ovine serum antibodies against Brucella ovis.

    PubMed

    López, G; Ayala, S M; Escobar, G I; Lucero, N E

    2005-02-25

    Brucella ovis causes a genital disease of sheep manifested by epididymitis in rams and placentitis in ewes producing reduced fertility in the flock. Clinical diagnosis is not sensitive enough and bacteriological testing is not feasible for detection of the disease in large numbers of animals. Indirect methods of serological testing are preferred for routine diagnosis, of which agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID), complement fixation (CF) and ELISA tests are recommended as the most efficient. Since B. ovis shares antigenic components with Brucella canis, it would seem that either strain could be used as antigen with the same results; however, the advantage of the B. canis (M-) strain variant is that it can be used to develop a satisfactory antigen for agglutination tests. We present data on AGID and IELISA tests using B. ovis antigen and rapid screening agglutination test (RSAT), 2-mercapto-ethanol RSAT (2ME-RSAT) and IELISA using B. canis antigen. We tested 225 animals. The cut-off values were adjusted by ROC analysis using 51 negative and 32 positive sera; the IELISA-B. canis cut-off value was 39 (%P) and IELISA-B. ovis, 51 (%P), with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Of the 32 positive sera from the infected flock RSAT detected 32 (100%), 2ME-RSAT 29 (91%) and AGID 31 (97%). Of the 142 sera from suspicious flocks, 46 were negative and 56 positive in all the tests; 16 were positive by RSAT, IELISA-B. canis and IELISA-B. ovis, 20 positive only with RSAT and 2 positive only by both IELISAs. RSAT is a very sensitive screening test that, because of its simplicity and easy interpretation, following a study in larger sample, could replace AGID as a screening test for diagnosis of ovine brucellosis caused by B. ovis. The IELISA-B. canis or IELISA-B. ovis could be used as confirmatory tests, since they show equal specificity and sensitivity.

  11. EFFICACY OF NITAZOXANIDE AGAINST Toxocara canis: LARVAL RECOVERY AND HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSE IN EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED MICE

    PubMed Central

    LESCANO, Susana A. Zevallos; dos SANTOS, Sergio Vieira; ASSIS, Jesiel Maurício Lemos; CHIEFFI, Pedro Paulo

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The efficacy of nitazoxanide (NTZ) against toxocariasis was investigated in an experimental murine model and results were compared to those obtained using mebendazole. Sixty male BALB/c mice, aged six to eight weeks-old, were divided into groups of 10 each; fifty were orally infected with 300 larvaed eggs of T. canisand grouped as follows, G I: infected untreated mice; G II: infected mice treated with MBZ (15 mg/kg/day) 10 days postinfection (dpi); G III: infected mice treated with NTZ (20 mg/kg/day) 10 dpi; G IV: infected mice treated with MBZ 60 dpi; G V: infected mice treated with NTZ 60 dpi; GVI: control group comprising uninfected mice. Mice were bled via retro-orbital plexus on four occasions between 30 and 120 dpi. Sera were processed using the ELISA technique to detect IgG anti- Toxocaraantibodies. At 120 dpi, mice were sacrificed for larval recovery in the CNS, liver, lungs, kidneys, eyes and carcass. Results showed similar levels of anti- ToxocaraIgG antibodies among mice infected but not submitted to treatment and groups treated with MBZ or NTZ, 10 and 60 dpi. Larval recovery showed similar values in groups treated with NTZ and MBZ 10 dpi. MBZ showed better efficacy 60 dpi, with a 72.6% reduction in the parasite load compared with NTZ, which showed only 46.5% reduction. We conclude that administration of these anthelmintics did not modify the humoral response in experimental infection by T. canis. No parasitological cure was observed with either drug; however, a greater reduction in parasite load was achieved following treatment with MBZ. PMID:26422159

  12. Molecular identification and antigenic characterization of a merozoite surface antigen and a secreted antigen of Babesia canis (BcMSA1 and BcSA1).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mo; Cao, Shinuo; Luo, Yuzi; Liu, Mingming; Wang, Guanbo; Moumouni, Paul Franck Adjou; Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk; Iguchi, Aiko; Vudriko, Patrick; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Löwenstein, Mario; Kern, Angela; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Ikuo; Xuan, Xuenan

    2016-05-03

    Babesia canis is an apicomplexan tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan responsible for causing canine babesiosis in Europe and west Asia. Despite its importance, there is no known rapid diagnostic kit detection of B. canis infection in dogs. The present study identified two novel antigens of B. canis and used the recombinant antigens to establish a rapid, specific and sensitive serodiagnostic technique for detection of B. canis infection. A complementary DNA (cDNA) expression library was constructed from the mRNA of B. canis and immunoscreened using B. canis-infected dog sera. The cDNAs encoding a merozoite surface antigen and a secreted antigen protein were identified and designated as BcMSA1 and BcSA1, respectively. The recombinant BcMSA1 and BcSA1 (rBcMSA1 and rBcSA1) expressed in Escherichia coli were purified and injected into mice for production of anti-sera. The native proteins were characterized by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. Furthermore, indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (iELISA) and rapid immunochromatographic tests (ICT) based on rBcMSA1 or rBcSA1 were established and evaluated to test specific antibodies in consecutive plasma samples from two B. canis-infected dogs. Antiserum raised against rBcMSA1 and rBcSA1 recognized the 39 kDa and 44 kDa native proteins by Western blot analysis, respectively. In addition, immunofluorescence and confocal microscopic observations revealed that BcMSA1 was found on the surface of parasites. However, BcSA1 localized in the matrix of the merozoites. The ELISA and ICT based on rBcMSA1 or rBcSA1 could detect specific antibodies in consecutive plasma samples from two B. canis-infected dogs. They showed no cross-reactions against the serum samples collected from dogs experimentally infected with closely related parasites. Taken together, the current results indicated that the rBcMSA1 and rBcSA1 are promising serodiagnostic antigens for developing iELISA and ICT to detect B. canis infection. To our

  13. Toxocara canis mucins among other excretory-secretory antigens induce in vitro secretion of cytokines by mouse splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Długosz, Ewa; Wasyl, Katarzyna; Klockiewicz, Maciej; Wiśniewski, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    The effect of Toxocara larval antigens on cytokine secretion by mouse splenocytes was studied in vitro. Recombinant mucins were produced in Pichia pastoris yeast, and Toxocara excretory-secretory (TES) antigens were collected from in vitro culture of L2 larvae. Tc-MUC-2, Tc-MUC-3, Tc-MUC-4, and Tc-MUC-5 were expressed as glycoproteins and were specifically recognized by Toxocara canis-infected dog serum antibodies. Mouse splenocytes stimulated with recombinant mucins produced IL-5, IL-6, and TGF-β. Cell stimulation with whole TES products was more effective and resulted in secretion of IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β and downregulation of TNF-α production. IFN-γ and IL-17 secretion was noted only after ConA treatment. Cells originating from infected animals produced significantly smaller amounts of these two cytokines compared to control cells, which suggests that Th1 and Th17 response in infected mice is strongly inhibited. However, splenocyte stimulation with both TES and ConA upregulated the production of IFN-γ and IL-17. This shows that TES antigens have strong immunomodulatory properties and are able to induce a broad range of effects on murine immune cells.

  14. Immunochemical characterization of antigens of Brucella canis and their use in seroprevalence study of canine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Barkha, Sharma; Dharmendra Kumar, Sinha; Dhirendra Kumar, Singh

    2011-11-01

    To explore immunochemical characterization of antigens of Brucella canis (B. canis), and the use in seroprevalence study of canine brucellosis. External hot phosphate buffer saline extract (HPBSE) and internal sonicated (SA) antigens were prepared from B. canis strain MEX 51 and immunochemically characterized. These antigens were used to test 527 serum samples of dogs by 2-mercaptoethanol-tube agglutination test (2 ME-TAT), agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID), dot-ELISA and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA) to assess the seroprevalence of canine brucellosis. The protein content of HPBSE and SA antigens was 0.387 mg/mL and 0.195 mg/mL, respectively, whereas carbohydrate content was 0.174 mg/mL and 0.150 mg/mL, respectively. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (12.5%) of HPBSE and SA, revealed 6 and 8 visible peptide bands ranging from 18-80 kDa and 12-45 kDa, respectively. Western blot analysis showed immunodominant bands of MW 12, 28, 39 and 45 kDa for HPBSE and 20-24 kDa for SA. The AGID revealed HPBSE as more specific antigen than SA but both I-ELISA and dot-ELISA indicated SA antigen to be more specific and reliable than HPBSE. The seroprevalence of canine brucellosis was 2.27% by 2ME-TAT, 1.5% by AGID, 3.03% by dot-ELISA and 16.12% by I-ELISA. On the basis of the results of present study, we concluded that HPBSE is suitable antigen for AGID, which is more specific; whereas SA antigen is suitable for I-ELISA, which is highly sensitive. Therefore, initial screening of serum samples should be carried out by I-ELISA followed by confirmation with AGID. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Serodiagnosis of toxocariasis by ELISA using crude antigen of Toxocara canis larvae.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Shen, Chenghua; Huh, Sun; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Choi, Min-Ho; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2013-08-01

    Toxocariasis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by larvae of ascarid nematodes of dogs or cats, Toxocara canis or T. cati. Diagnosis of human toxocariasis currently relies on serology that uses T. canis excretory-secretory antigen to detect specific IgG antibodies by ELISA. We investigated the serodiagnostic efficacy of ELISA using crude antigen of T. canis larvae (TCLA). Serum specimens of 64 clinically confirmed toxocariasis, 115 healthy controls, and 119 other tissue-invading helminthiases were screened by ELISA using TCLA. The ELISA using TCLA showed 92.2% (59/64 patient samples) sensitivity and 86.6% (103/119) specificity. Its positive diagnostic predictivity was 78.7% and negative predictivity was 97.8%. No serum of healthy controls reacted but that of anisakiasis (45.5%), gnathostomiasis (19.2%), clonorchiasis (15.8%), sparganosis (11.1%), and cysticercosis (6.3%) cross-reacted. Immunoblot analysis on TCLA recognized antigenic proteins of 28- and 30-kDa bands in their dominant protein quantity and strong blotting reactivity. The present results indicate that the ELISA using our TCLA antigen is acceptable by the sensitivity and specificity for serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis. ELISA with TCLA is recommended to make differential diagnosis for patients with any sign of organ infiltration and eosinophilia.

  16. Detection of antibodies to Brucella ovis in sheep milk using B. ovis and B. canis antigen.

    PubMed

    López, G; Escobar, G I; Ayala, S M; Lucero, N E

    2006-08-25

    The diagnostic techniques most widely used for detecting brucellosis caused by Brucella ovis are serological tests such as complement fixation (CFT), agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID), and ELISAs. However, to our knowledge, milk tests, with the advantage that samples may be taken in a non invasive manner, have not been investigated as diagnostic tools. We studied 144 samples of milk and sera from lactating ewes, comparing bacteriological studies, serological and milk tests using Brucella canis and B. ovis antigens. A group of 75 ewes in an uninfected flock were serologically negative to rapid slide agglutination test (RSAT), indirect ELISA (IELISA)-B. canis, AGID and IELISA-B. ovis. The milk of these ewes had an IELISA-B. canis mean (%P) value of 16.18 (S.D. 5.63), while the IELISA-B. ovis had a mean (%P) value of 12.52 (S.D. 4.94). A cut-off value of (%P) 27.44 (+2 S.D.) or (%P) 33 (+3 S.D.) was determined by milk-ELISA-B. canis and (%P) 22.4 (+2 S.D.) and (%P) 27.34 (+3 S.D.) by milk-IELISA-B. ovis. These cut-off values were adjusted by receiver-operator characteristics (ROC) analysis using 23 positive samples from infected ewes, which indicated a milk-IELISA-B. canis cut-off value of (%P) 33 and milk-IELISA-B. ovis of (%P) 26 with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Based on our results, we propose that, following a study of a larger number of samples, the milk-IELISA-B. canis could be considered a suitable test for the diagnosis of B. ovis brucellosis in lactating ewes.

  17. Diagnosis of canine brucellosis by ELISA using an antigen obtained from wild Brucella canis.

    PubMed

    Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria; Poester, Fernando Padilla; Ribeiro, Marcos Borges; de Alcântara, Adriano Costa; Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Palis; Nascimento, Ivana Lúcia; Schaer, Robert Eduard; Nascimento, Roberto Meyer; Freire, Songelí Menezes

    2007-12-01

    An indirect ELISA test was developed for the diagnosis of Brucella canis infection in dogs. A bacterial whole cell extract was used as a solid phase antigen, using B. canis isolated from an infected animal. Sera from culture-positive and healthy negative animals were used as internal reference controls. The cut-off point was determined by a mathematical formula for a statistically valid value, which defined the upper prediction limit, based on the upper tail of the t-distribution of 21 negative control sera readings, for the confidence level of 99.5%. The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA test were 95% and 91%, respectively. The ELISA test showed a significant concordance index (K=0.84) with the agar gel immunodiffusion test. The reliability of the ELISA for the detection of infected animals was established by a double blind study testing 280 sera provided by serum banks from different diagnostic and research institutions and analyzed by ROC Curve.

  18. Use of western blot to study Microsporum canis antigenic proteins in canine dermatophytosis.

    PubMed

    Peano, Andrea; Min, Annarita Molinar; Beccati, Massimo; Menzano, Arianna; Pasquetti, Mario; Gallo, Maria Grazia

    2011-05-01

    Western blotting was used to describe the Microsporum canis proteins with antigenic activity in dogs with dermatophytosis. Electrophoretic separation of whole fungal strain extract cultured from a cat was performed under denaturing conditions. The proteins were blotted onto nitrocellulose and probed with sera collected from 22 dogs with dermatophytosis (18 M. canis, 3 M. gypseum, 1 Trichophyton mentagrophytes; group A), 20 dogs with skin diseases other than dermatophytosis, and 22 dogs with no clinical cutaneous signs (group B, n = 42). Nine principal IgG-binding proteins with apparent molecular weights of 180, 144, 130, 120, 102, 96, 80, 68, and 48 kD were visualised on group A blots. For these proteins, serological cross-reactivity with different strains of M. canis may be indirectly confirmed, whereas additional proteins were found to react with sera from individual dogs. The proteins visualised in this study may represent diagnostic markers of dermatophyte infection. The proteins should be further evaluated for their role in the cellular immune response of dogs with dermatophytosis. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. [Investigation of Brucella canis seropositivity by in-house slide agglutination test antigen in healthy blood donors].

    PubMed

    Sayan, Murat; Erdenliğ, Sevil; Etiler, Nilay

    2011-10-01

    Canine brucellosis which is due to Brucella canis, is transmitted to man by infected dogs or their secretions. The symptoms of canine brucellosis are similar to the symptoms of brucellosis caused by other Brucella species and endocarditis or meningitis may develop in untreated cases. There is limited data regarding B.canis infections in man and the current status of the disease is insufficiently evaluated in our country. Serological diagnosis of brucellosis is classically based on standard slide and tube agglutination tests. However, the antigens used in these tests detect antibodies that develop against species (B.melitensis, B.abortus, B.suis) with "smooth" lipopolysaccharides in their cell wall. B.canis has "rough" lipopolysaccharide in its cell wall and thus these classical tests can not detect antibodies against B.canis. Besides there is no commercial slide agglutination test which uses B.canis antigens. The aim of this study was to investigate the B.canis seropositivity by slide agglutination test (SAT), using homemade B.canis antigen, in healthy subjects and to determine the prevalence of B.canis infection in our population. A total of 1930 blood donors (age range: 18-55 years) who were admitted to the blood donation centers of different hospitals in Kocaeli province (located at Northwestern part of Turkey) between January-December 2010, have been included in the study. All of the subjects were negative in terms of Rose-Bengal plate test (B.abortus antigen test). Undiluted serum samples were initially screened by SAT, and those which were found positive were retested by SAT in the dilutions of 1/25 - 1/200. Confirmation of the positive results was performed by using 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) SAT. The test antigen (Alton antigen) was prepared from the less mucoid M(-) variant of B.canis, and 1/1048 titered dog antiserum was used as positive control. Of the 1930 blood donors sera, 40 (2.1%) were found positive with SAT, whereas 16 of them yielded equivocal

  20. Antigenic profiling of Yersinia pestis infection in the Wyoming coyote (Canis latrans)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vernati, G.; Edwards, W.H.; Rocke, T.E.; Little, S.F.; Andrews, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Although Yersinia pestis is classified as a "high-virulence" pathogen, some host species are variably susceptible to disease. Coyotes (Canis latrans) exhibit mild, if any, symptoms during infection, but antibody production occurs postinfection. This immune response has been reported to be against the F1 capsule, although little subsequent characterization has been conducted. To further define the nature of coyote humoral immunity to plague, qualitative serology was conducted to assess the antiplague antibody repertoire. Humoral responses to six plasmid-encoded Y. pestis virulence factors were first examined. Of 20 individual immune coyotes, 90% were reactive to at least one other antigen in the panel other than F1. The frequency of reactivity to low calcium response plasmid (pLcr)-encoded Yersinia protein kinase A (YpkA) and Yersinia outer protein D (YopD) was significantly greater than that previously observed in a murine model for plague. Additionally, both V antigen and plasminogen activator were reactive with over half of the serum samples tested. Reactivity to F1 was markedly less frequent in coyotes (35%). Twenty previously tested antibody-negative samples were also examined. While the majority were negative across the panel, 15% were positive for 1-3 non-F1 antigens. In vivo-induced antigen technology employed to identify novel chromosomal genes of Y. pestis that are up-regulated during infection resulted in the identification of five proteins, including a flagellar component (FliP) that was uniquely reactive with the coyote serum compared with immune serum from two other host species. Collectively, these data suggest that humoral immunity to pLcr-encoded antigens and the pesticin plasmid (pPst)-encoded Pla antigen may be relevant to plague resistance in coyotes. The serologic profile of Y. pestis chromosomal antigens up-regulated in vivo specific to C. latrans may provide insight into the differences in the pathogen-host responses during Y. pestis infection.

  1. Antigenic profiling of yersinia pestis infection in the Wyoming coyote (Canis latrans).

    PubMed

    Vernati, G; Edwards, W H; Rocke, T E; Little, S F; Andrews, G P

    2011-01-01

    Although Yersinia pestis is classified as a "high-virulence" pathogen, some host species are variably susceptible to disease. Coyotes (Canis latrans) exhibit mild, if any, symptoms during infection, but antibody production occurs postinfection. This immune response has been reported to be against the F1 capsule, although little subsequent characterization has been conducted. To further define the nature of coyote humoral immunity to plague, qualitative serology was conducted to assess the antiplague antibody repertoire. Humoral responses to six plasmid-encoded Y. pestis virulence factors were first examined. Of 20 individual immune coyotes, 90% were reactive to at least one other antigen in the panel other than F1. The frequency of reactivity to low calcium response plasmid (pLcr)-encoded Yersinia protein kinase A (YpkA) and Yersinia outer protein D (YopD) was significantly greater than that previously observed in a murine model for plague. Additionally, both V antigen and plasminogen activator were reactive with over half of the serum samples tested. Reactivity to F1 was markedly less frequent in coyotes (35%). Twenty previously tested antibody-negative samples were also examined. While the majority were negative across the panel, 15% were positive for 1-3 non-F1 antigens. In vivo-induced antigen technology employed to identify novel chromosomal genes of Y. pestis that are up-regulated during infection resulted in the identification of five proteins, including a flagellar component (FliP) that was uniquely reactive with the coyote serum compared with immune serum from two other host species. Collectively, these data suggest that humoral immunity to pLcr-encoded antigens and the pesticin plasmid (pPst)-encoded Pla antigen may be relevant to plague resistance in coyotes. The serologic profile of Y. pestis chromosomal antigens up-regulated in vivo specific to C. latrans may provide insight into the differences in the pathogen-host responses during Y. pestis infection.

  2. Comprehensive annotation and evolutionary insights into the canine (Canis lupus familiaris) antigen receptor loci.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jolyon; Ponstingl, Hannes; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Archer, Joy; Sargan, David; Bradley, Allan

    2017-09-19

    Dogs are an excellent model for human disease. For example, the treatment of canine lymphoma has been predictive of the human response to that treatment. However, an incomplete picture of canine (Canis lupus familiaris) immunoglobulin (IG) and T cell receptor (TR)-or antigen receptor (AR)-gene loci has restricted their utility. This work advances the annotation of the canine AR loci and looks into breed-specific features of the loci. Bioinformatic analysis of unbiased RNA sequence data was used to complete the annotation of the canine AR genes. This annotation was used to query 107 whole genome sequences from 19 breeds and identified over 5500 alleles across the 550 genes of the seven AR loci: the IG heavy, kappa, and lambda loci; and the TR alpha, beta, gamma, and delta loci. Of note was the discovery that half of the IGK variable (V) genes were located downstream of, and inverted with respect to, the rest of the locus. Analysis of the germline sequences of all the AR V genes identified greater conservation between dog and human than mouse with either. This work brings our understanding of the genetic diversity and expression of AR in dogs to the same completeness as that of mice and men, making it the third species to have all AR loci comprehensively and accurately annotated. The large number of germline sequences serves as a reference for future studies, and has allowed statistically powerful conclusions to be drawn on the pressures that have shaped these loci.

  3. Polymeric antigen BLSOmp31 in aluminium hydroxide induces serum bactericidal and opsonic antibodies against Brucella canis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Clausse, Maria; Díaz, Alejandra G; Pardo, Romina P; Zylberman, Vanesa; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Estein, Silvia M

    2017-02-01

    Polymeric antigen BLSOmp31 is an immunogenic vaccine candidate that confers protection against Brucella canis in mice. In this preliminary study, the immunogenicity and safety of BLSOmp31 adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide gel (BLSOmp31-AH) were evaluated in Beagle dogs. In addition, the potential to elicit serum antibodies with complement-dependent bactericidal activity and/or to enhance phagocytosis by neutrophils were analyzed. Dogs were immunized three times with BLSOmp31-AH by subcutaneous route, followed by an annual booster. The vaccine elicited specific antibodies 3 weeks after the first immunization. Annual booster induced comparable antibody response as the primary series. Humoral immune response stimulated by BLSOmp31-AH did not interfere with routine agglutination test for canine brucellosis. Antibodies demonstrated a high complement-dependent bactericidal activity against B. canis. Moreover, opsonization by immune serum not only stimulated binding and uptake of the bacteria by neutrophils but effectively enhanced the destruction of B. canis. Specific IgG was detected in 3/4 immunized dogs in preputial secretions. The antibody profile corresponded to a marked Th2 response, since IgG1 prevailed over IgG2 and cellular immune response was not detected in vitro or in vivo. These results require further evaluation in larger field studies to establish the full prophylactic activity of BLSOmp31 against canine brucellosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of antibodies against Rickettsia conorii, Babesia canis, Ehrlichia canis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum antigens in dogs from the Stretto di Messina area (Italy).

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Maria-Grazia; Caprì, Alessandra; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Lombardo, Gabriella; Torina, Alessandra; Masucci, Marisa

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the seroprevalence for Rickettsia conorii, Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Babesia canis in outdoor-kennelled dogs (n=249) from the Stretto di Messina (Italy) and to compare seroprevalence in 2 public shelters and 4 privately-owned kennels where different tick-preventive measures were implemented in order to focus on the specific sanitary risk posed by public shelters in southern Italy for tick-borne pathogens. R. conorii (72%) and B. canis (70%) were the most prevalent infections when compared to E. canis (46%) and A. phagocytophilum (38%). Seroprevalence for R. conorii, E. canis, and A. phagocytophilum was significantly higher in public shelters than in private kennels. However, B. canis seropositivity was similar in both types of kennels. In addition, in private kennels where a regular ectocide treatment was carried out by means of spot-on devices, dogs did not present E. canis and A. phagocytophilum antibodies. One hundred fifty-one dogs out of 249 (61%) were seropositive to more than one pathogen with R. conorii and B. canis the most common ones. Coinfections were more frequently found in public-shelter dogs. This study demonstrated high seroprevalences against R. conorii, B. canis, E. canis, and A. phagocytophilum in kennelled dogs from both coastal sites of the Stretto di Messina and the importance of regular tick-bite prevention by means of individual spot-on devices.

  5. Production and evaluation of the recombinant antigen TES-30 of Toxocara canis for the immunodiagnosis of toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Olave, Ana M; Mesa, Jairo A; Botero, Jorge H; Patiño, Edwin B; García, Gisela M; Alzate, Juan F

    2016-03-03

    Toxocara canis is a pathogenic nematode of canines which can be accidentally transmitted to humans. Although serology is the most important diagnostic tool for this zoonosis, diagnostic kits use crude excretion/secretion antigens, most of them being glycoproteins which are not species-specific and may cross-react with antibodies generated against other parasites.  To produce the rTES-30 recombinant antigen of Toxocara canis and evaluate it in the immunodiagnosis of toxocariasis.  The gene that codes for TES-30 was cloned in the expression vector pET28a (+) using single-stranded oligonucleotides united by PCR. The protein rTES-30 was purified by Ni2+ affinity chromotography. Seroreactivity of rTES-30 was evaluated by immunoblot. Given that there is no gold standard test, the behaviour of the antigen was compared with the method that is routinely used to immunodiagnose toxocariasis, i.e., the conventional ELISA technique using excretion/secretion antigens.  The rTES-30 was produced from an Escherichia coli LB culture which yielded 2.25 mg/L of the antigen with a purity of 95%. The results obtained showed 73% (46/63) concordance of reactivity between the rTES-30 immunoblot and the conventional ELISA, and 100% concordance with the nonreactive sera (21). Nineteen of the 21 sera positive for other parasitoses reacted with ELISA, while only seven of these were positive with the rTES-30 immunoblot. Concordance between the ELISA and the immunoblot was moderate (kappa coefficient: 0.575; 95% CI: 0.41- 0.74).  The data presented show the potential of the rTES-30 inmunoblot for confirmation of possible ELISA positives, not only in epidemiological studies, but also as a candidate for the development of diagnostic tests for ocular toxocariasis in Colombia.

  6. Cross-reactions of sera from Toxascaris leonina and Ascaris suum infected mice with Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina and Ascaris suum antigens.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, C; Fenoy, S; Guillén, J L

    1995-06-01

    The ELISA method using larval ES products and homogenized Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina and Ascaris suum adult worms extract, was used to determine the possible cross-reactions in BALB/c and C57BL/10 mice inoculated with embryonated eggs or adult worms extract of T. leonina of T. leonina or A. suum in single and multiple doses. When we used sera of mice infected with embryonated eggs of T. leonina against different heterologous Ag, no cross-reactions against T. canis ES and A. suum ES Ag were observed using a single dose. Similarly, in multiple doses no response against T. canis ES Ag was observed. In mice inoculated with adult worms extract of T. leonina cross-reactions with T. canis ES and A. suum ES Ag did not occur. Sera from BALB/c mice infected with embryonated eggs of A. suum, was tested using ES Ag from both A. suum and T. canis and no reactions were observed. This fact confirmed the resistance of this murine strain to A. suum embryonated eggs. When we used sera of susceptible C57BL/10 mice infected against different heterologous Ag, we observed no cross-reactions against T. canis ES Ag. In the case of both BALB/c and C57BL/10 and C57BL/10 mice immunized with a single dose of A. suum adult crude extract no cross-reactions were seen against ES T. canis Ag and with sera from C57BL/10 mice against ES T. leonina. These facts confirmed the specificity of the ES T. canis Ag.

  7. Serological differentiation between cystic and alveolar echinococcosis by use of recombinant larval antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, M; Frosch, P; Kern, P; Frosch, M

    1993-01-01

    Two recombinant antigens of the larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis, termed EG55 and EM10, respectively, were applied for serodiagnosis and serological differentiation between parasitic infections caused by the metacestode tissue of both tapeworms. Antigen EM10 is synthesized by E. multilocularis larvae. Antigen EG55 represents the recombinant form of the low-molecular-weight subunit of antigen B, which is an Echinococcus genus-specific antigen. Both recombinant antigens were expressed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with monoclonal antibodies against EM10 and EG55 as capture reagents for the recombinant antigens was established and was evaluated with 74 serum samples from patients with histologically confirmed alveolar echinococcosis and 63 serum samples from patients with histologically confirmed cystic echinococcosis. A sensitivity of 93.2% and a specificity of 96.8% were achieved for the serodiagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis. Cystic echinococcosis could be detected with a sensitivity of 89.1% and a specificity of 98.6%. PMID:8308113

  8. Development of a sensitive and specific indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on a baculovirus recombinant antigen for detection of specific antibodies against Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    López, Lissett; Venteo, Angel; Aguirre, Enara; García, Marga; Rodríguez, Majosé; Amusátegui, Inmaculada; Tesouro, Miguel A; Vela, Carmen; Sainz, Angel; Rueda, Paloma

    2007-11-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on baculovirus recombinant P30 protein of Ehrlichia canis and the 1BH4 anticanine IgG monoclonal antibody was developed and evaluated by examining a panel of 98 positive and 157 negative sera using the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test as the reference technique. The P30-based ELISA appeared to be sensitive and specific (77.55% and 95.54%, respectively) when qualitative results (positive/negative) were compared with those of the IFA test; the coefficient of correlation (R) between the 2 tests was 0.833. Furthermore, it was possible to establish a mathematical formula for use in comparing the results of both techniques. These results indicate that recombinant P30 antigen-based ELISA is a suitable alternative of the IFA test for simple, consistent, and rapid serodiagnosis of canine ehrlichiosis. Moreover, the use of this recombinant protein as antigen offers a great advantage for antigen preparation in comparison with other techniques in which the whole E. canis organism is used as antigen.

  9. Serological detection of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Ehrlichia canis antibodies and Dirofilaria immitis antigen in a countrywide survey in dogs in Poland.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Friederike; Schaper, Roland; Schunack, Bettina; Połozowski, Andrzej; Piekarska, Jolanta; Szwedko, Aleksandra; Jodies, Robert; Kowalska, Dagmara; Schüpbach, Dörte; Pantchev, Nikola

    2014-09-01

    Canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs) have increasingly become a focus of attention in the past few years. Nevertheless, in many parts of Europe information on their occurrence is still scarce. In a large study in Poland 3,094 serum samples taken from dogs throughout all 16 Polish provinces were tested using a commercial kit for the detection of circulating antibodies against Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Ehrlichia canis and of Dirofilaria immitis antigen. A total of 12.31% (381/3,094; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.18-13.52%) and 3.75% (116/3,094; 95% CI: 3.11-4.48%) of the dogs were positive for A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi s.l. antibodies, respectively. Furthermore, 0.26% (8/3,094; 95% CI: 0.11-0.51%) were positive for E. canis antibodies and 0.16% (5/3,094; 95% CI: 0.05-0.38%) for D. immitis antigen. The highest percentages of A. phagocytophilum-positive dogs were noted in Lesser Poland, Silesia and Łódź Provinces. For B. burgdorferi s.l., the highest prevalence was recorded in Łódź Province. Co-infections with A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi s.l. were recorded in 1.71% of all examined dogs (53/3,094; 95% CI: 1.29-2.23%). One dog even had a triple infection, testing positive for E. canis too. Both A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi s.l. have previously been reported in Poland and were confirmed in the present study by positive samples from all 16 provinces. Concerning E. canis and D. immitis travel history or importation cannot be excluded as factors which may have determined the occurrence of these pathogens in the relevant animals. Practitioners in Poland should be aware of the above mentioned CVBDs and of prophylactic measures to protect dogs and their owners.

  10. Protection against Taenia pisiformis larval infection induced by a recombinant oncosphere antigen vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Yang, D Y; Xie, Y; Nong, X; Huang, X; Fu, Y; Gu, X B; Wang, S X; Peng, X R; Yang, G Y

    2014-02-13

    Taenia pisiformis larvae cause significant health problems to rabbits. At present, it is not known whether the recombinant antigen from the T. pisiformis oncosphere is able to confer protective immunity against T. pisiformis larval infection. The full-length cDNA was cloned into a pET32a (+) vector, and the recombinant protein was then expressed in BL21 (DE3) cells. Vaccination with the purified rTpUbc2 coupled with QuilA was carried out in New Zealand rabbits to evaluate the immunoprotective effect against T. pisiformis infection. The full-length open reading frame of the TpUbc2 gene was 444 bp, and encoded a 16.63-kDa protein. Finally, rTpUbc2 was used to evaluate the ability to induce immunoprotective responses in rabbits. A 79.3-90.8% reduction (P < 0.01) in the recovery of larvae was observed in the experimental group compared to the control group. Specific anti-rTpUbc2 antibodies from immunized rabbits had significantly higher levels of IgG (P < 0.01) compared to the control group; however, no significant difference in IgA levels was found between groups (P > 0.05). Our data support the use of rTpUbc2 as a potential candidate to develop a vaccine against T. pisiformis larvae.

  11. Serological detection of antibodies to Anaplasma spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Ehrlichia canis and of Dirofilaria immitis antigen in dogs from Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Víctor M; Bonilla, Marta C; Kaminsky, Darwin; Romero-Zúñiga, Juan José; Siebert, Susanne; Krämer, Friederike

    2017-03-15

    In a study in Costa Rica 314 serum samples from dogs throughout all seven provinces were tested using a commercial kit for the detection of circulating antibodies against Anaplasma spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Ehrlichia canis, and of circulating antigen of Dirofilaria immitis. A total of 6.4% (20/314) and 38.2% (120/314) were positive for Anaplasma spp. (An) and E. canis (Ec) antibodies. Overall, 8.0% (25/314) were positive for D. immitis (Di) antigen. One single dog reacted positive with B. burgdorferi s.l. (Bb) antigen (0.3%, 1/314). E. canis positive dogs were detected in all provinces (highest percentages in Guanacaste, Puntarenas [both significantly different compared to the overall] and Limón). Guanacaste and Puntarenas also showed the highest prevalences of Anaplasma spp. (both significantly different compared to the overall). The highest prevalence of D. immitis was detected in Puntarenas (significantly different compared to the overall). Double pathogen exposure (Ec plus An; Ec plus Di; Ec plus Bb) were recorded in 8.9% (28/314). Two dogs showed a triple pathogen exposure (0.6%, 2/314; An, Ec and Di). There was a significant difference between male (11.5%, 18/156) and female (4.4%, 7/158) animals for D. immitis positive results. There was also a significant difference between breed and no breed dogs regarding the characteristics of a general positive test, as well as seropositivity to the single pathogens of Anaplasma spp., E. canis and D. immitis. Finally there was a significant difference in the presence of clinical signs again regarding the characteristics of a general positive test, as well as seropositivity to Anaplasma spp., E. canis and D. immitis. Practitioners in Costa Rica should be aware of the canine vector-borne diseases mentioned as dogs are at risk of becoming infected. Concerning the positive B. burgdorferi s.l. dog, an autochthonous occurrence cannot be confirmed due to a history of adoption and an unusual tattoo number

  12. Toxocara canis: Analysis of the kinetics of antigen release and antibody production in an in vivo model for the detection of past or present infection.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Caballero, Aarón; Martínez-Gordillo, Mario Noé; Caballero-Salazar, Silvia; Rufino-González, Yadira; Ponce-Macotela, Martha

    2017-08-30

    Worldwide, Toxocara canis is an important zoonotic nematode of public health concern. This soil-transmitted helminth causes visceral larva and ocular larva migrans in paratenic hosts. The detection of T. canis larva migrans is complicated because current immunological tests detect only IgG antibodies, which can cross-react with antigens from other parasites and cannot distinguish between the past and present infection. Analysis of antigen release and antibody production could help improve the detection of larva migrans. Here, we report the kinetics of antigen release, IgM and IgG production in an in vivo model for the detection of past or present infection. We used four groups of seven mice: two groups infected orally with 50 or 100 embryonated eggs, and the other two infected intraperitoneally with 50 or 100 live larvae. We obtained blood samples at 0, 3, 7, and 14days and, then, every two weeks until day 140. Sandwich ELISA and indirect ELISA were performed for antigen capture and the detection of immunoglobulins, respectively. Mice inoculated with larvae developed an immune response faster than those inoculated with eggs. In all groups, antigen capture was positive starting at 3days until 140days post-inoculation (dpi). Detection of immunoglobulins was at 14 or 28dpi in mice inoculated with larvae or eggs, respectively. Negative IgM values were detected at days 98 and 112. The samples remained positive for IgG until the last day of the experiment. Data suggest that in mice inoculated with T canis eggs, some larvae did not hatch, others died or never reached the bloodstream. Based on our model, we propose that there is early infection when only antigens are present, and active larva migrans when antigen and immunoglobulins are detected, implying an immune response of the host against the antigen. Our study offers a view into the parasite-host relationship and enables us to infer if there are live larvae. Additionally, these findings provide a foundation for the

  13. Development of a Highly Specific Recombinant Toxocara canis Second-Stage Larva Excretory-Secretory Antigen for Immunodiagnosis of Human Toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Araki, Kunioki; Lim, Patricia Kim Chooi; Zasmy, Ngah; Mak, Joon Wah; Taib, Radzan; Aoki, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    The specificity of the recombinant Toxocara canis antigen developed for the immunodiagnosis of human toxocariasis was compared with that of the excretory-secretory antigen from T. canis second-stage larvae (TES) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A total of 153 human serum samples from patients infected with 20 different helminths, including 11 cases of toxocariasis, were examined. No false-negative reactions were observed for the toxocariasis cases. When the TES was used at concentrations of 0.5 and 0.125 μg/ml, cross-reactions were observed in 79 (55.6%) and 61 (43.0%) of 142 cases, respectively. In contrast, when the recombinant antigen was tested at a concentration of 0.5 μg/ml, cross-reactions were observed in 19 (13.4%) of 142 cases. At a concentration of 0.125 μg/ml, however, the cross-reaction rate decreased sharply to only 2.1%, corresponding to 3 of 142 cases. The cross-reactions occurred with one case each of gnathostomiasis, paragonimiasis with Paragonimus miyazakii, and spirometriasis, in which high antibody titers were detected. In addition, the recombinant antigen showed negative reactions with serum samples from patients infected with Ascaris and hookworms, which are the most common parasites in the world. These findings are also supported by experiments with animals infected with Ascaris and hookworm. From these results, the recombinant antigen is highly specific for toxocariasis and may provide more reliable diagnostic results than other methods. PMID:10747116

  14. Toxocara Canis IgG Seropositivity in Patients with Chronic Urticaria.

    PubMed

    Burak Selek, Mehmet; Baylan, Orhan; Kutlu, Ali; Özyurt, Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate IgG antibody levels specific to Toxocara canis (T. canis), a parasite which subsists in dog's intestine, on serum samples obtained from patients with chronic urticaria (CU) to evaluate effective risk in CU etiopathogenesis. In this study, 73 patients diagnosed with CU and 109 healthy individuals as control group, were included. Various factors such as sex, age, education and income, daily hand washing habits, history of dog owning and soil eating were questioned in patient anamnesis. T. canis IgG antibodies were detected using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit prepared with T. canis larval excretory-secretory antigens. Positive results were confirmed with western blot (WB) WB test. We found T. canis IgG positivity in 17.8% (n=13) of patients (n=73) with CU. But we did not observe any T. canis IgG positivity in healthy controls (n=109). Low molecular weight bands (24-35 kDa) were observed in 11 samples in WB analyses while two of the samples were weakly positive. It is revealed that dog owning history increases T. canis seropositivity 12.9 times while insufficient daily hand washing habit (less than six times a day) increases seropositivity 20.7 times. Our study showed that T. canis may trigger CU since we found 17.8% seropositivity in 73 patients with CU and none in 109 healthy individuals. Moreover, various socio-demographic characteristics have been shown to affect T. canis seropositivity in patients with CU.

  15. Canis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Greater Dog; abbrev. CMa, gen. Canis Majoris; area 380 sq. deg.) A southern constellation which lies between Lepus and Puppis, and culminates at midnight in early January. It represents one of the two dogs of Orion (the Hunter), which dominates the sky to the north-west (the other dog being represented by Canis Minor). Its brightest star, α Canis Majoris (Sirius), is known as the `dog star'....

  16. Efficacy of milbemycin oxime in combination with spinosad in the treatment of larval and immature adult stages of Ancylostoma caninum and Toxocara canis in experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Dwight D; Reinemeyer, Craig R; Wiseman, Scott; Snyder, Daniel E

    2014-09-15

    Ancylostoma caninum and Toxocara canis are two important zoonotic parasites of dogs. The primary objective of these studies were to confirm the oral effectiveness of milbemycin oxime (MO) and spinosad in dogs experimentally infected with immature (L4 and immature adult) stages of T. canis or A. caninum. Both trials were conducted as randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled dose confirmation studies. Treatments using the intended European commercial tablet formulation of Trifexis were administered in a timeframe relative to inoculation so that effectiveness could be assessed against specific immature stages of A. caninum or T. canis. In each study on Day 0, each of 32, 3-4 month old dogs were inoculated with 250 infective eggs of T. canis or 300 infective L3 of the hookworm, A. caninum. All dogs were weighed before their scheduled treatment, randomized to 1 of the 4 treatment groups in each study (8 dogs/group). All dogs were fed just prior to dosing. For T. canis, dogs were treated orally with an MO/spinosad tablet on Day 14 or Day 24. For A. caninum, dogs were treated orally with an MO/spinosad tablet on Day 7 or Day 11. Corresponding control groups in each study received a placebo tablet. Dogs were necropsied 5 or 6 days after their respective treatments. The digestive tract was removed and processed to recover, count, and identify all stages. The GM worm count for the MO/spinosad tablet on Day 14 (L4 T. canis) was 0.0, with efficacy calculated as 100%; however, only 3 of 8 control dogs had adequate infections. The GM worm count for the MO/spinosad tablet on Day 24 (immature adult stage) was 0.30; efficacy calculated at 96.15%. This is based on 5 of the 8 control dogs with adequate infections. In the two A. caninum studies, GM worm counts for the MO/spinosad tablets on Day 7 (L4 efficacy) was 2.37 and 0.8 with efficacy calculated as 98.92% and 99.25%, respectively. The GM count for the group treated with the MO/spinosad combination on Day 11 (immature adult) was 6

  17. A simplified method for hatching and isolating Toxocara canis larvae to facilitate excretory-secretory antigen collection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Macotela, Martha; Rodríguez-Caballero, Aarón; Peralta-Abarca, Gustavo E; Martínez-Gordillo, Mario N

    2011-02-10

    Human toxocariasis causes several dangerous syndromes that can involve the viscera, vision and central nervous system. Diagnosing toxocariasis requires the identification of antibodies against Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati excretions and secretions (ES). To obtain ES it is necessary to collect a large number of larvae. However, since the earliest work describing the culture of Toxocara larvae, few advances in the method have been made. It has been suggested that carbon dioxide triggers molecular mechanisms that enable nematode hatching. A similar hypothesis has been made regarding Giardia excystation. To test the hypothesis we used the Giardia excystation HBSS method to hatch embryonated T. canis eggs. We found that the HBSS method was more effective than the original De Savigny method. Our results suggest that both parasites require stimulation in an acidic environment, and the abrupt change to a basic milieu in duodenum. This physiological adaptation is successful to exploit the intestinal habitat. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of surface proteins and antigens from larval stages of Ascaris suum by two-dimensional electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kasuga-Aoki, H; Tsuji, N; Suzuki, K; Isobe, T; Yoshihara, S

    2000-12-01

    An understanding of the biology of the cuticle in the larval stages of Ascariodea is of importance since the cuticle molecules not only possess a variety of functions related to survival but also have a potential role as a target for immunoprophylaxis. Thus, we made a preliminary characterization of surface proteins and antigens from 3rd-stage larvae (L3) and lung-stage larvae of Ascaris suum using two biotin-derivatives and two-dimen sional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The proteins labelled with biotin comprised a total of 37 and 32 spots, with molecular weights (Air) ranging from 15 to 101 kDa and isoelectric points (pI) from 3.8 to 7.6, in L3 and lung-stage larvae, respectively. The profiles revealed that the individual spots bound to one or both biotin derivatives. In addition, stage-common and stage-specific spots were found in L3 and lung-stage larvae. 2D-PAGE/immunoblotting analysis was performed with antisera from rabbits repeatedly inoculated with A. suum L3. Nineteen spots were recognized as surface antigens, with Mr ranging from 32 to 66 kDa and pI from 4.9 to 7.6, from L3 and lung-stage larvae after alignment of the immunoblots with the profile of the surface proteins. These spots were found to include stage-common and stage-specific antigens. Identification of surface proteins by biotin labelling combined with 2D-PAGE allows a substantial shortening of sample preparation time for the target proteins, and will be a viable method for protein analysis of surface proteins and antigens of A. suum L3 and lung-stage larvae.

  19. Rough lipopolysaccharide of Brucella abortus RB51 as a common antigen for serological detection of B. ovis, B. canis, and B. abortus RB51 exposure using indirect enzyme immunoassay and fluorescence polarization assay.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K; Smith, P; Conde, S; Draghi de Benitez, G; Gall, D; Halbert, G; Kenny, K; Massengill, C; Muenks, Q; Rojas, X; Perez, B; Samartino, L; Silva, P; Tollersrud, T; Jolley, M

    2004-01-01

    Rough lipopolysaccharide (RLPS) antigens were prepared from cultures of Brucella abortus RB51, B. ovis, and B. canis. The preparations were standardized by weight and tested with sera from cattle immunized with B. abortus RB51, sheep infected with B. ovis, and dogs infected with B. canis. Populations of unexposed animals of each species were also tested. The tests used were the indirect enzyme immunoassay (IELISA) using RLPS and the fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) using RLPS core fractions, labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate. The IELISA using B. abortus RB51 RLPS antigen resulted in sensitivity and specificity values of 94.8% and 97.3%, respectively, when testing bovine sera, 98.5% and 97.8% when testing ovine sera, and 95.8% and 100% when testing dog sera. The IELISA using B. ovis RLPS antigen gave sensitivity and specificity values of 80.5% and 91.7%, respectively with bovine sera, 98.9% and 93.8% with sheep sera, and 70.8% and 79.8% with dog sera. The IELISA using B. canis RLPS antigen resulted in sensitivity and specificity values of 97.0% and 97.4%, respectively, with bovine sera, 96.2% and 96.3% with sheep sera, and 95.8% and 98.8% with dog sera. Labeling RLPS core from B. ovis and B. canis with fluorescein was not successful. B. abortus RB51 core labeled with fluorescein resulted in sensitivity and specificity values of 93.5% and 99.8%, respectively, with bovine sera and 78.1% and 99.0% with sheep sera. It was not possible to test the dog sera in the FPA.

  20. Canis Minor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Lesser Dog; abbrev. CMi, gen. Canis Minoris; area 183 sq. deg.) A northern constellation which lies between Gemini and Monoceros, and culminates at midnight in mid-January. It represents one of the two dogs of Orion (the Hunter), which dominates the sky to the west (the other dog being represented by Canis Major). Its brightest stars were cataloged by Ptolemy (c. AD 100-175) in the Almagest....

  1. Cutaneous hypersensitivity responses to Rhipicephalus tick larval antigens in pre-sensitized cattle.

    PubMed

    Marufu, M C; Chimonyo, M; Mans, B J; Dzama, K

    2013-06-01

    Nguni cattle are known to be more resistant to ticks than Bonsmara cattle, even if the immunological mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are not fully understood. Cutaneous hypersensitivity responses to unfed larval extracts (ULE) of the ticks Rhipicephalus decoloratus and Rhipicephalus microplus were investigated in Nguni and Bonsmara cattle to improve knowledge on the immunity to ticks. Hypersensitivity reactions were induced by intradermal inoculation of 0.1ml of ULE of R. decoloratus and R. microplus ticks (50μg protein) in the right and left ear, respectively, of 8-9-month-old Nguni (n=11) and Bonsmara (n=9) heifers. Ear thickness was measured using callipers before and 0.5, 1, 6, 24, 48, and 72h post inoculation (PI). Bonsmara cattle showed a more intense immediate reaction with maximum response at 1h PI and no delayed hypersensitivity reaction. Nguni heifers, conversely, presented a less intense immediate reaction with maximum response at 1h PI, and a delayed hypersensitivity reaction at 72h PI. Reactions to R. decoloratus ULE produced a more intense skin response than to R. microplus in both breeds at all time intervals. Nguni cattle showed lower tick infestation indicating higher tick resistance than Bonsmara cattle. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction could be associated with superior tick resistance in the Nguni breed, while immediate hypersensitivity reaction could be associated with increased tick susceptibility in the Bonsmara breed. This study indicates the need for further investigations on the correlation of tick resistance and cellular immune responses to tick infestation in Nguni cattle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Purified protein derivative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and excretory-secretory antigen(s) of Toxocara canis expand in vitro human T cells with stable and opposite (type 1 T helper or type 2 T helper) profile of cytokine production.

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, G F; De Carli, M; Mastromauro, C; Biagiotti, R; Macchia, D; Falagiani, P; Ricci, M; Romagnani, S

    1991-01-01

    A large series of T cell clones (TCC) specific for purified protein derivative (PPD) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (total 60) or Toxocara canis excretory/secretory (TES) antigen (total 69) were established from the peripheral blood of two healthy individuals and analyzed for their profile of cytokine production in response to stimulation with either the specific antigen or the polyclonal activator phorbol myristate acetate plus anti-CD3 antibody. Under both these experimental conditions, the great majority of PPD-specific TCC secreted IL-2 and IFN-gamma but not, or limited amounts of, IL-4 and IL-5. In contrast, most TES-specific TCC secreted IL-4 and IL-5 but not, or limited amounts of, IL-2 and IFN-gamma. PPD-specific TCC that failed to secrete IL-4 and IL-5, and TES-specific TCC that failed to secrete IL-2 and IFN-gamma, were found to lack transcripts for IL-4 and IL-5, or for IL-2 and IFN-gamma, respectively. During the course of the study, over a 6-mo period, the functional phenotype of both TES- and PPD-specific TCC was repeatedly assessed and remained constant. These data demonstrate that T cells with stable Th1 or Th2 functional pattern exist not only in mice but also in humans and suggest that in the course of natural immunization certain infectious agents preferentially expand T cell subsets with stable and definite profile of cytokine production. PMID:1829097

  3. Cellular Microbiology of Mycoplasma canis

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, Dina L.; Leibowitz, Jeffrey A.; Azaiza, Mohammed T.; Shil, Pollob K.; Shama, Suzanne M.; Kutish, Gerald F.; Distelhorst, Steven L.; Balish, Mitchell F.; May, Meghan A.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma canis can infect many mammalian hosts but is best known as a commensal or opportunistic pathogen of dogs. The unexpected presence of M. canis in brains of dogs with idiopathic meningoencephalitis prompted new in vitro studies to help fill the void of basic knowledge about the organism's candidate virulence factors, the host responses that it elicits, and its potential roles in pathogenesis. Secretion of reactive oxygen species and sialidase varied quantitatively (P < 0.01) among strains of M. canis isolated from canine brain tissue or mucosal surfaces. All strains colonized the surface of canine MDCK epithelial and DH82 histiocyte cells and murine C8-D1A astrocytes. Transit through MDCK and DH82 cells was demonstrated by gentamicin protection assays and three-dimensional immunofluorescence imaging. Strains further varied (P < 0.01) in the extents to which they influenced the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and the neuroendocrine regulatory peptide endothelin-1 by DH82 cells. Inoculation with M. canis also decreased major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen expression by DH82 cells (P < 0.01), while secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and complement factor H was unaffected. The basis for differences in the responses elicited by these strains was not obvious in their genome sequences. No acute cytopathic effects on any homogeneous cell line, or consistent patterns of M. canis polyvalent antigen distribution in canine meningoencephalitis case brain tissues, were apparent. Thus, while it is not likely a primary neuropathogen, M. canis has the capacity to influence meningoencephalitis through complex interactions within the multicellular and neurochemical in vivo milieu. PMID:27045036

  4. Toxocara canis: Molecular basis of immune recognition and evasion

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Toxocara canis has extraordinary abilities to survive for many years in the tissues of diverse vertebrate species, as well as to develop to maturity in the intestinal tract of its definitive canid host. Human disease is caused by larval stages invading musculature, brain and the eye, and immune mechanisms appear to be ineffective at eliminating the infection. Survival of T. canis larvae can be attributed to two molecular strategies evolved by the parasite. Firstly, it releases quantities of ‘excretory–secretory’ products which include lectins, mucins and enzymes that interact with and modulate host immunity. For example, one lectin (CTL-1) is very similar to mammalian lectins, required for tissue inflammation, suggesting that T. canis may interfere with leucocyte extravasation into infected sites. The second strategy is the elaboration of a specialised mucin-rich surface coat; this is loosely attached to the parasite epicuticle in a fashion that permits rapid escape when host antibodies and cells adhere, resulting in an inflammatory reaction around a newly vacated focus. The mucins have been characterised as bearing multiple glycan side-chains, consisting of a blood-group-like trisaccharide with one or two O-methylation modifications. Both the lectins and these trisaccharides are targeted by host antibodies, with anti-lectin antibodies showing particular diagnostic promise. Antibodies to the mono-methylated trisaccharide appear to be T. canis-specific, as this epitope is not found in the closely related Toxocara cati, but all other antigenic determinants are very similar between the two species. This distinction may be important in designing new and more accurate diagnostic tests. Further tools to control toxocariasis could also arise from understanding the molecular cues and steps involved in larval development. In vitro-cultivated larvae express high levels of four mRNAs that are translationally silenced, as the proteins they encode are not detectable in

  5. Detection of Specific Antibody Reactivity to Toxocara Larval Excretory-secretory Antigens in Asthmatic Patients (5-15 Years)

    PubMed Central

    Mosayebi, Mahdi; Moini, Latif; Hajihossein, Reza; Didehdar, Mojtaba; Eslamirad, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background & Purpose: Humans act as an intermediate host for Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati. Toxocara may be an important risk factor for asthma in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-Toxocara canis antibody, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in asthmatic patients (aged 5-15 years), referring to a clinic of pulmonary diseases in Arak, Iran. Materials & Methods: In this bi-group cross sectional study, serum samples were collected from 110 children with confirmed asthma and 70 children without asthma within one year. IgG anti-Toxocara antibody was detected via ELISA method. The collected data were analyzed, using SPSS. Results: The seroprevalence of antibodies against Toxocara species was estimated at 1.8% (two males) in asmathic children via ELISA method; however, no antibodies against Toxocara canis were detected in the control group. There was no significant correlation between the frequency of antibodies against Toxocara and variables such as age, gender, or place of residence (P>0.05). Moreover, the frequency of antibodies against Toxocara was not significantly correlated with contact with dogs, consumption of unwashed fruits and vegetables, or use of raw/undercooked sheep liver (P>0.05). Conclusion: The present study showed anti-Toxocara antibody in 1.8% of asthmatic children and determined the seroprevalence of toxocariasis in asthmatic children and adolescents in Arak, Iran. Based on the findings, the low rate of infection with Toxocara among asthmatic children may be attributed to acceptable personal hygiene and religious considerations. PMID:27857820

  6. Identification of immunodominant antigens for the laboratory diagnosis of toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Bin; Ajmera, Ravi; Geiger, Stefan Michael; Gonçalves, Marco Túlio Porto; Liu, Zhuyun; Wei, Junfei; Wilkins, Patricia P; Fujiwara, Ricardo; Gazzinelli-Guimaraes, Pedro Henrique; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter

    2015-12-01

    To identify immunodominant antigens of Toxocara canis recognised by Toxocara-infected sera as recombinant reagents for immunodiagnosis of toxocariasis. Pooled sera from human cases of toxocariasis were used to identify immunodominant antigens by immunoscreening a T. canis larval expression cDNA library. The positive clones were sequenced to reveal the identity of the antigens. The recombinant proteins were expressed in E. coli and then used to confirm their immunoreaction with sera of humans with toxocariasis. Two chosen antigens were also used to differentiate Toxocara infection from other helminth infections in mice. Eleven antigens with immunodiagnostic potential were identified, including two C-type lectins (CTLs) that reacted strongly with the Toxocara-positive serum pool. The first CTL (Tc-CTL-1) is the same as TES-32, previously identified as a major immunodominant component of TES; the second CTL (Tc-CTL-2) is a novel C-type lectin sharing 83% amino acid sequence identity within the functional domain of Tc-CTL-1. The E. coli-expressed recombinant Tc-CTL-1 was strongly recognised by the Toxocara-positive serum pool or sera from animals experimentally infected with T. canis. Reactivity with recombinant Tc-CTL-1 was higher when the unreduced protein was used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), dot-blot assay or Western blot test compared to the protein under reduced condition. Both recombinant Tc-CTL-1- and Tc-CTL-2-based ELISAs were able to differentiate T. canis infection from other helminth infections in experimentally infected mice. Both Tc-CTL-1 and Tc-CTL-2 were able to differentiate Toxocara infection from other helminth infections and could potentially be used as sensitive and specific immunodiagnostic antigens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Acanthocheilonema viteae: Vaccination of jirds with irradiation-attenuated stage-3 larvae and with exported larval antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Lucius, R.; Textor, G.; Kern, A.; Kirsten, C. )

    1991-08-01

    Jirds (Meriones unguiculatus) were immunized with irradiated (35 krad) stage-3 larvae (L3) of Acanthocheilonema viteae. The induced resistance against homologous challenge infection and the antibody response of the animals were studied. Immunization with 3, 2, or 1 dose of 50 irradiated L3 induced approximately 90% resistance. Immunization with a single dose of only 5 irradiated L3 resulted in 60.8% protection while immunization with a single dose of 25 L3 induced 94.1% protection. The protection induced with 3 doses of 50 irradiated L3 did not decrease significantly during a period of 6 months. Sera of a proportion, but not all resistant jirds, contained antibodies against the surface of vector derived L3 as defined by IFAT. No surface antigens of microfilariae or adult worms were recognized by the sera. Vaccinated animals had antibody responses against antigens in the inner organs of L3 and in the cuticle and reproductive organs of adult worms as shown by IFAT. Immunoblotting with SDS-PAGE-separated L3 antigens and L3-CSN revealed that all sera contained antibodies against two exported antigens of 205 and 68 kDa, and against a nonexported antigen of 18 kDa. The 205-kDa antigen easily degraded into fragments of 165, 140, 125, and 105 kDa which were recognized by resistant jird sera. Various antigens of adult worms, but relatively few antigens of microfilariae, were also recognized. To test the relevance of exported antigens of L3 to resistance, jirds were immunized with L3-CSN together with a mild adjuvant. This immunization induced 67.7% resistance against challenge infection and sera of the immunized animals recognized the 205- and 68-kDa antigens of L3.

  8. Brucella canis peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Javeri, H; Jamieson, S; Sehgal, R; Cadena, J

    2014-02-01

    Although brucellosis is a common zoonotic disease worldwide, infection with Brucella canis is rare and often difficult to diagnose. We describe the clinical and epidemiological aspects of a case of B. canis peritonitis.

  9. Unusual clinical presentation of brucellosis caused by Brucella canis.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Nidia E; Jacob, Nestor O; Ayala, Sandra M; Escobar, Gabriela I; Tuccillo, Patricia; Jacques, Isabelle

    2005-05-01

    Brucella canis is considered a rare cause of human brucellosis. The clinical importance of this infection may have been underestimated so far because of difficulties with presumptive diagnosis. The case described here presented symptoms compatible with brucellosis but the routine tests using Brucella abortus antigen were negative. The infection would have remained undiagnosed if culture had not been positive. This case illustrates the potential for a favourable outcome in Brucella canis diagnosis and supports recommendations for the use of B. canis serology. The infection should be suspected in patients with compatible symptoms and negative serology for B. abortus antigen.

  10. The effect of different adjuvants on immune parameters and protection following vaccination of sheep with a larval-specific antigen of the gastrointestinal nematode, Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, David; Preston, Sarah; Kemp, Joanna; de Veer, Michael; Sherrard, Jayne; Kraska, Troy; Elhay, Martin; Meeusen, Els

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognised that vaccine adjuvants play a critical role in directing the nature of a vaccine induced effector response. In the present study, several adjuvants were evaluated for their ability to protect sheep after field vaccination with the larval-specific Haemonchus contortus antigen, HcsL3. Using a suboptimal antigen dose, aluminium adjuvant was shown to reduce the cumulative faecal egg counts (cFEC) and worm burden by 23% and 25% respectively, in agreement with a previous study. The addition of Quil A to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine brought cFEC back to control levels. Vaccination with the adjuvant DEAE-dextran almost doubled the protection compared to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine resulting in 40% and 41% reduction in cFEC and worm counts compared to controls. Examination of skin responses following i.d. injection of exsheathed L3, revealed that cFEC was negatively correlated with wheal size and tissue eosinophils for the DEAE-dextran and aluminium-adjuvanted groups respectively. These studies have for the first time shown the potential of DEAE-dextran adjuvant for helminth vaccines, and discovered significant cellular correlates of vaccine-induced protection.

  11. Seroepidemiology of Toxocara Canis infection among primary schoolchildren in the capital area of the Republic of the Marshall Islands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxocariasis, which is predominantly caused by Toxocara canis (T. canis) infection, is a common zoonotic parasitosis worldwide; however, the status of toxocariasis endemicity in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) remains unknown. Methods A seroepidemiological investigation was conducted among 166 primary school children (PSC) aged 7–12 years from the capital area of the RMI. Western blots based the excretory-secretory antigens of larval T. canis (TcES) was employed, and children were considered seropositive if their serum reacted with TcES when diluted at a titer of 1:64. Information regarding demographic characteristics of and environmental risk factors affecting these children was collected using a structured questionnaire. A logistic regression model was applied to conduct a multivariate analysis. Results The overall seropositive rate of T. canis infection was 86.75% (144/166). In the univariate analysis, PSC who exhibited a history of feeding dogs at home (OR = 5.52, 95% CI = 1.15–26.61, p = 0.02) and whose parents were employed as nonskilled workers (OR = 2.86, 95% CI = 1.08–7.60, p = 0.03) demonstrated a statistically elevated risk of contracting T. canis infections. Cleaning dog huts with gloves might prevent infection, but yielded nonsignificant effects. The multivariate analysis indicated that parental occupation was the critical risk factor in this study because its effect remained significant after adjusting for other variables; by contrast, the effect of dog feeding became nonsignificant because of other potential confounding factors. No associations were observed among gender, age, consuming raw meat or vegetables, drinking unboiled water, cleaning dog huts with gloves, or touching soil. Conclusions This is the first serological investigation of T. canis infection among PSC in the RMI. The high seroprevalence indicates the commonness of T. canis transmission and possible human risk. The fundamental

  12. Seroepidemiology of Toxocara canis infection among primary schoolchildren in the capital area of the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chung-Jung; Chuang, Ting-Wu; Lin, Huei-Shan; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Liu, Yung-Ching; Langinlur, Mailynn K; Lu, Min-Yun; Hsiao, Wesley Wei-Wen; Fan, Chia-Kwung

    2014-05-15

    Toxocariasis, which is predominantly caused by Toxocara canis (T. canis) infection, is a common zoonotic parasitosis worldwide; however, the status of toxocariasis endemicity in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) remains unknown. A seroepidemiological investigation was conducted among 166 primary school children (PSC) aged 7-12 years from the capital area of the RMI. Western blots based the excretory-secretory antigens of larval T. canis (TcES) was employed, and children were considered seropositive if their serum reacted with TcES when diluted at a titer of 1:64. Information regarding demographic characteristics of and environmental risk factors affecting these children was collected using a structured questionnaire. A logistic regression model was applied to conduct a multivariate analysis. The overall seropositive rate of T. canis infection was 86.75% (144/166). In the univariate analysis, PSC who exhibited a history of feeding dogs at home (OR = 5.52, 95% CI = 1.15-26.61, p = 0.02) and whose parents were employed as nonskilled workers (OR = 2.86, 95% CI = 1.08-7.60, p = 0.03) demonstrated a statistically elevated risk of contracting T. canis infections. Cleaning dog huts with gloves might prevent infection, but yielded nonsignificant effects. The multivariate analysis indicated that parental occupation was the critical risk factor in this study because its effect remained significant after adjusting for other variables; by contrast, the effect of dog feeding became nonsignificant because of other potential confounding factors. No associations were observed among gender, age, consuming raw meat or vegetables, drinking unboiled water, cleaning dog huts with gloves, or touching soil. This is the first serological investigation of T. canis infection among PSC in the RMI. The high seroprevalence indicates the commonness of T. canis transmission and possible human risk. The fundamental information that the present study provides

  13. Experimental transmission of Toxocara canis from Blattella germanica and Periplaneta americana cockroaches to a paratenic host.

    PubMed

    González-García, T; Muñoz-Guzmán, M A; Sánchez-Arroyo, H; Prado-Ochoa, M G; Cuéllar-Ordaz, J A; Alba-Hurtado, F

    2017-11-15

    The present study assessed the capacity of Blattella germanica and Periplaneta americana to disseminate and transmit infective phases of T. canis to rats, which were used as a model paratenic host. P. americana and B. germanica inoculated orally with T. canis larvated eggs shed eggs and larvae in their fecal matter during the first 6days post-inoculation. Larvae were recovered from the brain, lungs, kidneys and liver of rats that had been inoculated with either infected cockroaches or their feces. ELISAs of serum detected an increase of antibodies anti-T. canis excretion-secretion antigens, whereas Western Blot (WB) showed 4 bands (120, 50, 35 and 28kDa) that were similar to those found in positive control rats. Macroscopically, the liver and kidneys of infected rats had hemorrhagic areas with milk-spot-like lesions. The lungs showed diffuse grey protuberances. Histologically, hemorrhagic areas with leucocytic infiltrate were observed in the liver, lungs and kidneys. Some larvae were found within a granuloma that was surrounded by eosinophils and other leucocytic infiltrates. Larvae were found in the brain, but without inflammatory infiltrate. Both cockroach species that ingested larvated eggs of T. canis may shed viable larvae or eggs in their fecal matter. The induction of specific serum antibodies, presence of larvae in tissues and characteristic lesions associated with larval migration in the organs of rats that had ingested either whole adults or feces of B. germanica or P. americana demonstrate the capacity of these cockroaches to transmit toxocariosis to paratenic hosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Toxocara canis larvae viability after disinfectant-exposition.

    PubMed

    Morrondo, P; Díez-Morrondo, C; Pedreira, J; Díez-Baños, N; Sánchez-Andrade, R; Paz-Silva, A; Díez-Baños, P

    2006-10-01

    The effect of three routinely used disinfectants on the embryonary development of Toxocara canis eggs was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro. In the in vitro experiment, T. canis eggs were treated with the ethanol, sodium hypochlorite, and one commercial mix of benzalconium chloride and formaldehyde, and the embryonary development was assessed. After a period of 24 days incubation, ethanol was the best disinfectant because it prevented the development of the T. canis larvae 2 in the eggs, and sodium hypochlorite caused degeneration in 50% eggs. By using the commercial mix, 25% T. canis eggs developed to 2nd stage larvae. In the in vivo experiment, the embryonated eggs treated with the disinfectants were inoculated to mice, and their brain tissues were examined for larval presence on the 24th day postinfection. In addition, a control group was set up for comparison with the infected groups. No injury or T. canis larvae were observed in mice infected with sodium hypochlorite-treated eggs, opposite to that recorded in the animals infected with the commercial disinfectant-treated eggs. These results showed that both ethanol and sodium hypochlorite are very appropriate because of their full efficacy against infective T. canis eggs. Disinfection of kennels, animal shelters, cages, and veterinary clinics with one of these products to eliminate T. canis eggs and to avoid contamination is strongly recommended.

  15. Antibody response to Hepatozoon canis in experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Baneth, G; Shkap, V; Samish, M; Pipano, E; Savitsky, I

    1998-01-31

    Canine hepatozoonosis is a disease caused by the tick-borne protozoan Hepatozoon canis. Five puppies were inoculated by ingestion of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks experimentally infected with H. canis, and all became infected with H. canis: gametocytes were detected in blood smears from four dogs and schizonts were observed in the spleen and bone marrow of the fifth. Antibodies reactive with H. canis gametocytes were detected by the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFA), with IgM detected initially in all dogs 16 to 39 days post infection (PI) and IgG 22 to 43 days PI. The presence of gametocytes was first observed within peripheral blood neutrophils in Giemsa-stained blood smears between days 28 and 43 PI. Gametocyte-reactive antibodies were detected before the appearance of blood gametocytes in three of the four parasitemic dogs and also in a dog with no observed parasitemia. The detection of serum antibodies prior to the detection of blood gametocytes, or without apparent parasitemia, suggests that antibodies reactive with gametocytes may be formed against earlier forms of the parasite developing in the parenchymal tissues. Sera of dogs experimentally infected with Babesia canis, Babesia gibsoni and Ehrlichia canis exhibited no reactivity when tested with H. canis antigen. Additionally, sera positive for H. canis were not reactive with antigens of Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Leishmania donovani and E. canis. In conclusion, incoculation of dogs with ticks infected with H. canis results in production of antibodies reactive with peripheral blood gametocytes. Detection of IgG titres would be beneficial for the diagnosis of progressive infections with undetectable parasitemia, for seroprevalence studies, and as an adjunct to IgM titres in early infections.

  16. Development of the serological response in rabbits infected with Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonina.

    PubMed

    Smith, H V; Quinn, R; Bruce, R G; Girdwood, R W

    1982-01-01

    The indirect fluorescent antibody test using frozen sections of infective Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonina eggs, and the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using homogenized Toxocara canis embryonated egg extract and T canis excretory-secretory products as adsorbed antigens were used to determine the specificity and development of circulating antibodies in rabbits. Frozen sections were subdivided into four morphologically distinct compartments for analysis of the development of the circulating antibody response. The fluid surrounding the larva was the most reactive up to 21 days after infection, and this material was found to be predominantly excretory-secretory in nature. As the infection progressed antibodies directed against 'somatic' tissue materials increased. Cross reactions between sera from rabbits infected with T. canis eggs and Toxascaris leonina frozen sections, and rabbits infected with T. leonina eggs and Toxocara canis frozen sections occurred between both the excretory-secretory fluid and somatic components of the infective eggs. These results were substantiated using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. When T. canis excretory-secretory antigen was used, an earlier response (peak day 21) was detected than when using T. canis embryonated egg extract (peak day 35). However, cross reactions between T. canis excretory-secretory antigen and sera from rabbits infected with Toxascaris leonina occurred, indicating that the serodiagnosis of visceral larva migrans using Toxocara canis excretory-secretory antigen may still prove unsatisfactory when considering the role of Toxascaris as a possible causative agent.

  17. Results from an indirect fluorescent antibody test using three different strains of Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Enara; Ayllón, Tania; Sainz, Angel; Amusategui, Inmaculada; Villaescusa, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Franco, Fernando; Tesouro, Miguel A

    2009-11-01

    An indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test is usually performed to detect antibodies in dogs naturally infected by Ehrlichia canis. In this work, results obtained using three different E. canis strains as antigen (a commercial antigen, the E. canis Oklahoma strain and the E. canis Madrid strain) were compared. One hundred and forty-nine serum samples obtained from dogs living in the centre of Spain were analysed. When qualitative results were evaluated, identical results were detected in 87.2% of samples for the three antigens tested. When comparing antibody titre results, differences between the Madrid strain and the commercial antigen, and between the Madrid and Oklahoma strains were statistically significant (P<0.0001). No differences were found when comparing the Oklahoma strain with the commercial antigen (P=0.562). Subtle intra-laboratory variations shown in this study suggest a higher sensitivity of the IFA test when an autochthonous strain is used as antigen.

  18. Immunity to onchocerciasis: cells from putatively immune individuals produce enhanced levels of interleukin-5, gamma interferon, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in response to Onchocerca volvulus larval and male worm antigens.

    PubMed

    Turaga, P S; Tierney, T J; Bennett, K E; McCarthy, M C; Simonek, S C; Enyong, P A; Moukatte, D W; Lustigman, S

    2000-04-01

    Antigen-specific interleukin-5 (IL-5), gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) responses in individuals living in an area of hyperendemicity for onchocerciasis in Cameroon were examined. The responses against antigens prepared from Onchocerca volvulus third-stage larvae (L3), molting L3 (mL3), and crude extract from adult males (M-OvAg) were compared to the responses against antigens from adult female worms and skin microfilariae. Cytokine responses for the putatively immune individuals (PI) and the infected individuals (INF) were compared. A differential cytokine profile of IL-5 (Th2 phenotype) and IFN-gamma (Th1 phenotype) was found in these individuals in response to the antigens. In both the PI and the INF, Th2 responses against all the antigens tested were dominant. However, in the PI group as a whole, there was an enhanced Th2 response against the larval antigens and the adult male and adult female antigens, and a Th1 response in a subgroup of the PI (27 to 54.5%) against L3, mL3, and M-OvAg antigens was present. While the PI produced significantly higher levels of GM-CSF against L3, mL3, and M-OvAg antigens than the INF, there was no difference in the GM-CSF responses of the groups against the other antigens. The present study indicated that, in comparison to the INF, the PI have distinct larva-specific and adult male-specific cytokine responses, thus supporting the premise that immunological studies of the PI would lead to the identification of immune mechanisms and the target genes that play a role in protective immunity.

  19. Genetic diversity of Ehrlichia canis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, D M; Zhang, X; Melo, A L T; Pacheco, T A; Meneses, A M C; Zanutto, M S; Horta, M C; Santarém, V A; Camargo, L M A; McBride, J W; Labruna, M B

    2013-06-28

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis is a highly prevalent disease in Brazil, where the genetic diversity of Ehrlichia canis remains undefined. In this study, we used the TRP36 gene to examine the genetic diversity of E. canis strains from naturally infected dogs residing in five distinct geographic regions in Brazil. E. canis DNA was detected in 82/126 (65%) dogs by dsb-specific PCR and E. canis was isolated in cell culture from 13 dogs. Sequences obtained from dsb genes amplified from the isolates were identical to the US E. canis strain. An extended molecular characterization based on the TRP36 gene identified two major genogroups based on differences among eight isolates. Isolates with tandem repeat amino acid sequence (TEDSVSAPA) identical to the previously reported TRP36 sequence were found in the midwest, northeast and southeast regions of Brazil, and classified into the US genogroup. A novel Brazilian genotype with a different tandem repeat sequence (ASVVPEAE) was also identified in midwest, northern and southern regions. Similarity in the N-terminal sequence of a US genogroup member with the Brazilian genogroup suggested that genomic recombination between the two genogroups may have occurred. Other subtypes within the Brazilian genogroup were also identified using C-terminal amino acid divergence. We identified two distinct major Brazilian genogroups and several subtypes based on analysis of TRP36, and such information will be useful for further genotyping and possible associations with disease severity, understanding of the genetic and antigenic variability of E. canis, and for developing strain-specific vaccines and diagnostic methods based on TRP36.

  20. Novel Papillomaviral Sequence Detected within Epidermal Plaques in a Wolf (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Rothenburger, Jamie L; Myers, Sherry; Lockerbie, Betty; Wobeser, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe numerous pale plaques affecting the inguinal skin of a grey wolf (Canis lupus). Histologically, these were consistent with papillomaviral plaques. Immunohistochemistry confirmed papillomavirus antigens, and partial sequencing of the L1 gene suggests this is a novel papillomavirus most-closely related to Canis familiaris Papillomavirus 5.

  1. CAP protein superfamily members in Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Stroehlein, Andreas J; Young, Neil D; Hall, Ross S; Korhonen, Pasi K; Hofmann, Andreas; Sternberg, Paul W; Jabbar, Abdul; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-06-24

    Proteins of the cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 (CAP) superfamily are recognized or proposed to play roles in parasite development and reproduction, and in modulating host immune attack and infection processes. However, little is known about these proteins for most parasites. In the present study, we explored CAP proteins of Toxocara canis, a socioeconomically important zoonotic roundworm. To do this, we mined and curated transcriptomic and genomic data, predicted and curated full-length protein sequences (n = 28), conducted analyses of these data and studied the transcription of respective genes in different developmental stages of T. canis. In addition, based on information available for Caenorhabditis elegans, we inferred that selected genes (including lon-1, vap-1, vap-2, scl-1, scl-8 and scl-11 orthologs) of T. canis and their interaction partners likely play central roles in this parasite's development and/or reproduction via TGF-beta and/or insulin-like signaling pathways, or via host interactions. In conclusion, this study could provide a foundation to guide future studies of CAP proteins of T. canis and related parasites, and might assist in finding new interventions against diseases caused by these parasites.

  2. Seroprevalence, disease awareness, and risk factors for Toxocara canis infection among primary schoolchildren in Makoko, an urban slum community in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Gyang, Pam V; Akinwale, Olaoluwa P; Lee, Yueh-Lun; Chuang, Ting-Wu; Orok, Akwaowo B; Ajibaye, Olusola; Liao, Chien-Wei; Chen, Po-Ching; Chou, Chia-Mei; Huang, Ying-Chieh; Barghouth, Ursula; Fan, Chia-Kwung

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the seroprevalence of Toxocara canis infection in southern Nigeria, which previously was unknown, in addition to evaluating disease awareness and potential risk factors for schoolchildren in an urban slum community. In total, 366 primary schoolchildren were investigated for the presence of anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies. Blood was collected and screened by a Western blot analysis based on the excretory-secretory antigens of larval T. canis (TcES), targeting low molecular weight bands of 24-35kDa specific for T. canis. Children were considered seropositive if their serum reacted with TcES when diluted to a titer of 1:32. Questionnaires concerning possible risk factors were given to the schoolchildren to acquire data on this infection. The overall seroprevalence of Toxocara infection was 86.1% (315/366). The logistic regression analysis of risk factors showed that children's age (odds ratio (OR)=2.88, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08-7.66, p=0.03), contact with dogs (OR=0.51, 95% CI=0.28-0.94, p=0.03), the age of the dog (OR=0.34, 95% CI=0.18-0.68, p=0.002), the feeding location of the dog (OR=0.31, 95% CI=0.12-0.79, p=0.01), the consumption of raw vegetables (OR=0.89, 95% CI=0.54-1.48, p=0.004), and the drinking of unboiled water (OR=0.48, 95% CI=0.26-0.90, p=0.02) were risk factors associated with Toxocara infection. Although there was a high awareness of dogs being hosts of some parasites in this study, not much was known about T. canis. This is the first serological investigation of T. canis infection among primary schoolchildren in southern Nigeria. The high seroprevalence recorded is an indication of high transmission with the consequent risk of visceral or ocular larval migrans and neurologic toxocariasis in these children. Our findings suggest the need for prompt interventional measures, particularly health education on personal hygiene.

  3. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis and Babesia canis vogeli in stray dogs in Mahasarakham province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Piratae, Supawadee; Pimpjong, Kiattisak; Vaisusuk, Kotchaphon; Chatan, Wasupon

    2015-01-01

    Canine tick borne diseases showing distribution worldwide have caused morbidity and mortality in dogs. This study observed the mainly tick borne pathogens described for dogs in Thailand, Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis and Babesia canis vogeli. From May to July 2014, blood samples were collected from 79 stray dogs from 7 districts of Mahasarakham province to molecular surveyed for 16s rRNA gene of E. canis and 18s rRNA gene of H. canis and B. canis vogeli. Twenty eight (35.44%) of stray dogs showed the infection with tick borne pathogens. The prevalence of E. canis infection was the highest with 21.5% (17/79). DNA of H. canis and B. canis vogeli were detected at the prevalence of 10.1% (8/79) and 6.3% (5/79), respectively. Co-infection between E. canis and B. canis vogeli were identified in 2 (2.5%) dogs. The results indicated that a wide range of tick borne pathogens are circulation in the canine population in Mahasarakham province. This study is the first report on prevalence of E. canis, H. canis and B. canis vogeli in stray dogs in Mahasarakham, a province in northern part of Thailand. This data providing is important to understand the prevalence of E. canis, H. canis and B. canis vogeli infection in stray dogs in this region, which will assist in the management of these blood parasite.

  4. Validation of an ELISA method for the serological diagnosis of canine brucellosis due to Brucella canis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Maria Zoraida Daltro; Vale, Vera; Keid, Lara; Freire, Songeli Menezes; Meyer, Roberto; Portela, Ricardo Wagner; Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria

    2011-06-01

    In the present study, the validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for serodiagnosis of canine brucellosis is described. Two different antigenic extracts, obtained by heat or ultrasonic homogenization of microbial antigens from a wild isolate of Brucella canis bacteria, were compared by ELISA and Western blot (WB). A total of 145 canine sera were used to define sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ELISA as follows: (1) sera from 34 animals with natural B. canis infection, confirmed by blood culture and PCR, as well as 51 sera samples from healthy dogs with negative results by the agar-gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for canine brucellosis, were used as the control panel for B. canis infection; and (2) to scrutinize the possibility of cross reactions with other common dog infections in the same geographical area in Brazil, 60 sera samples from dogs harboring known infections by Leptospira sp., Ehrlichia canis, canine distemper virus (CDV), Neospora caninum, Babesia canis and Leishmania chagasi (10 in each group) were included in the study. The ELISA using heat soluble bacterial extract (HE-antigen) as antigen showed the best values of sensitivity (91.18%), specificity (100%) and accuracy (96.47%). In the WB analyses, the HE-antigen showed no cross-reactivity with sera from dogs with different infections, while the B. canis sonicate had various protein bands identified by those sera. The performance of the ELISA standardized with the heat soluble B. canis antigen indicates that this assay can be used as a reliable and practical method to confirm infection by this microorganism, as well as a tool for seroepidemiological studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Adult Toxocara canis encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, C; Ringelstein, E B; Biniek, R; Glöckner, W M

    1994-01-01

    A 48-year-old patient with Toxocara canis infection developed severe ataxia, rigor and neuropsychological disturbances. An aetiology was proven by an indirect immunofluorescence test. CT and MRI revealed both diffuse and circumscribed white matter lesions. Angiography showed multiple occlusion of branches of the middle cerebral artery. Anthelminthic treatment was beneficial in the initial stage of the disease, but had no effect on progression of CNS symptoms. Immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine yielded partial recovery and stabilisation of the patient. Images PMID:8126514

  6. Clinical varieties of Toxocariasis canis in Children's Hospital, Mansoura University: is it an underestimated problem?

    PubMed

    Elshazly, Atef M; Attia, Gehan; El-Ghareeb, Azza S A; Belal, Usama S

    2011-08-01

    Human toxocariasis is a worldwide parasitic disease. Children are more frequently infected because of the closer contact with contaminated soil and relatively frequent geophagia. Toxocariasis in children has variable modes of presentation but clinical diagnosis is difficult. Various clinical phenotypes of toxocariasis in symptomatic children attending Children's Hospital Mansoura University were studied. A total of 480 children were included in the study with mean age 7.24 +/- 4.22 years, 61.9% were boys and 200 age-sex-matched healthy controls. Patients were examined clinically, and the anti-Toxocara antibodies in the blood of children were performed by ELISA using T. canis larval excretory-secretory products as antigen. Eosinophils level in peripheral blood was measured. Sero-positive cases were 12 % of patients and only 3.5% of controls. Statistical analysis showed a significant association between infection and male sex (P <0.001). Sero-positive children were older than the sero-negative (P <0.001). Eosinophilia was detected in 86.2% of sero-positive children. Sero-positivity and degree of eosinophilia were more frequently detected among patients with allergy (bronchial asthma and urticaria). Degree of eosinophilia was found to be positively correlated to the optical density (OD) ELISA of anti-Toxocara IgG.

  7. [Investigation of Brucella canis Seroprevalence in Brucellosis Suspected Cases].

    PubMed

    Yüksekkaya, Serife; Aras, Zeki; Uçan, Uçkun Sait

    2013-01-01

    Brucella canis which is the main etiologic agent of brucellosis in dogs, can be transmitted to man. It causes mild or asymptomatic infection in human compared with other Brucella species. B.canis can be transmitted to man either by laboratory accidents or contact with infected dogs. Since B.canis infections in humans are not routinely investigated in hospitals in Turkey, the data are limited to reveal the current status of B.canis infections in people in our country. The purpose of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of B.canis infection in brucellosis-suspected cases. The study was conducted at Konya Education and Research Hospital, (located at Central Anatolia of Turkey) during March-August 2010 period. Serum samples were obtained from 1000 patients (age range: 15-65 years; 652 of them were women) presented with brucellosis-like symptoms, including fever, headache, night sweats, appetite loss, weakness, arthralgia and myalgia. Rose Bengal Plate Tests (Seromed, Turkey) for smooth Brucella species were negative in all serum samples. Rough type B.canis antigen was prepared with B.canis NCTC 10854 strain for serodiagnosis. Antibody responses to B.canis in the serum samples were investigated by rapid slide agglutination test (SAT) and modified plate agglutination test (MPAT). Of the 1000 sera tested, 34 (0.34%) were found to be positive with SAT while the remaining were found negative. MPAT was used for the detection of antibody titer and 22 (0.22%) out of 1000 sera were found positive with MPAT (one had 1/48, five had 1/96, six had 1/192, six had 1/384, four had 1/768 titers). Among 22 positive patients, 17 were female and five were male, and the difference between the genders was found statistically significant (p< 0.05). It was concluded the use of both S and R antigens in the serological tests applied for the diagnosis of brucellosis in our country will supplement both diagnosis and seroepidemiological data related to brucellosis.

  8. [Effects of household chemicals on infested Toxocara canis eggs].

    PubMed

    Shchuchinova, L D; Pautova, E A; Dovgalev, A S

    2013-01-01

    Six household chemicals were tested for effects on cultured Toxocara canis eggs in the mobile larval stage. The cleansing gel Comet (Double Effect) and its 10%, 25%, and 50% aqueous solutions have the most pronounced ovicidal and larvicidal effects under laboratory conditions (+19-22 degrees C). Domestos and Belizna (Bleach) are also effective. These agents are recommended for the disinvasion and washing of premises for canids: aviaries of dog-breeding centers; farms for silver and polar foxes; shelters for stray dogs; rooms in veterinary clinics; and apartments where domestic animals (dogs) are present.

  9. Evaluation of follow-up of therapy with fenbendazole incorporated into stabilized liposomes and immunomodulator glucan in mice infected with Toxocara canis larvae.

    PubMed

    Hrckova, G; Velebný, S; Obwaller, A; Auer, H; Kogan, G

    2007-01-01

    Anthelmintic activity of benzimidazole carbamate anthelmintics is low against dormant Toxocara canis larvae during late infections in paratenic hosts. The present study was conducted to examine the efficacy of pure fenbendazole, or drug incorporated into sterically stabilized liposomes (SL-FBZ) administered to T. canis-infected mice alone and after its co-administration with the immunomodulator (1-->3)-beta-D-glucan against larvae localized in muscles and brains. Therapy with either drug forms (in total 250 mg/kg in 10 doses) commenced on day 28 post-infection (p.i.) and the efficacy of treatment, examined on day 30 after the last dose of drug, was the highest in groups of mice treated with SL-FBZ in combination with glucan (89.5+/-5.8% in the muscles, 66.1+/-8.1% in brains). During 56 days of follow-up after termination of therapy, serum levels of anti-TES IgG antibodies, circulating IgG-TES immune complexes (CIC) as well as IgG antibodies to the most immunogenic part of recombinant myosin antigen of T. canis larvae were investigated. In contrast to anti-TES IgG antibodies, levels of CIC and anti-myosin antibodies were in the linear correlation with the efficacy of treatments beginning from day 38 post-therapy. We also showed that the serum levels of CIC as well as anti-myosin IgG antibodies seem to be the suitable serological markers for the monitoring of progress in larval destruction and TES resorption from the tissues.

  10. Autochthonous canine babesiosis caused by Babesia canis canis in Latvia.

    PubMed

    Berzina, Inese; Capligina, Valentina; Baumanis, Viesturs; Ranka, Renate; Cirule, Dina; Matise, Ilze

    2013-09-23

    This is the first report of confirmed canine babesiosis in Latvia supporting the observed geographical expansion of this disease. Between 2009 and 2011 three dogs which have not traveled outside of Latvia were diagnosed with babesiosis. Hematological analysis and serological tests for granulocytic anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis and borreliosis were negative (Idexx SNAP 4Dx test). Peripheral blood erythrocytes of the three dogs contained large Babesia that were identified as Babesia canis canis by PCR. Sequences of partial 18S rRNA gene were 98-100% similar to the sequences of B. canis canis isolated from dogs in other European countries. We conclude that these are the first autochthonous canine babesiosis cases reported from Latvia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. SCM-positive Streptococcus canis are predominant among pet-associated group G streptococci.

    PubMed

    Verkühlen, Gerd-Josef; Pägelow, Dennis; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Fulde, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) canis is a neglected zoonotic pathogen with increasing impor- tance. Since knowledge about its distribution in pets in Germany is scant, we designed a study and tested 335 dogs and 71 cats for colonization by S. canis. S. canis was isolated from swabs taken from the perianal region by culture and subsequent identification was performed biochemically as well as by PCR. In total, 15.8% (53) of the canine and 8.5% (six) of the feline strains grown on Staphlyo- coccus/Streptococcus Selective Agar were tested positive for the Lancefield group G antigen. The vast majority of strains expressing the Lancefield Group G carbohy- drate (56 out of 59) were further identified as S. canis underlining their outstanding role among animal-associated Group G streptococci (GGS). Furthermore, 90.0% of the canine and 83.3% of the feline S. canis strains harbour the species-specific anti- phagocytic M protein homologue SCM, which has been described as an important virulence factor. In contrast, emm-genes typically encoded by human-specific GGS could not be detected in any of the S. canis isolates. Taken together, this study provides insights into the distribution of the neglected zoonotic pathogen S. canis in a population of pets in Germany. The presence of SCM in the vast majority of strains indicates their pathogenic potential.

  12. The occurrence of Dirofilaria immitis, Borrelia burgdorferi, Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophium in dogs in China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Z; Yu, D; Mao, J; Zhang, Z; Yu, J

    2012-06-01

    A survey of the occurrence of Dirofilaria immitis, Borrelia burgdorferi, Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophium in dogs was undertaken in the People's Republic of China between October 2008 and October 2009. A total of 600 blood samples were taken from dogs in four cities in China: 300 in Beijing, 150 in Shenzhen, 30 in Shanghai and 120 in Zhengzhou. All samples were tested for the heartworm antigen and antibodies of canine B. burgdorferi, E. canis and A. phagocytophium by using the canine SNAP® 4Dx® test kit. The occurrence of D. immitis, B. burgdorferi, E. canis and A. phagocytophium was 1.17% (7/600), 0.17% (1/600), 2.17% (13/600) and 0.5% (3/600), respectively. In Shenzhen city 2% (3/150), 8.67% (13/150) and 2% (3/150) of samples were positive for D. immitis, E. canis and A. phagocytophium, respectively. The occurrence of heartworm antigen was 0.33% (1/300) in Beijing, 2.00% (3/150) in Shenzhen, 3.33% (1/30) in Shanghai and 1.67% (2/120) in Zhengzhou. We found E. canis and A. phagocytophium only at one site, Shenzhen, while the only occurrence of B. burgdorferi was at Beijing. In conclusion, the dog population in China is at potential risk for D. immitis, B. burgdorferi, E. canis and A. phagocytophium infection, the risk being especially high in southern China.

  13. Proteomic analysis of Toxocara canis excretory and secretory (TES) proteins.

    PubMed

    Sperotto, Rita Leal; Kremer, Frederico Schmitt; Aires Berne, Maria Elisabeth; Costa de Avila, Luciana F; da Silva Pinto, Luciano; Monteiro, Karina Mariante; Caumo, Karin Silva; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer; Berne, Natália; Borsuk, Sibele

    2017-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a neglected disease, and its main etiological agent is the nematode Toxocara canis. Serological diagnosis is performed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using T. canis excretory and secretory (TES) antigens produced by in vitro cultivation of larvae. Identification of TES proteins can be useful for the development of new diagnostic strategies since few TES components have been described so far. Herein, we report the results obtained by proteomic analysis of TES proteins using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approach. TES fractions were separated by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The MS/MS spectra were compared with a database of protein sequences deduced from the genome sequence of T. canis, and a total of 19 proteins were identified. Classification according to the signal peptide prediction using the SignalP server showed that seven of the identified proteins were extracellular, 10 had cytoplasmic or nuclear localization, while the subcellular localization of two proteins was unknown. Analysis of molecular functions by BLAST2GO showed that the majority of the gene ontology (GO) terms associated with the proteins present in the TES sample were associated with binding functions, including but not limited to protein binding (GO:0005515), inorganic ion binding (GO:0043167), and organic cyclic compound binding (GO:0097159). This study provides additional information about the exoproteome of T. canis, which can lead to the development of new strategies for diagnostics or vaccination.

  14. Prevalence of Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina and Dirofilaria immitis in dogs in Chuncheon, Korea (2004).

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hun; Huh, Sun

    2005-06-01

    The intestines and hearts of dogs were examined for Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina, and Dirofilaria immitis, after necropsy between June 26 and September 29, 2004 in Chuncheon, Korea. Of the 662 dogs examined, 6 were infected with T. canis (0.9%), 86 with T. leonina (13.0%). Fifty dogs were infected with D. immitis among 500 dogs examined (10.0%). Five were co-infected with T. canis and T. leonina, and three were co-infected with T. leonina and D. immitis. The cumulative positive infection rate for three species was 134/662 (20.2%). Considering previously reported seropositive rates of T. canis excretory-secretory antigen, i.e., 5% in the adult population in Korea, the possibility of toxocariasis caused by T. leonina should be reevaluated.

  15. Prevalence of Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina and Dirofilaria immitis in dogs in Chuncheon, Korea (2004)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Hun

    2005-01-01

    The intestines and hearts of dogs were examined for Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina, and Dirofilaria immitis, after necropsy between June 26 and September 29, 2004 in Chuncheon, Korea. Of the 662 dogs examined, 6 were infected with T. canis (0.9%), 86 with T. leonina (13.0%). Fifty dogs were infected with D. immitis among 500 dogs examined (10.0%). Five were co-infected with T. canis and T. leonina, and three were co-infected with T. leonina and D. immitis. The cumulative positive infection rate for three species was 134/662(20.2%). Considering previously reported seropositive rates of T. canis excretory-secretory antigen, i.e., 5% in the adult population in Korea, the possibility of toxocariasis caused by T. leonina should be reevaluated. PMID:15951642

  16. Genetic blueprint of the zoonotic pathogen Toxocara canis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xing-Quan; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Cai, Huimin; Young, Neil D.; Nejsum, Peter; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Boag, Peter R.; Tan, Patrick; Li, Qiye; Min, Jiumeng; Yang, Yulan; Wang, Xiuhua; Fang, Xiaodong; Hall, Ross S.; Hofmann, Andreas; Sternberg, Paul W.; Jex, Aaron R.; Gasser, Robin B.

    2015-01-01

    Toxocara canis is a zoonotic parasite of major socioeconomic importance worldwide. In humans, this nematode causes disease (toxocariasis) mainly in the under-privileged communities in developed and developing countries. Although relatively well studied from clinical and epidemiological perspectives, to date, there has been no global investigation of the molecular biology of this parasite. Here we use next-generation sequencing to produce a draft genome and transcriptome of T. canis to support future biological and biotechnological investigations. This genome is 317 Mb in size, has a repeat content of 13.5% and encodes at least 18,596 protein-coding genes. We study transcription in a larval, as well as adult female and male stages, characterize the parasite’s gene-silencing machinery, explore molecules involved in development or host–parasite interactions and predict intervention targets. The draft genome of T. canis should provide a useful resource for future molecular studies of this and other, related parasites. PMID:25649139

  17. Babesia canis canis, Babesia canis vogeli, Babesia canis rossi: differentiation of the three subspecies by a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis on amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Carret, C; Walas, F; Carcy, B; Grande, N; Précigout, E; Moubri, K; Schetters, T P; Gorenflot, A

    1999-01-01

    The parasites Babesia canis and Babesia gibsoni (phylum Apicomplexa) are responsible for canine babesiosis throughout the world. Babesia canis was previously described as a group of three biologically different subspecies, namely B. canis canis, B. canis vogeli, and B. canis rossi. We report partial sequences of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (ssu-rDNA) of each subspecies amplified in vitro with primers derived from a semi-conserved region of the ssu-rDNA genes in other Babesia species. The polymerase chain reaction combined with a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, using HinfI and TaqI restriction enzymes, confirmed the separation of B. canis into three subspecies. These sequences were compared with previously published sequences of other Babesia species. A phylogenetic approach showed that the three subspecies of B. canis belong to the clade of Babesia species sensu stricto where B. canis canis clusters with B. canis rossi whereas B. canis vogeli might form a monophyletic group with the cluster B. divergens and B. odocoilei. Our results show that the three subspecies of B. canis can readily be differentiated at the molecular level and suggest that they might be considered as true species.

  18. Giardia canis: ultrastructural analysis of G. canis trophozoites transfected with full length G. canis virus cDNA transcripts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Giardia canis virus (GCV) is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus of the family Totiviridae. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the G. canis virus was constructed in pPoly2/sfinot vector and RNA was transcribed in vitro. Virus-free G. canis trophozoites were transfected with in vitro transcribed ...

  19. Visceral larva migrans—an immunofluorescent examination of rabbit and human sera for antibodies to the ES antigens of the second stage larvae of Toxocara canis, Toxocara cati and Toxascaris leonina (Nematoda)

    PubMed Central

    Hogarth-Scott, R. S.

    1966-01-01

    Precipitates were demonstrated in vitro at the orifices of the second stage larvae of Toxocara canis and T. cati when placed in sera derived from rabbits infected with these nematodes. Cross-reactions occurred between these two species. Furthermore, these precipitates occurring at the oral, excretory pore and the anal orifices of these larvae were shown to be of a specific antibody nature by the use of the direct fluorescent antibody (Coons) staining technique. The second stage larvae of Toxascaris leonina did not react in this way when examined in the above-mentioned experimental system, or in sera or globulins derived from rabbits infected with T. leonina. Human sera, taken from clinically suspect cases of visceral larva migrans, were examined in this manner (q.v.). Comparable results were obtained, and it was possible to determine whether fluorescent antibodies were present, and to use this information as an aid to the clinical diagnosis of this disease. The significance of these findings in relation to the aetiology, pathogenesis and immuno-diagnosis of visceral larva migrans is discussed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:5327555

  20. Sequential Evaluation of Dogs Naturally Infected with Ehrlichia canis, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Ehrlichia equi, Ehrlichia ewingii, or Bartonella vinsonii

    PubMed Central

    Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Hegarty, Barbara C.; Hancock, Susan I.

    1998-01-01

    Historically, disease manifestations in dogs seroreactive to Ehrlichia canis antigens by indirect immunofluorescent antibody testing have been attributed to infection with either E. canis or Ehrlichia ewingii. A 1996 study by Dawson and colleagues provided PCR evidence that healthy dogs from southeastern Virginia could be naturally infected with Ehrlichia chaffeensis. This observation stimulated us to determine which Ehrlichia spp. infected sick dogs that were referred to our hospital from the same region. Based upon PCR amplification with species-specific primers, sick dogs seroreactive to E. canis antigens were determined to be infected with four Ehrlichia species: E. canis, E. chaffeensis, E. equi, and E. ewingii. Coinfection with three Ehrlichia species (E. canis, E. ewingii, and E. equi) was documented for one dog. An additional canine pathogen presumed to be tick transmitted, Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii, was identified in 7 of 12 dogs. Importantly, our results indicate that in naturally infected dogs, E. chaffeensis can cause severe disease manifestations that are clinically and serologically indistinguishable from disease manifestations of E. canis or E. ewingii. In addition, our findings support the efficacy of doxycycline for treatment of E. canis, E. equi, and E. ewingii infections but indicate that, based upon the persistence of E. chaffeensis DNA for 1 year following treatment, E. chaffeensis infection in dogs may be more refractory to doxycycline treatment. Undetected coinfection with Bartonella may also complicate the evaluation of treatment efficacy while resulting in disease manifestations that mimic ehrlichiosis. PMID:9705408

  1. Trichoderma virens as a biocontrol of Toxocara canis: In vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    de Souza Maia Filho, Fernando; da Silva Fonseca, Anelise Oliveira; Persici, Beatriz Maroneze; de Souza Silveira, Julia; Braga, Caroline Quintana; Pötter, Luciana; de Avila Botton, Sônia; Brayer Pereira, Daniela Isabel

    Microorganisms have been widely studied as biological control agents of parasites of medical and veterinary importance. Coprophagous arthropods, bacteria and fungi are among the different organisms evaluated as potential biological control agents. Nematophagous fungi capture and digest the free forms of nematodes in the soil. Due to its zoonotic potential, Toxocara canis have been brought to the attention of researchers. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the administration of embryonated T. canis eggs exposed to the nematophagous fungus Trichoderma virens reduces parasite infection in experimental animals. Embryonated T. canis eggs were exposed to T. virens mycelium for 15 days at 25°C. Subsequently, 100 fungus-exposed eggs were orally administered to 20 Swiss mice. As a positive control, another 20 mice received 100 embryonated eggs that were not exposed to the fungus. After 48h, the animals were killed, and heart, lungs and liver were harvested for the recovery of larvae. The organs of the animals that received embryonated T. canis eggs exposed to the fungus showed a lower mean larval recovery when compared with the animals that received embryonated eggs without fungus exposure (p<0.05). The exposure of T. canis eggs to T. virens reduces the experimental infection, demonstrating the potential of this nematophagous fungus as a biocontrol agent. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Lambdapapillomavirus 2 in a gray wolf (Canis lupus) from Minnesota with oral papillomatosis and sarcoptic mange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knowles, Susan N.; Windels, Steve K.; Adams, Marie; Hall, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Oral papillomatosis was diagnosed in a gray wolf (Canis lupus) with sarcoptic mange from Minnesota, USA found dead in February 2015. Intranuclear inclusion bodies were evident histologically, and papillomaviral antigens were confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Sequencing of the L1 papillomavirus gene showed closest similarity to Lambdapapillomavirus 2.

  3. Ehrlichial infection in Cameroonian canines by Ehrlichia canis and Ehrlichia ewingii.

    PubMed

    Ndip, L M; Ndip, R N; Esemu, S N; Dickmu, V L; Fokam, E B; Walker, D H; McBride, J W

    2005-11-30

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii are agents of emerging human ehrlichioses in North America and are transmitted primarily by Amblyomma americanum ticks, while Ehrlichia canis is the globally distributed cause of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) and is transmitted by the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Although E. canis and Ehrlichia ruminantium are endemic in Africa, the presence of ehrlichial agents in dogs and ticks in Cameroon has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of ehrlichial infections in Cameronian dogs using a combination of serologic and molecular methods. Peripheral blood was collected, clinical signs and the presence or absence of ticks on dogs (n=104) presenting for various reasons at local veterinary clinics around the Mount Cameroon region were noted. IFA identified 33 dogs (32%) with antibodies reactive with E. canis, and reactivity of these sera with all major E. canis antigens (200, 140, 95, 75, 47, 36, 28, and 19-kDa) was confirmed by immunoblotting. Multicolor real-time PCR detected ehrlichial DNA (E. canis (15) and E. ewingii (2)) in 17 dogs (16.3%), all of which had attached ticks at time of presentation. The dsb amplicons (378 bp) from E. canis and E. ewingii were identical to gene sequences from North American isolates. This study identifies canine ehrlichiosis as a prevalent unrecognized cause of disease in Cameroonian canines.

  4. Diagnosis of human brucellosis caused by Brucella canis.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Nidia E; Escobar, Gabriela I; Ayala, Sandra M; Jacob, Nestor

    2005-05-01

    The transmission of Brucella canis to man commonly occurs through contact with infected dogs or their secretions, or through direct laboratory exposure. The disease is underdiagnosed due to a general lack of serological testing facilities and misconceptions concerning its prevalence. This report shows the potential use of an indirect ELISA (IELISA) for the diagnosis of human brucellosis caused by B. canis in a population of patients negative by smooth-Brucella antigen tests but positive by rapid slide agglutination test (RSAT). One hundred and ten sera from asymptomatic people found negative by tests using smooth Brucella abortus antigen and by RSAT showed an IELISA specificity of 100 % when a cut-off value of 27 % positivity (%P) was selected. For 17 sera from patients with positive B. canis culture or in close contact with culture-positive dogs, the IELISA sensitivity was 100 % with the same cut-off value. The positive patients presented clinical symptoms similar to brucellosis caused by other species of Brucella and some of them received antibiotic treatment and made good progress. Using this cut-off value, we studied 35 patients with negative blood cultures but positive RSATs, and IELISA detected 18 as positive; of the 17 IELISA-negative, two were RSAT-positive at dilution 1 : 2 and 15 were weakly positive with pure serum. These samples were probably from patients at an early stage of infection or indicate false-positive results. No cross-reaction was observed among the sera from nine cases with a diagnosis other than brucellosis, but cross-reactivity was evident in sera from patients infected with smooth-Brucella species. Since routine brucellosis diagnosis does not include B. canis investigation, infection with this species may be more widespread than is currently suspected. The RSAT could be a suitable screening test for the diagnosis of B. canis human brucellosis, and a supplementary technique, such as IELISA, performed on all positive RSAT samples that

  5. A serological diagnostic survey for Brucella canis infection in Turkish patients with Brucellosis-like symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sayan, Murat; Erdenlig, Sevil; Stack, Judy; Kilic, Selcuk; Guducuoglu, Huseyin; Aksoy, Yavuz; Baklan, Ayhan; Etiler, Nilay

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of Brucella canis infection in humans is unknown in Turkey. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of B. canis infection in human sera obtained from six regions in Turkey and comparatively evaluated the results obtained by agglutination-based techniques using standardized antigens made from B. canis. The patients (n = 1,746) presented with clinical symptoms that were similar to those of brucellosis. All patients who tested negative in the Rose Bengal test for the smooth Brucella strains (abortus, melitensis, and suis) were screened for evidence of B. canis infection using the rapid slide agglutination test (RSAT), the microagglutination test (MAT), and the 2-mercaptoethanol RSAT test (2ME-RSAT). Of the samples tested, 157 (8.9%), 68 (3.8%), and 66 (3.7%) were positive for B. canis, as determined by RSAT, MAT, and 2ME-RSAT, respectively. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of RSAT were 100%, 94.6%, 42%, and 100%, respectively, and of MAT were 100%, 99.9%, 97%, and 100%, respectively. We recommend the routine use of MAT and 2ME-RSAT to check the sera of all patients with symptoms of brucellosis who are negative for brucellosis using a smooth Brucella antigen.

  6. PCR test for Microsporum canis identification.

    PubMed

    Brillowska-Dabrowska, Anna; Michałek, Ewelina; Saunte, Ditte Marie Lindhardt; Nielsen, Sanne Søgaard; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling

    2013-08-01

    Microsporum canis, for which the natural hosts are cats and dogs, is the most prevalent zoophilic agent causing tinea capitis and tinea corporis in humans. We present here a diagnostic PCR test for M. canis, since its detection and species identification is relevant to the choice of treatment and to the understanding of a probable source of infection. An M. canis-specific PCR was evaluated using 130 clinical isolates of dermatophytes (including M. canis [n = 15] and 13 other species), 10 yeast or mold isolates, 12 hair and skin samples from animals with or without experimental M. canis infection, and 35 patient specimens, including seven specimens positive for M. canis and 15 dermatophyte negative samples. All pure cultures, animal specimens and clinical samples with M. canis were detected by the PCR test, whereas none of the other fungal isolates or samples without M. canis was negative. This study indicates that the PCR test for M. canis identification applied directly to patient specimens or animal hair, as well as to clinical isolates had 100% specificity and sensitivity.

  7. Classification of Babesia canis strains in Europe based on polymorphism of the Bc28.1-gene from the Babesia canis Bc28 multigene family.

    PubMed

    Carcy, B; Randazzo, S; Depoix, D; Adaszek, L; Cardoso, L; Baneth, G; Gorenflot, A; Schetters, T P

    2015-07-30

    The vast majority of clinical babesiosis cases in dogs in Europe is caused by Babesia canis. Although dogs can be vaccinated, the level of protection is highly variable, which might be due to genetic diversity of B. canis strains. One of the major merozoite surface antigens of B. canis is a protein with a Mr of 28 kDa that belongs to the Bc28 multigene family, that comprises at least two genes, Bc28.1 and a homologous Bc28.2 gene. The two genes are relatively conserved but they are very distinct in their 3' ends, enabling the design of specific primers. Sequencing of the Bc28.1 genes from 4 genetically distinct B. canis laboratory strains (A8, B, 34.01 and G) revealed 20 mutations at conserved positions of which three allowed the classification of B. canis strains into three main groups (A, B and 34.01/G) by RFLP. This assay was subsequently used to analyze blood samples of 394 dogs suspected of clinical babesiosis from nine countries in Europe. All blood samples were first analyzed with a previously described assay that allowed detection of the different Babesia species that infect dogs. Sixty one percent of the samples contained detectable levels of Babesia DNA. Of these, 98.3% were positive for B. canis, the remaining cases were positive for B. vogeli. Analysis of the Bc28.1 gene, performed on 178 of the B. canis samples, revealed an overall dominance of genotype B (62.4%), followed by genotypes A (37.1%) and 34 (11.8%). Interestingly, a great variation in the geographical distribution and prevalence of the three B. canis genotypes was observed; in the North-East genotype A predominated (72.1% A against 27.9% B), in contrast to the South-West where genotype B predominated (10.3% A against 89.7% B). In the central part of Europe intermediate levels were found (26.0-42.9% A against 74.0-57.1% B, from West to East). Genotype 34 was only identified in France (26.9% among 78 samples) and mostly as co-infection with genotypes A or B (61.9%). A comparative analysis of

  8. Toxocara canis in experimentally infected silver and arctic foxes.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Isam; Taira, Kensuke; Kapel, Christian M O

    2005-09-01

    In two experiments, thirty-six farm foxes of two species were inoculated with various doses of infective Toxocara canis eggs or tissue larvae isolated from mice. In experiment I, six adult arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus; 11-month old) were each inoculated with 20,000 eggs and sacrificed 100, 220, or 300 days post infection (dpi), while ten silver fox cubs (Vulpes vulpes; 6-9-week old) were infected with varying doses of eggs (30-3000) and necropsied 120 dpi. In experiment II, two groups of five cubs and two groups of five adult silver foxes received both a primary inoculation and either one or two challenge inoculations: primary inoculation (day 0) with 400 embryonated eggs were administered to five cubs and five adults and another five cubs and five adults received 400 larvae. At 50 dpi, the first challenge inoculation (400 eggs) was inoculated in all animals. At 100 dpi, three animals from each group were necropsied. The remaining two animals in each group were received a second challenge inoculation of 400 tissue larvae on 100 dpi and were subsequently necropsied at 150 dpi. In both experiments, the highest numbers of larvae per gram (lpg) of tissue was found in the kidneys (100-300 dpi). In adult foxes receiving a high dose (20,000 eggs), increasing larval burdens were found in the kidneys over the course of the experiment (up to 300 dpi). The larval migration from the lungs to other tissues appeared to be dose-dependent with the highest larval burdens found in adult foxes. The faecal egg excretion, larval burden and intestinal worm burdens decreased from the first to the second challenge infection.

  9. Isolation, in vitro propagation, genetic analysis, and immunogenic characterization of an Ehrlichia canis strain from southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rosiane Nascimento; Rieck, Susana Elisa; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos; Labruna, Marcelo Bahia; Beletti, Marcelo EmÍlio

    2014-01-01

    Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from a blood sample obtained from a dog in southeastern Brazil was used to confirm a naturally acquired Ehrlichia (E.) canis infection. Following isolation and culturing of the new bacterial strain called Uberlandia, partial sequences of the dsb and p28 genes were obtained. The dsb partial sequence of the novel strain was 100% similar to dsb gene sequences of E. canis obtained from different geographic areas around the world. Conversely, the p28 partial sequence for the E. canis Uberlândia strain differed at several nucleotides from other sequences available in GenBank. To confirm the antigenic profile of the Uberlândia strain, an indirect immunofluorescence assay against E. canis antigens was performed using dog sera collected from two different areas in Brazil (Uberlândia and São Paulo). The results suggest that both antigens were able to identify animals seropositive for E. canis in Brazil since these Brazilian strains appear to be highly conserved.

  10. First record of autochthonous canine ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichia canis in Romania.

    PubMed

    Morar, Doru; Dărăbuş, Gheorghe; Imre, Mirela; Ilie, Marius Stelian; Imre, Kálmán

    2015-06-01

    This case study describes the first genetically confirmed and clinically manifested autochthonous Ehrlichia canis infection in a 9-year-old female mixed-breed dog from Romania. Health screening of the dog included clinical examination, evaluation of stained peripheral blood smear and hematologic variables, as well as serologic testing and molecular analysis. Clinical signs included fever, apathy, dehydration, pale mucous membranes, and weakness. The microscopic examination of the blood smear and immunologic assays for Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and E canis antibodies, and for Dirofilaria immitis antigen yielded negative results. Hematologic abnormalities included moderate nonregenerative anemia, leucopenia with neutropenia, and moderate thrombocytopenia. The biochemical abnormalities identified were hypoalbuminemia, and mildly increased serum enzyme activities of AST and ALT. In addition, increased urea and creatinine levels associated with low urine specific gravity and proteinuria were also present. Nested PCR amplification of the partial E canis 16S rRNA gene demonstrated the presence of this rickettsial pathogen in the dog's blood, which subsequently was confirmed through sequencing based on the 100% homology with GenBank deposited E canis isolates. After specific treatment with doxycycline (10 mg/kg, orally, SID) for one month, the proteinuria, and hematologic and serum biochemical abnormalities with the exception of mild azotemia resolved. This report supports the geographical expansion of canine ehrlichiosis caused by E canis in nonendemic regions of Europe.

  11. Efficacy of emodepside plus praziquantel tablets (Profender tablets for dogs) against mature and immature infections with Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonina in dogs.

    PubMed

    Altreuther, Gertraut; Schimmel, Annette; Schroeder, Iris; Bach, Thomas; Charles, Samuel; Kok, Dawid J; Kraemer, Friederike; Wolken, Sonja; Young, David; Krieger, Klemens J

    2009-08-01

    The efficacy of emodepside plus praziquantel tablets (Profender tablets for dogs) against mature adult, immature adult and larval stages of Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonina was evaluated in ten randomised, blinded and placebo-controlled dose confirmation studies in naturally or experimentally infected dogs. The tablets were used at the proposed minimum dose of 1 mg emodepside and 5 mg praziquantel per kg body weight. Efficacy was calculated based on worm counts after necropsy. Five studies demonstrated >99% efficacy against mature adult, >92% efficacy against immature adult, >98% efficacy against L4 and >94% efficacy against L3 larval stages of T. canis. Another five studies demonstrated >99% efficacy against mature and immature adult and >95% efficacy against L4 larval stages of T. leonina. No side effects of the treatment were observed. Emodepside plus praziquantel tablets thus provide a comprehensive new treatment option for ascarid infections in the dog.

  12. Assessment of primers designed for the subspecies-specific discrimination among Babesia canis canis, Babesia canis vogeli and Babesia canis rossi by PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Sabrina Castilho; Linhares, Guido Fontgalland Coelho; Romanowsky, Tatiana Nunes; da Silveira Neto, Osvaldo José; Borges, Ligia Miranda Ferreira

    2008-03-25

    Canine babesiosis is an infectious disease caused by either Babesia gibsoni or Babesia canis protozoans. The latter is also classified under three different phylogenetic groups, referred to as subspecies B. canis canis, B. canis vogeli and B. canis rossi. The objective of the present study was to validate and standardize a PCR assay to discriminate the organisms at the subspecies level. First, the reference sequences of the 18S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA and 28S rRNA genes, including the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and 2 (ITS2) of the most common species and subspecies of the genus Babesia were retrieved from the GenBank database. Subspecies-specific primers (BAB3, BAB4 and BAB5) and one genus-specific primer were designed from the alignment of the sequences. The PCR assays were evaluated in three different combinations of primer pairs in order to assure complete specificity for each reaction. The results of the tests had demonstrated effectiveness of the novel primer pairs BAB1/BAB3, BAB1/BAB4 and BAB1/BAB5 for the amplification of the subspecies-specific target fragments of 746 bp (B. c. canis), 546 bp (B. c. vogeli) and 342 bp (B. c. rossi) by PCR. The original enzymatic amplification assays with novel primers reported in this paper were confirmed to be a reliable tool for the specific discrimination among B. canis subspecies by single-step PCR assays.

  13. Cryptosporidium canis in Two Mexican Toddlers.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Mariana; Urrea-Quezada, Alejandro; Villegas-Gómez, Isaac; Durazo, María; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Hernández, Jesús; Xiao, Lihua; Valenzuela, Olivia

    2016-11-01

    Cryptosporidium canis is reported for the first time in 2 toddlers in Northwestern Mexico. The 2 toddlers (33 and 34 months old) were symptomatic at diagnosis, presenting diarrhea and fever, and 1 case presented chronic malnutrition. Both toddlers were HIV-negative. C. canis was identified by SspI and VspI restriction enzyme digestion of the 18S rRNA polymerase chain reaction products and confirmed by sequence analysis.

  14. A safe and molecular-tagged Brucella canis ghosts confers protection against virulent challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jing; Bu, Zhaoyang; Lang, Xulong; Yan, Guangmou; Yang, Yanling; Wang, Xiuran; Wang, Xinglong

    2017-05-01

    Canine brucellosis, caused by Brucella canis, is a persistent infectious reproductive disease in dogs. The absence of effective treatment to the intracellular pathogen and the irreversible consequence of infection makes the need of a specific vaccine urgent. Bacterial ghosts (BGs) are the empty envelopes of bacteria with no genome content inside, which emerge as a proper vaccine candidate due to its intact outer antigen. It is generally derived from a genetically engineered strain, through the expression of Bacteriophage phiX174 lysis E gene upon induction. In this study, we combined the homologous recombination (HR) and bacterial ghost technologies, generating a genetically stable B. canis ghost strain which bears no drug resistance gene. When the ghost strain grows to OD600 of 0.6, 100% inactivation can be achieved under 42°C in 60h. The resultant BGs showed guaranteed safety and comparable immunogenicity to a live vaccine. The bacterial B0419 protein was depleted during HR process, which is subsequently proved to work as a molecular tag in distinguishing natural infection and BGs immunization through ELISA. Additionally, the BGs also conferred protection against B. canis RM6/66 and B. melitensis 16M. Therefore, the application of current BGs as a vaccine candidate and the corresponding serological diagnostic approach may provide better B. canis prevention strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor in a female wolf (Canis lupus lupus)

    PubMed Central

    SHIRAKI, Ayako; YOSHIDA, Toshinori; KAWASHIMA, Masahi; MURAYAMA, Hirotada; NAGAHARA, Rei; ITO, Nanao; SHIBUTANI, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    A 17-year-old female wolf (Canis lupus lupus) had a right lung mass that was adhered to the thoracic cavity. Histopathological examination revealed that the mass consisted of sheets, cord or ribbon-like structures of monotonous, small, cuboidal cells with round, oval or short-spindle nuclei and scant clear cytoplasm, demarcated by a fine fibrovascular stroma. Focal necrosis, congestion and thrombi were observed. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells diffusely expressed cytokeratin AE1/AE3, and some expressed chromogranin A, neural cell adhesion molecule (CD56) and thyroid transcription factor-1. The number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive tumor cells was low. A diagnosis of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor was based on the resemblance to carcinoids. PMID:28190820

  16. MicroRNAs of Toxocara canis and their predicted functional roles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guangxu; Luo, Yongfang; Zhu, Honghong; Luo, Yongli; Korhonen, Pasi K; Young, Neil D; Gasser, Robin B; Zhou, Rongqiong

    2016-04-23

    Toxocara canis is the causative agent of toxocariasis of humans and other animals. This parasitic nematode (roundworm) has a complex life cycle, in which substantial developmental changes and switches occur. As small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression in a wide range of organisms, we explored these RNAs in T. canis to provide a basis for future studies of its developmental biology as well as host interactions and disease at the molecular level. We conducted high-throughput RNA sequencing and bioinformatic analyses to define sRNAs in individual male and female adults of T. canis. Apart from snRNA and snoRNA, 560 and 619 microRNAs (miRNAs), including 5 and 2 novel miRNAs, were identified in male and female worms, respectively, without piRNAs being detected in either sex. An analysis of transcriptional profiles showed that, of 564 miRNAs predicted as being differentially transcribed between male and female individuals of T. canis, 218 miRNAs were transcribed exclusively in male and 277 in female worms. Functional enrichment analysis predicted that both male and female miRNAs were mainly involved in regulating embryonic morphogenesis, hemidesmosome assembly and genetic information processing. The miRNAs differentially transcribed between the sexes were predicted to be associated with sex determination, embryonic morphogenesis and nematode larval development. The roles of miRNAs were predicted based on gene ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway annotations. The miRNAs Tc-miR-2305 and Tc-miR-6090 are proposed to have roles in reproduction, embryo development and larval development, and Tc-let-7-5p, Tc-miR-34 and Tc-miR-100 appear to be involved in host-parasite interactions. Together with published information from previous studies, some miRNAs (such as Tc-miR-2861, Tc-miR-2881 and Tc-miR-5126) are predicted to represent drug targets and/or associated with drug resistance. This is the first exploration of miRNAs in T. canis, which could provide a

  17. R Canis Majoris---Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, M. B. K.; Rao, P. Vivekananda; Abhyankar, K. D.

    1996-02-01

    U, B, and V light curves by Radhakrishnan et al. (1985) and Hα (wide) and Hα (narrow) light curves by Edalati et al. (1989) of the semi-detached eclipsing binary system R Canis Majoris (R CMa) were analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney synthetic light curve method keeping the two parameters, Te,h (temperature of the hot component) and q (mass-ratio mc/mh) as fixed at 7310 K and 0.158 (Tomkin 1995), respectively. From the results of these analyses the following absolute elements of the system are obtained: mh = 1.070±0.20 Msun, mc = 0.168±0.02 Msun, Rh = 1.50±0.10 Rsun, Rc = 1.15±0.08 Rsun, log Lh/Lsun = 0.76±0.18 and log Lc/Lsun = -0.41±0.16. From the positions of the primary and secondary components in the plots of log m versus log L, log R, and log Te for main sequence stars, it is noticed that both the components are overluminous, oversized, and hotter for their derived masses. Assuming the overluminosity of the primary component to be due to overabundance of He, we calculated the initial masses of the original primary and secondary components of R CMa.

  18. [Uveitis caused by Toxocara canis].

    PubMed

    Janjetović, Zeljka; Arar, Zeljka Vuković; Marinić, Miljenko; Pandak, Nenad

    2006-01-01

    The course of disease in a 64-year-old man with toxocariasis and ocular manifestations of the disease, treated at Departments of Ophthalmology and of Infectious Diseases, Dr. Josip Bencević General Hospital in Slavonski Brod, Croatia, is presented. The patient was hospitalized for bilateral uveitis of unknown etiology. In several days, the patient developed high fever with respiratory tract involvement and hepatomegaly. Worsening of the patient's general condition and laboratory findings of leukocytosis and eosinophilia indicated clinical examinations for parasitosis, in consultation with a specialist for infectious diseases. Specific serologic testing pointed to toxocariasis. The patient's general condition and ophthalmologic status improved in response to specific therapy with anthelmintics and corticosteorids. Toxocariasis is an acute infectious disease that primarily affects animals and less frequently humans. Clinically, toxocariasis manifests as a systemic disease, and on the eye as parasitic posterior uveitis. The disease is caused by the nematodes Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati, the species parasitic in the intestine of dogs and cats, respectively. When the parasite eggs reach human intestine, larvae are released and migrate via blood and lymphatic system to the liver, lungs, eyes, and other organs. Considering the mechanism of disease transmission, the potential preventive measures should include treatment and appropriate anthelmintic management of infected animals, and due control of public areas such as public gardens, promenades, playgrounds, along with taking pets for exercise to the sites specially intended for this purpose.

  19. Secreted Metalloprotease Gene Family of Microsporum canis

    PubMed Central

    Brouta, Frédéric; Descamps, Frédéric; Monod, Michel; Vermout, Sandy; Losson, Bertrand; Mignon, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Keratinolytic proteases secreted by dermatophytes are likely to be virulence-related factors. Microsporum canis, the main agent of dermatophytosis in dogs and cats, causes a zoonosis that is frequently reported. Using Aspergillus fumigatus metalloprotease genomic sequence (MEP) as a probe, three genes (MEP1, MEP2, and MEP3) were isolated from an M. canis genomic library. They presented a quite-high percentage of identity with both A. fumigatus MEP and Aspergillus oryzae neutral protease I genes. At the amino acid level, they all contained an HEXXH consensus sequence, confirming that these M. canis genes (MEP genes) encode a zinc-containing metalloprotease gene family. Furthermore, MEP3 was found to be the gene encoding a previously isolated M. canis 43.5-kDa keratinolytic metalloprotease, and was successfully expressed as an active recombinant enzyme in Pichia pastoris. Reverse transcriptase nested PCR performed on total RNA extracted from the hair of M. canis-infected guinea pigs showed that at least MEP2 and MEP3 are produced during the infection process. This is the first report describing the isolation of a gene family encoding potential virulence-related factors in dermatophytes. PMID:12228297

  20. Draft Genome of Toxocara canis, a Pathogen Responsible for Visceral Larva Migrans

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jinhwa; Won, Jungim; Yoon, Jeehee; Lee, UnJoo; Kim, Jong-Il; Huh, Sun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at constructing a draft genome of the adult female worm Toxocara canis using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and de novo assembly, as well as to find new genes after annotation using functional genomics tools. Using an NGS machine, we produced DNA read data of T. canis. The de novo assembly of the read data was performed using SOAPdenovo. RNA read data were assembled using Trinity. Structural annotation, homology search, functional annotation, classification of protein domains, and KEGG pathway analysis were carried out. Besides them, recently developed tools such as MAKER, PASA, Evidence Modeler, and Blast2GO were used. The scaffold DNA was obtained, the N50 was 108,950 bp, and the overall length was 341,776,187 bp. The N50 of the transcriptome was 940 bp, and its length was 53,046,952 bp. The GC content of the entire genome was 39.3%. The total number of genes was 20,178, and the total number of protein sequences was 22,358. Of the 22,358 protein sequences, 4,992 were newly observed in T. canis. Following proteins previously unknown were found: E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase cbl-b and antigen T-cell receptor, zeta chain for T-cell and B-cell regulation; endoprotease bli-4 for cuticle metabolism; mucin 12Ea and polymorphic mucin variant C6/1/40r2.1 for mucin production; tropomodulin-family protein and ryanodine receptor calcium release channels for muscle movement. We were able to find new hypothetical polypeptides sequences unique to T. canis, and the findings of this study are capable of serving as a basis for extending our biological understanding of T. canis. PMID:28095660

  1. Draft Genome of Toxocara canis, a Pathogen Responsible for Visceral Larva Migrans.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jinhwa; Won, Jungim; Yoon, Jeehee; Lee, UnJoo; Kim, Jong-Il; Huh, Sun

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed at constructing a draft genome of the adult female worm Toxocara canis using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and de novo assembly, as well as to find new genes after annotation using functional genomics tools. Using an NGS machine, we produced DNA read data of T. canis. The de novo assembly of the read data was performed using SOAPdenovo. RNA read data were assembled using Trinity. Structural annotation, homology search, functional annotation, classification of protein domains, and KEGG pathway analysis were carried out. Besides them, recently developed tools such as MAKER, PASA, Evidence Modeler, and Blast2GO were used. The scaffold DNA was obtained, the N50 was 108,950 bp, and the overall length was 341,776,187 bp. The N50 of the transcriptome was 940 bp, and its length was 53,046,952 bp. The GC content of the entire genome was 39.3%. The total number of genes was 20,178, and the total number of protein sequences was 22,358. Of the 22,358 protein sequences, 4,992 were newly observed in T. canis. Following proteins previously unknown were found: E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase cbl-b and antigen T-cell receptor, zeta chain for T-cell and B-cell regulation; endoprotease bli-4 for cuticle metabolism; mucin 12Ea and polymorphic mucin variant C6/1/40r2.1 for mucin production; tropomodulin-family protein and ryanodine receptor calcium release channels for muscle movement. We were able to find new hypothetical polypeptides sequences unique to T. canis, and the findings of this study are capable of serving as a basis for extending our biological understanding of T. canis.

  2. Helicobacter canis colonization in sheep: a zoonotic link

    PubMed Central

    Swennes, Alton G.; Turk, Michelle L.; Trowel, Elise M.; Cullin, Cassandra; Shen, Zeli; Pang, Jassia; Petersson, Katherine H.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Fox, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter canis has been associated with hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal disease in dogs, cats, and humans. Here we report H. canis isolation from sheep feces confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism, biochemical profiles, and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. This study identifies sheep as H. canis reservoirs potentially important in zoonotic or foodborne transmission. PMID:24188726

  3. Further Evidence for the Canis Major Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    We analyze deep widefield V and R photometry from candidate open clusters in the direction of the recently discovered Monoceros ring and the proposed Canis Major dwarf galaxy remnant. For two fields we find significant evidence for a new stellar population which is not explained by known Galactic components such as the warp, flare and spiral arms. One field exhibits significant evidence for a discrete population of stars at a heliocentric distance of 8 kpc in support of the existence of the Canis Major remnant galaxy.

  4. Babesia canis vogeli, Ehrlichia canis, and Anaplasma platys infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Al Izzi, Salah; Martin, Donald S; Chan, Roxanne Y Y; Leutenegger, Christian M

    2013-12-01

    A 12-month-old male neutered mixed breed dog was presented with a history of diarrhea, lethargy, emaciation, polydypsia, and sniffling. Physical examination findings included pale mucous membranes, increased heart and respiratory rates, and normal rectal temperature (38°C). Hematologic abnormalities included anemia and thrombocytopenia. Biochemical abnormalities included hypoalbuminemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and elevated ALP and ALT activities. A SNAP 4Dx test result was positive for Ehrlichia canis. Babesia canis vogeli organisms were found in the peripheral blood films, while morulae of E canis were not seen. Real-time polymerase chain reaction testing confirmed the presence of both B c vogeli and E canis organisms, and also was positive for Anaplasma platys infection. The dog recovered following treatment with doxycycline and imidocarb dipropionate, with normal hematology and biochemical profiles.

  5. Neurotoxocarosis: marked preference of Toxocara canis for the cerebrum and T. cati for the cerebellum in the paratenic model host mouse.

    PubMed

    Janecek, Elisabeth; Beineke, Andreas; Schnieder, Thomas; Strube, Christina

    2014-04-22

    Infective larvae of the worldwide occurring zoonotic roundworm T. canis exhibit a marked affinity to the nervous tissues of paratenic hosts. In humans, most cases of neurotoxocarosis are considered to be caused by larvae of T. canis as T. cati larvae have rarely been found in the CNS in previous studies. However, direct comparison of studies is difficult as larval migration depends on a variety of factors including mouse strains and inoculation doses. Therefore, the present study aims to provide a direct comparison of both roundworm species in mice as a model for paratenic hosts with specific focus on the CNS during the acute and chronic phase of disease to provide a basis for further studies dealing with neurotoxocarosis. C57Bl/6J mice were infected with 2000 embryonated T. canis and T. cati eggs, respectively as well as Balb/c mice infected with T. cati eggs only. On 8 time points post infection, organs were removed and microscopically examined for respective larvae. Special focus was put on the CNS, including analysis of larval distribution in the cerebrum and cerebellum, right and left hemisphere as well as eyes and spinal cord. Additionally, brains of all infection groups as well as uninfected controls were examined histopathologically to characterize neurostructural damage. Significant differences in larval distribution were observed between and within the infection groups during the course of infection. As expected, significantly higher recovery rates of T. canis than T. cati larvae were determined in the brain. Surprisingly, significantly more T. canis larvae could be found in cerebra of infected mice whereas T. cati larvae were mainly located in the cerebellum. Structural damage in brain tissue could be observed in all infection groups, being more severe in brains of T. canis infected mice. The data obtained provides an extensive characterization of migrational routes of T. canis and T. cati in the paratenic host mouse in direct comparison. Even though to

  6. Neurotoxocarosis: marked preference of Toxocara canis for the cerebrum and T. cati for the cerebellum in the paratenic model host mouse

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Infective larvae of the worldwide occurring zoonotic roundworm T. canis exhibit a marked affinity to the nervous tissues of paratenic hosts. In humans, most cases of neurotoxocarosis are considered to be caused by larvae of T. canis as T. cati larvae have rarely been found in the CNS in previous studies. However, direct comparison of studies is difficult as larval migration depends on a variety of factors including mouse strains and inoculation doses. Therefore, the present study aims to provide a direct comparison of both roundworm species in mice as a model for paratenic hosts with specific focus on the CNS during the acute and chronic phase of disease to provide a basis for further studies dealing with neurotoxocarosis. Methods C57Bl/6J mice were infected with 2000 embryonated T. canis and T. cati eggs, respectively as well as Balb/c mice infected with T. cati eggs only. On 8 time points post infection, organs were removed and microscopically examined for respective larvae. Special focus was put on the CNS, including analysis of larval distribution in the cerebrum and cerebellum, right and left hemisphere as well as eyes and spinal cord. Additionally, brains of all infection groups as well as uninfected controls were examined histopathologically to characterize neurostructural damage. Results Significant differences in larval distribution were observed between and within the infection groups during the course of infection. As expected, significantly higher recovery rates of T. canis than T. cati larvae were determined in the brain. Surprisingly, significantly more T. canis larvae could be found in cerebra of infected mice whereas T. cati larvae were mainly located in the cerebellum. Structural damage in brain tissue could be observed in all infection groups, being more severe in brains of T. canis infected mice. Conclusions The data obtained provides an extensive characterization of migrational routes of T. canis and T. cati in the paratenic host

  7. Case report. Onychomycosis due to Microsporum canis.

    PubMed

    Romano, C; Paccagnini, E; Pelliccia, L

    2001-05-01

    A case of distal subungual onychomycosis of the big toe due to Microsporum canis is reported in a 69-year-old male asthma patient who had been treated with systemic corticosteroids for the last 3 years. The nail infection was contracted from a cat who was a healthy carrier. The patient was treated successfully with intermittent itraconazole therapy.

  8. The Mitochondrial Genome of Toxocara canis

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, D. Timothy J.; Hu, Min; Gasser, Robin B.

    2008-01-01

    Toxocara canis (Ascaridida: Nematoda), which parasitizes (at the adult stage) the small intestine of canids, can be transmitted to a range of other mammals, including humans, and can cause the disease toxocariasis. Despite its significance as a pathogen, the genetics, epidemiology and biology of this parasite remain poorly understood. In addition, the zoonotic potential of related species of Toxocara, such as T. cati and T. malaysiensis, is not well known. Mitochondrial DNA is known to provide genetic markers for investigations in these areas, but complete mitochondrial genomic data have been lacking for T. canis and its congeners. In the present study, the mitochondrial genome of T. canis was amplified by long-range polymerase chain reaction (long PCR) and sequenced using a primer-walking strategy. This circular mitochondrial genome was 14162 bp and contained 12 protein-coding, 22 transfer RNA, and 2 ribosomal RNA genes consistent for secernentean nematodes, including Ascaris suum and Anisakis simplex (Ascaridida). The mitochondrial genome of T. canis provides genetic markers for studies into the systematics, population genetics and epidemiology of this zoonotic parasite and its congeners. Such markers can now be used in prospecting for cryptic species and for exploring host specificity and zoonotic potential, thus underpinning the prevention and control of toxocariasis in humans and other hosts. PMID:18682828

  9. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay with Conserved Immunoreactive Glycoproteins gp36 and gp19 Has Enhanced Sensitivity and Provides Species-Specific Immunodiagnosis of Ehrlichia canis Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Ana Maria; Doyle, C. Kuyler; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Nethery, Kimberly; Corstvet, Richard E.; Walker, David H.; McBride, Jere W.

    2007-01-01

    Ehrlichia canis is the primary etiologic agent of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, a globally distributed and potentially fatal disease of dogs. We previously reported on the identification of two conserved major immunoreactive antigens, gp36 and gp19, which are the first proteins to elicit an E. canis-specific antibody response, and gp200 and p28, which elicit strong antibody responses later in the acute phase of the infection. In this report, the sensitivities and specificities of five recombinant E. canis proteins for the immunodiagnosis of E. canis infection by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were evaluated. Recombinant polypeptides gp36, gp19, and gp200 (N and C termini) exhibited 100% sensitivity and specificity for immunodiagnosis by the recombinant glycoprotein ELISA compared with the results obtained by an indirect fluorescent-antibody assay (IFA) for the detection of antibodies in dogs that were naturally infected with E. canis. Moreover, the enhanced sensitivities of gp36 and gp19 for immunodiagnosis by the recombinant glycoprotein ELISA compared to those obtained by IFA were demonstrated with dogs experimentally infected with E. canis, in which antibodies were detected as much as 2 weeks earlier, on day 14 postinoculation. gp36 and gp19 were not cross-reactive with antibodies in sera from E. chaffeensis-infected dogs and thus provided species-specific serologic discrimination between E. canis and E. chaffeensis infections. This is the first demonstration of the improved detection capability of the recombinant protein technology compared to the capability of the “gold standard” IFA and may eliminate the remaining obstacles associated with the immunodiagnosis of E. canis infections, including species-specific identification and the lack of sensitivity associated with low antibody titers early in the acute phase of the infection. PMID:17151186

  10. Cloning and Characterization of Multigenes Encoding the Immunodominant 30-Kilodalton Major Outer Membrane Proteins of Ehrlichia canis and Application of the Recombinant Protein for Serodiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Norio; Unver, Ahmet; Zhi, Ning; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    1998-01-01

    A 30-kDa major outer membrane protein of Ehrlichia canis, the agent of canine ehrlichiosis, is the major antigen recognized by both naturally and experimentally infected dog sera. The protein cross-reacts with a serum against a recombinant 28-kDa protein (rP28), one of the outer membrane proteins of a gene (omp-1) family of Ehrlichia chaffeensis. Two DNA fragments of E. canis were amplified by PCR with two primer pairs based on the sequences of E. chaffeensis omp-1 genes, cloned, and sequenced. Each fragment contained a partial 30-kDa protein gene of E. canis. Genomic Southern blot analysis with the partial gene probes revealed the presence of multiple copies of these genes in the E. canis genome. Three copies of the entire gene (p30, p30-1, and p30a) were cloned and sequenced from the E. canis genomic DNA. The open reading frames of the two copies (p30 and p30-1) were tandemly arranged with an intergenic space. The three copies were similar but not identical and contained a semivariable region and three hypervariable regions in the protein molecules. The following genes homologous to three E. canis 30-kDa protein genes and the E. chaffeensis omp-1 family were identified in the closely related rickettsiae: wsp from Wolbachia sp., p44 from the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, msp-2 and msp-4 from Anaplasma marginale, and map-1 from Cowdria ruminantium. Phylogenetic analysis among the three E. canis 30-kDa proteins and the major surface proteins of the rickettsiae revealed that these proteins are divided into four clusters and the two E. canis 30-kDa proteins are closely related but that the third 30-kDa protein is not. The p30 gene was expressed as a fusion protein, and the antibody to the recombinant protein (rP30) was raised in a mouse. The antibody reacted with rP30 and a 30-kDa protein of purified E. canis. Twenty-nine indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA)-positive dog plasma specimens strongly recognized the rP30 of E. canis. To evaluate whether the rP30

  11. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis in dogs in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Mojgan; Lim, Sue Yee; Watanabe, Mahira; Sharma, Reuben S K; Cheng, Nadzariah A B Y; Watanabe, Malaika

    2013-01-01

    An epidemiological study of Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs in Peninsular Malaysia was carried out using molecular detection techniques. A total of 500 canine blood samples were collected from veterinary clinics and dog shelters. Molecular screening by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed using genus-specific primers followed by PCR using E. canis species-specific primers. Ten out of 500 dogs were positive for E. canis. A phylogenetic analysis of the E. canis Malaysia strain showed that it was grouped tightly with other E. canis strains from different geographic regions. The present study revealed for the first time, the presence of genetically confirmed E. canis with a prevalence rate of 2.0% in naturally infected dogs in Malaysia.

  12. Kerion Celsi due to Microsporum canis with a Dermatophytid Reaction.

    PubMed

    Gorgievska-Sukarovska, Biljana; Skerlev, Mihael; Žele-Starčević, Lidija; Husar, Karmela; Halasz, Mirna

    2017-07-01

    Microsporum (M.) canis is the most common fungus to cause tinea capitis in Europe, especially in the Mediterranean region and South and Central Europe. Fungal scalp infections caused by M. canis tend to be non-inflammatory. Recently, a growing number of cases of tinea capitis characterized by inflammatory infection caused by M. canis and M. gypseum have been registered. We present a case of highly inflammatory tinea capitis, also known as kerion celsi, caused by M. canis in a 6-year-old-patient. Scalp infections due to M. canis are a growing problem in dermatological practice. Changes in epidemiology, etiology, and clinical patterns of fungal infections due to M. canis are significant. Greater awareness of this problem is needed in order to establish proper diagnosis and successful treatment strategy for these patients.

  13. Systemic infection by Pasteurella canis biotype 1 in newborn puppies.

    PubMed

    de la Puente Redondo, V A; Gutiérrez Martín, C B; García del Blanco, N; Antolín Ayala, M I; Alonso Alonso, P; Rodríguez Ferri, E F

    2000-01-01

    Pasteurella canis biotype 1, usually associated with the oral cavity of dogs and cats, or with human wound infections following dog bites, was isolated from newborn puppies with a fatal systemic infection. The identity of P. canis was confirmed by arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction and the organism was susceptible to all the penicillins, cephalosporins, tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones tested and to most of the aminoglycosides tested. This represents the first report of systemic pasteurellosis caused by P. canis in dogs.

  14. Dermatophytosis of tiger caused by Microsporum canis.

    PubMed

    Takatori, K; Ichijo, S; Kurata, H

    1981-02-13

    Microsporum canis was isolated from the inflammatory skin lesions of a Bengal tiger in April, 1979. In clinical findings rounded area of alopecia, 3 to 8 cm in size was observed on the right haunch and the tail. The skin lesions were covered with thin scales, but the inflammatory changes were not severe. Findings, on physical examination, were unremarkable and the animal appeared healthy except for the skin lesions. The infected hairs were invaded by the fungal elements and arthroconidia were around the hair shaft. Cuticles and cortex of the infected hairs were brittle. They were evidently digested and were easily pulled out from the hair follicles. In mycological findings numerous and typical macroconidia were observed. By cross mating of a isolate from tiger and Nannizzia otae(-) strains, cleistothecia were produced. Both organic iodide and undecylenic acid ointment were effective for therapy. In this paper the dermatophytosis of tiger caused by M. canis is described.

  15. Recent trends in human Brucella canis infection.

    PubMed

    Marzetti, Sandra; Carranza, Cristina; Roncallo, Mariela; Escobar, Gabriela I; Lucero, Nidia E

    2013-01-01

    There is little information in the literature regarding the clinical progress of brucellosis in patients affected by other diseases. We report Brucella canis human infection link to Gaucher's disease and Guillain Barré syndrome and discuss complications observed in a case with infective endocarditis. The three cases described came from areas of socio-economic deprivation and scarce epidemiological information where the healthcare personnel did not even consider such diagnosis. The growth of large urban populations deprived from basic services has created a new set of global health challenges. Changes in the urban environment due to slum communities' expansion have resulted in increased dog populations in the peridomiciliary environment. Eleven laboratory employees working with the strains found and their identification were examined. Sanitary authorities should focus on the zoonotic aspect of B. canis considering the dramatic increase of canine roamers near urban centers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fungal ovicidal activity on Toxocara canis eggs.

    PubMed

    De Souza Maia Filho, Fernando; Nunes Vieira, Juliana; Aires Berne, Maria Elisabeth; Stoll, Franciele Elisa; Da Silva Nascente, Patricia; Pötter, Luciana; Brayer Pereira, Daniela Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Visceral toxocariasis is a parasitic zoonosis caused by Toxocara canis. The prevalence of this parasite in dogs, soil contamination and the resistance of eggs increase human exposure to the disease. Moreover, the difficulties of the control measures justify the need for alternative ones. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro ovicidal activity of fungi isolated from soils from public places in the city of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, on Toxocara canis. Samples of soil from ten localities were inoculated onto Petri dishes with 2% water-agar (WA) that contained antibiotics, and incubated at 25°C/21 days. Isolated fungi were tested in vitro for ovicidal activity, with five replicates. One mL of an embryonated Toxocara canis egg suspension (10(3) eggs) was poured over the fungal cultures after 10 days of growth. At intervals of 7, 14 and 21 days, 100 eggs were removed from each plaque and evaluated by optical microscopy. Acremonium, Aspergillus, Bipolaris, Fusarium, Gliocladium, Mucor and Trichoderma were isolated from the soil. A significant ovicidal type 3 effect was observed in Trichoderma, Fusarium solani complex and Acremonium. Those isolates from the genus Trichoderma showed their ovicidal effect on the 14th day of fungus-egg interaction. The other fungal genera tested showed a type 2 effect. These results suggest that the use of Trichoderma and Fusarium solani complex in biological control of T. canis is promising; however, further studies should be performed. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of Brucella canis in a dog in Italy.

    PubMed

    Corrente, Marialaura; Franchini, Delia; Decaro, Nicola; Greco, Grazia; D'Abramo, Maria; Greco, Maria Fiorella; Latronico, Francesca; Crovace, Antonio; Martella, Vito

    2010-10-01

    Brucella spp. is a worldwide zoonotic pathogen. Infection by Brucella canis in dogs is endemic in the Southern USA and in Central and South America, but it appears sporadically in other parts of the world, including Europe. Tissue samples from a dog with chronic prostatitis, discospondylitis and locomotor problems were subjected to clinical and laboratory examinations. B. canis was detected by PCR in biological fluids and tissues of the animal, while antibodies to B. canis were found in the serum, providing additional strong evidence for the circulation of B. canis in Italy.

  18. Canine vector-borne co-infections: Ehrlichia canis and Hepatozoon canis in the same host monocytes.

    PubMed

    Baneth, Gad; Harrus, Shimon; Gal, Arnon; Aroch, Itamar

    2015-02-28

    The protozoon Hepatozoon canis and the rickettsia Ehrlichia canis are tick-borne pathogens, transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus, which cause canine hepatozoonosis and canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, respectively. Co-infection of the same host monocytes with H. canis and E. canis confirmed by molecular characterization of the infecting agents and quantitative assessment of co-infected cells is described for the first time in three naturally-infected dogs. Blood smear evaluation indicated that at least 50% of the leukocytes infected with H. canis gamonts contained E. canis morulae. Co-infection of the same host cell demonstrated in this report suggests that infection with one pathogen may permit or enhance invasion or prolonged cellular survival of the other.

  19. Extracellular enzymatic activity of Microsporum canis isolates.

    PubMed

    Papini, R; Mancianti, F

    The enzymatic activity of 70 feline and canine Microsporum canis isolates was determined by the Api-Zym test. The liquid phase of cultures, inoculated into Tryptic Soy Broth, was used to examine 19 enzymes. Considerable differences were observed among the extracellular enzymatic patterns. All the isolates produced alkaline phosphatase and beta-glucosidase, while lipase (C14), trypsin, chymotrypsin, beta-glucuronidase, and alpha-fucosidase activity was never revealed. Esterase (C4) activity was present in 57 samples (81%), esterase lipase (C8) in 31 (44%), leucine arylamidase in 35 (50%), valine arylamidase and cystine arylamidase in 7 (10%), acid phosphatase in 64 (91%), naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase in 60 (86%), alpha-galactosidase in 5 (7%), beta-galactosidase in 6 (8%), alpha-glucosidase in 25 (36%), N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase in 41 (58%), and alpha-mannosidase in 51 (73%). The beta-galactosidase activity of M. canis has not been reported previously. Remarkable variations of intensity for each enzymatic activity were also detected. It is believed that these results could provide basic data for further investigations on the pathogenic role of enzymes secreted by M. canis.

  20. The transmission of Babesia canis to the wild dog Lycaon pictus (Temminck) and black-backed jackal Canis mesomelas Schreber.

    PubMed

    Van Heerden, J

    1980-06-01

    Babesia canis was successfully transmitted from the domestic dog to 3 wild dogs Lycaon pictus and 4 black-backed jackals Canis mesomelas. Both wild dogs and black-backed jackals showed no clinical signs or clinical pathological evidence of disease. Trophozoites of Babesia canis were found in peripheral blood smears from all experimental animals. The disease was also successfully transmitted from both black-backed jackals and wild dogs to the domestic dog.

  1. Drosophila adult and larval pheromones modulate larval food choice

    PubMed Central

    Farine, Jean-Pierre; Cortot, Jérôme; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Insects use chemosensory cues to feed and mate. In Drosophila, the effect of pheromones has been extensively investigated in adults, but rarely in larvae. The colonization of natural food sources by Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila simulans species may depend on species-specific chemical cues left in the food by larvae and adults. We identified such chemicals in both species and measured their influence on larval food preference and puparation behaviour. We also tested compounds that varied between these species: (i) two larval volatile compounds: hydroxy-3-butanone-2 and phenol (predominant in D. simulans and D. buzzatii, respectively), and (ii) adult cuticular hydrocarbons (CHs). Drosophila buzzatii larvae were rapidly attracted to non-CH adult conspecific cues, whereas D. simulans larvae were strongly repulsed by CHs of the two species and also by phenol. Larval cues from both species generally reduced larval attraction and pupariation on food, which was generally—but not always—low, and rarely reflected larval response. As these larval and adult pheromones specifically influence larval food search and the choice of a pupariation site, they may greatly affect the dispersion and survival of Drosophila species in nature. PMID:24741012

  2. Drosophila adult and larval pheromones modulate larval food choice.

    PubMed

    Farine, Jean-Pierre; Cortot, Jérôme; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2014-06-07

    Insects use chemosensory cues to feed and mate. In Drosophila, the effect of pheromones has been extensively investigated in adults, but rarely in larvae. The colonization of natural food sources by Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila simulans species may depend on species-specific chemical cues left in the food by larvae and adults. We identified such chemicals in both species and measured their influence on larval food preference and puparation behaviour. We also tested compounds that varied between these species: (i) two larval volatile compounds: hydroxy-3-butanone-2 and phenol (predominant in D. simulans and D. buzzatii, respectively), and (ii) adult cuticular hydrocarbons (CHs). Drosophila buzzatii larvae were rapidly attracted to non-CH adult conspecific cues, whereas D. simulans larvae were strongly repulsed by CHs of the two species and also by phenol. Larval cues from both species generally reduced larval attraction and pupariation on food, which was generally--but not always--low, and rarely reflected larval response. As these larval and adult pheromones specifically influence larval food search and the choice of a pupariation site, they may greatly affect the dispersion and survival of Drosophila species in nature.

  3. Seroprevalence and geographic distribution of Dirofilaria immitis and tick-borne infections (Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, and Ehrlichia canis) in dogs from Romania.

    PubMed

    Mircean, Viorica; Dumitrache, Mirabela Oana; Györke, Adriana; Pantchev, Nikola; Jodies, Robert; Mihalca, Andrei Daniel; Cozma, Vasile

    2012-07-01

    Tick-borne diseases are of great concern worldwide. Despite this, in Romania there is only limited information regarding the prevalence of vector-borne pathogens in dogs. In all, 1146 serum samples were tested by SNAP(®) 4Dx(®) (IDEXX Laboratories, Inc., Westbrook, ME) for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Ehrlichia canis antibodies, and for Dirofilaria immitis antigen. The correlation between positive cases and their geographic distribution, as well as potential risk factors (age, sex, breed, type of dog, habitat, and prophylactic treatments) were evaluated. Overall, 129 dogs (11.3%) were serologically-positive to one or more of the tested pathogens. The seroprevalence for the four infectious agents were: A. phagocytophilum 5.5% (63/1146), D. immitis 3.3% (38/1146), E. canis 2.1% (24/1146), and B. burgdorferi 0.5% (6/1146). Co-infection with E. canis and A. phagocytophilum was registered in 2 dogs (0.2%). The geographical distribution of the seropositive cases suggests clustered foci in southern regions and in the western part of the country for D. immitis, and in the southeastern region (Constanţa County) for E. canis. A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi showed a homogenous distribution, with a tendency for Lyme-positive samples to concentrate in central Romania. For D. immitis, A. phagocytophilum, and E. canis, administering prophylactic treatments was a risk factor associated with infection. Another associated risk factor was the type of dog (stray dogs were at risk being positive for D. immitis, shelter dogs for E. canis, and hunting dogs for B. burgdorferi). The prevalence of D. immitis was significantly higher in males and in dogs older than 2 years. This survey represents the first data detailing A. phagocytophilum and E. canis seroprevalence in Romanian dogs, and the most comprehensive epidemiological study on vector-borne infections in dogs from this country.

  4. Initial development and preliminary evaluation of a multiplex bead assay to detect antibodies to Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis outer membrane peptides in naturally infected dogs from Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Melinda J; Black, Kelley E; Lanza-Perea, Marta; Sharma, Bhumika; Gibson, Kathryn; Stone, Diana M; George, Anushka; Nair, Arathy D S; Ganta, Roman R

    2017-01-01

    Tick-borne bacteria, Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis are significant pathogens of dogs worldwide, and coinfections of E. canis and A. platys are common in dogs on the Caribbean islands. We developed and evaluated the performance of a multiplex bead-based assay to detect antibodies to E. canis, A. platys, and E. chaffeensis peptides in dogs from Grenada, West Indies, where E. canis and A. platys infections are endemic. Peptides from outer membrane proteins of P30 of E. canis, OMP-1X of A. platys, and P28-19/P28-14 of E. chaffeensis were coupled to magnetic beads. The multiplex peptide assay detected antibodies in dogs experimentally infected with E. canis and E. chaffeensis, but not in an A. platys experimentally infected dog. In contrast, the multiplex assay and an in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detected A. platys antibodies in naturally infected Grenadian dogs. Following testing of 104 Grenadian canine samples, multiplex assay results had good agreement with commercially available ELISA and immunofluorescent assay for E. canis antibody-positive dogs ( K values of 0.73 and 0.84), whereas A. platys multiplex results had poor agreement with these commercial assays ( K values of -0.02 and 0.01). Prevalence of seropositive E. canis and A. platys Grenadian dogs detected by the multiplex and commercial antibody assays were similar to previous reports. Although the multiplex peptide assay performed well in detecting the seropositive status of dogs to E. canis and had good agreement with commercial assays, better antigen targets are necessary for the antibody detection of A. platys.

  5. A larval Devonian lungfish.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Keith S; Sutton, Mark; Thomas, Bethia

    2003-12-18

    Perhaps the most enduring of puzzles in palaeontology has been the identity of Palaeospondylus gunni Traquair, a tiny (5-60-mm) vertebrate fossil from the Middle Devonian period (approximately 385 Myr ago) of Scotland, first discovered in 1890 (refs 1-3). It is known principally from a single site (Achanarras Quarry, Caithness) where, paradoxically, it is extremely abundant, preserved in varved lacustrine deposits along with 13 other genera of fishes. Here we show that Palaeospondylus is the larval stage of a lungfish, most probably Dipterus valenciennesi Sedgwick and Murchison 1828 (ref. 5), and that development of the adult form requires a distinct metamorphosis. Palaeospondylus is the oldest known true larva of a vertebrate.

  6. Development of a Luminex Bead Based Assay for Diagnosis of Toxocariasis Using Recombinant Antigens Tc-CTL-1 and Tc-TES-26.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John P; Rascoe, Lisa N; Levert, Keith; Chastain, Holly M; Reed, Matthew S; Rivera, Hilda N; McAuliffe, Isabel; Zhan, Bin; Wiegand, Ryan E; Hotez, Peter J; Wilkins, Patricia P; Pohl, Jan; Handali, Sukwan

    2015-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of human disease caused by the roundworms Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati ranges from visceral and ocular larva migrans to covert toxocariasis. The parasite is not typically recovered in affected tissues, so detection of parasite-specific antibodies is usually necessary for establishing a diagnosis. The most reliable immunodiagnostic methods use the Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens (TES-Ag) in ELISA formats to detect Toxocara-specific antibodies. To eliminate the need for native parasite materials, we identified and purified immunodiagnostic antigens using 2D gel electrophoresis followed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Three predominant immunoreactive proteins were found in the TES; all three had been previously described in the literature: Tc-CTL-1, Tc-TES-26, and Tc-MUC-3. We generated Escherichia coli expressed recombinant proteins for evaluation in Luminex based immunoassays. We were unable to produce a functional assay with the Tc-MUC-3 recombinant protein. Tc-CTL-1 and Tc-TES-26 were successfully coupled and tested using defined serum batteries. The use of both proteins together generated better results than if the proteins were used individually. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay for detecting visceral larval migrans using Tc-CTL-1 plus Tc-TES-26 was 99% and 94%, respectively; the sensitivity for detecting ocular larval migrans was 64%. The combined performance of the new assay was superior to the currently available EIA and could potentially be employed to replace current assays that rely on native TES-Ag.

  7. Efficacy of emodepside plus toltrazuril (Procox(®) oral suspension for dogs) against Toxocara canis, Uncinaria stenocephala and Ancylostoma caninum in dogs.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Annette; Schroeder, Iris; Altreuther, Gertraut; Settje, Terry; Charles, Samuel; Wolken, Sonja; Kok, Dawid J; Ketzis, Jennifer; Young, David; Hutchens, Douglas; Krieger, Klemens J

    2011-08-01

    The efficacy of emodepside plus toltrazuril (Procox® oral suspension for dogs) against different species of gastrointestinal nematodes (Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, Uncinaria stenocephala) was evaluated in nine randomised,blinded and placebo-controlled laboratory studies in naturally or experimentally infected dogs. The product was used at the proposed minimum dose of 0.45 mg emodepside and 9 mg toltrazuril per kg body weight. Efficacy was calculated based on worm counts after necropsy. Worm burdens in the control dogs ranged between 0 and 409 worms of the respective stage for T. canis and between 4 and 655 worms for hookworms. The studies demonstrated 100 % efficacy of emodepside/toltrazuril suspension against mature adult, ≥ 94.7 %efficacy against immature adult and 99.3 % efficacy against the L4 larval stage of T. canis. The efficacy against mature adult A. caninum was ≥ 99.5 % and the efficacy against mature adult U. stenocephala was 100 %. All differences between treatment and control groups were statistically significant and no gender effect was found. It can be concluded that the emodepside/toltrazuril suspension represents a safe and highly effective product in dogs with nematode (T. canis, hookworms) infection.

  8. Pathogenic Fungus Microsporum canis Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Liming; Zhang, Liping; Li, Hua; Chen, Wei; Wang, Hongbin; Wu, Shuxian; Guo, Caiqin; Lu, Ailing; Yang, Guiwen; An, Liguo

    2014-01-01

    Microsporum canis is a pathogenic fungus with worldwide distribution that causes tinea capitis in animals and humans. M. canis also causes invasive infection in immunocompromised patients. To defy pathogenic fungal infection, the host innate immune system is the first line of defense. As an important arm of innate immunity, the inflammasomes are intracellular multiprotein complexes that control the activation of caspase-1, which cleaves proinflammatory cytokine pro-interleukin-1β (IL-1β) into its mature form. To determine whether the inflammasome is involved in the host defense against M. canis infection, we challenged human monocytic THP-1 cells and mouse dendritic cells with a clinical strain of M. canis isolated from patients with tinea capitis. We found that M. canis infection triggered rapid secretion of IL-1β from both THP-1 cells and mouse dendritic cells. Moreover, by using gene-specific shRNA and competitive inhibitors, we determined that M. canis-induced IL-1β secretion was dependent on NLRP3. The pathways proposed for NLRP3 inflammasome activation, namely, cathepsin B activity, K+ efflux, and reactive oxygen species production, were all required for the inflammasome activation triggered by M. canis. Meanwhile, Syk, Dectin-1, and Card9 were found to be involved in M. canis-induced IL-1β secretion via regulation of pro-IL-1β transcription. More importantly, our data revealed that M. canis-induced production of IL-1β was dependent on the NLRP3 inflammasome in vivo. Together, this study unveils that the NLRP3 inflammasome exerts a critical role in host innate immune responses against M. canis infection, and our data suggest that diseases that result from M. canis infection might be controlled by regulating the activation of inflammasomes. PMID:24478101

  9. Prevalence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, Babesia canis vogeli, Hepatozoon canis, Bartonella vinsonii berkhoffii, and Rickettsia spp. in dogs from Grenada.

    PubMed

    Yabsley, Michael J; McKibben, John; Macpherson, Calum N; Cattan, Peggy F; Cherry, Natalie A; Hegarty, Barbara C; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; O'Connor, Tom; Chandrashekar, Ramaswamy; Paterson, Tara; Perea, Marta Lanza; Ball, Geoffrey; Friesen, Stanley; Goedde, Jill; Henderson, Brooke; Sylvester, Wayne

    2008-02-14

    To identify the tick-borne pathogens in dogs from Grenada, we conducted a serologic survey for Ehrlichia canis in 2004 (104 dogs) and a comprehensive serologic and molecular survey for a variety of tick-borne pathogens in 2006 (73 dogs). In 2004 and 2006, 44 and 32 dogs (42.3% and 43.8%) were seropositive for E. canis, respectively. In 2006, several tick-borne pathogens were identified by serology and PCR. DNA of E. canis, Anaplasma platys, Babesia canis vogeli, Hepatozoon canis, and Bartonella sp. were identified in 18 (24.7%), 14 (19.2%), 5 (7%), 5 (7%), and 1 (1.4%) dogs, respectively. Six (8.2%) dogs were seropositive for Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. All dogs were seronegative and PCR-negative for Rickettsia spp. Coinfection with two or three pathogens was observed in eight dogs. Partial 16S rRNA E. canis and A. platys sequences were identical to sequences in GenBank. Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences from the Grenadian H. canis were identical to each other and had one possible mismatch (ambiguous base) from H. canis detected from Spain and Brazil. Grenadian B. c. vogeli sequences were identical to B. c. vogeli from Brazil and Japan. All of the detected pathogens are transmitted, or suspected to be transmitted, by Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Results of this study indicate that dogs from Grenada are infected with multiple tick-borne pathogens; therefore, tick-borne diseases should be included as differentials for dogs exhibiting thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, fever, or lethargy. One pathogen, E. canis, is also of potential public health significance.

  10. The in vitro effect of prolactin on the growth, motility and expression of prolactin receptors in larvae of Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Güitrón, L E; Morales-Montor, J; Muñoz-Guzmán, M A; Nava-Castro, K E; Ramírez-Álvarez, H; Moreno-Méndoza, N A; Hernández-Cervantes, R; Alba-Hurtado, F

    2016-07-15

    The in vitro effect of prolactin (PRL) on the growth and motility of Toxocara canis larvae was assessed. Additionally, the expression and location of prolactin receptors (PRL-Rs) were determined in the larvae. Larvae of T. canis were incubated with different concentrations of PRL for different periods of time. The stimulated larvae accelerated their enlargement and increased their motility. The mean percentage of PRL-R+ cells in non-stimulated larvae, measured by flow cytometry was 7.3±0.3%. Compared with non-stimulated larvae, the mean fluorescence intensity (p<0.05) increased in larvae incubated with 40ng/mL of PRL for 10 days. A 465-bp length fragment was amplified from larvae gDNA by PCR. The sequence of this fragment showed 99% similarity with the gene fragment that codes for the PRL-R of the domestic dog. A high concentration of PRL-Rs was immune-located in the posterior region of the larval intestine; therefore, the intestinal cells in this region were most likely the targets for this hormone. Based on these results, PRL-Rs were identified in T. canis larvae, and the in vitro stimulation with PRL increased the number of these receptors, accelerated the growth and modified the activity of larvae. All of the above suggest that T. canis larvae are evolutionarily adapted to recognize the PRL of their definitive host and furthermore might explain the reactivation of tissue-arrested larvae during the gestation of bitches, which does not occur in gestating females of other species.

  11. "Toxocara canis" Infection of Children: Epidemiology and Neurospychologic Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmor, Michael; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presents results of a serologic survey for antibodies to Toxocara canis (the common roundworm of dogs) in a sample of 4,652 New York City children. Discusses findings of a case-control study conducted to identify host and environmental risk factors for T. canis infection and to investigate its consequences. (KH)

  12. "Toxocara canis" Infection of Children: Epidemiology and Neurospychologic Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmor, Michael; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presents results of a serologic survey for antibodies to Toxocara canis (the common roundworm of dogs) in a sample of 4,652 New York City children. Discusses findings of a case-control study conducted to identify host and environmental risk factors for T. canis infection and to investigate its consequences. (KH)

  13. Genetic Polymorphism Characteristics of Brucella canis Isolated in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Heng; Zhao, Hongyan; Piao, Dongri; Tian, Lili; Tian, Guozhong; Kang, Jingli; Mao, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Du, Pengfei; Zhu, Lin; Zhao, Zhuo; Mao, Lingling; Yao, Wenqing; Guan, Pingyuan; Fan, Weixing; Jiang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    In China, brucellosis is an endemic disease typically caused by Brucella melitensis infection (biovars 1 and 3). Brucella canis infection in dogs has not traditionally recognized as a major problem. In recent years however, brucellosis resulting from Brucella canis infection has also been reported, suggesting that infections from this species may be increasing. Data concerning the epidemiology of brucellosis resulting from Brucella canis infection is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the diversity among Chinese Brucella canis strains for epidemiological purposes. First, we employed a 16-marker VNTR assay (Brucella MLVA-16) to assess the diversity and epidemiological relationship of 29 Brucella canis isolates from diverse locations throughout China with 38 isolates from other countries. MLVA-16 analysis separated the 67 Brucella canis isolates into 57 genotypes that grouped into five clusters with genetic similarity coefficients ranging from 67.73 to 100%. Moreover, this analysis revealed a new genotype (2-3-9-11-3-1-5-1:118), which was present in two isolates recovered from Guangxi in 1986 and 1987. Second, multiplex PCR and sequencing analysis were used to determine whether the 29 Chinese Brucella canis isolates had the characteristic BMEI1435 gene deletion. Only two isolates had this deletion. Third, amplification of the omp25 gene revealed that 26 isolates from China had a T545C mutation. Collectively, this study reveals that considerable diversity exists among Brucella canis isolates in China and provides resources for studying the genetic variation and microevolution of Brucella. PMID:24465442

  14. Genetic polymorphism characteristics of Brucella canis isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Di, Dongdong; Cui, Buyun; Wang, Heng; Zhao, Hongyan; Piao, Dongri; Tian, Lili; Tian, Guozhong; Kang, Jingli; Mao, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Du, Pengfei; Zhu, Lin; Zhao, Zhuo; Mao, Lingling; Yao, Wenqing; Guan, Pingyuan; Fan, Weixing; Jiang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    In China, brucellosis is an endemic disease typically caused by Brucella melitensis infection (biovars 1 and 3). Brucella canis infection in dogs has not traditionally recognized as a major problem. In recent years however, brucellosis resulting from Brucella canis infection has also been reported, suggesting that infections from this species may be increasing. Data concerning the epidemiology of brucellosis resulting from Brucella canis infection is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the diversity among Chinese Brucella canis strains for epidemiological purposes. First, we employed a 16-marker VNTR assay (Brucella MLVA-16) to assess the diversity and epidemiological relationship of 29 Brucella canis isolates from diverse locations throughout China with 38 isolates from other countries. MLVA-16 analysis separated the 67 Brucella canis isolates into 57 genotypes that grouped into five clusters with genetic similarity coefficients ranging from 67.73 to 100%. Moreover, this analysis revealed a new genotype (2-3-9-11-3-1-5-1:118), which was present in two isolates recovered from Guangxi in 1986 and 1987. Second, multiplex PCR and sequencing analysis were used to determine whether the 29 Chinese Brucella canis isolates had the characteristic BMEI1435 gene deletion. Only two isolates had this deletion. Third, amplification of the omp25 gene revealed that 26 isolates from China had a T545C mutation. Collectively, this study reveals that considerable diversity exists among Brucella canis isolates in China and provides resources for studying the genetic variation and microevolution of Brucella.

  15. Brucella canis in a HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Lawaczeck, E; Toporek, J; Cwikla, J; Mathison, B A

    2011-03-01

    The true incidence of Brucella canis in humans is unknown, but immunocompromised patients in direct contact with dogs are thought to be at a higher risk for infection. In this case report, we present a human case of B. canis in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis: an emerging zoonosis?

    PubMed

    Lacave, Guillaume; Coutard, Aymeric; Troché, Gilles; Augusto, Sandrine; Pons, Stéphanie; Zuber, Benjamin; Laurent, Virginie; Amara, Marlène; Couzon, Brigitte; Bédos, Jean-Pierre; Pangon, Béatrice; Grimaldi, David

    2016-02-01

    We report a human case of infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis. Identification was carried out from positive blood culture using mass spectrometry and SodA gene sequencing. S. canis related zoonotic invasive infections may have been previously underdiagnosed due to inadequate identification of group G Streptococcus species.

  17. Experimental evidence against transmission of Hepatozoon canis by Ixodes ricinus.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Alessio; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Mencke, Norbert; Baneth, Gad; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-09-01

    Hepatozoon canis is among the most widespread tick-borne protozoa infecting domestic and wild carnivores. Its distribution is related to the occurrence of its major vector, the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. However, the role of Ixodes ricinus as a vector of H. canis has been hypothesized. In the present study, the development of H. canis was investigated in I. ricinus and R. sanguineus nymphs collected from a naturally infested dog. All I. ricinus ticks examined (n=133) were negative by cytological examination at days 20, 30, and 90 post collection, although H. canis DNA was detected in one nymph at day 20 and in 2 nymphs at day 30 post collection. On the other hand, H. canis sporogony was documented by cytology, and H. canis DNA was detected by PCR in R. sanguineus at day 30 post collection. These results indicate that H. canis sporogony does not occur in I. ricinus, but in R. sanguineus, suggesting that I. ricinus does not act as a vector of H. canis.

  18. Taenia taeniaeformis: immunoprecipitation analysis of the protein antigens of oncospheres and larvae.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, D D; Mitchell, G F; Anders, R F; Lightowlers, M W; Rickard, M D

    1983-12-01

    Biosynthetically or exogenously labeled proteins and immunoprecipitated protein antigens of established 28-day-old larvae of Taenia taeniaeformis were compared with proteins and antigens of infective oncospheres using single and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Immunoprecipitation was carried out using sera from infected mice and mouse antisera raised to larvae or oncospheres, and emphasis was placed on identifying antigens common to both oncospheres and larvae. Two major larval antigens of Mr 40,000 and 200,000, designated Tt40 and Tt200, are common to somatic larval preparations and oncospheres. Additionally, two major oncosphere antigens of Mr 55,000 and 60,000, designated Tt55 and Tt60, are also present in larval excretory and secretory (i.e., ES or exoantigen) products. Information obtained from these immunoprecipitation analyses will facilitate isolation and production of common as well as stage-specific protein antigens in the development of defined-antigen vaccines in this model system of cysticercosis.

  19. Rhipicephalus turanicus, a new vector of Hepatozoon canis.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Alessio; Lia, Riccardo Paolo; Annoscia, Giada; Buonavoglia, Canio; Lorusso, Eleonora; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Baneth, Gad; Otranto, Domenico

    2016-12-21

    The distribution of Hepatozoon canis mainly encompasses areas where its main tick vector, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, is present. However, the detection of this pathogen in dogs, foxes and golden jackals well outside the areas inhabited by this tick species reinforced the hypothesis that additional ixodids are involved in the life cycle and transmission of this protozoon. The present study provides, for the first time, data supporting the sporogonic development of H. canis in specimens of Rhipicephalus turanicus collected from a naturally infected fox from southern Italy. The epidemiological role of R. turanicus as a vector of H. canis is discussed, along with information on the potential use of cell cultures for the experimental infection with H. canis sporozoites. The in vitro infection of canine leucocytes by sporozoites from ticks is proposed as a potential tool for future in-depth studies on the biology of H. canis.

  20. Multiplex real-time qPCR for the detection of Ehrlichia canis and Babesia canis vogeli.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Ofer; Baneth, Gad; Eyal, Osnat; Inbar, Jacob; Harrus, Shimon

    2010-10-29

    Ehrlichia canis and Babesia canis vogeli are two tick-borne canine pathogens with a worldwide importance. Both pathogens are transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus, the brown dog tick, which has an increasing global distribution. A multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of the tick-borne pathogens E. canis and B. canis vogeli was developed using dual-labeled probes. The target genes were the 16S rRNA of E. canis and the heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) of B. canis vogeli. The canine beta actin (ACTB) gene was used as an internal control gene. The assay was conducted without using any pre-amplification steps such as nested reactions. The sensitivity of each reaction in the multiplex qPCR assay was tested in the presence of high template concentrations of the other amplified genes in the same tube and in the presence of canine DNA. The detection threshold of the multiplex assay was 1-10 copies/μl in all channels and the amplifications of the B. canis hsp70 and ACTB were not affected by the other simultaneous reactions, while minor interference was observed in the amplification of the E. canis 16S rRNA gene. This assay would be useful for diagnostic laboratories and may save time, labor and costs.

  1. Emergence of Babesia canis in southern England.

    PubMed

    de Marco, Maria Del Mar Fernández; Hernández-Triana, Luis M; Phipps, L Paul; Hansford, Kayleigh; Mitchell, E Sian; Cull, Ben; Swainsbury, Clive S; Fooks, Anthony R; Medlock, Jolyon M; Johnson, Nicholas

    2017-05-17

    The United Kingdom is considered free of autochthonous transmission of canine babesiosis although cases are reported in dogs associated with recent travel abroad. During the winter months of 2015/16, a cluster of cases of disease in dogs with signs suggestive of canine babesiosis were reported in Harlow, Essex. Babesia species were detected in dog blood samples by Giemsa staining of blood smears and by pan-piroplasm PCRs. Babesia species were also detected in extracts of tick DNA using pan-piroplasm PCRs. DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis was used to confirm the species of Babesia present in dog blood and tick samples. Tick species were identified by PCR-sequencing based on amplification of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit one (cox1) gene. Dermacentor reticulatus ticks were sampled from field sites in England and Wales. Blood smear analysis on samples taken from some of the affected dogs confirmed the presence of a large Babesia species within erythrocytes. A tick recovered from one of these cases was identified as Dermacentor reticulatus, a species with a limited distribution in England and Wales, but a known vector of canine babesiosis in continental Europe. Babesia canis was subsequently identified in blood samples obtained from three clinical cases (all dogs) within the area and from ticks associated with these dogs. A field survey detected 17 adult D. reticulatus ticks from one area visited by the affected dogs. Fourteen of these ticks were shown to be positive for the B. canis parasite, implicating them as a potential source for babesiosis in Harlow. In order to assess whether the parasite is present in more than one tick population, D. reticulatus ticks from across England and Wales were screened for the presence of Babesia species. In addition to the Harlow site, a further five locations where D. reticulatus is present were screened for Babesia species. Babesia was not detected from most sites tested but one tick from a single location in Wales was

  2. ZZ Canis Minoris as a symbiotic star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.

    1984-01-01

    The H-aplha and Na I D-line regions of the M6 giant star ZZ Canis Minoris (ZZ CMi) were observed with the Kitt Peak coude feed telescope and a CCD detector. It is shown that ZZ CMi has similar spectroscopic and photoproperties to the symbiotic star EG And. The data are used to argue for the classification of ZZ CMi as a symbiotic star despite its current listing in the General Catalog of Variable Stars (GCVS) as a semi-regular variable. The infrared magnitudes of ZZ CMi and the known symbiotic stars are compared in a table.

  3. Leadership in wolf, Canis lupus, packs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David

    2000-01-01

    I examine leadership in Wolf (Canis lupus) packs based on published observations and data gathered during summers from 1986 to 1998 studying a free-ranging pack of Wolves on Ellesmere Island that were habituated to my presence. The breeding male tended to initiate activities associated with foraging and travel, and the breeding female to initiate, and predominate in, pup care and protection. However, there was considerable overlap and interaction during these activities such that leadership could be considered a joint function. In packs with multiple breeders, quantitative information about leadership is needed.

  4. Unique Solution of R Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Young Woon; Kim, Jinyoung; Zhai, Di-Sheng

    1998-09-01

    We present spectroscopic CCD observations of R Canis Majoris obtained in 1993. A total of 19 plates for Hα line were secured and reduced with the IRAF for radial velocities. A new radial velocity curve has been analyzed with collected light curves by the method of the Wilson and Devinney Differential Correction. The solution set including mass ratio q = 0.17 is determined as a unique solution by cross checking simultaneous adjustment of radial velocity and light curves, mass-luminosity relation, and distance.

  5. Serosurvey for the Prevalence of Brucella Canis Antibodies in Dogs in Central Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Infection In The United States, 1967- 978.............................. .. 127 3 Seroprevalence Of Brucella canis In Humans .................. 132 4...Seroprevalence Survey For Brucella canis By Canine Population As Determined By MIETAT ......................... 134 5 Seroprevalence Survey For Brucella ... canis By Population And Sex As Determined B, MEfAT.............................. 135 6 Dogs Seropositive For Brucella canis As Determined By METAT

  6. Injuries from larval Neuroptera.

    PubMed

    Southcott, R V

    1991-03-04

    Bites from larval Neuroptera (lacewings) in Australia are recorded. This order of insects is among the most primitive of the higher or holometabolous insects, those with a life-history of complete metamorphoses--namely, from egg to larva to pupa to adult. The mobile instars (larva and adult) live by predation. Larvae have generally long, sharp-pointed jaws, which are used in piercing and sucking prey. One family (Chrysopidae) has larvae with jaws capable of piercing human skin. The larvae seek their prey on leaves of shrubs and trees, and occasionally cause bites to gardeners and others, but as these larvae commonly camouflage themselves with the cast skins of their prey (small insects and mites), as well as other material, such as caterpillar faeces and scraps of vegetable debris, they are mostly not recognised by their human victims. The effects are of immediate local pain with erythema and a local papule, lasting a few hours or at most a day or so. No treatment is required.

  7. Toxocara canis and the allergic process

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, Mauricio Grecco; de Oliveira, Sandra Regina Pereira; de Castro, Cynthia Aparecida; Soares, Edson Garcia; Afonso, Ana; Monnazzi, Luis Gustavo S; Peitl, Oscar; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Anibal, Fernanda de Freitas

    2015-01-01

    The protective effect of infectious agents against allergic reactions has been thoroughly investigated. Current studies have demonstrated the ability of some helminths to modulate the immune response of infected hosts. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Toxocara canis infection and the development of an allergic response in mice immunised with ovalbumin (OVA). We determined the total and differential blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells using BALB/c mice as a model. To this end, the levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-10 and anti-OVA-IgE were measured using an ELISA. The inflammatory process in the lungs was observed using histology slides stained with haematoxylin and eosin. The results showed an increase in the total number of leukocytes and eosinophils in the blood of infected and immunised animals at 18 days after infection. We observed a slight lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate in the portal space in all infected mice. Anti-OVA-IgE levels were detected in smaller proportions in the plasma of immunised and infected mice compared with mice that were only infected. Therefore, we concluded that T. canis potentiates inflammation in the lungs in response to OVA, although anti-OVA-IgE levels suggest a potential reduction of the inflammatory process through this mechanism. PMID:26517650

  8. Current Surveys of the Seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi, Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Leishmania infantum, Babesia canis, Angiostrongylus vasorum and Dirofilaria immitis in Dogs in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Pantchev, Nikola; Schnyder, Manuela; Vrhovec, Majda Globokar; Schaper, Roland; Tsachev, Ilia

    2015-08-01

    Canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs) have increasingly become a focus of interest in recent years. Some of the CVBDs are zoonotic and may therefore also represent a risk for the human population. Different factors are in discussion to explain the expansion of vectors and pathogens into formerly unaffected areas. Knowledge of the prevalence and distribution of CVBDs in Bulgaria is scant overall and most data rely on single case descriptions. The aim of the present study was to determine the seroprevalence of important CVBDs in 167 dogs from central-southern Bulgaria (Stara Zagora), with special emphasis on hitherto uninvestigated babesiosis and angiostrongylosis, on poorly investigated Lyme borreliosis and canine granulocytic anaplasmosis, and on the potentially zoonotic dirofilariosis and leishmaniosis. Relatively high prevalence rates were documented for anti-Babesia canis antibodies, Dirofilaria immitis antigen (16.2 %; 27/167 each), anti-Ehrlichia canis (21 %; 35/167) and anti-Anaplasma phagocytophilum antibodies (30.5 - 46.1 %; 51 - 77/167), while Borrelia burgdorferi seroprevalence was low (2.4 %; 4/167). All samples were negative for Leishmania infantum antibodies and Angiostrongylus vasorum antigen and antibodies. In total, 64.7 % (108/167) of the samples indicated infection or exposure to at least one agent and a high proportion of dual infections (39.8 %; 43/108) was demonstrated. Multiple infections with up to four different organisms were also detected. Our data underline the importance of CVBDs and especially of co-infections which could influence the clinical outcome in dogs.

  9. Oxidant and antioxidant parameters in patients with Brucella canis.

    PubMed

    Usta, Murat; Aras, Zeki; Tas, Abdulaziz

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidative status in patient with Brucella canis (B. canis) and healthy controls by measurement of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant capacity (TOS), and calculation of oxidative stress index (OSI). Six patients with B. canis and 6 healthy control subjects were included in this study. Diagnosis of B. canis was made by rapid slide agglutination test (RSAT) and Modified Plate Agglutination Test (MPAT). The serum samples of B. canis positive patients and controls were used for measurement of TAC and TOS levels. The TOS and OSI index were significantly higher in brucellosis positive patients than control group (p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively), while TAC level was found similar in patient and control groups. Findings of this study have shown that B. canis generate low TOS and OSI index in man compared with smooth Brucella species infection. This difference may help to provide understanding about the pathogenesis of B. canis infection in man. Copyright © 2012 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Helicobacter canis colonization in sheep: a Zoonotic link.

    PubMed

    Swennes, Alton G; Turk, Michelle L; Trowel, Elise M; Cullin, Cassandra; Shen, Zeli; Pang, Jassia; Petersson, Katherine H; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Fox, James G

    2014-02-01

    Helicobacter canis has been associated with hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal disease in dogs, cats, and humans. Infection has not been documented in other species. Sheep feces subjected to microaerobic culture. Isolates were characterized by genus-specific PCR, restriction fragment length polymorphism, biochemical profiling, and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Helicobacter canis was isolated from sheep feces and confirmed by the above methods. These isolates are distinct from other sheep-origin enterohepatic Helicobacter species previously isolated. This study identifies sheep as H. canis reservoirs potentially important in zoonotic or foodborne transmission. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Diagnosis of canine monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis): an overview.

    PubMed

    Harrus, Shimon; Waner, Trevor

    2011-03-01

    Canine monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (CME), caused by the rickettsia Ehrlichia canis, an important canine disease with a worldwide distribution. Diagnosis of the disease can be challenging due to its different phases and multiple clinical manifestations. CME should be suspected when a compatible history (living in or traveling to an endemic region, previous tick exposure), typical clinical signs and characteristic hematological and biochemical abnormalities are present. Traditional diagnostic techniques including hematology, cytology, serology and isolation are valuable diagnostic tools for CME, however a definitive diagnosis of E. canis infection requires molecular techniques. This article reviews the current literature covering the diagnosis of infection caused by E. canis.

  12. Ehrlichia canis in Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks in the Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Socolovschi, Cristina; Gomez, José; Marié, Jean-Lou; Davoust, Bernard; Guigal, Pierre-Michel; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichia canis is distributed globally, but its prevalence in Africa is poorly known. In the study reported herein, 27% of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks collected from watchdogs in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, were positive for E. canis using quantitative real-time PCR. A new molecular strategy is proposed that can be used not only for epidemiological study, but also for the diagnosis of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Our findings show for the first time the presence of E. canis using molecular tools in the Ivory Coast, providing direct evidence for the presence of this pathogen.

  13. The systematic status of the Italian wolf Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowak, R.M.; Federoff, N.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the past, the gray wolf Canis lupus Linnaeus, 1758, has been recognized in Italy as either the subspecies lupus or italicus. It has also been postulated that this population has undergone introgression from the domestic dog Canis familiaris. In order to clarify these issues, multistatistical analyses were made of 10 skull measurements of 34 full grown male wolves from the Italian Peninsula, 91 other male Eurasian wolves, and 20 domestic dogs. The analyses, together with other morphological evidence and prior genetic research, support recognition of the Italian wolf as a separate subspecies, Canis lupus italicus. The same evidence indicates that the subspecies has not been affected through hybridization with the domestic dog.

  14. Efficacy of eprinomectin against Toxacara canis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kozan, Esma; Sevimli, Feride Kircali; Birdane, Fatih Mehmet; Adanir, Ramazan

    2008-02-01

    This study was made to investigate efficacy of eprinomectin against to Toxocara canis in dogs. In the study, 20 stray dogs naturally infected with T. canis were divided into two groups as treatment (ten dogs) and control (ten dogs). Eprinomectin (100 microg/kg, Eprinex 250 ml) was given to treatment group dogs orally, and eggs per gram were determined in the faeces on the day of pre-treatment and the second, fourth, sixth, eighth and tenth days of post-treatment. No side effects associated with nervous, respiratory, gastrointestinal systems and some haematological parameters were observed. In conclusion, eprinomectin was determined to be 100% effectual against T. canis.

  15. Fine structure of A and M antigens from Brucella biovars.

    PubMed

    Meikle, P J; Perry, M B; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Bundle, D R

    1989-09-01

    Brucella A and M epitopes were found on single O-polysaccharide chains of all biotype strains of this species. Lipopolysaccharides from the type and reference strains of five of the six Brucella species, B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, B. canis, and B. neotomae, were extracted and purified. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, in conjunction with silver staining and immunoblotting developed by monoclonal antibodies, showed bands characteristic of A, M, or mixed A and M antigens. The A antigen previously described as an exclusively alpha 1,2-linked homopolymer of 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyranose was shown by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to possess a fine structure consistent with the low-frequency occurrence of alpha 1, 3-linked 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyranose residues. This feature was previously attributed only to the M antigen, which is also a homopolymer of the same sugar. B. melitensis biotype 3 and B. suis biotype 4 lipopolysaccharides showed characteristics of mixed A and M antigens. Immunoabsorption of these O polysaccharides on a column of immobilized A-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody enriched polymer chains with A-antigen characteristics but did not eliminate M epitopes. Composite A- and M-antigen characteristics resulted from O polysaccharides in which the frequency of alpha 1,3 linkages, and hence, M-antigen characteristics, varied. All biotypes assigned as A+ M- expressed one or two alpha 1,3-linked residues per polysaccharide O chain. M antigens (M+ A-) also possessed a unique M epitope as well as a tetrasaccharide determinant common to A-antigen structures. B. canis and B. abortus 45/20, both rough strains, expressed low-molecular-weight A antigen.

  16. DNA barcoding of three species (Canis aureus, Canis lupus and Vulpes vulpes) of Canidae.

    PubMed

    Aksöyek, Eren; İbiş, Osman; Özcan, Servet; Moradi, Mohammad; Tez, Coşkun

    2017-09-01

    Sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene have been used for DNA barcoding and determining the genetic diversity of mammal species. In the current study, our intention was to test the validity of COI barcodes for detecting genetic divergence and to reveal whether or not there is a genetic variation at this marker within canids. Three species (Canis aureus, Canis lupus and Vulpes vulpes) from the family Canidae were selected for DNA barcoding using samples collected from Iran and Turkey. All three species had unique barcoding sequences and none of the sequences were shared among these species. The mean sequence divergences within and among the species were 0.61% and 12.32%, respectively, which fell into the mean divergence ranges found in some mammal groups. The genetic diversity of these three canid species was relatively higher than that found in previously reported studies.

  17. Structural and functional characterization of Bc28.1, major erythrocyte-binding protein from Babesia canis merozoite surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin-Shan; Murciano, Brice; Moubri, Karina; Cibrelus, Prisca; Schetters, Theo; Gorenflot, André; Delbecq, Stéphane; Roumestand, Christian

    2012-03-16

    Babesiosis (formerly known as piroplasmosis) is a tick-borne disease caused by the intraerythrocytic development of protozoa parasites from the genus Babesia. Like Plasmodium falciparum, the agent of malaria, or Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for human toxoplasmosis, Babesia belongs to the Apicomplexa family. Babesia canis is the agent of the canine babesiosis in Europe. Clinical manifestations of this disease range from mild to severe and possibly lead to death by multiple organ failure. The identification and characterization of parasite surface proteins represent major goals, both for the understanding of the Apicomplexa invasion process and for the vaccine potential of such antigens. Indeed, we have already shown that Bd37, the major antigenic adhesion protein from Babesia divergens, the agent of bovine babesiosis, was able to induce complete protection against various parasite strains. The major merozoite surface antigens of Babesia canis have been described as a 28-kDa membrane protein family, anchored at the surface of the merozoite. Here, we demonstrate that Bc28.1, a major member of this multigenic family, is expressed at high levels at the surface of the merozoite. This protein is also found in the parasite in vitro culture supernatants, which are the basis of effective vaccines against canine babesiosis. We defined the erythrocyte binding function of Bc28.1 and determined its high resolution solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, although these proteins are thought to play a similar role in the adhesion process, the structure of Bc28.1 from B. canis appears unrelated to the previously published structure of Bd37 from B. divergens. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments also suggest that the mechanism of the interaction with the erythrocyte membrane could be different for the two proteins. The resolution of the structure of Bc28 represents a milestone for the characterization of the parasite erythrocyte binding and its interaction with

  18. Structural and Functional Characterization of Bc28.1, Major Erythrocyte-binding Protein from Babesia canis Merozoite Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yin-Shan; Murciano, Brice; Moubri, Karina; Cibrelus, Prisca; Schetters, Theo; Gorenflot, André; Delbecq, Stéphane; Roumestand, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis (formerly known as piroplasmosis) is a tick-borne disease caused by the intraerythrocytic development of protozoa parasites from the genus Babesia. Like Plasmodium falciparum, the agent of malaria, or Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for human toxoplasmosis, Babesia belongs to the Apicomplexa family. Babesia canis is the agent of the canine babesiosis in Europe. Clinical manifestations of this disease range from mild to severe and possibly lead to death by multiple organ failure. The identification and characterization of parasite surface proteins represent major goals, both for the understanding of the Apicomplexa invasion process and for the vaccine potential of such antigens. Indeed, we have already shown that Bd37, the major antigenic adhesion protein from Babesia divergens, the agent of bovine babesiosis, was able to induce complete protection against various parasite strains. The major merozoite surface antigens of Babesia canis have been described as a 28-kDa membrane protein family, anchored at the surface of the merozoite. Here, we demonstrate that Bc28.1, a major member of this multigenic family, is expressed at high levels at the surface of the merozoite. This protein is also found in the parasite in vitro culture supernatants, which are the basis of effective vaccines against canine babesiosis. We defined the erythrocyte binding function of Bc28.1 and determined its high resolution solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, although these proteins are thought to play a similar role in the adhesion process, the structure of Bc28.1 from B. canis appears unrelated to the previously published structure of Bd37 from B. divergens. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments also suggest that the mechanism of the interaction with the erythrocyte membrane could be different for the two proteins. The resolution of the structure of Bc28 represents a milestone for the characterization of the parasite erythrocyte binding and its interaction with

  19. Mass loss from UW Canis Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drechsel, H.; Rahe, J.; Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The present analysis is an application of the theory described by Lucy (1971) for the calculation of P Cygni resonance line profiles formed by isotropic and coherent scattering in spherically symmetric expanding circumstellar envelopes. Copernicus satellite measurements of resonance features in the FUV spectrum of the O 7 supergiant UW Canis Majoris (= HD 57060) are compared with theoretical P Cygni profiles. Grids of line profiles are computed using four free parameters which contain information about the velocity law, ionization equilibrium, temperature, and envelope density. Thus, with the assumption of a spherically symmetric steady flow, and of solar element abundances, the stellar mass loss rate and the electron temperature of the expanding shell can be derived. The mass flow is treated in a fully transonic way, i.e., the Sobolev approximation is applied.

  20. A spectroscopic flare of YZ Canis Minoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mochnacki, S. W.; Schommer, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of a spectroscopic flare in YZ Canis Minoris are reported. Emission lines of Mg I, Fe I, and Fe II were found in the spectral region 5090-5350 A. The intensity of the emission lines declined only slightly over a span of 2 hours. No significant radial-velocity difference was found between the emission and absorption lines. The turbulent velocity dispersion was less than 20 km/s. Upper limits of 7500 and 15,000 gauss can be placed on the longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields. The equal intensities of the Mg I b lines imply that the emitting region was optically thick. The intensity ratios did not change with time.

  1. Incentive contrast in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Bentosela, Mariana; Jakovcevic, Adriana; Elgier, Angel M; Mustaca, Alba E; Papini, Mauricio R

    2009-05-01

    Dogs (Canis familiaris) trained to receive a preferred food (dry beef liver) from an experimenter learned to maintain a longer gaze on the experimenter than dogs receiving a less preferred food (dog pellets). Dogs downshifted from dry liver to pellets rejected food more frequently than nonshifted controls. Gaze duration also decreased in downshifted dogs below the level of a group always reinforced with pellets. In addition, downshifted dogs tended to move away from the experimenter, adopting a lying down posture. This phenomenon, called successive negative contrast, has been described in analogous experiments with a variety of mammalian species, but has failed to occur in similar experiments with nonmammalian vertebrates. Unlike similar previous observations, the present data were obtained in an environment involving interspecific communication.

  2. Mass loss from UW Canis Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drechsel, H.; Rahe, J.; Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The present analysis is an application of the theory described by Lucy (1971) for the calculation of P Cygni resonance line profiles formed by isotropic and coherent scattering in spherically symmetric expanding circumstellar envelopes. Copernicus satellite measurements of resonance features in the FUV spectrum of the O 7 supergiant UW Canis Majoris (= HD 57060) are compared with theoretical P Cygni profiles. Grids of line profiles are computed using four free parameters which contain information about the velocity law, ionization equilibrium, temperature, and envelope density. Thus, with the assumption of a spherically symmetric steady flow, and of solar element abundances, the stellar mass loss rate and the electron temperature of the expanding shell can be derived. The mass flow is treated in a fully transonic way, i.e., the Sobolev approximation is applied.

  3. Prey escaping wolves, Canis lupus, despite close proximity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    We describe attacks by wolf (Canis lupus) packs in Minnesota on a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and a moose (Alces alces) in which wolves were within contact distance of the prey but in which the prey escaped.

  4. Seroepidemiological study and associated risk factors of Toxocara canis infection among preschool children in Osun State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Sowemimo, Oluyomi A; Lee, Yueh-Lun; Asaolu, Samuel O; Chuang, Ting-Wu; Akinwale, Olaoluwa P; Badejoko, Bolaji O; Gyang, Vincent P; Nwafor, Timothy; Henry, Emmanuel; Fan, Chia-Kwung

    2017-09-01

    Human toxocariasis is caused by the nematode, Toxocara canis and it is a poorly understood phenomenon in Nigeria. Seroepidemiological studies have not been previously carried out among the preschool aged children in Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was conducted in pre-school children in four communities from Osun State, Nigeria between January and July 2016. A total of 308 children Aged 9 months and 5 years were studied comprising 53.2% (164/308) male and 46.8% (144/308) female. Blood samples were collected and screened for the presence of anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies by Western blot analysis based on the excretory-secretory antigens of larva T. canis (TcES), targeting low molecular weight bands of 24 - 35kDa specific for T. canis. Questionnaires were given to parents/guardians of the studied children to collect information regarding relationship between infection and host factors. The overall seroprevalence of Toxocara infection was 37.3%. The seroprevalence in the studied preschool children ranged from 18.2% in children less than one year old to a max of 57.6% in children aged 3 years and above. The logistic regression analysis of risk factors showed that children's age (odds ratio (OR)=6.12, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.25-29.90, p=0.02), contact with dogs (OR=3.17, 95% CI=1.40-7.20, p=0.01) and parent's religion (OR=0.54, 95% CI=0.32-0.91, p=0.02) were the risk factors associated with Toxocara infection. However, after adjustment by multivariate logistic regression analysis, contact with dogs (p=0.02) remained the only statistically significant risk factor. Preschool children were exposed early in life to T. canis infection as 18.18% of children less than one year old were infected. This is the first serological investigation of T. canis infection among preschool children in Nigeria. The results show high levels of exposure to T. canis infection among the studied group and contact with the dog plays the predominant risk factor. It indicates high transmission

  5. Molecular characterization of Ehrlichia canis infecting dogs, Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Cicuttin, Gabriel L; De Salvo, María N; Gury Dohmen, Federico E

    2016-07-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) is a worldwide potentially fatal tick-borne rickettsial disease of dogs caused by Ehrlichia canis and transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato. CME diagnosis includes indirect (serology) and direct (e.g. blood smears and PCR) methods. PCR is more sensitive and specific than direct microscopic examination and positive PCR results confirm infection, whereas positive serologic test results only confirm exposure. The aim of the present study was to perform a molecular characterization of E. canis from canine samples of the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires. We studied 223 blood samples of dogs submitted to our institute for CME diagnoses. The samples were initially screened for Anaplasmataceae family by PCR, resulting in 30 positive dogs (13.4%). Subsequently, positive DNAs were analyzed by nested PCR 16S rRNA specific for E. canis or Anaplasma platys, resulting in 15 (6.7%) and 16 (7.2%) positive dogs, respectively. For molecular characterization, samples positive for E. canis were subjected to amplification of a fragment of the dsb and p28 genes. The nucleotide sequences obtained for the dsb fragment resulted in 100% identity with others E. canis found in dogs from different regions of worldwide. The nucleotide sequences obtained for p28 gene resulted in 100% of identity with each other and closely with E. canis str. Jaboticabal (Brazil). Identity with others sequences of E. canis ranged from 76.9 to 79.7%. The occurrence of canine cases molecularly confirmed in Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires highlights the need for more studies in order to understand epidemiological factors associated with CME, especially the disease transmission dynamic in South America given the existence of two lineages of R. sanguineus sensu lato with different vectorial capacity for transmission of E. canis.

  6. Comparative transcriptomic analyses of male and female adult Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rong-Qiong; Ma, Guang-Xu; Korhonen, Pasi K; Luo, Yong-Li; Zhu, Hong-Hong; Luo, Yong-Fang; Gasser, Robin B; Xia, Qing-You

    2017-02-05

    Toxocariasis is an important, neglected zoonosis caused mainly by Toxocara canis. Although our knowledge of helminth molecular biology is improving through completed draft genome projects, there is limited detailed information on the molecular biology of Toxocara species. Here, transcriptomic sequencing of male and female adult T. canis and comparative analyses were conducted. For each sex, two-thirds (66-67%) of quality-filtered reads mapped to the gene set of T. canis, and at least five reads mapped to each of 16,196 (87.1%) of all 18,596 genes, and 321 genes were specifically transcribed in female and 1467 in male T. canis. Genes differentially transcribed between the two sexes were identified, enriched biological processes and pathways linked to these genes established, and molecules associated with reproduction and development predicted. In addition, small RNA pathways involved in reproduction were characterized, but there was no evidence for piwi RNA pathways in adult T. canis. The results of this transcriptomic study should provide a useful basis to support investigations of the reproductive biology of T. canis and related nematodes.(2).

  7. Application the mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF technique for detection of Babesia canis canis infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Adaszek, Łukasz; Banach, Tomasz; Bartnicki, Michał; Winiarczyk, Dagmara; Łyp, Paweł; Winiarczyk, Stanisław

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to use rapid mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics analyses for diagnosis of Babesia canis canis infections in dogs. The study was conducted on two groups of dogs--healthy dogs and dogs infected with B. canis canis which demonstrated symptoms of babesiosis. The matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS technique revealed the presence of a protein fraction of 51-52 kDa in the blood serum of all the animals infected with the protozoa, which was not found in the serum of healthy dogs. The proteins are suspected to be disease markers, whereas the MALDI-TOF technique itself has high specificity and sensitivity and can be applied in analytical laboratories in the diagnosis of canine babesiosis.

  8. Molecular assessment of the transplacental transmission of Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Brucella canis and Ehrlichia canis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Taques, Isis Indaiara Gonçalves Granjeiro; Barbosa, Tatiane Rodrigues; Martini, Andresa de Cássia; Pitchenin, Letícia Camara; Braga, Ísis Assis; de Melo, Andréia Lima Tomé; Nakazato, Luciano; Dutra, Valéria; de Aguiar, Daniel Moura

    2016-12-01

    Given the fact that numerous microbial species can be detected in pregnant female dogs, the objective of this study was to assess the transplacental transmission of Brucella canis, Ehrlichia canis, Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in stillborn puppies. This study involved 41 stillborn puppies, 78.6% of which were positive for T. gondii, 52.4% for N. caninum and 59.5% for B. canis. E. canis was not detected in any of the analyzed puppies. Pregnancy is an important physiological condition for the transmission of infectious agents to puppies and transplacental transmission may be epidemiologically relevant in the spread of these opportunistic agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimentally induced clinical Cystoisospora canis coccidiosis in dogs with prior natural patent Cystoisospora ohioensis-like or C. canis infections.

    PubMed

    Houk, Alice E; O'Connor, Thomas; Pena, Hilda F J; Gennari, Solange Maria; Zajac, Anne M; Lindsay, David S

    2013-10-01

    Diarrhea caused by intestinal coccidia (Cystoisospora species) is a common problem in pet dogs and in dogs in animal shelters. Cystoisospora canis has the largest oocysts of the 4 named species of coccidia infecting dogs. The present study examined an isolate of C. canis obtained from a dog from São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Oocysts sporulated within 2 days at room temperature, and 20 sporulated oocysts were measured at 37.6 by 28.6 μm (range 35-42 by 26-31 μm). Most sporulated oocysts contained 2 sporocysts, each with 4 sporozoites, although a few (<1%) were Caryospora-like and contained 1 sporocyst with 8 sporozoites. Two experiments using a total of 11 female 6-wk-old beagles were conducted to determine the pathogenicity of oral infection with 5 × 10(4) sporulated oocysts of this isolate of C. canis. Five of the 11 dogs had natural infections with Cystoisospora ohioensis-like (n = 4) or C. canis (n = 1) species prior to the predicted patent period of 9-10 days. Ten of the dogs developed diarrhea with occasional blood, and 3 dogs were affected to the extent that clinical treatment for coccidiosis using sulfadimethoxine was recommended. Dog CRU had a natural C. canis infection and did not develop clinical disease after oral infection with C. canis oocysts. This dog had a prepatent period of 9 days and a patent period of 3 days, corresponding to experimental infection with the new isolate of C. canis. It excreted fewer C. canis oocysts than did the other dogs. The 4 dogs with natural C. ohioensis-like infection all developed clinical disease, and 1 required treatment. The prepatent period was 9-10 days, and the patent period was 10-11 days in these dogs. All 6 dogs not naturally infected with Cystoisospora developed clinical disease, and 2 required treatment. The prepatent period was 9-10 days, and the patent period was 8-12 days. The present study confirms that C. canis is a primary pathogen for young dogs. It demonstrates that prior infection with C. canis but not C

  10. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Outer Membrane Protein 31 Vaccine Formulations for Protection against Brucella canis in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Clausse, Maria; Díaz, Alejandra G.; Ibañez, Andrés E.; Cassataro, Juliana; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2014-01-01

    Canine brucellosis is an infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Brucella canis. Unlike conventional control programs for other species of the genus Brucella, currently there is no vaccine available against canine brucellosis, and preventive measures are simply diagnosis and isolation of infected dogs. New approaches are therefore needed to develop an effective and safe immunization strategy against this zoonotic pathogen. In this study, BALB/c mice were subcutaneously immunized with the following: (i) the recombinant Brucella Omp31 antigen formulated in different adjuvants (incomplete Freund adjuvant, aluminum hydroxide, Quil A, and Montanide IMS 3012 VGPR), (ii) plasmid pCIOmp31, or (iii) pCIOmp31 plasmid followed by boosting with recombinant Omp31 (rOmp31). The immune response and the protective efficacy against B. canis infection were characterized. The different strategies induced a strong immunoglobulin G (IgG) response. Furthermore, spleen cells from rOmp31-immunized mice produced gamma interferon and interleukin-4 (IL-4) after in vitro stimulation with rOmp31, indicating the induction of a mixed Th1-Th2 response. Recombinant Omp31 administered with different adjuvants as well as the prime-boost strategy conferred protection against B. canis. In conclusion, our results suggest that Omp31 could be a useful candidate for the development of a subcellular vaccine against B. canis infection. PMID:25339409

  11. Evaluation of the efficacy of outer membrane protein 31 vaccine formulations for protection against Brucella canis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Clausse, Maria; Díaz, Alejandra G; Ibañez, Andrés E; Cassataro, Juliana; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Estein, Silvia M

    2014-12-01

    Canine brucellosis is an infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Brucella canis. Unlike conventional control programs for other species of the genus Brucella, currently there is no vaccine available against canine brucellosis, and preventive measures are simply diagnosis and isolation of infected dogs. New approaches are therefore needed to develop an effective and safe immunization strategy against this zoonotic pathogen. In this study, BALB/c mice were subcutaneously immunized with the following: (i) the recombinant Brucella Omp31 antigen formulated in different adjuvants (incomplete Freund adjuvant, aluminum hydroxide, Quil A, and Montanide IMS 3012 VGPR), (ii) plasmid pCIOmp31, or (iii) pCIOmp31 plasmid followed by boosting with recombinant Omp31 (rOmp31). The immune response and the protective efficacy against B. canis infection were characterized. The different strategies induced a strong immunoglobulin G (IgG) response. Furthermore, spleen cells from rOmp31-immunized mice produced gamma interferon and interleukin-4 (IL-4) after in vitro stimulation with rOmp31, indicating the induction of a mixed Th1-Th2 response. Recombinant Omp31 administered with different adjuvants as well as the prime-boost strategy conferred protection against B. canis. In conclusion, our results suggest that Omp31 could be a useful candidate for the development of a subcellular vaccine against B. canis infection. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Potential of recombinant inorganic pyrophosphatase antigen as a new vaccine candidate against Baylisascaris schroederi in mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yue; Chen, Sijie; Yan, Yubo; Zhang, Zhihe; Li, Desheng; Yu, Hua; Wang, Chengdong; Nong, Xiang; Zhou, Xuan; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2013-10-03

    The intestinal nematode Baylisascaris schroederi is an important cause of death for wild and captive giant pandas. Inorganic pyrophosphatases (PPases) are critical for development and molting in nematode parasites and represent potential targets for vaccination. Here, a new PPase homologue, Bsc-PYP-1, from B. schroederi was identified and characterized, and its potential as a vaccine candidate was evaluated in a mouse challenge model. Sequence alignment of PPases from nematode parasites and other organisms show that Bsc-PYP-1 is a nematode-specific member of the family I soluble PPases. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong localization of native Bsc-PYP-1 to the body wall, gut epithelium, ovary and uterus of adult female worms. Additionally, Bsc-PYP-1 homologues were found in roundworms infecting humans (Ascaris lumbricoides), swine (Ascaris suum) and dogs (Toxocara canis). In two vaccine trials, recombinant Bsc-PYP-1 (rBsc-PYP-1) formulated with Freund complete adjuvant induced significantly high antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G but no IgE or IgM responses. Analysis of IgG-subclass profiles revealed a greater increase of IgG1 than IgG2a. Splenocytes from rBsc-PYP-1/FCA-immunized mice secreted low levels of T helper (Th)1-type cytokines, interferon-γ and interleukin (IL)-2, while producing significantly high levels of IL-10 and significantly elevated levels of IL-4 (Th2 cytokines) after stimulation with rBsc-PYP-1 in vitro. Finally, vaccinated mice had 69.02-71.15% reductions (in 2 experiments) in larval recovery 7 days post-challenge (dpc) and 80% survival at 80 dpc. These results suggest that Th2-mediated immunity elicited by rBsc-PYP-1 provides protection against B. schroederi, and the findings should contribute to further development of Bsc-PYP-1 as a candidate vaccine against baylisascariasis.

  13. Potential of recombinant inorganic pyrophosphatase antigen as a new vaccine candidate against Baylisascaris schroederi in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal nematode Baylisascaris schroederi is an important cause of death for wild and captive giant pandas. Inorganic pyrophosphatases (PPases) are critical for development and molting in nematode parasites and represent potential targets for vaccination. Here, a new PPase homologue, Bsc-PYP-1, from B. schroederi was identified and characterized, and its potential as a vaccine candidate was evaluated in a mouse challenge model. Sequence alignment of PPases from nematode parasites and other organisms show that Bsc-PYP-1 is a nematode-specific member of the family I soluble PPases. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong localization of native Bsc-PYP-1 to the body wall, gut epithelium, ovary and uterus of adult female worms. Additionally, Bsc-PYP-1 homologues were found in roundworms infecting humans (Ascaris lumbricoides), swine (Ascaris suum) and dogs (Toxocara canis). In two vaccine trials, recombinant Bsc-PYP-1 (rBsc-PYP-1) formulated with Freund complete adjuvant induced significantly high antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G but no IgE or IgM responses. Analysis of IgG-subclass profiles revealed a greater increase of IgG1 than IgG2a. Splenocytes from rBsc-PYP-1/FCA-immunized mice secreted low levels of T helper (Th)1-type cytokines, interferon-γ and interleukin (IL)-2, while producing significantly high levels of IL-10 and significantly elevated levels of IL-4 (Th2 cytokines) after stimulation with rBsc-PYP-1 in vitro. Finally, vaccinated mice had 69.02–71.15% reductions (in 2 experiments) in larval recovery 7 days post-challenge (dpc) and 80% survival at 80 dpc. These results suggest that Th2-mediated immunity elicited by rBsc-PYP-1 provides protection against B. schroederi, and the findings should contribute to further development of Bsc-PYP-1 as a candidate vaccine against baylisascariasis. PMID:24090087

  14. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Leptospira interrogans Isolated from Canis familiaris in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Sérgio; Monte, Leonardo G; De Oliveira, Natasha R; Collares, Thais F; Roloff, Bárbara C; Gomes, Charles K; Hartwig, Daiane D; Dellagostin, Odir A; Hartleben, Cláudia P

    2015-10-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes from the genus Leptospira, which includes 20 species and more than 300 serovars. Canines are important hosts of pathogenic leptospires and can transmit the pathogen to humans via infected urine. Here, we report the phenotypic and molecular characterization of Leptospira interrogans isolated from Canis familiaris in Southern Brazil. The isolated strain was characterized by variable-number tandem-repeats analysis as L. interrogans, serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae. In addition, the isolate was recognized by antibodies from human and canine serum samples previously tested by microscopic agglutination test. Ultimately, the expression of membrane-associated antigens (LipL32 and leptospiral immunoglobulin-like proteins) from pathogenic leptospires using monoclonal antibodies was detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay. In conclusion, identification of new strains of Leptospira can help in the diagnosis and control of leptospirosis.

  15. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma bovis, Anaplasma platys, Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii and Babesia canis vogeli in ticks from Israel.

    PubMed

    Harrus, S; Perlman-Avrahami, A; Mumcuoglu, K Y; Morick, D; Eyal, O; Baneth, G

    2011-03-01

    : Ticks are vectors of important pathogens of human and animals. Therefore, their microbial carriage capacity is constantly being investigated. The aim of this study was to characterize the diversity of domestic animal pathogens in ticks collected from vegetation and the ground, from different parts of Israel. Non-engorged questing adult ticks were collected from 13 localities. A total of 1196 ticks in 131 pools-83 pools of Rhipicephalus turanicus and 48 of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (with two to ten ticks per pool)-were included in this study. In addition, 13 single free-roaming Hyalomma spp. ticks were collected. Screening by molecular techniques revealed the presence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, Anaplasma bovis and Babesia canis vogeli DNA in R. turanicus ticks. E. canis, A. bovis, B. canis vogeli and Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii DNA sequences were detected in R. sanguineus ticks. Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii DNA was also detected in Hyalomma spp. ticks. Neither Hepatozoon spp. nor Bartonella spp. DNA was detected in any of the ticks examined. This study describes the first detection of E. canis in the tick R. turanicus, which may serve as a vector of this canine pathogen; E. canis was the most common pathogen detected in the collected questing ticks. It also describes the first detection of A. bovis and Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii in Israel. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first report describing the detection of DNA of the latter two pathogens in R. sanguineus, and of A. bovis in R. turanicus.

  16. The prevention of transmission of Babesia canis canis by Dermacentor reticulatus ticks to dogs using a novel combination of fipronil, amitraz and (S)-methoprene.

    PubMed

    Jongejan, Frans; Fourie, Josephus J; Chester, S Theodore; Manavella, Coralie; Mallouk, Yasmina; Pollmeier, Matthias G; Baggott, Derek

    2011-07-15

    Four groups of seven dogs were treated topically with a novel combination of fipronil, amitraz and (S)-methoprene in a spot-on formulation (CERTIFECT™, Merial Limited, GA, USA) on 28, 21, 14 and 7 days prior to tick infestation, respectively and acaricidal efficacy and transmission blocking compared with an untreated control group (seven dogs). All dogs were infested with adult Dermacentor reticulatus ticks harbouring Babesia canis canis. Babesia canis canis was transmitted by D. reticulatus to all seven untreated control dogs, confirmed following demonstration of clinical signs, by the detection of B. canis parasites in thin blood smears and B. canis canis PCR-RLB DNA assay on blood and the development of B. canis canis antibody titres by 14-21 days after tick infestation. The majority of treated dogs remained sero-negative for 42 days after infestation. Therefore, the treatment of dogs with CERTIFECT applied up to 28 days prior to infestation with D. reticulatus harbouring B. canis canis, successfully prevented the development of clinical signs of canine babesiosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. SDS-PAGE separation of dermatophyte antigens, and western immunoblotting in feline dermatophytosis.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, A H; Stokes, C R; Gruffydd-Jones, T J

    1994-11-01

    Water-soluble antigens liberated from the disrupted mycelium of nine dermatophytes (seven isolates of Microsporum canis, one each of Microsporum gypseum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes) were compared by analytical slab SDS-PAGE. No substantial differences were observed between the protein bands of the M. Canis isolates, but certain distinctive bands were apparent in the other two species examined. Western immunoblotting using M. canis-derived antigens separated by SDS-PAGE was used to investigate the humoral immune response in 79 cats with naturally-occurring dermatophytosis (72 with M. canis, six with M. gypseum and one with T. mentagrophytes) and this information was compared to results of immunoblots from 46 control (non-dermatophyte exposed) cats. Seven dominant bands (bands which occurred frequently and stained heavily) were identified in immunoblots from the dermatophyte-infected cats with apparent molecular weights varying between 39 and 120 kD. None of these bands were totally specific markers for dermatophytosis as a variable proportion of the control cats showed reactivity to all these proteins. However, most (73%) of the dermatophyte-infected cats showed reactivity to six or seven of the identified bands whereas most (80%) of the control cats showed reactivity to between zero and three of these bands (p < 0.005). Western immunoblotting could be used to select individual immunodominant antigens for further evaluation of protective (cell-mediated) immunity.

  18. Genome Sequences of Three Brucella canis Strains Isolated from Humans and a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Marcus Vinicius Canário; Govil Batra, Dhwani; Boisvert, Sébastien; Brettin, Thomas Scott; Frace, Michael; Xia, Fangfang; Azevedo, Vasco; Tiller, Rebekah; Hoffmaster, Alex R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Brucella canis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that preferentially infects members of the Canidae family. Here, we report the genome sequencing of two Brucella canis strains isolated from humans and one isolated from a dog host. PMID:28232424

  19. UVES observations of the Canis Major overdensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbordone, L.; Bonifacio, P.; Marconi, G.; Zaggia, S.; Buonanno, R.

    2005-01-01

    We present the first detailed chemical abundances for three giant stars which are candidate members of the Canis Major overdensity, obtained by using FLAMES-UVES at VLT. The stars, in the background of the open cluster NGC 2477, have radial velocities compatible with a membership to this structure. However, due to Galactic disc contamination, radial velocity by itself is unable to firmly establish membership. The metallicities span the range -0.5⪉ [Fe/H] ⪉ +0.1. Assuming that at least one of the three stars is indeed a member of CMa implies that this structure has undergone a high level of chemical processing, comparable to that of the Galactic disc. The most metal-rich star of the sample, EIS 6631, displays several abundance ratios which are remarkably different from those of Galactic stars: [α/Fe] ˜ -0.2, [Cu/Fe] ˜ +0.25, [La/Fe] ˜ +0.6, [Ce/Fe] ˜ +0.8 and [Nd/Fe]˜ +0.6. These ratios make it likely that this star was formed in an external galaxy. Based on observations obtained in the ESO Director's Discretionary Time program 272-B.5017.

  20. Distance to VY Canis Majoris with VERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoon Kyung; Hirota, Tomoya; Honma, Mareki; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Bushimata, Takeshi; Imai, Hiroshi; Iwadate, Kenzaburo; Jike, Takaaki; Kameno, Seiji; Kameya, Osamu; Kamohara, Ryuichi; Kan-Ya, Yukitoshi; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Kijima, Masachika; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kuji, Seisuke; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Manabe, Seiji; Maruyama, Kenta; Matsui, Makoto; Matsumoto, Naoko; Miyaji, Takeshi; Nagayama, Takumi; Nakagawa, Akiharu; Nakamura, Kayoko; Oh, Chung Sik; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Oyama, Tomoaki; Sakai, Satoshi; Sasao, Tetsuo; Sato, Katsuhisa; Sato, Mayumi; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Tsushima, Miyuki; Yamashita, Kazuyoshi

    2008-10-01

    We report on astrometric observations of H2O masers around the red supergiant VY Canis Majoris carried out with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). Based on astrometric monitoring for 13 months, we successfully measured a trigonometric parallax of 0.88±0.08 mas, corresponding to a distance of 1.14+0.11-0.09kpc. This is the most accurate determined distance to VY CMa and the first one based on an annual parallax measurement. The luminosity of VY CMa has been overestimated due to a previously accepted distance. With our result, we re-estimated the luminosity of VY CMa to be (3±0.5) × 105Lodot using the bolometric flux integrated over optical and IR wavelengths. This improved luminosity value makes the location of VY CMa on the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram much closer to the theoretically allowable zone (i.e. the left side of the Hayashi track) than previous ones, though the uncertainty in the effective temperature of the stellar surface still does not permit us to make a final conclusion.

  1. A cannonball star candidate in Canis Minor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.

    2005-07-01

    We report on the identification of a cannonball star candidate toward the direction of Canis Minor. The star is called PSS 544-7 and it has been selected as a result of a search in SIMBAD at CDS. With uncorrected colors B - V = 1.58 ± 0.15, V - J = 2.66 ± 0.14, V - KS = 3.38 ± 0.23, J - H = 0.675 ± 0.167, H - KS = 0.046 ± 0.244, J - KS = 0.721 ± 0.219, the object exhibits a significant proper motion, 401 ± 13 mas/yr. Based on the object's photometry, we conclude that it is likely a M-dwarf with an unusually high velocity perpendicular to the galactic disk. Its photometric parallax yields a distance estimate of 210 ± 60 pc, a tangential velocity of 399 ± 127 km/s and a W-component >350 km/s. If our interpretation is correct, given its location and kinematic signature, the object is a candidate cannonball star ejected by a star cluster.

  2. Coyotes (Canis latrans) and the matching law.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Norton, Lynne B; Shahan, Timothy A; Shivik, John A

    2009-10-01

    Environmental change is accelerating due to anthropogenic influence. Species that have greater behavioral flexibility may be better adapted to exploit new or constantly changing habitats. There are few mammals and even fewer carnivores that better illustrate widespread adaptability and behavioral flexibility in the wake of human disturbance than coyotes (Canis latrans). Yet how such predators successfully track resources, enabling them to survive and extend their range in stochastic environments remains unknown. We tested eight wild-born, captive coyotes individually on an operant two-choice test using concurrent variable interval (VI) schedules. We held the overall rate of reinforcement constant but manipulated the ratio of reinforcement available from the two choices. We analyzed sensitivity of coyotes' tracking of resource change by fitting the generalized matching equation to the data. Results showed all coyotes efficiently tracked changes in reinforcement ratios within the first few sessions of each new condition and matched their relative rate of foraging time to relative rate of resources. We suggest the matching paradigm provides a methodology to explore coyote foraging strategies, and a potential framework to compare behavioral flexibility across species, by measuring the ability to track resource change under variable resource conditions.

  3. Trophic cascades linking wolves (Canis lupus), coyotes (Canis latrans), and small mammals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, B.J.; Harlow, H.J.; Harlow, T.S.; Biggins, D.; Ripple, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    When large carnivores are extirpated from ecosystems that evolved with apex predators, these systems can change at the herbivore and plant trophic levels. Such changes across trophic levels are called cascading effects and they are very important to conservation. Studies on the effects of reintroduced wolves in Yellowstone National Park have examined the interaction pathway of wolves (Canis lupus L., 1758) to ungulates to plants. This study examines the interaction effects of wolves to coyotes to rodents (reversing mesopredator release in the absence of wolves). Coyotes (Canis latrans Say, 1823) generally avoided areas near a wolf den. However, when in the proximity of a den, they used woody habitats (pine or sage) compared with herbaceous habitats (grass or forb or sedge)- when they were away from the wolf den. Our data suggested a significant increase in rodent numbers, particularly voles (genus Microtus Schrank, 1798), during the 3-year study on plots that were within 3 km of the wolf den, but we did not detect a significant change in rodent numbers over time for more distant plots. Predation by coyotes may have depressed numbers of small mammals in areas away from the wolf den. These factors indicate a top-down effect by wolves on coyotes and subsequently on the rodents of the area. Restoration of wolves could be a powerful tool for regulating predation at lower trophic levels.

  4. Fatal acute babesiosis in captive grey wolves (Canis lupus) due to Babesia canis.

    PubMed

    Erdélyi, Károly; Mezősi, László; Vladov, Sztojkov; Földvári, Gábor

    2014-04-01

    Two adult male Eurasian grey wolves belonging to a group of 12 animals, kept in an open air 15,000-m(2) enclosure at the Bear Farm facility near Veresegyháza, Hungary, were found dead in September 2002. Another 2 wolves died during the same period, but laboratory examination of their carcasses was not possible. During necropsy both animals were found to be in a good body condition. Oral mucosa, conjunctiva, sclera, and subcutaneous tissues revealed severe jaundice. The liver, gall bladder, and spleen were enlarged. The kidneys were paler than normal, and petechial haemorrhages were also seen under their fascia. Small, round Babesia-like organisms, 1.5-2 μm in diameter, were demonstrated in large numbers in stained impression smears made from the spleens of both animals. PCR amplification and sequencing identified Babesia canis. There are very few reports on babesiosis in the grey wolf, and our findings draw attention to the potential threat posed by B. canis that will probably have to be taken into account in future ex situ and in situ wolf conservation efforts.

  5. Toxocara canis infection of children: epidemiologic and neuropsychologic findings.

    PubMed Central

    Marmor, M; Glickman, L; Shofer, F; Faich, L A; Rosenberg, C; Cornblatt, B; Friedman, S

    1987-01-01

    Sera from 4,652 children whose blood was submitted to the New York City Department of Health for lead analysis were tested for antibodies to Toxocara canis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Standardized to the age distribution of the study population, T. canis seropositivity (inverse titers greater than or equal to 16) was 5.7 per cent in males and 5.1 per cent in females. T. canis antibody titers and lead exposures as measured by Centers for Disease Control lead classes were positively correlated. Children who were seropositive to T. canis (cases) were compared to seronegatives (controls) matched on age (+/- 6 months), sex, time-of-screening (+/- 3 months) and CDC lead class. Logistic regression analysis of 155 case-control pairs demonstrated elevated relative risks (RRs) for geophagia (RR = 3.14; 95% CI = 1.75, 5.64) and having had a litter of puppies in the home (RR = 5.22; 95% CI = 1.63, 16.71). Compared to controls, cases had increased eosinophil counts, serum immunoglobulin E concentrations, and anti-hemagglutinin-A titers. Small deficits in cases compared to controls were found in performance on several neuropsychological tests after adjustment for potential confounders including case-control differences in race, socioeconomic status, and current blood lead concentrations. The study thus confirmed that T. canis infection is common in urban children and suggested that infection may be associated with adverse neuropsychological effects. PMID:3565646

  6. Evaluation of Microsporum canis in different methods of storage.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, R S N; Cavalcante, C S P; Soares-Júnior, F A; Monteiro, A J; Brito, E H S; Cordeiro, R A; Sidrim, J J C; Rocha, M F G

    2004-12-01

    The main objective of this investigation was to evaluate different methods of storage for Microsporum canis based on materials and equipment that are readily available in developing countries. We tested 32 strains of M. canis at - 20 degrees C in potato dextrose agar (PDA) in its plain condition, or amended with 10% dimethyl sulfoxide or with 10% glycerol. In addition, we tested 25 degrees C storage of isolates in plain saline (0.9% NaCl) and in saline covered with a mineral-oil layer. After 9 months of storage, none of the M. canis strains frozen in PDA supplemented with glycerol survived, while only 16 and 6%, respectively, of the isolates in plain and DMSO medium lost viability. Nine month's storage in saline with or without mineral oil increased the amount of pleomorphic development of sterile hyphae; this phenomenon occurred at a significantly higher level than was seen in isolates stored at -20 degrees C. The physiological characteristics of M. canis were not affected by the different storage tests. The results suggest that, in order to ensure optimal viability, purity and pristine isolate condition, each M. canis isolate maintained should be held in at least two methods of storage, namely, PDA at -20 degrees C and saline with a mineral-oil layer at 25 degrees C.

  7. Inhibition of Haemonchus contortus larval development by fungal lectins.

    PubMed

    Heim, Christian; Hertzberg, Hubertus; Butschi, Alex; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Aebi, Markus; Deplazes, Peter; Künzler, Markus; Štefanić, Saša

    2015-08-19

    development while 40 μg/ml were needed to achieve the same inhibition by CCL2 lectin. MOA was the only lectin tested that caused larval death while other toxic lectins had larvistatic effect manifesting as L1 growth arrest. Using lectin histochemistry we demonstrate that of all lectins tested, only the four toxic ones displayed binding to the larvae's gut and likewise were found to interact with glycans localized to the gastrodermal tissue of adults. The results of our study suggest a correlation between the presence of target glycans of lectins in the digestive tract and the lectin-mediated toxicity in Haemonchus contortus. We demonstrate that binding to the structurally conserved glycan structures found in H. contortus gastrodermal tissue by the set of fungal lectins has detrimental effect on larval development. Some of these glycan structures might represent antigens which are not exposed to the host immune system (hidden antigens) and thus have a potential for vaccine or drug development. Nematotoxic fungal lectins prove to be a useful tool to identify such targets in parasitic nematodes.

  8. The feasibility of using antigens prepared with rough Brucella strains for diagnosis of canine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Escobar, G I; Boeri, E J; Ayala, S M; Lucero, N E

    2010-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of canine brucellosis is not sensitive enough and a negative blood culture cannot rule out the disease. Indirect methods of serological testing such as agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID), rapid slide agglutination test (RSAT) and indirect enzyme linked immunoassay (IELISA) are preferred for routine diagnosis. Since Brucella canis shares antigenic components with the Brucella ovis and Brucella abortus RB51 strain, it would seem that either strain could be used as antigen. We present data on AGID and IELISA tests using the B. ovis antigen, RSAT and IELISA using the B. canis antigen and IELISA using the B. abortus RB51 antigen. The cut-off values were adjusted by the ROC analysis; the IELISA-B. ovis cut-off value was 23 (%P) and the IELISA-B. abortus RB51, 24 (%P), with 100% sensitivity and 98.8% specificity. RSAT detected 100% of positive cases, while AGID was less sensitive. The sera from dogs treated with antibiotic showed that %P correlated well with the clinical course. Sera from dogs presumptively infected with B. suis were negative in all tests performed with the rough Brucella strains. RSAT is a very sensitive screening test and IELISA-B. canis, B. ovis and B. abortus RB51 could be used as confirmatory tests, since they show good specificity and sensitivity.

  9. 'Peer pressure' in larval Drosophila?

    PubMed

    Niewalda, Thomas; Jeske, Ines; Michels, Birgit; Gerber, Bertram

    2014-06-06

    Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on 'peer pressure', that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i) by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii) by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii) by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv) by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Isolation of viable neospora caninum from brains of wild gray wolves (canis lupus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neospora caninum is a common cause of abortion in cattle worldwide. Canids, including the dog and the dingo (Canis familiaris), the coyote (Canis latrans), and the gray wolf (Canis lupus) are its definitive hosts, but also can act as intermediate hosts by harbor tissue stages of the parasite that ca...

  11. Cross-reactivity of Toxocariasis with Crude Antigen of Toxascaris leonina Larvae by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Shen, Chenghua; Huh, Sun; Choi, Min-Ho; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2015-05-01

    Roundworms of Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonina are common gastrointestinal helminths of canids over the world. Humans are infected with T. canis larvae through ingestion of infective eggs in contaminated environments or larvae by consumption of raw or uncooked meat or livers. Recently, patients of clinically diagnosed toxocariasis are increasing and require correct diagnosis in Korea. The present study investigated serological cross-reactivity between crude antigens of T. canis (TCLA) and T. leonina (TLLA) larvae. We collected serum specimens from 177 toxocariasis patients who were clinically suspected in the Seoul National University Hospital and 115 healthy controls. An ELISA method for toxocariasis was used to evaluate diagnostic efficacy of TLLA for serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis. The IgG ELISA using TLLA gave 14 (14.3%) positives of 98 TCLA positive specimens among 177 suspected toxocariasis patients. Most of them showed high absorbances with TCLA. In conclusion, there is a partial cross reaction between serum specimens of toxocariasis and TLLA.

  12. Generalized Microsporum canis dermatophytosis in six Yorkshire terrier dogs.

    PubMed

    Cerundolo, Rosario

    2004-06-01

    Six Yorkshire terrier dogs with generalized, chronic dermatophytosis caused by Microsporum canis were seen over a 3-year period. Specific tests showed that they also had concurrent leishmaniosis (four cases), leishmaniosis and ehrlichiosis (one case) or diabetes mellitus (one case). Although specific therapy for these infectious diseases was instituted and the dogs were treated systemically and topically with appropriate antifungal drugs, only partial clinical resolution of the dermatophytosis was achieved. M. canis infection resolved in the dog with diabetes mellitus after stabilizing the diabetes mellitus. Although immunological studies were not performed in these cases, it is theorized that the immune disregulation caused by leishmaniosis, ehrlichiosis or diabetes mellitus may have favoured generalization of the infection and prevented favourable responses to appropriate treatment of the M. canis infection.

  13. Urinary tract infections due to Mycoplasma canis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ulgen, M; Cetin, C; Sentürk, S; Ozel, A E; Ozdemir, U

    2006-09-01

    Urine samples were obtained from 100 dogs with symptoms of lower urinary tract disease by cystocentesis and were examined for mycoplasmas. Urinalysis, haematological and biochemical analyses were also performed. Bacteria were isolated from urine in 41 of 100 dogs; Mycoplasma canis was isolated from four of 100 (4%) urine samples and three were pure culture. Selective mycoplasma media were used for isolation. In growth inhibition test, propagation of the four M. canis isolates was inhibited by their specific hyperimmune sera and there was no cross reactivity between isolates and hyperimmune sera of other mycoplasmas. Dogs in which M. canis was isolated were azotemic. All dogs were treated with enrofloxacin, furosemide, and supportive therapy (fluid therapy, ascorbic acid). In all animals, clinical improvements were observed after treatment.

  14. Radiolabeling and autoradiographic tracing of Toxocara canis larvae in male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, S.E.; Georgi, J.R.

    1987-02-01

    Artificially hatched infective larvae of Toxocara canis were labeled with /sup 75/Se in Medium 199 (Gibco) containing /sup 75/Se-methionine. Male CD-1 mice were infected with radiolabeled larvae by intragastric intubation or by intraperitoneal injection. At intervals of 3-56 days mice were killed and the organs prepared for compressed organ autoradiography. Radioactivity of parasitic larvae showed an exponential decrease with time, reflecting catabolism of label with a biological half life of 26 days (effective half life of 21 days) making possible experiments lasting several months. Total body larva counts, estimated by total body autoradiography, displayed an overall downward trend, but the rate of reduction was probably not constant because no significant positive or negative trends were noted from day 14 onward in the numbers of larvae. The carcass accumulated the greatest number of larvae followed by the central nervous system, liver, and lung in that order. When the numbers of larvae were considered in relationship to the mass of tissue, there were 4 groupings: central nervous system, liver, lung, carcass, and kidney, and genito-urinary organ, pelt, and intestine. No significant difference between intragastric and intraperitoneal administration was observed in the larval distribution after the larvae had left the initial site of deposition.

  15. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for coproantigen detection of Ancylostoma caninum and Toxocara canis in dogs and Toxocara cati in cats.

    PubMed

    Elsemore, David A; Geng, Jinming; Cote, Jennifer; Hanna, Rita; Lucio-Forster, Araceli; Bowman, Dwight D

    2017-09-01

    We report the development and field validation of 2 ELISAs for the detection of Ancylostoma caninum or Toxocara canis coproantigens in the feces of dogs with experimental and natural infections, and evidence of cross-reactivity with respective feline counterparts. A. caninum-specific coproantigens were detected in feces of experimentally infected dogs starting at 9 d post-infection (dpi), whereas eggs were not seen until 23 dpi. T. canis-specific coproantigens were detected in 3 of 5 experimentally infected dogs by 31 dpi, and 4 of the 5 animals by 38 dpi. T. canis eggs were seen in feces of 4 of the 5 animals by 38 dpi. One dog had delayed coproantigen detection and low egg output. Additionally, 817 canine and 183 feline fecal samples from naturally infected animals tested by flotation were subjected to coproantigen ELISA testing. Of these 1,000 canine and feline samples, 13 and 23 samples, respectively, were positive for "hookworm" or "roundworm" eggs; 19 and 26 samples were ELISA positive, respectively. The T. canis ELISA detected T. cati coproantigen in cat fecal samples. Discrepant ELISA and flotation results were obtained for 16 hookworm- and 13 roundworm-positive samples. Re-examination of the egg-positive, ELISA-negative samples indicated several instances of possible misidentification or coprophagy, whereas detection of antigen in samples without egg observations is likely a reflection of true infection status with egg shedding below detection levels. There is good indication, based on accumulated field data, that these antigen tests also detect other hookworm and ascarid species.

  16. Eosinophilic pleocytosis and myelitis related to Toxocara canis infection.

    PubMed

    Goffette, S; Jeanjean, A P; Duprez, T P; Bigaignon, G; Sindic, C J

    2000-11-01

    Toxocara canis causes the visceral larva migrans syndrome in which central nervous involvement is rare. We report the case of a 40-year-old woman presenting with a subacute weakness of the right leg and dysaesthesiae in the right Th8-Th10 dermatomas. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging examination showed abnormal hyperintensity within the spinal cord. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed eosinophilic pleocytosis. Antibody titres to Toxocara canis were higher in the cerebrospinal fluid than in the serum. Treatment using mebendazole led to a complete clinical recovery, normalization of cerebrospinal fluid parameters and improvement in spinal magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities.

  17. Biological activity of Paecilomyces genus against Toxocara canis eggs.

    PubMed

    Basualdo, J A; Ciarmela, M L; Sarmiento, P L; Minvielle, M C

    2000-10-01

    Saprophytic soil fungi can exert ovicidal and ovistatic effects on helminths with differing degrees of efficiency. The representatives of such fungi from temperate regions, Paecilomyces lilacinus (Thom) Samson and P. marquandii (Masse) Hughes, exhibit recognized ovicidal activity on some nematodes. We evaluated the action in vitro of P. lilacinus and P. marquandii on the zoonotic canine roundworm eggs of Toxocara canis. Eggs exposed and unexposed to fungal samples were observed by both light and scanning electron microscopy on days 4, 7 and 14 post-inoculation. Ovicidal activity of P. lilacinus on T. canis eggs was considered to be high and that of P. marquandii to be intermediate.

  18. Brucella canis causing infection in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Nidia E; Maldonado, Patricia I; Kaufman, Sara; Escobar, Gabriela I; Boeri, Eduardo; Jacob, Néstor R

    2010-06-01

    From the blood culture of an HIV-positive patient with a febrile syndrome (CD4 count 385 cells/microL and viral load nondetectable), Brucella canis was isolated. The patient was presumptively infected from his dogs, which tested positive, and showed good outcome after the therapy with doxycycline-ciprofloxacin, and the HIV infection would seem not to have been influenced by brucellosis. To our knowledge, no other case of B. canis in the setting of HIV infection has been reported in the literature, and the emerging zoonotic potential of the disease in urban areas should be considered.

  19. Characterization of Anopheles pseudopunctipennis larval habitats.

    PubMed

    Manguin, S; Roberts, D R; Peyton, E L; Rejmankova, E; Pecor, J

    1996-12-01

    A survey of Anopheles pseudopunctipennis larval habitats was performed throughout most of its known geographic range. Eleven key environment variables characterized most larval habitats of this important vector of malaria in the Americas. Larval habitats occurred mainly in valley and foothill areas which were often situated in arid regions. Immatures were found primarily during the dry season in sun-exposed freshwater stream pools with clear, shallow, stagnant water containing abundant filamentous green algae and/or aquatic vegetation.

  20. ANTIGENIC MODULATION

    PubMed Central

    Old, Lloyd J.; Stockert, Elisabeth; Boyse, Edward A.; Kim, Jae Ho

    1968-01-01

    Antigenic modulation (the loss of TL antigens from TL+ cells exposed to TL antibody in the absence of lytic complement) has been demonstrated in vitro. An ascites leukemia, phenotype TL.1,2,3, which modulates rapidly and completely when incubated with TL antiserum in vitro, was selected for further study of the phenomenon. Over a wide range of TL antibody concentrations modulation at 37°C was detectable within 10 min and was complete within approximately 1 hr. The cells were initially sensitized to C' by their contact with antibody, thereafter losing this sensitivity to C' lysis together with their sensitivity to TL antibody and C' in the cytotoxic test. The capacity of the cells to undergo modulation was abolished by actinomycin D and by iodoacetamide, and by reducing the temperature of incubation to 0°C. Thus modulation apparently is an active cellular process. Antigens TL. 1,2, and 3 are all modulated by anti-TL.1,3 serum and by anti-TL.3 serum. This modulation affects all three TL components together, even when antibody to one or two of them is lacking. aAnti-TL.2 serum does not induce modulation and in fact impairs modulation by the other TL antibodies. The influence of the TL phenotype of cells upon the demonstrable content of H-2 (D region) isoantigen, first shown in cells modulated in vivo, has been observed with cells modulated in vitro. Cells undergoing modulation show a progressive increase in H-2 (D region) antigen over a period of 4 hr, with no change in H-2 antigens of the K region. Restoration of the TL+ phenotype of modulated cells after removal of antibody is less rapid than TL+ → TL- modulation and may require several cell divisions. PMID:5636556

  1. Identification of serum biomarkers in dogs naturally infected with Babesia canis canis using a proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Canine babesiosis is a tick-borne disease that is caused by the haemoprotozoan parasites of the genus Babesia. There are limited data on serum proteomics in dogs, and none of the effect of babesiosis on the serum proteome. The aim of this study was to identify the potential serum biomarkers of babesiosis using proteomic techniques in order to increase our understanding about disease pathogenesis. Results Serum samples were collected from 25 dogs of various breeds and sex with naturally occurring babesiosis caused by B. canis canis. Blood was collected on the day of admission (day 0), and subsequently on the 1st and 6th day of treatment. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) of pooled serum samples of dogs with naturally occurring babesiosis (day 0, day 1 and day 6) and healthy dogs were run in triplicate. 2DE image analysis showed 64 differentially expressed spots with p ≤ 0.05 and 49 spots with fold change ≥2. Six selected spots were excised manually and subjected to trypsin digest prior to identification by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry on an Amazon ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Mass spectrometry data was processed using Data Analysis software and the automated Matrix Science Mascot Daemon server. Protein identifications were assigned using the Mascot search engine to interrogate protein sequences in the NCBI Genbank database. A number of differentially expressed serum proteins involved in inflammation mediated acute phase response, complement and coagulation cascades, apolipoproteins and vitamin D metabolism pathway were identified in dogs with babesiosis. Conclusions Our findings confirmed two dominant pathogenic mechanisms of babesiosis, haemolysis and acute phase response. These results may provide possible serum biomarker candidates for clinical monitoring of babesiosis and this study could serve as the basis for further proteomic investigations in canine babesiosis. PMID:24885808

  2. Multiplex PCR-based identification of Streptococcus canis, Streptococcus zooepidemicus and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies from dogs.

    PubMed

    Moriconi, M; Acke, E; Petrelli, D; Preziuso, S

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus canis (S. canis), Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies (S. dysgalactiae subspecies) are β-haemolytic Gram positive bacteria infecting animals and humans. S. canis and S. zooepidemicus are considered as two of the major zoonotic species of Streptococcus, while more research is needed on S. dysgalactiae subspecies bacteria. In this work, a multiplex-PCR protocol was tested on strains and clinical samples to detect S. canis, S. dysgalactiae subspecies and S. equi subspecies bacteria in dogs. All strains were correctly identified as S. canis, S. equi subspecies or S. dysgalactiae subspecies by the multiplex-PCR. The main Streptococcus species isolated from symptomatic dogs were confirmed S. canis. The multiplex-PCR protocol described is a rapid, accurate and efficient method for identifying S. canis, S. equi subspecies and S. dysgalactiae subspecies in dogs and could be used for diagnostic purposes and for epidemiological studies.

  3. Detection of circulating toxocaral antigens in dogs by sandwich enzyme-immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, K; Kazuta, Y; Endo, R; Tanaka, K

    1984-01-01

    This study describes the presence of circulating toxocaral antigens (CTA) in the sera of dogs infected with Toxocara canis (T. canis) by using a sandwich enzyme-immunoassay (SEIA). A specificity of this assay with different antigens was observed, i.e. the EIA values, which express the antigen concentration, of excretory-secretory antigen from T. canis larvae were higher than those of other antigens (Ascaris lumbricoides, Dirofilaria immitis and Fasciola hepatica). The variability in intra-assay was below 10%. In age distribution of CTA levels, the highest level was observed at 1 month of age. Thereafter, the levels decreased gradually until 6 months of age and then the same levels were maintained until adult age. Also, slightly elevated levels were found in the sera of foetuses. A significant correlation was obtained between age and CTA levels. The positive correlation between the number of worms and CTA levels was significant. As for the IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies, a significant correlation was observed between the IgM antibody activities and CTA levels, but this was not observed with IgG and IgA antibodies. From these results, it was indicated that the immunological response to T. canis infection in dogs may not be reached until 1 or 2 months after birth, although detectable CTA levels were observed in foetal and early life. It was also suggested that the immunological stimulation for canine toxocariasis may be maintained by the excretory-secretory materials from the larvae through life and as a result, IgM antibody production may be observed even in chronically infected adult dogs. The SEIA technique reported in this study may be useful as a diagnostic tool of human toxocariasis, since the CTA can be directly demonstrated by the technique. PMID:6365746

  4. Serodetection of Ehrlichia canis amongst dogs in central Namibia.

    PubMed

    Manyarara, Rutendo; Tubbesing, Ulf; Soni, Minty; Noden, Bruce H

    2015-06-01

    Ehrlichia canis is a major pathogen in dogs throughout Africa, yet it has not been reported in Namibia. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of canine ehrlichiosis in central Namibia using the ImmunoComb assay (Biogal, Galed Laboratories). The study included 76 dogs that presented to the Rhino Park Veterinary Clinic in the north-western suburb of Khomasdal, Windhoek, Namibia, as well as 30 stray dogs from the Windhoek branch of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Of the 106 dogs tested, 53.8% were seropositive at titres > 1:80. Dogs that presented with symptoms of E. canis infection had a significantly higher seroprevalence (86.6%) compared with apparently healthy dogs (41.6%) (P = 0.00). Location of habitation was significant (P < 0.017), with a high percentage of dogs exposed to E. canis living in the northern or north-western part of Windhoek. As the first study to serologically establish E. canis as a major pathogen in dogs in central Namibia, it is notable that the highest proportion of seropositive dogs came from low-income areas. Further investigation is necessary to describe the ecology of this important tick-borne pathogen of companion animals in Namibia.

  5. Long daily movements of wolves (Canis lupus) during pup raising

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Cluff, H. Dean

    2009-01-01

    Wolves, Canis lupus, on Ellesmere Island traveled a daily round-trip distance of 40.2 km from their den to a landfill during July 2008, plus an undetermined distance hunting after leaving the landfill. Although long travels by Wolves are well known, this appears to be the first documentation of long daily movements by Wolves rearing pups.

  6. Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) death by stick impalement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber-Meyer, Shannon; Schmidt, Lori; Mech, L. David

    2017-01-01

    Although Canis lupus L. (Gray Wolf) individuals are sometimes impaled by sticks, we could find no documentation of natural impalement by sticks as a cause of death for wild Wolves. Here we report on a wild Gray Wolf from northeastern Minnesota that died due to stick puncture of its thorax and abdomen.

  7. The WISE Census of Young Stellar Objects in Canis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W. J.; Padgett, D. L.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    While searches for young stellar objects (YSOs) with the Spitzer Space Telescope focused on known molecular clouds, photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) can be used to extend the search to the entire sky. As a precursor to more expansive searches, we present results for a 100 deg2 region centered on the Canis Major clouds.

  8. An example of endurance in an old wolf, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    1997-01-01

    An 11 to 13-year-old Arctic Wolf (Canis lupus arctos) was observed chasing a young Arctic Hare (Lepus arcticus) for 6 to 7 minutes and catching it. This provides an example of the degree of endurance of which an old wolf is capable.

  9. Serum detection of IgG antibodies against Demodex canis by western blot in healthy dogs and dogs with juvenile generalized demodicosis.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Ivan; Ferreira, Diana; Gallego, Laia Solano; Bardagí, Mar; Ferrer, Lluís

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of canine immunoglobulins (Ig) G against Demodex proteins in the sera of healthy dogs and of dogs with juvenile generalized demodicosis (CanJGD) with or without secondary pyoderma. Demodex mites were collected from dogs with CanJGD. Protein concentration was measured and a western blot technique was performed. Pooled sera from healthy dogs reacted mainly with antigen bands ranging from 55 to 72 kDa. Pooled sera from dogs with CanJGD without secondary pyoderma reacted either with 10 kDa antigen band or 55 to 72 kDa bands. Pooled sera from dogs with CanJGD with secondary pyoderma reacted only with a 10 kDa antigen band. The results of this study suggest that both healthy dogs and dogs with CanJGD develop a humoral response against different proteins of Demodex canis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Canine peritoneal larval cestodosis caused by Mesocestoides spp. larval stages].

    PubMed

    Häußler, T C; Peppler, C; Schmitz, S; Bauer, C; Hirzmann, J; Kramer, M

    2016-01-01

    In a female dog with unspecific clinical symptoms, sonography detected a hyperechoic mass in the middle abdomen and blood analysis a middle grade systemic inflammatory reaction. Laparotomy revealed a peritoneal larval cestodosis (PLC). The diagnosis of an infection with tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides spp. was confirmed by parasitological examination and molecularbiological analysis. Reduction of the intra-abdominal parasitic load as well as a high dose administration of fenbendazole over 3 months led to a successful treatment which could be documented sonographically and by decreased concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP). Seven months after discontinuation of fenbendazole administration, PLC recurred, pre-empted by an elevation of serum CRP values. According to the literature a life-long fenbendazole treatment was initiated. In cases of unclear chronic granulomatous inflammations in the abdominal cavity in dogs, PLC should be considered. CRP concentration and sonographic examinations are suitable to control for treatment success and a possibly occurring relapse.

  11. Prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis, Ehrlichia canis, and Borrelia burgdorferi in pet dogs, racing greyhounds, and shelter dogs in Florida.

    PubMed

    Tzipory, Nirit; Crawford, P Cynda; Levy, Julie K

    2010-07-15

    Arthropod vectors of canine infectious diseases are present throughout Florida. Since crowded housing has the potential to bring vectors and infected dogs into close proximity, it is possible that prevalence of infection is higher in intensely housed dogs. In this study, the seroprevalence of Dirofilaria immitis, Ehrlichia canis, and Borrelia burgdorferi in dogs residing in two types of intensive housing, greyhound kennels and animal shelters, was compared to dogs residing in low-intensity housing, private homes. Serum was collected from a cross-section of 1500 adult dogs from Florida, including 500 pet dogs referred to the Veterinary Medical Center of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Florida, 500 racing greyhounds, and 500 dogs residing in animal shelters. Serum was tested for D. immitis antigen, E. canis antibodies, and B. burgdorferi antibodies by ELISA. Seroprevalence of D. immitis was significantly higher (14.6%) in shelter dogs and in pet dogs (1.4%) than in racing greyhounds (0.2%) (P<0.04). There were no significant differences in the seroprevalence of E. canis (0.4-1.6%) or B. burgdorferi (0-0.8%) among the groups. There was no association of sex or age with D. immitis infection, but pit bull type dogs were more than twice as likely to be infected than other breeds (P=0.003). Evidence for vector-borne infections, particularly D. immitis, was found in dogs throughout the state. The prevalence was greatest for D. immitis infection in shelter dogs, likely due to lack of preventive medications prior to impoundment. Although heartworm infection is considered to be a treatable condition, insufficient resources in shelters may lead to euthanasia of infected dogs that would otherwise be considered adoptable. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) for the serodiagnosis of canine dermatophytosis caused by Microsporum canis.

    PubMed

    Peano, Andrea; Rambozzi, Luisa; Gallo, Maria G

    2005-04-01

    Abstract In dogs, dermatophytosis should be considered in any case of alopecic, papular or pustular lesion. The aim of this study was to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) as an aid in the diagnosis of canine dermatophytosis. The antigen used was a whole fungal extract obtained from an isolate of Microsporum canis cultured on a liquid medium from the parasitized hair of a cat with patches of alopecia. To assess the ELISA performances, sera from 18 dogs with dermatophytosis caused by M. canis (group A, n = 18), 20 dogs with skin diseases other than dermatophytosis and 22 healthy dogs (group B, n = 42) were tested. Four further animals were tested: three with dermatophytosis caused by M. gypseum and one by T. mentagrophytes. A significant difference (P < 0.01, Wilcoxon's test, w = 364) was found between IgG-specific levels of sera of recently M. canis-infected dogs (infection < 15 days) and controls (although three dogs had negative titres at this stage). A highly significant difference (P < 0.001, w = 462) was noted between controls and dogs with infection of longer duration (> 30 days). All dogs had positive titres at this stage. A highly significant correlation (P < 0.001, Spearman's test, rho = 0.86) between duration of infection and IgG concentration was noted. The test has good sensitivity (83.3%) and high specificity (95.2%) but some dogs retained positive titres after elimination of infection. The sensitivity is higher than that of direct microscopic hair examination and similar to that of fungal culture with DTM (dermatophyte test medium).

  13. Detection of genotype-specific Ehrlichia canis exposure in Brazilian dogs by TRP36 peptide ELISA.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Daniel M; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Braga, Isis A; Taques, Isis I G G; McBride, Jere W

    2016-02-01

    We recently characterized a novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis based on the tandem repeat (TR) sequence of the TRP36 gene in Brazil. The TR amino acid sequence of the Brazilian (Br) genotype (ASVVPEAE) was divergent from the previously described US genotype (TEDSVSAPA) of E. canis. In this study, we developed an ELISA based on TRP36 TR synthetic peptides from both Br and US E. canis TRP36 genotypes to serologically detect and distinguish infections caused by these genotypes. Sera from 30 Brazilian dogs naturally infected with E. canis, sera from dogs experimentally infected E. canis (Jake and Cuiabá #1 strains) and E. chaffeensis (Arkansas strain) and 12 seronegative E. canis dogs were evaluated. Fifteen naturally infected Brazilian dogs had antibodies that reacted with the US TRP36 (n=9) or Br TRP36 (n=6) only, and 13 dogs had antibodies that reacted with both TPR36 peptides suggesting that these dogs were exposed to both genotypes. Most dogs (n=28) had antibodies that reacted with the highly conserved E. canis TRP19 peptide; however, two dogs had antibodies to E. canis TRP19, but did not have TRP36 antibodies, raising the possibility that another novel TRP36 genotype is circulating in Brazil. Our results demonstrate that synthetic peptides based on the TR region of E. canis TRP36 can be used to serologically distinguish infections or identify coinfections by different genotypes, and to determine the seroprevalence of various E. canis genotypes in Brazil.

  14. Patent Toxocara canis infections in previously exposed and in helminth-free dogs after infection with low numbers of embryonated eggs.

    PubMed

    Fahrion, A S; Staebler, S; Deplazes, P

    2008-03-25

    The outcome of Toxocara canis infections in the canine host depends on the migratory pathway of parasite larvae (somatic or tracheal) which is considered to be related to the host's age and its immune status. However, field studies attest high prevalences of patent T. canis infections in adult animals. The controlled induction of patent infections with low doses of embryonated eggs was investigated in 18 beagles in a 7-month study until their 16th life month. The animals were assigned to three groups, each consisting of three vertically infected dogs (with a short patent infection as pups before anthelmintic treatment) and three helminth-free dogs. At study days 10 and 40, the animals of groups 1 and 3 were given each 100 embryonated T. canis eggs. In each case, group 1 was treated 10 days post-infection with Milbemax, while dogs of group 3 remained untreated. Control group 2 was not experimentally infected but treated as group 1. Two weeks after first egg administration, a sharp increase of specific antibody reactions in ELISA and increased eosinophilic counts indicated larval invasion in all infected dogs. 42-56 days following first infection, patent infections were detected coproscopically in all animals of group 3, but in none of the uninfected dogs (group 2) or the infected and treated dogs (group 1). Following a 3-month observation period, all animals of the three groups were treated with piperazine citrate to eliminate intestinal infections and all were administered 100 embryonated eggs. Subsequently, patent infections developed in animals of all groups: in one of the infected and treated animals of group 1, in five of the so far not infected control group 2 and in four of the dogs with previous patent infections (group 3). Susceptibility to patent infections was not significantly altered in T. canis-free dogs compared to dogs with previous patent infection (vertically acquired or experimentally induced). However, dogs of group 1 treated with Milbemax after

  15. Rhodopsin of the larval mosquito.

    PubMed

    Brown, P K; White, R H

    1972-04-01

    Larvae of the mosquito Aedes aegypti have a cluster of four ocelli on each side of the head. The visual pigment of each ocellus of mosquitoes reared in darkness was characterized by microspectrophotometry, and found to be the same. Larval mosquito rhodopsin (lambda(max) = 515 nm) upon short irradiation bleaches to a stable photoequilibrium with metarhodopsin (lambda(max) = 480 nm). On long irradiation of glutaraldehyde-fixed tissues or in the presence of potassium borohydride, bleaching goes further, and potassium borohydride reduces the product, retinal, to retinol (vitamin A(1)). In the presence of hydroxylamine, the rhodopsin bleaches rapidly, with conversion of the chromophore to retinaldehyde oxime (lambda(max) about 365 nm).

  16. Molecular detection of co-infections with Anaplasma phagocytophilum and/or Babesia canis canis in Dirofilaria-positive dogs from Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Víchová, Bronislava; Miterpáková, Martina; Iglódyová, Adriana

    2014-06-16

    Recently, several arthropod-borne infections have been introduced into previously non-endemic regions in Europe as the result of various global changes. At the same time, endemic regions are expanding and the risk of co-infections is rising, due to climate change that allows vectors to move and spread infectious diseases into new areas. The aim of the current study was to confirm simultaneous infections with Anaplasma phagocytophilum and/or Babesia canis canis in Dirofilaria-infected dogs from Slovakia, central Europe. Genomic DNA was isolated from 366 blood samples of microfilaraemic dogs without clinical signs of infection. Samples were further screened for the presence of canine tick-borne pathogens using PCR and sequencing. This survey revealed co-infection with four arthropod-borne pathogens, in particular, Dirofilaria repens, Dirofilaria immitis, A. phagocytophilum, and B. canis canis. While D. repens, responsible for canine subcutaneous dirofilariosis, is scattered through the whole territory of the country, D. immitis occurs only in endemic areas of southeastern and southwestern Slovakia in mixed infection with D. repens. Co-infection with A. phagocytophilum was reported in 3.27% of the dogs positive for D. repens; mixed infection with D. repens and B. canis canis was detected in 3.55% of the tested blood samples. Eastern Slovak Lowland represents a natural focus of B. canis canis and is a highly endemic area for canine dirofilariosis. The presence of triple infection with D. repens, A. phagocytophilum, and B. canis canis was detected in one dog originating from the eastern lowland region of Slovakia. This study highlights the importance of co-infected, clinically healthy dogs in the spreading of several different arthropod-borne pathogens and the necessity for detailed epidemiological surveys, especially in newly infested areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Factors associated with Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs infested with ticks from Huanuco, Peru].

    PubMed

    Huerto-Medina, Edward; Dámaso-Mata, Bernardo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the frequency and associated factors of Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs. Blood samples from 150 dogs infested with ticks in 10 veterinary clinics in the city of Huanuco in Peru were collected. The dogs were randomly selected without regard to breed, age or sex. Ehrlichia canis antibodies were detected by chromatographic immunoassay.51.3% of dogs were infected with Ehrlichia canis. In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with the presence of Ehrlichia canis were: poor health of the dog (p = 0.049), a higher average of tick infestation (p = 0.018), and adult dogs (p = 0.038). The frequency of Ehrlichia canis in dogs of this city is high. Control of the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) vector of Ehrlichia canis is recommended.

  18. Behavioural changes and muscle strength in Rattus norvegicus experimentally infected with Toxocara cati and T. canis.

    PubMed

    Santos, S V; Moura, J V L; Lescano, S A Z; Castro, J M; Ribeiro, M C S A; Chieffi, P P

    2015-07-01

    Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati are nematode parasites in dogs and cats, respectively, transmitted by ingestion of embryonated eggs, transmammary and transplacental (T. canis) routes and paratenic host predation. Many parasites use mechanisms that change the behaviour of their hosts to ensure continued transmission. Several researchers have demonstrated behavioural changes in mouse models as paratenic hosts for T. canis. However, there have been no studies on behavioural changes in laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) experimentally infected with T. cati. This study investigated behavioural changes and muscle strength in male and female rats experimentally infected with T. cati or T. canis in acute and chronic phases of infection. Regardless of sex, rats infected with T. cati showed a greater decrease in muscle strength 42 days post infection compared to rats infected with T. canis. However, behavioural changes were only observed in female rats infected with T. canis.

  19. Divergence of the TRP36 protein (gp36) in Ehrlichia canis strains found in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Daniel M; Melo, Andreia L T

    2015-03-01

    The molecular characterization of 16S rRNA gene and immunoreactive proteins of Ehrlichia canis usually provide little information about the overall diversity of this organism. On the other hand, distinct sequences of the Tandem Repeat Protein 36 (TRP36/gp36) gene of E. canis have been reported, indicating substantial degree of diversity. The present letter aims to update and discuss the molecular divergence of the TRP36 protein between strains of E. canis isolated in different countries including Brazil.

  20. Impairment of cellular immunity in west Greenland sledge dogs (Canis familiaris) dietary exposed to polluted minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) blubber.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Larsen, Hans J S; Loft, Klaus Earl; Kirkegaard, Maja; Letcher, Robert J; Shahmiri, Soheila; Móller, Per

    2006-03-15

    Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) blubber is rich in organohalogen contaminants, mercury, and n-3 fatty acids. In the present study we show that a daily intake of 50-200 g of minke whale blubber causes an impairment of the nonspecific and specific cellular immune system in the West Greenland sledge dog (Canis familiaris). Immune reactions were measured by mitogen (PHA, Con A) and antigen (KLH) intradermal testing, and as the study used exposure levels similar to those of Inuits and polar bears (Ursus maritimus), it is reasonable to infer that Inuits and polar bears suffer from similar decreased resistance to diseases. It is speculated that food sources are depleted by thinning sea ice due to climate change and that more research should assess the forecasted rise in additive immunopathy effects in polar bears. Additionally, our study suggests that the fatty acid composition may be of importance when investigating combined immunotoxic effects of contaminated food resources in future Inuit and polar bear studies.

  1. MASTICATORY MUSCLE MYOSITIS IN A GRAY WOLF (CANIS LUPUS).

    PubMed

    Kent, Marc; Glass, Eric N; Castro, Fernando A; Miller, Andrew D; de Lahunta, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    A 10-yr-old male, neutered gray wolf ( Canis lupus ) was presented for atrophy of the temporalis and masseter muscles. Clinical signs and magnetic resonance imaging were consistent with a myopathy. Positive serology for antibody titers directed against Type 2M myofibers, and the observation of a mixed mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrate along with eosinophils and neutrophils within the temporalis muscle, were diagnostic for masticatory muscle myositis. Importantly, protozoal myositis was excluded based on other clinicopathologic data. The case highlights the potential for immune-mediated polymyositis in canids other than the domesticated dog ( Canis lupus familaris). Additionally, awareness of a diet in which raw meat is used should prompt a thorough investigation for an underlying infectious myositis in the gray wolf.

  2. Giardia and Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in coyotes (Canis latrans).

    PubMed

    Trout, James M; Santín, Mónica; Fayer, Ronald

    2006-06-01

    Feces and duodenal scrapings were collected from 22 coyotes (Canis latrans) killed in managed hunts in northeastern Pennsylvania. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods were used to detect Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp. PCR-amplified fragments of Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp. SSU-rRNA genes were subjected to DNA sequence analysis for species/genotype determination. Seven coyotes (32%) were positive for G. duodenalis: three assemblage C, three assemblage D, and one assemblage B. Six coyotes (27%) were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. One isolate shared 99.7% homology with C. muris, whereas five others (23%) shared 100% homology with C. canis, coyote genotype. This is the first report on multiple genotypes of Giardia spp. in coyotes and on the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. genotypes in coyotes.

  3. The occurrence of nematodes of the genus Trichinella in wolves (Canis lupus) from the Bieszczady Mountains and Augustowska Forest in Poland.

    PubMed

    Bień, Justyna; Moskwa, Bożena; Goździk, Katarzyna; Cybulska, Aleksandra; Kornacka, Aleksandra; Welc, Mirosław; Popiołek, Marcin; Cabaj, Władysław

    2016-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of Trichinella infection in wolves (Canis lupus) in two regions in Poland. Muscle samples were collected from 21 wolves between 1999 and 2015 and processed by artificial digestion. In two cases, the muscle larvae (ML) were obtained and stored in alcohol. ML were detected in 12 wolves and genotyped by multiplex PCR. Trichinella britovi was confirmed in 12 wolves (54.5%). The larval burdens in infected animals ranged from 0.009 to 27 larvae per gram. The high prevalence of Trichinella infection in wolves might suggest that this predator is a significant reservoir of Trichinella species in the sylvatic cycle in Poland. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A new star-forming region in Canis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magakian, T. Yu.; Movsessian, T. A.; Bally, J.

    2016-07-01

    A new southern star-formation region, located at an estimated distance of ˜1.5 kpc in the Lynds 1664 dark cloud in Canis Major, is described. Lynds 1664 contains several compact star clusters, small stellar groups and young stars associated with reflection nebulae. Narrow-band H α and [S II] images obtained with the 4-m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory reveal more than 20 new Herbig-Haro objects associated with several protostellar outflows.

  5. SCM, the M Protein of Streptococcus canis Binds Immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Simone; Eichhorn, Inga; Kohler, Thomas P; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Goldmann, Oliver; Rohde, Manfred; Fulde, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    The M protein of Streptococcus canis (SCM) is a virulence factor and serves as a surface-associated receptor with a particular affinity for mini-plasminogen, a cleavage product of the broad-spectrum serine protease plasmin. Here, we report that SCM has an additional high-affinity immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding activity. The ability of a particular S. canis isolate to bind to IgG significantly correlates with a scm-positive phenotype, suggesting a dominant role of SCM as an IgG receptor. Subsequent heterologous expression of SCM in non-IgG binding S. gordonii and Western Blot analysis with purified recombinant SCM proteins confirmed its IgG receptor function. As expected for a zoonotic agent, the SCM-IgG interaction is species-unspecific, with a particular affinity of SCM for IgGs derived from human, cats, dogs, horses, mice, and rabbits, but not from cows and goats. Similar to other streptococcal IgG-binding proteins, the interaction between SCM and IgG occurs via the conserved Fc domain and is, therefore, non-opsonic. Interestingly, the interaction between SCM and IgG-Fc on the bacterial surface specifically prevents opsonization by C1q, which might constitute another anti-phagocytic mechanism of SCM. Extensive binding analyses with a variety of different truncated SCM fragments defined a region of 52 amino acids located in the central part of the mature SCM protein which is important for IgG binding. This binding region is highly conserved among SCM proteins derived from different S. canis isolates but differs significantly from IgG-Fc receptors of S. pyogenes and S. dysgalactiae sub. equisimilis, respectively. In summary, we present an additional role of SCM in the pathogen-host interaction of S. canis. The detailed analysis of the SCM-IgG interaction should contribute to a better understanding of the complex roles of M proteins in streptococcal pathogenesis.

  6. Denning behaviour of non-gravid wolves, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Phillips, M.K.; Smith, D.W.; Kreeger, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    Wild wolves (Canis lupus) that had produced pups in earlier years but were not currently pregnant, and ovariectomized captive wolves, dug dens during and after the whelping season even though they produced no pups. These observations suggest that den digging is not a function of pregnancy or of ovarian estrogen or progesterone. We hypothesize that increasing prolactin in spring elicits or mediates den-digging behavior.

  7. Molecular and serological detection of Ehrlichia canis and Babesia vogeli in dogs in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, G; André, M R; Faria, J L M; Munhoz, T D; Hernandez-Rodriguez, M; Machado, R Z; Tinucci-Costa, M

    2012-05-25

    Ehrlichiosis and babesiosis are tick-borne diseases, caused mainly by Ehrlichia canis and Babesia canis, respectively, with a worldwide occurrence in dogs, whose main vector is the brown-dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. The present work aimed to detect the presence of E. canis and Babesia sp. in 91 dog blood samples in Colombia, by molecular and serological techniques. We also performed sequence alignment to indicate the identity of the parasite species infecting these animals. The present work shows the first molecular detection of E. canis and B. vogeli in dogs from Colombia. Immunoglobulin-G (IgG) antibodies to E. canis and Babesia vogeli were found in 75 (82.4%) and 47 (51.6%) sampled dogs, respectively. Thirty-seven (40.6%) and 5 (5.5%) dogs were positive in PCR for E. canis and Babesia sp., respectively. After sequencing, amplicons showed 99% of identity with isolates of E. canis and B. vogeli. The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA-Anaplasmataceae sequences and 18S rRNA-piroplasmid sequences supported the identity of the found E. canis and B. vogeli DNAs, respectively. The present work shows the first molecular detection of E. canis and B. vogeli in dogs in Colombia.

  8. [Molecular identification of Ehrlichia canis in a dog from Arica, Chile].

    PubMed

    López, Javier; Abarca, Katia; Mundaca, M Isabel; Caballero, Carla; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando

    2012-10-01

    We report a molecular confirmed case of canine ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichia canis. A 10-year old female crossbred Siberian from the city of Arica, which was infested by ticks, presented hemorrhagic manifestations (hematomas and snout bleeding) and prostration. Blood cell count revealed thrombocytopenia (30,000 platelets/ mm³). Immunochromatographic rapid testing for E. canis IgG was positive. Amplification and sequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA gen from a blood sample showed 100% homology with E. canis from Perú. This is the first report of E. canis in Chile, an agent with known zoonotic potential.

  9. Didelphis albiventris naturally infected with Hepatozoon canis in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Maria Regina Lucas; Fornazari, Felipe; Demoner, Larissa de Castro; Teixeira, Carlos Roberto; Langoni, Helio; O'Dwyer, Lucia Helena

    2017-10-01

    Hepatozoon species are vector-borne pathogens that infect domestic and wild animals. Marsupials of the species Didelphis albiventris are adapted to urban and peri-urban areas and act as reservoir hosts for several parasites. The present study evaluated the occurrence of infection by Hepatozoon species in synantropic D. albiventris from Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil. Blood samples and ectoparasites from 19 D. albiventris were collected from urban and peri-urban areas. Hepatozoon spp. detection was performed by microscopy and molecular analysis. One opossum was positive for Hepatozoon spp. in microscopy analysis and PCR, while another animal was positive only in PCR. The obtained sequences were 100% identical to Hepatozoon canis. Six species of ticks and two species of fleas were detected on D. albiventris. This is the first report of H. canis in synantropic D. albiventris. In Brazil, H. canis transmission among dog populations is not well established, which highlights the importance of investigating the role that opossums might play in the epidemiology of this protozoan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative study of Microsporum canis isolates by DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Shabnam; Khosravi, Ali Reza; Ashrafi Tamai, Iradj

    2014-08-01

    Microsporum canis is a zoophilic fungus and it is an important agent of dermatophytosis. Cats act as important reservoirs. Clinically, it is too difficult to differentiate dermatophytosis caused by various species, also this fungus loses its morphological characteristics easily because of subculture; so using of rapid and accurate laboratory techniques for identifying the dermatophytes is important, therefore, RAPD-PCR was applied for the differentiation of the isolates. In this study, 10 M. canis isolates were detected in cats, dog, human, fox and rabbit at the Mycology Research Center, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran. For running the RAPD-PCR, PCR set system and three random primers OPU 15, OPU 13 and OPA 04 were used. Then phylogenetic tree and similarity coefficient table were drawn. The results showed that there were some common bands between M. canis isolates. There were some specific bands for each isolates, as well. Our study showed, despite the typical morphology of the whole isolates, they were placed in different branches in molecular typing. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Molecular characterization of Hepatozoon canis in dogs from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernandez, Giovanni; André, Marcos R; Munhoz, Thiago D; Faria, Joice M L; Machado, Rosangela Z; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela

    2012-01-01

    Hepatozoonosis is a tick-borne disease whose transmission to dogs occurs by ingestion of oocysts infected ticks or feeding on preys infested by infected ticks. Until now, there is no previous report of molecular characterization of Hepatozoon sp. in dogs from Colombia. EDTA blood samples were collected from 91 dogs from central-western region of Colombia (Bogotá, Bucaramanga, and Villavicencio cities) and submitted to 18S rRNA Hepatozoon sp. PCR and blood smears confection. Phylogenetic analysis was used to access the identity of Hepatozoon species found in sampled dogs. From 91 sampled dogs, 29 (31.8%) were positive to Hepatozoon sp. (25 dogs were only positive in PCR, 1 was positive only in blood smears, and 3 were positive in both blood smears and PCR). After sequencing, the found Hepatozoon sp. DNA showed 100% of identity with Hepatozoon canis DNA isolates. The phylogenetic tree supported the identity of the found Hepatozoon sp. DNA, showing that the isolates from Colombia were placed in the same clade than other H. canis isolates from Venezuela, Spain, and Taiwan. This is the first molecular detection of H. canis in dogs from Colombia.

  12. Tinea corporis due to Microsporum canis from an asymptomatic dog.

    PubMed

    Katoh, T; Maruyama, R; Nishioka, K; Sano, T

    1991-06-01

    The patient was a 19-year-old female student who purchased a puppy from a pet shop four weeks earlier. At the time of her first examination, an annular edematous erythema with adherent scales and vesicles surrounding its margin was seen on the left forearm. On direct examination of the vesicles, fungal elements were detected, and Microsporum canis was isolated. The puppy was a Pomeranian and was kept in the house at all times. No clinical lesions were seen on the puppy, and the Wood's lamp test was negative. However, M. canis was isolated from the animal by the hairbrush method. Symptoms disappeared after the patient was treated topically with terbinafine cream for three weeks. Although the dog received no treatment whatsoever, there was no evidence of the disease on the pet. Results of the hairbrush method performed on the pet two and three weeks later were negative, but, at five weeks, it was again positive. Human infection with M. canis from an asymptomatic dog was demonstrated in this case. Attention should be paid to preventing infections from animals without lesions.

  13. Contamination of dog hair with eggs of Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Roddie, Gillian; Stafford, Peter; Holland, Celia; Wolfe, Alan

    2008-03-25

    Toxocara canis, the common intestinal nematode of dogs and foxes, is the parasite responsible for human toxocarosis. It has recently been shown that dogs may harbour eggs of the parasite in their fur. To further investigate this claim a population of 100 stray dogs was examined to establish the prevalence and intensity of adult toxocaral worm infection in the intestines and eggs harboured in the hair. A novel method of washing the eggs from the hair was used. Sixty-seven percent of dogs were found to have T. canis eggs on their hair with a mean egg retrieval of nearly 584 eggs per gram from positive dogs. The age of the dog was found to be the only significant factor to influence the prevalence and intensity of eggs, with 95% of all the eggs recovered found on puppies. Thirty-nine percent of dogs were found to have adult T. canis worms in their intestine, although a significantly higher percentage of puppies (80%) were infected with worms than adults (22.5%). Puppies also had more worms per infection than adults and have a strong positive correlation between egg and worms numbers whereas adults did not. These studies show that stray dogs, particularly puppies, potentially harbour considerable numbers of eggs on their hair, at densities far higher than those reported in the soil or the general environment.

  14. Soundscapes and Larval Settlement: Larval Bivalve Responses to Habitat-Associated Underwater Sounds.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, David B; Lillis, Ashlee; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R

    2016-01-01

    We quantified the effects of habitat-associated sounds on the settlement response of two species of bivalves with contrasting habitat preferences: (1) Crassostrea virginicia (oyster), which prefers to settle on other oysters, and (2) Mercenaria mercenaria (clam), which settles on unstructured habitats. Oyster larval settlement in the laboratory was significantly higher when exposed to oyster reef sound compared with either off-reef or no-sound treatments. Clam larval settlement did not vary according to sound treatments. Similar to laboratory results, field experiments showed that oyster larval settlement in "larval housings" suspended above oyster reefs was significantly higher compared with off-reef sites.

  15. Behavioral ecology of larval dragonflies and damselflies.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D M

    1991-01-01

    During the past decade, larval dragonflies and damselflies (Insecta: Odonata) have been the subjects for very productive ecological research. Descriptive field work, enclosure experiments and laboratory behavior studies have identified fish predation, intraguild predation (especially mutual predation among odonates, including cannibalism) and interference competition as particularly strong interactions influencing larval odonate assemblages. Behavioral differences among species suggest evolutionary adaptations for coexistence with different predators, and for winning intraspecific aggressive encounters.

  16. Detecting larval export from marine reserves

    PubMed Central

    Pelc, R. A.; Warner, R. R.; Gaines, S. D.; Paris, C. B.

    2010-01-01

    Marine reserve theory suggests that where large, productive populations are protected within no-take marine reserves, fished areas outside reserves will benefit through the spillover of larvae produced in the reserves. However, empirical evidence for larval export has been sparse. Here we use a simple idealized coastline model to estimate the expected magnitude and spatial scale of larval export from no-take marine reserves across a range of reserve sizes and larval dispersal scales. Results suggest that, given the magnitude of increased production typically found in marine reserves, benefits from larval export are nearly always large enough to offset increased mortality outside marine reserves due to displaced fishing effort. However, the proportional increase in recruitment at sites outside reserves is typically small, particularly for species with long-distance (on the order of hundreds of kilometers) larval dispersal distances, making it very difficult to detect in field studies. Enhanced recruitment due to export may be detected by sampling several sites at an appropriate range of distances from reserves or at sites downcurrent of reserves in systems with directional dispersal. A review of existing empirical evidence confirms the model's suggestion that detecting export may be difficult without an exceptionally large differential in production, short-distance larval dispersal relative to reserve size, directional dispersal, or a sampling scheme that encompasses a broad range of distances from the reserves. PMID:20181570

  17. Larval nervous systems: true larval and precocious adult.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Claus

    2015-02-15

    The apical organ of ciliated larvae of cnidarians and bilaterians is a true larval organ that disappears before or at metamorphosis. It appears to be sensory, probably involved in metamorphosis, but knowledge is scant. The ciliated protostome larvae show ganglia/nerve cords that are retained as the adult central nervous system (CNS). Two structures can be recognized, viz. a pair of cerebral ganglia, which form the major part of the adult brain, and a blastoporal (circumblastoporal) nerve cord, which becomes differentiated into a perioral loop, paired or secondarily fused ventral nerve cords and a small perianal loop. The anterior loop becomes part of the brain. This has been well documented through cell-lineage studies in a number of spiralians, and homologies with similar structures in the ecdysozoans are strongly indicated. The deuterostomes are generally difficult to interpret, and the nervous systems of echinoderms and enteropneusts appear completely enigmatic. The ontogeny of the chordate CNS can perhaps be interpreted as a variation of the ontogeny of the blastoporal nerve cord of the protostomes, and this is strongly supported by patterns of gene expression. The presence of 'deuterostomian' blastopore fates both in an annelid and in a mollusk, which are both placed in families with the 'normal' spiralian gastrulation type, and in the chaetognaths demonstrates that the chordate type of gastrulation could easily have evolved from the spiralian type. This indicates that the latest common ancestor of the deuterostomes was very similar to the latest common pelago-benthic ancestor of the protostomes as described by the trochaea theory, and that the neural tube of the chordates is morphologically ventral.

  18. The antigens - Volume VII

    SciTech Connect

    Sela, M. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains four chapters. They are: Ir Genes: Antigen-Specific Genetic Regulation of the Immune Response; Molecular Genetics of Class II (Ia) Antigens; Antigen-Specific T Cell Clones and T Cell Factors; and Infection and Autoimmunity.

  19. In-clinic laboratory diagnosis of canine babesiosis (Babesia canis canis) for veterinary practitioners in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Kirtz, G; Leschnik, M; Hooijberg, E; Tichy, A; Leidinger, E

    2012-04-24

    Haematological changes in dogs and climatic conditions favourable for the vector may assist in the quick in-house diagnosis of canine babesiosis. Blood samples from 358 dogs suspected to have canine babesiosis were evaluated. The diagnosis was confirmed in 113 dogs by detection of Babesia canis by microscopic examination of a stained blood smear using the concentration line technique. Thrombocytopenia was present in all 113 dogs. Red blood cell count, packed cell volume and haemoglobin values were below the reference range in 62.8%, 61.1% and 46.0% of affected dogs, respectively. An increased reticulocyte count was apparent in five Babesia canis -positive dogs. Leukopenia, lymphopenia, neutropenia and monocytosis were present in 54.9%, 47.8%, 30.4% and 6.5% of the dogs, respectively. Evaluating haematological parameters by CART-analysis revealed a predictive model (accuracy= 93.5%) for canine babesiosis, when using the leucocyte, thrombocyte, and reticulocyte count. Climatic conditions present at the most probable time of Babesia canis- infection accounted for biseasonal occurrence. Changes of climatic factors during the year influence the vector activity and in conclusion should highlight babesiosis in the ranking of differentials for veterinarians. The results demonstrate that a tentative diagnosis of canine babesiosis can be made based on typical haematological changes. The results recorded match well with the seasonality of the tick vector and were confirmed here by the month of sample submission.

  20. A survey for infection with Dirofilaria immitis, Ehrlichia canis, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Babesia canis in feral and client-owned dogs in the Turks and Caicos Islands, British West Indies

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Brent; McEwen, Beverly; Peregrine, Andrew S.

    2008-01-01

    The frequency of infection with Dirofilaria immitis and Babesia canis and seropositivity to Ehrlichia canis and Borrelia burgdorferi in feral and client-owned dogs was determined. Feral dogs were 14.8 and 11.2 times more likely to be seropositive to D. immitis and E. canis, respectively, than were client-owned dogs. None of the dogs tested positive for B. burgdorferi or B. canis. PMID:18624070

  1. A survey for infection with Dirofilaria immitis, Ehrlichia canis, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Babesia canis in feral and client-owned dogs in the Turks and Caicos Islands, British West Indies.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Brent; McEwen, Beverly; Peregrine, Andrew S

    2008-06-01

    The frequency of infection with Dirofilaria immitis and Babesia canis and seropositivity to Ehrlichia canis and Borrelia burgdorferi in feral and client-owned dogs was determined. Feral dogs were 14.8 and 11.2 times more likely to be seropositive to D. immitis and E. canis, respectively, than were client-owned dogs. None of the dogs tested positive for B. burgdorferi or B. canis.

  2. Larval development of Phoronis pallida (Phoronida): implications for morphological convergence and divergence among larval body plans.

    PubMed

    Santagata, Scott

    2004-03-01

    Morphological variation among larval body plans must be placed into a phylogenetic and ecological context to assess whether similar morphologies are the result of phylogenetic constraints or convergent selective pressures. Investigations are needed of the diverse larval forms within the Lophotrochozoa, especially the larvae of phoronids and brachiopods. The actinotroch larva of Phoronis pallida (Phoronida) was reared in the laboratory to metamorphic competence. Larval development and growth were followed with video microscopy, SEM, and confocal microscopy. Early developmental features were similar to other phoronid species. Gastrulation was accomplished by embolic invagination of the vegetal hemisphere. Mesenchymal cells were found in the remaining blastocoelic space after invagination began. Mesenchymal cells formed the body wall musculature during the differentiation of larval features. Body wall musculature served as the framework from which all other larval muscles proliferated. Larval growth correlated best with developmental stage rather than age. Consistent with other phoronid species, differentiation of juvenile tissues occurred most rapidly at the latest stages of larval development. The minimum precompetency period of P. pallida was estimated to be approximately 4-6 weeks. Previously published studies have documented that the planktonic embryos of P. pallida develop faster than the brooded embryos of P. vancouverensis. However, these data showed that the difference in developmental rate between the two species decreased in succeeding larval stages. There may be convergent selective pressures that result in similar timing to metamorphic competence among phoronid and brachiopod planktotrophic larval types. Morphological differences between these larval types result from heterochronic developmental shifts in the differentiation of juvenile tissue. Similarities in the larval morphology of phoronids and basal deuterostomes are likely the result of functional

  3. The bovine immune response to Brucella abortus I. A water soluble antigen precipitated by sera of some naturally infected cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Stemshorn, B; Nielsen, K

    1977-01-01

    Selected sera from cattle naturally infected with Brucella abortus precipitate water soluble antigens extracted by sonication from B. abortus. One of these antigens resembles antigen E (Baughn and Freeman) as it is excluded from Sephadex G-200 gels, migrates anodally when electrophoresed at pH 8.6, resists heating at 100 degrees C for ten minutes and appears to be susceptible to papain digestion. Precipitins specific for this antigen remained in sera from which all detectable Brucella agglutinating antibody had been removed by adsorption with live or heat killed B. abortus. The antigen has been extracted from smooth and rough strains of B abortus. Precipitins specific for this antigen have been detected in antisera produced against Brucella canis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:405088

  4. Metacommunity patterns in larval odonates.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Shannon J; Davis, Christopher J; Relyea, Rick A; Yurewicz, Kerry L; Skelly, David K; Werner, Earl E

    2008-11-01

    The growth of metacommunity ecology as a subdiscipline has increased interest in how processes at different spatial scales structure communities. However, there is still a significant knowledge gap with respect to relating the action of niche- and dispersal-assembly mechanisms to observed species distributions across gradients. Surveys of the larval dragonfly community (Odonata: Anisoptera) in 57 lakes and ponds in southeast Michigan were used to evaluate hypotheses about the processes regulating community structure in this system. We considered the roles of both niche- and dispersal-assembly processes in determining patterns of species richness and composition across a habitat gradient involving changes in the extent of habitat permanence, canopy cover, area, and top predator type. We compared observed richness patterns and species distributions in this system to patterns predicted by four general community models: species sorting related to adaptive trade-offs, a developmental constraints hypothesis, dispersal assembly, and a neutral community assemblage. Our results supported neither the developmental constraints nor the neutral-assemblage models. Observed patterns of richness and species distributions were consistent with patterns expected when adaptive tradeoffs and dispersal-assembly mechanisms affect community structure. Adaptive trade-offs appeared to be important in limiting the distributions of species which segregate across the habitat gradient. However, dispersal was important in shaping the distributions of species that utilize habitats with a broad range of hydroperiods and alternative top predator types. Our results also suggest that the relative importance of these mechanisms may change across this habitat gradient and that a metacommunity perspective which incorporates both niche- and dispersal-assembly processes is necessary to understand how communities are organized.

  5. Co-option and dissociation in larval origins and evolution: the sea urchin larval gut.

    PubMed

    Love, Alan C; Lee, Abigail E; Andrews, Mary E; Raff, Rudolf A

    2008-01-01

    The origin of marine invertebrate larvae has been an area of controversy in developmental evolution for over a century. Here, we address the question of whether a pelagic "larval" or benthic "adult" morphology originated first in metazoan lineages by testing the hypothesis that particular gene co-option patterns will be associated with the origin of feeding, indirect developing larval forms. Empirical evidence bearing on this hypothesis is derivable from gene expression studies of the sea urchin larval gut of two closely related but differently developing congenerics, Heliocidaris tuberculata (feeding indirect-developing larva) and H. erythrogramma (nonfeeding direct developer), given two subsidiary hypotheses. (1) If larval gut gene expression in H. tuberculata was co-opted from an ancestral adult expression pattern, then the gut expression pattern will remain in adult H. erythrogramma despite its direct development. (2) Genes expressed in the larval gut of H. tuberculata will not have a coordinated expression pattern in H. erythrogramma larvae due to loss of a functional gut. Five structural genes expressed in the invaginating archenteron of H. tuberculata during gastrulation exhibit substantially different expression patterns in H. erythrogramma with only one remaining endoderm specific. Expression of these genes in the adult of H. erythrogramma and larval gut of H. tuberculata, but not in H. erythrogramma larval endoderm, supports the hypothesis that they first played roles in the formation of adult structures and were subsequently recruited into larval ontogeny during the origin and evolution of feeding planktotrophic deuterostome larvae.

  6. The effects of benzimidazoles on the larval stage of Toxocara cati in experimentally infected chickens.

    PubMed

    Oryan, A; Sadjjani, S M; Azizi, S

    2009-04-01

    Toxocara cati (T. cati) and Toxocara canis (T. canis), roundworms of cats and dogs, are zoonotic parasites that cause visceral and ocular larval migrans in human beings. Humans and other paratenic hosts are infected by ingesting the infective Toxocara eggs from contaminated soil, unwashed hands, contaminated raw vegetables or ingestion of under-cooked organs and muscle tissues of infected paratenic hosts such as chickens, cattle and sheep. It has been shown that the seroprevalence of toxocariasis in the rural and urban children of southern Iran is high and more than 50% of cats of this area are also infected with T. cati. It is stated that consumption of raw chicken meat resulted in visceral toxocariasis. It is possible that poultry reared outdoors and feeding in open range system, gain Toxocara eggs from soil and or by eating infected earthworms as paratenic host. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of albendazole and febendazole in experimentally infected chickens with eggs of T. cati by histopathological and digestive methods. Pathologic lesions were observed only in the untreated group and larvae were detected in brain of 3 chickens of this group by squash method. No larva was observed at histopathological level in liver, lungs, brain, cardiac and skeletal muscles and other examined organs of either treated or untreated animals. No lesion was seen in other tissues of the infected untreated chickens. Treatment resulted in disappearance of the larvae and disappearance of the gross and histopathologic abnormalities from their organs. No detectable difference was observed in chemosusceptibility of the two drugs.

  7. 75 FR 24741 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Mexican Wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Mexican Wolf (Canis lupus... availability of the Mexican Wolf Conservation Assessment (assessment). The assessment provides scientific information relevant to the conservation of the Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) in Arizona and New...

  8. Complete genome sequence of Brucella canis strain 118, a strain isolated from canine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangjun; Li, Jing; Li, Tiefeng; Zhang, Zhengfang; Wang, Liping; Yuan, Xitong; Wang, Yufei; Xu, Jie; Ke, Yuehua; Huang, Liuyu; Wang, Dali; Chen, Zeliang; Xu, Xingran

    2012-12-01

    Brucella canis infects several species of animals, and canine is the preferred host. Genome sequences of strains from different hosts are valuable for comparative analysis of host adaptation and microevolution. Here, we report the genome sequence of Brucella canis strain 118, a strain isolated from canine.

  9. Genome Sequences of Three Brucella canis Strains Isolated from Humans and a Dog.

    PubMed

    Viana, Marcus Vinicius Canário; Wattam, Alice Rebecca; Govil Batra, Dhwani; Boisvert, Sébastien; Brettin, Thomas Scott; Frace, Michael; Xia, Fangfang; Azevedo, Vasco; Tiller, Rebekah; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2017-02-23

    Brucella canis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that preferentially infects members of the Canidae family. Here, we report the genome sequencing of two Brucella canis strains isolated from humans and one isolated from a dog host. Copyright © 2017 Viana et al.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Brucella canis BCB018, a strain isolated from a human patient.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufei; Ke, Yuehua; Zhen, Qing; Yuan, Xitong; Xu, Jie; Qiu, Yefeng; Wang, Zhoujia; Li, Tiefeng; Wang, Dali; Huang, Liuyu; Chen, Zeliang

    2012-12-01

    Brucella canis is considered a rare cause of human brucellosis because of difficulties in presumptive diagnosis and underestimation of the incidence. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a Brucella canis isolate, BCB018, isolated from a human patient, providing precious resources for comparative genomics analysis of Brucella field strains.

  11. Investigation of the spread of Brucella canis via the U.S. interstate dog trade.

    PubMed

    Brower, Alexandra; Okwumabua, Ogi; Massengill, Chuck; Muenks, Quentin; Vanderloo, Peter; Duster, Megan; Homb, Kelly; Kurth, Kathy

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate and help address a growing need for regulatory or molecular tools to track and control the spread of canine brucellosis. Our study objectives were to first characterize Brucella canis outbreaks in Wisconsin kennels in the context of the dog trade in the USA, and then to identify a molecular technique that may be useful for strain differentiation of B. canis isolates. Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (WVDL) B. canis serology data from 1995 to 2005 were reviewed, three canine brucellosis outbreaks in Wisconsin dog kennels were investigated, and eight B. canis isolates recovered from Wisconsin outbreaks and kennels in Missouri and Arkansas and four isolates received from outside sources were subjected to ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), outer membrane protein analysis (OMPA), and cellular fatty acid profiling (CFAP). WVDL has received increasing numbers of B. canis positive samples from Wisconsin kennels, and Wisconsin outbreaks are associated with the interstate dog trade. All of the B. canis isolates we examined were genetically homogenous and as such could not be differentiated by ribotyping, PFGE and OMPA. However, dendrogram analysis of CFAP divided the isolates into two groups, indicating that CFAP methyl ester analysis has discriminatory power. CFAP methyl ester analysis has promise as a tool for epidemiological tracing of B. canis outbreaks and will be useful in comparison studies as isolation of B. canis continues to expand globally.

  12. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Isolates of Canis familiaris Oral Papillomavirus from South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Regnard, Guy L.; Baloyi, Nwaxigombe M.; Bracher, Leonard R.; Hitzeroth, Inga I.

    2016-01-01

    Canis familiaris oral papillomavirus, formerly canine oral papillomavirus, is a causative agent of the self-resolving canine oral papillomatosis and was first described in 1994. This is the first report of two full-length genome sequences described in South Africa and indicates the highly conserved nature of Canis familiaris oral papillomavirus. PMID:27932637

  13. Human Brucella canis Infection and Subsequent Laboratory Exposures Associated with a Puppy, New York City, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Dentinger, Catherine M.; Jacob, Kathleen; Lee, Lillian V.; Mendez, Herman A.; Chotikanatis, Kobkul; McDonough, Patrick L.; Chico, David M.; De, Barun K.; Traxler, Rita M.; Campagnolo, Enzo R.; Schmitt, David; Guerra, Marta A.; Slavinski, Sally A.

    2015-01-01

    Human Brucella canis infection incidence is unknown. Most identified cases are associated with pet dogs. Contact with pathogenic Brucella spp. can lead to laboratory-acquired infections. We identified a pediatric B. canis case, the source, and other exposed persons. A three-year-old New York City child with fever and dyspnea was hospitalized for 48 hours for bronchiolitis. After her admission blood culture grew B. canis, she was prescribed antimicrobials and recovered. B. canis was isolated from blood of the child's pet dog. Isolates from the child and the dog were genetically similar. The dog originated from an Iowa breeding facility which was quarantined after identification of the puppy's infection. Thirty-one laboratory workers were exposed and subsequently monitored for symptoms; 15 completed post-exposure prophylaxis. This first report strongly suggesting B. canis transmission from a canine to a child in the United States highlights the need for coordinated control policies to minimize human illness. PMID:25363807

  14. Human Brucella canis Infection and Subsequent Laboratory Exposures Associated with a Puppy, New York City, 2012.

    PubMed

    Dentinger, C M; Jacob, K; Lee, L V; Mendez, H A; Chotikanatis, K; McDonough, P L; Chico, D M; De, B K; Tiller, R V; Traxler, R M; Campagnolo, E R; Schmitt, D; Guerra, M A; Slavinski, S A

    2015-08-01

    Human Brucella canis infection incidence is unknown. Most identified cases are associated with pet dogs. Laboratory-acquired infections can occur following contact with Brucella spp. We identified a paediatric B. canis case, the source and other exposed persons. A 3-year-old New York City child with fever and dyspnoea was hospitalized for 48 h for bronchiolitis. After her admission, blood culture grew B. canis, she was prescribed anti-microbials and recovered. B. canis was also isolated from blood of the child's pet dog; these isolates were genetically similar. The dog originated from an Iowa breeding facility which was quarantined after identification of the dog's infection. Additionally, 31 laboratory workers were exposed and subsequently monitored for symptoms; 15 completed post-exposure prophylaxis. To our knowledge, this is the first report strongly suggesting B. canis zoonotic transmission to a child in the United States, and highlights the need for coordinated control policies to minimize human illness.

  15. Intraoperative bleeding in dogs from Grenada seroreactive to Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Lanza-Perea, M; Zieger, U; Qurollo, B A; Hegarty, B C; Pultorak, E L; Kumthekar, S; Bruhl-Day, R; Breitschwerdt, E B

    2014-01-01

    Frequent exposure of Grenadian dogs to Rhipicephalus sanguineus results in Anaplasma platys, and Ehrlichia canis seroreactivity. During elective surgeries, substantial intraoperative hemorrhage occurs in some seroreactive dogs. To assess hemostatic parameters and bleeding tendencies as well as prevalence of PCR positivity in apparently healthy A. platys and E. canis seroreactive and seronegative free-roaming dogs from Grenada. Forty-seven elective surgery dogs allocated to 4 groups: Seronegative control (n = 12), A. platys (n = 10), E. canis (n = 14) and A. platys, and E. canis (n = 11) seroreactive. Preoperatively, hemostasis was assessed by platelet count, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and buccal mucosal bleeding time. Intra- and postoperative bleeding scores were subjectively assigned. Blood, spleen, bone marrow, and lymph node aspirates were tested by PCR. Bleeding scores in dogs coseroreactive for A. platys and E. canis were higher (P = .015) than those of seronegative dogs. A. platys DNA was amplified from 7/21 (33%) A. platys seroreactive dogs and from 1 E. canis seroreactive dog; E. canis DNA was amplified from 21/25 (84%) E. canis seroreactive dogs. E. canis DNA was amplified most often from blood, whereas A. platys DNA was amplified most often from bone marrow. Apparently healthy, free-roaming dogs coseropositive for A. platys and E. canis may have increased intraoperative bleeding tendencies despite normal hemostatic parameters. Future investigations should explore the potential for vascular injury as a cause for bleeding in these dogs. Improved tick control is needed for dogs in Grenada. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Acute-phase response in Babesia canis and Dirofilaria immitis co-infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Milanović, Zorana; Ilić, Anja; Andrić, Jelena Francuski; Radonjić, Vladimir; Beletić, Anđelo; Filipović, Milica Kovačević

    2017-10-01

    Babesia canis and Dirofilaria immitis are emerging and geographically overlapping vector-borne pathogens in dogs. Infection with B. canis leads to acute-phase response (APR) that can be mild to severe and results in either non-complicated or complicated forms of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether acute B. canis infection is more severe in dogs with underlying asymptomatic D. immitis infection. Dogs of both sexes, different ages and breeds, with naturally occurring mono-infections with B. canis (n=13) and D. immitis (n=18) and co-infected dogs (n=7) were enrolled as well as healthy controls (n=15). Routine haematology and biochemistry, agarose gel electrophoresis (agEF) protein fraction separation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for serum amyloid A (SAA) were performed. Based on clinical and laboratory findings, sepsis was diagnosed in the majority of dogs with acute B. canis infection with or without underlying asymptomatic D. immitis infection. Overall, haematology, biochemistry and agEF pattern changes were induced and dictated by acute B. canis infection whether or not the dogs had an asymptomatic D. immitis infection. D. immitis infection slightly influenced the level of anaemia, slightly aggravated the level of dehydration and increased the concentration of γ-globulins in acute-phase B. canis infection. D. immitis infection prevented B. canis-induced leukopenia. SAA equally increased in dogs with acute B. canis infection with or without underlying D. immitis infection. The level of SAA was not changed in dogs with asymptomatic D. immitis when compared to the controls. In conclusion, asymptomatic D. immitis infection does not influence overall APR after acute B. canis infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Decontamination of laundry exposed to Microsporum canis hairs and spores.

    PubMed

    Moriello, Karen A

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of decontamination of fabric exposed to Microsporum canis hairs and spores by mechanical washing using hot or cold water with or without a sodium hypochlorite additive, and to field test a washing protocol for terry cloth and denim exposed to M canis via direct contact with infected cats. Cotton, terry cloth and denim fabric swatches were contaminated with isolated infective spores and hairs and then washed in water at temperatures of 30°C and 60°C, with and without a sodium hypochlorite additive, and with and without mechanical drying. Terry cloth and denim were contaminated by direct contact with infected kittens and washed at 30°C until culture-negative. All prelaundering samples had >300 colony forming units (cfu)/plate. Experimentally contaminated fabrics were culture-negative, regardless of fabric type, water temperature, the presence or absence of sodium hypochlorite, or tumble drying after one wash. After one wash, 22/34 (65%) of terry cloth towels and 12/20 (60%) denim fabric squares were culture-positive, but the infective load was minimal (1-5 cfu/plate). After two washes in cold water there was no detectable contamination of fabric. The rinse water was not contaminated with spores. The laundry tub was easily decontaminated via mechanical cleaning followed by use of a disinfectant. Washable textiles exposed to M canis can be decontaminated via mechanical washes in cold water without the addition of bleach. Two washes are recommended to ensure removal of spores. Laundry can be effectively decontaminated by washing twice in cold water on a long wash cycle (for ⩾14 mins). It is important to ensure maximal agitation (ie, the machine should not be overloaded). © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  18. An experimental approach to the study of intraocular Toxocara canis.

    PubMed Central

    Luxenberg, M N

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study of nematode endophthalmitis due to T canis and review of the literature has been presented. Six owl monkeys were infected either by nasogastric tube using embryonated T canis eggs or by carotid or intravitreal injection of second stage larvae. The clinical manifestations, especially ocular, were observed and various diagnostic tests performed. Only minimal or no intraocular changes were seen after systemic infection but significant abnormalities such as retinal hemorrhages and venous dilation were noted after intravitreal infection. Motile larvae were observed in the lenses of three eyes and in the vitreous of five eyes and, probably a sixth, after intravitreal injection. The intensity and timing of the intraocular reaction seemed to correlate with the infecting dose and apparent disappearance of larvae from the eye. Pathologic confirmation of larvae in the lens was obtained in one eye. A marked inflammatory reaction occurred in eyes receiving intraocular infection but none was seen in eyes with only systemic infectin. Various laboratory and serologic studies were performed, including the ELISA test, which were used to evaluate systemic as well as intraocular responses to infection with T canis. The two monkeys infected by nasogastric tube gave a positive ELISA response in the serum but intraocular fluids gave a negative response in all monkeys including those infected syst:mically and/or intraocularly. Problems in the understanding of clinical aspects of the disease, laboratory diagnosis and treatment are discussed. The need for future experimental studies is emphasized. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 2 C FIGURE 2 D FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 PMID:120993

  19. High throughput pyrosequencing technology for molecular differential detection of Babesia vogeli, Hepatozoon canis, Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys in canine blood samples.

    PubMed

    Kaewkong, Worasak; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Kongklieng, Amornmas; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Boonmars, Thidarut; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-06-01

    Canine babesiosis, hepatozoonosis, ehrlichiosis, and anaplasmosis are tick-borne diseases caused by different hemopathogens. These diseases are causes of morbidity and mortality in dogs. The classic method for parasite detection and differentiation is based on microscopic observation of blood smears. The limitations of the microscopic method are that its performance requires a specially qualified person with professional competence, and it is ineffective in differentiating closely related species. This study applied PCR amplification with high throughput pyrosequencing for molecular differential detection of the following 4 hemoparasites common to tropical areas in dog blood samples: Babesia vogeli, Hepatozoon canis, Ehrlichia canis, and Anaplasma platys. PCR was initially used to amplify specific target regions of the ribosomal RNA genes of each parasite using 2 primer pairs that included 18S rRNA for protozoa (B. vogeli and H. canis) and 16S rRNA for rickettsia (E. canis and A. platys). Babesia vogeli and H. canis were discriminated using 9 nucleotide positions out of 30 base pairs, whereas E. canis and A. platys were differentiated using 15 nucleotide positions out of 34 base pairs that were determined from regions adjacent to 3' ends of the sequencing primers. This method provides a challenging alternative for a rapid diagnosis and surveillance of these tick-borne diseases in canines.

  20. Cystoisospora canis Nemeséri, 1959 (syn. Isospora canis), infections in dogs: clinical signs, pathogenesis, and reproducible clinical disease in beagle dogs fed oocysts.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sheila M; Zajac, Anne M; Charles, Sam; Duncan, Robert B; Lindsay, David S

    2007-04-01

    Canine intestinal coccidiosis is a cause of diarrhea in young dogs and dogs that are immunocompromised. Reports in the literature indicate that experimental reproduction of clinical coccidiosis with Cystoisospora canis (syn. Isospora canis) is difficult, and few studies have been done with C. canis. Experimental oral infections were attempted in 22, 6- to 8-wk-old female beagles with 5 x 10(4) (n = 2) or 1 x 10(5) (n = 20) sporulated C. canis oocysts. Diarrhea was observed in all inoculated dogs. Diarrhea began 2-3 days before oocyst excretion. Five of the 22 dogs were given an anticoccidial (sulfadimethoxine) because of their clinical signs. The mean prepatent period was 9.8 days (range, 9-11 days, n = 22 dogs), and the patent period was 8.9 days (range, 7-18 days, n = 20 dogs). Two dogs exhibiting clinical coccidiosis were examined at necropsy 10 days after infection. Developmental stages of C. canis were present in cells in the lamina propria throughout the entire small intestine in both dogs. Microscopic lesions observed in both of these dogs were villous atrophy, dilation of lacteals, and hyperplasia of lymph nodes in Peyer's patches. Results of bacterial and viral examinations of these 2 dogs were negative, indicating that intestinal coccidiosis was the cause of the diarrhea. Our study indicates that C. canis can be a primary cause of diarrhea in young dogs.

  1. Accessory carpal bone luxation in two gray wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Keller, Dominique L; Ellison, Michelle; Clyde, Victoria L; Wallace, Roberta S

    2012-09-01

    Two sibling male castrated gray wolves (Canis lupus) developed acute onset right forelimb lameness, one at 8 and the other at 11 yr of age. In both cases, the right carpus was swollen, carpal hyperextension was notable, and the wolves exhibited significant intermittent lameness of the affected limb. Radiographs revealed right accessory carpal bone luxation in both cases, with type III fracture of the accessory carpal bone in one wolf. Although carpal bone luxation in domestic dogs is frequently treated surgically, conservative medical management resolved the lameness in both wolves with no further complications.

  2. Tinea faciei caused by Microsporum canis in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, M; Kukita, A

    1988-01-01

    A case of tinea faciei caused by Microsporum canis in a 14-day-old infant is reported. The incubation period was seen to be 1 week. This was a familial infection which also affected the infant's grandmother and their pet cat and dog. Topical treatment with clotrimazole controlled the infection in the baby. A review of 14 cases (including our own) of dermatophytosis in newborn infants reported in the Japanese literature showed that newborn infants might be infected by several of these agents.

  3. Tracking of food quantity by coyotes (Canis latrans).

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph M; Shivik, John; Jordan, Kerry E

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Weber's Law mediates quantitative discrimination abilities across various species. Here, we tested coyotes' (Canis latrans) ability to discriminate between various quantities of food and investigated whether this ability conforms to predictions of Weber's Law. We demonstrate herein that coyotes are capable of reliably discriminating large versus small quantities of discrete food items. As predicted by Weber's Law, coyotes' quantitative discrimination abilities are mediated by the ratio between the large and small quantities of food and exhibit scalar variability. Furthermore, in this task coyotes were not discriminating large versus small quantities based on olfactory cues alone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. SCM, the M Protein of Streptococcus canis Binds Immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Simone; Eichhorn, Inga; Kohler, Thomas P.; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Goldmann, Oliver; Rohde, Manfred; Fulde, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    The M protein of Streptococcus canis (SCM) is a virulence factor and serves as a surface-associated receptor with a particular affinity for mini-plasminogen, a cleavage product of the broad-spectrum serine protease plasmin. Here, we report that SCM has an additional high-affinity immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding activity. The ability of a particular S. canis isolate to bind to IgG significantly correlates with a scm-positive phenotype, suggesting a dominant role of SCM as an IgG receptor. Subsequent heterologous expression of SCM in non-IgG binding S. gordonii and Western Blot analysis with purified recombinant SCM proteins confirmed its IgG receptor function. As expected for a zoonotic agent, the SCM-IgG interaction is species-unspecific, with a particular affinity of SCM for IgGs derived from human, cats, dogs, horses, mice, and rabbits, but not from cows and goats. Similar to other streptococcal IgG-binding proteins, the interaction between SCM and IgG occurs via the conserved Fc domain and is, therefore, non-opsonic. Interestingly, the interaction between SCM and IgG-Fc on the bacterial surface specifically prevents opsonization by C1q, which might constitute another anti-phagocytic mechanism of SCM. Extensive binding analyses with a variety of different truncated SCM fragments defined a region of 52 amino acids located in the central part of the mature SCM protein which is important for IgG binding. This binding region is highly conserved among SCM proteins derived from different S. canis isolates but differs significantly from IgG-Fc receptors of S. pyogenes and S. dysgalactiae sub. equisimilis, respectively. In summary, we present an additional role of SCM in the pathogen-host interaction of S. canis. The detailed analysis of the SCM-IgG interaction should contribute to a better understanding of the complex roles of M proteins in streptococcal pathogenesis. PMID:28401063

  5. Decontamination of carpet exposed to Microsporum canis hairs and spores.

    PubMed

    Moriello, Karen A

    2017-04-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of vacuuming and three carpet cleaning methods for the removal of Microsporum canis spores and hairs from experimentally contaminated carpets. Methods Sterile Berber carpeting was artificially contaminated with naturally infective M canis hairs and spores. Carpet swatches were vacuumed for 10 s, 30 s and 60 s, and then cultured. Three carpet cleaning methods were evaluated on area rugs experimentally contaminated with infective material: a beater brush carpet shampooing, beater brush carpet shampooing post-disinfectant application and hot water extraction. Home cleaning products labeled as having efficacy against Trichophyton species were used in addition to 1% potassium peroxymonosulfate. Carpets were cultured at 24 h, 48 h and 7 days after cleaning. Good efficacy was no detectable spores at post-cleaning culture. Results All pretreatment carpet samples were culture positive for M canis (>300 colony-forming units [cfu]/site). Vacuuming did not decontaminate carpets but did remove intact hairs. Spores were not detected by wipe samples after two washings with an upright beater brush carpet shampooer or pretreatment with a disinfectant prior to carpet shampooing. Carpets cleaned with one hot water extraction technique had a decrease from 300 cfu/site to a mean of 5.5 cfu/site at 24 and 48 h post-cleaning and 2 cfu/site at day 7. The use of disinfectants was associated with odor, even when dry, and permanent discoloration. Hot water extraction cleaning was associated with the fastest drying time and no discoloration. Conclusions and relevance Carpets exposed to M canis can be disinfected via carpet shampooing or hot water extraction cleaning. Vacuuming of carpets is recommended to remove infective hairs. For homes, exposed carpeting can be decontaminated by routine washing with a carpet shampooer (twice) or hot water extraction. Use of pretreatment with a disinfectant is recommended when a high level

  6. The QUEST RR Lyrae Survey of the Canis Major Overdensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, C.; Vivas, A. K.

    2009-05-01

    We present results from the QUEST RR Lyrae Survey in the Canis Major overdensity. The survey consists of multi-epoch observations in V and R filters, obtained with the Jürgen Stock telescope and the QUEST-I camera at the National Observatory of Venezuela, spanning a total area of 16.7 square degrees. A number of 12 RR Lyrae stars were identified, 6 of type ab and 6 of type c. We compare our results with the number of RR Lyrae stars expected from the halo and thick disk, as well as that expected from dSph galaxies with different specific frequencies of RR Lyrae stars.

  7. Systematic status of wild Canis in North-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Nowak, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    Skulls of wild Canis collected 2003–2004 in north-central Texas are morphometrically similar to a series taken there and in nearby areas in 1964–1971, which was considered to represent a population of Coyotes (C. latrans) modified through introgression from Red Wolves (C. rufus). A few of the new specimens closely resemble small examples of Red Wolves. Such affinity is supported by authoritative examination of living and videotaped animals. The persistence of influence of Red Wolves, long after presumed extirpation through hybridization and human persecution, may be relevant to wolf conservation.

  8. Magnetic compass orientation by larval Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dommer, David H; Gazzolo, Patrick J; Painter, Michael S; Phillips, John B

    2008-04-01

    We report evidence for magnetic compass orientation by larval Drosophila melanogaster. Groups of larvae were exposed from the time of hatching to directional ultraviolet (365nm) light emanating from one of four magnetic directions. Larvae were then tested individually on a circular agar plate under diffuse light in one of four magnetic field alignments. The larvae exhibited magnetic compass orientation in a direction opposite that of the light source in training. Evidence for a well-developed magnetic compass in a larval insect that moves over distances of at most a few tens of centimeters has important implications for understanding the adaptive significance of orientation mechanisms like the magnetic compass. Moreover, the development of an assay for studying magnetic compass orientation in larval D. melanogaster will make it possible to use a wide range of molecular genetic techniques to investigate the neurophysiological, biophysical, and molecular mechanisms underlying the magnetic compass.

  9. Rehydration of forensically important larval Diptera specimens.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Michelle R; Pechal, Jennifer L; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

    2011-01-01

    Established procedures for collecting and preserving evidence are essential for all forensic disciplines to be accepted in court and by the forensic community at large. Entomological evidence, such as Diptera larvae, are primarily preserved in ethanol, which can evaporate over time, resulting in the dehydration of specimens. In this study, methods used for rehydrating specimens were compared. The changes in larval specimens with respect to larval length and weight for three forensically important blow fly (Diptera: Calliphoridae) species in North America were quantified. Phormia regina (Meigen), Cochliomyia macellaria (F.), and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) third-instar larvae were collected from various decomposing animals and preserved with three preservation methods (80% ethanol, 70% isopropyl alcohol, and hot-water kill then 80% ethanol). Preservative solutions were allowed to evaporate. Rehydration was attempted with either of the following: 80% ethanol, commercial trisodium phosphate substitute solution, or 0.5% trisodium phosphate solution. All three methods partially restored weight and length of specimens recorded before preservation. Analysis of variance results indicated that effects of preservation, rehydration treatment, and collection animal were different in each species. The interaction between preservative method and rehydration treatment had a significant effect on both P. regina and C. macellaria larval length and weight. In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of collection animal on larval C. macellaria measurements. No significant effect was observed in C. rufifacies larval length or weight among the preservatives or treatments. These methods could be used to establish a standard operating procedure for dealing with dehydrated larval specimens in forensic investigations.

  10. Divergent patterns of neural development in larval echinoids and asteroids.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yoko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Murray, Greg; Burke, Robert D

    2004-01-01

    The development and organization of the nervous systems of echinoderm larvae are incompletely described. We describe the development and organization of the larval nervous systems of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Asterina pectinifera using a novel antibody, 1E11, that appears to be neuron specific. In the early pluteus, the antibody reveals all known neural structures: apical ganglion, oral ganglia, lateral ganglia, and an array of neurons and neurites in the ciliary band, the esophagus, and the intestine. The antibody also reveals several novel features, such as neurites that extend to the posterior end of the larva and additional neurons in the apical ganglion. Similarly, in asteroid larvae the antibody binds to all known neural structures and identifies novel features, including large numbers of neurons in the ciliary bands, a network of neurites under the oral epidermis, cell bodies in the esophagus, and a network of neurites in the intestine. The 1E11 antigen is expressed during gastrulation and can be used to trace the ontogenies of the nervous systems. In S. purpuratus, a small number of neuroblasts arise in the oral ectoderm in late gastrulae. The cells are adjacent to the presumptive ciliary bands, where they project neurites with growth cone-like endings that interconnect the neurons. In A. pectinifera, a large number of neuroblasts appear scattered throughout the ectoderm of gastrulae. The cells aggregate in the developing ciliary bands and then project neurites under the oral epidermis. Although there are several shared features of the larval nervous systems of echinoids and asteroids, the patterns of development reveal fundamental differences in neural ontogeny.

  11. Serum-mediated Haemonchus contortus larval aggregation differs by larval stage and is enhanced by complement.

    PubMed

    Garza, J J; Greiner, S P; Bowdridge, S A

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to measure Haemonchus contortus larval aggregation by complement/antibody complexes, determine effect of breed resistance and infection status and determine the effect of larval maturation on larval aggregation in vitro. Larval binding assays were performed on H. contortus L3, exsheathed L3 and L4 incubated with serum from either parasite naïve or H. contortus primed St. Croix (resistant) and Suffolk (susceptible) lambs. No differences in L3 aggregation were observed between serum from either breed or infection status. Exsheathed L3 (60%) and L4 (42%) aggregation by primed Suffolk serum was significantly reduced compared with L3 (80%, P<.001). Removal of either complement or antibody effectively eliminated L3 aggregation (P<.001). Combination of antibody-depleted and complement-inactivated serum restored L3 aggregation to levels consistent with unprocessed serum, supporting a role for antibody and complement in aggregation (P<.001). Use of fluorescence-labelled anti-sheep IgG antibody allowed documentation of IgG bound to serum complexes within L3 masses and was present only in larvae incubated with normal serum, and complement- and antibody-depleted serum combination. These data indicate that complement/antibody complexes inhibit larval motility through larval aggregation which may be critical in early larval clearance of H. contortus. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Immunochemical analysis of Taenia taeniaeformis antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, D D; Saint, R B; Rickard, M D; Mitchell, G F

    1986-12-01

    Previously we reported the isolation of several Escherichia coli clones expressing fragments of Taenia taeniaeformis antigens as beta-galactosidase fused proteins (Bowtell, Saint, Rickard & Mitchell, 1984). Here we describe the isolation of additional antigen-expressing clones from a larval cDNA library and the assignment of these clones to 7 antigen families. These were isolated with a polyspecific rabbit antiserum raised to the oncosphere. Since this serum was capable of reacting with a large number of antigens, it was important to develop techniques for rapidly determining the identity of the native T. taeniaeformis molecule corresponding to a cloned antigen gene. These included active immunization of rabbits with fused proteins and several techniques involving affinity purification on immobilized fused proteins. The reactivity of the antigen-positive clones with sera from humans infected with related parasites was also assessed. Finally, immunization of mice with several fused proteins failed to protect against subsequent infection, although antigens previously identified as candidate host-protective antigens (Bowtell, Mitchell, Anders, Lightowlers & Rickard, 1983) have yet to be identified in the expression library.

  13. Soundscapes and Larval Settlement: Characterizing the Stimulus from a Larval Perspective.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Ashlee; Eggleston, David B; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that underwater sounds serve as a cue for the larvae of marine organisms to locate suitable settlement habitats; however, the relevant spatiotemporal scales of variability in habitat-related sounds and how this variation scales with larval settlement processes remain largely uncharacterized, particularly in estuarine habitats. Here, we provide an overview of the approaches we have developed to characterize an estuarine soundscape as it relates to larval processes, and a conceptual framework is provided for how habitat-related sounds may influence larval settlement, using oyster reef soundscapes as an example.

  14. Total protein concentration and diagnostic test results for gray wolf (Canis lupus) serum using Nobuto filter paper strips.

    PubMed

    Jara, Rocío F; Sepúlveda, Carolina; Ip, Hon S; Samuel, Michael D

    2015-04-01

    Nobuto filter paper strips are widely used for storing blood-serum samples, but the recovery of proteins from these strips following rehydration is unknown. Poor recovery of proteins could reduce the concentration of antibodies and antigens and reduce the sensitivity of diagnostic assays. We compared the protein concentration, and its association with test sensitivity, of eluted Nobuto strip samples with paired sera. We collected and froze serum from five gray wolves (Canis lupus) for 8 mo. When thawed, we used a spectrophotometer (absorbance 280 nm) to determine the serum protein concentration for paired sera and Nobuto eluates for each animal in 2-fold serial dilutions. Total protein concentration was similar for both sample storage methods (Nobuto eluates and control sera), except for the undiluted samples in which Nobuto eluates had higher total protein concentrations. Both sample storage methods appear to produce similar results using the SNAP® 4Dx® Test to detect antibodies against pathogens causing Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, and ehrlichiosis as well as antigen for canine heartworm disease.

  15. Total protein concentration and diagnostic test results for gray wolf (Canis lupus) serum using Nobuto filter paper strips

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jara, Rocio F.; Sepúlveda, Carolina; Ip, Hon S.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Nobuto filter paper strips are widely used for storing blood-serum samples, but the recovery of proteins from these strips following rehydration is unknown. Poor recovery of proteins could reduce the concentration of antibodies and antigens and reduce the sensitivity of diagnostic assays. We compared the protein concentration, and its association with test sensitivity, of eluted Nobuto strip samples with paired sera. We collected and froze serum from five gray wolves (Canis lupus) for 8 mo. When thawed, we used a spectrophotometer (absorbance 280 nm) to determine the serum protein concentration for paired sera and Nobuto eluates for each animal in 2-fold serial dilutions. Total protein concentration was similar for both sample storage methods (Nobuto eluates and control sera), except for the undiluted samples in which Nobuto eluates had higher total protein concentrations. Both sample storage methods appear to produce similar results using the SNAP® 4Dx® Test to detect antibodies against pathogens causing Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, and ehrlichiosis as well as antigen for canine heartworm disease.

  16. Toxocara canis: anthelmintic activity of quinone derivatives in murine toxocarosis.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, T; Mata-Santos, H A; Carneiro, P F; De Moura, K C G; Fenalti, J M; Klafke, G B; Cruz, L A X; Martins, L H R; Pinto, N F; Pinto, M C F R; Berne, M E A; Da Silva, P E A; Scaini, C J

    2016-04-01

    Human toxocarosis is a chronic tissue parasitosis most often caused by Toxocara canis. The seroprevalence can reach up to 50%, especially among children and adolescents. The anthelmintics used in the treatment have moderate efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of quinones and their derivatives against T. canis larvae and the cytotoxicity of the larvicidal compounds. The compounds were evaluated at 1 mg mL(-1) concentration in microculture plates containing third stage larvae in an Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 environment, incubated at 37 °C in 5% CO2 tension for 48 h. Five naphthoxiranes were selected for the cytotoxicity analysis. The cell viability evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays using murine peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice revealed that the naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) were less cytotoxic at a concentration of 0.05 mg mL(-1). The efficacy of naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) was examined in murine toxocarosis also. The anthelmintic activity was examined by evaluating the number of larvae in the brain, carcass, liver, lungs, heart, kidneys and eyes. Compound (3) demonstrated anthelmintic activity similar to that of albendazole by decreasing the number of larvae in the organs of mice and thus could form the basis of the development of a new anthelmintic drug.

  17. Large dust grains in the wind of VY Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scicluna, P.; Siebenmorgen, R.; Wesson, R.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Kasper, M.; Voshchinnikov, N. V.; Wolf, S.

    2015-12-01

    Massive stars live short lives, losing large amounts of mass through their stellar wind. Their mass is a key factor determining how and when they explode as supernovae, enriching the interstellar medium with heavy elements and dust. During the red supergiant phase, mass-loss rates increase prodigiously, but the driving mechanism has proven elusive. Here we present high-contrast optical polarimetric-imaging observations of the extreme red supergiant VY Canis Majoris and its clumpy, dusty, mass-loss envelope, using the new extreme-adaptive-optics instrument SPHERE at the VLT. These observations allow us to make the first direct and unambiguous detection of submicron dust grains in the ejecta; we derive an average grain radius ~0.5 μm, 50 times larger than in the diffuse ISM, large enough to receive significant radiation pressure by photon scattering. We find evidence for varying grain sizes throughout the ejecta, highlighting the dynamical nature of the envelope. Grains with 0.5 μm sizes are likely to reach a safe distance from the eventual explosion of VY Canis Majoris; hence it may inject upwards of 10-2 M⊙ of dust into the ISM. Based on observations made with European Southern Observatory (ESO) telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program 60.A-9368(A).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. A WISE Census of Young Stellar Objects in Canis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, William J.; Padgett, Deborah L.; Stapelfeldt, Karl L.; Sewiło, Marta

    2016-08-01

    With the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we searched for young stellar objects (YSOs) in a 100 deg2 region centered on the lightly studied Canis Major star-forming region. Applying stringent magnitude cuts to exclude the majority of extragalactic contaminants, we find 144 Class I candidates and 335 Class II candidates. The sensitivity to Class II candidates is limited by their faintness at the distance to Canis Major (assumed as 1000 pc). More than half the candidates (53%) are found in 16 groups of more than four members, including four groups with more than 25 members each. The ratio of Class II to Class I objects, N II/N I, varies from 0.4 to 8.3 in just the largest four groups. We compare our results to those obtainable with combined Two Micron All Sky Survey and post-cryogenic Spitzer Space Telescope data; the latter approach recovers missing Class II sources. Via a comparison to protostars characterized with the Herschel Space Observatory, we propose new WISE color criteria for flat-spectrum and Class 0 protostars, finding 80 and 7 of these, respectively. The distribution of YSOs in CMa OB1 is consistent with supernova-induced star formation, although the diverse N II/N I ratios are unexpected if this parameter traces age and the YSOs are due to the same supernova. Less massive clouds feature larger N II/N I ratios, suggesting that initial conditions play a role in determining this quantity.

  19. Demodicosis caused by Demodex canis and Demodex cornei in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sivajothi, S; Sudhakara Reddy, B; Rayulu, V C

    2015-12-01

    Two mongrel dogs aged between 7 and 9 months in a same house were presented to the clinics with a history of chronic dermatitis associated with pruritus. Clinical examination revealed presence of primary and secondary skin lesions on the face, around the ears, chin, neck, fore limbs and lateral abdomen. Examination of skin scrapings revealed Demodex cornei (majority) and D. canis (minority) in both the dogs. By using hair pluck examination D. canis were detected and by tape impression smears examination large number of adult short-tail Demodex mites were found. D. cornei was identified by based on the morphological characters including short opisthosoma with blind and round terminal end. Mean length of total body, opisthosoma of both types of the mites were differed statistically significant (P < 0.01) but gnathosoma and podosoma did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). Dogs were treated with daily oral ivermectin @ 500 μg/kg/day, external application of amitraz along with supportive therapy. After completion of 45 days of therapy dogs were recovered completely without any side effects.

  20. Recovery threshold of Toxocara canis eggs from soil.

    PubMed

    Rosa Xavier, I G; Ramos, B C; Santarém, V A

    2010-01-20

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the threshold of Toxocara canis eggs form soil samples through utilisation of a centrifuge-flotation technique (CFT). Aliquots of soil (1g each) were artificially contaminated with known numbers of T. canis eggs (1, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 eggs). The threshold was evaluated based on a CFT using zinc sulphate (Zn(2)SO(4)) and sodium nitrate (Na(2)NO(3)) solutions at a specific gravity of 1.20. The number of eggs recovered was directly proportional to the number of eggs employed to seed the soil. Both solutions enabled full recovery of samples containing merely three eggs; only Zn(2)SO(4) demonstrated efficiency in soil contaminated with a single egg. A recovery rate of 100% was obtained for all tests with samples containing 10 and 25 eggs for Zn(2)SO(4) and Na(2)NO(3), respectively(.) There was no difference in the mean number of recovered eggs regarding either the efficacy of the solutions or the repetition of evaluations in the same trial (p>0.05). Therefore, the CFT is efficient for the detection of Toxocara eggs, even in samples containing low egg numbers. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Human Brucella canis outbreak linked to infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lucero, N E; Corazza, R; Almuzara, M N; Reynes, E; Escobar, G I; Boeri, E; Ayala, S M

    2010-02-01

    The zoonotic risk of Brucella canis has been considered fairly high for persons who handle breeding dogs in kennels or are exposed to infected animals. Transmission to humans in other circumstances has been thought to be rare. We describe an uncommon outbreak of brucellosis caused by B. canis which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first reported in the literature. This outbreak involved six persons (three children and three adults), a bitch and three puppies which had close daily contact with the family. The clinical symptoms of the index case led to an erroneous diagnosis and the infection would have gone undiagnosed if culture had not been positive. This report aims to increase awareness of medical personnel of the need to order screening tests for children, immunodeficient persons or pregnant women presenting with fever of unknown origin, unexplained spleen or liver enlargement or other systemic signs. The emerging zoonotic potential of this disease in urban areas and the need to coordinate canine brucellosis surveillance systems should be evaluated.

  2. [Brucella canis endocarditis: first documented case in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Manias, Valeria; Nagel, Alicia; Mollerach, Analía; Mendosa, María A; Freyre, Hugo; Gómez, Abel; Ferrara, Elisa; Vay, Carlos; de Los A Méndez, Emilce

    2013-01-01

    We herein present the case of an adult male patient who consulted for lower extremity edema, a 2- month history of fever and oppressive chest pain radiating to the left arm. He referred neither contact with breeding animals nor consumption of unpasteurized dairy products. A diagnosis of endocarditis was confirmed by cardiac studies. Since the empirical treatment with cephalotin, ampicillin and gentamicin failed, the patient underwent aortic valve replacement. A total of four blood cultures were positive with a gram-negative rod. Bacterial identification was performed using the API 20 NE technique (bioMèrieux), the Phoenix automated method (BD) and conventional biochemical tests which were unable to classify the isolate as to genus and species. The strain was sent to the INEI-ANLIS "Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán" where it was identified as Brucella canis. The antimicrobial treatment was switched to doxycycline, rifampicin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole with good evolution of the patient. The clinical significance of this case report lies in the possible failure of the empiric antibiotic therapy administered for endocarditis, since B. canis did not respond to the conventional antimicrobial treatment for this pathology.

  3. Ferritin 1 silencing effect in Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae) during experimental infection with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Ferrolho, Joana; Antunes, Sandra; Sanches, Gustavo S; Couto, Joana; Évora, Patrícia M; Rosa, Catarina; André, Marcos R; Machado, Rosângela Z; Bechara, Gervásio H; Domingos, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s.l.) is a very common ectoparasite of domestic dogs able to transmit several pathogens of human and veterinary importance. Tick infestations and tick-borne diseases (TBDs) remain a serious and persistent problem, due to the lack of efficient control measures. It is therefore vital that novel approaches to control are pursued. Whilst vaccination is recognised as a potential control method to reduce tick infestation, no anti-R. sanguineus vaccine is available. Ticks depend on their blood meals to obtain nutrients and to achieve sexual maturity, which exposes them to vast amounts of iron. Although an essential molecule for several biological processes, its excess can lead to oxidative stress. Iron homeostasis is achieved with the help of iron-binding proteins called ferritins, among others, present in several tick tissues and developmental stages. These evolutionarily conserved proteins regulate iron homeostasis by storing and releasing iron in a controlled manner. In this study the R. sanguineus ferritin 1 gene was silenced through RNA interference (RNAi) in adult females exposed to an experimental infection with Ehrlichia canis. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of this protein in tick feeding, ovary development, oogenesis, and pathogen acquisition. Our data has shown that silencing ferritin 1 alters tick competence to normally engorge and causes morphologic and histochemical changes in the ovaries (OV) and oocytes. Furthermore, our data revealed that no E. canis DNA was found in either experimental group. Determining the function of molecules that act in key biological processes, such as blood digestion or reproduction, and that could be considered potential tick antigens will contribute towards the improvement of current control measures against these ectoparasites and the pathogens they vector.

  4. Sero-Epidemiology of Toxocara Canis Infection in Children Attending Four Selected Health Facilities in the Central Region of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Kyei, G; Ayi, I; Boampong, J N; Turkson, P K

    2015-06-01

    The study determined the seroprevalence of Toxocara canis infection among children attending four selected health facilities in the Central Region of Ghana. Cross-sectional study. Sera from 566 children aged 1-15 years attending four selected health facilities in the Central Region of Ghana between July and September 2012 was used in a Toxocara excretory-secretory antigen-based ELISA to detect serum IgG. A short questionnaire was designed to obtain data on respondents as to age, gender, educational level, locality of residence, habits of washing of fruits, vegetable and hands before eating, keeping of pet (dogs or cats), and history of playing with soil and pets. Clinical information was also collected. Associations between sero-positivity and age group, gender, risk factors, educational level and other variables were determined by Chi square test. The overall sero-prevalence was 53.5% (n=566). Age, educational level and hospital visited were significantly associated with sero-positivity (p< 0.05). Children with history of playing with soil (χ(2)=9.03, p=0.003), pet-keeping (χ(2)=14.77, p=0.001) and not washing hands with soap before eating (χ(2)=5.82, p=0.016) were significantly associated with sero-positivity. The sero-prevalence of T. canis infection in children in the study was high. The children should be educated to desist from risk factors such as playing with soil and pets and be encouraged to ensure proper personal hygiene.

  5. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure processing on embryonation of Toxocara canis eggs.

    PubMed

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Houk, Alice E; Flick, George J; Lindsay, David S

    2014-07-01

    Toxocara canis is a zoonotic nematode parasite that can be transmitted to humans by food or water contaminated with T. canis eggs from infected dog feces. High-pressure processing (HPP) is a useful alternative to thermal treatments to eliminate pathogens from foods. Most of the research on HPP has focused on prokaryotes, but little is known about its effects on eukaryotic organisms. We evaluated the ability of HPP to affect embryonation of T. canis eggs to test the hypothesis that HPP treatment can delay development of T. canis eggs. Efficacy of HPP was determined by using an embryonation assay on T. canis eggs from naturally infected puppies. For each treatment, 2500 T. canis eggs in tap water were placed in sealable plastic bags and subjected to 138-400 megapascals (MPa; 1 MPa=10 atm=147 psi) for 60 s in a commercial HPP unit. We found that treatment with 300 or 400 MPa for 60 s killed 100% of eggs using embryonation as the standard. Treatment with 250, 241, and 207 MPa was less effective and killed 80%, 56%, and 8% of eggs, respectively. Results from this study suggest that HPP may be a useful treatment to protect foods from T. canis contamination.

  6. A new Brucella canis species-specific PCR assay for the diagnosis of canine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Il; Lee, Sang-Eun; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Kichan; Kim, Jong-Wan; Lee, Hyang-Keun; Sung, So-Ra; Heo, Young-Ran; Jung, Suk Chan; Her, Moon

    2014-09-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease that is transmitted from animals to humans, and the development of a rapid, accurate, and widely available identification method is essential for diagnosing this disease. In this study, we developed a new Brucella canis species-specific (BcSS) PCR assay and evaluated its specificity and sensitivity. A specific PCR primer set was designed based on the BCAN_B0548-0549 region in chromosome II of B. canis. The PCR detection for B. canis included amplification of a 300-bp product that is, not found on other Brucella species or, genetically or serologically related bacteria. The detection limit of BcSS-PCR assay was 6pg/μl by DNA dilution, or 3×10(3) colony-forming units (CFU) in the buffy coats separated from whole blood experimentally inoculated with B. canis. Using the buffy coat in this PCR assay resulted in approximately 100-times higher sensitivity for B. canis as compared to detect directly from whole blood. This is the first report of a species-specific PCR assay to detect B. canis, and the new assay will provide a valuable tool for the diagnosis of B. canis infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spinal cord transection in the larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Briona, Lisa K; Dorsky, Richard I

    2014-05-21

    Mammals fail in sensory and motor recovery following spinal cord injury due to lack of axonal regrowth below the level of injury as well as an inability to reinitiate spinal neurogenesis. However, some anamniotes including the zebrafish Danio rerio exhibit both sensory and functional recovery even after complete transection of the spinal cord. The adult zebrafish is an established model organism for studying regeneration following spinal cord injury, with sensory and motor recovery by 6 weeks post-injury. To take advantage of in vivo analysis of the regenerative process available in the transparent larval zebrafish as well as genetic tools not accessible in the adult, we use the larval zebrafish to study regeneration after spinal cord transection. Here we demonstrate a method for reproducibly and verifiably transecting the larval spinal cord. After transection, our data shows sensory recovery beginning at 2 days post-injury (dpi), with the C-bend movement detectable by 3 dpi and resumption of free swimming by 5 dpi. Thus we propose the larval zebrafish as a companion tool to the adult zebrafish for the study of recovery after spinal cord injury.

  8. Behavorial assessments of larval zebrafish neurotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fishes have long been a popular organism in ecotoxicology research, and are increasingly used in human health research as an alternative animal model for chemical screening. Our laboratory incorporates a zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo/larval assay to screen chemicals for developm...

  9. Behavorial assessments of larval zebrafish neurotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fishes have long been a popular organism in ecotoxicology research, and are increasingly used in human health research as an alternative animal model for chemical screening. Our laboratory incorporates a zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo/larval assay to screen chemicals for developm...

  10. Use of an automated system for detection of canine serum antibodies against Ehrlichia canis glycoprotein 36.

    PubMed

    Moroff, Scott; Sokolchik, Irene; Woodring, Todd; Woodruff, Colby; Atkinson, Brett; Lappin, Michael R

    2014-07-01

    Ehrlichia canis is the most common cause of monocytotropic ehrlichiosis in dogs around the world. The purpose of the present study was to validate a new automated fluorescence system (Accuplex4™ BioCD system; Antech Diagnostics, Lake Success, New York) to detect antibodies against the E. canis immunodominant glycoprotein 36 (gp36). Sera and blood samples (ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid) were collected from mixed sex beagles ( n = 8) on days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, 21, 28, 42, 49, 56, 63, 70, 77, 84, and 98 after intravenous inoculation with culture-derived E. canis. Sera were assayed using the Accuplex4 BioCD system (Accuplex4), an E. canis indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), and a commercially available kit. A complete blood cell count and a proprietary E. canis polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed on each blood sample. On the day thrombocytopenia was first detected for each dog, E. canis DNA was amplified from blood of all dogs. At those times, E. canis antibodies were detected in 7 of 8 dogs by the Accuplex4, 1 of 8 dogs by the commercial kit, and 4 of 8 dogs by IFAT. Ehrlichia canis DNA was amplified from blood before seroconversion in any antibody assay for 6 dogs. Antibodies against gp36 were detected by Accuplex4 within 3 days of PCR-positive test results and were detected up to 25 days sooner than the commercial kit. After starting doxycycline treatment, E. canis DNA was no longer amplified by PCR assay, but serum antibodies remained detectable by all assays.

  11. Molecular identification and characterization of Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis in dogs in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Almazán, Consuelo; González-Álvarez, Vicente H; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Martínez, Rafael; de la Fuente, José

    2016-03-01

    The tick-borne pathogens Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys are the causative agents of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) and canine cyclic thrombocytopenia (CCT). Although molecular evidence of E. canis has been shown, phylogenetic analysis of this pathogen has not been performed and A. platys has not been identified in Mexico, where the tick vector Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s.l.) is common. The aim of this research was to screen, identify and characterize E. canis and A. platys by PCR and phylogenetic analysis in dogs from La Comarca Lagunera, a region formed by three municipalities, Torreon, Gomez-Palacio and Lerdo, in the Northern states of Coahuila and Durango, Mexico. Blood samples and five engorged R. sanguineus s.l. ticks per animal were collected from 43 females and 57 male dogs presented to veterinary clinics or lived in the dog shelter from La Comarca Lagunera. All the sampled dogs were apparently healthy and PCR for Anaplasma 16S rRNA, Ehrlichia 16S rRNA, and E. canis trp36 were performed. PCR products were sequenced and used for phylogenetic analysis. PCR products were successfully amplified in 31% of the samples using primers for Anaplasma 16S rRNA, while 10% and 4% amplified products using primers for Ehrlichia 16S rRNA and E. canis trp36 respectively. Subsequent sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of these products showed that three samples corresponded to A. platys and four to E. canis. Based on the analysis of trp36 we confirmed that the E. canis strains isolated from Mexico belong to a conservative clade of E. canis and are closely related to strains from USA. In conclusion, this is the first molecular identification of A. platys and the first molecular characterization and phylogenetic study of both A. platys and E. canis in dogs in Mexico.

  12. Inhibitory effect of interferon gamma on frequency of Ehrlichia canis-infected cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Tomoko; Wada, Makoto

    2013-12-15

    Ehrlichia canis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that infects the macrophage-monocyte cells of dogs, causing canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), along with other cytokines, mediates the immune response to such intracellular bacterial invasions. To determine the role of IFN-γ in the immunity of dogs to E. canis infection, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and white blood cells (WBC) were collected from E. canis-infected dogs and added to a culture of E. canis in DH82 cells. The number of E. canis inclusion-positive cells was significantly reduced in cultures containing PBMC and WBC from E. canis-infected dogs compared to uninfected dogs. However, this resistance was inhibited by the addition of an anti-dog IFN-γ antibody. Resistance was also observed when PBMC were added to the Cell Culture Inserts, which prohibited contact of PBMC to DH82 cells, while allowed the diffusion of soluble cell products. The results of this study indicate that resistance was not dependent on cell to cell contact, but was associated with soluble cell products, such as IFN-γ. The addition of recombinant canine IFN-γ to the E. canis culture also reduced the number of infected cells. A commercial recombinant canine IFN-γ, which is sold in Japan, was also effective at reducing E. canis-infected cell number. These results indicate that IFN-γ has an inhibitory effect on the frequency of E. canis-infected cells in vitro and that contact between effector and target cells is not necessary for the resistance.

  13. Molecular detection of Dirofilaria immitis, Hepatozoon canis, Babesia spp., Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis in dogs on Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lanjing; Kelly, Patrick; Ackerson, Kate; El-Mahallawy, Heba S; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard; Wang, Chengming

    2014-03-01

    Although vector-borne diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in dogs in tropical areas, there is little information on these conditions in Costa Rica. In PCRs of blood from dogs in Costa Rica, we did not detect DNAs of Rickettsia (R.) felis and Coxiella (C.) burnetii but we did find evidence of infection with Dirofilaria (D.) immitis (9/40, 22.5%), Hepatozoon (H.) canis (15/40, 37.5%), Babesia spp. (10/40, 25%; 2 with B. gibsoni and 8 with B. vogeli), Anaplasma (A.) platys (3/40, 7.5%) and Ehrlichia (E.) canis (20/40, 50%). Nine dogs (22.5%) were free of any vector-borne pathogens while 14 (35%) were infected with a single pathogen, 11 (27.5%) with two, 4 (10%) with three, 1 (2.5%) with four, and 1 (2.5%) with five pathogens. Dogs in Costa Rica are commonly infected with vector-borne agents.

  14. Pedigree-based assignment tests for reversing coyote (Canis latrans) introgression into the wild red wolf (Canis rufus) population.

    PubMed

    Miller, Craig R; Adams, Jennifer R; Waits, Lisette P

    2003-12-01

    The principal threat to the persistence of the endangered red wolf (Canis rufus) in the wild is hybridization with the coyote (Canis latrans). To facilitate idengification and removal of hybrids, assignment tests are developed which use genotype data to estimate identity as coyote, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 or full red wolf. The tests use genotypes from the red wolves that founded the surviving population and the resulting pedigree, rather than a contemporary red wolf sample. The tests are evaluated by analysing both captive red wolves at 18 microsatellite loci, and data simulated under a highly parameterized, biologically reasonable model. The accuracy of assignment rates are generally high, with over 95% of known red wolves idengified correctly. There are, however, tradeoffs between ambiguous assignments and misassignments, and between misidengifying red wolves as hybrids and hybrids as red wolves. These result in a compromise between limiting introgression and avoiding demographic losses. The management priorities and level of introgression determine the combination of test and removal strategy that best balances these tradeoffs. Ultimately, we conclude that the use of the assignment tests has the capacity to arrest and reverse introgression. To our knowledge, the presented approach is novel in that it accounts for genetic drift when the genotypes under analysis are temporally separated from the reference populations to which they are being assigned. These methods may be valuable in cases where reference databases for small populations have aged substantially, pedigree information is available or data are generated from historical samples.

  15. First Reported Isolation of Neisseria canis from a Deep Facial Wound Infection in a Dog▿

    PubMed Central

    Cantas, Hasan; Pekarkova, Marta; Kippenes, Hege S.; Brudal, Espen; Sorum, Henning

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria canis was isolated in pure culture from a mandibular abscess in a dog. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration was used to obtain a sample from the abscess. Conventional bacteriological examination techniques followed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing from pure subculture and construction of a phylogenetic tree verified the isolate as N. canis. 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed that a broader phylogenetic platform is needed in the part of the phylogenetic tree where the canine pathogenic N. canis isolate is located. The canine pathogenic isolate was found to be resistant to cephalexin and trimethoprim. PMID:21411579

  16. The ultraviolet spectrum of beta Canis Majoris stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, M.; de Jager, C.; Kamperman, T. M.; Neven, L.

    1980-10-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of 15 beta Canis Majoris stars in wavelength bands of approximately 100 A around 2100, 2500, and 2800 A (resolution 1.8 A), obtained with the Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrophotometer S 59 on board the ESRO TD-1A satellite are discussed. In general the spectra are similar to those of 'normal' stars, only the star alpha Vir has He I, C II, and Mg II lines slightly weaker than normal. Comparison with theoretical computations shows that the Fe abundance in the beta CMa stars is solar and that the average microturbulent velocity is about 4 km/sec. The UV spectral lines of beta Cep do not show any significant variations in equivalent width with phase.

  17. Prolonged intensive dominance behavior between gray wolves, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Cluff, H. Dean

    2010-01-01

    Dominance is one of the most pervasive and important behaviors among wolves in a pack, yet its significance in free-ranging packs has been little studied. Insights into a behavior can often be gained by examining unusual examples of it. In the High Arctic near Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, we videotaped and described an unusually prolonged and intensive behavioral bout between an adult male Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) and a male member of his pack, thought to be a maturing son. With tail raised, the adult approached a male pack mate about 50 m from us and pinned and straddled this packmate repeatedly over 6.5 minutes, longer than we had ever seen in over 50 years of studying wolves. We interpreted this behavior as an extreme example of an adult wolf harassing a maturing offspring, perhaps in prelude to the offspring?s dispersal.

  18. Zinc-responsive dermatosis in a red wolf (canis rufus).

    PubMed

    Kearns, K; Sleeman, J; Frank, L; Munson, L

    2000-06-01

    An 18-mo-old male red wolf (Canis rufus) presented with footpad hyperkeratosis, suppurative paronychia, distal limb pyoderma, and peripheral lymphadenopathy. Diet for the previous 11 mo consisted of a mixture of two commercially prepared dog foods with a mineral supplement containing primarily calcium. Culture of the draining tracts on the distal limbs yielded a mixed population of opportunistic bacteria. Histopathologic findings were consistent with a diagnosis of zinc deficiency. Medical therapy consisted of 15 mg/kg amoxicillin p.o. b.i.d. and 10 mg/kg zinc sulfate p.o. s.i.d. Calcium supplementation was discontinued. Clinical signs resolved by 10 wk after the initiation of treatment.

  19. The WISE Census of Young Stellar Objects in Canis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, William J.; Padgett, Deborah; Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2015-08-01

    While Spitzer enabled the efficent discovery of thousands of young stellar objects within 1 kpc of the Sun, it focused on known molecular clouds. With WISE, color and magnitude criteria similar to those used in Spitzer studies can identify YSOs in largely unexplored regions. Newly identified YSOs may refine the initial stellar mass function, allow a better characterization of star and planet formation in regions with low initial gas densities, and identify nearby targets for high-resolution follow-up imaging. As a precursor to more expansive searches, we present results for a 100 square degree region centered on the relatively unexplored Canis Major clouds. Our preliminary catalog contains 114 Class I YSOs and 242 Class II YSOs that are mostly concentrated at the sites of known 13CO clouds. We will discuss several newly discovered clusters that are dominated by Class I protostars and explore the ability of WISE to identify even younger Class 0 protostars.

  20. Results from the Coded Aperture Neutron Imaging System (CANIS).

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik; Steele, John T.; Brennan, James S.; Hilton, Nathan R.; Marleau, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Because of their penetrating power, energetic neutrons and gamma rays ({approx}1 MeV) offer the best possibility of detecting highly shielded or distant special nuclear material (SNM). Of these, fast neutrons offer the greatest advantage due to their very low and well understood natural background. We are investigating a new approach to fast-neutron imaging- a coded aperture neutron imaging system (CANIS). Coded aperture neutron imaging should offer a highly efficient solution for improved detection speed, range, and sensitivity. We have demonstrated fast neutron and gamma ray imaging with several different configurations of coded masks patterns and detectors including an 'active' mask that is composed of neutron detectors. Here we describe our prototype detector and present some initial results from laboratory tests and demonstrations.

  1. Pasteurella canis Isolation following Penetrating Eye Injury: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Noor-Khairul; Zam, Zarifah; Mdnoor, Siti-Suraya; Siti-Raihan, Ishak; Azhany, Yaakub

    2012-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy presented with history of trauma to the left eye after he accidentally injured his eye with a broom stick made up from coconut skewers. There was history of cats as their pets but not dogs. Ocular examination revealed left superonasal conjunctival laceration and scleral perforation with prolapsed vitreous. Fundus examination showed minimal vitreous haemorrhage and flat retina. Conjunctiva swab at the wound site was sent for gram staining, culture, and sensitivity. He underwent scleral suturing, vitreous tap, and intravitreal injection of Ceftazidime and Amikacin. Vitreous tap was sent for gram stained, culture and sensitivity. Postoperatively, he was started empirically on IV Ciprofloxacin 160 mg BD, Guttae Ciprofloxacin, and Guttae Ceftazidime. Conjunctiva swab grew Pasteurella canis which was sensitive to all Beta lactams, Ciprofloxacin, Chloramphenicol, and Aminoglycoside. Post-operative was uneventful, absent signs of endophthalmitis or orbital cellulitis.

  2. Rotational disturbance in the intermediate polar BG Canis Minoris.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlick, M. A.

    1996-04-01

    The author reports on the independent discovery of a feature in the intermediate polar BG Canis Minoris which resembles a rotational disturbance. A similar effect has already been reported by de Martino et al., but in the He II λ4686 line only, whereas the data presented in the present article show the effect in the Balmer lines only. Another difference is that the new disturbance occurs at phase 0.75 - this is 0.25 orbital cycles prior to that reported previously. There is, however, indication of a change in the V/R ratio at phase zero as well, in phase with that reported previously, and in phase with an apparent eclipse of the He II λ4686 line flux. These results corroborate the suggestion of de Martino et al. that BG CMi is at a relatively high inclination, and moreover imply that some intriguing and previously unseen transient behaviour is at work in this system.

  3. Confirmed case of feline mycetoma due to Microsporum canis.

    PubMed

    Kano, Rui; Edamura, Kazuya; Yumikura, Hisayoshi; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Asano, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Shigeo; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    The first case of feline true mycetoma because of a dermatophyte has been reported in this manuscript, although pseudomycetoma has been described in dogs and cats. The patient was a 9-year-old castrated male Persian cat weighing 4.2 kg with subcutaneous nodules on the dorsal trunk. Physical examination revealed two subcutaneous nodules (2.5 x 5.0 cm and 3.5 x 5.0 cm in size) that drained purulent exudates with cement-like substances containing yellowish granules. The impression smear of the yellowish granules demonstrated by PAS staining that they were masses of fungal septated hyphae (3-4 mum of width). From the nodular inflammation with fibrosis, fistulae draining from deep tissue and many grains containing abundant hyphal filaments, the case was diagnosed as mycetoma, complying with the definitive criteria of mycetoma. The etiologic fungus was molecularly as well as morphologically identified as Microsporum canis.

  4. Primary lymphangiectasia in a dingo (Canis familiaris dingo).

    PubMed

    Suedmeyer, Wm Kirk; Ludlow, Chris; Layton, Candace; Dennis, Jeff; Miller, Margaret

    2004-12-01

    A 3-yr-old intact male dingo (Canis familiaris dingo) presented with a 3-mo history of diarrhea. The diarrhea did not resolve with antibiotics or intestinal protectants. Fecal examination for parasites, fecal cultures, physical examination, and radiographs were unremarkable. Enteroscopic duodenal biopsies showed dilated lacteals without inflammation. Results of serum folate, cobalamin, and trypsin-like immunoreactivity were normal. Low serum total protein and albumin combined with increased fecal levels of alpha-1 protease inhibitor suggested the diagnosis of lymphangiectasia. Full-thickness intestinal biopsies of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum revealed dilated mucosal and submucosal lacteals without associated inflammation, confirming the diagnosis of primary lymphangiectasia. Currently, the dingo is being maintained with nutritional management.

  5. Myotonic dystrophy in two European grey wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Pákozdy, A; Leschnik, M; Nell, B; Kolm, U S; Virányi, Z; Belényi, B; Molnár, M J; Bilzer, T

    2007-03-01

    Two related European Grey wolves (Canis lupus) with the history of muscle stiffness beginning at 2 weeks of age were examined in this study. Muscle tone and muscle mass were increased in both animals. Muscle stiffness was worsened by stress so that the animals fell into lateral recumbency. Blood chemistry revealed mildly increased serum creatine kinase activity. Abnormal potentials typical of myotonic discharges were recorded by electromyography. Cataract, first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block and inhomogeneous myocardial texture by ultrasound suggested extramuscular involvement. Myopathology demonstrated dystrophic signs in the muscle biopsy specimen. The presumptive diagnosis based on the in vivo findings was myotonic dystrophy. Immunochemistry of the striated muscles revealed focal absence of dystrophin 1 and beta-dystroglycan in both cases. Cardiac and ophthalmologic involvement suggested a disorder very similar to a human form of myotonic dystrophy. This is the first description of myotonic dystrophy in wolves.

  6. Contraception has gone to the coyotes (Canis latrans).

    PubMed

    MacGregor, Marjorie J; Perkins, Elsey G; Asa, Cheryl; Skinner, Donal C

    2013-12-01

    Coyotes (Canis latrans) are predators of livestock. Current management programs, primarily lethal control, are ineffective for long-term management of predation. Controlling reproduction of coyotes may reduce depredations if territory fidelity is maintained by breeding pairs. Surgical sterilization is successful in altering predatory behaviors of coyotes but may provide a challenge for field implementation. An alternative approach is the development of a one-time non-transferable chemical contraceptive. This research is investigating the efficacy of a single high dose treatment of a sustained release gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, deslorelin, on coyotes as a long term contraceptive. Male coyotes were administered 47 mg deslorelin subcutaneously. Preliminary data show full suppression of the reproductive axis for over 12 mo as indicated by complete absence of sperm.

  7. First molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys in ticks from dogs in Cebu, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Ybañez, Adrian P; Perez, Zandro O; Gabotero, Shirleny R; Yandug, Ryan T; Kotaro, Matsumoto; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2012-12-01

    Ehrlichia canis infection of dogs in the Philippines has been detected by serological and peripheral blood smear examination methods, but not by molecular means. Anaplasma platys infection in dogs has not yet been officially reported, although it is suspected to occur in the country. Thus, sensitive and specific molecular techniques were used in this study to demonstrate the presence of both E. canis and A. platys in the Philippines. A total of 164 Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks was collected from 36 dogs. Seven tick samples were found positive with E. canis and one sample with A. platys. To further characterize these pathogens, molecular analyses based on citrate synthase and heat-shock operon genes were also performed. Philippine strains were found to be not divergent from strains from other countries. The present results are the first molecular detection and analyses of E. canis and A. platys in ticks from dogs in the Philippines.

  8. First isolation and molecular characterization of Ehrlichia canis in Costa Rica, Central America.

    PubMed

    Romero, L E; Meneses, A I; Salazar, L; Jiménez, M; Romero, J J; Aguiar, D M; Labruna, M B; Dolz, G

    2011-08-01

    The present study investigated Ehrlichia species in blood samples from dogs suspected of clinical ehrlichiosis, using molecular and isolation techniques in cell culture. From a total of 310 canine blood samples analyzed by 16S rRNA nested PCR, 148 (47.7%) were positive for Ehrlichia canis. DNA from Ehrlichia chaffeensis or Ehrlichia ewingii was not detected in any sample using species-specific primers in separated reactions. Leukocytes from five PCR-positive dogs were inoculated into DH82 cells; successful isolation of E. canis was obtained in four samples. Partial sequence of the dsb gene of eight canine blood samples (including the five samples for in vitro isolation) was obtained by PCR and their analyses through BLAST showed 100% of identity with the corresponding sequence of E. canis in GenBank. This study represents the first molecular diagnosis, isolation, and molecular characterization of E. canis in dogs from Costa Rica.

  9. [Tinea caused by Microsporum canis in children under 30 days of age].

    PubMed

    Zaror, L; Moreno, M I; Bilbao, M T

    1985-02-01

    Six cases of ringworm due to Microsporum canis are reported in infants no more than 30 days old. The infections came from cats. The patients responded to therapy with griseofulvin and tolnaftate, miconazole or iodine.

  10. [Diphyllobothrium pacificum (Nybelin,1931) margolis, 1956 in Canis familiaris from Chincha city, Peru].

    PubMed

    Cabrera, R; Tantaleán, M; Rojas, R

    2001-01-01

    In this communication is presented the finding of the tapeworm Diphyllobothrium pacificum, parasite of sea lions, in Canis familiaris (dog) in Chincha city, Peru. This is the first canine infection with D. pacificum in the South Peruvian coast.

  11. [Detection of Brucella canis by immunochromatography method in vague dogs captured in Temuco city, Chile, 2011].

    PubMed

    Tuemmers, Christian; Lüders, Carlos; Rojas, Claudio; Serri, Michel; Castillo, Carolina; Espinoza, Rodrigo

    2013-08-01

    Brucella canis is responsible for brucellosis in dogs, causing reproductive disorders and is considered a zoonoses, as described in several countries. The epidemiological data are scarce in our country. To determine the prevalence of Brucella canis in vague dogs in Temuco city and housed in the Temuco Kennel. Quantitative and cross-section study. We used 400 samples of dogs of both sexes, different ages and mainly mixed race, which were tested by immunochromatography. Antibodies were detected in 4 samples Brucella canis which represented 1% of the population studied, 2 females (0.5%) and 2 males (0.5%). We conclude that dogs are infected by B. canis in a low range but remains a risk condition to the health of the human population if not maintained adequate sanitary control of pets, like vague dogs.

  12. Transstadial Transmission of Hepatozoon canis by Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Aktas, M; Özübek, S

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated possible transovarial and transstadial transmission of Hepatozoon canis by Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) ticks collected from naturally infected dogs in a municipal dog shelter and the grounds of the shelter. Four hundred sixty-five engorged nymphs were collected from 16 stray dogs that were found to be infected with H. canis by blood smear and PCR analyses and maintained in an incubator at 28 °C for moulting. Four hundred eighteen nymphs moulted to adults 14-16 d post collection. Unfed ticks from the shelter grounds comprised 1,500 larvae, 2,100 nymphs, and 85 adults; were sorted according to origin, developmental stage, and sex into 117 pools; and screened by 18S rRNA PCR for Hepatozoon infection. Of 60 adult tick pools examined, 51 were infected with H. canis. The overall maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of infection rate was calculated as 21.0% (CI 15.80-28.21). Hepatozoon canis was detected in 31 out of 33 female pools (MLE 26.96%, CI 17.64-44.33) and 20 out of 27 male pools (MLE 14.82%, CI 20.15-46.41). Among 42 unfed nymph pools collected from the shelter, 26 were infected with H. canis, and MLE of infection was calculated as 1.9% (CI 1.25-2.77). No H. canis DNA was detected in any of the gDNA pools consisting of larva specimens. Partial sequences of the 18S rRNA gene shared 99-100% similarity with the corresponding H. canis isolates. Our results revealed the transstadial transmission of H. canis by R. sanguineus, both from larva to nymph and from nymph to adult, in field conditions. However, there were no evidence of transovarial transmission. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Spatial distribution of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Hepatozoon canis in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Tolnai, Z; Sréter-Lancz, Z; Sréter, T

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, Ehrlichia canis and Hepatozoon canis transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus were reported from Hungary. The aim of the present study was to reveal the spatial distribution pattern of pathogens transmitted by R. sanguineus in a sentinel species, red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Hungary and to analyse the relationship of these patterns with landscape and climate by geographical information systems. Fox carcasses, representing 0.5% of the total fox population were randomly selected out of all the foxes of Hungary. The spleen samples of the animals were tested by real-time PCR for Anaplasma platys, Babesia vogeli, E. canis and H. canis infection. Positive results were confirmed by conventional PCR followed by sequencing. The prevalence of H. canis infection was 22.2% (95% CI=18.4-26.4%), and this parasite was detected in all areas including the mountain regions of Hungary. These findings indicate that other tick species or other transmission routes (oral and transplacental) might be in the background of the countrywide distribution of H. canis. Anaplasma platys was not found; nevertheless, the prevalence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection transmitted by Ixodes ricinus was 12.5% (95% CI=9.7-16.1%) in foxes. B. vogeli and E. canis infection was not detected. There was no correlation between environmental parameter values in the home range of foxes and A. phagocytophilum or H. canis infection, which is in line with that observed in the case of tick species infesting foxes in Hungary. The results of this study indicate that R. sanguineus, if present, might be rare in Hungary. Our baseline study can be used for future evaluation of the effect of climate change on the spreading and emergence of R. sanguineus transmitted pathogens in Hungary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. First detection of Brucella canis infections in a breeding kennel in Austria.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Erwin; Bag, Zolt N; Revilla-Fern Ndez, Sandra; Melzer, Falk; Tomaso, Herbert; L Pez-Go I, Igniacio; Fasching, Gerhard; Schmoll, Friedrich

    2012-10-01

    Brucella canis occurs almost worldwide and is a potential danger to the health of dogs and humans. The pathogen was detected in the placenta and fetuses of a Standard Poodle by direct culture and immunohistochemistry. Further, Brucellae were also isolated from the blood samples of two asymptomatic female Medium Poodles. The isolates were identified as B. canis by conventional microbiological methods and a novel Bruce-ladder multiplex PCR. Genotyping was performed by multiple locus variable number tandem repeats analysis (MLVA).

  15. Brucella canis Is an Intracellular Pathogen That Induces a Lower Proinflammatory Response than Smooth Zoonotic Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Altamirano-Silva, Pamela; González-Espinoza, Gabriela; Medina, María-Concepción; Alfaro-Alarcón, Alejandro; Bouza-Mora, Laura; Jiménez-Rojas, César; Wong, Melissa; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Rojas, Norman; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Canine brucellosis caused by Brucella canis is a disease of dogs and a zoonotic risk. B. canis harbors most of the virulence determinants defined for the genus, but its pathogenic strategy remains unclear since it has not been demonstrated that this natural rough bacterium is an intracellular pathogen. Studies of B. canis outbreaks in kennel facilities indicated that infected dogs displaying clinical signs did not present hematological alterations. A virulent B. canis strain isolated from those outbreaks readily replicated in different organs of mice for a protracted period. However, the levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-12 in serum were close to background levels. Furthermore, B. canis induced lower levels of gamma interferon, less inflammation of the spleen, and a reduced number of granulomas in the liver in mice than did B. abortus. When the interaction of B. canis with cells was studied ex vivo, two patterns were observed, a predominant scattered cell-associated pattern of nonviable bacteria and an infrequent intracellular replicative pattern of viable bacteria in a perinuclear location. The second pattern, responsible for the increase in intracellular multiplication, was dependent on the type IV secretion system VirB and was seen only if the inoculum used for cell infections was in early exponential phase. Intracellular replicative B. canis followed an intracellular trafficking route undistinguishable from that of B. abortus. Although B. canis induces a lower proinflammatory response and has a stealthier replication cycle, it still displays the pathogenic properties of the genus and the ability to persist in infected organs based on the ability to multiply intracellularly. PMID:26438796

  16. Brucella canis is an intracellular pathogen that induces a lower proinflammatory response than smooth zoonotic counterparts.

    PubMed

    Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Altamirano-Silva, Pamela; González-Espinoza, Gabriela; Medina, María-Concepción; Alfaro-Alarcón, Alejandro; Bouza-Mora, Laura; Jiménez-Rojas, César; Wong, Melissa; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Rojas, Norman; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Moreno, Edgardo; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban

    2015-12-01

    Canine brucellosis caused by Brucella canis is a disease of dogs and a zoonotic risk. B. canis harbors most of the virulence determinants defined for the genus, but its pathogenic strategy remains unclear since it has not been demonstrated that this natural rough bacterium is an intracellular pathogen. Studies of B. canis outbreaks in kennel facilities indicated that infected dogs displaying clinical signs did not present hematological alterations. A virulent B. canis strain isolated from those outbreaks readily replicated in different organs of mice for a protracted period. However, the levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-12 in serum were close to background levels. Furthermore, B. canis induced lower levels of gamma interferon, less inflammation of the spleen, and a reduced number of granulomas in the liver in mice than did B. abortus. When the interaction of B. canis with cells was studied ex vivo, two patterns were observed, a predominant scattered cell-associated pattern of nonviable bacteria and an infrequent intracellular replicative pattern of viable bacteria in a perinuclear location. The second pattern, responsible for the increase in intracellular multiplication, was dependent on the type IV secretion system VirB and was seen only if the inoculum used for cell infections was in early exponential phase. Intracellular replicative B. canis followed an intracellular trafficking route undistinguishable from that of B. abortus. Although B. canis induces a lower proinflammatory response and has a stealthier replication cycle, it still displays the pathogenic properties of the genus and the ability to persist in infected organs based on the ability to multiply intracellularly. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Behavioral dissection of Drosophila larval phototaxis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhefeng

    2009-05-01

    A behavior generally comprises multiple processes. Analyzing these processes helps to reveal more characteristics of the behavior. In this report, light/dark choice-based Drosophila larval phototaxis is analyzed with a simplistic mathematical model to reveal a fast phase and a slow phase response that are involved. Larvae of the strain w(1118), which is photophobic in phototaxis tests, prefer darkness to light in an immediate light/dark boundary passing test and demonstrate a significant reduction in motility in the dark condition during phototaxis tests. For tim(01) larvae, which show neutral performance in phototaxis tests, larvae unexpectedly prefer light to darkness in the immediate light/dark boundary passing test and demonstrate no significant motility alteration in the dark condition. It is proposed that Drosophila larval phototaxis is determined by a fast phase immediate light/dark choice and an independent slow phase light/dark-induced motility alteration that follows.

  18. Organization of the Drosophila larval visual circuit

    PubMed Central

    Gendre, Nanae; Neagu-Maier, G Larisa; Fetter, Richard D; Schneider-Mizell, Casey M; Truman, James W; Zlatic, Marta; Cardona, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Visual systems transduce, process and transmit light-dependent environmental cues. Computation of visual features depends on photoreceptor neuron types (PR) present, organization of the eye and wiring of the underlying neural circuit. Here, we describe the circuit architecture of the visual system of Drosophila larvae by mapping the synaptic wiring diagram and neurotransmitters. By contacting different targets, the two larval PR-subtypes create two converging pathways potentially underlying the computation of ambient light intensity and temporal light changes already within this first visual processing center. Locally processed visual information then signals via dedicated projection interneurons to higher brain areas including the lateral horn and mushroom body. The stratified structure of the larval optic neuropil (LON) suggests common organizational principles with the adult fly and vertebrate visual systems. The complete synaptic wiring diagram of the LON paves the way to understanding how circuits with reduced numerical complexity control wide ranges of behaviors.

  19. Molecular Diagnosis of Ehrlichia canis in Dogs and Ticks Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pat-Nah, Henry; Rodriguez-Vivas, Roger Ivan; Bolio-Gonzalez, Manuel Emilio; Villegas-Perez, Sandra Luz; Reyes-Novelo, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Ehrlichia canis is the etiological agent behind canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, and the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) is its main vector. Blood smear and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were used to identify E. canis infection in dogs and R. sanguineus, and explore factors possibly associated with infection in dogs in Yucatan, Mexico. Blood samples were taken and ticks R. sanguineus collected from 50 dogs (10 house dogs and 40 in an animal control center). Data were collected on dog age, sex, body condition, and signs associated with platelet deficiencies (epistaxis). Blood smears were analyzed to identify E. canis morulae and generate platelet counts. Nested PCR analysis was done on blood samples and 200 ticks. A χ(2) test was done to identify factors associated with the E. canis infection in the tested dogs. The overall prevalence for infection, as determined by PCR, was 36% (18 out of 50). All positive dogs were from samples collected from the animal shelter, representing prevalence, for this sampling site, of 45% (18 out of 40). Morulae in monocytes were identified in only 4% of samples. Dog origin (i.e. animal control center) was the only variable associated with E. canis infection (P < 0.01). Male ticks had a higher (P < 0.05) infection rate than female ticks (24.5 vs 13.5%). It is concluded that E. canis infection is present in both dogs and the brown dog ticks R. sanguineus in Yucatan, Mexico.

  20. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys in dogs in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lasta, Camila Serina; dos Santos, Andrea Pires; Messick, Joanne Belle; Oliveira, Simone Tostes; Biondo, Alexander Welker; Vieira, Rafael Felipe da Costa; Dalmolin, Magnus Larruscaim; González, Félix Hilario Diaz

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the occurrence of Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs in Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil; and to investigate their association with hematological abnormalities. Serum samples from 196 dogs were first tested using dot-ELISA for antibodies against Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia canis. Peripheral blood samples from 199 dogs were subjected to 16S rRNA nested PCR (nPCR) for A. platys and E. canis, followed by DNA sequencing to ensure pathogen identity. A total of 19/196 samples (9.69%) were positive for Anaplasma spp. using ELISA and 28/199 (14.07%) samples were positive for A. platys by nested PCR. All the dog samples were negative for E. canis, both in anti-E. canis antibody tests and in nested PCR. There were no significant differences in hematological parameters between A. platys-PCR positive and negative dogs and Anaplasma spp. serologically positive dogs, except for basophil counts, which were higher in nPCR-positive dogs. This is the first report showing A. platys presence in dogs in Southern Brazil. In conclusion, hematological parameters may not be sufficient to diagnose A. platys infection in dogs in Southern Brazil, probably due either to low pathogenicity or to chronic infection. On the other hand, E. canis may either have very low occurrence or be absent in dogs in Porto Alegre.

  1. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the gp200 protein of Ehrlichia canis from dogs in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chia-Chia; Hsieh, Yu-Chen; Tsang, Chau-Loong; Chung, Yang-Tsung

    2010-12-01

    Ehrlichia (E.) canis is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium responsible for canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Currently, the genetic diversity of E. canis strains worldwide is poorly defined. In the present study, sequence analysis of the nearly full-length 16S rDNA (1,620 bp) and the complete coding region (4,269 bp) of the gp200 gene, which encodes the largest major immunoreactive protein in E. canis, from 17 Taiwanese samples was conducted. The resultant 16S rDNA sequences were found to be identical to each other and have very high homology (99.4~100%) with previously reported E. canis sequences. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis of gp200 demonstrated that the E. canis Taiwanese genotype was genetically distinct from other reported isolates obtained from the United States, Brazil, and Israel, and that it formed a separate clade. Remarkable variations unique to the Taiwanese genotype were found throughout the deduced amino acid sequence of gp200, including 15 substitutions occurring in two of five known species-specific epitopes. The gp200 amino acid sequences of the Taiwanese genotype bore 94.4~94.6 identities with those of the isolates from the United States and Brazil, and 93.7% homology with that of the Israeli isolate. Taken together, these results suggest that the Taiwanese genotype represents a novel strain of E. canis that has not yet been characterized.

  2. Identification and characterization of the arginine deiminase system of Streptococcus canis.

    PubMed

    Hitzmann, A; Bergmann, S; Rohde, M; Chhatwal, G S; Fulde, M

    2013-02-22

    Although Streptococcus (S.) canis is known to cause severe infections in dogs and cats and harbors a clear zoonotic potential, knowledge about physiology and pathogenesis is mostly elusive. The arginine deiminase system (ADS) has been described in certain streptococcal species and its role in the establishment of infection has been suggested. In this study we focused on the identification and characterization of the ADS in S. canis. Using genome sequencing and subsequent in silico analysis we identified the ADS of S. canis as a gene cluster composed of seven genes. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the ADS of S. canis is transcribed in four transcriptional units, comprising three monocistronical mRNAs and one operon structure. As a secondary metabolic pathway, the ADS of S. canis is strictly regulated by carbon catabolite repression (CCR) and arginine as demonstrated on transcriptional, translational, and enzymatical level, respectively. Furthermore, growth kinetics with a chemically defined medium clearly showed that arginine, the substrate of the ADS, is essential for the biological fitness of S. canis. Using Immuno-electron microscopy analysis, we observed a surface-exposed localization of the ADS enzymes arginine deiminase (ArcA), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (ArcB), and carbamate kinase (ArcC), respectively, which might suggest the contribution of the ADS to the development of streptococcal infections.

  3. Intestinal nematode infections in Turkish military dogs with special reference to Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Senlik, B; Cirak, V Y; Karabacak, A

    2006-09-01

    The prevalence and potential zoonotic risk factors of intestinal nematodes of military working dogs, which are used for different military purposes, were assessed. Faecal samples from 352 defined-breed Turkish military dogs were investigated and 107 (30.4%) dogs were found to be infected with one or two nematode species. The following nematodes, with their respective prevalences, were diagnosed in the faecal samples: Toxascaris leonina (21.8%), Toxocara canis (13.3%), Trichuris vulpis (2.9%) and Uncinaria stenocephala (1.2%). Toxocara canis infections were more frequently seen in puppies (0-6 months old). The prevalence of T. canis was significantly higher in male than in female dogs and also higher in dogs which were exercised daily than in those without exercise. The highest prevalence was found in Belgian malinois breed dogs. Toxocara canis infections were not influenced by the floor type of the kennels (i.e. concrete or soil floor). There was no difference in the occurrence of T. canis infection when the last anthelmintic treatment was carried out less or more than 3 months prior to sampling. It is suggested that T. canis infected military dogs would be a threat not only for dog trainers but also for military personnel, notably during national and international operations.

  4. Strains differentiation of Microsporum canis by RAPD analysis using (GACA)4 and (ACA)5 primers.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolska, Anita; Debska, Joanna; Kozłowska, Magdalena; Staczek, Paweł

    2011-01-01

    Molecular analysis of dermatophytes (based on PCR fingerprinting) revealed high clonal differentiation between the genus and species. Microsporum canis (zoophilic dermatophyte, belonging to genus Microsporum), responsible for most cases of tinea capitis in children, tinea corporis in adults and dermatophytoses in cats, is very unique in comparison with other dermatophytes. Results of most molecular studies show that there is no clonal differentiation within M. canis as distinct from other species. The aim of this study was application of (GACA)4 repetitive primer and (ACA)5 primer for typing of M. canis strains isolated from human and animals in Central Poland. Fungal strains: 32 clinical isolates of M. canis, originated from patients from Central Poland; 11 strains isolated from infected cats (6) and dogs (7), reference strains of M. canis (CBS 113480), T rubrum (CBS 120358), T mentagrophytes (CBS 120357) and E. floccosum (CBS 970.95). The genomic DNAs of the strains were used as a template in RAPD reaction. No differentiation was observed for the analyzed M. canis strains using (GACA)4 and (ACA)5 typing.

  5. Tissue-specific distribution of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 of Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guang Xu; Zhou, Rong Qiong; Huang, Han Cheng; Hu, Shi Jun; Lin, Jie

    2014-10-15

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is expressed in developing and reproductively active male Toxocara canis. To investigate the tissue-specific expression of PP1 in T. canis, the PP1 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was used to generate a rabbit polyclonal antiserum. Indirect fluorescence immunohistochemical analysis of adult male T. canis showed that PP1 was expressed in the germ line tissues, primarily in the testis, seminal vesicle, vas deferens, and sperm cells, indicating the potential roles of PP1 in spermatogenesis. What's more, structural predictions of PP1 in T. canis were performed. The predictions of the structure indicated that PP1 may be a potential target for antihelmintic drugs. This is the first report of the tissue distributions and structural prediction of PP1 in T. canis, which might lead to the development of novel, innovative strategies for controlling T. canis infestations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A study of ectoparasites of Canis lupus familiaris in Mueang district, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nithikathkul, Choosak; Polseela, Ruxsina; Iamsa-ard, Jareerat; Wongsawad, Chalobol; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn

    2005-01-01

    We studied ectoparasites found on Canis lupus familiaris sampled in five areas in Mueang district, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand. The prevalence of fleas and ticks as well as their density were determined in 100 dogs that did not receive treatments. A total number of 458 ectoparasites was found corresponding to two species: 25.8% Ctenocephalides canis and 74.2% Rhipicephalus sanguineus. R. sanguineus was the most abundant species, and Ct. canis was the only flea species found. The stages of R. sanguineus were larvae (5.3%), nymphs (29.1%) and adults (39.1% in male and 26.5% in female). The stages of Ct. canis were larvae (41.5%) and adults (58.5%). Both species were commonly found on domestic dogs in all areas of the study. Ct. canis was not present on domestic dogs in one sub-district. The prevalence rates of tick-harboring domestic dogs was 80% (R. sanguineus), and flea-haboring domestic dogs was 26% (Ct. canis).

  7. Feline polymorphonuclear neutrophils produce pro-inflammatory cytokines following exposure to Microsporum canis.

    PubMed

    Cambier, Ludivine; Mathy, Anne; Baldo, Aline; Bagut, Elena Tatiana; Tabart, Jérémy; Antoine, Nadine; Mignon, Bernard

    2013-03-23

    The mechanisms involved in the establishment of the specific immune response against dermatophytes remain unknown. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are recruited early during the infection process and participate in the elimination of dermatophytes. They could therefore be involved in the induction of the immune response during dermatophytoses by producing specific cytokines. The aim of this work was to assess the in vitro cytokine production by feline PMNs exposed to living arthroconidia from the dermatophyte species Microsporum canis or stimulated with either a secreted or a structural component of M. canis, the latter consisting of heat-killed arthroconidia. The levels of specific cytokines produced by PMNs were determined by capture ELISA and/or quantitative RT-PCR. Results showed that PMNs secrete TNFα, IL-1β and IL-8 following exposure to M. canis living arthroconidia and stimulation with both a secreted component and heat-killed arthroconidia. The level of IL-8 mRNA was also increased in PMNs stimulated with M. canis living arthroconidia. In conclusion, infective M. canis arthroconidia induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by feline PMNs that can be activated either by secreted or structural fungal components. Our results suggest that these granulocytes are involved in the initiation of the immune response against M. canis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Newly identified variability in Brucella canis fatty-acid content is associated with geographical origin.

    PubMed

    Brower, A; Lucero, N; Okwumabua, O; Groussaud, P; Gopaul, K K; Whatmore, A M; Cravero, S L; Trangoni, M D

    2013-04-01

    This study compared the fatty-acid profiles of Brucella canis blood culture isolates obtained from infected dogs in the UK, Germany, Japan, South Africa, Peru, Mexico, Colombia, and Argentina, and from a human clinical case in Argentina, to a bank of isolates obtained from canine outbreaks in the USA. Analysis of a total of 42 B. canis isolates and one reference strain found a marked variation within the species. Fatty-acid analysis showed that only the isolates from Argentina, Colombia, and Mexico, which included the human B. canis isolate, contained a specific fatty acid, 19:0 cyclopropane (lactobacillic acid), w8c (cis-11,12-methylene octadecanoic acid), and that this fatty acid, when present, made up a large percentage of overall fatty-acid content. Prior to this study, the cellular fatty-acid 19:0 cyclopropane had been identified in all of the species of Brucella considered to be pathogenic to humans (B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis) except for B. canis. Discovering that this fatty acid not only occurs in B. canis, but also that it is only present in some strains of the species provides a new focus for investigations aimed at identifying the cause of reported geographical variability in human B. canis infection, and at finding predictors of biological behaviour and human pathogenicity within this Brucella species.

  9. Detection of Brucella canis from inguinal lymph nodes of naturally infected dogs by PCR.

    PubMed

    Aras, Z; Uçan, U S

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to standardize and evaluate a PCR assay for the detection of Brucella canis (B. canis) in lymph node samples of naturally infected dogs. The performance of the PCR was compared with the results of bacteriological culture as reference method. Forty-eight inguinal lymph node samples were collected from 48 dogs (18 males and 30 females) that died in the city's pound in the years 2007-2008 and were examined by microbiological culture and the PCR assay. B. canis was isolated from 4 (8.3%) of 48 lymph node samples. Forty-four (91.7%) of the samples were bacteriological culture negative. B. canis DNA was directly detected from all culture positive lymph node samples (n = 4) by PCR. All of the culture negative samples were confirmed as negative by PCR. When the culture method was used as a gold standard, sensitivity and specificity of the PCR assay were found to be 100%. The limit of PCR detection of B. canis DNA was 1.4 x 10(1) CFU/g at least. In conclusion, the PCR assay has been shown to have a diagnostic performance equal to bacteriological culture for detection of B. canis. By a non-hazardous protocol for laboratory workers, the assay can be performed in one day. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular typing for epidemiological evaluation of Brucella abortus and Brucella canis isolated in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Il; Her, Moon; Heo, Eun Jeong; Nam, Hyang Mi; Jung, Suk Chan; Cho, Donghee

    2009-08-01

    To investigate genotype relationships among regional groups of Brucella isolates, variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis was conducted according to previously reported methods. Field strains of Brucella abortus and Brucella canis were isolated from 9 provinces in the Republic of Korea during the years 1996-2006 and each of the isolates was classified by eight loci of HOOF-Prints. On the basis of the alleles, the 33 B. abortus and 21 B. canis field strains were divided into 22 and 18 distinct genotypes, respectively. Phylogenetic cluster analysis of Brucella isolates could be discriminated with geographical region in the Republic of Korea. Simpson's diversity index values of B. abortus and B. canis isolates ranged from 0 to 0.85. The stability of each locus was determined with in vivo and in vitro experiments. After twenty passages in blood agar, the VNTR numbers of loci 1 and 7 in B. abortus isolates and loci 5, 7, and 8 in B. canis isolates changed. The same change of the VNTR numbers at loci 1 and 7 was observed with B. abortus RB51 strains isolated from vaccinated cattle for the in vivo experiment. Although B. canis and B. abortus isolates were discriminated to herd levels by the HOOF-Prints, this method needs further improvement for the high variable locus. This study represents the first epidemiological data of molecular typing of B. abortus and B. canis reported in Korea.

  11. Transstadial transmission of Hepatozoon canis from larvae to nymphs of Rhipicephalus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Alessio; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Di Paola, Giancarlo; Mencke, Norbert; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Baneth, Gad; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-09-01

    Hepatozoon canis is an apicomplexan parasite of dogs, which is known to become infected by ingesting Rhipicephalus sanguineus adult ticks. To investigate the possibility of H. canis transovarial and transstadial transmission from larvae to nymphs, engorged adult female ticks were collected from a private animal shelter in southern Italy, where H. canis infection is highly prevalent. Female ticks (n=35) and egg batches were tested by PCR for H. canis. All eggs examined were PCR-negative whereas 88.6% of females from the environment tested positive. Additionally, fed larvae (n=120) from a dog naturally infected by H. canis were dissected at different time points post collection (i.e. 0, 10, 20 and 30 days). Molted nymphs dissected at 20 days post collection revealed immature oocysts displaying an amorphous central structure in 50% of the specimens, and oocysts containing sporocysts with sporozoites were found in 53.3% of the nymphs dissected at 30 days post collection. This study demonstrates that H. canis is not transmitted transovarially, but it is transmitted transstadially from larvae to nymphs of R. sanguineus and develops sporozoites in oocysts that may infect dogs.

  12. Novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis detected in samples of human blood bank donors in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bouza-Mora, Laura; Dolz, Gaby; Solórzano-Morales, Antony; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Salazar-Sánchez, Lizbeth; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the detection and identification of DNA and antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. in samples of blood bank donors in Costa Rica using molecular and serological techniques. Presence of Ehrlichia canis was determined in 10 (3.6%) out of 280 blood samples using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the ehrlichial dsb conserved gene. Analysis of the ehrlichial trp36 polymorphic gene in these 10 samples revealed substantial polymorphism among the E. canis genotypes, including divergent tandem repeat sequences. Nucleotide sequences of dsb and trp36 amplicons revealed a novel genotype of E. canis in blood bank donors from Costa Rica. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) detected antibodies in 35 (35%) of 100 serum samples evaluated. Thirty samples showed low endpoint titers (64-256) to E. canis, whereas five sera yielded high endpoint titers (1024-8192); these five samples were also E. canis-PCR positive. These findings represent the first report of the presence of E. canis in humans in Central America. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. ‘Peer pressure’ in larval Drosophila?

    PubMed Central

    Niewalda, Thomas; Jeske, Ines; Michels, Birgit; Gerber, Bertram

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on ‘peer pressure’, that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i) by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii) by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii) by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv) by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila. PMID:24907371

  14. Pattern of nipple use by puppies: A comparison of the dingo (Canis dingo) and the domestic dog (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Hudson, Robyn; Rödel, Heiko G; Elizalde, Marise Trejo; Arteaga, Lourdes; Kennedy, Gerard A; Smith, Bradley P

    2016-08-01

    Surprisingly little information is available about the behavior of newborn mammals in the functionally vital context of suckling. We have previously reported notable differences in the pattern of nipple use by kittens of the domestic cat and puppies of the domestic dog. Whereas kittens rapidly develop a "teat order," with each individual using principally 1 or 2 particular nipples, puppies show no such pattern. We asked whether the more "chaotic" behavior seen in puppies of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris) could be the result of relaxed selection due to domestication. In a first test of this hypothesis, we studied suckling behavior in 4 litters of wild-type captive dingoes (Canis dingo), a canid species that has inhabited the Australian mainland in substantial numbers for at least 5,000 years with minimal human influence. On all measures of individual puppies' behavior-time spent attached to nipples, lack of individual use of particular nipples and consequent absence of a teat order, lack of synchronized suckling with other littermates, lack of agonistic behavior-we found no differences between the 2 species. In conclusion, we suggest that the difference between the pattern of suckling behavior of kittens of the domestic cat (and other felids) and the domestic dog is not an artifact of domestication, but rather reflects phylogenetic differences between felids and canids as a consequence of their different lifestyles and associated patterns of parental care. These findings emphasize the need for comparative studies to avoid simplistic generalizations from 1 or 2 species across broad taxonomic groups. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Evolution of increased larval competitive ability in Drosophila melanogaster without increased larval feeding rate.

    PubMed

    Sarangi, Manaswini; Nagarajan, Archana; Dey, Snigdhadip; Bose, Joy; Joshi, Amitabh

    2016-09-01

    Multiple experimental evolution studies on Drosophila melanogaster in the 1980s and 1990s indicated that enhanced competitive ability evolved primarily through increased larval tolerance to nitrogenous wastes and increased larval feeding and foraging rate, at the cost of efficiency of food conversion to biomass, and this became the widely accepted view of how adaptation to larval crowding evolves in fruitflies.We recently showed that populations of D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta subjected to extreme larval crowding evolved greater competitive ability without evolving higher feeding rates, primarily through a combination of reduced larval duration, faster attainment of minimum critical size for pupation, greater efficiency of food conversion to biomass, increased pupation height and, perhaps, greater urea/ammonia tolerance. This was a very different suite of traits than that seen to evolve under similar selection in D. melanogaster and was closer to the expectations from the theory of K-selection. At that time, we suggested two possible reasons for the differences in the phenotypic correlates of greater competitive ability seen in the studies with D. melanogaster and the other two species. First, that D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta had a very different genetic architecture of traits affecting competitive ability compared to the long-term laboratory populations of D. melanogaster used in the earlier studies, either because the populations of the former two species were relatively recently wild-caught, or by virtue of being different species. Second, that the different evolutionary trajectories in D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta versus D. melanogaster were a reflection of differences in the manner in which larval crowding was imposed in the two sets of selection experiments. The D. melanogaster studies used a higher absolute density of eggs per unit volume of food, and a substantially larger total volume of food, than the studies on D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta. Here, we

  16. 78 FR 60813 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removing the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) From the List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    .... (2) Information concerning the genetics and taxonomy of the eastern wolf, Canis lycaon. (3...) Genetics and taxonomy; (b) New information concerning range, distribution, population size, and population...

  17. Comparative performance of SNP typing and 'Bruce-ladder' in the discrimination of Brucella suis and Brucella canis.

    PubMed

    Koylass, Mark S; King, Amanda C; Edwards-Smallbone, James; Gopaul, Krishna K; Perrett, Lorraine L; Whatmore, Adrian M

    2010-05-19

    Two novel molecular assays, 'Bruce-ladder' and SNP typing, have recently been described designed to differentiate isolates of the genus Brucella, causative organisms of the significant zoonotic disease brucellosis, at the species level. Differentiation of Brucella canis from Brucella suis by molecular approaches can be difficult and here we compare the performance of 'Bruce-ladder' and SNP typing in correctly identifying B. canis isolates. Both assays proved easy to perform but while 'Bruce-ladder' misidentifies a substantial proportion of B. canis isolates as B. suis, all B. canis isolates were correctly identified by SNP typing. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Brucella canis strain HSK A52141, isolated from the blood of an infected dog.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-So; Jeong, Wooseog; Jeoung, Hye-Young; Song, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyungtae; Beak, Jeong-Hun; Parisutham, Vinuselvi; Lee, Sung Kuk; Kim, Jong Wan; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Jung, Suk Chan; Her, Moon; An, Dong-Jun

    2012-09-01

    Brucella canis infection can be clinically inapparent in dogs, and when infection goes unnoticed, there is a chance for dog-to-human transmission. A new strain of B. canis was isolated from the blood of an infected dog in order to analyze the pathogenic mechanism, compare genetic properties, and develop new genetic tools for early diagnosis of canine brucellosis. Herein, we report the complete genome sequence of the strain B. canis HSK A52141. This is the second complete genome sequence and biological annotation available for a member of B. canis.

  19. Transmission of Ehrlichia canis by Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks feeding on dogs and on artificial membranes.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Josephus J; Stanneck, Dorothee; Luus, Herman G; Beugnet, Frederic; Wijnveld, Michiel; Jongejan, Frans

    2013-11-08

    A South African strain of Ehrlichia canis was isolated and used to infect a laboratory-bred Beagle dog. Rhipicephalus sanguineus nymphs, which fed on this dog, moulted to adult ticks which carried infection rates of E. canis between 12% and 19% and were used in a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments. Five groups of 6 dogs were challenged with the infected R. sanguineus ticks, which were removed 24h, 12h, 6h or 3h after the ticks had been released onto the dogs. The animals were monitored for fever and thrombocytopenia and were considered infected if they became serologically positive for E. canis antibodies as well as PCR positive for E. canis DNA. Seven dogs became infected with E. canis in the following groups: Group 1 (24h tick challenge) 1 out of 6; Group 2 (12h) 1 of 6; Group 3 (6h) 2 of 6; Group 4 (6h) 2 of 6 and Group 5 (3h) 1 out of 6. Six of those 7 infected dogs developed fever and a significant thrombocytopenia. One dog did not show any symptoms, but seroconverted and was found PCR positive on several occasions. Five additional dogs were PCR positive on one test sample only but were not considered infected because they did not develop any specific E. canis antibodies. In vitro, R. sanguineus ticks attached and fed on bovine blood through silicone membranes with attachment rates up to 72.5% after 24h increasing to 84.2% at 72 h. The ticks transmitted E. canis as soon as 8h post application as demonstrated by E. canis DNA found in the nutritive blood medium. In conclusion, transmission of E. canis by R. sanguineus ticks starts within a few hours after attachment, which is earlier than previously thought. These findings underpin the need for acaricides to provide either a repellent, an anti-attachment and/or a rapid killing effect against ticks in order to decrease the risk of transmission of E. canis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Diagnosis of Hepatozoon canis in young dogs by cytology and PCR

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatozoon canis is a widespread tick-borne protozoan affecting dogs. The diagnosis of H. canis infection is usually performed by cytology of blood or buffy coat smears, but this method may not be sensitive. Our study aimed to evaluate the best method to achieve a parasitological diagnosis of H. canis infection in a population of receptive young dogs, previously negative by cytology and exposed to tick infestation for one summer season. Results A total of 73 mongrel dogs and ten beagles younger than 18 months of age, living in an animal shelter in southern Italy where dogs are highly infested by Rhipicephalus sanguineus, were included in this study. In March-April 2009 and in October 2009, blood and bone marrow were sampled from each dog. Blood, buffy coat and bone marrow were examined by cytology only (at the first sampling) and also by PCR for H. canis (second sampling). In March-April 2009, only one dog was positive for H. canis by cytological examination, whereas in October 2009 (after the summer season), the overall incidence of H. canis infection by cytological examinations was 43.9%. Molecular tests carried out on samples taken in October 2009 showed a considerably higher number of dogs positive by PCR (from 27.7% up to 51.2% on skin and buffy coat tissues, respectively), with an overall positivity of 57.8%. All animals, but one, which were positive by cytology were also PCR-positive. PCR on blood or buffy coat detected the highest number of H. canis-positive dogs displaying a sensitivity of 85.7% for both tissues that increased up to 98% when used in parallel. Twenty-six (74.8%) out of the 28 H. canis-positive dogs presented hematological abnormalities, eosinophilia being the commonest alteration observed. Conclusions The results suggest that PCR on buffy coat and blood is the best diagnostic assay for detecting H. canis infection in dogs, although when PCR is not available, cytology on buffy coat should be preferred to blood smear evaluation

  1. A new PCR assay for the detection and differentiation of Babesia canis and Babesia vogeli.

    PubMed

    Annoscia, Giada; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Olivieri, Emanuela; Manfredi, Maria Teresa; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2017-10-01

    Babesia spp. are globally distributed tick-borne protozoan parasites that infect the red blood cells of a wide range of vertebrate hosts, including humans. Diagnosis of babesiosis is often impeded by the transient presence of the parasites in peripheral blood, as well as by their pleomorphic nature. Given the reports of an expanding and, in some cases, sympatric geographical distribution of Babesia canis and Babesia vogeli in dogs and associated vectors, in Europe, the development of time-efficient and cost-effective diagnostic tools to detect and differentiate these two species is warranted. In this study, we designed and developed a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the parasite cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene, for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of B. canis and B. vogeli. The analytical sensitivity of the PCR was evaluated using serial dilutions of genomic DNA extracted from individual and artificially mixed canine blood samples infected by B. canis (3×10(2) infected erythrocytes/ml, ie/ml) and B. vogeli (2.1×10(1) ie/ml). The analytical specificity of the assay was assessed using blood samples positive for Hepatozoon canis, Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, Babesia microti, Babesia rossi and Theileria annae (syn. Babesia vulpes). The clinical specificity of the PCR assay was evaluated on 147 blood samples from dogs and 128 tick specimens (Dermacentor reticulatus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato). Species-specific bands of the expected sizes (i.e., 750bp for B. canis and 450bp for B. vogeli), and two bands in the mixed blood samples were obtained. The PCR assay developed herein detected a low number of infected erythrocytes (i.e., 3×10(-2)B. canis, 2.1×10(-2)B. vogeli ie/ml). Of the 147 blood samples, nine (6.1%) were positive for B. canis and six (4.1%) for B. vogeli, whereas only one tick (D. reticulatus) was positive for B. canis. This PCR assay represents a rapid and reliable tool for the diagnosis of

  2. Parasites and cancers: parasite antigens as possible targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Darani, Hossein Yousofi; Yousefi, Morteza

    2012-12-01

    An adverse relationship between some parasite infections and cancer in the human population has been reported by different research groups. Anticancer activity of some parasites such as Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, Toxocara canis, Acantamoeba castellani and Plasmodium yoelii has been shown in experimental animals. Moreover, it has been shown that cancer-associated mucin-type O-glycan compositions are made by parasites, therefore cancers and parasites have common antigens. In this report anticancer activities of some parasites have been reviewed and the possible mechanisms of these actions have also been discussed.

  3. Larval development and settlement of a whale barnacle.

    PubMed

    Nogata, Yasuyuki; Matsumura, Kiyotaka

    2006-03-22

    Larval development and settlement of whale barnacles have not previously been described, unlike intertidal barnacles. Indeed, the mechanisms of the association between barnacles and whales have not been studied. Here we describe the larval development and settlement of the whale barnacle, Coronula diadema, and possible involvement of a cue from the host in inducing larval settlement. Eight-cell stage embryos were collected from C. diadema on a stranded humpback whale, incubated in filtered seawater for 7 days, and nauplius larvae hatched out. When fed with Chaetoceros gracilis, the nauplii developed to stage VI, and finally metamorphosed to the cypris stage. The larval development looked similar to that of intertidal barnacles with planktotrophic larval stages. The cyprids did not settle in normal seawater, but did settle in polystyrene Petri dishes when incubated in seawater with a small piece of skin tissue from the host whale. This strongly suggests the involvement of a chemical cue from the host whale tissue to induce larval settlement.

  4. Larval connectivity and the international management of fisheries.

    PubMed

    Kough, Andrew S; Paris, Claire B; Butler, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the oceanic dispersal of planktonic larvae that connect scattered marine animal populations is difficult, yet crucial for management of species whose movements transcend international boundaries. Using multi-scale biophysical modeling techniques coupled with empirical estimates of larval behavior and gamete production, we predict and empirically verify spatio-temporal patterns of larval supply and describe the Caribbean-wide pattern of larval connectivity for the Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus), an iconic coral reef species whose commercial value approaches $1 billion USD annually. Our results provide long sought information needed for international cooperation in the management of marine resources by identifying lobster larval connectivity and dispersal pathways throughout the Caribbean. Moreover, we outline how large-scale fishery management could explicitly recognize metapopulation structure by considering larval transport dynamics and pelagic larval sanctuaries.

  5. Larval Connectivity and the International Management of Fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Kough, Andrew S.; Paris, Claire B.; Butler, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the oceanic dispersal of planktonic larvae that connect scattered marine animal populations is difficult, yet crucial for management of species whose movements transcend international boundaries. Using multi-scale biophysical modeling techniques coupled with empirical estimates of larval behavior and gamete production, we predict and empirically verify spatio-temporal patterns of larval supply and describe the Caribbean-wide pattern of larval connectivity for the Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus), an iconic coral reef species whose commercial value approaches $1 billion USD annually. Our results provide long sought information needed for international cooperation in the management of marine resources by identifying lobster larval connectivity and dispersal pathways throughout the Caribbean. Moreover, we outline how large-scale fishery management could explicitly recognize metapopulation structure by considering larval transport dynamics and pelagic larval sanctuaries. PMID:23762273

  6. First detection and molecular characterization of Ehrlichia canis from dogs in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Kamani, Joshua; Lee, Chung-Chan; Haruna, Ayuba M; Chung, Ping-Jun; Weka, Paul R; Chung, Yang-Tsung

    2013-02-01

    The present study aimed to detect the presence of Ehrlichia canis in naturally infected dogs in Nigeria, using a combination of PCR and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and two genes encoding the tandem repeat-containing proteins (TRPs), TRP19 and TRP36. Out of a total of 100 blood samples collected from domestic dogs presented to veterinary hospitals in Jos, the capital city of Plateau State of Nigeria, 11 were positive in nested PCR for E. canis. Sequencing results for these amplicons showed that all of the 16S rDNA sequences (1623 bp) or the TRP19 coding sequences (414 bp) were identical to each other and had very high similarities (99.3-100%) with those from other E. canis strains accessible in GenBank. The TRP36 gene sequences derived from the 11 Nigerian isolates were identical to each other except for the number of the 27-bp repeat unit in a tandem repeat region, which was found to be 8, 12 or 18. Without considering the number of tandem repeats, these sequences had 100% identity to that of the reported Cameroon 71 isolate, but distinctly differed from those obtained from other geographically distant E. canis strains previously published. A phylogenetic tree of E. canis based on the TRP36 amino acid sequences showed that the Nigerian isolates and the Cameroon 71 isolate fell into a separate clade, indicating that they may share a common ancestor. Overall, this study not only provides the first molecular evidence of E. canis infections in dogs from Nigeria but also highlights the value of the TRP36 gene as a tool to classify E. canis isolates and to elucidate their phylogeographic relationships.

  7. C-reactive protein and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein levels in dogs infected with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed Central

    Rikihisa, Y; Yamamoto, S; Kwak, I; Iqbal, Z; Kociba, G; Mott, J; Chichanasiriwithaya, W

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate whether acute-phase protein responses occur in dogs infected with Ehrlichia canis, C-reactive protein (CRP) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) levels were serially measured in the plasma of five dogs experimentally inoculated with E. canis and 10 sham-inoculated or noninoculated control dogs. The CRP concentration was measured by a canine-specific capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the AAG concentration was measured by a canine-specific radial immunodiffusion method. In all E. canis-inoculated dogs, a 3.3- to 6.5-fold increase in the plasma CRP concentration and a 1.9- to 8.6-fold increase in the plasma AAG concentration over the preinoculation level occurred at days 4 to 6 postexposure. Despite the persistence of E. canis and high antibody titers, both CRP and AAG concentrations gradually declined to preexposure levels by day 34 postexposure. E. canis-infected dogs had mild and transient clinical signs which resolved without treatment by day 14 postexposure. The CRP and AAG concentrations in control inoculated or nontreated dogs remained within the normal range throughout the experimental period. Of 12 dogs naturally infected with E. canis, 75% had greater than 50 micrograms of CRP per ml and 83% had greater than 500 micrograms of AAG per ml. All of these 12 dogs had chronic and severe clinical signs of canine ehrlichiosis. Thus, elevations in the levels of acute-phase proteins occur in both acute and chronic canine ehrlichiosis. Determination of CRP and AAG concentrations may help in assessing the severity of inflammatory damage in dogs with E. canis infections. PMID:8027343

  8. Inter-specific territoriality in a Canis hybrid zone: spatial segregation between wolves, coyotes, and hybrids.

    PubMed

    Benson, John F; Patterson, Brent R

    2013-12-01

    Gray wolves (Canis lupus) and coyotes (Canis latrans) generally exhibit intraspecific territoriality manifesting in spatial segregation between adjacent packs. However, previous studies have found a high degree of interspecific spatial overlap between sympatric wolves and coyotes. Eastern wolves (Canis lycaon) are the most common wolf in and around Algonquin Provincial Park (APP), Ontario, Canada and hybridize with sympatric gray wolves and coyotes. We hypothesized that all Canis types (wolves, coyotes, and hybrids) exhibit a high degree of spatial segregation due to greater genetic, morphologic, and ecological similarities between wolves and coyotes in this hybrid system compared with western North American ecosystems. We used global positioning system telemetry and probabilistic measures of spatial overlap to investigate spatial segregation between adjacent Canis packs. Our hypothesis was supported as: (1) the probability of locating wolves, coyotes, and hybrids within home ranges ([Formula: see text] = 0.05) or core areas ([Formula: see text] < 0.01) of adjacent packs was low; and (2) the amount of shared space use was negligible. Spatial segregation did not vary substantially in relation to genotypes of adjacent packs or local environmental conditions (i.e., harvest regulations or road densities). We provide the first telemetry-based demonstration of spatial segregation between wolves and coyotes, highlighting the novel relationships between Canis types in the Ontario hybrid zone relative to areas where wolves and coyotes are reproductively isolated. Territoriality among Canis may increase the likelihood of eastern wolves joining coyote and hybrid packs, facilitate hybridization, and could play a role in limiting expansion of the genetically distinct APP eastern wolf population.

  9. Digital Gene Expression Analysis of Microsporum canis Exposed to Berberine Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chen-Wen; Ji, Quan-An; Wei, Qiang; Liu, Yan; Pan, Li-Jun; Bao, Guo-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, a natural isoquinoline alkaloid of many medicinal herbs, has an active function against a variety of microbial infections including Microsporum canis (M. canis). However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. To study the effect of berberine chloride on M. canis infection, a Digital Gene Expression (DGE) tag profiling was constructed and a transcriptome analysis of the M. canis cellular responses upon berberine treatment was performed. Illimina/Hisseq sequencing technique was used to generate the data of gene expression profile, and the following enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology (GO) and Pathway function were conducted based on the data of transcriptome. The results of DGE showed that there were 8476945, 14256722, 7708575, 5669955, 6565513 and 9303468 tags respectively, which was obtained from M. canis incubated with berberine or control DMSO. 8,783 genes were totally mapped, and 1,890 genes have shown significant changes between the two groups. 1,030 genes were up-regulated and 860 genes were down-regulated (P<0.05) in berberine treated group compared to the control group. Besides, twenty-three GO terms were identified by Gene Ontology functional enrichment analysis, such as calcium-transporting ATPase activity, 2-oxoglutarate metabolic process, valine catabolic process, peroxisome and unfolded protein binding. Pathway significant enrichment analysis indicated 6 signaling pathways that are significant, including steroid biosynthesis, steroid hormone biosynthesis, Parkinson’s disease, 2,4-Dichlorobenzoate degradation, and tropane, piperidine and Isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis. Among these, eleven selected genes were further verified by qRT-PCR. Our findings provide a comprehensive view on the gene expression profile of M. canis upon berberine treatment, and shed light on its complicated effects on M. canis. PMID:25874937

  10. First molecular evidence of Hepatozoon canis infection in red foxes and golden jackals from Hungary.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Róbert; Solymosi, Norbert; Takács, Nóra; Hornyák, Ákos; Hornok, Sándor; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Baneth, Gad

    2014-07-02

    Recently, Hepatozoon canis infection has been detected among shepherd, hunting and stray dogs in the southern part of Hungary, which is considered to be free of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato and close to the border with Croatia. The aim of this study was to acquire information on the possibility that red foxes and/or golden jackals could play a role in the appearance and spread of H. canis in Hungary. A conventional PCR was used to amplify a 666 bp long fragment of the Hepatozoon 18S rRNA gene from blood samples collected from 334 foxes shot in 231 locations in 16 counties and 15 golden jackals shot in 9 locations in two southwestern counties close to Croatia. A second PCR assay was performed in some of the samples positive by the first PCR to amplify a larger segment (approximately 1500 bp) of the 18S rRNA gene of Hepatozoon spp. for further phylogenetic analysis. Hepatozoon infection was detected in canids shot in 30 locations and 9 counties. Altogether 26 foxes (8.0%, 95% CI: 5-11%) and 9 jackals (60%, 95% CI: 33-81%) were PCR positive. Hepatozoon canis sequences were obtained from 12 foxes and 7 jackals. DNA sequences from 16 animals were 99-100% similar to H. canis from Croatian foxes or dogs while two of the sequences were 99% similar to an Italian fox. Half (13/26) of the infected red foxes and all golden jackals were shot in the two southwestern counties. This is the first report on molecular evidence of H. canis in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and golden jackals (Canis aureus) from Hungary, which is considered free from the tick vector of H. canis, R. sanguineus. Although no R. sanguineus sensu lato had been found on infected or non-infected wild canids, the detection of authochnous canine hepatozoonosis in Hungary might imply that the range of R. sanguineus sensu lato has reached this country.

  11. Phylogeography of the Golden Jackal (Canis aureus) in India.

    PubMed

    Yumnam, Bibek; Negi, Tripti; Maldonado, Jesús E; Fleischer, Robert C; Jhala, Yadvendradev V

    2015-01-01

    The golden jackal (Canis aureus) is one of the most common and widely distributed carnivores in India but phylogeographic studies on the species have been limited across its range. Recent studies have observed absence of mitochondrial (mt) DNA diversity in European populations while some North African populations of golden jackal were found to carry gray wolf (Canis lupus lupaster) mtDNA lineages. In the present study, we sequenced 440 basepairs (bp) of control region (CR) and 412 bp of cytochrome b (cyt b) gene of mtDNA from 62 golden jackals sampled from India (n = 55), Israel (n = 2) and Bulgaria (n = 5), to obtain a total of eighteen haplotypes, comprising sixteen from India and one each from Israel and Bulgaria. Except for three previously described haplotypes represented by one cyt b and one CR haplotype both from India, and one CR haplotype from Bulgaria, all haplotypes identified in this study are new. Genetic diversity was high in golden jackals compared to that reported for other canids in India. Unlike the paraphyletic status of African conspecifics with the gray wolf, the Indian (and other Eurasian) golden jackal clustered in a distinct but shallow monophyletic clade, displaying no evidence of admixture with sympatric and related gray wolf and domestic dog clades in the region. Phylogeographic analyses indicated no clear pattern of genetic structuring of the golden jackal haplotypes and the median joining network revealed a star-shaped polytomy indicative of recent expansion of the species from India. Indian haplotypes were observed to be interior and thus ancestral compared to haplotypes from Europe and Israel, which were peripheral and hence more derived. Molecular tests for demographic expansion confirmed a recent event of expansion of golden jackals in the Indian subcontinent, which can be traced back ~ 37,000 years ago during the late Pleistocene. Our results suggest that golden jackals have had a potentially longer evolutionary history in India

  12. Phylogeography of the Golden Jackal (Canis aureus) in India

    PubMed Central

    Yumnam, Bibek; Negi, Tripti; Maldonado, Jesús E.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Jhala, Yadvendradev V.

    2015-01-01

    The golden jackal (Canis aureus) is one of the most common and widely distributed carnivores in India but phylogeographic studies on the species have been limited across its range. Recent studies have observed absence of mitochondrial (mt) DNA diversity in European populations while some North African populations of golden jackal were found to carry gray wolf (Canis lupus lupaster) mtDNA lineages. In the present study, we sequenced 440 basepairs (bp) of control region (CR) and 412 bp of cytochrome b (cyt b) gene of mtDNA from 62 golden jackals sampled from India (n = 55), Israel (n = 2) and Bulgaria (n = 5), to obtain a total of eighteen haplotypes, comprising sixteen from India and one each from Israel and Bulgaria. Except for three previously described haplotypes represented by one cyt b and one CR haplotype both from India, and one CR haplotype from Bulgaria, all haplotypes identified in this study are new. Genetic diversity was high in golden jackals compared to that reported for other canids in India. Unlike the paraphyletic status of African conspecifics with the gray wolf, the Indian (and other Eurasian) golden jackal clustered in a distinct but shallow monophyletic clade, displaying no evidence of admixture with sympatric and related gray wolf and domestic dog clades in the region. Phylogeographic analyses indicated no clear pattern of genetic structuring of the golden jackal haplotypes and the median joining network revealed a star-shaped polytomy indicative of recent expansion of the species from India. Indian haplotypes were observed to be interior and thus ancestral compared to haplotypes from Europe and Israel, which were peripheral and hence more derived. Molecular tests for demographic expansion confirmed a recent event of expansion of golden jackals in the Indian subcontinent, which can be traced back ~ 37,000 years ago during the late Pleistocene. Our results suggest that golden jackals have had a potentially longer evolutionary history in India

  13. AntigenMap 3D: an online antigenic cartography resource.

    PubMed

    Barnett, J Lamar; Yang, Jialiang; Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Antigenic cartography is a useful technique to visualize and minimize errors in immunological data by projecting antigens to 2D or 3D cartography. However, a 2D cartography may not be sufficient to capture the antigenic relationship from high-dimensional immunological data. AntigenMap 3D presents an online, interactive, and robust 3D antigenic cartography construction and visualization resource. AntigenMap 3D can be applied to identify antigenic variants and vaccine strain candidates for pathogens with rapid antigenic variations, such as influenza A virus. http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap3D

  14. Critical analysis of vector-borne infections in dogs: Babesia vogeli, Babesia gibsoni, Ehrlichia canis and Hepatozoon canis in Punjab, India.

    PubMed

    Singla, Lachhman Das; Sumbria, Deepak; Mandhotra, Ajay; Bal, M S; Kaur, Paramjit

    2016-12-01

    There are few published studies on various vector borne diseases of dogs in India and most depict clinical infection in dogs, diagnosed by observation of the haemopathogens in stained blood smears. This study provides the first report regarding molecular confirmation and ancestral relationship analysis of blood smears positive cases of assorted haemopathogens in Punjab province of India. On blood smear examination, haemopathogens were observed in 124 out of 778 (15.95%, 95% CI: 13.53- 18.68) blood smears. Further polymerase chain reactions (PCR) was used on bloods smear positive cases to validate the results. Out of 778 blood samples, Babesia gibsoni was most common parasite infecting dogs (15.04%, 95% CI: 12.7-17.72), followed by Ehrlichia canis (0.39%, 95% CI: 0.0-1.13), infection of Babesia vogeli and Hepatozoon canis was same (0.26%, 95% CI: 0.0-0.9). Among various risk factors studied (age, sex, season), prevalence of infection was non-significantly higher in 1-2 year of age group (19.88%, 95% CI: 14.45-26.71), regarding sex same prevalence was recorded (15.94%), and chances of infection was highest in pre-monsoon i.e. summer (18.26%, 95% CI: 14.49-22.76). Phylogenetic analysis revealed ancestral background of Ludhiana isolates of B. vogeli, B. gibsoni, H. canis, and E. canis with the isolates of Philippines, Mongolia and Tunisia.

  15. Development and ultrastructure of Cystoisospora canis Nemeséri, 1959 (syn, Isospora canis) monozoic cysts in two noncanine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sheila M; Zajac, Anne M; Lindsay, David S

    2009-08-01

    Cystoisospora canis is a coccidial parasite of the intestinal tract that can cause severe disease in dogs. Clinical signs include watery diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and weight loss. Extraintestinal stages of Cystoisospora spp. have been demonstrated in the mesenteric lymph nodes of paratenic hosts. Information on the biology of extraintestinal stages of canine Cystoisospora species is limited. The current study examined the development of C. canis in 2 noncanine cell lines and the ultrastructure of the monozoic cysts that formed. Monolayers of bovine turbinate cells and African green monkey kidney cells were grown on coverslips and inoculated with excysted C. canis sporozoites. Coverslips were collected on various days and fixed and stained for light microscopy (LM) or transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A single, centrally located, slightly crescent-shaped sporozoite surrounded by a thick cyst wall within a parasitophorous vacuole was observed with the use of LM and TEM. No division and no multinucleated stages were observed with either LM or TEM. With TEM, typical organelles of sporozoites were observed, such as rhoptries, dense granules, a crystalloid body, polysaccharide granules, and a conoid. The structure and ultrastructure of C. canis monozoic cysts produced in vitro are similar to extraintestinal cysts of other Cystoisospora species in experimentally infected animals and those of Cystoisospora belli observed in immunocompromised humans. This is the first study that fully demonstrates in vitro the development of what structurally resemble extraintestinal cysts of a Cystoisospora spp.

  16. Evaluating sampling strategies for larval cisco (Coregonus artedi)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, J.T.; Stockwell, J.D.; Yule, D.L.; Black, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    To improve our ability to assess larval cisco (Coregonus artedi) populations in Lake Superior, we conducted a study to compare several sampling strategies. First, we compared density estimates of larval cisco concurrently captured in surface waters with a 2 x 1-m paired neuston net and a 0.5-m (diameter) conical net. Density estimates obtained from the two gear types were not significantly different, suggesting that the conical net is a reasonable alternative to the more cumbersome and costly neuston net. Next, we assessed the effect of tow pattern (sinusoidal versus straight tows) to examine if propeller wash affected larval density. We found no effect of propeller wash on the catchability of larval cisco. Given the availability of global positioning systems, we recommend sampling larval cisco using straight tows to simplify protocols and facilitate straightforward measurements of volume filtered. Finally, we investigated potential trends in larval cisco density estimates by sampling four time periods during the light period of a day at individual sites. Our results indicate no significant trends in larval density estimates during the day. We conclude estimates of larval cisco density across space are not confounded by time at a daily timescale. Well-designed, cost effective surveys of larval cisco abundance will help to further our understanding of this important Great Lakes forage species.

  17. A prototype of the direct agglutination test kit (DAT-Canis) for the serological diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Edward; Saliba, Juliana Wilke; Oliveira, Diana; Dias, Edelberto Santos; Paz, Gustavo Fontes

    2016-05-15

    This report describes the stege I/II development of a new direct agglutination test (DAT) for the diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) using freeze-dried antigen produced Coomassie blue-stained Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum promastigotes. In stage I, 16 canine serum samples, collected from eight dogs carrying CVL and eight healthy dogs, were assessed with the DAT using 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME), N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), kaolin or NAC plus urea (NAC+U) to improve the assay conditions. Stage II assessed the diagnostic accuracy with 100 serum samples collected from dogs with symptomatic CVL and clinically healthy dogs, comparing the four different sample diluents. The CVL-DAT prototype kit showed equivalent performances when 2-ME, NAC or NAC+U were used: 97.1% sensitivity (CI: 83-99.8%), 97% specificity (CI: 88.5-99.5%) and a 97% diagnostic accuracy (CI: 90.8-99.2). With kaolin, a 94.1% sensitivity (CI: 79-99%), 97% specificity (CI: 88.5-99.5%) and 96% diagnostic accuracy were observed (CI: 89.5-98.7), with no statistically significant differences among the four reagents (p=1.0). The NAC plus urea in sample diluent decreased non-specific agglutination, promoted a better defined sharp-edged blue spot and was thus chosen as a component for the new DAT prototype to diagnose canine VL, designated DAT-Canis.

  18. Serological reactivity to Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Neorickettsia risticii, Borrelia burgdorferi and Rickettsia conorii in dogs from northwestern Spain.

    PubMed

    Amusategui, Inmaculada; Tesouro, Miguel A; Kakoma, Ibulaimu; Sainz, Angel

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the seroprevalence against Ehrlichia canis (Ec), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Ap), Neorickettsia risticii (Nr), Rickettsia conorii (Rc), and Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) in two different clusters of canine samples from Northwestern Spain. Cluster 1 included 479 dogs presented at veterinary clinics located in Ourense and Pontevedra. Cluster II included 170 dogs from the public kennel of Ourense. All 649 canine serum samples were analyzed by immunofluorescent antibody test. Prevalences against the above-mentioned agents in cluster I were: Rc (24.6%), Bb (6.26%), Ec (3.13%), Ap (5.01%), and Nr (1.04%), whereas for cluster II were: Rc (50%), Bb (8.8%), Ec (54.7%), Ap (45.3%), and Nr (4.7%). Rc was significantly associated with age and history of exposure to ticks, and Bb showed a statistical relationship with age and clinical status. Ec and Ap were related to the occupation of the dogs, with stray dogs being the most frequently seropositive. Furthermore, seroreactivity against Ec and Ap was significantly higher in Ourense than in Pontevedra. The univariate analysis demonstrated a significant concomitant seroreactivity between Ec and Ap and between Rc and Ec and Ap antigens. The seroreactivity to Nr must be interpreted very cautiously as this infectious agent has been seldom reported outside North America.

  19. Dances with anthrax: wolves (Canis lupus) kill anthrax bacteremic plains bison (Bison bison bison) in southwestern Montana.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Jason K; Asher, Valpa; Stokke, Stephen; Hunter, David L; Alexander, Kathleen A

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the cause of anthrax, was recovered from two plains bison (Bison bison bison) cows killed by wolves (Canis lupus) in Montana, USA, without associated wolf mortality in July 2010. This bison herd experienced an epizootic in summer 2008, killing ∼ 8% of the herd, the first documented in the region in several decades. No wolf deaths were associated with the 2008 event. Surveillance has continued since 2008, with research, ranch, and wildlife personnel diligent during summer. As part of this, we tested wolf-killed bison and elk (Cervus elaphus) for anthrax during the 2010 summer using lateral flow immunochromatographic assays (LFIA). Two bison cows were positive for protective antigen, confirming active bacteremia. The LFIA results were confirmed with traditional bacteriology recovering viable B. anthracis. No wolf fatalities were associated with the bison deaths, despite consuming the meat. Low-level anthrax occurrence in large, rough terrain landscapes remains difficult to detect, particularly if mortality in the herbivore host is not a consequence of infection. In these instances, surveillance of predators with large home ranges may provide a more sensitive indicator of anthrax emergence or reemergence in such systems. Though speculative, it is also possible that anthrax infection in the bison increased predation risk. These results also suggest B. anthracis remains a threat to wildlife and associated livestock in southwestern Montana.

  20. The 33.1 kDa Excretory/secretory Protein Produced by Toxocara canis Larvae Serves as a Potential Common Biomarker for Serodiagnosis of Toxocariasis in Paratenic Animals and Human

    PubMed Central

    NGUYEN, Huu-Hung; VO, Doan-Trung; THAI, Thi-Tuyet-Trinh; LE, Thi-Thanh-Thao; LE, Thanh-Dong; HOANG, Nghia-Son

    2017-01-01

    Background: Toxocariasis is a prevalent zoonosis disease caused by the closely related nematode species Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati which parasitise Canidae and Felidae respectively. In paratenic hosts, larvae of these worms cause multiple organ damage. However, how these paratenic hosts response to these worms and whether any common biomarker can be applied for diagnosis are still unclear. Methods: Excreted/secreted (E/S) antigens were prepared by culture of T. canis larvae in vitro. Using a western blot (WB) assay the humoral IgG responses, induced by Toxocara spp. larvae to the worm’s E/S antigens in different infected hosts including mice, rabbits and human, were examined. Results: In a mouse model of toxocariasis, intraperitoneal injection of T. canis larvae induces inflammatory leukocyte accumulation in the liver and the lungs but not in the brain, although a remarkable number of larvae were detected in this organ. Mice and rabbits responded differently to Toxocara spp. resulting in distinct heterogenous WB band patterns. Mice and rabbits both responded to a 33.1 kDa E/S constituent that turned out to be the most sensitive protein for serodiagnosis. Sera from human toxocariasis patients showed heterogenous WB band patterns similar to those observed in rabbits and all responded to the 33.1 kDa band. Conclusion: 33.1 kDa E/S protein can be considered as a critical common biomarker for toxocariasis immuno-diagnosis in both paratenic animals and human and its specificity requires further investigation. PMID:28761463

  1. Microarray gene expression analysis reveals major differences between Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati neurotoxocarosis and involvement of T. canis in lipid biosynthetic processes.

    PubMed

    Janecek, Elisabeth; Wilk, Esther; Schughart, Klaus; Geffers, Robert; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati are globally occurring intestinal nematodes of dogs and cats with a high zoonotic potential. Migrating larvae in the CNS of paratenic hosts, including humans, may cause neurotoxocarosis resulting in a variety of neurological symptoms. Toxocara canis exhibits a stronger affinity to the CNS than T. cati, causing more severe neurological symptoms in the mouse model. Pathomechanisms of neurotoxocarosis as well as host responses towards the respective parasite are mostly unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterise the pathogenesis at a transcriptional level using whole genome microarray expression analysis and identify differences and similarities between T. canis- and T. cati-infected brains. Microarray analysis was conducted in cerebra and cerebella of infected C57Bl/6J mice 42daysp.i. revealing more differentially transcribed genes for T. canis- than T. cati-infected brains. In cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice, a total of 2304 and 1954 differentially transcribed genes, respectively, were identified whereas 113 and 760 differentially transcribed genes were determined in cerebra and cerebella of T. cati-infected mice. Functional annotation analysis revealed major differences in host responses in terms of significantly enriched biological modules. Up-regulated genes were mainly associated with the terms "immune and defence response", "sensory perception" as well as "behaviour/taxis" retrieved from the Gene Ontology database. These observations indicate a strong immune response in both infection groups with T. cati-infected brains revealing less severe reactions. Down-regulated genes in T. canis-infected cerebra and cerebella revealed a significant enrichment for the Gene Ontology term "lipid/cholesterol biosynthetic process". Cholesterol is a highly abundant and important component in the brain, representing several functions. Disturbances of synthesis as well as concentration changes may lead to

  2. Adaptive locomotor behavior in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Portugues, Ruben; Engert, Florian

    2011-01-01

    In this study we report that larval zebrafish display adaptive locomotor output that can be driven by unexpected visual feedback. We develop a new assay that addresses visuomotor integration in restrained larval zebrafish. The assay involves a closed-loop environment in which the visual feedback a larva receives depends on its own motor output in a way that resembles freely swimming conditions. The experimenter can control the gain of this closed feedback loop, so that following a given motor output the larva experiences more or less visual feedback depending on whether the gain is high or low. We show that increases and decreases in this gain setting result in adaptive changes in behavior that lead to a generalized decrease or increase of motor output, respectively. Our behavioral analysis shows that both the duration and tail beat frequency of individual swim bouts can be modified, as well as the frequency with which bouts are elicited. These changes can be implemented rapidly, following an exposure to a new gain of just 175 ms. In addition, modifications in some behavioral parameters accumulate over tens of seconds and effects last for at least 30 s from trial to trial. These results suggest that larvae establish an internal representation of the visual feedback expected from a given motor output and that the behavioral modifications are driven by an error signal that arises from the discrepancy between this expectation and the actual visual feedback. The assay we develop presents a unique possibility for studying visuomotor integration using imaging techniques available in the larval zebrafish.

  3. Adaptive Locomotor Behavior in Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Portugues, Ruben; Engert, Florian

    2011-01-01

    In this study we report that larval zebrafish display adaptive locomotor output that can be driven by unexpected visual feedback. We develop a new assay that addresses visuomotor integration in restrained larval zebrafish. The assay involves a closed-loop environment in which the visual feedback a larva receives depends on its own motor output in a way that resembles freely swimming conditions. The experimenter can control the gain of this closed feedback loop, so that following a given motor output the larva experiences more or less visual feedback depending on whether the gain is high or low. We show that increases and decreases in this gain setting result in adaptive changes in behavior that lead to a generalized decrease or increase of motor output, respectively. Our behavioral analysis shows that both the duration and tail beat frequency of individual swim bouts can be modified, as well as the frequency with which bouts are elicited. These changes can be implemented rapidly, following an exposure to a new gain of just 175 ms. In addition, modifications in some behavioral parameters accumulate over tens of seconds and effects last for at least 30 s from trial to trial. These results suggest that larvae establish an internal representation of the visual feedback expected from a given motor output and that the behavioral modifications are driven by an error signal that arises from the discrepancy between this expectation and the actual visual feedback. The assay we develop presents a unique possibility for studying visuomotor integration using imaging techniques available in the larval zebrafish. PMID:21909325

  4. Microhabitat influence on larval fish assemblages within ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We examined larval and juvenile fish assemblage structure in relation to microhabitat variables within the St. Louis River estuary, a drowned river mouth of Lake Superior. Fish were sampled in vegetated beds throughout the estuary, across a gradient of vegetation types and densities (including disturbed, preserved and post-restoration sites). Canonical correspondence analysis, relating species abundances to environmental variables revealed that plant species richness, turbidity and aquatic plant cover were most influential in structuring assemblages. Results from this microhabitat analysis at this crucial life stage has potential to inform wetland restoration efforts within the St. Louis River and other Great Lake coastal wetlands. not applicable

  5. Burrowing activities of the larval lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawyer, Philip J.

    1959-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1950 of Applegate's work on the sea lamprey in Michigan (U. S. Fish and Wildl. Serv., Spec. Sci. Rept.; Fish, No. 55) and the subsequent development of means to control lampreys in the Great Lakes, biologists have accumulated much additional information on adult lampreys. Larval lampreys, however, are difficult animals to observe in the field, and many facets of their behavior are still unknown. While working with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, I kept ammocetes in captivity, and was able to observe their burrowing activities.

  6. Larval morphology of Metaphycus flavus and its role in host attachment and larval cannibalism.

    PubMed

    Tena, A; Kapranas, A; Walker, G P; Garcia-Marí, F; Luck, R F

    2011-06-01

    Metaphycus flavus (Howard) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) is a facultatively gregarious endoparasitoid of soft scales (Hemiptera: Coccidae). When it develops in superparasitised hosts, the larvae often attack and consume brood mates six or more days post oviposition. Under our laboratory conditions (25±1°C and 14 hours of light followed by 18±1°C and ten hours of darkness in 50-70% R.H.), M. flavus eggs hatched three days after oviposition. Measurements of the mandibles and tentorium indicate there are four larval instars, and M. flavus reaches the fourth instar by day six post oviposition, and pupates on day eight. Thus, cannibalism among M. flavus larvae occurs during the fourth instar. During this instar, M. flavus larvae separate from their attachment to the scale cuticle, to which they were tethered by a respiratory structure during the previous three larval instars. Once detached, they are free to move within the scale, which increases the probability of larval encounters and aggressive behaviours. Moreover, the mandibles of the fourth instar are better adapted for fighting than are those of the first three larval instars, since they are larger and more sclerotized. The cranium and mouthparts of M. flavus have four different types of sensory organs, some of which are almost certainly olfactory, an unexpected function for a larva that presumably is surrounded by an aqueous medium where gustatory sensilla would seem to be more appropriate. The cranium also bears two pairs of what appear to be secretory pores.

  7. Maternal diet and larval diet influence survival skills of larval red drum Sciaenops ocellatus.

    PubMed

    Perez, K O; Fuiman, L A

    2015-04-01

    Larval red drum Sciaenops ocellatus survival, turning rate, routine swimming speed, escape response latency and escape response distance were significantly correlated with essential fatty-acid (EFA) concentrations in eggs. Of the five traits that varied with egg EFA content, two (escape response latency and routine swimming speed) were significantly different when larvae were fed enriched diets compared with the low fatty-acid diet, indicating that the larval diet can compensate for some imbalances in egg composition. Turning rate during routine swimming and escape response distance, however, did not change when larvae predicted to have low performance (based on egg composition) were fed an enriched diet, indicating that these effects of egg composition may be irreversible. Escape response distances and survival rates of larvae predicted to perform well (based on egg composition) and fed highly enriched diets were lower than expected, suggesting that high levels of EFA intake can be detrimental. Altogether, these results suggest that both maternal diet, which is responsible for egg EFA composition, and larval diet may play a role in larval survivorship and recruitment.

  8. Isolation of Microsporum canis from the hair coat of pet dogs and cats belonging to owners diagnosed with M. canis tinea corporis.

    PubMed

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Romito, Diana; Capelli, Gioia; Guillot, Jacques; Otranto, Domenico

    2006-10-01

    Microsporum canis has been frequently isolated from human cases of tinea capitis and tinea corporis. The infection may be acquired from infected animals with cutaneous lesions but also from asymptomatic carriers or from the environment. As asymptomatic M. canis carriers are considered to be a critical factor in the epidemiology of dermatophytosis in humans, this study investigated the relationship between the presence of dermatophytes on the hair coats of dogs and cats without cutaneous lesions and the occurrence of the disease in their respective owners. A total of 136 dogs and 248 cats were sampled from January 1999 to January 2005. Seventy-eight animals (22 dogs and 56 cats) belonged to individuals affected by tinea corporis caused by M. canis and 306 (114 dogs and 192 cats) to individuals without dermatophytosis. Age, sex, breed, habitat and season were recorded for each animal and examined as potential risk factors. Dermatophytes were isolated from 20.5% of the dogs and 28.2% of the cats. Microsporum canis was isolated from 36.4% of dogs cohabiting with owners diagnosed with tinea corporis but it was never isolated from dogs whose owners had no lesions. By contrast, M. canis was isolated from 53.6% of cats cohabiting with owners diagnosed with tinea corporis and from 14.6% of cats whose owners had no signs of the disease. These results clearly indicate that both cats and dogs should be considered as a major source of pathogenic dermatophytes for humans even when they do not present clinical signs of dermatophytosis.

  9. Primary alveolar echinococcosis: course of larval development and antibody responses in intermediate host rodents with different genetic backgrounds after oral infection with eggs of Echinococcus multilocularis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Jun; Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Oku, Yuzaburo; Yagi, Kinpei

    2010-09-01

    We investigated parasite establishment, subsequent larval development and antibody responses in gerbils, cotton rats and 4 inbred mouse strains until 16 weeks post inoculation (p.i.) with 200 eggs of Echinococcus multilocularis. The rate of parasite establishment in the liver determined at 4 weeks p.i. was highest in DBA/2, followed by AKR/N, C57BL/10 and C57BL/6 mice, whereas gerbils harboured few parasite foci. The accurate number of liver lesions in cotton rats could not be determined due to rapid growth and advanced multivesiculation of the parasite observed at 2 weeks p.i. The course of larval development was most advanced in DBA/2 mice with mature protoscolex formation at 16 weeks p.i., followed by AKR/N harbouring metacestodes with sparsely distributed immature protoscoleces. On the other hand, C57BL/6 and C57BL/10 mice had infertile metacestodes without any protoscolex formation. The parasite growth in mice was totally slower than those in gerbils and cotton rats. Specific IgG and IgM responses against 3 types of native crude antigens of larval E. multilocularis were evaluated using somatic extracts of and vesicle fluid of metacestode, and somatic extracts from purified protoscoleces. The 4 mouse strains demonstrated basically similar kinetics with apparent IgG and IgM increases at 9 weeks p.i. and thereafter, except C57BL/10, exhibited higher levels of IgM against crude antigens at some time point of infection. On the other hand, a follow-up determination of specific IgG and IgM levels against recombinant antigens from larval E. multilocularis revealed that each mouse strain showed different antibody-level kinetics. The findings in the present study demonstrate that the course of host-parasite interactions in primary alveolar echinococcosis, caused by larval E. multilocularis, clearly varies among intermediate host rodents with different genetic backgrounds.

  10. An ELISA for the early diagnosis of acute canine babesiosis detecting circulating antigen of large Babesia spp.

    PubMed

    Eichenberger, Ramon M; Štefanić, Saša; Naucke, Torsten J; Šarkūnas, Mindaugas; Zamokas, Gintaras; Grimm, Felix; Deplazes, Peter

    2017-08-30

    Babesia canis is the predominant Babesia species in dogs in Europe and is responsible for a severe and fatal disease. An increase in global pet tourism and a widening of the geographic distribution of the tick vector has led to the emergence of infections in areas where previously only imported cases have been reported. Due to the potential for rapid and serious disease progression, direct parasite detection by stained blood smears and light microscopy or DNA-based methods have traditionally been used for the diagnosis of acute infections. This study describes the production of a murine monoclonal antibody ('mAb BcFIII 7/1/2') that reacts to a 65kDa corpuscular epitope present in B. canis-infected erythrocytes and can be used in an ELISA to detect circulating Babesia antigen during acute infections. The sensitivity of the ELISA was 100% (95%CI: 84.5-100) as determined using blood lysate samples from 27 dogs with acute B. canis infections. Sensitivity was reduced to 53.8% in 13 patent Babesia vogeli infections (95%CI: 26.1-79.6) based on the current test design using convalescent serum from a B. canis-infected dog. The specificity was determined to be 86.4% (95%CI: 64-96.4) using 22 samples from healthy canine blood donors. In the course of acute B. canis infections, the ELISA showed a positive result at the same time as a positive PCR result was recorded. This was 24-48h before parasites could be detected by light microscopy. Convalescent samples collected from 6 B. canis-infected dogs at least 14days post treatment resulted in negative ELISA reactions. The hyper-acute to acute phase of a B. canis infection represents an emergency situation with high mortality. To increase the chances of survival, a fast and accurate diagnosis and immediate treatment is required. The current study demonstrates the opportunity of an early and specific detection of acute infections by an AgELISA that is potentially translatable to a rapid diagnostic test design. Copyright © 2017

  11. Spectroscopy of planetary nebulae in the region of Canis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniazev, A. Yu.

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of a pilot project of spectroscopic observations for planetary nebulae (PNe) and PN candidates in Canis Major, a sky region where the remnant of a disrupted dwarf galaxy cannibalized by the Milky Way may be located. The spectra of seven objects were taken while testing the SALT spectrograph (South African Astronomical Observatory). All elemental abundances have been obtained by the T e method, where the electron temperature is calculated directly using the measured weak auroral [OIII] λ 4363 Å and/or [NII] λ 5755 Å lines. We have measured the intensities of all the detected emission lines and determined the abundances of oxygen and several other elements (N, Ne, S, Cl, C, and He) in all PNe. The radial velocity for one PN has been measured for the first time and the velocities for all of the remaining PNe have been measured with a considerably better accuracy than that of the previously published ones. The elemental abundances for three PNe have been calculated for the first time and the accuracies of determining the abundances for three others have been improved. The measured heavy-element abundance ratios (S/O, Ne/O, Cl/O) are in good agreement with their typical values for HII regions. Among the PNe studied, ESO 428-05 is the first and so far the most likely candidate for belonging to the remnants of a possible dwarf galaxy disrupted by the tidal interaction with the Milky Way.

  12. Speckle masking observations of the young binary Z Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, W.; Weigelt, G.; Zinnecker, H.

    1994-11-01

    We present the first speckle masking observations of the pre-main sequence binary system Z canis majoris (Z CMa) at optical wavelengths (narrow-band R filter and edge filter RG 610). The diffraction-limited images confirm that Z CMa is a binary with a separation of 0.100 sec + or - 0.008 sec at position angle 350 deg + or - 2 deg. The intensity ratio of the stars is 7.2 for the narrow-band R filter and 7.7 for the RG610 filter. The south-eastern component is the brighter component (i.e. the FU Ori object), in agreement with the results of Koresko et al. (1991) based on near-infrared speckle data. However, our optical detection of the north-western component (the infrared companion) would not have been expected according to Koresko et al.'s analysis. One possible explanation could be scattered light. This agrees with recent polarimetric evidence from Whitney at a. (1993) that scattering plays a role in seeing the infrared companion. We discuss the possiblity that both components of the Z CMa system may be FU Ori objects.

  13. Phylogeography of wolves (Canis lupus) in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weckworth, B.V.; Talbot, S.L.; Cook, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Glacial cycles in the late Pleistocene played a dominant role in sculpting the evolutionary histories of many high-latitude organisms. The refugial hypothesis argues that populations retracted during glacial maxima and were isolated in separate refugia. One prediction of this hypothesis is that populations inhabiting different refugia diverged and then, during interglacial periods, rapidly expanded into deglaciated regions. The range of the gray wolf (Canis lupus) was modified by these expansion and contraction cycles in the late Pleistocene. Our analyses of variation of mitochondrial control region sequences corroborate previous microsatellite analyses supporting independent evolutionary histories for Coastal and Continental wolves in North America. Coastal wolves represent the remnants of a formerly widespread and diverse southern clade that expanded into coastal Southeast Alaska, likely in the early Holocene. In contrast, extant northern Continental populations appear to be admixed, composed of lineages independently arising from ancestors that persisted in either southern or northern (Beringia) refugia. This pattern of diversification suggests the possibility of 3 temporally independent colonizations of North America by wolves from Asia. Coastal wolves are the last vestige of a formerly widespread phylogroup that largely was extirpated in North America by humans during the last century. The independent phylogeographic history of these Coastal wolves has yet to be characterized. Their distinctiveness among North American wolf populations may warrant a reevaluation of their conservation status and management. ?? 2009 American Society of Mammalogists.

  14. Diet of wolves Canis lupus returning to Hungary.

    PubMed

    Lanszki, József; Márkus, Márta; Ujváry, Dóra; Szabó, Adám; Szemethy, László

    2012-04-01

    At the end of the nineteenth century, the wolf Canis lupus was extinct in Hungary and in recent decades has returned to the northern highland area of the country. The diet of wolves living in groups in Aggteleki National Park was investigated using scat analysis (n = 81 scats) and prey remains (n = 31 carcasses). Throughout the year wolves (average, minimum two wolves per year) consumed mostly wild-living ungulates (mean percent of biomass consumed, B% 97.2%; relative frequency of occurrence, %O 74.0%). The wild boar Sus scrofa was the most common prey item found in wolf scat (%B 35.6%) and is also the most commonly occurring ungulate in the study areas. The second most commonly occurring prey item in wolf scat was red deer Cervus elaphus (B% 32.8%). Conversely, prey remain analyses revealed wild boar as the second most commonly utilised prey species (%O 16.1%) after red deer (%O 67.7%). The roe deer Capreolus capreolus that occurs at lower population densities was the third most commonly utilised prey species. The importance of low population density mouflon Ovis aries, livestock and other food types was low. The results are similar to those found in the northern part of the Carpathian Mountains.

  15. [Dog (Canis familiaris) infectivity to Lutzomyia youngi in Trujillo, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Hernández, Dalila; Rojas, Elina; Scorza, José Vicente; Jorquera, Alicia

    2006-10-01

    In Trujillo, Venezuela the prevalence for American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) is 38 per 100,000 inhabitants. In a periurban, rural settlement of the capital city Trujillo, we studied the potential capability of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris) as a source of infection for Lutzomyia youngi, a phlebotomine sand fly species abundant in the study area and whose domestic vectorial activity has been proven. Dogs with dermal lesions suggestive of ATL and parasitological confirmation of infection, were selected for xenodiagnosis by allowing sylvatic phlebotomines from a ATL free area, to feed ad libitum over each animal's entire body surface. The insects' intestinal tracts were dissected 5 days after the blood meal in order to look for flagellate forms. When these were found, parasitological identification was performed by the multiplex-PCR technique. Four hundred and fifty five sand flies engorged over two dogs in three different assays; promastigotes were found in 4 (0.88%) of the specimens on only one occasion. PCR identified DNA of the Leishmania Viannia subgenus. The household dog has the potential of being a domestic risk factor in the ATL transmission cycle.

  16. Accounts of famous North American Wolves, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gipson, P.S.; Ballard, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    We examined historical accounts of 59 famous North American Gray Wolves (Canis lupus) reported during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Fifty of the 59 wolves were purportedly responsible for great losses to livestock, but for 29 reports, evidence suggested that ???2 wolves (e.g., packs) were responsible for the purported kills; in addition, seven wolves had traits that suggested they were hybrids with dogs, and one wolf was probably not from the area where the damage purportedly occurred. Reported livestock losses, especially to Longhorn cattle, from individual wolves appeared excessively high in relation to current literature. Most famous wolves were old and/or impaired from past injuries: 19 were reportedly ???10 years old, 18 had mutilated feet from past trap injuries, and one had a partially severed trachea from being in a snare. Old age and physical impairments probably contributed to livestock depredations by some famous wolves. Several accounts appeared exaggerated, inaccurate, or fabricated. Historical accounts of famous wolves should be interpreted with great caution, especially when considering impacts of wolf reintroductions or when modeling predation rates.

  17. Where and How Wolves (Canis lupus) Kill Beavers (Castor canadensis)

    PubMed Central

    Gable, Thomas D.; Windels, Steve K.; Bruggink, John G.; Homkes, Austin T.

    2016-01-01

    Beavers (Castor canadensis) can be a significant prey item for wolves (Canis lupus) in boreal ecosystems due to their abundance and vulnerability on land. How wolves hunt beavers in these systems is largely unknown, however, because observing predation is challenging. We inferred how wolves hunt beavers by identifying kill sites using clusters of locations from GPS-collared wolves in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. We identified 22 sites where wolves from 4 different packs killed beavers. We classified these kill sites into 8 categories based on the beaver-habitat type near which each kill occurred. Seasonal variation existed in types of kill sites as 7 of 12 (58%) kills in the spring occurred at sites below dams and on shorelines, and 8 of 10 (80%) kills in the fall occurred near feeding trails and canals. From these kill sites we deduced that the typical hunting strategy has 3 components: 1) waiting near areas of high beaver use (e.g., feeding trails) until a beaver comes near shore or ashore, 2) using vegetation, the dam, or other habitat features for concealment, and 3) immediately attacking the beaver, or ambushing the beaver by cutting off access to water. By identifying kill sites and inferring hunting behavior we have provided the most complete description available of how and where wolves hunt and kill beavers. PMID:27992441

  18. Cross-fostering in gray wolves (Canis lupus lupus).

    PubMed

    Scharis, Inger; Amundin, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Cross-fostering in canids, with captive-bred pups introduced into endangered wild populations, might aid conservation efforts by increasing genetic diversity and lowering the risk of inbreeding depression. The gray wolf (Canis lupus lupus) population in Scandinavia suffers from severe inbreeding due to a narrow genetic base and geographical isolation. This study aimed at evaluating the method to cross-foster wolf pups from zoo-born to zoo-born litters. The following was assessed: female initial acceptance of foster pups, growth rate in relation to age difference between foster pups and pups in recipient litters and survival over the first 33 weeks. The study included four litters added by two foster pups in each. The age differences between the foster pups and the recipient litters were 2-8 days. After augmentation, all four females accepted the foster pups, demonstrated by her moving the entire litter to a new den site. Growth rate was dependent on the age difference of the pups in the foster litters, with a considerably slower growth rate in the 8 days younger pups. However, these pups later appeared to be at no disadvantage. Foster pups had a higher survival rate than females' pups, however, the causes of death were probably not kin or non-kin related. The results indicate that cross-fostering works in gray wolves and that this might be a plausible way to increase genetic variation in the wild population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Spatial memory in dogs (Canis familiaris) on a radial maze.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Krista; Roberts, William A

    2010-02-01

    Working spatial memory in dogs (Canis familiaris) was tested in Experiments 1 and 2 on an 8-arm radial maze. When dogs chose freely among all 8 arms containing food in Experiment 1, they learned to enter all 8 arms with progressively fewer arm visits over trials. In Experiment 2, 2 groups of dogs were forced to visit 4 randomly chosen arms on the maze and then tested for memory of these arm visits using a win-shift rule for 1 group and a win-stay rule for the other group. Dogs performed better with the win-shift rule than with the win-stay rule. In Experiment 3, reference memory was investigated by using a 4-arm maze on which 0, 1, 3, and 6 pieces of food were consistently placed on different arms. Dogs learned to visit the arms with the larger amounts before the arms with the smaller amounts. Dogs' memory capacity in these studies was found to be surprisingly low.

  20. Inbreeding and inbreeding depression in endangered red wolves (Canis rufus).

    PubMed

    Brzeski, Kristin E; Rabon, David R; Chamberlain, Michael J; Waits, Lisette P; Taylor, Sabrina S

    2014-09-01

    In natural populations, the expression and severity of inbreeding depression can vary widely across taxa. Describing processes that influence the extent of inbreeding and inbreeding depression aid in our understanding of the evolutionary history of mating systems such as cooperative breeding and nonrandom mate selection. Such findings also help shape wildlife conservation theory because inbreeding depression reduces the viability of small populations. We evaluated the extent of inbreeding and inbreeding depression in a small, re-introduced population of red wolves (Canis rufus) in North Carolina. Since red wolves were first re-introduced in 1987, pedigree inbreeding coefficients (f) increased considerably and almost every wild born wolf was inbred (average f = 0.154 and max f = 0.383). The large inbreeding coefficients were due to both background relatedness associated with few founders and numerous close relative matings. Inbreeding depression was most evident for adult body size and generally absent for direct fitness measures such as reproductive success and survival; no lethal equivalents (LE = 0.00) were detected in juvenile survival. The lack of strong inbreeding depression in direct measures of fitness could be due to a founder effect or because there were no outbred individuals for comparison. Our results highlight the variable expression of inbreeding depression across traits and the need to measure a number of different traits when evaluating inbreeding depression in a wild population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Medical management of pyometra in three red wolves (Canis rufus).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kadie; Wolf, Karen N

    2013-12-01

    Pyometra is a serious, life-threatening disease of both domestic and non-domestic species often requiring ovariohysterectomy to preserve the life of the animal. Medical management of pyometra has been successful in domestic and non-domestic species, and the consideration of such treatment is of marked importance in a critically endangered species. Of the canids, the red wolf (Canis rufus) is second only to African hunting dogs (Lycaon pictus) in terms of the prevalence of both cystic endometrial hyperplasia and pyometra. In this report, three red wolves were medically managed for pyometra. Aside from vaginal discharge, none of the wolves exhibited clinical signs, nor were there reflective inflammatory changes in the laboratory findings. All wolves received standard treatment for pyometra, including prostaglandin F2alpha and antibiotic therapy, while one wolf was more aggressively managed with uterine lavage. Pyometra recurred in two of the treated wolves, while the most aggressively managed wolf continues to show ultrasonographic resolution 2 yr posttreatment. Aggressive medical management of pyometra should be considered a treatment option in certain red wolf females, as it may preserve the animal's reproductive potential.

  2. Where and How Wolves (Canis lupus) Kill Beavers (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    Gable, Thomas D; Windels, Steve K; Bruggink, John G; Homkes, Austin T

    2016-01-01

    Beavers (Castor canadensis) can be a significant prey item for wolves (Canis lupus) in boreal ecosystems due to their abundance and vulnerability on land. How wolves hunt beavers in these systems is largely unknown, however, because observing predation is challenging. We inferred how wolves hunt beavers by identifying kill sites using clusters of locations from GPS-collared wolves in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. We identified 22 sites where wolves from 4 different packs killed beavers. We classified these kill sites into 8 categories based on the beaver-habitat type near which each kill occurred. Seasonal variation existed in types of kill sites as 7 of 12 (58%) kills in the spring occurred at sites below dams and on shorelines, and 8 of 10 (80%) kills in the fall occurred near feeding trails and canals. From these kill sites we deduced that the typical hunting strategy has 3 components: 1) waiting near areas of high beaver use (e.g., feeding trails) until a beaver comes near shore or ashore, 2) using vegetation, the dam, or other habitat features for concealment, and 3) immediately attacking the beaver, or ambushing the beaver by cutting off access to water. By identifying kill sites and inferring hunting behavior we have provided the most complete description available of how and where wolves hunt and kill beavers.

  3. Eye lens ageing in the dogfish (Mustelus canis).

    PubMed

    Zigman, S; Yulo, T

    1979-01-01

    1. Age-related alterations in the distribution of water-soluble, high molecular weight (colloidal), and water-insoluble proteins of the lens of smooth dogfish (Mustelus canis) were measured. 2. The ages of these animals ranged approx from 2 to 50 yr, during which time the lenses grew from 100 to 1500 mg (wet wt). The lenses contained approx 50% water. 3. Water-insoluble protein accumulated to a level greater than 50% of the total proteins by the time the animals reached maturity. The lenses of other animals, such as mammals and humans, would be opaque if they had a similar insoluble protein content. 4. Each protein fraction contained the same protein chains (mol. et 1900-25,000 daltons), as observed by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, except the water-insoluble fraction, which seemed to contain several extra protein chains with higher molecular weights, which represent fiber cell membrane components. 5. Further purification of these fiber cell membranes indicated that their protein chain makeup was mainly from the same low molecular weight chains present in the soluble and high molecular weight colloidal proteins.

  4. Spermophagy in semen in the red wolf, Canis rufus.

    PubMed

    Koehler, J K; Platz, C C; Waddell, W; Jones, M H; Smith, R; Behrns, S

    1994-04-01

    The red wolf (Canis rufus) is an endangered species with 194 individuals remaining in the wild and in various captive facilities. Breeding efforts at the Graham, WA site (Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium) have involved artificial insemination with fresh or frozen semen in an effort to increase population and maximize the genetic potential of the stock. Electron microscopic observations were made in semen specimens obtained by electro-ejaculation from mature males prior to their use in an effort to determine semen parameters that might be useful in guiding breeding procedures. Sperm samples were either fixed immediately or treated with capacitating media and fixed after 4 to 7 hr of incubation. Many of the specimens examined were pyospermic (white cell in semen) and showed evidence of spermophagy, primarily by neutrophils. Of the six animals surveyed, only one showed little evidence of spermophagy, and three had extensive pyospermia and spermophagy but this finding was not correlated with fertility. Samples fixed immediately as well as those incubated for several hours showed evidence of spermophagy, indicating that the phagocytosis was not the result of culture. Gene pool restriction and/or captive stress may be contributing factors of reduced semen quality.

  5. Urbanization, Grassland, and Diet Influence Coyote (Canis latrans) Parasitism Structure.

    PubMed

    Watts, Alexander G; Lukasik, Victoria M; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Alexander, Shelley M

    2015-12-01

    Land use change can alter the ecological mechanisms that influence infectious disease exposure in animal populations. However, few studies have empirically integrated the environmental, spatial, and dietary patterns of wildlife epidemiology. We investigate how urbanization, habitat type, and dietary behavior are associated with coyote (Canis latrans) parasitism structure along a gradient of rural to urban land cover using multivariate redundancy analyses. Coyote fecal samples were collected in eight urban and six rural sites in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Parasite and diet components were identified using common flotation procedures and fecal dietary analysis, respectively. Redundancy analysis was used to identify the best land cover, connectivity, and dietary predictors. We tested for significance using multiple permutation tests and ANOVAs. Significant factors affecting enteric parasite prevalence included dietary and land cover factors (R (2) = 0.4130, P < 0.05). Variation in dietary behavior was observed between urban and rural sites (R (2) = 0.4712, P < 0.05), as anthropogenic diet items (i.e., garbage, crabapples) were strongly influenced by urbanization. Our research supports that developed habitat, grassland cover, and dietary choice interact to possibly influence the exposure of coyote hosts to enteric parasites and pioneers future investigation of disease ecology for natural populations in anthropogenic landscapes.

  6. Fundamental Parameters of the Eclipsing Binary TU Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcés L., J.; Mennickent, R. E.; Zharikov, S.

    2017-04-01

    We present a spectroscopic and photometric study of the eclipsing binary TU Canis Majoris aimed to obtain their fundamental stellar parameters and evolutionary stage. Our results indicate that the masses, radii, temperatures, and luminosities for the primary and secondary stars are: {M}1=1.761+/- 0.012 {M}ȯ , {M}2=1.144+/- 0.010 {M}ȯ , {R}1=1.553+/- 0.002 {R}ȯ , {R}2=1.075+/- 0.002 {R}ȯ , {T}1=8014+/- 151 K, {T}2=6060+/- 100 K, {L}1=8.913 +/- 0.695 {L}ȯ , and {L}2=1.396+/- 0.097 {L}ȯ . We estimate an age for the system of τ =2.11+/- 0.24× {10}8 years, and a distance of d = 324.81+/- 12.86 pc. In addition, we note that none of the components has filled their respective Roche lobe and both are on the main sequence.

  7. Visual discrimination of species in dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Autier-Dérian, Dominique; Deputte, Bertrand L; Chalvet-Monfray, Karine; Coulon, Marjorie; Mounier, Luc

    2013-07-01

    In most social interactions, an animal has to determine whether the other animal belongs to its own species. This perception may be visual and may involve several cognitive processes such as discrimination and categorization. Perceptual categorization is likely to be involved in species characterized by a great phenotypic diversity. As a consequence of intensive artificial selection, domestic dogs, Canis familiaris, present the largest phenotypic diversity among domestic mammals. The goal of our study was to determine whether dogs can discriminate any type of dog from other species and can group all dogs whatever their phenotypes within the same category. Nine pet dogs were successfully trained through instrumental conditioning using a clicker and food rewards to choose a rewarded image, S+, out of two images displayed on computer screens. The generalization step consisted in the presentation of a large sample of paired images of heads of dogs from different breeds and cross-breeds with those of other mammal species, included humans. A reversal phase followed the generalization step. Each of the nine subjects was able to group all the images of dogs within the same category. Thus, the dogs have the capacity of species discrimination despite their great phenotypic variability, based only on visual images of heads.

  8. Phenotypic characterization of Microsporum canis isolated from cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Maia, M L; Dos Santos, J I; Viani, F C; Larsson, C E; Paula, C R; Gambale, W

    2001-12-01

    To characterize strains of Microsporum canis that infect dogs and cats in São Paulo city, 30 isolates of this dermatophyte were tested for their ability to assimilate carbon and nitrogen sources, for proteinase and phospholipase secretion, for susceptibility to yeast killer toxins, and for susceptibility to the antifungals fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, 5-fluorocytosine and amphotericin B, in E test. All samples assimilated the nitrogen sources asparagine, ammonium sulphate, urea and sodium nitrate, as well as the carbon sources inulin, mannitol, trehalose, meso-erythritol, maltose, mannose, sorbitol, cellobiose, fructose and dextrin. Not all the samples assimilated adonitol, galactose, arabinose, rhamnose, raffinose, melibiose, ribose and sucrose, and none of them was capable of growing with dulcitol, lactose, or xylose as the only carbon source. Proteinase and phospholipase secretion was observed for most isolates. In the test of yeast killer toxin, 10 types could be identified, with four types exclusively observed in isolates from dogs and two types exclusively observed in isolates from cats. In the E test, all isolates were found to be resistant to the fluconazole and 5-fluorocytosine, while they were variably sensitive to amphotericin B, ketoconazole and itraconazole. When the data were submitted to the qualitative analysis in the matrix distance program FITOPAC, the similarity of the isolates could be assessed.

  9. Helminth parasites of the wolf Canis lupus from Latvia.

    PubMed

    Bagrade, G; Kirjusina, M; Vismanis, K; Ozoliņs, J

    2009-03-01

    Thirty-four wolves were collected between 2003 and 2008 from throughout Latvia and examined for helminths. A total of 17 helminth species were recorded: the trematode Alaria alata (85.3%); the cestodes Diphyllobothrium latum (2.9%), Echinococcus granulosus (2.9%), Echinococcus multilocularis (5.9%), Mesocestoides lineatus (5.9%), Taenia crassiceps (8.8%), Taenia hydatigena (41.2%), Taenia (ovis) krabbei (8.8%), Taenia multiceps (47.1%), Taenia pisiformis (20.6%), Taenia polyacantha (11.8%), Taenia spp. (8.8%); and the nematodes Ancylostoma caninum (2.9%), Crenosoma vulpis (9.1%), Eucoleus aerophilus (36.4%), Pearsonema plica (41.4%), Trichinella spp. (69.7%), Toxocara canis (5.8%), and Uncinaria stenocephala (41.2%). Alaria alata presented the highest mean intensity (403.8). All animals were infected with at least one species of parasite, while the maximum recorded in one specimen was eight. No differences in the intensity or prevalence of any helminth species were found among the host based on age and gender, except for T. multiceps which was more prevalent in adults than in juveniles.

  10. Occurrence of Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys in household dogs from northern Parana.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gislaine Cristina Ferreira; Benitez, Aline do Nascimento; Girotto, Aline; Taroda, Alessandra; Vidotto, Marilda Carlos; Garcia, João Luis; de Freitas, Julio Cesar; Arlington, Selwyn Headley; Vidotto, Odilon

    2012-01-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis caused primarily by Ehrlichia canis and canine thrombocytic anaplasmosis induced by Anaplasma platys are important emerging zoonotic tick-borne diseases of dogs. There is evidence that these pathogens can also affect humans. This study evaluated the presence of E. canis and A. platys in blood samples collected from 256 domiciled dogs in the municipality of Jataizinho, located in north region of the State of Parana, Brazil, by PCR assay. The occurrence of E. canis and A. platys was 16.4% (42/256) and 19.4% (49/256), respectively; while 5.47% (14/256) of the dogs evaluated were co-infected by these two organisms. The presence of E. canis and A. platys was not significantly associated with the variables evaluated (sex, age, outdoor access, and presence of ticks during blood collection). Infection of dogs by E. canis was associated with anemia and thrombocytopenia, while infection induced by A. platys was related only to thrombocytopenia. Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis and canine thrombocytic anaplasmosis should be included in the differential diagnoses when these hematological alterations are observed during routine laboratory evaluation of dogs.

  11. Synovial fluid cytology in experimental acute canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis).

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Konstantina; Leontides, Leonidas; Siarkou, Victoria I; Petanides, Theodoros; Tsafas, Konstantinos; Harrus, Shimon; Mylonakis, Mathios E

    2015-05-15

    Evidence-based information of a cause-and-effect relationship between Ehrlichia canis infection and polyarthritis in naturally- or experimentally-infected dogs is currently lacking. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate whether synovial fluid cytological evidence of arthritis could be documented in dogs with acute monocytic ehrlichiosis. Direct synovial fluid cytology smears from eight Beagle dogs experimentally infected with E. canis were examined prior to, and on 21, 35 and 63 days post-inoculation. The cytological variables assessed included cellularity, percentages of mononuclear cells and neutrophils, macrophage reactivity and evidence of E. canis morulae. The median cellularity and percentages of mononuclear cells and neutrophils prior to inoculation did not differ when compared to post-inoculation cytological evaluation. Increased cellularity, E. canis morulae or cytological evidence of arthritis or macrophage reactivity were not observed throughout the course of the study. In the present study, no cytological evidence of arthritis was found in dogs with experimental acute canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, suggesting that E. canis infection should be considered a rather uncommon cause of arthritis in dogs.

  12. Molecular survey of Ehrlichia canis and Coxiella burnetii infections in wild mammals of southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Mario; Veneziano, Vincenzo; D'Alessio, Nicola; Di Prisco, Francesca; Lucibelli, Maria Gabriella; Borriello, Giorgia; Cerrone, Anna; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Otranto, Domenico; Galiero, Giorgio

    2016-11-01

    Ehrlichiosis and Q fever caused by the intracellular bacteria Ehrlichia canis and Coxiella burnetii, respectively, are tick-borne diseases with zoonotic potential and widespread geographical distribution. This study investigated the prevalence of both infections in wild mammals in southern Italy. Tissue samples obtained from the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), European badger (Meles meles), gray wolf (Canis lupus), beech marten (Martes foina), and crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata) were processed for molecular detection of both pathogens. E. canis was detected in 55 out of 105 (52 %) red foxes and three out of six gray wolves. Four sequence types were identified, three of which were found in the spleen and liver samples of red foxes and wolves, and one in the kidney of a red fox. None of the examined mammals was positive to C. burnetii type. This represents the first report of E. canis in free-ranging wolves worldwide, as well as the first evidence of this pathogen in red foxes in the peninsular Italy. Our results suggest that E. canis infection is common in free-ranging canids in southern Italy and that a sylvatic life cycle of this pathogen may occur.

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated with Toxocara canis Infection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Romero Núñez, Camilo; Mendoza Martínez, Germán David; Yañez Arteaga, Selene; Ponce Macotela, Martha; Bustamante Montes, Patricia; Ramírez Durán, Ninfa

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine seroprevalence and identify risk factors associated with Toxocara canis infection. A clinical and epidemiological questionnaire and body mass index were used to assess the risk factors associated with human toxocariasis in 108 children with an age range of 2–16 years. Antibodies against Toxocara canis were detected using an ELISA test kit. Chi-square analysis and odds ratio (OR) were used to identify risk factors associated with Toxocara canis seropositivity. The prevalence of antibodies against Toxocara canis was greater (P = 0.02) in males than females (28.84% and 16.07%, resp.). Chi-square analysis and odds ratio revealed just one variable with P < 0.05, and OR > 1.0 was associated with seropositivity: the possession of dogs under one year old (OR = 1.78). Although not significant, the OR values suggest that other factors may be epidemiologically important for Toxocara presence such as not washing hands before meals, malnutrition, obesity, and use of public parks. Children in the age group >12 and <16 years old had higher seroprevalence to Toxocara canis (17.59%) than the >2 and <11 years old age group (4.62%). Toxocariosis infection needs to be prevented by pet deworming and hygienic measures after contact with dogs. PMID:23844404

  14. Toxocara canis infection in preschool age children: risk factors and the cognitive development of preschool children.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S; Greene, T; Ernhart, C B

    1996-01-01

    Risk factors for Toxocara canis (T. canis) infection were evaluated in a prospective study of disadvantaged preschool children. In addition, the hypothesis that T. canis exposure is associated with lower intelligence was tested. Seropositivity was tested at 2 years, 3 years, and at 4 years 10 months (4-10). Intelligence was measured at age 4-10 by the Full Scale IQ of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scales of Intelligence (WPPSI). Pica and ownership of a dog were unrelated to seropositivity. Seropositive children had lower scores on the Mental Development Index (MDI) of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development at age 1 year (prior to likely exposure). They also had less favorable scores on a measure of the quality of childrearing. These findings suggest that, for disadvantaged children, lower initial intelligence and less advantageous child rearing are risk factors for T. canis exposure. Seropositive children also had higher blood lead levels, probably as a result of the common pathway of hand to mouth transmittal. Seropositivity at 3 years, at age 4-10, or, cumulatively, at any of the age 2, 3, or 4-10 assessments was associated with the WPPSI IQ after adjustment for sociodemographic factors. Exposure at age 4-10-years was significantly associated with reduced IQ scores (p = 0.030). However, when the age 1 year MDI score was controlled, the estimate became nonsignificant. We, thus, can neither confirm nor deny a relationship of T. canis and intelligence, but the importance of considering prior developmental status is emphasized.

  15. Prevalence and risk factors associated with Toxocara canis infection in children.

    PubMed

    Romero Núñez, Camilo; Mendoza Martínez, Germán David; Yañez Arteaga, Selene; Ponce Macotela, Martha; Bustamante Montes, Patricia; Ramírez Durán, Ninfa

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine seroprevalence and identify risk factors associated with Toxocara canis infection. A clinical and epidemiological questionnaire and body mass index were used to assess the risk factors associated with human toxocariasis in 108 children with an age range of 2-16 years. Antibodies against Toxocara canis were detected using an ELISA test kit. Chi-square analysis and odds ratio (OR) were used to identify risk factors associated with Toxocara canis seropositivity. The prevalence of antibodies against Toxocara canis was greater (P = 0.02) in males than females (28.84% and 16.07%, resp.). Chi-square analysis and odds ratio revealed just one variable with P < 0.05, and OR > 1.0 was associated with seropositivity: the possession of dogs under one year old (OR = 1.78). Although not significant, the OR values suggest that other factors may be epidemiologically important for Toxocara presence such as not washing hands before meals, malnutrition, obesity, and use of public parks. Children in the age group >12 and <16 years old had higher seroprevalence to Toxocara canis (17.59%) than the >2 and <11 years old age group (4.62%). Toxocariosis infection needs to be prevented by pet deworming and hygienic measures after contact with dogs.

  16. Genetic variability in Microsporum canis isolated from cats, dogs and humans in Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Fernanda V A; Farias, Marconi R; Bier, Daniele; de Andrade, Caroline P; de Castro, Luiza A; da Silva, Sérgio C; Ferreiro, Laerte

    2013-09-01

    Dermatophytosis caused by Microsporum canis is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical manifestations. M. canis is a zoophilic dermatophyte and the most frequent fungi isolated from dogs, cats and children in Brazil. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic variability of M. canis isolates from different animal species using two microsatellite markers, namely, McGT(13) and McGT(17), and to correlate the results with the clinical and epidemiological patient data in Brazil. The study included a global set of 102 M. canis strains, including 37 symptomatic cats, 35 asymptomatic cats, 19 human patients with tinea, 9 asymptomatic dogs and 2 symptomatic dogs. A total of 14 genotypes were identified, and 6 large populations were distinguished. There was no correlation between these multilocus genotypes and the clinical and epidemiological data, including the source, symptomatology, clinical picture, breed, age, sex, living conditions and geographic location. These results demonstrate that the use of microsatellite polymorphisms is a reliable method for the differentiation of M. canis strains. However, we were unable to demonstrate a shared clinical and epidemiological pattern among the same genotype samples. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Short communication: Streptococcus canis is able to establish a persistent udder infection in a dairy herd.

    PubMed

    Król, Jarosław; Twardoń, Jan; Mrowiec, Jacek; Podkowik, Magdalena; Dejneka, Grzegorz; Dębski, Bogdan; Nowicki, Tadeusz; Zalewski, Wojciech

    2015-10-01

    Bovine mastitis caused by Streptococcus canis is relatively rare. Consequently, many epidemiologic aspects of the infection, including factors that mediate crossing of host species barriers by the pathogen, infectiousness of the microorganism to the mammary gland, and the course of the disease within a herd, are still not elucidated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to describe results of a 15-mo observation of subclinical Strep. canis mastitis on a dairy farm housing 76 lactating Holstein-Friesian cows. Upon 3 visits to the farm during a period between April 2013 and June 2014, Strep. canis was cultured from milk samples of 17 (22.4% of the herd), 7 (9.6%), and 8 (11.3%) cows, respectively. The isolates obtained were characterized phenotypically by means of the API Strep identification kit (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France), as well as genetically by using random amplified polymorphic DNA and macrorestriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All strains displayed the same biochemical features, and the molecular methods revealed that the isolates belonged to a single clone or were very closely related. Results of the study indicate that Strep. canis is capable of causing intramammary infections of long duration, behaving in a contagious manner. Because a persistently infected cow may serve as the source of Strep. canis infection for other animals, effective control of this type of udder infection within a herd may require similar measures to those adopted in Streptococcus agalactiae eradication programs.

  18. Evidence of morphine like substance and μ-opioid receptor expression in Toxacara canis (Nematoda: Ascaridae)

    PubMed Central

    Golabi, Mostafa; Naem, Soraya; Imani, Mehdi; Dalirezh, Nowruz

    2016-01-01

    Toxocara canis (Nematoda: Ascaridae) is an intestinal nematode parasite of dogs, which can also cause disease in humans. Transmission to humans usually occurs because of direct contact with T. canis eggs present in soil contaminated with the feces of infected dogs. This nematode has extraordinary abilities to survive for many years in different tissues of vertebrates, and develop to maturity in the intestinal tract of its definitive host. Survival of parasitic nematodes within a host requires immune evasion using complicated pathways. Morphine-like substance, as well as opioids, which are known as down regulating agents, can modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, and let the parasite survives in their hosts. In the present study, we aimed to find evidences of morphine-like substance and µ-opiate receptor expression in T. canis, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results indicated that T. canis produced morphine-like substances at the level of 2.31± 0.26 ng g-1 wet weight, and expressed µ-opiate receptor as in expected size of 441 bp. According to our findings, it was concluded that T. canis, benefits using morphine-like substance to modulate host immunity. PMID:28144426

  19. Molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of Ehrlichia canis in a Philippine dog.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Balbin, Michelle M; Mingala, Claro N; Gicana, Karlo R B; Bernando, Francis A E M; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-09-20

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME), caused by a rickettsial bacterium, Ehrlichia canis, is distributed worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. Transmission of E. canis is primarily mediated by the vector tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato and the bacteria then infect and replicate in monocytes and macrophages. Many cases are seen in veterinary hospitals and treated routinely; however, the genetic variation of E. canis strains found in the Philippines has been poorly investigated to date. In this study, the 16S rRNA gene and the gp200 gene of E. canis were detected by polymerase chain reaction from an infected dog in the Philippines, and the deduced amino acid sequence of the gp200 gene was subjected to a phylogenetic analysis. The Philippine genotype formed a cluster with the Taiwan genotype, and was somewhat divergent from the USA and Brazil strains. This suggested that E. canis underwent evolution in East and Southeast Asia, confirming the utility of the gp200 gene for the assessment of genetic relationships among strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Evidence of morphine like substance and μ-opioid receptor expression in Toxacara canis (Nematoda: Ascaridae).

    PubMed

    Golabi, Mostafa; Naem, Soraya; Imani, Mehdi; Dalirezh, Nowruz

    2016-01-01

    Toxocara canis (Nematoda: Ascaridae) is an intestinal nematode parasite of dogs, which can also cause disease in humans. Transmission to humans usually occurs because of direct contact with T. canis eggs present in soil contaminated with the feces of infected dogs. This nematode has extraordinary abilities to survive for many years in different tissues of vertebrates, and develop to maturity in the intestinal tract of its definitive host. Survival of parasitic nematodes within a host requires immune evasion using complicated pathways. Morphine-like substance, as well as opioids, which are known as down regulating agents, can modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, and let the parasite survives in their hosts. In the present study, we aimed to find evidences of morphine-like substance and µ-opiate receptor expression in T. canis, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results indicated that T. canis produced morphine-like substances at the level of 2.31± 0.26 ng g(-1) wet weight, and expressed µ-opiate receptor as in expected size of 441 bp. According to our findings, it was concluded that T. canis, benefits using morphine-like substance to modulate host immunity.

  1. Urinary creatinine to serum creatinine ratio and renal failure index in dogs infected with Babesia canis.

    PubMed

    Zygner, Wojciech; Gójska-Zygner, Olga; Wesołowska, Agnieszka; Wędrychowicz, Halina

    2013-09-01

    Urinary creatinine to serum creatinine (UCr/SCr) ratio and renal failure index (RFI) are useful indices of renal damage. Both UCr/SCr ratio and RFI are used in differentiation between prerenal azotaemia and acute tubular necrosis. In this work the authors calculated the UCr/SCr ratio and RFI in dogs infected with Babesia canis and the values of these indices in azotaemic dogs infected with the parasite. The results of this study showed significantly lower UCr/SCr ratio in dogs infected with B. canis than in healthy dogs. Moreover, in azotaemic dogs infected with B. canis the UCr/SCr ratio was significantly lower and the RFI was significantly higher than in non-azotaemic dogs infected with B. canis. The calculated correlation between RFI and duration of the disease before diagnosis and treatment was high, positive and statistically significant (r = 0.89, p < 0.001). The results of this study showed that during the course of canine babesiosis caused by B. canis in Poland acute tubular necrosis may develop.

  2. Serological survey of Brucella canis in dogs in urban Harare and selected rural communities in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Chinyoka, Simbarashe; Dhliwayo, Solomon; Marabini, Lisa; Dutlow, Keith; Matope, Gift; Pfukenyi, Davies M

    2014-04-07

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in order to detect antibodies for Brucella canis (B. canis) in dogs from urban Harare and five selected rural communities in Zimbabwe. Sera from randomly selected dogs were tested for antibodies to B. canis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Overall, 17.6% of sera samples tested (57/324, 95% CI: 13.5-21.7) were positive for B. canis antibodies. For rural dogs, seroprevalence varied from 11.7% - 37.9%. Rural dogs recorded a higher seroprevalence (20.7%, 95% CI: 15.0-26.4) compared with Harare urban dogs (12.7%, 95% CI: 6.9-18.5) but the difference was not significant (p = 0.07). Female dogs from both sectors had a higher seroprevalence compared with males, but the differences were not significant (p > 0.05). Five and two of the positive rural dogs had titres of 1:800 and 1:1600, respectively, whilst none of the positive urban dogs had a titre above 1:400. This study showed that brucellosis was present and could be considered a risk to dogs from the studied areas. Further studies are recommended in order to give insight into the epidemiology of brucellosis in dogs and its possible zoonotic consequences in Zimbabwe. Screening for other Brucella spp. (Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis and Brucella suis) other than B. canis is also recommended.

  3. Genetic comparison of Brucella canis isolates by the MLVA assay in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Il; Heo, Eun Jeong; Cho, Donghee; Kim, Jong Wan; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Jung, Suk Chan; Her, Moon

    2011-06-01

    The multiple-locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) assay is a method frequently employed as a molecular epidemiological tool for Brucella genetic fingerprinting. The purpose of this study was to assess the genotyping of 77 B. canis isolates from 14 different dog breeding farms in Korea by the MLVA assay and to compare the epidemiological relationships between the Korean isolates and foreign ones. Simpson's diversity index for 17 loci showed a range from 0 to 0.846 in 77 B. canis isolates. B. canis isolates in Korea were observed to have high genetic diversity at the most variable loci and were divided into 30 distinct genotypes by phylogenetic analysis. Some B. canis isolates were closely related to previously typed isolates in other countries. The MLVA assay can be helpful to analyze the epidemiological correlation of B. canis isolates in domestic pet animals and to track the geographic origin by comparing the genetic patterns with foreign isolates. Therefore, the MLVA assay will be useful as a tool for control and preventive measures of canine brucellosis.

  4. Detection and molecular identification of Hepatozoon canis and Babesia vogeli from domestic dogs in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Kifaya; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Abdelkader, Ahmad; Zaid, Taher; Ereqat, Suheir; Sawalha, Samer S; Baneth, Gad; Abdeen, Ziad

    2017-04-01

    Dogs serve as hosts for a great number of parasites, which may affect their health and wellbeing. This study aimed to observe tick borne pathogens in dogs from Palestine including Hepatozoon canis and Babesia species. The prevalence of both H. canis and Babesia species infections in apparently healthy dogs, from ten districts of the West Bank was surveyed. DNA was extracted from blood samples obtained from dogs (n = 362) and ticks (n = 213) collected from dogs (n = 77). A primer set that amplifies a partial sequence of the Babesia and Hepatozoon 18S rRNA gene was used for PCR and the DNA sequences of the PCR products of all samples were determined. Twenty-nine (8·0%) of the dogs were found infected including 20 with H. canis (5·5%), seven with Babesia vogeli (1·9%) and two with undefined Babesia spp. (0·6%). Twelve Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l ticks were pathogen-positive, including ten with H. canis (4·7%), one with B. vogeli (0·5%), and one with Hepatozoon felis (0·5%). The results indicated that a wide range of tick borne pathogens is circulating in the canine population in the surveyed region. This study is the first report on the prevalence of H. canis, B. vogeli and Babesia spp. in dogs in Palestine and its results will assist in the management of diseases associated with these blood parasites.

  5. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  6. Navigational strategies underlying phototaxis in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiuye; Engert, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how the brain transforms sensory input into complex behavior is a fundamental question in systems neuroscience. Using larval zebrafish, we study the temporal component of phototaxis, which is defined as orientation decisions based on comparisons of light intensity at successive moments in time. We developed a novel "Virtual Circle" assay where whole-field illumination is abruptly turned off when the fish swims out of a virtually defined circular border, and turned on again when it returns into the circle. The animal receives no direct spatial cues and experiences only whole-field temporal light changes. Remarkably, the fish spends most of its time within the invisible virtual border. Behavioral analyses of swim bouts in relation to light transitions were used to develop four discrete temporal algorithms that transform the binary visual input (uniform light/uniform darkness) into the observed spatial behavior. In these algorithms, the turning angle is dependent on the behavioral history immediately preceding individual turning events. Computer simulations show that the algorithms recapture most of the swim statistics of real fish. We discovered that turning properties in larval zebrafish are distinctly modulated by temporal step functions in light intensity in combination with the specific motor history preceding these turns. Several aspects of the behavior suggest memory usage of up to 10 swim bouts (~10 sec). Thus, we show that a complex behavior like spatial navigation can emerge from a small number of relatively simple behavioral algorithms.

  7. Navigational strategies underlying phototaxis in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiuye; Engert, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how the brain transforms sensory input into complex behavior is a fundamental question in systems neuroscience. Using larval zebrafish, we study the temporal component of phototaxis, which is defined as orientation decisions based on comparisons of light intensity at successive moments in time. We developed a novel “Virtual Circle” assay where whole-field illumination is abruptly turned off when the fish swims out of a virtually defined circular border, and turned on again when it returns into the circle. The animal receives no direct spatial cues and experiences only whole-field temporal light changes. Remarkably, the fish spends most of its time within the invisible virtual border. Behavioral analyses of swim bouts in relation to light transitions were used to develop four discrete temporal algorithms that transform the binary visual input (uniform light/uniform darkness) into the observed spatial behavior. In these algorithms, the turning angle is dependent on the behavioral history immediately preceding individual turning events. Computer simulations show that the algorithms recapture most of the swim statistics of real fish. We discovered that turning properties in larval zebrafish are distinctly modulated by temporal step functions in light intensity in combination with the specific motor history preceding these turns. Several aspects of the behavior suggest memory usage of up to 10 swim bouts (~10 sec). Thus, we show that a complex behavior like spatial navigation can emerge from a small number of relatively simple behavioral algorithms. PMID:24723859

  8. Phototaxis of larval and juvenile northern pike

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zigler, S.J.; Dewey, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Age- Phi northern pike Esox lucius prefer vegetated habitats that are difficult to sample with standard towed gears. Light traps can be effective for sampling larval fishes in dense vegetation, given positive phototaxis of fish. We evaluated the phototactic response of young northern pike by comparing the catches of larvae and juveniles obtained with plexiglass traps deployed with a chemical light stick versus traps deployed without a light source (controls) in a laboratory raceway and in a vegetated pond. In the laboratory tests, catches of protolarvae and mesolarvae in lighted traps were 11-35 times greater than catches in control traps. The catches of juvenile northern pike in field and laboratory experiments were 3-15 times greater in lighted traps than in control traps, even though the maximum body width of the larger juveniles was similar to the width of the entrance slots of the traps (5 mm). Larval and juvenile northern pike were photopositive; thus, light traps should effectively sample age-0 northern pike for at least 6 weeks after hatching.

  9. The efficacy of Advantix® to prevent transmission of Ehrlichia canis to dogs by Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Josephus Johannes; Luus, Herman Gerhardus; Stanneck, Dorothee; Jongejan, Frans

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of a topical combination of imidacloprid and permethrin (Advantix(®)) to prevent transmission of Ehrlichia canis was studied in two groups of six dogs. One group served as controls, whereas the other group was treated. All dogs were exposed to E. canis-infected Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks on Days 7, 14, 21 and Day 28 post acaricidal treatment. The adult R. sanguineus ticks were released into the individual kennels of the dogs to simulate natural tick exposure. In situ tick counts were conducted on Day 9, 16 and 23 and any remaining ticks were counted and removed on Day 30. The efficacy of the acaricidal treatment against R. sanguineus ranged between 96.1% and 98.9% at 48 h post-application and lasted up to 4 weeks. Four out of six control dogs became infected with E. canis, as demonstrated by the presence of specific E. canis antibodies and the detection by PCR of E. canis DNA in blood samples. These dogs became thrombocytopenic and displayed fever and were consecutively rescue-treated by doxycycline. None of the six treated dogs became infected with E. canis, as confirmed by the lack of specific antibodies and absence of E. canis DNA in blood samples. Advantix(®) prevented transmission of E. canis and provided protection against monocytic ehrlichiosis for 4 weeks post acaricidal treatment.

  10. 78 FR 54614 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removing the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) From the List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... Protections for the Mexican Wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) by Listing It as Endangered AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... endangered status for the Mexican wolf by listing it as a subspecies (Canis lupus baileyi), and we announced... maintain endangered status for the Mexican wolf by listing it as a subspecies is extended to October 28...

  11. Prevention of transmission of Babesia canis by Dermacentor reticulatus ticks to dogs treated with an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Josephus J; Stanneck, Dorothee; Jongejan, Frans

    2013-02-18

    A group of 8 dogs was treated with an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar (Seresto(®)) 28 days prior to infestation with adult Dermacentor reticulatus ticks, infected with Babesia canis. The ability of the collar to prevent transmission of B. canis in the treated group was compared to an untreated control group. All 8 dogs in the untreated control group became infected with B. canis parasites, which were detected in blood smears as early as day 6 post tick-application. All control dogs developed clinical signs of babesiosis and were rescue-treated with imidocarb dipropionate. These dogs also developed specific B. canis antibodies as identified by serology (IFA test) and were confirmed PCR/RLB positive. None of the 8 dogs treated with the imidacloprid/flumethrin collar became infected with B. canis, which was confirmed by the absence of specific B. canis antibodies and babesial DNA as confirmed by PCR/RLB. The collar caused 96.02% of the ticks to die within 48h post challenge and this increased to 100% within 4 days. Although a high percentage of 44% of the Dermacentor ticks were infected with B. canis, they were unable to transmit the infection to the treated group. Hence, the imidacloprid/flumethrin collar effectively prevented transmission of B. canis 1 month after application onto the dogs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genotyping Brucella canis isolates using a highly discriminatory multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) assay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Yin; Poulsen, Elizabeth; Ransburgh, Russell; Liu, Xuming; An, Baoyan; Lu, Nanyan; Anderson, Gary; Wang, Chengming; Bai, Jianfa

    2017-04-21

    Differentiation of Brucella canis from other Brucella species are mainly performed through PCR-based methods and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) procedures. Both PCR-based and MLVA methods are limited in discriminating B. canis strains. A new MLVA-13Bc method for B. canis genotyping was established by combining eight newly-developed VNTRs with five published ones. During 2010 and 2016, 377 B. canis PCR-positives were identified from 6,844 canine blood samples from 22 U.S. states, resulting in 229 B. canis isolates. The MLVA-13Bc method was able to differentiate each of these 229 isolates. The Hunter-Gaston Discriminatory Index of the individual VNTR loci ranged from 0.516 to 0.934 and the combined discriminatory index reached 1.000. Three major clusters (A, B and C) and 10 genotype groups were identified from the 229 B. canis isolates. Cluster A mainly contains genotype groups 1 and 2, and a few group 3 isolates; nearly all Cluster B isolates were from group 6; other genotype groups were classified into Cluster C. Our newly developed MLVA-13Bc assay is a highly discriminatory assay for B. canis genotyping, and can serve as a useful molecular epidemiological tool, especially for tracing the source of contamination in an event of a B. canis outbreak.

  13. First evidence of hybridization between golden jackal (Canis aureus) and domestic dog (Canis familiaris) as revealed by genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Galov, Ana; Fabbri, Elena; Caniglia, Romolo; Arbanasić, Haidi; Lapalombella, Silvana; Florijančić, Tihomir; Bošković, Ivica; Galaverni, Marco; Randi, Ettore

    2015-12-01

    Interspecific hybridization is relatively frequent in nature and numerous cases of hybridization between wild canids and domestic dogs have been recorded. However, hybrids between golden jackals (Canis aureus) and other canids have not been described before. In this study, we combined the use of biparental (15 autosomal microsatellites and three major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci) and uniparental (mtDNA control region and a Y-linked Zfy intron) genetic markers to assess the admixed origin of three wild-living canids showing anomalous phenotypic traits. Results indicated that these canids were hybrids between golden jackals and domestic dogs. One of them was a backcross to jackal and another one was a backcross to dog, confirming that golden jackal-domestic dog hybrids are fertile. The uniparental markers showed that the direction of hybridization, namely females of the wild species hybridizing with male domestic dogs, was common to most cases of canid hybridization. A melanistic 3bp-deletion at the K locus (β-defensin CDB103 gene), that was absent in reference golden jackal samples, but was found in a backcross to jackal with anomalous black coat, suggested its introgression from dogs via hybridization. Moreover, we demonstrated that MHC sequences, although rarely used as markers of hybridization, can be also suitable for the identification of hybrids, as long as haplotypes are exclusive for the parental species.

  14. First evidence of hybridization between golden jackal (Canis aureus) and domestic dog (Canis familiaris) as revealed by genetic markers

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Elena; Caniglia, Romolo; Arbanasić, Haidi; Lapalombella, Silvana; Florijančić, Tihomir; Bošković, Ivica; Galaverni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization is relatively frequent in nature and numerous cases of hybridization between wild canids and domestic dogs have been recorded. However, hybrids between golden jackals (Canis aureus) and other canids have not been described before. In this study, we combined the use of biparental (15 autosomal microsatellites and three major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci) and uniparental (mtDNA control region and a Y-linked Zfy intron) genetic markers to assess the admixed origin of three wild-living canids showing anomalous phenotypic traits. Results indicated that these canids were hybrids between golden jackals and domestic dogs. One of them was a backcross to jackal and another one was a backcross to dog, confirming that golden jackal–domestic dog hybrids are fertile. The uniparental markers showed that the direction of hybridization, namely females of the wild species hybridizing with male domestic dogs, was common to most cases of canid hybridization. A melanistic 3bp-deletion at the K locus (β-defensin CDB103 gene), that was absent in reference golden jackal samples, but was found in a backcross to jackal with anomalous black coat, suggested its introgression from dogs via hybridization. Moreover, we demonstrated that MHC sequences, although rarely used as markers of hybridization, can be also suitable for the identification of hybrids, as long as haplotypes are exclusive for the parental species. PMID:27019731

  15. Intraspecific larval competition in the olive fruit fly (Diptera: tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Burrack, Hannah Joy; Fornell, Angela M; Connell, Joseph H; O'Connell, Neil V; Phillips, Phil A; Vossen, Paul M; Zalom, Frank G

    2009-10-01

    Olive fruit flies [Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin)] occur at densities in California that can result in intraspecific larval competition within infested fruit. Larval B. oleae densities tracked in the field at six location were found to be highly variable and related to the proportion of fruit infested and adult densities. Egg and larval distribution within the field was generally aggregated early in the season and trended toward random and uniform as the season progressed. To determine whether B. oleae experienced fitness consequences at a range of larval densities observed in the field, olive fruits were infested with one, two, four, and six eggs, and larval and pupal developmental time, pupal weight, and pupal yield were compared. At the highest egg density, all measures of performance were negatively impacted, resulting in fewer and lighter pupae that took longer to pupate and emerge as adults, and even when only two larvae was present per olive, resulting pupae were significantly smaller. Density did not impact the sex ratio of the resulting flies or survive to adults. As field surveys showed, larval densities ranged from 1 to 11 B. oleae per fruit at some sites, and our results suggest that, at high densities, B. oleae do experience competition for larval resources. The impact of intraspecific larval competition North American in field populations of B. oleae is unknown, but the potential for competition is present.

  16. Larval fish distribution in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to determine what study design, environmental, and habitat variables contribute to the distribution and abundance of larval fish in the St. Louis River estuary. Larval fish habitat associations are poorly understood in Great Lakes coastal wetlands, yet critical ...

  17. Larval fish distribution in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to determine what study design, environmental, and habitat variables contribute to the distribution and abundance of larval fish in the St. Louis River estuary. Larval fish habitat associations are poorly understood in Great Lakes coastal wetlands, yet critical ...

  18. Ehrlichia canis in dogs in a semiarid region of Northeastern Brazil: serology, molecular detection and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Tanikawa, A; Labruna, M B; Costa, A; Aguiar, D M; Justiniano, S V; Mendes, R S; Melo, A L T; Alves, C J; Azevedo, S S

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated infection by Ehrlichia spp. agents by PCR, immunofluorescence assay test (IFAT), and by Giemsa-stained blood smears in 108 dogs from a semiarid region of the state of Paraíba, Northeastern Brazil. Seventy-five (69.4%) of the 108 dogs were found to be seropositive to Ehrlichia canis, while only four dogs (3.7%) were positive in real-time PCR for E. canis. In six dogs (5.6%) E. canis-like morulae were observed in monocytes. Animals that stayed in environment whose floor was dried dirt, and dogs whose owners reported low frequency of cleaning the dog environment had higher (P<0.05) PCR positivity for E. canis. Increasing seropositivity was found in older dogs (P=0.012). This study provides the first molecular detection of E. canis in the semiarid region of Northeastern Brazil.

  19. The infection of questing Dermacentor reticulatus ticks with Babesia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

    PubMed

    Karbowiak, Grzegorz; Vichová, Bronislavá; Slivinska, Kateryna; Werszko, Joanna; Didyk, Julia; Peťko, Branislav; Stanko, Michal; Akimov, Igor

    2014-08-29

    Tick occurrence was studied in the Chernobyl exclusion zone (CEZ) during the August-October 2009-2012. Dermacentor reticulatus ticks were collected using the flagging method and then screened for infection with Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia canis by a PCR method incorporating specific primers and sequence analysis. The prevalence of infection with B. canis canis and A. phagocytophilum was found to be 3.41% and 25.36%, respectively. The results present the first evidence of B. canis canis and A. phagocytophilum in questing D. reticulatus ticks from the Chernobyl exclusion zone. They also reveal the presence of tick-borne disease foci in areas with no human activity, and confirm that they can be maintained in areas after a nuclear disaster with radioactive contamination.

  20. Brucella canis infection in dogs attended in veterinary clinics from patos, ParabaĪBA state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Annielle Regina Fonseca; de Azevedo, Sérgio Santos; Pinheiro, Eliana Scarcelli; Genovez, Margareth Élide; de Azevedo, Adílio Santos; de Sousa Américo Batista, Carolina; Alves, Clebert José

    2011-10-01

    To determine the frequency of anti-Brucella canis antibodies in dogs attended in veterinary clinics from Patos, Paraíba State, Brazil, as well as to identify risk factors and to isolate and identify the agent, 193 dogs were used. Agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID) was used to detect B. canis antibodies in sera. Isolation of B. canis was carried out in blood and bone marrow from seropositive animals. Six animals tested seropositive in AGID, resulting in a frequency of 3.11%. B. canis was isolated from bone marrow of one seropositive animal, with confirmation by PCR. Lack of cleaning of the dog's environment was identified as risk factor (odds ratio = 7.91). This is the first report of isolation of B. canis in dogs from the Northeast region of Brazil.

  1. Effect of two hydatid cyst antigens on the growth of melanoma cancer in C57/black mice.

    PubMed

    Chookami, Milad Badri; Sharafi, Seyedeh Maryam; Sefiddashti, Raheleh Rafiei; Jafari, Rasool; Bahadoran, Mehran; Pestechian, Nader; Yousofi Darani, Hossein

    2016-12-01

    Hydatid cyst is the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. In previous studies inhibitory effect of this parasite on cancer cell growth in culture medium has been shown. In this study effect of hydatid cyst antigens on tumor growth in experimental animals has been investigated. Two antigens of hydatid cyst including protoscolices excretory secretory antigen and hydatid fluid absorbed on alum as adjuvant were injected to two groups of C57/black mice as case groups. Control groups were injected with only saline and alum. All mice then were injected with melanoma cells. Both antigens reduced the tumor size in mice in case groups. The difference of tumor size in mice in case groups and control group was statistically significant. In conclusion, anti-tumor effect of hydatid cyst antigens may be related to antigenic similarities which exist between hydatid cyst and cancer cells.

  2. Isolation of viable Neospora caninum from brains of wild gray wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Jenkins, M C; Ferreira, L R; Choudhary, S; Verma, S K; Kwok, O C H; Fetterer, R; Butler, E; Carstensen, M

    2014-03-17

    Neospora caninum is a common cause of abortion in cattle worldwide. Canids, including the dog and the dingo (Canis familiaris), the coyote (Canis latrans), and the gray wolf (Canis lupus) are its definitive hosts that can excrete environmentally resistant oocysts in the environment, but also can act as intermediate hosts, harboring tissue stages of the parasite. In an attempt to isolate viable N. caninum from tissues of naturally infected wolves, brain and heart tissue from 109 wolves from Minnesota were bioassayed in mice. Viable N. caninum (NcWolfMn1, NcWolfMn2) was isolated from the brains of two wolves by bioassays in interferon gamma gene knockout mice. DNA obtained from culture-derived N. caninum tachyzoites of the two isolates were analyzed by N. caninum-specific Nc5 polymerase chain reaction and confirmed diagnosis. This is the first report of isolation of N. caninum from tissues of any wild canid host. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Extracellular proteolytic activity and molecular analysis of Microsporum canis strains isolated from symptomatic and asymptomatic cats.

    PubMed

    Viani, Flávio Cesar; Cazares Viani, Paula Regina; Gutierrez Rivera, Irma Nelly; Gonçalves da Silva, Eriques; Rodrigues Paula, Claudete; Gambale, Walderez

    2007-03-01

    Microsporum canis is the main zoophylic dermatophyte in dogs and cats, and it is also an important zoonotic agent. The literature showed that cats are asymptomatic carriers of M. canis. This is apparently due to host resistance and/or the presence of strains with lower virulence. This study was aimed to evaluate the keratinolytic, elastinolytic and collagenolytic activities of M. canis strains and their relationship with symptomatic and asymptomatic cats. In addition, these strains were analysed by RFLP. The strains isolated from cats with clinical dermatophytosis had higher keratinase and elastase activity than those isolated from asymptomatic animals (p minus than 0.05). There were not differences in RFLP patterns based on Hind III digestion.

  4. Endoparasites of the coyote (Canis latrans), a recent migrant to insular newfoundland.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Kimberly E; Baggs, Eric M; Finney-Crawley, Jean

    2009-10-01

    This study provides the first data on the helminth fauna of the coyote (Canis latrans) in insular Newfoundland. Sixty-nine coyotes were collected between 2001 and 2003 and examined for helminths. A total of 10 helminth species were recorded: the cestodes Taenia ovis krabbei (9%), Taenia hydatigena (4%), Taenia pisiformis (1%), and Mesocestoides spp. (5%); and the nematodes Toxocara canis (19%), Toxascaris leonina (1%), Crenosoma vulpis (19%), Physaloptera rara (6%), Uncinaria stenocephala (3%), and Angiostrongylus vasorum (1%). No significant differences (P< or =0.05) were detected between sexes. Mesocestoides spp., T. canis, and C. vulpis were more prevalent in juveniles than adults. Angiostrongylus vasorum is reported in coyotes for the second time in Newfoundland, Canada.

  5. PARASITOLOGY AND SEROLOGY OF FREE-RANGING COYOTES (CANIS LATRANS) IN NORTH CAROLINA, USA.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, M Colter; Swingen, Morgan B; Lashley, Marcus A; Flowers, James R; Palamar, Maria B; Apperson, Charles S; Olfenbuttel, Colleen; Moorman, Christopher E; DePerno, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    Coyotes (Canis latrans) have expanded recently into the eastern US and can serve as a source of pathogens to domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris), livestock, and humans. We examined free-ranging coyotes from central North Carolina, US, for selected parasites and prevalence of antibodies against viral and bacterial agents. We detected ticks on most (81%) coyotes, with Amblyomma americanum detected on 83% of those with ticks. Fifteen (47%) coyotes were positive for heartworms (Dirofilaria immitis), with a greater detection rate in adults (75%) than juveniles (22%). Serology revealed antibodies against canine adenovirus (71%), canine coronavirus (32%), canine distemper virus (17%), canine parvovirus (96%), and Leptospira spp. (7%). We did not detect antibodies against Brucella abortus/suis or Brucella canis. Our results showed that coyotes harbor many common pathogens that present health risks to humans and domestic animals and suggest that continued monitoring of the coyote's role in pathogen transmission is warranted.

  6. Data on the parasitological status of golden jackal (Canis aureus L., 1758) in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Takács, András; Szabó, László; Juhász, Lajos; Takács, András Attila; Lanszki, József; Takács, Péter Tamás; Heltai, Miklós

    2014-03-01

    In Hungary, twenty Canis aureus individuals were submitted to parasitological examinations in 2010-2012. Two Coccidia: Cystoisospora canis (15%) and Toxoplasma-type oocysts (5%), one Trematoda: Alaria alata (10%), six Cestoda: Mesocestoides lineatus (20%), Echinococcus granulosus (10%), Dipylidium caninums (5%), Taenia hydatigena (15%), Taenia pisiformis (20%), Taenia crassiceps (40%), and nine Nematoda: Angiostrongylus vasorum (10%), Crenosoma vulpis (30%), Capillaria aerophila (5%), Toxocara canis (20%), Toxascaris leonina (15%), Trichuris vulpis (10%), Ancylostoma caninum (45%), Uncinaria stenocephala (40%), Capillaria plica (45%) have been identified. Angiostronglyus vasorum has been reported from carnivores in Europe, Africa, South America and North America. The helminth A. vasorum or French heartworm is a metastrongylid nematode, widely distributed in Western Europe, that infects the pulmonary arterial tree of dogs, various species of foxes, wolves, Eurasian badgers, coyotes and stoats. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural A. vasorum infection in golden jackal.

  7. Tinea Corporis, Caused by Microsporum Canis - a Case Report From Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Kokollari, Fatime; Daka, Aferdita; Blyta, Ymrane; Ismajli, Fellanza; Haxhijaha-Lulaj, Kujtesa

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tinea corporis (B35.6) caused by Microsporum canis which is fungal species that causes numerous forms of disease. It is part of a group of fungi known as Dermatophytes. Though mostly well known for ringworm in pets, it is also known to infect humans. This fact makes this pathogen both anthrophilic and zoophilic in nature. Microsporum canis is a communicable pathogen. Case report: We will report about a case, 22-year-old female, residing in a village, with typical changes of a mycotic infection caused by M. Canis. Dermatological description can be summarized with polymorphic erythematous, papulosquamous changes, erosions mainly on genital organ and spread to the thighs and lower abdomen which are accompanied with itching and burning. Diagnosis B35.6 was determined on the basis of clinical appearance complemented with anamnesis, microscopic examination and culture. The patient was treated successfully with general and local antimycotics and antibiotics. PMID:26622092

  8. Immunoregulation by Taenia crassiceps and its antigens.

    PubMed

    Peón, Alberto N; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; Terrazas, Luis I

    2013-01-01

    Taenia crassiceps is a cestode parasite of rodents (in its larval stage) and canids (in its adult stage) that can also parasitize immunocompromised humans. We have studied the immune response elicited by this helminth and its antigens in mice and human cells, and have discovered that they have a strong capacity to induce chronic Th2-type responses that are primarily characterized by high levels of Th2 cytokines, low proliferative responses in lymphocytes, an immature and LPS-tolerogenic profile in dendritic cells, the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, specially, alternatively activated macrophages. We also have utilized the immunoregulatory capabilities of this helminth to successfully modulate autoimmune responses and the outcome of other infectious diseases. In the present paper, we review the work of others and ourselves with regard to the immune response induced by T. crassiceps and its antigens, and we compare the advances in our understanding of this parasitic infection model with the knowledge that has been obtained from other selected models.

  9. Immunoregulation by Taenia crassiceps and Its Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Peón, Alberto N.; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2013-01-01

    Taenia crassiceps is a cestode parasite of rodents (in its larval stage) and canids (in its adult stage) that can also parasitize immunocompromised humans. We have studied the immune response elicited by this helminth and its antigens in mice and human cells, and have discovered that they have a strong capacity to induce chronic Th2-type responses that are primarily characterized by high levels of Th2 cytokines, low proliferative responses in lymphocytes, an immature and LPS-tolerogenic profile in dendritic cells, the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, specially, alternatively activated macrophages. We also have utilized the immunoregulatory capabilities of this helminth to successfully modulate autoimmune responses and the outcome of other infectious diseases. In the present paper, we review the work of others and ourselves with regard to the immune response induced by T. crassiceps and its antigens, and we compare the advances in our understanding of this parasitic infection model with the knowledge that has been obtained from other selected models. PMID:23484125

  10. Similarities and Differences for Swimming in Larval and Adult Lampreys.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Andrew D; Pale, Timothée; Messina, J Alex; Buso, Scott; Shebib, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The spinal locomotor networks controlling swimming behavior in larval and adult lampreys may have some important differences. As an initial step in comparing the locomotor systems in lampreys, in larval animals the relative timing of locomotor movements and muscle burst activity were determined and compared to those previously published for adults. In addition, the kinematics for free swimming in larval and adult lampreys was compared in detail for the first time. First, for swimming in larval animals, the neuromechanical phase lag between the onsets or terminations of muscle burst activity and maximum concave curvature of the body increased with increasing distance along the body, similar to that previously shown in adults. Second, in larval lampreys, but not adults, absolute swimming speed (U; mm s(-1)) increased with animal length (L). In contrast, normalized swimming speed (U'; body lengths [bl] s(-1)) did not increase with L in larval or adult animals. In both larval and adult lampreys, U' and normalized wave speed (V') increased with increasing tail-beat frequency. Wavelength and mechanical phase lag did not vary significantly with tail-beat frequency but were significantly different in larval and adult animals. Swimming in larval animals was characterized by a smaller U/V ratio, Froude efficiency, and Strouhal number than in adults, suggesting less efficient swimming for larval animals. In addition, during swimming in larval lampreys, normalized lateral head movements were larger and normalized lateral tail movements were smaller than for adults. Finally, larval animals had proportionally smaller lateral surface areas of the caudal body and fin areas than adults. These differences are well suited for larval sea lampreys that spend most of the time buried in mud/sand, in which swimming efficiency is not critical, compared to adults that would experience significant selection pressure to evolve higher-efficiency swimming to catch up to and attach to fish for

  11. Comparative Experimental Infection Study in Dogs with Ehrlichia canis, E. chaffeensis, Anaplasma platys and A. phagocytophilum.

    PubMed

    Nair, Arathy D S; Cheng, Chuanmin; Ganta, Chanran K; Sanderson, Michael W; Alleman, Arthur R; Munderloh, Ulrike G; Ganta, Roman R

    2016-01-01

    Dogs acquire infections with the Anaplasmataceae family pathogens, E. canis, E. chaffeensis, E. ewingii, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum mostly during summer months when ticks are actively feeding on animals. These pathogens are also identified as causing diseases in people. Despite the long history of tick-borne diseases in dogs, much remains to be defined pertaining to the clinical and pathological outcomes of infections with these pathogens. In the current study, we performed experimental infections in dogs with E. canis, E. chaffeensis, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum. Animals were monitored for 42 days to evaluate infection-specific clinical, hematological and pathological differences. All four pathogens caused systemic persistent infections detectible throughout the 6 weeks of infection assessment. Fever was frequently detected in animals infected with E. canis, E. chaffeensis, and A. platys, but not in dogs infected with A. phagocytophilum. Hematological differences were evident in all four infected groups, although significant overlap existed between the groups. A marked reduction in packed cell volume that correlated with reduced erythrocytes and hemoglobin was observed only in E. canis infected animals. A decline in platelet numbers was common with E. canis, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum infections. Histopathological lesions in lung, liver and spleen were observed in all four groups of infected dogs; infection with E. canis had the highest pathological scores, followed by E. chaffeensis, then A. platys and A. phagocytophilum. All four pathogens induced IgG responses starting on day 7 post infection, which was predominantly comprised of IgG2 subclass antibodies. This is the first detailed investigation comparing the infection progression and host responses in dogs after inoculation with four pathogens belonging to the Anaplasmataceae family. The study revealed a significant overlap in clinical, hematological and pathological changes resulting from the

  12. Environmental detection of Microsporum canis arthrospores in the households of infected cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Mancianti, F; Nardoni, S; Corazza, M; D'Achille, P; Ponticelli, C

    2003-12-01

    Microsporum canis is the dermatophyte most frequently recovered from canine and feline ringworm cases. The household environment can be contaminated both by symptomatic animals and through asymptomatic M canis carriage, resulting in a potential human health risk. The load of M canis arthrospores was determined in households harbouring infected pets, in order to evaluate the infectivity of the animals versus the environment. The environments inhabited by 30 symptomatic animals (21 cats and 9 dogs) infected by M canis were examined by sampling both surfaces and indoor air. The surfaces were examined by means of contact plates; the air sampling was performed with a Sas super-100 AIR SAMPLER (PBI, Italy). Environmental contamination was detected in all households with cats, while only four out of nine houses harbouring dogs were found positive. The frequence of isolation in each sampling, and the results in terms of colony forming units per plate in the different houses appeared to be quite homogeneous. Heavily infected environments harboured kittens only. Infected owners were observed in eight households, in all of which at least one infected cat was present. No history of human dermatophytosis in households harbouring dogs was found. On the basis of our results, infected cats appear to cause substantial environmental contamination, and provoke a substantial presence of viable airborne fungal elements. Dogs seem to be of lower importance in the spread of M CANIS: they contaminated surfaces, but they never contaminated the air. The results of this study confirm the potential leading role of the feline species in the environmental spread of M canis.

  13. Toxocara canis, Trichinella spiralis and Taenia solium helminthozoonoses: seroprevalence among selected populations in north India.

    PubMed

    Singh, B B; Sharma, R; Gill, J P S

    2015-09-01

    Helminthozoonoses are being considered as a research priority in India and many other tropical and subtropical countries. Taenia solium and Trichinella spiralis are emerging public health and food safety issues in the country and the developing world. The asymptomatic Ta. solium carriers act as important risk for neurocysticercosis, leading to adult onset epilepsy in the country. Human toxocariasis is another common zoonosis which occurs due to larvae of Toxocara canis or T. cati. The current study was planned to obtain baseline seropositivity data for Ta. solium, To. canis and Tr. spiralis antibodies among selected populations in Punjab province of northern India. In the present study, 122 human subjects belonging to selected occupations viz. farmers and veterinary practitioners were screened using the RIDASCREEN(®) Ta. solium IgG, RIDASCREEN(®) Toxocara IgG and RIDASCREEN(®) Trichinella IgG enzyme immunoassays for the qualitative determination of IgG antibodies against Ta. solium, Tr. spiralis and To. canis, respectively in human serum. The seropositivity of To. canis, Tr. spiralis and Ta. solium infections were found to be 22.13, 5.73 and 11.47 %, respectively in human serum samples. The relative risk of being infected for To. canis, Tr. spiralis and Ta. solium infections was found to be 1.91 (95 % CI 0.786-4.669), 2.61 (95 % CI 0.3258-20.94) and 1.596 (95 % CI 0.427-5.3893) times high respectively in farmers when compared to veterinary practitioners. The present study indicates that exposure to To. canis and Ta. solium is not uncommon among farmers and veterinary practitioners in this part of the country. These results provided evidence of Tr. spiralis among selected human populations in the country and demand more research related to trichinellosis in their respective animal and human hosts.

  14. Comparative Experimental Infection Study in Dogs with Ehrlichia canis, E. chaffeensis, Anaplasma platys and A. phagocytophilum

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Arathy D. S.; Cheng, Chuanmin; Ganta, Chanran K.; Sanderson, Michael W; Alleman, Arthur R.; Munderloh, Ulrike G.; Ganta, Roman R.

    2016-01-01

    Dogs acquire infections with the Anaplasmataceae family pathogens, E. canis, E. chaffeensis, E. ewingii, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum mostly during summer months when ticks are actively feeding on animals. These pathogens are also identified as causing diseases in people. Despite the long history of tick-borne diseases in dogs, much remains to be defined pertaining to the clinical and pathological outcomes of infections with these pathogens. In the current study, we performed experimental infections in dogs with E. canis, E. chaffeensis, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum. Animals were monitored for 42 days to evaluate infection-specific clinical, hematological and pathological differences. All four pathogens caused systemic persistent infections detectible throughout the 6 weeks of infection assessment. Fever was frequently detected in animals infected with E. canis, E. chaffeensis, and A. platys, but not in dogs infected with A. phagocytophilum. Hematological differences were evident in all four infected groups, although significant overlap existed between the groups. A marked reduction in packed cell volume that correlated with reduced erythrocytes and hemoglobin was observed only in E. canis infected animals. A decline in platelet numbers was common with E. canis, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum infections. Histopathological lesions in lung, liver and spleen were observed in all four groups of infected dogs; infection with E. canis had the highest pathological scores, followed by E. chaffeensis, then A. platys and A. phagocytophilum. All four pathogens induced IgG responses starting on day 7 post infection, which was predominantly comprised of IgG2 subclass antibodies. This is the first detailed investigation comparing the infection progression and host responses in dogs after inoculation with four pathogens belonging to the Anaplasmataceae family. The study revealed a significant overlap in clinical, hematological and pathological changes resulting from the

  15. Detection of Brucella canis-induced reproductive diseases in a kennel.

    PubMed

    Gyuranecz, Miklós; Szeredi, Levente; Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Dénes, Béla; Dencso, László; Dán, Ádám; Pálmai, Nimród; Hauser, Zsófia; Lami, Erzsébet; Makrai, László; Erdélyi, Károly; Jánosi, Szilárd

    2011-01-01

    Brucella spp. were isolated from an abortion case submitted for laboratory examination 8 months after the first clinical symptoms appeared in a kennel consisting of 31 dogs. Pathological investigations revealed the parallel presence of necrotic placentitis and the strong immunostaining of trophoblast cells by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using hyperimmune rabbit anti-Brucella canis primary antibodies. The rapid slide agglutination test was positive in 7 of 31 (23%) cases. The organism B. canis was successfully cultured from the blood, tissues, or vaginal swabs of only 3 of 31 (10%) cases. The isolated strains were identified as B. canis based on their colony morphology and agglutination with R sera. The strains were initially misidentified as B. suis with the "Bruce-ladder" method, and were subsequently correctly identified as B. canis with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing test. Three culture-positive cases and 3 culture-negative cases with histories of reproductive disorders were selected and examined for the presence of B. canis infection using histopathology, IHC, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Characteristic histologic lesions were found in all of the 6 animals, whereas IHC and PCR yielded positive results only in single cases from both groups. The results imply that all cases of canine abortion should be examined for brucellosis by bacterial culture of aborted fetuses and placentas. Immunohistochemical examination of placentas is also recommended because it is a quick and sensitive technique compared with bacterial culture. Multiple methods (i.e., serology, blood, and genital bacterial cultures) should be applied simultaneously and repeatedly for the reliable screening of B. canis infection in live individuals.

  16. Larval development of Evermannia zosterura (Perciformes: Gobiidae).

    PubMed

    González-Navarro, Enrique; Saldierna-Martínez, Ricardo Javier; Aceves-Medina, Gerardo

    2014-06-01

    Gobiidae is the most specious fish family in the world with almost 2 000 species, however only 11% of them have been described for their larval stages. The entire life cycle information is essential to understand the biology and ecology of this important fish group. Previous studies on zooplankton samples from Ensenada de La Paz, México, have shown the presence of several Gobiidae larvae and juveniles which were identified as Evermania zosterura. The main objective of this work was to describe the larval stages of this species, widely distributed in the Eastern tropical Pacific. The development of E. zosterura larvae was described based on 66 specimens. A total of 53 specimens were used to describe morphometrics and pigmentation patterns, while 13 specimens were cleared and stained, to obtain meristic characteristics. Cleared specimens had 30 to 31 total vertebrae; dorsal-fin elements: IV; 1, 13-14, anal-fin elements: 1, 13-14, and most had pterygiophore formula 4-111100. The combination of these characteristics confirmed these specimens as E. zosterura. The pigment pattern is similar throughout ontogeny. Larvae are characterized by having three to five dendritic melanophores along the post-anal ventral margin, four to nine smaller melanophores along the ventral margin between the isthmus and anus, and one on the midpoint of the dorsal margin of the tail. There is one small pigment spot on the angle of the jaw, and other on the tip of lower lip. There is an elongated internal pigment under the notochord, between the head and gas bladder. Notochord flexion starts near 3.5mm BL and ends at 4.6mm BL; transformalion to the juvenile stage is at about 13.6mm BL. Our conclusion is that the most useful characters to distinguish this species early-larval stages from those of similar species in the area, are the number of myomeres, the large melanophores (approximately uniformly in size) on the post anal ventral margin, and the elongate internal pigment under the notochord

  17. Initial Analysis of the Near Contact Binary, CR Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samec, R. G.; Sims, E.; Wolfe, D.; Hawkins, N. C.

    2003-12-01

    We present here our initial analysis of the near-contact binary, CR Canis Majoris [GSC 5973 1733, α (2000) = 7h 18m 2.14s, δ (2000) = -19° 40' 57.7"]. The observations were taken at CTIO on 26, 27, 29, 30, December 2002 and 1 January 2003, by RGS with the 0.9-m reflector and the CFIM T2K CCD camera in quad mode. About 240 observations were taken in U,Rc and Ic and 220 in B and V. The comparison and check stars were GSC 5973 1418 (α (2000) = 7h 18m 15.25s, δ (2000) = -19° 40' 27.7") and GSC 5973 2291 (α (2000) = 7h 18m 3.86s, δ (2000) = -19° 40' 31.8"), respectively. Mean epochs of minimum light for two primary eclipses, HJD = 2452639.7905(6) and 2452641.6634(8) as well as one secondary eclipse 2452635.7345(7) were calculated. We averaged parabola fits for all bands to obtain these consistent values. We calculated the following ephemerides from all available timings of minimum light: J.D. Hel Min I = 2452641.6634 (52) + 0.624141545 (23) d*E, (1) and J.D. Hel Min I = 2452641.66309 (60) + 0.62408 (10) d*E. (2) Equation (1) represents a fit to all available times of minimum light and equation (2) is from our present observations only. The eclipse depths CR CMa are 0.51 mag and 0.12 mag (V) in the primary and secondary eclipses, respectively. A Binary Maker fit and perhaps a Wilson Code solution will be presented. This work was done as a part of our undergraduate observational astronomy class. We wish to thank Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory for their allocation of observing time, and the grant from NASA administered by the American Astronomical Society which supported this run.

  18. The High Amplitude delta Scuti Star AD Canis Minoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsen, R. A.; Napier-Munn, T.

    2016-12-01

    The high amplitude delta Scuti star AD Canis Minoris was studied by photoelectric photometry (PEP) during one night in in February 2011 and by digital single lens reflex (DSLR) photometry during seven nights in January and February 2016. Nine light curve peaks were captured, eight of them by DSLR photometry. A review of the literature enabled us to tabulate 109 times of maximum since 1959, to which we added 9 times of maximum from our data, thus creating the largest dataset to date for this star. Assuming a linear ephemeris, the period of AD CMi was calculated to be 0.122974511 (+/- 0.000000004) d, almost identical to that quoted in earlier literature. We constructed an observed minus computed (O-C) diagram which exhibited a quasi-sinusoidal shape, and fitted a weighted model characterised by combined quadratic and trigonometric functions. The fit indicates that the shape of the O-C diagram is attributable to the effects of a slow increase in the pulsation period of AD CMi at a constant rate, and the light time effect of a binary pair, confirming the results from previous authors, and updating most of the coefficients of the equation for the fitted model. The values of all of the coefficients in the function are statistically significant. The rate of increase in the pulsation period of AD CMi was calculated from the entire dataset to be dP/dt = 6.17 (+/- 0.75) x 10-9 d yr-1 or dP/Pdt = 5.01 (+/- 0.61) x 10-8 yr-1.

  19. Attempted treatment of tigers (Panthera tigris) infected with Microsporum canis.

    PubMed

    Sykes, John M; Ramsay, Edward C

    2007-06-01

    An outbreak of dermatophytosis caused by Microsporum canis occurred in tigers (Panthera tigris) at an exotic felid sanctuary in 2003. In an attempt to find an effective, practical, safe, and affordable method for controlling this epizootic, a clinical treatment trial was conducted. Nonalopecic tigers were studied to address the inapparent carrier state observed at the facility. The efficacy of three topical and environmental treatment combinations of a 2% lime sulfur solution and a peroxide-based cleaner were evaluated in nonalopecic, culture-positive tigers (n = 18) housed in four separate enclosures. Lime sulfur solution was applied topically to all of these animals. As a control, nonalopecic but culture-positive tigers (n = 6) housed in two other enclosures were not treated. Environmental treatments included lime sulfur solution (n = 1), a peroxide-based cleaner (n = 1), and no treatment (n = 2). All solutions were applied at 2-wk intervals for seven treatments. The 2% lime sulfur solution treatments were unsuccessful in resolving infections in most tigers. Lime sulfur was effective in suppressing environmental fungal growth immediately posttreatment, whereas the peroxide-based cleaner was not effective. A follow-up survey of all study tigers and their enclosures was conducted 2 yr later, at which time 22 of 24 tigers (92%) had attained resolution, defined as two sequential negative hair cultures. Review of the culture results during the clinical trial and follow-up study suggests that nonalopecic dermatophytosis in tigers that are housed outdoors may not warrant aggressive individual or environmental treatment, as the infection may clear with time.

  20. Sarcoptic mange in the Scandinavian wolf Canis lupus population.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Boris; Zimmermann, Barbara; Wabakken, Petter; Bornstein, Set; Månsson, Johan; Evans, Alina L; Liberg, Olof; Sand, Håkan; Kindberg, Jonas; Ågren, Erik O; Arnemo, Jon M

    2016-07-27

    Sarcoptic mange, a parasitic disease caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei, is regularly reported on wolves Canis lupus in Scandinavia. We describe the distribution and transmission of this parasite within the small but recovering wolf population by analysing 269 necropsy reports and performing a serological survey on 198 serum samples collected from free-ranging wolves between 1998 and 2013. The serological survey among 145 individual captured Scandinavian wolves (53 recaptures) shows a consistent presence of antibodies against sarcoptic mange. Seropositivity among all captured wolves was 10.1 % (CI. 6.4 %-15.1 %). Sarcoptic mange-related mortality reported at necropsy was 5.6 % and due to secondary causes, predominantly starvation. In the southern range of the population, seroprevalence was higher, consistent with higher red fox densities. Female wolves had a lower probability of being seropositive than males, but for both sexes the probability increased with pack size. Recaptured individuals changing from seropositive to seronegative suggest recovery from sarcoptic mange. The lack of seropositive pups (8-10 months, N = 56) and the occurrence of seropositive and seronegative individuals in the same pack indicates interspecific transmission of S. scabiei into this wolf population. We consider sarcoptic mange to have little effect on the recovery of the Scandinavian wolf population. Heterogenic infection patterns on the pack level in combination with the importance of individual-based factors (sex, pack size) and the north-south gradient for seroprevalence suggests low probability of wolf-to-wolf transmission of S. scabiei in Scandinavia.

  1. Exploration of the "larval pool": development and ground-truthing of a larval transport model off leeward Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Wren, Johanna L K; Kobayashi, Donald R

    2016-01-01

    Most adult reef fish show site fidelity thus dispersal is limited to the mobile larval stage of the fish, and effective management of such species requires an understanding of the patterns of larval dispersal. In this study, we assess larval reef fish distributions in the waters west of the Big Island of Hawai'i using both in situ and model data. Catches from Cobb midwater trawls off west Hawai'i show that reef fish larvae are most numerous in offshore waters deeper than 3,000 m and consist largely of pre-settlement Pomacanthids, Acanthurids and Chaetodontids. Utilizing a Lagrangian larval dispersal model, we were able to replicate the observed shore fish distributions from the trawl data and we identified the 100 m depth strata as the most likely depth of occupancy. Additionally, our model showed that for larval shore fish with a pelagic larval duration longer than 40 days there was no significant change in settlement success in our model. By creating a general additive model (GAM) incorporating lunar phase and angle we were able to explain 67.5% of the variance between modeled and in situ Acanthurid abundances. We took steps towards creating a predictive larval distribution model that will greatly aid in understanding the spatiotemporal nature of the larval pool in west Hawai'i, and the dispersal of larvae throughout the Hawaiian archipelago.

  2. Serological evidence of exposure to Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Central Italian healthy domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Ebani, Valentina V; Bertelloni, Fabrizio

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present survey was to estimate the seroprevalences of Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in the Central Italian feline population. Serum samples of 560 healthy domestic cats were examined by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFAT), considering an antibody titre of 1:40 as cut-off. Seroprevalences of 6.4% and 4.5% were found for E. canis and A. phagocytophilum, respectively. Adult, mixed breed cats showed seroprevalences higher than younger and purebred subjects, whereas no differences were observed in relation to gender and living conditions.

  3. Prevalence of Toxocara canis in Dogs, North West Bank of Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the prevalence of Toxocara canis in local districts in North West Bank of Palestine. Fecal samples from 132 dogs were collected in Nablus, Tulkarm, and Jenin cities from September 2008 to April 2009 and examined for T. canis eggs with the floating technique. The overall infection rate of toxocariasis in dogs was 36.4%. The dogs less than 6 months old showed higher infection rates than those older than 12 months (P=0.04). Vigorous interventions are necessary, such as routine coprological examinations of dogs and prescription of anthelmintics to infected dogs. PMID:21738276

  4. Hepatitis associated with a Sarcocystis canis-like protozoan in a Hawaiian monk seal (Monachus schauinslandi).

    PubMed

    Yantis, D; Moeller, R; Braun, R; Gardiner, C H; Aguirre, A; Dubey, J P

    2003-12-01

    A Hawaiian monk seal (Monachus schauinslandi) died in captivity at the National Marine Fisheries Service, Kewalo Basin Facility in Honolulu, Hawaii. The animal was icteric, and the liver was friable. Microscopic lesions were detected in the colon and liver. Colonic lesions included multifocal, necrohemorrhagic colitis associated with gram-negative bacilli. The liver lesions included random hepatic necrosis and cholestasis. Asexual stages of a Sarcocystis canis-like apicomplexan were detected in hepatocytes. The parasite divided by endopolygeny. Merozoites occasionally formed rosettes around a central residual body. Ultrastructurally, merozoites lacked rhoptries. This is the first report of S. canis infection in M. schauinslandi, which is an endangered pinniped in U.S. waters.

  5. ELEVATED TRANS-MAMMARY TRANSMISSION OF Toxocara canis LARVAE IN BALB/c MICE

    PubMed Central

    Telmo, Paula de Lima; de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; dos Santos, Cristina Araújo; de Aguiar, Patrícia de Souza; Martins, Lourdes Helena Rodrigues; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; Scaini, Carlos James

    2015-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a widespread zoonosis and is considered an important worldwide public health problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of trans-mammary Toxocara canis infection in newborn BALB/c mice nursed by females experimentally infected with 1,200 eggs after delivery. After 50 days of age, the presence of larvae in different organs of the offspring was investigated. Trans-mammary infection was confirmed in 73.9% of the mice that had been nursed by infected females. These data show a high trans-mammary transmission of T. canis and confirm the significance of this transmission route in paratenic hosts. PMID:25651332

  6. Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis due to Toxocara canis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Jose E; Sztajnbok, Jaques; Seguro, Antonio Carlos

    2003-09-01

    Toxocariasis is usually manifested as visceral larva migrans. Nervous system involvement is a rare complication. In this report, we describe one case of meningoencephalitis due to Toxocara canis and review the literature. We report a previously healthy two-year-old boy who was admitted after 24 hours of severe neurologic symptoms with marked eosinophilic pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid and a single subcortical lesion detected by cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Both serum and spinal fluid tested positive for T. canis. Initial treatment with thiabendazole was ineffective. After marked improvement in clinical and laboratory results were achieved using albendazole and corticosteroids, the child was discharged.

  7. Serology, molecular detection and risk factors of Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Barrantes-González, Alexander V; Jiménez-Rocha, Ana E; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Dolz, Gaby

    2016-10-01

    A cross-sectional study combining different serological and molecular techniques for the detection of Ehrlichia species in dogs and their ticks was carried out with data from all regions of Costa Rica. A seroprevalence of 32.1% (131/408), and infection with E. canis of 3.2% (13/407) was found, whereas 6.9% (9/130) of ticks attached to the dogs were PCR positive to E. canis. Higher prevalences were found outside the Greater Metropolitan Area (GMA). Risk factors associated with E. canis seropositivity were age, between 2 and 7 years (RR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.2-2.2) and 8-15 years (RR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-3.0), number of dogs/total of households [Dogs per Household Ratio (DHR) ≥3.1 (RR: 2.0; 95% CI: 1.4-3.0)], number of dogs infested with at least one tick/total of dogs sampled [Tick Infestation Prevalence (TIP)≥31% (RR: 2.1; 95% CI:1.3-3.3)] and living outside the GMA (RR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.2-2.4) and being a mixed-breed dog (RR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1-2.1). Risk factors for E. canis PCR positive dogs were a depressive attitude (OR: 11.2; 95% CI: 1.1-115.9), fever (OR:4.8; 95% CI:1.2-19.3), DHR≥3.1 (OR: 5.7; 95% CI:1.7-19.2)], number of ticks/total of dogs sampled [Tick Distribution Ratio (TDR) ≥2.1 (OR: 6.5; 95% CI: 1.3-31.8)], and TIP≥40% (OR: 5.7; 95% CI: 1.7-19.2). This paper describes E. canis seroprevalence, PCR prevalence and tick analysis in dogs from Costa Rica, with associated clinical signs and owner perceptions. In summary, most of the E. canis infections in dogs in our country seemed to pass unnoticed by owners. Since most of the seropositive dogs (97.7%, 131/134) were negative for E. canis DNA in their blood, it is important to determine in future studies if these dogs recovered from the E. canis infection without any medication, or are persistently infected, and will develop chronic disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular survey of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia canis in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from central Italy.

    PubMed

    Ebani, Valentina Virginia; Verin, Ranieri; Fratini, Filippo; Poli, Alessandro; Cerri, Domenico

    2011-07-01

    During the 2007-2008 hunting season, 150 spleen samples were collected from free-ranging red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in central Italy. The specimens were tested by two nested PCR assays to detect DNA of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, etiologic agent of granulocytic ehrlichiosis of animals and humans, and DNA of Ehrlichia canis, which causes the monocytic ehrlichiosis in canids. None of the foxes were PCR-positive for E. canis; 25 (16.6%) were positive for A. phagocytophilum. No specific gross alterations were detected at necropsy, and no histopathologic lesions found on PCR-positive spleen samples.

  9. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MICROSPORUM CANIS FROM ASIAN ELEPHANTS (ELEPHAS MAXIMUS) IN THE CHONGQING ZOO, CHINA.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xingfang; Hu, Juan; Wu, Denghu; Wei, Li; Yang, Yang; Chen, Jiankang; Mi, Benzhong; Yang, SongQuan

    2016-09-01

    Skin diseases affect millions of people and animals worldwide, including Asian elephants. This study sought to determine the pathogen of skin diseases that occurred in Asian elephants in Chongqing Zoo, China. The isolated fungus was identified through its cultural characteristics, morphology, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The PCR amplification using common fungal primers (ITS1 and ITS4) determined that the pathogen was 99.7% homologous to Microsporum canis. This is the first report on elephants infected with Microsporum canis in China.

  10. [Helminths of wolves (Canis lupus) from south Mazurian Lakeland, a coprological study].

    PubMed

    Kloch, Agnieszka; Bajer, Anna

    2003-01-01

    52 wolf scats collected during winter 2001/2002 in Puszcza Piska and Napiwodzko-Ramuckic forests were examined using Fulleborn's method. The overall helminth prevalence was 28.8%. Six helminth species were recorded, the most frequent species were Uncinaria stenocepmhala/Ancylostoma caninmu (treated together; found in 6 samples), Toxocara canis and Trichuris vulpis (both identified in 4 samples). The mean intensity of egg expulsion was 2.0 eggs/g feces, the most intense infection was this with Toxocara canis (average 23.0 eggs/g feces). There were observed differences in prevalence of parasite' species between packs. Present paper is first such an investigation in northeastern Poland.

  11. Evidence for unapparent Brucella canis infections among adults with occupational exposure to dogs.

    PubMed

    Krueger, W S; Lucero, N E; Brower, A; Heil, G L; Gray, G C

    2014-11-01

    Human serological assays designed to detect brucellosis will miss infections caused by Brucella canis, and low levels of periodic bacteremia limit diagnosis by blood culture. Recent B. canis outbreaks in dogs and concomitant illnesses in caretakers suggest that unapparent human infections may be occurring. With more than a quarter of a million persons in occupations involving dogs, and nearly 80 million dog owners in the United States, this pathogen is an under-recognized human health threat. To investigate occupational exposure to B. canis, we adapted a commercial canine serological assay and present the first controlled seroepidemiological study of human B. canis infections in recent years. 306 adults with occupational exposure to dogs and 101 non-matched, non-canine-exposed subjects were enrolled. Antibodies were detected using the canine D-Tec(®) CB rapid slide agglutination test (RSAT) kit with a secondary 2-mercaptoethanol (ME)-RSAT. Results were validated on a blinded subset of sera with an additional RSAT and indirect enzyme-linked immunoassay at the National Administration of Laboratories and Health Institutes (ANLIS) in Argentina. Seroprevalence ranged from 10.8% (RSAT) to 3.6% (ME-RSAT) among canine-exposed subjects. Kennel employees were more likely to test RSAT seropositive compared with other canine exposures (OR = 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3-5.8); however, low seroprevalence limited meaningful occupational risk factor analyses. Two seropositive participants reported experiencing symptoms consistent with brucellosis and having exposure to B. canis-infected dogs; however, temporality of symptom onset with reported exposure could not be determined. D-Tec(®) CB results had substantial agreement with ANLIS assays (Cohen's kappa = 0.60-0.68). These data add to a growing body of literature suggesting that people occupationally exposed to dogs may be at risk of unapparent B. canis infection. It seems prudent to consider B. canis as an occupational public health

  12. Cyclic AMP affects the haemocyte responses of larval Galleria mellonella to selected antigens.

    PubMed

    Marin, David; Dunphy, Gary B; Mandato, Craig A

    2005-05-01

    Signal transduction of the innate immediate responses of insect haemocytes to foreign matter is rarely considered. Herein using a combination of adenylate cyclase inhibitors and activators and phosphodiesterase inhibitors we determined that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) at high levels normally impairs non-self response. Haemocyte contact with glass and bacteria lowered cAMP in vitro. Inactive phosphodiesterases, including type 4, impaired haemocyte reactions in vitro. Using the drugs in vivo to modulate adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterases altered the total and types of haemocytes. Adenylate cyclase inhibitors and etazolate (a type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor) alone produced changes in the haemograms similar to those caused by Bacillus subtilis. Sequential injections of an enzyme modulator followed by B. subtilis impaired bacterial removal due (1) in the case of enzyme inhibitors, to the removal of haemocytes prior to bacterial challenge and (2) in the case of forskolin and IBMX to the shut-down of the haemocytes. Activating adenylate cyclase or inhibiting phosphodiesterase impaired bacterial removal when co-injecting the compounds and bacteria.

  13. Coastal pollution limits pelagic larval dispersal.

    PubMed

    Puritz, Jonathan B; Toonen, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The ecological impact of large coastal human populations on marine ecosystems remains relatively unknown. Here, we examine the population structure of Patiria miniata, the bat star, and correlate genetic distances with a model based on flow rates and proximity to P. miniata populations for the four major stormwater runoff and wastewater effluent sources of the Southern California Bight. We show that overall genetic connectivity is high (F(ST)~0.005); however, multivariate analyses show that genetic structure is highly correlated with anthropogenic inputs. The best models included both stormwater and wastewater variables and explained between 26.55 and 93.69% of the observed structure. Additionally, regressions between allelic richness and distance to sources show that populations near anthropogenic pollution have reduced genetic diversity. Our results indicate that anthropogenic runoff and effluent are acting as barriers to larval dispersal, effectively isolating a high gene flow species that is virtually free of direct human impact.

  14. Morphology of isolated crustacean larval salt glands.

    PubMed

    Lowy, R J; Conte, F P

    1985-06-01

    Larval salt glands isolated from the naupliar brine shrimp (Artemia salina) were examined using light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These methods demonstrated that most cellular and subcellular features of the in vitro organ compared favorably with those seen in vivo. This salt gland measures 130 micron in diameter and is comprised of 50-70 secretory cells, which are of a single epithelial cell type. Characteristic ultrastructural features that are well preserved include apical to basal cell polarity, apical plasma membrane projections, and the extent of the basolateral tubular labyrinth and its association with numerous mitochondria. Some features that have been altered are a decrease in cell-cell contact, separation of septate junctions, and expansion of tubular labyrinth lumens and mitochondrial cristae. Use of this preparation has allowed examination of the salt gland cell's hemocoelic surface for the first time and provided information about the ultrastructure of the tufts formed by the apical plasma membrane.

  15. GROWTH AND BEHAVIOR OF LARVAL ZEBRAFISH Danio ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Because Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have become a popular and important model for scientific research, the capability to rear larval zebrafish to adulthood is of great importance. Recently research examining the effects of diet (live versus processed) have been published. In the current study we examined whether the larvae can be reared on a processed diet alone, live food alone, or the combination while maintaining normal locomotor behavior, and acceptable survival, length and weight at 14 dpf in a static system. A 14 day feeding trial was conducted in glass crystallizing dishes containing 500 ml of 4 ppt Instant Ocean. On day 0 pdf 450 embryos were selected as potential study subjects and placed in a 26○C incubator on a 14:10 (light:dark) light cycle. At 4 dpf 120 normally developing embryos were selected per treatment and divided into 3 bowls of 40 embryos (for an n=3 per treatment; 9 bowls total). Treatment groups were: G (Gemma Micro 75 only), R (L-type marine rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) only) or B (Gemma and rotifers). Growth (length), survival, water quality and rotifer density were monitored on days 5-14. On day 14, weight of larva in each bowl was measured and 8 larva per bowl were selected for use in locomotor testing. This behavior paradigm tests individual larval zebrafish under both light and dark conditions in a 24-well plate.After 14 dpf, survival among the groups was not different (92-98%). By days 7 -14 R and B larvae were ~2X longer

  16. Antigen injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Leprosy is caused by the organism Mycobacterium leprae . The leprosy test involves injection of an antigen just under ... if your body has a current or recent leprosy infection. The injection site is labeled and examined ...

  17. Mosquito larval source management for controlling malaria

    PubMed Central

    Tusting, Lucy S; Thwing, Julie; Sinclair, David; Fillinger, Ulrike; Gimnig, John; Bonner, Kimberly E; Bottomley, Christian; Lindsay, Steven W

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria is an important cause of illness and death in people living in many parts of the world, especially sub-Saharan Africa. Long-lasting insecticide treated bed nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) reduce malaria transmission by targeting the adult mosquito vector and are key components of malaria control programmes. However, mosquito numbers may also be reduced by larval source management (LSM), which targets mosquito larvae as they mature in aquatic habitats. This is conducted by permanently or temporarily reducing the availability of larval habitats (habitat modification and habitat manipulation), or by adding substances to standing water that either kill or inhibit the development of larvae (larviciding). Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of mosquito LSM for preventing malaria. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; CABS Abstracts; and LILACS up to 24 October 2012. We handsearched the Tropical Diseases Bulletin from 1900 to 2010, the archives of the World Health Organization (up to 11 February 2011), and the literature database of the Armed Forces Pest Management Board (up to 2 March 2011). We also contacted colleagues in the field for relevant articles. Selection criteria We included cluster randomized controlled trials (cluster-RCTs), controlled before-and-after trials with at least one year of baseline data, and randomized cross-over trials that compared LSM with no LSM for malaria control. We excluded trials that evaluated biological control of anopheline mosquitoes with larvivorous fish. Data collection and analysis At least two authors assessed each trial for eligibility. We extracted data and at least two authors independently determined the risk of bias in the included studies. We resolved all disagreements through discussion with a third author. We analyzed the data using Review Manager 5 software

  18. Mosquito larval source management for controlling malaria.

    PubMed

    Tusting, Lucy S; Thwing, Julie; Sinclair, David; Fillinger, Ulrike; Gimnig, John; Bonner, Kimberly E; Bottomley, Christian; Lindsay, Steven W

    2013-08-29

    Malaria is an important cause of illness and death in people living in many parts of the world, especially sub-Saharan Africa. Long-lasting insecticide treated bed nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) reduce malaria transmission by targeting the adult mosquito vector and are key components of malaria control programmes. However, mosquito numbers may also be reduced by larval source management (LSM), which targets mosquito larvae as they mature in aquatic habitats. This is conducted by permanently or temporarily reducing the availability of larval habitats (habitat modification and habitat manipulation), or by adding substances to standing water that either kill or inhibit the development of larvae (larviciding). To evaluate the effectiveness of mosquito LSM for preventing malaria. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; CABS Abstracts; and LILACS up to 24 October 2012. We handsearched the Tropical Diseases Bulletin from 1900 to 2010, the archives of the World Health Organization (up to 11 February 2011), and the literature database of the Armed Forces Pest Management Board (up to 2 March 2011). We also contacted colleagues in the field for relevant articles. We included cluster randomized controlled trials (cluster-RCTs), controlled before-and-after trials with at least one year of baseline data, and randomized cross-over trials that compared LSM with no LSM for malaria control. We excluded trials that evaluated biological control of anopheline mosquitoes with larvivorous fish. At least two authors assessed each trial for eligibility. We extracted data and at least two authors independently determined the risk of bias in the included studies. We resolved all disagreements through discussion with a third author. We analyzed the data using Review Manager 5 software. We included 13 studies; four cluster-RCTs, eight controlled before

  19. Assessing the prevalence of hybridization between sympatric Canis species surrounding the red wolf (Canis rufus) recovery area in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Bohling, Justin H; Waits, Lisette P

    2011-05-01

    Predicting spatial patterns of hybridization is important for evolutionary and conservation biology yet are hampered by poor understanding of how hybridizing species can interact. This is especially pertinent in contact zones where hybridizing populations are sympatric. In this study, we examined the extent of red wolf (Canis rufus) colonization and introgression where the species contacts a coyote (C. latrans) population in North Carolina, USA. We surveyed 22,000km(2) in the winter of 2008 for scat and identified individual canids through genetic analysis. Of 614 collected scats, 250 were assigned to canids by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing. Canid samples were genotyped at 6-17 microsatellite loci (nDNA) and assigned to species using three admixture criteria implemented in two Bayesian clustering programs. We genotyped 82 individuals but none were identified as red wolves. Two individuals had red wolf mtDNA but no significant red wolf nDNA ancestry. One individual possessed significant red wolf nDNA ancestry (approximately 30%) using all criteria, although seven other individuals showed evidence of red wolf ancestry (11-21%) using the relaxed criterion. Overall, seven individuals were classified as hybrids using the conservative criteria and 37 using the relaxed criterion. We found evidence of dog (C. familiaris) and gray wolf (C. lupus) introgression into the coyote population. We compared the performance of different methods and criteria by analyzing known red wolves and hybrids. These results suggest that red wolf colonization and introgression in North Carolina is minimal and provide insights into the utility of Bayesian clustering methods to detect hybridization. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Canis mtDNA HV1 database: a web-based tool for collecting and surveying Canis mtDNA HV1 haplotype in public database.

    PubMed

    Thai, Quan Ke; Chung, Dung Anh; Tran, Hoang-Dung

    2017-06-26

    Canine and wolf mitochondrial DNA haplotypes, which can be used for forensic or phylogenetic analyses, have been defined in various schemes depending on the region analyzed. In recent studies, the 582 bp fragment of the HV1 region is most commonly used. 317 different canine HV1 haplotypes have been reported in the rapidly growing public database GenBank. These reported haplotypes contain several inconsistencies in their haplotype information. To overcome this issue, we have developed a Canis mtDNA HV1 database. This database collects data on the HV1 582 bp region in dog mitochondrial DNA from the GenBank to screen and correct the inconsistencies. It also supports users in detection of new novel mutation profiles and assignment of new haplotypes. The Canis mtDNA HV1 database (CHD) contains 5567 nucleotide entries originating from 15 subspecies in the species Canis lupus. Of these entries, 3646 were haplotypes and grouped into 804 distinct sequences. 319 sequences were recognized as previously assigned haplotypes, while the remaining 485 sequences had new mutation profiles and were marked as new haplotype candidates awaiting further analysis for haplotype assignment. Of the 3646 nucleotide entries, only 414 were annotated with correct haplotype information, while 3232 had insufficient or lacked haplotype information and were corrected or modified before storing in the CHD. The CHD can be accessed at http://chd.vnbiology.com . It provides sequences, haplotype information, and a web-based tool for mtDNA HV1 haplotyping. The CHD is updated monthly and supplies all data for download. The Canis mtDNA HV1 database contains information about canine mitochondrial DNA HV1 sequences with reconciled annotation. It serves as a tool for detection of inconsistencies in GenBank and helps identifying new HV1 haplotypes. Thus, it supports the scientific community in naming new HV1 haplotypes and to reconcile existing annotation of HV1 582 bp sequences.

  1. Molecular detection of Anaplasma platys, Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis and Rickettsia monacensis in dogs from Maio Island of Cape Verde archipelago.

    PubMed

    Lauzi, Stefania; Maia, João P; Epis, Sara; Marcos, Ricardo; Pereira, Cristina; Luzzago, Camilla; Santos, Marta; Puente-Payo, Pablo; Giordano, Alessia; Pajoro, Massimo; Sironi, Giuseppe; Faustino, Augusto

    2016-07-01

    Tick-borne diseases are emerging worldwide and have an important zoonotic relevance. Dogs play an important role in the epidemiology of several zoonotic tick-borne pathogens acting as sentinels and/or reservoirs. This study focused on the molecular identification of tick-borne pathogens in blood samples of 153 autochthonous asymptomatic dogs in Maio Island, Cape Verde archipelago. Eighty-four (54.9%) dogs were positive for one or more pathogens. Fifty-five (35.9%) dogs were infected with Hepatozoon canis, 53 (34.6%) with Anaplasma platys, five (3.3%) with Ehrlichia canis and Rickettsia monacensis, an emerging human pathogen, was also identified in a single dog (0.7%). The former three pathogens cause important canine tick-borne diseases that are transmitted or potentially transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l., the only hard tick identified in Cape Verde. Furthermore, Wolbachia spp. was amplified from the blood of one dog. None of the dogs were positive for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Midichloria mitochondrii, Bartonella spp., Babesia spp. or Theileria spp. Fifty-four (35.3%) animals showed single infections and 30 (19.6%) co-infections, with A. platys and H. canis co-infection being the most frequent (28 dogs, 18.3%). The frequency of E. canis infection was statistically different among age groups (P=0.017), being higher among dogs older than 4 years compared to younger dogs. Infection by A. platys was also statistically different among age groups (P=0.031), being higher in dogs younger than 2 years compared to older dogs. The statistical analyses showed no significant association of PCR positivity with gender or location. The frequency of tick-borne pathogens detected in dogs in Maio Island, including R. monacensis, highlights the need to improve diagnosis and control in order to prevent the risk of transmission of these pathogens among dogs and humans living in or travelling to this touristic island.

  2. Preliminary report on the stimulation of immunity to the larval stage of Taenia multiceps.

    PubMed

    Verster, A; Tustin, R C

    1982-09-01

    The efficacy of Oncosphere Secretory Antigen (OSA) in protecting sheep against the larval stage of Taenia multiceps was assessed in 47 sheep in 2 trials. In the pilot trial no cerebral coenuri were found in 3 sheep which were treated with OSA 28 and 14 days before challenge with 6 000 eggs of T. multiceps. Cerebral coenuri were present in 3 untreated controls. In the second experiment 30 sheep were similarly treated with OSA and challenged with 5 000 eggs of T. multiceps, while 11 sheep served as untreated controls. At necropsy either developing coenuri or degenerate lesions were present in the brain of 5 (16,6%) of the 30 vaccinated animals while 8 out of 11 (72,7%) of the untreated animals had cerebral coenuri or degenerate lesions in the brain. It is concluded that OSA may be used to protect animals against cerebral coenuriosis.

  3. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) Increases Survival of Larval Sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonathan S F; Poretsky, Rachel S; Cook, Matthew A; Reyes-Tomassini, Jose J; Berejikian, Barry A; Goetz, Frederick W

    2016-06-01

    High concentrations of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a chemical compound released by lysed phytoplankton, may indicate high rates of grazing by zooplankton and may thus be a foraging cue for planktivorous fishes. Previous studies have shown that some planktivorous fishes and birds aggregate or alter locomotory behavior in response to this chemical cue, which is likely adaptive because it helps them locate prey. These behavioral responses have been demonstrated in juveniles and adults, but no studies have tested for effects on larval fish. Larvae suffer from high mortality rates and are vulnerable to starvation. While larvae are generally thought to be visual predators, they actually have poor vision and cryptic prey. Thus, larval fish should benefit from a chemical cue that provides information on prey abundance. We reared larval sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria, for one week and supplemented feedings with varying concentrations of DMSP to test the hypothesis that DMSP affects larval survival. Ecologically relevant DMSP concentrations increased larval survival by up to 70 %, which has implications for production in aquaculture and recruitment in nature. These results provide a new tool for increasing larval production in aquaculture and also suggest that larvae may use DMSP as an olfactory cue. The release of DMSP may be a previously unappreciated mechanism through which phytoplankton affect larval survival and recruitment.

  4. Does fish larval dispersal differ between high and low latitudes?

    PubMed Central

    Leis, Jeffrey M.; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Bradbury, Ian R.; Kristiansen, Trond; Llopiz, Joel K.; Miller, Michael J.; O'Connor, Mary I.; Paris, Claire B.; Shanks, Alan L.; Sogard, Susan M.; Swearer, Stephen E.; Treml, Eric A.; Vetter, Russell D.; Warner, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Several factors lead to expectations that the scale of larval dispersal and population connectivity of marine animals differs with latitude. We examine this expectation for demersal shorefishes, including relevant mechanisms, assumptions and evidence. We explore latitudinal differences in (i) biological (e.g. species composition, spawning mode, pelagic larval duration, PLD), (ii) physical (e.g. water movement, habitat fragmentation), and (iii) biophysical factors (primarily temperature, which could strongly affect development, swimming ability or feeding). Latitudinal differences exist in taxonomic composition, habitat fragmentation, temperature and larval swimming, and each difference could influence larval dispersal. Nevertheless, clear evidence for latitudinal differences in larval dispersal at the level of broad faunas is lacking. For example, PLD is strongly influenced by taxon, habitat and geographical region, but no independent latitudinal trend is present in published PLD values. Any trends in larval dispersal may be obscured by a lack of appropriate information, or use of ‘off the shelf’ information that is biased with regard to the species assemblages in areas of concern. Biases may also be introduced from latitudinal differences in taxa or spawning modes as well as limited latitudinal sampling. We suggest research to make progress on the question of latitudinal trends in larval dispersal. PMID:23516247

  5. Bean Type Modifies Larval Competition in Zabrotes subfasciatus (Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, S O D; Rodrigues, A S; Vieira, J L; Rosi-Denadai, C A; Guedes, N M P; Guedes, R N C

    2015-08-01

    Larval competition is particularly prevalent among grain beetles that remain within their mother-selected grain throughout development, and the behavioral process of competition is usually inferred by the competition outcome. The Mexican bean weevil Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman) is subjected to resource availability variation because of the diversity of common bean types and sizes, from small (e.g., kidney beans) to large (e.g., cranberry beans). The competition process was identified in the Mexican bean weevil reared on kidney and cranberry beans by inference from the competition outcome and by direct observation through digital X-ray imaging. Increased larval density negatively affected adult emergence in kidney beans and reduced adult body mass in both kidney and cranberry beans. Developmental time was faster in cranberry beans. The results allowed for increased larval fitness (i.e., higher larval biomass produced per grain), with larval density reaching a maximum plateau >5 hatched larvae per kidney bean, whereas in cranberry beans, larval fitness linearly increased with density to 13 hatched larvae per bean. These results, together with X-ray imaging without evidence of direct aggressive interaction among larvae, indicate scramble competition, with multiple larvae emerging per grain. However, higher reproductive output was detected for adults from lower density competition with better performance on cranberry beans. Larger populations and fitter adults are expected in intermediate larval densities primarily in cranberry beans where grain losses should be greater.

  6. Mimicry epitope from Ehrlichia canis for interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein 201-216 prevents autoimmune uveoretinitis by acting as altered peptide ligand.

    PubMed

    Gangaplara, Arunakumar; Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Steffen, David; Reddy, Jay

    2013-10-15

    We report here identification of novel mimicry epitopes for interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) 201-216, a candidate ocular antigen that causes experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) in A/J mice. One mimicry epitope from Ehrlichia canis (EHC), designated EHC 44-59, induced cross-reactive T cells for IRBP 201-216 capable of producing T helper (Th)1 and Th17 cytokines, but failed to induce EAU in A/J mice. In addition, animals first primed with suboptimal doses of IRBP 201-216 and subsequently immunized with EHC 44-59 did not develop EAU; rather, the mimicry epitope prevented the disease induced by IRBP 201-216. However, alteration in the composition of EHC 44-59 by substituting alanine with valine at position 49, similar to the composition of IRBP 201-216, enabled the mimicry epitope to acquire uveitogenicity. The data provide new insights as to how microbes containing mimicry sequences for retinal antigens can prevent ocular inflammation by acting as naturally occurring altered peptide ligands.

  7. Larval habitat diversity and ecology of anopheline larvae in Eritrea.

    PubMed

    Shililu, Josephat; Ghebremeskel, Tewolde; Seulu, Fessahaye; Mengistu, Solomon; Fekadu, Helen; Zerom, Mehari; Ghebregziabiher, Asmelash; Sintasath, David; Bretas, Gustavo; Mbogo, Charles; Githure, John; Brantly, Eugene; Novak, Robert; Beier, John C

    2003-11-01

    Studies on the spatial distribution of anopheline mosquito larvae were conducted in 302 villages over two transmission seasons in Eritrea. Additional longitudinal studies were also conducted at eight villages over a 24-mo period to determine the seasonal variation in anopheline larval densities. Eight anopheline species were identified with Anopheles arabiensis predominating in most of the habitats. Other species collected included: An. cinereus, An. pretoriensis, An. d'thali, An. funestus, An. squamosus, An. adenensis, and An. demeilloni. An. arabiensis was found in five of the six aquatic habitats found positive for anopheline larvae during the survey. Anopheles larvae were sampled predominantly from stream edges and streambed pools, with samples from this habitat type representing 91.2% (n = 9481) of the total anopheline larval collection in the spatial distribution survey. Other important anopheline habitats included rain pools, ponds, dams, swamps, and drainage channels at communal water supply points. Anopheline larvae were abundant in habitats that were shallow, slow flowing and had clear water. The presence of vegetation, intensity of shade, and permanence of aquatic habitats were not significant determinants of larval distribution and abundance. Larval density was positively correlated with water temperature. Larval abundance increased during the wet season and decreased in the dry season but the timing of peak densities was variable among habitat types and zones. Anopheline larvae were collected all year round with the dry season larval production restricted mainly to artificial aquatic habitats such as drainage channels at communal water supply points. This study provides important information on seasonal patterns of anopheline larval production and larval habitat diversity on a countrywide scale that will be useful in guiding larval control operations in Eritrea.

  8. Deglycosylation of Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens improves the specificity of the serodiagnosis for human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Roldán, W H; Elefant, G R; Ferreira, A W

    2015-11-01

    Serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis is difficult in tropical areas where other helminthiasis are endemic. Many studies have shown that glycans from helminths may be the responsible for cross-reactions in the immunoassays. In this study, we have evaluated the deglycosylation of the Toxocara canis excretory-secretory (TES) antigens for the detection of IgG antibodies using a panel of 228 serum samples (58 patients with toxocariasis, 75 patients with other helminth infections and 95 healthy individuals) by ELISA and Western blot assays. Our results showed that the deglycosylation of TES antigens resulted in a single fraction of 26 kDa (dTES) and was able to detect IgG antibodies with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in both above-mentioned assays. The rate of cross-reactions, observed in ELISA with TES (13·3%), was significantly reduced (5·3%) when the dTES antigens were used. Likewise, the cross-reactivity observed with the fractions of 32, 55 and 70 kDa of the TES antigens was totally eliminated when the dTES were used in the Western blot. All these results showed that the deglycosylation of the TES antigens really improves the specificity of the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis in endemic areas for helminth infections.

  9. A novel combination of fipronil and permethrin (Frontline Tri-Act®/Frontect®) reduces risk of transmission of Babesia canis by Dermacentor reticulatus and of Ehrlichia canis by Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks to dogs.

    PubMed

    Jongejan, Frans; de Vos, Christa; Fourie, Josephus J; Beugnet, Frederic

    2015-11-19

    The ability of Frontline Tri-Act®/Frontect®, a topical ectoparasiticide containing fipronil and permethrin for dogs, to prevent the transmission of Babesia canis as well as Ehrlichia canis was evaluated by infesting dogs with infected vector ticks. For the Babesia canis study, 16 dogs were randomly allocated to two groups. Eight dogs were treated on day 0 with a topical spot-on formulation containing 6.76 % w/v fipronil plus 50.48 % w/v permethrin and eight dogs served as the untreated control group. Dermacentor reticulatus ticks, with a B. canis infection rate ranging between 2 and 10 %, were placed onto dogs on days 7, 14, 21 and 28. In situ tick counts were performed on Days 9, 16 and 23. Ticks were counted and removed on Day 30. Infection of the dogs with B. canis was monitored by rectal temperature readings, clinical examinations and blood smears as well as PCR and IFA (indirect fluorescent antibody assay). For the Ehrlichia canis study, another 16 dogs were allocated to two groups. Eight dogs were treated with the fipronil and permethrin combination on days 0 and 28 and eight dogs served as untreated controls. Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks, carrying an infection rate of 13 % for E. canis, were released in the sleeping kennels of the dogs on days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49 and 56. Ticks were counted in situ on the dogs on a weekly basis. All ticks were removed and counted on the final assessment day 58. Infection of the dogs with E. canis was monitored by rectal temperature, clinical examinations, and testing of blood samples by PCR, IFA and platelet counts. B. canis was transmitted by D. reticulatus ticks to all eight untreated control dogs and to one treated dog, which was confirmed by blood smears, PCR and IFA. E.canis was transmitted by R. sanguineus ticks to all eight untreated control dogs. Two of the dogs in the treated group were found positive based on PCR and/or IFA. Frontline Tri-Act®/Frontect® significantly lowered the risk for dogs to

  10. Epsilon Canis Majoris and the ionization of the local cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Welsh, B. Y.

    1995-05-01

    The Lyman continuum radiation from the brightest extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source, the B2 II star epsilon Canis Majoris (Adara), is so intense that it dominates the local stellar EUV radiation field at wavelengths longer than 450 A and therefore sets a lower limit to the ionization of hydrogen in the Local Cloud. Using the EUV (70-730 A) spectrum of epsilon CMa taken with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE) and simple models that extrapolate this spectrum to the Lyman edge at 912 A, we have determined the local interstellar hydrogen photionizatin parameter Gamma solely from epsilon CMa to be 1.1 x 10-15/s. This figure is a factor of 7 greater than previous estimates of Gamma calculated for all nearby stars combined (Bruhweiler & Cheng 1988). Using measured values of the density and temperature of neutral interstellar hydrogen gas in the Local Cloud, we derive a particle density of ionized hydrogen n(H(+)) and electrons ne of 0.015-0.019/cu cm assuming ionization equilibrium and a helium ionization fraction of less than 20%. These values correspond to a hydrogen ionizatin fraction, chiH from 19% to 15%, respectively. The range of these derived quantities is due to the uncertainties in the local values of the neutral hydrogen and helium interstellar densities derived from both (1) solar backscatter measurements of Ly alpha lines of hydrogen and helium (1216 and 584 A), and (2) the average neutral densities along the line of sight to nearby stars. The local proton density produced by epsilon CMa is enough to allow the ionization mechanism of Ripken & Fahr (1983) to work at the heliopause and explain the discrepancy between the neutral hydrogen density derived from solar backscatter measurements and line-of-sight averages to nearby stars. A large value of electron density in the Local Cloud of ne is approximately 0.3-0.7/cu cm (T = 7000 K) has recently been reported by Lallement et al. (1994) using observations of Mg II and Mg I toward Sirius A. We show

  11. Epsilon Canis Majoris and the ionization of the local cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Welsh, B. Y.

    1995-01-01

    The Lyman continuum radiation from the brightest extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source, the B2 II star epsilon Canis Majoris (Adara), is so intense that it dominates the local stellar EUV radiation field at wavelengths longer than 450 A and therefore sets a lower limit to the ionization of hydrogen in the Local Cloud. Using the EUV (70-730 A) spectrum of epsilon CMa taken with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE) and simple models that extrapolate this spectrum to the Lyman edge at 912 A, we have determined the local interstellar hydrogen photionizatin parameter Gamma solely from epsilon CMa to be 1.1 x 10(exp -15)/s. This fiugre is a factor of 7 greater than previous estimates of Gamma calculated for all nearby stars combined (Bruhweiler & Cheng 1988). Using measured values of the density and temperature of neutral interstellar hydrogen gas in the Local Cloud, we derive a particle density of ionized hydrogen n(H(+)) and electrons n(sub e) of 0.015-0.019/cu cm assuming ionization equilibrium and a helium ionization fraction of less than 20%. These values correspond to a hydrogen ionizatin fraction, chi(sub H) from 19% to 15%, respectively. The range of these derived quantities is due to the uncertainties in the local values of the neutral hydrogen and helium interstellar densities derived from both (1) solar backscatter measurements of Ly alpha lines of hydrogen and helium (1216 and 584 A), and (2) the average neutral densities along the line of sight to nearby stars. The local proton density produced by epsilon CMa is enough to allow the ionization mechanism of Ripken & Fahr (1983) to work at the heliopause and explain the discrepancy between the neutral hydrogen density derived from solar backscatter measurements and line-of-sight averages to nearby stars. A large value of electron density in the Local Cloud of n(sub e) is approximately 0.3-0.7/cu cm (T = 7000 K) has recently been reported by Lallement et al. (1994) using observations of Mg II and Mg I

  12. Epsilon Canis Majoris and the ionization of the local cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Welsh, B. Y.

    1995-01-01

    The Lyman continuum radiation from the brightest extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source, the B2 II star epsilon Canis Majoris (Adara), is so intense that it dominates the local stellar EUV radiation field at wavelengths longer than 450 A and therefore sets a lower limit to the ionization of hydrogen in the Local Cloud. Using the EUV (70-730 A) spectrum of epsilon CMa taken with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE) and simple models that extrapolate this spectrum to the Lyman edge at 912 A, we have determined the local interstellar hydrogen photionizatin parameter Gamma solely from epsilon CMa to be 1.1 x 10(exp -15)/s. This fiugre is a factor of 7 greater than previous estimates of Gamma calculated for all nearby stars combined (Bruhweiler & Cheng 1988). Using measured values of the density and temperature of neutral interstellar hydrogen gas in the Local Cloud, we derive a particle density of ionized hydrogen n(H(+)) and electrons n(sub e) of 0.015-0.019/cu cm assuming ionization equilibrium and a helium ionization fraction of less than 20%. These values correspond to a hydrogen ionizatin fraction, chi(sub H) from 19% to 15%, respectively. The range of these derived quantities is due to the uncertainties in the local values of the neutral hydrogen and helium interstellar densities derived from both (1) solar backscatter measurements of Ly alpha lines of hydrogen and helium (1216 and 584 A), and (2) the average neutral densities along the line of sight to nearby stars. The local proton density produced by epsilon CMa is enough to allow the ionization mechanism of Ripken & Fahr (1983) to work at the heliopause and explain the discrepancy between the neutral hydrogen density derived from solar backscatter measurements and line-of-sight averages to nearby stars. A large value of electron density in the Local Cloud of n(sub e) is approximately 0.3-0.7/cu cm (T = 7000 K) has recently been reported by Lallement et al. (1994) using observations of Mg II and Mg I

  13. First description of natural Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys infections in dogs from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Eiras, Diego Fernando; Craviotto, María Belén; Vezzani, Darío; Eyal, Osnat; Baneth, Gad

    2013-03-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Anaplasmataceae family are vector transmitted agents that affect a variety of vertebrate hosts including the tick-borne pathogens Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys, which cause canine monocytic ehrlichiosis and cyclic thrombocytopenia, respectively. These two infections, typically reported from tropical and sub-tropical regions, have not been previously reported in dogs from Argentina. A total of 86 blood samples from dogs with suspected rickettsial disease and 28 non-suspected dogs were studied. Analysis included evaluation of hematological findings, PCR for Ehrlichia and Anaplasma species and sequencing of the positive PCR products. E. canis was detected in the blood of six dogs and A. platys in eighteen. All the dogs categorized as non-suspected were negative by PCR. Co-infection with Hepatozoon canis and Babesia vogeli was documented. This first report of E. canis and A. platys infections in dogs from Argentina indicates that these tick-borne infections have a considerably broader range than previously recognized in South America.

  14. Iron metabolism and oxidative profile of dogs naturally infected by Ehrlichia canis: Acute and subclinical disease.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Crivellenti, Leandro Z; Borin-Crivellenti, Sofia; Oliveira, Jéssica R; Coelho, Stefanie B; Contin, Catarina M; Tatsch, Etiane; Moresco, Rafael N; Santana, Aureo E; Tonin, Alexandre A; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidant profile and iron metabolism in serum of dogs infected by Ehrlichia canis. Banked sera samples of dogs were divided into two groups: negative control (n = 17) and infected by E. canis on acute (n = 24), and subclinical (n = 18) phases of the disease. The eritrogram, leucogram, and platelet counts were evaluate as well as iron, ferritin, and transferrin levels, latent iron binding capacity (LIBC), and transferrin saturation index (TSI) concentration. In addition, the advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) in sera were also analyzed. Blood samples were examined for the presence of E. canis by PCR techniques. History and clinical signals were recorded for each dog. During the acute phase of the disease, infected animals showed thrombocytopenia and anemia when compared to healthy animals (P < 0.05) as a consequence of lower iron levels. Ferritin and transferrin levels were higher in both phases (acute and subclinical) of the disease. The AOPP and FRAP levels increased in infected animals on the acute phase; however, the opposite occurred in the subclinical phase. We concluded that dogs naturally infected by E. canis showed changes in the iron metabolism and developed an oxidant status in consequence of disease pathophysiology.

  15. Detection of Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys DNA using multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Rufino, Claudia Pinheiro; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Reis, Thais; Campos, Ruan; Aguiar, Délia Cristina Figueira; McCulloch, John Anthony; Meneses, Andre Marcelo Conceição; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa

    2013-12-01

    We hereby propose a novel sensitive, specific, and cost-efficient method to detect Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys DNA from canine whole blood samples by multiplex PCR. Blood samples from hemoparasited dogs attending the Veterinary Hospital at the Universidade Federal Rural da Amazônia-UFRA, Belém, Brazil, were collected in tubes containing EDTA. Amplification of E. canis and A. platys 16S rDNA by nested (n) PCR was successfully achieved by using primers specific to the Anaplasmataceae in the first round of PCR, followed by a second round of PCR using E. canis-specific primers in conjunction with A. platys-specific primers. The amplicons obtained were cloned and sequenced, yielding sequences of 478 and 473 bp (including primers) pertaining to regions of the 16S rDNA of E. canis and A. platys, respectively. The protocol we here propose may help to measure the prevalence of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) and canine cyclic thrompocytopenia, not only in northern Brazil, where there is no data available, but also elsewhere.

  16. Molecular detection of Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis in dogs from Kabylie, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Dahmani, Mustapha; Loudahi, Abdelghani; Mediannikov, Oleg; Fenollar, Florence; Raoult, Didier; Davoust, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys are bacteria belonging to the Anaplasmataceae family that cause acute, self-limiting and sometimes fatal vector-borne infections in dogs. These bacteria have been reported worldwide and are transmitted mainly by Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Aside from a report on E. canis once in 1935, no other Anaplasmataceae bacteria have been reported in Algeria to date. The aim of this study was to identify the microbial species implicated in ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis by a molecular epidemiological survey in dogs. The study was carried out in Kabylie, in northeast Algeria. Sampling was performed in 11 municipalities in the province of Tizi Ouzou and 2 municipalities in the province of Béjaïa. Peripheral blood samples from 110 dogs were screened by qPCR, which is capable of identifying most Anaplasmataceae bacteria. Out of 110, a total of 13 samples screened positive (7/110 E. canis and 6/110 A. platys), and two genetic variants of A. platys and one of E. canis were identified. This is the first study to report the presence of A. platys in dogs from Algeria using a molecular investigative method. This survey was conducted in early spring. As tick activity can affect the prevalence of these pathogens in dogs, further investigations are needed to establish the year-round prevalence of these infections.

  17. Toxocara canis: impact of preweaning nutritional deprivation on the pathogenesis of pneumonia in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Daniela S; Rocha, Gutemberg M

    2005-08-01

    The present study was conducted to better understand the immure response to Toxocara canis pneumonia in mice with preweaning nutritional deprivation. Breast-fed Swiss mice, undernourished due to large litter size (up to 15 pups) and paired controls with only 5-8 pups were used. At 21 days old, both groups were infected with T. canis larvae. Liver retinol, retinyl palmitate, and inflammatory infiltrate in lungs were compared in both groups. Significantly lower levels of retinol and retinyl palmitate in liver tissue confirmed the hypovitaminosis A (P < 0.0001 for both comparisons) in the nutritionally deprived animals. Histological analysis showed similar eosinophilic infiltration in both groups at day 3 but was significantly more severe in undernourished mice at day 20 post-infection (P = 0.01). The present findings indicate that preweaning undernourishment is associated with a more severe inflammation in response to T. canis pneumonia. It suggests that vitamin A deficiency that persists after nutritional rehabilitation, may contribute to the severity of T. canis infection. The authors suggest that nutritional status should be carefully investigated in patients with more severe clinical findings.

  18. Gray wolf (Canis lupus) is a natural definitive host for Neospora caninum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The gray wolf (Canis lupus) was found to be a new natural definitive host for Neospora caninum. This finding is based on the recovery of Neospora-like oocysts from the feces of 3 of 73 wolves from Minnesota examined at necropsy, and on successful amplification of N. caninum-specific sequences from ...

  19. Proximity of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, ranges to wolf Canis lupus, pack homesites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    2001-01-01

    Seven adult female White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in northeastern Minnesota lived within 1.8 km of Wolf pack (Canis lupus) homesites without vacating their home ranges. Six of these deer and at least three of their fawns survived through the Wolf homesite period.

  20. Killing of a muskox, Ovibus moschatus, by two wolves, Canis lupis, and subsequent caching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Adams, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    The killing of a cow Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) by two Wolves (Canis lupus) in 5 minutes during summer on Ellesmere Island is described. After two of the four feedings observed, one Wolf cached a leg and regurgitated food as far as 2.3 km away and probably farther. The implications of this behavior for deriving food-consumption estimates are discussed

  1. Killing of a Muskox, Ovibos moschatus, by two Wolves, Canis lupus, and subsequent caching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Mech L.; Adams, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    The killing of a cow Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) by two Wolves (Canis lupus) in 5 minutes during summer on Ellesmere Island is described. After two of the four feedings observed, one Wolf cached a leg and regurgitated food as far as 2.3 km away and probably farther. The implications of this behavior for deriving food-consumption estimates are discussed.

  2. Sustained release cyclosporine therapy for bilateral keratoconjunctivitis sicca in a red wolf (Canis rufus).

    PubMed

    Acton, Anne E; Beale, A Brady; Gilger, Brian C; Stoskopf, Michael K

    2006-12-01

    A 12-yr-old intact male red wolf (Canis rufus) diagnosed with bilateral idiopathic dry eye was treated with subconjunctival drug delivery implants designed to release therapeutic levels of cyclosporine from 12-24 mo. Normal tear production and corneal health has been maintained, alleviating the need for daily handling of the animal for topical medication.

  3. Characterization and differential expression analysis of Toxocara canis aquaporin-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yong-Fang; Hu, Ling; Ma, Guang-Xu; Luo, Yong-Li; Yin, Sha-Sha; Xiong, Yi; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhou, Rong-Qiong

    2016-09-01

    Toxocara canis is an intestinal nematode of canids with a worldwide distribution, causing an important but neglected parasitic zoonosis in humans. Aquaporins (AQP) are a family of water channel proteins, which function as membrane channels to regulate water homeostasis. In this study, the coding sequence of aquaporin-1 gene of T. canis (Tc-aqp-1) was cloned and characterized. The obtained Tc-aqp-1 coding sequence was 933 bp in length, which predicted to encode 311 amino acids. Two conserved asparagine-proline-alanine (NPA) motifs were identified in the multiple sequence alignments. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the closest relationship between T. canis and Opisthorchis viverrini based on aquaporin-1 amino acid sequence. A structure was predicted with ligand binding sites predicted at H93, N95, N226, L94, I79, and I210 and with active sites predicted at I256 and G207. Gene Ontology (GO) annotations predicted its cellular component term of integral component of plasma membrane (GO: 0005887), molecular function term of channel activity (GO: 0015250), and biological process term of water transport (GO: 0006833). Tissue expression analysis revealed that the Tc-aqp-1 was highly expressed in the intestine of adult male. The findings of the present study provide the basis for further functional studies of T. canis aquaporin-1.

  4. Isolation and genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from the gray wolf Canis lupus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife. In the present study feral gray wolf (Canis lupus) from Minnesota were examined for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 130 (52.4%) of 248 wolves tested by the modified agglutination test...

  5. Tissue distribution and functional analysis of vitellogenin-6 of Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Hong; Ma, Guang-Xu; Luo, Yong-Fang; Luo, Yong-Li; Yin, Sha-Sha; Xiong, Yi; Zhou, Rong-Qiong

    2017-06-01

    Toxocara canis is an common intestinal nematode of canids and the principal causative agent of human toxocariasis. Vitellogenin (Vg), a source of amino acids and lipids in the eggs, are considered to play an important role in embryo development of a wide range of organisms. In the present study, the transcriptional levels of Tc-vit-6 gene in male and female adult T. canis were determined by quantitative real-time PCR, which indicated high transcription of Tc-vit-6 in the intestine, reproductive tract and body wall of male and female adult T. canis. The fragment of Tc-vit-6 encoding a vWD domain, was cloned and expressed to produce a rabbit anti-TcvWD polyclonal antibody. Tissue distribution of TcVg6 was detected by immunohistochemical assays, which showed predominant distribution of TcVg6 in the tissues of intestine, as well as reproductive tract (including some of the germ cells) and musculature of male and female adult worms. Collectively, these results indicated multiple biological roles of TcVg6 apart from that in the reproduction of T. canis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The WISE Census of Young Stellar Objects and Clusters in Canis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W. J.; Padgett, D. L.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.

    The photometric data returned by WISE, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, can be used to search the sky for young stellar objects (YSOs) away from the molecular clouds studied in detail by Spitzer and Herschel. We present updated results for a 100 deg2 region centered on Canis Major, including a look at the clustering properties of YSOs in the region.

  7. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of serine/threonine protein phosphatase of Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guang Xu; Zhou, Rong Qiong; Hu, Shi Jun; Huang, Han Cheng; Zhu, Tao; Xia, Qing You

    2014-06-01

    Toxocara canis (T. canis) is a widely prevalent zoonotic parasite that infects a wide range of mammalian hosts, including humans. We generated the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of the serine/threonine phosphatase gene of T. canis (Tc stp) using 5' rapid amplification of the cDNA ends. The 1192-bp sequence contained a continuous 942-nucleotide open reading frame, encoding a 313-amino-acid polypeptide. The Tc STP polypeptide shares a high level of amino-acid sequence identity with the predicted STPs of Loa loa (89%), Brugia malayi (86%), Oesophagostomum columbianum (76%), and Oesophagostomumdentatum (76%). The Tc STP contains GDXHG, GDXVDRG, GNHE motifs, which are characteristic of members of the phosphoprotein phosphatase family. Our quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the Tc STP was expressed in six different tissues in the adult male, with high-level expression in the spermary, vas deferens, and musculature, but was not expressed in the adult female, suggesting that Tc STP might be involved in spermatogenesis and mating behavior. Thus, STP might represent a potential molecular target for controlling T. canis reproduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sarcocystis arctica (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae): ultrastructural description and its new host record, the Alaskan wolf (Canis lupus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sarcocystis sarcocysts are common in muscles of herbivores but are rare in muscles of carnivores. Here, we report sarcocysts in muscle of an Alaskan wolf (Canis lupus) from Alaska, USA for the first time. Sarcocysts extracted from tongue of the wolf were up to 900 µm long, slender, and appeared to h...

  9. RAD sequencing and genomic simulations resolve hybrid origins within North American Canis

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, L. Y.; Devillard, S.; Boone, J. Q.; Hohenlohe, P. A.; White, B. N.

    2015-01-01

    Top predators are disappearing worldwide, significantly changing ecosystems that depend on top-down regulation. Conflict with humans remains the primary roadblock for large carnivore conservation, but for the eastern wolf (Canis lycaon), disagreement over its evolutionary origins presents a significant barrier to conservation in Canada and has impeded protection for grey wolves (Canis lupus) in the USA. Here, we use 127 235 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) of wolves and coyotes, in combination with genomic simulations, to test hypotheses of hybrid origins of Canis types in eastern North America. A principal components analysis revealed no evidence to support eastern wolves, or any other Canis type, as the product of grey wolf × western coyote hybridization. In contra